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Sample records for modeling respiratory gas

  1. A Comparative Data-Based Modeling Study on Respiratory CO2 Gas Exchange during Mechanical Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Sei eKim

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is to derive a minimally complex but credible model of respiratory CO2 gas exchange that may be used in systematic design and pilot testing of closed-loop end-tidal CO2 controllers in mechanical ventilation. We first derived a candidate model that captures the essential mechanisms involved in the respiratory CO2 gas exchange process. Then, we simplified the candidate model to derive two lower-order candidate models. We compared these candidate models for predictive capability and reliability using experimental data collected from 25 pediatric subjects undergoing dynamically varying mechanical ventilation during surgical procedures. A two-compartment model equipped with transport delay to account for CO2 delivery between the lungs and the tissues showed modest but statistically significant improvement in predictive capability over the same model without transport delay. Aggregating the lungs and the tissues into a single compartment further degraded the predictive fidelity of the model. In addition, the model equipped with transport delay demonstrated superior reliability to the one without transport delay. Further, the respiratory parameters derived from the model equipped with transport delay, but not the one without transport delay, were physiologically plausible. The results suggest that gas transport between the lungs and the tissues must be taken into account to accurately reproduce the respiratory CO2 gas exchange process under conditions of wide-ranging and dynamically varying mechanical ventilation conditions.

  2. Modeling Respiratory Gas Dynamics in the Aviator’s Breathing System. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-01

    tricuspid valve which is presumed to track intrathoracic pressure. The pressures and flows in the various segments are coupled by their spatial connections...function in clinically significant pulmonary disease or for teaching respiratory physiology.’Ŗ’,13,14,15,16.17 Unfortunately, these were developed for...inspiratory valve model relates the flow and pressures between the mask supply hose and the oronasal cavity during inspiration. The expiratory valve

  3. Different Techniques of Respiratory Support Do Not Significantly Affect Gas Exchange during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in a Newborn Piglet Model.

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    Mendler, Marc R; Maurer, Miriam; Hassan, Mohammad A; Huang, Li; Waitz, Markus; Mayer, Benjamin; Hummler, Helmut D

    2015-01-01

    There are no evidence-based recommendations on the use of different techniques of respiratory support and chest compressions (CC) during neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We studied the short-term effects of different ventilatory support strategies along with CC representing clinical practice on gas exchange [arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2) and arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2)], hemodynamics and cerebral oxygenation. We hypothesized that in newborn piglets with cardiac arrest, use of a T-piece resuscitator (TPR) providing positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) improves gas exchange as measured by SaO2 during CPR as compared to using a self-inflating bag (SIB) without PEEP. Furthermore, we explored the effects of a mechanical ventilator without synchrony to CC. Thirty newborn piglets with asystole were randomized into three groups and resuscitated for 20 min [fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) = 0.21 for 10 min and 1.0 thereafter]. Group 1 received ventilation using a TPR [peak inspiratory pressure (PIP)/PEEP of 20/5 cm H2O, rate 30/min] with inflations interposed between CC (3:1 ratio). Group 2 received ventilation using a SIB (PIP of 20 cm H2O without PEEP, rate 30/min) with inflations interposed between CC (3:1 ratio). Group 3 received ventilation using a mechanical ventilator (PIP/PEEP of 20/5 cm H2O, rate 30/min). CC were applied with a rate of 120/min without synchrony to inflations. We found no significant differences in SaO2 between the three groups. However, there was a trend toward a higher SaO2 [TPR: 28.0% (22.3-40.0); SIB: 23.7% (13.4-52.3); ventilator: 44.1% (39.2-54.3); median (interquartile range)] and a lower PaCO2 [TPR: 95.6 mm Hg (82.1-113.6); SIB: 100.8 mm Hg (83.0-108.0); ventilator: 74.1 mm Hg (68.5-83.1); median (interquartile range)] in the mechanical ventilator group. We found no significant effect on gas exchange using different respiratory support strategies

  4. Effects of respiratory rate and tidal volume on gas exchange in total liquid ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Joseph L; Tredici, Stefano; Fujioka, Hideki; Komori, Eisaku; Grotberg, James B; Hirschl, Ronald B

    2009-01-01

    Using a rabbit model of total liquid ventilation (TLV), and in a corresponding theoretical model, we compared nine tidal volume-respiratory rate combinations to identify a ventilator strategy to maximize gas exchange, while avoiding choked flow, during TLV. Nine different ventilation strategies were tested in each animal (n = 12): low [LR = 2.5 breath/min (bpm)], medium (MR = 5 bpm), or high (HR = 7.5 bpm) respiratory rates were combined with a low (LV = 10 ml/kg), medium (MV = 15 ml/kg), or high (HV = 20 ml/kg) tidal volumes. Blood gases and partial pressures, perfluorocarbon gas content, and airway pressures were measured for each combination. Choked flow occurred in all high respiratory rate-high volume animals, 71% of high respiratory rate-medium volume (HRMV) animals, and 50% of medium respiratory rate-high volume (MRHV) animals but in no other combinations. Medium respiratory rate-medium volume (MRMV) resulted in the highest gas exchange of the combinations that did not induce choke. The HRMV and MRHV animals that did not choke had similar or higher gas exchange than MRMV. The theory predicted this behavior, along with spatial and temporal variations in alveolar gas partial pressures. Of the combinations that did not induce choked flow, MRMV provided the highest gas exchange. Alveolar gas transport is diffusion dominated and rapid during gas ventilation but is convection dominated and slow during TLV. Consequently, the usual alveolar gas equation is not applicable for TLV.

  5. The Respiratory Toxicities of Mustard Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Ghanei

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Sulfur mustard is one of the major potent chemical warfareagents. It was widely used against not only military personnelbut also civilian people of Iran during the last years (1984–1988 of the Iraq–Iran war. A number of studies were performedregarding the acute and long-term consequences ofsulfur mustard on respiratory system. Currently, many aspectsof leading respiratory disorder that was prescribed as “mustardlung” have been revealed. However, there is growing concernabout pathophysiological mechanisms behind the mustardlung. Herein available published materials about mustard lungare summarized, and it has been tried to highlight practicalpoints relevant to the diagnosis and treatment of the disease.Iran J Med Sci 2010; 35(4: 273-280.

  6. A Review on Human Respiratory Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafarian, Pardis; Jamaati, Hamidreza; Hashemian, Seyed Mohammadreza

    2016-01-01

    Input impedance of the respiratory system is measured by forced oscillation technique (FOT). Multiple prior studies have attempted to match the electromechanical models of the respiratory system to impedance data. Since the mechanical behavior of airways and the respiratory system as a whole are similar to an electrical circuit in a combination of series and parallel formats some theories were introduced according to this issue. It should be noted that, the number of elements used in these models might be less than those required due to the complexity of the pulmonary-chest wall anatomy. Various respiratory models have been proposed based on this idea in order to demonstrate and assess the different parts of respiratory system related to children and adults data. With regard to our knowledge, some of famous respiratory models in related to obstructive, restrictive diseases and also Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) are reviewed in this article.

  7. Acute respiratory symptoms and evacuation-related behavior after exposure to chlorine gas leakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sung-Woo; Choi, Won-Jun; Yi, Min-Kee; Song, Seng-Ho; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Han, Sang-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    A study was performed on the accidental chlorine gas leakage that occurred in a factory of printed circuit boards manufactured without chlorine. Health examination was performed for all 52 workers suspected of exposure to chlorine gas, and their evacuation-related behaviors were observed in addition to analyzing the factors that affected the duration of their acute respiratory symptoms. Behavioral characteristics during the incidence of the accidental chlorine gas leakage, the estimated time of exposure, and the duration of subjective acute respiratory symptoms were investigated. In addition, clinical examination, chest radiography, and dental erosion test were performed. As variables that affected the duration of respiratory symptoms, dose group, body weight, age, sex, smoking, work period, and wearing a protective gear were included and analyzed by using the Cox proportional hazard model. Of 47 workers exposed to chlorine gas, 36 (77 %) developed more than one subjective symptom. The duration of the subjective symptoms according to exposure level significantly differed, with a median of 1 day (range, 0-5 days) in the low-exposure group and 2 days (range, 0-25 days) in the high-exposure group. Among the variables that affected the duration of the acute respiratory symptoms, which were analyzed by using the Cox proportional hazard model, only exposure level was significant (hazard ratio 2.087, 95 % CI = 1.119, 3.890). Regarding the evacuation-related behaviors, 22 workers (47 %) voluntarily evacuated to a safety zone immediately after recognizing the accidental exposure, but 25 workers (43 %) delayed evacuation until the start of mandatory evacuation (min 5, max 25 min). The duration of the subjective acute respiratory symptoms significantly differed between the low- and high-exposure groups. Among the 27 workers in the high-exposure group, 17 misjudged the toxicity after being aware of the gas leakage, which is a relatively high number.

  8. Mucosal inflammation at the respiratory interface: a zebrafish model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Progatzky, Fränze; Cook, H Terence; Lamb, Jonathan R; Bugeon, Laurence; Dallman, Margaret J

    2016-03-15

    Inflammatory diseases of the respiratory system such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are increasing globally and remain poorly understood conditions. Although attention has long focused on the activation of type 1 and type 2 helper T cells of the adaptive immune system in these diseases, it is becoming increasingly apparent that there is also a need to understand the contributions and interactions between innate immune cells and the epithelial lining of the respiratory system. Cigarette smoke predisposes the respiratory tissue to a higher incidence of inflammatory disease, and here we have used zebrafish gills as a model to study the effect of cigarette smoke on the respiratory epithelium. Zebrafish gills fulfill the same gas-exchange function as the mammalian airways and have a similar structure. Exposure to cigarette smoke extracts resulted in an increase in transcripts of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, and MMP9 in the gill tissue, which was at least in part mediated via NF-κB activation. Longer term exposure of fish for 6 wk to cigarette smoke extract resulted in marked structural changes to the gills with lamellar fusion and mucus cell formation, while signs of inflammation or fibrosis were absent. This shows, for the first time, that zebrafish gills are a relevant model for studying the effect of inflammatory stimuli on a respiratory epithelium, since they mimic the immunopathology involved in respiratory inflammatory diseases of humans. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Mathematical modelling of a human external respiratory system

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    A closed system of algebraic and common differential equations solved by computer is investigated. It includes equations which describe the activity pattern of the respiratory center, the phrenic nerve, the thrust produced by the diaphragm as a function of the lung volume and discharge frequency of the phrenic nerve, as well as certain relations of the lung stretch receptors and chemoreceptors on various lung and blood characteristics, equations for lung biomechanics, pulmonary blood flow, alveolar gas exchange and capillary blood composition equations to determine various air and blood flow and gas exchange parameters, and various gas mixing and arterial and venous blood composition equations, to determine other blood, air and gas mixing characteristics. Data are presented by means of graphs and tables, and some advantages of this model over others are demonstrated by test results.

  10. Closed system respirometry may underestimate tissue gas exchange and bias the respiratory exchange ratio (RER).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malte, Christian Lind; Nørgaard, Simon; Wang, Tobias

    2016-02-01

    Closed respirometry is a commonly used method to measure gas exchange in animals due to its apparent simplicity. Typically, the rates of O2 uptake and CO2 excretion (VO2 and VCO2, respectively) are assumed to be in steady state, such that the measured rates of gas exchange equal those at tissue level. In other words, the respiratory gas exchange ratio (RER) is assumed to equal the respiratory quotient (RQ). However, because the gas concentrations change progressively during closure, the animal inspires air with a progressively increasing CO2 concentration and decreasing O2 concentration. These changes will eventually affect gas exchange causing the O2 and CO2 stores within the animal to change. Because of the higher solubility/capacitance of CO2 in the tissues of the body, VCO2 will be more affected than VO2, and we hypothesize therefore that RER will become progressively underestimated as closure time is prolonged. This hypothesis was addressed by a combination of experimental studies involving closed respirometry on ball pythons (Python regius) as well as mathematical models of gas exchange. We show that increased closed duration of the respirometer reduces RER by up to 13%, and these findings may explain previous reports of RER values being below 0.7. Our model reveals that the maximally possible reduction in RER is determined by the storage capacity of the body for CO2 (product of size and specific capacitance) relative to the respirometer storage capacity. Furthermore, modeling also shows that pronounced ventilatory and circulatory response to hypercapnia can alleviate the reduction in RER. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Biophysical Modeling of Respiratory Organ Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, René

    Methods to estimate respiratory organ motion can be divided into two groups: biophysical modeling and image registration. In image registration, motion fields are directly extracted from 4D ({D}+{t}) image sequences, often without concerning knowledge about anatomy and physiology in detail. In contrast, biophysical approaches aim at identification of anatomical and physiological aspects of breathing dynamics that are to be modeled. In the context of radiation therapy, biophysical modeling of respiratory organ motion commonly refers to the framework of continuum mechanics and elasticity theory, respectively. Underlying ideas and corresponding boundary value problems of those approaches are described in this chapter, along with a brief comparison to image registration-based motion field estimation.

  12. Crucial roles of reactive chemical species in modification of respiratory syncytial virus by nitrogen gas plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Toyokawa, Yoichi; Imanishi, Yuichiro; Murakami, Tomoyuki

    2017-05-01

    The exact mechanisms by which nanoparticles, especially those composed of soft materials, are modified by gas plasma remain unclear. Here, we used respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), which has a diameter of 80-350nm, as a model system to identify important factors for gas plasma modification of nanoparticles composed of soft materials. Nitrogen gas plasma, generated by applying a short high-voltage pulse using a static induction (SI) thyristor power supply produced reactive chemical species (RCS) and caused virus inactivation. The plasma treatment altered the viral genomic RNA, while treatment with a relatively low concentration of hydrogen peroxide, which is a neutral chemical species among RCS, effectively inactivated the virus. Furthermore, a zero dimensional kinetic global model of the reaction scheme during gas plasma generation identified the production of various RCS, including neutral chemical species. Our findings suggest the nitrogen gas plasma generates RCS, including neutral species that damage the viral genomic RNA, leading to virus inactivation. Thus, RCS generated by gas plasma appears to be crucial for virus inactivation, suggesting this may constitute an important factor in terms of the efficient modification of nanoparticles composed of soft materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Respiratory Mechanics and Gas Exchange: The Effect of Surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jbaily, Abdulrahman; Szeri, Andrew J.

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of the lung is to exchange gases, primarily oxygen and carbon dioxide, between the atmosphere and the circulatory system. To enable this exchange, the airways in the lungs terminate in some 300 million alveoli that provide adequate surface area for transport. During breathing, work must be done to stretch various tissues to accommodate a greater volume of gas. Considerable work must also be done to expand the liquid lining (hypophase) that coats the interior surfaces of the alveoli. This is enabled by a surface active lipo-protein complex, known as pulmonary surfactant, that modifies the surface tension at the hypophase-air interface. Surfactants also serve as physical barriers that modify the rate of gas transfer across interfaces. We develop a mathematical model to study the action of pulmonary surfactant and its determinative contributions to breathing. The model is used to explore the influence of surfactants on alveolar mechanics and on gas exchange: it relates the work of respiration at the level of the alveolus to the gas exchange rate through the changing influence of pulmonary surfactant over the breathing cycle. This work is motivated by a need to develop improved surfactant replacement therapies to treat serious medical conditions.

  14. Modeling Respiratory Toxicity of Authentic Lunar Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Patricia A.; James, John T.; Lam, Chiu-Wing

    2010-01-01

    The lunar expeditions of the Apollo operations from the 60 s and early 70 s have generated awareness about lunar dust exposures and their implication towards future lunar explorations. Critical analyses on the reports from the Apollo crew members suggest that lunar dust is a mild respiratory and ocular irritant. Currently, NASA s space toxicology group is functioning with the Lunar Airborne Dust Toxicity Assessment Group (LADTAG) and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to investigate and examine toxic effects to the respiratory system of rats in order to establish permissible exposure levels (PELs) for human exposure to lunar dust. In collaboration with the space toxicology group, LADTAG and NIOSH the goal of the present research is to analyze dose-response curves from rat exposures seven and twenty-eight days after intrapharyngeal instillations, and model the response using BenchMark Dose Software (BMDS) from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Via this analysis, the relative toxicities of three types of Apollo 14 lunar dust samples and two control dust samples, titanium dioxide (TiO2) and quartz will be determined. This will be executed for several toxicity endpoints such as cell counts and biochemical markers in bronchoaveolar lavage fluid (BALF) harvested from the rats.

  15. Respiratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    The words "respiratory" and "respiration" refer to the lungs and breathing. ... Boron WF. Organization of the respiratory system. In: Boron WF, Boulpaep EL, eds. Medical Physiology . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 26.

  16. Simple gas chromatographic system for analysis of microbial respiratory gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carle, G. C.

    1972-01-01

    Dual column ambient temperature system, consisting of pair of capillary columns, microbead thermistor detector and micro gas-sampling valve, is used in remote life-detection equipment for space experiments. Performance outweighs advantage gained by utilizing single-column systems to reduce weight, conserve carrier gas and operate at lower power levels.

  17. Respiratory trace deposition models. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, H.C.

    1980-03-01

    Respiratory tract characteristics of four mammalian species (human, dog, rat and Syrian hamster) were studied, using replica lung casts. An in situ casting techniques was developed for making the casts. Based on an idealized branch model, over 38,000 records of airway segment diameters, lengths, branching angles and gravity angles were obtained from measurements of two humans, two Beagle dogs, two rats and one Syrian hamster. From examination of the trimmed casts and morphometric data, it appeared that the structure of the human airway is closer to a dichotomous structure, whereas for dog, rat and hamster, it is monopodial. Flow velocity in the trachea and major bronchi in living Beagle dogs was measured using an implanted, subminiaturized, heated film anemometer. A physical model was developed to simulate the regional deposition characteristics proposed by the Task Group on Lung Dynamics of the ICRP. Various simulation modules for the nasopharyngeal (NP), tracheobronchial (TB) and pulmonary (P) compartments were designed and tested. Three types of monodisperse aerosols were developed for animal inhalation studies. Fifty Syrian hamsters and 50 rats were exposed to five different sizes of monodisperse fused aluminosilicate particles labeled with 169 Yb. Anatomical lung models were developed for four species (human, Beagle dog, rat and Syrian hamster) that were based on detailed morphometric measurements of replica lung casts. Emphasis was placed on developing a lobar typical-path lung model and on developing a modeling technique which could be applied to various mammalian species. A set of particle deposition equations for deposition caused by inertial impaction, sedimentation, and diffusion were developed. Theoretical models of particle deposition were developed based on these equations and on the anatomical lung models

  18. Animal models of human respiratory syncytial virus disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bem, Reinout A.; Domachowske, Joseph B.; Rosenberg, Helene F.

    2011-01-01

    Infection with the human pneumovirus pathogen, respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV), causes a wide spectrum of respiratory disease, notably among infants and the elderly. Laboratory animal studies permit detailed experimental modeling of hRSV disease and are therefore indispensable in the search for

  19. SU-E-J-190: Development of Abdominal Compression & Respiratory Guiding System Using Gas Pressure Sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, T; Kim, D; Kang, S; Cho, M; Kim, K; Shin, D; Suh, T; Kim, S

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Abdominal compression is known to be effective but, often makes external-marker-based monitoring of breathing motion not feasible. In this study, we developed and evaluated a system that enables both abdominal compression and monitoring of residual abdominal motion simultaneously. The system can also provide visual-biofeedback capability. Methods: The system developed consists of a compression belt, an abdominal motion monitoring sensor (gas pressure sensor) and a visual biofeedback device. The compression belt was designed to be able to compress the frontal side of the abdomen. The pressure level of the belt is controlled by air volume and monitored in real time using the gas pressure sensor. The system displays not only the real-time monitoring curve but also a guiding respiration model (e.g., a breath hold or shallow breathing curve) simultaneously on the head mounted display to help patients keep their breathing pattern as consistent as possible. Three healthy volunteers were enrolled in this pilot study and respiratory signals (pressure variations) were obtained both with and without effective abdominal compression to investigate the feasibility of the developed system. Two guidance patterns, breath hold and shallow breathing, were tested. Results: All volunteers showed smaller abdominal motion with compression (about 40% amplitude reduction compared to without compression). However, the system was able to monitor residual abdominal motion for all volunteers. Even under abdominal compression, in addition, it was possible to make the subjects successfully follow the guide patterns using the visual biofeedback system. Conclusion: The developed abdominal compression & respiratory guiding system was feasible for residual abdominal motion management. It is considered that the system can be used for a respiratory motion involved radiation therapy while maintaining the merit of abdominal compression. This work was supported by the Radiation Technology R

  20. Computational Models and Emergent Properties of Respiratory Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Bruce G.; Rybak, Ilya A.; Smith, Jeffrey C.

    2012-01-01

    Computational models of the neural control system for breathing in mammals provide a theoretical and computational framework bringing together experimental data obtained from different animal preparations under various experimental conditions. Many of these models were developed in parallel and iteratively with experimental studies and provided predictions guiding new experiments. This data-driven modeling approach has advanced our understanding of respiratory network architecture and neural mechanisms underlying generation of the respiratory rhythm and pattern, including their functional reorganization under different physiological conditions. Models reviewed here vary in neurobiological details and computational complexity and span multiple spatiotemporal scales of respiratory control mechanisms. Recent models describe interacting populations of respiratory neurons spatially distributed within the Bötzinger and pre-Bötzinger complexes and rostral ventrolateral medulla that contain core circuits of the respiratory central pattern generator (CPG). Network interactions within these circuits along with intrinsic rhythmogenic properties of neurons form a hierarchy of multiple rhythm generation mechanisms. The functional expression of these mechanisms is controlled by input drives from other brainstem components, including the retrotrapezoid nucleus and pons, which regulate the dynamic behavior of the core circuitry. The emerging view is that the brainstem respiratory network has rhythmogenic capabilities at multiple levels of circuit organization. This allows flexible, state-dependent expression of different neural pattern-generation mechanisms under various physiological conditions, enabling a wide repertoire of respiratory behaviors. Some models consider control of the respiratory CPG by pulmonary feedback and network reconfiguration during defensive behaviors such as cough. Future directions in modeling of the respiratory CPG are considered. PMID:23687564

  1. Integrative approaches for modeling regulation and function of the respiratory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Tal, Alona; Tawhai, Merryn H

    2013-01-01

    Mathematical models have been central to understanding the interaction between neural control and breathing. Models of the entire respiratory system-which comprises the lungs and the neural circuitry that controls their ventilation-have been derived using simplifying assumptions to compartmentalize each component of the system and to define the interactions between components. These full system models often rely-through necessity-on empirically derived relationships or parameters, in addition to physiological values. In parallel with the development of whole respiratory system models are mathematical models that focus on furthering a detailed understanding of the neural control network, or of the several functions that contribute to gas exchange within the lung. These models are biophysically based, and rely on physiological parameters. They include single-unit models for a breathing lung or neural circuit, through to spatially distributed models of ventilation and perfusion, or multicircuit models for neural control. The challenge is to bring together these more recent advances in models of neural control with models of lung function, into a full simulation for the respiratory system that builds upon the more detailed models but remains computationally tractable. This requires first understanding the mathematical models that have been developed for the respiratory system at different levels, and which could be used to study how physiological levels of O2 and CO2 in the blood are maintained. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Respiratory health effect of persons accidentally expose to high concentration of chlorine gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chierakul, Nitipatana; Rittayamai, Nuttapol; Passaranon, Prachya; Chamchod, Charttiwut; Suntiwuth, Bralee

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate the short term and long term respiratory health effects of subjects who accidentally exposed to high concentration of chlorine gas. There was an accidental leakage of sodium hypochlorite from an industrial factory in Rayong province in June 2010. Medical records of those who developed severe symptoms after exposed to high concentration of chlorine gas were reviewed. Prospective observational study was conducted after hospital discharge by interviewing with respiratory health questionnaires, physical examination, spirometry, methacholine challenge test, and home peak expiratory flow (PEF) monitoring at 2, 5 and 8 months after the event. Among 1,434 persons exposed to chlorine gas, 92 developed severe symptoms required hospital admission and 21 participated in the follow-up study at 2 months there after. Respiratory symptoms were noted in 18 participants. Three most common symptoms were dyspnea (81%), chest tightness (71%), and cough (67%). Obstructive defect from spirometry was identified in 2 participants, one of which also had bronchial hyper responsiveness (BHR) compatible with reactive airway dysfunction syndrome (RADS). Seven participants had abnormal PEF variability. There were 10 and 5 participants left in the follow-up visit at 5 and 8 months respectively. Two participants had persistent obstructive defect with additional two subjects were noticed. Those who had BHR and abnormal PEF variability remained unchanged. Acute exposure to high concentration of chlorine gas causes both significant short and long term respiratory health effects. Most of the patients although have gradual improvement of respiratory symptoms, but some symptoms remain persistent. Few patients have lung function impairment lasting for at least 8 months.

  3. Xenon Anesthesia Improves Respiratory Gas Exchanges in Morbidly Obese Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Abramo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Xenon-in-oxygen is a high density gas mixture and may improve PaO2/FiO2 ratio in morbidly obese patients uniforming distribution of ventilation during anesthesia. Methods. We compared xenon versus sevoflurane anesthesia in twenty adult morbidly obese patients (BMI>35 candidate for roux-en-Y laparoscopic gastric bypass and assessed PaO2/FiO2 ratio at baseline, at 15 min from induction of anaesthesia and every 60 min during surgery. Differences in intraoperative and postoperative data including heart rate, systolic and diastolic pressure, oxygen saturation, plateau pressure, eyes opening and extubation time, Aldrete score on arrival to the PACU were compared by the Mann-Whitney test and were considered as secondary aims. Moreover the occurrence of side effects and postoperative analgesic demand were assessed. Results. In xenon group PaO2-FiO2 ratio was significantly higher after 60 min and 120 min from induction of anesthesia; heart rate and overall remifentanil consumption were lower; the eyes opening time and the extubation time were shorter; morphine consumption at 72 hours was lower; postoperative nausea was more common. Conclusions. Xenon anesthesia improved PaO2/FiO2 ratio and maintained its distinctive rapid recovery times and cardiovascular stability. A reduction of opioid consumption during and after surgery and an increased incidence of PONV were also observed in xenon group.

  4. Assessment of respiratory disorders in relation to solution gas flaring activities in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-02-01

    A study was conducted by Alberta Health to address the issue of whether or not flaring of solution gas has a negative impact on human health. The Flaring Working Group of the Clean Air Strategic Alliance initiated this study which focused on the assessment of the relationship between human health disorders (such as asthma, bronchitis, pneumonia and upper respiratory infections) and solution gas flaring activities in rural, urban and aboriginal populations. The personal exposure to flaring emissions was estimated by physical proximity to the source of emissions. A small area was studied in which geographical variations in human health disorders were compared to geographical variations of socioeconomic and environmental factors. Data was gathered from 1989 to 1996 to evaluate long term average conditions and changes over the time period investigated. Notwithstanding physicians' claims for increased rates of respiratory infections and hospitalization attributed to solution gas flaring, the study found no evidence linking respiratory infections and solution gas flaring. This was the conclusion regardless of the measure of health outcomes, the rural-urban status, ethnicity, or age. Nevertheless, the study recommended identification of bio-markers of exposure and effect reflective of the compounds of interest, and the development of a responsive and comprehensive geographic information database that would allow data linkage at all geographic levels for different periods of time. refs., 10 tabs., 15 figs., 1 appendix

  5. Modelling gas generation for landfill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakma, Sumedha; Mathur, Shashi

    2017-06-01

    A methodology was developed to predict the optimum long-term spatial and temporal generation of landfill gases such as methane, carbon dioxide, ammonia, and hydrogen sulphide on post-closure landfill. The model incorporated the chemical and the biochemical processes responsible for the degradation of the municipal solid waste. The developed model also takes into account the effects of heterogeneity with different layers as observed at the site of landfills' morphology. The important parameters for gas generation due to biodegradation such as temperature, pH, and moisture content were incorporated. The maximum and the minimum generations of methane and hydrogen sulphide were observed. The rate of gas generation was found almost same throughout the depth after 30 years of landfill closure. The proposed model would be very useful for landfill engineering in the mining landfill gas and proper design for landfill gas management systems.

  6. A closed-loop model of the respiratory system: focus on hypercapnia and active expiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molkov, Yaroslav I; Shevtsova, Natalia A; Park, Choongseok; Ben-Tal, Alona; Smith, Jeffrey C; Rubin, Jonathan E; Rybak, Ilya A

    2014-01-01

    Breathing is a vital process providing the exchange of gases between the lungs and atmosphere. During quiet breathing, pumping air from the lungs is mostly performed by contraction of the diaphragm during inspiration, and muscle contraction during expiration does not play a significant role in ventilation. In contrast, during intense exercise or severe hypercapnia forced or active expiration occurs in which the abdominal "expiratory" muscles become actively involved in breathing. The mechanisms of this transition remain unknown. To study these mechanisms, we developed a computational model of the closed-loop respiratory system that describes the brainstem respiratory network controlling the pulmonary subsystem representing lung biomechanics and gas (O2 and CO2) exchange and transport. The lung subsystem provides two types of feedback to the neural subsystem: a mechanical one from pulmonary stretch receptors and a chemical one from central chemoreceptors. The neural component of the model simulates the respiratory network that includes several interacting respiratory neuron types within the Bötzinger and pre-Bötzinger complexes, as well as the retrotrapezoid nucleus/parafacial respiratory group (RTN/pFRG) representing the central chemoreception module targeted by chemical feedback. The RTN/pFRG compartment contains an independent neural generator that is activated at an increased CO2 level and controls the abdominal motor output. The lung volume is controlled by two pumps, a major one driven by the diaphragm and an additional one activated by abdominal muscles and involved in active expiration. The model represents the first attempt to model the transition from quiet breathing to breathing with active expiration. The model suggests that the closed-loop respiratory control system switches to active expiration via a quantal acceleration of expiratory activity, when increases in breathing rate and phrenic amplitude no longer provide sufficient ventilation. The model

  7. A closed-loop model of the respiratory system: focus on hypercapnia and active expiration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaroslav I Molkov

    Full Text Available Breathing is a vital process providing the exchange of gases between the lungs and atmosphere. During quiet breathing, pumping air from the lungs is mostly performed by contraction of the diaphragm during inspiration, and muscle contraction during expiration does not play a significant role in ventilation. In contrast, during intense exercise or severe hypercapnia forced or active expiration occurs in which the abdominal "expiratory" muscles become actively involved in breathing. The mechanisms of this transition remain unknown. To study these mechanisms, we developed a computational model of the closed-loop respiratory system that describes the brainstem respiratory network controlling the pulmonary subsystem representing lung biomechanics and gas (O2 and CO2 exchange and transport. The lung subsystem provides two types of feedback to the neural subsystem: a mechanical one from pulmonary stretch receptors and a chemical one from central chemoreceptors. The neural component of the model simulates the respiratory network that includes several interacting respiratory neuron types within the Bötzinger and pre-Bötzinger complexes, as well as the retrotrapezoid nucleus/parafacial respiratory group (RTN/pFRG representing the central chemoreception module targeted by chemical feedback. The RTN/pFRG compartment contains an independent neural generator that is activated at an increased CO2 level and controls the abdominal motor output. The lung volume is controlled by two pumps, a major one driven by the diaphragm and an additional one activated by abdominal muscles and involved in active expiration. The model represents the first attempt to model the transition from quiet breathing to breathing with active expiration. The model suggests that the closed-loop respiratory control system switches to active expiration via a quantal acceleration of expiratory activity, when increases in breathing rate and phrenic amplitude no longer provide sufficient

  8. Reference respiratory waveforms by minimum jerk model analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anetai, Yusuke, E-mail: anetai@radonc.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Sumida, Iori; Takahashi, Yutaka; Yagi, Masashi; Mizuno, Hirokazu; Ogawa, Kazuhiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Yamadaoka 2-2, Suita-shi, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ota, Seiichi [Department of Medical Technology, Osaka University Hospital, Yamadaoka 2-15, Suita-shi, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: CyberKnife{sup ®} robotic surgery system has the ability to deliver radiation to a tumor subject to respiratory movements using Synchrony{sup ®} mode with less than 2 mm tracking accuracy. However, rapid and rough motion tracking causes mechanical tracking errors and puts mechanical stress on the robotic joint, leading to unexpected radiation delivery errors. During clinical treatment, patient respiratory motions are much more complicated, suggesting the need for patient-specific modeling of respiratory motion. The purpose of this study was to propose a novel method that provides a reference respiratory wave to enable smooth tracking for each patient. Methods: The minimum jerk model, which mathematically derives smoothness by means of jerk, or the third derivative of position and the derivative of acceleration with respect to time that is proportional to the time rate of force changed was introduced to model a patient-specific respiratory motion wave to provide smooth motion tracking using CyberKnife{sup ®}. To verify that patient-specific minimum jerk respiratory waves were being tracked smoothly by Synchrony{sup ®} mode, a tracking laser projection from CyberKnife{sup ®} was optically analyzed every 0.1 s using a webcam and a calibrated grid on a motion phantom whose motion was in accordance with three pattern waves (cosine, typical free-breathing, and minimum jerk theoretical wave models) for the clinically relevant superior–inferior directions from six volunteers assessed on the same node of the same isocentric plan. Results: Tracking discrepancy from the center of the grid to the beam projection was evaluated. The minimum jerk theoretical wave reduced the maximum-peak amplitude of radial tracking discrepancy compared with that of the waveforms modeled by cosine and typical free-breathing model by 22% and 35%, respectively, and provided smooth tracking for radial direction. Motion tracking constancy as indicated by radial tracking discrepancy

  9. Modelling gas markets - a survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This report reviews research of relevance to the analysis of present and future developments of the European natural gas market. The research activities considered are confined to (1) numerical models for gas markets, (2) analyses of energy demand, and (3) analyses of behaviour and cost structures in the transmission and distribution sector. Most of the market models are strictly micro economic and assume perfect competition or a game-theoretical equilibrium. They use sophisticated solution concepts, but very simplified specifications of supply and demand functions. Most of the research on demand is econometric analyses. These have more detailed model specification than have the aggregated market models. It is found, however, that the econometric literature based on neo-classical economics has not yielded unambiguous results and the specifications disregard important real world aspects of gas demand. The section on demand concludes that the extent of the gas grid is an important determinant for gas demand, but there has been virtually no research on what determines this variable. Data about transmission and distribution of gas in Europe is scarce and only a few non-econometric and virtually no econometric analyses are available. However, some conclusions can be made from relevant North American literature: (1) there has been significant autonomous technical progress in the transmission industry, (2) distribution costs strongly depend on geographical and other conditions, and (3) ownership, whether private or public, may be important for distribution costs and pricing policies. 56 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Modelling gas markets - a survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This report reviews research of relevance to the analysis of present and future developments of the European natural gas market. The research activities considered are confined to (1) numerical models for gas markets, (2) analyses of energy demand, and (3) analyses of behaviour and cost structures in the transmission and distribution sector. Most of the market models are strictly micro economic and assume perfect competition or a game-theoretical equilibrium. They use sophisticated solution concepts, but very simplified specifications of supply and demand functions. Most of the research on demand is econometric analyses. These have more detailed model specification than have the aggregated market models. It is found, however, that the econometric literature based on neo-classical economics has not yielded unambiguous results and the specifications disregard important real world aspects of gas demand. The section on demand concludes that the extent of the gas grid is an important determinant for gas demand, but there has been virtually no research on what determines this variable. Data about transmission and distribution of gas in Europe is scarce and only a few non-econometric and virtually no econometric analyses are available. However, some conclusions can be made from relevant North American literature: (1) there has been significant autonomous technical progress in the transmission industry, (2) distribution costs strongly depend on geographical and other conditions, and (3) ownership, whether private or public, may be important for distribution costs and pricing policies. 56 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  11. Gas-Filled Capillary Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauer, L. C.; Kimura, W. D.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a 1-D, quasi-steady-state numerical model for a gas-filled capillary discharge that is designed to aid in selecting the optimum capillary radius in order to guide a laser beam with the required intensity through the capillary. The model also includes the option for an external solenoid B-field around the capillary, which increases the depth of the parabolic density channel in the capillary, thereby allowing for propagation of smaller laser beam waists. The model has been used to select the parameters for gas-filled capillaries to be utilized during the Staged Electron Laser Acceleration -- Laser Wakefield (STELLA-LW) experiment

  12. Impact of gas emboli and hyperbaric treatment on respiratory function of loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portugues, Cyril; Crespo-Picazo, Jose Luis; García-Párraga, Daniel; Altimiras, Jordi; Lorenzo, Teresa; Borque-Espinosa, Alicia; Fahlman, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    Fisheries interactions are the most serious threats for sea turtle populations. Despite the existence of some rescue centres providing post-traumatic care and rehabilitation, adequate treatment is hampered by the lack of understanding of the problems incurred while turtles remain entrapped in fishing gears. Recently it was shown that bycaught loggerhead sea turtles ( Caretta caretta ) could experience formation of gas emboli (GE) and develop decompression sickness (DCS) after trawl and gillnet interaction. This condition could be reversed by hyperbaric O 2 treatment (HBOT). The goal of this study was to assess how GE alters respiratory function in bycaught turtles before recompression therapy and measure the improvement after this treatment. Specifically, we assessed the effect of DCS on breath duration, expiratory and inspiratory flow and tidal volume ( V T ), and the effectiveness of HBOT to improve these parameters. HBOT significantly increased respiratory flows by 32-45% while V T increased by 33-35% immediately after HBOT. Repeated lung function testing indicated a temporal increase in both respiratory flow and V T for all bycaught turtles, but the changes were smaller than those seen immediately following HBOT. The current study suggests that respiratory function is significantly compromised in bycaught turtles with GE and that HBOT effectively restores lung function. Lung function testing may provide a novel means to help diagnose the presence of GE, be used to assess treatment efficacy, and contribute to sea turtle conservation efforts.

  13. One-dimensional photonic crystals for eliminating cross-talk in mid-IR photonics-based respiratory gas sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, L.; Gibson, D.; Song, S.; Hutson, D.; Reid, S.; MacGregor, C.; Clark, C.

    2017-02-01

    Mid-IR carbon dioxide (CO2) gas sensing is critical for monitoring in respiratory care, and is finding increasing importance in surgical anaesthetics where nitrous oxide (N2O) induced cross-talk is a major obstacle to accurate CO2 monitoring. In this work, a novel, solid state mid-IR photonics based CO2 gas sensor is described, and the role that 1- dimensional photonic crystals, often referred to as multilayer thin film optical coatings [1], play in boosting the sensor's capability of gas discrimination is discussed. Filter performance in isolating CO2 IR absorption is tested on an optical filter test bed and a theoretical gas sensor model is developed, with the inclusion of a modelled multilayer optical filter to analyse the efficacy of optical filtering on eliminating N2O induced cross-talk for this particular gas sensor architecture. Future possible in-house optical filter fabrication techniques are discussed. As the actual gas sensor configuration is small, it would be challenging to manufacture a filter of the correct size; dismantling the sensor and mounting a new filter for different optical coating designs each time would prove to be laborious. For this reason, an optical filter testbed set-up is described and, using a commercial optical filter, it is demonstrated that cross-talk can be considerably reduced; cross-talk is minimal even for very high concentrations of N2O, which are unlikely to be encountered in exhaled surgical anaesthetic patient breath profiles. A completely new and versatile system for breath emulation is described and the capability it has for producing realistic human exhaled CO2 vs. time waveforms is shown. The cross-talk inducing effect that N2O has on realistic emulated CO2 vs. time waveforms as measured using the NDIR gas sensing technique is demonstrated and the effect that optical filtering will have on said cross-talk is discussed.

  14. Angiotensin-converting enzyme genotype and late respiratory complications of mustard gas exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humphries Steve E

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to mustard gas frequently results in long-term respiratory complications. However the factors which drive the development and progression of these complications remain unclear. The Renin Angiotensin System (RAS has been implicated in lung inflammatory and fibrotic responses. Genetic variation within the gene coding for the Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE, specifically the Insertion/Deletion polymorphism (I/D, is associated with variable levels of ACE and with the severity of several acute and chronic respiratory diseases. We hypothesized that the ACE genotype might influence the severity of late respiratory complications of mustard gas exposure. Methods 208 Kurdish patients who had suffered high exposure to mustard gas, as defined by cutaneous lesions at initial assessment, in Sardasht, Iran on June 29 1987, underwent clinical examination, spirometric evaluation and ACE Insertion/Deletion genotyping in September 2005. Results ACE genotype was determined in 207 subjects. As a continuous variable, FEV1 % predicted tended to be higher in association with the D allele 68.03 ± 20.5%, 69.4 ± 21.4% and 74.8 ± 20.1% for II, ID and DD genotypes respectively. Median FEV1 % predicted was 73 and this was taken as a cut off between groups defined as having better or worse lung function. The ACE DD genotype was overrepresented in the better spirometry group (Chi2 4.9 p = 0.03. Increasing age at the time of exposure was associated with reduced FEV1 %predicted (p = 0.001, whereas gender was not (p = 0.43. Conclusion The ACE D allele is associated with higher FEV1 % predicted when assessed 18 years after high exposure to mustard gas.

  15. Computational 3-D Model of the Human Respiratory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    We are developing a comprehensive, morphologically-realistic computational model of the human respiratory system that can be used to study the inhalation, deposition, and clearance of contaminants, while being adaptable for age, race, gender, and health/disease status. The model ...

  16. Perumusan Model Moneter Berdasarkan Perilaku Gas Ideal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachmad Resmiyanto

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Telah disusun sebuah model moneter yang berdasarkan perilaku gas ideal. Model disusun dengan menggunakan metode kias/analogi. Model moneter gas ideal mengiaskan jumlah uang beredar dengan volume gas, daya beli dengan tekanan gas dan produksi barang dengan suhu gas. Model ini memiliki formulasi yang berbeda dengan Teori Kuantitas Uang (Quantity Theory of Money yang dicetuskan oleh Irving Fisher, model moneter Marshal-Pigou dari Cambridge serta model moneter ala Keynes. Selama ini 3 model tersebut dianggap sebagai model yang mapan dalam teori moneter pada buku-buku teks ekonomi. Model moneter gas ideal dapat menjadi cara pandang baru terhadap sistem moneter.

  17. An Improved Dynamic Model for the Respiratory Response to Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leidy Y. Serna

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory system modeling has been extensively studied in steady-state conditions to simulate sleep disorders, to predict its behavior under ventilatory diseases or stimuli and to simulate its interaction with mechanical ventilation. Nevertheless, the studies focused on the instantaneous response are limited, which restricts its application in clinical practice. The aim of this study is double: firstly, to analyze both dynamic and static responses of two known respiratory models under exercise stimuli by using an incremental exercise stimulus sequence (to analyze the model responses when step inputs are applied and experimental data (to assess prediction capability of each model. Secondly, to propose changes in the models' structures to improve their transient and stationary responses. The versatility of the resulting model vs. the other two is shown according to the ability to simulate ventilatory stimuli, like exercise, with a proper regulation of the arterial blood gases, suitable constant times and a better adjustment to experimental data. The proposed model adjusts the breathing pattern every respiratory cycle using an optimization criterion based on minimization of work of breathing through regulation of respiratory frequency.

  18. 3-chlorotyrosine and 3,5-dichlorotyrosine as biomarkers of respiratory tract exposure to chlorine gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sochaski, Mark A; Jarabek, Annie M; Murphy, John; Andersen, Melvin E

    2008-01-01

    Modification of tyrosine by reactive chlorine can produce both 3-chlorotyrosine (CY) and 3,5-dichlorotyrosine (dCY). Both of these amino acids have proven to be promising biomarkers for assessing the extent of myeloperoxidase-catalyzed chlorine stress in a number of adverse physiological conditions. To date, there has been no application of these biomarkers for determining the extent of exposure to environmentally present gaseous chlorinating chemicals. In this manuscript, we present a method using selective ion monitoring gas chromatography for the simultaneous analysis of both CY and dCY in nasal tissue excised from Fisher 344 rats exposed to varying concentrations of chlorine gas. Using this method, we were able to demonstrate the following: 1. a dose-dependent increase in the conversion of tyrosine to CY and dCY in the respiratory epithelium tissue; 2. preferential formation of CY and dCY in the respiratory and transitional epithelium versus the olfactory epithelium of the nasal cavity of the rat; and 3. similar rates of formation for CY and dCY when exposed to chlorine gas based on a strong [CY] versus [dCY] correlation (slope = 1.001, r(2) = 0.912).

  19. Development of an anesthetized rat model of exercise hyperpnoea: An integrative model of respiratory control using an equilibrium diagram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Tadayoshi; Manabe, Kou; Ueda, Shinya; Nakahara, Hidehiro

    2018-03-06

    What is the central question of this study? The lack of useful small animal models for studying exercise hyperpnoea makes it difficult to investigate the underlying mechanisms of exercise-induced ventilatory abnormalities in various disease states. What is the main finding and its importance? We developed an anesthetized rat model for studying exercise hyperpnoea, using respiratory equilibrium diagram for quantitative characterization of the respiratory chemoreflex feedback system. This experimental model will provide an opportunity to clarify the major determinant mechanisms of exercise hyperpnoea, and will be useful for understanding the mechanisms responsible for abnormal ventilatory responses to exercise in disease models. Exercise-induced ventilatory abnormalities in various disease states seem to arise from pathological changes of the respiratory regulation. Although experimental studies in small animals are essential to investigate the pathophysiologic basis in various disease models, the lack of integrated framework for quantitatively characterizing respiratory regulation during exercise prevents us from resolving these problems. The purpose of this study was to develop an anesthetized rat model for studying exercise hyperpnoea for quantitative characterization of the respiratory chemoreflex feedback system. In 24 anesthetized rats, we induced muscle contraction by stimulating bilateral distal sciatic nerves at low and high voltage to mimic exercise. We recorded breath-by-breath respiratory gas analysis data, and cardiorespiratory responses while running two protocols to characterize the controller and plant of the respiratory chemoreflex. The controller was characterized by determining the linear relationship between end-tidal CO 2 pressure (P ETCO2 ) and minute ventilation (V E ), and the plant by the hyperbolic relationship between V E and P ETCO2 . During exercise, the controller curve shifted upward without change in controller gain, accompanying

  20. 3-D Model of the Human Respiratory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA’s Office of Research and Development (ORD) has developed a 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the human respiratory system that allows for the simulation of particulate based contaminant deposition and clearance, while being adaptable for age, ethn...

  1. Mathematical modeling of respiratory system mechanics in the newborn lamb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Rolle, Virginie; Samson, Nathalie; Praud, Jean-Paul; Hernández, Alfredo I

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, a mathematical model of the respiratory mechanics is used to reproduce experimental signal waveforms acquired from three newborn lambs. As the main challenge is to determine specific lamb parameters, a sensitivity analysis has been realized to find the most influent parameters, which are identified using an evolutionary algorithm. Results show a close match between experimental and simulated pressure and flow waveforms obtained during spontaneous ventilation and pleural pressure variations acquired during the application of positive pressure, since root mean square errors equal to 0.0119, 0.0052 and 0.0094. The identified parameters were discussed in light of previous knowledge of respiratory mechanics in the newborn.

  2. Impaired gas exchange: accuracy of defining characteristics in children with acute respiratory infection1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoal, Lívia Maia; Lopes, Marcos Venícios de Oliveira; Chaves, Daniel Bruno Resende; Beltrão, Beatriz Amorim; da Silva, Viviane Martins; Monteiro, Flávia Paula Magalhães

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to analyze the accuracy of the defining characteristics of the Impaired gas exchange nursing diagnosis in children with acute respiratory infection. METHOD: open prospective cohort study conducted with 136 children monitored for a consecutive period of at least six days and not more than ten days. An instrument based on the defining characteristics of the Impaired gas exchange diagnosis and on literature addressing pulmonary assessment was used to collect data. The accuracy means of all the defining characteristics under study were computed. RESULTS: the Impaired gas exchange diagnosis was present in 42.6% of the children in the first assessment. Hypoxemia was the characteristic that presented the best measures of accuracy. Abnormal breathing presented high sensitivity, while restlessness, cyanosis, and abnormal skin color showed high specificity. All the characteristics presented negative predictive values of 70% and cyanosis stood out by its high positive predictive value. CONCLUSION: hypoxemia was the defining characteristic that presented the best predictive ability to determine Impaired gas exchange. Studies of this nature enable nurses to minimize variability in clinical situations presented by the patient and to identify more precisely the nursing diagnosis that represents the patient's true clinical condition. PMID:26155010

  3. Deterministic and stochastic models for middle east respiratory syndrome (MERS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryani, Dessy Rizki; Zevika, Mona; Nuraini, Nuning

    2018-03-01

    World Health Organization (WHO) data stated that since September 2012, there were 1,733 cases of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) with 628 death cases that occurred in 27 countries. MERS was first identified in Saudi Arabia in 2012 and the largest cases of MERS outside Saudi Arabia occurred in South Korea in 2015. MERS is a disease that attacks the respiratory system caused by infection of MERS-CoV. MERS-CoV transmission occurs directly through direct contact between infected individual with non-infected individual or indirectly through contaminated object by the free virus. Suspected, MERS can spread quickly because of the free virus in environment. Mathematical modeling is used to illustrate the transmission of MERS disease using deterministic model and stochastic model. Deterministic model is used to investigate the temporal dynamic from the system to analyze the steady state condition. Stochastic model approach using Continuous Time Markov Chain (CTMC) is used to predict the future states by using random variables. From the models that were built, the threshold value for deterministic models and stochastic models obtained in the same form and the probability of disease extinction can be computed by stochastic model. Simulations for both models using several of different parameters are shown, and the probability of disease extinction will be compared with several initial conditions.

  4. ASSISTED MODELLING OF MOBILE MEDICAL TREATMENT EQUIPMENT, UPPER RESPIRATORY AFFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GOANTA Adrian Mihai

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to present some aspects of parametric modelling application in medical engineering, specifically in the design of medical instruments for ENT diseases. The work also contains both stages, how to obtain all parts parametrically and related accessories that are part of a mobile aerosol -generating medical equipment intended for the treatment of the upper respiratory diseases. Also photorealistic visualization capabilities are highlighted with NX Software from Siemens as well as how to obtain the corresponding 2D documentation.

  5. Effective gas exchange in paralyzed juvenile rabbits using simple, inexpensive respiratory support devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diblasi, Robert M; Zignego, Jay C; Smith, Charles V; Hansen, Thomas N; Richardson, C Peter

    2010-12-01

    We have developed two devices: a high-amplitude bubble continuous positive airway pressure (HAB-CPAP) and an inexpensive bubble intermittent mandatory ventilator (B-IMV) to test the hypotheses that simple, inexpensive devices can provide gas exchange similar to that of bubble CPAP (B-CPAP) and conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV). Twelve paralyzed juvenile rabbits were intubated, stabilized on CMV, and then switched to CPAP. On identical mean airway pressures (MAPs), animals were unable to maintain pulse oximeter oxygen saturation (SpO2) >80% on conventional B-CPAP, but all animals oxygenated well (97.3 ± 2.1%) on HAB-CPAP. In fact, arterial partial pressures of O2 (Pao2) were higher during HAB-CPAP than during CMV (p = 0.01). After repeated lung lavages, arterial partial pressures of CO2 (Paco2) were lower with B-IMV than with CMV (p simple inexpensive devices can provide respiratory support in the face of severe lung disease and could extend the use of respiratory support for preterm infants into severely resource-limited settings.

  6. Hemodynamics and Gas Exchange Effects of Inhaled Nitrous Oxide in Patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Poptsov

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhaled nitrous oxide (iNO therapy aimed at improving pulmonary oxygenizing function and at decreasing artificial ventilation (AV load has been used in foreign clinical practice in the past decade. The study was undertaken to evaluate the hemodynamic and gas exchange effects of iNO in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS that developed after car-diosurgical operations. Fifty-eight (43 males and 15 females patients aged 21 to 76 (55.2±2.4 years were examined. The study has demonstrated that in 48.3% of cases, the early stage of ARDS is attended by the increased tone pulmonary vessels due to impaired NO-dependent vasodilatation. In these patients, iNO therapy is an effective therapeutic method for correcting hemodynamic disorders and lung oxygenizing function.

  7. Influence of a Gas Exchange Correction Procedure on Resting Metabolic Rate and Respiratory Quotient in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galgani, Jose E; Castro-Sepulveda, Mauricio A

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of a gas exchange correction protocol on resting metabolic rate (RMR) and respiratory quotient (RQ), assessed by a Vmax Encore 29n metabolic cart (SensorMedics Co., Yorba Linda, California) in overnight fasted and fed humans, and to assess the predictive power of body size for corrected and uncorrected RMR. Healthy participants (23 M/29 F; 34 ± 9 years old; 26.3 ± 3.7 kg/m 2 ) ingested two 3-hour-apart glucose loads (75 g). Indirect calorimetry was conducted before and hourly over a 6-hour period. Immediately after indirect calorimetry assessment, gas exchange was simulated through high-precision mass-flow regulators, which permitted the correction of RMR and RQ values. Uncorrected and corrected RMR and RQ were directly related at each time over the 6-hour period. However, uncorrected versus corrected RMR was 6.9% ± 0.5% higher (128 ± 7 kcal/d; P exchange in humans over a 6-hour period is feasible and provides information of improved accuracy. © 2017 The Obesity Society.

  8. The new ICRP respiratory model for radiation protection (ICRP 66) : applications and comparative evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellani, C.M.; Luciani, A.

    1996-02-01

    The aim of this report is to present the New ICRP Respiratory Model Tract for Radiological Protection. The model allows considering anatomical and physiological characteristics, giving reference values for children aged 3 months, 1, 5,10, and 15 years for adults; it also takes into account aerosol and gas characteristics. After a general description of the model structure, deposition, clearance and dosimetric models are presented. To compare the new and previous model (ICRP 30), dose coefficients (committed effective dose for unit intake) foe inhalation of radionuclides by workers are calculated considering aerosol granulometries with activity median aerodynamic of 1 and 5 μm, reference values for the respective publications. Dose coefficients and annual limits of intakes concerning respective dose limits (50 and 20 mSv respectively for ICRP 26 and 60) for workers and for members of population in case of dispersion of fission products aerosols, are finally calculated

  9. The Linear Model Research on Tibetan Six-Character Poetry's Respiratory Signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonghong, Li; Yangrui, Yang; Lei, Guo; Hongzhi, Yu

    In this paper, we studied the Tibetan six-character pomes' respiratory signal during reading from the perspective of the physiological. Main contents include: 1) Selected 40 representative Tibetan six-character and four lines pomes from ldquo; The Love-songs of 6th Dalai Lama Tshang•yangGya•tsho ", and recorded speech sounds, voice and respiratory signals; 2) Designed a set of respiratory signal parameters for the study of poetry; 3) Extracted the relevant parameters of poetry respiratory signal by using the well-established respiratory signal processing platform; 4) Studied the type of breathing pattern, established the linear model of poetry respiratory signal.

  10. Long-term effects of mustard gas on respiratory system of Iranian veterans after Iraq-Iran war: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Seyed-Mansour; Ghanei, Mostafa; Salamati, Payman; Safiabadi, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    To review long-term respiratory effects of mustard gas on Iranian veterans having undergone Iraq-Iran war. Electronic databases of Scopus, Medline, ISI, IranMedex, and Irandoc sites were searched. We accepted articles published in scientific journals as a quality criterion.The main pathogenic factors are free radical mediators. Prevalence of pulmonary involvement is approximately 42.5%. The most common complaints are cough and dyspnea. Major respiratory complications are chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, bronchiectasis, and asthma. Spirometry results can reveal restrictive and obstructive pulmonary disease. Plain chest X-ray does not help in about 50% of lung diseases. High-resolution CT of the lung is the best modality for diagnostic assessment of parenchymal lung and bronchi. There is no definite curative treatment for mustard lung. The effective treatment regimens consist of oxygen administration, use of vaporized moist air, respiratory physiotherapy, administration of mucolytic agents, bronchodilators, corticosteroids, and long-acting beta-2 agonists, antioxidants, surfactant, magnesium ions, therapeutic bronchoscopy, laser therapy, placement of respiratory stents, early tracheostomy in laryngospasm, and ultimately lung transplantation. High-resolution CT of the lung is the most accurate modality for the evaluation of the lung parenchyma and bronchi. The treatment efficacy of patients exposed to mustard gas depends on patient conditions (acute or chronic, upper or lower respiratory tract involvement). There are various treatment protocols, but unfortunately none of them is definitely curable.

  11. A Novel Parametric Model For The Human Respiratory System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Mihaela IONESCU

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work is to present some recent results in an ongoing research project between Ghent University and Chess Medical Technology Company Belgium. The overall aim of the project is to provide a fast method for identification of the human respiratory system in order to allow for an instantaneously diagnosis of the patient by the medical staff. A novel parametric model of the human respiratory system as well as the obtained experimental results is presented in this paper. A prototype apparatus developed by the company, based on the forced oscillation technique is used to record experimental data from 4 patients in this paper. Signal processing is based on spectral analysis and is followed by the parametric identification of a non-linear mechanistic model. The parametric model is equivalent to the structure of a simple electrical RLC-circuit, containing a non-linear capacitor. These parameters have a useful and easy-to-interpret physical meaning for the medical staff members.

  12. A comparative meta-analysis of maximal aerobic metabolism of vertebrates: implications for respiratory and cardiovascular limits to gas exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Stanley S; Hancock, Thomas V; Hedrick, Michael S

    2013-02-01

    Maximal aerobic metabolic rates (MMR) in vertebrates are supported by increased conductive and diffusive fluxes of O(2) from the environment to the mitochondria necessitating concomitant increases in CO(2) efflux. A question that has received much attention has been which step, respiratory or cardiovascular, provides the principal rate limitation to gas flux at MMR? Limitation analyses have principally focused on O(2) fluxes, though the excess capacity of the lung for O(2) ventilation and diffusion remains unexplained except as a safety factor. Analyses of MMR normally rely upon allometry and temperature to define these factors, but cannot account for much of the variation and often have narrow phylogenetic breadth. The unique aspect of our comparative approach was to use an interclass meta-analysis to examine cardio-respiratory variables during the increase from resting metabolic rate to MMR among vertebrates from fish to mammals, independent of allometry and phylogeny. Common patterns at MMR indicate universal principles governing O(2) and CO(2) transport in vertebrate cardiovascular and respiratory systems, despite the varied modes of activities (swimming, running, flying), different cardio-respiratory architecture, and vastly different rates of metabolism (endothermy vs. ectothermy). Our meta-analysis supports previous studies indicating a cardiovascular limit to maximal O(2) transport and also implicates a respiratory system limit to maximal CO(2) efflux, especially in ectotherms. Thus, natural selection would operate on the respiratory system to enhance maximal CO(2) excretion and the cardiovascular system to enhance maximal O(2) uptake. This provides a possible evolutionary explanation for the conundrum of why the respiratory system appears functionally over-designed from an O(2) perspective, a unique insight from previous work focused solely on O(2) fluxes. The results suggest a common gas transport blueprint, or Bauplan, in the vertebrate clade.

  13. COPD management as a model for all chronic respiratory conditions: report of the 4th Consensus Conference in Respiratory Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardini, Stefano; De Benedetto, Fernando; Sanguinetti, Claudio M; Bellofiore, Salvatore; Carlone, Stefano; Privitera, Salvatore; Sagliocca, Luciano; Tupputi, Emmanuele; Baccarani, Claudio; Caiffa, Gennaro; Calabrese, Maria Consiglia; Capuozzo, Antonio; Cauchi, Salvatore; Conio, Valentina; Coratella, Giuseppe; Crismancich, Franco; Dal Negro, Roberto W; Dellarole, Franco; Delucchi, Maurizio; Favaretti, Carlo; Forte, Silvia; Gallo, Franca Matilde; Giuliano, Riccardo; Grandi, Marco; Grillo, Antonino; Gualano, Maria Rosaria; Guffanti, Enrico; Locicero, Salvatore; Lombardo, Francesco Paolo; Mantero, Marco; Marasso, Roberto; Martino, Laura; Mastroberardino, Michele; Mereu, Carlo; Messina, Roberto; Neri, Margherita; Novelletto, Bruno Franco; Parente, Paolo; Pasquinucci, Sergio; Pistolesi, Massimo; Polverino, Mario; Posca, Agnese; Richeldi, Luca; Roccia, Fernando; Giustini, Ettore Saffi; Salemi, Michelangelo; Santacroce, Salvatore; Schisano, Mario; Schisano, Matteo; Selvi, Eleonora; Silenzi, Andrea; Soverina, Patrizio; Taranto, Claudio; Ugolini, Marta; Visaggi, Piero; Zanasi, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) kill 40 million people each year. The management of chronic respiratory NCDs such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is particularly critical in Italy, where they are widespread and represent a heavy burden on healthcare resources. It is thus important to redefine the role and responsibility of respiratory specialists and their scientific societies, together with that of the whole healthcare system, in order to create a sustainable management of COPD, which could become a model for other chronic respiratory conditions. These issues were divided into four main topics (Training, Organization, Responsibilities, and Sustainability) and discussed at a Consensus Conference promoted by the Research Center of the Italian Respiratory Society held in Rome, Italy, 3-4 November 2016. Regarding training, important inadequacies emerged regarding specialist training - both the duration of practical training courses and teaching about chronic diseases like COPD. A better integration between university and teaching hospitals would improve the quality of specialization. A better organizational integration between hospital and specialists/general practitioners (GPs) in the local community is essential to improve the diagnostic and therapeutic pathways for chronic respiratory patients. Improving the care pathways is the joint responsibility of respiratory specialists, GPs, patients and their caregivers, and the healthcare system. The sustainability of the entire system depends on a better organization of the diagnostic-therapeutic pathways, in which also other stakeholders such as pharmacists and pharmaceutical companies can play an important role.

  14. Lattice Model for Production of Gas

    KAUST Repository

    Marder, M.

    2017-12-01

    We define a lattice model for rock, absorbers, and gas that makes it possible to examine the flow of gas to a complicated absorbing boundary over long periods of time. The motivation is to deduce the geometry of the boundary from the time history of gas absorption. We find a solution to this model using Green\\'s function techniques, and apply the solution to three absorbing networks of increasing complexity.

  15. Animal models of cerebral arterial gas embolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weenink, Robert P.; Hollmann, Markus W.; van Hulst, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral arterial gas embolism is a dreaded complication of diving and invasive medical procedures. Many different animal models have been used in research on cerebral arterial gas embolism. This review provides an overview of the most important characteristics of these animal models. The properties

  16. Mathematical models of natural gas consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabo, Kristian; Scitovski, Rudolf; Vazler, Ivan; Zekic-Susac, Marijana

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we consider the problem of natural gas consumption hourly forecast on the basis of hourly movement of temperature and natural gas consumption in the preceding period. There are various methods and approaches for solving this problem in the literature. Some mathematical models with linear and nonlinear model functions relating to natural gas consumption forecast with the past natural gas consumption data, temperature data and temperature forecast data are mentioned. The methods are tested on concrete examples referring to temperature and natural gas consumption for the area of the city of Osijek (Croatia) from the beginning of the year 2008. The results show that most acceptable forecast is provided by mathematical models in which natural gas consumption and temperature are related explicitly.

  17. Taurine alters respiratory gas exchange and nutrient metabolism in type 2 diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Nagakatsu; Ninomiya, Chika; Osako, Yoshie; Morishima, Masaki; Mawatari, Kazuaki; Takahashi, Akira; Nakaya, Yutaka

    2004-07-01

    To assess the effect of taurine supplementation on respiratory gas exchange, which might reflect the improved metabolism of glucose and/or lipid in the type 2 diabetic Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats. Male OLETF rats (16 weeks of age) were randomly divided into two groups: unsupplemented group and taurine-supplemented (3% in drinking water) group. After 9 weeks of treatment, indirect calorimetry and insulin tolerance tests were conducted. The amounts of visceral fat pads, tissue glycogen, the blood concentrations of glucose, triacylglycerol, taurine, and electrolytes, and the level of hematocrit were compared between groups. A nondiabetic rat strain (Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka) was used as the age-matched normal control. The indirect calorimetry showed that the treatment of OLETF rats with taurine could reduce a part of postprandial glucose oxidation possibly responsible for the increase of triacylglycerol synthesis in the body. Taurine supplementation also improved hyperglycemia and insulin resistance and increased muscle glycogen content in the OLETF rats. Supplementation with taurine increased the blood concentration of taurine and electrolyte and fluid volume, all of which were considered to be related to the improvement of metabolic disturbance in OLETF rats. Taurine supplementation may be an effective treatment for glucose intolerance and fat/lipid accumulation observed in type 2 diabetes associated with obesity. These metabolic changes might be ascribed, in part, to the alteration of circulating blood profiles, where the improved hyperglycemia and/or the blood accumulation of taurine itself would play roles. Copyright 2004 NAASO

  18. Velocity profiles in idealized model of human respiratory tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jicha M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with numerical simulation focused on velocity profiles in idealized model of human upper airways during steady inspiration. Three r gimes of breathing were investigated: Resting condition, Deep breathing and Light activity which correspond to most common regimes used for experiments and simulations. Calculation was validated with experimental data given by Phase Doppler Anemometry performed on the model with same geometry. This comparison was made in multiple points which form one cross-section in trachea near first bifurcation of bronchial tree. Development of velocity profile in trachea during steady inspiration was discussed with respect for common phenomenon formed in trachea and for future research of transport of aerosol particles in human respiratory tract.

  19. Detection of Severe Respiratory Disease Epidemic Outbreaks by CUSUM-Based Overcrowd-Severe-Respiratory-Disease-Index Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Polanco

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A severe respiratory disease epidemic outbreak correlates with a high demand of specific supplies and specialized personnel to hold it back in a wide region or set of regions; these supplies would be beds, storage areas, hemodynamic monitors, and mechanical ventilators, as well as physicians, respiratory technicians, and specialized nurses. We describe an online cumulative sum based model named Overcrowd-Severe-Respiratory-Disease-Index based on the Modified Overcrowd Index that simultaneously monitors and informs the demand of those supplies and personnel in a healthcare network generating early warnings of severe respiratory disease epidemic outbreaks through the interpretation of such variables. A post hoc historical archive is generated, helping physicians in charge to improve the transit and future allocation of supplies in the entire hospital network during the outbreak. The model was thoroughly verified in a virtual scenario, generating multiple epidemic outbreaks in a 6-year span for a 13-hospital network. When it was superimposed over the H1N1 influenza outbreak census (2008–2010 taken by the National Institute of Medical Sciences and Nutrition Salvador Zubiran in Mexico City, it showed that it is an effective algorithm to notify early warnings of severe respiratory disease epidemic outbreaks with a minimal rate of false alerts.

  20. Detection of Severe Respiratory Disease Epidemic Outbreaks by CUSUM-Based Overcrowd-Severe-Respiratory-Disease-Index Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañón-González, Jorge Alberto; Macías, Alejandro E.; Samaniego, José Lino; Buhse, Thomas; Villanueva-Martínez, Sebastián

    2013-01-01

    A severe respiratory disease epidemic outbreak correlates with a high demand of specific supplies and specialized personnel to hold it back in a wide region or set of regions; these supplies would be beds, storage areas, hemodynamic monitors, and mechanical ventilators, as well as physicians, respiratory technicians, and specialized nurses. We describe an online cumulative sum based model named Overcrowd-Severe-Respiratory-Disease-Index based on the Modified Overcrowd Index that simultaneously monitors and informs the demand of those supplies and personnel in a healthcare network generating early warnings of severe respiratory disease epidemic outbreaks through the interpretation of such variables. A post hoc historical archive is generated, helping physicians in charge to improve the transit and future allocation of supplies in the entire hospital network during the outbreak. The model was thoroughly verified in a virtual scenario, generating multiple epidemic outbreaks in a 6-year span for a 13-hospital network. When it was superimposed over the H1N1 influenza outbreak census (2008–2010) taken by the National Institute of Medical Sciences and Nutrition Salvador Zubiran in Mexico City, it showed that it is an effective algorithm to notify early warnings of severe respiratory disease epidemic outbreaks with a minimal rate of false alerts. PMID:24069063

  1. Long-term effects of mustard gas on respiratory system of Iranian veterans after Iraq-Iran war: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razavi Seyed Mansour

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】To review long-term respiratory effects of mustard gas on Iranian veterans having undergone Iraq-Iran war. Electronic databases of Scopus, Medline, ISI, IranMedex, and Irandoc sites were searched. We accepted articles published in scientific journals as a quality criterion. The main pathogenic factors are free radical mediators. Preva-lence of pulmonary involvement is approximately 42.5%. The most common complaints are cough and dyspnea. Major respiratory complications are chronic obstructive pulmo-nary disease, bronchiectasis, and asthma. Spirometry re-sults can reveal restrictive and obstructive pulmonary disease. Plain chest X-ray does not help in about 50% of lung diseases. High-resolution CT of the lung is the best modality for diagnostic assessment of parenchymal lung and bronchi. There is no definite curative treatment for mus-tard lung. The effective treatment regimens consist of oxy-gen administration, use of vaporized moist air, respiratory physiotherapy, administration of mucolytic agents, bronchodilators, corticosteroids, and long-acting beta-2 agonists, antioxidants, surfactant, magnesium ions, thera-peutic bronchoscopy, laser therapy, placement of respira-tory stents, early tracheostomy in laryngospasm, and ulti-mately lung transplantation. High-resolution CT of the lung is the most accurate modality for the evaluation of the lung parenchyma and bronchi. The treatment efficacy of patients exposed to mustard gas depends on patient conditions (acute or chronic, upper or lower respiratory tract involvement. There are various treatment protocols, but unfortunately none of them is definitely curable. Key words: Lung injury; Chemical warfare; Mustard gas

  2. Thermodynamic modelling of acid gas removal from natural gas using the Extended UNIQUAC model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadegh, Negar; Stenby, Erling Halfdan; Thomsen, Kaj

    2017-01-01

    Thermodynamics of natural gas sweetening process needs to be known for proper design of natural gas treating plants. Absorption with aqueous N-Methyldiethanolamine is currently the most commonly used process for removal of acid gas (CO2 and H2S) impurities from natural gas. Model parameters...... for the Extended UNIQUAC model have already been determined by the same authors to calculate single acid gas solubility in aqueous MDEA. In this study, the model is further extended to estimate solubility of CO2 and H2S and their mixture in aqueous MDEA at high pressures with methane as a makeup gas....

  3. Changes in blood lactate and respiratory gas exchange measures in sports with discontinuous load profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smekal, Gerhard; von Duvillard, Serge P; Pokan, Rochus; Tschan, Harald; Baron, Ramon; Hofmann, Peter; Wonisch, Manfred; Bachl, Norbert

    2003-06-01

    This study compares two different sport events (orienteering = OTC; tennis = TEC) with discontinuous load profiles and different activity/recovery patterns by means of blood lactate (LA), heart rate (HR), and respiratory gas exchange measures (RGME) determined via a portable respiratory system. During the TEC, 20 tennis-ranked male subjects [age: 26.0 (3.7) years; height: 181.0 (5.7) cm; weight: 73.2 (6.8) kg; maximal oxygen consumption (VO(2)max): 57.3 (5.1) ml.kg(-1).min(-1)] played ten matches of 50 min. During the OTC, 11 male members of the Austrian National Team [age: 23.5 (3.9) years; height: 183.6 (6.8) cm; weight: 72.4 (3.9) kg; VO(2)max: 67.9 (3.8) ml.kg(-1).min(-1)] performed a simulated OTC (six sections; average length: 10.090 m). In both studies data from the maximal treadmill tests (TT) were used as reference values for the comparison of energy expenditure of OTC and TEC. During TEC, the average VO(2) was considerably lower [29.1 (5.6) ml(.)kg(-1.)min(-1)] or 51.1 (10.9)% of VO(2)max and 64.8.0 (13.3)% of VO(2) determined at the individual anaerobic threshold (IAT) on the TT. The short high-intensity periods (activity/recovery = 1/6) did not result in higher LA levels [average LA of games: 2.07 (0.9) mmol.l(-1)]. The highest average VO(2 )value for a whole game was 47.8 ml.kg(-1.)min(-1) and may provide a reference for energy demands required to sustain high-intensity periods of tennis predominantly via aerobic mechanism of energy delivery. During OTC, we found an average VO(2) of 56.4 (4.5) ml.kg(-1).min(-1) or 83.0 (3.8)% of VO(2)max and 94.6 (5.2)% of VO(2) at IAT. In contrast to TEC, LA were relatively high [5.16 (1.5) mmol.l(-1)) although the average VO(2) was significantly lower than VO(2) at IAT. Our data suggest that portable RGEM provides valuable information concerning the energy expenditure in sports that cannot be interpreted from LA or HR measures alone. Portable RGEM systems provide valuable assessment of under- or over-estimation of

  4. [Reliability of Selected Parameters of Cycling Ergospirometry from the PowerCube-Ergo Respiratory Gas Analyser].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, M W; Sperlich, B; Baumgart, C; Janssen, M; Freiwald, J

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate the reliability of 1) the key parameters of cycling ergospirometry (maximum power output [Pmax] and oxygen uptake [V̇O2peak], ventilatory thresholds 1 [VT 1] and 2 [VT 2], and cycling efficiency [CE] and gross efficiency [GE]), 2) the commonly used parameters to quantify exhaustion (maximum heart rate [HFmax], respiratory quotient [RQmax], blood lactate concentration [BLAmax], and ratings of perceived exhaustion [RPEmax]), and 3) the kinetics of exercise induced gas exchange measurements (oxygen uptake [V̇O2], carbon dioxide output [V̇CO2], and minute ventilation [V̇E]) using the PowerCube-Ergo metabolic system in consideration of international statistical recommendations. 12 women and 12 men (28 ± 4 years; 23.2 ± 2.4 kg/m(2)) performed two cycling tests (20 watt/min) separated by one week. The reliability was calculated based on differences in means (t test and effect sizes), retest correlation (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC]), and within-subject variation (standard error of measurement [SEM]). Of the key parameters of cycling ergospirometry, an excellent reliability (ICC ≥ 0.969; p = 0.000) and high accuracy (%SEM ≤ 4.6) were found for Pmax, V̇O2peak, and VT 1. Of the most commonly used parameters to quantify exhaustion, an excellent reliability (ICC = 0.922; p = 0.000) and high accuracy (%SEM = 1.0) existed only for HFmax. The gas exchange measurements (V̇O2, V̇CO2 und V̇E) of the PowerCube-Ergo were all excellently reliable (ICC ≥ 0,991; p = 0.000) and the accuracy of V̇O2 (SEM = 0.10 l/min) and V̇E (SEM = 3.13 l/min) fulfilled the quality guidance of exercise physiology laboratories. For future studies and practical purposes, the results are vital for the decision as to whether a difference between two tests represents a true intervention effect or just a measurement error and for the estimation of required sample sizes. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG

  5. Decision support models for natural gas dispatch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, L. (Bentley College, Waltham, MA (United States)); Vollmann, T.E. (International Inst. for Management Development, Lausanne (Switzerland))

    A decision support model is presented which will give utilities the support tools to manage the purchasing of natural gas supplies in the most cost effective manner without reducing winter safety stocks to below minimum levels. In Business As Usual (BAU) purchasing quantities vary with the daily forecasts. With Material Requirements Planning (MRP) and Linear Programming (LP), two types of factors are used: seasonal weather and decision rule. Under current practices, BAU simulation uses the least expensive gas source first, then adding successively more expensive sources. Material Requirements Planning is a production planning technique which uses a parent item master production schedule to determine time phased requirements for component points. Where the MPS is the aggregate gas demand forecasts for the contract year. This satisfies daily demand with least expensive gas and uses more expensive when necessary with automatic computation of available-to-promise (ATP) gas a dispacher knows daily when extra gas supplies may be ATP. Linear Programming is a mathematical algorithm used to determine optimal allocations of scarce resources to achieve a desired result. The LP model determines optimal daily gas purchase decisions with respect to supply cost minimization. Using these models, it appears possible to raise gross income margins 6 to 10% with minimal additions of customers and no new gas supply.

  6. Decision support models for natural gas dispatch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, L.; Vollmann, T.E.

    1992-01-01

    A decision support model is presented which will give utilities the support tools to manage the purchasing of natural gas supplies in the most cost effective manner without reducing winter safety stocks to below minimum levels. In Business As Usual (BAU) purchasing quantities vary with the daily forecasts. With Material Requirements Planning (MRP) and Linear Programming (LP), two types of factors are used: seasonal weather and decision rule. Under current practices, BAU simulation uses the least expensive gas source first, then adding successively more expensive sources. Material Requirements Planning is a production planning technique which uses a parent item master production schedule to determine time phased requirements for component points. Where the MPS is the aggregate gas demand forecasts for the contract year. This satisfies daily demand with least expensive gas and uses more expensive when necessary with automatic computation of available-to-promise (ATP) gas a dispacher knows daily when extra gas supplies may be ATP. Linear Programming is a mathematical algorithm used to determine optimal allocations of scarce resources to achieve a desired result. The LP model determines optimal daily gas purchase decisions with respect to supply cost minimization. Using these models, it appears possible to raise gross income margins 6 to 10% with minimal additions of customers and no new gas supply

  7. Natural gas supply in Denmark - A model of natural gas transmission and the liberalized gas market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bregnbaek, L.

    2005-01-01

    In the wake of the liberalization of European energy markets a large area of research has spawned. This area includes the development of mathematical models to analyze the impact of liberalization with respect to efficiency, supply security and environment, to name but a few subjects. This project describes the development of such a model. In Denmark the parallel liberalization of the markets of natural gas and electricity and the existence of an abundance of de-centralized combined heat and power generators of which most are natural gas fired, leads to the natural assumption that the future holds a greater deal of interdependency for these markets. A model is developed describing network flows in the natural gas transmission system, the main arteries of natural gas supply, from a technical viewpoint. This yields a technical bounding on the supply available in different parts of the country. Additionally the economic structure of the Danish natural gas market is formulated mathematically giving a description of the transmission, distribution and storage options available to the market. The supply and demand of natural gas is put into a partial equilibrium context by integrating the developed model with the Balmorel model, which describes the markets for electricity and district heat. Specifically on the demand side the consumption of natural gas for heat and power generation is emphasized. General results and three demonstration cases are presented to illustrate how the developed model can be used to analyze various energy policy issues, and to disclose the strengths and weaknesses in the formulation. (au)

  8. Modelling gas generation in radioactive waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agg, P.J.

    1992-07-01

    In a repository containing low- and intermediate-level waste, gas generation will occur principally by the coupled processes of metal corrosion and microbial degradation of cellulosic waste. This paper describes a mathematical model designed to address gas generation by these mechanisms. The metal corrosion model incorporates a three-stage process encompassing both aerobic and anaerobic corrosion regimes; the microbial degradation model simulates the activities of eight different microbial populations, which are maintained as functions both of pH and of the concentrations of particular chemical species. Gas concentrations have been measured over a period of three years in large-scale drum experiments designed to simulate repository conditions. Model predictions are confirmed against the experimental measurements, and a prediction is then made of gas concentrations and generation rates over an assessment period of one million years in a radioactive waste repository. (Author)

  9. Modelling gas generation in radioactive waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agg, P.J.

    1993-02-01

    In a repository containing low- and intermediate-level waste, gas generation will occur principally by the coupled processes of metal corrosion and microbial degradation of cellulosic waste. This Paper describes a mathematical model design to address gas generation by these mechanisms. The metal corrosion model incorporates a three-stage process encompassing both aerobic and anaerobic corrosion regimes; the microbial degradation model simulates the activities of eight different microbial populations, which are maintained as functions both of pH and of the concentrations of particular chemical species. Gas concentrations have been measured over a period of three years in large-scale drum experiments designed to simulate repository conditions. Model predictions are confirmed against the experimental measurements, and a prediction is then made of gas concentrations and generation rates over an assessment period of one million years in a radioactive waste repository. (author)

  10. Phase transition in the hadron gas model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorenstein, M.I.; Petrov, V.K.; Zinov'ev, G.M.

    1981-01-01

    A class of statistical models of hadron gas allowing an analytical solution is considered. A mechanism of a possible phase transition in such a system is found and conditions for its occurence are determined [ru

  11. Interaction between gas cooking and GSTM1 null genotype in bronchial responsiveness: results from the European Community Respiratory Health Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, André F S; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Castro-Giner, Francesc; Minelli, Cosetta; Accordini, Simone; Sørheim, Inga-Cecilie; Pin, Isabelle; Kogevinas, Manolis; Jõgi, Rain; Balding, David J; Norbäck, Dan; Verlato, Giuseppe; Olivieri, Mario; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Janson, Christer; Zock, Jan-Paul; Heinrich, Joachim; Jarvis, Deborah L

    2014-01-01

    Background Increased bronchial responsiveness is characteristic of asthma. Gas cooking, which is a major indoor source of the highly oxidant nitrogen dioxide, has been associated with respiratory symptoms and reduced lung function. However, little is known about the effect of gas cooking on bronchial responsiveness and on how this relationship may be modified by variants in the genes GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1, which influence antioxidant defences. Methods The study was performed in subjects with forced expiratory volume in one second at least 70% of predicted who took part in the multicentre European Community Respiratory Health Survey, had bronchial responsiveness assessed by methacholine challenge and had been genotyped for GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1-rs1695. Information on the use of gas for cooking was obtained from interviewer-led questionnaires. Effect modification by genotype on the association between the use of gas for cooking and bronchial responsiveness was assessed within each participating country, and estimates combined using meta-analysis. Results Overall, gas cooking, as compared with cooking with electricity, was not associated with bronchial responsiveness (β=−0.08, 95% CI −0.40 to 0.25, p=0.648). However, GSTM1 significantly modified this effect (β for interaction=−0.75, 95% CI −1.16 to −0.33, p=4×10−4), with GSTM1 null subjects showing more responsiveness if they cooked with gas. No effect modification by GSTT1 or GSTP1-rs1695 genotypes was observed. Conclusions Increased bronchial responsiveness was associated with gas cooking among subjects with the GSTM1 null genotype. This may reflect the oxidant effects on the bronchi of exposure to nitrogen dioxide. PMID:24613990

  12. Theoretical models for recombination in expanding gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avron, Y.; Kahane, S.

    1978-09-01

    In laser isotope separation of atomic uranium, one is confronted with the theoretical problem of estimating the concentration of thermally ionized uranium atoms. To investigate this problem theoretical models for recombination in an expanding gas and in the absence of local thermal equilibrium have been constructed. The expansion of the gas is described by soluble models of the hydrodynamic equation, and the recombination by rate equations. General results for the freezing effect for the suitable ranges of the gas parameters are obtained. The impossibility of thermal equilibrium in expanding two-component systems is proven

  13. Adsorption Model for Off-Gas Separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veronica J. Rutledge

    2011-03-01

    The absence of industrial scale nuclear fuel reprocessing in the U.S. has precluded the necessary driver for developing the advanced simulation capability now prevalent in so many other countries. Thus, it is essential to model complex series of unit operations to simulate, understand, and predict inherent transient behavior and feedback loops. A capability of accurately simulating the dynamic behavior of advanced fuel cycle separation processes will provide substantial cost savings and many technical benefits. The specific fuel cycle separation process discussed in this report is the off-gas treatment system. The off-gas separation consists of a series of scrubbers and adsorption beds to capture constituents of interest. Dynamic models are being developed to simulate each unit operation involved so each unit operation can be used as a stand-alone model and in series with multiple others. Currently, an adsorption model has been developed in gPROMS software. Inputs include gas stream constituents, sorbent, and column properties, equilibrium and kinetic data, and inlet conditions. It models dispersed plug flow in a packed bed under non-isothermal and non-isobaric conditions for a multiple component gas stream. The simulation outputs component concentrations along the column length as a function of time from which the breakthrough data is obtained. It also outputs temperature along the column length as a function of time and pressure drop along the column length. Experimental data will be input into the adsorption model to develop a model specific for iodine adsorption on silver mordenite as well as model(s) specific for krypton and xenon adsorption. The model will be validated with experimental breakthrough curves. Another future off-gas modeling goal is to develop a model for the unit operation absorption. The off-gas models will be made available via the server or web for evaluation by customers.

  14. A Bidirectional Coupling Procedure Applied to Multiscale Respiratory Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuprat, Andrew P.; Kabilan, Senthil; Carson, James P.; Corley, Richard A.; Einstein, Daniel R.

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we present a novel multiscale computational framework for efficiently linking multiple lower-dimensional models describing the distal lung mechanics to imaging-based 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of the upper pulmonary airways in order to incorporate physiologically appropriate outlet boundary conditions. The framework is an extension of the Modified Newton’s Method with nonlinear Krylov accelerator developed by Carlson and Miller [1, 2, 3]. Our extensions include the retention of subspace information over multiple timesteps, and a special correction at the end of a timestep that allows for corrections to be accepted with verified low residual with as little as a single residual evaluation per timestep on average. In the case of a single residual evaluation per timestep, the method has zero additional computational cost compared to uncoupled or unidirectionally coupled simulations. We expect these enhancements to be generally applicable to other multiscale coupling applications where timestepping occurs. In addition we have developed a “pressure-drop” residual which allows for stable coupling of flows between a 3D incompressible CFD application and another (lower-dimensional) fluid system. We expect this residual to also be useful for coupling non-respiratory incompressible fluid applications, such as multiscale simulations involving blood flow. The lower-dimensional models that are considered in this study are sets of simple ordinary differential equations (ODEs) representing the compliant mechanics of symmetric human pulmonary airway trees. To validate the method, we compare the predictions of hybrid CFD-ODE models against an ODE-only model of pulmonary airflow in an idealized geometry. Subsequently, we couple multiple sets of ODEs describing the distal lung to an imaging-based human lung geometry. Boundary conditions in these models consist of atmospheric pressure at the mouth and intrapleural pressure applied to the multiple

  15. A bidirectional coupling procedure applied to multiscale respiratory modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuprat, A.P., E-mail: andrew.kuprat@pnnl.gov [Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Kabilan, S., E-mail: senthil.kabilan@pnnl.gov [Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Carson, J.P., E-mail: james.carson@pnnl.gov [Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Corley, R.A., E-mail: rick.corley@pnnl.gov [Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Einstein, D.R., E-mail: daniel.einstein@pnnl.gov [Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we present a novel multiscale computational framework for efficiently linking multiple lower-dimensional models describing the distal lung mechanics to imaging-based 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFDs) models of the upper pulmonary airways in order to incorporate physiologically appropriate outlet boundary conditions. The framework is an extension of the modified Newton’s method with nonlinear Krylov accelerator developed by Carlson and Miller [1], Miller [2] and Scott and Fenves [3]. Our extensions include the retention of subspace information over multiple timesteps, and a special correction at the end of a timestep that allows for corrections to be accepted with verified low residual with as little as a single residual evaluation per timestep on average. In the case of a single residual evaluation per timestep, the method has zero additional computational cost compared to uncoupled or unidirectionally coupled simulations. We expect these enhancements to be generally applicable to other multiscale coupling applications where timestepping occurs. In addition we have developed a “pressure-drop” residual which allows for stable coupling of flows between a 3D incompressible CFD application and another (lower-dimensional) fluid system. We expect this residual to also be useful for coupling non-respiratory incompressible fluid applications, such as multiscale simulations involving blood flow. The lower-dimensional models that are considered in this study are sets of simple ordinary differential equations (ODEs) representing the compliant mechanics of symmetric human pulmonary airway trees. To validate the method, we compare the predictions of hybrid CFD–ODE models against an ODE-only model of pulmonary airflow in an idealized geometry. Subsequently, we couple multiple sets of ODEs describing the distal lung to an imaging-based human lung geometry. Boundary conditions in these models consist of atmospheric pressure at the mouth and intrapleural

  16. A bidirectional coupling procedure applied to multiscale respiratory modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuprat, A.P.; Kabilan, S.; Carson, J.P.; Corley, R.A.; Einstein, D.R.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we present a novel multiscale computational framework for efficiently linking multiple lower-dimensional models describing the distal lung mechanics to imaging-based 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFDs) models of the upper pulmonary airways in order to incorporate physiologically appropriate outlet boundary conditions. The framework is an extension of the modified Newton’s method with nonlinear Krylov accelerator developed by Carlson and Miller [1], Miller [2] and Scott and Fenves [3]. Our extensions include the retention of subspace information over multiple timesteps, and a special correction at the end of a timestep that allows for corrections to be accepted with verified low residual with as little as a single residual evaluation per timestep on average. In the case of a single residual evaluation per timestep, the method has zero additional computational cost compared to uncoupled or unidirectionally coupled simulations. We expect these enhancements to be generally applicable to other multiscale coupling applications where timestepping occurs. In addition we have developed a “pressure-drop” residual which allows for stable coupling of flows between a 3D incompressible CFD application and another (lower-dimensional) fluid system. We expect this residual to also be useful for coupling non-respiratory incompressible fluid applications, such as multiscale simulations involving blood flow. The lower-dimensional models that are considered in this study are sets of simple ordinary differential equations (ODEs) representing the compliant mechanics of symmetric human pulmonary airway trees. To validate the method, we compare the predictions of hybrid CFD–ODE models against an ODE-only model of pulmonary airflow in an idealized geometry. Subsequently, we couple multiple sets of ODEs describing the distal lung to an imaging-based human lung geometry. Boundary conditions in these models consist of atmospheric pressure at the mouth and intrapleural

  17. Modeling pressure rise in gas targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangiri, P.; Lapi, S. E.; Publicover, J.; Buckley, K.; Martinez, D. M.; Ruth, T. J.; Hoehr, C.

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to introduce a universal mathematical model to explain a gas target behaviour at steady-state time scale. To obtain our final goal, an analytical model is proposed to study the pressure rise in the targets used to produce medical isotopes on low-energy cyclotrons. The model is developed based on the assumption that during irradiation the system reaches steady-state. The model is verified by various experiments performed at different beam currents, gas type, and initial pressures at 13 MeV cyclotron at TRIUMF. Excellent agreement is achieved.

  18. Mucosal inflammation at the respiratory interface: a zebrafish model

    OpenAIRE

    Progatzky, Fr?nze; Cook, H. Terence; Lamb, Jonathan R.; Bugeon, Laurence; Dallman, Margaret J.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory diseases of the respiratory system such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are increasing globally and remain poorly understood conditions. Although attention has long focused on the activation of type 1 and type 2 helper T cells of the adaptive immune system in these diseases, it is becoming increasingly apparent that there is also a need to understand the contributions and interactions between innate immune cells and the epithelial lining of the respiratory sys...

  19. Pharmacologic modeling of primary mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, James; Ganetzky, Rebecca; Lightfoot, Richard; Tzeng, Michael; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Seiler, Christoph; Falk, Marni J

    2017-07-18

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) disease is a heterogeneous and highly morbid group of energy deficiency disorders for which no proven effective therapies exist. Robust vertebrate animal models of primary RC dysfunction are needed to explore the effects of variation in RC disease subtypes, tissue-specific manifestations, and major pathogenic factors contributing to each disorder, as well as their pre-clinical response to therapeutic candidates. We have developed a series of zebrafish (Danio rerio) models that inhibit, to variable degrees, distinct aspects of RC function, and enable quantification of animal development, survival, behaviors, and organ-level treatment effects as well as effects on mitochondrial biochemistry and physiology. Here, we characterize four pharmacologic inhibitor models of mitochondrial RC dysfunction in early larval zebrafish, including rotenone (complex I inhibitor), azide (complex IV inhibitor), oligomycin (complex V inhibitor), and chloramphenicol (mitochondrial translation inhibitor that leads to multiple RC complex dysfunction). A range of concentrations and exposure times of each RC inhibitor were systematically evaluated on early larval development, animal survival, integrated behaviors (touch and startle responses), organ physiology (brain death, neurologic tone, heart rate), and fluorescence-based analyses of mitochondrial physiology in zebrafish skeletal muscle. Pharmacologic RC inhibitor effects were validated by spectrophotometric analysis of Complex I, II and IV enzyme activities, or relative quantitation of ATP levels in larvae. Outcomes were prioritized that utilize in vivo animal imaging and quantitative behavioral assessments, as may optimally inform the translational potential of pre-clinical drug screens for future clinical study in human mitochondrial disease subjects. The RC complex inhibitors each delayed early embryo development, with short-term exposures of these three agents or chloramphenicol from 5 to 7 days

  20. Respiratory Health – Exposure Measurements and Modeling in the Fragrance and Flavour Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelini, Eric; Camerini, Gerard; Diop, Malick; Roche, Patrice; Rodi, Thomas; Schippa, Christine; Thomas, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Although the flavor and fragrance industry is about 150 years old, the use of synthetic materials started more than 100 years ago, and the awareness of the respiratory hazard presented by some flavoring substances emerged only recently. In 2001, the US National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) identified for the first time inhalation exposure to flavoring substances in the workplace as a possible occupational hazard. As a consequence, manufacturers must comply with a variety of workplace safety requirements, and management has to ensure the improvement of health and safety of the employees exposed to hazardous volatile organic compounds. In this sensitive context, MANE opened its facilities to an intensive measuring campaign with the objective to better estimate the real level of hazardous respiratory exposure of workers. In this study, exposure to 27 hazardous volatile substances were measured during several types of handling operations (weighing-mixing, packaging, reconditioning-transferring), 430 measurement results were generated, and were exploited to propose an improved model derived from the well-known ECETOC-TRA model. The quantification of volatile substances in the working atmosphere involved three main steps: adsorption of the chemicals on a solid support, thermal desorption, followed by analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Our approach was to examine experimental measures done in various manufacturing workplaces and to define correction factors to reflect more accurately working conditions and habits. Four correction factors were adjusted in the ECETOC-TRA to integrate important exposure variation factors: exposure duration, percentage of the substance in the composition, presence of collective protective equipment and wearing of personal protective equipment. Verification of the validity of the model is based on the comparison of the values obtained after adaptation of the ECETOC-TRA model, according to various exposure

  1. Respiratory Health - Exposure Measurements and Modeling in the Fragrance and Flavour Industry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Angelini

    Full Text Available Although the flavor and fragrance industry is about 150 years old, the use of synthetic materials started more than 100 years ago, and the awareness of the respiratory hazard presented by some flavoring substances emerged only recently. In 2001, the US National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH identified for the first time inhalation exposure to flavoring substances in the workplace as a possible occupational hazard. As a consequence, manufacturers must comply with a variety of workplace safety requirements, and management has to ensure the improvement of health and safety of the employees exposed to hazardous volatile organic compounds. In this sensitive context, MANE opened its facilities to an intensive measuring campaign with the objective to better estimate the real level of hazardous respiratory exposure of workers. In this study, exposure to 27 hazardous volatile substances were measured during several types of handling operations (weighing-mixing, packaging, reconditioning-transferring, 430 measurement results were generated, and were exploited to propose an improved model derived from the well-known ECETOC-TRA model. The quantification of volatile substances in the working atmosphere involved three main steps: adsorption of the chemicals on a solid support, thermal desorption, followed by analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Our approach was to examine experimental measures done in various manufacturing workplaces and to define correction factors to reflect more accurately working conditions and habits. Four correction factors were adjusted in the ECETOC-TRA to integrate important exposure variation factors: exposure duration, percentage of the substance in the composition, presence of collective protective equipment and wearing of personal protective equipment. Verification of the validity of the model is based on the comparison of the values obtained after adaptation of the ECETOC-TRA model, according to

  2. The influence of a fentanyl and dexmedetomidine combination on external respiratory functions in acute hemorrhage model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay G. Vengerovich

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The synthetic opioid analgesic fentanyl is widely used for prophylaxis and therapy of traumatic shock associated with massive bleeding. Its side effects – skeletal muscle rigidity and respiratory center depression – are especially pronounced with repeated administration. It is rational to apply fentanyl in diminished doses in combination with non-opioid analgesics in order to reduce respiratory disturbances risk.Aim. The aim of the work is to justify the influence of opioid analgesic fentanyl and α2 -adrenomimetic dexmedetomidine combination on external respiratory functions in acute hemorrhage model.Materials and methods. Acute loss of 35–40% of circulating blood volume was modeled in experiments on 75 white mongrel male rats. The external respiratory functions (respiratory rate, respiratory volume, breath volume per minute were estimated in animals of 5 groups: 1 – rats without analgesic help (controls; 2–3 – rats receiving a single fentanyl intramuscular injection (ED99 98,96 mcg/kg or fentanyl together with dexme detomidine (ED99 of combination 67,94 mcg/kg 15 min after acute blood loss; 4–5 – rats receiving the same drugs 15 min, 30, 45 and 60 min later.Results. In experimental acute loss of 35–40% of circulating blood volume, 15 min later a secondary acute respiratory failure developed with a drop of respiratory rate, respiratory volume and volume of breath per minute by 30%, 21 and 47% (p < 0,05. The external respiratory functions recoverеd after 4 h mainly due to the increase of respiratory volume. A single intramuscular injection of fentanyl caused respiratory depression 15 min after experimental blood loss which resulted in the decrease of breath volume per minute to 30–61% (p < 0,05 for 90 min. Four intramuscular injections of fentanyl 15 min, 30, 45 and 60 min after hemorrhage caused a severe respiratory dysfunction, accompanied by apnea periods and Biot’s respiration. Respiratory rate was reduced

  3. Modeling internal ballistics of gas combustion guns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorge, Volker; Grossjohann, Rico; Schönekess, Holger C; Herbst, Jörg; Bockholdt, Britta; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Frank, Matthias

    2016-05-01

    Potato guns are popular homemade guns which work on the principle of gas combustion. They are usually constructed for recreational rather than criminal purposes. Yet some serious injuries and fatalities due to these guns are reported. As information on the internal ballistics of homemade gas combustion-powered guns is scarce, it is the aim of this work to provide an experimental model of the internal ballistics of these devices and to investigate their basic physical parameters. A gas combustion gun was constructed with a steel tube as the main component. Gas/air mixtures of acetylene, hydrogen, and ethylene were used as propellants for discharging a 46-mm caliber test projectile. Gas pressure in the combustion chamber was captured with a piezoelectric pressure sensor. Projectile velocity was measured with a ballistic speed measurement system. The maximum gas pressure, the maximum rate of pressure rise, the time parameters of the pressure curve, and the velocity and path of the projectile through the barrel as a function of time were determined according to the pressure-time curve. The maximum gas pressure was measured to be between 1.4 bar (ethylene) and 4.5 bar (acetylene). The highest maximum rate of pressure rise was determined for hydrogen at (dp/dt)max = 607 bar/s. The muzzle energy was calculated to be between 67 J (ethylene) and 204 J (acetylene). To conclude, this work provides basic information on the internal ballistics of homemade gas combustion guns. The risk of injury to the operator or bystanders is high, because accidental explosions of the gun due to the high-pressure rise during combustion of the gas/air mixture may occur.

  4. Gas analysis modeling system forecast for the Energy Modeling Forum North American Natural Gas Market Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mariner-Volpe, B.; Trapmann, W.

    1989-01-01

    The Gas Analysis Modeling System is a large computer-based model for analyzing the complex US natural gas industry, including production, transportation, and consumption activities. The model was developed and first used in 1982 after the passage of the NGPA, which initiated a phased decontrol of most natural gas prices at the wellhead. The categorization of gas under the NGPA and the contractual nature of the natural gas market, which existed at the time, were primary factors in the development of the basic structure of the model. As laws and regulations concerning the natural gas market have changed, the model has evolved accordingly. Recent increases in competition in the wellhead market have also led to changes in the model. GAMS produces forecasts of natural gas production, consumption, and prices annually through 2010. It is an engineering-economic model that incorporates several different mathematical structures in order to represent the interaction of the key groups involved in the natural gas market. GAMS has separate supply and demand components that are equilibrated for each year of the forecast by means of a detailed transaction network

  5. Respiratory muscle dysfunction in animal models of hypoxic disease: antioxidant therapy goes from strength to strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Halloran KD

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Ken D O’Halloran,1 Philip Lewis2 1Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland; 2Institute and Policlinic for Occupational Medicine, Environmental Medicine and Preventative Research, University Hospital of Cologne, Germany Abstract: The striated muscles of breathing play a critical role in respiratory homeostasis governing blood oxygenation and pH regulation. Upper airway dilator and thoracic pump muscles retain a remarkable capacity for plasticity throughout life, both in health and disease states. Hypoxia, whatever the cause, is a potent driver of respiratory muscle remodeling with evidence of adaptive and maladaptive outcomes for system performance. The pattern, duration, and intensity of hypoxia are key determinants of respiratory muscle structural-, metabolic-, and functional responses and adaptation. Age and sex also influence respiratory muscle tolerance of hypoxia. Redox stress emerges as the principal protagonist driving respiratory muscle malady in rodent models of hypoxic disease. There is a growing body of evidence demonstrating that antioxidant intervention alleviates hypoxia-induced respiratory muscle dysfunction, and that N-acetyl cysteine, approved for use in humans, is highly effective in preventing hypoxia-induced respiratory muscle weakness and fatigue. We posit that oxygen homeostasis is a key driver of respiratory muscle form and function. Hypoxic stress is likely a major contributor to respiratory muscle malaise in diseases of the lungs and respiratory control network. Animal studies provide an evidence base in strong support of the need to explore adjunctive antioxidant therapies for muscle dysfunction in human respiratory disease. Keywords: respiratory muscle, diaphragm, upper airway, hypoxia, antioxidants, N-acetyl-cysteine, OSA, COPD

  6. Modeling Gas Dynamics in California Sea Lions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Modeling Gas Dynamics in California Sea Lions Andreas...California sea lions . The model will be calibrated against measured arterial and venous PO2 levels from California sea lions , and estimate the error between...existing model with new species-specific parameter estimates for California sea lions . Aim 2: Compare estimated and measured arterial and venous

  7. Coupled and reduced dimensional modeling of respiratory mechanics during spontaneous breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, M; Comerford, A; Wall, W A

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we develop a total lung model based on a tree of 0D airway and acinar models for studying respiratory mechanics during spontaneous breathing. This model utilizes both computer tomography-based geometries and artificially generated lobe-filling airway trees to model the entire conducting region of the lung. Beyond the conducting airways, we develop an acinar model, which takes into account the alveolar tissue resistance, compliance, and the intrapleural pressure. With this methodology, we compare four different 0D models of airway mechanics and determine the best model based on a comparison with a 3D-0D coupled model of the conducting airways; this methodology is possible because the majority of airway resistance is confined to the lower generations, that is, the trachea and the first few bronchial generations. As an example application of the model, we simulate the flow and pressure dynamics under spontaneous breathing conditions, that is, at flow conditions driven purely by pleural space pressure. The results show good agreement, both qualitatively and quantitatively, with reported physiological values. One of the key advantages of this model is the ability to provide insight into lung ventilation in the peripheral regions. This is often crucial because this is where information, specifically for studying diseases and gas exchange, is needed. Thus, the model can be used as a tool for better understanding local peripheral lung mechanics without excluding the upper portions of the lung. This tool will be also useful for in vitro investigations of lung mechanics in both health and disease. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Fatigue modelling for gas nitriding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Weil

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to develop an algorithm able to predict the fatigue lifetime of nitrided steels. Linear multi-axial fatigue criteria are used to take into account the gradients of mechanical properties provided by the nitriding process. Simulations on rotating bending fatigue specimens are made in order to test the nitrided surfaces. The fatigue model is applied to the cyclic loading of a gear from a simulation using the finite element software Ansys. Results show the positive contributions of nitriding on the fatigue strength

  9. Simulation Model of Membrane Gas Separator Using Aspen Custom Modeler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Dong-keun [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Gahui; Yun, Jinwon; Yu, Sangseok [Chungnam Nat’l Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Membranes are used to separate pure gas from gas mixtures. In this study, three different types of mass transport through a membrane were developed in order to investigate the gas separation capabilities of a membrane. The three different models typically used are a lumped model, a multi-cell model, and a discretization model. Despite the multi-cell model producing similar results to a discretization model, the discretization model was selected for this investigation, due to the cell number dependence of a multi-cell model. The mass transport model was then used to investigate the effects of pressure difference, flow rate, total exposed area, and permeability. The results showed that the pressure difference increased with the stage cut, but the selectivity was a trade-off for the increasing pressure difference. Additionally, even though permeability is an important parameter, the selectivity and stage cut of the membrane converged as permeability increased.

  10. A Model of Locomotor-Respiratory Coupling in Quadrupeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliodori,, Mauricio J.; Lujan, Heidi L.; Briggs, Whitney S.; DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2009-01-01

    Locomotion and respiration are not independent phenomena in running mammals because locomotion and respiration both rely on cyclic movements of the ribs, sternum, and associated musculature. Thus, constraints are imposed on locomotor and respiratory function by virtue of their linkage. Specifically, locomotion imposes mechanical constraints on…

  11. A strategic model of European gas supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holz, Franziska; Hirschhausen, Christian von; Kemfert, Claudia

    2005-01-01

    Structural changes in the European natural gas market such as liberalization, increasing demand, and growing import dependency have triggered new attempts to model these markets accurately. This paper proposes a model of the European natural gas supply including the possibility of strategic behavior of the agents along the value-added chain. We structure it as a two-stage-game of successive natural gas exports to Europe (first stage) and wholesale trade within Europe (second stage). In the case of non-cooperative Cournot competition at both stages, which is the most realistic scenario, this yields a market outcome with double marginalization, that is suppliers at both stages generate a mark-up, at the expense of the final customers. Our results suggest that the main suppliers of natural gas to Europe remain dominant (Norway, the Netherlands), although some lose market shares (Algeria, UK, and especially Russia). Traditional exports will be complemented in the future by overseas supplies of LNG from the Middle East, Nigeria, Trinidad and Tobago which are becoming competitive. The model also enables us to identify transport infrastructure bottlenecks; we find that transport capacity on the upstream market is sufficient but the capacity constraint is binding for many intra-EU trade relations. (Author)

  12. Universal model for water costs of gas exchange by animals and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, H Arthur; Smith, Jennifer N

    2010-05-04

    For terrestrial animals and plants, a fundamental cost of living is water vapor lost to the atmosphere during exchange of metabolic gases. Here, by bringing together previously developed models for specific taxa, we integrate properties common to all terrestrial gas exchangers into a universal model of water loss. The model predicts that water loss scales to gas exchange with an exponent of 1 and that the amount of water lost per unit of gas exchanged depends on several factors: the surface temperature of the respiratory system near the outside of the organism, the gas consumed (oxygen or carbon dioxide), the steepness of the gradients for gas and vapor, and the transport mode (convective or diffusive). Model predictions were largely confirmed by data on 202 species in five taxa--insects, birds, bird eggs, mammals, and plants--spanning nine orders of magnitude in rate of gas exchange. Discrepancies between model predictions and data seemed to arise from biologically interesting violations of model assumptions, which emphasizes how poorly we understand gas exchange in some taxa. The universal model provides a unified conceptual framework for analyzing exchange-associated water losses across taxa with radically different metabolic and exchange systems.

  13. Time-varying respiratory system elastance: a physiological model for patients who are spontaneously breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiew, Yeong Shiong; Pretty, Christopher; Docherty, Paul D; Lambermont, Bernard; Shaw, Geoffrey M; Desaive, Thomas; Chase, J Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory mechanics models can aid in optimising patient-specific mechanical ventilation (MV), but the applications are limited to fully sedated MV patients who have little or no spontaneously breathing efforts. This research presents a time-varying elastance (E(drs)) model that can be used in spontaneously breathing patients to determine their respiratory mechanics. A time-varying respiratory elastance model is developed with a negative elastic component (E(demand)), to describe the driving pressure generated during a patient initiated breathing cycle. Data from 22 patients who are partially mechanically ventilated using Pressure Support (PS) and Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (NAVA) are used to investigate the physiology relevance of the time-varying elastance model and its clinical potential. E(drs) of every breathing cycle for each patient at different ventilation modes are presented for comparison. At the start of every breathing cycle initiated by patient, E(drs) is 25 cmH2Os/l and thus can be used as an acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) severity indicator. The E(drs) model captures unique dynamic respiratory mechanics for spontaneously breathing patients with respiratory failure. The model is fully general and is applicable to both fully controlled and partially assisted MV modes.

  14. Time-varying respiratory system elastance: a physiological model for patients who are spontaneously breathing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeong Shiong Chiew

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Respiratory mechanics models can aid in optimising patient-specific mechanical ventilation (MV, but the applications are limited to fully sedated MV patients who have little or no spontaneously breathing efforts. This research presents a time-varying elastance (E(drs model that can be used in spontaneously breathing patients to determine their respiratory mechanics. METHODS: A time-varying respiratory elastance model is developed with a negative elastic component (E(demand, to describe the driving pressure generated during a patient initiated breathing cycle. Data from 22 patients who are partially mechanically ventilated using Pressure Support (PS and Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (NAVA are used to investigate the physiology relevance of the time-varying elastance model and its clinical potential. E(drs of every breathing cycle for each patient at different ventilation modes are presented for comparison. RESULTS: At the start of every breathing cycle initiated by patient, E(drs is 25 cmH2Os/l and thus can be used as an acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS severity indicator. CONCLUSION: The E(drs model captures unique dynamic respiratory mechanics for spontaneously breathing patients with respiratory failure. The model is fully general and is applicable to both fully controlled and partially assisted MV modes.

  15. Cell proliferation in rat nasal respiratory epithelium following three months exposure to formaldehyde gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monticello, T.M.; Morgan, K.T.

    1990-01-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO), a ubiquitous chemical and rat nasal carcinogen, enhances cell proliferation in rat, monkey, and xenotransplanted human respiratory epithelium following short-term exposure. The present studies were designed to evaluate cell proliferation in relation to tumor induction in rat nasal respiratory epithelium following subchronic HCHO exposure. Male F-344 rats were whole-body exposed to either 0, 0.7, 2, 6, 10, or 15 ppm HCHO, for wither 4 d (6hr/d), 6 wks (5d/wk) or 3 months. Animals were labeled with tritiated thymidine prior to euthanasia. Nasal sections were processed for autoradiography and cell proliferation data was expressed as unit length labeling indices (ULLI). HCHO-induced lesions and increases in cell proliferation occurred in specific regions of the nose, primarily the wall of the lateral meatus and nasal septum of the anterior nasal cavity. Following 4 d exposure, significant elevations in cell proliferation were observed only in the 6, 10 and 15 ppm groups (16-, 18-, and 20-fold increase over control, respectively). Increases in ULLI were also present in the 6, 10 and 15 ppm groups after 6 wks of exposure (12-, 35-, and 40-fold increase over control). However, after 3 months exposure, elevations in ULLI were present only in the 10 and 15 ppm groups (9- and 14-fold increase over controls). These results demonstrate that (1) low levels of HCHO (0.7 and 2 ppm) do not increase cell proliferation in rat nasal respiratory epithelium; (2) 6 ppm HCHO induces transient increases in cell proliferation; and (3) clearly carcinogenic concentrations of HCHO (10 and 15 ppm) cause sustained elevations in cell proliferation which may play an important role in HCHO-induced carcinogenesis

  16. A new approach to modeling of selected human respiratory system diseases, directed to computer simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redlarski, Grzegorz; Jaworski, Jacek

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents a new versatile approach to model severe human respiratory diseases via computer simulation. The proposed approach enables one to predict the time histories of various diseases via information accessible in medical publications. This knowledge is useful to bioengineers involved in the design and construction of medical devices that are employed for monitoring of respiratory condition. The approach provides the data that are crucial for testing diagnostic systems. This can be achieved without the necessity of probing the physiological details of the respiratory system as well as without identification of parameters that are based on measurement data. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of hypothyroidism on the respiratory system and control of breathing: Human studies and animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenker, Evelyn H

    2012-04-30

    Hypothyroidism, subclinical hypothyroidism and euthyroid sick syndrome, are prevalent disorders that affect all body systems including the respiratory system and control of breathing. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the regulation of thyroid hormone production and their function at the cellular level; the many causes of hypothyroidism; the effects of hypothyroidism on the respiratory system and on control of ventilation in hypothyroid patients; the variety of ways animal models of hypothyroidism are induced; and how in animal models hypothyroidism affects the respiratory system and control of breathing including neurotransmitters that influence breathing. Finally, this review will present controversies that exist in the field and thus encourage new research directions. Because of the high prevalence of hypothyroidism and subclinical forms of hypothyroidism and their influence on ventilation and the respiratory system, understanding underlying molecular mechanisms is necessary to ascertain how and sometimes why not thyroid replacement may normalize function. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Equation Discovery for Model Identification in Respiratory Mechanics of the Mechanically Ventilated Human Lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganzert, Steven; Guttmann, Josef; Steinmann, Daniel; Kramer, Stefan

    Lung protective ventilation strategies reduce the risk of ventilator associated lung injury. To develop such strategies, knowledge about mechanical properties of the mechanically ventilated human lung is essential. This study was designed to develop an equation discovery system to identify mathematical models of the respiratory system in time-series data obtained from mechanically ventilated patients. Two techniques were combined: (i) the usage of declarative bias to reduce search space complexity and inherently providing the processing of background knowledge. (ii) A newly developed heuristic for traversing the hypothesis space with a greedy, randomized strategy analogical to the GSAT algorithm. In 96.8% of all runs the applied equation discovery system was capable to detect the well-established equation of motion model of the respiratory system in the provided data. We see the potential of this semi-automatic approach to detect more complex mathematical descriptions of the respiratory system from respiratory data.

  19. Assessment of blood gas analysis results and degree of infection in children with severe pneumonia and respiratory failure after NCPAP therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Luo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the blood gas analysis results and degree of infection in children with severe pneumonia and respiratory failure after NCPAP therapy. Methods: A total of 60 cases of children with severe pneumonia and respiratory failure who were treated in our hospital from August 2013 to August 2015 were included in the study and randomly divided into observation group and control group (n=30. Control group received routine anti-infection and oxygen inhalation by nasal tube, observation group received additional NCPAP therapy, and then differences in values of blood gas and oxygen metabolism indexes, resting pulmonary function, respiratory mechanics indexes and serum infection-related parameters were compared between two groups. Results: After observation group received NCPAP therapy, PaO2, PH, CaO2, DO2 and SaO2 values were higher than those of control group while PaCO2 and VO2 values were lower than those of control group; VC%, FVC%, FEV1%, PEF%, MMEF% and MVV% values were higher than those of control group; respiratory mechanics parameters PIP, PP, Pm, VE and R values were lower than those of control group; serum CHE and PA values were higher than those of control group while sTREM-1 and HMGB-1 values were lower than those of control group. Conclusion: NCPAP therapy can significantly optimize the respiratory function and promote the recovery from infection in children with severe pneumonia and respiratory failure, and it has positive clinical significance.

  20. A semi-Markov chain approach to modeling respiratory patterns prior to extubation in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onu, Charles C; Kanbar, Lara J; Shalish, Wissam; Brown, Karen A; Sant'Anna, Guilherme M; Kearney, Robert E; Precup, Doina

    2017-07-01

    After birth, extremely preterm infants often require specialized respiratory management in the form of invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV). Protracted IMV is associated with detrimental outcomes and morbidities. Premature extubation, on the other hand, would necessitate reintubation which is risky, technically challenging and could further lead to lung injury or disease. We present an approach to modeling respiratory patterns of infants who succeeded extubation and those who required reintubation which relies on Markov models. We compare the use of traditional Markov chains to semi-Markov models which emphasize cross-pattern transitions and timing information, and to multi-chain Markov models which can concisely represent non-stationarity in respiratory behavior over time. The models we developed expose specific, unique similarities as well as vital differences between the two populations.

  1. Regional intratidal gas distribution in acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome assessed by electric impedance tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowhagen, K; Lundin, S; Stenqvist, O

    2010-12-01

    Regional tidal volume distribution and end-expiratory lung volume (EELV) distribution in patients with acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI, ARDS) have previously been investigated using computed tomograpy and electric impedance tomography (EIT). In the present study, we utilized the high temporal resolution of EIT to assess intratidal gas distribution. Sixteen ventilator patients with ALI/ARDS were studied. EIT was used for analysis of intertidal, intratidal and EELV regional distribution. Intratidal regional gas distribution (ITV) was analyzed by dividing the regional tidal impedance signal into eight iso-volume parts. Alveolar pressure/volume curves during ongoing ventilation and volume-dependent compliance during the initial inspiration (Cini) were calculated. A low-pressure (~32 cm H2O) recruitment maneuver and a decremental PEEPtrial were implemented. The increase in EELV was preferentially distributed to non-dependent lung regions. The intratidal gas distribution pattern was similar to the tidal volume distribution following increased PEEP; non-dependent distribution decreased and dependent distribution increased during inspiration. Cini increased, indicating successful recruitment. The distribution varied widely among individual patients. In one patient with a low EELV, the ITV pattern showed that non-dependent distribution increased and dependent distribution decreased. This coincided with minimal improvement in volume-dependent compliance. This patient probably needed higher recruitment pressure. In one patient with a high baseline EELV, there was very little change in regional ITV, and non-dependent Cini decreased. This was probably a patient with low potential recruitability, who required only moderate PEEP. On-line intratidal gas distribution monitoring offers additional information on recruitability and optimal PEEP.

  2. A finite state model for respiratory motion analysis in image guided radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Huanmei; Sharp, Gregory C; Salzberg, Betty; Kaeli, David; Shirato, Hiroki; Jiang, Steve B

    2004-01-01

    Effective image guided radiation treatment of a moving tumour requires adequate information on respiratory motion characteristics. For margin expansion, beam tracking and respiratory gating, the tumour motion must be quantified for pretreatment planning and monitored on-line. We propose a finite state model for respiratory motion analysis that captures our natural understanding of breathing stages. In this model, a regular breathing cycle is represented by three line segments, exhale, end-of-exhale and inhale, while abnormal breathing is represented by an irregular breathing state. In addition, we describe an on-line implementation of this model in one dimension. We found this model can accurately characterize a wide variety of patient breathing patterns. This model was used to describe the respiratory motion for 23 patients with peak-to-peak motion greater than 7 mm. The average root mean square error over all patients was less than 1 mm and no patient has an error worse than 1.5 mm. Our model provides a convenient tool to quantify respiratory motion characteristics, such as patterns of frequency changes and amplitude changes, and can be applied to internal or external motion, including internal tumour position, abdominal surface, diaphragm, spirometry and other surrogates

  3. A finite state model for respiratory motion analysis in image guided radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Huanmei [College of Computer and Information Science, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Sharp, Gregory C [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Salzberg, Betty [College of Computer and Information Science, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Kaeli, David [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Shirato, Hiroki [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Jiang, Steve B [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)

    2004-12-07

    Effective image guided radiation treatment of a moving tumour requires adequate information on respiratory motion characteristics. For margin expansion, beam tracking and respiratory gating, the tumour motion must be quantified for pretreatment planning and monitored on-line. We propose a finite state model for respiratory motion analysis that captures our natural understanding of breathing stages. In this model, a regular breathing cycle is represented by three line segments, exhale, end-of-exhale and inhale, while abnormal breathing is represented by an irregular breathing state. In addition, we describe an on-line implementation of this model in one dimension. We found this model can accurately characterize a wide variety of patient breathing patterns. This model was used to describe the respiratory motion for 23 patients with peak-to-peak motion greater than 7 mm. The average root mean square error over all patients was less than 1 mm and no patient has an error worse than 1.5 mm. Our model provides a convenient tool to quantify respiratory motion characteristics, such as patterns of frequency changes and amplitude changes, and can be applied to internal or external motion, including internal tumour position, abdominal surface, diaphragm, spirometry and other surrogates.

  4. Modelling fission gas release at high burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loesoenen, Pekka

    1999-01-01

    High burn-up phenomena in LWR/HWR UO 2 fuel pellets important for fission gas release were modelled. The degradation of the thermal conductivity of UO 2 was accounted for 1) with a burnup -dependent factor in the phonon term of the corresponding equation and 2) with a correlation describing the increase in the porosity at the pellet rim as a function of local burnup and radial position. The model was tested against IFA-432 and IFA-429 data. It was found out that the degradation of the thermal conductivity in the phonon term is perhaps not a function of the local burnup only, but the irradiation temperature may play an important role, too. The burnup as a function of the pellet radius has to be known to determine the local thermal conductivity. A model for this was picked up from the literature, but a new estimation of a few empirical fitting parameters was performed with hundreds of data points from the OECD/NEA data base and from the literature. The model predicts reliably the radial burnup profile and the fission gas generation across the pellet in typical LWR and HWR fuels. The thermal release and the athermal release from the pellet rim were modelled separately. The model for the rim release is a function of the temperature history and the local burnup. The rim release and the thermal release can occur at the same radial position of the pellets simultaneously, which is accounted for in the calculation of the total release. The model for the rim release in in agreement with the latest experimental findings, but the tuning of the model parameters is yet to be done. However, the fraction of the rim structured fuel and the excessive porosity in the rim structure in isothermal irradiation as a function of the burnup was predicted by using typical model parameters (author) (ml)

  5. Modeling of respiratory system dysfunction among nuclear workers: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaeva, Z D; Osovets, S V; Scott, B R; Zhuntova, G V; Grigoryeva, E S

    2008-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported on cancers among Mayak Production Association (PA) nuclear workers. Other studies have reported on serious deterministic effects of large radiation doses for the same population. This study relates to deterministic effects (respiratory system dysfunction) in Mayak workers after relatively small chronic radiation doses (alpha plus gamma). Because cigarette smoke is a confounding factor, we also account for smoking effects. Here we present a new empirical mathematical model that was introduced for simultaneous assessment of radiation and cigarette-smoking-related damage to the respiratory system. The model incorporates absolute thresholds for smoking- and radiation-induced respiratory system dysfunction. As the alpha radiation dose to the lung increased from 0 to 4.36 Gy, respiratory function indices studied decreased, although remaining in the normal range. The data were consistent with the view that alpha radiation doses to the lung above a relatively small threshold (0.15 to 0.39 Gy) cause some respiratory system dysfunction. Respiratory function indices were not found to be influenced by total-body gamma radiation doses in the range 0-3.8 Gy when delivered at low rates over years. However, significant decreases in airway conductance were found to be associated with cigarette smoking. Whether the indicated cigarette smoking and alpha radiation associated dysfunction is debilitating is unclear.

  6. Patient specific respiratory motion modeling using a limited number of 3D lung CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xueli; Gao, Xin; Xia, Wei; Liu, Yangchuan; Liang, Zhiyuan

    2014-01-01

    To build a patient specific respiratory motion model with a low dose, a novel method was proposed that uses a limited number of 3D lung CT volumes with an external respiratory signal. 4D lung CT volumes were acquired for patients with in vitro labeling on the upper abdominal surface. Meanwhile, 3D coordinates of in vitro labeling were measured as external respiratory signals. A sequential correspondence between the 4D lung CT and the external respiratory signal was built using the distance correlation method, and a 3D displacement for every registration control point in the CT volumes with respect to time can be obtained by the 4D lung CT deformable registration. A temporal fitting was performed for every registration control point displacements and an external respiratory signal in the anterior-posterior direction respectively to draw their fitting curves. Finally, a linear regression was used to fit the corresponding samples of the control point displacement fitting curves and the external respiratory signal fitting curve to finish the pulmonary respiration modeling. Compared to a B-spline-based method using the respiratory signal phase, the proposed method is highly advantageous as it offers comparable modeling accuracy and target modeling error (TME); while at the same time, the proposed method requires 70% less 3D lung CTs. When using a similar amount of 3D lung CT data, the mean of the proposed method's TME is smaller than the mean of the PCA (principle component analysis)-based methods' TMEs. The results indicate that the proposed method is successful in striking a balance between modeling accuracy and number of 3D lung CT volumes.

  7. Modelling and Simulation of Gas Engines Using Aspen HYSYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Ekwonu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper gas engine model was developed in Aspen HYSYS V7.3 and validated with Waukesha 16V275GL+ gas engine. Fuel flexibility, fuel types and part load performance of the gas engine were investigated. The design variability revealed that the gas engine can operate on poor fuel with low lower heating value (LHV such as landfill gas, sewage gas and biogas with biogas offering potential integration with bottoming cycles when compared to natural gas. The result of the gas engine simulation gave an efficiency 40.7% and power output of 3592kW.

  8. Mathematical analysis of intermittent gas injection model in oil production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasmi, Silvya, D. R.; Pudjo, S.; Leksono, M.; Edy, S.

    2016-02-01

    Intermittent gas injection is a method to help oil production process. Gas is injected through choke in surface and then gas into tubing. Gas forms three areas in tubing: gas column area, film area and slug area. Gas column is used to propel slug area until surface. A mathematical model of intermittent gas injection is developed in gas column area, film area and slug area. Model is expanding based on mass and momentum conservation. Using assume film thickness constant in tubing, model has been developed by Tasmi et. al. [14]. Model consists of 10 ordinary differential equations. In this paper, assumption of pressure in gas column is uniform. Model consist of 9 ordinary differential equations. Connection of several variables can be obtained from this model. Therefore, dynamics of all variables that affect to intermittent gas lift process can be seen from four equations. To study the behavior of variables can be analyzed numerically and mathematically. In this paper, simple mathematically analysis approach is used to study behavior of the variables. Variables that affect to intermittent gas injection are pressure in upstream valve and in gas column. Pressure in upstream valve will decrease when gas mass in valve greater than gas mass in choke. Dynamic of the pressure in the gas column will decrease and increase depending on pressure in upstream valve.

  9. Validation of statistical models for estimating hospitalization associated with influenza and other respiratory viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Reliable estimates of disease burden associated with respiratory viruses are keys to deployment of preventive strategies such as vaccination and resource allocation. Such estimates are particularly needed in tropical and subtropical regions where some methods commonly used in temperate regions are not applicable. While a number of alternative approaches to assess the influenza associated disease burden have been recently reported, none of these models have been validated with virologically confirmed data. Even fewer methods have been developed for other common respiratory viruses such as respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, parainfluenza and adenovirus. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We had recently conducted a prospective population-based study of virologically confirmed hospitalization for acute respiratory illnesses in persons <18 years residing in Hong Kong Island. Here we used this dataset to validate two commonly used models for estimation of influenza disease burden, namely the rate difference model and Poisson regression model, and also explored the applicability of these models to estimate the disease burden of other respiratory viruses. The Poisson regression models with different link functions all yielded estimates well correlated with the virologically confirmed influenza associated hospitalization, especially in children older than two years. The disease burden estimates for RSV, parainfluenza and adenovirus were less reliable with wide confidence intervals. The rate difference model was not applicable to RSV, parainfluenza and adenovirus and grossly underestimated the true burden of influenza associated hospitalization. CONCLUSION: The Poisson regression model generally produced satisfactory estimates in calculating the disease burden of respiratory viruses in a subtropical region such as Hong Kong.

  10. Quantifying lung morphology with respiratory-gated micro-CT in a murine model of emphysema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, N. L.; Martin, E. L.; Lewis, J. F.; Veldhuizen, R. A. W.; Holdsworth, D. W.; Drangova, M.

    2009-04-01

    Non-invasive micro-CT imaging techniques have been developed to investigate lung structure in free-breathing rodents. In this study, we investigate the utility of retrospectively respiratory-gated micro-CT imaging in an emphysema model to determine if anatomical changes could be observed in the image-derived quantitative analysis at two respiratory phases. The emphysema model chosen was a well-characterized, genetically altered model (TIMP-3 knockout mice) that exhibits a homogeneous phenotype. Micro-CT scans of the free-breathing, anaesthetized mice were obtained in 50 s and retrospectively respiratory sorted and reconstructed, providing 3D images representing peak inspiration and end expiration with 0.15 mm isotropic voxel spacing. Anatomical measurements included the volume and CT density of the lungs and the volume of the major airways, along with the diameters of the trachea, left bronchus and right bronchus. From these measurements, functional parameters such as functional residual capacity and tidal volume were calculated. Significant differences between the wild-type and TIMP-3 knockout groups were observed for measurements of CT density over the entire lung, indicating increased air content in the lungs of TIMP-3 knockout mice. These results demonstrate retrospective respiratory-gated micro-CT, providing images at multiple respiratory phases that can be analyzed quantitatively to investigate anatomical changes in murine models of emphysema.

  11. Visualisation of time-varying respiratory system elastance in experimental ARDS animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Drunen, Erwin J; Chiew, Yeong Shiong; Pretty, Christopher; Shaw, Geoffrey M; Lambermont, Bernard; Janssen, Nathalie; Chase, J Geoffrey; Desaive, Thomas

    2014-03-02

    Patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) risk lung collapse, severely altering the breath-to-breath respiratory mechanics. Model-based estimation of respiratory mechanics characterising patient-specific condition and response to treatment may be used to guide mechanical ventilation (MV). This study presents a model-based approach to monitor time-varying patient-ventilator interaction to guide positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) selection. The single compartment lung model was extended to monitor dynamic time-varying respiratory system elastance, Edrs, within each breathing cycle. Two separate animal models were considered, each consisting of three fully sedated pure pietrain piglets (oleic acid ARDS and lavage ARDS). A staircase recruitment manoeuvre was performed on all six subjects after ARDS was induced. The Edrs was mapped across each breathing cycle for each subject. Six time-varying, breath-specific Edrs maps were generated, one for each subject. Each Edrs map shows the subject-specific response to mechanical ventilation (MV), indicating the need for a model-based approach to guide MV. This method of visualisation provides high resolution insight into the time-varying respiratory mechanics to aid clinical decision making. Using the Edrs maps, minimal time-varying elastance was identified, which can be used to select optimal PEEP. Real-time continuous monitoring of in-breath mechanics provides further insight into lung physiology. Therefore, there is potential for this new monitoring method to aid clinicians in guiding MV treatment. These are the first such maps generated and they thus show unique results in high resolution. The model is limited to a constant respiratory resistance throughout inspiration which may not be valid in some cases. However, trends match clinical expectation and the results highlight both the subject-specificity of the model, as well as significant inter-subject variability.

  12. Evaluation of two different respiratory physiotherapy methods after thoracoscopy with regard to arterial blood gas, respiratory function test, number of days until discharge, cost analysis, comfort and pain control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunay, S; Eser, I; Ozbey, M; Agar, M; Koruk, I; Kurkcuoglu, I C

    2016-01-01

    Although the methods used in thoracic surgery have been developing rapidly over the last five decades, postoperative pulmonary complications are seen in this field more than in other surgical branches. We aimed at comparing the acute effects of incentive spirometry (IS) and breathing retraining exercises by a respiratory physiotherapist or experienced physiotherapist. Patients were randomized into two groups as spirometry and physiotherapist. Combined respiratory exercises were implemented through IS inspirometry group and by a physiotherapist in physiotherapist group. Blood gas, respiratory function tests, survey results of the Burford pain thermometer, discharge days, and cost analyses of both groups were examined just before the beginning of physiotherapy and on the 3rd day of therapy. There were no statistical difference in first and last values of pH and PCO2and also there were no difference between groups (P > 0.05). Forced expiratory volume one second (FEV1) values are statistically increased compared to basal levels in both groups and mean difference in FEV1values was statistically increased in physiotherapist group compared to spirometry group (P 0.05). Cost analysis was not statistically different, mean hospitalization day and mean pain score were statistically decreased in physiotherapist group. Based on the outcome of this study, respiratory physiotherapy methods carried out by a respiratory physiotherapist are more effective in acute cardiothoracic conditions after thoracotomy compared to IS by patients.

  13. Modeling greenhouse gas emissions from dairy farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotz, C Alan

    2017-11-15

    Dairy farms have been identified as an important source of greenhouse gas emissions. Within the farm, important emissions include enteric CH 4 from the animals, CH 4 and N 2 O from manure in housing facilities during long-term storage and during field application, and N 2 O from nitrification and denitrification processes in the soil used to produce feed crops and pasture. Models using a wide range in level of detail have been developed to represent or predict these emissions. They include constant emission factors, variable process-related emission factors, empirical or statistical models, mechanistic process simulations, and life cycle assessment. To fully represent farm emissions, models representing the various emission sources must be integrated to capture the combined effects and interactions of all important components. Farm models have been developed using relationships across the full scale of detail, from constant emission factors to detailed mechanistic simulations. Simpler models, based upon emission factors and empirical relationships, tend to provide better tools for decision support, whereas more complex farm simulations provide better tools for research and education. To look beyond the farm boundaries, life cycle assessment provides an environmental accounting tool for quantifying and evaluating emissions over the full cycle, from producing the resources used on the farm through processing, distribution, consumption, and waste handling of the milk and dairy products produced. Models are useful for improving our understanding of farm processes and their interacting effects on greenhouse gas emissions. Through better understanding, they assist in the development and evaluation of mitigation strategies for reducing emissions and improving overall sustainability of dairy farms. The Authors. Published by the Federation of Animal Science Societies and Elsevier Inc. on behalf of the American Dairy Science Association®. This is an open access article

  14. Physiorack: an integrated MRI safe/conditional, gas delivery, respiratory gating, and subject monitoring solution for structural and functional assessments of pulmonary function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halaweish, Ahmed F; Charles, H Cecil

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the use of a modular MRI conditional respiratory monitoring and gating solution, designed to facilitate proper monitoring of subjects' vital signals and their respiratory efforts, during free-breathing and breathheld 19F, oxygen-enhanced, and Fourier-decomposition MRI-based acquisitions. All Imaging was performed on a Siemens TIM Trio 3 Tesla MRI scanner, following Institutional Review Board approval. Gas delivery is accomplished through the use of an MR compatible pneumotachometer, in conjunction with two three-way pneumatically controlled Hans Rudolph Valves. The pneumatic valves are connected to Douglas bags used as the gas source. A mouthpiece (+nose clip) or an oro-nasal Hans Rudolph disposable mask is connected following the pneumatic valve to minimize dead-space and provide an airtight seal. Continuous monitoring/sampling of inspiratory and expiratory oxygen and carbon dioxide levels at the mouthpiece/mask is achieved through the use of an Oxigraf gas analyzer. Forty-four imaging sessions were successfully monitored, during Fourier-decomposition (n=3), fluorine-enhanced (n=29), oxygen-enhanced, and ultra short echo (n=12) acquisitions. The collected waveforms, facilitated proper monitoring and coaching of the subjects. We demonstrate an inexpensive, off-the-shelf solution for monitoring these signals, facilitating assessments of lung function. Monitoring of respiratory efforts and exhaled gas concentrations assists in understanding the heterogeneity of lung function visualized by gas imaging. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Variability in respiratory rhythm generation: In vitro and in silico models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fietkiewicz, Christopher; Shafer, Geoffrey O.; Platt, Ethan A.; Wilson, Christopher G.

    2016-03-01

    The variability inherent in physiological rhythms is disruptive in extremis (too great or too little) but may also serve a functional and important role in homeostatic systems. Here we focus on the neural control of respiration which is critical for survival in many animals. The overall respiratory control system is comprised of multiple nuclei, each of which may have different contributions to rhythm variability. We focused on the pre-Bötzinger complex (preBötC) which is unique in that it can be studied in vitro as an isolated nucleus with autorhythmic behavior. The in vitro results show a bounded range of variability in which the upper and lower limits are functions of the respiratory rate. In addition, the correlation between variability and respiratory rate changes during development. We observed a weaker correlation in younger animals (0-3 days old) as compared to older animals (4-5 days old). Based on experimental observations, we developed a computational model that can be embedded in more comprehensive models of respiratory and cardiovascular autonomic control. Our simulation results successfully reproduce the variability we observed experimentally. The in silico model suggests that age-dependent variability may be due to a developmental increase in mean synaptic conductance between preBötC neurons. We also used simulations to explore the effects of stochastic spiking in sensory relay neurons. Our results suggest that stochastic spiking may actually stabilize modulation of both respiratory rate and its variability when the rate changes due to physiological demand.

  16. Noninvasive evaluation of respiratory muscles in pre-clinical model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela M. Oliveira

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Since respiratory insufficiency is the main cause of death in patients affected by Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD, the present study aims at establishing a new non-invasive method to evaluate the clinical parameters of respiratory conditions of experimental models affected by DMD. With this purpose in mind, we evaluated the cardiorespiratory clinical conditions, the changes in the intercostal muscles, the diaphragmatic mobility, and the respiratory cycles in Golden Retriever Muscular Dystrophy (GRMD employing ultrasonography (US. A control group consisting of dogs of the same race, but not affected by muscular dystrophy, were used in this study. The results showed that inspiration, expiration and plateau movements (diaphragm mobility were lower in the affected group. Plateau phase in the affected group was practically non-existent and showed that the diaphragm remained in constant motion. Respiratory rate reached 15.5 per minute for affected group and 26.93 per minute for the control group. Expiration and inspiration movements of intercostal muscles reached 8.99mm and 8.79mm, respectively, for control group and 7.42mm and 7.40mm, respectively, for affected group. Methodology used in the present analysis proved to be viable for the follow-up and evaluation of the respiratory model in GRMD and may be adapted to other muscular dystrophy experimental models.

  17. [Extracorporeal gas exchange--an alternative to ventilation of the premature newborn infant with respiratory insufficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, S; Dudenhausen, J W; Langner, K; Laiblin, C; Saling, E

    1984-01-01

    In spite of improvements in its prophylaxis and therapy the membrane syndrome is still one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality in newborns. In many perinatal centers in the United States extracorporeal gas exchange via an artificial lung is the ultimate step in therapy for this group of patients today. As a result of our own research work we are able to introduce an extracorporeal circulation system which is especially suited to the particular situation of the immature newborn and which enables a complete immobilization of the lung to avoid baro-trauma with alveolar oxygen diffusion and CO2-removal through the membrane lung. Using appropriate dimensions the system can be housed in a newborn incubator. With low total resistance the perfusion in the newborn is performed via an arterio-venous shunt of the umbilical vessels alternatively with and without a mechanical pump. We tested this perfusion system on premature lambs with a gestational age of 128 to 130 days. During a test period of from 6 to 8 hours at a low blood flow rate (200 ml/min) we achieved a sufficient CO2-removal via the membrane lung with enough oxygen supply through the non-ventilated lung. By means of suitable materials, and using CO2 gas priming procedure and employing prostacyclin analogons to inhibit thrombocyte aggregation, it was possible to lower the heparine dosage to a minimum.

  18. High-throughput gene expression analysis in pigs as model for respiratory infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Kerstin; Brogaard, Louise; Schou, Kirstine Klitgaard

    for disease and inflammation. Pigs are fully susceptible to human influenza, and have been demonstrated to be involved in influenza evolution and ecology. Pigs share many similarities with humans regarding lung physiology and innate immune cell infiltration of the respiratory system and thus seem...... to be an obvious large animal model for respiratory infections. This study aimed at providing a better understanding of the involvement of circulating non-coding RNA and innate immune factors in porcine blood leukocytes during influenza virus infection. By employing the pig as a model we were able to perform...

  19. The Respiratory Impedance in an Asymmetric Model of the Lung Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin De Keyser

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a model of the respiratory tree as a recurrent, but asymmetric, structure. The intrinsic properties posed by such a system lead to a multi-fractal structure, i.e. a non-integer order model of the total impedance. The fractional order behavior of the asymmetric tree simulated as a dynamic system is assessed by means of Bode plots, on a wide range of frequencies. The results indicate than in a specific frequency range, both the symmetric
    and asymmetric representation of the respiratory tree lead to similar values in the impedance.

  20. Inverse Modeling of Respiratory System during Noninvasive Ventilation by Maximum Likelihood Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Saatci

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a procedure to estimate the model parameters of presented nonlinear Resistance-Capacitance (RC and the widely used linear Resistance-Inductance-Capacitance (RIC models of the respiratory system by Maximum Likelihood Estimator (MLE. The measurement noise is assumed to be Generalized Gaussian Distributed (GGD, and the variance and the shape factor of the measurement noise are estimated by MLE and Kurtosis method, respectively. The performance of the MLE algorithm is also demonstrated by the Cramer-Rao Lower Bound (CRLB with artificially produced respiratory signals. Airway flow, mask pressure, and lung volume are measured from patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD under the noninvasive ventilation and from healthy subjects. Simulations show that respiratory signals from healthy subjects are better represented by the RIC model compared to the nonlinear RC model. On the other hand, the Patient group respiratory signals are fitted to the nonlinear RC model with lower measurement noise variance, better converged measurement noise shape factor, and model parameter tracks. Also, it is observed that for the Patient group the shape factor of the measurement noise converges to values between 1 and 2 whereas for the Control group shape factor values are estimated in the super-Gaussian area.

  1. Modeling of greenhouse gas emission from livestock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjo eJose

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects of climate change on humans and other living ecosystems is an area of on-going research. The ruminant livestock sector is considered to be one of the most significant contributors to the existing greenhouse gas (GHG pool. However the there are opportunities to combat climate change by reducing the emission of GHGs from ruminants. Methane (CH4 and nitrous oxide (N2O are emitted by ruminants via anaerobic digestion of organic matter in the rumen and manure, and by denitrification and nitrification processes which occur in manure. The quantification of these emissions by experimental methods is difficult and takes considerable time for analysis of the implications of the outputs from empirical studies, and for adaptation and mitigation strategies to be developed. To overcome these problems computer simulation models offer substantial scope for predicting GHG emissions. These models often include all farm activities while accurately predicting the GHG emissions including both direct as well as indirect sources. The models are fast and efficient in predicting emissions and provide valuable information on implementing the appropriate GHG mitigation strategies on farms. Further, these models help in testing the efficacy of various mitigation strategies that are employed to reduce GHG emissions. These models can be used to determine future adaptation and mitigation strategies, to reduce GHG emissions thereby combating livestock induced climate change.

  2. Respiratory nanoparticle-based vaccines and challenges associated with animal models and translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renukaradhya, Gourapura J; Narasimhan, Balaji; Mallapragada, Surya K

    2015-12-10

    Vaccine development has had a huge impact on human health. However, there is a significant need to develop efficacious vaccines for several existing as well as emerging respiratory infectious diseases. Several challenges need to be overcome to develop efficacious vaccines with translational potential. This review focuses on two aspects to overcome some barriers - 1) the development of nanoparticle-based vaccines, and 2) the choice of suitable animal models for respiratory infectious diseases that will allow for translation. Nanoparticle-based vaccines, including subunit vaccines involving synthetic and/or natural polymeric adjuvants and carriers, as well as those based on virus-like particles offer several key advantages to help overcome the barriers to effective vaccine development. These include the ability to deliver combinations of antigens, target the vaccine formulation to specific immune cells, enable cross-protection against divergent strains, act as adjuvants or immunomodulators, allow for sustained release of antigen, enable single dose delivery, and potentially obviate the cold chain. While mouse models have provided several important insights into the mechanisms of infectious diseases, they are often a limiting step in translation of new vaccines to the clinic. An overview of different animal models involved in vaccine research for respiratory infections, with advantages and disadvantages of each model, is discussed. Taken together, advances in nanotechnology, combined with the right animal models for evaluating vaccine efficacy, has the potential to revolutionize vaccine development for respiratory infections. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. 4D motion models over the respiratory cycle for use in lung cancer radiotherapy planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, J. R.; Chandler, A. G.; Blackall, J. M.; Ahmad, S.; Landau, D. B.; Hawkes, D. J.

    2005-04-01

    Respiratory motion causes problems of tumour localisation in radiotherapy treatment planning for lung cancer patients. We have developed a novel method of building patient specific motion models, which model the movement and non-rigid deformation of a lung tumour and surrounding lung tissue over the respiratory cycle. Free-breathing (FB) CT scans are acquired in cine mode, using 3 couch positions to acquire contiguous 'slabs' of 16 slices covering the region of interest. For each slab, 20 FB volumes are acquired over approx 20s. A reference volume acquired at Breath Hold (BH) and covering the whole lung, is non-rigidly registered to each of the FB volumes. The FB volumes are assigned a position in the respiratory cycle (PRC) calculated from the displacement of the chest wall. A motion model is then constructed for each slab, by fitting functions that temporally interpolate the registration results over the respiratory cycle. This can produce a prediction of the lung and tumour within the slab at any arbitrary PRC. The predictions for each of the slabs are then combined to produce a volume covering the whole region of interest. Results indicate that the motion modelling method shows considerable promise, offering significant improvement over current clinical practice, and potential advantages over alternative 4D CT imaging techniques. Using this framework, we examined and evaluated several different functions for performing the temporal interpolation. We believe the results of these comparisons will aid future model building for this and other applications.

  4. A modeling of buoyant gas plume migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silin, D.; Patzek, T.; Benson, S.M.

    2008-12-01

    This work is motivated by the growing interest in injecting carbon dioxide into deep geological formations as a means of avoiding its atmospheric emissions and consequent global warming. Ideally, the injected greenhouse gas stays in the injection zone for a geologic time, eventually dissolves in the formation brine and remains trapped by mineralization. However, one of the potential problems associated with the geologic method of sequestration is that naturally present or inadvertently created conduits in the cap rock may result in a gas leakage from primary storage. Even in a supercritical state, the carbon dioxide viscosity and density are lower than those of the formation brine. Buoyancy tends to drive the leaked CO{sub 2} plume upward. Theoretical and experimental studies of buoyancy-driven supercritical CO{sub 2} flow, including estimation of time scales associated with plume evolution and migration, are critical for developing technology, monitoring policy, and regulations for safe carbon dioxide geologic sequestration. In this study, we obtain simple estimates of vertical plume propagation velocity taking into account the density and viscosity contrast between CO{sub 2} and brine. We describe buoyancy-driven countercurrent flow of two immiscible phases by a Buckley-Leverett type model. The model predicts that a plume of supercritical carbon dioxide in a homogeneous water-saturated porous medium does not migrate upward like a bubble in bulk water. Rather, it spreads upward until it reaches a seal or until it becomes immobile. A simple formula requiring no complex numerical calculations describes the velocity of plume propagation. This solution is a simplification of a more comprehensive theory of countercurrent plume migration (Silin et al., 2007). In a layered reservoir, the simplified solution predicts a slower plume front propagation relative to a homogeneous formation with the same harmonic mean permeability. In contrast, the model yields much higher

  5. A novel swine model of ricin-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahaf Katalan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary exposure to the plant toxin ricin leads to respiratory insufficiency and death. To date, in-depth study of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS following pulmonary exposure to toxins is hampered by the lack of an appropriate animal model. To this end, we established the pig as a large animal model for the comprehensive study of the multifarious clinical manifestations of pulmonary ricinosis. Here, we report for the first time, the monitoring of barometric whole body plethysmography for pulmonary function tests in non-anesthetized ricin-treated pigs. Up to 30 h post-exposure, as a result of progressing hypoxemia and to prevent carbon dioxide retention, animals exhibited a compensatory response of elevation in minute volume, attributed mainly to a large elevation in respiratory rate with minimal response in tidal volume. This response was followed by decompensation, manifested by a decrease in minute volume and severe hypoxemia, refractory to oxygen treatment. Radiological evaluation revealed evidence of early diffuse bilateral pulmonary infiltrates while hemodynamic parameters remained unchanged, excluding cardiac failure as an explanation for respiratory insufficiency. Ricin-intoxicated pigs suffered from increased lung permeability accompanied by cytokine storming. Histological studies revealed lung tissue insults that accumulated over time and led to diffuse alveolar damage. Charting the decline in PaO2/FiO2 ratio in a mechanically ventilated pig confirmed that ricin-induced respiratory damage complies with the accepted diagnostic criteria for ARDS. The establishment of this animal model of pulmonary ricinosis should help in the pursuit of efficient medical countermeasures specifically tailored to deal with the respiratory deficiencies stemming from ricin-induced ARDS.

  6. The effect of discontinuous gas exchange on respiratory water loss in grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae) varies across an aridity gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shu-Ping; Talal, Stav; Ayali, Amir; Gefen, Eran

    2015-08-01

    The significance of discontinuous gas-exchange cycles (DGC) in reducing respiratory water loss (RWL) in insects is contentious. Results from single-species studies are equivocal in their support of the classic 'hygric hypothesis' for the evolution of DGC, whereas comparative analyses generally support a link between DGC and water balance. In this study, we investigated DGC prevalence and characteristics and RWL in three grasshopper species (Acrididae, subfamily Pamphaginae) across an aridity gradient in Israel. In order to determine whether DGC contributes to a reduction in RWL, we compared the DGC characteristics and RWL associated with CO2 release (transpiration ratio, i.e. the molar ratio of RWL to CO2 emission rates) among these species. Transpiration ratios of DGC and continuous breathers were also compared intraspecifically. Our data show that DGC characteristics, DGC prevalence and the transpiration ratios correlate well with habitat aridity. The xeric-adapted Tmethis pulchripennis exhibited a significantly shorter burst period and lower transpiration ratio compared with the other two mesic species, Ocneropsis bethlemita and Ocneropsis lividipes. However, DGC resulted in significant water savings compared with continuous exchange in T. pulchripennis only. These unique DGC characteristics for T. pulchripennis were correlated with its significantly higher mass-specific tracheal volume. Our data suggest that the origin of DGC may not be adaptive, but rather that evolved modulation of cycle characteristics confers a fitness advantage under stressful conditions. This modulation may result from morphological and/or physiological modifications. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. Gas analyzer’s drift leads to systematic error in maximal oxygen uptake and maximal respiratory exchange ratio determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibai eGarcia-Tabar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to examine the drift in the measurements of fractional concentration of oxygen (FO2 and carbon dioxide (FCO2 of a Nafion-using metabolic cart during incremental maximal exercise in 18 young and 12 elderly males, and to propose a way in which the drift can be corrected. The drift was verified by comparing the pre-test calibration values with the immediate post-test verification values of the calibration gases. The system demonstrated an average downscale drift (P < 0.001 in FO2 and FCO2 of -0.18% and -0.05%, respectively. Compared with measured values, corrected average maximal oxygen uptake values were 5-6% lower (P < 0.001 whereas corrected maximal respiratory exchange ratio values were 8-9% higher (P < 0.001. The drift was not due to an electronic instability in the analyzers because it was reverted after 20 minutes of recovery from the end of the exercise. The drift may be related to an incomplete removal of water vapor from the expired gas during transit through the Nafion conducting tube. These data demonstrate the importance of checking FO2 and FCO2 values by regular pre-test calibrations and post-test verifications, and also the importance of correcting a possible shift immediately after exercise.

  8. Population pharmacodynamic modeling and simulation of the respiratory effect of acetazolamide in decompensated COPD patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Heming

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients may develop metabolic alkalosis during weaning from mechanical ventilation. Acetazolamide is one of the treatments used to reverse metabolic alkalosis.619 time-respiratory (minute ventilation, tidal volume and respiratory rate and 207 time-PaCO2 observations were obtained from 68 invasively ventilated COPD patients. We modeled respiratory responses to acetazolamide in mechanically ventilated COPD patients and then simulated the effect of increased amounts of the drug.The effect of acetazolamide on minute ventilation and PaCO2 levels was analyzed using a nonlinear mixed effect model. The effect of different ventilatory modes was assessed on the model. Only slightly increased minute ventilation without decreased PaCO2 levels were observed in response to 250 to 500 mg of acetazolamide administered twice daily. Simulations indicated that higher acetazolamide dosage (>1000 mg daily was required to significantly increase minute ventilation (P0.75 L min(-1 in 60% of the population. The model also predicts that 45% of patients would have a decrease of PaCO2>5 mmHg with doses of 1000 mg per day.Simulations suggest that COPD patients might benefit from the respiratory stimulant effect after the administration of higher doses of acetazolamide.

  9. Research Summary 3-D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Model Of The Human Respiratory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA’s Office of Research and Development (ORD) has developed a 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the human respiratory system that allows for the simulation of particulate based contaminant deposition and clearance, while being adaptable for age, ethn...

  10. Biological effects of desert dust in respiratory epithelial cells and a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract As a result of the challenge of recent dust storms to public health, we tested the postulate that desert dust collected in the southwestern United States could impact a biological effect in respiratory epithelial cells and an animal model. Two samples of surface sedime...

  11. Respiratory mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Theodore A

    2016-01-01

    This book thoroughly covers each subfield of respiratory mechanics: pulmonary mechanics, the respiratory pump, and flow. It presents the current understanding of the field and serves as a guide to the scientific literature from the golden age of respiratory mechanics, 1960 - 2010. Specific topics covered include the contributions of surface tension and tissue forces to lung recoil, the gravitational deformation of the lung, and the interdependence forces that act on pulmonary airways and blood vessels. The geometry and kinematics of the ribs is also covered in detail, as well as the respiratory action of the external and internal intercostal muscles, the mechanics of the diaphragm, and the quantitative compartmental models of the chest wall is also described. Additionally, flow in the airways is covered thoroughly, including the wave-speed and viscous expiratory flow-limiting mechanisms; convection, diffusion and the stationary front; and the distribution of ventilation. This is an ideal book for respiratory ...

  12. Evaluating humidity recovery efficiency of currently available heat and moisture exchangers: a respiratory system model study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanette Janaina Jaber Lucato

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate and compare the efficiency of humidification in available heat and moisture exchanger models under conditions of varying tidal volume, respiratory rate, and flow rate. INTRODUCTION: Inspired gases are routinely preconditioned by heat and moisture exchangers to provide a heat and water content similar to that provided normally by the nose and upper airways. The absolute humidity of air retrieved from and returned to the ventilated patient is an important measurable outcome of the heat and moisture exchangers' humidifying performance. METHODS: Eight different heat and moisture exchangers were studied using a respiratory system analog. The system included a heated chamber (acrylic glass, maintained at 37°C, a preserved swine lung, a hygrometer, circuitry and a ventilator. Humidity and temperature levels were measured using eight distinct interposed heat and moisture exchangers given different tidal volumes, respiratory frequencies and flow-rate conditions. Recovery of absolute humidity (%RAH was calculated for each setting. RESULTS: Increasing tidal volumes led to a reduction in %RAH for all heat and moisture exchangers while no significant effect was demonstrated in the context of varying respiratory rate or inspiratory flow. CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate that heat and moisture exchangers are more efficient when used with low tidal volume ventilation. The roles of flow and respiratory rate were of lesser importance, suggesting that their adjustment has a less significant effect on the performance of heat and moisture exchangers.

  13. Evaluating humidity recovery efficiency of currently available heat and moisture exchangers: a respiratory system model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucato, Jeanette Janaina Jaber; Adams, Alexander Bernard; Souza, Rogério; Torquato, Jamili Anbar; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro; Marini, John J

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate and compare the efficiency of humidification in available heat and moisture exchanger models under conditions of varying tidal volume, respiratory rate, and flow rate. Inspired gases are routinely preconditioned by heat and moisture exchangers to provide a heat and water content similar to that provided normally by the nose and upper airways. The absolute humidity of air retrieved from and returned to the ventilated patient is an important measurable outcome of the heat and moisture exchangers' humidifying performance. Eight different heat and moisture exchangers were studied using a respiratory system analog. The system included a heated chamber (acrylic glass, maintained at 37 degrees C), a preserved swine lung, a hygrometer, circuitry and a ventilator. Humidity and temperature levels were measured using eight distinct interposed heat and moisture exchangers given different tidal volumes, respiratory frequencies and flow-rate conditions. Recovery of absolute humidity (%RAH) was calculated for each setting. Increasing tidal volumes led to a reduction in %RAH for all heat and moisture exchangers while no significant effect was demonstrated in the context of varying respiratory rate or inspiratory flow. Our data indicate that heat and moisture exchangers are more efficient when used with low tidal volume ventilation. The roles of flow and respiratory rate were of lesser importance, suggesting that their adjustment has a less significant effect on the performance of heat and moisture exchangers.

  14. A novel modelling approach to energy transport in a respiratory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nithiarasu, Perumal; Sazonov, Igor

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, energy transport in a respiratory tract is modelled using the finite element method for the first time. The upper and lower respiratory tracts are approximated as a 1-dimensional domain with varying cross-sectional and surface areas, and the radial heat conduction in the tissue is approximated using the 1-dimensional cylindrical coordinate system. The governing equations are solved using 1-dimensional linear finite elements with convective and evaporative boundary conditions on the wall. The results obtained for the exhalation temperature of the respiratory system have been compared with the available animal experiments. The study of a full breathing cycle indicates that evaporation is the main mode of heat transfer, and convection plays almost negligible role in the energy transport. This is in-line with the results obtained from animal experiments. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. A dynamic population-based model for the development of work-related respiratory health effects among bakery workers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warren, N.; Meijster, T.; Heederik, D.; Tielemans, E.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This paper presents a dynamic population-based model for the development of sensitisation and respiratory symptoms in bakery workers. The model simulates a population of individual workers longitudinally and tracks the development of work-related sensitisation and respiratory symptoms in

  16. A dynamic population-based model for the development of work-related respiratory health effects among bakery workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warren, N.; Meijster, T.; Heederik, D.; Tielemans, E.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: This paper presents a dynamic population-based model for the development of sensitisation and respiratory symptoms in bakery workers. The model simulates a population of individual workers longitudinally and tracks the development of work-related sensitisation and respiratory symptoms in

  17. Development of a natural Gas Systems Analysis Model (GSAM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godec, M.; Haas, M.; Pepper, W.; Rose, J.

    1993-01-01

    Recent dramatic changes in natural gas markets have significant implications for the scope and direction of DOE's upstream as well as downstream natural gas R ampersand D. Open access transportation changes the way gas is bought and sold. The end of the gas deliverability surplus requires increased reserve development above recent levels. Increased gas demand for power generation and other new uses changes the overall demand picture in terms of volumes, locations and seasonality. DOE's Natural Gas Strategic Plan requires that its R ampersand D activities be evaluated for their ability to provide adequate supplies of reasonably priced gas. Potential R ampersand D projects are to be evaluated using a full fuel cycle, benefit-cost approach to estimate likely market impact as well as technical success. To assure R ampersand D projects are evaluated on a comparable basis, METC has undertaken the development of a comprehensive natural gas technology evaluation framework. Existing energy systems models lack the level of detail required to estimate the impact of specific upstream natural gas technologies across the known range of geological settings and likely market conditions. Gas Systems Analysis Model (GSAM) research during FY 1993 developed and implemented this comprehensive, consistent natural gas system evaluation framework. Rather than a isolated research activity, however, GSAM represents the integration of many prior and ongoing natural gas research efforts. When complete, it will incorporate the most current resource base description, reservoir modeling, technology characterization and other geologic and engineering aspects developed through recent METC and industry gas R ampersand D programs

  18. Arteriovenous extracorporeal lung assist allows for maximization of oscillatory frequencies: a large-animal model of respiratory distress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kranke Peter

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the minimization of the applied tidal volume (VT during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV reduces the risk of alveolar shear stress, it can also result in insufficient CO2-elimination with severe respiratory acidosis. We hypothesized that in a model of acute respiratory distress (ARDS the application of high oscillatory frequencies requires the combination of HFOV with arteriovenous extracorporeal lung assist (av-ECLA in order to maintain or reestablish normocapnia. Methods After induction of ARDS in eight female pigs (56.5 ± 4.4 kg, a recruitment manoeuvre was performed and intratracheal mean airway pressure (mPaw was adjusted 3 cmH2O above the lower inflection point (Plow of the pressure-volume curve. All animals were ventilated with oscillatory frequencies ranging from 3–15 Hz. The pressure amplitude was fixed at 60 cmH2O. At each frequency gas exchange and hemodynamic measurements were obtained with a clamped and de-clamped av-ECLA. Whenever the av-ECLA was de-clamped, the oxygen sweep gas flow through the membrane lung was adjusted aiming at normocapnia. Results Lung recruitment and adjustment of the mPaw above Plow resulted in a significant improvement of oxygenation (p Conclusion In this animal model of ARDS, maximization of oscillatory frequencies with subsequent minimization of VT leads to hypercapnia that can only be reversed by adding av-ECLA. When combined with a recruitment strategy, these high frequencies do not impair oxygenation

  19. Arteriovenous Extracorporeal Lung Assist Allows For Maximization Of Oscillatory Frequencies: A Large-animal Model Of Respiratory Distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muellenbach, Ralf M; Kuestermann, Julian; Kredel, Markus; Johannes, Amélie; Wolfsteiner, Ulrike; Schuster, Frank; Wunder, Christian; Kranke, Peter; Roewer, Norbert; Brederlau, Jörg

    2008-11-14

    Although the minimization of the applied tidal volume (VT) during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) reduces the risk of alveolar shear stress, it can also result in insufficient CO₂-elimination with severe respiratory acidosis. We hypothesized that in a model of acute respiratory distress (ARDS) the application of high oscillatory frequencies requires the combination of HFOV with arteriovenous extracorporeal lung assist (av-ECLA) in order to maintain or reestablish normocapnia. After induction of ARDS in eight female pigs (56.5 ± 4.4 kg), a recruitment manoeuvre was performed and intratracheal mean airway pressure (mPaw) was adjusted 3 cmH₂O above the lower inflection point (Plow) of the pressure-volume curve. All animals were ventilated with oscillatory frequencies ranging from 3-15 Hz. The pressure amplitude was fixed at 60 cmH₂O. At each frequency gas exchange and hemodynamic measurements were obtained with a clamped and de-clamped av-ECLA. Whenever the av-ECLA was de-clamped, the oxygen sweep gas flow through the membrane lung was adjusted aiming at normocapnia. Lung recruitment and adjustment of the mPaw above Plow resulted in a significant improvement of oxygenation (p < 0.05). Compared to lung injury, oxygenation remained significantly improved with rising frequencies (p < 0.05). Normocapnia during HFOV was only maintained with the addition of av-ECLA during frequencies of 9 Hz and above. In this animal model of ARDS, maximization of oscillatory frequencies with subsequent minimization of VT leads to hypercapnia that can only be reversed by adding av-ECLA. When combined with a recruitment strategy, these high frequencies do not impair oxygenation.

  20. Brownian gas models for extreme-value laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we establish one-dimensional Brownian gas models for the extreme-value laws of Gumbel, Weibull, and Fréchet. A gas model is a countable collection of independent particles governed by common diffusion dynamics. The extreme-value laws are the universal probability distributions governing the affine scaling limits of the maxima and minima of ensembles of independent and identically distributed one-dimensional random variables. Using the recently introduced concept of stationary Poissonian intensities, we construct two gas models whose global statistical structures are stationary, and yield the extreme-value laws: a linear Brownian motion gas model for the Gumbel law, and a geometric Brownian motion gas model for the Weibull and Fréchet laws. The stochastic dynamics of these gas models are studied in detail, and closed-form analytical descriptions of their temporal correlation structures, their topological phase transitions, and their intrinsic first-passage-time fluxes are presented. (paper)

  1. Association between exposure to emissions from the oil and gas industry and pathology of the immune, nervous, and respiratory systems, and skeletal and cardiac muscle in beef calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldner, Cheryl L; Clark, Edward G

    2009-01-01

    To determine potential associations between emissions from oil and gas field facilities and the risk of lesions in the immune, nervous, and respiratory systems of beef calves, researchers examined tissue samples collected from 1,531 cases with exposure data, which included aborted fetuses, stillbirths, and calf mortalities from 203 cow-calf herds, by means of histopathology. The researchers prospectively measured exposure to sulfur dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, and volatile organic compounds by using air-monitoring data from passive monitors. They used the density of facilities surrounding each pasture as a second measure of exposure. Each tissue was classified by the presence or absence of a series of specified lesions, including those associated with degeneration, necrosis, infection, inflammation, anomaly, lympholysis (for lymphoid tissue), and proliferation (for the respiratory system). Exposure was not associated with the risk of lesions to tissues of either the immune or nervous system in calves that were aborted or died in spring 2002. Exposures to sulfur dioxide and hydrogen sulfide were not significantly associated with the risk of lesions to respiratory tissues in calves that were born alive in spring 2002. Increasing postnatal exposures to volatile organic compounds measured as benzene and toluene were associated with increased odds of respiratory lesions. The association between volatile organic compounds measured as benzene and respiratory lesions was significant for calves older than 3 weeks. During gestation, increasing exposure to sulfur dioxide was associated with increased odds of lesions in either the skeletal muscle or myocardium.

  2. Efficient solvers for coupled models in respiratory mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdugo, Francesc; Roth, Christian J; Yoshihara, Lena; Wall, Wolfgang A

    2017-02-01

    We present efficient preconditioners for one of the most physiologically relevant pulmonary models currently available. Our underlying motivation is to enable the efficient simulation of such a lung model on high-performance computing platforms in order to assess mechanical ventilation strategies and contributing to design more protective patient-specific ventilation treatments. The system of linear equations to be solved using the proposed preconditioners is essentially the monolithic system arising in fluid-structure interaction (FSI) extended by additional algebraic constraints. The introduction of these constraints leads to a saddle point problem that cannot be solved with usual FSI preconditioners available in the literature. The key ingredient in this work is to use the idea of the semi-implicit method for pressure-linked equations (SIMPLE) for getting rid of the saddle point structure, resulting in a standard FSI problem that can be treated with available techniques. The numerical examples show that the resulting preconditioners approach the optimal performance of multigrid methods, even though the lung model is a complex multiphysics problem. Moreover, the preconditioners are robust enough to deal with physiologically relevant simulations involving complex real-world patient-specific lung geometries. The same approach is applicable to other challenging biomedical applications where coupling between flow and tissue deformations is modeled with additional algebraic constraints. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Interdisciplinary approaches of transcranial magnetic stimulation applied to a respiratory neuronal circuitry model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Vinit

    Full Text Available Respiratory related diseases associated with the neuronal control of breathing represent life-threatening issues and to date, no effective therapeutics are available to enhance the impaired function. The aim of this study was to determine whether a preclinical respiratory model could be used for further studies to develop a non-invasive therapeutic tool applied to rat diaphragmatic neuronal circuitry. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS was performed on adult male Sprague-Dawley rats using a human figure-of-eight coil. The largest diaphragmatic motor evoked potentials (MEPdia were recorded when the center of the coil was positioned 6 mm caudal from Bregma, involving a stimulation of respiratory supraspinal pathways. Magnetic shielding of the coil with mu metal reduced magnetic field intensities and improved focality with increased motor threshold and lower amplitude recruitment curve. Moreover, transynaptic neuroanatomical tracing with pseudorabies virus (applied to the diaphragm suggest that connections exist between the motor cortex, the periaqueductal grey cell regions, several brainstem neurons and spinal phrenic motoneurons (distributed in the C3-4 spinal cord. These results reveal the anatomical substrate through which supraspinal stimulation can convey descending action potential volleys to the spinal motoneurons (directly or indirectly. We conclude that MEPdia following a single pulse of TMS can be successfully recorded in the rat and may be used in the assessment of respiratory supraspinal plasticity. Supraspinal non-invasive stimulations aimed to neuromodulate respiratory circuitry will enable new avenues of research into neuroplasticity and the development of therapies for respiratory dysfunction associated with neural injury and disease (e.g. spinal cord injury, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  4. The relation between air pollution and respiratory deaths in Tehran, Iran- using generalized additive models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghan, Azizallah; Khanjani, Narges; Bahrampour, Abbas; Goudarzi, Gholamreza; Yunesian, Masoud

    2018-03-20

    Some epidemiological evidence has shown a relation between ambient air pollution and adverse health outcomes. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of air pollution on mortality from respiratory diseases in Tehran, Iran. In this ecological study, air pollution data was inquired from the Tehran Province Environmental Protection Agency and the Tehran Air Quality Control Company. Meteorological data was collected from the Tehran Meteorology Organization and mortality data from the Tehran Cemetery Mortality Registration. Generalized Additive Models (GAM) was used for data analysis with different lags, up to 15 days. A 10-unit increase in all pollutants except CO (1-unit) was used to compute the Relative Risk of deaths. During 2005 until 2014, 37,967 respiratory deaths occurred in Tehran in which 21,913 (57.7%) were male. The strongest relationship between NO 2 and PM 10 and respiratory death was seen on the same day (lag 0), and was respectively (RR = 1.04, 95% CI: 1.02-1.07) and (RR = 1.03, 95% CI: 1.02-1.04). O 3 and PM 2.5 had the strongest relationship with respiratory deaths on lag 2 and 1 respectively, and the RR was equal to 1.03, 95% CI: 1.01-1.05 and 1.06, 95% CI: 1.02-1.10 respectively. NO 2 , O 3 , PM 10 and PM 2.5 also showed significant relations with respiratory deaths in the older age groups. The findings of this study showed that O 3 , NO 2 , PM 10 and PM 2.5 air pollutants were related to respiratory deaths in Tehran. Reducing ambient air pollution can save lives in Tehran.

  5. Development of a Gas Systems Analysis Model (GSAM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, A.B.; Pepper, W.J.

    1995-01-01

    Objective of developing this model (GSAM) is to create a comprehensive, nonproprietary, PC-based model of domestic gas industry activity. The system can assess impacts of various changes in the natural gas system in North America; individual and collective impacts due to changes in technology and economic conditions are explicitly modeled in GSAM. Major gas resources are all modeled, including conventional, tight, Devonian Shale, coalbed methane, and low-quality gas sources. The modeling system assesses all key components of the gas industry, including available resources, exploration, drilling, completion, production, and processing practices. Distribution, storage, and utilization of natural gas in a dynamic market-gased analytical structure is assessed. GSAM is designed to provide METC managers with a tool to project impacts of future research, development, and demonstration benefits

  6. Optimized carbon dioxide removal model for gas fired power plant

    OpenAIRE

    Arachchige, Udara Sampath P.; Mohsin, Muhammad; Melaaen, Morten Christian

    2012-01-01

    The carbon capture process model was developed for 500MW gas-fired power plant flue gas treating. Three different efficiencies, 85%, 90%, and 95%, were used to implement the model in Aspen Plus. The electrolyte NRTL rate base model was used to develop the model. The selected solvent properties were used to develop and implemented model is used for further simulations. The implemented open loop base case model of 85% removal efficiency is used to check the parameters' effect on removal efficie...

  7. GASCAP: Wellhead Gas Productive Capacity Model documentation, June 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Wellhead Gas Productive Capacity Model (GASCAP) has been developed by EIA to provide a historical analysis of the monthly productive capacity of natural gas at the wellhead and a projection of monthly capacity for 2 years into the future. The impact of drilling, oil and gas price assumptions, and demand on gas productive capacity are examined. Both gas-well gas and oil-well gas are included. Oil-well gas productive capacity is estimated separately and then combined with the gas-well gas productive capacity. This documentation report provides a general overview of the GASCAP Model, describes the underlying data base, provides technical descriptions of the component models, diagrams the system and subsystem flow, describes the equations, and provides definitions and sources of all variables used in the system. This documentation report is provided to enable users of EIA projections generated by GASCAP to understand the underlying procedures used and to replicate the models and solutions. This report should be of particular interest to those in the Congress, Federal and State agencies, industry, and the academic community, who are concerned with the future availability of natural gas

  8. Forecasting natural gas consumption in China by Bayesian Model Averaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available With rapid growth of natural gas consumption in China, it is in urgent need of more accurate and reliable models to make a reasonable forecast. Considering the limitations of the single model and the model uncertainty, this paper presents a combinative method to forecast natural gas consumption by Bayesian Model Averaging (BMA. It can effectively handle the uncertainty associated with model structure and parameters, and thus improves the forecasting accuracy. This paper chooses six variables for forecasting the natural gas consumption, including GDP, urban population, energy consumption structure, industrial structure, energy efficiency and exports of goods and services. The results show that comparing to Gray prediction model, Linear regression model and Artificial neural networks, the BMA method provides a flexible tool to forecast natural gas consumption that will have a rapid growth in the future. This study can provide insightful information on natural gas consumption in the future.

  9. THE DIFFERENCE IN RESPIRATORY AND BLOOD GAS VALUES DURING RECOVERY AFTER EXERCISE WITH SPONTANEOUS VERSUS REDUCED BREATHING FREQUENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jernej Kapus

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Extrapolation from post-exercise measurements has been used to estimate respiratory and blood gas parameters during exercise. This may not be accurate in exercise with reduced breathing frequency (RBF, since spontaneous breathing usually follows exercise. This study was performed to ascertain whether measurement of oxygen saturation and blood gases immediately after exercise accurately reflected their values during exercise with RBF. Eight healthy male subjects performed an incremental cycling test with RBF at 10 breaths per minute. A constant load test with RBF (B10 was then performed to exhaustion at the peak power output obtained during the incremental test. Finally, the subjects repeated the constant load test with spontaneous breathing (SB using the same protocol as B10. Pulmonary ventilation (VE, end-tidal oxygen (PETO2, and carbon dioxide pressures (PETCO2 and oxygen saturation (SaO2 were measured during both constant load tests. The partial pressures of oxygen (PO2 and carbon dioxide (PCO2 in capillary blood were measured during the last minute of exercise, immediately following exercise and during the third minute of recovery. At the end of exercise RBF resulted in lower PETO2, SaO2 and PO2, and higher PETCO2 and PCO2 when compared to spontaneous breathing during exercise. Lower SaO2 and PETO2 were detected only for the first 16s and 20s of recovery after B10 compared to the corresponding period in SB. There were no significant differences in PO2 between SB and B10 measured immediately after the exercise. During recovery from exercise, PETCO2 remained elevated for the first 120s in the B10 trial. There were also significant differences between SB and B10 in PCO2 immediately after exercise. We conclude that RBF during high intensity exercise results in hypoxia; however, due to post-exercise hyperpnoea, measurements of blood gas parameters taken 15s after cessation of exercise did not reflect the changes in PO2 and SaO2 seen during

  10. A modeled experiment of gas behavior in aquifer and residual gas formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, K.; Yamada, Y.; Murata, S.; Nakano, M.; Matsuoka, T.

    2007-12-01

    National and international concern is rising about the possible effects of greenhouse gases (GHGs) on the climate. Several methods are proposed to reduce the gas in the atmosphere and underground sequestration is recently expected as an effective concept. Especially, residual gas can be the most effective method to store the gas in reservoir. Underground sequestration requires the gas injected into a reservoir. When the gas is injected into a water- saturated aquifer, it pushes water out of the pore space. As the gas bubbles go upward, the gas space is filled with water again, but small gas bubbles are trapped in the pore space by surface force and capillary pressure of water. This is the residual gas formation. Once the residual gas is formed, it seldom moves again from the pore space. Residual gas formation needs neither cap-rock nor structural trap, thus has a potential to be applied to broader regions. The purpose of this study is to examine the fundamental mechanism of residual gas formation and gas migration underground by injecting the gas into a modeled and visualized aquifer. We designed and constructed an experimental apparatus to measure the distribution and the saturation of the residual gas. We used glass beads of 1 or 2mm diameters as porous media to construct some reservoir models that have various porosity, permeability, and wettability. The glass beads packed in our apparatus which has 30cm width, 33.5cm height, and 1cm thickness. It has 1§¤volume in amount. The pore space was filled with viscous liquid, then air was injected from the bottom. Some conditions in the injection time and rate were tested. We observed air behavior and measured the volume of the distribution area of residual gas from its digital photographs, and the volume of residual gas from the amount of water that was pushed out from the apparatus. The experimental results showed that differences of reservoir properties made changes in the gas behavior and residual gas volume. It

  11. Gas migration mechanism of saturated dense bentonite and its modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yukihisa; Hironaga, Michihiko; Kudo, Koji

    2007-01-01

    In the current concept of repository for nuclear waste disposal, compacted bentonite will be used as an engineered barrier mainly for inhibiting migration of radioactive nuclides. Hydrogen gas can be generated inside the engineered barrier by anaerobic corrosion of metals used for containers, etc. If the gas generation rate exceeds the diffusion rate of gas molecules inside of the engineered barrier, gas will accumulate in the void space inside of the engineered barrier until its pressure becomes large enough for it to enter the bentonite as a discrete gaseous phase. It is expected to be not easy for gas to entering into the bentonite as a discrete gaseous phase because the pore of compacted bentonite is so minute. Therefore it is necessary to investigate the following subjects: a) Effect of the accumulated gas pressure on surrounding objects such as concrete lining, rock mass. b) Effect of gas breakthrough on the barrier function of bentonite. c) Revealing and modeling gas migration mechanism for overcoming the scale effects in laboratory specimen test. Therefore in this study, gas migration tests for compacted and saturated bentonite to investigate and to model the mechanism of gas migration phenomenon. Firstly, the following conclusions were obtained through by the results of the gas migration tests which are conducted in this study: 1) Bubbles appear in the semitransparent drainage tube at first when the total gas is equal to the initial total axial stress or somewhat smaller. By increasing the gas pressure more, breakthrough of gas migration, which is defined as a sudden increase of amount of emission gas, occurred. When the total gas pressure exceeds the initial total axial stress, the total axial stress is always equal to the total gas pressure because specimens shrink in the axial direction with causing the clearance between the end of the specimen and porous metal. 2) Effective gas conductivity after breakthrough of gas migration is times larger than that

  12. Comparison of old and new ICRP models for respiratory tract dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boecker, B.B.

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines the historical development and application of respiratory tract dosimetry models by the International Commission for Radiological Protection, ICRP, for health protection from inhaled radioactive aerosols. Three different models are discussed, those that were included in ICRP recommendations published in 1960 and 1979, and the new ICRP Publication 66. Basic features of these models are compared and contrasted. These features include model structure, sites and frequencies of particle deposition, processes and rates of clearance of the deposited material from the respiratory tract, and consideration of the parameters involved in these processes and how various factors can influence these parameters. All three models lead to the calculation of absorbed radiation doses with differing degrees of regional and local specificity. These calculations are achieved using different tools ranging from quick hand calculations to sophisticated computerized modeling approaches. A side-by-side review of these models indicates several important trends in respiratory tract dosimetry models, the most obvious of which is the increased complexity of each new model over the past 30+ years. These increases reflect both the increasing size of the knowledge base derived from studies in laboratory animals and in human subjects and the need for models more broadly applicable for both occupational and environmental exposures. It is likely that future research will be directed to those key aspects of the new model having the largest uncertainties. The detailed design of the new model and its associated software provide excellent means of identifying useful research areas and using the resulting new information in organized and productive ways

  13. Porter Five Forces Model Pada PT. Ruci Gas

    OpenAIRE

    Riky, Alfonsus

    2014-01-01

    Penelitian ini akan membahas mengenai analisis lima model utama kekuatan Porter pada Perusahaan keluarga PT.Ruci Gas. Tujuan dari penelitian ini penulis ingin menganalis tentang struktur industri PT. Ruci Gas yang dikaitkan dengan teori lima model kekuatan utama yang dikembangkan oleh Porter. Selain itu penulis ingin menganalisis mengenai tingkat atraktif investasi gas di Indonesia. Jenis dari penelitian ini adalah kualitatif deskriptif.Dengan pengumpulan data dengan metode wawancara dan obse...

  14. Diaphragm remodeling and compensatory respiratory mechanics in a canine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, A F; Petrov, M; Malik, A S; Mitchell, M A; Childers, M K; Bogan, J R; Seidner, G; Kornegay, J N; Stedman, H H

    2014-04-01

    Ventilatory insufficiency remains the leading cause of death and late stage morbidity in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). To address critical gaps in our knowledge of the pathobiology of respiratory functional decline, we used an integrative approach to study respiratory mechanics in a translational model of DMD. In studies of individual dogs with the Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) mutation, we found evidence of rapidly progressive loss of ventilatory capacity in association with dramatic morphometric remodeling of the diaphragm. Within the first year of life, the mechanics of breathing at rest, and especially during pharmacological stimulation of respiratory control pathways in the carotid bodies, shift such that the primary role of the diaphragm becomes the passive elastic storage of energy transferred from abdominal wall muscles, thereby permitting the expiratory musculature to share in the generation of inspiratory pressure and flow. In the diaphragm, this physiological shift is associated with the loss of sarcomeres in series (∼ 60%) and an increase in muscle stiffness (∼ 900%) compared with those of the nondystrophic diaphragm, as studied during perfusion ex vivo. In addition to providing much needed endpoint measures for assessing the efficacy of therapeutics, we expect these findings to be a starting point for a more precise understanding of respiratory failure in DMD.

  15. Studying human respiratory disease in animals--role of induced and naturally occurring models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kurt; Roman, Jesse

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory disorders like asthma, emphysema, and pulmonary fibrosis affect millions of Americans and many more worldwide. Despite advancements in medical research that have led to improved understanding of the pathophysiology of these conditions and sometimes to new therapeutic interventions, these disorders are for the most part chronic and progressive; current interventions are not curative and do not halt disease progression. A major obstacle to further advancements relates to the absence of animal models that exactly resemble the human condition, which delays the elucidation of relevant mechanisms of action, the unveiling of biomarkers of disease progression, and identification of new targets for intervention in patients. There are currently many induced animal models of human respiratory disease available for study, and even though they mimic features of human disease, discoveries in these models have not always translated into safe and effective treatments in humans. A major obstacle relates to the genetic, anatomical, and functional variations amongst species, which represents the major challenge to overcome when searching for appropriate models of respiratory disease. Nevertheless, rodents, in particular mice, have become the most common species used for experimentation, due to their relatively low cost, size, and adequate understanding of murine genetics, among other advantages. Less well known is the fact that domestic animals also suffer from respiratory illnesses similar to those found in humans. Asthma, bronchitis, pneumonia, and pulmonary fibrosis are among the many disorders occurring naturally in dogs, cats, and horses, among other species. These models might better resemble the human condition and are emphasized here, but further investigations are needed to determine their relevance. Copyright © 2015 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Assessment of blood gas parameters and the degree of inflammation in noninvasive positive pressure ventilation combined with aminophylline treatment of COPD complicated with type II respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Ru Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the effect of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation combined with aminophylline therapy on blood gas parameters and the degree of inflammation in patients with COPD and type II respiratory failure. Methods: A total of 80 patients with COPD and type Ⅱ respiratory failure were randomly divided into observation group and control group (n=40, control group received symptomatic treatment + aminophylline treatment, observation group received symptomatic treatment + aminophylline + noninvasive positive pressure ventilation treatment, and then differences in blood gas parameters, pulmonary function parameters, hemorheology parameters and inflammatory factor levels were compared between two groups of patients after treatment. Results: Radial artery pH and PO2 values of observation group after treatment were higher than those of control group while PCO2, Cl- and CO2CP values were lower than those of control group; pulmonary function parameters FVC, FEV1, FEF25-75, MMF, PEF and FRC values of observation group after treatment were higher than those of control group; whole blood viscosity (150 s- and 10 s-, plasma viscosity, fibrinogen, erythrocyte aggregation index and erythrocyte rigidity index values in peripheral venous blood of observation group after treatment were lower than those of control group; serum IL-17, IL-33, TREM-1, sICAM-1 and PGE2 levels of observation group after treatment were lower than those of control group. Conclusion: Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation combined with aminophylline can optimize the respiratory function of patients with COPD and type II respiratory failure and improve blood gas parameters and the degree of inflammation.

  17. Estimates of global seasonal influenza-associated respiratory mortality: a modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iuliano, A Danielle; Roguski, Katherine M; Chang, Howard H; Muscatello, David J; Palekar, Rakhee; Tempia, Stefano; Cohen, Cheryl; Gran, Jon Michael; Schanzer, Dena; Cowling, Benjamin J; Wu, Peng; Kyncl, Jan; Ang, Li Wei; Park, Minah; Redlberger-Fritz, Monika; Yu, Hongjie; Espenhain, Laura; Krishnan, Anand; Emukule, Gideon; van Asten, Liselotte; Pereira da Silva, Susana; Aungkulanon, Suchunya; Buchholz, Udo; Widdowson, Marc-Alain; Bresee, Joseph S

    2017-12-14

    Estimates of influenza-associated mortality are important for national and international decision making on public health priorities. Previous estimates of 250 000-500 000 annual influenza deaths are outdated. We updated the estimated number of global annual influenza-associated respiratory deaths using country-specific influenza-associated excess respiratory mortality estimates from 1999-2015. We estimated country-specific influenza-associated respiratory excess mortality rates (EMR) for 33 countries using time series log-linear regression models with vital death records and influenza surveillance data. To extrapolate estimates to countries without data, we divided countries into three analytic divisions for three age groups (respiratory infection mortality rates. We calculated mortality rate ratios (MRR) to account for differences in risk of influenza death across countries by comparing GHE respiratory infection mortality rates from countries without EMR estimates with those with estimates. To calculate death estimates for individual countries within each age-specific analytic division, we multiplied randomly selected mean annual EMRs by the country's MRR and population. Global 95% credible interval (CrI) estimates were obtained from the posterior distribution of the sum of country-specific estimates to represent the range of possible influenza-associated deaths in a season or year. We calculated influenza-associated deaths for children younger than 5 years for 92 countries with high rates of mortality due to respiratory infection using the same methods. EMR-contributing countries represented 57% of the global population. The estimated mean annual influenza-associated respiratory EMR ranged from 0·1 to 6·4 per 100 000 individuals for people younger than 65 years, 2·9 to 44·0 per 100 000 individuals for people aged between 65 and 74 years, and 17·9 to 223·5 per 100 000 for people older than 75 years. We estimated that 291 243-645 832 seasonal

  18. Measurement of fractional order model parameters of respiratory mechanical impedance in total liquid ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Alexandre; Bossé, Dominick; Micheau, Philippe; Avoine, Olivier; Praud, Jean-Paul; Walti, Hervé

    2012-02-01

    This study presents a methodology for applying the forced-oscillation technique in total liquid ventilation. It mainly consists of applying sinusoidal volumetric excitation to the respiratory system, and determining the transfer function between the delivered flow rate and resulting airway pressure. The investigated frequency range was f ∈ [0.05, 4] Hz at a constant flow amplitude of 7.5 mL/s. The five parameters of a fractional order lung model, the existing "5-parameter constant-phase model," were identified based on measured impedance spectra. The identification method was validated in silico on computer-generated datasets and the overall process was validated in vitro on a simplified single-compartment mechanical lung model. In vivo data on ten newborn lambs suggested the appropriateness of a fractional-order compliance term to the mechanical impedance to describe the low-frequency behavior of the lung, but did not demonstrate the relevance of a fractional-order inertance term. Typical respiratory system frequency response is presented together with statistical data of the measured in vivo impedance model parameters. This information will be useful for both the design of a robust pressure controller for total liquid ventilators and the monitoring of the patient's respiratory parameters during total liquid ventilation treatment. © 2011 IEEE

  19. Respiratory symptoms and lung function 8-10 months after community exposure to chlorine gas: a public health intervention and cross-sectional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Kathleen A; Chanda, Debjani; Balte, Pallavi; Karmaus, Wilfried J; Cai, Bo; Vena, John; Lawson, Andrew B; Mohr, Lawrence C; Gibson, James J; Svendsen, Erik R

    2013-10-09

    We implemented a community based interventional health screening for individuals located within one mile of a 54 metric tons release of liquid chlorine following a 16 tanker car train derailment on 6 January, 2005 in Graniteville, South Carolina, USA. Public health intervention occurred 8-10 months after the event, and provided pulmonary function and mental health assessment by primary care providers. Its purpose was to evaluate those exposed to chlorine for evidence of ongoing impairment for medical referral and treatment. We report comparative analysis between self-report of respiratory symptoms via questionnaire and quantitative spirometry results. Health assessments were obtained through respiratory symptom and exposure questionnaires, simple spirometry, and physical exam. Simple spirometry was used as the standard to identify continued breathing problems. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were applied to evaluate the validity of the respiratory questionnaire. We also identified the direction of discrepancy between self-reported respiratory symptoms and spirometry measures. Generalized estimation equations determined prevalence ratios for abnormal spirometry based on the presence of participant persistent respiratory symptoms. Covariate adjustment was made for participant age, sex, race, smoking and educational status. Two hundred fifty-nine people participated in the Graniteville health screening; 53 children (mean age = 11 years, range: chlorine exposure, the Graniteville health screening participants under-reported respiratory symptoms when compared to abnormal spirometry results. Sensitivity and specificity were low, and we determined that relying upon the self-report questionnaire was not adequate to objectively assess the lung health of our population following irritant gas exposure.

  20. Respiratory symptoms and lung function 8–10 months after community exposure to chlorine gas: a public health intervention and cross-sectional analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background We implemented a community based interventional health screening for individuals located within one mile of a 54 metric tons release of liquid chlorine following a 16 tanker car train derailment on 6 January, 2005 in Graniteville, South Carolina, USA. Public health intervention occurred 8–10 months after the event, and provided pulmonary function and mental health assessment by primary care providers. Its purpose was to evaluate those exposed to chlorine for evidence of ongoing impairment for medical referral and treatment. We report comparative analysis between self-report of respiratory symptoms via questionnaire and quantitative spirometry results. Methods Health assessments were obtained through respiratory symptom and exposure questionnaires, simple spirometry, and physical exam. Simple spirometry was used as the standard to identify continued breathing problems. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were applied to evaluate the validity of the respiratory questionnaire. We also identified the direction of discrepancy between self-reported respiratory symptoms and spirometry measures. Generalized estimation equations determined prevalence ratios for abnormal spirometry based on the presence of participant persistent respiratory symptoms. Covariate adjustment was made for participant age, sex, race, smoking and educational status. Results Two hundred fifty-nine people participated in the Graniteville health screening; 53 children (mean age = 11 years, range: chlorine exposure, the Graniteville health screening participants under-reported respiratory symptoms when compared to abnormal spirometry results. Sensitivity and specificity were low, and we determined that relying upon the self-report questionnaire was not adequate to objectively assess the lung health of our population following irritant gas exposure. PMID:24107111

  1. Modeling of Fission Gas Release in UO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MH Krohn

    2006-01-23

    A two-stage gas release model was examined to determine if it could provide a physically realistic and accurate model for fission gas release under Prometheus conditions. The single-stage Booth model [1], which is often used to calculate fission gas release, is considered to be oversimplified and not representative of the mechanisms that occur during fission gas release. Two-stage gas release models require saturation at the grain boundaries before gas is release, leading to a time delay in release of gases generated in the fuel. Two versions of a two-stage model developed by Forsberg and Massih [2] were implemented using Mathcad [3]. The original Forsbers and Massih model [2] and a modified version of the Forsberg and Massih model that is used in a commercially available fuel performance code (FRAPCON-3) [4] were examined. After an examination of these models, it is apparent that without further development and validation neither of these models should be used to calculate fission gas release under Prometheus-type conditions. There is too much uncertainty in the input parameters used in the models. In addition. the data used to tune the modified Forsberg and Massih model (FRAPCON-3) was collected under commercial reactor conditions, which will have higher fission rates relative to Prometheus conditions [4].

  2. Modeling of Fission Gas Release in UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MH Krohn

    2006-01-01

    A two-stage gas release model was examined to determine if it could provide a physically realistic and accurate model for fission gas release under Prometheus conditions. The single-stage Booth model [1], which is often used to calculate fission gas release, is considered to be oversimplified and not representative of the mechanisms that occur during fission gas release. Two-stage gas release models require saturation at the grain boundaries before gas is release, leading to a time delay in release of gases generated in the fuel. Two versions of a two-stage model developed by Forsberg and Massih [2] were implemented using Mathcad [3]. The original Forsbers and Massih model [2] and a modified version of the Forsberg and Massih model that is used in a commercially available fuel performance code (FRAPCON-3) [4] were examined. After an examination of these models, it is apparent that without further development and validation neither of these models should be used to calculate fission gas release under Prometheus-type conditions. There is too much uncertainty in the input parameters used in the models. In addition. the data used to tune the modified Forsberg and Massih model (FRAPCON-3) was collected under commercial reactor conditions, which will have higher fission rates relative to Prometheus conditions [4

  3. A model of the gas analysis system operation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakimenko, I. V.; Kanishchev, O. A.; Lyamets, L. L.; Volkova, I. V.

    2017-12-01

    The characteristic features of modeling the gas-analysis measurement system operation process on the basis of the semi-Markov process theory are discussed. The model of the measuring gas analysis system operation process is proposed, which makes it possible to take into account the influence of the replacement interval, the level of reliability and maintainability and to evaluate the product reliability.

  4. A Two-Dimensional Human Minilung System (Model for Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmeralda Magro-Lopez

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV is a major cause of serious pediatric respiratory diseases that lacks effective vaccine or specific therapeutics. Although our understanding about HRSV biology has dramatically increased during the last decades, the need for adequate models of HRSV infection is compelling. We have generated a two-dimensional minilung from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs. The differentiation protocol yielded at least six types of lung and airway cells, although it is biased toward the generation of distal cells. We show evidence of HRSV replication in lung cells, and the induction of innate and proinflammatory responses, thus supporting its use as a model for the study of HRSV–host interactions.

  5. Development of gas turbines simplified mathematical models; Desenvolvimento de modelos matematicos simplificados das turbinas a gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Leonardo Vinicius; Mendes, Pedro Paulo C. [Escola Federal de Engenharia de Itajuba, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Eletrotecnica; Ferreira, Claudio [Agencia Nacional de Energia Eletrica (ANEEL), Brasilia, DF (Brazil)

    1999-07-01

    This paper presents the development and analysis of various mathematical models for gas turbine which can be incorporated to dynamic stability or to electric power systems. The work provides answers for questions such as: the dynamic behaviour of gas turbine driven generator unities, the influence of those equipment in the other elements and the best operational conditions for the equipment.

  6. Validation of spectral gas radiation models under oxyfuel conditions. Part A: Gas cell experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becher, Valentin; Clausen, Sønnik; Fateev, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    AbstractCombustion of hydrocarbon fuels with pure oxygen results in a different flue gas composition as combustion with air. Standard CFD spectral gas radiation models for air combustion are out of their validity range. The series of three articles provides a common spectral basis...

  7. Mathematical modeling and validation in physiology applications to the cardiovascular and respiratory systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bachar, Mostafa; Kappel, Franz

    2013-01-01

    This volume synthesizes theoretical and practical aspects of both the mathematical and life science viewpoints needed for modeling of the cardiovascular-respiratory system specifically and physiological systems generally.  Theoretical points include model design, model complexity and validation in the light of available data, as well as control theory approaches to feedback delay and Kalman filter applications to parameter identification. State of the art approaches using parameter sensitivity are discussed for enhancing model identifiability through joint analysis of model structure and data. Practical examples illustrate model development at various levels of complexity based on given physiological information. The sensitivity-based approaches for examining model identifiability are illustrated by means of specific modeling  examples. The themes presented address the current problem of patient-specific model adaptation in the clinical setting, where data is typically limited.

  8. Anatomy and bronchoscopy of the porcine lung. A model for translational respiratory medicine.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Judge, Eoin P

    2014-09-01

    The porcine model has contributed significantly to biomedical research over many decades. The similar size and anatomy of pig and human organs make this model particularly beneficial for translational research in areas such as medical device development, therapeutics and xenotransplantation. In recent years, a major limitation with the porcine model was overcome with the successful generation of gene-targeted pigs and the publication of the pig genome. As a result, the role of this model is likely to become even more important. For the respiratory medicine field, the similarities between pig and human lungs give the porcine model particular potential for advancing translational medicine. An increasing number of lung conditions are being studied and modeled in the pig. Genetically modified porcine models of cystic fibrosis have been generated that, unlike mouse models, develop lung disease similar to human cystic fibrosis. However, the scientific literature relating specifically to porcine lung anatomy and airway histology is limited and is largely restricted to veterinary literature and textbooks. Furthermore, methods for in vivo lung procedures in the pig are rarely described. The aims of this review are to collate the disparate literature on porcine lung anatomy, histology, and microbiology; to provide a comparison with the human lung; and to describe appropriate bronchoscopy procedures for the pig lungs to aid clinical researchers working in the area of translational respiratory medicine using the porcine model.

  9. A computational model of insect discontinuous gas exchange: A two-sensor, control systems approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieshaber, Beverley J; Terblanche, John S

    2015-06-07

    The insect gas exchange system is characterised by branching air-filled tubes (tracheae/tracheoles) and valve-like structures in their outer integument (spiracles) which allow for a periodic gas exchange pattern known as the discontinuous gas exchange cycle (DGC). The DGC facilitates the temporal decoupling of whole animal gas exchange from cellular respiration rates and may confer several physiological benefits, which are nevertheless highly controversial (primarily reduction of cellular oxidative damage and/or respiratory water saving). The intrinsic and extrinsic factors influencing DGCs are the focus of extensive ongoing research and little consensus has been reached on the evolutionary genesis or mechanistic costs and benefits of the pattern. Despite several hypotheses and much experimental and evolutionary biology research, a mechanistic physical model, which captures various key elements of the DGC pattern, is currently lacking. Here, we present a biologically realistic computational, two-sensor DGC model (pH/carbon dioxide and oxygen setpoints) for an Orthopteran gas exchange system, and show computationally for the first time that a control system of two interacting feedback loops is capable of generating a full DGC pattern with outputs which are physiologically realistic, quantitatively matching experimental results found in this taxonomic model elsewhere. A finite-element mathematical approach is employed and various trigger sets are considered. Parameter sensitivity analyses suggest that various aspects of insect DGC are adequately captured in this model. In particular, with physiologically relevant input parameters, the full DGC pattern is induced; and the phase durations, endotracheal carbon dioxide partial pressure ranges, and pH fluctuations which arise are physically realistic. The model results support the emergent property hypothesis for the existence of DGC, and indicate that asymmetric loading and off-loading (hysteresis) in one of the sensor

  10. Modeling gas kinetic effects in drop collision and impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubynsky, Mykyta V.; Belousov, Kirill I.; Lockerby, Duncan A.; Sprittles, James E.

    2017-11-01

    When liquid drops collide with each other (collision) or with a solid surface (impact), the thickness of the intervening gas film (which, in particular, gives rise to bouncing off wettable surfaces) is often comparable to the mean free path of the gas molecules and thus gas kinetic effects are significant. We study drop collision and impact computationally using an interface-tracking finite element approach. The gas film is treated in the lubrication approximation. Gas kinetic effects are taken into account by introducing factors (functions of the Knudsen number) modifying the gas flow rate and shear stress. Our results for drop collision are in excellent agreement with those of Li who modeled the gas using the full Navier-Stokes equations with an effective viscosity. For impact, where Li's approach cannot be used, we obtain good agreement with drop bouncing experiments. We acknowledge the support of the Leverhulme Trust and the EPSRC (EP/N016602/1).

  11. Automated respiratory support in newborn infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claure, Nelson; Bancalari, Eduardo

    2009-02-01

    A considerable proportion of premature infants requires mechanical ventilatory support and supplemental oxygen. Due to their immaturity, exposure to these forms of respiratory support contributes to the development of lung injury, oxidative stress and abnormal retinal development. These conditions are associated with poor long-term respiratory and neurological outcome. Mechanically ventilated preterm infants present with frequent fluctuations in ventilation and gas exchange. Currently available ventilatory modes and manual adjustment to the ventilator or supplemental oxygen cannot effectively adapt to these recurrent fluctuations. Moreover, the respiratory support often exceeds the infant's real needs. Techniques that adapt the mechanical ventilatory support and supplemental oxygen to the changing needs of preterm infants are being developed in order to improve stability of gas exchange, to minimise respiratory support and to reduce personnel workload. This article describes the preliminary evidence on the application of these new techniques in preterm infants and animal models.

  12. Size Distribution and Estimated Respiratory Deposition of Total Chromium, Hexavalent Chromium, Manganese, and Nickel in Gas Metal Arc Welding Fume Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cena, Lorenzo G.; Chisholm, William P.; Keane, Michael J.; Cumpston, Amy; Chen, Bean T.

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to determine the mass of total Cr, Cr(VI), Mn, and Ni in 15 size fractions for mild and stainless steel gas-metal arc welding (GMAW) fumes. Samples were collected using a nano multi orifice uniform deposition impactor (MOUDI) with polyvinyl chloride filters on each stage. The filters were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and ion chromatography. Limits of detection (LODs) and quantitation (LOQs) were experimentally calculated and percent recoveries were measured from spiked metals in solution and dry, certified welding-fume reference material. The fraction of Cr(VI) in total Cr was estimated by calculating the ratio of Cr(VI) to total Cr mass for each particle size range. Expected, regional deposition of each metal was estimated according to respiratory-deposition models. The weight percent (standard deviation) of Mn in mild steel fumes was 9.2% (6.8%). For stainless steel fumes, the weight percentages were 8.4% (5.4%) for total Cr, 12.2% (6.5%) for Mn, 2.1% (1.5%) for Ni and 0.5% (0.4%) for Cr(VI). All metals presented a fraction between 0.04 and 0.6 μm. Total Cr and Ni presented an additional fraction <0.03 μm. On average 6% of the Cr was found in the Cr(VI) valence state. There was no statistical difference between the smallest and largest mean Cr(VI) to total Cr mass ratio (p-value D 0.19), hence our analysis does not show that particle size affects the contribution of Cr(VI) to total Cr. The predicted total respiratory deposition for the metal particles was ∼25%. The sites of principal deposition were the head airways (7–10%) and the alveolar region (11–14%). Estimated Cr(VI) deposition was highest in the alveolar region (14%). PMID:26848207

  13. Modelling of hot surface ignition within gas turbines subject to flammable gas in the intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lea Duedahl; Nielsen, Kenny Krogh; Yin, Chungen

    2017-01-01

    successfully developed and implemented in the commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code ANSYS CFX. This model is based on a combination of standard models, User Defined Functions (UDFs) and the CFX Expression Language (CEL). Prediction of ignition is based on a set of criteria to be fulfilled while......Controlling risks associated with fires and explosions from leaks of flammable fluids at oil and gas facilities is paramount to ensuring safe operations. The gas turbine is a significant potential source of ignition; however, the residual risk is still not adequately understood. A model has been...... but decreases with increase in initial mixture temperature and pressure. The model shows a great potential in reliable prediction of the risk of hot surface ignition within gas turbines in the oil and gas industry. In the future, a dedicated experimental study will be performed not only to improve...

  14. Model documentation: Natural gas transmission and distribution model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS was developed in the Office of integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy information Administration (EIA). NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the EIA and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. The NGTDM is the model within the NEMS that represents the transmission, distribution, and pricing of natural gas. The model also includes representations of the end-use demand for natural gas, the production of domestic natural gas, and the availability of natural gas traded on the international market based on information received from other NEMS models. The NGTDM determines the flow of natural gas in an aggregate, domestic pipeline network, connecting domestic and foreign supply regions with 12 demand regions. The methodology employed allows the analysis of impacts of regional capacity constraints in the interstate natural gas pipeline network and the identification of pipeline capacity expansion requirements. There is an explicit representation of core and noncore markets for natural gas transmission and distribution services, and the key components of pipeline tariffs are represented in a pricing algorithm. Natural gas pricing and flow patterns are derived by obtaining a market equilibrium across the three main elements of the natural gas market: the supply element, the demand element, and the transmission and distribution network that links them. The NGTDM consists of four modules: the Annual Flow Module, the Capacity F-expansion Module, the Pipeline Tariff Module, and the Distributor Tariff Module. A model abstract is provided in Appendix A

  15. Model documentation: Natural gas transmission and distribution model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-17

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS was developed in the Office of integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy information Administration (EIA). NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the EIA and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. The NGTDM is the model within the NEMS that represents the transmission, distribution, and pricing of natural gas. The model also includes representations of the end-use demand for natural gas, the production of domestic natural gas, and the availability of natural gas traded on the international market based on information received from other NEMS models. The NGTDM determines the flow of natural gas in an aggregate, domestic pipeline network, connecting domestic and foreign supply regions with 12 demand regions. The methodology employed allows the analysis of impacts of regional capacity constraints in the interstate natural gas pipeline network and the identification of pipeline capacity expansion requirements. There is an explicit representation of core and noncore markets for natural gas transmission and distribution services, and the key components of pipeline tariffs are represented in a pricing algorithm. Natural gas pricing and flow patterns are derived by obtaining a market equilibrium across the three main elements of the natural gas market: the supply element, the demand element, and the transmission and distribution network that links them. The NGTDM consists of four modules: the Annual Flow Module, the Capacity F-expansion Module, the Pipeline Tariff Module, and the Distributor Tariff Module. A model abstract is provided in Appendix A.

  16. Respiratory flows during early childhood: Computational models to examine therapeutic aerosols in the developing airways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenbaum-Katan, Janna; Hofemeier, Philipp; Sznitman, Josué; Janna Tenenbaum-Katan Team

    2015-11-01

    Inhalation therapy is the cornerstone of early-childhood respiratory treatments, as well as a rising potential for systemic drug delivery and pulmonary vaccination. As such, indispensable understanding of respiratory flow phenomena, coupled with particle transport at the deep regions of children's lungs is necessary to attain efficient targeting of aerosol therapy. However, fundamental research of pulmonary transport is overwhelmingly focused on adults. In our study, we have developed an anatomically-inspired computational model of representing pulmonary acinar regions at several age points during a child's development. Our numerical simulations examine respiratory flows and particle deposition maps within the acinar model, accounting for varying age dependant anatomical considerations and ventilation patterns. Resulting deposition maps of aerosols alter with age, such findings might suggest that medication protocols of inhalation therapy in young children should be considered to be accordingly amended with the child's development. Additionally to understanding basic scientific concepts of age effects on aerosol deposition, our research can potentially contribute practical guidelines to therapy protocols, and its' necessary modifications with age. We acknowledge the support of the ISF and the Israeli ministry of Science.

  17. 4D modeling and estimation of respiratory motion for radiation therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lorenz, Cristian

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory motion causes an important uncertainty in radiotherapy planning of the thorax and upper abdomen. The main objective of radiation therapy is to eradicate or shrink tumor cells without damaging the surrounding tissue by delivering a high radiation dose to the tumor region and a dose as low as possible to healthy organ tissues. Meeting this demand remains a challenge especially in case of lung tumors due to breathing-induced tumor and organ motion where motion amplitudes can measure up to several centimeters. Therefore, modeling of respiratory motion has become increasingly important in radiation therapy. With 4D imaging techniques spatiotemporal image sequences can be acquired to investigate dynamic processes in the patient’s body. Furthermore, image registration enables the estimation of the breathing-induced motion and the description of the temporal change in position and shape of the structures of interest by establishing the correspondence between images acquired at different phases of the br...

  18. NASAL-Geom, a free upper respiratory tract 3D model reconstruction software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cercos-Pita, J. L.; Cal, I. R.; Duque, D.; de Moreta, G. Sanjuán

    2018-02-01

    The tool NASAL-Geom, a free upper respiratory tract 3D model reconstruction software, is here described. As a free software, researchers and professionals are welcome to obtain, analyze, improve and redistribute it, potentially increasing the rate of development, and reducing at the same time ethical conflicts regarding medical applications which cannot be analyzed. Additionally, the tool has been optimized for the specific task of reading upper respiratory tract Computerized Tomography scans, and producing 3D geometries. The reconstruction process is divided into three stages: preprocessing (including Metal Artifact Reduction, noise removal, and feature enhancement), segmentation (where the nasal cavity is identified), and 3D geometry reconstruction. The tool has been automatized (i.e. no human intervention is required) a critical feature to avoid bias in the reconstructed geometries. The applied methodology is discussed, as well as the program robustness and precision.

  19. The respiratory tract deposition model proposed by the ICRP Task Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, A.C.; Briant, J.K.; Stahlhofen, W.; Rudolf, G.; Gehr, P.

    1990-11-01

    The Task Group has developed a new model of the deposition of inhaled aerosols in each anatomical region of the respiratory tract. The model is used to evaluate the fraction of airborne activity that is deposited in respiratory regions having distinct retention characteristics and clearance pathways: the anterior nares, the extrathoracic airways of the naso- and oropharynx and larynx, the bronchi, the bronchioles, and the alveolated airways of the lung. Drawn from experimental data on total and regional deposition in human subjects, the model is based on extrapolation of these data by means of a detailed theoretical model of aerosol transport and deposition within the lung. The Task Group model applies to all practical conditions, and for aerosol particles and vapors from atomic size up to very coarse aerosols with an activity median aerodynamic diameter of 100 μm. The model is designed to predict regional deposition in different subjects, including adults of either sex, children of various ages, and infants, and also to account for anatomical differences among Caucasian and non-Caucasian subjects. The Task Group model represents aerosol inhalability and regional deposition in different subjects by algebraic expressions of aerosol size, breathing rates, standard lung volumes, and scaling factors for airway dimensions. 35 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Functional and histopathological identification of the respiratory failure in a DMSXL transgenic mouse model of myotonic dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrica-Adrian Panaite

    2013-05-01

    Acute and chronic respiratory failure is one of the major and potentially life-threatening features in individuals with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1. Despite several clinical demonstrations showing respiratory problems in DM1 patients, the mechanisms are still not completely understood. This study was designed to investigate whether the DMSXL transgenic mouse model for DM1 exhibits respiratory disorders and, if so, to identify the pathological changes underlying these respiratory problems. Using pressure plethysmography, we assessed the breathing function in control mice and DMSXL mice generated after large expansions of the CTG repeat in successive generations of DM1 transgenic mice. Statistical analysis of breathing function measurements revealed a significant decrease in the most relevant respiratory parameters in DMSXL mice, indicating impaired respiratory function. Histological and morphometric analysis showed pathological changes in diaphragmatic muscle of DMSXL mice, characterized by an increase in the percentage of type I muscle fibers, the presence of central nuclei, partial denervation of end-plates (EPs and a significant reduction in their size, shape complexity and density of acetylcholine receptors, all of which reflect a possible breakdown in communication between the diaphragmatic muscles fibers and the nerve terminals. Diaphragm muscle abnormalities were accompanied by an accumulation of mutant DMPK RNA foci in muscle fiber nuclei. Moreover, in DMSXL mice, the unmyelinated phrenic afferents are significantly lower. Also in these mice, significant neuronopathy was not detected in either cervical phrenic motor neurons or brainstem respiratory neurons. Because EPs are involved in the transmission of action potentials and the unmyelinated phrenic afferents exert a modulating influence on the respiratory drive, the pathological alterations affecting these structures might underlie the respiratory impairment detected in DMSXL mice. Understanding

  1. Modification of TOUGH2 to Include the Dusty Gas Model for Gas Diffusion; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WEBB, STEPHEN W.

    2001-01-01

    The GEO-SEQ Project is investigating methods for geological sequestration of CO(sub 2). This project, which is directed by LBNL and includes a number of other industrial, university, and national laboratory partners, is evaluating computer simulation methods including TOUGH2 for this problem. The TOUGH2 code, which is a widely used code for flow and transport in porous and fractured media, includes simplified methods for gas diffusion based on a direct application of Fick's law. As shown by Webb (1998) and others, the Dusty Gas Model (DGM) is better than Fick's Law for modeling gas-phase diffusion in porous media. In order to improve gas-phase diffusion modeling for the GEO-SEQ Project, the EOS7R module in the TOUGH2 code has been modified to include the Dusty Gas Model as documented in this report. In addition, the liquid diffusion model has been changed from a mass-based formulation to a mole-based model. Modifications for separate and coupled diffusion in the gas and liquid phases have also been completed. The results from the DGM are compared to the Fick's law behavior for TCE and PCE diffusion across a capillary fringe. The differences are small due to the relatively high permeability (k= 10(sup -11) m(sup 2)) of the problem and the small mole fraction of the gases. Additional comparisons for lower permeabilities and higher mole fractions may be useful

  2. Modelling of Rotor-gas bearings for Feedback Controller Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theisen, Lukas Roy Svane; Niemann, Hans Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Controllable rotor-gas bearings are popular oering adaptability, high speed operation, low friction and clean operation. Rotor-gas bearings are however highly sensitive to disturbances due to the low friction of the injected gas. These undesirable damping properties call for controllers, which ca...... and are shown to accurately describe the dynamical behaviour of the rotor-gas bearing. Design of a controller using the identied models is treated and experiments verify the improvement of the damping properties of the rotor-gas bearing.......Controllable rotor-gas bearings are popular oering adaptability, high speed operation, low friction and clean operation. Rotor-gas bearings are however highly sensitive to disturbances due to the low friction of the injected gas. These undesirable damping properties call for controllers, which can...... be designed from suitable models describing the relation from actuator input to measured shaft position. Current state of the art models of controllable gas bearings however do not provide such relation, which calls for alternative strategies. The present contribution discusses the challenges for feedback...

  3. Modeling greenhouse gas emissions from dairy farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dairy farms have been identified as an important source of greenhouse gas emissions. Within the farm, important emissions include enteric methane (CH4) from the animals, CH4 and nitrous oxide (N2O) from manure in housing facilities, during long-term storage and during field application, and N2O from...

  4. External Validation of Prediction Models for Pneumonia in Primary Care Patients with Lower Respiratory Tract Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schierenberg, Alwin; Minnaard, Margaretha C; Hopstaken, Rogier M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pneumonia remains difficult to diagnose in primary care. Prediction models based on signs and symptoms (S&S) serve to minimize the diagnostic uncertainty. External validation of these models is essential before implementation into routine practice. In this study all published S&S models...... for prediction of pneumonia in primary care were externally validated in the individual patient data (IPD) of previously performed diagnostic studies. METHODS AND FINDINGS: S&S models for diagnosing pneumonia in adults presenting to primary care with lower respiratory tract infection and IPD for validation were...... identified through a systematical search. Six prediction models and IPD of eight diagnostic studies (N total = 5308, prevalence pneumonia 12%) were included. Models were assessed on discrimination and calibration. Discrimination was measured using the pooled Area Under the Curve (AUC) and delta AUC...

  5. Sin-quadratic model for chest tomosynthesis respiratory signal analysis and its application in four dimensional chest tomosynthesis reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xi; Zhang, Hua; Qin, Genggeng; Ma, Jianhua; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan

    2018-02-01

    Chest tomosynthesis (CTS) is a newly developed imaging technique which provides pseudo-3D volume anatomical information of thorax from limited-angle projections and contains much less of superimposed anatomy than the chest X-ray radiography. One of the relatively common problems in CTS is the patient respiratory motion during image acquisition, which negatively impacts the detectability. In this work, we propose a sin-quadratic model to analyze the respiratory motion during CTS scan, which is a real time method where the respiratory signal is generated by extracting the motion of diaphragm from projection radiographs. According to the estimated respiratory signal, the CTS projections were then amplitude-based sorted into four to eight phases, and an iterative reconstruction strategy with total variation regularization was adopted to reconstruct the CTS images at each phase. Simulated digital XCAT phantom data and three sets of patient data were adopted for the experiments to validate the performance of the sin-quadratic model and its application in four dimensional (4D) CTS reconstruction. Results of the XCAT phantom simulation study show that the correlation coefficient between the extracted respiratory signal and the originally designed respiratory signal is 0.9964, which suggests that the proposed model could exactly extract the respiratory signal from CTS projections. The 4D CTS reconstructions of both the phantom data and the patient data show clear reduction of motion-induced blur. Copyright © 2018 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Modelling and simulation of gas explosions in complex geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeter, Olav

    1998-12-31

    This thesis presents a three-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code (EXSIM94) for modelling and simulation of gas explosions in complex geometries. It gives the theory and validates the following sub-models : (1) the flow resistance and turbulence generation model for densely packed regions, (2) the flow resistance and turbulence generation model for single objects, and (3) the quasi-laminar combustion model. It is found that a simple model for flow resistance and turbulence generation in densely packed beds is able to reproduce the medium and large scale MERGE explosion experiments of the Commission of European Communities (CEC) within a band of factor 2. The model for a single representation is found to predict explosion pressure in better agreement with the experiments with a modified k-{epsilon} model. This modification also gives a slightly improved grid independence for realistic gas explosion approaches. One laminar model is found unsuitable for gas explosion modelling because of strong grid dependence. Another laminar model is found to be relatively grid independent and to work well in harmony with the turbulent combustion model. The code is validated against 40 realistic gas explosion experiments. It is relatively grid independent in predicting explosion pressure in different offshore geometries. It can predict the influence of ignition point location, vent arrangements, different geometries, scaling effects and gas reactivity. The validation study concludes with statistical and uncertainty analyses of the code performance. 98 refs., 96 figs, 12 tabs.

  7. Respiratory acidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventilatory failure; Respiratory failure; Acidosis - respiratory ... Causes of respiratory acidosis include: Diseases of the airways (such as asthma and COPD ) Diseases of the lung tissue (such as ...

  8. Respiratory explants as a model to investigate early events of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Teodoro, Giovanni; Marruchella, Giuseppe; Di Provvido, Andrea; Orsini, Gianluca; Ronchi, Gaetano Federico; D'Angelo, Anna Rita; D'Alterio, Nicola; Sacchini, Flavio; Scacchia, Massimo

    2018-01-12

    Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) is a severe disease caused by Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides (Mmm). Knowledge on CBPP pathogenesis is fragmented and hampered by the limited availability of laboratory animal and in vitro models of investigation. The purpose of the present study is to assess respiratory explants as useful tools to study the early stages of CBPP. Explants were obtained from trachea, bronchi and lungs of slaughtered cattle, tested negative for Mycoplasma spp. and for the major bacterial and viral respiratory pathogens. The interaction of Mmm with explant cells was studied by immunohistochemistry (IHC), double-labelling indirect immunofluorescence (DLIIF) and laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM). Mmm capability to survive and proliferate within the explants was evaluated by standard microbiological procedures. Finally, the putative cellular internalization of Mmm was further investigated by the gentamicin invasion assay. IHC and DLIIF indicated that Mmm can colonize explants, showing a marked tropism for lower airways. Specifically, Mmm was detected on/inside the bronchiolar and alveolar epithelial cells, the alveolar macrophages and the endothelial cells. The interaction between Mmm and explant cells was abolished by the pre-incubation of the pathogen with bovine anti-Mmm immune sera. Mmm was able to survive and proliferate in all tracheal, bronchial and lung explants, during the entire time course of the experiments. LSCM and gentamicin invasion assay both confirmed that Mmm can enter non-phagocytic host cells. Taken together, our data supports bovine respiratory explants as a promising tool to investigate CBPP, alternative to cattle experimental infection.

  9. Modeling Hydrates and the Gas Hydrate Markup Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihua Wang

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas hydrates, as an important potential fuels, flow assurance hazards, and possible factors initiating the submarine geo-hazard and global climate change, have attracted the interest of scientists all over the world. After two centuries of hydrate research, a great amount of scientific data on gas hydrates has been accumulated. Therefore the means to manage, share, and exchange these data have become an urgent task. At present, metadata (Markup Language is recognized as one of the most efficient ways to facilitate data management, storage, integration, exchange, discovery and retrieval. Therefore the CODATA Gas Hydrate Data Task Group proposed and specified Gas Hydrate Markup Language (GHML as an extensible conceptual metadata model to characterize the features of data on gas hydrate. This article introduces the details of modeling portion of GHML.

  10. Atomistic Modeling of Gas Adsorption in Nanocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Zollo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanostructures are currently under investigation as possible ideal media for gas storage and mesoporous materials for gas sensors. The recent scientific literature concerning gas adsorption in nanocarbons, however, is affected by a significant variation in the experimental data, mainly due to the different characteristics of the investigated samples arising from the variety of the synthesis techniques used and their reproducibility. Atomistic simulations have turned out to be sometimes crucial to study the properties of these systems in order to support the experiments, to indicate the physical limits inherent in the investigated structures, and to suggest possible new routes for application purposes. In consideration of the extent of the theme, we have chosen to treat in this paper the results obtained within some of the most popular atomistic theoretical frameworks without any purpose of completeness. A significant part of this paper is dedicated to the hydrogen adsorption on C-based nanostructures for its obvious importance and the exceptional efforts devoted to it by the scientific community.

  11. Overview of the EPRI CONTRACTMIX model for natural gas applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    The Contract Mix Model (CONTRACTMIX) is designed to assist gas supply planners in analyzing the costs and risks of alternative supply strategies. By explicitly incorporating uncertainty about gas demand and market conditions into the analysis, the methodology permits the analyst to compare contracting strategies on the basis of cost and risk and to assess the value of flexible strategies and contracts. The model is applicable to purchase decisions for natural gas and other fuels. CONTRACTMIX may be used at all phases of supply decision-making, from broad strategy formulation to detailed contract design and evaluation. This document introduces the prospective user to the model's capability for analysis of gas supply contracting decisions. The document describes the types of problems CONTRACTMIX is designed to address as well as the model's structure, inputs, outputs, and unique features

  12. Gas/Aerosol partitioning: a simplified method for global modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metzger, S.M.

    2000-01-01

    The main focus of this thesis is the development of a simplified method to routinely calculate gas/aerosol partitioning of multicomponent aerosols and aerosol associated water within global atmospheric chemistry and climate models. Atmospheric aerosols are usually multicomponent mixtures,

  13. Thermodynamic Modeling of Natural Gas Systems Containing Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karakatsani, Eirini K.; Kontogeorgis, Georgios M.

    2013-01-01

    As the need for dew point specifications remains very urgent in the natural gas industry, the development of accurate thermodynamic models, which will match experimental data and will allow reliable extrapolations, is needed. Accurate predictions of the gas phase water content in equilibrium...... with a heavy phase were previously obtained using cubic plus association (CPA) coupled with a solid phase model in the case of hydrates, for the binary systems of water–methane and water–nitrogen and a few natural gas mixtures. In this work, CPA is being validated against new experimental data, both water...... content and phase equilibrium data, and solid model parameters are being estimated for four natural gas main components (methane, ethane, propane, and carbon dioxide). Different tests for the solid model parameters are reported, including vapor-hydrate-equilibria (VHE) and liquid-hydrate-equilibria (LHE...

  14. Practical Techniques for Modeling Gas Turbine Engine Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Jeffryes W.; Lavelle, Thomas M.; Litt, Jonathan S.

    2016-01-01

    The cost and risk associated with the design and operation of gas turbine engine systems has led to an increasing dependence on mathematical models. In this paper, the fundamentals of engine simulation will be reviewed, an example performance analysis will be performed, and relationships useful for engine control system development will be highlighted. The focus will be on thermodynamic modeling utilizing techniques common in industry, such as: the Brayton cycle, component performance maps, map scaling, and design point criteria generation. In general, these topics will be viewed from the standpoint of an example turbojet engine model; however, demonstrated concepts may be adapted to other gas turbine systems, such as gas generators, marine engines, or high bypass aircraft engines. The purpose of this paper is to provide an example of gas turbine model generation and system performance analysis for educational uses, such as curriculum creation or student reference.

  15. Effects of gas types and models on optimized gas fuelling station reservoir's pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Farzaneh-Gord

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available There are similar algorithms and infrastructure for storing gas fuels at CNG (Compressed Natural Gas and CHG (Compressed Hydrogen Gas fuelling stations. In these stations, the fuels are usually stored in the cascade storage system to utilize the stations more efficiently. The cascade storage system generally divides into three reservoirs, commonly termed low, medium and high-pressure reservoirs. The pressures within these reservoirs have huge effects on performance of the stations. In the current study, based on the laws of thermodynamics, conservation of mass and real/ideal gas assumptions, a theoretical analysis has been constructed to study the effects of gas types and models on performance of the stations. It is intended to determine the optimized reservoir pressures for these stations. The results reveal that the optimized pressure differs between the gas types. For ideal and real gas models in both stations (CNG and CHG, the optimized non-dimensional low pressure-reservoir pressure is found to be 0.22. The optimized non-dimensional medium-pressure reservoir pressure is the same for the stations, and equal to 0.58.

  16. Numerical modeling of underground storage system for natural gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, J.; Wang, S.

    2017-12-01

    Natural gas is an important type of base-load energy, and its supply needs to be adjusted according to different demands in different seasons. For example, since natural gas is increasingly used to replace coal for winter heating, the demand for natural gas in winter is much higher than that in other seasons. As storage systems are the essential tools for balancing seasonal supply and demand, the design and simulation of natural gas storage systems form an important research direction. In this study, a large-scale underground storage system for natural gas is simulated based on theoretical analysis and finite element modeling.It is proven that the problem of axi-symmetric Darcy porous flow of ideal gas is governed by the Boussinesq equation. In terms of the exact solution to the Boussinesq equation, the basic operating characteristics of the underground storage system is analyzed, and it is demonstrated that the propagation distance of the pore pressure is proportional to the 1/4 power of the mass flow rate and to the 1/2 power of the propagation time. This quantitative relationship can be used to guide the overall design of natural gas underground storage systems.In order to fully capture the two-way coupling between pore pressure and elastic matrix deformation, a poro-elastic finite element model for natural gas storage is developed. Based on the numerical model, the dynamic processes of gas injection, storage and extraction are simulated, and the corresponding time-dependent surface deformations are obtained. The modeling results not only provide a theoretical basis for real-time monitoring for the operating status of the underground storage system through surface deformation measurements, but also demonstrate that a year-round balance can be achieved through periodic gas injection and extraction.This work is supported by the CAS "100 talents" Program and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (41371090).

  17. Phase space analysis of some interacting Chaplygin gas models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khurshudyan, M. [Academy of Sciences of Armenia, Institute for Physical Research, Ashtarak (Armenia); Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, Laboratory for Theoretical Cosmology, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Tomsk State Pedagogical University, Department of Theoretical Physics, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Myrzakulov, R. [Eurasian National University, Eurasian International Center for Theoretical Physics, Astana (Kazakhstan)

    2017-02-15

    In this paper we discuss a phase space analysis of various interacting Chaplygin gas models in general relativity. Linear and nonlinear sign changeable interactions are considered. For each case appropriate late time attractors of field equations are found. The Chaplygin gas is one of the dark fluids actively considered in modern cosmology due to the fact that it is a joint model of dark energy and dark matter. (orig.)

  18. Coupled Gas-Liquid Diffusion in Porous Media Using the Dusty Gas Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, S. W.; Pruess, K.

    2001-12-01

    Numerous problems involve the simultaneous diffusion of chemical species in both aqueous and gaseous phases. Applications include diffusion of non-condensible gases including carbon sequestration, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and chemicals from buried landmines. Diffusion in the unsaturated zone involves simultaneous transport in the aqueous and gaseous pathways. Calculation of diffusion in the individual phases is straightforward. However, for simultaneous diffusion in both phases, simply adding diffusive fluxes in gas and liquid phases will in general not be correct. Proper treatment of diffusion in multiphase conditions must take into account the coupling between diffusion and phase partitioning. Coupled gas-liquid diffusion was previously considered using Fick's law for both aqueous and gaseous diffusion. The diffusive strength term was harmonically weighted at the interface to enforce mass conservation. Results showed that the coupling effects are significant, and that uncoupled results can seriously underestimate diffusion across a capillary fringe. In the present work, the Dusty Gas Model (DGM) has been used to model gas diffusion. The DGM is a more fundamentally sound model for gas diffusion than Fick's law. However, the formulation of multiphase diffusion coupled with gas-liquid phase partitioning becomes considerably more complicated, and mass conservation must be explicitly imposed on each component through solution for the appropriate interface conditions. For higher permeability and trace gas conditions, the two models (Fick's law and DGM) give similar results as expected. However, for lower permeability media and non-trace gas conditions, significant differences exist. This work was supported by the U.S Department of Energy under Contracts No. DE-AC04-94AL85000 and DE-AC03-76SF00098.

  19. Evaluating fugacity models for trace components in landfill gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafi, Sophie; Sweetman, Andrew; Hough, Rupert L.; Smith, Richard; Rosevear, Alan; Pollard, Simon J.T.

    2006-01-01

    A fugacity approach was evaluated to reconcile loadings of vinyl chloride (chloroethene), benzene, 1,3-butadiene and trichloroethylene in waste with concentrations observed in landfill gas monitoring studies. An evaluative environment derived from fictitious but realistic properties such as volume, composition, and temperature, constructed with data from the Brogborough landfill (UK) test cells was used to test a fugacity approach to generating the source term for use in landfill gas risk assessment models (e.g. GasSim). SOILVE, a dynamic Level II model adapted here for landfills, showed greatest utility for benzene and 1,3-butadiene, modelled under anaerobic conditions over a 10 year simulation. Modelled concentrations of these components (95 300 μg m -3 ; 43 μg m -3 ) fell within measured ranges observed in gas from landfills (24 300-180 000 μg m -3 ; 20-70 μg m -3 ). This study highlights the need (i) for representative and time-referenced biotransformation data; (ii) to evaluate the partitioning characteristics of organic matter within waste systems and (iii) for a better understanding of the role that gas extraction rate (flux) plays in producing trace component concentrations in landfill gas. - Fugacity for trace component in landfill gas

  20. Decline curve based models for predicting natural gas well performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Kamari

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The productivity of a gas well declines over its production life as cannot cover economic policies. To overcome such problems, the production performance of gas wells should be predicted by applying reliable methods to analyse the decline trend. Therefore, reliable models are developed in this study on the basis of powerful artificial intelligence techniques viz. the artificial neural network (ANN modelling strategy, least square support vector machine (LSSVM approach, adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS, and decision tree (DT method for the prediction of cumulative gas production as well as initial decline rate multiplied by time as a function of the Arps' decline curve exponent and ratio of initial gas flow rate over total gas flow rate. It was concluded that the results obtained based on the models developed in current study are in satisfactory agreement with the actual gas well production data. Furthermore, the results of comparative study performed demonstrates that the LSSVM strategy is superior to the other models investigated for the prediction of both cumulative gas production, and initial decline rate multiplied by time.

  1. Modeling and forecasting natural gas demand in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadud, Zia; Dey, Himadri S.; Kabir, Md. Ashfanoor; Khan, Shahidul I.

    2011-01-01

    Natural gas is the major indigenous source of energy in Bangladesh and accounts for almost one-half of all primary energy used in the country. Per capita and total energy use in Bangladesh is still very small, and it is important to understand how energy, and natural gas demand will evolve in the future. We develop a dynamic econometric model to understand the natural gas demand in Bangladesh, both in the national level, and also for a few sub-sectors. Our demand model shows large long run income elasticity - around 1.5 - for aggregate demand for natural gas. Forecasts into the future also show a larger demand in the future than predicted by various national and multilateral organizations. Even then, it is possible that our forecasts could still be at the lower end of the future energy demand. Price response was statistically not different from zero, indicating that prices are possibly too low and that there is a large suppressed demand for natural gas in the country. - Highlights: → Natural gas demand is modeled using dynamic econometric methods, first of its kind in Bangladesh. → Income elasticity for aggregate natural gas demand in Bangladesh is large-around 1.5. → Demand is price insensitive, indicating too low prices and/or presence of large suppressed demand. → Demand forecasts reveal large divergence from previous estimates, which is important for planning. → Attempts to model demand for end-use sectors were successful only for the industrial sector.

  2. Reliability modelling - PETROBRAS 2010 integrated gas supply chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faertes, Denise; Heil, Luciana; Saker, Leonardo; Vieira, Flavia; Risi, Francisco; Domingues, Joaquim; Alvarenga, Tobias; Carvalho, Eduardo; Mussel, Patricia

    2010-09-15

    The purpose of this paper is to present the innovative reliability modeling of Petrobras 2010 integrated gas supply chain. The model represents a challenge in terms of complexity and software robustness. It was jointly developed by PETROBRAS Gas and Power Department and Det Norske Veritas. It was carried out with the objective of evaluating security of supply of 2010 gas network design that was conceived to connect Brazilian Northeast and Southeast regions. To provide best in class analysis, state of the art software was used to quantify the availability and the efficiency of the overall network and its individual components.

  3. Validation of spectral gas radiation models under oxyfuel conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becher, Johann Valentin

    2013-05-15

    Combustion of hydrocarbon fuels with pure oxygen results in a different flue gas composition than combustion with air. Standard computational-fluid-dynamics (CFD) spectral gas radiation models for air combustion are therefore out of their validity range in oxyfuel combustion. This thesis provides a common spectral basis for the validation of new spectral models. A literature review about fundamental gas radiation theory, spectral modeling and experimental methods provides the reader with a basic understanding of the topic. In the first results section, this thesis validates detailed spectral models with high resolution spectral measurements in a gas cell with the aim of recommending one model as the best benchmark model. In the second results section, spectral measurements from a turbulent natural gas flame - as an example for a technical combustion process - are compared to simulated spectra based on measured gas atmospheres. The third results section compares simplified spectral models to the benchmark model recommended in the first results section and gives a ranking of the proposed models based on their accuracy. A concluding section gives recommendations for the selection and further development of simplified spectral radiation models. Gas cell transmissivity spectra in the spectral range of 2.4 - 5.4 {mu}m of water vapor and carbon dioxide in the temperature range from 727 C to 1500 C and at different concentrations were compared in the first results section at a nominal resolution of 32 cm{sup -1} to line-by-line models from different databases, two statistical-narrow-band models and the exponential-wide-band model. The two statistical-narrow-band models EM2C and RADCAL showed good agreement with a maximal band transmissivity deviation of 3 %. The exponential-wide-band model showed a deviation of 6 %. The new line-by-line database HITEMP2010 had the lowest band transmissivity deviation of 2.2% and was therefore recommended as a reference model for the

  4. Simulation of The ICRP-30 Dosimetric Model for the Respiratory Tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giaddui, T.; Atia, M. A.

    2004-01-01

    Matlab was used to write a simulation program (ACID1) to simulate the ICRP-30 dosimetric model for the respiratory tract. The program (a new version of the one presented at the sixth Arab conference held in Cairo 2002) calculates a series of dosimetric quantities for the reference man as a result of the inhalation of any radionuclide. The program also plots the variation of activity with time for all organs and provided with a graphical user interface to make it friendly user. The results obtained by this program was compared with similar results obtained by other source and found to be very close. (Authors)

  5. Respiratory compensation in projection imaging using a magnification and displacement model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, C.R.; King, K.F.; Ritchie, C.J.; Godwin, J.D.

    1996-01-01

    Respiratory motion during the collection of computed tomography (CT) projections generates structured artifacts and a loss of resolution that can render the scans unusable. This motion is problematic in scans of those patients who cannot suspend respiration, such as the very young or incubated patients. In this paper, the authors present an algorithm that can be used to reduce motion artifacts in CT scans caused by respiration. An approximate model for the effect of respiration is that the object cross section under interrogation experiences time-varying magnification and displacement along two axes. Using this model an exact filtered backprojection algorithm is derived for the case of parallel projections. The result is extended to generate an approximate reconstruction formula for fan-beam projections. Computer simulations and scans of phantoms on a commercial CT scanner validate the new reconstruction algorithms for parallel and fan-beam projections. Significant reduction in respiratory artifacts is demonstrated clinically when the motion model is satisfied. The method can be applied to projection data used in CT single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), positron emission tomography (PET), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

  6. USERS MANUAL: LANDFILL GAS EMISSIONS MODEL - VERSION 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    The document is a user's guide for a computer model, Version 2.0 of the Landfill Gas Emissions Model (LandGEM), for estimating air pollution emissions from municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. The model can be used to estimate emission rates for methane, carbon dioxide, nonmet...

  7. Cardio-respiratory development in bird embryos: new insights from a venerable animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren W. Burggren

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The avian embryo is a time-honored animal model for understanding vertebrate development. A key area of extensive study using bird embryos centers on developmental phenotypic plasticity of the cardio-respiratory system and how its normal development can be affected by abiotic factors such as temperature and oxygen availability. Through the investigation of the plasticity of development, we gain a better understanding of both the regulation of the developmental process and the embryo's capacity for self-repair. Additionally, experiments with abiotic and biotic stressors during development have helped delineate not just critical windows for avian cardio-respiratory development, but the general characteristics (e.g., timing and dose-dependence of critical windows in all developing vertebrates. Avian embryos are useful in exploring fetal programming, in which early developmental experiences have implications (usually negative later in life. The ability to experimentally manipulate the avian embryo without the interference of maternal behavior or physiology makes it particularly useful in future studies of fetal programming. The bird embryo is also a key participant in studies of transgenerational epigenetics, whether by egg provisioning or effects on the germline that are transmitted to the F1 generation (or beyond. Finally, the avian embryo is heavily exploited in toxicology, in which both toxicological testing of potential consumer products as well as the consequences of exposure to anthropogenic pollutants are routinely carried out in the avian embryo. The avian embryo thus proves useful on numerous experimental fronts as an animal model that is concurrently both of adequate complexity and sufficient simplicity for probing vertebrate cardio-respiratory development.

  8. Intercambio gaseoso en el síndrome de dificultad respiratoria aguda Gas exchange in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Raimondi

    2003-04-01

    efecto beneficioso de todas estas técnicas en la mejoría del IG en el ARDS, no se ha demostrado efecto beneficioso en la sobrevida.The hypoxemia of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS depends chiefly upon shunt and ventilation-perfusion (V A/Q inequality produced by fluid located in the interstitial space, alveolar collapse and flooding. Variables other than inspired oxygen fraction and the underlying physiological abnormality can influence arterial oxygen partial pressure (PaO2. Changes in cardiac output, hemoglobin concentration, oxygen consumption and alcalosis can cause changes in PaO2 through their influence on mixed venous PO2. Gas exchange (GE in ARDS may be studied using the inert gas elimination technique (MIGET which enables to define the distribution of ventilation and perfusion without necessarily altering the FIO2 differentiating shunt from lung units with low V A/Q ratios and dead space from lung units with high V A/Q ratios. Different ventilatory strategies that increase mean airway pressure (positive end-expiratory pressure, high tidal volumes, inverse inspiratory-expiratory ratio, etc improve PaO2 through increasing lung volume by recruiting new open alveoli and spreading the intra-alveolar fluid over a large surface area. Also prone-position ventilation would result in a marked improvement in GE enhancing dorsal lung ventilation by the effects on the gravitional distribution of pleural pressure and the reduction in the positive pleural pressure that develops in dorsal regions in ARDS. Inhaled nitric oxide (NO has been shown to increase PaO2 in ARDS patients by inducing vasodilation predominantly in ventilated areas redistributing pulmonary blood flow away from nonventilated toward ventilated areas of the lung thus resulting in a shunt reduction. On the same way inhaled prostaglandins (PGI2 or PGE1 causes selective pulmonary vasodilation improving pulmonary GE. Intravenous almitrine, a selective pulmonary vasoconstrictor, has been shown to

  9. A GIS-based Model for Natural Gas Data Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitik, E.; Seker, D. Z.; Denli, H. H.

    2014-12-01

    In Turkey gas utility sector has undergone major changes in terms of increased competition between gas providers, efforts in improving services, and applying new technological solutions. This paper discusses the challenges met by gas companies to switch from long workflows of gas distribution, sales and maintenance into IT driven efficient management of complex information both spatially and non-spatially. The aim of this study is migration of all gas data and information into a GIS environment in order to manage and operate all infrastructure investments with a Utility Management System. All data conversion model for migration was designed and tested during the study. A flowchart is formed to transfer the old data layers to the new structure based on geodatabase.

  10. NATGAS. A Model of the European Natural Gas Market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulder, M; Zwart, G.

    2006-02-01

    The NATural GAS model is an integrated model of the European wholesale gas market providing long-run projections of supply, transport, storage and consumption patterns in the model region, aggregated in 5-year periods, distinguishing two seasons (winter and summer). Model results include levels of investment in the various branches, output and consumption, depletion of reserves and price levels. The NATGAS model computes long-term effects of policy measures on future gas production and gas prices in Europe. NATGAS is an equilibrium model describing behaviour of gas producers, investors in infrastructure (pipeline, LNG capacity, as well as storage), traders and consumers. NATGAS covers the main European demand regions, including the United Kingdom, Germany, the Netherlands and Italy. Moreover, it covers the main origins of supply on the European market, such as Russia, Norway, Algeria, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and LNG. In this memorandum, we first discuss the theoretical background as well as the model specifications. Afterwards, we describe the data we used, present some results and assess validity by computing sensitivities and comparing with current developments

  11. High-throughput Gene Expression Analysis In Pigs As Model For Respiratory Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Kerstin; Brogaard, Louise; Schou, Kirstine Klitgaard

    (WHO). Animal models are essential in understanding the mechanisms involved in human infectious disease and for the development of effective prevention and treatment strategies. It is increasingly realized that large animal models like the pig are exceptionally human like and serve as an excellent...... pleuropneumoniae causes pneumonia in pigs, a disease which is associated with high morbidity and mortality, as well as impaired animal welfare. The rapidly evolving pneumonia is characterized by large areas of lung necrosis resulting from the combined effect of tissue damage caused by the bacteria, and a strong...... model for disease and inflammation. Pigs are fully susceptible to human influenza, and have been demonstrated to be involved in influenza evolution and ecology. Pigs share many similarities with humans regarding lung physiology and innate immune cell infiltration of the respiratory system and thus seem...

  12. Effect of adjuvant noninvasive positive pressure ventilation on blood gas parameters, cardiac function and inflammatory state in patients with COPD and type II respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Ming Zhu1

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: T o analyze the effect of adjuvant noninvasive positive pressure ventilation on blood gas parameters, cardiac function and inflammatory state in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and type II respiratory failure. Methods: 90 patients with COPD and type II respiratory failure were randomly divided into observation group and control group (n=45. Control group received conventional therapy, observation group received conventional therapy + adjuvant noninvasive positive pressure ventilation, and differences in blood gas parameters, cardiac function, inflammatory state, etc., were compared between two groups of patients 2 weeks after treatment. Results: Arterial blood gas parameters pH and alveolar-arterial partial pressure of oxygen [P(A-aO2] levels of observation group were higher than those of control group while, potassium ion (K+, chloride ion (Cl﹣ and carbon dioxide combining power (CO2CP levels were lower than those of control group 2 weeks after treatment; echocardiography parameters Doppler-derived tricuspid lateral annular systolic velocity (DTIS and pulmonary arterial velocity (PAV levels were lower than those of control group (P<0.05 while pulmonary artery accelerating time (PAACT, left ventricular enddiastolic dimension (LVDd and right atrioventricular tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE levels were higher than those of control group (P<0.05; serum cardiac function indexes adiponectin (APN, Copeptin, N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP, cystatin C (CysC, growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15 and heart type fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP content were lower than those of control group (P<0.05; serum inflammatory factors hypersensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β, IL-8, IL-10, and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1 content were lower than those of control group (P<0.05. Conclusions: Adjuvant

  13. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of Bacillus anthracis spore deposition in rabbit and human respiratory airways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabilan, S.; Suffield, S. R.; Recknagle, K. P.; Jacob, R. E.; Einstein, D. R.; Kuprat, A. P.; Carson, J. P.; Colby, S. M.; Saunders, J. H.; Hines, S. A.; Teeguarden, J. G.; Straub, T. M.; Moe, M.; Taft, S. C.; Corley, R. A.

    2016-09-01

    Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics and Lagrangian particle deposition models were developed to compare the deposition of aerosolized Bacillus anthracis spores in the respiratory airways of a human with that of the rabbit, a species commonly used in the study of anthrax disease. The respiratory airway geometries for each species were derived respectively from computed tomography (CT) and µCT images. Both models encompassed airways that extended from the external nose to the lung with a total of 272 outlets in the human model and 2878 outlets in the rabbit model. All simulations of spore deposition were conducted under transient, inhalation–exhalation breathing conditions using average species-specific minute volumes. Two different exposure scenarios were modeled in the rabbit based upon experimental inhalation studies. For comparison, human simulations were conducted at the highest exposure concentration used during the rabbit experimental exposures. Results demonstrated that regional spore deposition patterns were sensitive to airway geometry and ventilation profiles. Due to the complex airway geometries in the rabbit nose, higher spore deposition efficiency was predicted in the nasal sinus compared to the human at the same air concentration of anthrax spores. In contrast, higher spore deposition was predicted in the lower conducting airways of the human compared to the rabbit lung due to differences in airway branching pattern. This information can be used to refine published and ongoing biokinetic models of inhalation anthrax spore exposures, which currently estimate deposited spore concentrations based solely upon exposure concentrations and inhaled doses that do not factor in species-specific anatomy and physiology for deposition.

  14. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Bacillus anthracis Spore Deposition in Rabbit and Human Respiratory Airways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabilan, Senthil; Suffield, Sarah R.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Jacob, Rick E.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Carson, James P.; Colby, Sean M.; Saunders, James H.; Hines, Stephanie; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Straub, Tim M.; Moe, M.; Taft, Sarah; Corley, Richard A.

    2016-09-30

    Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics and Lagrangian particle deposition models were developed to compare the deposition of aerosolized Bacillus anthracis spores in the respiratory airways of a human with that of the rabbit, a species commonly used in the study of anthrax disease. The respiratory airway geometries for each species were derived from computed tomography (CT) or µCT images. Both models encompassed airways that extended from the external nose to the lung with a total of 272 outlets in the human model and 2878 outlets in the rabbit model. All simulations of spore deposition were conducted under transient, inhalation-exhalation breathing conditions using average species-specific minute volumes. The highest exposure concentration was modeled in the rabbit based upon prior acute inhalation studies. For comparison, human simulation was also conducted at the same concentration. Results demonstrated that regional spore deposition patterns were sensitive to airway geometry and ventilation profiles. Due to the complex airway geometries in the rabbit nose, higher spore deposition efficiency was predicted in the upper conducting airways compared to the human at the same air concentration of anthrax spores. As a result, higher particle deposition was predicted in the conducting airways and deep lung of the human compared to the rabbit lung due to differences in airway branching pattern. This information can be used to refine published and ongoing biokinetic models of inhalation anthrax spore exposures, which currently estimate deposited spore concentrations based solely upon exposure concentrations and inhaled doses that do not factor in species-specific anatomy and physiology.

  15. Evaluating fugacity models for trace components in landfill gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafi, Sophie; Sweetman, Andrew; Hough, Rupert L; Smith, Richard; Rosevear, Alan; Pollard, Simon J T

    2006-12-01

    A fugacity approach was evaluated to reconcile loadings of vinyl chloride (chloroethene), benzene, 1,3-butadiene and trichloroethylene in waste with concentrations observed in landfill gas monitoring studies. An evaluative environment derived from fictitious but realistic properties such as volume, composition, and temperature, constructed with data from the Brogborough landfill (UK) test cells was used to test a fugacity approach to generating the source term for use in landfill gas risk assessment models (e.g. GasSim). SOILVE, a dynamic Level II model adapted here for landfills, showed greatest utility for benzene and 1,3-butadiene, modelled under anaerobic conditions over a 10 year simulation. Modelled concentrations of these components (95,300 microg m(-3); 43 microg m(-3)) fell within measured ranges observed in gas from landfills (24,300-180,000 microg m(-3); 20-70 microg m(-3)). This study highlights the need (i) for representative and time-referenced biotransformation data; (ii) to evaluate the partitioning characteristics of organic matter within waste systems and (iii) for a better understanding of the role that gas extraction rate (flux) plays in producing trace component concentrations in landfill gas.

  16. Shallow layer modelling of dense gas clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, S.; Nielsen, M.

    1996-11-01

    The motivation for making shallow layer models is that they can deal with the dynamics of gravity driven flow in complex terrain at a modest computational cost compared to 3d codes. The main disadvantage is that the air-cloud interactions still have to be added `by hand`, where 3d models inherit the correct dynamics from the fundamental equations. The properties of the inviscid shallow water equations are discussed, focusing on existence and uniqueness of solutions. It is demonstrated that breaking waves and fronts pose severe problems, that can only be overcome if the hydrostatic approximation is given up and internal friction is added to the model. A set of layer integrated equations is derived starting from the Navier-Stokes equations. The various steps in the derivation are accompanied by plausibility arguments. These form the scientific basis of the model. The principle of least action is introduced as a means of generating consistent models, and as a tool for making discrete equations for numerical models, which automatically obey conservation laws. A numerical model called SLAM (Shallow LAyer Model) is presented. SLAM has some distinct features compared to other shallow layer models: A Lagrangian, moving grid; Explicit account for the turbulent kinetic energy budget; The entrainment rate is estimated on the basis of the local turbulent kinetic energy; Non-hydrostatic pressure; and Numerical methods respect conservation laws even for coarse grids. Thorney Island trial 8 is used as a reference case model tuning. The model reproduces the doughnut shape of the cloud and yield concentrations in reasonable agreement with observations, even when a small number of cells (e.g. 16) is used. It is concluded that lateral exchange of matter within the cloud caused by shear is important, and that the model should be improved on this point. (au) 16 ills., 38 refs.

  17. The World gas model. A multi-period mixed complementarity model for the global natural gas market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egging, Ruud; Holz, Franziska; Gabriel, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    We provide the description, mathematical formulation and illustrative results of the World Gas Model, a multi-period complementarity model for the global natural gas market with explicit consideration of market power in the upstream market. Market players include producers, traders, pipeline and storage operators, LNG (liquefied natural gas) liquefiers and regasifiers as well as marketers. The model data set contains more than 80 countries and regions and covers 98% of world wide natural gas production and consumption. We also include a detailed representation of cross-border natural gas pipelines and constraints imposed by long-term contracts in the LNG market. The model is calibrated to match production and consumption projections from the PRIMES [EC. European energy and transport: trends to 2030-update 2007. Brussels: European Commission; 2008] and POLES models [EC. World energy technology outlook - 2050 (WETO-H2). Brussels: European Commission; 2006] up to 2030. The results of our numerical simulations illustrate how the supply shares of pipeline and LNG in various regions in the world develop very differently over time. LNG will continue to play a major role in the Asian market, also for new importers like China and India. Europe will expand its pipeline import capacities benefiting from its relative proximity to major gas suppliers. (author)

  18. Next Generation Respiratory Viral Vaccine System: Advanced and Emerging Bioengineered Human Lung Epithelia Model (HLEM) Organoid Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.; Schneider, Sandra L.; MacIntosh, Victor; Gibbons, Thomas F.

    2010-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections, including pneumonia and influenza, are the S t" leading cause of United States and worldwide deaths. Newly emerging pathogens signaled the need for an advanced generation of vaccine technology.. Human bronchial-tracheal epithelial tissue was bioengineered to detect, identify, host and study the pathogenesis of acute respiratory viral disease. The 3-dimensional (3D) human lung epithelio-mesechymal tissue-like assemblies (HLEM TLAs) share characteristics with human respiratory epithelium: tight junctions, desmosomes, microvilli, functional markers villin, keratins and production of tissue mucin. Respiratory Syntial Virus (RSV) studies demonstrate viral growth kinetics and membrane bound glycoproteins up to day 20 post infection in the human lung-orgainoid infected cell system. Peak replication of RSV occurred on day 10 at 7 log10 particles forming units per ml/day. HLEM is an advanced virus vaccine model and biosentinel system for emergent viral infectious diseases to support DoD global surveillance and military readiness.

  19. Comparisons of calculated respiratory tract deposition of particles based on the NCRP/ITRI model and the new ICRP66 model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Hsu-Chi; Phalen, R.F. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Chang, I. [Lovelace Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) in the United States and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) have been independently reviewing and revising respiratory tract dosimetry models for inhaled radioactive aerosols. The newly proposed NCRP respiratory tract dosimetry model represents a significant change in philosophy from the old ICRP Task Group model. The proposed NCRP model describes respiratory tract deposition, clearance, and dosimetry for radioactive substances inhaled by workers and the general public and is expected to be published soon. In support of the NCRP proposed model, ITRI staff members have been developing computer software. Although this software is still incomplete, the deposition portion has been completed and can be used to calculate inhaled particle deposition within the respiratory tract for particle sizes as small as radon and radon progeny ({approximately} 1 nm) to particles larger than 100 {mu}m. Recently, ICRP published their new dosimetric model for the respiratory tract, ICRP66. Based on ICRP66, the National Radiological Protection Board of the UK developed PC-based software, LUDEP, for calculating particle deposition and internal doses. The purpose of this report is to compare the calculated respiratory tract deposition of particles using the NCRP/ITRI model and the ICRP66 model, under the same particle size distribution and breathing conditions. In summary, the general trends of the deposition curves for the two models were similar.

  20. Reassessment of the cardio-respiratory stress response, using the king penguin as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willener, Astrid S T; Halsey, Lewis G; Strike, Siobhán; Enstipp, Manfred R; Georges, Jean-Yves; Handrich, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Research in to short-term cardio-respiratory changes in animals in reaction to a psychological stressor typically describes increases in rate of oxygen consumption (V̇(O2)) and heart rate. Consequently, the broad consensus is that they represent a fundamental stressor response generalizable across adult species. However, movement levels can also change in the presence of a stressor, yet studies have not accounted for this possible confound on heart rate. Thus the direct effects of psychological stressors on the cardio-respiratory system are not resolved. We used an innovative experimental design employing accelerometers attached to king penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus) to measure and thus account for movement levels in a sedentary yet free-to-move animal model during a repeated measures stress experiment. As with previous studies on other species, incubating king penguins (N = 6) exhibited significant increases in both V̇(O2) and heart rate when exposed to the stressor. However, movement levels, while still low, also increased in response to the stressor. Once this was accounted for by comparing periods of time during the control and stress conditions when movement levels were similar as recorded by the accelerometers, only V̇(O2) significantly increased; there was no change in heart rate. These findings offer evidence that changing movement levels have an important effect on the measured stress response and that the cardio-respiratory response per se to a psychological stressor (i.e. the response as a result of physiological changes directly attributable to the stressor) is an increase in V̇(O2) without an increase in heart rate.

  1. Application of morphological and physiological parameters representative of a sample Brazilian population in the human respiratory tract model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, A.A.; Cardoso, J.C.S.; Lourenco, M.C.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The Human Respiratory Tract Model (HRTM) proposed in ICRP Publication 66 account for the morphology and physiology of the respiratory tract. The characteristics of air drawn into the lungs and exhaled are greatly influenced by the morphology of the respiratory tract, which causes numerous changes in pressure, flow rate, direction and humidity as air moves into and out of the lungs. These changing characteristics can influence the rates and the sites of deposition. Concerning the respiratory physiological parameters the breathing characteristics influence the volume, the inhalation rate of air and the portion that enters through the nose and the mouth. These characteristics are important to determine the fractional deposition. The HRTM model uses morphological and physiological parameters from the Caucasian man to establish deposition fractions in the respiratory tract regions. lt is known that the morphology and physiology are influenced by environmental, occupational and economic conditions. The ICRP recommends for a reliable evaluation of the regional deposition the use of parameters from a local population when information is available. The main purpose of this study is to verify the influence in using the morphology and physiology parameters representative of a sample of the Brazilian population on the deposition model of ICRP Publication 66. The morphological and physiological data were obtained from the literature. The software EXCEL for Windows (version 2000) was used in order to implement the deposition model and also to allow the changes in parameters of interest. Initially, the implemented model was checked using the parameters defined in ICRP and the results of the fraction deposition in the respiratory tract compartments were compared. Finally, morphological and physiological parameters from Brazilian adult male were applied and the fractional deposition calculated. The respiratory values at different levels of activity for ages varying from

  2. Estimating Predictive Variance for Statistical Gas Distribution Modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lilienthal, Achim J.; Asadi, Sahar; Reggente, Matteo

    2009-01-01

    Recent publications in statistical gas distribution modelling have proposed algorithms that model mean and variance of a distribution. This paper argues that estimating the predictive concentration variance entails not only a gradual improvement but is rather a significant step to advance the field. This is, first, since the models much better fit the particular structure of gas distributions, which exhibit strong fluctuations with considerable spatial variations as a result of the intermittent character of gas dispersal. Second, because estimating the predictive variance allows to evaluate the model quality in terms of the data likelihood. This offers a solution to the problem of ground truth evaluation, which has always been a critical issue for gas distribution modelling. It also enables solid comparisons of different modelling approaches, and provides the means to learn meta parameters of the model, to determine when the model should be updated or re-initialised, or to suggest new measurement locations based on the current model. We also point out directions of related ongoing or potential future research work.

  3. Simulation modelling for new gas turbine fuel controller creation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendland, L. E.; Pribylov, V. G.; Borisov, Yu A.; Arzamastsev, M. A.; Kosoy, A. A.

    2017-11-01

    State of the art gas turbine fuel flow control systems are based on throttle principle. Major disadvantage of such systems is that they require high pressure fuel intake. Different approach to fuel flow control is to use regulating compressor. And for this approach because of controller and gas turbine interaction a specific regulating compressor is required. Difficulties emerge as early as the requirement definition stage. To define requirements for new object, his properties must be known. Simulation modelling helps to overcome these difficulties. At the requirement definition stage the most simplified mathematical model is used. Mathematical models will get more complex and detailed as we advance in planned work. If future adjusting of regulating compressor physical model to work with virtual gas turbine and physical control system is planned.

  4. A continuum model for metabolic gas exchange in pear fruit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q Tri Ho

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Exchange of O(2 and CO(2 of plants with their environment is essential for metabolic processes such as photosynthesis and respiration. In some fruits such as pears, which are typically stored under a controlled atmosphere with reduced O(2 and increased CO(2 levels to extend their commercial storage life, anoxia may occur, eventually leading to physiological disorders. In this manuscript we have developed a mathematical model to predict the internal gas concentrations, including permeation, diffusion, and respiration and fermentation kinetics. Pear fruit has been selected as a case study. The model has been used to perform in silico experiments to evaluate the effect of, for example, fruit size or ambient gas concentration on internal O(2 and CO(2 levels. The model incorporates the actual shape of the fruit and was solved using fluid dynamics software. Environmental conditions such as temperature and gas composition have a large effect on the internal distribution of oxygen and carbon dioxide in fruit. Also, the fruit size has a considerable effect on local metabolic gas concentrations; hence, depending on the size, local anaerobic conditions may result, which eventually may lead to physiological disorders. The model developed in this manuscript is to our knowledge the most comprehensive model to date to simulate gas exchange in plant tissue. It can be used to evaluate the effect of environmental stresses on fruit via in silico experiments and may lead to commercial applications involving long-term storage of fruit under controlled atmospheres.

  5. Lattice-gas models for multiphase flows and magnetohydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, H.; Chen, S.; Doolen, G.D.; Matthaeus, W.H.

    1990-01-01

    Lattice-gas automata are many-body dynamical systems described by discrete space and time variables. The microscopic state of such a system is completely specified by a few integer quantities at each lattice site. The system is updated according to the dynamics of the lattice-gas particles, which are usually determined only by local information. The first lattice-gas model was introduced by Frisch, Hasslacher, and Pomeau (FHP). The FHP model simulates fluid behavior and, in the low-Mach-number limit, obeys the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Since the creation of the FHP model, lattice-gas research has developed rapidly, providing not only further insight into the relation between microscopic processes and macroscopic properties but also new procedures for fast computation. Recent improvements and extensions of the FHP model have opened up brand-new fields. Already such research has had some impact on the understanding of the macroscopic properties of physics, in particular, the properties of multiple-fluid systems. Moreover, some potential industrial applications are now being explored. Lattice-gas models for single-phase fluids, multiphase fluids, and magnetohydrodynamic fluids are briefly described. 22 refs., 2 figs

  6. Reduction of irregular breathing artifacts in respiration-correlated CT images using a respiratory motion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertanto, Agung; Zhang, Qinghui; Hu, Yu-Chi; Dzyubak, Oleksandr; Rimner, Andreas; Mageras, Gig S

    2012-06-01

    Respiration-correlated CT (RCCT) images produced with commonly used phase-based sorting of CT slices often exhibit discontinuity artifacts between CT slices, caused by cycle-to-cycle amplitude variations in respiration. Sorting based on the displacement of the respiratory signal yields slices at more consistent respiratory motion states and hence reduces artifacts, but missing image data (gaps) may occur. The authors report on the application of a respiratory motion model to produce an RCCT image set with reduced artifacts and without missing data. Input data consist of CT slices from a cine CT scan acquired while recording respiration by monitoring abdominal displacement. The model-based generation of RCCT images consists of four processing steps: (1) displacement-based sorting of CT slices to form volume images at 10 motion states over the cycle; (2) selection of a reference image without gaps and deformable registration between the reference image and each of the remaining images; (3) generation of the motion model by applying a principal component analysis to establish a relationship between displacement field and respiration signal at each motion state; (4) application of the motion model to deform the reference image into images at the 9 other motion states. Deformable image registration uses a modified fast free-form algorithm that excludes zero-intensity voxels, caused by missing data, from the image similarity term in the minimization function. In each iteration of the minimization, the displacement field in the gap regions is linearly interpolated from nearest neighbor nonzero intensity slices. Evaluation of the model-based RCCT examines three types of image sets: cine scans of a physical phantom programmed to move according to a patient respiratory signal, NURBS-based cardiac torso (NCAT) software phantom, and patient thoracic scans. Comparison in physical motion phantom shows that object distortion caused by variable motion amplitude in phase

  7. A whole farm model for quantifying total greenhouse gas emissions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents a model to quantify total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from dairy farms. The model, which is based on a whole farm management approach, accounts for the variability that occurs in GHG emissions among farm production and management practices. The variation is accommodated in six dairy farm ...

  8. Heliox reduces respiratory system resistance in respiratory syncytial virus induced respiratory failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneyber, Martin C. J.; van Heerde, Marc; Twisk, Jos W. R.; Plotz, Frans B.; Markhors, Dick G.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease is characterised by narrowing of the airways resulting in increased airway resistance, air-trapping and respiratory acidosis. These problems might be overcome using helium-oxygen gas mixture. However, the effect of

  9. Heliox reduces respiratory system resistance in respiratory syncytial virus induced respiratory failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneijber, M.C.J.; van Heerde, M.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Plotz, F.; Markhorst, D.G.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease is characterised by narrowing of the airways resulting in increased airway resistance, air-trapping and respiratory acidosis. These problems might be overcome using helium-oxygen gas mixture. However, the effect of

  10. Modeling Propagation of Gas Path Damage

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This paper describes how damage propagation can be tracked and modeled for a range of fault modes in some modules of commercial high bypass aircraft engines. To that...

  11. Evaluation of green house gas emissions models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The objective of the project is to evaluate the GHG emissions models used by transportation agencies and industry leaders. Factors in the vehicle : operating environment that may affect modal emissions, such as, external conditions, : vehicle fleet c...

  12. [Etiological analysis and establishment of a discriminant model for lower respiratory tract infections in hospitalized patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y S; Lin, X H; Li, H R; Hua, Z D; Lin, M Q; Huang, W S; Yu, T; Lyu, H Y; Mao, W P; Liang, Y Q; Peng, X R; Chen, S J; Zheng, H; Lian, S Q; Hu, X L; Yao, X Q

    2017-12-12

    Objective: To analyze the pathogens of lower respiratory tract infection(LRTI) including bacterial, viral and mixed infection, and to establish a discriminant model based on clinical features in order to predict the pathogens. Methods: A total of 243 hospitalized patients with lower respiratory tract infections were enrolled in Fujian Provincial Hospital from April 2012 to September 2015. The clinical data and airway (sputum and/or bronchoalveolar lavage) samples were collected. Microbes were identified by traditional culture (for bacteria), loop-mediated isothermal amplification(LAMP) and gene sequencing (for bacteria and atypical pathogen), or Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Real-time PCR)for viruses. Finally, a discriminant model was established by using the discriminant analysis methods to help to predict bacterial, viral and mixed infections. Results: Pathogens were detected in 53.9% (131/243) of the 243 cases.Bacteria accounted for 23.5%(57/243, of which 17 cases with the virus, 1 case with Mycoplasma pneumoniae and virus), mainly Pseudomonas Aeruginosa and Klebsiella Pneumonia. Atypical pathogens for 4.9% (12/243, of which 3 cases with the virus, 1 case of bacteria and viruses), all were mycoplasma pneumonia. Viruses for 34.6% (84/243, of which 17 cases of bacteria, 3 cases with Mycoplasma pneumoniae, 1 case with Mycoplasma pneumoniae and bacteria) of the cases, mainly Influenza A virus and Human Cytomegalovirus, and other virus like adenovirus, human parainfluenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus, human metapneumovirus, human boca virus were also detected fewly. Seven parameters including mental status, using antibiotics prior to admission, complications, abnormal breath sounds, neutrophil alkaline phosphatase (NAP) score, pneumonia severity index (PSI) score and CRUB-65 score were enrolled after univariate analysis, and discriminant analysis was used to establish the discriminant model by applying the identified pathogens as the

  13. Flipped classroom model improves graduate student performance in cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tune, Johnathan D; Sturek, Michael; Basile, David P

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a traditional lecture-based curriculum versus a modified "flipped classroom" curriculum of cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal physiology delivered to first-year graduate students. Students in both courses were provided the same notes and recorded lectures. Students in the modified flipped classroom were required to watch the prerecorded lectures before class and then attend class, where they received a quiz or homework covering material in each lecture (valued at 25% of the final grade) followed by a question and answer/problem-solving period. In the traditional curriculum, attending lectures was optional and there were no quizzes. Evaluation of effectiveness and student performance was achieved by having students in both courses take the same multiple-choice exams. Within a comparable group of graduate students, participants in the flipped course scored significantly higher (P ≤ 0.05) on the cardiovascular, respiratory, and weighted cumulative sections by an average of >12 percentage points. Exam averages for students in the flipped course also tended to be higher on the renal section by ∼11 percentage points (P = 0.06). Based on our experience and responses obtained in blinded student surveys, we propose that the use of homework and in-class quizzes were critical motivating factors that likely contributed to the increase in student exam performance. Taken together, our findings support that the flipped classroom model is a highly effective means in which to disseminate key physiological concepts to graduate students.

  14. Potential biodefense model applications for portable chlorine dioxide gas production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubblefield, Jeannie M; Newsome, Anthony L

    2015-01-01

    Development of decontamination methods and strategies to address potential infectious disease outbreaks and bioterrorism events are pertinent to this nation's biodefense strategies and general biosecurity. Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas has a history of use as a decontamination agent in response to an act of bioterrorism. However, the more widespread use of ClO2 gas to meet current and unforeseen decontamination needs has been hampered because the gas is too unstable for shipment and must be prepared at the application site. Newer technology allows for easy, onsite gas generation without the need for dedicated equipment, electricity, water, or personnel with advanced training. In a laboratory model system, 2 unique applications (personal protective equipment [PPE] and animal skin) were investigated in the context of potential development of decontamination protocols. Such protocols could serve to reduce human exposure to bacteria in a decontamination response effort. Chlorine dioxide gas was capable of reducing (2-7 logs of vegetative and spore-forming bacteria), and in some instances eliminating, culturable bacteria from difficult to clean areas on PPE facepieces. The gas was effective in eliminating naturally occurring bacteria on animal skin and also on skin inoculated with Bacillus spores. The culturable bacteria, including Bacillus spores, were eliminated in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Results of these studies suggested portable, easily used ClO2 gas generation systems have excellent potential for protocol development to contribute to biodefense strategies and decontamination responses to infectious disease outbreaks or other biothreat events.

  15. A multiple-location model for natural gas forward curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buffington, J.C.

    1999-06-01

    This thesis presents an approach for financial modelling of natural gas in which connections between locations are incorporated and the complexities of forward curves in natural gas are considered. Apart from electricity, natural gas is the most volatile commodity traded. Its price is often dependent on the weather and price shocks can be felt across several geographic locations. This modelling approach incorporates multiple risk factors that correspond to various locations. One of the objectives was to determine if the model could be used for closed-form option prices. It was suggested that an adequate model for natural gas must consider 3 statistical properties: volatility term structure, backwardation and contango, and stochastic basis. Data from gas forward prices at Chicago, NYMEX and AECO were empirically tested to better understand these 3 statistical properties at each location and to verify if the proposed model truly incorporates these properties. In addition, this study examined the time series property of the difference of two locations (the basis) and determines that these empirical properties are consistent with the model properties. Closed-form option solutions were also developed for call options of forward contracts and call options on forward basis. The options were calibrated and compared to other models. The proposed model is capable of pricing options, but the prices derived did not pass the test of economic reasonableness. However, the model was able to capture the effect of transportation as well as aspects of seasonality which is a benefit over other existing models. It was determined that modifications will be needed regarding the estimation of the convenience yields. 57 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs., 1 append

  16. Application of morphological and physiological parameters representative of a Brazilian population sample in the respiratory tract model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dos Reis, A. A.; Cardoso, J. C. S.; Lourenco, M. C.

    2007-01-01

    The human respiratory tract model (HRTM) adopted by ICRP in its Publication 66 accounts for the morphology and physiology of the respiratory tract. The characteristics of air drawn into the lungs and exhaled are greatly influenced by the morphology of the respiratory tract, which causes numerous changes in pressure, flow rate, direction and humidity as air moves into and out of the lungs. These characteristics are important to determine the fractional deposition. It is known that the morphology and physiology are influenced by environmental, occupational and economic conditions. The ICRP recommends, for a reliable evaluation of the regional deposition, the use of parameters from a local population wherever such information is available. The main purpose of this study is to verify the influence of using the morphology and physiology parameters representative of a sample of the Brazilian population on the deposition model of the ICRP Publication 66 model. (authors)

  17. Cytochrome C Biosensor—A Model for Gas Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Nelles

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This work is about gas biosensing with a cytochrome c biosensor. Emphasis is put on the analysis of the sensing process and a mathematical model to make predictions about the biosensor response. Reliable predictions about biosensor responses can provide valuable information and facilitate biosensor development, particularly at an early development stage. The sensing process comprises several individual steps, such as phase partition equilibrium, intermediate reactions, mass-transport, and reaction kinetics, which take place in and between the gas and liquid phases. A quantitative description of each step was worked out and finally combined into a mathematical model. The applicability of the model was demonstrated for a particular example of methanethiol gas detection by a cytochrome c biosensor. The model allowed us to predict the optical readout response of the biosensor from tabulated data and data obtained in simple liquid phase experiments. The prediction was experimentally verified with a planar three-electrode electro-optical cytochrome c biosensor in contact with methanethiol gas in a gas tight spectroelectrochemical measurement cell.

  18. An Equilibrium-Based Model of Gas Reaction and Detonation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trowbridge, L.D.

    2000-01-01

    During gaseous diffusion plant operations, conditions leading to the formation of flammable gas mixtures may occasionally arise. Currently, these could consist of the evaporative coolant CFC-114 and fluorinating agents such as F2 and ClF3. Replacement of CFC-114 with a non-ozone-depleting substitute is planned. Consequently, in the future, the substitute coolant must also be considered as a potential fuel in flammable gas mixtures. Two questions of practical interest arise: (1) can a particular mixture sustain and propagate a flame if ignited, and (2) what is the maximum pressure that can be generated by the burning (and possibly exploding) gas mixture, should it ignite? Experimental data on these systems, particularly for the newer coolant candidates, are limited. To assist in answering these questions, a mathematical model was developed to serve as a tool for predicting the potential detonation pressures and for estimating the composition limits of flammability for these systems based on empirical correlations between gas mixture thermodynamics and flammability for known systems. The present model uses the thermodynamic equilibrium to determine the reaction endpoint of a reactive gas mixture and uses detonation theory to estimate an upper bound to the pressure that could be generated upon ignition. The model described and documented in this report is an extended version of related models developed in 1992 and 1999

  19. Within-breath arterial PO2 oscillations in an experimental model of acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, E M; Viale, J P; Hamilton, R M; McPeak, H; Sutton, L; Hahn, C E

    2000-09-01

    Tidal ventilation causes within-breath oscillations in alveolar oxygen concentration, with an amplitude which depends on the prevailing ventilator settings. These alveolar oxygen oscillations are transmitted to arterial oxygen tension, PaO2, but with an amplitude which now depends upon the magnitude of venous admixture or true shunt, QS/QT. We investigated the effect of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on the amplitude of the PaO2 oscillations, using an atelectasis model of shunt. Blood PaO2 was measured on-line with an intravascular PaO2 sensor, which had a 2-4 s response time (10-90%). The magnitude of the time-varying PaO2 oscillation was titrated against applied PEEP while tidal volume, respiratory rate and inspired oxygen concentration were kept constant. The amplitude of the PaO2 oscillation, delta PaO2, and the mean PaO2 value varied with the level of PEEP applied. At zero PEEP, both the amplitude and the mean were at their lowest values. As PEEP was increased to 1.5 kPa, both delta PaO2 and the mean PaO2 increased to a maximum. Thereafter, the mean PaO2 increased but delta PaO2 decreased. Clear oscillations of PaO2 were seen even at the lowest mean PaO2, 9.5 kPa. Conventional respiratory models of venous admixture predict that these PaO2 oscillations will be reduced by the steep part of the oxyhaemoglobin dissociation curve if a constant pulmonary shunt exists throughout the whole respiratory cycle. The facts that the PaO2 oscillations occurred at all mean PaO2 values and that their amplitude increased with increasing PEEP suggest that QS/QT, in the atelectasis model, varies between end-expiration and end-inspiration, having a much lower value during inspiration than during expiration.

  20. Respiratory mechanics and plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 6 are affected by gas humidification during mechanical ventilation in dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Hernández-Jiménez

    Full Text Available The use of dry gases during mechanical ventilation has been associated with the risk of serious airway complications. The goal of the present study was to quantify the plasma levels of TNF-alpha and IL-6 and to determine the radiological, hemodynamic, gasometric, and microscopic changes in lung mechanics in dogs subjected to short-term mechanical ventilation with and without humidification of the inhaled gas. The experiment was conducted for 24 hours in 10 dogs divided into two groups: Group I (n = 5, mechanical ventilation with dry oxygen dispensation, and Group II (n = 5, mechanical ventilation with oxygen dispensation using a moisture chamber. Variance analysis was used. No changes in physiological, hemodynamic, or gasometric, and radiographic constants were observed. Plasma TNF-alpha levels increased in group I, reaching a maximum 24 hours after mechanical ventilation was initiated (ANOVA p = 0.77. This increase was correlated to changes in mechanical ventilation. Plasma IL-6 levels decreased at 12 hours and increased again towards the end of the study (ANOVA p>0.05. Both groups exhibited a decrease in lung compliance and functional residual capacity values, but this was more pronounced in group I. Pplat increased in group I (ANOVA p = 0.02. Inhalation of dry gas caused histological lesions in the entire respiratory tract, including pulmonary parenchyma, to a greater extent than humidified gas. Humidification of inspired gases can attenuate damage associated with mechanical ventilation.

  1. Respiratory mechanics and plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 6 are affected by gas humidification during mechanical ventilation in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Jiménez, Claudia; García-Torrentera, Rogelio; Olmos-Zúñiga, J Raúl; Jasso-Victoria, Rogelio; Gaxiola-Gaxiola, Miguel O; Baltazares-Lipp, Matilde; Gutiérrez-González, Luis H

    2014-01-01

    The use of dry gases during mechanical ventilation has been associated with the risk of serious airway complications. The goal of the present study was to quantify the plasma levels of TNF-alpha and IL-6 and to determine the radiological, hemodynamic, gasometric, and microscopic changes in lung mechanics in dogs subjected to short-term mechanical ventilation with and without humidification of the inhaled gas. The experiment was conducted for 24 hours in 10 dogs divided into two groups: Group I (n = 5), mechanical ventilation with dry oxygen dispensation, and Group II (n = 5), mechanical ventilation with oxygen dispensation using a moisture chamber. Variance analysis was used. No changes in physiological, hemodynamic, or gasometric, and radiographic constants were observed. Plasma TNF-alpha levels increased in group I, reaching a maximum 24 hours after mechanical ventilation was initiated (ANOVA p = 0.77). This increase was correlated to changes in mechanical ventilation. Plasma IL-6 levels decreased at 12 hours and increased again towards the end of the study (ANOVA p>0.05). Both groups exhibited a decrease in lung compliance and functional residual capacity values, but this was more pronounced in group I. Pplat increased in group I (ANOVA p = 0.02). Inhalation of dry gas caused histological lesions in the entire respiratory tract, including pulmonary parenchyma, to a greater extent than humidified gas. Humidification of inspired gases can attenuate damage associated with mechanical ventilation.

  2. Model-based setting of inspiratory pressure and respiratory rate in pressure-controlled ventilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schranz, C; Möller, K; Becher, T; Schädler, D; Weiler, N

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation carries the risk of ventilator-induced-lung-injury (VILI). To minimize the risk of VILI, ventilator settings should be adapted to the individual patient properties. Mathematical models of respiratory mechanics are able to capture the individual physiological condition and can be used to derive personalized ventilator settings. This paper presents model-based calculations of inspiration pressure (p I ), inspiration and expiration time (t I , t E ) in pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV) and a retrospective evaluation of its results in a group of mechanically ventilated patients. Incorporating the identified first order model of respiratory mechanics in the basic equation of alveolar ventilation yielded a nonlinear relation between ventilation parameters during PCV. Given this patient-specific relation, optimized settings in terms of minimal p I and adequate t E can be obtained. We then retrospectively analyzed data from 16 ICU patients with mixed pathologies, whose ventilation had been previously optimized by ICU physicians with the goal of minimization of inspiration pressure, and compared the algorithm's ‘optimized’ settings to the settings that had been chosen by the physicians. The presented algorithm visualizes the patient-specific relations between inspiration pressure and inspiration time. The algorithm's calculated results highly correlate to the physician's ventilation settings with r = 0.975 for the inspiration pressure, and r = 0.902 for the inspiration time. The nonlinear patient-specific relations of ventilation parameters become transparent and support the determination of individualized ventilator settings according to therapeutic goals. Thus, the algorithm is feasible for a variety of ventilated ICU patients and has the potential of improving lung-protective ventilation by minimizing inspiratory pressures and by helping to avoid the build-up of clinically significant intrinsic positive end

  3. Online model checking for monitoring surrogate-based respiratory motion tracking in radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoni, Sven-Thomas; Rinast, Jonas; Ma, Xintao; Schupp, Sibylle; Schlaefer, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    Correlation between internal and external motion is critical for respiratory motion compensation in radiosurgery. Artifacts like coughing, sneezing or yawning or changes in the breathing pattern can lead to misalignment between beam and tumor and need to be detected to interrupt the treatment. We propose online model checking (OMC), a model-based verification approach from the field of formal methods, to verify that the breathing motion is regular and the correlation holds. We demonstrate that OMC may be more suitable for artifact detection than the prediction error. We established a sinusoidal model to apply OMC to the verification of respiratory motion. The method was parameterized to detect deviations from typical breathing motion. We analyzed the performance on synthetic data and on clinical episodes showing large correlation error. In comparison, we considered the prediction error of different state-of-the-art methods based on least mean squares (LMS; normalized LMS, nLMS; wavelet-based multiscale autoregression, wLMS), recursive least squares (RLSpred) and support vector regression (SVRpred). On synthetic data, OMC outperformed wLMS by at least 30 % and SVRpred by at least 141 %, detecting 70 % of transitions. No artifacts were detected by nLMS and RLSpred. On patient data, OMC detected 23-49 % of the episodes correctly, outperforming nLMS, wLMS, RLSpred and SVRpred by up to 544, 491, 408 and 258 %, respectively. On selected episodes, OMC detected up to 94 % of all events. OMC is able to detect changes in breathing as well as artifacts which previously would have gone undetected, outperforming prediction error-based detection. Synthetic data analysis supports the assumption that prediction is very insensitive to specific changes in breathing. We suggest using OMC as an additional safety measure ensuring reliable and fast stopping of irradiation.

  4. Model documentation Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) of the National Energy Modeling System is developed and maintained by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. This report documents the archived version of the NGTDM that was used to produce the natural gas forecasts presented in the Annual Energy Outlook 1996, (DOE/EIA-0383(96)). The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic approach, and provides detail on the methodology employed. Previously this report represented Volume I of a two-volume set. Volume II reported on model performance, detailing convergence criteria and properties, results of sensitivity testing, comparison of model outputs with the literature and/or other model results, and major unresolved issues

  5. Model documentation Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-26

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) of the National Energy Modeling System is developed and maintained by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. This report documents the archived version of the NGTDM that was used to produce the natural gas forecasts presented in the Annual Energy Outlook 1996, (DOE/EIA-0383(96)). The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic approach, and provides detail on the methodology employed. Previously this report represented Volume I of a two-volume set. Volume II reported on model performance, detailing convergence criteria and properties, results of sensitivity testing, comparison of model outputs with the literature and/or other model results, and major unresolved issues.

  6. Experimental Grey Box Model Identification of an Active Gas Bearing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theisen, Lukas Roy Svane; Pierart Vásquez, Fabián Gonzalo; Niemann, Hans Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Gas bearings have inherent dynamics that gives rise to low damping and potential instability at certain rotational speeds. Required damping and stabilization properties can be achieved by active ow control if bearing parameters are known. This paper deals with identifacation of parameters...... in a dynamic model of an active gas bearing and subsequent control loop design. A grey box model is determined based on experiments where piezo actuated valves are used to perturb the journal and hence excite the rotor-bearing system. Such modelling from actuator to output is shown to effciently support...... controller design, in contrast to impact models that focus on resonance dynamics. The identified model is able to accurately reproduce the lateral dynamics of the rotor-bearing system in a desired operating range, in this case around the first two natural frequencies. The identified models are validated...

  7. A Computational Model for Predicting Gas Breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Zachary

    2017-10-01

    Pulsed-inductive discharges are a common method of producing a plasma. They provide a mechanism for quickly and efficiently generating a large volume of plasma for rapid use and are seen in applications including propulsion, fusion power, and high-power lasers. However, some common designs see a delayed response time due to the plasma forming when the magnitude of the magnetic field in the thruster is at a minimum. New designs are difficult to evaluate due to the amount of time needed to construct a new geometry and the high monetary cost of changing the power generation circuit. To more quickly evaluate new designs and better understand the shortcomings of existing designs, a computational model is developed. This model uses a modified single-electron model as the basis for a Mathematica code to determine how the energy distribution in a system changes with regards to time and location. By analyzing this energy distribution, the approximate time and location of initial plasma breakdown can be predicted. The results from this code are then compared to existing data to show its validity and shortcomings. Missouri S&T APLab.

  8. A simple method to reconstruct the molar mass signal of respiratory gas to assess small airways with a double-tracer gas single-breath washout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Port, Johannes; Tao, Ziran; Junger, Annika; Joppek, Christoph; Tempel, Philipp; Husemann, Kim; Singer, Florian; Latzin, Philipp; Yammine, Sophie; Nagel, Joachim H; Kohlhäufl, Martin

    2017-11-01

    For the assessment of small airway diseases, a noninvasive double-tracer gas single-breath washout (DTG-SBW) with sulfur hexafluoride (SF 6 ) and helium (He) as tracer components has been proposed. It is assumed that small airway diseases may produce typical ventilation inhomogeneities which can be detected within one single tidal breath, when using two tracer components. Characteristic parameters calculated from a relative molar mass (MM) signal of the airflow during the washout expiration phase are analyzed. The DTG-SBW signal is acquired by subtracting a reconstructed MM signal without tracer gas from the signal measured with an ultrasonic sensor during in- and exhalation of the double-tracer gas for one tidal breath. In this paper, a simple method to determine the reconstructed MM signal is presented. Measurements on subjects with and without obstructive lung diseases including the small airways have shown high reliability and reproducibility of this method.

  9. Lattice Boltzmann model for thermal binary-mixture gas flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jinfen; Prasianakis, Nikolaos I; Mantzaras, John

    2013-05-01

    A lattice Boltzmann model for thermal gas mixtures is derived. The kinetic model is designed in a way that combines properties of two previous literature models, namely, (a) a single-component thermal model and (b) a multicomponent isothermal model. A comprehensive platform for the study of various practical systems involving multicomponent mixture flows with large temperature differences is constructed. The governing thermohydrodynamic equations include the mass, momentum, energy conservation equations, and the multicomponent diffusion equation. The present model is able to simulate mixtures with adjustable Prandtl and Schmidt numbers. Validation in several flow configurations with temperature and species concentration ratios up to nine is presented.

  10. Power and gas flow models for monoenergetic neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fasolo, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    Large, ignition tokamak reactors (ITR, EPR, and beyond will require supplemental heating to achieve ignition. In the earlier machines, at least, this heating will probably be provided by monoenergetic neutral beams. These beams, with energies greater than or equal to 150 keV, will most likely be derived from D + or D - ions produced by direct extraction ion sources. A positive ion source will be followed by a bending magnet, a neutralizer, and a second bending magnet. The first magnet will remove molecular ions, and the second one atomic ions. Direct convertors will be used to recover energy from unused molecular and atomic ions. The first bending magnet may be omitted if D - ion sources are used. Models have been developed for power and gas flow in injectors which employ direct extraction D + or D - ion sources. The power flow model accounts explicitly for all beam losses in terms of line densities of gas along paths traversed by ions and neutrals and cross sections for dissociation and charge-changing collisions. The gas flow model uses the results of power flow calculations and known gas flows from sources and neutralizers to determine gas loads and pumping requirements in various parts of the injector

  11. Prediction of gas compressibility factor using intelligent models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Mohamadi-Baghmolaei

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The gas compressibility factor, also known as Z-factor, plays the determinative role for obtaining thermodynamic properties of gas reservoir. Typically, empirical correlations have been applied to determine this important property. However, weak performance and some limitations of these correlations have persuaded the researchers to use intelligent models instead. In this work, prediction of Z-factor is aimed using different popular intelligent models in order to find the accurate one. The developed intelligent models are including Artificial Neural Network (ANN, Fuzzy Interface System (FIS and Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy System (ANFIS. Also optimization of equation of state (EOS by Genetic Algorithm (GA is done as well. The validity of developed intelligent models was tested using 1038 series of published data points in literature. It was observed that the accuracy of intelligent predicting models for Z-factor is significantly better than conventional empirical models. Also, results showed the improvement of optimized EOS predictions when coupled with GA optimization. Moreover, of the three intelligent models, ANN model outperforms other models considering all data and 263 field data points of an Iranian offshore gas condensate with R2 of 0.9999, while the R2 for best empirical correlation was about 0.8334.

  12. Gas adsorption in active carbons and the slit-pore model 1: Pure gas adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweatman, M B; Quirke, N

    2005-05-26

    We describe procedures based on the polydisperse independent ideal slit-pore model, Monte Carlo simulation and density functional theory (a 'slab-DFT') for predicting gas adsorption and adsorption heats in active carbons. A novel feature of this work is the calibration of gas-surface interactions to a high surface area carbon, rather than to a low surface area carbon as in all previous work. Our models are used to predict the adsorption of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrogen, and hydrogen up to 50 bar in several active carbons at a range of near-ambient temperatures based on an analysis of a single 293 K carbon dioxide adsorption isotherm. The results demonstrate that these models are useful for relatively simple gases at near-critical or supercritical temperatures.

  13. An optimized in vitro model of the respiratory tract wall to study particle cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Fabian; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara M; Schurch, Samuel; Gehr, Peter

    2006-01-01

    As a part of the respiratory tissue barrier, lung epithelial cells play an important role against the penetration of the body by inhaled particulate foreign materials. In most cell culture models, which are designed to study particle-cell interactions, the cells are immersed in medium. This does not reflect the physiological condition of lung epithelial cells which are exposed to air, separated from it only by a very thin liquid lining layer with a surfactant film at the air-liquid interface. In this study, A549 epithelial cells were grown on microporous membranes in a two chamber system. After the formation of a confluent monolayer the cells were exposed to air. The morphology of the cells and the expression of tight junction proteins were studied with confocal laser scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Air-exposed cells maintained monolayer structure for 2 days, expressed tight junctions and developed transepithelial electrical resistance. Surfactant was produced and released at the apical side of the air-exposed epithelial cells. In order to study particle-cell interactions fluorescent 1 microm polystyrene particles were sprayed over the epithelial surface. After 4 h, 8.8% of particles were found inside the epithelium. This fraction increased to 38% after 24 h. During all observations, particles were always found in the cells but never between them. In this study, we present an in vitro model of the respiratory tract wall consisting of air-exposed lung epithelial cells covered by a liquid lining layer with a surfactant film to study particle-cell interactions.

  14. Off-gas Adsorption Model and Simulation - OSPREY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veronica J Rutledge

    2013-10-01

    The absence of industrial scale nuclear fuel reprocessing in the U.S. has precluded the necessary driver for developing the advanced simulation capability now prevalent in so many other countries. Thus, it is essential to model complex series of unit operations to simulate, understand, and predict inherent transient behavior. A capability of accurately simulating the dynamic behavior of advanced fuel cycle separation processes is expected to provide substantial cost savings and many technical benefits. To support this capability, a modeling effort focused on the off-gas treatment system of a used nuclear fuel recycling facility is in progress. The off-gas separation consists of a series of scrubbers and adsorption beds to capture constituents of interest. Dynamic models are being developed to simulate each unit operation involved so each unit operation can be used as a stand-alone model and in series with multiple others. Currently, an adsorption model has been developed within Multi-physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Off-gas Separation and REcoverY (OSPREY) models the adsorption of offgas constituents for dispersed plug flow in a packed bed under non-isothermal and non-isobaric conditions. Inputs to the model include gas composition, sorbent and column properties, equilibrium and kinetic data, and inlet conditions. The simulation outputs component concentrations along the column length as a function of time from which breakthrough data can be obtained. The breakthrough data can be used to determine bed capacity, which in turn can be used to size columns. In addition to concentration data, the model predicts temperature along the column length as a function of time and pressure drop along the column length. A description of the OSPREY model, results from krypton adsorption modeling and plans for modeling the behavior of iodine, xenon, and tritium will be discussed.

  15. Modelling and interpretation of gas detection using remote laser pointers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgkinson, J; van Well, B; Padgett, M; Pride, R D

    2006-04-01

    We have developed a quantitative model of the performance of laser pointer style gas leak detectors, which are based on remote detection of backscattered radiation. The model incorporates instrumental noise limits, the reflectivity of the target background surface and a mathematical description of gas leak dispersion in constant wind speed and turbulence conditions. We have investigated optimum instrument performance and limits of detection in simulated leak detection situations. We predict that the optimum height for instruments is at eye level or above, giving an operating range of 10 m or more for most background surfaces, in wind speeds of up to 2.5 ms(-1). For ground based leak sources, we find laser pointer measurements are dominated by gas concentrations over a short distance close to the target surface, making their readings intuitive to end users in most cases. This finding is consistent with the results of field trials.

  16. Off-gas adsorption model and simulation - OSPREY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutledge, V.J. [Idaho National Laboratory, P. O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2013-07-01

    A capability of accurately simulating the dynamic behavior of advanced fuel cycle separation processes is expected to provide substantial cost savings and many technical benefits. To support this capability, a modeling effort focused on the off-gas treatment system of a used nuclear fuel recycling facility is in progress. The off-gas separation consists of a series of scrubbers and adsorption beds to capture constituents of interest. Dynamic models are being developed to simulate each unit operation involved so each unit operation can be used as a stand-alone model and in series with multiple others. Currently, an adsorption model has been developed within Multi-physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Off-gas Separation and Recovery (OSPREY) models the adsorption of offgas constituents for dispersed plug flow in a packed bed under non-isothermal and non-isobaric conditions. Inputs to the model include gas composition, sorbent and column properties, equilibrium and kinetic data, and inlet conditions. The simulation outputs component concentrations along the column length as a function of time from which breakthrough data can be obtained. The breakthrough data can be used to determine bed capacity, which in turn can be used to size columns. In addition to concentration data, the model predicts temperature along the column length as a function of time and pressure drop along the column length. A description of the OSPREY model, results from krypton adsorption modeling and plans for modeling the behavior of iodine, xenon, and tritium will be discussed. (author)

  17. Aerobic fitness in patients with fibrositis. A controlled study of respiratory gas exchange and 133-xenon clearance from exercising muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, R.M.; Clark, S.R.; Goldberg, L.; Nelson, D.; Bonafede, R.P.; Porter, J.; Specht, D.

    1989-01-01

    Aerobic fitness was evaluated in 25 women with fibrositis, by having them exercise to volitional exhaustion on an electronically braked cycle ergometer. Compared with published standards, greater than 80% of the fibrositis patients were not physically fit, as assessed by maximal oxygen uptake. Compared with matched sedentary controls, fibrositis patients accurately perceived their level of exertion in relation to oxygen consumption and attained a similar level of lactic acidosis, as assessed by their respiratory quotient and ventilatory threshold. Exercising muscle blood flow was estimated by 133-xenon clearance in a subgroup of 16 fibrositis patients and compared with that in 16 matched sedentary controls; the fibrositis patients exhibited reduced 133-xenon clearance. These results indicate a need to include aerobic fitness as a matched variable in future controlled studies of fibrositis and suggest that the detraining phenomenon may be of relevance to the etiopathogenesis of the disease

  18. Impact of ethane and propane variation in natural gas on the performance of a model gas turbine combustor

    OpenAIRE

    Flores, RM; McDonell, VG; Samuelsen, GS

    2003-01-01

    In the area of stationary power generation, there exists a growing interest in understanding the role that gaseous fuel composition plays on the performance of natural gas-fired gas turbine systems. In this study, an atmospherically fired model gas turbine combustor with a fuel flexible fuel/air premixer is employed to investigate the impact of significant amounts of ethane and propane addition into a baseline natural gas fuel supply. The impacts of these various fuel compositions, in terms o...

  19. Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonnenthal Eric

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study investigates the generation of HCl and other acid gases from boiling calcium chloride dominated waters at atmospheric pressure, primarily using numerical modeling. The main focus of this investigation relates to the long-term geologic disposal of nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, where pore waters around waste-emplacement tunnels are expected to undergo boiling and evaporative concentration as a result of the heat released by spent nuclear fuel. Processes that are modeled include boiling of highly concentrated solutions, gas transport, and gas condensation accompanied by the dissociation of acid gases, causing low-pH condensate. Results Simple calculations are first carried out to evaluate condensate pH as a function of HCl gas fugacity and condensed water fraction for a vapor equilibrated with saturated calcium chloride brine at 50-150°C and 1 bar. The distillation of a calcium-chloride-dominated brine is then simulated with a reactive transport model using a brine composition representative of partially evaporated calcium-rich pore waters at Yucca Mountain. Results show a significant increase in boiling temperature from evaporative concentration, as well as low pH in condensates, particularly for dynamic systems where partial condensation takes place, which result in enrichment of HCl in condensates. These results are in qualitative agreement with experimental data from other studies. Conclusion The combination of reactive transport with multicomponent brine chemistry to study evaporation, boiling, and the potential for acid gas generation at the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is seen as an improvement relative to previously applied simpler batch evaporation models. This approach allows the evaluation of thermal, hydrological, and chemical (THC processes in a coupled manner, and modeling of settings much more relevant to actual field conditions than the distillation experiment considered. The actual

  20. MODELLING OF THE GAS DIFFUSION IN FLEXIBLE PIPELINES FOR OIL & GAS PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius STAN

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This presentation describes a model used to study gas diffusion through layers of flexible pipes by time. The temperature gradient pipe is considered as temperature dependent permeability rates. This model is coupled with a calculation that indicate changes in pressure and volume of vapors resulting in the annular space. Associated mathematical models and methods for solving the results obtained are presented in Math Soft with a user-friendly interface that helps in data entry and processing results. In this presentation will show the possibilities of this software.

  1. A Randomized Placebo Controlled Trial of Ibuprofen for Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in a Bovine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Paul; Behrens, Nicole; Carvallo Chaigneau, Francisco R.; McEligot, Heather; Agrawal, Karan; Newman, John W.; Anderson, Mark; Gershwin, Laurel J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of bronchiolitis and hospital admission in infants. An analogous disease occurs in cattle and costs US agriculture a billion dollars a year. RSV causes much of its morbidity indirectly via adverse effects of the host response to the virus. RSV is accompanied by elevated prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) which is followed by neutrophil led inflammation in the lung. Ibuprofen is a prototypical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that decreases PGE2 levels by inhibiting cyclooxygenase. Hypotheses We hypothesized that treatment of RSV with ibuprofen would decrease PGE2 levels, modulate the immune response, decrease clinical illness, and decrease the histopathological lung changes in a bovine model of RSV. We further hypothesized that viral replication would be unaffected. Methods We performed a randomized placebo controlled trial of ibuprofen in 16 outbred Holstein calves that we infected with RSV. We measured clinical scores, cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase and endocannabinoid products in plasma and mediastinal lymph nodes and interleukin (Il)-4, Il-13, Il-17 and interferon-γ in mediastinal lymph nodes. RSV shedding was measured daily and nasal Il-6, Il-8 and Il-17 every other day. The calves were necropsied on Day 10 post inoculation and histology performed. Results One calf in the ibuprofen group required euthanasia on Day 8 of infection for respiratory distress. Clinical scores (pibuprofen group. Ibuprofen decreased cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase, and cytochrome P450 products, and increased monoacylglycerols in lung lymph nodes. Ibuprofen modulated the immune response as measured by narrowed range of observed Il-13, Il-17 and IFN-γ gene expression in mediastinal lymph nodes. Lung histology was not different between groups, and viral shedding was increased in calves randomized to ibuprofen. Conclusions Ibuprofen decreased PGE2, modulated the immune response, and improved clinical outcomes. However lung

  2. Model-based dynamic control and optimization of gas networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofsten, Kai

    2001-07-01

    This work contributes to the research on control, optimization and simulation of gas transmission systems to support the dispatch personnel at gas control centres for the decision makings in the daily operation of the natural gas transportation systems. Different control and optimization strategies have been studied. The focus is on the operation of long distance natural gas transportation systems. Stationary optimization in conjunction with linear model predictive control using state space models is proposed for supply security, the control of quality parameters and minimization of transportation costs for networks offering transportation services. The result from the stationary optimization together with a reformulation of a simplified fluid flow model formulates a linear dynamic optimization model. This model is used in a finite time control and state constrained linear model predictive controller. The deviation from the control and the state reference determined from the stationary optimization is penalized quadratically. Because of the time varying status of infrastructure, the control space is also generally time varying. When the average load is expected to change considerably, a new stationary optimization is performed, giving a new state and control reference together with a new dynamic model that is used for both optimization and state estimation. Another proposed control strategy is a control and output constrained nonlinear model predictive controller for the operation of gas transmission systems. Here, the objective is also the security of the supply, quality control and minimization of transportation costs. An output vector is defined, which together with a control vector are both penalized quadratically from their respective references in the objective function. The nonlinear model predictive controller can be combined with a stationary optimization. At each sampling instant, a non convex nonlinear programming problem is solved giving a local minimum

  3. Modeling of diode pumped metastable rare gas lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zining; Yu, Guangqi; Wang, Hongyan; Lu, Qisheng; Xu, Xiaojun

    2015-06-01

    As a new kind of optically pumped gaseous lasers, diode pumped metastable rare gas lasers (OPRGLs) show potential in high power operation. In this paper, a multi-level rate equation based model of OPRGL is established. A qualitative agreement between simulation and Rawlins et al.'s experimental result shows the validity of the model. The key parameters' influences and energy distribution characteristics are theoretically studied, which is useful for the optimized design of high efficient OPRGLs.

  4. Negative heat capacity in the microcanonical lattice gas model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulminelli, G.; Duflot, V.; Chomaz, Ph.; Duflot, V.

    2000-02-01

    In this paper we study a microcanonical lattice gas model with different boundary conditions. Only if the partitions volume is let free to fluctuate and is not constrained by an external box the phase transition region is characterized by a negative branch for the heat capacity. We show that the caloric curve is not the proper way to look for the phase transition because it directly depends on the considered transformation. Conversely, kinetic energy fluctuations are shown to be a direct measure of the equation of state. The presence of abnormal fluctuations is a robust signature of the liquid gas phase transition. (authors)

  5. An integration scheme for stiff solid-gas reactor models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjarne A. Foss

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Many dynamic models encounter numerical integration problems because of a large span in the dynamic modes. In this paper we develop a numerical integration scheme for systems that include a gas phase, and solid and liquid phases, such as a gas-solid reactor. The method is based on neglecting fast dynamic modes and exploiting the structure of the algebraic equations. The integration method is suitable for a large class of industrially relevant systems. The methodology has proven remarkably efficient. It has in practice performed excellent and been a key factor for the success of the industrial simulator for electrochemical furnaces for ferro-alloy production.

  6. Lattice-gas model in kinetic theory of gas-solid interface processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovbin, Yu. K.

    The improvement of the experimental methods for investigating surface processes changes the existing ideas about the role of the different factors of the gas-solid system and the mechanisms of the processes. The recent studies have confirmed the conception of surface processes as the ones taking place in the condensed phases. At the same time, the surface processes generally are described by fairly rough models based on the law of mass action, which is true of the ideal systems. The contradiction is eliminated to a certain degree when a lattice-gas model which takes into account the proper volume of the adspecies and adspecies interaction is used. On this basis it is easy to consider the effect of the local environment on the activation barrier of an elementary process. This enables one to apply it extensively to be the atomic-molecular processes associated with a change in the spatial arrangement of the adspecies and their chemical conversion. The review describes the development of the kinetic theory of the surface processes at the gas-solid interface using on the lattice-gas model and its modern modifications. Applications of the theory to the adsorption-desorption processes and the catalytic reactions are considered. The reaction rates in the condensed phases and the role of the correlation effects of the interacting adspecies and the distribution of the system's components are described. The lattice-gas model helps us explain the empirical principles of the adsorption processes; a variable order of desorption rate; the splitting of the thermodesorption spectra on the homogeneous surfaces; an increase in the sticking coefficient with coverage at its small values; phase transitions in the adlayers and their effect on the adsorption-desorption rate and the diffusion coefficients; a great mutual effect of the adspecies of the different kinds on the rate of the elementary processes; the dependence of the course of a process on the conditions in which the initial

  7. Modeling Associations between Principals' Reported Indoor Environmental Quality and Students' Self-Reported Respiratory Health Outcomes Using GLMM and ZIP Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyinbo, Oluyemi; Matilainen, Markus; Turunen, Mari; Putus, Tuula; Shaughnessy, Richard; Haverinen-Shaughnessy, Ulla

    2016-03-30

    The aim of this paper was to examine associations between school building characteristics, indoor environmental quality (IEQ), and health responses using questionnaire data from both school principals and students. From 334 randomly sampled schools, 4248 sixth grade students from 297 schools participated in a questionnaire. From these schools, 134 principals returned questionnaires concerning 51 IEQ related questions of their school. Generalized linear mixed models (GLMM) were used to study the associations between IEQ indicators and existence of self-reported upper respiratory symptoms, while hierarchical Zero Inflated Poisson (ZIP)-models were used to model the number of symptoms. Significant associations were established between existence of upper respiratory symptoms and unsatisfactory classroom temperature during the heating season (ORs 1.45 for too hot and cold, and 1.27 for too cold as compared to satisfactory temperature) and dampness or moisture damage during the year 2006-2007 (OR: 1.80 as compared to no moisture damage), respectively. The number of upper respiratory symptoms was significantly associated with inadequate ventilation and dampness or moisture damage. A higher number of missed school days due to respiratory infections were reported in schools with inadequate ventilation (RR: 1.16). The school level IEQ indicator variables described in this paper could explain a relatively large part of the school level variation observed in the self-reported upper respiratory symptoms and missed school days due to respiratory infections among students.

  8. Extending the generalized Chaplygin gas model by using geometrothermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviles, Alejandro; Bastarrachea-Almodovar, Aztlán; Campuzano, Lorena; Quevedo, Hernando

    2012-09-01

    We use the formalism of geometrothermodynamics to derive fundamental thermodynamic equations that are used to construct general relativistic cosmological models. In particular, we show that the simplest possible fundamental equation, which corresponds in geometrothermodynamics to a system with no internal thermodynamic interaction, describes the different fluids of the standard model of cosmology. In addition, a particular fundamental equation with internal thermodynamic interaction is shown to generate a new cosmological model that correctly describes the dark sector of the Universe and contains as a special case the generalized Chaplygin gas model.

  9. Microeconomics of the ideal gas like market models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Anindya S.; Chakrabarti, Bikas K.

    2009-10-01

    We develop a framework based on microeconomic theory from which the ideal gas like market models can be addressed. A kinetic exchange model based on that framework is proposed and its distributional features have been studied by considering its moments. Next, we derive the moments of the CC model (Eur. Phys. J. B 17 (2000) 167) as well. Some precise solutions are obtained which conform with the solutions obtained earlier. Finally, an output market is introduced with global price determination in the model with some necessary modifications.

  10. Pediatric Specialty Care Model for Management of Chronic Respiratory Failure: Cost and Savings Implications and Misalignment With Payment Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Robert J; McManus, Michael L; Rodday, Angie Mae; Weidner, Ruth Ann; Parsons, Susan K

    2018-02-03

    To describe program design, costs, and savings implications of a critical care-based care coordination model for medically complex children with chronic respiratory failure. All program activities and resultant clinical outcomes were tracked over 4 years using an adapted version of the Care Coordination Measurement Tool. Patient characteristics, program activity, and acute care resource utilization were prospectively documented in the adapted version of the Care Coordination Measurement Tool and retrospectively cross-validated with hospital billing data. Impact on total costs of care was then estimated based on program outcomes and nationally representative administrative data. Tertiary children's hospital. Critical Care, Anesthesia, Perioperative Extension and Home Ventilation Program enrollees. None. The program provided care for 346 patients and families over the study period. Median age at enrollment was 6 years with more than half deriving secondary respiratory failure from a primary neuromuscular disease. There were 11,960 encounters over the study period, including 1,202 home visits, 673 clinic visits, and 4,970 telephone or telemedicine encounters. Half (n = 5,853) of all encounters involved a physician and 45% included at least one care coordination activity. Overall, we estimated that program interventions were responsible for averting 556 emergency department visits and 107 hospitalizations. Conservative monetization of these alone accounted for annual savings of $1.2-2 million or $407/pt/mo net of program costs. Innovative models, such as extension of critical care services, for high-risk, high-cost patients can result in immediate cost savings. Evaluation of financial implications of comprehensive care for high-risk patients is necessary to complement clinical and patient-centered outcomes for alternative care models. When year-to-year cost variability is high and cost persistence is low, these savings can be estimated from documentation within care

  11. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. The NGTDM is the model within the NEMS that represents the transmission, distribution, and pricing of natural gas. The model also includes representations of the end-use demand for natural gas, the production of domestic natural gas, and the availability of natural gas traded on the international market based on information received from other NEMS models. The NGTDM determines the flow of natural gas in an aggregate, domestic pipeline network, connecting domestic and foreign supply regions with 12 demand regions. The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic design, provides detail on the methodology employed, and describes the model inputs, outputs, and key assumptions. Subsequent chapters of this report provide: an overview of NGTDM; a description of the interface between the NEMS and NGTDM; an overview of the solution methodology of the NGTDM; the solution methodology for the Annual Flow Module; the solution methodology for the Distributor Tariff Module; the solution methodology for the Capacity Expansion Module; the solution methodology for the Pipeline Tariff Module; and a description of model assumptions, inputs, and outputs.

  12. A heterogeneous lattice gas model for simulating pedestrian evacuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiwei; Chen, Jianqiao; Zheng, Yaochen; Wei, Junhong

    2012-02-01

    Based on the cellular automata method (CA model) and the mobile lattice gas model (MLG model), we have developed a heterogeneous lattice gas model for simulating pedestrian evacuation processes in an emergency. A local population density concept is introduced first. The update rule in the new model depends on the local population density and the exit crowded degree factor. The drift D, which is one of the key parameters influencing the evacuation process, is allowed to change according to the local population density of the pedestrians. Interactions including attraction, repulsion, and friction between every two pedestrians and those between a pedestrian and the building wall are described by a nonlinear function of the corresponding distance, and the repulsion forces increase sharply as the distances get small. A critical force of injury is introduced into the model, and its effects on the evacuation process are investigated. The model proposed has heterogeneous features as compared to the MLG model or the basic CA model. Numerical examples show that the model proposed can capture the basic features of pedestrian evacuation, such as clogging and arching phenomena.

  13. Model documentation: Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System; Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-02-24

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is a component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. This report documents the archived version of NGTDM that was used to produce the natural gas forecasts used in support of the Annual Energy Outlook 1994, DOE/EIA-0383(94). The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic design, provides detail on the methodology employed, and describes the model inputs, outputs, and key assumptions. It is intended to fulfill the legal obligation of the EIA to provide adequate documentation in support of its models (Public Law 94-385, Section 57.b.2). This report represents Volume 1 of a two-volume set. (Volume 2 will report on model performance, detailing convergence criteria and properties, results of sensitivity testing, comparison of model outputs with the literature and/or other model results, and major unresolved issues.) Subsequent chapters of this report provide: (1) an overview of the NGTDM (Chapter 2); (2) a description of the interface between the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) and the NGTDM (Chapter 3); (3) an overview of the solution methodology of the NGTDM (Chapter 4); (4) the solution methodology for the Annual Flow Module (Chapter 5); (5) the solution methodology for the Distributor Tariff Module (Chapter 6); (6) the solution methodology for the Capacity Expansion Module (Chapter 7); (7) the solution methodology for the Pipeline Tariff Module (Chapter 8); and (8) a description of model assumptions, inputs, and outputs (Chapter 9).

  14. Exact solutions in a model of vertical gas migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silin, Dmitriy B.; Patzek, Tad W.; Benson, Sally M.

    2006-06-27

    This work is motivated by the growing interest in injectingcarbon dioxide into deep geological formations as a means of avoidingatmospheric emissions of carbon dioxide and consequent global warming.One of the key questions regarding the feasibility of this technology isthe potential rate of leakage out of the primary storage formation. Weseek exact solutions in a model of gas flow driven by a combination ofbuoyancy, viscous and capillary forces. Different combinations of theseforces and characteristic length scales of the processes lead todifferent time scaling and different types of solutions. In the case of athin, tight seal, where the impact of gravity is negligible relative tocapillary and viscous forces, a Ryzhik-type solution implies square-rootof time scaling of plume propagation velocity. In the general case, a gasplume has two stable zones, which can be described by travelling-wavesolutions. The theoretical maximum of the velocity of plume migrationprovides a conservative estimate for the time of vertical migration.Although the top of the plume has low gas saturation, it propagates witha velocity close to the theoretical maximum. The bottom of the plumeflows significantly more slowly at a higher gas saturation. Due to localheterogeneities, the plume can break into parts. Individual plumes alsocan coalesce and from larger plumes. The analytical results are appliedto studying carbon dioxide flow caused by leaks from deep geologicalformations used for CO2 storage. The results are also applicable formodeling flow of natural gas leaking from seasonal gas storage, or formodeling of secondary hydrocarbon migration.

  15. Simulation of Gas Transport in Tight/Shale Gas Reservoirs by a Multicomponent Model Based on PEBI Grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longjun Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The ultra-low permeability and nanosize pores of tight/shale gas reservoir would lead to non-Darcy flow including slip flow, transition flow, and free molecular flow, which cannot be described by traditional Darcy’s law. The organic content often adsorbs some gas content, while the adsorbed amount for different gas species is different. Based on these facts, we develop a new compositional model based on unstructured PEBI (perpendicular bisection grid, which is able to characterize non-Darcy flow including slip flow, transition flow, and free molecular flow and the multicomponent adsorption in tight/shale gas reservoirs. With the proposed model, we study the effect of non-Darcy flow, length of the hydraulic fracture, and initial gas composition on gas production. The results show both non-Darcy flow and fracture length have significant influence on gas production. Ignoring non-Darcy flow would underestimate 67% cumulative gas production in lower permeable gas reservoirs. Gas production increases with fracture length. In lower permeable reservoirs, gas production increases almost linearly with the hydraulic fracture length. However, in higher permeable reservoirs, the increment of the former gradually decreases with the increase in the latter. The results also show that the presence of CO2 in the formation would lower down gas production.

  16. Towards the simplest hydrodynamic lattice-gas model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boghosian, Bruce M; Love, Peter J; Meyer, David A

    2002-03-15

    It has been known since 1986 that it is possible to construct simple lattice-gas cellular automata whose hydrodynamics are governed by the Navier-Stokes equations in two dimensions. The simplest such model heretofore known has six bits of state per site on a triangular lattice. In this work, we demonstrate that it is possible to construct a model with only five bits of state per site on a Kagome lattice. Moreover, the model has a simple, deterministic set of collision rules and is easily implemented on a computer. In this work, we derive the equilibrium distribution function for this lattice-gas automaton and carry out the Chapman-Enskog analysis to determine the form of the Navier-Stokes equations.

  17. A New Empirical Model to Estimate Landfill Gas Pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Kamalan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Landfills are the most important producers of methane as human source. So, prediction of landfill gas generation is by far the most important concern of scientists, decision makers, and landfill owners as well as health authorities. Almost all the currently used models are based on Monod equation first order decay rate which is experimental while the main purpose of this research is to develop a numerical model. Methods: A real scale pilot landfill with 4500 tons of municipal solid waste has been designed, constructed, and operated for two years. Required measurements have been done to provide proper data on greenhouse gases emitted by the landfill and monitor its status such as internal temperature, leachate content, and its settlement during two years. Afterwards, weighted residual method has been used to develop the numerical model. Then, the newly mathematical method has been verified with data from another landfill. Results: Measurements showed that the minimum and maximum percentages of methane among landfill gas were 22.3 and 46.1%, respectively. These values for velocity of landfill gas are 0.3 and 0.48 meters per second, in that order. Conclusion: Since there is just 0.6 percent error in calculation as compared to real measurements from a landfill in California and most of the models used have ten percent error, this simple empirical numerical model is suggested to be utilized by scientists, decision makers, and landfill owners

  18. MODELING AND AVAILABILITY ANALYZES OF A COMPLEX GAS PIPELINE NETWORK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ainouche, A.; Ainouche, H.

    2007-07-01

    The network reliability, in the way of security of supply of international markets, is proved to be an essential criterion for the conservation of the market shares and the conquest of new customers. In relation with the importance and the existing configurations diversity of gas pipelines networks, the obtaining of a global availability model of a network is difficult to implement by the use of a classic approach based on the analysis of the whole of failure risks, the definition of their probability and the estimation of their impact in term of productivity. This because mainly of the huge dimensions of the phase space that would result from such a conception. To get round this problem we implemented a systemic type approach for the modeling of the availability of a complex gas pipelines network. The approach of modeling is of 'bottom-up' type. The model of coordination is a model of flow maximization whose formalization requires the representation of the gas pipeline network by the graphs theory. The developed tool can also be used as a stand of experimentation and to define by simulation the impact of every decision having the tendency to improve the availability of the network. (auth)

  19. Off-Gas Adsorption Model Capabilities and Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyon, Kevin L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Welty, Amy K. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Law, Jack [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ladshaw, Austin [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Yiacoumi, Sotira [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Tsouris, Costas [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Off-gas treatment is required to reduce emissions from aqueous fuel reprocessing. Evaluating the products of innovative gas adsorption research requires increased computational simulation capability to more effectively transition from fundamental research to operational design. Early modeling efforts produced the Off-Gas SeParation and REcoverY (OSPREY) model that, while efficient in terms of computation time, was of limited value for complex systems. However, the computational and programming lessons learned in development of the initial model were used to develop Discontinuous Galerkin OSPREY (DGOSPREY), a more effective model. Initial comparisons between OSPREY and DGOSPREY show that, while OSPREY does reasonably well to capture the initial breakthrough time, it displays far too much numerical dispersion to accurately capture the real shape of the breakthrough curves. DGOSPREY is a much better tool as it utilizes a more stable set of numerical methods. In addition, DGOSPREY has shown the capability to capture complex, multispecies adsorption behavior, while OSPREY currently only works for a single adsorbing species. This capability makes DGOSPREY ultimately a more practical tool for real world simulations involving many different gas species. While DGOSPREY has initially performed very well, there is still need for improvement. The current state of DGOSPREY does not include any micro-scale adsorption kinetics and therefore assumes instantaneous adsorption. This is a major source of error in predicting water vapor breakthrough because the kinetics of that adsorption mechanism is particularly slow. However, this deficiency can be remedied by building kinetic kernels into DGOSPREY. Another source of error in DGOSPREY stems from data gaps in single species, such as Kr and Xe, isotherms. Since isotherm data for each gas is currently available at a single temperature, the model is unable to predict adsorption at temperatures outside of the set of data currently

  20. Solid-Gas Coupling Model for Coal-Rock Mass Deformation and Pressure Relief Gas Flow in Protection Layer Mining

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Zhuohui; Feng, Tao; Yuan, Zhigang; Xie, Donghai; Chen, Wei

    2018-01-01

    The solid-gas coupling model for mining coal-rock mass deformation and pressure relief gas flow in protection layer mining is the key to determine deformation of coal-rock mass and migration law of pressure relief gas of protection layer mining in outburst coal seams. Based on the physical coupling process between coal-rock mass deformation and pressure-relief gas migration, the coupling variable of mining coal-rock mass, a part of governing equations of gas seepage field and deformation fiel...

  1. Estimating methane gas generation from Devil's swamp landfill using greenhouse gas emission models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyemi, Ayodeji Thompson

    Greenhouse gas (GHG) has been a key issue in the study, design, and management of landfills. Landfill gas (LFG) is considered either as a significant source of renewable energy (if extracted and processed accordingly) or significant source of pollution and risk (if not mitigated or processed). A municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill emits a significant amount of methane, a potent GHG. Thus, quantification and mitigation of GHG emissions is an important area of study in engineering and other sciences related to landfill technology and management. The present study will focus on estimating methane generation from Devils swamp landfill (DSLF), a closed landfill in Baton Rouge, LA. The landfill operated for 53 years (1940-1993) and contains both industrial and municipal waste products. Since the Clean Air Act of 1963, landfills are now classified as New Source Performance Standard (NSPS) waste (i.e., waste that will decompose to generate LFG). Currently, the DSLF is being used as source of renewable energy through the "Waste to Energy" program. For this study, to estimate the methane potential in the DSLF, it is important to determine the characteristics and classification of the landfill's wastes. The study uses and compares different GHG modeling tools---LandGEM, a multiphase model, and a simple first-order model---to estimate methane gas emission and compare results with the actual emissions from the DSLF. The sensitivity of the methane generation rate was analyzed by the methane generation models to assess the effects of variables such as initial conditions, specific growth rate, and reaction rate constants. The study concludes that methane (L0) and initial organic concentration in waste (k) are the most important parameters when estimating methane generation using the models.

  2. Gas Modelling in the Disc of HD 163296

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilling, I.; Woitke, P.; Meeus, G.; Mora, A.; Montesinos, B.; Riviere-Marichalar, P.; Eiroa, C.; Thi, W. -F.; Isella, A.; Roberge, A.; hide

    2011-01-01

    We present detailed model fits to observations of the disc around the Herbig Ae star HD 163296. This well-studied object has an age of approx. 4Myr, with evidence of a circumstellar disc extending out to approx. 540AU. We use the radiation thermo-chemical disc code ProDiMo to model the gas and dust in the circumstellar disc of HD 163296, and attempt to determine the disc properties by fitting to observational line and continuum data. These include new Herschel/PACS observations obtained as part of the open-time key program GASPS (Gas in Protoplanetary Systems), consisting of a detection of the [Oi] 63 m line and upper limits for several other far infrared lines. We complement this with continuum data and ground-based observations of the CO-12 3-2, 2-1 and CO-13 J=1-0 line transitions, as well as the H2 S(1) transition. We explore the effects of stellar ultraviolet variability and dust settling on the line emission, and on the derived disc properties. Our fitting efforts lead to derived gas/dust ratios in the range 9-100, depending on the assumptions made. We note that the line fluxes are sensitive in general to the degree of dust settling in the disc, with an increase in line flux for settled models. This is most pronounced in lines which are formed in the warm gas in the inner disc, but the low excitation molecular lines are also affected. This has serious implications for attempts to derive the disc gas mass from line observations. We derive fractional PAH abundances between 0.007 and 0.04 relative to ISM levels. Using a stellar and UV excess input spectrum based on a detailed analysis of observations, we find that the all observations are consistent with the previously assumed disc geometry

  3. Sorption Modeling and Verification for Off-Gas Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavlarides, Lawrence [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States); Yiacoumi, Sotira [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Tsouris, Costas [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Gabitto, Jorge [Prairie View Texas A& M; DePaoli, David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-12-20

    This project was successfully executed to provide valuable adsorption data and improve a comprehensive model developed in previous work by the authors. Data obtained were used in an integrated computer program to predict the behavior of adsorption columns. The model is supported by experimental data and has been shown to predict capture of off gas similar to that evolving during the reprocessing of nuclear waste. The computer program structure contains (a) equilibrium models of off-gases with the adsorbate; (b) mass-transfer models to describe off-gas mass transfer to a particle, diffusion through the pores of the particle, and adsorption on the active sites of the particle; and (c) incorporation of these models into fixed bed adsorption modeling, which includes advection through the bed. These models are being connected with the MOOSE (Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment) software developed at the Idaho National Laboratory through DGOSPREY (Discontinuous Galerkin Off-gas SeParation and REcoverY) computer codes developed in this project. Experiments for iodine and water adsorption have been conducted on reduced silver mordenite (Ag0Z) for single layered particles. Adsorption apparatuses have been constructed to execute these experiments over a useful range of conditions for temperatures ranging from ambient to 250°C and water dew points ranging from -69 to 19°C. Experimental results were analyzed to determine mass transfer and diffusion of these gases into the particles and to determine which models best describe the single and binary component mass transfer and diffusion processes. The experimental results were also used to demonstrate the capabilities of the comprehensive models developed to predict single-particle adsorption and transients of the adsorption-desorption processes in fixed beds. Models for adsorption and mass transfer have been developed to mathematically describe adsorption kinetics and transport via diffusion and advection

  4. Gas leak detection in infrared video with background modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiaoxia; Huang, Likun

    2018-03-01

    Background modeling plays an important role in the task of gas detection based on infrared video. VIBE algorithm is a widely used background modeling algorithm in recent years. However, the processing speed of the VIBE algorithm sometimes cannot meet the requirements of some real time detection applications. Therefore, based on the traditional VIBE algorithm, we propose a fast prospect model and optimize the results by combining the connected domain algorithm and the nine-spaces algorithm in the following processing steps. Experiments show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  5. Generalized Chaplygin gas model, supernovae, and cosmic topology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bento, M.C.; Bertolami, O.; Silva, P.T.; Reboucas, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    In this work we study to which extent the knowledge of spatial topology may place constraints on the parameters of the generalized Chaplygin gas (GCG) model for unification of dark energy and dark matter. By using both the Poincare dodecahedral and binary octahedral spaces as the observable spatial topologies, we examine the current type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) constraints on the GCG model parameters. We show that the knowledge of spatial topology does provide additional constraints on the A s parameter of the GCG model but does not lift the degeneracy of the α parameter

  6. A Novel Large Animal Model of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Induced by Mitochondrial Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Pablo G; Pasrija, Chetan; Mulligan, Matthew J; Wadhwa, Mandheer; Pratt, Diana L; Li, Tieluo; Gammie, James S; Kon, Zachary N; Pham, Si M; Griffith, Bartley P

    2017-12-01

    We aimed to create a reproducible lung injury model utilizing injection of mitochondrial damage-associated molecular products. Our goal was to characterize the pathophysiologic response to damage-associated molecular pattern mediated organ injury. There remain significant gaps in our understanding of acute respiratory distress syndrome, in part due to the lack of clinically applicable animal models of this disease. Animal models of noninfectious, tissue damage-induced lung injury are needed to understand the signals and responses associated with this injury. Ten pigs (35-45 kg) received an intravenous dose of disrupted mitochondrial products and were followed for 6 hours under general anesthesia. These animals were compared to a control group (n = 5) and a model of lung injury induced by bacterial products (lipopolysaccharide n = 5). Heart rate and temperature were significantly elevated in the mitochondrial product (204 ± 12 and 41 ± 1) and lipopolysaccharide groups (178 ± 18 and 42 ± 0.5) compared with controls (100 ± 13 and 38 ± 0.5) (P products and lipopolysaccharide groups compared with controls (170 ± 39, 196 ± 27, and 564 ± 75 mm Hg respectively, P = 0.001). Lung injury scoring of histological sections was significantly worse in mitochondrial and lipopolysaccharide groups compared with controls (mitochondrial-64 ± 6, lipopolysaccharide-54 ± 8, control-14 ± 1.5, P= 0.002). Our data demonstrated that the presence of mitochondrial products in the circulation leads to systemic inflammatory response and lung injury. In its acute phase lung injury induced by tissue or bacterial products is clinically indistinguishable.

  7. A Novel Respiratory Motion Perturbation Model Adaptable to Patient Breathing Irregularities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Amy [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wei, Jie [Department of Computer Science, City College of New York, New York, New York (United States); Gaebler, Carl P.; Huang, Hailiang; Olek, Devin [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Li, Guang, E-mail: lig2@mskcc.org [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: To develop a physical, adaptive motion perturbation model to predict tumor motion using feedback from dynamic measurement of breathing conditions to compensate for breathing irregularities. Methods and Materials: A novel respiratory motion perturbation (RMP) model was developed to predict tumor motion variations caused by breathing irregularities. This model contained 2 terms: the initial tumor motion trajectory, measured from 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images, and motion perturbation, calculated from breathing variations in tidal volume (TV) and breathing pattern (BP). The motion perturbation was derived from the patient-specific anatomy, tumor-specific location, and time-dependent breathing variations. Ten patients were studied, and 2 amplitude-binned 4DCT images for each patient were acquired within 2 weeks. The motion trajectories of 40 corresponding bifurcation points in both 4DCT images of each patient were obtained using deformable image registration. An in-house 4D data processing toolbox was developed to calculate the TV and BP as functions of the breathing phase. The motion was predicted from the simulation 4DCT scan to the treatment 4DCT scan, and vice versa, resulting in 800 predictions. For comparison, noncorrected motion differences and the predictions from a published 5-dimensional model were used. Results: The average motion range in the superoinferior direction was 9.4 ± 4.4 mm, the average ΔTV ranged from 10 to 248 mm{sup 3} (−26% to 61%), and the ΔBP ranged from 0 to 0.2 (−71% to 333%) between the 2 4DCT scans. The mean noncorrected motion difference was 2.0 ± 2.8 mm between 2 4DCT motion trajectories. After applying the RMP model, the mean motion difference was reduced significantly to 1.2 ± 1.8 mm (P=.0018), a 40% improvement, similar to the 1.2 ± 1.8 mm (P=.72) predicted with the 5-dimensional model. Conclusions: A novel physical RMP model was developed with an average accuracy of 1.2 ± 1.8 mm for

  8. TU-F-17A-03: An Analytical Respiratory Perturbation Model for Lung Motion Prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, G; Yuan, A [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Wei, J [City College of New York, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Breathing irregularity is common, causing unreliable prediction in tumor motion for correlation-based surrogates. Both tidal volume (TV) and breathing pattern (BP=ΔVthorax/TV, where TV=ΔVthorax+ΔVabdomen) affect lung motion in anterior-posterior and superior-inferior directions. We developed a novel respiratory motion perturbation (RMP) model in analytical form to account for changes in TV and BP in motion prediction from simulation to treatment. Methods: The RMP model is an analytical function of patient-specific anatomic and physiologic parameters. It contains a base-motion trajectory d(x,y,z) derived from a 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) at simulation and a perturbation term Δd(ΔTV,ΔBP) accounting for deviation at treatment from simulation. The perturbation is dependent on tumor-specific location and patient-specific anatomy. Eleven patients with simulation and treatment 4DCT images were used to assess the RMP method in motion prediction from 4DCT1 to 4DCT2, and vice versa. For each patient, ten motion trajectories of corresponding points in the lower lobes were measured in both 4DCTs: one served as the base-motion trajectory and the other as the ground truth for comparison. In total, 220 motion trajectory predictions were assessed. The motion discrepancy between two 4DCTs for each patient served as a control. An established 5D motion model was used for comparison. Results: The average absolute error of RMP model prediction in superior-inferior direction is 1.6±1.8 mm, similar to 1.7±1.6 mm from the 5D model (p=0.98). Some uncertainty is associated with limited spatial resolution (2.5mm slice thickness) and temporal resolution (10-phases). Non-corrected motion discrepancy between two 4DCTs is 2.6±2.7mm, with the maximum of ±20mm, and correction is necessary (p=0.01). Conclusion: The analytical motion model predicts lung motion with accuracy similar to the 5D model. The analytical model is based on physical relationships, requires no

  9. Version 2.0 of the European Gas Model. Changes and their impact on the German gas sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balmert, David; Petrov, Konstantin

    2015-01-01

    In January 2015 ACER, the European Agency for the Cooperation of Energy Regulators, presented an updated version of its target model for the inner-European natural gas market, also referred to as version 2.0 of the Gas Target Model. During 2014 the existing model, originally developed by the Council of European Energy Regulators (CEER) and launched in 2011, had been analysed, revised and updated in preparation of the new version. While it has few surprises to offer, the new Gas Target Model contains specifies and goes into greater detail on many elements of the original model. Some of the new content is highly relevant to the German gas sector, not least the deliberations on the current key issues, which are security of supply and the ability of the gas markets to function.

  10. Study on Fluid-solid Coupling Mathematical Models and Numerical Simulation of Coal Containing Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gang; Hao, Meng; Jin, Hongwei

    2018-02-01

    Based on coal seam gas migration theory under multi-physics field coupling effect, fluid-solid coupling model of coal seam gas was build using elastic mechanics, fluid mechanics in porous medium and effective stress principle. Gas seepage behavior under different original gas pressure was simulated. Results indicated that residual gas pressure, gas pressure gradient and gas low were bigger when original gas pressure was higher. Coal permeability distribution decreased exponentially when original gas pressure was lower than critical pressure. Coal permeability decreased rapidly first and then increased slowly when original pressure was higher than critical pressure.

  11. Mechanisms underlying gas exchange alterations in an experimental model of pulmonary embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.H.T. Ferreira

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine the ventilation/perfusion ratio that contributes to hypoxemia in pulmonary embolism by analyzing blood gases and volumetric capnography in a model of experimental acute pulmonary embolism. Pulmonary embolization with autologous blood clots was induced in seven pigs weighing 24.00 ± 0.6 kg, anesthetized and mechanically ventilated. Significant changes occurred from baseline to 20 min after embolization, such as reduction in oxygen partial pressures in arterial blood (from 87.71 ± 8.64 to 39.14 ± 6.77 mmHg and alveolar air (from 92.97 ± 2.14 to 63.91 ± 8.27 mmHg. The effective alveolar ventilation exhibited a significant reduction (from 199.62 ± 42.01 to 84.34 ± 44.13 consistent with the fall in alveolar gas volume that effectively participated in gas exchange. The relation between the alveolar ventilation that effectively participated in gas exchange and cardiac output (V Aeff/Q ratio also presented a significant reduction after embolization (from 0.96 ± 0.34 to 0.33 ± 0.17 fraction. The carbon dioxide partial pressure increased significantly in arterial blood (from 37.51 ± 1.71 to 60.76 ± 6.62 mmHg, but decreased significantly in exhaled air at the end of the respiratory cycle (from 35.57 ± 1.22 to 23.15 ± 8.24 mmHg. Exhaled air at the end of the respiratory cycle returned to baseline values 40 min after embolism. The arterial to alveolar carbon dioxide gradient increased significantly (from 1.94 ± 1.36 to 37.61 ± 12.79 mmHg, as also did the calculated alveolar (from 56.38 ± 22.47 to 178.09 ± 37.46 mL and physiological (from 0.37 ± 0.05 to 0.75 ± 0.10 fraction dead spaces. Based on our data, we conclude that the severe arterial hypoxemia observed in this experimental model may be attributed to the reduction of the V Aeff/Q ratio. We were also able to demonstrate that V Aeff/Q progressively improves after embolization, a fact attributed to the alveolar ventilation redistribution

  12. Chlorine gas inhalation: human clinical evidence of toxicity and experience in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Carl W; Martin, James G

    2010-07-01

    Humans can come into contact with chlorine gas during short-term, high-level exposures due to traffic or rail accidents, spills, or other disasters. By contrast, workplace and public (swimming pools, etc.) exposures are more frequently long-term, low-level exposures, occasionally punctuated by unintentional transient increases. Acute exposures can result in symptoms of acute airway obstruction including wheezing, cough, chest tightness, and/or dyspnea. These findings are fairly nonspecific, and might be present after exposures to a number of inhaled chemical irritants. Clinical signs, including hypoxemia, wheezes, rales, and/or abnormal chest radiographs may be present. More severely affected individuals may suffer acute lung injury (ALI) and/or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Up to 1% of exposed individuals die. Humidified oxygen and inhaled beta-adrenergic agents are appropriate therapies for victims with respiratory symptoms while assessments are underway. Inhaled bicarbonate and systemic or inhaled glucocorticoids also have been reported anecdotally to be beneficial. Chronic sequelae may include increased airways reactivity, which tends to diminish over time. Airways hyperreactivity may be more of a problem among those survivors that are older, have smoked, and/or have pre-existing chronic lung disease. Individuals suffering from irritant-induced asthma (IIA) due to workplace exposures to chlorine also tend to have similar characteristics, such as airways hyperresponsiveness to methacholine, and to be older and to have smoked. Other workplace studies, however, have indicated that workers exposed to chlorine dioxide/sulfur dioxide have tended to have increased risk for chronic bronchitis and/or recurrent wheezing attacks (one or more episodes) but not asthma, while those exposed to ozone have a greater incidence of asthma. Specific biomarkers for acute and chronic exposures to chlorine gas are currently lacking. Animal models for chlorine gas

  13. An Updated Gas/grain Sulfur Network for Astrochemical Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laas, Jacob; Caselli, Paola

    2017-06-01

    Sulfur is a chemical element that enjoys one of the highest cosmic abundances. However, it has traditionally played a relatively minor role in the field of astrochemistry, being drowned out by other chemistries after it depletes from the gas phase during the transition from a diffuse cloud to a dense one. A wealth of laboratory studies have provided clues to its rich chemistry in the condensed phase, and most recently, a report by a team behind the Rosetta spacecraft has significantly helped to unveil its rich cometary chemistry. We have set forth to use this information to greatly update/extend the sulfur reactions within the OSU gas/grain astrochemical network in a systematic way, to provide more realistic chemical models of sulfur for a variety of interstellar environments. We present here some results and implications of these models.

  14. Development of odorous gas model using municipal solid waste emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Nahar bin Othman; Muhd Noor Muhd Yunus; Ku Halim Ku Hamid

    2010-01-01

    The impact of ambient odour in the vicinity of the Semenyih MSW processing plant, commonly known as RDF plant, can be very negative to the nearby population, causing public restlessness and consequently affecting the business operation and sustainability of the plant. The precise source of the odour, types, emission level and the meteorological conditions are needed to predict and established the ambient odour level at the perimeter fence of the plant and address it with respect to the ambient standards. To develop the odour gas model for the purpose of treatment is very compulsory because in MSW odour it contain many component of chemical that contribute the smell. Upon modelling using an established package as well as site measurements, the odour level at the perimeter fence of the plant was deduced and found to be marginally high, above the normal ambient level. Based on this issue, a study was made to model odour using Ausplume Model. This paper will address and discuss the measurement of ambient gas odour, the dispersion modelling to establish the critical ambient emission level, as well as experimental validation using a simulated odour. The focus will be made on exploring the use of Ausplume modelling to develop the pattern of odour concentrations for various condition and times, as well as adapting the model for MSW odour controls. (author)

  15. Modeling of modification experiments involving neutral-gas release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhardt, P.A.

    1983-01-01

    Many experiments involve the injection of neutral gases into the upper atmosphere. Examples are critical velocity experiments, MHD wave generation, ionospheric hole production, plasma striation formation, and ion tracing. Many of these experiments are discussed in other sessions of the Active Experiments Conference. This paper limits its discussion to: (1) the modeling of the neutral gas dynamics after injection, (2) subsequent formation of ionosphere holes, and (3) use of such holes as experimental tools

  16. Local lattice-gas model for immiscible fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.; Doolen, G.D.; Eggert, K.; Grunau, D.; Loh, E.Y.

    1991-01-01

    We present a lattice-gas model for two-dimensional immiscible fluid flows with surface tension that uses strictly local collision rules. Instead of using a local total color flux as Somers and Rem [Physica D 47, 39 (1991)], we use local colored holes to be the memory of particles of the same color. Interactions between walls and fluids are included that produce arbitrary contact angles

  17. Transmission of human respiratory syncytial virus in the immunocompromised ferret model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Waal, L. (Leon); S.L. Smits (Saskia); E.J.B. Veldhuis Kroeze (Edwin); G. van Amerongen (Geert); Pohl, M.O. (Marie O.); Osterhaus, A.D.M.E. (Albert D. M. E.); K.J. Stittelaar (Koert)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractHuman respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) causes substantial morbidity and mortality in vulnerable patients, such as the very young, the elderly, and immunocompromised individuals of any age. Nosocomial transmission of HRSV remains a serious challenge in hospital settings, with

  18. Global, regional, and national disease burden estimates of acute lower respiratory infections due to respiratory syncytial virus in young children in 2015 : A systematic review and modelling study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shi, Ting; McAllister, David A.; O'Brien, Katherine L.; Simoes, Eric A. F.; Madhi, Shabir A.; Gessner, Bradford D.; Polack, Fernando P.; Balsells, Evelyn; Acacio, Sozinho; Aguayo, Claudia; Alassani, Issifou; Ali, Asad; Antonio, Martin; Awasthi, Shally; Awori, Juliet O.; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo; Baggett, Henry C.; Baillie, Vicky L.; Balmaseda, Angel; Barahona, Alfredo; Basnet, Sudha; Bassat, Quique; Basualdo, Wilma; Bigogo, Godfrey; Bont, Louis; Breiman, Robert F.; Brooks, W. Abdullah; Broor, Shobha; Bruce, Nigel; Bruden, Dana; Buchy, Philippe; Campbell, Stuart; Carosone-Link, Phyllis; Chadha, Mandeep; Chipeta, James; Chou, Monidarin; Clara, Wilfrido; Cohen, Cheryl; de Cuellar, Elizabeth; Dang, Duc Anh; Dash-yandag, Budragchaagiin; Deloria-Knoll, Maria; Dherani, Mukesh; Eap, Tekchheng; Ebruke, Bernard E.; Echavarria, Marcela; de Freitas Lázaro Emediato, Carla Cecília; Fasce, Rodrigo A.; Feikin, Daniel R.; Feng, Luzhao; Gentile, Angela; Gordon, Aubree; Goswami, Doli; Goyet, Sophie; Groome, Michelle J; Halasa, Natasha; Hirve, Siddhivinayak; Homaira, Nusrat; Howie, Stephen R.C.; Jara, Jorge; Jroundi, Imane; Kartasasmita, Cissy B.; Khuri-Bulos, Najwa; Kotloff, Karen L.; Krishnan, Anand; Libster, Romina; Lopez, Olga; Lucero, Marilla G.; Lucion, Florencia; Lupisan, Socorro P.; Marcone, Debora N.; McCracken, John P.; Mejia, Mario; Moisi, Jennifer C.; Montgomery, Joel M.; Moore, David P.; Moraleda, Cinta; Moyes, Jocelyn; Munywoki, Patrick; Mutyara, Kuswandewi; Nicol, Mark P.; Nokes, D. James; Nymadawa, Pagbajabyn; da Costa Oliveira, Maria Tereza; Oshitani, Histoshi; Pandey, Nitin; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Phillips, Lia N.; Picot, Valentina Sanchez; Rahman, Mustafizur; Rakoto-Andrianarivelo, Mala; Rasmussen, Zeba A.; Rath, Barbara A.; Robinson, Annick; Romero, Candice; Russomando, Graciela; Salimi, Vahid; Sawatwong, Pongpun; Scheltema, Nienke; Schweiger, Brunhilde; Scott, J. Anthony G.; Seidenberg, Phil; Shen, Kunling; Singleton, Rosalyn; Sotomayor, Viviana; Strand, Tor A.; Sutanto, Agustinus; Sylla, Mariam; Tapia, Milagritos D.; Thamthitiwat, Somsak; Thomas, Elizabeth D.; Tokarz, Rafal; Turner, Claudia; Venter, Marietjie; Waicharoen, Sunthareeya; Wang, Jianwei; Watthanaworawit, Wanitda; Yoshida, Lay Myint; Yu, Hongjie; Zar, Heather J.; Campbell, Harry; Nair, Harish

    2017-01-01

    Background: We have previously estimated that respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was associated with 22% of all episodes of (severe) acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI) resulting in 55 000 to 199 000 deaths in children younger than 5 years in 2005. In the past 5 years, major research activity on

  19. A new gas cooling model for semi-analytic galaxy formation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jun; Lacey, Cedric G.; Frenk, Carlos S.

    2018-03-01

    Semi-analytic galaxy formation models are widely used to gain insight into the astrophysics of galaxy formation and in model testing, parameter space searching and mock catalogue building. In this work, we present a new model for gas cooling in haloes in semi-analytic models, which improves over previous cooling models in several ways. Our new treatment explicitly includes the evolution of the density profile of the hot gas driven by the growth of the dark matter halo and by the dynamical adjustment of the gaseous corona as gas cools down. The effect of the past cooling history on the current mass cooling rate is calculated more accurately, by doing an integral over the past history. The evolution of the hot gas angular momentum profile is explicitly followed, leading to a self-consistent and more detailed calculation of the angular momentum of the cooled down gas. This model predicts higher cooled down masses than the cooling models previously used in GALFORM, closer to the predictions of the cooling models in L-GALAXIES and MORGANA, even though those models are formulated differently. It also predicts cooled down angular momenta that are higher than in previous GALFORM cooling models, but generally lower than the predictions of L-GALAXIES and MORGANA. When used in a full galaxy formation model, this cooling model improves the predictions for early-type galaxy sizes in GALFORM.

  20. Planning the network of gas pipelines through modeling tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sucupira, Marcos L.L.; Lutif Filho, Raimundo B. [Companhia de Gas do Ceara (CEGAS), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Natural gas is a source of non-renewable energy used by different sectors of the economy of Ceara. Its use may be industrial, residential, commercial, as a source of automotive fuel, as a co-generation of energy and as a source for generating electricity from heat. For its practicality this energy has a strong market acceptance and provides a broad list of clients to fit their use, which makes it possible to reach diverse parts of the city. Its distribution requires a complex network of pipelines that branches throughout the city to meet all potential clients interested in this source of energy. To facilitate the design, analysis, expansion and location of bottlenecks and breaks in the distribution network, a modeling software is used that allows the network manager of the net to manage the various information about the network. This paper presents the advantages of modeling the gas distribution network of natural gas companies in Ceara, showing the tool used, the steps necessary for the implementation of the models, the advantages of using the software and the findings obtained with its use. (author)

  1. Simulation of Gas Transport in Tight/Shale Gas Reservoirs by a Multicomponent Model Based on PEBI Grid

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Longjun; Li, Daolun; Wang, Lei; Lu, Detang

    2015-01-01

    The ultra-low permeability and nanosize pores of tight/shale gas reservoir would lead to non-Darcy flow including slip flow, transition flow, and free molecular flow, which cannot be described by traditional Darcy’s law. The organic content often adsorbs some gas content, while the adsorbed amount for different gas species is different. Based on these facts, we develop a new compositional model based on unstructured PEBI (perpendicular bisection) grid, which is able to characterize non-Darcy ...

  2. A phantom model demonstration of tomotherapy dose painting delivery, including managed respiratory motion without motion management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kissick, Michael W; Mo Xiaohu; McCall, Keisha C; Mackie, Thomas R [Department of Medical Physics, Wisconsin Institutes for Medical Research, 111 Highland Avenue, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53705 (United States); Schubert, Leah K [Radiation Oncology Department, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198 (United States); Westerly, David C, E-mail: mwkissick@wisc.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States)

    2010-05-21

    The aim of the study was to demonstrate a potential alternative scenario for accurate dose-painting (non-homogeneous planned dose) delivery at 1 cm beam width with helical tomotherapy (HT) in the presence of 1 cm, three-dimensional, intra-fraction respiratory motion, but without any active motion management. A model dose-painting experiment was planned and delivered to the average position (proper phase of a 4DCT scan) with three spherical PTV levels to approximate dose painting to compensate for hypothetical hypoxia in a model lung tumor. Realistic but regular motion was produced with the Washington University 4D Motion Phantom. A small spherical Virtual Water(TM) phantom was used to simulate a moving lung tumor inside of the LUNGMAN(TM) anthropomorphic chest phantom to simulate realistic heterogeneity uncertainties. A piece of 4 cm Gafchromic EBT(TM) film was inserted into the 6 cm diameter sphere. TomoTherapy, Inc., DQA(TM) software was used to verify the delivery performed on a TomoTherapy Hi-Art II(TM) device. The dose uncertainty in the purposeful absence of motion management and in the absence of large, low frequency drifts (periods greater than the beam width divided by the couch velocity) or randomness in the breathing displacement yields very favorable results. Instead of interference effects, only small blurring is observed because of the averaging of many breathing cycles and beamlets and the avoidance of interference. Dose painting during respiration with helical tomotherapy is feasible in certain situations without motion management. A simple recommendation is to make respiration as regular as possible without low frequency drifting. The blurring is just small enough to suggest that it may be acceptable to deliver without motion management if the motion is equal to the beam width or smaller (at respiration frequencies) when registered to the average position.

  3. A phantom model demonstration of tomotherapy dose painting delivery, including managed respiratory motion without motion management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kissick, Michael W; Mo Xiaohu; McCall, Keisha C; Mackie, Thomas R; Schubert, Leah K; Westerly, David C

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to demonstrate a potential alternative scenario for accurate dose-painting (non-homogeneous planned dose) delivery at 1 cm beam width with helical tomotherapy (HT) in the presence of 1 cm, three-dimensional, intra-fraction respiratory motion, but without any active motion management. A model dose-painting experiment was planned and delivered to the average position (proper phase of a 4DCT scan) with three spherical PTV levels to approximate dose painting to compensate for hypothetical hypoxia in a model lung tumor. Realistic but regular motion was produced with the Washington University 4D Motion Phantom. A small spherical Virtual Water(TM) phantom was used to simulate a moving lung tumor inside of the LUNGMAN(TM) anthropomorphic chest phantom to simulate realistic heterogeneity uncertainties. A piece of 4 cm Gafchromic EBT(TM) film was inserted into the 6 cm diameter sphere. TomoTherapy, Inc., DQA(TM) software was used to verify the delivery performed on a TomoTherapy Hi-Art II(TM) device. The dose uncertainty in the purposeful absence of motion management and in the absence of large, low frequency drifts (periods greater than the beam width divided by the couch velocity) or randomness in the breathing displacement yields very favorable results. Instead of interference effects, only small blurring is observed because of the averaging of many breathing cycles and beamlets and the avoidance of interference. Dose painting during respiration with helical tomotherapy is feasible in certain situations without motion management. A simple recommendation is to make respiration as regular as possible without low frequency drifting. The blurring is just small enough to suggest that it may be acceptable to deliver without motion management if the motion is equal to the beam width or smaller (at respiration frequencies) when registered to the average position.

  4. Diaphragm Muscle Adaptation to Sustained Hypoxia: Lessons from Animal Models with Relevance to High Altitude and Chronic Respiratory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Lewis

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The diaphragm is the primary inspiratory pump muscle of breathing. Notwithstanding its critical role in pulmonary ventilation, the diaphragm like other striated muscles is malleable in response to physiological and pathophysiological stressors, with potential implications for the maintenance of respiratory homeostasis. This review considers hypoxic adaptation of the diaphragm muscle, with a focus on functional, structural, and metabolic remodeling relevant to conditions such as high altitude and chronic respiratory disease. On the basis of emerging data in animal models, we posit that hypoxia is a significant driver of respiratory muscle plasticity, with evidence suggestive of both compensatory and deleterious adaptations in conditions of sustained exposure to low oxygen. Cellular strategies driving diaphragm remodeling during exposure to sustained hypoxia appear to confer hypoxic tolerance at the expense of peak force-generating capacity, a key functional parameter that correlates with patient morbidity and mortality. Changes include, but are not limited to: redox-dependent activation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF and MAP kinases; time-dependent carbonylation of key metabolic and functional proteins; decreased mitochondrial respiration; activation of atrophic signaling and increased proteolysis; and, altered functional performance. Diaphragm muscle weakness may be a signature effect of sustained hypoxic exposure. We discuss the putative role of reactive oxygen species as mediators of both advantageous and disadvantageous adaptations of diaphragm muscle to sustained hypoxia, and the role of antioxidants in mitigating adverse effects of chronic hypoxic stress on respiratory muscle function.

  5. Thermodynamic modeling of a gas micro turbine power system; Modelagem termodinamica de uma microturbina a gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venson, Giuliano Gardolinski [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica], e-mail: venson@ufmg.br; Barros, Jose Eduardo Mautone; Pereira, Josemar Figueiredo [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais (CEFET-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: mautone@des.cefetmg.br, e-mail: josemar_cefet@yahoo.com.br

    2006-07-01

    This work presents the modeling of a gas microturbine power generator. The microturbine consists in a small thermo-electrical power unit, design for combined heat and power generation. The unit has an electric generator, coaxially connected with a turbocharger, which one is driven by a fuel burner. The system also incorporates an air regenerator, used for pre-heat the combustion air, and a heat exchanger, used for water heating. The objective of the modeling is the attainment of the electrical performance and the operational limits for the microturbine in function of the subsystems operational conditions. The modeling is based on the first law of the thermodynamic, using specific models for each component. In the combustion chamber is used a model that takes the fuel injection properties, as absolute pressure and temperature. A semi-empirical model, based in the modified Euler equation, is used in the turbocharger. In the air regenerator and heat exchanger, the method of mean logarithmic temperature difference is used. Through the modeling of a commercial microturbine, reference values obtained were used in some subsystems of a new microturbine. The results for this new microturbine in development, based in automotive turbochargers, indicate a nominal electrical power of 38 kW with electrical efficiency of 33% and global efficiency of 73%. (author)

  6. Modeling Respiratory Gas Dynamics in the Aviator’s Breathing System. Volume 2. Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-01

    INITIAL VALUE FOR KJ, KBEO,DEPENDS ON C WHETHER IT IS FOR INHALATION OR EXHALATION. C Jul KJGKJBEG IWJMTSO 2020 ICOWIT=IC0JNT~1 FCJnFCNIN4(J- 1)’DFC...PRESSM(i a PAMS FLOUi) a 0.O0 DFDTCI) a 0.00 DVDT(C) a O.DO OPOYTi)- 0.00 END00 C ... C... Comlpute Starting values for derivatives by calling DERV C...a DMINCPREGOPRESS(1)) END IF RNQAO a PRESS(2)*GlAO/RUNIV/TBCDY ! Density Oronasat cavity IF (DNMD0T,TC) - TPAUSE .GE. 0.DO) THEN XT DNOD( TTC

  7. Gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The French government has decided to modify the conditions of extension of local natural gas authorities to neighbouring districts. The European Union is studying the conditions of internal gas market with the objective of more open markets although considering public service requirements

  8. Modeling beam-front dynamics at low gas pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, R.J.; Yu, S.

    1982-01-01

    The dynamics of space charge neutralization at the front of an intense self-focused electron beam pulse exhibits important differences in different gas pressure regimes. At very low pressures, the beam front is in the so-called ion-focused regime (IFR) where all secondary electrons are expelled from the beam region by the radial electric field without causing significant additional ionization. We estimate the upper pressure boundary of this regime by considering the distance scale length for cascade (avalanche) ionization. Data from the FX-25 diode experiments indicate a critical transition pressure (P/sub c/) that agrees with this estimate and with its scaling among various gas types. Normal mobility-limited treatments (local conductivity models) of the secondary electrons at the beam front are not justified until the gas pressure is 10 to 50 times higher than P/sub c/, due to runaway of these secondary electrons in the strong space-charge electric field at the lower pressures. The main conclusion of this study is that a non-local phase space (Boltzmann) treatment of the secondary electrons is required to accurately describe these different beam front regimes and the transitions between them; such a code model is currently under development

  9. Mathematical modelling of mixing in gas stirred ladles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez-Argaez, M. A.; Tapia, J.; Espinoza, J.; Alcantar, E.

    2006-01-01

    In this work injection of air into a water physical model of an industrial steel ladle was mathematically simulated. Calculations were developed based on a multiphase Eulerian fluid flow model involving principles of conservation of mass, momentum and chemical species on both phases in order to predict turbulent flow patterns and mixing times in both centric and eccentric injections. Mixing phenomena was addressed by injecting a tracer centric and eccentric injections. Mixing phenomena was addressed by injecting a tracer and it was analyzed the effect of the gas flow rate, injector position, number of injectors and geometry of the ladle on the mixing time. It was concluded that the optimum injection conditions is using a single injector at 2/3 of the radius with high gas flow rates. It is shown that incrementing the number of injectors is detrimental on mixing. Finally, quantitative correlations of mixing time as a function of gas flow rate, position of the injectors, geometry of the ladle and mass of liquid were obtained. (Author)

  10. Electro-thermal modeling of a microbridge gas sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manginell, R.P.; Smith, J.H.; Ricco, A.J.; Hughes, R.C.; Moreno, D.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Huber, R.J. [Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    1997-08-01

    Fully CMOS-compatible, surface-micromachined polysilicon microbridges have been designed, fabricated, and tested for use in catalytic, calorimetric gas sensing. To improve sensor behavior, extensive electro-thermal modeling efforts were undertaken using SPICE. The validity of the SPICE model was verified comparing its simulated behavior with experiment. Temperature distribution of an electrically heated microbridges was measured using an infrared microscope. Comparisons among the measured distribution, the SPICE simulation, and distributions obtained by analytical methods show that heating at the ends of a microbridges has important implications for device response. Additional comparisons between measured and simulated current-voltage characteristics, as well as transient response, further support the accuracy of the model. A major benefit of electro- thermal modeling with SPICE is the ability to simultaneously simulate the behavior of a device and its control/sensing electronics. Results for the combination of a unique constant-resistance control circuit and microbridges gas sensor are given. Models of in situ techniques for monitoring catalyst deposition are shown to be in agreement with experiment. Finally, simulated chemical response of the detector is compared with the data, and methods of improving response through modifications in bridge geometry are predicted.

  11. Study and mathematical model of ultra-low gas burner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueorguieva, A.

    2001-01-01

    The main objective of this project is prediction and reduction of NOx and CO 2 emissions under levels recommended from European standards for gas combustion processes. A mathematical model of burner and combustion chamber is developed based on interacting fluid dynamics processes: turbulent flow, gas phase chemical reactions, heat and radiation transfer The NOx prediction model for prompt and thermal NOx is developed. The validation of CFD (Computer fluid-dynamics) simulations corresponds to 5 MWI burner type - TEA, installed on CASPER boiler. This burner is three-stream air distribution burner with swirl effect, designed by ENEL to meet future NOx emission standards. For performing combustion computer modelling, FLUENT CFD code is preferred, because of its capabilities to provide accurately description of large number of rapid interacting processes: turbulent flow, phase chemical reactions and heat transfer and for its possibilities to present wide range of calculation and graphical output reporting data The computational tool used in this study is FLUENT version 5.4.1, installed on fs 8200 UNIX systems The work includes: study the effectiveness of low-NOx concepts and understand the impact of combustion and swirl air distribution and flue gas recirculation on peak flame temperatures, flame structure and fuel/air mixing. A finite rate combustion model: Eddy-Dissipation (Magnussen-Hjertager) Chemical Model for 1, 2 step Chemical reactions of bi-dimensional (2D) grid is developed along with NOx and CO 2 predictions. The experimental part of the project consists of participation at combustion tests on experimental facilities located in Livorno. The results of the experiments are used, to obtain better vision for combustion process on small-scaled design and to collect the necessary input data for further Fluent simulations

  12. Respiratory Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Respiratory failure happens when not enough oxygen passes from your lungs into your blood. Your body's organs, such as ... need oxygen-rich blood to work well. Respiratory failure also can happen if your lungs can't ...

  13. Respiratory system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, R. G., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The general anatomy and function of the human respiratory system is summarized. Breathing movements, control of breathing, lung volumes and capacities, mechanical relations, and factors relevant to respiratory support and equipment design are discussed.

  14. Analytical modeling of wet compression of gas turbine systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyoung Hoon; Ko, Hyung-Jong; Perez-Blanco, Horacio

    2011-01-01

    Evaporative gas turbine cycles (EvGT) are of importance to the power generation industry because of the potential of enhanced cycle efficiencies with moderate incremental cost. Humidification of the working fluid to result in evaporative cooling during compression is a key operation in these cycles. Previous simulations of this operation were carried out via numerical integration. The present work is aimed at modeling the wet-compression process with approximate analytical solutions instead. A thermodynamic analysis of the simultaneous heat and mass transfer processes that occur during evaporation is presented. The transient behavior of important variables in wet compression such as droplet diameter, droplet mass, gas and droplet temperature, and evaporation rate is investigated. The effects of system parameters on variables such as droplet evaporation time, compressor outlet temperature and input work are also considered. Results from this work exhibit good agreement with those of previous numerical work.

  15. Sorption Modeling and Verification for Off-Gas Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavlarides, Lawrence L.; Lin, Ronghong; Nan, Yue; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas; Ladshaw, Austin; Sharma, Ketki; Gabitto, Jorge; DePaoli, David

    2015-01-01

    The project has made progress toward developing a comprehensive modeling capability for the capture of target species in off gas evolved during the reprocessing of nuclear fuel. The effort has integrated experimentation, model development, and computer code development for adsorption and absorption processes. For adsorption, a modeling library has been initiated to include (a) equilibrium models for uptake of off-gas components by adsorbents, (b) mass transfer models to describe mass transfer to a particle, diffusion through the pores of the particle and adsorption on the active sites of the particle, and (c) interconnection of these models to fixed bed adsorption modeling which includes advection through the bed. For single-component equilibria, a Generalized Statistical Thermodynamic Adsorption (GSTA) code was developed to represent experimental data from a broad range of isotherm types; this is equivalent to a Langmuir isotherm in the two-parameter case, and was demonstrated for Kr on INL-engineered sorbent HZ PAN, water sorption on molecular sieve A sorbent material (MS3A), and Kr and Xe capture on metal-organic framework (MOF) materials. The GSTA isotherm was extended to multicomponent systems through application of a modified spreading pressure surface activity model and generalized predictive adsorbed solution theory; the result is the capability to estimate multicomponent adsorption equilibria from single-component isotherms. This advance, which enhances the capability to simulate systems related to off-gas treatment, has been demonstrated for a range of real-gas systems in the literature and is ready for testing with data currently being collected for multicomponent systems of interest, including iodine and water on MS3A. A diffusion kinetic model for sorbent pellets involving pore and surface diffusion as well as external mass transfer has been established, and a methodology was developed for determining unknown diffusivity parameters from transient

  16. Sorption Modeling and Verification for Off-Gas Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavlarides, Lawrence L. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States); Lin, Ronghong [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States); Nan, Yue [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States); Yiacoumi, Sotira [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Tsouris, Costas [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Ladshaw, Austin [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Sharma, Ketki [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Gabitto, Jorge [Prairie View A & M Univ., Prairie View, TX (United States); DePaoli, David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-04-29

    The project has made progress toward developing a comprehensive modeling capability for the capture of target species in off gas evolved during the reprocessing of nuclear fuel. The effort has integrated experimentation, model development, and computer code development for adsorption and absorption processes. For adsorption, a modeling library has been initiated to include (a) equilibrium models for uptake of off-gas components by adsorbents, (b) mass transfer models to describe mass transfer to a particle, diffusion through the pores of the particle and adsorption on the active sites of the particle, and (c) interconnection of these models to fixed bed adsorption modeling which includes advection through the bed. For single-component equilibria, a Generalized Statistical Thermodynamic Adsorption (GSTA) code was developed to represent experimental data from a broad range of isotherm types; this is equivalent to a Langmuir isotherm in the two-parameter case, and was demonstrated for Kr on INL-engineered sorbent HZ PAN, water sorption on molecular sieve A sorbent material (MS3A), and Kr and Xe capture on metal-organic framework (MOF) materials. The GSTA isotherm was extended to multicomponent systems through application of a modified spreading pressure surface activity model and generalized predictive adsorbed solution theory; the result is the capability to estimate multicomponent adsorption equilibria from single-component isotherms. This advance, which enhances the capability to simulate systems related to off-gas treatment, has been demonstrated for a range of real-gas systems in the literature and is ready for testing with data currently being collected for multicomponent systems of interest, including iodine and water on MS3A. A diffusion kinetic model for sorbent pellets involving pore and surface diffusion as well as external mass transfer has been established, and a methodology was developed for determining unknown diffusivity parameters from transient

  17. Analytical model for thermal boundary conductance and equilibrium thermal accommodation coefficient at solid/gas interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Ashutosh; Hopkins, Patrick E

    2016-02-28

    We develop an analytical model for the thermal boundary conductance between a solid and a gas. By considering the thermal fluxes in the solid and the gas, we describe the transmission of energy across the solid/gas interface with diffuse mismatch theory. From the predicted thermal boundary conductances across solid/gas interfaces, the equilibrium thermal accommodation coefficient is determined and compared to predictions from molecular dynamics simulations on the model solid-gas systems. We show that our model is applicable for modeling the thermal accommodation of gases on solid surfaces at non-cryogenic temperatures and relatively strong solid-gas interactions (ε(sf) ≳ k(B)T).

  18. A complementarity model for the European natural gas market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egging, Ruud; Gabriel, Steven A.; Holz, Franziska; Zhuang, Jifang

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present a detailed and comprehensive complementarity model for computing market equilibrium values in the European natural gas system. Market players include producers and their marketing arms which we call 'traders', pipeline and storage operators, marketers, LNG liquefiers, regasifiers, tankers, and three end-use consumption sectors. The economic behavior of producers, traders, pipeline and storage operators, liquefiers and regasifiers is modeled via optimization problems whose Karush-Kuhn-Tucker (KKT) optimality conditions in combination with market-clearing conditions form the complementarity system. The LNG tankers, marketers and consumption sectors are modeled implicitly via appropriate cost functions, aggregate demand curves, and ex post calculations, respectively. The model is run on several case studies that highlight its capabilities, including a simulation of a disruption of Russian supplies via Ukraine

  19. A theoretical model for gas permeability in a composite membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano, D. A

    2009-01-01

    We present in this work an analytical expression for permeability in a two-layer composite membrane, which was derived assuming the same hypothesis as those of Adzumi model for permeability in a homogeneous membrane. Whereas in Adzumi model permeability shows a linear dependence on the mean pressure, our model for a composite membrane related permeability to pressure through a rather complex expression, which covers the whole range of flow, from molecular-Knudsen to viscous-Poiseuille regimes. The expression obtained for permeability contained information of membrane structural properties as pore size, porosity and thickness of each layer, as well as gas nature and operational conditions. Our two-layer-model expression turns into Adzumi formula when the structure of the layers approach to each other. [es

  20. Modeling methane fluxes in wetlands with gas-transporting plants. 1. Single-root scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segers, R.; Leffelaar, P.A.

    2001-01-01

    Methane dynamics in a water-saturated soil layer with gas-transporting roots is modeled with a weighed set of single-root model systems. Each model system consists of a soil cylinder with a gas-transporting root along its axis or a soil sphere with a gas-transporting root at its center. The weights

  1. Modeling methane fluxes in wetlands with gas-transporting plants 2. Soil layer scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segers, R; Rappoldt, C; Leffelaar, PA

    2001-01-01

    Methane dynamics in a water-saturated soil layer with gas-transporting roots is modeled with a weighed set of single-loot model systems. Each model system consists of a soil cylinder with a gas-transporting root along its axis or a soil sphere with a gas-transporting root at its centre. The weights

  2. GAS-GRAIN MODELS FOR INTERSTELLAR ANION CHEMISTRY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordiner, M. A.; Charnley, S. B.

    2012-01-01

    Long-chain hydrocarbon anions C n H – (n = 4, 6, 8) have recently been found to be abundant in a variety of interstellar clouds. In order to explain their large abundances in the denser (prestellar/protostellar) environments, new chemical models are constructed that include gas-grain interactions. Models including accretion of gas-phase species onto dust grains and cosmic-ray-induced desorption of atoms are able to reproduce the observed anion-to-neutral ratios, as well as the absolute abundances of anionic and neutral carbon chains, with a reasonable degree of accuracy. Due to their destructive effects, the depletion of oxygen atoms onto dust results in substantially greater polyyne and anion abundances in high-density gas (with n H 2 ∼>10 5 cm –3 ). The large abundances of carbon-chain-bearing species observed in the envelopes of protostars such as L1527 can thus be explained without the need for warm carbon-chain chemistry. The C 6 H – anion-to-neutral ratio is found to be most sensitive to the atomic O and H abundances and the electron density. Therefore, as a core evolves, falling atomic abundances and rising electron densities are found to result in increasing anion-to-neutral ratios. Inclusion of cosmic-ray desorption of atoms in high-density models delays freeze-out, which results in a more temporally stable anion-to-neutral ratio, in better agreement with observations. Our models include reactions between oxygen atoms and carbon-chain anions to produce carbon-chain-oxide species C 6 O, C 7 O, HC 6 O, and HC 7 O, the abundances of which depend on the assumed branching ratios for associative electron detachment.

  3. Gas-Grain Models for Interstellar Anion Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordiner, M. A.; Charnely, S. B.

    2012-01-01

    Long-chain hydrocarbon anions C(sub n) H(-) (n = 4, 6, 8) have recently been found to be abundant in a variety of interstellar clouds. In order to explain their large abundances in the denser (prestellar/protostellar) environments, new chemical models are constructed that include gas-grain interactions. Models including accretion of gas-phase species onto dust grains and cosmic-ray-induced desorption of atoms are able to reproduce the observed anion-to-neutral ratios, as well as the absolute abundances of anionic and neutral carbon chains, with a reasonable degree of accuracy. Due to their destructive effects, the depletion of oxygen atoms onto dust results in substantially greater polyyne and anion abundances in high-density gas (with n(sub H2) approx > / cubic cm). The large abundances of carbon-chain-bearing species observed in the envelopes of protostars such as L1527 can thus be explained without the need for warm carbon-chain chemistry. The C6H(-) anion-to-neutral ratio is found to be most sensitive to the atomic O and H abundances and the electron density. Therefore, as a core evolves, falling atomic abundances and rising electron densities are found to result in increasing anion-to-neutral ratios. Inclusion of cosmic-ray desorption of atoms in high-density models delays freeze-out, which results in a more temporally stable anion-to-neutral ratio, in better agreement with observations. Our models include reactions between oxygen atoms and carbon-chain anions to produce carbon-chain-oxide species C6O, C7O, HC6O, and HC7O, the abundances of which depend on the assumed branching ratios for associative electron detachment

  4. Phrenic and hypoglossal nerve activity during respiratory response to hypoxia in 6-OHDA unilateral model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrzejewski, Kryspin; Budzińska, Krystyna; Kaczyńska, Katarzyna

    2017-07-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients apart from motor dysfunctions exhibit respiratory disturbances. Their mechanism is still unknown and requires investigation. Our research was designed to examine the activity of phrenic (PHR) and hypoglossal (HG) nerves activity during a hypoxic respiratory response in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) model of PD. Male adult Wistar rats were injected unilaterally with 6-OHDA (20μg) or the vehicle into the right medial forebrain bundle (MFB). Two weeks after the surgery the activity of the phrenic and hypoglossal nerve was registered in anesthetized, vagotomized, paralyzed, and mechanically ventilated rats under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Lesion effectiveness was confirmed by the cylinder test, performed before the MFB injection and 14days after, before the respiratory experiment. 6-OHDA lesioned animals showed a significant increase in normoxic inspiratory time. Expiratory time and total time of the respiratory cycle were prolonged in PD rats after hypoxia. The amplitude of the PHR activity and its minute activity were increased in comparison to the sham group at recovery time and during 30s of hypoxia. The amplitude of the HG activity was increased in response to hypoxia in 6-OHDA lesioned animals. The degeneration of dopaminergic neurons decreased the pre-inspiratory/inspiratory ratio of the hypoglossal burst amplitude during and after hypoxia. Unilateral MFB lesion changed the activity of the phrenic and hypoglossal nerves. The altered pre-inspiratory hypoglossal nerve activity indicates modifications to the central mechanisms controlling the activity of the HG nerve and may explain respiratory disorders seen in PD, i.e. apnea. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cynomolgus macaque as an animal model for severe acute respiratory syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James V Lawler

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS in 2002 and 2003 affected global health and caused major economic disruption. Adequate animal models are required to study the underlying pathogenesis of SARS-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV infection and to develop effective vaccines and therapeutics. We report the first findings of measurable clinical disease in nonhuman primates (NHPs infected with SARS-CoV.In order to characterize clinically relevant parameters of SARS-CoV infection in NHPs, we infected cynomolgus macaques with SARS-CoV in three groups: Group I was infected in the nares and bronchus, group II in the nares and conjunctiva, and group III intravenously. Nonhuman primates in groups I and II developed mild to moderate symptomatic illness. All NHPs demonstrated evidence of viral replication and developed neutralizing antibodies. Chest radiographs from several animals in groups I and II revealed unifocal or multifocal pneumonia that peaked between days 8 and 10 postinfection. Clinical laboratory tests were not significantly changed. Overall, inoculation by a mucosal route produced more prominent disease than did intravenous inoculation. Half of the group I animals were infected with a recombinant infectious clone SARS-CoV derived from the SARS-CoV Urbani strain. This infectious clone produced disease indistinguishable from wild-type Urbani strain.SARS-CoV infection of cynomolgus macaques did not reproduce the severe illness seen in the majority of adult human cases of SARS; however, our results suggest similarities to the milder syndrome of SARS-CoV infection characteristically seen in young children.

  6. CFD model of a spinning pipe gas lens

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Snedden, Glen C

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Slides on: Spinning Pipe Gas Lens; Focal Length; Refractive Index; Gas Dynamics; Guess at the gas dynamics; Density Profile; Flow Profile; Rosby Waves; Rayleigh–Taylor Instabilities...

  7. Newborn Respiratory Distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermansen, Christian L; Mahajan, Anand

    2015-12-01

    Newborn respiratory distress presents a diagnostic and management challenge. Newborns with respiratory distress commonly exhibit tachypnea with a respiratory rate of more than 60 respirations per minute. They may present with grunting, retractions, nasal flaring, and cyanosis. Common causes include transient tachypnea of the newborn, respiratory distress syndrome, meconium aspiration syndrome, pneumonia, sepsis, pneumothorax, persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn, and delayed transition. Congenital heart defects, airway malformations, and inborn errors of metabolism are less common etiologies. Clinicians should be familiar with updated neonatal resuscitation guidelines. Initial evaluation includes a detailed history and physical examination. The clinician should monitor vital signs and measure oxygen saturation with pulse oximetry, and blood gas measurement may be considered. Chest radiography is helpful in the diagnosis. Blood cultures, serial complete blood counts, and C-reactive protein measurement are useful for the evaluation of sepsis. Most neonates with respiratory distress can be treated with respiratory support and noninvasive methods. Oxygen can be provided via bag/mask, nasal cannula, oxygen hood, and nasal continuous positive airway pressure. Ventilator support may be used in more severe cases. Surfactant is increasingly used for respiratory distress syndrome. Using the INSURE technique, the newborn is intubated, given surfactant, and quickly extubated to nasal continuous positive airway pressure. Newborns should be screened for critical congenital heart defects via pulse oximetry after 24 hours but before hospital discharge. Neonatology consultation is recommended if the illness exceeds the clinician's expertise and comfort level or when the diagnosis is unclear in a critically ill newborn.

  8. A strategic model of European gas supply (GASMOD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holz, Franziska; Hirschhausen, Christian von; Kemfert, Claudia

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a model of the European natural gas supply, GASMOD, which is structured as a two-stage-game of successive natural gas exports to Europe (upstream market) and wholesale trade within Europe (downstream market) and which explicitly includes infrastructure capacities. We compare three possible market scenarios: Cournot competition in both markets, perfect competition in both markets, and perfect competition in the downstream with Cournot competition in the upstream market (EU liberalization). We find that Cournot competition in both markets is the most accurate representation of today's European natural gas market, where suppliers at both stages generate a mark-up at the expense of the final customer (double marginalization). Our results yield a diversified supply portfolio with newly emerging (LNG) exporters gaining market shares. Enforcing competition in the European downstream market would lead to lower prices and higher quantities by avoiding the welfare-reducing effects of double marginalization. Binding infrastructure capacity restrictions strongly influence the results, and we identify bottlenecks mainly for intra-European trade relations whereas transport capacity in the upstream market is globally sufficient in the Cournot scenario. (author)

  9. Modeling cast IN-738 superalloy gas tungsten arc welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonifaz, E.A.; Richards, N.L.

    2009-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite-element thermal model has been developed to generate weld profiles, and to analyze transient heat flow, thermal gradients and thermal cycles in cast IN-738 superalloy gas tungsten arc welds. Outputs of the model (cooling rates, the thermal gradient G and the growth rate R) were used to describe solidification structures found around the weld pool for three different welding speeds at constant heat input. Calculations around the weld pool indicate that the cooling rate increases from the fusion line to the centerline at all welding speeds. It was also observed that the cooling rate (G x R) and the ratio G/R fall with welding speed. For instance, as the welding speed is increased, the cooling rates at the centerline, fusion line and penetration depth decrease. Moreover, it was observed that as the power and welding speed both increase (but keeping the heat input constant), the weld pool becomes wider and more elongated, shifting from circular to elliptical shaped. The calculations were performed using ABAQUS FE code on the basis of a time-increment Lagrangian formulation. The heat source represented by a moving Gaussian power density distribution is applied over the top surface of the specimen during a period of time that depends on the welding speed. Temperature-dependent material properties and the effect of forced convection due to the flow of the shielding gas are included in the model. Numerically predicted sizes of the melt-pool zone and dendrite secondary arm spacing induced by the gas tungsten arc welding process are also given

  10. COMPARATIVE COMPUTATIONAL MODELING OF AIRFLOWS AND VAPOR DOSIMETY IN THE RESPIRATORY TRACTS OF RAT, MONKEY, AND HUMAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corley, Richard A.; Kabilan, Senthil; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Carson, James P.; Minard, Kevin R.; Jacob, Rick E.; Timchalk, Charles; Glenny, Robb W.; Pipavath, Sudhaker; Cox, Timothy C.; Wallis, Chris; Larson, Richard; Fanucchi, M.; Postlewait, Ed; Einstein, Daniel R.

    2012-07-01

    Coupling computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models is useful for predicting site-specific dosimetry of airborne materials in the respiratory tract and elucidating the importance of species differences in anatomy, physiology, and breathing patterns. Historically, these models were limited to discrete regions of the respiratory system. CFD/PBPK models have now been developed for the rat, monkey, and human that encompass airways from the nose or mouth to the lung. A PBPK model previously developed to describe acrolein uptake in nasal tissues was adapted to the extended airway models as an example application. Model parameters for each anatomic region were obtained from the literature, measured directly, or estimated from published data. Airflow and site-specific acrolein uptake patterns were determined under steadystate inhalation conditions to provide direct comparisons with prior data and nasalonly simulations. Results confirmed that regional uptake was dependent upon airflow rates and acrolein concentrations with nasal extraction efficiencies predicted to be greatest in the rat, followed by the monkey, then the human. For human oral-breathing simulations, acrolein uptake rates in oropharyngeal and laryngeal tissues were comparable to nasal tissues following nasal breathing under the same exposure conditions. For both breathing modes, higher uptake rates were predicted for lower tracheo-bronchial tissues of humans than either the rat or monkey. These extended airway models provide a unique foundation for comparing dosimetry across a significantly more extensive range of conducting airways in the rat, monkey, and human than prior CFD models.

  11. Strategies simulation model for the gas business chain MEGAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, S.M. de; Uzcategui, R.; Brea, E.; Diaz, R.

    1994-01-01

    MEGAS is a simulation model representing fundamental parameters of Corpoven's natural gas and NGL production, handling, processing, transportation and distribution systems in the Venezuelan mid-east, as well as its financial implications. Various strategies regarding development, prices, costs, new business opportunities, production scenarios, demand and energy policies can be evaluated through this model in order to determine, after analyzing the economics results, a set of strategies to follow in the mid and long term. MEGAS could be also used to make risk analysis studies, considering that probabilistic parameters and variables like gas quality, production, demand, plant shutdowns and others are to be represented by their distinctive function. It is possible to set up a probabilistic function for each economic indicator or operating variables with an appropriate experiment design. MEGAS is based on a dynamic simulation language, which facilitates both the real system components representation and the main variables statistical data accumulation. It also allows graphical representation of results and the simulation animation. Demand and price forecasts, new projects, costs and capabilities of the systems are some of the model input data. MEGAS should be considered as a tool that eases the strategic planning of the business, making it possible for the Corporation to foresee changes, both in the domestic and international market, to predict how these changes could affect its business affairs and to visualize different return scenarios

  12. Mathematical model of gas plasma applied to chronic wounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J. G.; Liu, X. Y.; Liu, D. W.; Lu, X. P. [State Key Lab of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, WuHan, HuBei 430074 (China); Zhang, Y. T. [Shandong Provincial Key Lab of UHV Technology and Gas Discharge Physics, School of Electrical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong Province 250061 (China)

    2013-11-15

    Chronic wounds are a major burden for worldwide health care systems, and patients suffer pain and discomfort from this type of wound. Recently gas plasmas have been shown to safely speed chronic wounds healing. In this paper, we develop a deterministic mathematical model formulated by eight-species reaction-diffusion equations, and use it to analyze the plasma treatment process. The model follows spatial and temporal concentration within the wound of oxygen, chemoattractants, capillary sprouts, blood vessels, fibroblasts, extracellular matrix material, nitric oxide (NO), and inflammatory cell. Two effects of plasma, increasing NO concentration and reducing bacteria load, are considered in this model. The plasma treatment decreases the complete healing time from 25 days (normal wound healing) to 17 days, and the contributions of increasing NO concentration and reducing bacteria load are about 1/4 and 3/4, respectively. Increasing plasma treatment frequency from twice to three times per day accelerates healing process. Finally, the response of chronic wounds of different etiologies to treatment with gas plasmas is analyzed.

  13. A Lagrangian particle model for marginally heavy gas dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, S. G.; Sharan, Maithili

    A simple approach within the framework of Lagrangian particle models was formulated to deal with gas vapours which are marginally affected by gravity and are also subjected to entrainment. For the model discussed in this study, a plume particle represents a small parcel of air and the pollutant. This parcel is subjected to the downward acceleration due to its excess of density over the surrounding. The mean downward motion of each particle was accounted by considering the Langevin equation with buoyancy correction term (Van Dop, 1992, Atmospheric Environment26A, 1335-1346). Further, the effect of entrainment was considered in a simple statistical way similar to the method considered by Cogan (1985, Atmospheric Environment21, 867-878). As an example, the formulation was used to study the dispersion of methyl isocyanate (MIC) that was accidentally released from the Union Carbide pesticide plant (Bhopal). A series of computer runs suggests that the particle model with the new formulation that accounts for heaviness and entrainment mechanisms simulates the transport and diffusion of marginally heavy gas vapours realistically.

  14. On The Modelling Of Hybrid Aerostatic - Gas Journal Bearings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morosi, Stefano; Santos, Ilmar

    2011-01-01

    modeling for hybrid lubrication of a compressible fluid film journal bearing. Additional forces are generated by injecting pressurized air into the bearing gap through orifices located on the bearing walls. A modified form of the compressible Reynolds equation for active lubrication is derived. By solving......Gas journal bearing have been increasingly adopted in modern turbo-machinery applications, as they meet the demands of operation at higher rotational speeds, in clean environment and great efficiency. Due to the fact that gaseous lubricants, typically air, have much lower viscosity than more...

  15. Modeling acute respiratory illness during the 2007 San Diego wildland fires using a coupled emissions-transport system and generalized additive modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelen, Brian; French, Nancy H F; Koziol, Benjamin W; Billmire, Michael; Owen, Robert Chris; Johnson, Jeffrey; Ginsberg, Michele; Loboda, Tatiana; Wu, Shiliang

    2013-11-05

    A study of the impacts on respiratory health of the 2007 wildland fires in and around San Diego County, California is presented. This study helps to address the impact of fire emissions on human health by modeling the exposure potential of proximate populations to atmospheric particulate matter (PM) from vegetation fires. Currently, there is no standard methodology to model and forecast the potential respiratory health effects of PM plumes from wildland fires, and in part this is due to a lack of methodology for rigorously relating the two. The contribution in this research specifically targets that absence by modeling explicitly the emission, transmission, and distribution of PM following a wildland fire in both space and time. Coupled empirical and deterministic models describing particulate matter (PM) emissions and atmospheric dispersion were linked to spatially explicit syndromic surveillance health data records collected through the San Diego Aberration Detection and Incident Characterization (SDADIC) system using a Generalized Additive Modeling (GAM) statistical approach. Two levels of geographic aggregation were modeled, a county-wide regional level and division of the county into six sub regions. Selected health syndromes within SDADIC from 16 emergency departments within San Diego County relevant for respiratory health were identified for inclusion in the model. The model captured the variability in emergency department visits due to several factors by including nine ancillary variables in addition to wildfire PM concentration. The model coefficients and nonlinear function plots indicate that at peak fire PM concentrations the odds of a person seeking emergency care is increased by approximately 50% compared to non-fire conditions (40% for the regional case, 70% for a geographically specific case). The sub-regional analyses show that demographic variables also influence respiratory health outcomes from smoke. The model developed in this study allows a

  16. Two-stage Bayesian model to evaluate the effect of air pollution on chronic respiratory diseases using drug prescriptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blangiardo, Marta; Finazzi, Francesco; Cameletti, Michela

    2016-08-01

    Exposure to high levels of air pollutant concentration is known to be associated with respiratory problems which can translate into higher morbidity and mortality rates. The link between air pollution and population health has mainly been assessed considering air quality and hospitalisation or mortality data. However, this approach limits the analysis to individuals characterised by severe conditions. In this paper we evaluate the link between air pollution and respiratory diseases using general practice drug prescriptions for chronic respiratory diseases, which allow to draw conclusions based on the general population. We propose a two-stage statistical approach: in the first stage we specify a space-time model to estimate the monthly NO2 concentration integrating several data sources characterised by different spatio-temporal resolution; in the second stage we link the concentration to the β2-agonists prescribed monthly by general practices in England and we model the prescription rates through a small area approach. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A randomized placebo controlled trial of ibuprofen for respiratory syncytial infection in a bovine model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of bronchiolitis and hospital admission in infants. An analogous disease occurs in cattle and costs US agriculture a billion dollars a year. RSV causes much of its morbidity indirectly via adverse effects of the host response to ...

  18. Models to predict both sensible and latent heat transfer in the respiratory tract of Morada Nova sheep under semiarid tropical environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Vinícius Carvalho; Saraiva, Edilson Paes; Maia, Alex Sandro Campos; Nascimento, Carolina Cardoso Nagib; da Silva, Josinaldo Araújo; Pereira, Walter Esfraim; Filho, Edgard Cavalcanti Pimenta; Almeida, Maria Elivânia Vieira

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to build a prediction model both sensible and latent heat transfer by respiratory tract for Morada Nova sheep under field conditions in a semiarid tropical environment, using easily measured physiological and environmental parameters. Twelve dry Morada Nova ewes with an average of 3 ± 1.2 years old and average body weight of 32.76 ± 3.72 kg were used in a Latin square design 12 × 12 (12 days of records and 12 schedules). Tidal volume, respiratory rate, expired air temperature, and partial vapor pressure of the expired air were obtained from the respiratory facial mask and using a physiological measurement system. Ewes were evaluated from 0700 to 1900 h in each day under shade. A simple nonlinear model to estimate tidal volume as a function of respiratory rate was developed. Equation to estimate the expired air temperature was built, and the ambient air temperature was the best predictor together with relative humidity and ambient vapor pressure. In naturalized Morada Nova sheep, respiratory convection seems to be a mechanism of heat transfer of minor importance even under mild air temperature. Evaporation from the respiratory system increased together with ambient air temperature. At ambient air temperature, up to 35 °C respiratory evaporation accounted 90 % of the total heat lost by respiratory system, on average. Models presented here allow to estimate the heat flow from the respiratory tract for Morada Nova sheep bred in tropical region, using easily measured physiological and environmental traits as respiratory rate, ambient air temperature, and relative humidity.

  19. Modeling the transient security constraints of natural gas network in day-ahead power system scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Jingwei; Zhang, Ning; Kang, Chongqing

    2017-01-01

    accurately, they are hard to be embedded into the power system scheduling model, which consists of algebraic equations and inequations. This paper addresses this dilemma by proposing an algebraic transient model of natural gas network which is similar to the branch-node model of power network. Based......The rapid deployment of gas-fired generating units makes the power system more vulnerable to failures in the natural gas system. To reduce the risk of gas system failure and to guarantee the security of power system operation, it is necessary to take the security constraints of natural gas...... pipelines into account in the day-ahead power generation scheduling model. However, the minute- and hour-level dynamic characteristics of gas systems prevents an accurate decision-making simply with the steady-state gas flow model. Although the partial differential equations depict the dynamics of gas flow...

  20. A Bayesian SIRS model for the analysis of respiratory syncytial virus in the region of Valencia, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corberán-Vallet, Ana; Santonja, Francisco J

    2014-09-01

    We present a Bayesian stochastic susceptible-infected-recovered-susceptible (SIRS) model in discrete time to understand respiratory syncytial virus dynamics in the region of Valencia, Spain. A SIRS model based on ordinary differential equations has also been proposed to describe RSV dynamics in the region of Valencia. However, this continuous-time deterministic model is not suitable when the initial number of infected individuals is small. Stochastic epidemic models based on a probability of disease transmission provide a more natural description of the spread of infectious diseases. In addition, by allowing the transmission rate to vary stochastically over time, the proposed model provides an improved description of RSV dynamics. The Bayesian analysis of the model allows us to calculate both the posterior distribution of the model parameters and the posterior predictive distribution, which facilitates the computation of point forecasts and prediction intervals for future observations. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Transient multiphase flow modeling of gas well liquid loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veeken, K.; Hu, B.; Schiferli, W.

    2009-01-01

    Gas well liquid loading occurs when gas production becomes insufficient to lift the associated liquids to surface. When that happens gas production first turns intermittent and eventually stops. Hence in depleting gas reservoirs the technical abandonment pressure and ultimate recovery are typically

  2. Modeling of noble gas injection into tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, D.Kh.; Yurchenko, E.I.; Lukash, V.E.; Baronova, E.O.; Rozhansky, V.A.; Senichenkov, I.Yu.; Veselova, I.Yu.; Schneider, R.

    2005-01-01

    Noble gas injection for mitigation of the disruption in DIII-D is simulated. The simulation of the first two stages is performed: of the neutral gas jet penetration through the background plasmas, and of the thermal quench. In order to simulate the first stage the 1.5-dimensional numerical code LLP with improved radiation model for noble gas is used. It is demonstrated that the jet remains mainly neutral and thus is able to penetrate to the central region of the tokamak in accordance with experimental observations. Plasma cooling at this stage is provided by the energy exchange with the jet. The radiation is relatively small, and the plasma thermal energy is spent mainly on the jet expansion. The magnetic surfaces in contact with the jet are cooled significantly. The cooling front propagates towards the plasma center. The simulations of the plasma column dynamics in the presence of moving jet is performed by means of the free boundary transport modeling DINA code. It has been shown that the cooling front is accompanied by strongly localized 'shark fin-like' perturbation in toroidal current density profile. After few milliseconds the jet (together with the current perturbation) achieves the region where safety factor is slightly higher than unity and a new type of the non-local kink mode develops. The unstable kink perturbation is non-resonant for any magnetic surface, both inside the plasma column, and in the vacuum space. The mode disturbs mainly the core region. The growth time of the 'shark fin-like' mode is higher than the Alfven time by a factor of 100 for DIII-D parameters. Hence, the simulation describes the DIII-D experimental results, at least, qualitatively. (author)

  3. Vitamin A is systemically bioavailable after intratracheal administration with surfactant in an animal model of newborn respiratory distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Avash J; Bronshtein, Vadim; Khashu, Minesh; Lee, Kyle; Potts, James E; Friel, James; Chessex, Philippe

    2010-06-01

    Chronic lung disease (CLD) is a major cause of long-term morbidity in extremely LBW infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Parenteral vitamin A administration decreases the risk of CLD. We tested the hypothesis that intratracheal vitamin A administration with surfactant is systemically bioavailable without interfering with the functional properties of exogenous surfactant. Newborn piglets were ventilated with 100% FiO2 and sequential saline lavage induced respiratory distress syndrome. During lung injury induction, ventilator changes were allowed, but none were made following treatment allocation. Animals were assigned by chance in a blinded control trial to three groups: I=control; II=surfactant; III=surfactant+vitamin A. Hemodynamics, lung mechanics, and blood gases were measured following instrumentation, pre- and posttreatment for 4 h, at which time the liver was sampled for retinol determination. All parameters improved in animals receiving surfactant. A significant interaction existed between time and group for PaO2 and alveolar-arterial oxygen difference (A-aDO2). Hepatic levels of retinol were higher (p<0.001) in animals receiving retinyl acetate. Intratracheal administration of surfactant+vitamin A did not alter the beneficial effects of surfactant on lung compliance and gas exchange. Intratracheal Vitamin A was associated with rapid hepatic uptake. Further studies are warranted.

  4. Advanced modeling of oxy-fuel combustion of natural gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chungen Yin

    2011-01-15

    The main goal of this small-scale project is to investigate oxy-combustion of natural gas (NG) through advanced modeling, in which radiation, chemistry and mixing will be reasonably resolved. 1) A state-of-the-art review was given regarding the latest R and D achievements and status of oxy-fuel technology. The modeling and simulation status and achievements in the field of oxy-fuel combustion were also summarized; 2) A computer code in standard c++, using the exponential wide band model (EWBM) to evaluate the emissivity and absorptivity of any gas mixture at any condition, was developed and validated in detail against data in literature. A new, complete, and accurate WSGGM, applicable to both air-fuel and oxy-fuel combustion modeling and applicable to both gray and non-gray calculation, was successfully derived, by using the validated EWBM code as the reference mode. The new WSGGM was implemented in CFD modeling of two different oxy-fuel furnaces, through which its great, unique advantages over the currently most widely used WSGGM were demonstrated. 3) Chemical equilibrium calculations were performed for oxy-NG flame and air-NG flame, in which dissociation effects were considered to different degrees. Remarkable differences in oxy-fuel and air-fuel combustion were revealed, and main intermediate species that play key roles in oxy-fuel flames were identified. Different combustion mechanisms are compared, e.g., the most widely used 2-step global mechanism, refined 4-step global mechanism, a global mechanism developed for oxy-fuel using detailed chemical kinetic modeling (CHEMKIN) as reference. 4) Over 15 CFD simulations were done for oxy-NG combustion, in which radiation, chemistry, mixing, turbulence-chemistry interactions, and so on were thoroughly investigated. Among all the simulations, RANS combined with 2-step and refined 4-step mechanism, RANS combined with CHEMKIN-based new global mechanism for oxy-fuel modeling, and LES combined with different combustion

  5. Analytical model of neutral gas shielding for hydrogen pellet ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuteev, Boris V.; Tsendin, Lev D. [State Technical Univ., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2001-11-01

    A kinetic gasdynamic scaling for hydrogen pellet ablation is obtained in terms of a neural gas shielding model using both numerical and analytical approaches. The scaling on plasma and pellet parameters proposed in the monoenergy approximation by Milora and Foster dR{sub pe}/dt{approx}S{sub n}{sup 2/3}R{sub p}{sup -2/3}q{sub eo}{sup 1/3}m{sub i}{sup -1/3} is confirmed. Here R{sub p} is the pellet radius, S{sub n} is the optical thickness of a cloud, q{sub eo} is the electron energy flux density and m{sub i} is the molecular mass. Only the numeral factor is approximately two times less than that for the monoenergy approach. Due to this effect, the pellet ablation rates, which were obtained by Kuteev on the basis of the Milora scaling, should be reduced by a factor of 1.7. Such a modification provides a reasonable agreement (even at high plasma parameters) between the two-dimensional kinetic model and the one-dimensional monoenergy approximation validated in contemporary tokamak experiments. As the could (in the kinetic approximation) is significantly thicker than that for the monoenergy case as well as the velocities of the gas flow are much slower, the relative effect of plasma and magnetic shielding on the ablation rate is strongly reduced. (author)

  6. A Model for Gas Microporosity in Aluminum and Magnesium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felicelli, Sergio D.; Wang, Liang; Pita, Claudio M.; Escobar de Obaldia, Enrique

    2009-04-01

    A quantitative prediction of the amount of gas microporosity in aluminum and magnesium-alloy castings is performed with a continuum model of dendritic solidification. The distribution of the pore volume fraction and pore size is calculated from a set of conservation equations that solves the transport phenomena during solidification at the macroscale and the hydrogen diffusion into the pores at the microscale. A technique based on a pseudo-alloy solute that is transported by the melt is used to determine the potential sites of pore growth, subject to considerations of mechanical and thermodynamic equilibrium. The modeling results for aluminum alloy A356 are found to agree well with published studies. In view of the limited availability of experimental data for Mg-alloy gravity-poured castings, the formation of porosity in AZ91 is studied qualitatively, assuming that casting conditions are similar to A356. In particular, the minimum initial hydrogen content that leads to the formation of gas porosity was compared for both alloys. It is found that the initial hydrogen content necessary for forming porosity is much higher in AZ91 than in A356. This is attributed to significant differences in the solubility of the hydrogen in both alloys.

  7. THERMODYNAMIC MODEL OF THE CYCLE OF SPARK IGNITION ENGINE WITH EXHAUST GAS RECIRCULATION

    OpenAIRE

    Öğüçlü, Özer

    2015-01-01

    A thermodynamic model has been developed and applied to predict the emission levels and performance of a spark ignition engine with using Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) gas. The model simulates the full thermodynamic cycle of the engine and includes heat transfer, combustion, gas exchange process, thermal dissociation of water and carbon dioxide, and chemical equilibrium. 

  8. Metabolic modeling of synthesis gas fermentation in bubble column reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin; Gomez, Jose A; Höffner, Kai; Barton, Paul I; Henson, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    A promising route to renewable liquid fuels and chemicals is the fermentation of synthesis gas (syngas) streams to synthesize desired products such as ethanol and 2,3-butanediol. While commercial development of syngas fermentation technology is underway, an unmet need is the development of integrated metabolic and transport models for industrially relevant syngas bubble column reactors. We developed and evaluated a spatiotemporal metabolic model for bubble column reactors with the syngas fermenting bacterium Clostridium ljungdahlii as the microbial catalyst. Our modeling approach involved combining a genome-scale reconstruction of C. ljungdahlii metabolism with multiphase transport equations that govern convective and dispersive processes within the spatially varying column. The reactor model was spatially discretized to yield a large set of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) in time with embedded linear programs (LPs) and solved using the MATLAB based code DFBAlab. Simulations were performed to analyze the effects of important process and cellular parameters on key measures of reactor performance including ethanol titer, ethanol-to-acetate ratio, and CO and H2 conversions. Our computational study demonstrated that mathematical modeling provides a complementary tool to experimentation for understanding, predicting, and optimizing syngas fermentation reactors. These model predictions could guide future cellular and process engineering efforts aimed at alleviating bottlenecks to biochemical production in syngas bubble column reactors.

  9. Generation of fluoroscopic 3D images with a respiratory motion model based on an external surrogate signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Martina; Williams, Christopher L; Mishra, Pankaj; Rottmann, Joerg; Dhou, Salam; Wagar, Matthew; Mannarino, Edward G; Mak, Raymond H; Lewis, John H

    2015-01-21

    Respiratory motion during radiotherapy can cause uncertainties in definition of the target volume and in estimation of the dose delivered to the target and healthy tissue. In this paper, we generate volumetric images of the internal patient anatomy during treatment using only the motion of a surrogate signal. Pre-treatment four-dimensional CT imaging is used to create a patient-specific model correlating internal respiratory motion with the trajectory of an external surrogate placed on the chest. The performance of this model is assessed with digital and physical phantoms reproducing measured irregular patient breathing patterns. Ten patient breathing patterns are incorporated in a digital phantom. For each patient breathing pattern, the model is used to generate images over the course of thirty seconds. The tumor position predicted by the model is compared to ground truth information from the digital phantom. Over the ten patient breathing patterns, the average absolute error in the tumor centroid position predicted by the motion model is 1.4 mm. The corresponding error for one patient breathing pattern implemented in an anthropomorphic physical phantom was 0.6 mm. The global voxel intensity error was used to compare the full image to the ground truth and demonstrates good agreement between predicted and true images. The model also generates accurate predictions for breathing patterns with irregular phases or amplitudes.

  10. Generation of fluoroscopic 3D images with a respiratory motion model based on an external surrogate signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurwitz, Martina; Williams, Christopher L; Mishra, Pankaj; Rottmann, Joerg; Dhou, Salam; Wagar, Matthew; Mannarino, Edward G; Mak, Raymond H; Lewis, John H

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory motion during radiotherapy can cause uncertainties in definition of the target volume and in estimation of the dose delivered to the target and healthy tissue. In this paper, we generate volumetric images of the internal patient anatomy during treatment using only the motion of a surrogate signal. Pre-treatment four-dimensional CT imaging is used to create a patient-specific model correlating internal respiratory motion with the trajectory of an external surrogate placed on the chest. The performance of this model is assessed with digital and physical phantoms reproducing measured irregular patient breathing patterns. Ten patient breathing patterns are incorporated in a digital phantom. For each patient breathing pattern, the model is used to generate images over the course of thirty seconds. The tumor position predicted by the model is compared to ground truth information from the digital phantom. Over the ten patient breathing patterns, the average absolute error in the tumor centroid position predicted by the motion model is 1.4 mm. The corresponding error for one patient breathing pattern implemented in an anthropomorphic physical phantom was 0.6 mm. The global voxel intensity error was used to compare the full image to the ground truth and demonstrates good agreement between predicted and true images. The model also generates accurate predictions for breathing patterns with irregular phases or amplitudes. (paper)

  11. A complementarity model for solving stochastic natural gas market equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang Jifang; Gabriel, Steven A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a stochastic equilibrium model for deregulated natural gas markets. Each market participant (pipeline operators, producers, etc.) solves a stochastic optimization problem whose optimality conditions, when combined with market-clearing conditions give rise to a certain mixed complementarity problem (MiCP). The stochastic aspects are depicted by a recourse problem for each player in which the first-stage decisions relate to long-term contracts and the second-stage decisions relate to spot market activities for three seasons. Besides showing that such a market model is an instance of a MiCP, we provide theoretical results concerning long-term and spot market prices and solve the resulting MiCP for a small yet representative market. We also note an interesting observation for the value of the stochastic solution for non-optimization problems

  12. A complementarity model for solving stochastic natural gas market equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jifang Zhuang; Gabriel, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a stochastic equilibrium model for deregulated natural gas markets. Each market participant (pipeline operators, producers, etc.) solves a stochastic optimization problem whose optimality conditions, when combined with market-clearing conditions give rise to a certain mixed complementarity problem (MiCP). The stochastic aspects are depicted by a recourse problem for each player in which the first-stage decisions relate to long-term contracts and the second-stage decisions relate to spot market activities for three seasons. Besides showing that such a market model is an instance of a MiCP, we provide theoretical results concerning long-term and spot market prices and solve the resulting MiCP for a small yet representative market. We also note an interesting observation for the value of the stochastic solution for non-optimization problems. (author)

  13. Conserved number fluctuations in a hadron resonance gas model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garg, P.; Mishra, D.K.; Netrakanti, P.K.; Mohanty, B.; Mohanty, A.K.; Singh, B.K.; Xu, N.

    2013-01-01

    Net-baryon, net-charge and net-strangeness number fluctuations in high energy heavy-ion collisions are discussed within the framework of a hadron resonance gas (HRG) model. Ratios of the conserved number susceptibilities calculated in HRG are being compared to the corresponding experimental measurements to extract information about the freeze-out condition and the phase structure of systems with strong interactions. We emphasize the importance of considering the actual experimental acceptances in terms of kinematics (pseudorapidity (η) and transverse momentum (p T )), the detected charge state, effect of collective motion of particles in the system and the resonance decay contributions before comparisons are made to the theoretical calculations. In this work, based on HRG model, we report that the net-baryon number fluctuations are least affected by experimental acceptances compared to the net-charge and net-strangeness number fluctuations

  14. An electricity price model with consideration to load and gas price effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Min-xiang; Tao, Xiao-hu; Han, Zhen-xiang

    2003-01-01

    Some characteristics of the electricity load and prices are studied, and the relationship between electricity prices and gas (fuel) prices is analyzed in this paper. Because electricity prices are strongly dependent on load and gas prices, the authors constructed a model for electricity prices based on the effects of these two factors; and used the Geometric Mean Reversion Brownian Motion (GMRBM) model to describe the electricity load process, and a Geometric Brownian Motion(GBM) model to describe the gas prices; deduced the price stochastic process model based on the above load model and gas price model. This paper also presents methods for parameters estimation, and proposes some methods to solve the model.

  15. Program for aerodynamic performance tests of helium gas compressor model of the gas turbine high temperature reactor (GTHTR300)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Shoji; Takizuka, Takakazu; Kunimoto, Kazuhiko; Yan, Xing; Itaka, Hidehiko; Mori, Eiji

    2003-01-01

    Research and development program for helium gas compressor aerodynamics was planned for the power conversion system of the Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor (GTHTR300). The axial compressor with polytropic efficiency of 90% and surge margin more than 30% was designed with 3-dimensional aerodynamic design. Performance and surge margin of the helium gas compressor tends to be lower due to the higher boss ratio which makes the tip clearance wide relative to the blade height, as well as due to a larger number of stages. The compressor was designed on the basis of methods and data for the aerodynamic design of industrial open-cycle gas-turbine. To validate the design of the helium gas compressor of the GTHTR300, aerodynamic performance tests were planned, and a 1/3-scale, 4-stage compressor model was designed. In the tests, the performance data of the helium gas compressor model will be acquired by using helium gas as a working fluid. The maximum design pressure at the model inlet is 0.88 MPa, which allows the Reynolds number to be sufficiently high. The present study is entrusted from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. (author)

  16. Gas-evolution oscillators. 10. A model based on a delay equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bar-Eli, K.; Noyes, R.M. [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States)

    1992-09-17

    This paper develops a simplified method to model the behavior of a gas-evolution oscillator with two differential delay equations in two unknowns consisting of the population of dissolved molecules in solution and the pressure of the gas.

  17. Gas-evolution oscillators. 10. A model based on a delay equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bar-Eli, K.; Noyes, R.M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper develops a simplified method to model the behavior of a gas-evolution oscillator with two differential delay equations in two unknowns consisting of the population of dissolved molecules in solution and the pressure of the gas

  18. Modelling of polysomnographic respiratory measurements for artefact detection and signal restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathnayake, S I; Abeyratne, U R; Hukins, C; Duce, B

    2008-01-01

    Polysomnography (PSG), which incorporates measures of sleep with measures of EEG arousal, air flow, respiratory movement and oxygenation, is universally regarded as the reference standard in diagnosing sleep-related respiratory diseases such as obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome. Over 15 channels of physiological signals are measured from a subject undergoing a typical overnight PSG session. The signals often suffer from data losses, interferences and artefacts. In a typical sleep scoring session, artefact-corrupted signal segments are visually detected and removed from further consideration. This is a highly time-consuming process, and subjective judgement is required for the job. During typical sleep scoring sessions, the target is the detection of segments of diagnostic interest, and signal restoration is not utilized for distorted segments. In this paper, we propose a novel framework for artefact detection and signal restoration based on the redundancy among respiratory flow signals. We focus on the air flow (thermistor sensors) and nasal pressure signals which are clinically significant in detecting respiratory disturbances. The method treats the respiratory system and other organs that provide respiratory-related inputs/outputs to it (e.g., cardiovascular, brain) as a possibly nonlinear coupled-dynamical system, and uses the celebrated Takens embedding theorem as the theoretical basis for signal prediction. Nonlinear prediction across time (self-prediction) and signals (cross-prediction) provides us with a mechanism to detect artefacts as unexplained deviations. In addition to detection, the proposed method carries the potential to correct certain classes of artefacts and restore the signal. In this study, we categorize commonly occurring artefacts and distortions in air flow and nasal pressure measurements into several groups and explore the efficacy of the proposed technique in detecting/recovering them. The results we obtained from a database of clinical

  19. Absence of respiratory inflammatory reaction of elemental sulfur using the California Pesticide Illness Database and a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kiyoung; Smith, Jodi L; Last, Jerold A

    2005-01-01

    Elemental sulfur, a natural substance, is used as a fungicide. Elemental sulfur is the most heavily used agricultural chemical in California. In 2003, annual sulfur usage in California was about 34% of the total weight of pesticide active ingredient used in production agriculture. Even though sulfur is mostly used in dust form, the respiratory health effects of elemental sulfur are not well documented. The purpose of this paper is to address the possible respiratory effect of elemental sulfur using the California Pesticide Illness Database and laboratory experiments with mice. We analyzed the California Pesticide Illness Database between 1991 and 2001. Among 127 reports of definite, probable, and possible illness involving sulfur, 21 cases (16%) were identified as respiratory related. A mouse model was used to examine whether there was an inflammatory or fibrotic response to elemental sulfur. Dust solutions were injected intratracheally into ovalbumin sensitized mice and lung damage was evaluated. Lung inflammatory response was analyzed via total lavage cell counts and differentials, and airway collagen content was analyzed histologically and biochemically. No significant differences from controls were seen in animals exposed to sulfur particles. The findings suggest that acute exposure of elemental sulfur itself may not cause an inflammatory reaction. However, further studies are needed to understand the possible health effects of chronic sulfur exposure and environmental weathering of sulfur dust.

  20. Natural gas transmission and distribution model of the National Energy Modeling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS was developed in the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA). NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the EIA and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. From 1982 through 1993, the Intermediate Future Forecasting System (IFFS) was used by the EIA for its analyses, and the Gas Analysis Modeling System (GAMS) was used within IFFS to represent natural gas markets. Prior to 1982, the Midterm Energy Forecasting System (MEFS), also referred to as the Project Independence Evaluation System (PIES), was employed. NEMS was developed to enhance and update EIA`s modeling capability by internally incorporating models of energy markets that had previously been analyzed off-line. In addition, greater structural detail in NEMS permits the analysis of a broader range of energy issues. The time horizon of NEMS is the midterm period (i.e., through 2015). In order to represent the regional differences in energy markets, the component models of NEMS function at regional levels appropriate for the markets represented, with subsequent aggregation/disaggregation to the Census Division level for reporting purposes.

  1. Natural gas transmission and distribution model of the National Energy Modeling System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-02-01

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS was developed in the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA). NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the EIA and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. From 1982 through 1993, the Intermediate Future Forecasting System (IFFS) was used by the EIA for its analyses, and the Gas Analysis Modeling System (GAMS) was used within IFFS to represent natural gas markets. Prior to 1982, the Midterm Energy Forecasting System (MEFS), also referred to as the Project Independence Evaluation System (PIES), was employed. NEMS was developed to enhance and update EIA's modeling capability by internally incorporating models of energy markets that had previously been analyzed off-line. In addition, greater structural detail in NEMS permits the analysis of a broader range of energy issues. The time horizon of NEMS is the midterm period (i.e., through 2015). In order to represent the regional differences in energy markets, the component models of NEMS function at regional levels appropriate for the markets represented, with subsequent aggregation/disaggregation to the Census Division level for reporting purposes

  2. SU-F-J-138: An Extension of PCA-Based Respiratory Deformation Modeling Via Multi-Linear Decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iliopoulos, AS; Sun, X [Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Pitsianis, N [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (Greece); Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Yin, FF; Ren, L

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To address and lift the limited degree of freedom (DoF) of globally bilinear motion components such as those based on principal components analysis (PCA), for encoding and modeling volumetric deformation motion. Methods: We provide a systematic approach to obtaining a multi-linear decomposition (MLD) and associated motion model from deformation vector field (DVF) data. We had previously introduced MLD for capturing multi-way relationships between DVF variables, without being restricted by the bilinear component format of PCA-based models. PCA-based modeling is commonly used for encoding patient-specific deformation as per planning 4D-CT images, and aiding on-board motion estimation during radiotherapy. However, the bilinear space-time decomposition inherently limits the DoF of such models by the small number of respiratory phases. While this limit is not reached in model studies using analytical or digital phantoms with low-rank motion, it compromises modeling power in the presence of relative motion, asymmetries and hysteresis, etc, which are often observed in patient data. Specifically, a low-DoF model will spuriously couple incoherent motion components, compromising its adaptability to on-board deformation changes. By the multi-linear format of extracted motion components, MLD-based models can encode higher-DoF deformation structure. Results: We conduct mathematical and experimental comparisons between PCA- and MLD-based models. A set of temporally-sampled analytical trajectories provides a synthetic, high-rank DVF; trajectories correspond to respiratory and cardiac motion factors, including different relative frequencies and spatial variations. Additionally, a digital XCAT phantom is used to simulate a lung lesion deforming incoherently with respect to the body, which adheres to a simple respiratory trend. In both cases, coupling of incoherent motion components due to a low model DoF is clearly demonstrated. Conclusion: Multi-linear decomposition can

  3. The new ICRP respiratory model for radiation protection (ICRP 66) : applications and comparative evaluations; Nuovo modello polmonare della ICRP per radioprotezione (ICRP 66)azioni e confronti con la modellistica precedenteIl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellani, C.; Luciani, A. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Bologna (Italy). Dip. Ambiente

    1996-02-01

    The aim of this report is to present the New ICRP Respiratory Model Tract for Radiological Protection. The model allows considering anatomical and physiological characteristics, giving reference values for children aged 3 months, 1, 5,10, and 15 years for adults; it also takes into account aerosol and gas characteristics. After a general description of the model structure, deposition, clearance and dosimetric models are presented. To compare the new and previous model (ICRP 30), dose coefficients (committed effective dose for unit intake) foe inhalation of radionuclides by workers are calculated considering aerosol granulometries with activity median aerodynamic of 1 and 5 {mu}m, reference values for the respective publications. Dose coefficients and annual limits of intakes concerning respective dose limits (50 and 20 mSv respectively for ICRP 26 and 60) for workers and for members of population in case of dispersion of fission products aerosols, are finally calculated.

  4. Modeling of Respiratory System Dysfunction Among Nuclear Workers: A Preliminary Study

    OpenAIRE

    Belyaeva, Z.D.; Osovets, S.V.; Scott, B.R.; Zhuntova, G.V.; Grigoryeva, E.S.

    2008-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported on cancers among Mayak Production Association (PA) nuclear workers. Other studies have reported on serious deterministic effects of large radiation doses for the same population. This study relates to deterministic effects (respiratory system dysfunction) in Mayak workers after relatively small chronic radiation doses (alpha plus gamma). Because cigarette smoke is a confounding factor, we also account for smoking effects. Here we present a new empirical mathemat...

  5. Global, regional, and national disease burden estimates of acute lower respiratory infections due to respiratory syncytial virus in young children in 2015: a systematic review and modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ting; McAllister, David A; O'Brien, Katherine L; Simoes, Eric A F; Madhi, Shabir A; Gessner, Bradford D; Polack, Fernando P; Balsells, Evelyn; Acacio, Sozinho; Aguayo, Claudia; Alassani, Issifou; Ali, Asad; Antonio, Martin; Awasthi, Shally; Awori, Juliet O; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo; Baggett, Henry C; Baillie, Vicky L; Balmaseda, Angel; Barahona, Alfredo; Basnet, Sudha; Bassat, Quique; Basualdo, Wilma; Bigogo, Godfrey; Bont, Louis; Breiman, Robert F; Brooks, W Abdullah; Broor, Shobha; Bruce, Nigel; Bruden, Dana; Buchy, Philippe; Campbell, Stuart; Carosone-Link, Phyllis; Chadha, Mandeep; Chipeta, James; Chou, Monidarin; Clara, Wilfrido; Cohen, Cheryl; de Cuellar, Elizabeth; Dang, Duc-Anh; Dash-Yandag, Budragchaagiin; Deloria-Knoll, Maria; Dherani, Mukesh; Eap, Tekchheng; Ebruke, Bernard E; Echavarria, Marcela; de Freitas Lázaro Emediato, Carla Cecília; Fasce, Rodrigo A; Feikin, Daniel R; Feng, Luzhao; Gentile, Angela; Gordon, Aubree; Goswami, Doli; Goyet, Sophie; Groome, Michelle; Halasa, Natasha; Hirve, Siddhivinayak; Homaira, Nusrat; Howie, Stephen R C; Jara, Jorge; Jroundi, Imane; Kartasasmita, Cissy B; Khuri-Bulos, Najwa; Kotloff, Karen L; Krishnan, Anand; Libster, Romina; Lopez, Olga; Lucero, Marilla G; Lucion, Florencia; Lupisan, Socorro P; Marcone, Debora N; McCracken, John P; Mejia, Mario; Moisi, Jennifer C; Montgomery, Joel M; Moore, David P; Moraleda, Cinta; Moyes, Jocelyn; Munywoki, Patrick; Mutyara, Kuswandewi; Nicol, Mark P; Nokes, D James; Nymadawa, Pagbajabyn; da Costa Oliveira, Maria Tereza; Oshitani, Histoshi; Pandey, Nitin; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Phillips, Lia N; Picot, Valentina Sanchez; Rahman, Mustafizur; Rakoto-Andrianarivelo, Mala; Rasmussen, Zeba A; Rath, Barbara A; Robinson, Annick; Romero, Candice; Russomando, Graciela; Salimi, Vahid; Sawatwong, Pongpun; Scheltema, Nienke; Schweiger, Brunhilde; Scott, J Anthony G; Seidenberg, Phil; Shen, Kunling; Singleton, Rosalyn; Sotomayor, Viviana; Strand, Tor A; Sutanto, Agustinus; Sylla, Mariam; Tapia, Milagritos D; Thamthitiwat, Somsak; Thomas, Elizabeth D; Tokarz, Rafal; Turner, Claudia; Venter, Marietjie; Waicharoen, Sunthareeya; Wang, Jianwei; Watthanaworawit, Wanitda; Yoshida, Lay-Myint; Yu, Hongjie; Zar, Heather J; Campbell, Harry; Nair, Harish

    2017-09-02

    We have previously estimated that respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was associated with 22% of all episodes of (severe) acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI) resulting in 55 000 to 199 000 deaths in children younger than 5 years in 2005. In the past 5 years, major research activity on RSV has yielded substantial new data from developing countries. With a considerably expanded dataset from a large international collaboration, we aimed to estimate the global incidence, hospital admission rate, and mortality from RSV-ALRI episodes in young children in 2015. We estimated the incidence and hospital admission rate of RSV-associated ALRI (RSV-ALRI) in children younger than 5 years stratified by age and World Bank income regions from a systematic review of studies published between Jan 1, 1995, and Dec 31, 2016, and unpublished data from 76 high quality population-based studies. We estimated the RSV-ALRI incidence for 132 developing countries using a risk factor-based model and 2015 population estimates. We estimated the in-hospital RSV-ALRI mortality by combining in-hospital case fatality ratios with hospital admission estimates from hospital-based (published and unpublished) studies. We also estimated overall RSV-ALRI mortality by identifying studies reporting monthly data for ALRI mortality in the community and RSV activity. We estimated that globally in 2015, 33·1 million (uncertainty range [UR] 21·6-50·3) episodes of RSV-ALRI, resulted in about 3·2 million (2·7-3·8) hospital admissions, and 59 600 (48 000-74 500) in-hospital deaths in children younger than 5 years. In children younger than 6 months, 1·4 million (UR 1·2-1·7) hospital admissions, and 27 300 (UR 20 700-36 200) in-hospital deaths were due to RSV-ALRI. We also estimated that the overall RSV-ALRI mortality could be as high as 118 200 (UR 94 600-149 400). Incidence and mortality varied substantially from year to year in any given population. Globally, RSV is a common cause

  6. Evaluation of exercise-respiratory system modifications and integration schemes for physiological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, R. R.

    1974-01-01

    Exercise subroutine modifications are implemented in an exercise-respiratory system model yielding improvement of system response to exercise forcings. A more physiologically desirable respiratory ventilation rate in addition to an improved regulation of arterial gas tensions and cerebral blood flow is observed. A respiratory frequency expression is proposed which would be appropriate as an interfacing element of the respiratory-pulsatile cardiovascular system. Presentation of a circulatory-respiratory system integration scheme along with its computer program listing is given. The integrated system responds to exercise stimulation for both nonstressed and stressed physiological states. Other integration possibilities are discussed with respect to the respiratory, pulsatile cardiovascular, thermoregulatory, and the long-term circulatory systems.

  7. CONSTRAINING INTRACLUSTER GAS MODELS WITH AMiBA13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molnar, Sandor M.; Umetsu, Keiichi; Ho, Paul T. P.; Koch, Patrick M.; Victor Liao, Yu-Wei; Lin, Kai-Yang; Liu, Guo-Chin; Nishioka, Hiroaki; Birkinshaw, Mark; Bryan, Greg; Haiman, Zoltan; Shang, Cien; Hearn, Nathan; Huang, Chih-Wei Locutus; Wang, Fu-Cheng; Wu, Jiun-Huei Proty

    2010-01-01

    Clusters of galaxies have been extensively used to determine cosmological parameters. A major difficulty in making the best use of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) and X-ray observations of clusters for cosmology is that using X-ray observations it is difficult to measure the temperature distribution and therefore determine the density distribution in individual clusters of galaxies out to the virial radius. Observations with the new generation of SZ instruments are a promising alternative approach. We use clusters of galaxies drawn from high-resolution adaptive mesh refinement cosmological simulations to study how well we should be able to constrain the large-scale distribution of the intracluster gas (ICG) in individual massive relaxed clusters using AMiBA in its configuration with 13 1.2 m diameter dishes (AMiBA13) along with X-ray observations. We show that non-isothermal β models provide a good description of the ICG in our simulated relaxed clusters. We use simulated X-ray observations to estimate the quality of constraints on the distribution of gas density, and simulated SZ visibilities (AMiBA13 observations) for constraints on the large-scale temperature distribution of the ICG. We find that AMiBA13 visibilities should constrain the scale radius of the temperature distribution to about 50% accuracy. We conclude that the upgraded AMiBA, AMiBA13, should be a powerful instrument to constrain the large-scale distribution of the ICG.

  8. Greenhouse Gas Source Attribution: Measurements Modeling and Uncertainty Quantification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Safta, Cosmin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Sargsyan, Khachik [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Najm, Habib N. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); LaFranchi, Brian W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Ivey, Mark D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Schrader, Paul E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Michelsen, Hope A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Bambha, Ray P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-09-01

    In this project we have developed atmospheric measurement capabilities and a suite of atmospheric modeling and analysis tools that are well suited for verifying emissions of green- house gases (GHGs) on an urban-through-regional scale. We have for the first time applied the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model to simulate atmospheric CO2 . This will allow for the examination of regional-scale transport and distribution of CO2 along with air pollutants traditionally studied using CMAQ at relatively high spatial and temporal resolution with the goal of leveraging emissions verification efforts for both air quality and climate. We have developed a bias-enhanced Bayesian inference approach that can remedy the well-known problem of transport model errors in atmospheric CO2 inversions. We have tested the approach using data and model outputs from the TransCom3 global CO2 inversion comparison project. We have also performed two prototyping studies on inversion approaches in the generalized convection-diffusion context. One of these studies employed Polynomial Chaos Expansion to accelerate the evaluation of a regional transport model and enable efficient Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling of the posterior for Bayesian inference. The other approach uses de- terministic inversion of a convection-diffusion-reaction system in the presence of uncertainty. These approaches should, in principle, be applicable to realistic atmospheric problems with moderate adaptation. We outline a regional greenhouse gas source inference system that integrates (1) two ap- proaches of atmospheric dispersion simulation and (2) a class of Bayesian inference and un- certainty quantification algorithms. We use two different and complementary approaches to simulate atmospheric dispersion. Specifically, we use a Eulerian chemical transport model CMAQ and a Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model - FLEXPART-WRF. These two models share the same WRF

  9. Modeling of Gas Production from Shale Reservoirs Considering Multiple Transport Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chaohua; Wei, Mingzhen; Liu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Gas transport in unconventional shale strata is a multi-mechanism-coupling process that is different from the process observed in conventional reservoirs. In micro fractures which are inborn or induced by hydraulic stimulation, viscous flow dominates. And gas surface diffusion and gas desorption should be further considered in organic nano pores. Also, the Klinkenberg effect should be considered when dealing with the gas transport problem. In addition, following two factors can play significant roles under certain circumstances but have not received enough attention in previous models. During pressure depletion, gas viscosity will change with Knudsen number; and pore radius will increase when the adsorption gas desorbs from the pore wall. In this paper, a comprehensive mathematical model that incorporates all known mechanisms for simulating gas flow in shale strata is presented. The objective of this study was to provide a more accurate reservoir model for simulation based on the flow mechanisms in the pore scale and formation geometry. Complex mechanisms, including viscous flow, Knudsen diffusion, slip flow, and desorption, are optionally integrated into different continua in the model. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to evaluate the effect of different mechanisms on the gas production. The results showed that adsorption and gas viscosity change will have a great impact on gas production. Ignoring one of following scenarios, such as adsorption, gas permeability change, gas viscosity change, or pore radius change, will underestimate gas production.

  10. Modeling of Gas Production from Shale Reservoirs Considering Multiple Transport Mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaohua Guo

    Full Text Available Gas transport in unconventional shale strata is a multi-mechanism-coupling process that is different from the process observed in conventional reservoirs. In micro fractures which are inborn or induced by hydraulic stimulation, viscous flow dominates. And gas surface diffusion and gas desorption should be further considered in organic nano pores. Also, the Klinkenberg effect should be considered when dealing with the gas transport problem. In addition, following two factors can play significant roles under certain circumstances but have not received enough attention in previous models. During pressure depletion, gas viscosity will change with Knudsen number; and pore radius will increase when the adsorption gas desorbs from the pore wall. In this paper, a comprehensive mathematical model that incorporates all known mechanisms for simulating gas flow in shale strata is presented. The objective of this study was to provide a more accurate reservoir model for simulation based on the flow mechanisms in the pore scale and formation geometry. Complex mechanisms, including viscous flow, Knudsen diffusion, slip flow, and desorption, are optionally integrated into different continua in the model. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to evaluate the effect of different mechanisms on the gas production. The results showed that adsorption and gas viscosity change will have a great impact on gas production. Ignoring one of following scenarios, such as adsorption, gas permeability change, gas viscosity change, or pore radius change, will underestimate gas production.

  11. Ammonia concentration modeling based on retained gas sampler data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terrones, G.; Palmer, B.J.; Cuta, J.M.

    1997-09-01

    The vertical ammonia concentration distributions determined by the retained gas sampler (RGS) apparatus were modeled for double-shell tanks (DSTs) AW-101, AN-103, AN-104, and AN-105 and single-shell tanks (SSTs) A-101, S-106, and U-103. One the vertical transport of ammonia in the tanks were used for the modeling. Transport in the non-convective settled solids and floating solids layers is assumed to occur primarily via some type of diffusion process, while transport in the convective liquid layers is incorporated into the model via mass transfer coefficients based on empirical correlations. Mass transfer between the top of the waste and the tank headspace and the effects of ventilation of the headspace are also included in the models. The resulting models contain a large number of parameters, but many of them can be determined from known properties of the waste configuration or can be estimated within reasonable bounds from data on the waste samples themselves. The models are used to extract effective diffusion coefficients for transport in the nonconvective layers based on the measured values of ammonia from the RGS apparatus. The modeling indicates that the higher concentrations of ammonia seen in bubbles trapped inside the waste relative to the ammonia concentrations in the tank headspace can be explained by a combination of slow transport of ammonia via diffusion in the nonconvective layers and ventilation of the tank headspace by either passive or active means. Slow transport by diffusion causes a higher concentration of ammonia to build up deep within the waste until the concentration gradients between the interior and top of the waste are sufficient to allow ammonia to escape at the same rate at which it is being generated in the waste

  12. Origin of marine sour natural gas and gas-filling model for the Wolonghe Gas Field, Sichuan Basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Quanyou; Jin, Zhijun; Li, Jian; Hu, Anping; Bi, Changchun

    2012-09-01

    The chemical and isotopic composition of natural gases from the Wolonghe Gas Field, Sichuan Basin, Southwest China, was investigated to assess the potential gas sources and reconstruct the gas-filling history of the reservoirs. All natural gases in this field are dominated by gaseous hydrocarbons (C1-C3) with varied amounts of non-hydrocarbon components (CO2, H2S and N2). The H2S content varies with reservoir intervals. It ranges from zero to 1.84% with an average of 0.37% in the Carboniferous reservoir, from 0.05% to 0.76% with an average of 0.30% in the Permian reservoir, and from 1.09% to 18.83% with an average of 5.39% in the Lower Triassic reservoir. The gas dryness coefficient (C1/C1-3) ranges from 0.97 to 1.0 with an average of 0.99. The carbon isotopic compositions of methane and its homologues in the Wolonghe Gas Field vary widely, with δ13C1 ⩾ δ13C2 rocks migrated into the Carboniferous reservoir through faults and fractures and was trapped beneath the Permian Liangshan Formation shale, whereas the natural gas in the Permian and Lower Triassic Jialingjiang Formation was generated and preserved in its own formations with the overlying gypsum acting as a cap rock.

  13. Viscoelastic Model for Lung Parenchyma for Multi-Scale Modeling of Respiratory System, Phase II: Dodecahedral Micro-Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freed, Alan D.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Carson, James P.; Jacob, Rick E.

    2012-03-01

    In the first year of this contractual effort a hypo-elastic constitutive model was developed and shown to have great potential in modeling the elastic response of parenchyma. This model resides at the macroscopic level of the continuum. In this, the second year of our support, an isotropic dodecahedron is employed as an alveolar model. This is a microscopic model for parenchyma. A hopeful outcome is that the linkage between these two scales of modeling will be a source of insight and inspiration that will aid us in the final year's activity: creating a viscoelastic model for parenchyma.

  14. Physiology of respiratory disturbances in muscular dystrophies

    OpenAIRE

    Lo Mauro, Antonella; Aliverti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy is a group of inherited myopathies characterised by progressive skeletal muscle wasting, including of the respiratory muscles. Respiratory failure, i.e. when the respiratory system fails in its gas exchange functions, is a common feature in muscular dystrophy, being the main cause of death, and it is a consequence of lung failure, pump failure or a combination of the two. The former is due to recurrent aspiration, the latter to progressive weakness of respiratory muscles an...

  15. New models for success emerge for US natural gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addy, W.M.; Hutchinson, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    Very few companies in the US natural gas industry are confident in their ability to compete effectively in the brave new world of deregulation. Boston Consulting Group recently conducted an internal study to help the industry think about its future and identify models for success in this new environment. The authors examined the historical performance of 800 companies using several shareholder-value indicators, including cash-flow returns on investment, a measure of cash returns on cash invested that correlates closely to share price. Based on that review and discussions with investment managers and industry analysts, the authors were able to focus on a handful of companies that actually have thrived and created value against the difficult landscape of the past decade. Interviews with their senior executives provided important strategic and operational insights

  16. Modelling carbon membranes for gas and isotope separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yan; Du, Aijun; Hankel, Marlies; Smith, Sean C

    2013-04-14

    Molecular modelling has become a useful and widely applied tool to investigate separation and diffusion behavior of gas molecules through nano-porous low dimensional carbon materials, including quasi-1D carbon nanotubes and 2D graphene-like carbon allotropes. These simulations provide detailed, molecular level information about the carbon framework structure as well as dynamics and mechanistic insights, i.e. size sieving, quantum sieving, and chemical affinity sieving. In this perspective, we revisit recent advances in this field and summarize separation mechanisms for multicomponent systems from kinetic and equilibrium molecular simulations, elucidating also anomalous diffusion effects induced by the confining pore structure and outlining perspectives for future directions in this field.

  17. Real-time prediction of respiratory motion based on a local dynamic model in an augmented space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, S-M; Jung, B-H; Ruan, D

    2011-03-21

    Motion-adaptive radiotherapy aims to deliver ablative radiation dose to the tumor target with minimal normal tissue exposure, by accounting for real-time target movement. In practice, prediction is usually necessary to compensate for system latency induced by measurement, communication and control. This work focuses on predicting respiratory motion, which is most dominant for thoracic and abdominal tumors. We develop and investigate the use of a local dynamic model in an augmented space, motivated by the observation that respiratory movement exhibits a locally circular pattern in a plane augmented with a delayed axis. By including the angular velocity as part of the system state, the proposed dynamic model effectively captures the natural evolution of respiratory motion. The first-order extended Kalman filter is used to propagate and update the state estimate. The target location is predicted by evaluating the local dynamic model equations at the required prediction length. This method is complementary to existing work in that (1) the local circular motion model characterizes 'turning', overcoming the limitation of linear motion models; (2) it uses a natural state representation including the local angular velocity and updates the state estimate systematically, offering explicit physical interpretations; (3) it relies on a parametric model and is much less data-satiate than the typical adaptive semiparametric or nonparametric method. We tested the performance of the proposed method with ten RPM traces, using the normalized root mean squared difference between the predicted value and the retrospective observation as the error metric. Its performance was compared with predictors based on the linear model, the interacting multiple linear models and the kernel density estimator for various combinations of prediction lengths and observation rates. The local dynamic model based approach provides the best performance for short to medium prediction lengths under relatively

  18. Modeling of ITER related vacuum gas pumping distribution systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misdanitis, Serafeim [University of Thessaly, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Pedion Areos, 38334 Volos (Greece); Association EURATOM - Hellenic Republic (Greece); Valougeorgis, Dimitris, E-mail: diva@mie.uth.gr [University of Thessaly, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Pedion Areos, 38334 Volos (Greece); Association EURATOM - Hellenic Republic (Greece)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • An algorithm to simulate vacuum gas flows through pipe networks consisting of long channels and channels of moderate length has been developed. • Analysis and results are based on kinetic theory as described by the BGK kinetic model equation. • The algorithm is capable of computing the mass flow rates (or the conductance) through the pipes and the pressure at the nodes of the network. • Since a kinetic approach is implemented, the algorithm is valid in the whole range of the Knudsen number. • The developed algorithm will be useful for simulating the vacuum distribution systems of ITER and future fusion reactors. -- Abstract: A novel algorithm recently developed to solve steady-state isothermal vacuum gas dynamics flows through pipe networks consisting of long tubes is extended to include, in addition to long channels, channels of moderate length 10 < L/D < 50. This is achieved by implementing the so-called end effect treatment/correction. Analysis and results are based on kinetic theory as described by the Boltzmann equation or associated reliable kinetic model equations. For a pipe network of known geometry the algorithm is capable of computing the mass flow rates (or the conductance) through the pipes as well as the pressure heads at the nodes of the network. The feasibility of the approach is demonstrated by simulating two ITER related vacuum distribution systems, one in the viscous regime and a second one in a wide range of Knudsen numbers. Since a kinetic approach is implemented, the algorithm is valid and the results are accurate in the whole range of the Knudsen number, while the involved computational effort remains small.

  19. The future of subsidence modelling: compaction and subsidence due to gas depletion of the Groningen gas field in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thienen-Visser, K. van; Fokker, P.A.

    2017-01-01

    The Groningen gas field has shown considerable compaction and subsidence since starting production in the early 1960s. The behaviour is understood from the geomechanical response of the reservoir pressure depletion. By integrating surface movement measurements and modelling, the model parameters can

  20. Multicomponent gas mixture air bearing modeling via lattice Boltzmann method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tae Kim, Woo; Kim, Dehee; Hari Vemuri, Sesha; Kang, Soo-Choon; Seung Chung, Pil; Jhon, Myung S.

    2011-04-01

    As the demand for ultrahigh recording density increases, development of an integrated head disk interface (HDI) modeling tool, which considers the air bearing and lubricant film morphology simultaneously is of paramount importance. To overcome the shortcomings of the existing models based on the modified Reynolds equation (MRE), the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is a natural choice in modeling high Knudsen number (Kn) flows owing to its advantages over conventional methods. The transient and parallel nature makes this LBM an attractive tool for the next generation air bearing design. Although LBM has been successfully applied to single component systems, a multicomponent system analysis has been thwarted because of the complexity in coupling the terms for each component. Previous studies have shown good results in modeling immiscible component mixtures by use of an interparticle potential. In this paper, we extend our LBM model to predict the flow rate of high Kn pressure-driven flows in multicomponent gas mixture air bearings, such as the air-helium system. For accurate modeling of slip conditions near the wall, we adopt our LBM scheme with spatially dependent relaxation times for air bearings in HDIs. To verify the accuracy of our code, we tested our scheme via simple two-dimensional benchmark flows. In the pressure-driven flow of an air-helium mixture, we found that the simple linear combination of pure helium and pure air flow rates, based on helium and air mole fraction, gives considerable error when compared to our LBM calculation. Hybridization with the existing MRE database can be adopted with the procedure reported here to develop the state-of-the-art slider design software.

  1. Multiscale model reduction for shale gas transport in fractured media

    KAUST Repository

    Akkutlu, I. Y.

    2016-05-18

    In this paper, we develop a multiscale model reduction technique that describes shale gas transport in fractured media. Due to the pore-scale heterogeneities and processes, we use upscaled models to describe the matrix. We follow our previous work (Akkutlu et al. Transp. Porous Media 107(1), 235–260, 2015), where we derived an upscaled model in the form of generalized nonlinear diffusion model to describe the effects of kerogen. To model the interaction between the matrix and the fractures, we use Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Method (Efendiev et al. J. Comput. Phys. 251, 116–135, 2013, 2015). In this approach, the matrix and the fracture interaction is modeled via local multiscale basis functions. In Efendiev et al. (2015), we developed the GMsFEM and applied for linear flows with horizontal or vertical fracture orientations aligned with a Cartesian fine grid. The approach in Efendiev et al. (2015) does not allow handling arbitrary fracture distributions. In this paper, we (1) consider arbitrary fracture distributions on an unstructured grid; (2) develop GMsFEM for nonlinear flows; and (3) develop online basis function strategies to adaptively improve the convergence. The number of multiscale basis functions in each coarse region represents the degrees of freedom needed to achieve a certain error threshold. Our approach is adaptive in a sense that the multiscale basis functions can be added in the regions of interest. Numerical results for two-dimensional problem are presented to demonstrate the efficiency of proposed approach. © 2016 Springer International Publishing Switzerland

  2. Modelling and Identification for Control of Gas Bearings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theisen, Lukas Roy Svane; Niemann, Hans Henrik; Santos, Ilmar

    2015-01-01

    Gas bearings are popular for their high speed capabilities, low friction and clean operation, but suffer from poor damping, which poses challenges for safe operation in presence of disturbances. Enhanced damping can be achieved through active lubrication techniques using feedback control laws...... to industrial rotating machinery with gas bearings and to allow for subsequent control design. The paper shows how piezoelectric actuators in a gas bearing are efficiently used to perturb the gas film for identification over relevant ranges of rotational speed and gas injection pressure. Parameter...

  3. Deficiency of GABAergic synaptic inhibition in the Kölliker-Fuse area underlies respiratory dysrhythmia in a mouse model of Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdala, Ana Paula; Toward, Marie A; Dutschmann, Mathias; Bissonnette, John M; Paton, Julian F R

    2016-01-01

    Life threatening breathing irregularity and central apnoeas are highly prevalent in children suffering from Rett syndrome. Abnormalities in inhibitory synaptic transmission have been associated with the physiopathology of this syndrome, and may underlie the respiratory disorder. In a mouse model of Rett syndrome, GABAergic terminal projections are markedly reduced in the Kölliker-Fuse nucleus (KF) in the dorsolateral pons, an important centre for control of respiratory rhythm regularity. Administration of a drug that augments endogenous GABA localized to this region of the pons reduced the incidence of apnoea and the respiratory irregularity of Rett female mice. Conversely, the respiratory disorder was recapitulated by blocking GABAergic transmission in the KF area of healthy rats. This study helps us understand the mechanism for generation of respiratory abnormality in Rett syndrome, pinpoints a brain site responsible and provides a clear anatomical target for the development of a translatable drug treatment. Central apnoeas and respiratory irregularity are a common feature in Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder most often caused by mutations in the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 gene (MECP2). We used a MECP2 deficient mouse model of RTT as a strategy to obtain insights into the neurobiology of the disease and into mechanisms essential for respiratory rhythmicity during normal breathing. Previously, we showed that, systemic administration of a GABA reuptake blocker in MECP2 deficient mice markedly reduced the occurrence of central apnoeas. Further, we found that, during central apnoeas, post-inspiratory drive (adductor motor) to the upper airways was enhanced in amplitude and duration in Mecp2 heterozygous female mice. Since the pontine Kölliker-Fuse area (KF) drives post-inspiration, suppresses inspiration, and can reset the respiratory oscillator phase, we hypothesized that synaptic inhibition in this area is essential for respiratory rhythm

  4. Modeling Corneal Oxygen with Scleral Gas Permeable Lens Wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compañ, Vicente; Aguilella-Arzo, Marcel; Edrington, Timothy B; Weissman, Barry A

    2016-11-01

    The main goal of this current work is to use an updated calculation paradigm, and updated boundary conditions, to provide theoretical guidelines to assist the clinician whose goal is to improve his or her scleral gas permeable (GP) contact lens wearing patients' anterior corneal oxygen supply. Our model uses a variable value of corneal oxygen consumption developed through Monod equations that disallows negative oxygen tensions within the stroma to predict oxygen tension at the anterior corneal surface of scleral GP contact lens wearing eyes, and to describe oxygen tension and flux profiles, for various boundary conditions, through the lens, tears, and cornea. We use several updated tissue and boundary parameters in our model. Tear exchange with GP scleral lenses is considered nonexistent in this model. The majority of current scleral GP contact lenses should produce some levels of corneal hypoxia under open eye conditions. Only lenses producing the thinnest of tear vaults should result in anterior corneal surface oxygen tensions greater than a presumed critical oxygen tension of 100 mmHg. We also find that corneal oxygen tension and flux are each more sensitive to modification in tear vault than to changes in lens oxygen permeability, within the ranges of current clinical manipulation. Our study suggests that clinicians would be prudent to prescribe scleral GP lenses manufactured from higher oxygen permeability materials and especially to fit without excessive corneal clearance.

  5. Estimating intratidal nonlinearity of respiratory system mechanics: a model study using the enhanced gliding-SLICE method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumann, Stefan; Burcza, Boris; Guttmann, Josef; Haberthür, Christoph; Lichtwarck-Aschoff, Michael

    2009-01-01

    In the clinical situation and in most research work, the analysis of respiratory system mechanics is limited to the estimation of single-value compliances during static or quasi-static conditions. In contrast, our SLICE method analyses intratidal nonlinearity under the dynamic conditions of mechanical ventilation by calculating compliance and resistance for six conjoined volume portions (slices) of the pressure–volume loop by multiple linear regression analysis. With the gliding-SLICE method we present a new approach to determine continuous intratidal nonlinear compliance. The performance of the gliding-SLICE method was tested both in computer simulations and in a physical model of the lung, both simulating different intratidal compliance profiles. Compared to the original SLICE method, the gliding-SLICE method resulted in smaller errors when calculating the compliance or pressure course (all p 2 O s L −1 to 0.8 ± 0.3 cmH 2 O s L −1 (mathematical model) and from 7.2 ± 3.9 cmH 2 O s L −1 to 0.4 ± 0.2 cmH 2 O s L −1 (physical model) (all p < 0.001). We conclude that the new gliding-SLICE method allows detailed assessment of intratidal nonlinear respiratory system mechanics without discontinuity error

  6. Respiratory system model for quasistatic pulmonary pressure-volume (P-V) curve: inflation-deflation loop analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, R; Narusawa, U

    2008-06-01

    A respiratory system model (RSM) is developed for the deflation process of a quasistatic pressure-volume (P-V) curve, following the model for the inflation process reported earlier. In the RSM of both the inflation and the deflation limb, a respiratory system consists of a large population of basic alveolar elements, each consisting of a piston-spring-cylinder subsystem. A normal distribution of the basic elements is derived from Boltzmann statistical model with the alveolar closing (opening) pressure as the distribution parameter for the deflation (inflation) process. An error minimization by the method of least squares applied to existing P-V loop data from two different data sources confirms that a simultaneous inflation-deflation analysis is required for an accurate determination of RSM parameters. Commonly used terms such as lower inflection point, upper inflection point, and compliance are examined based on the P-V equations, on the distribution function, as well as on the geometric and physical properties of the basic alveolar element.

  7. MODEL AHP/DEA UNTUK MENGUKUR EFISIENSI PENGGUNAAN TEKNOLOGI GAS BUANG RUMAH TANGGA RAMAH LINGKUNGAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parwadi Moengin

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Dalam makalah ini diperkenalkan sebuah model AHP/DEA untuk mengukur efisiensi penggunaan teknologi gas buang  rumah tangga ramah lingkungan. Model ini merupakan sebuah model yang mengintegrasikan antara AHP dan DEA yang merupakan salah satu dari metode multi-criteria decision making (MCDM. Metode ini merupakan salah satu prosedur saintifik yang dapat digunakan untuk mengukur penggunaan teknologi gas ramah lingkungan. Kata kunci: AHP, DEA, teknologi gas ramah lingkungan.   Abstract This paper introduced a model of AHP / DEA to measure the efficiency of the use of exhaust gas technology environmentally friendly household. This model is a model that integrates the AHP and DEA, which is one of the methods of multi-criteria decision making (MCDM. This method is a scientific procedure that can be used to measure the use of environmentally friendly gas technologies. Keywords: AHP, DEA, environmentally friendly gas technologies.

  8. Detailed modelling of a flue-gas desulfurisation plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, A.; Fueyo, N.; Tomas, A. [University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain)

    2007-11-15

    This paper presents a CFD model for a flue-gas desulfurisation plant, and its application to an operating plant. The FGD plant is of the wet-scrubber type, with co-current and counter-current sections. The sorbent used is limestone, and, after cleaning the flue gases, the limestone slurry is collected in an oxidation tank for the production of gypsum. The model uses an Eulerian-Eulerian treatment of the multiphase flow in the absorber and the tank. The essential mass-transfer mechanisms (such as SO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} absorption and CO{sub 2} desorption) are accounted for, as are also the main chemical kinetics leading to the formation of gypsum. Given the different nature of the flow in the absorber and tank, two separate simulations are conducted for each of these domains, and the solutions are iteratively coupled through boundary conditions during the calculations. The model is applied to the FGD plant of the Teruel powerstation located in Andorra (Teruel, Spain). The powerstation is fired with a high-sulfur coal (up to 4.5 percent), and the FGD system has been designed for a desulfurisation capacity of 1.4 million N m{sup 3}/hr for a desulfurisation efficiency in excess of 90 percent. Validation of the model is conducted by comparison with available plant data for two design coals and two desulfurisation efficiencies. The model accuracy is reasonable, given the complexity of the aero/hydrodynamical and thermo-chemical phenomena involved.

  9. Variable Ventilation Improved Respiratory System Mechanics and Ameliorated Pulmonary Damage in a Rat Model of Lung Ischemia-Reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soluri-Martins, André; Moraes, Lillian; Santos, Raquel S; Santos, Cintia L; Huhle, Robert; Capelozzi, Vera L; Pelosi, Paolo; Silva, Pedro L; de Abreu, Marcelo Gama; Rocco, Patricia R M

    2017-01-01

    Lung ischemia-reperfusion injury remains a major complication after lung transplantation. Variable ventilation (VV) has been shown to improve respiratory function and reduce pulmonary histological damage compared to protective volume-controlled ventilation (VCV) in different models of lung injury induced by endotoxin, surfactant depletion by saline lavage, and hydrochloric acid. However, no study has compared the biological impact of VV vs. VCV in lung ischemia-reperfusion injury, which has a complex pathophysiology different from that of other experimental models. Thirty-six animals were randomly assigned to one of two groups: (1) ischemia-reperfusion (IR), in which the left pulmonary hilum was completely occluded and released after 30 min; and (2) Sham, in which animals underwent the same surgical manipulation but without hilar clamping. Immediately after surgery, the left (IR-injured) and right (contralateral) lungs from 6 animals per group were removed, and served as non-ventilated group (NV) for molecular biology analysis. IR and Sham groups were further randomized to one of two ventilation strategies: VCV ( n = 6/group) [tidal volume (V T ) = 6 mL/kg, positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) = 2 cmH 2 O, fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO 2 ) = 0.4]; or VV, which was applied on a breath-to-breath basis as a sequence of randomly generated V T values ( n = 1200; mean V T = 6 mL/kg), with a 30% coefficient of variation. After 5 min of ventilation and at the end of a 2-h period (Final), respiratory system mechanics and arterial blood gases were measured. At Final, lungs were removed for histological and molecular biology analyses. Respiratory system elastance and alveolar collapse were lower in VCV than VV (mean ± SD, VCV 3.6 ± 1.3 cmH 2 0/ml and 2.0 ± 0.8 cmH 2 0/ml, p = 0.005; median [interquartile range], VCV 20.4% [7.9-33.1] and VV 5.4% [3.1-8.8], p = 0.04, respectively). In left lungs of IR animals, VCV increased the expression of interleukin-6 and

  10. Ocular tropism of respiratory viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belser, Jessica A; Rota, Paul A; Tumpey, Terrence M

    2013-03-01

    Respiratory viruses (including adenovirus, influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus, coronavirus, and rhinovirus) cause a broad spectrum of disease in humans, ranging from mild influenza-like symptoms to acute respiratory failure. While species D adenoviruses and subtype H7 influenza viruses are known to possess an ocular tropism, documented human ocular disease has been reported following infection with all principal respiratory viruses. In this review, we describe the anatomical proximity and cellular receptor distribution between ocular and respiratory tissues. All major respiratory viruses and their association with human ocular disease are discussed. Research utilizing in vitro and in vivo models to study the ability of respiratory viruses to use the eye as a portal of entry as well as a primary site of virus replication is highlighted. Identification of shared receptor-binding preferences, host responses, and laboratory modeling protocols among these viruses provides a needed bridge between clinical and laboratory studies of virus tropism.

  11. The AIMAR recommendations for early diagnosis of chronic obstructive respiratory disease based on the WHO/GARD model*

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    the Italian context; the document of the Agency for Regional Healthcare Services (AGE.NA.S) is a more suited compendium for consultation, and the recent joint statement on integrated COPD management of the three major Italian scientific Associations in the respiratory area together with the contribution of a Society of General Medicine deals prevalently with some critical issues (appropriateness of diagnosis, pharmacological treatment, rehabilitation, continuing care); also the document “Care Continuity: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)” of the Global Alliance against chronic Respiratory Diseases (GARD)-Italy does not treat in depth the issue of early diagnosis. The present document – produced by the AIMAR (Interdisciplinary Association for Research in Lung Disease) Task Force for early diagnosis of chronic respiratory disease based on the WHO/GARD model and on available evidence and expertise –after a general examination of the main epidemiologic aspects, proposes to integrate the above-mentioned existing documents. In particular: a) it formally indicates on the basis of the available evidence the modalities and the instruments necessary for carrying out secondary prevention at the primary care level (a pro-active,‘case-finding’approach; assessment of the individual’s level of risk of COPD; use of short questionnaires for an initial screening based on symptoms; use of simple spirometry for the second level of screening); b) it identifies possible ways of including these activities within primary care practice; c) it places early diagnosis within the “systemic”, consequential management of chronic respiratory diseases, which will be briefly described with the aid of schemes taken from the Italian and international reference documents. PMID:25473523

  12. Universal model for water costs of gas exchange by animals and plants

    OpenAIRE

    Woods, H. Arthur; Smith, Jennifer N.

    2010-01-01

    For terrestrial animals and plants, a fundamental cost of living is water vapor lost to the atmosphere during exchange of metabolic gases. Here, by bringing together previously developed models for specific taxa, we integrate properties common to all terrestrial gas exchangers into a universal model of water loss. The model predicts that water loss scales to gas exchange with an exponent of 1 and that the amount of water lost per unit of gas exchanged depends on several factors: the surface t...

  13. Kinetic Modeling of the Thermal Destruction of Nitrogen Mustard Gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizardo-Huerta, Juan-Carlos; Sirjean, Baptiste; Verdier, Laurent; Fournet, René; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre

    2017-05-04

    The destruction of stockpiles or unexploded ammunitions of nitrogen mustard (tris(2-chloroethyl)amine, HN-3) requires the development of safe processes. The thermal destruction of this kind of compound is one of the most efficient method of destruction. Because of the high-level of toxicity of this chemical, there is a considerable lack of knowledge on the chemical kinetics at high temperatures. In this study, a detailed chemical kinetic model for the pyrolysis of nitrogen mustard gas is developed based on a large number of thermokinetic parameters calculated with theoretical chemistry. The thermal decomposition of HN-3 is shown to mainly proceed through stepwise dechlorination with Cl-atom being the principal chain carrier. The successive losses of chlorine atom mainly lead to unsaturated amines without chlorine groups. Theoretical calculations demonstrated that the thermal decomposition of these compounds ultimately lead to the formation of pyrrole, which can accumulate at low temperature. At higher temperatures, pyrrole yields HCN and acetylene. Simulations also predict that about 52% of the total flux of decomposition of HN-3 leads to the formation of N,N-diethenyl-2-chloroethylamine (P29), which acts as a chain branching agent because its unimolecular decomposition is preponderant and produces one chlorine and one hydrogen atoms. Comparisons with the simulated reactivity of sulfur mustard gas are also performed and show that HN-3 is more reactive that the former toxic. The higher number of chlorine atoms in HN-3 compared to sulfur mustard (3 vs 2) and the formation of the chain branching intermediate P29 during its decomposition explain this behavior.

  14. Formation of natural gas hydrates in marine sediments 1. Conceptual model of gas hydrate growth conditioned by host sediment properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clennell, M.B.; Hovland, M.; Booth, J.S.; Henry, P.; Winters, W.J.

    1999-01-01

    The stability of submarine gas hydrates is largely dictated by pressure and temperature, gas composition, and pore water salinity. However, the physical properties and surface chemistry of deep marine sediments may also affect the thermodynamic state, growth kinetics, spatial distributions, and growth forms of clathrates. Our conceptual model presumes that gas hydrate behaves in a way analogous to ice in a freezing soil. Hydrate growth is inhibited within fine-grained sediments by a combination of reduced pore water activity in the vicinity of hydrophilic mineral surfaces, and the excess internal energy of small crystals confined in pores. The excess energy can be thought of as a "capillary pressure" in the hydrate crystal, related to the pore size distribution and the state of stress in the sediment framework. The base of gas hydrate stability in a sequence of fine sediments is predicted by our model to occur at a lower temperature (nearer to the seabed) than would be calculated from bulk thermodynamic equilibrium. Capillary effects or a build up of salt in the system can expand the phase boundary between hydrate and free gas into a divariant field extending over a finite depth range dictated by total methane content and pore-size distribution. Hysteresis between the temperatures of crystallization and dissociation of the clathrate is also predicted. Growth forms commonly observed in hydrate samples recovered from marine sediments (nodules, and lenses in muds; cements in sands) can largely be explained by capillary effects, but kinetics of nucleation and growth are also important. The formation of concentrated gas hydrates in a partially closed system with respect to material transport, or where gas can flush through the system, may lead to water depletion in the host sediment. This "freeze-drying" may be detectable through physical changes to the sediment (low water content and overconsolidation) and/or chemical anomalies in the pore waters and metastable

  15. Knowledge Brokering: An Innovative Model for Supporting Evidence-Informed Practice in Respiratory Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison M Hoens

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of adopting research findings in the clinical setting is challenging, regardless of the area of practice. One strategy to facilitate this process is the use of knowledge brokering. Knowledge brokers (KBs are individuals who work to bridge the gap between researchers and knowledge users. In the health care setting, KBs work closely with clinicians to facilitate enhanced uptake of research findings into clinical practice. They also work with researchers to ensure research findings are translatable and meaningful to clinical practice. The present article discusses a KB’s role in a respiratory care setting. Working closely with both researchers and clinicians, the KB has led teams in the process of conceptualizing, developing, testing, disseminating and evaluating several projects related to respiratory care, including projects related to mobility in critical care settings and acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; inspiratory muscle training; and the use of incentive spirometry in postsurgical populations. The KB role has provided an important communication link between researcher and knowledge user that has facilitated evidence-informed practice to improve patient care.

  16. Modelling the radiolysis of RSG-GAS primary cooling water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butarbutar, S. L.; Kusumastuti, R.; Subekti, M.; Sunaryo, G. R.

    2018-02-01

    Water chemistry control for light water coolant reactor required a reliable understanding of radiolysis effect in mitigating corrosion and degradation of reactor structure material. It is known that oxidator products can promote the corrosion, cracking and hydrogen pickup both in the core and in the associated piping components of the reactor. The objective of this work is to provide the radiolysis model of RSG GAS cooling water and further more to predict the oxidator concentration which can lead to corrosion of reactor material. Direct observations or measurements of the chemistry in and around the high-flux core region of a nuclear reactor are difficult due to the extreme conditions of high temperature, pressure, and mixed radiation fields. For this reason, chemical models and computer simulations of the radiolysis of water under these conditions are an important route of investigation. FACSIMILE were used to calculate the concentration of O2 formed at relatively long-time by the pure water γ and neutron irradiation (pH=7) at temperature between 25 and 50 °C. This simulation method is based on a complex chemical reaction kinetic. In this present work, 300 MeV-proton were used to mimic γ-rays radiolysis and 2 MeV fast neutrons. Concentration of O2 were calculated at 10-6 - 106 s time scale.

  17. Thermodynamic Model for Updraft Gasifier with External Recirculation of Pyrolysis Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fajri Vidian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of the thermodynamic modeling of gasification for updraft gasifier uses one process of decomposition (decomposition of fuel. In the present study, a thermodynamic model which uses two processes of decomposition (decomposition of fuel and char is used. The model is implemented in modification of updraft gasifier with external recirculation of pyrolysis gas to the combustion zone and the gas flowing out from the side stream (reduction zone in the updraft gasifier. The goal of the model obtains the influences of amount of recirculation pyrolysis gas fraction to combustion zone on combustible gas and tar. The significant results of modification updraft are that the increases amount of recirculation of pyrolysis gas will increase the composition of H2 and reduce the composition of tar; then the composition of CO and CH4 is dependent on equivalence ratio. The results of the model for combustible gas composition are compared with previous study.

  18. Enhancement of Antituberculosis Immunity in a Humanized Model System by a Novel Virus-Vectored Respiratory Mucosal Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yushi; Lai, Rocky; Afkhami, Sam; Haddadi, Siamak; Zganiacz, Anna; Vahedi, Fatemeh; Ashkar, Ali A; Kaushic, Charu; Jeyanathan, Mangalakumari; Xing, Zhou

    2017-07-01

    The translation of preclinically promising novel tuberculosis vaccines to ultimate human applications has been challenged by the lack of animal models with an immune system equivalent to the human immune system in its genetic diversity and level of susceptibility to tuberculosis. We have developed a humanized mice (Hu-mice) tuberculosis model system to investigate the clinical relevance of a novel virus-vectored (VV) tuberculosis vaccine administered via respiratory mucosal or parenteral route. We find that VV vaccine activates T cells in Hu-mice as it does in human vaccinees. The respiratory mucosal route for delivery of VV vaccine in Hu-mice, but not the parenteral route, significantly reduces the humanlike lung tuberculosis outcomes in a human T-cell-dependent manner. Our results suggest that the Hu-mouse can be used to predict the protective efficacy of novel tuberculosis vaccines/strategies before they proceed to large, expensive human trials. This new vaccine testing system will facilitate the global pace of clinical tuberculosis vaccine development. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Evaluation of gas radiation models in CFD modeling of oxy-combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajhi, M.A.; Ben-Mansour, R.; Habib, M.A.; Nemitallah, M.A.; Andersson, K.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • CFD modeling of a typical industrial water tube boiler is conducted. • Different combustion processes were considered including air and oxy-fuel combustion. • SGG, EWBM, Leckner, Perry and WSGG radiation models were considered in the study. • EWBM is the most accurate model and it’s considered to be the benchmark model. • Characteristics of oxy-fuel combustion are compared to those of air–fuel combustion. - Abstract: Proper determination of the radiation energy is very important for proper predictions of the combustion characteristics inside combustion devices using CFD modeling. For this purpose, different gas radiation models were developed and applied in the present work. These radiation models vary in their accuracy and complexity according to the application. In this work, a CFD model for a typical industrial water tube boiler was developed, considering three different combustion environments. The combustion environments are air–fuel combustion (21% O 2 and 79% N 2 ), oxy-fuel combustion (21% O 2 and 79% CO 2 ) and oxy-fuel combustion (27% O 2 and 73% CO 2 ). Simple grey gas (SGG), exponential wide band model (EWBM), Leckner, Perry and weighted sum of grey gases (WSGG) radiation models were examined and their influences on the combustion characteristics were evaluated. Among those radiation models, the EWBM was found to provide close results to the experimental data for the present boiler combustion application. The oxy-fuel combustion characteristics were analyzed and compared with those of air–fuel combustion

  20. Experimental study and new three-dimensional kinetic modeling of foamy solution-gas drive processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaofei; Zhang, Yanyu; Wang, Shilin; Song, Zhaoyao; Li, Peng; Wang, Changfa

    2018-03-12

    Foamy solution-gas drive processes in heavy oil reservoirs are very complex. The influence of some microscopic factors on this process is not fully understood due to limitations of traditional depletion tests. This study aims to investigate foamy solution-gas drive by experiments and simulations. First, the effects of the pressure depletion rate on critical gas saturation and foamy solution-gas drive processes were investigated by laboratory experiments. Second, a new three-dimensional foamy oil model that captures many important characteristics of foamy solution-gas drive, such as non-equilibrium behavior, gas evolution kinetics, and the effect of viscous forces on gas mobility, was developed. Last, the effects of some important parameters on foamy solution-gas drive were systematically investigated,and a model application was conducted in a typical foamy oil reservoir. The results indicate that the new model is capble of simulating many of the unusual behaviors observed in foamy solution-gas drive on a laboratory and field scales. High oil recoveries were obtained with a high oil viscosity, high depletion rate, long sandpack, and low solution gas-oil ratio. Foamy solution-gas drive processes are sensitive to the depletion rate, length, and critical gas saturation. The oil viscosity, solution GOR and diffusion coefficient are not sensitive factors.

  1. Evaluation of two different respiratory physiotherapy methods after ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-09-01

    Sep 1, 2015 ... the acute effects of incentive spirometry (IS) and breathing retraining exercises by a respiratory physiotherapist or ... Conclusions: Based on the outcome of this study, respiratory physiotherapy methods carried out by a respiratory ... methods after thoracoscopy with regard to arterial blood gas, respiratory.

  2. Mathematical modeling of non-stationary gas flow in gas pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetisov, V. G.; Nikolaev, A. K.; Lykov, Y. V.; Duchnevich, L. N.

    2018-03-01

    An analysis of the operation of the gas transportation system shows that for a considerable part of time pipelines operate in an unsettled regime of gas movement. Its pressure and flow rate vary along the length of pipeline and over time as a result of uneven consumption and selection, switching on and off compressor units, shutting off stop valves, emergence of emergency leaks. The operational management of such regimes is associated with difficulty of reconciling the operating modes of individual sections of gas pipeline with each other, as well as with compressor stations. Determining the grounds that cause change in the operating mode of the pipeline system and revealing patterns of these changes determine the choice of its parameters. Therefore, knowledge of the laws of changing the main technological parameters of gas pumping through pipelines in conditions of non-stationary motion is of great importance for practice.

  3. Dependence of subject-specific parameters for a fast helical CT respiratory motion model on breathing rate: an animal study

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Dylan; Thomas, David H.; Lamb, James M.; Lewis, John H.; Dou, Tai; Sieren, Jered P.; Saylor, Melissa; Hofmann, Christian; Hoffman, Eric A.; Lee, Percy P.; Low, Daniel A.

    2018-02-01

    To determine if the parameters relating lung tissue displacement to a breathing surrogate signal in a previously published respiratory motion model vary with the rate of breathing during image acquisition. An anesthetized pig was imaged using multiple fast helical scans to sample the breathing cycle with simultaneous surrogate monitoring. Three datasets were collected while the animal was mechanically ventilated with different respiratory rates: 12 bpm (breaths per minute), 17 bpm, and 24 bpm. Three sets of motion model parameters describing the correspondences between surrogate signals and tissue displacements were determined. The model error was calculated individually for each dataset, as well asfor pairs of parameters and surrogate signals from different experiments. The values of one model parameter, a vector field denoted α which related tissue displacement to surrogate amplitude, determined for each experiment were compared. The mean model error of the three datasets was 1.00  ±  0.36 mm with a 95th percentile value of 1.69 mm. The mean error computed from all combinations of parameters and surrogate signals from different datasets was 1.14  ±  0.42 mm with a 95th percentile of 1.95 mm. The mean difference in α over all pairs of experiments was 4.7%  ±  5.4%, and the 95th percentile was 16.8%. The mean angle between pairs of α was 5.0  ±  4.0 degrees, with a 95th percentile of 13.2 mm. The motion model parameters were largely unaffected by changes in the breathing rate during image acquisition. The mean error associated with mismatched sets of parameters and surrogate signals was 0.14 mm greater than the error achieved when using parameters and surrogate signals acquired with the same breathing rate, while maximum respiratory motion was 23.23 mm on average.

  4. Shale gas technology innovation rate impact on economic Base Case – Scenario model benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weijermars, Ruud

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Cash flow models control which technology is affordable in emerging shale gas plays. • Impact of technology innovation on IRR can be as important as wellhead price hikes. • Cash flow models are useful for technology decisions that make shale gas plays economic. • The economic gap can be closed by appropriate technology innovation. - Abstract: Low gas wellhead prices in North America have put its shale gas industry under high competitive pressure. Rapid technology innovation can help companies to improve the economic performance of shale gas fields. Cash flow models are paramount for setting effective production and technology innovation targets to achieve positive returns on investment in all global shale gas plays. Future cash flow of a well (or cluster of wells) may either improve further or deteriorate, depending on: (1) the regional volatility in gas prices at the wellhead – which must pay for the gas resource extraction, and (2) the cost and effectiveness of the well technology used. Gas price is an externality and cannot be controlled by individual companies, but well technology cost can be reduced while improving production output. We assume two plausible scenarios for well technology innovation and model the return on investment while checking against sensitivity to gas price volatility. It appears well technology innovation – if paced fast enough – can fully redeem the negative impact of gas price decline on shale well profits, and the required rates are quantified in our sensitivity analysis

  5. Effects on Pulmonary Vascular Mechanics of Two Different Lung-Protective Ventilation Strategies in an Experimental Model of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Arnoldo; Gomez-Peñalver, Eva; Monge-Garcia, M Ignacio; Retamal, Jaime; Borges, João Batista; Tusman, Gerardo; Hedenstierna, Goran; Larsson, Anders; Suarez-Sipmann, Fernando

    2017-11-01

    To compare the effects of two lung-protective ventilation strategies on pulmonary vascular mechanics in early acute respiratory distress syndrome. Experimental study. University animal research laboratory. Twelve pigs (30.8 ± 2.5 kg). Acute respiratory distress syndrome was induced by repeated lung lavages and injurious mechanical ventilation. Thereafter, animals were randomized to 4 hours ventilation according to the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network protocol or to an open lung approach strategy. Pressure and flow sensors placed at the pulmonary artery trunk allowed continuous assessment of pulmonary artery resistance, effective elastance, compliance, and reflected pressure waves. Respiratory mechanics and gas exchange data were collected. Acute respiratory distress syndrome led to pulmonary vascular mechanics deterioration. Four hours after randomization, pulmonary vascular mechanics was similar in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network and open lung approach: resistance (578 ± 252 vs 626 ± 153 dyn.s/cm; p = 0.714), effective elastance, (0.63 ± 0.22 vs 0.58 ± 0.17 mm Hg/mL; p = 0.710), compliance (1.19 ± 0.8 vs 1.50 ± 0.27 mL/mm Hg; p = 0.437), and reflection index (0.36 ± 0.04 vs 0.34 ± 0.09; p = 0.680). Open lung approach as compared to Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network was associated with improved dynamic respiratory compliance (17.3 ± 2.6 vs 10.5 ± 1.3 mL/cm H2O; p mechanics similarly. The use of higher positive end-expiratory pressures in the open lung approach strategy did not worsen pulmonary vascular mechanics, improved lung mechanics, and gas exchange but at the expense of a lower cardiac index.

  6. 5D respiratory motion model based image reconstruction algorithm for 4D cone-beam computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiulong; Zhang, Xue; Zhang, Xiaoqun; Zhao, Hongkai; Gao, Yu; Thomas, David; Low, Daniel A.; Gao, Hao

    2015-11-01

    4D cone-beam computed tomography (4DCBCT) reconstructs a temporal sequence of CBCT images for the purpose of motion management or 4D treatment in radiotherapy. However the image reconstruction often involves the binning of projection data to each temporal phase, and therefore suffers from deteriorated image quality due to inaccurate or uneven binning in phase, e.g., under the non-periodic breathing. A 5D model has been developed as an accurate model of (periodic and non-periodic) respiratory motion. That is, given the measurements of breathing amplitude and its time derivative, the 5D model parametrizes the respiratory motion by three time-independent variables, i.e., one reference image and two vector fields. In this work we aim to develop a new 4DCBCT reconstruction method based on 5D model. Instead of reconstructing a temporal sequence of images after the projection binning, the new method reconstructs time-independent reference image and vector fields with no requirement of binning. The image reconstruction is formulated as a optimization problem with total-variation regularization on both reference image and vector fields, and the problem is solved by the proximal alternating minimization algorithm, during which the split Bregman method is used to reconstruct the reference image, and the Chambolle's duality-based algorithm is used to reconstruct the vector fields. The convergence analysis of the proposed algorithm is provided for this nonconvex problem. Validated by the simulation studies, the new method has significantly improved image reconstruction accuracy due to no binning and reduced number of unknowns via the use of the 5D model.

  7. Modeling syngas-fired gas turbine engines with two dilutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Mitchell E.

    2011-12-01

    Prior gas turbine engine modeling work at the University of Wyoming studied cycle performance and turbine design with air and CO2-diluted GTE cycles fired with methane and syngas fuels. Two of the cycles examined were unconventional and innovative. The work presented herein reexamines prior results and expands the modeling by including the impacts of turbine cooling and CO2 sequestration on GTE cycle performance. The simple, conventional regeneration and two alternative regeneration cycle configurations were examined. In contrast to air dilution, CO2 -diluted cycle efficiencies increased by approximately 1.0 percentage point for the three regeneration configurations examined, while the efficiency of the CO2-diluted simple cycle decreased by approximately 5.0 percentage points. For CO2-diluted cycles with a closed-exhaust recycling path, an optimum CO2-recycle pressure was determined for each configuration that was significantly lower than atmospheric pressure. Un-cooled alternative regeneration configurations with CO2 recycling achieved efficiencies near 50%, which was approximately 3.0 percentage points higher than the conventional regeneration cycle and simple cycle configurations that utilized CO2 recycling. Accounting for cooling of the first two turbine stages resulted in a 2--3 percentage point reduction in un-cooled efficiency, with air dilution corresponding to the upper extreme. Additionally, when the work required to sequester CO2 was accounted for, cooled cycle efficiency decreased by 4--6 percentage points, and was more negatively impacted when syngas fuels were used. Finally, turbine design models showed that turbine blades are shorter with CO2 dilution, resulting in fewer design restrictions.

  8. Respiratory alkalosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a condition marked by a low level of carbon dioxide in the blood due to breathing excessively. ... aimed at the condition that causes respiratory alkalosis. Breathing ... dioxide -- sometimes helps reduce symptoms when anxiety is the ...

  9. A sequential Monte Carlo model of the combined GB gas and electricity network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudry, Modassar; Wu, Jianzhong; Jenkins, Nick

    2013-01-01

    A Monte Carlo model of the combined GB gas and electricity network was developed to determine the reliability of the energy infrastructure. The model integrates the gas and electricity network into a single sequential Monte Carlo simulation. The model minimises the combined costs of the gas and electricity network, these include gas supplies, gas storage operation and electricity generation. The Monte Carlo model calculates reliability indices such as loss of load probability and expected energy unserved for the combined gas and electricity network. The intention of this tool is to facilitate reliability analysis of integrated energy systems. Applications of this tool are demonstrated through a case study that quantifies the impact on the reliability of the GB gas and electricity network given uncertainties such as wind variability, gas supply availability and outages to energy infrastructure assets. Analysis is performed over a typical midwinter week on a hypothesised GB gas and electricity network in 2020 that meets European renewable energy targets. The efficacy of doubling GB gas storage capacity on the reliability of the energy system is assessed. The results highlight the value of greater gas storage facilities in enhancing the reliability of the GB energy system given various energy uncertainties. -- Highlights: •A Monte Carlo model of the combined GB gas and electricity network was developed. •Reliability indices are calculated for the combined GB gas and electricity system. •The efficacy of doubling GB gas storage capacity on reliability of the energy system is assessed. •Integrated reliability indices could be used to assess the impact of investment in energy assets

  10. A Computation Fluid Dynamic Model for Gas Lift Process Simulation in a Vertical Oil Well

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadivar Arash

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Continuous gas-lift in a typical oil well was simulated using computational fluid dynamic (CFD technique. A multi fluid model based on the momentum transfer between liquid and gas bubbles was employed to simulate two-phase flow in a vertical pipe. The accuracy of the model was investigated through comparison of numerical predictions with experimental data. The model then was used to study the dynamic behaviour of the two-phase flow around injection point in details. The predictions by the model were compared with other empirical correlations, as well. To obtain an optimum condition of gas-lift, the influence of the effective parameters including the quantity of injected gas, tubing diameter and bubble size distribution were investigated. The results revealed that increasing tubing diameter, the injected gas rate and decreasing bubble diameter improve gas-lift performance.

  11. A Computation Fluid Dynamic Model for Gas Lift Process Simulation in a Vertical Oil Well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadivar, Arash; Lay, Ebrahim Nemati

    2017-03-01

    Continuous gas-lift in a typical oil well was simulated using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) technique. A multi fluid model based on the momentum transfer between liquid and gas bubbles was employed to simulate two-phase flow in a vertical pipe. The accuracy of the model was investigated through comparison of numerical predictions with experimental data. The model then was used to study the dynamic behaviour of the two-phase flow around injection point in details. The predictions by the model were compared with other empirical correlations, as well. To obtain an optimum condition of gas-lift, the influence of the effective parameters including the quantity of injected gas, tubing diameter and bubble size distribution were investigated. The results revealed that increasing tubing diameter, the injected gas rate and decreasing bubble diameter improve gas-lift performance.

  12. Impact of Cardiopulmonary Bypass on Respiratory Mucociliary Function in an Experimental Porcine Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Sánchez-Véliz

    Full Text Available The impact of cardiac surgery using cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB on the respiratory mucociliary function is unknown. This study evaluated the effects of CPB and interruption of mechanical ventilation on the respiratory mucociliary system.Twenty-two pigs were randomly assigned to the control (n = 10 or CPB group (n = 12. After the induction of anesthesia, a tracheostomy was performed, and tracheal tissue samples were excised (T0 from both groups. All animals underwent thoracotomy. In the CPB group, an aorto-bicaval CPB was installed and maintained for 90 minutes. During the CPB, mechanical ventilation was interrupted, and the tracheal tube was disconnected. A second tracheal tissue sample was obtained 180 minutes after the tracheostomy (T180. Mucus samples were collected from the trachea using a bronchoscope at T0, T90 and T180. Ciliary beat frequency (CBF and in situ mucociliary transport (MCT were studied in ex vivo tracheal epithelium. Mucus viscosity (MV was assessed using a cone-plate viscometer. Qualitative tracheal histological analysis was performed at T180 tissue samples.CBF decreased in the CPB group (13.1 ± 1.9 Hz vs. 11.1 ± 2.1 Hz, p < 0.05 but not in the control group (13.1 ± 1 Hz vs. 13 ± 2.9 Hz. At T90, viscosity was increased in the CPB group compared to the control (p < 0.05. No significant differences were observed in in situ MCT. Tracheal histology in the CPB group showed areas of ciliated epithelium loss, submucosal edema and infiltration of inflammatory cells.CPB acutely contributed to alterations in tracheal mucocilliary function.

  13. Pharmacological Effects of Lactuca serriola L. in Experimental Model of Gastrointestinal, Respiratory, and Vascular Ailments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Hussain Janbaz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactuca serriola L. has traditionally been used in folkloric medicine to manage respiratory, gastrointestinal, and multiple other ailments. The present study was undertaken to explore the effect of methanol extract of L. serriola on isolated rabbit tissue preparations, that is, jejunum, trachea, and aorta in an attempt to validate its folkloric use in traditional medicine for gastrointestinal, respiratory, and vascular ailments. The application of the methanol extract to isolated rabbit jejunum preparations exhibited concentration-dependent spasmogenic effect (0.03 to 3.0 mg/mL, but interestingly further increase in concentration (5.0 mg/mL resulted in complete spasmolytic effect. The pretreatment of the tissue preparations with atropine (0.1 μM caused the suppression of the contractile response. Moreover, the same extract also caused relaxation of K+-(80 mM induced spastic contractions of isolated rabbit jejunum preparations (5.0 mg/mL and shifted the Ca++ dose response curves towards right at concentration range of 0.3–1.0 mg/mL. Similarly, the extract application to isolated rabbit tracheal preparations relaxed the carbachol-(1 μM induced (0.3–1.0 mg/mL as well as K+-(80 mM induced contractions (3.0 mg/mL. Furthermore, it relaxed the phenylephrine (1 μM-induced contractions in isolated rabbit aorta preparations (3.0 mg/mL and K+ (80 mM-induced contractions (1.0 mg/mL. These effects were found comparable to that of dicyclomine, as an antagonist of muscarinic receptors as well as a possible Ca++ channel blocker. The previously mentioned findings may partially justify the folkloric use of Lactuca serriola in the management of conditions pertaining to spasm of intestine, bronchioles, and vasculature.

  14. The AgI/II family adhesin AspA is required for respiratory infection by Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Franklin

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS is a human pathogen that causes pharyngitis and invasive diseases such as toxic shock syndrome and sepsis. The upper respiratory tract is the primary reservoir from which GAS can infect new hosts and cause disease. The factors involved in colonisation are incompletely known however. Previous evidence in oral streptococci has shown that the AgI/II family proteins are involved. We hypothesized that the AspA member of this family might be involved in GAS colonization. We describe a novel mouse model of GAS colonization of the nasopharynx and lower respiratory tract to elucidate these interactions. We used two clinical M serotypes expressing AspA, and their aspA gene deletant isogenic mutants in experiments using adherence assays to respiratory epithelium, macrophage phagocytosis and neutrophil killing assays and in vivo models of respiratory tract colonisation and infection. We demonstrated the requirement for AspA in colonization of the respiratory tract. AspA mutants were cleared from the respiratory tract and were deficient in adherence to epithelial cells, and susceptible to phagocytosis. Expression of AspA in the surrogate host Lactococcus lactis protected bacteria from phagocytosis. Our results suggest that AspA has an essential role in respiratory infection, and may function as a novel anti-phagocytic factor.

  15. Modeling Grade IV Gas Emboli using a Limited Failure Population Model with Random Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Laura A.; Conkin, Johnny; Chhikara, Raj S.; Powell, Michael R.

    2002-05-01

    Venous gas emboli (VGE) (gas bubbles in venous blood) are associated with an increased risk of decompression sickness (DCS) in hypobaric environments. A high grade of VGE can be a precursor to serious DCS. In this paper, we model time to Grade IV VGE considering a subset of individuals assumed to be immune from experiencing VGE. Our data contain monitoring test results from subjects undergoing up to 13 denitrogenation test procedures prior to exposure to a hypobaric environment. The onset time of Grade IV VGE is recorded as contained within certain time intervals. We fit a parametric (lognormal) mixture survival model to the interval-and right-censored data to account for the possibility of a subset of "cured" individuals who are immune to the event. Our model contains random subject effects to account for correlations between repeated measurements on a single individual. Model assessments and cross-validation indicate that this limited failure population mixture model is an improvement over a model that does not account for the potential of a fraction of cured individuals. We also evaluated some alternative mixture models. Predictions from the best fitted mixture model indicate that the actual process is reasonably approximated by a limited failure population model.

  16. MRGC performance evaluation model of gas leak infrared imaging detection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiakun; Jin, Weiqi; Wang, Xia; Zhang, Xu

    2014-12-15

    Gas leak infrared imaging detection technology has become one of the most effective means to detect gas leaks. We propose a novel MRGC (minimum resolvable gas concentration) model that is suitable for evaluating the performance of passive GLIIDSs (gas leak infrared imaging detection systems). An MRGC equivalent calculation method and a direct MRGC measurement method based on the MRTD (minimum resolvable temperature difference) model are also proposed. The MRGC measurement system is designed and built. The measured and calculated results are in good agreement, which verifies the MRGC model's correctness and demonstrates the effectiveness of the MRGC performance evaluation method.

  17. Modelling and analysis of offshore energy systems on North Sea oil and gas platforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Tuong-Van; Elmegaard, Brian; Pierobon, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    Offshore processes are associated with significant energy consumption and large CO2 emissions. Conventional North Sea oil and gas facilities include the following operations: crude oil separation, gas compression and purification, wastewater treatment, gas lifting, seawater injection, oil and gas...... export, and power generation. In this paper, a generic model of a North Sea oil and gas platform is described and the most thermodynamically inefficient processes are identified by performing an exergy analysis. Models and simulations are built and run with the tools Aspen Plus R, DNA and Aspen HYSYS R....... Results reveal that the total exergy destruction of the system is particularly sensitive to the gas-to-oil ratio and amounts to 55-65 MW, while the total exergy losses amount to 15-20 MW. The gas compression train and the production manifold module are the most exergy-destructive operations of the oil...

  18. The practical use of resistance modelling to interpret the gas separation properties of hollow fiber membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad Fauzi Ismail; Shilton, S.J.

    2000-01-01

    A simple resistance modelling methodology is presented for gas transport through asymmetric polymeric membranes. The methodology allows fine structural properties such as active layer thickness and surface porosity, to be determined from experimental gas permeation data. This paper, which could be regarded as a practical guide, shows that resistance modeling, if accompanied by realistic working assumptions, need not be difficult and can provide a valuable insight into the relationships between the membrane fabrication conditions and performance of gas separation membranes. (Author)

  19. Airway remodeling in a mouse asthma model assessed by in-vivo respiratory-gated micro-computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lederlin, Mathieu; Montaudon, Michel [Universite Bordeaux 2, Laboratoire de Physiologie Cellulaire Respiratoire, Bordeaux (France); Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM), U885, Bordeaux (France); CHU Bordeaux, Unite d' Imagerie Thoracique, Pessac (France); Ozier, Annaig; Begueret, Hugues; Ousova, Olga; Marthan, Roger; Berger, Patrick [Universite Bordeaux 2, Laboratoire de Physiologie Cellulaire Respiratoire, Bordeaux (France); Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM), U885, Bordeaux (France); Laurent, Francois [Universite Bordeaux 2, Laboratoire de Physiologie Cellulaire Respiratoire, Bordeaux (France); Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM), U885, Bordeaux (France); CHU Bordeaux, Unite d' Imagerie Thoracique, Pessac (France); CHU de Bordeaux, Hopital du Haut-Leveque, Hopital Cardiologique, Unite d' Imagerie Thoracique et Cardiovasculaire, Pessac (France)

    2010-01-15

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the feasibility of non-invasive respiratory-gated micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) for assessment of airway remodelling in a mouse asthma model. Six female BALB/c mice were challenged intranasally with ovalbumin. A control group of six mice received saline inhalation. All mice underwent plethysmographic study and micro-CT. For each mouse, peribronchial attenuation values of 12 bronchi were measured, from which a peribronchial density index (PBDI) was computed. Mice were then sacrificed and lungs examined histologically. Final analysis involved 10 out of 12 mice. Agreement of measurements across observers and over time was very good (intraclass correlation coefficients: 0.94-0.98). There was a significant difference in PBDI between asthmatic and control mice (-210 vs. -338.9 HU, P=0.008). PBDI values were correlated to bronchial muscle area (r=0.72, P=0.018). This study shows that respiratory-gated micro-CT may allow non-invasive monitoring of bronchial remodelling in asthmatic mice and evaluation of innovative treatment effects. (orig.)

  20. Modeling lateral gas transport in soil adjacent to an old landfill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, T.G.; Christophersen, Mette; Moldrup, P.

    2001-01-01

    Lateral migration of landfill gases in soils surrounding old (closed) municipal landfills can lead to explosion hazards and damage to vegetation. Landfill gas production and migration is controlled by microbial activity and soil physical properties such as gas (air) permeability, gas diffusivity...... during the calibration. The model was used to evaluate the sensitivity of landfill gas concentration and flux with respect to a set of governing parameters. The results of the sensitivity analysis indicated that landfill gas migration in the field soil was most sensitive to air permeability and soil...

  1. Escalation scenarios initiated by gas explosions on offshore installations. Probabilistic cause and consequence modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eknes, Monika Loeland

    1996-12-31

    This Dr. ing. thesis deals with escalation scenarios initiated by gas explosions on offshore installations. Gas explosions is one of the major hazards to such installations. The objectives were to estimate the probability of ignition and frequency of gas explosions for gas leaks on top sides of offshore installations, and to estimate the response and resistance of components that could result in escalation if they failed. Main fields considered cover risk analysis methodology, gas explosions, simplified escalation models, evaluation of structural consequences, case studies, and guidelines. 107 refs., 33 figs., 33 tabs.

  2. Thermal piston model for the optoacoustic effect: Sound generation in an optically thick gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, R.B.; Diebold, G.J.

    1987-01-01

    At high concentrations of an infrared absorbing gas, the optical absorption length for the incident radiation can become small compared with the thermal diffusion length in the gas. A description of the optoacoustic effect consequently must include thermal conduction of heat to the cell window since sound generation takes place in a thin layer of gas adjacent to the entrance window. A piston model is given here for the optoacoustic effect generated in a highly absorbing gas; in addition, experiments are reported that show new phase and amplitude dependences of the acoustic signal on gas concentrations, and modulation frequency

  3. Innovative characteristics of the new dosimetric model for the human respiratory tract studied by the ICRP appointed Task Group of Committee 2

    CERN Document Server

    Melandri, C; Tarroni, G

    1991-01-01

    In 1984, the ICRP appointed a Task Group of Committee 2 to review and revise, as necessary, the current lung dosimetric model. On the basis of the knowledge acquired during the past 20 years, the Task Group's approach has been to review, in depth, the morphology and physiology of the human respiratory tract, inspirability of aerosols and regional deposition of inhaled particles as functions of aerosol size and breathing parameters, clearance of deposited materials, nature and specific sites of damage to the respiratory system caused by inhaled radioactive substances. In the proposed model, clearance from the three regions of the respiratory tract (extrathoracic ET, fast-clearing thoracic T sub f and slow-clearing thoracic T sub s , comprising lymph nodes) is described in terms of competition between the mechanical processes moving particles, which do not depend on the substances, and those of absorption into the blood, determined solely by the material. A Task Group report will also include models for calcula...

  4. Very low tidal volume ventilation with associated hypercapnia--effects on lung injury in a model for acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Fuchs

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ventilation using low tidal volumes with permission of hypercapnia is recommended to protect the lung in acute respiratory distress syndrome. However, the most lung protective tidal volume in association with hypercapnia is unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of different tidal volumes with associated hypercapnia on lung injury and gas exchange in a model for acute respiratory distress syndrome. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this randomized controlled experiment sixty-four surfactant-depleted rabbits were exposed to 6 hours of mechanical ventilation with the following targets: Group 1: tidal volume = 8-10 ml/kg/PaCO(2 = 40 mm Hg; Group 2: tidal volume = 4-5 ml/kg/PaCO(2 = 80 mm Hg; Group 3: tidal volume = 3-4 ml/kg/PaCO(2 = 120 mm Hg; Group 4: tidal volume = 2-3 ml/kg/PaCO(2 = 160 mm Hg. Decreased wet-dry weight ratios of the lungs, lower histological lung injury scores and higher PaO(2 were found in all low tidal volume/hypercapnia groups (group 2, 3, 4 as compared to the group with conventional tidal volume/normocapnia (group 1. The reduction of the tidal volume below 4-5 ml/kg did not enhance lung protection. However, oxygenation and lung protection were maintained at extremely low tidal volumes in association with very severe hypercapnia and no adverse hemodynamic effects were observed with this strategy. CONCLUSION: Ventilation with low tidal volumes and associated hypercapnia was lung protective. A tidal volume below 4-5 ml/kg/PaCO(2 80 mm Hg with concomitant more severe hypercapnic acidosis did not increase lung protection in this surfactant deficiency model. However, even at extremely low tidal volumes in association with severe hypercapnia lung protection and oxygenation were maintained.

  5. Modelling gas migration in compacted bentonite: gambit club phase 3. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoch, A.R.; Cliffe, K.A.; Swift, B.T.; Rodwell, W.R.

    2004-04-01

    This report describes the third phase of a programme of work to develop a computational model of gas migration through highly compacted water-saturated bentonite. One difficulty with this endeavour is the definitive determination of the mechanism of the gas migration from the available experimental data. The report contains a brief review of the experimental data and their interpretation. The model development work reported involves the investigation of two ways of enhancing a model proposed in the previous phase of the programme. This model was based on the concept that gas migration pathways were created by consolidating the clay fabric by application of gas pressure to create porosity through which the gas could flow. The two developments of this model that are separately explored in this work are: (a) The incorporation of a proper treatment of the stress-strain behaviour of the clay in (b) response to gas migration. The previous model had only considered stress effects through simple volume changes to the clay fabric. The inclusion of a dual-porosity feature into the model in an attempt to address the role that the clay fabric might play in gas migration through the clay, in particular the role that pre-existing interstack voids might have in gas migration. The consideration of hysteresis effects was also included in this study. As in previous GAMBIT Club work, the models are tested against the results of laboratory experiments. (orig.)

  6. Dynamic simulation of dispersed gas-liquid two-phase flow using a discrete bubble model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delnoij, E.; Lammers, F.A.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1997-01-01

    In this paper a detailed hydrodynamic model for gas-liquid two-phase flow will be presented. The model is based on a mixed Eulerian-Lagrangian approach and describes the time-dependent two-dimensional motion of small, spherical gas bubbles in a bubble column operating in the homogeneous regime. The

  7. An optimization model for natural gas supply portfolios of a power generation company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jirutitijaroen, Panida; Kim, Sujin; Kittithreerapronchai, Oran; Prina, José

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► An optimization model for daily operation of a natural gas-fired generation company is proposed. ► The model considers uncertainties in electricity price and natural gas price. ► The model is formulated to capture the hedging decisions by the company. ► The solution yields quantities of natural gas, generating schedule and purchasing quantities of electricity. ► Higher profit can be achieved by adapting inventory and production to the actual spot prices of natural gas and electricity. - Abstract: This paper considers a deregulated electricity market environment where a natural gas-fired generation company can engage in different types of contracts to manage its natural gas supply as well as trade on the electricity market. If the contracts are properly designed, they can protect the company from fluctuations in electricity price and demand, at some cost to the company’s expected profit. This reduction in profit can be mitigated by trading on the natural gas and electricity spot markets, but this trading activity may also sometimes result in losses. A stochastic programming model is formulated to capture the hedging decisions made by the company, as well as the interactions between the natural gas and electricity markets. The benefits offered by this approach for profit maximization in a variety of business scenarios, such as the case where the company can hold some amount of gas in storage are studied and presented. It is found that the stochastic model enables the company to optimize the electricity generation schedule and the natural gas consumption, including spot price transactions and gas storage management. Several managerial insights into the natural gas market, natural gas storage, and distribution profit are given

  8. Gas generation in deep radioactive waste repositories: a review of processes, controls and models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, M.A.

    1990-10-01

    Gas generation within radioactive waste repositories may produce two general problems: 1) breaching of engineered and natural barriers due to high gas pressures; 2) enhanced radiological risk due to reduced groundwater travel times and/or greater aqueous or gaseous activities reaching the biosphere. As a result of these concerns, HMIP must be aware of the current status of relevant research, together with any associated deficiencies. This report addresses the current status of published research on near-field gas generation from worldwide sources and documents the important gas generating processes, the factors controlling them and models available to simulate them. In the absence of suitable models, outline technical specifications for corrosion and microbial degradation gas generation models are defined and the deficiencies in the current understanding of gas generation are highlighted; a conceptual research programme to correct these deficiencies is presented. (author)

  9. compliance of the respiratory system as a predictor for successful

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -weight infants ... respiratory rate/Vt and mean inspiratory flow were measured during two different ventilatory ..... respiratory system compliance and gas exchange in newboms with hyaline membrane disease. Peditztr Pulmono11989; 6: 2-7.

  10. Comparison of artificial neural network (ANN) and partial least squares (PLS) regression models for predicting respiratory ventilation: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ming-I Brandon; Groves, William A; Freivalds, Andris; Lee, Eun Gyung; Harper, Martin

    2012-05-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the potential for using artificial neural networks (ANN) to predict inspired minute ventilation (V(I)) during exercise activities. Six physiological/kinematic measurements obtained from a portable ambulatory monitoring system, along with individual's anthropometric and demographic characteristics, were employed as input variables to develop and optimize the ANN configuration with respect to reference values simultaneously measured using a pneumotachograph (PT). The generalization ability of the resulting two-hidden-layer ANN model was compared with a linear predictive model developed through partial least squares (PLS) regression, as well as other V(I) predictive models proposed in the literature. Using an independent dataset recorded from nine 80-min step tests, the results showed that the ANN-estimated V(I) was highly correlated (R(2) = 0.88) with V(I) measured by the PT, with a mean difference of approximately 0.9%. In contrast, the PLS and other regression-based models resulted in larger average errors ranging from 7 to 34%. In addition, the ANN model yielded estimates of cumulative total volume that were on average within 1% of reference PT measurements. Compared with established statistical methods, the proposed ANN model demonstrates the potential to provide improved prediction of respiratory ventilation in workplace applications for which the use of traditional laboratory-based instruments is not feasible. Further research should be conducted to investigate the performance of ANNs for different types of physical activity in larger and more varied worker populations.

  11. Application of the physiological and morphological parameters of the brazilian population sample to the mathematical model of the human respiratory tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, Arlene Alves dos

    2005-01-01

    The Human Respiratory Tract Model proposed by the ICRP Publication 66 accounts for the morphology and physiology of the respiratory tract. The characteristics of air drawn into the lungs and exhaled are greatly influenced by the morphology of the respiratory tract, which causes numerous changes in pressure, flow rate, direction and humidity as air moves into and out of the lungs. Concerning the respiratory physiological parameters the breathing characteristics influence the volume, the inhalation rate of air and the portion that enters through the nose and the mouth. These characteristics are important to determine the fractional deposition. The model uses morphological and physiological parameters from the Caucasian man to establish deposition fractions in the respiratory tract regions. It is known that the morphology and physiology are influenced by environmental, occupational and economic conditions. The ICRP recommends, for a reliable evaluation of the regional deposition, the use of parameters from a local population when information is available. The main purpose of this study is to verify the influence in using the morphology and physiology parameters representative of a sample of the Brazilian population on the deposition model of the ICRP Publication 66. The morphological and physiological data were obtained from the literature. The software EXCEL for Windows (version 2000) was used in order to implement the deposition model and also to allow the changes in parameters of interest. Initially, the implemented model was checked using the parameters defined by the ICRP and the results of the fraction deposition in the respiratory tract compartments were compared. Finally, morphological and physiological parameters from Brazilian adult male were applied and the fractional deposition calculated. The results suggest a significant variation in fractional deposition when Brazilian parameters are applied in the model. (author)

  12. Multiscale development of a fission gas thermal conductivity model: Coupling atomic, meso and continuum level simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonks, Michael R.; Millett, Paul C.; Nerikar, Pankaj; Du, Shiyu; Andersson, David; Stanek, Christopher R.; Gaston, Derek; Andrs, David; Williamson, Richard

    2013-09-01

    Fission gas production and evolution significantly impact the fuel performance, causing swelling, a reduction in the thermal conductivity and fission gas release. However, typical empirical models of fuel properties treat each of these effects separately and uncoupled. Here, we couple a fission gas release model to a model of the impact of fission gas on the fuel thermal conductivity. To quantify the specific impact of grain boundary (GB) bubbles on the thermal conductivity, we use atomistic and mesoscale simulations. Atomistic molecular dynamic simulations were employed to determine the GB thermal resistance. These values were then used in mesoscale heat conduction simulations to develop a mechanistic expression for the effective GB thermal resistance of a GB containing gas bubbles, as a function of the percentage of the GB covered by fission gas. The coupled fission gas release and thermal conductivity model was implemented in Idaho National Laboratory's BISON fuel performance code to model the behavior of a 10-pellet LWR fuel rodlet, showing how the fission gas impacts the UO2 thermal conductivity. Furthermore, additional BISON simulations were conducted to demonstrate the impact of average grain size on both the fuel thermal conductivity and the fission gas release.

  13. Multiscale development of a fission gas thermal conductivity model: Coupling atomic, meso and continuum level simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonks, Michael R.; Millett, Paul C.; Nerikar, Pankaj; Du, Shiyu; Andersson, David; Stanek, Christopher R.; Gaston, Derek; Andrs, David; Williamson, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Fission gas production and evolution significantly impact the fuel performance, causing swelling, a reduction in the thermal conductivity and fission gas release. However, typical empirical models of fuel properties treat each of these effects separately and uncoupled. Here, we couple a fission gas release model to a model of the impact of fission gas on the fuel thermal conductivity. To quantify the specific impact of grain boundary (GB) bubbles on the thermal conductivity, we use atomistic and mesoscale simulations. Atomistic molecular dynamic simulations were employed to determine the GB thermal resistance. These values were then used in mesoscale heat conduction simulations to develop a mechanistic expression for the effective GB thermal resistance of a GB containing gas bubbles, as a function of the percentage of the GB covered by fission gas. The coupled fission gas release and thermal conductivity model was implemented in Idaho National Laboratory’s BISON fuel performance code to model the behavior of a 10-pellet LWR fuel rodlet, showing how the fission gas impacts the UO 2 thermal conductivity. Furthermore, additional BISON simulations were conducted to demonstrate the impact of average grain size on both the fuel thermal conductivity and the fission gas release

  14. Demand for seasonal gas storage in northwest Europe until 2030. Simulation results with a dynamic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Joode, J.; Oezdemir, Oe.

    2010-01-01

    The fact that depletion of indigenous gas production increases gas import dependency is widely known and accepted. However, there is considerable less attention for the implications of indigenous resource depletion for the provision of seasonal flexibility. The traditionally largest source of seasonal flexibility in Europe is indigenous gas production, mainly based in the Netherlands and the United Kingdom. With the depletion of indigenous sources the market increasingly needs to rely on other sources for seasonal flexibility, such as gas storage facilities. We investigate the future need for gas storage as a source for seasonal flexibility provision using a dynamic gas market model (GASTALE) in which different potential sources for seasonal flexibility - gas production, imports via pipeline, LNG imports and storage facilities - compete with each other in a market-based environment. The inclusion of seasonal flexibility properties in a gas market model allows a more complex analysis of seasonal flexibility issues than previously documented in literature. This is demonstrated in an analysis of the future demand for gas storage in northwestern Europe until 2030. Our results indicate that there is substantial need for additional gas storage facilities and thus supports current project proposals for new investment in gas storage facilities. (author)

  15. Historical greenhouse gas concentrations for climate modelling (CMIP6)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinshausen, Malte; Vogel, Elisabeth; Nauels, Alexander; Lorbacher, Katja; Meinshausen, Nicolai; Etheridge, David M.; Fraser, Paul J.; Montzka, Stephen A.; Rayner, Peter J.; Trudinger, Cathy M.; Krummel, Paul B.; Beyerle, Urs; Canadell, Josep G.; Daniel, John S.; Enting, Ian G.; Law, Rachel M.; Lunder, Chris R.; O'Doherty, Simon; Prinn, Ron G.; Reimann, Stefan; Rubino, Mauro; Velders, Guus J. M.; Vollmer, Martin K.; Wang, Ray H. J.; Weiss, Ray

    2017-05-01

    Atmospheric greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations are at unprecedented, record-high levels compared to the last 800 000 years. Those elevated GHG concentrations warm the planet and - partially offset by net cooling effects by aerosols - are largely responsible for the observed warming over the past 150 years. An accurate representation of GHG concentrations is hence important to understand and model recent climate change. So far, community efforts to create composite datasets of GHG concentrations with seasonal and latitudinal information have focused on marine boundary layer conditions and recent trends since the 1980s. Here, we provide consolidated datasets of historical atmospheric concentrations (mole fractions) of 43 GHGs to be used in the Climate Model Intercomparison Project - Phase 6 (CMIP6) experiments. The presented datasets are based on AGAGE and NOAA networks, firn and ice core data, and archived air data, and a large set of published studies. In contrast to previous intercomparisons, the new datasets are latitudinally resolved and include seasonality. We focus on the period 1850-2014 for historical CMIP6 runs, but data are also provided for the last 2000 years. We provide consolidated datasets in various spatiotemporal resolutions for carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O), as well as 40 other GHGs, namely 17 ozone-depleting substances, 11 hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), 9 perfluorocarbons (PFCs), sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), nitrogen trifluoride (NF3) and sulfuryl fluoride (SO2F2). In addition, we provide three equivalence species that aggregate concentrations of GHGs other than CO2, CH4 and N2O, weighted by their radiative forcing efficiencies. For the year 1850, which is used for pre-industrial control runs, we estimate annual global-mean surface concentrations of CO2 at 284.3 ppm, CH4 at 808.2 ppb and N2O at 273.0 ppb. The data are available at https://esgf-node.llnl.gov/search/input4mips/ and http

  16. A weakly compressible formulation for modelling liquid-gas sloshing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Heyns, Johan A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available , the implementation of a weakly compressible formulation which accounts for variations in the gas density is presented. With the aim of ensuring a computational efficient implementation of the proposed formulation, an implicit iterative GMRES solver with LU...

  17. Global weak solutions for a compressible gas-liquid model with well-formation interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evje, Steinar

    The objective of this work is to explore a compressible gas-liquid model designed for modeling of well flow processes. We build into the model well-reservoir interaction by allowing flow of gas between well and formation (surrounding reservoir). Inflow of gas and subsequent expansion of gas as it ascends towards the top of the well (a so-called gas kick) represents a major concern for various well operations in the context of petroleum engineering. We obtain a global existence result under suitable assumptions on the regularity of initial data and the rate function that controls the flow of gas between well and formation. Uniqueness is also obtained by imposing more regularity on the initial data. The key estimates are to obtain appropriate lower and upper bounds on the gas and liquid masses. For that purpose we introduce a transformed version of the original model that is highly convenient for analysis of the original model. In particular, in the analysis of the transformed model additional terms, representing well-formation interaction, can be treated by natural extensions of arguments that previously have been employed for the single-phase Navier-Stokes model. The analysis ensures that transition to single-phase regions do not appear when the initial state is a true gas-liquid mixture.

  18. Sustained inflation and incremental mean airway pressure trial during conventional and high-frequency oscillatory ventilation in a large porcine model of acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wunder Christian

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To compare the effect of a sustained inflation followed by an incremental mean airway pressure trial during conventional and high-frequency oscillatory ventilation on oxygenation and hemodynamics in a large porcine model of early acute respiratory distress syndrome. Methods Severe lung injury (Ali was induced in 18 healthy pigs (55.3 ± 3.9 kg, mean ± SD by repeated saline lung lavage until PaO2 decreased to less than 60 mmHg. After a stabilisation period of 60 minutes, the animals were randomly assigned to two groups: Group 1 (Pressure controlled ventilation; PCV: FIO2 = 1.0, PEEP = 5 cmH2O, VT = 6 ml/kg, respiratory rate = 30/min, I:E = 1:1; group 2 (High-frequency oscillatory ventilation; HFOV: FIO2 = 1.0, Bias flow = 30 l/min, Amplitude = 60 cmH2O, Frequency = 6 Hz, I:E = 1:1. A sustained inflation (SI; 50 cmH2O for 60s followed by an incremental mean airway pressure (mPaw trial (steps of 3 cmH2O every 15 minutes were performed in both groups until PaO2 no longer increased. This was regarded as full lung inflation. The mPaw was decreased by 3 cmH2O and the animals reached the end of the study protocol. Gas exchange and hemodynamic data were collected at each step. Results The SI led to a significant improvement of the PaO2/FiO2-Index (HFOV: 200 ± 100 vs. PCV: 58 ± 15 and TAli: 57 ± 12; p 2-reduction (HFOV: 42 ± 5 vs. PCV: 62 ± 13 and TAli: 55 ± 9; p Ali: 6.1 ± 1 vs. T75: 3.4 ± 0.4; PCV: TAli: 6.7 ± 2.4 vs. T75: 4 ± 0.5; p Conclusion A sustained inflation followed by an incremental mean airway pressure trial in HFOV improved oxygenation at a lower mPaw than during conventional lung protective ventilation. HFOV but not PCV resulted in normocapnia, suggesting that during HFOV there are alternatives to tidal ventilation to achieve CO2-elimination in an "open lung" approach.

  19. Low-Dimensional Models for Physiological Systems: Nonlinear Coupling of Gas and Liquid Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staples, A. E.; Oran, E. S.; Boris, J. P.; Kailasanath, K.

    2006-11-01

    Current computational models of biological organisms focus on the details of a specific component of the organism. For example, very detailed models of the human heart, an aorta, a vein, or part of the respiratory or digestive system, are considered either independently from the rest of the body, or as interacting simply with other systems and components in the body. In actual biological organisms, these components and systems are strongly coupled and interact in complex, nonlinear ways leading to complicated global behavior. Here we describe a low-order computational model of two physiological systems, based loosely on a circulatory and respiratory system. Each system is represented as a one-dimensional fluid system with an interconnected series of mass sources, pumps, valves, and other network components, as appropriate, representing different physical organs and system components. Preliminary results from a first version of this model system are presented.

  20. Establishment and Application of Coalmine Gas Prediction Model Based on Multi-Sensor Data Fusion Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyu Lv

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Undoubtedly an accident involving gas is one of the greater disasters that can occur in a coalmine, thus being able to predict when an accident involving gas might occur is an essential aspect in loss prevention and the reduction of safety hazards. However, the traditional methods concerning gas safety prediction is hindered by multi-objective and non-continuous problem. The coalmine gas prediction model based on multi-sensor data fusion technology (CGPM-MSDFT was established through analysis of accidents involving gas using artificial neural network to fuse multi- sensor data, using an improved algorithm designed to train the network and using an early stop method to resolve the over-fitting problem, the network test and field application results show that this model can provide a new direction for research into predicting the likelihood of a gas related incident within a coalmine. It will have a broad application prospect in coal mining.

  1. Testing of Snorre Field Foam Assisted Water Alternating Gas (FAWAG Performance in New Foam Screening Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spirov Pavel

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Eclipse Functional Foam Model was used in order to provide a guideline for the history matching process (Gas-Oil Ratio (GOR, oil and gas production rates to the Foam Assisted Water Alternating Gas method in the Snorre field, Norway, where the surfactant solution was injected in two slugs to control gas mobility and prevent gas breakthrough. The simulation showed that the first short slug was not efficient while significant GOR decrease and incremental oil production was obtained after the second longer slug in some periods. This study shows that the Eclipse foam model is applicable to the planning of water and gas injections, the testing of various surfactant properties, and the evaluation of the efficiency of the method at the field scale.

  2. Misoprostol Inhibits Equine Neutrophil Adhesion, Migration, and Respiratory Burst in an In Vitro Model of Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Medlin Martin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In many equine inflammatory disease states, neutrophil activities, such as adhesion, migration, and reactive oxygen species (ROS production become dysregulated. Dysregulated neutrophil activation causes tissue damage in horses with asthma, colitis, laminitis, and gastric glandular disease. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs do not adequately inhibit neutrophil inflammatory functions and can lead to dangerous adverse effects. Therefore, novel therapies that target mechanisms of neutrophil-mediated tissue damage are needed. One potential neutrophil-targeting therapeutic is the PGE1 analog, misoprostol. Misoprostol is a gastroprotectant that induces intracellular formation of the secondary messenger molecule cyclic AMP (cAMP, which has been shown to have anti-inflammatory effects on neutrophils. Misoprostol is currently used in horses to treat NSAID-induced gastrointestinal injury; however, its effects on equine neutrophils have not been determined. We hypothesized that treatment of equine neutrophils with misoprostol would inhibit equine neutrophil adhesion, migration, and ROS production, in vitro. We tested this hypothesis using isolated equine peripheral blood neutrophils collected from 12 healthy adult teaching/research horses of mixed breed and gender. The effect of misoprostol treatment on adhesion, migration, and respiratory burst of equine neutrophils was evaluated via fluorescence-based adhesion and chemotaxis assays, and luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence, respectively. Neutrophils were pretreated with varying concentrations of misoprostol, vehicle, or appropriate functional inhibitory controls prior to stimulation with LTB4, CXCL8, PAF, lipopolysaccharide (LPS or immune complex (IC. This study revealed that misoprostol pretreatment significantly inhibited LTB4-induced adhesion, LTB4-, CXCL8-, and PAF-induced chemotaxis, and LPS-, IC-, and PMA-induced ROS production in a concentration-dependent manner. This data indicate that

  3. A UWB Radar Signal Processing Platform for Real-Time Human Respiratory Feature Extraction Based on Four-Segment Linear Waveform Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chi-Hsuan; Chiu, Yu-Fang; Shen, Yi-Hsiang; Chu, Ta-Shun; Huang, Yuan-Hao

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents an ultra-wideband (UWB) impulse-radio radar signal processing platform used to analyze human respiratory features. Conventional radar systems used in human detection only analyze human respiration rates or the response of a target. However, additional respiratory signal information is available that has not been explored using radar detection. The authors previously proposed a modified raised cosine waveform (MRCW) respiration model and an iterative correlation search algorithm that could acquire additional respiratory features such as the inspiration and expiration speeds, respiration intensity, and respiration holding ratio. To realize real-time respiratory feature extraction by using the proposed UWB signal processing platform, this paper proposes a new four-segment linear waveform (FSLW) respiration model. This model offers a superior fit to the measured respiration signal compared with the MRCW model and decreases the computational complexity of feature extraction. In addition, an early-terminated iterative correlation search algorithm is presented, substantially decreasing the computational complexity and yielding negligible performance degradation. These extracted features can be considered the compressed signals used to decrease the amount of data storage required for use in long-term medical monitoring systems and can also be used in clinical diagnosis. The proposed respiratory feature extraction algorithm was designed and implemented using the proposed UWB radar signal processing platform including a radar front-end chip and an FPGA chip. The proposed radar system can detect human respiration rates at 0.1 to 1 Hz and facilitates the real-time analysis of the respiratory features of each respiration period.

  4. Integrated field modelling[Oil and gas fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarian, Bamshad

    2002-07-01

    This research project studies the feasibility of developing and applying an integrated field simulator to simulate the production performance of an entire oil or gas field. It integrates the performance of the reservoir, the wells, the chokes, the gathering system, the surface processing facilities and whenever applicable, gas and water injection systems. The approach adopted for developing the integrated simulator is to couple existing commercial reservoir and process simulators using available linking technologies. The simulators are dynamically linked and customised into a single hybrid application that benefits from the concept of open software architecture. The integrated field simulator is linked to an optimisation routine developed based on the genetic algorithm search strategies. This enables optimisation of the system at field level, from the reservoir to the process. Modelling the wells and the gathering network is achieved by customising the process simulator. This study demonstrated that the integrated simulation improves current capabilities to simulate the performance of the entire field and optimise its design. This is achieved by evaluating design options including spread and layout of the wells and gathering system, processing alternatives, reservoir development schemes and production strategies. Effectiveness of the integrated simulator is demonstrated and tested through several field-level case studies that discuss and investigate technical problems relevant to offshore field development. The case studies cover topics such as process optimisation, optimum tie-in of satellite wells into existing process facilities, optimal well location and field layout assessment of a high pressure high temperature deepwater oil field. Case study results confirm the viability of the total field simulator by demonstrating that the field performance simulation and optimal design were obtained in an automated process with treasonable computation time. No significant

  5. Thermodynamic modeling and Exergy Analysis of Gas Turbine Cycle for Different Boundary conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Lalatendu Pattanayak

    2015-01-01

    In this study an exergy analysis of 88.71 MW 13D2 gas turbine (GT) topping cycle is carried out. Exergy analysis based on second law was applied to the gas cycle and individual components through a modeling approach. The analysis shows that the highest exergy destruction occurs in the combustion chamber (CC). In addition, the effects of the gas turbine load and performance variations with ambient temperature, compression ratio and turbine inlet temperature (TIT) are investigated to analyse th...

  6. Modeling of microbial gas generation: application to the eastern Mediterranean “Biogenic Play”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, M.; Dubille, M.; Montadert, L.

    2016-07-01

    Biogenic gas is becoming increasingly important as an exploration target in the petroleum industry because it occurs in geologically predictable circumstances and in large quantities at shallow depths as free gas or gas hydrates. As accumulations of biogenic gas result in a subtle synchronization between early generation and early trapping, we integrated a macroscopic model of microbial gas generation within a 3D basin and petroleum system forward simulator. The macroscopic model is based on a microscopic model, which consists in a 1D sedimentary column that accounts for sedimentation, compaction, Darcy flow and Diffusion flow. The organic carbon is the only non-soluble element considered in this version of the model. The dissolved elements are O2, SO4 2-, H2, CH3COOH, and CH4. Methane is dissolved in water or present as a free phase if its concentration exceeds its solubility at given pressure and temperature. In this microscopic model, the transformation of substrate into biomass is described through a set of logistic equations coupled with the transport equations (advection and diffusion). Based on the microscopic considerations we developed the macroscopic model of low maturity/biogenic gas generation in which hydrocarbons are generated through first order kinetic reactions at low maturity. This macroscopic model is adapted to petroleum system modeling at basin scale with TemisFlow®, which aims to understand and predict hydrocarbon generation, migration, and accumulation. It is composed of: i) A source rock criteria which allow defining the biogenic gas source rocks potential and ii) A kinetic model of methane generation. The previous model has been successfully applied on different basins such as the Carupano Basin from the offshore Venezuela, the Magdalena Delta (offshore Colombia) and the offshore Vietnam where direct observations of low-maturity gas were available. Furthermore, it has been applied in the offshore Lebanon in order to check the viability of

  7. Three mechanisms model of shale gas in real state transport through a single nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongdong; Zhang, Yanyu; Sun, Xiaofei; Li, Peng; Zhao, Fengkai

    2018-02-01

    At present, the apparent permeability models of shale gas consider only the viscous flow and Knudsen diffusion of free gas, but do not take into account the influence of surface diffusion. Moreover, it is assumed that shale gas is in ideal state. In this paper, shale gas is assumed in real state, a new apparent permeability model for shale gas transport through a single nanopore is developed that captures many important migration mechanisms, such as viscous flow and Knudsen diffusion of free gas, surface diffusion of adsorbed gas. According to experimental data, the accuracy of apparent permeability model was verified. What’s more, the effects of pressure and pore radius on apparent permeability, and the effects on the permeability fraction of viscous flow, Knudsen diffusion and surface diffusion were analysed, separately. Finally, the results indicate that the error of the developed model in this paper was 3.02%, which is less than the existing models. Pressure and pore radius seriously affect the apparent permeability of shale gas. When the pore radius is small or pressure is low, the surface diffusion cannot be ignored. When the pressure and the pore radius is big, the viscous flow occupies the main position.

  8. Modelling of landfill gas adsorption with bottom ash for utilization of renewable energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Chen

    2011-10-06

    Energy crisis, environment pollution and climate change are the serious challenges to people worldwide. In the 21st century, human being is trend to research new technology of renewable energy, so as to slow down global warming and develop society in an environmentally sustainable method. Landfill gas, produced by biodegradable municipal solid waste in landfill, is a renewable energy source. In this work, landfill gas utilization for energy generation is introduced. Landfill gas is able to produce hydrogen by steam reforming reactions. There is a steam reformer equipment in the fuel cells system. A sewage plant of Cologne in Germany has run the Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cells power station with biogas for more than 50,000 hours successfully. Landfill gas thus may be used as fuel for electricity generation via fuel cells system. For the purpose of explaining the possibility of landfill gas utilization via fuel cells, the thermodynamics of landfill gas steam reforming are discussed by simulations. In practice, the methane-riched gas can be obtained by landfill gas purification and upgrading. This work investigate a new method for upgrading-landfill gas adsorption with bottom ash experimentally. Bottom ash is a by-product of municipal solid waste incineration, some of its physical and chemical properties are analysed in this work. The landfill gas adsorption experimental data show bottom ash can be used as a potential adsorbent for landfill gas adsorption to remove CO{sub 2}. In addition, the alkalinity of bottom ash eluate can be reduced in these adsorption processes. Therefore, the interactions between landfill gas and bottom ash can be explained by series reactions accordingly. Furthermore, a conceptual model involving landfill gas adsorption with bottom ash is developed. In this thesis, the parameters of landfill gas adsorption equilibrium equations can be obtained by fitting experimental data. On the other hand, these functions can be deduced with theoretical approach

  9. Simulation of Water Level Fluctuations in a Hydraulic System Using a Coupled Liquid-Gas Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Wang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A model for simulating vertical water level fluctuations with coupled liquid and gas phases is presented. The Preissmann implicit scheme is used to linearize the governing equations for one-dimensional transient flow for both liquid and gas phases, and the linear system is solved using the chasing method. Some classical cases for single liquid and gas phase transients in pipelines and networks are studied to verify that the proposed methods are accurate and reliable. The implicit scheme is extended using a dynamic mesh to simulate the water level fluctuations in a U-tube and an open surge tank without consideration of the gas phase. Methods of coupling liquid and gas phases are presented and used for studying the transient process and interaction between the phases, for gas phase limited in a chamber and gas phase transported in a pipeline. In particular, two other simplified models, one neglecting the effect of the gas phase on the liquid phase and the other one coupling the liquid and gas phases asynchronously, are proposed. The numerical results indicate that the asynchronous model performs better, and are finally applied to a hydropower station with surge tanks and air shafts to simulate the water level fluctuations and air speed.

  10. The water-induced linear reduction gas diffusivity model extended to three pore regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chamindu, Deepagoda; De Jonge, Lis Wollesen; Kawamoto, Ken

    2015-01-01

    An existing gas diffusivity model developed originally for sieved, repacked soils was extended to characterize gas diffusion in differently structured soils and functional pore networks. A gas diffusivity-derived pore connectivity index was used as a measure of soil structure development. Charact......An existing gas diffusivity model developed originally for sieved, repacked soils was extended to characterize gas diffusion in differently structured soils and functional pore networks. A gas diffusivity-derived pore connectivity index was used as a measure of soil structure development....... Characterization of soil functional pore structure is an essential prerequisite to understand key gas transport processes in variably saturated soils in relation to soil ecosystems, climate, and environmental services. In this study, the water-induced linear reduction (WLR) soil gas diffusivity model originally...... gas diffusivity from moist to dry conditions across differently structured porous media, including narrow soil size fractions, perforated plastic blocks, fractured limestone, peaty soils, aggregated volcanic ash soils, and particulate substrates for Earth- or space-based applications. The new Cip...

  11. A model describing intra-granular fission gas behaviour in oxide fuel for advanced engineering tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzocri, D.; Pastore, G.; Barani, T.; Magni, A.; Luzzi, L.; Van Uffelen, P.; Pitts, S. A.; Alfonsi, A.; Hales, J. D.

    2018-04-01

    The description of intra-granular fission gas behaviour is a fundamental part of any model for the prediction of fission gas release and swelling in nuclear fuel. In this work we present a model describing the evolution of intra-granular fission gas bubbles in terms of bubble number density and average size, coupled to gas release to grain boundaries. The model considers the fundamental processes of single gas atom diffusion, gas bubble nucleation, re-solution and gas atom trapping at bubbles. The model is derived from a detailed cluster dynamics formulation, yet it consists of only three differential equations in its final form; hence, it can be efficiently applied in engineering fuel performance codes while retaining a physical basis. We discuss improvements relative to previous single-size models for intra-granular bubble evolution. We validate the model against experimental data, both in terms of bubble number density and average bubble radius. Lastly, we perform an uncertainty and sensitivity analysis by propagating the uncertainties in the parameters to model results.

  12. Intraindividual comparison of image quality using retrospective and prospective respiratory gating for the acquisition of thin sliced four dimensional multidetector CT of the thorax in a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, Cyrus; Groth, Michael; Henes, Frank Oliver; Schwarz, Dorothee; Deibele, André; Begemann, Philipp G C; Adam, Gerhard; Regier, Marc

    2015-01-01

    To intraindividually compare image quality and anatomical depiction of the lung and mediastinum using retrospective and prospective respiratory gating techniques for the acquisition of 4D-multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) of the chest in a porcine model. Twelve trachealy intubated domestic pigs underwent 64-row MDCT of the thorax. For retrospective and prospective gating the automated respiratory frequency was adjusted to 10, 14, 18, and 22 respiratory cycles per minute. Further, free breathing MDCT scans of the lung were performed at the same respiratory settings. A breathhold scan was acquired which served as the reference standard. Three reviewers independently analyzed the MDCT data applying a 4-point-grading scale regarding the degree of artifacts observed and anatomical depiction (1, excellent, no artifacts; 4, nondiagnostic due to severe artifacts). For statistical analysis the Wilcoxon matched pairs and Chi-square test were used. Breathhold imaging allowed for the highest image quality (mean value: trachea, 1.00; bronchi, 1.10; lung parenchyma, 1.08; diaphragm, 1.00; pericardium, 1.80). Retrospective gating proved to be of superior image quality compared to prospective gating for all respiratory frequencies. With the respiratory frequency set to 14/min retrospective gating even enabled an identical image quality score as at breathhold. Performing image acquisition during continuous breathing lead to a severe decrease in image quality. High image quality can be acquired using respiratory gating techniques for 4D-MDCT of the thorax. Retrospective is superior to prospective gating and can be of an equivalent image quality as standard breathhold imaging, but at the cost of a significantly higher radiation dose.

  13. Reduced Order Modeling of Combustion Instability in a Gas Turbine Model Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold-Medabalimi, Nicholas; Huang, Cheng; Duraisamy, Karthik

    2017-11-01

    Hydrocarbon fuel based propulsion systems are expected to remain relevant in aerospace vehicles for the foreseeable future. Design of these devices is complicated by combustion instabilities. The capability to model and predict these effects at reduced computational cost is a requirement for both design and control of these devices. This work focuses on computational studies on a dual swirl model gas turbine combustor in the context of reduced order model development. Full fidelity simulations are performed utilizing URANS and Hybrid RANS-LES with finite rate chemistry. Following this, data decomposition techniques are used to extract a reduced basis representation of the unsteady flow field. These bases are first used to identify sensor locations to guide experimental interrogations and controller feedback. Following this, initial results on developing a control-oriented reduced order model (ROM) will be presented. The capability of the ROM will be further assessed based on different operating conditions and geometric configurations.

  14. Heliox reduces respiratory system resistance in respiratory syncytial virus induced respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneyber, Martin C J; van Heerde, Marc; Twisk, Jos W R; Plötz, Frans B; Markhors, Dick G

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease is characterised by narrowing of the airways resulting in increased airway resistance, air-trapping and respiratory acidosis. These problems might be overcome using helium-oxygen gas mixture. However, the effect of mechanical ventilation with heliox in these patients is unclear. The objective of this prospective cross-over study was to determine the effects of mechanical ventilation with heliox 60/40 versus conventional gas on respiratory system resistance, air-trapping and CO2 removal. Mechanically ventilated, sedated and paralyzed infants with proven RSV were enrolled within 24 hours after paediatric intensive care unit (PICU)admission. At T = 0, respiratory system mechanics including respiratory system compliance and resistance, and peak expiratory flow rate were measured with the AVEA ventilator. The measurements were repeated at each interval (after 30 minutes of ventilation with heliox, after 30 minutes of ventilation with nitrox and again after 30 minutes of ventilation with heliox). Indices of gas exchange (ventilation and oxygenation index) were calculated at each interval. Air-trapping (defined by relative change in end-expiratory lung volume) was determined by electrical impedance tomography (EIT) at each interval. Thirteen infants were enrolled. In nine, EIT measurements were performed. Mechanical ventilation with heliox significantly decreased respiratory system resistance. This was not accompanied by an improved CO2 elimination, decreased peak expiratory flow rate or decreased end-expiratory lung volume. Importantly, oxygenation remained unaltered throughout the experimental protocol. Respiratory system resistance is significantly decreased by mechanical ventilation with heliox (ISCRTN98152468).

  15. Future evolution of the liberalised European gas market: Simulation results with a dynamic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lise, Wietze [IBS Research and Consultancy, Aga Han, Agahamami Cadessi 1/6, Cihangir, 34433 Beyoglu, Istanbul (Turkey); Energy Markets and International Environmental Policy group, ECN Policy Studies, Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hobbs, Benjamin F. [Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University, Ames Hall 313, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2008-07-15

    Strategic behaviour by gas producers is likely to affect future gas prices and investments in the European Union (EU). To analyse this issue, a computational g