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Sample records for modeling rayleigh wave

  1. Modeling of Rayleigh wave dispersion in Iberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Badal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Phase and group velocities of 15–70 s Rayleigh waves propagating across the Iberian Peninsula have been transformed into local dispersion curves by linear inversion of travel times. The procedure permits that the waveform dispersion to be obtained as a continuous period-dependent velocity function at grid points belonging to the area probed by the waves, thus providing phase- and group-velocity contour maps for several periods within the interval of interest. The regionalization process rests on a homogeneous initial data set in which the number of observations remains almost constant for all periods of reference. Damped least-squares inversion of the local dispersion curves for shear-wave velocity structure is performed to obtain depth-dependent S-wave velocity profiles at the grid points covering the model region. The reliability of the results should improve significantly owing to the use of phase and group velocities simultaneously. On this basis, we have built horizontal depth sections that give an updated view of the seismic velocity structure of the peninsula at lithospheric and upper mantle depths (20–200 km. After averaging all the pure-path S-wave velocities previously determined at each grid point, the velocity-depth models so obtained for major tectonic units allow the comparison between the Hercynian basement and other areas of Mesozoic folding and Tertiary basins.

  2. Assessing the viscoelasticity of chicken liver by OCE and a Rayleigh wave model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhaolong; Liu, Chih-hao; Singh, Manmohan; Aglyamov, Salavat R.; Raghunathan, Raksha; Wu, Chen; Larin, Kirill V.

    2017-02-01

    This study investigates the feasibility of quantifying the viscoelasticity of soft tissues with a dynamic noncontact optical coherence elastography (OCE) technique coupled with a Rayleigh wave model. Spectral analysis of an air-pulse induced elastic wave as measured by OCE provided the elastic wave dispersion curve. The dispersion curve was fitted to an analytical solution of the Rayleigh wave model to determine the Young's modulus and shear viscosity of samples. In order to validate the method, 10% gelatin phantoms with and without different concentrations of oil were prepared and tested by OCE and mechanical testing. Results demonstrated that the elasticities as assessed by the Rayleigh wave model generally agreed well with mechanical testing, and that the viscosity in the phantom with oil samples was higher than the phantoms without oil, which is in agreement with the literature. Further, this method was applied to quantify the viscoelasticity of chicken liver. The Young's modulus was E=2.04+/-0.88 kPa and the shear viscosity was η=1.20+/-0.13 Pa·s with R2=0.96+/-0.04 between the OCE-measured dispersion curve and Rayleigh wave model analytical solution. Combining OCE and the Rayleigh wave model shows promise as an effective tool for noninvasively quantifying the viscoelasticity of soft tissues.

  3. Pseudospectral modeling and dispersion analysis of Rayleigh waves in viscoelastic media

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    Zhang, K.; Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Chen, C.

    2011-01-01

    Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) is one of the most widely used techniques in environmental and engineering geophysics to determine shear-wave velocities and dynamic properties, which is based on the elastic layered system theory. Wave propagation in the Earth, however, has been recognized as viscoelastic and the propagation of Rayleigh waves presents substantial differences in viscoelastic media as compared with elastic media. Therefore, it is necessary to carry out numerical simulation and dispersion analysis of Rayleigh waves in viscoelastic media to better understand Rayleigh-wave behaviors in the real world. We apply a pseudospectral method to the calculation of the spatial derivatives using a Chebyshev difference operator in the vertical direction and a Fourier difference operator in the horizontal direction based on the velocity-stress elastodynamic equations and relations of linear viscoelastic solids. This approach stretches the spatial discrete grid to have a minimum grid size near the free surface so that high accuracy and resolution are achieved at the free surface, which allows an effective incorporation of the free surface boundary conditions since the Chebyshev method is nonperiodic. We first use an elastic homogeneous half-space model to demonstrate the accuracy of the pseudospectral method comparing with the analytical solution, and verify the correctness of the numerical modeling results for a viscoelastic half-space comparing the phase velocities of Rayleigh wave between the theoretical values and the dispersive image generated by high-resolution linear Radon transform. We then simulate three types of two-layer models to analyze dispersive-energy characteristics for near-surface applications. Results demonstrate that the phase velocity of Rayleigh waves in viscoelastic media is relatively higher than in elastic media and the fundamental mode increases by 10-16% when the frequency is above 10. Hz due to the velocity dispersion of P

  4. Modeling of atmospheric-coupled Rayleigh waves on planets with atmosphere: From Earth observation to Mars and Venus perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lognonné, Philippe; Karakostas, Foivos; Rolland, Lucie; Nishikawa, Yasuhiro

    2016-08-01

    Acoustic coupling between solid Earth and atmosphere has been observed since the 1960s, first from ground-based seismic, pressure, and ionospheric sensors and since 20 years with various satellite measurements, including with global positioning system (GPS) satellites. This coupling leads to the excitation of the Rayleigh surface waves by local atmospheric sources such as large natural explosions from volcanoes, meteor atmospheric air-bursts, or artificial explosions. It contributes also in the continuous excitation of Rayleigh waves and associated normal modes by atmospheric winds and pressure fluctuations. The same coupling allows the observation of Rayleigh waves in the thermosphere most of the time through ionospheric monitoring with Doppler sounders or GPS. The authors review briefly in this paper observations made on Earth and describe the general frame of the theory enabling the computation of Rayleigh waves for models of telluric planets with atmosphere. The authors then focus on Mars and Venus and give in both cases the atmospheric properties of the Rayleigh normal modes and associated surface waves compared to Earth. The authors then conclude on the observation perspectives especially for Rayleigh waves excited by atmospheric sources on Mars and for remote ionospheric observations of Rayleigh waves excited by quakes on Venus.

  5. Seismic Rayleigh Wave Digital Processing Technology

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    Jie, Li

    2013-04-01

    In Rayleigh wave exploration, the digital processing of data plays a very important position. This directly affects the interpretation of ground effect. Therefore, the use of accurate processing software and effective method in the Rayleigh wave exploration has important theoretical and practical significance. Previously, Rayleigh wave dispersion curve obtained by the one-dimensional phase analysis. This method requires channel spacing should be less than the effective wavelength. And minimal phase error will cause great changes in the phase velocity of Rayleigh wave. Damped least square method is a local linear model. It is easy to cause that inversion objective function cannot find the global optimal solution. Therefore, the method and the technology used in the past are difficult to apply the requirements of the current Rayleigh wave exploration. This study focused on the related technologies and algorithms of F-K domain dispersion curve extraction and GA global non-linear inversion, and combined with the impact of Rayleigh wave data acquisition parameters and the characteristics. Rayleigh wave exploration data processing software design and process technology research is completed. Firstly, the article describes the theoretical basis of Rayleigh wave method. This is also part of the theoretical basis of following treatment. The theoretical proof of existence of Rayleigh wave Dispersive in layered strata. Secondly, F-K domain dispersion curve extraction tests showed that the method can overcome the one-dimensional digital processing technology deficiencies, and make full use of multi-channel Rayleigh wave data record information. GA global non-linear inversion indicated that the inversion is not easy getting into local optimal solution. Thirdly, some examples illustrate each mode Rayleigh wave dispersion curve characteristics in the X-T domain. Tests demonstrated the impact on their extraction of dispersion curves. Parameters change example (including the X

  6. A trade-off between model resolution and variance with selected Rayleigh-wave data

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    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Xu, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Inversion of multimode surface-wave data is of increasing interest in the near-surface geophysics community. For a given near-surface geophysical problem, it is essential to understand how well the data, calculated according to a layered-earth model, might match the observed data. A data-resolution matrix is a function of the data kernel (determined by a geophysical model and a priori information applied to the problem), not the data. A data-resolution matrix of high-frequency (??? 2 Hz) Rayleigh-wave phase velocities, therefore, offers a quantitative tool for designing field surveys and predicting the match between calculated and observed data. First, we employed a data-resolution matrix to select data that would be well predicted and to explain advantages of incorporating higher modes in inversion. The resulting discussion using the data-resolution matrix provides insight into the process of inverting Rayleigh-wave phase velocities with higher mode data to estimate S-wave velocity structure. Discussion also suggested that each near-surface geophysical target can only be resolved using Rayleigh-wave phase velocities within specific frequency ranges, and higher mode data are normally more accurately predicted than fundamental mode data because of restrictions on the data kernel for the inversion system. Second, we obtained an optimal damping vector in a vicinity of an inverted model by the singular value decomposition of a trade-off function of model resolution and variance. In the end of the paper, we used a real-world example to demonstrate that selected data with the data-resolution matrix can provide better inversion results and to explain with the data-resolution matrix why incorporating higher mode data in inversion can provide better results. We also calculated model-resolution matrices of these examples to show the potential of increasing model resolution with selected surface-wave data. With the optimal damping vector, we can improve and assess an inverted

  7. Modelling of Rayleigh-type seam waves in disturbed coal seams and around a coal mine roadway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essen, Katja; Bohlen, Thomas; Friederich, Wolfgang; Meier, Thomas

    2007-08-01

    Wave propagation in coal seams is numerically modelled in order to identify approaches towards the reconnaissance beyond the heading face of an advancing coal mine roadway. Complete synthetic wavefields including P-SV body waves and Rayleigh-type seam waves are calculated using a Green's function approach for simple, laterally homogeneous models and a parallel elastic 2-D/3-D finite difference modelling code for more realistic geometries. For a simple three-layer model the wavefield within the seam is dominated by a fundamental Rayleigh seam mode symmetrical with respect to the centre of the seam on the vertical component and antisymmetrical on the horizontal component. If the seam contains an interleaved dirt band with higher velocities and density, higher modes dominate the wave propagation, depending on the thickness of the dirt band. Wave propagation in laterally inhomogeneous coal seam models with disturbances like seam ends, faults, thinning, washouts and seam splitting is strongly influenced by the type of disturbance. Amplitudes of seam waves reflected from these disturbances strongly depend on the fault throw and the degree of thinning or washout. In some cases, conversion to higher modes can occur. In all investigated models, those Rayleigh seam wave phases are preferably reflected, which have frequencies above the fundamental mode Airy phase. Lower frequency phases are preferably transmitted. However, seam waves are not reflected from a seam splitting disturbance. Thus a detection of seam splitting with reflected seam waves appears to be impossible. FD computations for 3-D models containing an ending tunnel parallel to the seam and a source beyond the heading face of the tunnel show that seam waves are converted into Rayleigh waves at the tunnel face. They propagate along the surface of the tunnel and interfere with the seam waves propagating beside the tunnel. This effect has to be taken into account for subsequent treatment of experimental data, where

  8. Optical coherence elastography assessment of corneal viscoelasticity with a modified Rayleigh-Lamb wave model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhaolong; Li, Jiasong; Singh, Manmohan; Wu, Chen; Liu, Chih-Hao; Raghunathan, Raksha; Aglyamov, Salavat R; Vantipalli, Srilatha; Twa, Michael D; Larin, Kirill V

    2017-02-01

    The biomechanical properties of the cornea play a critical role in forming vision. Diseases such as keratoconus can structurally degenerate the cornea causing a pathological loss in visual acuity. UV-A/riboflavin corneal collagen crosslinking (CXL) is a clinically available treatment to stiffen the cornea and restore its healthy shape and function. However, current CXL techniques do not account for pre-existing biomechanical properties of the cornea nor the effects of the CXL treatment itself. In addition to the inherent corneal structure, the intraocular pressure (IOP) can also dramatically affect the measured biomechanical properties of the cornea. In this work, we present the details and development of a modified Rayleigh-Lamb frequency equation model for quantifying corneal biomechanical properties. After comparison with finite element modeling, the model was utilized to quantify the viscoelasticity of in situ porcine corneas in the whole eye-globe configuration before and after CXL based on noncontact optical coherence elastography measurements. Moreover, the viscoelasticity of the untreated and CXL-treated eyes was quantified at various IOPs. The results showed that the stiffness of the cornea increased after CXL and that corneal stiffness is close to linear as a function of IOP. These results show that the modified Rayleigh-Lamb wave model can provide an accurate assessment of corneal viscoelasticity, which could be used for customized CXL therapies.

  9. High-Frequency Rayleigh-Wave Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianghai Xia; Richard D Millerg; Xu Yixian; Luo Yinhe; Chen Chao; Liu Jiangping; Julian Ivanov; Chong Zeng

    2009-01-01

    High-frequency (≥2 Hz) Rayleigh-wave data acquired with a multichannei recording sys-tem have been utilized to determine shear (S)-wave velocities in near-surface geophysics since the early 1980s. This overview article discusses the main research results of high-frequency surface-wave tech-niques achieved by research groups at the Kansas Geological Survey and China University of Geosciences in the last 15 years. The multichannel analysis of surface wave (MASW) method is a nou-iuvasive acoustic approach to estimate near-surface S-wave velocity. The differences between MASW results and direct borehole measurements are approximately 15% or less and random. Studies show that simultaneous inversion with higher modes and the fundamental mode can increase model resolution and an investigation depth. The other important seismic property, quality factor (Q), can also be estimated with the MASW method by inverting attenuation coefficients of Rayleigh waves. An inverted model (S-wave velocity or Q) obtained using a damped least-squares method can be assessed by an optimal damping vector in a vicinity of the inverted model determined by an objective function, which is the trace of a weighted sum of model-resolution and model-covariance matrices. Current developments include modeling high-frequency Rayleigh-waves in near-surface media, which builds a foundation for shallow seismic or Rayleigh-wave inversion in the time-offset domain; imaging dispersive energy with high resolution in the frequency-velocity domain and possibly with data in an arbitrary acquisition geometry, which opens a door for 3D surface-wave techniques; and successfully separating surface-wave modes, which provides a valuable tool to perform S-wave velocity profiling with high-horizontal resolution.

  10. Rayleigh's, Stoneley's, and Scholte's Interface Waves in Elastic Models Using a Boundary Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban Flores-Mendez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is focused on studying interface waves for three canonical models, that is, interfaces formed by vacuum-solid, solid-solid, and liquid-solid. These interfaces excited by dynamic loads cause the emergence of Rayleigh's, Stoneley's, and Scholte's waves, respectively. To perform the study, the indirect boundary element method is used, which has proved to be a powerful tool for numerical modeling of problems in elastodynamics. In essence, the method expresses the diffracted wave field of stresses, pressures, and displacements by a boundary integral, also known as single-layer representation, whose shape can be regarded as a Fredholm's integral representation of second kind and zero order. This representation can be considered as an exemplification of Huygens' principle, which is equivalent to Somigliana's representation theorem. Results in frequency domain for the three types of interfaces are presented; then, using the fourier discrete transform, we derive the results in time domain, where the emergence of interface waves is highlighted.

  11. Crustal thinning between the Ethiopian and East African Plateaus from modeling Rayleigh wave dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benoit, M H; Nyblade, A A; Pasyanos, M E

    2006-01-17

    The East African and Ethiopian Plateaus have long been recognized to be part of a much larger topographic anomaly on the African Plate called the African Superswell. One of the few places within the African Superswell that exhibit elevations of less than 1 km is southeastern Sudan and northern Kenya, an area containing both Mesozoic and Cenozoic rift basins. Crustal structure and uppermost mantle velocities are investigated in this area by modeling Rayleigh wave dispersion. Modeling results indicate an average crustal thickness of 25 {+-} 5 km, some 10-15 km thinner than the crust beneath the adjacent East African and Ethiopian Plateaus. The low elevations can therefore be readily attributed to an isostatic response from crustal thinning. Low Sn velocities of 4.1-4.3 km/s also characterize this region.

  12. Shear-wave Velocity Model from Rayleigh Wave Group Velocities Centered on the Sacramento/San Joaquin Delta

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    Fletcher, Jon B.; Erdem, Jemile

    2017-06-01

    Rayleigh wave group velocities obtained from ambient noise tomography are inverted for an upper crustal model of the Central Valley, California, centered on the Sacramento/San Joaquin Delta. Two methods were tried; the first uses SURF96, a least squares routine. It provides a good fit to the data, but convergence is dependent on the starting model. The second uses a genetic algorithm, whose starting model is random. This method was tried at several nodes in the model and compared to the output from SURF96. The genetic code is run five times and the variance of the output of all five models can be used to obtain an estimate of error. SURF96 produces a more regular solution mostly because it is typically run with a smoothing constraint. Models from the genetic code are generally consistent with the SURF96 code sometimes producing lower velocities at depth. The full model, calculated using SURF96, employed a 2-pass strategy, which used a variable damping scheme in the first pass. The resulting model shows low velocities near the surface in the Central Valley with a broad asymmetrical sedimentary basin located close to the western edge of the Central Valley near 122°W longitude. At shallow depths, the Rio Vista Basin is found nestled between the Pittsburgh/Kirby Hills and Midland faults, but a significant basin also seems to exist to the west of the Kirby Hills fault. There are other possible correlations between fast and slow velocities in the Central Valley and geologic features such as the Stockton Arch, oil or gas producing regions and the fault-controlled western boundary of the Central Valley.

  13. Imaging Rayleigh wave attenuation with USArray

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    Bao, Xueyang; Dalton, Colleen A.; Jin, Ge; Gaherty, James B.; Shen, Yang

    2016-07-01

    The EarthScope USArray provides an opportunity to obtain detailed images of the continental upper mantle at an unprecedented scale. The majority of mantle models derived from USArray data to date contain spatial variations in seismic-wave speed; however, in many cases these data sets do not by themselves allow a non-unique interpretation. Joint interpretation of seismic attenuation and velocity models can improve upon the interpretations based only on velocity and provide important constraints on the temperature, composition, melt content, and volatile content of the mantle. The surface wave amplitudes that constrain upper-mantle attenuation are sensitive to factors in addition to attenuation, including the earthquake source excitation, focusing and defocusing by elastic structure, and local site amplification. Because of the difficulty of isolating attenuation from these other factors, little is known about the attenuation structure of the North American upper mantle. In this study, Rayleigh wave traveltime and amplitude in the period range 25-100 s are measured using an interstation cross-correlation technique, which takes advantage of waveform similarity at nearby stations. Several estimates of Rayleigh wave attenuation and site amplification are generated at each period, using different approaches to separate the effects of attenuation and local site amplification on amplitude. It is assumed that focusing and defocusing effects can be described by the Laplacian of the traveltime field. All approaches identify the same large-scale patterns in attenuation, including areas where the attenuation values are likely contaminated by unmodelled focusing and defocusing effects. Regionally averaged attenuation maps are constructed after removal of the contaminated attenuation values, and the variations in intrinsic shear attenuation that are suggested by these Rayleigh wave attenuation maps are explored.

  14. Measurement of Rayleigh wave Z/H ratio and joint inversion for a high-resolution S wave velocity model beneath the Gulf of Mexico passive margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, W.; Li, G.; Niu, F.

    2016-12-01

    Knowledge on the 3D sediment structure beneath the Gulf of Mexico passive margin is not only important to explore the oil and gas resources in the area, but also essential to decipher the deep crust and mantle structure beneath the margin with teleseismic data. In this study, we conduct a joint inversion of Rayleigh wave ellipticity and phase velocity at 6-40 s to construct a 3-D S wave velocity model in a rectangular area of 100°-87° west and 28°-37° north. We use ambient noise data from a total of 215 stations of the Transportable Array deployed under the Earthscope project. Rayleigh wave ellipticity, or Rayleigh wave Z/H (vertical to horizontal) amplitude ratio is mostly sensitive to shallow sediment structure, while the dispersion data are expected to have reasonably good resolution to uppermost mantle depths. The Z/H ratios measured from stations inside the Gulf Coastal Plain are distinctly lower in comparison with those measured from the inland stations. We also measured the phase velocity dispersion from the same ambient noise dataset. Our preliminary 3-D model is featured by strong low-velocity anomalies at shallow depth, which are spatially well correlated with Gulf Cost, East Texas, and the Lower Mississippi basins. We will discuss other features of the 3-D models once the model is finalized.

  15. The Uniqueness of Single Data Function, Multiple Model Functions, Inverse Problems Including the Rayleigh Wave Dispersion Problem

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    Menke, William

    2017-02-01

    We prove that the problem of inverting Rayleigh wave phase velocity functions c( k ) , where k is wavenumber, for density ρ ( z ) , rigidity μ ( z ) and Lamé parameter λ ( z ) , where z is depth, is fully non-unique, at least in the highly-idealized case where the base Earth model is an isotropic half space. The model functions completely trade off. This is one special case of a common inversion scenario in which one seeks to determine several model functions from a single data function. We explore the circumstances under which this broad class of problems is unique, starting with very simple scenarios, building up to the somewhat more complicated (and common) case where data and model functions are related by convolutions, and then finally, to scale-independent problems (which include the Rayleigh wave problem). The idealized cases that we examine analytically provide insight into the kinds of nonuniqueness that are inherent in the much more complicated problems encountered in modern geophysical imaging (though they do not necessarily provide methods for solving those problems). We also define what is meant by a Backus and Gilbert resolution kernel in this kind of inversion and show under what circumstances a unique localized average of a single model function can be constructed.

  16. The Uniqueness of Single Data Function, Multiple Model Functions, Inverse Problems Including the Rayleigh Wave Dispersion Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, William

    2017-04-01

    We prove that the problem of inverting Rayleigh wave phase velocity functions c( k ), where k is wavenumber, for density ρ ( z ), rigidity μ ( z ) and Lamé parameter λ ( z ), where z is depth, is fully non-unique, at least in the highly-idealized case where the base Earth model is an isotropic half space. The model functions completely trade off. This is one special case of a common inversion scenario in which one seeks to determine several model functions from a single data function. We explore the circumstances under which this broad class of problems is unique, starting with very simple scenarios, building up to the somewhat more complicated (and common) case where data and model functions are related by convolutions, and then finally, to scale-independent problems (which include the Rayleigh wave problem). The idealized cases that we examine analytically provide insight into the kinds of nonuniqueness that are inherent in the much more complicated problems encountered in modern geophysical imaging (though they do not necessarily provide methods for solving those problems). We also define what is meant by a Backus and Gilbert resolution kernel in this kind of inversion and show under what circumstances a unique localized average of a single model function can be constructed.

  17. Reflectometry using longitudinal, shear and Rayleigh waves.

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    Chen, W; Wu, J

    2000-09-01

    A new technique of reflectometry using longitudinal, shear and Rayleigh waves is presented. Reflection coefficient as a function of angle incidence of an ultrasound beam with a finite beamwidth was measured for water-aluminum, water-brass, and water-glass interfaces. The measured values have matched very favorably with the results of numerical calculations based on the angular spectrum of waves method. It has been shown that the speeds of longitudinal, shear and Rayleigh waves of a solid can be determined very accurately by measuring a spectacularly reflected signal versus angle of incidence.

  18. Retrieval of Rayleigh Wave Ellipticity from Ambient Vibration Recordings

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    Maranò, Stefano; Hobiger, Manuel; Fäh, Donat

    2017-01-01

    The analysis of ambient vibrations is a useful tool in microzonation and geotechnical investigations. Ambient vibrations are composed to a large part of surface waves, both Love and Rayleigh waves. One reason to analyse surface waves is that they carry information about the subsurface. The dispersion curve of Rayleigh waves and Love waves can be retrieved using array processing techniques. The Rayleigh wave ellipticity, including the sense of rotation of the particle motion, can also be retrieved using array techniques. These quantities are used in an inversion procedure aimed at obtaining a structural model of the subsurface. The focus of this work is the retrieval of Rayleigh wave ellipticity. We show applications of the (ML) method presented in Maranó et al. (2012) to a number of sites in Switzerland. The sites examined are chosen to reflect a wide range of soil conditions that are of interest in microzonation studies. Using a synthetic wavefield with known structural model, we compare our results with theoretical ellipticity curves and we show the accuracy of the considered algorithm. The sense of rotation of the particle motion (prograde vs. retrograde) is also estimated. In addition, we show that by modelling the presence of both Love and Rayleigh waves it is possible to mitigate the disruptive influence of Love waves on the estimation of Rayleigh wave ellipticity. Using recordings from several real sites, we show that it is possible to retrieve the ellipticity curve over a broad range of frequencies. Fundamental modes and higher modes are retrieved. Singularities of the ellipticity, corresponding to a change of the sense of rotation from prograde to retrograde (or vice versa), are detected with great accuracy. Knowledge of Rayleigh wave ellipticity, including the sense of rotation, is useful in several ways. The ellipticity angle allows us to pinpoint accurately the frequency of singularities (i.e., peaks and zeros of the H/V representation of the

  19. Attenuation of Rayleigh Surface Waves in a Porous Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DEBBOUB Salima; BOUMA(I)ZA Youcef; BOUDOUR Amar; TAHRAOUI Tarek

    2012-01-01

    Using acoustic microscopy at higher frequency,we show the velocity evolutions of surface acoustic waves,in particular Rayleigh waves that depend on porosity for a mesoporous silicon layer.The velocities are obtained from different V(z) curves,which are determined experimentally at a frequency of 600MHz.The analysis of V(z) data yields attenuation that is directly dependent on porosity.On the other hand,αN attenuation has been modeled and allows us to investigate its influence on the velocity VR of the propagation for Rayleigh waves.%Using acoustic microscopy at higher frequency, we show the velocity evolutions of surface acoustic waves, in particular Rayleigh waves that depend on porosity for a mesoporous silicon layer. The velocities are obtained from different V(z) curves, which are determined experimentally at a frequency of 600 MHz. The analysis of V(z) data yields attenuation that is directly dependent on porosity. On the other hand, αN attenuation has been modeled and allows us to investigate its influence on the velocity VR of the propagation for Rayleigh waves.

  20. Rayleigh wave modeling: A study of dispersion curve sensitivity and methodology for calculating an initial model to be included in an inversion algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lucena, Rodrigo F.; Taioli, Fabio

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a study on Rayleigh wave modeling. After model implementation using Matlab software, unpublished studies were conducted of dispersion curve sensitivity to percentage changes in parameter values, including S- and P-wave velocities, substrate density, and layer thickness. The study of the sensitivity of dispersion curves demonstrated that parameters such as S-wave velocity and layer thickness cannot be ignored as inversion parameters, while P-wave velocity and density can be considered as known parameters since their influence is minimal. However, the results showed limitations that should be considered and overcome when choosing the known and unknown parameters through determining a good initial model or/and by gathering a priori information. A methodology considering the sensitivity study of dispersion curves was developed and evaluated to generate initial values (initial model) to be included in the local search inversion algorithm, clearly establishing initial favorable conditions for data inversion.

  1. Modeling of the attenuation of stress waves in concrete based on the Rayleigh damping model using time-reversal and PZT transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhen; Huo, Linsheng; Gao, Weihang; Li, Hongnan; Song, Gangbing

    2017-10-01

    Wave-based concrete structural health monitoring has attracted much attention. A stress wave experiences significant attenuation in concrete, however there is a lack of a unified method for predicting the attenuation coefficient of the stress wave. In this paper, a simple and effective absorption attenuation model of stress waves in concrete is developed based on the Rayleigh damping model, which indicates that the absorption attenuation coefficient of stress waves in concrete is directly proportional to the square of the stress wave frequency when the damping ratio is small. In order to verify the theoretical model, related experiments were carried out. During the experiments, a concrete beam was designed in which the d33-model piezoelectric smart aggregates were embedded to detect the propagation of stress waves. It is difficult to distinguish direct stress waves due to the complex propagation paths and the reflection and scattering of stress waves in concrete. Hence, as another innovation of this paper, a new method for computing the absorption attenuation coefficient based on the time-reversal method is developed. Due to the self-adaptive focusing properties of the time-reversal method, the time-reversed stress wave focuses and generates a peak value. The time-reversal method eliminates the adverse effects of multipaths, reflection, and scattering. The absorption attenuation coefficient is computed by analyzing the peak value changes of the time-reversal focused signal. Finally, the experimental results are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical model.

  2. Leaky Rayleigh wave investigation on mortar samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuenschwander, J; Schmidt, Th; Lüthi, Th; Romer, M

    2006-12-01

    Aggressive mineralized ground water may harm the concrete cover of tunnels and other underground constructions. Within a current research project mortar samples are used to study the effects of sulfate interaction in accelerated laboratory experiments. A nondestructive test method based on ultrasonic surface waves was developed to investigate the topmost layer of mortar samples. A pitch and catch arrangement is introduced for the generation and reception of leaky Rayleigh waves in an immersion technique allowing the measurement of their propagation velocity. The technique has been successfully verified for the reference materials aluminium, copper, and stainless steel. First measurements performed on mortar specimens demonstrate the applicability of this new diagnostic tool.

  3. On Lamb and Rayleigh wave convergence in viscoelastic tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nenadic, Ivan Z; Urban, Matthew W; Aristizabal, Sara; Mitchell, Scott A; Humphrey, Tye C; Greenleaf, James F, E-mail: Nenadic.Ivan@mayo.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, 55905 (United States)

    2011-10-21

    Characterization of the viscoelastic material properties of soft tissue has become an important area of research over the last two decades. Our group has been investigating the feasibility of using a shear wave dispersion ultrasound vibrometry (SDUV) method to excite Lamb waves in organs with plate-like geometry to estimate the viscoelasticity of the medium of interest. The use of Lamb wave dispersion ultrasound vibrometry to quantify the mechanical properties of viscoelastic solids has previously been reported. Two organs, the heart wall and the spleen, can be readily modeled using plate-like geometries. The elasticity of these two organs is important because they change in pathological conditions. Diastolic dysfunction is the inability of the left ventricle (LV) of the heart to supply sufficient stroke volumes into the systemic circulation and is accompanied by the loss of compliance and stiffening of the LV myocardium. It has been shown that there is a correlation between high splenic stiffness in patients with chronic liver disease and strong correlation between spleen and liver stiffness. Here, we investigate the use of the SDUV method to quantify the viscoelasticity of the LV free-wall myocardium and spleen by exciting Rayleigh waves on the organ's surface and measuring the wave dispersion (change of wave velocity as a function of frequency) in the frequency range 40-500 Hz. An equation for Rayleigh wave dispersion due to cylindrical excitation was derived by modeling the excised myocardium and spleen with a homogenous Voigt material plate immersed in a nonviscous fluid. Boundary conditions and wave potential functions were solved for the surface wave velocity. Analytical and experimental convergence between the Lamb and Rayleigh waves is reported in a finite element model of a plate in a fluid of similar density, gelatin plate and excised porcine spleen and left-ventricular free-wall myocardium.

  4. On Lamb and Rayleigh wave convergence in viscoelastic tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenadic, Ivan Z; Urban, Matthew W; Aristizabal, Sara; Mitchell, Scott A; Humphrey, Tye C; Greenleaf, James F

    2011-10-21

    Characterization of the viscoelastic material properties of soft tissue has become an important area of research over the last two decades. Our group has been investigating the feasibility of using a shear wave dispersion ultrasound vibrometry (SDUV) method to excite Lamb waves in organs with plate-like geometry to estimate the viscoelasticity of the medium of interest. The use of Lamb wave dispersion ultrasound vibrometry to quantify the mechanical properties of viscoelastic solids has previously been reported. Two organs, the heart wall and the spleen, can be readily modeled using plate-like geometries. The elasticity of these two organs is important because they change in pathological conditions. Diastolic dysfunction is the inability of the left ventricle (LV) of the heart to supply sufficient stroke volumes into the systemic circulation and is accompanied by the loss of compliance and stiffening of the LV myocardium. It has been shown that there is a correlation between high splenic stiffness in patients with chronic liver disease and strong correlation between spleen and liver stiffness. Here, we investigate the use of the SDUV method to quantify the viscoelasticity of the LV free-wall myocardium and spleen by exciting Rayleigh waves on the organ's surface and measuring the wave dispersion (change of wave velocity as a function of frequency) in the frequency range 40–500 Hz. An equation for Rayleigh wave dispersion due to cylindrical excitation was derived by modeling the excised myocardium and spleen with a homogenous Voigt material plate immersed in a nonviscous fluid. Boundary conditions and wave potential functions were solved for the surface wave velocity. Analytical and experimental convergence between the Lamb and Rayleigh waves is reported in a finite element model of a plate in a fluid of similar density, gelatin plate and excised porcine spleen and left-ventricular free-wall myocardium.

  5. On Lamb and Rayleigh Wave Convergence in Viscoelastic Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenadic, Ivan Z.; Urban, Matthew W.; Aristizabal, Sara; Mitchell, Scott A.; Humphrey, Tye C.; Greenleaf, James F.

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of the viscoelastic material properties of soft tissue has become an important area of research over the last two decades. Our group has been investigating the feasibility of using Shearwave Dispersion Ultrasound Vibrometry (SDUV) method to excite Lamb waves in organs with plate-like geometry to estimate the viscoelasticity of the medium of interest. The use of Lamb wave Dispersion Ultrasound Vibrometry (LDUV) to quantify mechanical properties of viscoelastic solids has previously been reported. Two organs, the heart wall and the spleen, can be readily modeled using plate-like geometries. The elasticity of these two organs is important because they change in pathological conditions. Diastolic dysfunction is the inability of the left ventricle (LV) of the heart to supply sufficient stroke volumes into the systemic circulation and is accompanied by the loss of compliance and stiffening of the LV myocardium. It has been shown that there is a correlation between high splenic stiffness in patients with chronic liver disease and strong correlation between spleen and liver stiffness. Here, we investigate the use of the SDUV method to quantify viscoelasticity of the LV free-wall myocardium and spleen by exciting Rayleigh waves on the organ’s surface and measuring the wave dispersion (change of wave velocity as a function of frequency) in the frequency range 40–500 Hz. An equation for Rayleigh wave dispersion due to cylindrical excitation was derived by modeling the excised myocardium and spleen with a homogenous Voigt material plate immersed in a nonviscous fluid. Boundary conditions and wave potential functions were solved for the surface wave velocity. Analytical and experimental convergence between the Lamb and Rayleigh waves is reported in a finite element model of a plate in a fluid of similar density, gelatin plate and excised porcine spleen and left-ventricular free-wall myocardium. PMID:21970846

  6. Demonstration of Shear Waves, Lamb Waves, and Rayleigh Waves by Mode Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, W. P.

    1980-01-01

    Introduces an experiment that can be demonstrated in the classroom to show that shear waves, Rayleigh waves, and Lamb waves can be easily generated and observed by means of mode conversion. (Author/CS)

  7. Coexisting Raman- and Rayleigh-Enhanced Four-Wave Mixing in Femtosecond Polarization Beats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIE Zhi-Qiang; ZHAO Yan; ZHANG Yan-Peng; GAN Chen-Li; ZHENG Huai-Sin; LI Chang-Biao; LU Ke-Qing

    2009-01-01

    Based on the polarization interference of Raman- and Rayleigh-enhanced four-wave mixing processes,heterodyne detection of the Raman,Rayleigh and coexisting Raman and Rayleigh femtosecond difference-frequency polarization beats is investigated in the cw and the three Markovian stochastic models,respectively.These two processes exhibit asymmetric and symmetric spectra,respectively,and the thermal effect in them can be suppressed by a field-correlation method.Such studies of coexisting Raman- and Rayleigh-enhanced four-wave mixing processes can have important applications in coherence quantum control,and quantum information processing.

  8. Sensitivity comparisons of layered Rayleigh wave and Love wave acoustic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrick, Michael K.; Tittmann, Bernhard R.

    2007-04-01

    Due to their high sensitivity, layered Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) devices are ideal for various film characterization and sensor applications. Two prominent wave types realized in these devices are Rayleigh waves consisting of coupled Shear Vertical and Longitudinal displacements and Love waves consisting of Shear Horizontal displacements. Theoretical calculations of sensitivity of SAW devices to pertubations in wave propagation are limited to idealized scenarios. Derivations of sensitivity to mass change in an overlayer are often based on the effect of rigid body motion of the overlayer on the propagation of one of the aforementioned wave types. These devices often utilize polymer overlayers for enhanced sensitivity. The low moduli of such overlayers are not sufficiently stiff to accommodate the rigid body motion assumption. This work presents device modeling based on the Finite Element Method. A coupled-field model allows for a complete description of device operation including displacement profiles, frequency, wave velocity, and insertion loss through the inclusion of transmitting and receiving IDTs. Geometric rotations and coordinate transformations allow for the modeling of different crystal orientations in piezoelectric substrates. The generation of Rayleigh and Love Wave propagation was realized with this model by examining propagation in ST Quartz both normal to and in the direction of the X axis known to support Love Waves and Rayleigh Waves, respectively. Sensitivities of layered SAW devices to pertubations in mass, layer thickness, and mechanical property changes of a Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and SU-8 overlayers were characterized and compared. Experimental validation of these models is presented.

  9. Experimental and theoretical study of Rayleigh-Lamb wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Wayne P.; Datta, Subhendu K.; Ju, T. H.

    1990-01-01

    Many space structures, such as the Space Station Freedom, contain critical thin-walled components. The structural integrity of thin-walled plates and shells can be monitored effectively using acoustic emission and ultrasonic testing in the Rayleigh-Lamb wave frequency range. A new PVDF piezoelectric sensor has been developed that is well suited to remote, inservice nondestructive evaluation of space structures. In the present study the new sensor was used to investigate Rayleigh-Lamb wave propagation in a plate. The experimental apparatus consisted of a glass plate (2.3 m x 25.4 mm x 5.6 mm) with PVDF sensor (3 mm diam.) mounted at various positions along its length. A steel ball impact served as a simulated acoustic emission source, producing surface waves, shear waves and longitudinal waves with dominant frequencies between 1 kHz and 200 kHz. The experimental time domain wave-forms were compared with theoretical predictions of the wave propagation in the plate. The model uses an analytical solution for the Green's function and the measured response at a single position to predict response at any other position in the plate. Close agreement was found between the experimental and theoretical results.

  10. Study on Rayleigh Wave Inversion for Estimating Shear-wave Velocity Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.A. Sanny

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Rayleigh wave or ground roll is a noise in seismic body waves. However, how to use this noise for soil characterization is very interesting since Rayleigh wave phase velocity is a function of compression-wave velocity, shear-wave velocity, density and layer thickness. In layered-medium Rayleigh wave velocity also depends on wavelength or frequency, and this phenomenon is called dispersion. Inversion procedure to get shear-wave velocity profile needs a priori information about the solution of the problem to limit the unknown parameters. The Lagrange multiplier method was used to solve the constrained optimization problems or well known as a smoothing parameter in inversion problems. The advantage of our inversion procedure is that it can guarantee the convergence of solution even though the field data is incomplete, insufficient, and inconsistent. The addition of smoothing parameter can reduce the time to converge. Beside numerical stability, the statistical stability is also involved in inversion procedure. In field experiment we extracted ground roll data from seismic refraction record. The dispersion curves had been constructed by applying f-k analysis and f-k dip filtering. The dispersion curves show the dependence of Rayleigh wave phase velocities in layered media to frequency. The synthetic models also demonstrate the stability and the speed of inversion procedure.

  11. Lithospheric structure of the westernmost Mediterranean inferred from finite frequency Rayleigh wave tomography S-velocity model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomeras, Imma; Villasenor, Antonio; Thurner, Sally; Levander, Alan; Gallart, Josep; Harnafi, Mimoun

    2016-04-01

    The Iberian Peninsula and Morocco, separated by the Alboran Sea and the Algerian Basin, constitute the westernmost Mediterranean. From north to south this region consists of the Pyrenees, the result of interaction between the Iberian and Eurasian plates; the Iberian Massif, a region that has been undeformed since the end of the Paleozoic; the Central System and Iberian Chain, regions with intracontinental Oligocene-Miocene deformation; the Gibraltar Arc (Betics, Rif and Alboran terranes) and the Atlas Mountains, resulting from post-Oligocene subduction roll-back and Eurasian-Nubian plate convergence. In this study we analyze data from recent broad-band array deployments and permanent stations on the Iberian Peninsula and in Morocco (Spanish IberArray and Siberia arrays, the US PICASSO array, the University of Munster array, and the Spanish, Portuguese, and Moroccan National Networks) to characterize its lithospheric structure. The combined array of 350 stations has an average interstation spacing of ~60 km, comparable to USArray. We have calculated the Rayleigh waves phase velocities from ambient noise for short periods (4 s to 40 s) and teleseismic events for longer periods (20 s to 167 s). We inverted the phase velocities to obtain a shear velocity model for the lithosphere to ~200 km depth. The model shows differences in the crust for the different areas, where the highest shear velocities are mapped in the Iberian Massif crust. The crustal thickness is highly variable ranging from ~25 km beneath the eastern Betics to ~55km beneath the Gibraltar Strait, Internal Betics and Internal Rif. Beneath this region a unique arc shaped anomaly with high upper mantle velocities (>4.6 km/s) at shallow depths (Gibraltar arc to ~55 km depth. Low upper mantle velocities (<4.2 km/s) are observed beneath the Atlas, the northeastern end of the Betic Mountains and the Late Cenozoic volcanic fields in Iberia and Morocco, indicative of high temperatures at relatively shallow depths

  12. Rayleigh surface wave modeling by finite difference method in biphasic media%双相介质瑞雷面波有限差分正演模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张伟; 甘伏平; 刘伟; 郑智杰

    2014-01-01

    为了研究双相介质瑞雷面波的形成机制及传播规律,促进瑞雷面波资料处理方法的发展。文章根据弹性波动方程,采用交错网格有限差分算法,对二维各向同性弹性介质做解析解与数值解的对比,在此基础上,将PML吸收边界条件,改进的镜像法应用于双相介质波动方程中,并作了稳定性分析,对双相介质水平层状、起伏分界面等典型模型瑞雷面波及体波在内的全波场进行研究。结果表明:基于弹性介质解析解与数值解的对比,在误差接受范围内,研究双相介质是可行的;把稍作改进的镜像法应用于双相介质中,能够有效地处理瑞雷面波自由边界问题;通过详细分析双相介质瑞雷面波及体波在内的全波场的信息,对以双相介质为基础的地震波勘探有一定的指导作用。%In order to study the mechanism and propagation of Rayleigh surface wave in biphasic media and promote the development of data⁃processing method of Rayleigh surface wave, the authors applied finite difference method with staggered grids to simulate the 2D i⁃sotropic elastic media based on the elastic wave equation, and made a comparison between the analytical and numerical solutions. On such a basis, the PML absorbing boundary condition and improved image method can be applied to the two⁃phase medium wave equa⁃tion to simulate the typical media model including horizontal layer and undulating interface, analyze the full wave information including the Rayleigh surface wave and body wave, and make a stability analysis. The results show that, on the basis of the comparison between the numerical solution and the analytical solution of the elastic media within the acceptable range of the error, the study of biphasic me⁃dium is feasible. The slight improvement of the image method can be applied to biphasic media to deal with free boundary condition problem of the Rayleigh surface wave

  13. Rayleigh Wave Ellipticity Modeling and Inversion for Shallow Structure at the Proposed InSight Landing Site in Elysium Planitia, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapmeyer-Endrun, Brigitte; Golombek, Matthew P.; Ohrnberger, Matthias

    2016-10-01

    The SEIS (Seismic Experiment for Interior Structure) instrument onboard the InSight mission will be the first seismometer directly deployed on the surface of Mars. From studies on the Earth and the Moon, it is well known that site amplification in low-velocity sediments on top of more competent rocks has a strong influence on seismic signals, but can also be used to constrain the subsurface structure. Here we simulate ambient vibration wavefields in a model of the shallow sub-surface at the InSight landing site in Elysium Planitia and demonstrate how the high-frequency Rayleigh wave ellipticity can be extracted from these data and inverted for shallow structure. We find that, depending on model parameters, higher mode ellipticity information can be extracted from single-station data, which significantly reduces uncertainties in inversion. Though the data are most sensitive to properties of the upper-most layer and show a strong trade-off between layer depth and velocity, it is possible to estimate the velocity and thickness of the sub-regolith layer by using reasonable constraints on regolith properties. Model parameters are best constrained if either higher mode data can be used or additional constraints on regolith properties from seismic analysis of the hammer strokes of InSight's heat flow probe HP3 are available. In addition, the Rayleigh wave ellipticity can distinguish between models with a constant regolith velocity and models with a velocity increase in the regolith, information which is difficult to obtain otherwise.

  14. Rayleigh wave inversion using heat-bath simulated annealing algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yongxu; Peng, Suping; Du, Wenfeng; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Ma, Zhenyuan; Lin, Peng

    2016-11-01

    The dispersion of Rayleigh waves can be used to obtain near-surface shear (S)-wave velocity profiles. This is performed mainly by inversion of the phase velocity dispersion curves, which has been proven to be a highly nonlinear and multimodal problem, and it is unsuitable to use local search methods (LSMs) as the inversion algorithm. In this study, a new strategy is proposed based on a variant of simulated annealing (SA) algorithm. SA, which simulates the annealing procedure of crystalline solids in nature, is one of the global search methods (GSMs). There are many variants of SA, most of which contain two steps: the perturbation of model and the Metropolis-criterion-based acceptance of the new model. In this paper we propose a one-step SA variant known as heat-bath SA. To test the performance of the heat-bath SA, two models are created. Both noise-free and noisy synthetic data are generated. Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithm and a variant of SA, known as the fast simulated annealing (FSA) algorithm, are also adopted for comparison. The inverted results of the synthetic data show that the heat-bath SA algorithm is a reasonable choice for Rayleigh wave dispersion curve inversion. Finally, a real-world inversion example from a coal mine in northwestern China is shown, which proves that the scheme we propose is applicable.

  15. Rayleigh scattering and nonlinear inversion of elastic waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gritto, R.

    1995-12-01

    Rayleigh scattering of elastic waves by an inclusion is investigated and the limitations determined. In the near field of the inhomogeneity, the scattered waves are up to a factor of 300 stronger than in the far field, excluding the application of the far field Rayleigh approximation for this range. The investigation of the relative error as a function of parameter perturbation shows a range of applicability broader than previously assumed, with errors of 37% and 17% for perturbations of {minus}100% and +100%, respectively. The validity range for the Rayleigh limit is controlled by large inequalities, and therefore, the exact limit is determined as a function of various parameter configurations, resulting in surprisingly high values of up to k{sub p}R = 0.9. The nonlinear scattering problem can be solved by inverting for equivalent source terms (moments) of the scatterer, before the elastic parameters are determined. The nonlinear dependence between the moments and the elastic parameters reveals a strong asymmetry around the origin, which will produce different results for weak scattering approximations depending on the sign of the anomaly. Numerical modeling of cross hole situations shows that near field terms are important to yield correct estimates of the inhomogeneities in the vicinity of the receivers, while a few well positioned sources and receivers considerably increase the angular coverage, and thus the model resolution of the inversion parameters. The pattern of scattered energy by an inhomogeneity is complicated and varies depending on the object, the wavelength of the incident wave, and the elastic parameters involved. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the direction of scattered amplitudes to determine the best survey geometry.

  16. Dispersion of Rayleigh, Scholte, Stoneley and Love waves in a model consisting of a liquid layer overlying a two-layer transversely isotropic solid medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Amirhossein; Greenhalgh, Stewart; Khojasteh, Ali; Rahimian, Mohammad

    2015-10-01

    The dispersion of interface waves is studied theoretically in a model consisting of a liquid layer of finite thickness overlying a transversely isotropic solid layer which is itself underlain by a transversely isotropic solid of dissimilar elastic properties. The method of potential functions and Hankel transformation was utilized to solve the equations of motion. Two frequency equations were developed: one for Love waves and the other for the remaining surface and interface waves. Numerical group and phase velocity dispersion curves were computed for four different classes of model, in which the substratum is stiffer or weaker than the overlying layer, and for various thickness combinations of the layers. Dispersion curves are presented for generalized Rayleigh, Scholte, Stoneley and Love waves, each of which are possible in all proposed models. They show the dependence of the velocity on layer thicknesses and material properties (elastic constants). Special cases involving zero thickness for the water layer or the solid layer, and/or isotropic material properties for the solid exhibit interesting features and agree favourably with previously published results for these simpler cases, thus validating the new formulation.

  17. Passive retrieval of Rayleigh waves in disordered elastic media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larose, Eric; Derode, Arnaud; Clorennec, Dominique; Margerin, Ludovic; Campillo, Michel

    2005-10-01

    When averaged over sources or disorder, cross correlation of diffuse fields yields the Green's function between two passive sensors. This technique is applied to elastic ultrasonic waves in an open scattering slab mimicking seismic waves in the Earth's crust. It appears that the Rayleigh wave reconstruction depends on the scattering properties of the elastic slab. Special attention is paid to the specific role of bulk to Rayleigh wave coupling, which may result in unexpected phenomena, such as a persistent time asymmetry in the diffuse regime.

  18. Feasibility of waveform inversion of Rayleigh waves for shallow shear-wave velocity using a genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, C.; Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Tsoflias, G.P.

    2011-01-01

    Conventional surface wave inversion for shallow shear (S)-wave velocity relies on the generation of dispersion curves of Rayleigh waves. This constrains the method to only laterally homogeneous (or very smooth laterally heterogeneous) earth models. Waveform inversion directly fits waveforms on seismograms, hence, does not have such a limitation. Waveforms of Rayleigh waves are highly related to S-wave velocities. By inverting the waveforms of Rayleigh waves on a near-surface seismogram, shallow S-wave velocities can be estimated for earth models with strong lateral heterogeneity. We employ genetic algorithm (GA) to perform waveform inversion of Rayleigh waves for S-wave velocities. The forward problem is solved by finite-difference modeling in the time domain. The model space is updated by generating offspring models using GA. Final solutions can be found through an iterative waveform-fitting scheme. Inversions based on synthetic records show that the S-wave velocities can be recovered successfully with errors no more than 10% for several typical near-surface earth models. For layered earth models, the proposed method can generate one-dimensional S-wave velocity profiles without the knowledge of initial models. For earth models containing lateral heterogeneity in which case conventional dispersion-curve-based inversion methods are challenging, it is feasible to produce high-resolution S-wave velocity sections by GA waveform inversion with appropriate priori information. The synthetic tests indicate that the GA waveform inversion of Rayleigh waves has the great potential for shallow S-wave velocity imaging with the existence of strong lateral heterogeneity. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  19. Rayleigh surface waves, phonon mode conversion, and thermal transport in nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Leon; Knezevic, Irena

    We study the effects of phonon mode conversion and Rayleigh (surface) waves on thermal transport in nanostructures. We present a technique to calculate thermal conductivity in the elastic-solid approximation: a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) solution of the elastic or scalar wave equations combined with the Green-Kubo formula. The technique is similar to an equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation, captures phonon wave behavior, and scales well to nanostructures that are too large to simulate with many other techniques. By imposing fixed or free boundary conditions, we can selectively turn off mode conversion and Rayleigh waves to study their effects. In the example case of graphenelike nanoribbons with rough edges, we find that mode conversion among bulk modes has little effect on thermal transport, but that conversion between bulk and Rayleigh waves can significantly reduce thermal conductivity. With increasing surface disorder, Rayleigh waves readily become trapped by the disorder and draw energy away from the propagating bulk modes, which lowers thermal conductivity. We discuss the implications on the accuracy of popular phonon-surface scattering models that stem from scalar wave equations and cannot capture mode conversion to Rayleigh waves.

  20. Forward problem for Love and quasi-Rayleigh waves: Exact dispersion relations and their sensitivities

    OpenAIRE

    Dalton, David R.; Slawinski, Michael A.; Stachura, Piotr; Stanoev, Theodore

    2016-01-01

    We examine two types of guided waves: the Love and the quasi-Rayleigh waves. Both waves propagate in the same model of an elastic isotropic layer above an elastic isotropic halfspace. From their dispersion relations, we calculate their speeds as functions of the elasticity parameters, mass densities, frequency and layer thickness. We examine the sensitivity of these relations to the model and wave properties.

  1. Analysis of Rayleigh waves with circular wavefront: a maximum likelihood approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranò, Stefano; Hobiger, Manuel; Bergamo, Paolo; Fäh, Donat

    2017-09-01

    Analysis of Rayleigh waves is an important task in seismology and geotechnical investigations. In fact, properties of Rayleigh waves such as velocity and polarization are important observables that carry information about the structure of the subsoil. Applications analysing Rayleigh waves include active and passive seismic surveys. In active surveys, there is a controlled source of seismic energy and the sensors are typically placed near the source. In passive surveys, there is not a controlled source, rather, seismic waves from ambient vibrations are analysed and the sources are assumed to be far outside the array, simplifying the analysis by the assumption of plane waves. Whenever the source is in the proximity of the array of sensors or even within the array it is necessary to model the wave propagation accounting for the circular wavefront. In addition, it is also necessary to model the amplitude decay due to geometrical spreading. This is the case of active seismic surveys in which sensors are located near the seismic source. In this work, we propose a maximum likelihood (ML) approach for the analysis of Rayleigh waves generated at a near source. Our statistical model accounts for the curvature of the wavefront and amplitude decay due to geometrical spreading. Using our method, we show applications on real data of the retrieval of Rayleigh wave dispersion and ellipticity. We employ arrays with arbitrary geometry. Furthermore, we show how it is possible to combine active and passive surveys. This enables us to enlarge the analysable frequency range and therefore the depths investigated. We retrieve properties of Rayleigh waves from both active and passive surveys and show the excellent agreement of the results from the two surveys. In our approach we use the same array of sensors for both the passive and the active survey. This greatly simplifies the logistics necessary to perform a survey.

  2. Effects on PP waves and Rayleigh waves of water column approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y.; Ni, S.

    2015-12-01

    Spectral-element method (SEM) combines the flexibility of the finite-element method and the accuracy of the pseudo-spectral method. It can handle the complexity of the 3-D earth model, such as heterogeneity of velocity and density, anisotropy, anelasticity, sharp velocity and density contrasts, topography. And with water column approximation, it can also deal with oceans. Because of its powerful ability, there are a wide range of application of SEM in studies of PP waves and Rayleigh waves. PP wave and its precursors have been used in measuring topography of 410 km or 660 km. Rayleigh waves are the most recognizable part of the seismograms and have been broadly applied in crustal and uppermost mantle tomography. In global SEM simulation, oceans are usually assumed to be incompressible, which means that the entire water column moves as a whole as a result of the normal displacement of the seafloor. It is necessary to investigate the accuracy of water column approximation when thickness of ocean approaches wavelength of the wave in the ocean water. In this paper, based on plane wave assumption, we study both the accurate form and water column approximate form of effective boundary condition. The reflection coefficient equation of PP waves with effective boundary of water was derived. Accurate and approximate PP reflection coefficient with oceans in different depth is demonstrated. The formula of Rayleigh wave phase velocity dispersion with effective water boundary is also investigated. It is shown that water column approximation in global SEM simulation is not sufficient for some parts of the ocean.

  3. Experimental study of ultrasonic beam sectors for energy conversion into Lamb waves and Rayleigh waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Declercq, Nico Felicien

    2014-02-01

    When a bounded beam is incident on an immersed plate Lamb waves or Rayleigh waves can be generated. Because the amplitude of a bounded beam is not constant along its wave front, a specific beam profile is formed that influences the local efficiency of energy conversion of incident sound into Lamb waves or Rayleigh waves. Understanding this phenomenon is important for ultrasonic immersion experiments of objects because the quality of such experiments highly depends on the amount of energy transmitted into the object. This paper shows by means of experiments based on monochromatic Schlieren photography that the area within the bounded beam responsible for Lamb wave generation differs from that responsible for Rayleigh wave generation. Furthermore it provides experimental verification of an earlier numerical study concerning Rayleigh wave generation.

  4. Seismic metasurfaces: Sub-wavelength resonators and Rayleigh wave interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Colquitt, D J; Craster, R V; Roux, P; Guenneau, S R L

    2016-01-01

    We consider the canonical problem of an array of rods, which act as resonators, placed on an elastic substrate; the substrate being either a thin elastic plate or an elastic half-space. In both cases the flexural plate, or Rayleigh surface, waves in the substrate interact with the resonators to create interesting effects such as effective band-gaps for surface waves or filters that transform surface waves into bulk waves; these effects have parallels in the field of optics where such sub-wavelength resonators create metamaterials, and metasurfaces, in the bulk and at the surface respectively. Here we carefully analyse this canonical problem by extracting the dispersion relations analytically thereby examining the influence of both the flexural and compressional resonances on the propagating wave. For an array of resonators atop an elastic half-space we augment the analysis with numerical simulations. Amongst other effects, we demonstrate the striking effect of a dispersion curve that transitions from Rayleigh...

  5. Spectral Ratios for Crack Detection Using P and Rayleigh Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Olivera-Villaseñor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We obtain numerical results to help the detection and characterization of subsurface cracks in solids by the application of P and Rayleigh elastic waves. The response is obtained from boundary integral equations, which belongs to the field of elastodynamics. Once the implementation of the boundary conditions has been done, a system of Fredholm integral equations of the second kind and order zero is found. This system is solved using the method of Gaussian elimination. Resonance peaks in the frequency domain allow us to infer the presence of cracks using spectral ratios. Several models of cracked media were analyzed, where effects due to different crack orientations and locations were observed. The results obtained are in good agreement with those published in the references.

  6. RAYLEIGH LAMB WAVES IN MICROPOLAR ISOTROPIC ELASTIC PLATE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rajneesh Kumar; Geeta Partap

    2006-01-01

    The propagation of waves in a homogeneous isotropic micropolar elastic cylindrical plate subjected to stress free conditions is investigated. The secular equations for symmetric and skew symmetric wave mode propagation are derived. At short wave limit,the secular equations for symmetric and skew symmetric waves in a stress free circular plate reduces to Rayleigh surface wave frequency equation. Thin plate results are also obtained. The amplitudes of displacements and microrotation components are obtained and depicted graphically. Some special cases are also deduced from the present investigations. The secular equations for symmetric and skew symmetric modes are also presented graphically.

  7. Propagation Characteristics of Laser-Generated Rayleigh Waves in Coating-Substrate Structures with Anisotropic and Viscoelastic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hong-xiang; Zhang, Shu-yi; Xia, Jian-ping

    2015-06-01

    The propagation characteristics of laser-generated Rayleigh waves in coating-substrate structures with anisotropic and viscoelastic properties have been investigated quantitatively. Based on the plane strain theory, finite element models for simulating laser-generated Rayleigh waves in coating-substrate structures are established, in which the carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy matrix composite and aluminum are used as the coating and/or the substrate alternately. The numerical results exhibit that the characteristics of the laser-generated Rayleigh waves, including attenuation, velocity, and dispersion, are mainly and closely related to the anisotropic and viscoelastic properties of the composite in the coating-substrate structures.

  8. The diffraction of Rayleigh waves by a fluid-saturated alluvial valley in a poroelastic half-space modeled by MFS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongxian; Liang, Jianwen; Wu, Chengqing

    2016-06-01

    Two dimensional diffraction of Rayleigh waves by a fluid-saturated poroelastic alluvial valley of arbitrary shape in a poroelastic half-space is investigated using the method of fundamental solutions (MFS). To satisfy the free surface boundary conditions exactly, Green's functions of compressional (PI and PII) and shear (SV) wave sources buried in a fluid-saturated poroelastic half-space are adopted. Next, the procedure for solving the scattering wave field is presented. It is verified that the MFS is of excellent accuracy and numerical stability. Numerical results illustrate that the dynamic response strongly depends on such factors as the incident frequency, the porosity of alluvium, the boundary drainage condition, and the valley shape. There is a significant difference between the diffraction of Rayleigh waves for the saturated soil case and for the corresponding dry soil case. The wave focusing effect both on the displacement and pore pressure can be observed inside the alluvial valley and the amplification effect seems most obvious in the case of higher porosity and lower frequency. Additionally, special attention should also be paid to the concentration of pore pressure, which is closely related to the site liquefaction in earthquakes.

  9. Estimation of near-surface shear-wave velocity by inversion of Rayleigh waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Park, C.B.

    1999-01-01

    The shear-wave (S-wave) velocity of near-surface materials (soil, rocks, pavement) and its effect on seismic-wave propagation are of fundamental interest in many groundwater, engineering, and environmental studies. Rayleigh-wave phase velocity of a layered-earth model is a function of frequency and four groups of earth properties: P-wave velocity, S-wave velocity, density, and thickness of layers. Analysis of the Jacobian matrix provides a measure of dispersion-curve sensitivity to earth properties. S-wave velocities are the dominant influence on a dispersion curve in a high-frequency range (>5 Hz) followed by layer thickness. An iterative solution technique to the weighted equation proved very effective in the high-frequency range when using the Levenberg-Marquardt and singular-value decomposition techniques. Convergence of the weighted solution is guaranteed through selection of the damping factor using the Levenberg-Marquardt method. Synthetic examples demonstrated calculation efficiency and stability of inverse procedures. We verify our method using borehole S-wave velocity measurements.Iterative solutions to the weighted equation by the Levenberg-Marquardt and singular-value decomposition techniques are derived to estimate near-surface shear-wave velocity. Synthetic and real examples demonstrate the calculation efficiency and stability of the inverse procedure. The inverse results of the real example are verified by borehole S-wave velocity measurements.

  10. Nonlinear mixing of laser generated narrowband Rayleigh surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakre, Chaitanya; Rajagopal, Prabhu; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    2017-02-01

    This research presents the nonlinear mixing technique of two co-directionally travelling Rayleigh surface waves generated and detected using laser ultrasonics. The optical generation of Rayleigh waves on the specimen is obtained by shadow mask method. In conventional nonlinear measurements, the inherently small higher harmonics are greatly influenced by the nonlinearities caused by coupling variabilities and surface roughness between the transducer and specimen interface. The proposed technique is completely contactless and it should be possible to eliminate this problem. Moreover, the nonlinear mixing phenomenon yields not only the second harmonics, but also the sum and difference frequency components, which can be used to measure the acoustic nonlinearity of the specimen. In this paper, we will be addressing the experimental configurations for this technique. The proposed technique is validated experimentally on Aluminum 7075 alloy specimen.

  11. Rayleigh wave scattering at the foot of a mountain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. Deshwal

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical study of scattering of seismic waves at the foot of a mountain is discussed here. A mountain of an arbitrary shape and of width a (0≤x≤a, z=0 in the surface of an elastic solid medium (z≥0 is hit by a Rayleigh wave. The method of solution is the technique of Wiener and Hopf. The reflected, transmitted and scattered waves are obtained by inversion of Fourier transforms. The scattered waves behave as decaying cylindrical waves at distant points and have a large amplitude near the foot of the mountain. The transmitted wave decreases exponentially as its distance from the other end of the mountain increases.

  12. Application of particle swarm optimization to interpret Rayleigh wave dispersion curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xianhai; Tang, Li; Lv, Xiaochun; Fang, Hongping; Gu, Hanming

    2012-09-01

    Rayleigh waves have been used increasingly as an appealing tool to obtain near-surface shear (S)-wave velocity profiles. However, inversion of Rayleigh wave dispersion curves is challenging for most local-search methods due to its high nonlinearity and to its multimodality. In this study, we proposed and tested a new Rayleigh wave dispersion curve inversion scheme based on particle swarm optimization (PSO). PSO is a global optimization strategy that simulates the social behavior observed in a flock (swarm) of birds searching for food. A simple search strategy in PSO guides the algorithm toward the best solution through constant updating of the cognitive knowledge and social behavior of the particles in the swarm. To evaluate calculation efficiency and stability of PSO to inversion of surface wave data, we first inverted three noise-free and three noise-corrupted synthetic data sets. Then, we made a comparative analysis with genetic algorithms (GA) and a Monte Carlo (MC) sampler and reconstructed a histogram of model parameters sampled on a low-misfit region less than 15% relative error to further investigate the performance of the proposed inverse procedure. Finally, we inverted a real-world example from a waste disposal site in NE Italy to examine the applicability of PSO on Rayleigh wave dispersion curves. Results from both synthetic and field data demonstrate that particle swarm optimization can be used for quantitative interpretation of Rayleigh wave dispersion curves. PSO seems superior to GA and MC in terms of both reliability and computational efforts. The great advantages of PSO are fast in locating the low misfit region and easy to implement. Also there are only three parameters to tune (inertia weight or constriction factor, local and global acceleration constants). Theoretical results exist to explain how to tune these parameters.

  13. Rayleigh scattering of a spherical sound wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Oleg A

    2013-02-01

    Acoustic Green's functions for a homogeneous medium with an embedded spherical obstacle arise in analyses of scattering by objects on or near an interface, radiation by finite sources, sound attenuation in and scattering from clouds of suspended particles, etc. An exact solution of the problem of diffraction of a monochromatic spherical sound wave on a sphere is given by an infinite series involving products of Bessel functions and Legendre polynomials. In this paper, a simple, closed-form solution is obtained for scattering by a sphere with a radius that is small compared to the wavelength. Soft, hard, impedance, and fluid obstacles are considered. The solution is valid for arbitrary positions of the source and receiver relative to the scatterer. Low-frequency scattering is shown to be rather sensitive to boundary conditions on the surface of the obstacle. Low-frequency asymptotics of the scattered acoustic field are extended to transient incident waves. The asymptotic expansions admit an intuitive interpretation in terms of image sources and reduce to classical results in appropriate limiting cases.

  14. RAYLEIGH WAVE STUDIES OF CATHODIC H-CHARGING OF Fe

    OpenAIRE

    Lunarska, E.; Fiore, N.

    1981-01-01

    The attenuation of 2-6 MHz Rayleigh waves /RW/ was measured in sheet samples of Fe which were undergoing electrolytic charging with H. The cathodic polarization and As2O3 addition into electrolyte were found to effect the attenuation and velocity of the surface waves. The attenuation changes were retarded by the deposition of a thin /2µm/ layer of Cu on the Fe surface, with the Cu acting as a H-permeation barrier. The decrease in attenuation was caused by the entry of H into solid solution at...

  15. Selective Manipulation of Microscopic Particles with Precursor Swirling Rayleigh Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaud, Antoine; Baudoin, Michael; Bou Matar, Olivier; Becerra, Loic; Thomas, Jean-Louis

    2017-02-01

    Contactless manipulation of microparticles is demonstrated with single-beam acoustical tweezers based on precursor swirling Rayleigh waves. These surface waves degenerate into acoustical vortices when crossing a stack made of a fluid layer and its solid support, hence creating a localized acoustical trap in a fluid cavity. They can be synthesized with a single interdigitated transducer whose spiraling shape encodes the phase of the field like a hologram. For applications, these tweezers have many attractive features: they are selective, flat, easily integrable, and compatible with disposable substrates.

  16. Rayleigh-Wave Group-Velocity Tomography of Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zheng; Mai, P. Martin; Chang, Sung-Joon; Zahran, Hani

    2017-04-01

    We use surface-wave tomography to investigate the lithospheric structure of the Arabian plate, which is traditionally divided into the Arabian shield in the west and the Arabian platform in the east. The Arabian shield is a complicated mélange of crustal material, composed of several Proterozoic terrains separated by ophiolite-bearing suture zones and dotted by outcropping Cenozoic volcanic rocks. The Arabian platform is primarily covered by very thick Paleozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic sediments. We develop high-resolution tomographic images from fundamental-mode Rayleigh-wave group-velocities across Saudi Arabia, utilizing the teleseismic data recorded by the permanent Saudi National Seismic Network (SNSN). Our study extends previous efforts on surface wave work by increasing ray path density and improving spatial resolution. Good quality dispersion measurements for roughly 3000 Rayleigh-wave paths have been obtained and utilized for the group-velocity tomography. We have applied the Fast Marching Surface Tomography (FMST) scheme of Rawlinson (2005) to obtain Rayleigh-wave group-velocity images for periods from 8 s to 40 s on a 0.8° 0.8° grid and at resolutions approaching 2.5° based on the checkerboard tests. Our results indicate that short-period group-velocity maps (8-15 s) correlate well with surface geology, with slow velocities delineating the main sedimentary features including the Arabian platform, the Persian Gulf and Mesopotamia. For longer periods (20-40 s), the velocity contrast is due to the differences in crustal thickness and subduction/collision zones. The lower velocities are sensitive to the thicker continental crust beneath the eastern Arabia and the subduction/collision zones between the Arabian and Eurasian plate, while the higher velocities in the west infer mantle velocity.

  17. Numerical simulation for recognition of coalfield fire areas by Rayleigh waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Mingshun; Pan Dongming; Chen Shenen; Dong Shouhua; Li Juanjuan

    2013-01-01

    Effective recognition of a coalfield fire area improves fire-fighting efficiency and helps avoid potential geological hazards.Coalfield fire areas are hard to detect accurately using general geophysical methods.This paper describes simulations of shallow,buried coalfield fires based on real geological conditions.Recognizing the coalfield fire by Rayleigh wave is proposed.Four representative geological models are constructed,namely; the non-burning model,the pseudo-burning model,the real-burning model,and the hidden-burning model.Numerical simulation using these models shows many markedly different characteristics between them in terms of Rayleigh wave dispersion and Eigen displacement.These characteristics,as well as the shear wave velocity obtained by inverting the fundamental dispersion,make it possible to distinguish the type of the coalfield fire area and indentify the real and serious coalfield fire area.The results are very helpful for future application of Rayleigh waves for the detection of coalfield fire area.

  18. Field-Correlation Effects on Rayleigh-Enhanced Nondegenerate Four-Wave Mixing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王延帮; 姜谦; 米辛; 俞祖和; 傅盘铭

    2002-01-01

    We study Rayleigh-enhanced nondegenerate four-wave mixing (NFWM) with time-delayed, correlated fluctuating fields. The importance of the field correlation is revealed in the Rayleigh-enhanced NFWM spectrum when the time delay is varied. The Rayleigh-enhanced NFWM is employed to study the ultrafast processes in the frequency domain. A relaxation time as short as 220 fs was deduced in the Rayleigh-enhanced NFWM experiments in carbon disulphide.

  19. Rayleigh Waves in Generalized Magneto-Thermo-Viscoelastic Granular Medium under the Influence of Rotation, Gravity Field, and Initial Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Abd-Alla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The surface waves propagation in generalized magneto-thermo-viscoelastic granular medium subjected to continuous boundary conditions has been investigated. In addition, it is also subjected to thermal boundary conditions. The solution of the more general equations are obtained for thermoelastic coupling. The frequency equation of Rayleigh waves is obtained in the form of a determinant containing a term involving the coefficient of friction of a granular media which determines Rayleigh waves velocity as a real part and the attenuation coefficient as an imaginary part, and the effects of rotation, magnetic field, initial stress, viscosity, and gravity field on Rayleigh waves velocity and attenuation coefficient of surface waves have been studied in detail. Dispersion curves are computed numerically for a specific model and presented graphically. Some special cases have also been deduced. The results indicate that the effect of rotation, magnetic field, initial stress, and gravity field is very pronounced.

  20. Wave fields and spectra of Rayleigh waves in poroelastic media in the exploration seismic frequency band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Xu, Yixian; Xia, Jianghai

    2012-12-01

    A better understanding of the influences of different surface fluid drainage conditions on the propagation and attenuation of surface waves as the stipulated frequency is varied is a key issue to apply surface wave method to detect subsurface hydrological properties. Our study develops three-dimensional dynamical Green's functions in poroelastic media for Rayleigh waves of possible free surface conditions: permeable - "open pore," impermeable - "closed pore," and partially permeable boundaries. The full transient response of wave fields and spectra due to a stress impulse wavelet on the surface are investigated in the exploration seismic frequency band for typical surface drainage conditions, viscous coupling-damping, solid frame properties and porous fluid flowing configuration. Our numerical results show that, due to the slow dilatational wave - P2 wave, two types of Rayleigh waves, designated as R1 and R2 waves, exist along the surface. R1 wave possesses high energy as classic Rayleigh waves in pure elastic media for each porous materials. A surface fluid drainage condition is a significant factor to influence dispersion and attenuation, especially attenuation of R1 waves. R2 wave for closed pore and partially permeable surfaces is only observed for a low coupling-damping coefficient. The non-physical wave for partially surface conditions causes the R1 wave radiates into the R2 wave in the negative attenuation frequency range. It makes weaker R1 wave and stronger R2 wave to closed pore surface. Moreover, it is observed that wave fields and spectra of R1 wave are sensitive to frame elastic moduli change for an open pore surface, and to pore fluid flow condition change for closed pore and partially permeable surface.

  1. Local Effects on Strain Seismograms at Matsushiro Seismological Observatory - 2. Rayleigh Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taishi Okamoto

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluate local effects on strain seismograms for a Rayleigh wave observed at Matsushiro Seismological Observatory, Japan Meteorological Agency, central Japan, by applying a method proposed in a previous report (Okamoto et al. 2007. The method involves examination of polarization angles, local phase velocity, and accuracy of velocity seismograms. The results are as follows: 1 Polarization angles of observed strain seismograms agree with expected ones from those of velocity seismograms also observed at Matsushiro; 2 Local phase velocity estimated by comparison between strain and velocity seismograms is 54% larger than the theoretical value calculated from the PREM velocity model; 3 Velocity spectra observed at Matsushiro have almost the same amplitude as an average of those at F-net observation stations near Matsushiro. These results indicate that both EW and NS component strain seismograms observed at Matsushiro have been reduced by 35% in amplitude for a Rayleigh wave due to local heterogeneity. The local effects on a Rayleigh wave are quite different from that on a Love wave obtained in the previous report.

  2. Measurement and fitting techniques for the assessment of material nonlinearity using nonlinear Rayleigh waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torello, David [GW Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Tech (United States); Kim, Jin-Yeon [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Tech (United States); Qu, Jianmin [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northwestern University (United States); Jacobs, Laurence J. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Tech and GW Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Tech (United States)

    2015-03-31

    This research considers the effects of diffraction, attenuation, and the nonlinearity of generating sources on measurements of nonlinear ultrasonic Rayleigh wave propagation. A new theoretical framework for correcting measurements made with air-coupled and contact piezoelectric receivers for the aforementioned effects is provided based on analytical models and experimental considerations. A method for extracting the nonlinearity parameter β{sub 11} is proposed based on a nonlinear least squares curve-fitting algorithm that is tailored for Rayleigh wave measurements. Quantitative experiments are conducted to confirm the predictions for the nonlinearity of the piezoelectric source and to demonstrate the effectiveness of the curve-fitting procedure. These experiments are conducted on aluminum 2024 and 7075 specimens and a β{sub 11}{sup 7075}/β{sub 11}{sup 2024} measure of 1.363 agrees well with previous literature and earlier work.

  3. Full wavefield decomposition of high-frequency secondary microseisms reveals distinct arrival azimuths for Rayleigh and Love waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, M.; Reading, A. M.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Koper, K. D.; Burlacu, R.

    2017-06-01

    In the secondary microseism band (0.1-1.0 Hz) the theoretical excitation of Rayleigh waves (Rg/LR), through oceanic wave-wave interaction, is well understood. For Love waves (LQ), the excitation mechanism in the secondary microseism band is less clear. We explore high-frequency secondary microseism excitation between 0.35 and 1 Hz by analyzing a full year (2013) of records from a three-component seismic array in Pilbara (PSAR), Australia. Our recently developed three-component waveform decomposition algorithm (CLEAN-3C) fully decomposes the beam power in slowness space into multiple point sources. This method allows for a directionally dependent power estimation for all separable wave phases. In this contribution, we compare quantitatively microseismic energy recorded on vertical and transverse components. We find the mean power representation of Rayleigh and Love waves to have differing azimuthal distributions, which are likely a result of their respective generation mechanisms. Rayleigh waves show correlation with convex coastlines, while Love waves correlate with seafloor sedimentary basins. The observations are compared to the WAVEWATCH III ocean model, implemented at the Institut Français de Recherche pour l'Exploitation de la Mer (IFREMER), which describes the spatial and temporal characteristics of microseismic source excitation. We find Love wave energy to originate from raypaths coinciding with seafloor sedimentary basins where strong Rayleigh wave excitation is predicted by the ocean model. The total power of Rg waves is found to dominate at 0.35-0.6 Hz, and the Rayleigh/Love wave power ratio strongly varies with direction and frequency.

  4. Rayleigh-type waves in nonlocal micropolar solid half-space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Aarti; Tomar, S K

    2017-01-01

    Propagation of Rayleigh type surface waves in nonlocal micropolar elastic solid half-space has been investigated. Two modes of Rayleigh-type waves are found to propagate under certain approximations. Frequency equations of these Rayleigh type modes and their conditions of existence have been derived. These frequency equations are found to be dispersive in character due to the presence of micropolarity and nonlocality parameters in the medium. One of the frequency equations is a counterpart of the classical Rayleigh waves and the other is new and has appeared due to micropolarity of the medium. Phase speeds of these waves are computed numerically for Magnesium crystal and their variation against wavenumber are presented graphically. Comparisons have been made between the phase speeds of Rayleigh type waves through nonlocal micropolar, local micropolar and elastic solid half-spaces. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Accuracy of the water column approximation in numerically simulating propagation of teleseismic PP waves and Rayleigh waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong; Ni, Sidao; Chu, Risheng; Yao, Huajian

    2016-08-01

    Numerical solvers of wave equations have been widely used to simulate global seismic waves including PP waves for modelling 410/660 km discontinuity and Rayleigh waves for imaging crustal structure. In order to avoid extra computation cost due to ocean water effects, these numerical solvers usually adopt water column approximation, whose accuracy depends on frequency and needs to be investigated quantitatively. In this paper, we describe a unified representation of accurate and approximate forms of the equivalent water column boundary condition as well as the free boundary condition. Then we derive an analytical form of the PP-wave reflection coefficient with the unified boundary condition, and quantify the effects of water column approximation on amplitude and phase shift of the PP waves. We also study the effects of water column approximation on phase velocity dispersion of the fundamental mode Rayleigh wave with a propagation matrix method. We find that with the water column approximation: (1) The error of PP amplitude and phase shift is less than 5 per cent and 9° at periods greater than 25 s for most oceanic regions. But at periods of 15 s or less, PP is inaccurate up to 10 per cent in amplitude and a few seconds in time shift for deep oceans. (2) The error in Rayleigh wave phase velocity is less than 1 per cent at periods greater than 30 s in most oceanic regions, but the error is up to 2 per cent for deep oceans at periods of 20 s or less. This study confirms that the water column approximation is only accurate at long periods and it needs to be improved at shorter periods.

  6. Quasi-Rayleigh waves in butt-welded thick steel plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamas, Tuncay; Giurgiutiu, Victor; Lin, Bin

    2015-03-01

    This paper discusses theoretical and experimental analyses of weld guided surface acoustic waves (SAW) through the guided wave propagation (GWP) analyses. The GWP analyses have been carried out by utilizing piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS) for in situ structural inspection of a thick steel plate with butt weld as the weld bead is ground flush. Ultrasonic techniques are commonly used for validation of welded structures in many in-situ monitoring applications, e.g. in off-shore structures, in nuclear and pressure vessel industries and in a range of naval applications. PWAS is recently employed in such ultrasonic applications as a resonator as well as a transducer. Quasi-Rayleigh waves a.k.a. SAW can be generated in relatively thick isotropic elastic plate having the same phase velocity as Rayleigh waves whereas Rayleigh waves are a high frequency approximation of the first symmetric (S0) and anti-symmetric (A0) Lamb wave modes. As the frequency becomes very high the S0 and the A0 wave speeds coalesce, and both have the same value. This value is exactly the Rayleigh wave speed and becomes constant along the frequency i.e. Rayleigh waves are non-dispersive guided surface acoustic waves. The study is followed with weld-GWP tests through the pitch-catch method along the butt weld line. The tuning curves of quasi-Rayleigh wave are determined to show the tuning and trapping effect of the weld bead that has higher thickness than the adjacent plates on producing a dominant quasi-Rayleigh wave mode. The significant usage of the weld tuned and guided quasi-Rayleigh wave mode is essentially discussed for the applications in the in-situ inspection of relatively thick structures with butt weld such as naval offshore structures. The paper ends with summary, conclusions and suggestions for future work.

  7. Quasi-Rayleigh waves in butt-welded thick steel plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamas, Tuncay, E-mail: kamas@email.sc.edu, E-mail: victorg@sc.edu, E-mail: linbin@cec.sc.edu; Giurgiutiu, Victor, E-mail: kamas@email.sc.edu, E-mail: victorg@sc.edu, E-mail: linbin@cec.sc.edu; Lin, Bin, E-mail: kamas@email.sc.edu, E-mail: victorg@sc.edu, E-mail: linbin@cec.sc.edu [Mechanical Engineering University of South Carolina, 300 Main Str., Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)

    2015-03-31

    This paper discusses theoretical and experimental analyses of weld guided surface acoustic waves (SAW) through the guided wave propagation (GWP) analyses. The GWP analyses have been carried out by utilizing piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS) for in situ structural inspection of a thick steel plate with butt weld as the weld bead is ground flush. Ultrasonic techniques are commonly used for validation of welded structures in many in-situ monitoring applications, e.g. in off-shore structures, in nuclear and pressure vessel industries and in a range of naval applications. PWAS is recently employed in such ultrasonic applications as a resonator as well as a transducer. Quasi-Rayleigh waves a.k.a. SAW can be generated in relatively thick isotropic elastic plate having the same phase velocity as Rayleigh waves whereas Rayleigh waves are a high frequency approximation of the first symmetric (S0) and anti-symmetric (A0) Lamb wave modes. As the frequency becomes very high the S0 and the A0 wave speeds coalesce, and both have the same value. This value is exactly the Rayleigh wave speed and becomes constant along the frequency i.e. Rayleigh waves are non-dispersive guided surface acoustic waves. The study is followed with weld-GWP tests through the pitch-catch method along the butt weld line. The tuning curves of quasi-Rayleigh wave are determined to show the tuning and trapping effect of the weld bead that has higher thickness than the adjacent plates on producing a dominant quasi-Rayleigh wave mode. The significant usage of the weld tuned and guided quasi-Rayleigh wave mode is essentially discussed for the applications in the in-situ inspection of relatively thick structures with butt weld such as naval offshore structures. The paper ends with summary, conclusions and suggestions for future work.

  8. The thermal structure of cratonic lithosphere from global Rayleigh wave attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Colleen A.; Bao, Xueyang; Ma, Zhitu

    2017-01-01

    The resolution of and level of agreement between different attenuation models have historically been limited by complexities associated with extracting attenuation from seismic-wave amplitudes, which are also affected by the source, the receiver, and propagation through velocity heterogeneities. For intermediate- and long-period Rayleigh waves, removing the amplitude signal due to focusing and defocusing effects is the greatest challenge. In this paper, three independent data sets of fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave amplitude are analyzed to investigate how three factors contribute to discrepancies between the attenuation models: uncertainties in the amplitude measurements themselves, variable path coverage, and the treatment of focusing effects. Regionalized pure-path and fully two-dimensional attenuation models are derived and compared. The approach for determining attenuation models from real data is guided by an analysis of amplitudes measured from synthetic spectral-element waveforms, for which the input Earth model is perfectly known. The results show that differences in the amplitude measurements introduce only very minor differences between the attenuation models; path coverage and the removal of focusing effects are more important. The pure-path attenuation values exhibit a clear dependence on tectonic region at shorter periods that disappears at long periods, in agreement with pure-path phase-velocity results obtained by inverting Rayleigh wave phase delays. The 2-D attenuation maps are highly correlated with each other to spherical-harmonic degree 16 and can resolve smaller features than the previous generation of global attenuation models. Anomalously low attenuation is nearly perfectly associated with continental cratons. Variations in lithospheric thickness are determined by forward modeling the global attenuation variations as a thermal boundary layer of variable thickness. Temperature profiles that satisfy the attenuation values systematically

  9. Rayleigh Wave Tomography of Mid-Continent Rift (MCR) using Earthquake and Ambient Noise Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleqabi, G. I.; Wiens, D.; Wysession, M. E.; Shen, W.; van der Lee, S.; Revenaugh, J.; Frederiksen, A. W.; Darbyshire, F. A.; Stein, S. A.; Jurdy, D. M.; Wolin, E.; Bollmann, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    The structure of the North American Mid-Continent Rift Zone (MCRZ) is examined using Rayleigh waves from teleseismic earthquakes and ambient seismic noise recorded by the Superior Province Rifting EarthScope Experiment (SPREE). Eighty-four broadband seismometers were deployed during 2011-2013 in Minnesota and Wisconsin, USA, and Ontario, CA, along three lines; two across the rift axis and the third along the rift axis. These stations, together with the EarthScope Transportable Array, provided excellent coverage of the MCRZ. The 1.1 Ga Mesoproterozoic failed rift consists of two arms, buried under post-rifting sedimentary formations that meet at Lake Superior. We compare two array-based tomography methods using teleseismic fundamental mode Rayleigh waves phase and amplitude measurements: the two-plane wave method (TPWM, Forsyth, 1998) and the automated surface wave phase velocity measuring system (ASWMS, Jin and Gaherty, 2015). Both array methods and the ambient noise method give relatively similar results showing low velocity zones extending along the MCRZ arms. The teleseismic Rayleigh wave results from 18 - 180 s period are combined with short period phase velocity results (period 8-30 s) obtained from ambient noise by cross correlation. Phase velocities from the methods are very similar at periods of 18-30 where results overlap; in this period range we use the average of the noise and teleseismic results. Finally the combined phase velocity curve is inverted using a Monte-Carlo inversion method at each geographic point in the model. The results show low velocities at shallow depths (5-10 km) that are the result of very deep sedimentary fill within the MCRZ. Deeper-seated low velocity regions may correspond to mafic underplating of the rift zone.

  10. Rayleigh Waves in a Rotating Orthotropic Micropolar Elastic Solid Half-Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baljeet Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A problem on Rayleigh wave in a rotating half-space of an orthotropic micropolar material is considered. The governing equations are solved for surface wave solutions in the half space of the material. These solutions satisfy the boundary conditions at free surface of the half-space to obtain the frequency equation of the Rayleigh wave. For numerical purpose, the frequency equation is approximated. The nondimensional speed of Rayleigh wave is computed and shown graphically versus nondimensional frequency and rotation-frequency ratio for both orthotropic micropolar elastic and isotropic micropolar elastic cases. The numerical results show the effects of rotation, orthotropy, and nondimensional frequency on the nondimensional speed of the Rayleigh wave.

  11. Empirical evidence of Rayleigh waves in Norcia (central Italy) and their quantitative contribution to ground motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffagni, Enrico; Cattaneo, Marco; Bordoni, Paola

    2016-04-01

    Spectral ratio techniques, such as the Horizontal-to-Vertical (HV) and Standard (SSR) may exhibit different trends in specific frequency bands when conducted in alluvial basins. A possible explanation of this discrepancy can be provided by the presence of Rayleigh oscillations, that are considered responsible of an amplification of the vertical component with respect to the horizontal. We propose a new methodology for the identification of Rayleigh waves arrivals, to test on small-size basins. With this procedure, candidate Rayleigh waves are localized in time-frequency domain on an instantaneous polarization plane which is constructed by defining the instantaneous maximum vertical and horizontal spectral amplitudes. Validation of the candidate Rayleigh arrivals is performed by evaluating the instantaneous ellipticity. This step yields to a quantitative measure of the polarization, providing an indicator of the Rayleigh contribution to ground motion. We tested this methodology in the Norcia basin (central Italy) using a 18 selected earthquakes (2.0 L'Aquila sequence (2009). We demonstrate the robustness of our methodology by localizing evidences of Rayleigh wave arrivals immediately from (1 s) up to 30 s after the first S-wave group, even for low-magnitude events (Ml < 3.0). The generation of the detected Rayleigh waves analyzed in time-frequency range, appears to be magnitude-dependent and in function of the location in the basin. Our quantitative estimate of the Rayleigh polarization resulted to be comparable to the HV response value in specific frequency bands, for example in deamplification, demonstrating a plausible connection with Rayleigh oscillations. The authors encourage the usage or implementation of similar procedures conducted in basin studies, in order to determine quantitatively the Rayleigh contribution to ground motion, for a better characterization of the local seismic response.

  12. Rayleigh waves ellipticity and mode mis-identification in multi-channel analysis of surface waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boaga, Jacopo; Cassiani, Giorgio; Strobbia, Claudio

    dispersion curve which is then inverted. Typically, single component vertical and multi channel receivers are used. In most cases the inversion of the dispersion properties is carried out assuming that the experimental dispersion curve corresponds to a single mode, mostly the fundamental Rayleigh mode......-identification known as ‘osculation’ (‘kissing’). In general it is called ‘osculation point’ the point where the energy peak shifts at low frequencies from the fundamental to the first higher mode. This jump occurs, with a continuous smooth transition, around a well-define frequency where the two modes get very close...... the vertical component of ground motion, as the mode osculation is linked to the Rayleigh wave ellipticity polarization, and therefore we conclude that multi-component data, using also horizontal receivers, can help discern the multi-modal nature of surface waves. Finally we introduce a-priori detectors...

  13. The uppermost crust structure of Ischia (southern Italy) from ambient noise Rayleigh waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strollo, R.; Nunziata, C.; Iannotta, A.; Iannotta, D.

    2015-05-01

    Ambient noise measurements were performed at the island of Ischia (southern Italy) along alignments of 2.4-7 km by using two three-component seismic stations. Synchronous noise recordings of 2-20 h were cross-correlated over 20-30 s windows, stacked and iteratively band-pass filtered to enhance the dispersive wave trains. Frequency time analysis was performed on the vertical and radial components of cross-correlations and the fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave group velocity was obtained. Validation of the dispersion data was possible with those obtained from an earthquake recording along a close path. The non-linear inversion of average Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion curves along 13 paths (receiver inter-distances) allowed the definition of shear wave velocity models in the uppermost 1-2 km of the crust. The correlation of VS profiles vs. depth and drilling stratigraphy allowed to attribute VS lower than 1 km/s to tuffs and VS of 1.41 km/s to very fractured lavas. Higher VS are found in the central area of the island, in correspondence of the resurgent area. The top of the trachytic lava basement, with VS of 2.2-2.4 km/s and density of 2.3 g/cm3 is about 0.6-0.7 km deep b.s.l. in the centre of Ischia, below altered, very fractured lava or thermally altered tuff.

  14. Analysis of group-velocity dispersion of high-frequency Rayleigh waves for near-surface applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Xu, Y.; Zeng, C.

    2011-01-01

    The Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) method is an efficient tool to obtain the vertical shear (S)-wave velocity profile using the dispersive characteristic of Rayleigh waves. Most MASW researchers mainly apply Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity dispersion for S-wave velocity estimation with a few exceptions applying Rayleigh-wave group-velocity dispersion. Herein, we first compare sensitivities of fundamental surface-wave phase velocities with group velocities with three four-layer models including a low-velocity layer or a high-velocity layer. Then synthetic data are simulated by a finite difference method. Images of group-velocity dispersive energy of the synthetic data are generated using the Multiple Filter Analysis (MFA) method. Finally we invert a high-frequency surface-wave group-velocity dispersion curve of a real-world example. Results demonstrate that (1) the sensitivities of group velocities are higher than those of phase velocities and usable frequency ranges are wider than that of phase velocities, which is very helpful in improving inversion stability because for a stable inversion system, small changes in phase velocities do not result in a large fluctuation in inverted S-wave velocities; (2) group-velocity dispersive energy can be measured using single-trace data if Rayleigh-wave fundamental-mode energy is dominant, which suggests that the number of shots required in data acquisition can be dramatically reduced and the horizontal resolution can be greatly improved using analysis of group-velocity dispersion; and (3) the suspension logging results of the real-world example demonstrate that inversion of group velocities generated by the MFA method can successfully estimate near-surface S-wave velocities. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  15. Pseudo Rayleigh wave in a partially saturated non-dissipative porous solid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, M. D.

    2016-09-01

    Propagation of surface waves is studied at the pervious boundary of a porous solid saturated with a mixture of two immiscible fluids. An approach, based on continuum mixture theory, is used to derive a secular equation for the propagation of harmonic waves at the stress-free plane surface of this non-dissipative medium. Numerical analysis shows that this secular equation may not represent the propagation of true surface wave in the porous aggregate. Then, this equation is solved numerically for the propagation of pseudo Rayleigh wave or the leaky surface waves. To ensure the existence of pseudo Rayleigh wave, capillary effect between two (wetting and non-wetting) pore-fluids is related to the partial saturation. Effects of porosity and partial saturation coupled with capillary effect are observed on the phase velocity of pseudo Rayleigh waves in sandstone saturated with water-CO2 mixture.

  16. Characterization of surface damage of a solid plate under tensile loading using nonlinear Rayleigh waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    This letter reports experimental observation of a direct correlation between the acoustic nonlinearity parameter (NP) measured with nonlinear Rayleigh waves and the accumulation of plasticity damage in an AZ31 magnesium alloy plate specimen.Rayleigh waves are generated and detected with wedge transducers,and the NPs are measured at different stress levels.The results show that there is a significant increase in the NPs with monotonic tensile loads surpassing the material's yielding stress.The research sugge...

  17. Identification of the Rayleigh surface waves for estimation of viscoelasticity using the surface wave elastography technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoming

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this Letter to the Editor is to demonstrate an effective method for estimating viscoelasticity based on measurements of the Rayleigh surface wave speed. It is important to identify the surface wave mode for measuring surface wave speed. A concept of start frequency of surface waves is proposed. The surface wave speeds above the start frequency should be used to estimate the viscoelasticity of tissue. The motivation was to develop a noninvasive surface wave elastography (SWE) technique for assessing skin disease by measuring skin viscoelastic properties. Using an optical based SWE system, the author generated a local harmonic vibration on the surface of phantom using an electromechanical shaker and measured the resulting surface waves on the phantom using an optical vibrometer system. The surface wave speed was measured using a phase gradient method. It was shown that different standing wave modes were generated below the start frequency because of wave reflection. However, the pure symmetric surface waves were generated from the excitation above the start frequency. Using the wave speed dispersion above the start frequency, the viscoelasticity of the phantom can be correctly estimated.

  18. Enhanced sensing and conversion of ultrasonic Rayleigh waves by elastic metasurfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombi, Andrea; Ageeva, Victoria; Smith, Richard J; Clare, Adam; Patel, Rikesh; Clark, Matt; Colquitt, Daniel; Roux, Philippe; Guenneau, Sebastien; Craster, Richard V

    2017-07-28

    Recent years have heralded the introduction of metasurfaces that advantageously combine the vision of sub-wavelength wave manipulation, with the design, fabrication and size advantages associated with surface excitation. An important topic within metasurfaces is the tailored rainbow trapping and selective spatial frequency separation of electromagnetic and acoustic waves using graded metasurfaces. This frequency dependent trapping and spatial frequency segregation has implications for energy concentrators and associated energy harvesting, sensing and wave filtering techniques. Different demonstrations of acoustic and electromagnetic rainbow devices have been performed, however not for deep elastic substrates that support both shear and compressional waves, together with surface Rayleigh waves; these allow not only for Rayleigh wave rainbow effects to exist but also for mode conversion from surface into shear waves. Here we demonstrate experimentally not only elastic Rayleigh wave rainbow trapping, by taking advantage of a stop-band for surface waves, but also selective mode conversion of surface Rayleigh waves to shear waves. These experiments performed at ultrasonic frequencies, in the range of 400-600 kHz, are complemented by time domain numerical simulations. The metasurfaces we design are not limited to guided ultrasonic waves and are a general phenomenon in elastic waves that can be translated across scales.

  19. Orienting ocean-bottom seismometers from P-wave and Rayleigh wave polarizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, John-Robert; Barruol, Guilhem; Fontaine, Fabrice R.; Sigloch, Karin; Crawford, Wayne C.; Deen, Martha

    2017-03-01

    We present two independent, automated methods for estimating the absolute horizontal misorientation of seismic sensors. We apply both methods to 44 free-fall ocean-bottom seismometers (OBSs) of the RHUM-RUM experiment (http://www.rhum-rum.net/). The techniques measure the 3-D directions of particle motion of (1) P-waves and (2) Rayleigh waves of earthquake recordings. For P-waves, we used a principal component analysis to determine the directions of particle motions (polarizations) in multiple frequency passbands. We correct for polarization deviations due to seismic anisotropy and dipping discontinuities using a simple fit equation, which yields significantly more accurate OBS orientations. For Rayleigh waves, we evaluated the degree of elliptical polarization in the vertical plane in the time and frequency domain. The results obtained for the RHUM-RUM OBS stations differed, on average, by 3.1° and 3.7° between the methods, using circular mean and median statistics, which is within the methods' estimate uncertainties. Using P-waves, we obtained orientation estimates for 31 ocean-bottom seismometers with an average uncertainty (95 per cent confidence interval) of 11° per station. For 7 of these OBS, data coverage was sufficient to correct polarization measurements for underlying seismic anisotropy and dipping discontinuities, improving their average orientation uncertainty from 11° to 6° per station. Using Rayleigh waves, we obtained misorientation estimates for 40 OBS, with an average uncertainty of 16° per station. The good agreement of results obtained using the two methods indicates that they should also be useful for detecting misorientations of terrestrial seismic stations.

  20. Rayleigh and acoustic gravity waves detection on magnetograms during the Japanese Tsunami, 2011

    CERN Document Server

    Klausner, Virginia; Muella, Marcio T A H; Mendes, Odim; Domingues, Margarete O; Papa, Andres R R

    2015-01-01

    The continuous geomagnetic field survey holds an important potential in future prevention of tsunami damages, and also, it could be used in tsunami forecast. In this work, we were able to detected for the first time Rayleigh and ionospheric acoustic gravity wave propagation in the Z-component of the geomagnetic field due to the Japanese tsunami, 2011 prior to the tsunami arrival. The geomagnetic measurements were obtained in the epicentral near and far-field. Also, these waves were detected within minutes to few hours of the tsunami arrival. For these reasons, these results are very encouraging, and confirmed that the geomagnetic field monitoring could play an important role in the tsunami warning systems, and also, it could provide additional information in the induced ionospheric wave propagation models due to tsunamis.

  1. Constraints on Shear Velocity in the Cratonic Upper Mantle From Rayleigh Wave Phase Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, A. C.; Dalton, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, the prevailing notion of Precambrian continental lithosphere as a thick boundary layer (200-300 km), defined by a depleted composition and a steady-state conductively cooled temperature structure, has been challenged by several lines of seismological evidence. One, profiles of shear velocity with depth beneath cratons exhibit lower wave speed at shallow depths and higher wave speed at greater depths than can be explained by temperature alone. These profiles are also characterized by positive or flat velocity gradients with depth and anomalously high attenuation in the uppermost mantle, both of which are difficult to reconcile with the low temperatures and large thermal gradient expected with a thermal boundary layer. Two, body-wave receiver-function studies have detected a mid-lithospheric discontinuity that requires a large and abrupt velocity decrease with depth in cratonic regions that cannot be achieved by thermal gradients alone. Here, we used forward-modeling to identify the suite of shear-velocity profiles that are consistent with phase-velocity observations made for Rayleigh waves that primarily traversed cratons in North America, South America, Africa, and Australia. We considered two approaches; with the first, depth profiles of shear velocity were predicted from thermal models of the cratonic upper mantle that correspond to a range of assumed values of mantle potential temperature, surface heat flow, and radiogenic heat production in the crust and upper mantle. With the second approach, depth profiles of shear velocity were randomly generated. In both cases, Rayleigh wave phase velocity was calculated from the Earth models and compared to the observed values. We show that it is very difficult to match the observations with an Earth model containing a low-velocity zone in the upper mantle; instead, the best-fit models contain a flat or positive velocity gradient with depth. We explore the implications of this result for the thermal and

  2. Crustal structure of northern Italy from the ellipticity of Rayleigh waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berbellini, Andrea; Morelli, Andrea; Ferreira, Ana M. G.

    2017-04-01

    Northern Italy is a diverse geological region, including the wide and thick Po Plain sedimentary basin, which is bounded by the Alps and the Apennines. The seismically slow shallow structure of the Po Plain is difficult to retrieve with classical seismic measurements such as surface wave dispersion, yet the detailed structure of the region greatly affects seismic wave propagation and hence seismic ground shaking. Here we invert Rayleigh wave ellipticity measurements in the period range 10-60 s for 95 stations in northern Italy using a fully non linear approach to constrain vertical vS,vP and density profiles of the crust beneath each station. The ellipticity of Rayleigh wave ground motion is primarily sensitive to shear-wave velocity beneath the recording station, which reduces along-path contamination effects. We use the 3D layering structure in MAMBo, a previous model based on a compilation of geological and geophysical information for the Po Plain and surrounding regions of northern Italy, and employ ellipticity data to constrain vS,vP and density within its layers. We show that ellipticity data from ballistic teleseismic wave trains alone constrain the crustal structure well. This leads to MAMBo-E, an updated seismic model of the region's crust that inherits information available from previous seismic prospection and geological studies, while fitting new seismic data well. MAMBo-E brings new insights into lateral heterogeneity in the region's subsurface. Compared to MAMBo, it shows overall faster seismic anomalies in the region's Quaternary, Pliocene and Oligo-Miocene layers and better delineates the seismic structures of the Po Plain at depth. Two low velocity regions are mapped in the Mesozoic layer in the western and eastern parts of the Plain, which seem to correspond to the Monferrato sedimentary basin and to the Ferrara-Romagna thrust system, respectively.

  3. Toward analytic theory of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability: lessons from a toy model

    CERN Document Server

    Mailybaev, Alexei A

    2016-01-01

    In this work we suggest that a turbulent phase of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability can be explained as a universal stochastic wave traveling with constant speed in a properly renormalized system. This wave, originating from ordinary deterministic chaos in a renormalized time, has two constant limiting states at both sides. These states are related to the initial discontinuity at large scales and to stationary turbulence at small scales. The theoretical analysis is confirmed with extensive numerical simulations made for a new shell model, which features all basic properties of the phenomenological theory for the Rayleigh-Taylor instability.

  4. Estimation of elastic moduli in a compressible Gibson half-space by inverting Rayleigh-wave phase velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, J.; Xu, Y.; Miller, R.D.; Chen, C.

    2006-01-01

    A Gibson half-space model (a non-layered Earth model) has the shear modulus varying linearly with depth in an inhomogeneous elastic half-space. In a half-space of sedimentary granular soil under a geostatic state of initial stress, the density and the Poisson's ratio do not vary considerably with depth. In such an Earth body, the dynamic shear modulus is the parameter that mainly affects the dispersion of propagating waves. We have estimated shear-wave velocities in the compressible Gibson half-space by inverting Rayleigh-wave phase velocities. An analytical dispersion law of Rayleigh-type waves in a compressible Gibson half-space is given in an algebraic form, which makes our inversion process extremely simple and fast. The convergence of the weighted damping solution is guaranteed through selection of the damping factor using the Levenberg-Marquardt method. Calculation efficiency is achieved by reconstructing a weighted damping solution using singular value decomposition techniques. The main advantage of this algorithm is that only three parameters define the compressible Gibson half-space model. Theoretically, to determine the model by the inversion, only three Rayleigh-wave phase velocities at different frequencies are required. This is useful in practice where Rayleigh-wave energy is only developed in a limited frequency range or at certain frequencies as data acquired at manmade structures such as dams and levees. Two real examples are presented and verified by borehole S-wave velocity measurements. The results of these real examples are also compared with the results of the layered-Earth model. ?? Springer 2006.

  5. Ellipticity of Rayleigh waves in basin and hard-rock sites in Northern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berbellini, Andrea; Morelli, Andrea; Ferreira, Ana M. G.

    2016-07-01

    We measure ellipticity of teleseismic Rayleigh waves at 95 seismic stations in Northern Italy, for wave period between 10 and 110 s, using an automatic technique and a large volume of high-quality seismic recordings from over 500 global earthquakes that occurred in 2008-2014. Northern Italy includes a wide range of crustal structures, from the wide and deep Po Plain sedimentary basin to outcropping sedimentary and crystalline rocks in the Northern Apennines and Alps. It thus provides an excellent case for studying the influence of shallow earth structure on polarization of surface waves. The ellipticity measurements show excellent spatial correlation with geological features in the region, such as high ellipticity associated with regions of low seismic velocity in the Po Plain and low ellipticity values in faster, hard rock regions in the Alps and Apennine mountains. Moreover, the observed ellipticity values also relate to the thickness of the basement, as highlighted by observed differences beneath the Alps and the Apennines. Comparison between observations and predicted ellipticity from a reference crustal model of the region show substantial fit, particularly for T ˜ 38 s data. Discrepancy for shorter wave period suggests that slight modifications of the model are needed, and that the ellipticity measurements could help to better constrain the shallow crustal structure of the region. Predictions for the Po Plain are larger than the observations by a factor of four or more and transition from retrograde to prograde Rayleigh wave motion at the surface for periods of T ˜ 10-13 s is predicted for seismic stations in the plain. Analysis of corresponding real data indicates a possible detection of teleseismic prograde particle motion, but the weak teleseismic earthquake signals are mixed with ambient noise signals at the predicted, short, transition periods. Detection of the period of polarity inversion from the joint analysis of earthquake and ambient noise

  6. Shear-wave velocity structure of the Tongariro Volcanic Centre, New Zealand: Fast Rayleigh and slow Love waves indicate strong shallow anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Holly J.; Fry, Bill; Savage, Martha K.

    2017-04-01

    Models of the velocity structure of volcanoes can help define possible magma pathways and contribute to calculating more accurate earthquake locations, which can help with monitoring volcanic activity. However, shear-wave velocity of volcanoes is difficult to determine from traditional seismic techniques, such as local earthquake tomography (LET) or refraction/reflection surveys. Here we use the recently developed technique of noise cross correlation of continuous seismic data to investigate the subsurface shear-wave velocity structure of the Tongariro Volcanic Centre (TgVC) of New Zealand, focusing on the active Ruapehu and Tongariro Volcanoes. We observe both the fundamental and first higher-order modes of Rayleigh and Love waves within our noise dataset, made from stacks of 15 min cross-correlation functions. We manually pick group velocity dispersion curves from over 1900 correlation functions, of which we consider 1373 to be high quality. We subsequently invert a subset of the fundamental mode Rayleigh- and Love-wave dispersion curves both independently and jointly for one dimensional shear-wave velocity (Vs) profiles at Ruapehu and Tongariro Volcanoes. Vs increases very slowly at a rate of approximately 0.2 km/s per km depth beneath Ruapehu, suggesting that progressive hydrothermal alteration mitigates the effects of compaction driven velocity increases. At Tongariro, we observe larger Vs increases with depth, which we interpret as different layers within Tongariro's volcanic system above altered basement greywacke. Slow Vs, on the order of 1-2 km/s, are compatible with P-wave velocities (using a Vp/Vs ratio of 1.7) from existing velocity profiles of areas within the TgVC, and the observations of worldwide studies of shallow volcanic systems that used ambient noise cross-correlation methods. Most of the measured group velocities of fundamental mode Love-waves across the TgVC are 0.1-0.4 km/s slower than those of fundamental mode Rayleigh-waves in the

  7. Impact of density information on Rayleigh surface wave inversion results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Julian; Tsoflias, Georgios; Miller, Richard D.; Peterie, Shelby; Morton, Sarah; Xia, Jianghai

    2016-12-01

    We assessed the impact of density on the estimation of inverted shear-wave velocity (Vs) using the multi-channel analysis of surface waves (MASW) method. We considered the forward modeling theory, evaluated model sensitivity, and tested the effect of density information on the inversion of seismic data acquired in the Arctic. Theoretical review, numerical modeling and inversion of modeled and real data indicated that the density ratios between layers, not the actual density values, impact the determination of surface-wave phase velocities. Application on real data compared surface-wave inversion results using: a) constant density, the most common approach in practice, b) indirect density estimates derived from refraction compressional-wave velocity observations, and c) from direct density measurements in a borehole. The use of indirect density estimates reduced the final shear-wave velocity (Vs) results typically by 6-7% and the use of densities from a borehole reduced the final Vs estimates by 10-11% compared to those from assumed constant density. In addition to the improved absolute Vs accuracy, the resulting overall Vs changes were unevenly distributed laterally when viewed on a 2-D section leading to an overall Vs model structure that was more representative of the subsurface environment. It was observed that the use of constant density instead of increasing density with depth not only can lead to Vs overestimation but it can also create inaccurate model structures, such as a low-velocity layer. Thus, optimal Vs estimations can be best achieved using field estimates of subsurface density ratios.

  8. Harmonic excitation of mantle Rayleigh waves by the 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo, Philippines

    OpenAIRE

    Kanamori, Hiroo; MORI, Jim

    1992-01-01

    An unusually long (at least two hours) seismic wave train having periods of about 230 sec was recorded at many worldwide seismic stations during the major eruption of Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines on June 15, 1991. This wave train exhibits two sharp spectral peaks at 228 and 270 sec. The group velocity, phase velocity, and the particle motion of this wave train indicate that it is a Rayleigh wave. The most probable excitation mechanism is acoustic coupling of atmospheric oscillations that...

  9. Rayleigh-wave mode separation by high-resolution linear radon transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Xu, Y.; Liu, J.; Liu, Q.

    2009-01-01

    Multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) method is an effective tool for obtaining vertical shear wave profiles from a single non-invasive measurement. One key step of the MASW method is generation of a dispersion image and extraction of a reliable dispersion curve from raw multichannel shot records. Because different Rayleigh-wave modes normally interfere with each other in the time and space domain, it is necessary to perform mode separation and reconstruction to increase the accuracy of phase velocities determined from a dispersion image. In this paper, we demonstrate the effectiveness of high-resolution linear Radon transform (LRT) as a means of separating and reconstructing multimode, dispersive Rayleigh-wave energy. We first introduce high-resolution LRT methods and Rayleigh-wave mode separation using high-resolution LRT. Next, we use synthetic data and a real-world example to demonstrate the effectiveness of Rayleigh-wave mode separation using high-resolution LRT. Our synthetic and real-world results demonstrate that (1) high-resolution LRT successfully separates and reconstructs multimode dispersive Rayleigh-wave energy with high resolution allowing the multimode energy to be more accurately determined. The horizontal resolution of the Rayleigh-wave method can be increased by extraction of dispersion curves from a pair of traces in the mode-separated shot gather and (2) multimode separation and reconstruction expand the usable frequency range of higher mode dispersive energy, which increases the depth of investigation and provides a means for accurately determining cut-off frequencies. ?? 2009 The Authors Journal compilation ?? 2009 RAS.

  10. Propagation of Rayleigh surface waves with small wavelengths in nonlocal visco-elastic solids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D P Acharya; Asit Mondal

    2002-12-01

    This paper investigates Rayleigh waves, propagating on the surface of a visco-elastic solid under the linear theory of nonlocal elasticity. Dispersion relations are obtained. It is observed that the waves are dispersive in nature for small wavelengths. Numerical calculations and discussions presented in this paper lead us to some important conclusions.

  11. Estimating the location of a tunnel using correlation and inversion of Rayleigh wave scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kasililar, A.; Harmankaya, U.; Wapenaar, C.P.A.; Draganov, D.S.

    2013-01-01

    The investigation of near-surface scatterers, such as cavities, tunnels, abandoned mine shafts, and buried objects, is important to mitigate geohazards and environmental hazards. By inversion of travel times of cross-correlated scattered waves, due to the incident Rayleigh waves, we estimate the loc

  12. Detection of near-surface cavities by generalized S-transform of Rayleigh waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Guang-zhou; Tsoflias, George P.; Li, Chang-jiang

    2016-06-01

    The near-surface cavities can cause a huge hidden trouble for urban infrastructure construction, such as, foundation settlement and roadbed subsidence, and so on. So, it is an important task to detect the underground cavities effectively for many engineering projects. At the same time, because of the complexity of near-surface materials and the limited resolution of geophysical methods, detecting the location of the hidden cavities quantitatively is still a technical challenge which needs to be studied further. Base on the study of Xia et al. (Xia et al., 2007), we performed a little modification to the travel time equation for the Rayleigh-wave diffraction. We put forward another way to detect the shallow subsurface voids. The generalized S-transform was adopted to extract the arrival times of the diffracted Rayleigh waves from the near and far-offset boundaries of the void at a certain receiver. Then the arrival times were used to calculate the boundary locations of the void. Three half-space void models and a two-layered void model were used to demonstrate the feasibility and effect of detecting a void with the generalized S-transform. A rotated staggered-grid finite-difference method was adopted in wave field modeling to obtain the synthetic seismic record. Finally, a real world field data was used to verify the detecting effect. The theoretical models and the real world example showed that it is feasible and effective to use the generalized S-transform to detect the near-surface cavities.

  13. On the reliability of direct Rayleigh-wave estimation from multicomponent cross-correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zongbo; Mikesell, T. Dylan

    2017-09-01

    Seismic interferometry is routinely used to image and characterize underground geology. The vertical component cross-correlations (CZZ) are often analysed in this process; although one can also use radial component and multicomponent cross-correlations (CRR and CZR, respectively), which have been shown to provide a more accurate Rayleigh-wave Green's function than CZZ when sources are unevenly distributed. In this letter, we identify the relationship between the multicomponent cross-correlations (CZR and CRR) and the Rayleigh-wave Green's functions to show why CZR and CRR are less sensitive than CZZ to non-stationary phase source energy. We demonstrate the robustness of CRR with a synthetic seismic noise data example. These results provide a compelling reason as to why CRR should be used to estimate the dispersive characteristics of the direct Rayleigh wave with seismic interferometry when the signal-to-noise ratio is high.

  14. Crust and upper mantle shear wave structure of Northeast Algeria from Rayleigh wave dispersion analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radi, Zohir; Yelles-Chaouche, Abdelkrim; Corchete, Victor; Guettouche, Salim

    2017-09-01

    We resolve the crust and upper mantle structure beneath Northeast Algeria at depths of 0-400 km, using inversion of fundamental mode Rayleigh wave. Our data set consists of 490 earthquakes recorded between 2007 and 2014 by five permanent broadband seismic stations in the study area. Applying a combination of different filtering technics and inversion method shear wave velocities structure were determined as functions of depth. The resolved changes in Vs at 50 km depth are in perfect agreement with crustal thickness estimates, which reflect the study area's orogenic setting, partly overlying the collision zone between the African and Eurasian plates. The inferred Moho discontinuity depths are close to those estimated for other convergent areas. In addition, there is good agreement between our results and variations in orientations of regional seismic anisotropy. At depths of 80-180 km, negative Vs anomalies at station CBBR suggest the existence of a failed subduction slab.

  15. Crustal structure below Popocat\\'epetl Volcano (Mexico) from analysis of Rayleigh waves

    CERN Document Server

    De Barros, Louis; Métaxian, J -P; Valdés-Gonzales, C; Lesage, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    An array of ten broadband stations was installed on the Popocat\\'epetl volcano (Mexico) for five months between October 2002 and February 2003. 26 regional and teleseismic earthquakes were selected and filtered in the frequency time domain to extract the fundamental mode of the Rayleigh wave. The average dispersion curve was obtained in two steps. Firstly, phase velocities were measured in the period range [2-50] s from the phase difference between pairs of stations, using Wiener filtering. Secondly, the average dispersion curve was calculated by combining observations from all events in order to reduce diffraction effects. The inversion of the mean phase velocity yielded a crustal model for the volcano which is consistent with previous models of the Mexican Volcanic Belt. The overall crustal structure beneath Popocat\\'epetl is therefore not different from the surrounding area, and the velocities in the lower crust are confirmed to be relatively low. Lateral variations of the structure were also investigated ...

  16. Nonlinear dynamic acousto-elasticity measurement by Rayleigh wave in concrete cover evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Quang Anh; Garnier, Vincent; Payan, Cédric; Chaix, Jean-François; Lott, Martin; Eiras, Jesús N.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents local non-destructive evaluation of concrete cover by using surface Rayleigh wave in nonlinear Dynamic Acousto-Elasticity (DAE) measurement. Dynamic non classical nonlinear elastic behavior like modulus decrease under applied stress and slow dynamic process has been observed in many varieties of solid, also in concrete. The measurements conducted in laboratory, consist in qualitative evaluation of concrete thermal damage. Nonlinear elastic parameters especially conditioning offset are analyzed for the cover concrete by Rayleigh wave. The results of DAE method show enhanced sensitivity when compared to velocity measurement. Afterward, this technique broadens measurements to the field.

  17. Methods to increase the depth and precision of transient Rayleigh wave exploration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jian-jun(张建军); WEI Xiu-cheng(魏修成); LIU Yang(刘洋)

    2004-01-01

    In order to increase the exploration depth of Rayleigh wave, new idea that different from the former principles in data acquisition was applied. Suitable data acquisition parameter was given out on the basis of large amount of experiments. By reducing the group interval, the low frequency signal are enhanced instead of been attenuated. Furthermore, to solve the problem that the precision of Rayleigh wave exploration method count much to the signal-to-noise ratio, some preprocessing methods were put forward. By using zero shift rectifying, digital F-K filtering and cutting, noises can be effectively eliminated.

  18. Estimate of Rayleigh-to-Love wave ratio in the secondary microseism by colocated ring laser and seismograph

    OpenAIRE

    Tanimoto, T; Hadziioannou, C; H. Igel; Wasserman, J.; U. Schreiber; Gebauer, A.

    2015-01-01

    ©2015. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. Using a colocated ring laser and an STS-2 seismograph, we estimate the ratio of Rayleigh-to-Love waves in the secondary microseism at Wettzell, Germany, for frequencies between 0.13 and 0.30 Hz. Rayleigh wave surface acceleration was derived from the vertical component of STS-2, and Love wave surface acceleration was derived from the ring laser. Surface wave amplitudes are comparable; near the spectral peak about 0.22 Hz, Rayleigh wave a...

  19. Crustal Structure of the Pakistan Himalayas from Ambient Noise and Seismic Rayleigh Wave Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, A.

    2007-05-01

    The western Himalayan syntaxi is a unique feature resulted from the India-Asia collision and its formation remains poorly understood. To image crustal structure in the western syntaxi, we analyze Rayleigh waves from ambient seismic noise and earthquake data recorded during the Pakistan Broadband Seismic Experiment. The Pakistan experiment included 9 broadband stations with an aperture of ~200 km and operated from September to December in 1992. We compute cross-correlations of ambient noise data on an hourly base and stack all the cross-correlations for 70 days to produce the estimated Green functions. Power spectrum analysis shows that the dominant energy is from 0.15 to 0.25 Hz and from 0.05 to 0.07 Hz, consistent with the well-know background seismic noise. A phase with large amplitude appears at near zero time on almost all stacked cross- correlations and its origin is not clear to us at this moment. Rayleigh waves can be clearly observed for station pairs at the distance of 80 km and larger but are contaminated by the near zero time phase at shorter station spacing. Rayleigh wave phase velocities at periods of 4 to 15 s will be produced from the ambient noise data. Using regional and teleseismic earthquakes, we expect to obtain Rayleigh wave dispersions at periods from 15 to 50 s. The phase velocities from both datasets will be inverted for crustal thickness and shear-wave structure beneath the Pakistan Himalayas.

  20. Single-scattering parabolic equation solutions for elastic media propagation, including Rayleigh waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzler, Adam M; Siegmann, William L; Collins, Michael D

    2012-02-01

    The parabolic equation method with a single-scattering correction allows for accurate modeling of range-dependent environments in elastic layered media. For problems with large contrasts, accuracy and efficiency are gained by subdividing vertical interfaces into a series of two or more single-scattering problems. This approach generates several computational parameters, such as the number of interface slices, an iteration convergence parameter τ, and the number of iterations n for convergence. Using a narrow-angle approximation, the choices of n=1 and τ=2 give accurate solutions. Analogous results from the narrow-angle approximation extend to environments with larger variations when slices are used as needed at vertical interfaces. The approach is applied to a generic ocean waveguide that includes the generation of a Rayleigh interface wave. Results are presented in both frequency and time domains.

  1. Development of nondestructive system for detecting the cracks in KTX brake disk using Rayleigh wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Soo; Lee, Ho Yong [Korea Railroad Research Institute, Uiwang (Korea, Republic of); Yeom, Yun Taek; Park, Jin Hyun; Song, Sung Jing; Kim, Hak Joon [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Sung Duck [Dept. of Physics, Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Recently, KTX (Korean Train Express) train stoppage accidents were mainly caused by malfunctioning equipment, aging and cracking of railway vehicles, crack breakages of brake disks, and breakages of brake disks. Breakage of brake disk can cause large-scale casualties such as high-speed collision and concern about derailment by hitting lower axle and wheel. Therefore, in this study, a brake disk with solid and ventilation type, which is the brake disk of a KTX train was modeled, and a dynamometer system was constructed to operate the disk. A Rayleigh wave was used to inspect the surface of the brake disk. An ultrasonic inspection module was developed for the brake disk by using a local immersion method due to the difficulty involved in ultrasonic inspection using an existing immersion method. In addition, the surface defects of the brake disk were evaluated using a dynamometer mock-up system and an ultrasonic inspection module of the brake disk.

  2. The acoustoelastic effect on Rayleigh waves in elastic-plastic deformed layered rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Jin-Xia; Cui Zhi-Wen; Wang Ke-Xie

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of the acoustoelastic theory for elastic-plastic materials, the influence of statically deformed states including both the elastic and plastic deformations induced by applied uniaxial stresses on the Rayleigh wave in layered rocks is investigated by using a transfer matrix method. The acoustoelastic effects of elastic-plastic strains in rocks caused by static deformations, are discussed in detail. The Rayleigh-type and Sezawa modes exhibit similar trends in acoustoelastic effect: the acoustoelastic effect increasing rapidly with the frequency-thickness product and the phase velocity change approaching a constant value for thick layer and high frequency limit. Elastic-plastic deformations in the Castlegate layered rock obviously modify the phase velocity of the Rayleigh wave and the cutoff points for the Sezawa modes. The investigation may be useful for seismic exploration, geotechnical engineering and ultrasonic detection.

  3. Crustal thickness variation beneath the Romanian seismic network from Rayleigh wave dispersion and receiver function analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tataru, Dragos; Grecu, Bogdan; Zaharia, Bogdan

    2014-05-01

    Variations in crustal thickness in Romania where determined by joint inversion of P wave receiver functions (RFs) and Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion. We present new models of shear wave velocity structure of the crust beneath Romanian broad band stations. The data set consist in more than 500 teleseismic earthquake with epicentral distance between 30° and 95°, magnitude greater than 6 and a signal-to-noise ratio greater than 3 for the P-wave pulse. Most epicenters are situated along the northern Pacific Rim and arrive with backazimuths (BAZs) between 0° and 135° at the Romanian seismic network. We combine receiver functions with fundamental-mode of the Rayleigh wave group velocities to further constrain the shear-wave velocity structure.To extract the group velocities we applied the Multiple Filter Technique analysis to the vertical components of the earthquakes recordings. This technique allowed us to identify the Rayleigh wave fundamental mode and to compute the dispersion curves of the group velocities at periods between 10 and 150 s allowing us to resolve shear wave velocities to a depth of 100 km. The time-domain iterative deconvolution procedure of Ligorrıa and Ammon (1999) was employed to deconvolve the vertical component of the teleseismic P waveforms from the corresponding horizontal components and obtain radial and transverse receiver functions at each broadband station. The data are inverted using a joint, linearized inversion scheme (Hermann, 2002) which accounts for the relative influence of each set of observations, and allows a trade-off between fitting the observations, constructing a smooth model, and matching a priori constraints. The results show a thin crust for stations located inside the Pannonian basin (28-30 km) and a thicker crust for those in the East European Platform (36-40 km). The stations within the Southern and Central Carpathian Orogen are characterized by crustal depths of ~35 km. For stations located in the Northern

  4. Modeling and Control Of Surface Acoustic Wave Motors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feenstra, P.J.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis introduces Rayleigh waves and describes the generation of Rayleigh waves. Furthermore, the principle of operation of a SAW motor is analyzed. The analysis is based on a contact model, which describes the behavior between slider and stator. Due to the contact model, the microscopic and

  5. A method for inversion of layered shear wavespeed azimuthal anisotropy from Rayleigh wave dispersion using the Neighborhood Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huajian Yao

    2015-01-01

    Seismic anisotropy provides important constraints on deformation patterns of Earth's material.Rayleigh wave dispersion data with azimuthal anisotropy can be used to invert for depth-dependent shear wavespeed azimuthal anisotropy,therefore reflecting depth-varying deformation patterns in the crust and upper mantle.In this study,we propose a two-step method that uses the Neighborhood Algorithm (NA) for the point-wise inversion of depth-dependent shear wavespeeds and azimuthal anisotropy from Rayleigh wave azimuthally anisotropic dispersion data.The first step employs the NA to estimate depthdependent Vsv (or the elastic parameter L) as well as their uncertainties from the isotropic part Rayleigh wave dispersion data.In the second step,we first adopt a difference scheme to compute approximate Rayleigh-wave phase velocity sensitivity kernels to azimuthally anisotropic parameters with respect to the velocity model obtained in the first step.Then we perform the NA to estimate the azi.muthally anisotropic parameters Gc/L and Gs/L at depths separately from the corresponding cosine and sine terms of the azimuthally anisotropic dispersion data.Finally,we compute the depth-dependent magnitude and fast polarization azimuth of shear wavespeed azimuthal anisotropy.The use of the global search NA and Bayesian analysis allows for more reliable estimates of depth-dependent shear wavespeeds and azimuthal anisotropy as well as their uncertainties.We illustrate the inversion method using the azimuthally anisotropic dispersion data in SE Tibet,where we find apparent changes of fast axes of shear wavespeed azimuthal anisotropy between the crust and uppermost mantle.

  6. Imaging Rayleigh Wave Attenuation and Phase Velocity beneath North America with USArray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, X.; Dalton, C. A.; Jin, G.; Gaherty, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    The EarthScope USArray provides an opportunity to obtain detailed images of the continental upper mantle of United States at a novel scale. The majority of mantle models derived from USArray data contain spatial variations in velocity; however, little is known about the attenuation structure of the North American upper mantle. Joint interpretation of seismic attenuation and velocity models can improve upon the interpretations based only on velocity, and provide important constraints on the temperature, composition, melt content, and volatile content of the mantle. In this study, Rayleigh wave travel time and amplitude are measured using an interstation cross-correlation version of the Generalized Seismological Data Functional algorithm, which takes advantage of waveform similarity at nearby stations. Our data are from 670 large teleseismic earthquakes that occurred from 2006 to 2014 and were recorded by 1,764 Transportable Array stations. More than 4.8 million measurements at periods between 20 and 100 s are collected into our database. Isolating the signal of attenuation in the amplitude observations is challenging because amplitudes are sensitive to a number of factors in addition to attenuation, such as focusing/defocusing and local site amplification. We generate several Rayleigh wave attenuation maps at each period, using several different approaches to account for source and receiver effects on amplitude. This suite of attenuation maps allows us to distinguish between the robust features in the maps and the features that are sensitive to the treatment of source and receiver effects. We apply Helmholtz surface-wave tomography (Lin et al., 2012) to determine velocity and attenuation maps. A significant contrast in velocity and attenuation is observed in the transition between the western and central United States along the Rocky Mountain front. We find low Q values in the western US, along the eastern coast, and the Gulf plain. These areas are also

  7. Mapping buried parts of a megalithic tomb with multichannel analysis of Rayleigh-waves and GPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilken, D.; Erkul, E.; Glomb, V.; Rabbel, W.

    2012-04-01

    The objective of the presented study was to image buried parts of a megalithic tomb in northern Germany with GPR and multichannel analysis of surface-waves (MASW). The latter method was applied with the aim of testing its feasibility when used on intermediate scale archaeological targets. As we do not expect MASW of being able to resolve archaeological objects in terms of inverted velocity structure, we look for spectral effects due to subsurface heterogeneity. Identifying and mapping these effects would give a distribution of possibly archaeological objects. The presented seismic dataset shows an amplitude shift between normal and a guided Rayleigh-wave mode. When mapped along parallel profiles the spatial distribution of this effect matches the geometry of the grave. The observed anomalies show good correlation to GPR results that included strong reflectors inside the grave border. Elastic finite difference modelling of the surface-wave propagation showed that the spectral effect can be reproduced by a compacted or bulked column above the GPR anomaly depth indicating that the observed anomalies may be caused by construction activities or load effects during multiple construction phases of the tomb. Observed GPR reflectors thus indicate the bottom of the disturbed zones and MASW effects map the distribution of disturbed subsoil columns.

  8. Direction dependent Love and Rayleigh wave noise characteristics using multiple arrays across Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juretzek, Carina; Perleth, Magdalena; Hadziioannou, Celine

    2016-04-01

    Seismic noise has become an important signal source for tomography and monitoring purposes. Better understanding of the noise field characteristics is crucial to further improve noise applications. Our knowledge about common and different origins of Love and Rayleigh waves in the microseism band is still limited. This applies in particular for constraints on source locations and source mechanisms of Love waves. Here, 3-component beamforming is used to distinguish between the different polarized wave types in the primary and secondary microseism noise field recorded at several arrays across Europe. We compare characteristics of Love and Rayleigh wave noise, such as source directions and frequency content. Further, Love to Rayleigh wave ratios are measured and a dependence on direction is found, especially in the primary microseism band. Estimates of the kinetic energy density ratios propose a dominance of coherent Love waves in the primary, but not in the secondary microseism band. The seasonality of the noise field characteristics is examined by using a full year of data in 2013 and is found to be stable.

  9. The preliminary results: Seismic ambient noise Rayleigh wave tomography around Merapi volcano, central Java, Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trichandi, Rahmantara, E-mail: rachmantara.tri@gmail.com [Geophysical Engineering, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institut Teknologi Bandung, 40132, Bandung (Indonesia); Yudistira, Tedi; Nugraha, Andri Dian [Global Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Zulhan, Zulfakriza [Earth Science Graduate Program, Faculty of Earth Science and Technology, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Saygin, Erdinc [Research School of Earth Sciences, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2015-04-24

    Ambient noise tomography is relatively a new method for imaging the shallow structure of the Earth subsurface. We presents the application of this method to produce a Rayleigh wave group velocity maps around the Merapi Volcano, Central Java. Rayleigh waves group velocity maps were reconstructed from the cross-correlation of ambient noise recorded by the DOMERAPI array which consists 43 broadband seismometers. In the processing stage, we first filtered the observation data to separatethe noise from the signal that dominated by the strong volcanic activities. Next, we cross-correlate the filtered data and stack to obtain the Green’s function for all possible station pairs. Then we carefully picked the peak of each Green’s function to estimate the dispersion trend and appliedMultiple Filter Technique to obtain the dispersion curve. Inter-station group velocity curvesare inverted to produceRayleigh wave group velocity maps for periods 1 to 10 s. The resulted Rayleigh group velocity maps show the interesting features around the Merapi Volcano which generally agree with the previous studies. Merapi-Lawu Anomaly (MLA) is emerged as a relatively low anomaly in our group velocity maps.

  10. The preliminary results: Seismic ambient noise Rayleigh wave tomography around Merapi volcano, central Java, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trichandi, Rahmantara; Yudistira, Tedi; Nugraha, Andri Dian; Zulhan, Zulfakriza; Saygin, Erdinc

    2015-04-01

    Ambient noise tomography is relatively a new method for imaging the shallow structure of the Earth subsurface. We presents the application of this method to produce a Rayleigh wave group velocity maps around the Merapi Volcano, Central Java. Rayleigh waves group velocity maps were reconstructed from the cross-correlation of ambient noise recorded by the DOMERAPI array which consists 43 broadband seismometers. In the processing stage, we first filtered the observation data to separatethe noise from the signal that dominated by the strong volcanic activities. Next, we cross-correlate the filtered data and stack to obtain the Green's function for all possible station pairs. Then we carefully picked the peak of each Green's function to estimate the dispersion trend and appliedMultiple Filter Technique to obtain the dispersion curve. Inter-station group velocity curvesare inverted to produceRayleigh wave group velocity maps for periods 1 to 10 s. The resulted Rayleigh group velocity maps show the interesting features around the Merapi Volcano which generally agree with the previous studies. Merapi-Lawu Anomaly (MLA) is emerged as a relatively low anomaly in our group velocity maps.

  11. Electromagnetic fields induced at the seafloor by Rayleigh-Stoneley waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, S.; Cobb, C.

    1982-05-10

    We model oceanic acoustic and seismic disturbances as Rayeigh-Stoneley waves in the layered medium consisting of ocean, sediment and rock. The waves induce electromagnetic fields because of motion of conducting materials through the geomagnetic field. Low-frequency disturbances in deep water are efficient electromagnetic generators because the motions are coherent over large volumes of highly conducting seawater. For wave frequencies below 0.1 Hz in deep water, the geomagnetic field is nearly frozen to the moving water. Consequently, the electric field measured by a voltmeter attached to the seabed is approximately ..delta..u x F, where ..delta..u is the difference between the velocity of the water and of the voltmeter itself as it is moved by the motion of the seafloor, and F is the geomagnetic field. This result applied to Love waves suggests that the electric field will result largely from the movement of the detector but detailed calculations have not been made. Although the fields are weak they should be detectable because the main interference is from ionospheric sources and the fields from, these sources are greatly attenuated at the seabed by the overlying oceanic shield. The effectiveness of the shield diminishes sharply at frequencies below 0.03 Hz. At high frequencies the principal limitation to detectability is in the inherent noise level of detectors whether electric or magnetic. At present, electric detectors are more effective than magnetic. They appear to be competitive with accelerometers for seismic detection in the deep ocean in a restricted frequency band near 0.05 Hz. A layer of unconsolidated sediment underlying the ocean profoundly affects the dispersion relation of Rayleigh-Stonely waves and thereby affects the electromagnetic induction process.

  12. Estimating Rayleigh wave particle motion from three-component array analysis of ambient vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggi, Valerio; Fäh, Donat

    2010-01-01

    Several methods have been proposed in the past years to extract the Rayleigh wave ellipticity from horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratios of single station ambient noise recordings. The disadvantage of this set of techniques is the difficulty in clearly identifying and separating the contribution of higher modes. In most cases, only the fundamental mode of ellipticity can be identified. Moreover, it is generally difficult to correct for the energy of SH and Love waves present in the horizontal components of the ambient vibration wavefield. We introduce a new methodology to retrieve Rayleigh wave ellipticity using high-resolution frequency-wavenumber array analysis. The technique is applied to the three components of motion and is based on the assumption that an amplitude maximum in the f-k cross-spectrum must represent the true power amplitude of the corresponding signal. In the case of Rayleigh waves, therefore, the ratio between maxima obtained from the horizontal (radial-polarized) and vertical components of motion will also represent the frequency-dependent ellipticity function. Consequently, if we can identify the Rayleigh dispersion curves of several modes on the f-k plane, then the corresponding modal ellipticity patterns can also be separated and extracted. To test the approach, synthetic and real data sets were processed. In all tested cases, a reliable estimation of segments of the fundamental mode ellipticity was obtained. The identification of higher modes is possible in most cases. The quality of results depends on the selected array geometry and the signal-to-noise ratio, with a major improvement achieved by increasing the number of receivers employed during the survey. An experiment conducted in the town of Visp (Switzerland) allowed the retrieval of portions of ellipticity curves up to the second Rayleigh higher mode, using two concentric circular array configurations of 14 and 11 receivers each.

  13. Influence of Initial Stress and Gravity Field on Propagation of Rayleigh and Stoneley Waves in a Thermoelastic Orthotropic Granular Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The propagation of Rayleigh and Stoneley waves in a thermoelastic orthotropic granular half-space supporting a different layer under the influence of initial stress and gravity field is studied. The frequency equation of Rayleigh waves in the form of twelfth-order determinantal expression and the frequency equation of Stoneley waves in the form of eighth-order determinantal expression are obtained. The standard equation of dispersion is discussed to obtain Rayleigh and Stoneley waves that have complex roots; the real part gives the velocity of Rayleigh or Stoneley waves but the imaginary part gives the attenuation coefficient. Finally, the numerical results have been given and illustrated graphically, and their physical meaning has been explained.

  14. Focusing of Rayleigh waves generated by high-speed trains under the condition of ground vibration boom

    CERN Document Server

    Krylov, Victor V

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, the effects of focusing of Rayleigh waves generated by high speed trains in the supporting ground under the condition of ground vibration boom are considered theoretically. These effects are similar to the effects of focusing of sound waves radiated by aircraft under the condition of sonic boom. In particular, if a railway track has a bend to provide the possibility of changing direction of train movement, the Rayleigh surface waves generated by high-speed trains under the condition of ground vibration boom may become focused. This results in concentration of their energy along a simple caustic line at one side of the track and in the corresponding increase in ground vibration amplitudes. The effect of focusing of Rayleigh waves may occur also if a train moves along a straight line with acceleration and its current speed is higher than Rayleigh wave velocity in the ground. The obtained results are illustrated by numerical calculations.

  15. Seasonal variations in the Rayleigh-to-Love wave ratio in the secondary microseism from colocated ring laser and seismograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, Toshiro; Hadziioannou, Céline; Igel, Heiner; Wassermann, Joachim; Schreiber, Ulrich; Gebauer, André; Chow, Bryant

    2016-04-01

    Monthly variations in the ratio of Rayleigh-to-Love waves in the secondary microseism are obtained from a colocated ring laser and an STS-2 seismograph at Wettzell, Germany. Two main conclusions are derived for the Rayleigh-to-Love wave kinetic energy ratios in the secondary microseism; first, the energy ratio is in the range 0.8-0.9 (Love wave energy is larger than Rayleigh wave energy most of the year by about 10-20%. Second, this ratio suddenly increases to 1.0-1.2 in June and July, indicating a larger fraction of Rayleigh wave energy. This change suggests that the locations and behaviors of excitation sources are different in these months.

  16. Nonlinear diffusion model for Rayleigh-Taylor mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boffetta, G; De Lillo, F; Musacchio, S

    2010-01-22

    The complex evolution of turbulent mixing in Rayleigh-Taylor convection is studied in terms of eddy diffusivity models for the mean temperature profile. It is found that a nonlinear model, derived within the general framework of Prandtl mixing theory, reproduces accurately the evolution of turbulent profiles obtained from numerical simulations. Our model allows us to give very precise predictions for the turbulent heat flux and for the Nusselt number in the ultimate state regime of thermal convection.

  17. Nonlinear diffusion model for Rayleigh-Taylor mixing

    CERN Document Server

    Boffetta, G; Musacchio, S

    2010-01-01

    The complex evolution of turbulent mixing in Rayleigh-Taylor convection is studied in terms of eddy diffusiviy models for the mean temperature profile. It is found that a non-linear model, derived within the general framework of Prandtl mixing theory, reproduces accurately the evolution of turbulent profiles obtained from numerical simulations. Our model allows to give very precise predictions for the turbulent heat flux and for the Nusselt number in the ultimate state regime of thermal convection.

  18. Joint Inversion for Earthquake Depths Using Local Waveforms and Amplitude Spectra of Rayleigh Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhe; Ni, Sidao; Chu, Risheng; Zhan, Zhongwen

    2017-01-01

    Reliable earthquake depth is fundamental to many seismological problems. In this paper, we present a method to jointly invert for centroid depths with local (distance distance of 5°-15°) Rayleigh wave amplitude spectra on sparse networks. We use earthquake focal mechanisms and magnitudes retrieved with the Cut-and-Paste (CAP) method to compute synthetic amplitude spectra of fundamental mode Rayleigh wave for a range of depths. Then we grid search to find the optimal depth that minimizes the joint misfit of amplitude spectra and local waveforms. As case studies, we apply this method to the 2008 Wells, Nevada Mw6.0 earthquake and a Mw5.6 outer-rise earthquake to the east of Japan Trench in 2013. Uncertainties estimated with a bootstrap re-sampling approach show that this joint inversion approach constrains centroid depths well, which are also verified by independent teleseismic depth-phase data.

  19. Elastic characterization of Au thin films utilizing laser induced acoustic Rayleigh waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haim, A.; Bar-Ad, S.; Azoulay, A.

    2011-01-01

    Wide frequency-band Rayleigh waves (~100 MHz) were utilized to characterize the elastic constants of thin Au/Cr films deposited on glass substrates. The Rayleigh waves were excited utilizing laser induced thermoelastic mechanism and detected using a knife-edge technique apparatus. The dispersion of the signals in glass substrates coated with Au/Cr was measured and fitted to theory using a non-linear regression algorithm. From the fitting, the Au films Young modulus and the film thickness were extracted. The results were analyzed with regards to AFM scans performed on the samples and independent thickness measurement done by a dektak3 profiler. Results show a good agreement between the two measurements.

  20. Elastic characterization of Au thin films utilizing laser induced acoustic Rayleigh waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haim, A; Azoulay, A [Ultrasonic Section, NDT Department, Soreq - Nuclear Research Center, Yavne 81800 (Israel); Bar-Ad, S, E-mail: arbelhai@gmail.com [School of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2011-01-01

    Wide frequency-band Rayleigh waves ({approx}100 MHz) were utilized to characterize the elastic constants of thin Au/Cr films deposited on glass substrates. The Rayleigh waves were excited utilizing laser induced thermoelastic mechanism and detected using a knife-edge technique apparatus. The dispersion of the signals in glass substrates coated with Au/Cr was measured and fitted to theory using a non-linear regression algorithm. From the fitting, the Au films Young modulus and the film thickness were extracted. The results were analyzed with regards to AFM scans performed on the samples and independent thickness measurement done by a dektak{sup 3} profiler. Results show a good agreement between the two measurements.

  1. Fast sampling model for X-ray Rayleigh scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Grichine, V M

    2013-01-01

    A simple model for X-ray Rayleigh scattering is discussed in terms of the process total cross-section and the angular distribution of scattered X-ray photons. Comparisons with other calculations and experimental data are presented. The model is optimized for the simulation of X-ray tracking inside experimental setups with complex geometry where performance and memory volume are issues to be optimized. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. S-wave velocity structure in the Nankai accretionary prism derived from Rayleigh admittance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonegawa, Takashi; Araki, Eiichiro; Kimura, Toshinori; Nakamura, Takeshi; Nakano, Masaru; Suzuki, Kensuke

    2017-04-01

    Two cabled seafloor networks with 22 and 29 stations (DONET 1 and 2: Dense Oceanfloor Network System for Earthquake and Tsunamis) have been constructed on the accretionary prism at the Nankai subduction zone of Japan since March 2010. The observation periods of DONET 1 and 2 exceed more than 5 years and 10 months, respectively. Each station contains broadband seismometers and absolute and differential pressure gauges. In this study, using Rayleigh waves of microseisms and earthquakes, we calculate the Rayleigh admittance (Ruan et al., 2014, JGR) at the seafloor for each station, i.e., an amplitude transfer function from pressure to displacement, particularly for the frequencies of 0.1-0.2 Hz (ambient noise) and 0.04-0.1 Hz (earthquake signal), and estimate S-wave velocity (Vs) structure beneath stations in DONET 1 and 2. We calculated the displacement seismogram by removing the instrument response from the velocity seismogram for each station. The pressure record observed at the differential pressure gauge was used in this study because of a high resolution of the pressure observation. In addition to Rayleigh waves of microseisms, we collected waveforms of Rayleigh waves for earthquakes with an epicentral distance of 15-90°, M>5.0, and focal depth shallower than 50 km. In the frequency domain, we smoothed the transfer function of displacement/pressure with the Parzen window of ±0.01 Hz. In order to determine one-dimensional Vs profiles, we performed a nonlinear inversion technique, i.e., simulated annealing. As a result, Vs profiles obtained at stations near the land show simple Vs structure, i.e., Vs increases with depth. However, some profiles located at the toe of the acceretionary prism have a low-velocity zone (LVZ) at a depth of 5-7 km within the accretinary sediment. The velocity reduction is approximately 5-20 %. Park et al. (2010) reported such a large reduction in P-wave velocity in the region of DONET 1 (eastern network and southeast of the Kii

  3. Source parameters of the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake determined from long-period Rayleigh waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiajun; Lay, Thorne

    1990-07-01

    The source parameters of the Loma Prieta earthquake are determined using long-period Rayleigh waves recorded by USGS/ERIS, IDA/IRIS, and GEOSCOPE stations. The source mechanism is well-constrained by the Rayleigh wave radiation pattern, with a dip = 70 (±5)°, strike = 130 (±5)°, rake = 135 (±5)°, and moment = 3.4 (±0.5) × 1019 Nm (Mw = 7.0). This mechanism is generally consistent with independent body wave determinations. The most stable long-period waves, with periods from 200 to 275 s, indicate that the source process has a centroid time of about 10 s, somewhat longer than that indicated by body waves (about 5-6 s). This discrepancy cannot be uniquely attributed to source effects because of uncertainties in the propagation corrections. The importance of using surface waves with short propagation paths for analysis of moderate size earthquakes such as the Loma Prieta event is demonstrated by the unreasonably long source durations inferred from R3 arrivals.

  4. Control of Rayleigh-like waves in thick plate Willis metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diatta, André; Achaoui, Younes; Brûlé, Stéphane; Enoch, Stefan; Guenneau, Sébastien

    2016-12-01

    Recent advances in control of anthropic seismic sources in structured soil led us to explore interactions of elastic waves propagating in plates (with soil parameters) structured with concrete pillars buried in the soil. Pillars are 2 m in diameter, 30 m in depth and the plate is 50 m in thickness. We study the frequency range 5 to 10 Hz, for which Rayleigh wave wavelengths are smaller than the plate thickness. This frequency range is compatible with frequency ranges of particular interest in earthquake engineering. It is demonstrated in this paper that two seismic cloaks' configurations allow for an unprecedented flow of elastodynamic energy associated with Rayleigh surface waves. The first cloak design is inspired by some approximation of ideal cloaks' parameters within the framework of thin plate theory. The second, more accomplished but more involved, cloak design is deduced from a geometric transform in the full Navier equations that preserves the symmetry of the elasticity tensor but leads to Willis' equations, well approximated by a homogenization procedure, as corroborated by numerical simulations. The two cloaks's designs are strickingly different, and the superior efficiency of the second type of cloak emphasizes the necessity for rigour in transposition of existing cloaks's designs in thin plates to the geophysics setting. Importantly, we focus our attention on geometric transforms applied to thick plates, which is an intermediate case between thin plates and semi-infinite media, not studied previously. Cloaking efficiency (reduction of the disturbance of the wave wavefront and its amplitude behind an obstacle) and protection (reduction of the wave amplitude within the center of the cloak) are studied for ideal and approximated cloaks' parameters. These results represent a preliminary step towards designs of seismic cloaks for surface Rayleigh waves propagating in sedimentary soils structured with concrete pillars.

  5. Assessment of Reinforced Concrete Surface Breaking Crack Using Rayleigh Wave Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Foo Wei; Chai, Hwa Kian; Lim, Kok Sing

    2016-03-05

    An improved single sided Rayleigh wave (R-wave) measurement was suggested to characterize surface breaking crack in steel reinforced concrete structures. Numerical simulations were performed to clarify the behavior of R-waves interacting with surface breaking crack with different depths and degrees of inclinations. Through analysis of simulation results, correlations between R-wave parameters of interest and crack characteristics (depth and degree of inclination) were obtained, which were then validated by experimental measurement of concrete specimens instigated with vertical and inclined artificial cracks of different depths. Wave parameters including velocity and amplitude attenuation for each case were studied. The correlations allowed us to estimate the depth and inclination of cracks measured experimentally with acceptable discrepancies, particularly for cracks which are relatively shallow and when the crack depth is smaller than the wavelength.

  6. Propagation of Rayleigh waves in anisotropic layer overlying a semi-infinite sandy medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.C. Pal

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation deals with the propagation of Rayleigh waves in anisotropic layer overlying a sandy medium. Anisotropic material is in the nature of most general case i.e. of triclinic crystal and sandy medium is of alluvial soil type. The solutions for layer and half-space are obtained analytically. The displacement components in x and z directions are obtained for both the media. The dispersion relation is obtained subjected to certain boundary conditions. The special cases are considered. The numerical results are presented in the form of wave number and phase velocity (k − c analytical curves.

  7. Elastic properties of amorphous thin films studied by Rayleigh waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, R.B.; Rubin, J.B.

    1993-08-01

    Physical vapor deposition in ultra-high vacuum was used to co-deposit nickel and zirconium onto quartz single crystals and grow amorphous Ni{sub 1-x}Zr{sub x} (0.1 < x < 0.87) thin film. A high-resolution surface acoustic wave technique was developed for in situ measurement of film shear moduli. The modulus has narrow maxima at x = 0. 17, 0.22, 0.43, 0.5, 0.63, and 0.72, reflecting short-range ordering and formation of aggregates in amorphous phase. It is proposed that the aggregates correspond to polytetrahedral atom arrangements limited in size by geometrical frustration.

  8. Gravity waves observation of wind field in stratosphere based on a Rayleigh Doppler lidar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ruocan; Dou, Xiankang; Sun, Dongsong; Xue, Xianghui; Zheng, Jun; Han, Yuli; Chen, Tingdi; Wang, Guocheng; Zhou, Yingjie

    2016-03-21

    Simultaneous wind and temperature measurements in stratosphere with high time-spatial resolution for gravity waves study are scarce. In this paper we perform wind field gravity waves cases in the stratosphere observed by a mobile Rayleigh Doppler lidar. This lidar system with both wind and temperature measurements were implemented for atmosphere gravity waves research in the altitude region 15-60 km. Observations were carried out for two periods of time: 3 months started from November 4, 2014 in Xinzhou, China (38.425°N,112.729°E) and 2 months started from October 7, 2015 in Jiuquan, China (39.741°N, 98.495°E) . The mesoscale fluctuations of the horizontal wind velocity and the two dimensional spectra analysis of these fluctuations show the presence of dominant oscillatory modes with wavelength of 4-14 km and period of around 10 hours in several cases. The simultaneous temperature observations make it possible to identify gravity wave cases from the relationships between different variables: temperature and horizontal wind. The observed cases demonstrate the Rayleigh Doppler Lidar's capacity to study gravity waves.

  9. Azimuthal anisotropy of Rayleigh waves beneath the Tibetan Plateau and adjacent areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The crustal and upper mantle azimuthal anisotropy of the Tibetan Plateau and adjacent areas was studied by Rayleigh wave tomography. We collected sufficient broadband digital seismograms trav-ersing the Tibetan Plateau and adjacent areas from available stations, including especially some data from the temporary stations newly deployed in Yunnan, eastern Tibet, and western Sichuan. They made an adequate path coverage in most regions to achieve a reasonable resolution for the inversion. The model resolution tests show that the anisotropic features of scope greater than 400 km and strength greater than 2% are reliable. The azimuthal anisotropy pattern inside the Tibetan Plateau was similar to the characteristic of tectonic partition. The crustal anisotropy strength is greater than 2% in most re-gions of East Tibet, and the anisotropy shows clockwise rotation surrounding the eastern Himalayan syntaxis. Vertically, the anisotropy direction indicates a coherent pattern within the upper crust, lower crust, and lithosphere mantle of the Tibetan Plateau, which also is consistent with GPS velocity field and SKS fast polarization directions. The result supports that the crust-mantle deformation beneath the Tibetan Plateau is vertically coherent. The anisotropy strength of crust and lithospheric upper mantle in Yunnan outside the Tibetan Plateau is lower than 2%, so SKS splitting from core-mantle boundary to station should largely be attributed to the anisotropy of asthenosphere.

  10. Azimuthal anisotropy of Rayleigh waves beneath the Tibetan Plateau and adjacent areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Wei; WANG ChunYong; HUANG ZhongXian

    2008-01-01

    The crustal and upper mantle azimuthal anisotropy of the Tibetan Plateau and adjacent areas was studied by Rayleigh wave tomography. We collected sufficient broadband digital seismograms traversing the Tibetan Plateau and adjacent areas from available stations, including especially some data from the temporary stations newly deployed in Yunnan, eastern Tibet, and western Sichuan. They made an adequate path coverage in most regions to achieve a reasonable resolution for the inversion. The model resolution tests show that the anisotropic features of scope greater than 400 km and strength greater than 2% are reliable. The azimuthal anisotropy pattern inside the Tibetan Plateau was similar to the characteristic of tectonic partition. The crustal anisotropy strength is greater than 2% in most regions of East Tibet, and the anisotropy shows clockwise rotation surrounding the eastern Himalayan syntaxis. Vertically, the anisotropy direction indicates a coherent pattern within the upper crust, lower crust, and lithosphere mantle of the Tibetan Plateau, which also is consistent with GPS velocity field and SKS fast polarization directions. The result supports that the crust-mantle deformation beneath the Tibetan Plateau is vertically coherent. The anisotropy strength of crust and lithospheric upper mantle in Yunnan outside the Tibetan Plateau is lower than 2%, so SKS splitting from core-mantle boundary to station should largely be attributed to the anisotropy of asthenosphere.

  11. Automatic Rayleigh scattering mapping system for optical quality evaluation of test masses for gravity wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zewu; Zhao, Chunnong; Ju, Li; Gras, Slawomir; Baringa, Pablo; Blair, David G.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes an automatic Rayleigh scattering mapping system (ARSMS), which enables quantitative high-resolution three-dimensional mapping of inhomogeneities in optical materials. The ARSMS allows large high-grade test mass samples for gravitational wave detectors to be evaluated to ensure that an adequate low level of scattering is achieved. The ARSMS combines proprietary camera software with data analysis software and control software to achieve fully automatic operation with graphical user interfaces. This article presents the instrument concept and examples of the output. Device mapping in all degrees of freedom is shown to be better than 0.5mm, with scattering sensitivity better than 0.5ppm/cm. This system is able to scan and map the Rayleigh scattering of large samples in both of cylindrical and rectangular samples using cylindrical and Cartesian coordinates.

  12. Degenerate RS perturbation theory. [Rayleigh-Schroedinger energies and wave functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschfelder, J. O.; Certain, P. R.

    1974-01-01

    A concise, systematic procedure is given for determining the Rayleigh-Schroedinger energies and wave functions of degenerate states to arbitrarily high orders even when the degeneracies of the various states are resolved in arbitrary orders. The procedure is expressed in terms of an iterative cycle in which the energy through the (2n + 1)-th order is expressed in terms of the partially determined wave function through the n-th order. Both a direct and an operator derivation are given. The two approaches are equivalent and can be transcribed into each other. The direct approach deals with the wave functions (without the use of formal operators) and has the advantage that it resembles the usual treatment of nondegenerate perturbations and maintains close contact with the basic physics. In the operator approach, the wave functions are expressed in terms of infinite-order operators which are determined by the successive resolution of the space of the zeroth-order functions.

  13. Rayleigh surface acoustic wave as an efficient heating system for biological reactions: investigation of microdroplet temperature uniformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux-Marchand, Thibaut; Beyssen, Denis; Sarry, Frederic; Elmazria, Omar

    2015-04-01

    When a microdroplet is put on the Rayleigh surface acoustic wave path, longitudinal waves are radiated into the liquid and induce several phenomena such as the wellknown surface acoustic wave streaming. At the same time, the temperature of the microdroplet increases as it has been shown. In this paper, we study the temperature uniformity of a microdroplet heated by Rayleigh surface acoustic wave for discrete microfluidic applications such as biological reactions. To precisely ascertain the temperature uniformity and not interfere with the biological reaction, we used an infrared camera. We then tested the temperature uniformity as a function of three parameters: the microdroplet volume, the Rayleigh surface acoustic wave frequency, and the continuous applied radio frequency power. Based on these results, we propose a new device structure to develop a future lab on a chip based on reaction temperatures.

  14. Dispersion of Rayleigh waves produced by nuclear explosions. Crustal structure of western Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. PAYO

    1964-06-01

    Full Text Available Most of the nuclear explosion fired near Novaya-Zemlya
    island from September 1961 to J a n u a r y 1963 (21 in total have been recorded
    on the seismographs of Toledo Observatory. The study of these records,
    mainly concerning the dispersion of Rayleigh waves, has been the purpose
    of this paper.
    A crust-mantle s t r u c t u r e for t h e Zemlya-Toledo p a t h has been determined
    by means of group velocity curves and especially by the phase velocity
    ones obtained from Rayleigh waves of explosions. This structure supposes
    a crust of about 40 kms thick with an upper sedimentary layer with a
    thickness of about 5,5 kms and a shear velocity of 2,3 km/sec.
    The average shear velocity in the granitic and basaltic layers jointly,
    is about 3,65 km/sec, permitting a small ambiguity at the position of the
    Conrad discontinuity between them.
    A velocity of 4,5 km/sec has been assigned for the underlying crust
    material, but a better agreement with the data recorded is obtained by
    taking 0.28 for the Poisson ratio value.
    Dispersion of Rayleigh waves of these explosions has been compared
    to the Rayleigh dispersion of some earthquakes of Eurasia, three of them
    with epicentral distances similar to those of the explosions and other four
    with the same azimuth in respect to that of Toledo-Zemlya, but more
    distants.
    The results do not show any notable difference either in dispersion
    between explosion and earthquakes or in structure of the path considered.
    The phase velocity between Toledo and Malaga Observatories supports
    t h e same above structure for this short path.
    The velocity of Lg waves, which clearly appears on the record of the
    explosions, confirms this admitted structure, which serves to deduce t h e more
    probable transmission mechanism for these channel waves.
    Also atmospheric pressure waves have been recorded on the three

  15. Rayleigh wave dispersion measurements reveal low-velocity zones beneath the new crust in the Gulf of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persaud, Patricia; Di Luccio, Francesca; Clayton, Robert W.

    2015-03-01

    Rayleigh wave tomography provides images of the shallow mantle shear wave velocity structure beneath the Gulf of California. Low-velocity zones (LVZs) are found on axis between 26 and 50 km depth beneath the Guaymas Basin but mostly off axis under the other rift basins, with the largest feature underlying the Ballenas Transform Fault. We interpret the broadly distributed LVZs as regions of partial melting in a solid mantle matrix. The pathway for melt migration and focusing is more complex than an axis-centered source aligned above a deeper region of mantle melt and likely reflects the magmatic evolution of rift segments. We also consider the existence of solid lower continental crust in the Gulf north of the Guaymas Basin, where the association of the LVZs with asthenospheric upwelling suggests lateral flow assisted by a heat source. These results provide key constraints for numerical models of mantle upwelling and melt focusing in this young oblique rift.

  16. Effect of quantum corrections on Rayleigh-Taylor instability and internal waves in strongly coupled magnetized viscoelastic fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Ramprasad

    2016-07-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability is recently investigated is strongly coupled plasma looking to its importance in dense stellar systems and Inertial Confinement Fusion [1-3]. In the present work, the effect of quantum corrections are studied on Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability and internal wave propagation in a strongly coupled, magnetized, viscoelastic fluid. The modified generalized hydrodynamic model is used to derive the analytical dispersion relation. The internal wave mode and dispersion relation are modified due to the presence of quantum corrections and viscoelastic effects. We observe that strong coupling effects and quantum corrections significantly modifies the dispersion characteristics. The dispersion relation is also discussed in weakly coupled (hydrodynamic) and strongly coupled (kinetic) limits. The explicit expression of R-T instability criterion is derived which is influenced by shear velocity and quantum corrections. Numerical calculations are performed in astrophysical and experimental relevance and it is examined that both the shear and quantum effects suppresses the growth rate of R-T instability. The possible application of the work is discussed in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) to discuss the suppression of R-T instability under considered situation. References: [1] R. P. Prajapati, Phys. Plasmas 23, 022106 (2016). [2] K. Avinash and A. Sen, Phys. Plasmas 22, 083707 (2015). [3] A. Das and P. Kaw, Phys. Plasmas 21 (2014) 062102.

  17. High quality broadband spatial reflections of slow Rayleigh surface acoustic waves modulated by a graded grooved surface

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Yanlong

    2015-01-21

    We report high quality broadband spatial reflections of Rayleigh surface acoustic waves (SAWs) through a graded grooved surface. High quality means that no wave is allowed to transmit and the incident wave is nearly all reflected to the input side. The graded grooved surface is structured by drilling one dimensional array of graded grooves with increased depths on a flat surface. We investigate SAW dispersion relations, wave field distribution at several typical SAW wavelengths, and time evolution of a Gaussian pulse through the graded grooved surface. Results show that the input broadband Rayleigh SAWs can be slowed, spatially enhanced and stopped, and finally reflected to the input side. The study suggests that engraving the flat surface can be used as an efficient and economical way to manipulate Rayleigh SAWs, which has potential application in novel SAW devices such as filters, reflectors, sensors, energy harvesters, and diodes.

  18. Resonant excitation of coupled Rayleigh waves in a short and narrow fluid channel clad between two identical metal plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor M. García-Chocano

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Transmission of ultrasonic waves through a slit between two water immersed brass plates is studied for sub-wavelength plate thicknesses and slit apertures. Extraordinary high absorption is observed at discrete frequencies corresponding to resonant excitation of Rayleigh waves on the both sides of the channel. The coupling of the Rayleigh waves occurs through the fluid and the corresponding contribution to the dispersion has been theoretically derived and also experimentally confirmed. Symmetric and anti-symmetric modes are predicted but only the symmetric mode resonances have been observed. It follows from the dispersion equation that the coupled Rayleigh waves cannot be excited in a channel with apertures less than the critical one. The calculated critical aperture is in a good agreement with the measured acoustic spectra. These findings could be applied to design a broadband absorptive metamaterial.

  19. Broad-band Rayleigh wave phase velocity maps (10-150 s) across the United States from ambient noise data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kaifeng; Luo, Yinhe; Xie, Jun

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of imaging broad-band (10-150 s) Rayleigh wave phase velocity maps on a continental scale using ambient noise tomography (ANT). We obtain broad-band Rayleigh waves from cross-correlations of ambient noise data between all station pairs of USArray and measure the dispersion curves from these cross-correlations at a period band of 10-150 s. The large-scale dense USArray enables us to obtain over 500 000 surface wave paths which cover the contiguous United States densely. Using these paths, we generate Rayleigh wave phase velocity maps at 10-150 s periods. Our phase velocity maps are similar to other reported phase velocity maps based on ambient noise data at short periods (phase velocity maps from ANT can be used to construct 3-D lithospheric and asthenospheric velocity structures.

  20. Tomographic Rayleigh-wave group velocities in the Central Valley, California centered on the Sacramento/San Joaquin Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Jon Peter B.; Erdem, Jemile; Seats, Kevin; Lawrence, Jesse

    2016-01-01

    If shaking from a local or regional earthquake in the San Francisco Bay region were to rupture levees in the Sacramento/San Joaquin Delta then brackish water from San Francisco Bay would contaminate the water in the Delta: the source of fresh water for about half of California. As a prelude to a full shear-wave velocity model that can be used in computer simulations and further seismic hazard analysis, we report on the use of ambient noise tomography to build a fundamental-mode, Rayleigh-wave group velocity model for the region around the Sacramento/San Joaquin Delta in the western Central Valley, California. Recordings from the vertical component of about 31 stations were processed to compute the spatial distribution of Rayleigh wave group velocities. Complex coherency between pairs of stations were stacked over 8 months to more than a year. Dispersion curves were determined from 4 to about 18 seconds. We calculated average group velocities for each period and inverted for deviations from the average for a matrix of cells that covered the study area. Smoothing using the first difference is applied. Cells of the model were about 5.6 km in either dimension. Checkerboard tests of resolution, which is dependent on station density, suggest that the resolving ability of the array is reasonably good within the middle of the array with resolution between 0.2 and 0.4 degrees. Overall, low velocities in the middle of each image reflect the deeper sedimentary syncline in the Central Valley. In detail, the model shows several centers of low velocity that may be associated with gross geologic features such as faulting along the western margin of the Central Valley, oil and gas reservoirs, and large cross cutting features like the Stockton arch. At shorter periods around 5.5s, the model’s western boundary between low and high velocities closely follows regional fault geometry and the edge of a residual isostatic gravity low. In the eastern part of the valley, the boundaries

  1. Rayleigh Wave Phase Velocity in the Upper Mantle Beneath the Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, K. E.; Dalton, C. A.; Ritsema, J.

    2016-12-01

    Most of what is currently understood about the seismic properties of oceanic upper mantle is based on either global studies or regional studies of the upper mantle beneath the Pacific Ocean. However, global seismic models and geochemical studies of mid-ocean ridge basalts indicate differences in the properties of the upper mantle beneath the Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian oceans. Though the Indian Ocean is not as well studied seismically, it is host to a number of geologically interesting features including 16,000 km of mid-ocean ridge with a range of spreading rates from 14 mm/yr along the Southwest Indian Ridge to 55-75 mm/yr along the Southeast Indian Ridge. The Indian Ocean also contains multiple volcanic hotspots, the Australian-Antarctic Discordance, and a low geoid anomaly south of India, and it overlies a portion of a large low-shear-velocity province. We are using Rayleigh waves to construct a high-resolution seismic velocity model of the Indian Ocean upper mantle. We utilize a global dataset of phase delays measured at 20 periods, between 37 and 375 seconds; the dataset includes between 700 and 20,000 that traverse our study region exclusively, with a larger number of paths at shorter periods. We explore variations in phase velocity using two separate approaches. One, we allow phase velocity to vary only as a function of seafloor age. Two, we perform a damped least-squares inversion to solve for 2-D phase velocity maps at each period. Preliminary results indicate low velocities along the Southeast Indian Ridge and Central Indian Ridge, but the expected low velocities are less apparent along the slow-spreading Southwest Indian Ridge. We observe a region of fast velocities extending from Antarctica northward between the Kerguelen and Crozet hotspots, and lower than expected velocities beneath the Reunion hotspot. Additionally, we find low velocities associated with a region of extinct seafloor spreading in the Wharton basin.

  2. Rayleigh wave group velocity tomography of Gujarat region, Western India and its implications to mantle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lorenzo, Salvatore; Michele, Maddalena; Emolo, Antonio; Tallarico, Andrea

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, fundamental Rayleigh waves with varying period from 10 to 80 s are used to obtain group velocity maps in the northwest Deccan Volcanic Province of India. About 350 paths are obtained using 53 earthquakes (4.8 ≤ M ≥ 7.9) recorded by the SeisNetG (Seismic Network of Gujarat). Individual dispersion curves of group velocity of Rayleigh wave for each source-station path are estimated using multiple filter technique. These curves are used to determine lateral distribution of Rayleigh wave group velocity by tomographic inversion method. Our estimated Rayleigh group velocity at varying depths showed conspicuous corroboration with three tectonic blocks [Kachchh Rift Basin (KRB), Saurashtra Horst (SH), and Mainland Gujarat (MG)] in the region. The seismically active KRB with a thicker crust is characterized as a low velocity zone at a period varying from 10 to 30 s as indicative of mantle downwarping or sagging of the mantle beneath the KRB, while the SH and MG are found to be associated with higher group velocities, indicating the existence of the reduced crustal thickness. The trend of higher group velocity was found prevailed adjacent to the Narmada and Cambay rift basins that also correspond to the reduced crust, suggesting the processes of mantle upwarping or uplifting due to mantle upwelling. The low velocities at periods longer than 40 s beneath the KRB indicate thicker lithosphere. The known Moho depth correlates well with the observed velocities at a period of about 30 s in the Gujarat region. Our estimates of relatively lower group velocities at periods varying from 70 to 80 s may correspond to the asthenospheric flow beneath the region. It is interesting to image higher group velocity for the thinner crust beneath the Arabian Sea adjacent to the west coast of Gujarat at the period of 40 s that may correspond to the upwarped or upwelled mantle beneath the Arabian Sea. Our results have better resolution estimated by a radius of equivalent

  3. Seismic anisotropy of Precambrian lithosphere: Insights from Rayleigh wave tomography of the eastern Superior Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrescu, Laura; Darbyshire, Fiona; Bastow, Ian; Totten, Eoghan; Gilligan, Amy

    2017-05-01

    The thick, seismically fast lithospheric keels underlying continental cores (cratons) are thought to have formed in the Precambrian and resisted subsequent tectonic destruction. A consensus is emerging from a variety of disciplines that keels are vertically stratified, but the processes that led to their development remain uncertain. Eastern Canada is a natural laboratory to study Precambrian lithospheric formation and evolution. It comprises the largest Archean craton in the world, the Superior Craton, surrounded by multiple Proterozoic orogenic belts. To investigate its lithospheric structure, we construct a frequency-dependent anisotropic seismic model of the region using Rayleigh waves from teleseismic earthquakes recorded at broadband seismic stations across eastern Canada. The joint interpretation of phase velocity heterogeneity and azimuthal anisotropy patterns reveals a seismically fast and anisotropically complex Superior Craton. The upper lithosphere records fossilized Archean tectonic deformation: anisotropic patterns align with the orientation of the main tectonic boundaries at periods ≤110 s. This implies that cratonic blocks were strong enough to sustain plate-scale deformation during collision at 2.5 Ga. Cratonic lithosphere with fossil anisotropy partially extends beneath adjacent Proterozoic belts. At periods sensitive to the lower lithosphere, we detect fast, more homogenous, and weakly anisotropic material, documenting postassembly lithospheric growth, possibly in a slow or stagnant convection regime. A heterogeneous, anisotropic transitional zone may also be present at the base of the keel. The detection of multiple lithospheric fabrics at different periods with distinct tectonic origins supports growing evidence that cratonization processes may be episodic and are not exclusively an Archean phenomenon.

  4. Shear-wave velocity structure of the south-eastern part of the Iberian Peninsula from Rayleigh wave analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corchete, V.; Chourak, M.

    2011-10-01

    In this study, we present the lithospheric structure of the south-eastern part of the Iberian Peninsula by means of a set of 2D images of shear velocity, for depths ranging from 0 to 50 km. This goal will be attained by means of the inversion of the Rayleigh wave dispersion. For it, the traces of 25 earthquakes occurred on the neighbouring of the study area, from 2001 to 2003, will be considered. These earthquakes have been registered by 11 broadband stations located on Iberia. All seismic events have been grouped in source zones to get an average dispersion curve for each source-station path. The dispersion curves have been measured for periods between 2 and 45 s, by combination of two digital filtering techniques: Multiple Filter Technique and Time Variable Filtering. The resulting set of source-station averaged dispersion curves has been inverted according to the generalized inversion theory, to get S-wave velocity models for each source-station path. Later, these models have been interpolated using the method of kriging, to obtain a 2D mapping of the S-wave velocity structure for the south-eastern part of Iberia. The results presented in this paper show that the techniques used here are a powerful tool to investigate the crust and upper mantle structure, through the dispersion analysis and its inversion to obtain shear velocity distributions with depth. By means of this analysis, principal structural features of the south-eastern part of Iberia, such as the existence of lateral and vertical heterogeneity in the whole study area, or the location of the Moho discontinuity at 30 km of depth (with an average S-velocity of uppermost mantle of 4.7 km/s), have been revealed. Other important structural features revealed by this analysis have been that the uppermost of Iberian massif shows higher velocity values than the uppermost of the Alpine domain, indicating that the massif is old and tectonically stable. The average velocity of the crust in Betic cordillera is of

  5. A theoretical study of the propagation of Rayleigh waves in a functionally graded piezoelectric material (FGPM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Salah, Issam; Njeh, Anouar; Ben Ghozlen, Mohamed Hédi

    2012-02-01

    An exact approach is used to investigate Rayleigh waves in a functionally graded piezoelectric material (FGPM) layer bonded to a semi infinite homogenous solid. The piezoelectric material is polarized when the six fold symmetry axis is put along the propagation direction x(1). The FGPM character imposes that the material properties change gradually with the thickness of the layer. Contrary to the analytical approach, the adopted numerical methods, including the ordinary differential equation (ODE) and the stiffness matrix method (SMM), treat separately the electrical and mechanical gradients. The influences of graded variations applied to FGPM film coefficients on the dispersion curves of Rayleigh waves are discussed. The effects of gradient coefficients on electromechanical coupling factor, displacement fields, stress distributions and electrical potential, are reported. The obtained deviations in comparison with the ungraded homogenous film are plotted with respect to the dimensionless wavenumber. Opposite effects are observed on the coupling factor when graded variations are applied separately. A particular attention has been devoted to the maximum of the coupling factor and it dependence on the stratification rate and the gradient coefficient. This work provides with a theoretical foundation for the design and practical applications of SAW devices with high performance.

  6. Control of Rayleigh-like waves in thick plate Willis metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Diatta, Andre; Brûlé, Stéphane; Enoch, Stefan; Guenneau, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in control of anthropic seismic sources in structured soil led us to explore interactions of elastic waves propagating in plates (with soil parameters) structured with concrete pillars buried in the soil. Pillars are $40$ m in depth and the plate is $100$ m in thickness, so that typical frequencies under study are in the frequency range 4 to 8 Hz, which is compatible with frequency ranges of particular interest in earthquake engineering. It is demonstrated in this paper that two seismic cloaks' configurations allow for an unprecedented flow of elastodynamic energy associated with Rayleigh surface waves. These designs are inspired by some ideal cloaks' parameters deduced from a geometric transform in the Navier equations that preserves the symmetry of the elasticity tensor but leads to Willis' equations as corroborated by numerical simulations. Importantly, we focus our attention on geometric transforms applied to thick plates, which is an intermediate case between thin plates and semi-infinite...

  7. Assessment of precipitation in alloy steel using nonlinear Rayleigh surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Sebastian; Matlack, Kathryn H.; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Qu, Jianmin; Wall, James J.; Jacobs, Laurence J.

    2014-02-01

    Nonlinear ultrasonic waves have shown to be sensitive to various microstructural changes in metals including coherent precipitates; these precipitates introduce a strain field in the lattice structure. The thermal aging of certain alloy steels leads to the formation of coherent precipitates, which pin dislocations and contribute to the generation of a second harmonic component. A precipitate hardenable material namely 17-4 PH stainless steel is thermally treated in this research to obtain different precipitation stages, and then the influence of precipitates on the acoustic nonlinearity parameter is assessed. Conclusions about the microstrucutural changes in the material are drawn based on the results from a nonlinear Rayleigh surface wave measurement and complementary thermo-electric power, hardness and ultrasonic velocity measurements. The results show that the nonlinear parameter is sensitive to coherent precipitates in the material and moreover that precipitation characteristics can be characterized based on the obtained experimental data.

  8. Application of negative velocity dispersion curves to the distinction between layer and substrate Rayleigh waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjoub, Zahia; Touati, Ibtissem; Doghmane, Malika; Doghmane, Abdellaziz

    2008-10-01

    This work concerns the investigation of loading layers/substrate structures in order to determine the critical thickness at which Rayleigh wave characteristics of layers can be completely distinguished from those of the substrates. To do so, we first calculate Rayleigh velocity dispersion curves of several thin film materials (about thirty) deposited on different slow and fast substrates (Be, Al 2O 3, AlN, Si, SiO 2, Mg, SiC, TiN, WC and Pyrex). Then, from the beginning of curve saturation (corresponding to the onset of intrinsic layer characteristics) we deduced normalized thickness transition for all layers/substrates combinations. Thus, we were able to deduce an analytical linear expression relating the critical thickness to combined effects of densities and velocities of both layers and substrates. Such a simple relation can be used, as an alternative method, to predict the transition critical thickness for any layer/substrate combination without the usual lengthy calculation of dispersion curves. To cite this article: Z. Hadjoub et al., C. R. Physique 9 (2008).

  9. ULTRASONIC INFLUENCE OF POROSITY LEVEL ON CFRP COMPOSITE LAMINATES USING RAYLEIGH PROBE WAVES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Je-Woong Park; Do-Jung Kim; Kwang-Hee Im; Sang-Kyu Park; David K.Hsu; Adam H.Kite; Sun-Kyu Kim; Kil-Sung Lee; In-Young Yang

    2008-01-01

    It was found that a pitch-catch signal was more sensitive than normal incidence backwall echo of longitudinal wave to subtle flaw conditions in the composites (damages,fiber orientation,low level porosity,ply waviness,and cracks).Both the strength and stiffness depend on the fiber orientation and porosity volume in the composites.The porosity content of a composite structure is critical to the strength and performance of the structure in general.The depth of the sampling volume where the pitch-catch signal came from was relatively shallow with the head to-head miniature Rayleigh probes,but the depth can be increased by increasing the separation distance of the transmitting and receiving probes.Also,a method was utilized to determine the porosity content of a composite lay-up by processing micrograph images of the laminate.A free software package was utilized to process micrograph images of the test sample.The results from the image processing method were compared with existing data.Beam profile was characterized in unidirectional CFRP(carbon fiber reinforced plastics) using pitch-catch Rayleigh probes and the one-sided pitch-catch technique was utilized to produce C-scan images with the aid of the automatic scanner.

  10. Analytical modeling of magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in compressible fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberatore, Stéphane; Bouquet, Serge

    2008-11-01

    The magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability (MRTI) is investigated in the case of compressible plasmas. The goal of this work is highlighting the influence of both the magnetic field and the compressibility of the material on the growth rate of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, compared to the classical growth rate derived for incompressible fluids. Our analytical linear models are derived in the framework of the ideal magnetohydrodynamics theory. Three general dispersion relations are obtained: (1) Two for stratified fluids, including compressible (denoted CS∥ when the wave vector k is parallel to the equilibrium magnetic field B0 and CS⊥ when k ⊥B0) and incompressible (denoted IS∥ and IS⊥) and (2) one for incompressible uniform density fluids, including finite mass (denoted Ifm) and infinite (denoted IU). For k ⊥B0, Ifm, IU, and IS⊥ are unmagnetized cases. Comparisons of those various configurations are performed and several differences are pointed out. The main results are as follows: Stratification weakens the MRTI while compressibility has a destabilizing effect. The magnetic field enhances these phenomena. The CS∥ and IU configurations have an identical cutoff wave number. The upper fluid (also called heavy fluid) is more sensitive to compressibility than the light one when k ∥B0. Finally, the CS∥ case is more sensitive than the CS⊥ one to physical variations.

  11. Influence of coupling with shear horizontal surface acoustic wave on lateral propagation of Rayleigh surface acoustic wave on 128°YX-LiNbO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Benfeng; Han, Tao; Tang, Gongbin; Zhang, Qiaozhen; Omori, Tatsuya; Hashimoto, Ken-ya

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate the impact of the coupling with shear horizontal (SH) surface acoustic wave (SAW) on the propagation of Rayleigh SAW in periodic grating structures on 128°YX-LiNbO3. First, the frequency dispersion behavior with longitudinal and lateral wavenumbers of Rayleigh SAW is calculated using the finite element method (FEM) software COMSOL. It is shown that the coupling causes (1) the satellite stopband and (2) variation of the anisotropy factor. It is also shown these phenomena remain even when the electromechanical coupling factor of SH SAW is zero. Then, the extended thin plate model which can take coupling between two SAWs into account, is applied to simulate the result of FEM. Good agreement between these results indicated that the mechanical coupling is responsible for these two phenomena. Finally, including electrical excitation and detection, the model is applied to the infinitely long interdigital transducer (IDT) structure and the calculated result is compared with that obtained by the three-dimensional FEM. The excellent agreement of both results confirms the effectiveness of the extended thin plate model.

  12. Rayleigh surface wave interaction with the 2D exciton Bose-Einstein condensate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boev, M. V.; Kovalev, V. M., E-mail: vadimkovalev@isp.nsc.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2015-06-15

    We describe the interaction of a Rayleigh surface acoustic wave (SAW) traveling on the semiconductor substrate with the excitonic gas in a double quantum well located on the substrate surface. We study the SAW attenuation and its velocity renormalization due to the coupling to excitons. Both the deformation potential and piezoelectric mechanisms of the SAW-exciton interaction are considered. We focus on the frequency and excitonic density dependences of the SAW absorption coefficient and velocity renormalization at temperatures both above and well below the critical temperature of Bose-Einstein condensation of the excitonic gas. We demonstrate that the SAW attenuation and velocity renormalization are strongly different below and above the critical temperature.

  13. Rayleigh scattering in sapphire test mass for laser interferometric gravitational-wave detectors:. II: Rayleigh scattering induced noise in a laser interferometric-wave detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benabid, F.; Notcutt, M.; Ju, L.; Blair, D. G.

    1999-10-01

    We present the level of noise induced by Rayleigh-scattered light from sapphire test mass, the limit of scattering loss on build-up power inside the interferometer and finally the tolerable absorption loss in order to meet the specification of the interferometer sensitivity. The results show that the Rayleigh scattering induced noise remains below h˜10 -25 Hz -1/2 and a higher tolerance on the absorption level in sapphire substrate compared with silica substrate.

  14. 3D-ambient noise Rayleigh wave tomography of Snæfellsjökull volcano, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermann, Anne; Lupi, Matteo; Mordret, Aurélien; Jakobsdóttir, Steinunn S.; Miller, Stephen A.

    2016-05-01

    From May to September 2013, 21 seismic stations were deployed around the Snæfellsjökull volcano, Iceland. We cross-correlate the five months of seismic noise and measure the Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion curves to gain more information about the geological structure of the Snæfellsjökull volcano. In particular, we investigate the occurrence of seismic wave anomalies in the first 6 km of crust. We regionalize the group velocity dispersion curves into 2-D velocity maps between 0.9 and 4.8 s. With a neighborhood algorithm we then locally invert the velocity maps to obtain accurate shear-velocity models down to 6 km depth. Our study highlights three seismic wave anomalies. The deepest, located between approximately 3.3 and 5.5 km depth, is a high velocity anomaly, possibly representing a solidified magma chamber. The second anomaly is also a high velocity anomaly east of the central volcano that starts at the surface and reaches approximately 2.5 km depth. It may represent a gabbroic intrusion or a dense swarm of inclined magmatic sheets (similar to the dike swarms found in the ophiolites), typical of Icelandic volcanic systems. The third anomaly is a low velocity anomaly extending up to 1.5 km depth. This anomaly, located directly below the volcanic edifice, may be interpreted either as a shallow magmatic reservoir (typical of Icelandic central volcanoes), or alternatively as a shallow hydrothermal system developed above the cooling magmatic reservoir.

  15. Temperature Frequency Characteristics of Hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) Polymer Coated Rayleigh Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) Resonators for Gas-Phase Sensor Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Ekaterina I. Radeva; Esmeryan, Karekin D.; Avramov, Ivan D.

    2012-01-01

    Temperature induced frequency shifts may compromise the sensor response of polymer coated acoustic wave gas-phase sensors operating in environments of variable temperature. To correct the sensor data with the temperature response of the sensor the latter must be known. This study presents and discusses temperature frequency characteristics (TFCs) of solid hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) polymer coated sensor resonators using the Rayleigh surface acoustic wave (RSAW) mode on ST-cut quartz. Using ...

  16. Bayes Estimation for Inverse Rayleigh Model under Different Loss Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guobing Fan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The inverse Rayleigh distribution plays an important role in life test and reliability domain. The aim of this article is study the Bayes estimation of parameter of inverse Rayleigh distribution. Bayes estimators are obtained under squared error loss, LINEX loss and entropy loss functions on the basis of quasi-prior distribution. Comparisons in terms of risks with the estimators of parameter under three loss functions are also studied. Finally, a numerical example is used to illustrate the results.

  17. Highly Sensitive Rayleigh Wave Hydrogen Sensors with WO3 Sensing Layers at Room Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Cheng; FAN Li; ZHANG Shu-Yi; YANG Yue-Tao; ZHOU Ding-Mao; SHUI Xiu-Ji

    2011-01-01

    Rayleigh wave hydrogen sensors based on 128° YX-LiNbO3 substrates with WO3 sensing layers operating at room temperature are studied.The experimental results indicate that the WO3 layers obtained by a sol-gel method have much higher sensitivities because the sensing layers produced by the sol-gel method have small grains and high roughness and porosity.It is also confirmed that in the sol-gel method,keeping WO3 solutions at low temperature and/or decreasing the viscosity of the solutions can decrease the grain sizes and increase the hydrogen-absorbability of the sensing layer.Under the optimized preparation conditions,the high sensitivity of the hydrogen sensors at room temperature is obtained,in which 1% hydrogen in natural air induces the frequency shift of 72 kHz at the operating frequency of 124.2 MHz.Surface acoustic wave (SAW) hydrogen sensors have attracted a great deal of attention so far,in which the sensors have achieved high sensitivity as the sensors were often operated at high temperature,such as higher than 100℃.[1-4] However,in these experiments,a heater and a thermostat were required,which induced the sensors to be more complicated and unfavorable for miniaturization,and limited their application at room temperature.Furthermore,the heater can induce extra power loss and risks of fire and explosion.%Rayleigh wave hydrogen sensors based on 128° YX-LiNbO3 substrates with WO3 sensing layers operating at room temperature are studied. The experimental results indicate that the WO3 layers obtained by a sol-gel method have much higher sensitivities because the sensing layers produced by the sol-gel method have small grains and high roughness and porosity. It is also confirmed that in the sol-gel method, keeping WO3 solutions at low temperature and/or decreasing the viscosity of the solutions can decrease the grain sizes and increase the hydrogen-absorbability of the sensing layer. Under the optimized preparation conditions, the high sensitivity of the

  18. Crust and upper mantle velocity structure of the northwestern Indian Peninsular Shield from inter-station phase velocities of Rayleigh and Love waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaddale Suresh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We measure the inter-station Rayleigh and Love wave phase velocities across the northwestern Indian Peninsular shield (NW-IP through cross-correlation and invert these velocities to evaluate the underneath crust and upper mantle velocity structure down to 400 km. We consider a cluster of three stations in the northern tip of the Peninsula and another cluster of eight stations in the south. We measure phase velocities along 28 paths for Rayleigh waves and 17 paths for Love waves joining two stations with one from each cluster and using broadband records of earthquakes which lie nearly on the great circle joining the pair of stations. The phase velocities are in the period range of 10 to 275 s for Rayleigh waves and of 10 to 120 s for Love waves. The isotropic model obtained through inversion of the phase velocities indicates 199.1 km thick lithosphere with 3-layered crust of thickness 36.3 km; the top two layers have nearly same velocities and both constitute the upper crust with thickness of 12.6 km. The upper crust is mafic, whereas the lower crust is felsic. In the mantle lid, velocities increase with depth. The velocities of mantle lid beneath NW-IP is lower than those beneath south Indian Peninsula showing the former is hotter than the later perhaps due to large Phanerozoic impact on NW-IP. The significant upper mantle low velocity zone beneath NW-IP indicates high temperature which could be attributed to the past existence of a broad plume head at the west-central part of the Peninsula.

  19. Constraints on the variable subglacial structure of Whillans Ice Stream from ambient noise Rayleigh wave H/V ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, M. J.; Shen, W.; Wiens, D.; Winberry, J. P.; Anandakrishnan, S.

    2016-12-01

    Horizontal-to-vertical (H/V) ellipticity ratios of Rayleigh waves have been used to determine shallow (reflection imaging showing a deeper sedimentary package that extends to an unknown depth. It is also known that the frictional properties of the WIS ice-bed interface at 700 m depth are highly heterogeneous, including stick-spots of high friction, possibly as a result of compacted sediment or bedrock, and active subglacial lakes where frictional coefficients are effectively zero. Ambient noise cross-correlations are calculated between all station pairs, restricting the minimum interstation distance to 20 km, as well as constraining valid H/V ratios of radial and vertical sources between the same station pair to wave energy with good signal-to-noise between 6 s and 20 s that are sensitive to the shear velocity of the shallowest sedimentary layers beneath the ice stream and is combined with average phase and group velocity of the area to help constrain the inversion. H/V ratio modeling results suggest that ratios are highly susceptible to sedimentary layer thickness. Ratios also increase over the observed frequency band with the presence of a shallow, saturated sedimentary layer with high Vp/Vs. In preliminary results, we observe an increase in H/V ratio towards the grounding line as well as at stations where hydro-potential surface is high. These higher ratios can be attributed to higher water content within sediments, or an increase in the sedimentary layer thickness.

  20. Imaging Crust and Mantle Structure beneath the D'Entrecasteaux Islands, Papua New Guinea, from Rayleigh Wave Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, G.; Gaherty, J. B.; Abers, G. A.; Kim, Y.; Eilon, Z.; Buck, W. R.; Verave, R.

    2012-12-01

    The D'Entrecasteaux Islands and adjacent Papuan peninsula in eastern Papua New Guinea are home to the earliest stages of extension associated with the Woodlark Rift system. Very young (7-8 Ma) ultra-high pressure (coesite-eclogite facies) rocks within metamorphic core complexes (MCCs) on the D'Entrecasteaux Islands indicates exhumation from 100 km depths at plate-tectonic rates. We investigate the dynamic processes driving uplift and extension using seismic images of crustal and mantle structure derived from surface waves across the region. From March 2010 to July 2011, 31 on-shore and 8 off-shore broadband seismic stations deployed across the extensional region recorded 68 earthquakes with high signal-to-noise Rayleigh waves. We utilize a multi-channel cross-correlation technique to measure the phase delay and amplitude across the array in a period band between 20-80 sec, which images a depth range from lower crust to approximately 150 km depth. The phase difference of Rayleigh-wave arrivals between nearby stations is measured for each earthquake by fitting the narrow-band filtered cross-correlation between the observed seismograms. We then invert these intra-array phase measurements for a slowness vector map using the Eikonal equation to get the dynamic phase velocity and propagation direction. Averaging the dynamic phase velocity of all available events produces set of final phase velocity maps that can be inverted for shear-velocity structure, and the variations in phase-velocity as a function of azimuth provide constraints on anisotropy. For most of the frequency bands, the region beneath the MCCs on Goodenough Island and Fergusson Island, adjacent to the tip of the Woodlark spreading center, shows slow phase velocity, suggestive of high temperatures and/or partial melt, perhaps related to localized mantle upwelling. In contrast, the region near the Trobriand Island to the north, and the Papuan peninsula to the south, shows consistently higher phase velocity

  1. Incorporating Love- and Rayleigh-wave magnitudes, unequal earthquake and explosion variance assumptions and interstation complexity for improved event screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Dale N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bonner, Jessie L [WESTON GEOPHYSICAL; Stroujkova, Anastasia [WESTON GEOPHYSICAL; Shumway, Robert [UC/DAVIS; Russell, David R [AFTAC

    2009-01-01

    Our objective is to improve seismic event screening using the properties of surface waves, We are accomplishing this through (1) the development of a Love-wave magnitude formula that is complementary to the Russell (2006) formula for Rayleigh waves and (2) quantifying differences in complexities and magnitude variances for earthquake and explosion-generated surface waves. We have applied the M{sub s} (VMAX) analysis (Bonner et al., 2006) using both Love and Rayleigh waves to events in the Middle East and Korean Peninsula, For the Middle East dataset consisting of approximately 100 events, the Love M{sub s} (VMAX) is greater than the Rayleigh M{sub s} (VMAX) estimated for individual stations for the majority of the events and azimuths, with the exception of the measurements for the smaller events from European stations to the northeast. It is unclear whether these smaller events suffer from magnitude bias for the Love waves or whether the paths, which include the Caspian and Mediterranean, have variable attenuation for Love and Rayleigh waves. For the Korean Peninsula, we have estimated Rayleigh- and Love-wave magnitudes for 31 earthquakes and two nuclear explosions, including the 25 May 2009 event. For 25 of the earthquakes, the network-averaged Love-wave magnitude is larger than the Rayleigh-wave estimate. For the 2009 nuclear explosion, the Love-wave M{sub s} (VMAX) was 3.1 while the Rayleigh-wave magnitude was 3.6. We are also utilizing the potential of observed variances in M{sub s} estimates that differ significantly in earthquake and explosion populations. We have considered two possible methods for incorporating unequal variances into the discrimination problem and compared the performance of various approaches on a population of 73 western United States earthquakes and 131 Nevada Test Site explosions. The approach proposes replacing the M{sub s} component by M{sub s} + a* {sigma}, where {sigma} denotes the interstation standard deviation obtained from the

  2. Zernike polynomial based Rayleigh-Ritz model of a piezoelectric unimorph deformable mirror

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Long, CS

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available , are routinely and conveniently described using Zernike polynomials. A Rayleigh-Ritz structural model, which uses Zernike polynomials directly to describe the displacements, is proposed in this paper. The proposed formulation produces a numerically inexpensive...

  3. Determining Ocean-Bottom Seismometer Orientations from the RHUM-RUM experiment from P-wave and Rayleigh wave polarizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, John-Robert; Barruol, Guilhem; Fontaine, Fabrice R.; Sigloch, Karin

    2016-04-01

    To image the upper mantle structure beneath La Réunion hotspot, a large-scale seismic network has been deployed on land and at sea in the frame of the RHUM-RUM project (Réunion Hotspot and Upper Mantle - Réunions Unterer Mantel). This French-German passive seismic experiment was designed to investigate and image the deep structure beneath La Réunion, from crust to core, to precise the shape and depth origin of a mantle plume, if any, and to precise the horizontal and vertical mantle flow associated to a possible plume upwelling, to its interaction with the overlying plate and with the neighboring Indian ridges. For this purpose, 57 Ocean-Bottom Seismometers (OBS) were installed around La Réunion and along the Central and Southwest Indian ridges. Broad-band instruments were deployed with the French R/V Marion Dufresne in late 2012 (cruise MD192), and recovered 13 months later by the German R/V Meteor (cruise M101). The pool of OBS was complemented by ~60 terrestrial stations, installed on different islands in the western Indian Ocean, such as La Réunion, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Mayotte and the Îles Éparses in the Mozambique channel. The OBS installation is a free-fall down to the seafloor, where they landed in an unknown orientation. Since seismologic investigations of crustal and upper mantle structure (e.g., receiver functions) and azimuthal anisotropy (e.g., SKS-splitting and Rayleigh waves) rely on the knowledge of the correct OBS orientation with respect to the geographic reference frame, it is of importance to determine the orientations of the OBS while recording on the seafloor. In an isotropic, horizontally homogeneous and non-dipping layered globe, the misorientation of each station refers to the offset between theoretical and recorded back-azimuth angle of a passive seismic event. Using large earthquakes (MW > 5.0), it is possible to establish multiple successful measurements per station and thus to determine with good confidence the

  4. Theoretical determination of Rayleigh wave acoustoelastic coefficients: comparison with experimental values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquennoy, Marc; Ouaftouh, Mohammadi; Ourak, Mohamed; Jenot, Frédéric

    2002-06-01

    The characterization of stress states in materials is often necessary in some industrial application. The ultrasonic methods can be potentially convenient since stress states inside materials can be obtained even if materials are opaque. Nevertheless, the knowledge of acousto-elastic coefficients is generally necessary to estimate residual stresses by ultrasonic methods, but the experimental determination of these acousto-elastic coefficients can be difficult in some cases. In this paper, Rayleigh wave (RW) acousto-elastic coefficients of an orthotropic material are theoretically determined according to its characteristics, i.e. the density and the secondand third-order elastic constants. Then, these RW acousto-elastic coefficients are directly measured during an experimental stage and a comparison between calculated and measured coefficients is realized. This study allows on the one hand to check the theoretical development and on the other hand to show that it is possible to calculate acousto-elastic coefficients theoretically from intrinsic characteristics of the material rather than measuring them directly during a calibration phase which is sometimes long and difficult to realize.

  5. Experimental and theoretical study of Rayleigh-Lamb waves in a plate containing a surface-breaking crack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paffenholz, Joseph; Fox, Jon W.; Gu, Xiaobai; Jewett, Greg S.; Datta, Subhendu K.

    1990-01-01

    Scattering of Rayleigh-Lamb waves by a normal surface-breaking crack in a plate has been studied both theoretically and experimentally. The two-dimensionality of the far field, generated by a ball impact source, is exploited to characterize the source function using a direct integration technique. The scattering of waves generated by this impact source by the crack is subsequently solved by employing a Green's function integral expression for the scattered field coupled with a finite element representation of the near field. It is shown that theoretical results of plate response, both in frequency and time, are similar to those obtained experimentally. Additionally, implication for practical applications are discussed.

  6. Estimate of Rayleigh-to-Love wave ratio in the secondary microseism by a small array at Piñon Flat observatory, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, Toshiro; Lin, Chin-Jen; Hadziioannou, Céline; Igel, Heiner; Vernon, Frank

    2016-11-01

    Using closely located seismographs at Piñon Flat (PFO), California, for 1 year long record (2015), we estimated the Rayleigh-to-Love wave energy ratio in the secondary microseism (0.1-0.35 Hz) in four seasons. Rayleigh wave energy was estimated from a vertical component seismograph. Love wave energy was estimated from rotation seismograms that were derived from a small array at PFO. Derived ratios are 2-2.5, meaning that there is 2-2.5 times more Rayleigh wave energy than Love wave energy at PFO. In our previous study at Wettzell, Germany, this ratio was 0.9-1.0, indicating comparable energy between Rayleigh waves and Love waves. This difference suggests that the Rayleigh-to-Love wave ratios in the secondary microseism may differ greatly from region to region. It also implies that an assumption of the diffuse wavefield is not likely to be valid for this low frequency range as the equipartition of energy should make this ratio much closer.

  7. Rayleigh-Taylor Gravity Waves and Quasiperiodic Oscillation Phenomenon in X-ray Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titarchuk, Lev

    2002-01-01

    Accretion onto compact objects in X-ray binaries (black hole, neutron star (NS), white dwarf) is characterized by non-uniform flow density profiles. Such an effect of heterogeneity in presence of gravitational forces and pressure gradients exhibits Rayleigh-Taylor gravity waves (RTGW). They should be seen as quasiperiodic wave oscillations (QPO) of the accretion flow in the transition (boundary) layer between the Keplerian disk and the central object. In this paper the author shows that the main QPO frequency, which is very close to the Keplerian frequency, is split into separate frequencies (hybrid and low branch) under the influence of the gravitational forces in the rotational frame of reference. The RTGWs must be present and the related QPOs should be detected in any system where the gravity, buoyancy and Coriolis force effects cannot be excluded (even in the Earth and solar environments). The observed low and high QPO frequencies are an intrinsic signature of the RTGW. The author elaborates the conditions for the density profile when the RTGW oscillations are stable. A comparison of the inferred QPO frequencies with QPO observations is presented. The author finds that hectohertz frequencies detected from NS binaries can be identified as the RTGW low branch frequencies. The author also predicts that an observer can see the double NS spin frequency during the NS long (super) burst events when the pressure gradients and buoyant forces are suppressed. The Coriolis force is the only force which acts in the rotational frame of reference and its presence causes perfect coherent pulsations with a frequency twice of the NS spin. The QPO observations of neutron binaries have established that the high QPO frequencies do not go beyond of the certain upper limit. The author explains this observational effect as a result of the density profile inversions. Also the author demonstrates that a particular problem of the gravity waves in the rotational frame of reference in the

  8. Joint inversion of teleseismic and ambient noise Rayleigh waves for phase velocity maps, an application to Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Nicholas; Rychert, Catherine A.

    2016-08-01

    We present a method for joint inversion of teleseismic and ambient noise Rayleigh wave data for phase velocity maps from 18 to 50 s period. We adapt the two-plane wave method for teleseismic data to include ambient noise phase data. We apply the method to data from Iceland's ICEMELT and HOTSPOT arrays. Checkerboard tests show that the joint inversion improves phase velocity model recovery over methods that use the data sets independently, particularly at 18 s period. The addition of ambient noise data also extends resolution to shallower depths and shorter periods in comparison to previous teleseismic results beneath Iceland. We show there are significant differences in the phase velocity maps from the joint approach in comparison to other approaches, for instance, using only teleseismic data, only ambient noise data, or the mean of the two. The difference in phase velocities in turn affects the resulting shear velocity models. The advantage of the joint inversion is that it produces a single phase velocity map that satisfies both data sets simultaneously. Our phase velocity maps show a transition from low velocities centered beneath the main volcanic centers in Iceland at 18-25 s period, primarily crustal depths, to a low-velocity region that traces the rift zones from the Reykjanes Ridge in the south to the Kolbeinsey Ridge in the north at 29-50 s period, greater depths. These results are consistent with previous studies, although with an extended and improved region of resolution, which extends further into the Atlantic and Arctic Ocean.

  9. Ridge asymmetry and deep aqueous alteration at the trench observed from Rayleigh wave tomography of the Juan de Fuca plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Samuel; Ruan, Youyi; Forsyth, Donald W.

    2016-10-01

    Using Rayleigh wave tomography of noise-removed ocean bottom seismometer data from the Cascadia Initiative, we illuminate the structure of the upper mantle beneath the Juan de Fuca plate. Beneath the Juan de Fuca ridge, there is strong asymmetry, with a pronounced low-velocity zone in the 25-65 km depth range. Extending to the west from the spreading axis, this anomaly has velocities low enough to indicate the presence of melt. The asymmetry in velocity structure and the much greater abundance of seamounts on the west flank of the ridge suggest that dynamic, buoyant upwelling is important, perhaps triggered by thermal or compositional anomalies beneath Axial Seamount. In contrast, there is no evidence for asymmetry in the axial zone or lower than expected velocities beneath the Gorda ridge. On the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca ridge, the shear velocity in the 25-65 depth range is higher than expected; the lithosphere appears to be colder and thicker than predicted by standard plate cooling models, perhaps caused by the downwelling counterpart of the upwelling on the west side of the ridge. Close to the trench, there is a sharp decrease in shear velocity. We interpret this as aqueous alteration caused by hydrothermal circulation through deep normal faults associated with bending of the plate. Beneath the Astoria and Nitinat fans, where abyssal plain sediment is thickest, the velocity decrease is much smaller, which is consistent with a thick sediment cap that prevents hydrothermal alteration of the plate.

  10. Rayleigh-wave Tomography and Seismic Anisotropic Structures in the Region of the Philippine Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsin-Yu; Legendre, Cédric P.; Chang, Emmy T. Y.

    2016-04-01

    The Philippine Sea Plate (PSP) is surrounded by convergent boundaries, the Pacific plate is subducting beneath the PSP along the Izu-Bonin and Mariana trenches at the east, whereas the PSP is subducting beneath the Eurasian plate along the Nankai trough, Ryukyu trench and Philippine trench at the west. The PSP can be divided by three oceanic basins: the oldest West Philippine basin developing in 35-45 Ma in the west, and the Shikoku and Parece Vela basins in 15-30 Ma in the east. Previous studies show a large variety of the seismic anisotropy structures in the region of the PSP, which correspond different scenarios of tectonic evolution for this area. In this study, we analyze both isotropic and anisotropic Rayleigh-wave velocity structures of the PSP by means of two-station method. The earthquakes of magnitude (Mw) greater than 5.0 in-between the years 1998-2014 were acquired. Totally, 7914 teleseismic events are adopted to form the measurements of Rayleigh-wave dispersion curves along 467 station-pairs over the PSP. The measured dispersion curves are then inverted into the isotropic and azimuthally anisotropic (2ψ) velocity maps at different periods with the damped, lateral smoothing LSQR inversion. The inversion is framed by the triangular grids which knots are of 200 km spacing. The consequent velocity anomalies are referenced to the average of the phase velocity at the periods between 50 and 100 seconds. The resulting velocity anomalies show a consistent pattern with the locations of the sub-basins in the PSP at the periods of 50 and 60 sec, which can be considered to be the association of lithospheric velocity structure with basin ages. The positive velocity anomalies are seen in the West Philippine basin associating the relatively old lithosphere; whereas the negative anomalies are found in the Shikoku and Parece Vela basins which the lithospheric structures are relatively young. On the other hand, the resultant azimuthal anisotropy reveals an apparent

  11. Lateral Variations of Rayleigh-Wave Dispersions in the Philippine Sea Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Yen Chang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Fresh two-dimensional group and phase-velocity distribution maps of the Philippine Sea and surrounding areas are constructed using the tomographic inversion of more than 2500 Rayleigh-wave dispersion curves in the 20- to 120-sec period range. The results show that, for the periods used, both the group and phase-velocity variation patterns are very close to the geological and topographic features and are also consistent with previous studies of magnetic anomalies and evolutionary history of the Philippine Basin. On average, the periods of the peak group-velocity for the West Philippine Basin and the Oki-Daito ridge are about 40 and 32 sec for the Parece Vela and Shikoku basins. This implies that the lithosphere of the western Philippine Sea Basin is thicker, which is related to plate cooling and seafloor age. For most of the examined periods, the high velocity symmetry of the two sides of the Central Basin Ridge in the West Philippine Basin coincides well with the evolutionary history of the Philippine Sea Basin, and may be taken as additional evidence confirming the existence of the ridge. The group and phase-velocity distributions for periods longer than 80 sec are smooth throughout the whole Philippine Sea Basin, which implies that the upper mantle beneath the Philippine Sea Basin is nearly homogeneous at depths of 100 - 200 km. Moreover, the group and phase velocities in the region of the East Volcano Belt and Active Marginal Basin remain almost constant in the 36- to 80-sec period range, which indicates that the boundary between the lithosphere and asthenosphere is probably not obvious in this area.

  12. Determination of Rayleigh wave ellipticity across the Earthscope Transportable Array using single-station and array-based processing of ambient seismic noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Eli; Lin, Fan-Chi; Koper, Keith D.

    2017-01-01

    We present a single station method for the determination of Rayleigh wave ellipticity, or Rayleigh wave horizontal to vertical amplitude ratio (H/V) using Frequency Dependent Polarization Analysis (FDPA). This procedure uses singular value decomposition of 3-by-3 spectral covariance matrices over 1-hr time windows to determine properties of the ambient seismic noise field such as particle motion and dominant wave-type. In FPDA, if the noise is mostly dominated by a primary singular value and the phase difference is roughly 90° between the major horizontal axis and the vertical axis of the corresponding singular vector, we infer that Rayleigh waves are dominant and measure an H/V ratio for that hour and frequency bin. We perform this analysis for all available data from the Earthscope Transportable Array between 2004 and 2014. We compare the observed Rayleigh wave H/V ratios with those previously measured by multicomponent, multistation noise cross-correlation (NCC), as well as classical noise spectrum H/V ratio analysis (NSHV). At 8 s the results from all three methods agree, suggesting that the ambient seismic noise field is Rayleigh wave dominated. Between 10 and 30 s, while the general pattern agrees well, the results from FDPA and NSHV are persistently slightly higher (˜2 per cent) and significantly higher (>20 per cent), respectively, than results from the array-based NCC. This is likely caused by contamination from other wave types (i.e. Love waves, body waves, and tilt noise) in the single station methods, but it could also reflect a small, persistent error in NCC. Additionally, we find that the single station method has difficulty retrieving robust Rayleigh wave H/V ratios within major sedimentary basins, such as the Williston Basin and Mississippi Embayment, where the noise field is likely dominated by reverberating Love waves and tilt noise.

  13. Influence of gravity waves and tides on mesospheric temperature inversion layers: simultaneous Rayleigh lidar and MF radar observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridharan, S. [National Atmospheric Research Lab., Chittoor (India); Sathishkumar, S.; Gurubaran, S. [Indian Inst. of Geomagnetism, Tirunelveli (India). Equatorial Geophysical Research Lab.

    2008-07-01

    Three nights of simultaneous Rayleigh lidar temperature measurements over Gadanki (13.5 N,79.2 E) and medium frequency (MF) radar wind measurements over Tirunelveli (8.7 N,77.8 E) have been analyzed to illustrate the possible effects due to tidal-gravity wave interactions on upper mesospheric inversion layers. The occurrence of tidal gravity wave interaction is investigated using MF radar wind measurements in the altitude region 86-90 km. Of the three nights, it is found that tidal gravity wave interaction occurred in two nights. In the third night, diurnal tidal amplitude is found to be significantly larger. As suggested in Sica et al. (2007), mesospheric temperature inversion seems to be a signature of wave saturation in the mesosphere, since the temperature inversion occurs at heights, when the lapse rate is less than half the dry adiabatic lapse rate. (orig.)

  14. Influence of gravity waves and tides on mesospheric temperature inversion layers: simultaneous Rayleigh lidar and MF radar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, S.; Sathishkumar, S.; Gurubaran, S.

    2008-11-01

    Three nights of simultaneous Rayleigh lidar temperature measurements over Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E) and medium frequency (MF) radar wind measurements over Tirunelveli (8.7° N, 77.8° E) have been analyzed to illustrate the possible effects due to tidal-gravity wave interactions on upper mesospheric inversion layers. The occurrence of tidal gravity wave interaction is investigated using MF radar wind measurements in the altitude region 86 90 km. Of the three nights, it is found that tidal gravity wave interaction occurred in two nights. In the third night, diurnal tidal amplitude is found to be significantly larger. As suggested in Sica et al. (2007), mesospheric temperature inversion seems to be a signature of wave saturation in the mesosphere, since the temperature inversion occurs at heights, when the lapse rate is less than half the dry adiabatic lapse rate.

  15. Upper mantle structure under western Saudi Arabia from Rayleigh wave tomography and the origin of Cenozoic uplift and volcanism on the Arabian Shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Y; Nyblade, A; Rodgers, A; Al-Amri, A

    2007-11-09

    The shear velocity structure of the shallow upper mantle beneath the Arabian Shield has been modeled by inverting new Rayleigh wave phase velocity measurements between 45 and 140 s together with previously published Rayleigh wave group velocity measurement between 10 and 45 s. For measuring phase velocities, we applied a modified array method that minimizes the distortion of raypaths by lateral heterogeneity. The new shear velocity model shows a broad low velocity region in the lithospheric mantle across the Shield and a low velocity region at depths {ge} 150 km localized along the Red Sea coast and Makkah-Madinah-Nafud (MMN) volcanic line. The velocity reduction in the upper mantle corresponds to a temperature anomaly of {approx}250-330 K. These finding, in particular the region of continuous low velocities along the Red Sea and MMN volcanic line, do not support interpretations for the origin of the Cenozoic plateau uplift and volcanism on the Shield invoking two separate plumes. When combined with images of the 410 and 660 km discontinuities beneath the southern part of the Arabian Shield, body wave tomographic models, a S-wave polarization analysis, and SKS splitting results, our new model supports an interpretation invoking a thermal upwelling of warm mantle rock originating in the lower mantle under Africa that crosses through the transition zone beneath Ethiopia and moves to the north and northwest under the eastern margin of the Red Sea and the Arabian Shield. In this interpretation, the difference in mean elevation between the Platform and Shield can be attributed to isostatic uplift caused by heating of the lithospheric mantle under the Shield, with significantly higher region along the Red Sea possibly resulting from a combination of lithosphere thinning and dynamic uplift.

  16. Structure of the Crust beneath Cameroon, West Africa, from the Joint Inversion of Rayleigh Wave Group Velocities and Receiver Functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokam, A K; Tabod, C T; Nyblade, A A; Julia, J; Wiens, D A; Pasyanos, M E

    2010-02-18

    Cameroon using 1-D shear wave velocity models obtained from the joint inversion of Rayleigh wave group velocities and P-receiver functions for 32 broadband seismic stations. From the 1-D shear wave velocity models, we obtain new insights into the composition and structure of the crust and upper mantle across Cameroon. After briefly reviewing the geological framework of Cameroon, we describe the data and the joint inversion method, and then interpret variations in crustal structure found beneath Cameroon in terms of the tectonic history of the region.

  17. Numerical simulations of full-wave fields and analysis of channel wave characteristics in 3-D coal mine roadway models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Si-Tong; Wei, Jiu-Chuan; Cheng, Jiu-Long; Shi, Long-Qing; Wen, Zhi-Jie

    2016-12-01

    Currently, numerical simulations of seismic channel waves for the advance detection of geological structures in coal mine roadways focus mainly on modeling twodimensional wave fields and therefore cannot accurately simulate three-dimensional (3-D) full-wave fields or seismic records in a full-space observation system. In this study, we use the first-order velocity-stress staggered-grid finite difference algorithm to simulate 3-D full-wave fields with P-wave sources in front of coal mine roadways. We determine the three components of velocity V x, V y, and V z for the same node in 3-D staggered-grid finite difference models by calculating the average value of V y, and V z of the nodes around the same node. We ascertain the wave patterns and their propagation characteristics in both symmetrical and asymmetric coal mine roadway models. Our simulation results indicate that the Rayleigh channel wave is stronger than the Love channel wave in front of the roadway face. The reflected Rayleigh waves from the roadway face are concentrated in the coal seam, release less energy to the roof and floor, and propagate for a longer distance. There are surface waves and refraction head waves around the roadway. In the seismic records, the Rayleigh wave energy is stronger than that of the Love channel wave along coal walls of the roadway, and the interference of the head waves and surface waves with the Rayleigh channel wave is weaker than with the Love channel wave. It is thus difficult to identify the Love channel wave in the seismic records. Increasing the depth of the receivers in the coal walls can effectively weaken the interference of surface waves with the Rayleigh channel wave, but cannot weaken the interference of surface waves with the Love channel wave. Our research results also suggest that the Love channel wave, which is often used to detect geological structures in coal mine stopes, is not suitable for detecting geological structures in front of coal mine roadways

  18. On Short Wave Stability and Sufficient Conditions for Stability in the Extended Rayleigh Problem of Hydrodynamic Stability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Subbiah; V Ganesh

    2010-06-01

    We consider the extended Rayleigh problem of hydrodynamic stability dealing with the stability of inviscid homogeneous shear flows in sea straits of arbitrary cross section. We prove a short wave stability result, namely, if $k>0$ is the wave number of a normal mode then $k>k_c$ (for some critical wave number $k_c$) implies the stability of the mode for a class of basic flows. Furthermore, if $K(z)=\\frac{-({U''}_0-T_0{U'}_0)}{U_0-U_{0s}}$, where $U_0$ is the basic velocity, $T_0$ (a constant) the topography and prime denotes differentiation with respect to vertical coordinate then we prove that a sufficient condition for the stability of basic flow is $0 < K(z)≤\\left(\\frac{^2}{D^2}+\\frac{T^2_0}{4}\\right)$, where the flow domain is $0≤ z≤ D$.

  19. The story of a craton from heart to margins: illuminating cratonic lithosphere with Rayleigh wave phase velocities in Eastern Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrescu, L.; Darbyshire, F. A.; Gilligan, A.; Bastow, I. D.; Totten, E. J.

    2015-12-01

    Cratons are Precambrian continental nuclei that are geologically distinct from modern continental regions and are typically underlain by seismically fast lithospheric roots (keels) to at least 200 km depth. Both plate and non-plate tectonic origin theories such as stacking of subducted slabs or multiple mantle plume underplating have been proposed to explain keel growth.Eastern Canada is an ideal continental region to investigate cratonization processes and the onset of plate tectonics. It comprises part of the largest Archean craton in the world, the Superior Province, flanked by a ~1.1 Ga Himalayan-scale orogenic belt, the Grenville Province, and the 500-300 Ma old Appalachian orogenic province, following the same general SW-NE axial trend. The region is also cross-cut by the Great Meteor Hotspot track, providing an excellent opportunity to study the interaction of hotspot tectonism with progressively younger lithospheric domains.We investigate the lithospheric structure of Precambrian Eastern Canada using teleseismic earthquake data recorded at permanent and temporary networks. We measure interstation dispersion curves of Rayleigh wave phase velocities between ~15 and 220 s, and compare the results to standard continental and cratonic reference models. We combine the dispersion curves via a tomographic inversion which solves for isotropic phase velocity heterogeneity and azimuthal anisotropy across the region at a range of periods. The phase velocity maps indicate variations in lithospheric properties from the heart of the Superior craton to the SE Canadian coast.The new regional-scale models will help to understand the processes that generated, stabilized and reworked the cratonic roots through their billion-year tectonic history. We investigate how surface tectonic boundaries relate to deeper lithospheric structural changes, and consider the effects of the multiple Wilson cycles that affected Laurentia.

  20. Rayleigh-Lamb wave propagation on a fractional order viscoelastic plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meral, F Can; Royston, Thomas J; Magin, Richard L

    2011-02-01

    A previous study of the authors published in this journal focused on mechanical wave motion in a viscoelastic material representative of biological tissue [Meral et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 126, 3278-3285 (2009)]. Compression, shear and surface wave motion in and on a viscoelastic halfspace excited by surface and sub-surface sources were considered. It was shown that a fractional order Voigt model, where the rate-dependent damping component that is dependent on the first derivative of time is replaced with a component that is dependent on a fractional derivative of time, resulted in closer agreement with experiment as compared with conventional (integer order) models, such as those of Voigt and Zener. In the present study, this analysis is extended to another configuration and wave type: out-of-plane response of a viscoelastic plate to harmonic anti-symmetric Lamb wave excitation. Theoretical solutions are compared with experimental measurements for a polymeric tissue mimicking phantom material. As in the previous configurations the fractional order modeling assumption improves the match between theory and experiment over a wider frequency range. Experimental complexities in the present study and the reliability of the different approaches for quantifying the shear viscoelastic properties of the material are discussed.

  1. a Global Shear Velocity Model of the Upper Mantle from New Fundamental and Higher Rayleigh Mode Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debayle, E.; Ricard, Y. R.

    2011-12-01

    We present a global SV-wave tomographic model of the upper mantle, built from a new dataset of fundamental and higher mode Rayleigh waveforms. We use an extension of the automated waveform inversion approach of Debayle (1999) designed to improve the extraction of fundamental and higher mode information from a single surface wave seismogram. The improvement is shown to be significant in the transition zone structure which is constrained by the higher modes. The new approach is fully automated and can be run on a Beowulf computer to process massive surface wave dataset. It has been used to match successfully over 350 000 fundamental and higher mode Rayleigh waveforms, corresponding to about 20 millions of new measurements extracted from the seismograms. For each seismogram, we obtain a path average shear velocity and quality factor model, and a set of fundamental and higher mode dispersion and attenuation curves compatible with the recorded waveform. The set of dispersion curves provides a global database for future finite frequency inversion. Our new 3D SV-wave tomographic model takes into account the effect of azimuthal anisotropy and is constrained with a lateral resolution of several hundred kilometers and a vertical resolution of a few tens of kilometers. In the uppermost 200 km, our model shows a very strong correlation with surface tectonics. The slow velocity signature of mid-oceanic ridges extend down to ~100 km depth while the high velocity signature of cratons vanishes below 200 km depth. At depth greater than 400 km, the pattern of seismic velocities appear relatively homogeneous at large scale, except for high velocity slabs which produce broad high velocity regions within the transition zone. Although resolution is still good, the region between 200 and 400 km is associated with a complex pattern of seismic heterogeneities showing no simple correlation with the shallower or deeper structure.

  2. Analisa Penggunaan Sinyal Radar Bentuk Pulsa dan Gelombang Kontinyu untuk Target Bergerak dengan Model Clutter Terdistribusi Rayleigh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fery Gustomo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Radar (Radio, Detection, and Ranging mampu mendeteksi target untuk mendapatkan informasi berupa jarak, azimuth, dan kecepatan. Sinyal Radar ada dua jenis, yaitu pulsa (Pulsed Radar dan gelombang kontinyu (Continuous Wave Radar. Pulsed Radar mempunyai prinsip kerja memancarkan sinyal pulsa dengan PRI (Pulse Repetition Interval dan PRF (Pulse Repetition Frequency tertentu dipancarkan dengan modulasi ke dalam sinyal sinusoidal dengan frekuensi yang lebih tinggi serta memanfaatkan delay dari setiap pulsanya untuk mendapatkan informasi dari target. Sedangkan Continuous Wave Radar mempunyai prinsip kerja memancarkan sinyal sinusoidal secara terus menerus dan memanfaatkan sinyal echo yang terdiri dari beberapa variasi frekuensi akibat adanya efek Doppler untuk mendeteksi target. Terdapat pengaruh jenis gelombang sinyal radar terhadap kemampuan deteksi radar. Model distribusi Rayleigh dipilih untuk dapat mewakili suatu kondisi lingkungan (clutter yang bergerak dan mempunyai parameter kecepatan angin. Hasil simulasi dari kedua jenis sinyal menunjukkan bahwa pada model clutter terdistribusi Rayleigh, radar CW mempunyai kemampuan deteksi yang lebih baik pada kecepatan target yang lebih tinggi, karena mampu mendeteksi target dengan kecepatan 20-60 knots. Sedangkan radar pulsa mempunyai kemampuan deteksi yang lebih baik pada kecepatan target rendah yaitu pada kecepatan 15-55 knots. Untuk Probabilitas deteksi minimum 90%, Radar CW mempunyai ketahanan yang lebih baik terhadap noise daripada radar pulsa karena kemampuan radar pulsa terbatas pada nilai SNR 20 dB. Sedangkan radar CW mampu mendeteksi target dengan baik sampai SNR bernilai 15 dB. Sedangkan untuk deteksi terhadap kecepatan target, radar CW mempunyai hasil yang lebih akurat daripada radar pulsa.

  3. Extracting the Group Velocity of Rayleigh Waves from the Cross Correlation of the Ambient Seismic Noise Between Two Seismic Stations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Xing; Li Jun; Lin Shu; Zhou Zhengrong; Kang Lanchi; Ou Yiping

    2008-01-01

    This paper uses the 8 broad-band stations' microseism data recorded by the Seismic Monitoring Network of Fujian Province to calculate the vertical correlation coefficient between two stationsat intervals of 5 minutes. According to the time intervals technique we obtain the different coefficients and then add the correlative coefficients. Depending on this, we extract the group velocity of Rayleigh waves from the cross correlation of the ambient seismic noise between two seismic stations and figure out the group velocity' spatial distribution. The results show that the signal noise ratio (SNR) increases proportionally to the superposition times, but the results from different days are similar to one another. Synchronously, the arrival-time is also stable and there is no obvious change when coming across typhoons. It is found the velocity of the surface wave is 2.9~3. 1km/s in Fujian Province, which is close to the observationally attained value.

  4. Detailed 3-D S-wave velocity beneath the High Lava Plains, Oregon, from 2-plane-wave Rayleigh wave inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, L. S.; Forsyth, D. W.; Fouch, M. J.; James, D. E.

    2009-12-01

    The High Lava Plains (HLP) of eastern Oregon represent an unusual track of bimodal volcanism extending from the southeastern-most corner of the state to its current position beneath the Newberry Volcano on the eastern margin of the Cascades. The silicic volcanism is time progressive along this track, beginning some 15 Ma near the Owyhee plateau and then trending to the north east. The timing and location of the start of the HLP coincides with that of the initial volcanism associated with the Yellowstone/Snake River Plain track (YSRP). While the YSRP has often been interpreted as the classic intra-continental hot spot track, the HLP, which trends almost normal to absolute plate motion, is harder to explain. This study uses the 100+ stations associated with the HLP seismic deployment together with another ~100 Earthscope Transportable Array stations (TA) to perform a high resolution inversion for Rayleigh wave phase velocities using the 2-plane-wave methodology of Forsyth and Li (2004). Because of the comparatively small grid spacing of this study, we are able to discern much finer scale structures than studies looking at the entire western U.S. with only TA stations. Preliminary results indicate very low velocities across the study area, especially at upper mantle depths. Especially low velocities are seen beneath the Owyhee plateau and along both the HLP and YSRP tracks. Final details about the exact geometries of these features will help constrain possible scenarios for the formation of the HLP volcanic sequence.

  5. Improving Earthquake and Explosion Discrimination by Using Love and Rayleigh Wave Magnitudes (Postprint) Annual Report 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    Seismology Data Management Center (DMC), corrected for the instrument response to displacement in nanometers, and rotated to transverse, radial, and...estimated in the a) Middle East, b) Korean Peninsula region, and in c) central Italy . Figure 3. Ms(VMAX)-Love versus Ms (VMAX)- Rayleigh for...earthquakes in the a) Middle East, b) Korean Peninsula region, and in c) central Italy . The third dataset focused on the damaging L’Aquila earthquake (6

  6. Graphene-mediated microfluidic transport and nebulization via high frequency Rayleigh wave substrate excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Kar M; Yeo, Leslie Y; Hung, Yew M; Tan, Ming K

    2016-09-21

    The deposition of a thin graphene film atop a chip scale piezoelectric substrate on which surface acoustic waves are excited is observed to enhance its performance for fluid transport and manipulation considerably, which can be exploited to achieve further efficiency gains in these devices. Such gains can then enable complete integration and miniaturization for true portability for a variety of microfluidic applications across drug delivery, biosensing and point-of-care diagnostics, among others, where field-use, point-of-collection or point-of-care functionality is desired. In addition to a first demonstration of vibration-induced molecular transport in graphene films, we show that the coupling of the surface acoustic wave gives rise to antisymmetric Lamb waves in the film which enhance molecular diffusion and hence the flow through the interstitial layers that make up the film. Above a critical input power, the strong substrate vibration displacement can also force the molecules out of the graphene film to form a thin fluid layer, which subsequently destabilizes and breaks up to form a mist of micron dimension aerosol droplets. We provide physical insight into this coupling through a simple numerical model, verified through experiments, and show several-fold improvement in the rate of fluid transport through the film, and up to 55% enhancement in the rate of fluid atomization from the film using this simple method.

  7. Computational Modeling of Wave Propagation in a Geophysical Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    form and finite element solution, the forcing function is described as ⎟ ⎠ ⎞ ⎜ ⎝ ⎛= t T htf π2cos)( for 22 TtT ≤≤− . For the finite element... htf π2cos 22 TtT ≤≤− , 2D Model R = 200 m NDOF = 23,000 R Short Duration Loading Surface Wave Problem – Vertical Velocity Analysis FEA Rayleigh P wave R

  8. The viscous surface-internal wave problem: nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yanjin

    2011-01-01

    We consider the free boundary problem for two layers of immiscible, viscous, incompressible fluid in a uniform gravitational field, lying above a rigid bottom in a three-dimensional horizontally periodic setting. The effect of surface tension is either taken into account at both free boundaries or neglected at both. We are concerned with the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, so we assume that the upper fluid is heavier than the lower fluid. When the surface tension at the free internal interface is below a critical value, which we identify, we establish that the problem under consideration is nonlinearly unstable.

  9. A pile-soil-bridge structure with dynamic interaction under Rayleigh wave excitation%Rayleigh波作用下桩-土-桥梁结构动力相互作用问题研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谷音; 于志敏

    2011-01-01

    A 2D finite element model for a semi-infinite space with layered media and Rayleigh wave input was built by using equivalent viscous-elastic artificial boundary elements. The responses in free-field of even and layered media were computed. The results indicated that the finite element method has excellent estimation precision compared with the theore tical solutions. The dynamic response of a pile-soil-bridge structure with dynamic interaction under Rayleigh waves was analyzed. A typical rigid frame bridge was included in this case study. The influence of different site conditions, changes of location of soft interlayer, different Rayleigh wave input and pile length on Rayleigh wave propagation and the seismic response were considered. The influencing factors of the rigid frame bridge structure were also discussed.%基于等效粘弹性人工边界单元建立了可考虑成层介质及Rayleigh波输入的二维有限元时域模型,计算了Sayleih波作用下成层介质与均匀介质的自由场反应,与理论解比较表明有限元计算结果具有较好的工程精度.针对Rayleigh波作用下桩-土-典型刚构桥梁结构动力反应进行了分析,考虑了场地条件的不同、软夹层位置的改变、不同频率Rayleigh波的输入以及桩长对Rayleigh波传播与场地地震反应的影响,对影响因素进行了讨论.

  10. Nonlinear hydrodynamic effects induced by Rayleigh surface acoustic wave in sessile droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghane, M; Chen, B X; Fu, Y Q; Li, Y; Desmulliez, M P Y; Mohammed, M I; Walton, A J

    2012-11-01

    We report an experimental and numerical characterization of three-dimensional acoustic streaming behavior in small droplets of volumes (1-30 μl) induced by surface acoustic wave (SAW). We provide a quantitative evidence of the existence of strong nonlinear nature of the flow inertia in this SAW-driven flow over a range of the newly defined acoustic parameter F{NA}=Fλ/(σ/R_{d})≥0.01, which is a measure of the strength of the acoustic force to surface tension, where F is the acoustic body force, λ is the SAW wavelength, σ is the surface tension, and R{d} is the droplet radius. In contrast to the widely used Stokes model of acoustic streaming, which generally ignores such a nonlinearity, we identify that the full Navier-Stokes equation must be applied to avoid errors up to 93% between the computed streaming velocities and those from experiments as in the nonlinear case. We suggest that the Stokes model is valid only for very small acoustic power of ≤1 μW (F{NA}droplets.

  11. Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity maps and three-dimensional shear velocity structure of the western US from local non-plane surface wave tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollitz, F.F.; Snoke, J. Arthur

    2010-01-01

    We utilize two-and-three-quarter years of vertical-component recordings made by the Transportable Array (TA) component of Earthscope to constrain three-dimensional (3-D) seismic shear wave velocity structure in the upper 200 km of the western United States. Single-taper spectral estimation is used to compile measurements of complex spectral amplitudes from 44 317 seismograms generated by 123 teleseismic events. In the first step employed to determine the Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity structure, we implement a new tomographic method, which is simpler and more robust than scattering-based methods (e.g. multi-plane surface wave tomography). The TA is effectively implemented as a large number of local arrays by defining a horizontal Gaussian smoothing distance that weights observations near a given target point. The complex spectral-amplitude measurements are interpreted with the spherical Helmholtz equation using local observations about a succession of target points, resulting in Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity maps at periods over the range of 18–125 s. The derived maps depend on the form of local fits to the Helmholtz equation, which generally involve the nonplane-wave solutions of Friederich et al. In a second step, the phase-velocity maps are used to derive 3-D shear velocity structure. The 3-D velocity images confirm details witnessed in prior body-wave and surface-wave studies and reveal new structures, including a deep (>100 km deep) high-velocity lineament, of width ∼200 km, stretching from the southern Great Valley to northern Utah that may be a relic of plate subduction or, alternatively, either a remnant of the Mojave Precambrian Province or a mantle downwelling. Mantle seismic velocity is highly correlated with heat flow, Holocene volcanism, elastic plate thickness and seismicity. This suggests that shallow mantle structure provides the heat source for associated magmatism, as well as thinning of the thermal lithosphere, leading to relatively high

  12. Approximations to the Non-Isothermal Distributed Activation Energy Model for Biomass Pyrolysis Using the Rayleigh Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhaundiyal Alok

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the influence of some parameters relevant to biomass pyrolysis on the numerical solutions of the nonisothermal nth order distributed activation energy model using the Rayleigh distribution. Investigated parameters are the integral upper limit, the frequency factor, the heating rate, the reaction order and the scale parameters of the Rayleigh distribution. The influence of these parameters has been considered for the determination of the kinetic parameters of the non-isothermal nth order Rayleigh distribution from the experimentally derived thermoanalytical data of biomass pyrolysis.

  13. Wave Reflection Model Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Larsen, Brian Juul

    The investigation concerns the design of a new internal breakwater in the main port of Ibiza. The objective of the model tests was in the first hand to optimize the cross section to make the wave reflection low enough to ensure that unacceptable wave agitation will not occur in the port. Secondly...

  14. Forward and inverse problems for surface acoustic waves in anisotropic media: a Ritz-Rayleigh method based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoklasová, Pavla; Sedlák, Petr; Seiner, Hanuš; Landa, Michal

    2015-02-01

    We show that the Ritz-Rayleigh method can be used for calculation of velocity of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) propagating in a general direction of an anisotropic medium of arbitrary symmetry class. The main advantage of this method is that expanding the displacement field of SAW into a fixed functional basis transforms the calculation of SAW velocities into a simple linear eigenvalue problem. The correctness and reliability of the proposed approach are verified on experimental SAW data obtained for generally oriented planes of an indium phosphide single crystal. The same experimental datasets are then used to discuss the invertibility of the method, i.e. the possibility of determination of elastic coefficients from SAW measurements in general directions. It is shown that the SAW data obtained on a single generally oriented plane are sufficient for such an inverse calculation for a cubic material only if they are complemented by measurements of velocities of bulk quasi-longitudinal (qL) waves propagating along the same free surface. Moreover, when the SAW and qL data are available from three almost perpendicular faces of a single specimen, the complete elastic tensor (21 independent constants) can be inversely determined, without considering a priori any symmetry constraints to the material.

  15. Temperature Frequency Characteristics of Hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO Polymer Coated Rayleigh Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW Resonators for Gas-Phase Sensor Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina I. Radeva

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Temperature induced frequency shifts may compromise the sensor response of polymer coated acoustic wave gas-phase sensors operating in environments of variable temperature. To correct the sensor data with the temperature response of the sensor the latter must be known. This study presents and discusses temperature frequency characteristics (TFCs of solid hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO polymer coated sensor resonators using the Rayleigh surface acoustic wave (RSAW mode on ST-cut quartz. Using a RF-plasma polymerization process, RSAW sensor resonators optimized for maximum gas sensitivity have been coated with chemosensitive HMDSO films at 4 different thicknesses: 50, 100, 150 and 250 nm. Their TFCs have been measured over a (−100 to +110 °C temperature range and compared to the TFC of an uncoated device. An exponential 2,500 ppm downshift of the resonant frequency and a 40 K downshift of the sensor’s turn-over temperature (TOT are observed when the HMDSO thickness increases from 0 to 250 nm. A partial temperature compensation effect caused by the film is also observed. A third order polynomial fit provides excellent agreement with the experimental TFC curve. The frequency downshift due to mass loading by the film, the TOT and the temperature coefficients are unambiguously related to each other.

  16. Lateral heterogeneity and azimuthal anistropy of the upper mantle: Love and Rayleigh waves 100-250 sec

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, T.; Anderson, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    The lateral heterogeneity and apparent anisotropy of the upper mantle are studied by measuring Rayleigh and Love wave phase velocities in the period range 100-250 sec. Spherical harmonic descriptions of the lateral heterogeneity are obtained for order and degree up to 1=m=10. Slow regions are evident at the East Pacific rise, northeast Africa, Tibet, Tasman sea, southwestern North America and triple junctions in the Northern Atlantic and Indian oceans. Fast regions occur in Australia, western Pacific and the eastern Atlantic. Details which are not evident in previous studies include two fast regions in the central Pacific and the subduction zone in the Scotia Arc region. Inversion for azimuthal dependence showed (1) little correlation between the fast phase velocity directions and the plate motion vector in plate interiors, but (2) correlation of the fast direction with the perpendicular direction to trenches and ridges. Phase velocity is high when waves propagate perpendicular to these structures. Severe tradeoffs exist between heterogeneity and azimuthal dependence because of the yet unsatisfactory path coverage.

  17. Lateral heterogeneity and azimuthal anisotropy of the upper mantle - Love and Rayleigh waves 100-250 sec

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, T.; Anderson, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    The lateral heterogeneity and apparent anisotropy of the upper mantle are studied by measuring Rayleigh and Love wave phase velocities in the period range 100-250 sec. Spherical harmonic descriptions of the lateral heterogeneity are obtained for order and degree up to 1=m=10. Slow regions are evident at the East Pacific rise, northeast Africa, Tibet, Tasman sea, southwestern North America and triple junctions in the Northern Atlantic and Indian oceans. Fast regions occur in Australia, western Pacific and the eastern Atlantic. Details which are not evident in previous studies include two fast regions in the central Pacific and the subduction zone in the Scotia Arc region. Inversion for azimuthal dependence showed (1) little correlation between the fast phase velocity directions and the plate motion vector in plate interiors, but (2) correlation of the fast direction with the perpendicular direction to trenches and ridges. Phase velocity is high when waves propagate perpendicular to these structures. Severe tradeoffs exist between heterogeneity and azimuthal dependence because of the yet unsatisfactory path coverage.

  18. Banquet Speech Some Sketches Of Rayleigh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, John N.

    1985-11-01

    Several short sketches are presented of Lord Rayleigh, to show his method of working and his interaction with his fellow scientists. The topics discussed are: his research on the blue of the sky (Rayleigh scattering); his rescue of Waterston from near-oblivion; his research on surface acoustic waves (Rayleigh waves); his collaboration with Agnes Pockels; his research on blackbody radiation (the Rayleigh-Jeans Law).

  19. Using McDaniel's model to represent non-Rayleigh active sonar reverberation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ming

    Reverberation in active sonar systems has often been observed to follow non-Rayleigh distributions. Current statistical models tend to be either too restrictive, leading to significant mismatch error, or too general, leading to large estimation error. McDaniel's model has shown promise as having reasonably tight representation in terms of skewness and kurtosis for reverberation from a variety of sonar systems. This dissertation intensively explores capability and effectiveness of the generalized McDaniel's model in representing non-Rayleigh reverberation when minimal data are available. Three major topics are covered in this dissertation. First, derivation and computation of the cumulative distribution function of McDaniel's model is addressed. Two approaches, one based on direct integration and the other via characteristic function inversion, are both shown to achieve adequate precision with the former leading to a closed-form solution and the latter requiring significantly less computational effort. Second, parameter estimators using both method of moments (MM) and maximum likelihood (ML) algorithms are developed. The MM estimator has the advantage of a simple and rapid implementation, but the disadvantage of a non- zero probability of a solution not existing. Bootstrap/pruning techniques are proposed to partially deal with the failure of this method. The ML estimator will always provide a solution; however, it requires multivariate optimization. The expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm iteration is also derived for obtaining the ML estimates and compared with the simplex method and quasi-Newton multivariate optimization routines. Furthermore, the ability of various statistical models to represent the probability of false alarm is evaluated as a function of sample size. It is demonstrated that when minimal data are available, McDaniel's model can more accurately represent non-Rayleigh reverberation than the K or Rayleigh mixture models. Third, detection

  20. Crustal and upper mantle S-wave velocity structures across the Taiwan Strait from ambient seismic noise and teleseismic Rayleigh wave analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y.; Yao, H.; Wu, F. T.; Liang, W.; Huang, B.; Lin, C.; Wen, K.

    2013-12-01

    Although orogeny seems to have stopped in western Taiwan large and small earthquakes do occur in the Taiwan Strait. Limited studies have focused on this region before and were barely within reach for comprehensive projects like TAICRUST and TAIGER for logistical reasons; thus, the overall crustal structures of the Taiwan Strait remain unknown. Time domain empirical Green's function (TDEGF) from ambient seismic noise to determine crustal velocity structure allows us to study an area using station pairs on its periphery. This research aims to resolve 1-D average crustal and upper mantle S-wave velocity (Vs) structures alone paths of several broadband station-pairs across the Taiwan Strait; 5-120 s Rayleigh wave phase velocity dispersion data derived by combining TDEGF and traditional surface wave two-station method (TS). The average Vs structures show significant differences in the upper 15 km as expected. In general, the highest Vs are observed in the coastal area of Mainland China and the lowest Vs appear along the southwest offshore of the Taiwan Island; they differ by about 0.6-1.1 km/s. For different parts of the Strait, the Vs are lower in the middle by about 0.1-0.2 km/s relative to those in the northern and southern parts. The overall crustal thickness is approximately 30 km, much thinner and less variable than under the Taiwan Island.

  1. Experimental and numerical investigations of beryllium strength models using the Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry de Frahan, M. T., E-mail: marchdf@umich.edu; Johnsen, E. [Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Belof, J. L.; Cavallo, R. M.; Ancheta, D. S.; El-dasher, B. S.; Florando, J. N.; Gallegos, G. F.; LeBlanc, M. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States); Raevsky, V. A.; Ignatova, O. N.; Lebedev, A. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center-VNIIEF, Sarov 607188 (Russian Federation)

    2015-06-14

    We present a set of high explosive driven Rayleigh-Taylor strength experiments for beryllium to produce data to distinguish predictions by various strength models. Design simulations using existing strength model parameterizations from Steinberg-Lund and Preston-Tonks-Wallace (PTW) suggested an optimal design that would delineate between not just different strength models, but different parameters sets of the PTW model. Application of the models to the post-shot results, however, suggests growth consistent with little material strength. We focus mostly on efforts to simulate the data using published strength models as well as the more recent RING relaxation model developed at VNIIEF. The results of the strength experiments indicate weak influence of strength in mitigating the growth with the RING model coming closest to predicting the material behavior. Finally, we present shock and ramp-loading recovery experiments.

  2. Acoustical breakdown of materials by focusing of laser-generated Rayleigh surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veysset, David; Maznev, A. A.; Veres, István A.; Pezeril, Thomas; Kooi, Steven E.; Lomonosov, Alexey M.; Nelson, Keith A.

    2017-07-01

    Focusing of high-amplitude surface acoustic waves leading to material damage is visualized in an all-optical experiment. The optical setup includes a lens and an axicon that focuses an intense picosecond excitation pulse into a ring-shaped pattern at the surface of a gold-coated glass substrate. Optical excitation induces a surface acoustic wave (SAW) that propagates in the plane of the sample and converges toward the center. The evolution of the SAW profile is monitored using interferometry with a femtosecond probe pulse at variable time delays. The quantitative analysis of the full-field images provides direct information about the surface displacement profiles, which are compared to calculations. The high stress at the focal point leads to the removal of the gold coating and, at higher excitation energies, to damage of the glass substrate. The results open the prospect for testing material strength on the microscale using laser-generated SAWs.

  3. New subgrid-scale models for large-eddy simulation of Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabbagh, F.; Trias, F. X.; Gorobets, A.; Oliva, A.

    2016-09-01

    At the crossroad between flow topology analysis and the theory of turbulence, a new eddy-viscosity model for Large-eddy simulation has been recently proposed by Trias et al.[PoF, 27, 065103 (2015)]. The S3PQR-model has the proper cubic near-wall behaviour and no intrinsic limitations for statistically inhomogeneous flows. In this work, the new model has been tested for an air turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection in a rectangular cell of aspect ratio unity and n span-wise open-ended distance. To do so, direct numerical simulation has been carried out at two Rayleigh numbers Ra = 108 and 1010, to assess the model performance and investigate a priori the effect of the turbulent Prandtl number. Using an approximate formula based on the Taylor series expansion, the turbulent Prandtl number has been calculated and revealed a constant and Ra-independent value across the bulk region equals to 0.55. It is found that the turbulent components of eddy-viscosity and eddy-diffusivity are positively prevalent to maintain a turbulent wind essentially driven by the mean buoyant force at the sidewalls. On the other hand, the new eddy-viscosity model is preliminary tested for the case of Ra = 108 and showed overestimation of heat flux within the boundary layer but fairly good prediction of turbulent kinetics at this moderate turbulent flow.

  4. Influence of yielding base and rigid base on propagation of Rayleigh-type wave in a viscoelastic layer of Voigt type

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S SAHA; A CHATTOPADHYAY; K C MISTRI; A K SINGH

    2017-09-01

    The present study aims to study the propagation of Rayleigh-type wave in a layer, composed of isotropic viscoelastic material of Voigt type, with the effect of yielding base and rigid base in two distinct cases.With the aid of an analytical treatment, closed-form expressions of phase velocity and damped velocity for both the cases are deduced. As a special case of the problem it is found that obtained results are in good agreement with the established standard results existing in the literature. It is established through the study that volume viscoelastic and shear-viscoelastic material parameter and yielding parameter have significant effect on phaseand damped velocities of Rayleigh-type wave in both the cases. Numerical calculations and graphical illustration have been carried out for both the considered cases in the presence and the absence of viscoelasticity. Acomparative study has been performed to analyse the effect of layer with yielding base, traction-free base and rigid base on the phase and damped velocities of Rayleigh-type wave.

  5. Asymptotic solution to the isothermal nth order distributed activation energy model using the Rayleigh Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Dhaundiyal

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the influence of relevant parameters of biomass pyrolysis on the numerical solution of the isothermal nth-order distributed activation energy model (DAEM using the Rayleigh distribution as the initial distribution function F(E of the activation energies. In this study, the integral upper limit, the frequency factor, the reaction order and the scale parameters are investigated. This paper also derived the asymptotic approximation for the DAEM. The influence of these parameters is used to calculate the kinetic parameters of the isothermal nth-order DAEM with the help of thermo-analytical results of TGA/DTG analysis.

  6. Group velocity distribution of Rayleigh waves and crustal and upper mantle velocity structure of the Chinese mainland and its vicinity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何正勤; 丁志峰; 叶太兰; 孙为国; 张乃铃

    2002-01-01

    Based on the long period digital surface wave data recorded by 11 CDSN stations and 11 IRIS stations, the dispersion curves of the group velocities of fundamental mode Rayleigh waves along 647 paths, with the periods from 10 s to 92 s, were measured by multi-filter. Their distribution at 25 central periods within the region of 18((54(N, 70(~140(E was inverted by Dimtar-Yanovskaya method. Within the period from 10 s to 15.9 s, the group velocity distribution is laterally inhomogeneous and is closely related to geotectonic units, with two low velocity zones located in the Tarim basin and the East China Sea and its north regions, respectively. From 21 s to 33 s, the framework of tectonic blocks is revealed. From 36.6 s to 40 s, the lithospheric subdivision of the Chinese mainland is obviously uncovered, with distinct boundaries among the South-North seismic belt, the Tibetan plateau, the North China, the South China and the Northeast China. Four cross-sections of group velocity distribution with period along 30(N, 38(N, 90(E and 120(E, are discussed, respectively, which display the basic features of the crust and upper mantle of the Chinese mainland and its neighboring regions. There are distinguished velocity differences among the different tectonic blocks. There are low-velocity-zones (LVZ) in the middle crust of the eastern Tibetan plateau, high velocity featured as stable platform in the Tarim basin and the Yangtze platform, shallow and thick low-velocity-zone in the upper mantle of the North China. The upper mantle LVZ in the East China Sea and the Japan Sea is related to the frictional heat from the subduction of the Philippine slab and the strong extension since the Himalayan orogenic period.

  7. Thermal Rayleigh-Marangoni convection in a three-layer liquid-metal-battery model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köllner, Thomas; Boeck, Thomas; Schumacher, Jörg

    2017-05-01

    The combined effects of buoyancy-driven Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RC) and surface tension-driven Marangoni convection (MC) are studied in a triple-layer configuration which serves as a simplified model for a liquid metal battery (LMB). The three-layer model consists of a liquid metal alloy cathode, a molten salt separation layer, and a liquid metal anode at the top. Convection is triggered by the temperature gradient between the hot electrolyte and the colder electrodes, which is a consequence of the release of resistive heat during operation. We present a linear stability analysis of the state of pure thermal conduction in combination with three-dimensional direct numerical simulations of the nonlinear turbulent evolution on the basis of a pseudospectral method. Five different modes of convection are identified in the configuration, which are partly coupled to each other: RC in the upper electrode, RC with internal heating in the molten salt layer, and MC at both interfaces between molten salt and electrode as well as anticonvection in the middle layer and lower electrode. The linear stability analysis confirms that the additional Marangoni effect in the present setup increases the growth rates of the linearly unstable modes, i.e., Marangoni and Rayleigh-Bénard instability act together in the molten salt layer. The critical Grashof and Marangoni numbers decrease with increasing middle layer thickness. The calculated thresholds for the onset of convection are found for realistic current densities of laboratory-sized LMBs. The global turbulent heat transfer follows scaling predictions for internally heated RC. The global turbulent momentum transfer is comparable with turbulent convection in the classical Rayleigh-Bénard case. In summary, our studies show that incorporating Marangoni effects generates smaller flow structures, alters the velocity magnitudes, and enhances the turbulent heat transfer across the triple-layer configuration.

  8. Ultrasonic Approach of Rayleigh Pitch-Catch Contact Ultrasound Waves on CFRP Laminated Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    In-Young Yang; Kwang-Hee Im; Uk Heo; David K Hsu; Je-Woong Park; Hak-Joon Kim; Sung-Jin Song

    2008-01-01

    CFRP (carbon fiber reinforced plastics) composite materials have wide applicability because of their inherent design flexibility and improved material properties. However, impacted composite structures have 50%-75% less strength than undamaged structures. In this work, a CFRP composite material was nondestructively characterized in order to ensure product quality and structural integrity of CFRP and one-sided pitch-catch technique was developed to measure impacted-damaged area by using an automated-data acquisition system in an immersion tank. A pitch-catch signal was found to be more sensitive than normal incidence backwall echo of longitudinal wave under defect conditions in the composite.

  9. Experimental and numerical investigations of beryllium strength models using the Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry de Frahan, M. T. [Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA; Belof, J. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California 94551-0808, USA; Cavallo, R. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California 94551-0808, USA; Raevsky, V. A. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center-VNIIEF, Sarov 607188, Russia; Ignatova, O. N. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center-VNIIEF, Sarov 607188, Russia; Lebedev, A. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center-VNIIEF, Sarov 607188, Russia; Ancheta, D. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California 94551-0808, USA; El-dasher, B. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California 94551-0808, USA; Florando, J. N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California 94551-0808, USA; Gallegos, G. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California 94551-0808, USA; Johnsen, E. [Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA; LeBlanc, M. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California 94551-0808, USA

    2015-06-14

    A recent collaboration between LLNL and VNIIEF has produced a set of high explosive driven Rayleigh-Taylor strength data for beryllium. Design simulations using legacy strength models from Steinberg-Lund and Preston-Tonks-Wallace (PTW) suggested an optimal design that would delineate between not just different strength models, but different parameters sets of the PTW model. Application of the models to the post-shot results, however, shows close to classical growth. We characterize the material properties of the beryllium tested in the experiments. We also discuss recent efforts to simulate the data using the legacy strength models as well as the more recent RING relaxation model developed at VNIIEF. Finally, we present shock and ramp-loading recovery experiments conducted as part of the collaboration.

  10. Phase velocities of Rayleigh and Love waves in central and northern Europe from automated, broad-band, interstation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soomro, R. A.; Weidle, C.; Cristiano, L.; Lebedev, S.; Meier, T.; Passeq Working Group

    2016-01-01

    The increasingly dense coverage of Europe with broad-band seismic stations makes it possible to image its lithospheric structure in great detail, provided that structural information can be extracted effectively from the very large volumes of data. We develop an automated technique for the measurement of interstation phase velocities of (earthquake-excited) fundamental-mode surface waves in very broad period ranges. We then apply the technique to all available broad-band data from permanent and temporary networks across Europe. In a new implementation of the classical two-station method, Rayleigh and Love dispersion curves are determined by cross-correlation of seismograms from a pair of stations. An elaborate filtering and windowing scheme is employed to enhance the target signal and makes possible a significantly broader frequency band of the measurements, compared to previous implementations of the method. The selection of acceptable phase-velocity measurements for each event is performed in the frequency domain, based on a number of fine-tuned quality criteria including a smoothness requirement. Between 5 and 3000 single-event dispersion measurements are averaged per interstation path in order to obtain robust, broad-band dispersion curves with error estimates. In total, around 63,000 Rayleigh- and 27,500 Love-wave dispersion curves between 10 and 350 s have been determined, with standard deviations lower than 2 per cent and standard errors lower than 0.5 per cent. Comparisons of phase-velocity measurements using events at opposite backazimuths and the examination of the variance of the phase-velocity curves are parts of the quality control. With the automated procedure, large data sets can be consistently and repeatedly measured using varying selection parameters. Comparison of average interstation dispersion curves obtained with different degrees of smoothness shows that rough perturbations do not systematically bias the average dispersion measurement. They

  11. Seismic Tomography Around the Eastern Edge of the Alps From Ambient-Noise-Based Rayleigh Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigone, Dimitri; Fuchs, Florian; Kolinsky, Petr; Gröschl, Gidera; Apoloner, Maria-Theresia; Qorbani, Ehsan; Schippkus, Sven; Löberich, Eric; Bokelmann, Götz; AlpArray Working Group

    2016-04-01

    Inspecting ambient noise Green's functions is an excellent tool for monitoring the quality of seismic data, and for swiftly detecting changes in the configuration of a seismological station. Those Green's functions readily provide stable information about structural variations near the Earth's surface. We apply the technique to a network consisting of about 40 broadband stations in the area of the Easternmost Alps, in particular those operated by the University of Vienna (AlpArrayAustria) and the Vienna University of Technology. Those data are used to estimate Green's functions between station pairs; the Green's function consist mainly of surface waves, and we use them to investigate crustal structure near the Eastern edge of the Alps. To obtain better signal-to-noise ratios in the noise correlation functions, we adopt a procedure using short time windows (2 hr). Energy tests are performed on the data to remove effects of transient sources and instrumental problems. The resulting 9-component correlation tensor is used to make travel time measurements on the vertical, radial and transverse components. Those measurements can be used to evaluate dispersion using frequency-time analysis for periods between 5-30 seconds. After rejecting paths without sufficient signal-to-noise ratio, we invert the velocity measurements using the Barmin et al. (2001) approach on a 10 km grid size. The obtained group velocity maps reveal complex structures with clear velocity contrasts between sedimentary basins and crystalline rocks. The Bohemian Massif and the Northern Calcareous Alps are associated with fast-velocity bodies. By contrast, the Vienna Basin presents clear low-velocity zones with group velocities down to 2 km/s at period of 7 s. The group velocities are then inverted to 3D images of shear wave speeds using the linear inversion method of Herrmann (2013). The results highlight the complex crustal structure and complement earthquake tomography studies in the region. Updated

  12. Statistical distribution of nonlinear random wave height

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU; Yijun; GUO; Peifang; SONG; Guiting; SONG; Jinbao; YIN; Baoshu; ZHAO; Xixi

    2006-01-01

    A statistical model of random wave is developed using Stokes wave theory of water wave dynamics. A new nonlinear probability distribution function of wave height is presented. The results indicate that wave steepness not only could be a parameter of the distribution function of wave height but also could reflect the degree of wave height distribution deviation from the Rayleigh distribution. The new wave height distribution overcomes the problem of Rayleigh distribution that the prediction of big wave is overestimated and the general wave is underestimated. The prediction of small probability wave height value of new distribution is also smaller than that of Rayleigh distribution. Wave height data taken from East China Normal University are used to verify the new distribution. The results indicate that the new distribution fits the measurements much better than the Rayleigh distribution.

  13. Determination of Love- and Rayleigh-Wave Magnitudes for Earthquakes and Explosions and Other Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-30

    3A8) For a typical continental crust (Russell, 2006), at T=20 sec let U=2.9 km/sec, and dU/dT= 0.02 km/sec2 in (3A8) for ...release; distribution is unlimited. iii Figure12. Ms and Ms(VMAX) processing results for the CUS model... processing results for the WUS model. ...................................... 40 Figure 14. Ms(VMAX) processing for two stations (Pinon Flats-left; ANMO

  14. A 3D algorithm based on the combined inversion of Rayleigh and Love waves for imaging and monitoring of shallow structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilz, Marco; Parolai, Stefano; Woith, Heiko

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARYIn recent years there has been increasing interest in the study of seismic noise interferometry as it can provide a complementary approach to active source or earthquake based methods for imaging and continuous monitoring the shallow structure of the Earth. This meaningful information is extracted from wavefields propagating between those receiver positions at which seismic noise was recorded. Until recently, noise-based imaging relied mostly on Rayleigh waves. However, considering similar wavelengths, a combined use of Rayleigh and Love wave tomography can succeed in retrieving velocity heterogeneities at depth due to their different sensitivity kernels. Here we present a novel one-step algorithm for simultaneously inverting Rayleigh and Love wave dispersion data aiming at identifying and describing complex 3D velocity structures. The algorithm may help to accurately and efficiently map the shear-wave velocities and the Poisson ratio of the surficial soil layers. In the high-frequency range, the scattered part of the correlation functions stabilizes sufficiently fast to provide a reliable estimate of the velocity structure not only for imaging purposes but also allows for changes in the medium properties to be monitored. Such monitoring can be achieved with a high spatial resolution in 3D and with a time resolution as small as a few hours. In this article, we describe a recent array experiment in a volcanic environment in Solfatara (Italy) and we show that this novel approach has identified strong velocity variations at the interface between liquids and gas-dominated reservoirs, allowing localizing a region which is highly dynamic due to the interaction between the deep convection and its surroundings.

  15. On a technique for deriving the explicit secular equation of Rayleigh waves in an orthotropic half-space coated by an orthotropic layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinh, P. C.; Anh, V. T. N.; Linh, N. T. K.

    2016-04-01

    The secular equation of Rayleigh propagating in an orthotropic half-space coated by an orthotropic layer has been obtained by Sotiropolous [Sotiropolous, D. A. (1999), The e®ect of anisotropy on guided elastic waves in a layered half-space, Mechanics of Materials 31, 215-233] and by Sotiropolous & Tougelidis [Sotiropolous, D. A. and Tougelidis, G. (1998), Guided elastic waves in orthotropic surface layer, Ultrasonics 36, 371-374]. However, it is not totally explicit and some misprints have occurred in this secular equation in both papers. This secular equation was derived by expanding directly a six-order determinant originated from the traction-free conditions at the top surface of the layer and the continuity of displacements and stresses through the interface between the layer and the half-space. Since the expansion of this six-order determinant was not shown in both two papers, it has been difficult to readers to recognize these misprints. This paper presents a technique that provides a totally explicit secular equation of the wave. The technique makes clear the way from the traction-free and continuity conditions to the secular equation and enables us to recognize the misprints appearing in the reported secular equation. The technique can be employed to obtain explicit secular equations of Rayleigh waves for many other cases. Moreover, the paper introduces a transfer matrix in explicit form for an orthotropic layer that is much simpler in form than the one obtained previously.

  16. Particle drift model for Z-pinch-driven magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Jia Kun; Xu, Qiang; Wang, Kun Lun; Ren, Xiao Dong; Huang, Xian Bin

    2016-09-01

    A theoretical model of Z-pinch driven magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability is proposed based on the particle drift point of view, which can explain the helical instability structure observed in premagnetized imploding liner experiments. It is demonstrated that all possible drift motions, including polarization drift, gradient drift, and curvature drift, which can lead to charge separations, each will attribute to an effective gravity acceleration. Theoretical predictions given by this model are dramatically different from those given by previous theories which have been readily recovered in the theory presented here as a limiting case. The theory shows qualitative agreement with available experimental data of the pitch angle and provides certain predictions to be verified.

  17. Modeling of the thermal boundary layer in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emran, Mohammad; Shishkina, Olga

    2016-11-01

    We report modeling of the thermal boundary layer in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC), which incorporates the effect of turbulent fluctuations. The study is based on the thermal boundary layer equation from Shishkina et al., and new Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of RBC in a cylindrical cell of the aspect ratio 1, for the Prandtl number variation of several orders of magnitude. Our modeled temperature profiles are found to agree with the DNS much better than those obtained with the classical Prandtl-Blasius or Falkner-Skan approaches. The work is supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) under the Grant Sh405/4 - Heisenberg fellowship and SFB963, Project A06.

  18. Two Mode Resonator and Contact Model for Standing Wave Piezomotor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, B.; Blanke, Mogens; Helbo, J.

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents a model for a standing wave piezoelectric motor with a two bending mode resonator. The resonator is modelled using Hamilton's principle and the Rayleigh-Ritz method. The contact is modelled using the Lagrange Multiplier method under the assumption of slip and it is showed how...... to solve the set of differential-algebraic equations. Detailled simulations show resonance frequencies as function of the piezoelement's position, tip trajectories and contact forces. The paper demonstrates that contact stiffness and stick should be included in such model to obtain physically realistic...

  19. Study and Simulation of Deformation Mechanics Modeling of Flexible Workpiece Processing by Rayleigh-Ritz Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaohua Deng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the calculation problems of bending deformation of FWP processing. Take three axis CNC machining as an example, to establish mechanics model of flexible workpiece processing process. The flexible workpiece balance equation is a two-dimensional partial differential equation, to solve the problem of flexible workpiece bending deformation using Rayleigh-Ritz method and designing the test function of bending deformation of flexible workpiece. By satisfying the minimum potential energy condition of FWP processing to work out the approximate solution of bending deformation of flexible workpiece, find out the relationship between material properties of flexible piece, acting force Fz, and deformation value. Finally, the rectangle flexible workpiece which is made up of polyurethane sponge is selected as an experiment subject. The results show that the average relative deviation between theoretical value and observed value is only 5.51%. It is proved that the bending deformation test function satisfies the actual deformation calculation requirements.

  20. Models of wave memory

    CERN Document Server

    Kashchenko, Serguey

    2015-01-01

    This monograph examines in detail models of neural systems described by delay-differential equations. Each element of the medium (neuron) is an oscillator that generates, in standalone mode, short impulses also known as spikes. The book discusses models of synaptic interaction between neurons, which lead to complex oscillatory modes in the system. In addition, it presents a solution to the problem of choosing the parameters of interaction in order to obtain attractors with predetermined structure. These attractors are represented as images encoded in the form of autowaves (wave memory). The target audience primarily comprises researchers and experts in the field, but it will also be beneficial for graduate students.

  1. Study on the electromechanical coupling coefficient of Rayleigh-type surface acoustic waves in semi-infinite piezoelectrics/non-piezoelectrics superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shi; Zhang, Yinhong; Lin, Shuyu; Fu, Zhiqiang

    2014-02-01

    The electromechanical coupling coefficient of Rayleigh-type surface acoustic waves in semi-infinite piezoelectrics/non-piezoelectrics superlattices is investigated by the transfer matrix method. Research results show the high electromechanical coupling coefficient can be obtained in these systems. The optimization design of it is also discussed fully. It is significantly influenced by electrical boundary conditions on interfaces, thickness ratios of piezoelectric and non-piezoelectric layers, and material parameters (such as velocities of pure longitudinal and transversal bulk waves in non-piezoelectric layers). In order to obtain higher electromechanical coupling coefficient, shorted interfaces, non-piezoelectric materials with large velocities of longitudinal and transversal bulk waves, and proper thickness ratios should be chosen.

  2. Sulfur Isotope Fractionation in Magmatic Systems:Models of Rayleigh Distillation and Selective Flux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑永飞

    1990-01-01

    The effect of Rayleigh distillation by outgassing of SO2 and H2S on the isotopic composition of sulfur remaining in silicate melts is quantitatively modelled.A threshold mole fraction of sulfur in sulfide component of the melts is reckoned to be of critical importance in shifting the δ34S of the melts mith respect to the original magmas.The partial equilibrium fractionation in a magmatic system is evaluated by assuming that a non-equilibrium flux of sulfur occurs between magmatic volatiles and the melts,while an equilibrium fractionation is approached between sulfate and sulfide within the melts.The results show that under high fo2 conditions,the sulfate/sulfide ratio in a melt entds to increase,and the δ34S value of sulfur in a solidified rock might then be shifted in the positive direction.This may either be due to Rayleigh outgassing in case the mole fraction of sulfide is less than the threshold,or due to a unidirectional increase in δ34S value of the sulfate with decreaing temperature,Conversely,at low fo2,the sulfate/sulfide ratio tends to decrease and the δ34S value of total sulfur could be driven in the negative direction,either because of the Rayleigh outgassing in case the mole fraction of sulfide is greater than the threshold,or because of a unidirectional decrease inδ34S value of the sulfide.To establish isotopic equilibrium between sulfate and sulfide,the HM,QFM or WM buffers in the magmatic system are suggested to provide the redox couple that could simultaneously reduce the sulfate and oxidize the sulfide.CaO present in the silicatte Melts is also called upon to participate in the chemical equilibrium between sulfate and sulfide,Consequently,the δ34S value of an igneous rock could considerably deviate from that of its original magma due to the influence of oxygen fugacity and temperature at the time of magma solidification.

  3. Statistical Analysis of Wind Power Density Based on the Weibull and Rayleigh Models of Selected Site in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliashim Albani

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The demand for electricity in Malaysia is growing in tandem with its Gross Domestic Product (GDP growth. Malaysia is going to need even more energy as it strives to grow towards a high-income economy. Malaysia has taken steps to exploring the renewable energy (RE including wind energy as an alternative source for generating electricity. In the present study, the wind energy potential of the site is statistically analyzed based on 1-year measured hourly time-series wind speed data. Wind data were obtained from the Malaysian Meteorological Department (MMD weather stations at nine selected sites in Malaysia. The data were calculated by using the MATLAB programming to determine and generate the Weibull and Rayleigh distribution functions. Both Weibull and Rayleigh models are fitted and compared to the Field data probability distributions of year 2011. From the analysis, it was shown that the Weibull distribution is fitting the Field data better than the Rayleigh distribution for the whole year 2011. The wind power density of every site has been studied based on the Weibull and Rayleigh functions. The Weibull distribution shows a good approximation for estimation of wind power density in Malaysia.

  4. Rayleigh-Taylor finger instability mixing in hydrodynamic shell convection models

    CERN Document Server

    Mocak, Miroslav

    2010-01-01

    Mixing processes in stars driven by composition gradients as a result of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability are not anticipated. They are supported only by hydrodynamic studies of stellar convection. We find that such mixing occurs below the bottom edge of convection zones in our multidimensional hydrodynamic shell convection models. It operates at interfaces created by off-center nuclear burning, where less dense gas with higher mean molecular weight is located above denser gas with a lower mean molecular weight. We discuss the mixing under various conditions with hydrodynamic convection models based on stellar evolutionary calculations of the core helium flash in a 1.25 Msun star, the core carbon flash in a 9.3 Msun star, and of oxygen burning shell in a star with a mass of 23 Msun. We simulate the hydrodynamic behavior of shell convection during various phases of stellar evolution with the Eulerian hydrodynamics code HERAKLES in two and three spatial dimensions. Initial models for this purpose are obtained by...

  5. Rayleigh-wave imaging of upper-mantle shear velocities beneath the Malawi Rift; Preliminary results from the SEGMeNT experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accardo, N. J.; Gaherty, J. B.; Shillington, D. J.; Nyblade, A.; Ebinger, C. J.; Mbogoni, G. J.; Chindandali, P. R. N.; Mulibo, G. D.; Ferdinand-Wambura, R.; Kamihanda, G.

    2015-12-01

    The Malawi Rift (MR) is an immature rift located at the southern tip of the Western branch of the East African Rift System (EARS). Pronounced border faults and tectonic segmentation are seen within the upper crust. Surface volcanism in the region is limited to the Rungwe volcanic province located north of Lake Malawi (Nyasa). However, the distribution of extension and magma at depth in the crust and mantle lithosphere is unknown. As the Western Rift of the EARS is largely magma-poor except for discrete volcanic provinces, the MR presents the ideal location to elucidate the role of magmatism in early-stage rifting and the manifestation of segmentation at depth. This study investigates the shear velocity of the crust and mantle lithosphere beneath the MR to constrain the thermal structure, the amount of total crustal and lithospheric thinning, and the presence and distribution of magmatism beneath the rift. Utilizing 55 stations from the SEGMeNT (Study of Extension and maGmatism in Malawi aNd Tanzania) passive-source seismic experiment operating in Malawi and Tanzania, we employed a multi-channel cross-correlation algorithm to obtain inter-station phase and amplitude information from Rayleigh wave observations between 20 and 80 s period. We retrieve estimates of phase velocity between 9-20 s period from ambient noise cross-correlograms in the frequency domain via Aki's formula. We invert phase velocity measurements to obtain estimates of shear velocity (Vs) between 50-200 km depth. Preliminary results reveal a striking low-velocity zone (LVZ) beneath the Rungwe volcanic province with Vs ~4.2-4.3 km/s in the uppermost mantle. Low velocities extend along the entire strike of Lake Malawi and to the west where a faster velocity lid (~4.5 km/s) is imaged. These preliminary results will be extended by incorporating broadband data from seven "lake"-bottom seismometers (LBS) to be retrieved from Lake Malawi in October of this year. The crust and mantle modeling will be

  6. Wave Equation Inversion of Skeletonized SurfaceWaves

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zhendong

    2015-08-19

    We present a surface-wave inversion method that inverts for the S-wave velocity from the Rayleigh dispersion curve for the fundamental-mode. We call this wave equation inversion of skeletonized surface waves because the dispersion curve for the fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave is inverted using finite-difference solutions to the wave equation. The best match between the predicted and observed dispersion curves provides the optimal S-wave velocity model. Results with synthetic and field data illustrate the benefits and limitations of this method.

  7. Phase-field model for the Rayleigh--Taylor instability of immiscible fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Celani, Antonio; Muratore-Ginanneschi, Paolo; Vozella, Lara

    2008-01-01

    The Rayleigh--Taylor instability of two immiscible fluids in the limit of small Atwood numbers is studied by means of a phase-field description. In this method the sharp fluid interface is replaced by a thin, yet finite, transition layer where the interfacial forces vary smoothly. This is achieved by introducing an order parameter (the phase field) whose variation is continuous across the interfacial layers and is uniform in the bulk region. The phase field model obeys a Cahn--Hilliard equation and is two-way coupled to the standard Navier--Stokes equations. Starting from this system of equations we have first performed a linear analysis from which we have analytically rederived the known gravity-capillary dispersion relation in the limit of vanishing mixing energy density and capillary width. We have performed numerical simulations and identified a region of parameters in which the known properties of the linear phase (both stable and unstable) are reproduced in a very accurate way. This has been done both i...

  8. Implosion of an underwater spark-generated bubble and acoustic energy evaluation using the Rayleigh model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buogo, Silvano; Cannelli, Giovanni B

    2002-06-01

    The growth, collapse, and rebound of a vapor bubble generated by an underwater spark is studied by means of high-speed cinematography, simultaneously acquiring the emitted acoustic signature. Video recordings show that the growth and collapse phases are nearly symmetrical during the first two or three cycles, the bubble shape being approximately spherical. After 2-3 cycles the bubble behavior changes from a collapsing/rebounding regime with sound-emitting implosions to a pulsating regime with no implosions. The motion of the bubble wall during the first collapses was found to be consistent with the Rayleigh model of a cavity in an incompressible liquid, with the inclusion of a vapor pressure term at constant temperature within each bubble cycle. An estimate of the pressure inside the bubble is obtained measuring the collapse time and maximum radius, and the amount of energy converted into acoustical energy upon each implosion is deduced. The resulting value of acoustic efficiency was found to be in agreement with measurements based on the emitted acoustic pulse.

  9. A sand wave simulation model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nemeth, A.A.; Hulscher, S.J.M.H.; Damme, van R.M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Sand waves form a prominent regular pattern in the offshore seabeds of sandy shallow seas. A two dimensional vertical (2DV) flow and morphological numerical model describing the behaviour of these sand waves has been developed. The model contains the 2DV shallow water equations, with a free water su

  10. Wave groups in uni-directional surface-wave models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groesen, van E.

    1998-01-01

    Uni-directional wave models are used to study wave groups that appear in wave tanks of hydrodynamic laboratories; characteristic for waves in such tanks is that the wave length is rather small, comparable to the depth of the layer. In second-order theory, the resulting Nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) eq

  11. Model testing of Wave Dragon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    Previous to this project a scale model 1:50 of the wave energy converter (WEC) Wave Dragon was built by the Danish Maritime Institute and tested in a wave tank at Aalborg University (AAU). The test programs investigated the movements of the floating structure, mooring forces and forces in the reflectors. The first test was followed by test establishing the efficiency in different sea states. The scale model has also been extensively tested in the EU Joule Craft project JOR-CT98-7027 (Low-Pressure Turbine and Control Equipment for Wave Energy Converters /Wave Dragon) at University College Cork, Hydraulics and Maritime Research Centre, Ireland. The results of the previous model tests have formed the basis for a redesign of the WEC. In this project a reconstruction of the scale 1:50 model and sequential tests of changes to the model geometry and mass distribution parameters will be performed. AAU will make the modifications to the model based on the revised Loewenmark design and perform the tests in their wave tank. Grid connection requirements have been established. A hydro turbine with no movable parts besides the rotor has been developed and a scale model 1:3.5 tested, with a high efficiency over the whole head range. The turbine itself has possibilities for being used in river systems with low head and variable flow, an area of interest for many countries around the world. Finally, a regulation strategy for the turbines has been developed, which is essential for the future deployment of Wave Dragon.The video includes the following: 1. Title, 2. Introduction of the Wave Dragon, 3. Model test series H, Hs = 3 m, Rc = 3 m, 4. Model test series H, Hs = 5 m, Rc = 4 m, 5. Model test series I, Hs = 7 m, Rc = 1.25 m, 6. Model test series I, Hs = 7 m, Rc = 4 m, 7. Rolling title. On this VCD additional versions of the video can be found in the directory 'addvideo' for playing the video on PC's. These versions are: Model testing of Wave Dragon, DVD version

  12. Numerical modeling of water waves

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Pengzhi

    2008-01-01

    Modelling large-scale wave fields and their interaction with coastal and offshore structures has become much more feasible over the last two decades with increases in computer speeds. Wave modelling can be viewed as an extension of wave theory, a mature and widely published field, applied to practical engineering through the use of computer tools. Information about the various wave models which have been developed is often widely scattered in the literature, and consequently this is one of the first books devoted to wave models and their applications. At the core of the book is an introduction to various types of wave models. For each model, the theoretical assumptions, the application range, and the advantages and limitations are elaborated. The combined use of different wave models from large-scale to local-scale is highlighted with a detailed discussion of the application and matching of boundary conditions. At the same time the book provides a grounding in hydrodynamics, wave theory, and numerical methods...

  13. Parameter-free numerical method for modeling thermal convection in square cavities in a wide range of Rayleigh numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goloviznin, V. M.; Korotkin, I. A.; Finogenov, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    Some numerical results for the two- and three-dimensional de Vahl Davis benchmark are presented. This benchmark describes thermal convection in a square (cubic) cavity with vertical heated walls in a wide range of Rayleigh numbers (104 to 1014), which covers both laminar and highly turbulent f lows. Turbulent f lows are usually described using a turbulence model with parameters that depend on the Rayleigh number and require adjustment. An alternative is Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) methods, but they demand extremely large computational grids. Recently, there has been an increasing interest in DNS methods with an incomplete resolution, which, in some cases, are able to provide acceptable results without resolving Kolmogorov scales. On the basis of this approach, the so-called parameter-free computational techniques have been developed. These methods cover a wide range of Rayleigh numbers and allow computing various integral properties of heat transport on relatively coarse computational grids. In this paper, a new numerical method based on the CABARET scheme is proposed for solving the Navier-Stokes equations in the Boussinesq approximation. This technique does not involve a turbulence model or any tuning parameters and has a second-order approximation scheme in time and space on uniform and nonuniform grids with a minimal computational stencil. Testing the technique on the de Vahl Davis benchmark and a sequence of refined grids shows that the method yields integral heat f luxes with a high degree of accuracy for both laminar and highly turbulent f lows. For Rayleigh numbers up to 1014, a several percent accuracy is achieved on an extremely coarse grid consisting of 20 × 20 cells refined toward the boundary. No definite or comprehensive explanation of this computational phenomenon has been given. Cautious optimism is expressed regarding the perspectives of using the new method for thermal convection computations at low Prandtl numbers typical of liquid metals.

  14. Wave Generation in Physical Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Frigaard, Peter

    The present book describes the most important aspects of wave generation techniques in physical models. Moreover, the book serves as technical documentation for the wave generation software AwaSys 6, cf. Aalborg University (2012). In addition to the two main authors also Tue Hald and Michael...

  15. Rayleigh/Raman lidar observations of gravity wave activity from 15 to 70 km altitude over Syowa (69°S, 40°E), the Antarctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogure, Masaru; Nakamura, Takuji; Ejiri, Mitsumu K.; Nishiyama, Takanori; Tomikawa, Yoshihiro; Tsutsumi, Masaki; Suzuki, Hidehiko; Tsuda, Takuo T.; Kawahara, Takuya D.; Abo, Makoto

    2017-08-01

    The potential energy of gravity waves (GWs) per unit mass (Ep), at altitudes of 15-70 km, has been examined from temperature profiles obtained by a Rayleigh/Raman lidar at Syowa Station (69°S, 40°E) from May 2011 to October 2013, with the exception of the summer months. The GWs with ground-based wave periods longer than 2 h and vertical wavelengths between 1.8 and 16 km were extracted from the temperature profiles. Ep was larger in winter than in spring and fall, although in 2012, at altitudes below 30 km, Ep was larger in spring than in winter and fall. Ep increased with a mean scale height of 11.3 km. Ep profiles showed a local maximum at an altitude of 20 km and a minimum at 25 km in almost every month, which has not been reported by previous studies observed by radiosondes. The values of Ep in October of 2012 were smaller at 35-60 km and larger at 20-35 km than those in October of 2011 and 2013. This difference in the Ep profile is most probably caused by different seasonal variations of zonal winds. The larger and smaller Ep values seem to be observed both below and above the altitude at which the zonal wind speed reached 0 m s-1. This result suggests that wind filtering of gravity waves with small phase speeds is significantly important in early spring.

  16. Abnormal Waves Modelled as Second-order Conditional Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents results for the expected second order short-crested wave conditional of a given wave crest at a specific point in time and space. The analysis is based on the second order Sharma and Dean shallow water wave theory. Numerical results showing the importance of the spectral density......, the water depth and the directional spreading on the conditional mean wave profile are presented. Application of conditional waves to model and explain abnormal waves, e.g. the well-known New Year Wave measured at the Draupner platform January 1st 1995, is discussed. Whereas the wave profile can be modelled...... quite well by the second order conditional wave including directional spreading and finite water depth the probability to encounter such a wave is still, however, extremely rare. The use of the second order conditional wave as initial condition to a fully non-linear three-dimensional analysis...

  17. Near Shore Wave Modeling and applications to wave energy estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zodiatis, G.; Galanis, G.; Hayes, D.; Nikolaidis, A.; Kalogeri, C.; Adam, A.; Kallos, G.; Georgiou, G.

    2012-04-01

    The estimation of the wave energy potential at the European coastline is receiving increased attention the last years as a result of the adaptation of novel policies in the energy market, the concernsfor global warming and the nuclear energy security problems. Within this framework, numerical wave modeling systems keep a primary role in the accurate description of wave climate and microclimate that is a prerequisite for any wave energy assessment study. In the present work two of the most popular wave models are used for the estimation of the wave parameters at the coastline of Cyprus: The latest parallel version of the wave model WAM (ECMWF version), which employs new parameterization of shallow water effects, and the SWAN model, classically used for near shore wave simulations. The results obtained from the wave models near shores are studied by an energy estimation point of view: The wave parameters that mainly affect the energy temporal and spatial distribution, that is the significant wave height and the mean wave period, are statistically analyzed,focusing onpossible different aspects captured by the two models. Moreover, the wave spectrum distribution prevailing in different areas are discussed contributing, in this way, to the wave energy assessmentin the area. This work is a part of two European projects focusing on the estimation of the wave energy distribution around Europe: The MARINA platform (http://www.marina-platform.info/ index.aspx) and the Ewave (http://www.oceanography.ucy.ac.cy/ewave/) projects.

  18. Parametric-based brain Magnetic Resonance Elastography using a Rayleigh damping material model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Andrii Y; Sellier, Mathieu; Docherty, Paul D; Chase, J Geoffrey

    2014-10-01

    The three-parameter Rayleigh damping (RD) model applied to time-harmonic Magnetic Resonance Elastography (MRE) has potential to better characterise fluid-saturated tissue systems. However, it is not uniquely identifiable at a single frequency. One solution to this problem involves simultaneous inverse problem solution of multiple input frequencies over a broad range. As data is often limited, an alternative elegant solution is a parametric RD reconstruction, where one of the RD parameters (μI or ρI) is globally constrained allowing accurate identification of the remaining two RD parameters. This research examines this parametric inversion approach as applied to in vivo brain imaging. Overall, success was achieved in reconstruction of the real shear modulus (μR) that showed good correlation with brain anatomical structures. The mean and standard deviation shear stiffness values of the white and gray matter were found to be 3±0.11kPa and 2.2±0.11kPa, respectively, which are in good agreement with values established in the literature or measured by mechanical testing. Parametric results with globally constrained μI indicate that selecting a reasonable value for the μI distribution has a major effect on the reconstructed ρI image and concomitant damping ratio (ξd). More specifically, the reconstructed ρI image using a realistic μI=333Pa value representative of a greater portion of the brain tissue showed more accurate differentiation of the ventricles within the intracranial matter compared to μI=1000Pa, and ξd reconstruction with μI=333Pa accurately captured the higher damping levels expected within the vicinity of the ventricles. Parametric RD reconstruction shows potential for accurate recovery of the stiffness characteristics and overall damping profile of the in vivo living brain despite its underlying limitations. Hence, a parametric approach could be valuable with RD models for diagnostic MRE imaging with single frequency data. Copyright © 2014

  19. Empirical assessment of the validity limits of the surface wave full ray theory using realistic 3-D Earth models

    KAUST Repository

    Parisi, Laura

    2016-02-10

    The surface wave full ray theory (FRT) is an efficient tool to calculate synthetic waveforms of surface waves. It combines the concept of local modes with exact ray tracing as a function of frequency, providing a more complete description of surface wave propagation than the widely used great circle approximation (GCA). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the ability of the FRT approach to model teleseismic long-period surface waveforms (T ∼ 45–150 s) in the context of current 3-D Earth models to empirically assess its validity domain and its scope for future studies in seismic tomography. To achieve this goal, we compute vertical and horizontal component fundamental mode synthetic Rayleigh waveforms using the FRT, which are compared with calculations using the highly accurate spectral element method. We use 13 global earth models including 3-D crustal and mantle structure, which are derived by successively varying the strength and lengthscale of heterogeneity in current tomographic models. For completeness, GCA waveforms are also compared with the spectral element method. We find that the FRT accurately predicts the phase and amplitude of long-period Rayleigh waves (T ∼ 45–150 s) for almost all the models considered, with errors in the modelling of the phase (amplitude) of Rayleigh waves being smaller than 5 per cent (10 per cent) in most cases. The largest errors in phase and amplitude are observed for T ∼ 45 s and for the three roughest earth models considered that exhibit shear wave anomalies of up to ∼20 per cent, which is much larger than in current global tomographic models. In addition, we find that overall the GCA does not predict Rayleigh wave amplitudes well, except for the longest wave periods (T ∼ 150 s) and the smoothest models considered. Although the GCA accurately predicts Rayleigh wave phase for current earth models such as S20RTS and S40RTS, FRT\\'s phase errors are smaller, notably for the shortest wave periods considered (T

  20. Empirical assessment of the validity limits of the surface wave full ray theory using realistic 3-D Earth models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Laura; Ferreira, Ana M. G.

    2016-04-01

    The surface wave full ray theory (FRT) is an efficient tool to calculate synthetic waveforms of surface waves. It combines the concept of local modes with exact ray tracing as a function of frequency, providing a more complete description of surface wave propagation than the widely used great circle approximation (GCA). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the ability of the FRT approach to model teleseismic long-period surface waveforms (T ˜ 45-150 s) in the context of current 3-D Earth models to empirically assess its validity domain and its scope for future studies in seismic tomography. To achieve this goal, we compute vertical and horizontal component fundamental mode synthetic Rayleigh waveforms using the FRT, which are compared with calculations using the highly accurate spectral element method. We use 13 global earth models including 3-D crustal and mantle structure, which are derived by successively varying the strength and lengthscale of heterogeneity in current tomographic models. For completeness, GCA waveforms are also compared with the spectral element method. We find that the FRT accurately predicts the phase and amplitude of long-period Rayleigh waves (T ˜ 45-150 s) for almost all the models considered, with errors in the modelling of the phase (amplitude) of Rayleigh waves being smaller than 5 per cent (10 per cent) in most cases. The largest errors in phase and amplitude are observed for T ˜ 45 s and for the three roughest earth models considered that exhibit shear wave anomalies of up to ˜20 per cent, which is much larger than in current global tomographic models. In addition, we find that overall the GCA does not predict Rayleigh wave amplitudes well, except for the longest wave periods (T ˜ 150 s) and the smoothest models considered. Although the GCA accurately predicts Rayleigh wave phase for current earth models such as S20RTS and S40RTS, FRT's phase errors are smaller, notably for the shortest wave periods considered (T ˜ 45 s and

  1. Modeling fluctuations in scattered waves

    CERN Document Server

    Jakeman, E

    2006-01-01

    Fluctuations in scattered waves limit the performance of imaging and remote sensing systems that operate on all wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum. To better understand these fluctuations, Modeling Fluctuations in Scattered Waves provides a practical guide to the phenomenology, mathematics, and simulation of non-Gaussian noise models and discusses how they can be used to characterize the statistics of scattered waves.Through their discussion of mathematical models, the authors demonstrate the development of new sensing techniques as well as offer intelligent choices that can be made for system analysis. Using experimental results and numerical simulation, the book illustrates the properties and applications of these models. The first two chapters introduce statistical tools and the properties of Gaussian noise, including results on phase statistics. The following chapters describe Gaussian processes and the random walk model, address multiple scattering effects and propagation through an extended med...

  2. Numerical Modelling of Wave Run-Up: Regular Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramirez, Jorge; Frigaard, Peter; Andersen, Thomas Lykke;

    2011-01-01

    Wave loads are important in problems related to offshore structure, such as wave run-up, slamming. The computation of such wave problems are carried out by CFD models. This paper presents one model, NS3, which solve 3D Navier-Stokes equations and use Volume of Fluid (VOF) method to treat the free...

  3. Numerical Modelling of Wave Run-Up: Regular Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramirez, Jorge; Frigaard, Peter; Andersen, Thomas Lykke

    2011-01-01

    Wave loads are important in problems related to offshore structure, such as wave run-up, slamming. The computation of such wave problems are carried out by CFD models. This paper presents one model, NS3, which solve 3D Navier-Stokes equations and use Volume of Fluid (VOF) method to treat the free...

  4. Analysis of gradient-diffusion modeling of Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability-induced mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Oleg; Mueschke, Nicholas; Latini, Marco; Don, Wai Sun; Andrews, Malcolm

    2006-11-01

    Gradient-diffusion models of turbulent transport in Rayleigh- Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability-induced mixing are assessed using direct numerical simulation (DNS) and implicit large-eddy simulation (ILES) data. Mean and fluctuating fields, defined from spatial averages over the periodic directions of the DNS, are used to construct the unclosed terms in the turbulent kinetic energy transport equation. These terms are then compared a priori with the corresponding terms modeled using the gradient-diffusion approximation to assess the validity of this approximation for these buoyancy- and shock- driven flows. Implications for two-equation turbulence modeling of Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability-induced mixing are discussed. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-Eng-48. This research was also sponsored by the National Nuclear Security Administration under the Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Program through DOE Research Grant No. DE-FG03- 02NA00060. UCRL-ABS-223369

  5. Seismic evidence of crustal heterogeneity beneath the northwestern Deccan volcanic province of India from joint inversion of Rayleigh wave dispersion measurements and P receiver functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, A. A.; Mohan, G.

    2016-10-01

    The northwestern Deccan volcanic province (NWDVP) of India, encompassing the Saurashtra peninsula and the adjoining Gulf of Cambay, is investigated through joint inversion of surface wave dispersion measurements and teleseismic P receiver functions, to estimate the crustal and shallow upper mantle shear wave velocity (Vs) structure. The Mw ∼ 7.7 Bhuj earthquake and the post Bhuj regional events, recorded during the period 2001-2010 at 7 stations along 37 source-receiver paths were used along with 35 teleseismic events. A joint curve fitting inversion technique is applied to obtain a best fit for the fundamental mode Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion curves for time periods 5-50 s and high quality crustal P wave receiver functions obtained at each station. Significant crustal heterogeneity is observed within the study region with the average crustal Vs ranging from 3.5 km/s to 3.8 km/s with the paths cutting across the Gulf of Cambay exhibiting large reduction in shear wave velocities. Utilizing the average crustal Vs ≈ 3.66 km/s estimated for Saurashtra, together with the average crustal P wave velocity (Vp) ≈ 6.54 km/s derived independently through deep seismic sounding studies, yields a bulk Vp/Vs ratio of 1.786 or an equivalent crustal Poisson's ratio of 0.271. A major contribution to the high Poisson's ratio comes from the 12 to 16 km thick lower crustal layers with shear velocities ranging from 3.8 km/s to 4.19 km/s suggesting widespread magmatic underplating due to emplacement of mafic cumulates in the lower crust. The shallow uppermost mantle shear velocities are in the range 4.2-4.5 km/s averaging 4.36 km/s, which is less than that observed for the Indian shield, indicating the effects of residual thermal anomaly. The variation in the crustal Vs, high Poisson's ratios and low upper mantle shear velocities reflect the thermal and compositional effects of the Deccan volcanism which are manifested in terms of pervasive presence of mafic dykes

  6. Spiral defect chaos in a model of Rayleigh-Benard convection

    CERN Document Server

    Xi, H; Viñals, J; Xi, Hao-wen; Vinals., Jorge

    1993-01-01

    A numerical solution of a generalized Swift-Hohenberg equation in two dimensions reveals the existence of a spatio-temporal chaotic state comprised of a large number of rotating spirals. This state is observed for a reduced Rayleigh number $\\epsilon=0.25$. The power spectrum of the state is isotropic, and the spatial correlation function decays exponentially, with an estimated decay length $\\xi \\approx 2.5 \\lambda_{c}$, where $\\lambda_{c}$ is the critical wavelength near the onset of convection. Our study suggests that this spiral defect state occurs for low Prandtl numbers and large aspect ratios.

  7. Asymptotic dynamics for the Cucker-Smale-type model with the Rayleigh friction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Seung-Yeal [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Taeyoung; Kim, Jong-Ho, E-mail: syha@snu.ac.k, E-mail: tha@nims.re.k, E-mail: jhkim@nims.re.k [National Institute for Mathematical Sciences, 385-16, 3F Tower Koreana, Doryong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-340 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-06

    We study the asymptotic flocking dynamics for the Cucker-Smale-type second-order continuous-time dynamical system with the Rayleigh friction. For mean-field communications with a positive lower bound, we show that an asymptotic flocking occurs for any compactly supported initial configuration in a large coupling regime. In contrast, in a small coupling regime, an asymptotic flocking is possible for a restricted class of initial configurations near complete flocking states. We also present several numerical simulations and compare them with our analytical results.

  8. Tango waves in a bidomain model of fertilization calcium waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue-Xian

    2003-12-01

    Fertilization of an egg cell is marked by one or several Ca 2+ waves that travel across the intra-cellular space, called fertilization Ca 2+ waves. Patterns of Ca 2+ waves observed in mature or immature oocytes include traveling fronts and pulses as well as concentric and spiral waves. These patterns have been studied in other excitable media in physical, chemical, and biological systems. Here, we report the discovery of a new wave phenomenon in the numerical study of a bidomain model of fertilization Ca 2+ waves. This wave is a front that propagates in a back-and-forth manner that resembles the movement of tango dancers, thus is called a tango wave. When the medium is excitable, a forward-moving tango wave can generate traveling pulses that propagate down the space without reversal. The study shows that the occurrence of tango waves is related to spatial inhomogeneity in the local dynamics. This is tested and confirmed by simulating similar waves in a medium with stationary spatial inhomogeneity. Similar waves are also obtained in a FitzHugh-Nagumo system with a linear spatial ramp. In both the bidomain model of Ca 2+ waves and the FitzHugh-Nagumo system, the front is stable when the slope of a linear ramp is large. As the slope decreases beyond a critical value, front oscillations occur. The study shows that tango waves facilitate the dispersion of localized Ca 2+. Key features of the bidomain model underlying the occurrence of tango waves are revealed. These features are commonly found in egg cells of a variety of species. Thus, we predict that tango waves can occur in real egg cells provided that a slowly varying inhomogeneity does occur following the sperm entry. The observation of tango wave-like waves in nemertean worm and ascidian eggs seems to support such a prediction.

  9. Enhanced Rayleigh waves tomography of Mexico using ambient noise cross-correlations (C1) and correlations of coda of correlations (C3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spica, Z. J.; Perton, M.; Calo, M.; Cordoba-Montiel, F.; Legrand, D.; Iglesias, A.

    2015-12-01

    Standard application of the seismic ambient noise tomography considers the existence of synchronous records at stations for green's functions retrieval. More recent theoretical and experimental observations showed the possibility to apply correlation of coda of noise correlation (C3) to obtain green's functions between stations of asynchronous seismic networks making possible to dramatically increase databases for imagining the Earth's interior. However, this possibility has not been fully exploited yet, and right now the data C3 are not included into tomographic inversions to refine seismic structures. Here we show for the first time how to incorporate the data of C1 and C3 to calculate dispersion maps of Rayleigh waves in the range period of 10-120s, and how the merging of these datasets improves the resolution of the structures imaged. Tomographic images are obtained for an area covering Mexico, the Gulf of Mexico and the southern U.S. We show dispersion maps calculated using both data of C1 and the complete dataset (C1+C3). The latter provide new details of the seismic structure of the region allowing a better understanding of their role on the geodynamics of the study area. The resolving power obtained in our study is several times higher than in previous studies based on ambient noise. This demonstrates the new possibilities for imaging the Earth's crust and upper mantle using this enlarged database.

  10. Modeling Tsunamis and Hydroacoustic Waves from Megathrust Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotto, G. C.; Belair, G. M.; Kozdon, J. E.; Dunham, E. M.

    2013-12-01

    The immense damage caused by the 11 March 2011 Tohoku, Japan earthquake demonstrated the importance of understanding tsunami excitation by megathrust ruptures. Of particular interest are any faster-propagating seismic or hydroacoustic signals that could be used to rapidly predict tsunami wave heights. To study the full seismic, acoustic, and tsunami wavefields, we have developed a provably stable and accurate finite-difference method that couples an elastic solid to a compressible fluid subject to gravitational restoring forces. We introduce a new treatment of the dynamic (free surface) boundary condition on the moving sea surface in the presence of gravity that is valid for small-amplitude perturbations about an ocean initially in hydrostatic balance. This permits us to model surface gravity waves in the linearized limit, including dispersion from nonhydrostatic motions at short wavelengths. This is done using summation-by-parts (SBP) finite difference operators and weak enforcement of boundary conditions. Shallow coseismic slip during megathrust events causes seafloor uplift that excites both tsunamis and long-period (~10 s) hydroacoustic waves; the latter ocean sound waves travel at several km/s and reach the coast many minutes sooner than tsunami waves. These hydroacoustic waves might be used as part of local tsunami early warning systems. Our previous dynamic rupture simulations of the Tohoku event, which neglected surface gravity waves, revealed correlations between pressure perturbations recorded at the seafloor (associated with ~10 s hydroacoustic waves in the ocean) and near-trench seafloor uplift caused by shallow slip. Now that we can model tsunamis within the same code, we plan to quantify the correlation between these pressure perturbations and tsunami height. We are also investigating properties of these hydroacoustic modes, which involve significant motions of the solid Earth as well as the ocean. Phase and group velocity curves for a uniform ocean

  11. Low-dimensional model of turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection in a Cartesian cell with square domain

    CERN Document Server

    Bailon-Cuba, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    A low-dimensional model (LDM) for turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection in a Cartesian cell with square domain, based on the Galerkin projection of the Boussinesq equations onto a finite set of empirical eigenfunctions, is presented. The empirical eigenfunctions are obtained from a joint Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) of the velocity and temperature fields using the Snapshot Method on the basis of a direct numerical simulation (DNS). The resulting LDM is a quadratic inhomogeneous system of coupled ordinary differential equations which we use to describe the long-time temporal evolution of the large-scale mode amplitudes for a Rayleigh number of 1e5 and a Prandtl number of 0.7. The truncation to a finite number of degrees of freedom, that does not exceed a number of 310 for the present, requires the additional implementation of an eddy viscosity-diffusivity to capture the missing dissipation of the small-scale modes. The magnitude of this additional dissipation mechanism is determined by requiring statis...

  12. Incorporating Love- and Rayleigh-Wave Magnitudes, Unequal Earthquake and Explosion Variance Assumptions, and Intrastation Complexity for Improved Event Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-30

    formulation of the teleseismic explosion identification problem with multiple discriminants, Bull. Seism . Soc.Am.9T. 1730-1741. Bonner, J.L., D...Application at Regional and Teleseismic Distances, Part II: Application and Ms-mh Performance. Bull. Seism . Soc. Am. 96: 678-696 Bonner, J. L., R. B...Herrmann, D. Harkrider, and M. Pasyanos (2008). The surface wave magnitude for the 9 October 2006 North Korean nuclear explosion. Bull. Seism . Soc

  13. Direct Numerical Simulation of the Rayleigh-Taylor Instability with the Spectral Element Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xu; TAN Duo-Wang

    2009-01-01

    A novel method is proposed to simulate Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities using a specially-developed unsteady threedimensional high-order spectral element method code.The numerical model used consists of Navier-Stokes equations and a transport-diffusive equation.The code is first validated with the results of linear stability perturbation theory.Then several characteristics of the Rayleigh-Taylor instabjJjties are studied using this three-dimensional unsteady code,inducling instantaneous turbulent structures and statistical turbulent mixing heights under different initial wave numbers.These results indicate that turbulent structures ofRayleigh-Taylor instabilities are strongly dependent on the initial conditions.The results also suggest that a high-order numerical method should provide the capability of sir.ulating small scale fluctuations of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities of turbulent flows.

  14. Rogue waves in a wave tank: experiments and modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lechuga

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In past decades theoretical studies have been carried out with the double aim of improving the knowledge of rogue wave main characteristics and of attempting to predict its sudden appearance. As an effort on this topic we tried the generation of rogue waves in a water wave tank using a symmetric spectrum (Akhmediev et al., 2011a as input on the wave maker. To go on further the next step has been to apply a theoretical model to the envelope of these waves. After some considerations the best model has been an analogue of the Ginzburg–Landau equation.

  15. Wave Numerical Model for Shallow Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐福敏; 严以新; 张长宽; 宋志尧; 茅丽华

    2000-01-01

    The history of forecasting wind waves by wave energy conservation equation is briefly described. Several currently used wave numerical models for shallow water based on different wave theories are discussed. Wave energy conservation models for the simulation of shallow water waves are introduced,with emphasis placed on the SWAN model, which takes use of the most advanced wave research achievements and has been applied to several theoretical and field conditions. The characteristics and applicability of the model, the finite difference numerical scheme of the action balance equation and its source terms computing methods are described in detail. The model has been verified with the propagation refraction numerical experiments for waves propagating in following and opposing currents; finally, the model is applied to the Haian Gulf area to simulate the wave height and wave period field there, and the results are compared with observed data.

  16. Mrg: A Magnitude Scale for 1 s Rayleigh Waves at Local Distances with Focus on Yield Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-23

    Bache, T. (1982), Estimating the yield of underground nuclear explosions, Bull. Seism . Soc. Am., 72, pp. S131-S168. Cho, K. H., R. B. Herrmann, C. J...Ammon, and K. Lee (2007), Imaging the upper crust of the Korean peninsula by surface-wave tomography, Bull. Seism . Soc. Am., 97, pp. 198-207. Denny...Monitoring the earthquake source process in North America, Bull. Seism . Soc. Am., 101, pp. 2609-2625. Kennett, B.L.N., E. R. Engdahl, and R. Buland

  17. Improvements on Mean Free Wave Surface Modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董国海; 滕斌; 程亮

    2002-01-01

    Some new results of the modeling of mean free surface of waves or wave set-up are presented. The stream function wave theory is applied to incident short waves. The limiting wave steepness is adopted as the wave breaker index in the calculation of wave breaking dissipation. The model is based on Roelvink (1993), but the numerical techniques used in the solution are based on the Weighted-Average Flux (WAF) method (Watson et al., 1992), with Time-Operator-Splitting (TOS) used for the treatment of the source terms. This method allows a small number of computational points to be used, and is particularly efficient in modeling wave set-up. The short wave (or incident primary wave) energy equation issolved by use of a traditional Lax-Wendroff technique. The present model is found to be satisfactory compared with the measurements conducted by Stive (1983).

  18. Estimation of underground structure using phase velocities of Love-and Rayleigh-waves from three-component microtremor array observation at Morioka city; Moriokashi ni okeru sanseibun are bido kansoku ni yoru reiri-ha rabu-ha no ryoiso sokudo wo mochiita chika kozo suitei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Hidekazu; Saito, Tokumi; Ohashi, Hiromasa [Iwate University, Iwate (Japan)

    1999-02-01

    In conventional microtremor prospecting methods, underground structure is estimated using the phase velocity of Rayleigh-wave only. However, it is considered that the underground structure can be estimated at a higher accuracy by using two phase velocities of Rayleigh-wave and Love-wave that directly reflects S-wave velocity structure. Therefore, three-component microtremor array observation of a circle (equilateral triangle) with the maximum radius of 40 to 250 m was carried out at the center of Morioka city. Analysis was carried out by means of extended space with autocorrelation to obtain phase velocities of Love- and Rayleigh-waves. The frequency zone of the obtained Rayleigh-wave phase velocity is 1.5 Hz to 8.6 Hz, and the phase velocity is 2670 m/s to 733 m/s. The frequency zone of the obtained Love-wave phase velocity is 3 Hz to 8.6 Hz, and the phase velocity is 2100 m/s to 412 m/s. The underground structure obtained by using two observed phase velocities is clarified under a depth of 116 m. A stratum deemed to be the basement exists from a depth of 21 m (Vs=1100 m). As a result, the underground structure can be estimated at a higher accuracy if two phase velocities of Love-and Rayleigh-waves are used. (translated by NEDO)

  19. A Wave Modulation Model of Ripples over Long Surface Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CONG Peixiu; ZHENG Guizhen

    2011-01-01

    A study is presented on the modulation of ripples induced by a long surface wave (LW) and a new theoretical modulation model is proposed. In this model, the wind surface stress modulation is related to the modulation of tipple spectrum. The model results show that in the case of LW propagating in the wind direction with the wave age parameter of LW increasing, the area with enhanced shear stress shifts from the region near the LW crest on the upwind slope to the LW trough. With a smaller wave age parameter of LW, the tipple modulation has the maximum on the upwind slope in the vicinity of LW crest, while with a larger parameter the enhancement of ripple spectrum does not occur in that region. At low winds the amplitude of ripple modulation transfer function (MTF) is larger in the gravity wave range, while at moderate or high winds it changes little in the range from short gravity waves to capillary waves.

  20. Assessment of a geological model by surface wave analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martorana, R.; Capizzi, P.; Avellone, G.; D'Alessandro, A.; Siragusa, R.; Luzio, D.

    2017-02-01

    A set of horizontal to vertical spectral ratio (HVSR) and multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) measurements, carried out in the Altavilla Milicia (Sicily) area, is analyzed to test a geological model of the area. Statistical techniques have been used in different stages of the data analysis, to optimize the reliability of the information extracted from geophysical measurements. In particular, cluster analysis algorithms have been implemented to select the time windows of the microseismic signal to be used for calculating the spectral ratio H/V and to identify sets of spectral ratio peaks likely caused by the same underground structures. Using results of reflection seismic lines, typical values of P-wave and S-wave velocity were estimated for each geological formation present in the area. These were used to narrow down the research space of parameters for the HVSR interpretation. MASW profiles have been carried out close to each HVSR measuring point, provided the parameters of the shallower layers for the HVSR models. MASW inversion has been constrained by extrapolating thicknesses from a known stratigraphic sequence. Preliminary 1D seismic models were obtained by adding deeper layers to models that resulted from MASW inversion. These justify the peaks of the HVSR curves due to layers deeper than MASW investigation depth. Furthermore, much deeper layers were included in the HVSR model, as suggested by geological setting and stratigraphic sequence. This choice was made considering that these latter layers do not generate other HVSR peaks and do not significantly affect the misfit. The starting models have been used to limit the starting research space for a more accurate interpretation, made considering the noise as a superposition of Rayleigh and Love waves. Results allowed to recognize four main seismic layers and to associate them to the main stratigraphic successions. The lateral correlation of seismic velocity models, joined with tectonic evidences

  1. Two-Mode Resonator and Contact Model for Standing Wave Piezomotor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, B.; Blanke, Mogens; Helbo, J.

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents a model for a standing wave piezoelectric motor with a two bending mode resonator. The resonator is modelled using Hamilton's principle and the Rayleigh-Ritz method. The contact is modelled using the Lagrange Multiplier method under the assumption of slip and it is showed how...... to solve the set of differential-algebraic equations. Detailed simulations show resonance frequencies as function of the piezoelement's position, tip trajectories and contact forces. The paper demonstrates that contact stiffness and stick should be included in such model to obtain physically realistic...

  2. Overview of Wave to Wire Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim; Kramer, Morten Mejlhede; Ferri, Francesco

    A “Wave to Wire” (W2W) model is a numerical tool that can calculate the power output from a specified Wave Energy Converter (WEC), under specified ocean wave conditions. The tool can be used to assess and optimize the performance of a Wave Energy Converter (WEC) design and provide knowledge of th...

  3. Regional Body-Wave Corrections and Surface-Wave Tomography Models to Improve Discrimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walter, W R; Pasyanos, M E; Rodgers, A J; Meyeda, K M; Sicherman, A

    2003-07-18

    multivariate combinations of ratios for their discrimination power. We also make use of the MDAC2 spectra and the noise spectra to determine the expected signal-to-noise value of each phase and use that to optimize the multivariate discriminants as a function of location. We quantify the discrimination power using the misidentified event trade-off curves and an equi-probable measure. In addition to the traditional phases, we are also exploring the application of coda amplitudes in discrimination. Coda-derived spectra can be peaked due to Rg-to-coda scattering, which can indicate an unusually shallow source. For surface waves we have a new high-resolution regional Rayleigh-Wave tomography for the Yellow Sea and Korean Peninsula Region, based on measuring thousands of seismograms. We also continue to make new measurements for our regional Rayleigh and Love wave group velocity tomography models of Western Eurasia and North Africa. These tomography models provide high-resolution maps of group velocity from 10- to 100-s period. The maps also provide estimates of the expected phase spectra of new events that can be used in phase-match filters to compress the expected signals and improve the signal-to-noise ratio on surface wave magnitude (Ms) estimates. Phase match filters in combination with regional Ms formulas can significantly lower the threshold at which Ms can be measured, extending the Ms-mb discriminant. We have measured Ms in western Eurasia for thousands of events at tens of stations, with and without phase match filtering, and found a marked improvement in discrimination. Here we start to quantify the improvement to both discrimination performance and the Ms threshold reduction. The group velocity models also provide constraints on velocity structure, particularly in low seismicity regions. For example we are working with Dr. Bob Henmann and Dr. Charles Ammon to combine tomography derived group velocity curves with station based receiver functions in joint inversions to

  4. Model for Shock Wave Chaos

    KAUST Repository

    Kasimov, Aslan R.

    2013-03-08

    We propose the following model equation, ut+1/2(u2−uus)x=f(x,us) that predicts chaotic shock waves, similar to those in detonations in chemically reacting mixtures. The equation is given on the half line, x<0, and the shock is located at x=0 for any t≥0. Here, us(t) is the shock state and the source term f is taken to mimic the chemical energy release in detonations. This equation retains the essential physics needed to reproduce many properties of detonations in gaseous reactive mixtures: steady traveling wave solutions, instability of such solutions, and the onset of chaos. Our model is the first (to our knowledge) to describe chaos in shock waves by a scalar first-order partial differential equation. The chaos arises in the equation thanks to an interplay between the nonlinearity of the inviscid Burgers equation and a novel forcing term that is nonlocal in nature and has deep physical roots in reactive Euler equations.

  5. Multiphase Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oresta, P.; Fornarelli, F.; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulations of two-phase Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a cylindrical cell with particles or vapor bubbles suspended in the fluid are described. The particles or bubbles are modeled as points, the Rayleigh number is 2×106 and the fluids considered are air, for the particle case, and

  6. Dispersive internal long wave models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camassa, R.; Choi, W.; Holm, D.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Levermore, C.D.; Lvov, Y. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This work is a joint analytical and numerical study of internal dispersive water wave propagation in a stratified two-layer fluid, a problem that has important geophysical fluid dynamics applications. Two-layer models can capture the main density-dependent effects because they can support, unlike homogeneous fluid models, the observed large amplitude internal wave motion at the interface between layers. The authors have derived new model equations using multiscale asymptotics in combination with the method they have developed for vertically averaging velocity and vorticity fields across fluid layers within the original Euler equations. The authors have found new exact conservation laws for layer-mean vorticity that have exact counterparts in the models. With this approach, they have derived a class of equations that retain the full nonlinearity of the original Euler equations while preserving the simplicity of known weakly nonlinear models, thus providing the theoretical foundation for experimental results so far unexplained.

  7. Bivariate Rayleigh Distribution and its Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Saeed Akhter

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Rayleigh (1880 observed that the sea waves follow no law because of the complexities of the sea, but it has been seen that the probability distributions of wave heights, wave length, wave induce pitch, wave and heave motions of the ships follow the Rayleigh distribution. At present, several different quantities are in use for describing the state of the sea; for example, the mean height of the waves, the root mean square height, the height of the “significant waves” (the mean height of the highest one-third of all the waves the maximum height over a given interval of the time, and so on. At present, the ship building industry knows less than any other construction industry about the service conditions under which it must operate. Only small efforts have been made to establish the stresses and motions and to incorporate the result of such studies in to design. This is due to the complexity of the problem caused by the extensive variability of the sea and the corresponding response of the ships. Although the problem appears feasible, yet it is possible to predict service conditions for ships in an orderly and relatively simple manner Rayleigh (1980 derived it from the amplitude of sound resulting from many independent sources. This distribution is also connected with one or two dimensions and is sometimes referred to as “random walk” frequency distribution. The Rayleigh distribution can be derived from the bivariate normal distribution when the variate are independent and random with equal variances. We try to construct bivariate Rayleigh distribution with marginal Rayleigh distribution function and discuss its fundamental properties.

  8. A global horizontal shear velocity model of the upper mantle from multimode Love wave measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Tak; Priestley, Keith; Debayle, Eric

    2016-10-01

    Surface wave studies in the 1960s provided the first indication that the upper mantle was radially anisotropic. Resolving the anisotropic structure is important because it may yield information on deformation and flow patterns in the upper mantle. The existing radially anisotropic models are in poor agreement. Rayleigh waves have been studied extensively and recent models show general agreement. Less work has focused on Love waves and the models that do exist are less well-constrained than are Rayleigh wave models, suggesting it is the Love wave models that are responsible for the poor agreement in the radially anisotropic structure of the upper mantle. We have adapted the waveform inversion procedure of Debayle & Ricard to extract propagation information for the fundamental mode and up to the fifth overtone from Love waveforms in the 50-250 s period range. We have tomographically inverted these results for a mantle horizontal shear wave-speed model (βh(z)) to transition zone depths. We include azimuthal anisotropy (2θ and 4θ terms) in the tomography, but in this paper we discuss only the isotropic βh(z) structure. The data set is significantly larger, almost 500 000 Love waveforms, than previously published Love wave data sets and provides ˜17 000 000 constraints on the upper-mantle βh(z) structure. Sensitivity and resolution tests show that the horizontal resolution of the model is on the order of 800-1000 km to transition zone depths. The high wave-speed roots beneath the oldest parts of the continents appear to extend deeper for βh(z) than for βv(z) as in previous βh(z) models, but the resolution tests indicate that at least parts of these features could be artefacts. The low wave speeds beneath the mid-ocean ridges fade by ˜150 km depth except for the upper mantle beneath the East Pacific Rise which remains slow to ˜250 km depth. The resolution tests suggest that the low wave speeds at deeper depths beneath the East Pacific Rise are not solely due

  9. Numerical Modelling of Wave Run-Up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramirez, Jorge Robert Rodriguez; Frigaard, Peter; Andersen, Thomas Lykke;

    2011-01-01

    Wave loads are important in problems related to offshore structure, such as wave run-up, slamming. The computation of such wave problems are carried out by CFD models. This paper presents one model, NS3, which solve 3D Navier-Stokes equations and use Volume of Fluid (VOF) method to treat the free...

  10. Numerical Modelling of Wave Run-Up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramirez, Jorge Robert Rodriguez; Frigaard, Peter; Andersen, Thomas Lykke

    2011-01-01

    Wave loads are important in problems related to offshore structure, such as wave run-up, slamming. The computation of such wave problems are carried out by CFD models. This paper presents one model, NS3, which solve 3D Navier-Stokes equations and use Volume of Fluid (VOF) method to treat the free...

  11. Chemical-reaction model for Mexican wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatani, Takashi

    2003-05-01

    We present a chemical-reaction model to describe the Mexican wave ( La Ola) in football stadia. The spectator's action is described in terms of chemical reactions. The model is governed by three reaction rates k 1, k 2, and k3. We study the nonlinear waves on one- and two-dimensional lattices. The Mexican wave is formulated as a clockwise forwardly propagating wave. Waves are growing or disappear, depending on the values of reaction rates. In the specific case of k1= k2= k3=1, the nonlinear-wave equation produces a propagating pulse like soliton.

  12. Wave chaotic experiments and models for complicated wave scattering systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Jen-Hao

    Wave scattering in a complicated environment is a common challenge in many engineering fields because the complexity makes exact solutions impractical to find, and the sensitivity to detail in the short-wavelength limit makes a numerical solution relevant only to a specific realization. On the other hand, wave chaos offers a statistical approach to understand the properties of complicated wave systems through the use of random matrix theory (RMT). A bridge between the theory and practical applications is the random coupling model (RCM) which connects the universal features predicted by RMT and the specific details of a real wave scattering system. The RCM gives a complete model for many wave properties and is beneficial for many physical and engineering fields that involve complicated wave scattering systems. One major contribution of this dissertation is that I have utilized three microwave systems to thoroughly test the RCM in complicated wave systems with varied loss, including a cryogenic system with a superconducting microwave cavity for testing the extremely-low-loss case. I have also experimentally tested an extension of the RCM that includes short-orbit corrections. Another novel result is development of a complete model based on the RCM for the fading phenomenon extensively studied in the wireless communication fields. This fading model encompasses the traditional fading models as its high-loss limit case and further predicts the fading statistics in the low-loss limit. This model provides the first physical explanation for the fitting parameters used in fading models. I have also applied the RCM to additional experimental wave properties of a complicated wave system, such as the impedance matrix, the scattering matrix, the variance ratio, and the thermopower. These predictions are significant for nuclear scattering, atomic physics, quantum transport in condensed matter systems, electromagnetics, acoustics, geophysics, etc.

  13. CORRIGENDUM: Atoms riding Rayleigh waves Atoms riding Rayleigh waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedek, G.; Echenique, P. M.; Toennies, J. P.; Traeger, F.

    2010-09-01

    In the original paper the affiliation list is incorrect. The correct address list is as follows: G Benedek1, 5, P M Echenique1, 2, J P Toennies3 and F Traeger4 1 Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), Paseo Manuel de Lardizábal 4, 20018 Donostia—San Sebastián, Spain 2 Departamento de Física de Materiales and CFM (CSIC-UPV/EHU), Universidad del País Vasco/Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, E-20018 San Sebastián/Donostia, Spain 3 Max Planck-Institut für Dynamik und Selbstorganisation, Bunsenstraße 10 D-37073 Göttingen, Germany 4 Fakultät für Chemie und Biochemie, Ruhr-Universität Bochum Universitätsstraße 150, 44801 Bochum, Germany 5 Permanent address: Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universitá di Milano-Bicocca, Via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano, Italy

  14. Modeling water waves beyond perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Clamond, Didier

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, we illustrate the advantage of variational principles for modeling water waves from an elementary practical viewpoint. The method is based on a `relaxed' variational principle, i.e., on a Lagrangian involving as many variables as possible, and imposing some suitable subordinate constraints. This approach allows the construction of approximations without necessarily relying on a small parameter. This is illustrated via simple examples, namely the Serre equations in shallow water, a generalization of the Klein-Gordon equation in deep water and how to unify these equations in arbitrary depth. The chapter ends with a discussion and caution on how this approach should be used in practice.

  15. Rayleigh Scattering of Moessbauer Radiation (RSMR) data, hydration effects and glass-like dynamical model of biopolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gol' danskii, V.I.; Krupyanskii, Yu.F.; Fleurov, V.N.

    1986-06-01

    Specific features of the Rayleigh Scattering of Moessbauer Radiation (RSMR) technique in the study of biological systems are described. Experimental data show that the temperature and hydration degree are the principal parameters which influence intramolecular mobility in biopolymers. Data on temperature dependencies of elastic fraction, f, and spectrum line-shape do not fit neither Debye or Einstein models of solids nor the free diffusion in liquids and demand for their explanation a multimode approximation (i.e. a wide spectrum of correlation times, at T=293 K from 10/sup -6/s to 10/sup -12/-10/sup -13/s). On the basis of RSMR, low temperature specific heat and X-ray dynamic analysis data and from the general conditions that information macromolecule must be in a non-equilibrium state (an independent confirmation of this fact comes from the kinetic model of protein folding) a glass-like dynamical model of biopolymers is formulated. A possible interpretation of RSMR data shows that fluctuatively prepared tunneling between quasiequilibrium positions (QEP) can prevail activated transitions up to a room temperature.

  16. Verification of A Numerical Harbour Wave Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A numerical model for wave propagation in a harbour is verified by use of physical models. The extended time-dependent mild slope equation is employed as the governing equation, and the model is solved by use of ADI method containing the relaxation factor. Firstly, the reflection coefficient of waves in front of rubble-mound breakwaters under oblique incident waves is determined through physical model tests, and it is regarded as the basis for simulating partial reflection boundaries of the numerical model. Then model tests on refraction, diffraction and reflection of waves in a harbour are performed to measure wave height distribution. Comparative results between physical and numerical model tests show that the present numerical model can satisfactorily simulate the propagation of regular and irregular waves in a harbour with complex topography and boundary conditions.

  17. 短时傅立叶变换和广义S变换用于提取面波频散曲线效果对比研究%GENERALIZED S TRANSFORMATION ARE USED OF EXTRACTING RAYLEIGH-WAVE DISPERSION CURVES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁伟; 周洪生; 刘成东; 李江鹏; 张薇

    2013-01-01

    Rayleigh wave exploration as a non-destructive in situ detection method has been increasingly used in geotechnical engineering testing and environmental engineering. Extraction of dispersion curves is an important step in the surface wave velocity. This will be short-time Fourier transform and the generalized S transform two linear time - frequency analysis method for Rayleigh wave dispersion curve extraction. According to the analysis of the theoretical model and real seismic data, it is concluded that; ①Short-time Fourier transform only for shallow high-frequency part of the energy of strong Rayleigh wave dispersion curve extraction is better, while the low-frequency energy extraction is the weaker part of the poor.②Generalized S transform X and p by the introduction of two parameters to the signal frequency according to the level of automatic mediation shape and size of the window function, with multi-resolution features, so while the high and low frequency of the Rayleigh wave signal better treatment effect, and thus help to improve the exploration depth of the Rayleigh wave.%瑞雷面波勘探作为一种无损原位检测方法,已越来越多的应用于岩土工程测试与环境工程中,其中频散曲线的提取则是得到面波速度的重要一步.这里将短时傅里叶变换与广义S变换两种线性时~频分析方法用于瑞雷面波的频散曲线提取,并加以对比分析它们的应用效果.通过理论模型与实际地震记录分析得出:①短时傅里叶变换只能对浅部能量较强的高频部份的瑞雷面波的频散曲线提取效果较好,而对低频能量较弱的部份提取效果则不佳;②广义S变换通过λ和ρ两个参数的引入,使其能根据信号频率的高低自动调解窗函数的形态与大小,具有多分辨的特性,使其同时对高频、低频的瑞雷面波信号有更好的处理效果,从而有利于提高瑞雷波的勘探深度.

  18. Stroh formalism and Rayleigh waves

    CERN Document Server

    Tanuma, Kazumi

    2008-01-01

    Introduces a powerful and elegant mathematical method for the analysis of anisotropic elasticity equationsThe reader can grasp the essentials as quickly as possibleCan be used as a textbook, which presents compactly introduction and applications of the Stroh formalismAppeals to the people not only in mathematics but also in mechanics and engineering sciencePrerequisites are only basic linear algebra, calculus and fundamentals of differential equations

  19. Longitudinal vibration of pile in layered soil based on Rayleigh-Love rod theory and fictitious soil-pile model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lü Shu-hui; WANG Kui-hua; WU Wen-bing; C. J. LEO

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic response of pile in layered soil is theoretically investigated when considering the transverse inertia effect. Firstly, the fictitious soil-pile model is employed to simulate the dynamic interaction between the pile and the soil layers beneath pile toe. The dynamic interactions of adjacent soil layers along the vertical direction are simplified as distributed Voigt models. Meanwhile, the pile and fictitious soil-pile are assumed to be viscoelastic Rayleigh-Love rods, and both the radial and vertical displacement continuity conditions at the soil-pile interface are taken into consideration. On this basis, the analytical solution for dynamic response at the pile head is derived in the frequency domain and the corresponding quasi-analytical solution in the time domain is then obtained by means of the convolution theorem. Following this, the accuracy and parameter value of the hypothetical boundaries for soil-layer interfaces are discussed. Comparisons with published solution and measured data are carried out to verify the rationality of the present solution. Parametric analyses are further conducted by using the present solution to investigate the relationships between the transverse inertia effects and soil-pile parameters.

  20. Energy Wave Model of Atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    伍细如

    2015-01-01

    proton emits energy wave, electron could sits any position away from nucleus, but be the most stable just when it sits at the trough of energy wave, and this position accords with Bohr radius and Schr?dinger equation.

  1. Short Rayleigh length free electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. B. Colson

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Conventional free electron laser (FEL oscillators minimize the optical mode volume around the electron beam in the undulator by making the resonator Rayleigh length about one third to one half of the undulator length. This maximizes gain and beam-mode coupling. In compact configurations of high-power infrared FELs or moderate power UV FELs, the resulting optical intensity can damage the resonator mirrors. To increase the spot size and thereby reduce the optical intensity at the mirrors below the damage threshold, a shorter Rayleigh length can be used, but the FEL interaction is significantly altered. We model this interaction using a coordinate system that expands with the rapidly diffracting optical mode from the ends of the undulator to the mirrors. Simulations show that the interaction of the strongly focused optical mode with a narrow electron beam inside the undulator distorts the optical wave front so it is no longer in the fundamental Gaussian mode. The simulations are used to study how mode distortion affects the single-pass gain in weak fields, and the steady-state extraction in strong fields.

  2. Modeling Water Waves with Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    flows, such as undertow, longshore currents, and rip currents. APPROACH The approach is based on improving various aspects of the SPH code ...Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics ( SPH ) is a meshless numerical method that is being developed for the study of nearshore waves and other Navy needs. The...Lagrangian nature of SPH allows the modeling of wave breaking, surf zones, ship waves, and wave-structure interaction, where the free surface becomes

  3. Modelling and Simulation of Wave Loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    A simple model of the wave load on slender members of offshore structures is described. The wave elevation of the sea state is modelled by a stationary Gaussian process. A new procedure to simulate realizations of the wave loads is developed. The simulation method assumes that the wave particle...... velocity can be approximated by a Gaussian Markov process. Known approximate results for the first-passage density or equivalently, the distribution of the extremes of wave loads are presented and compared with rather precise simulation results. It is demonstrated that the approximate results...

  4. Modelling and Simulation of Wave Loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    1985-01-01

    A simple model of the wave load on stender members of offshore structures is described . The wave elevation of the sea stateis modelled by a stationary Gaussian process. A new procedure to simulate realizations of the wave loads is developed. The simulation method assumes that the wave particle...... velocity can be approximated by a Gaussian Markov process. Known approximate results for the first passage density or equivalently, the distribution of the extremes of wave loads are presented and compared with rather precise simulation results. It is demonstrated that the approximate results...

  5. An analysis of surface acoustic wave propagation in a plate of functionally graded materials with a layered model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In a homogeneous plate, Rayleigh waves will have a symmetric and anti-symmetric mode regarding to the mid-plane with different phase velocities. If plate properties vary along the thickness, or the plate is of functionally graded material (FGM), the symmetry of modes and frequency behavior will be modified, thus producing dif-ferent features for engineering applications such as amplifying or reducing the velocity and deformation. This kind of effect can also be easily realized by utilizing a layered structure with desired material properties that can produce these effects in terms of velocity and displacements, since Rayleigh waves in a solid with gen-eral material property grading schemes are difficult to analyze with known methods. Solutions from layered structures with exponential and polynomial property grad-ing schemes are obtained from the layered model and comparisons with known analytical results are made to validate the method and examine possible applica-tions of such structures in engineering.

  6. Modeling extreme wave heights from laboratory experiments with the nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H. D.; Guedes Soares, C.; Cherneva, Z.; Onorato, M.

    2014-04-01

    Spatial variation of nonlinear wave groups with different initial envelope shapes is theoretically studied first, confirming that the simplest nonlinear theoretical model is capable of describing the evolution of propagating wave packets in deep water. Moreover, three groups of laboratory experiments run in the wave basin of CEHIPAR (Canal de Experiencias Hidrodinámicas de El Pardo, known also as El Pardo Model Basin) was founded in 1928 by the Spanish Navy. are systematically compared with the numerical simulations of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Although a little overestimation is detected, especially in the set of experiments characterized by higher initial wave steepness, the numerical simulation still displays a high degree of agreement with the laboratory experiments. Therefore, the nonlinear Schrödinger equation catches the essential characteristics of the extreme waves and provides an important physical insight into their generation. The modulation instability, resulting from the quasi-resonant four-wave interaction in a unidirectional sea state, can be indicated by the coefficient of kurtosis, which shows an appreciable correlation with the extreme wave height and hence is used in the modified Edgeworth-Rayleigh distribution. Finally, some statistical properties on the maximum wave heights in different sea states have been related with the initial Benjamin-Feir index.

  7. Rayleigh reflections and nonlinear acoustics of solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breazeale, M. A.

    1980-10-01

    Schlierken studies of ultrasonic waves, and nonlinear acoustics of solids are addressed. A goniometer for use in a Schlieren system for visualization of ultrasonic waves in liquids is described. The goniometer is used to obtain Schlieren photographs of leaky Rayleigh waves excited on an Al2O3 layer on a stainless steel reflector immersed in water, showing that the Rayleigh wave velocity in this case is less than that of either a water Al203 layer or a water stainless steel layer. Also investigated are: (1) nonlinearity parameters and third order elastic constants of copper between 300 and 3 K; (2) measurement of nonlinearity parameters in small solid samples by the harmonic generation technique; (3) relationship between solid nonlinearity parameters and thermodynamic Gruneisen parameters; and (4) quantum mechanical theory of nonlinear interaction of ultrasonic waves.

  8. Rayleigh-Taylor mixing in supernova experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swisher, N. C.; Abarzhi, S. I., E-mail: snezhana.abarzhi@gmail.com [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Kuranz, C. C. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Arnett, D. [University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Hurricane, O.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    We report a scrupulous analysis of data in supernova experiments that are conducted at high power laser facilities in order to study core-collapse supernova SN1987A. Parameters of the experimental system are properly scaled to investigate the interaction of a blast-wave with helium-hydrogen interface, and the induced Rayleigh-Taylor instability and Rayleigh-Taylor mixing of the denser and lighter fluids with time-dependent acceleration. We analyze all available experimental images of the Rayleigh-Taylor flow in supernova experiments and measure delicate features of the interfacial dynamics. A new scaling is identified for calibration of experimental data to enable their accurate analysis and comparisons. By properly accounting for the imprint of the experimental conditions, the data set size and statistics are substantially increased. New theoretical solutions are reported to describe asymptotic dynamics of Rayleigh-Taylor flow with time-dependent acceleration by applying theoretical analysis that considers symmetries and momentum transport. Good qualitative and quantitative agreement is achieved of the experimental data with the theory and simulations. Our study indicates that in supernova experiments Rayleigh-Taylor flow is in the mixing regime, the interface amplitude contributes substantially to the characteristic length scale for energy dissipation; Rayleigh-Taylor mixing keeps order.

  9. Travelling waves in hybrid chemotaxis models

    CERN Document Server

    Franz, Benjamin; Painter, Kevin J; Erban, Radek

    2013-01-01

    Hybrid models of chemotaxis combine agent-based models of cells with partial differential equation models of extracellular chemical signals. In this paper, travelling wave properties of hybrid models of bacterial chemotaxis are investigated. Bacteria are modelled using an agent-based (individual-based) approach with internal dynamics describing signal transduction. In addition to the chemotactic behaviour of the bacteria, the individual-based model also includes cell proliferation and death. Cells consume the extracellular nutrient field (chemoattractant) which is modelled using a partial differential equation. Mesoscopic and macroscopic equations representing the behaviour of the hybrid model are derived and the existence of travelling wave solutions for these models is established. It is shown that cell proliferation is necessary for the existence of non-transient (stationary) travelling waves in hybrid models. Additionally, a numerical comparison between the wave speeds of the continuum models and the hybr...

  10. Model-based internal wave processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candy, J.V.; Chambers, D.H.

    1995-06-09

    A model-based approach is proposed to solve the oceanic internal wave signal processing problem that is based on state-space representations of the normal-mode vertical velocity and plane wave horizontal velocity propagation models. It is shown that these representations can be utilized to spatially propagate the modal (dept) vertical velocity functions given the basic parameters (wave numbers, Brunt-Vaisala frequency profile etc.) developed from the solution of the associated boundary value problem as well as the horizontal velocity components. Based on this framework, investigations are made of model-based solutions to the signal enhancement problem for internal waves.

  11. Mud-Wave Interaction: A Viscoelastic Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This study is devoted to the interaction between water surface waves and a thin layer of viscoelastic mud on the bottom. On the assumption that the mud layer is comparable in thickness with the wave boundary layer and is much smaller than the wavelength, a two-layer Stokes boundary layer model is adopted to determine the mud motions under the waves. Analytical expressions are derived for the near-bottom water and mud velocity fields, surface wave-damping rate, and interface wave amplitude and phase lag. Examined in particular is how these kinematic quantities may depend on the viscous and elastic properties of the mud.

  12. Asymptotic Rayleigh instantaneous unit hydrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troutman, B.M.; Karlinger, M.R.

    1988-01-01

    The instantaneous unit hydrograph for a channel network under general linear routing and conditioned on the network magnitude, N, tends asymptotically, as N grows large, to a Rayleigh probability density function. This behavior is identical to that of the width function of the network, and is proven under the assumption that the network link configuration is topologically random and the link hydraulic and geometric properties are independent and identically distributed random variables. The asymptotic distribution depends only on a scale factor, {Mathematical expression}, where ?? is a mean link wave travel time. ?? 1988 Springer-Verlag.

  13. Opdriftsbaserede modeller for Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten

    Formålet med dette skrift er at få en forhåndsvurdering af mulige effektforøgelser for Wave Star ved anvendelse af aktiv akkumulatordrift. Disse vurderinger baseres på simuleringsmodeller for driften af Wave Star i uregelmæssige bølger. Modellen er udarbejdet i programmeringssproget Delphi og er en...

  14. Importance of a 3D forward modeling tool for surface wave analysis methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pageot, Damien; Le Feuvre, Mathieu; Donatienne, Leparoux; Philippe, Côte; Yann, Capdeville

    2016-04-01

    Since a few years, seismic surface waves analysis methods (SWM) have been widely developed and tested in the context of subsurface characterization and have demonstrated their effectiveness for sounding and monitoring purposes, e.g., high-resolution tomography of the principal geological units of California or real time monitoring of the Piton de la Fournaise volcano. Historically, these methods are mostly developed under the assumption of semi-infinite 1D layered medium without topography. The forward modeling is generally based on Thomson-Haskell matrix based modeling algorithm and the inversion is driven by Monte-Carlo sampling. Given their efficiency, SWM have been transfered to several scale of which civil engineering structures in order to, e.g., determine the so-called V s30 parameter or assess other critical constructional parameters in pavement engineering. However, at this scale, many structures may often exhibit 3D surface variations which drastically limit the efficiency of SWM application. Indeed, even in the case of an homogeneous structure, 3D geometry can bias the dispersion diagram of Rayleigh waves up to obtain discontinuous phase velocity curves which drastically impact the 1D mean velocity model obtained from dispersion inversion. Taking advantages of high-performance computing center accessibility and wave propagation modeling algorithm development, it is now possible to consider the use of a 3D elastic forward modeling algorithm instead of Thomson-Haskell method in the SWM inversion process. We use a parallelized 3D elastic modeling code based on the spectral element method which allows to obtain accurate synthetic data with very low numerical dispersion and a reasonable numerical cost. In this study, we choose dike embankments as an illustrative example. We first show that their longitudinal geometry may have a significant effect on dispersion diagrams of Rayleigh waves. Then, we demonstrate the necessity of 3D elastic modeling as a forward

  15. 多道瞬态瑞雷波在隧道超前探测中的应用%Application of Multi-channel Transient Rayleigh Wave Method on the Advanced Detecting Technology to Tunnel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴腾飞; 吴荣新; 张平松; 程刚

    2013-01-01

    Advanced?detection?is?an?essential?technology?for?preventing?geology?hazards?in?the?construction?of?underground?engineering.?At?first,?this?paper?summarized?the?domestic?and?foreign?tunnel?detection?method,?and?focuses?on?analysis?of?the?Rayleigh?wave?detection?technology?in?tunnel?advanced?detection?advantages.?Introduces?the?detection?principle?and?the?field?construction?method?of?Rayleigh?wave,?and?uses?He-Fu?High?Speed?Rail?examples?to?prove?that?compared?to?traditional?tunnel?detection?methods,?Rayleigh?wave?has?advantages?of?simple?construction,?economical,?shallow?detection?higher?resolution?etc,?to?a?great?extent?can?find?out?tunnel?spread?range?of?geological?anomalies,?providing?a?reliable?basis?for?driving?security.?In?the?end,?the?future?research?direction?of?Rayleigh?wave?in?tunnel?advanced?detection?is?proposed?according?to?engineering?experiment.%超前探测是预防地下工程施工环节发生灾害的重要技术方法。此文先对国内外隧道超前探测技术方法进行了总结,并着重分析了瑞雷波探测技术在隧道超前探测中的优势。介绍了多道瞬态瑞雷波探测的技术原理和现场施工方法,通过合福高铁安徽段7标某隧道超前预报的应用实例,说明瑞雷波探测技术与其他隧道超前探测方法相比,具有施工简便、经济、浅层探测分辨率高等优点,可大限度地查明隧道掘进波及范围内地质异常情况,为掘进安全提供可靠技术依据。最后,笔者根据工程试验,提出了瑞雷波在隧道超前探测中今后的研究方向。

  16. Multiple Boundary Layer Stripping Model by Plateau-Rayleigh Instability for Fuel-Coolant Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Woo Hyun; Moriyama, Kiyofumi; Park, Hyun Sun [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    One of them is FCI (Fuel-Coolant Interaction) phenomenon which is resulted from RPV (Reactor Pressure Vessel) failure at high pressure and high temperature condition of molten fuel. If RPV fails, the melt is ejected to the cavity which is flooded by water as a jet form. Then, the ejected melt jet interacts with water causing massive steam generation and resulting in particulate debris bed on the basemat. As a result of FCI, the initial boundary conditions of steam explosion and debris bed coolability are determined and that is the reason why understanding exact mechanism of melt jet breakup is important in this field. That is, FCI can be said as a starting phenomenon in the ex-vessel severe accident scenario. Until now, numerous previous researchers conducted FCI experiments and numerical analysis in small scale and plant scale. In two MATE experiments, the jet breakup lengths are compared and analyzed with the visualization data. From the observation, the new jet breakup model is proposed including the multiple boundary layer stripping mechanism. Combining the existing and new models, the erosion rate fraction for total melt mass rate was obtained. The new model showed that multiple BLS mechanisms contribute approximately 30% of the total melt jet breakup resulting in the short jet breakup length observed in the MATE 00-2 experiment.

  17. Langevin equation for the extended Rayleigh model with an asymmetric bath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plyukhin, Alexander V; Schofield, Jeremy

    2004-02-01

    In this paper a one-dimensional model of two infinite gases separated by a movable heavy piston is considered. The nonlinear Langevin equation for the motion of the piston is derived from first principles for the case when the thermodynamic parameters and/or the molecular masses of gas particles on the left and right sides of the piston are different. Microscopic expressions involving time correlation functions of the force between bath particles and the piston are obtained for all parameters appearing in the nonlinear Langevin equation. It is demonstrated that the equation has stationary solutions corresponding to directional fluctuation-induced drift in the absence of systematic forces. In the case of ideal gases interacting with the piston via a quadratic repulsive potential, the model is exactly solvable and explicit expressions for the kinetic coefficients in the nonlinear Langevin equation are derived. The transient solution of the nonlinear Langevin equation is analyzed perturbatively and it is demonstrated that previously obtained results for systems with the hard-wall interaction are recovered.

  18. Skeletonized wave-equation Qs tomography using surface waves

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jing

    2017-08-17

    We present a skeletonized inversion method that inverts surface-wave data for the Qs quality factor. Similar to the inversion of dispersion curves for the S-wave velocity model, the complicated surface-wave arrivals are skeletonized as simpler data, namely the amplitude spectra of the windowed Rayleigh-wave arrivals. The optimal Qs model is then found that minimizes the difference in the peak frequencies of the predicted and observed Rayleigh wave arrivals using a gradient-based wave-equation optimization method. Solutions to the viscoelastic wave-equation are used to compute the predicted Rayleigh-wave arrivals and the misfit gradient at every iteration. This procedure, denoted as wave-equation Qs tomography (WQs), does not require the assumption of a layered model and tends to have fast and robust convergence compared to Q full waveform inversion (Q-FWI). Numerical examples with synthetic and field data demonstrate that the WQs method can accurately invert for a smoothed approximation to the subsur-face Qs distribution as long as the Vs model is known with sufficient accuracy.

  19. Wave-equation Qs Inversion of Skeletonized Surface Waves

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jing

    2017-02-08

    We present a skeletonized inversion method that inverts surface-wave data for the Qs quality factor. Similar to the inversion of dispersion curves for the S-wave velocity model, the complicated surface-wave arrivals are skeletonized as simpler data, namely the amplitude spectra of the windowed Rayleigh-wave arrivals. The optimal Qs model is the one that minimizes the difference in the peak frequencies of the predicted and observed Rayleigh wave arrivals using a gradient-based wave-equation optimization method. Solutions to the viscoelastic wave-equation are used to compute the predicted Rayleigh-wave arrivals and the misfit gradient at every iteration. This procedure, denoted as wave-equation Qs inversion (WQs), does not require the assumption of a layered model and tends to have fast and robust convergence compared to full waveform inversion (FWI). Numerical examples with synthetic and field data demonstrate that the WQs method can accurately invert for a smoothed approximation to the subsurface Qs distribution as long as the Vs model is known with sufficient accuracy.

  20. Directional wave measurements and modelling

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anand, N.M.; Nayak, B.U.; Bhat, S.S.; SanilKumar, V.

    Some of the results obtained from analysis of the monsoon directional wave data measured over 4 years in shallow waters off the west coast of India are presented. The directional spectrum computed from the time series data seems to indicate...

  1. Baroclinic stationary waves in aquaplanet models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucarini, V.; Zappa, G.

    2012-04-01

    An aquaplanet model is used to study the nature of the highly persistent low frequency waves that have been observed in models forced by zonally symmetric boundary conditions. Using the Hayashi spectral analysis of the extratropical waves, we find that a quasi-stationary (QS) wave five belongs to a wave packet obeying a well defined dispersion relation with eastward group velocity. The components of the dispersion relation with k>5 baroclinically convert eddy available potential energy into eddy kinetic energy, while those with kinverse energy cascade, which had been previously proposed as a main forcing for this type of waves, only acts as a positive feedback on its predominantly baroclinic energetics. The QS wave is reinforced by a phase lock to an analogous pattern in the tropical convection, which provides further amplification to the wave. We also find that the Pedlosky bounds on the phase speed of unstable waves provide guidance in explaining the latitudinal structure of the energy conversion, which is shown to be more enhanced where the zonal westerly surface wind is weaker. The wave energy is then trapped in the wave guide created by the upper tropospheric jet stream. In agreement with Green's theory, as the equator to pole SST difference is reduced the stationary marginally stable component shifts toward higher wavenumbers, while the wave five becomes neutral and westward propagating. Some properties of the aquaplanet QS waves are found in interesting agreement with a low frequency wave observed by Salby (1982) in the southern hemisphere DJF, so that this perspective on low frequency variability might be, apart from its value in terms of basic geophysical fluid dynamics, of specific interest for studying the Earth's atmosphere.

  2. Rayleigh Lidar observed atmospheric temperature characteristics over a western Indian location: intercomparison with satellite observations and models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Som; Vaishnav, Rajesh; Shukla, Krishna K.; Lal, Shyam; Chandra, Harish; Acharya, Yashwant B.

    2017-07-01

    General characteristics of sub-tropical middle atmospheric temperature structure over a high altitude station, Mt. Abu (24.5°N, 72.7°E, altitude 1670 m, above mean sea level (amsl)) are presented using about 150 nights observational datasets of Rayleigh Lidar. The monthly mean temperature contour plot shows two distinct maxima in the stratopause region ( 45-55 km), occurring during February-March and September-October, a seasonal dependence similar to that reported for mid- and high-latitudes respectively. Semi-Annual Oscillation (SAO) are stronger at an altitude 60 km in the mesospheric temperature in comparison to stratospheric region. A comparison with the satellite (Halogen Occultation Experiment, (HALOE)) data shows qualitative agreement, but quantitatively a significant difference is found between the observation and satellite. The derived temperatures from Lidar observations are warmer 2-3 K in the stratospheric region and 5-10 K in the mesospheric region than temperatures observed from the satellite. A comparison with the models, COSPAR International Reference Atmosphere (CIRA)-86 and Mass Spectrometer Incoherent Scatter Extended (MSISE)-90, showed differences of 3 K in the stratosphere and 5-10 K in the mesosphere, with deviations somewhat larger for CIRA-86. In most of the months and in all altitude regions model temperatures were lower than the Lidar observed temperature except in the altitude range of 40-50 km. MSISE-90 Model temperature overestimates as compared to Lidar temperature during December-February in the altitude region of 50-60 km. In the altitude region of 55-70 km both models deviate significantly, with differences exceeding 10-12 K, particularly during equinoctial periods. An average heating rate of 2.5 K/month during equinoxes and cooling rate of 4 K/month during November-December are found in altitude region of 50-70 km, relatively less heating and cooling rates are found in the altitude range of 30-50 km. The stratospheric

  3. Efficient Focusing Models for Generation of Freak Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xi-zeng; SUN Zhao-chen; LIANG Shu-xiu

    2009-01-01

    Four focusing models for generation of freak waves are presented. An extreme wave focusing model is presented on the basis of the enhanced High-Order Spectral (HOS) method and the importance of the nonlinear wave-wave interaction is evaluated by comparison of the calculated results with experimental and theoretical data. Based on the modification of the Longuet-Higgins model, four wave models for generation of freak waves (a. Extreme wave model + random wave model; b. Extreme wave model + regular wave model; c. Phase interval modulation wave focusing model; d. Number modulation wave focusing model with the same phase) are proposed. By use of different energy distribution techniques in the four models, freak wave events are obtained with different H_(max)/H_s in finite space and time.

  4. Probing inflation models with gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Domcke, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    A direct detection of primordial gravitational waves is the ultimate probe for any inflation model. While current CMB bounds predict the generic scale-invariant gravitational wave spectrum from slow-roll inflation to be below the reach of upcoming gravitational wave interferometers, this prospect may dramatically change if the inflaton is a pseudoscalar. In this case, a coupling to any abelian gauge field leads to a tachyonic instability for the latter and hence to a new source of gravitational waves, directly related to the dynamics of inflation. In this contribution we discuss how this setup enables the upcoming gravitational wave interferometers advanced LIGO/VIRGO and eLISA to probe the microphysics of inflation, distinguishing between different universality classes of single-field slow-roll inflation models. We find that the prime candidate for an early detection is a Starobinsky-like model.

  5. On Rayleigh's Principle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kurt Munk

    1997-01-01

    Rayleigh's principle expresses that the smallest eigenvalue of a regular Sturm-Liouville problem with regular boundary conditions is the minimum value of a certain functional, the so called Rayleigh's quotient, and that this value is attained at the corresponding eigenfunctions only. This can...... be proved by means of more advanced methods. However, it turns out that there is an elementary proof, which is presented in the report....

  6. THE DIABATIC WAVES IN BAROTROPIC MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The equations of barotropic model are used to discuss the effects of diabatic factors such as heating of convective condensation, evaporation-wind feedback and CISK on the Rossby wave and the Kelvin wave. In low latitudes we have obtained the angular frequency and analyzed the period and stability of waves. The result shows the existence of the diabatic factors not only enlarges the period of adiabatic waves but also changes the stability of waves. Thus we think that the so-called intraseasonal oscillation and some other low-frequency oscillations are a kind of diabatic waves which are important factors producing the long-term weather changes and short-term climatic evolution.

  7. Quantification of Wave Model Uncertainties Used for Probabilistic Reliability Assessments of Wave Energy Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambühl, Simon; Kofoed, Jens Peter; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2015-01-01

    Wave models used for site assessments are subjected to model uncertainties, which need to be quantified when using wave model results for probabilistic reliability assessments. This paper focuses on determination of wave model uncertainties. Four different wave models are considered, and validation...... uncertainties can be implemented in probabilistic reliability assessments....

  8. A global shear velocity model of the mantle from normal modes and surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    durand, S.; Debayle, E.; Ricard, Y. R.; Lambotte, S.

    2013-12-01

    We present a new global shear wave velocity model of the mantle based on the inversion of all published normal mode splitting functions and the large surface wave dataset measured by Debayle & Ricard (2012). Normal mode splitting functions and surface wave phase velocity maps are sensitive to lateral heterogeneities of elastic parameters (Vs, Vp, xi, phi, eta) and density. We first only consider spheroidal modes and Rayleigh waves and restrict the inversion to Vs, Vp and the density. Although it is well known that Vs is the best resolved parameter, we also investigate whether our dataset allows to extract additional information on density and/or Vp. We check whether the determination of the shear wave velocity is affected by the a priori choice of the crustal model (CRUST2.0 or 3SMAC) or by neglecting/coupling poorly resolved parameters. We include the major discontinuities, at 400 and 670 km. Vertical smoothing is imposed through an a priori gaussian covariance matrix on the model and we discuss the effect of coupling/decoupling the inverted structure above and below the discontinuities. We finally discuss the large scale structure of our model and its geodynamical implications regarding the amount of mass exchange between the upper and lower mantle.

  9. Baroclinic stationary waves in aquaplanet models

    CERN Document Server

    Zappa, Giuseppe; Navarra, Antonio; 10.1175/2011JAS3573.1

    2011-01-01

    An aquaplanet model is used to study the nature of the highly persistent low frequency waves that have been observed in models forced by zonally symmetric boundary conditions. Using the Hayashi spectral analysis of the extratropical waves, we find that a quasi-stationary (QS) wave five belongs to a wave packet obeying a well defined dispersion relation with eastward group velocity. The components of the dispersion relation with k>5 baroclinically convert eddy available potential energy into eddy kinetic energy, while those with k<5 are baroclinically neutral. In agreement with the Green's model of baroclinic instability, the wave five is weakly unstable, and the inverse energy cascade, which had been previously proposed as a main forcing for this type of waves, only acts as a positive feedback on its predominantly baroclinic energetics. The QS wave is reinforced by a phase lock to an analogous pattern in the tropical convection, which provides further amplification to the wave. We also find that the Pedlos...

  10. Contribution to modelization and simulation of the ablative-like Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities for ICF; Contribution a la modelisation et a la simulation des instabilites de type Rayleigh-Taylor ablatif pour la FCI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egly, H

    2007-10-15

    This thesis deals with the dynamics of accelerated ablative front spreading in Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments. ICF is designed for the implosion of a deuterium-tritium spherical target. The outer shell, the ablator, is irradiated providing a high level pressure inside the target. During this first stage, the ablation front propagating inwards is perturbed by hydrodynamics instabilities, which can prevent the fusion reaction in the decelerated stage. We propose here a study on Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities during ablation process, in the two dimensional case. In order to obtain a numerical solution, we perform an asymptotic analysis in the limit of a high temperature ratio, between the remaining cold ablator and the hot ablated plasma. This study is divided in two steps. First, the thermo-diffusive part of the set of equations is approximated by a Hele-Shaw model, which is then perturbed by the hydrodynamics part. Using a vortex method, we have to solve the advection of a vortical sheet moving with the ablation front. We compute the numerical solution on an Eulerian mesh coupled with a marker method. The thermal part is computed by implementing the Fat Boundary Method, recently developed. The hydrodynamic part is obtained from a Finite Volume scheme. (author)

  11. Travelling Waves in Hybrid Chemotaxis Models

    KAUST Repository

    Franz, Benjamin

    2013-12-18

    Hybrid models of chemotaxis combine agent-based models of cells with partial differential equation models of extracellular chemical signals. In this paper, travelling wave properties of hybrid models of bacterial chemotaxis are investigated. Bacteria are modelled using an agent-based (individual-based) approach with internal dynamics describing signal transduction. In addition to the chemotactic behaviour of the bacteria, the individual-based model also includes cell proliferation and death. Cells consume the extracellular nutrient field (chemoattractant), which is modelled using a partial differential equation. Mesoscopic and macroscopic equations representing the behaviour of the hybrid model are derived and the existence of travelling wave solutions for these models is established. It is shown that cell proliferation is necessary for the existence of non-transient (stationary) travelling waves in hybrid models. Additionally, a numerical comparison between the wave speeds of the continuum models and the hybrid models shows good agreement in the case of weak chemotaxis and qualitative agreement for the strong chemotaxis case. In the case of slow cell adaptation, we detect oscillating behaviour of the wave, which cannot be explained by mean-field approximations. © 2013 Society for Mathematical Biology.

  12. Variational modelling of nonlinear water waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalogirou, Anna; Bokhove, Onno

    2015-11-01

    Mathematical modelling of water waves is demonstrated by investigating variational methods. A potential flow water wave model is derived using variational techniques and extented to include explicit time-dependence, leading to non-autonomous dynamics. As a first example, we consider the problem of a soliton splash in a long wave channel with a contraction at its end, resulting after a sluice gate is removed at a finite time. The removal of the sluice gate is included in the variational principle through a time-dependent gravitational potential. A second example involving non-autonomous dynamics concerns the motion of a free surface in a vertical Hele-Shaw cell. Explicit time-dependence now enters the model through a linear damping term due to the effect of wall friction and a term representing the motion of an artificially driven wave pump. In both cases, the model is solved numerically using a Galerkin FEM and the numerical results are compared to wave structures observed in experiments. The water wave model is also adapted to accommodate nonlinear ship dynamics. The novelty is this case is the coupling between the water wave dynamics, the ship dynamics and water line dynamics on the ship. For simplicity, we consider a simple ship structure consisting of V-shaped cross-sections.

  13. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF THE MAGNETIC RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR INSTABILITY IN THE KIPPENHAHN-SCHLUeTER PROMINENCE MODEL. I. FORMATION OF UPFLOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillier, Andrew; Isobe, Hiroaki; Shibata, Kazunari [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Berger, Thomas, E-mail: andrew@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2012-02-20

    The launch of the Hinode satellite led to the discovery of rising plumes, dark in chromospheric lines, that propagate from large ({approx}10 Mm) bubbles that form at the base of quiescent prominences. The plumes move through a height of approximately 10 Mm while developing highly turbulent profiles. The magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability was hypothesized to be the mechanism that drives these flows. In this study, using three-dimensional (3D) MHD simulations, we investigate the nonlinear stability of the Kippenhahn-Schlueter prominence model for the interchange mode of the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The model simulates the rise of a buoyant tube inside the quiescent prominence model, where the interchange of magnetic field lines becomes possible at the boundary between the buoyant tube and the prominence. Hillier et al. presented the initial results of this study, where upflows of constant velocity (maximum found 6 km s{sup -1}) and a maximum plume width Almost-Equal-To 1.5 Mm which propagate through a height of approximately 6 Mm were found. Nonlinear interaction between plumes was found to be important for determining the plume dynamics. In this paper, using the results of ideal MHD simulations, we determine how the initial parameters for the model and buoyant tube affect the evolution of instability. We find that the 3D mode of the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability grows, creating upflows aligned with the magnetic field of constant velocity (maximum found 7.3 km s{sup -1}). The width of the upflows is dependent on the initial conditions, with a range of 0.5-4 Mm which propagate through heights of 3-6 Mm. These results are in general agreement with the observations of the rising plumes.

  14. Hydraulic Model Tests on Modified Wave Dragon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Tue; Lynggaard, Jakob

    A floating model of the Wave Dragon (WD) was built in autumn 1998 by the Danish Maritime Institute in scale 1:50, see Sørensen and Friis-Madsen (1999) for reference. This model was subjected to a series of model tests and subsequent modifications at Aalborg University and in the following...... are found in Hald and Lynggaard (2001). Model tests and reconstruction are carried out during the phase 3 project: ”Wave Dragon. Reconstruction of an existing model in scale 1:50 and sequentiel tests of changes to the model geometry and mass distribution parameters” sponsored by the Danish Energy Agency...

  15. 山西地区面波相速度分布图像%Rayleigh-wave phase velocity distribution in Shanxi region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋美琴; 何正勤; 郑勇; 吕芳; 刘春; 梁向军; 苏燕; 李丽

    2013-01-01

    In this work,seismic datas are taken from seismograms of over 100 earthquakes which are recorded from Feburary in 2009 to November in 2011 at 31 stations in Shanxi Province and other 6 broadband stations in adjacent areas,including Hebei,Henan,Shanxi and Neimeng Province.We obtained 350 high-quality Rayleigh wave phase velocity dispersion curves of fundamental mode by removing the duplicate paths and low quality data.The periods of the dispersion curves range from 8 to 75 seconds.Based on the method of Ditmar & Yanovskaya,we obtained phase velocity dispersion maps in 33 periods with resolution ranges from 40 to 50 km.We analyzed the phase velocity distribution maps at four representative periods and the phase velocity section maps along three profiles.The phase velocity maps reveal the lateral heterogeneity of the velocity structure and the phase speed variation with depth in the crust and the upper mantle of the Shanxi fault depression zone.The phase velocity map at 10 s clearly shows the spatial differences between the rift zone and the uplift zones in the two sides,presenting low phase velocity anomalies in the maximum depression regions near the centers of several basins inside the rift zone Moderate to strong earthquakes(M≥6)in Shanxi are mostly concentrated in the transitional zones where dramatic phase velocity changes occur at 15 s.At 20~26 s period,significant phase velocity difference can be observed across the latitude of 38°N,where phase velocity is higher in the south side than that in the north,which is in consistent with the variation pattern of Moho depth in the depression zone.This kind of velocity pattern keeps constant with the increase of period,which is consistent with the feature that the blocks in the north Shanxi is relatively weaker than those in the south.Along 113°E,the phase velocities at periods of 25~75 s are higher in the north side of latitude 38°N than in the south.This is consistent with the result of the lithospheric

  16. On the modelling of equatorial waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantin, A.

    2012-03-01

    The present theory of geophysical waves that either raise or lower the equatorial thermocline, based on the reduced-gravity shallow-water equations on the β-plane, ignores vertical variations of the flow. In particular, the vertical structure of the Equatorial Undercurrent is absent. As a remedy we propose a simple approach by modeling this geophysical process as a wave-current interaction in the f-plane approximation, the underlying current being of positive constant vorticity. The explicit dispersion relation allows us to conclude that, despite its simplicity, the proposed model captures to a reasonable extent essential features of equatorial waves.

  17. Study on Solitary Waves of a General Boussinesq Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we employ the bifurcation method of dynamical systems to study the solitary waves and periodic waves of a generalized Boussinesq equations. All possible phase portraits in the parameter plane for the travelling wave systems are obtained. The possible solitary wave solutions, periodic wave solutions and cusp waves for the general Boussinesq type fluid model are also investigated.

  18. -Advanced Models for Tsunami and Rogue Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. W. Pravica

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A wavelet , that satisfies the q-advanced differential equation for , is used to model N-wave oscillations observed in tsunamis. Although q-advanced ODEs may seem nonphysical, we present an application that model tsunamis, in particular the Japanese tsunami of March 11, 2011, by utilizing a one-dimensional wave equation that is forced by . The profile is similar to tsunami models in present use. The function is a wavelet that satisfies a q-advanced harmonic oscillator equation. It is also shown that another wavelet, , matches a rogue-wave profile. This is explained in terms of a resonance wherein two small amplitude forcing waves eventually lead to a large amplitude rogue. Since wavelets are used in the detection of tsunamis and rogues, the signal-analysis performance of and is examined on actual data.

  19. Statistical distribution of nonlinear random wave height in shallow water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Here we present a statistical model of random wave,using Stokes wave theory of water wave dynamics,as well as a new nonlinear probability distribution function of wave height in shallow water.It is more physically logical to use the wave steepness of shallow water and the factor of shallow water as the parameters in the wave height distribution.The results indicate that the two parameters not only could be parameters of the distribution function of wave height but also could reflect the degree of wave height distribution deviation from the Rayleigh distribution.The new wave height distribution overcomes the problem of Rayleigh distribution that the prediction of big wave is overestimated and the general wave is underestimated.The prediction of small probability wave height value of new distribution is also smaller than that of Rayleigh distribution.The effect of wave steepness in shallow water is similar to that in deep water;but the factor of shallow water lowers the wave height distribution of the general wave with the reduced factor of wave steepness.It also makes the wave height distribution of shallow water more centralized.The results indicate that the new distribution fits the in situ measurements much better than other distributions.

  20. Wave scattering through classically chaotic cavities in the presence of absorption: A maximum-entropy model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pier A Mello; Eugene Kogan

    2002-02-01

    We present a maximum-entropy model for the transport of waves through a classically chaotic cavity in the presence of absorption. The entropy of the -matrix statistical distribution is maximized, with the constraint $\\langle {\\rm Tr}SS^{\\dagger}\\rangle = n: n$ is the dimensionality of , and 0 ≤ ≤ 1. For = 1 the -matrix distribution concentrates on the unitarity sphere and we have no absorption; for = 0 the distribution becomes a delta function at the origin and we have complete absorption. For strong absorption our result agrees with a number of analytical calculations already given in the literature. In that limit, the distribution of the individual (angular) transmission and reflection coefficients becomes exponential – Rayleigh statistics – even for = 1. For ≫ 1 Rayleigh statistics is attained even with no absorption; here we extend the study to < 1. The model is compared with random-matrix-theory numerical simulations: it describes the problem very well for strong absorption, but fails for moderate and weak absorptions. The success of the model for strong absorption is understood in the light of a central-limit theorem. For weak absorption, some important physical constraint is missing in the construction of the model.

  1. Turbulent Spot Pressure Fluctuation Wave Packet Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dechant, Lawrence J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Wave packet analysis provides a connection between linear small disturbance theory and subsequent nonlinear turbulent spot flow behavior. The traditional association between linear stability analysis and nonlinear wave form is developed via the method of stationary phase whereby asymptotic (simplified) mean flow solutions are used to estimate dispersion behavior and stationary phase approximation are used to invert the associated Fourier transform. The resulting process typically requires nonlinear algebraic equations inversions that can be best performed numerically, which partially mitigates the value of the approximation as compared to a more complete, e.g. DNS or linear/nonlinear adjoint methods. To obtain a simpler, closed-form analytical result, the complete packet solution is modeled via approximate amplitude (linear convected kinematic wave initial value problem) and local sinusoidal (wave equation) expressions. Significantly, the initial value for the kinematic wave transport expression follows from a separable variable coefficient approximation to the linearized pressure fluctuation Poisson expression. The resulting amplitude solution, while approximate in nature, nonetheless, appears to mimic many of the global features, e.g. transitional flow intermittency and pressure fluctuation magnitude behavior. A low wave number wave packet models also recover meaningful auto-correlation and low frequency spectral behaviors.

  2. Mesoscale Wind Predictions for Wave Model Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    N0001400WX20041(B) http://www.nrlmry.navy.mil LONG TERM GOALS The long-term goal is to demonstrate the significance and importance of high...ocean waves by an appropriate wave model. OBJECTIVES The main objectives of this project are to: 1. Build the infrastructure to generate the...temperature for all COAMPS grids at the resolution of each of these grids. These analyses are important for the proper 2 specification of the lower

  3. Large-scale inhomogeneity in sapphire test masses revealed by Rayleigh scattering imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zewu; Ju, Li; Eon, François; Gras, Slawomir; Zhao, Chunnong; Jacob, John; Blair, David G.

    2004-03-01

    Rayleigh scattering in test masses can introduce noise and reduce the sensitivity of laser interferometric gravitational wave detectors. In this paper, we present laser Rayleigh scattering imaging as a technique to investigate sapphire test masses. The system provides three-dimensional Rayleigh scattering mapping of entire test masses and quantitative evaluation of the Rayleigh scattering coefficient. Rayleigh scattering mapping of two sapphire samples reveals point defects as well as inhomogeneous structures in the samples. We present results showing significant non-uniform scattering within two 4.5 kg sapphire test masses manufactured by the heat exchanger method.

  4. Wave Modeling of the Solar Wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, Leon

    The acceleration and heating of the solar wind have been studied for decades using satellite observations and models. However, the exact mechanism that leads to solar wind heating and acceleration is poorly understood. In order to improve the understanding of the physical mechanisms that are involved in these processes a combination of modeling and observational analysis is required. Recent models constrained by satellite observations show that wave heating in the low-frequency (MHD), and high-frequency (ion-cyclotron) range may provide the necessary momentum and heat input to coronal plasma and produce the solar wind. This review is focused on the results of several recent solar modeling studies that include waves explicitly in the MHD and the kinetic regime. The current status of the understanding of the solar wind acceleration and heating by waves is reviewed.

  5. Making Waves: Seismic Waves Activities and Demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braile, S. J.; Braile, L. W.

    2011-12-01

    The nature and propagation of seismic waves are fundamental concepts necessary for understanding the exploration of Earth's interior structure and properties, plate tectonics, earthquakes, and seismic hazards. Investigating seismic waves is also an engaging approach to learning basic principles of the physics of waves and wave propagation. Several effective educational activities and demonstrations are available for teaching about seismic waves, including the stretching of a spring to demonstrate elasticity; slinky wave propagation activities for compressional, shear, Rayleigh and Love waves; the human wave activity to demonstrate P- and S- waves in solids and liquids; waves in water in a simple wave tank; seismic wave computer animations; simple shake table demonstrations of model building responses to seismic waves to illustrate earthquake damage to structures; processing and analysis of seismograms using free and easy to use software; and seismic wave simulation software for viewing wave propagation in a spherical Earth. The use of multiple methods for teaching about seismic waves is useful because it provides reinforcement of the fundamental concepts, is adaptable to variable classroom situations and diverse learning styles, and allows one or more methods to be used for authentic assessment. The methods described here have been used effectively with a broad range of audiences, including K-12 students and teachers, undergraduate students in introductory geosciences courses, and geosciences majors.

  6. Modeling the effect of wave-vegetation interaction on wave setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooijen, A. A.; McCall, R. T.; van Thiel de Vries, J. S. M.; van Dongeren, A. R.; Reniers, A. J. H. M.; Roelvink, J. A.

    2016-06-01

    Aquatic vegetation in the coastal zone attenuates wave energy and reduces the risk of coastal hazards, e.g., flooding. Besides the attenuation of sea-swell waves, vegetation may also affect infragravity-band (IG) waves and wave setup. To date, knowledge on the effect of vegetation on IG waves and wave setup is lacking, while they are potentially important parameters for coastal risk assessment. In this study, the storm impact model XBeach is extended with formulations for attenuation of sea-swell and IG waves, and wave setup effects in two modes: the sea-swell wave phase-resolving (nonhydrostatic) and the phase-averaged (surfbeat) mode. In surfbeat mode, a wave shape model is implemented to capture the effect of nonlinear wave-vegetation interaction processes on wave setup. Both modeling modes are verified using data from two flume experiments with mimic vegetation and show good skill in computing the sea-swell and IG wave transformation, and wave setup. In surfbeat mode, the wave setup prediction greatly improves when using the wave shape model, while in nonhydrostatic mode (nonlinear) intrawave effects are directly accounted for. Subsequently, the model is used for a range of coastal geomorphological configurations by varying bed slope and vegetation extent. The results indicate that the effect of wave-vegetation interaction on wave setup may be relevant for a range of typical coastal geomorphological configurations (e.g., relatively steep to gentle slope coasts fronted by vegetation).

  7. Simple opdriftsbaserede modeller for Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten

    Wave Star modellen er udarbejdet i programmeringssproget Delphi. Modellerne er en videre udarbejdelse af tidligere anvendte Excel-modeller. I forhold til Excelmodellerne udmærker de nye Dephi-modeller sig ved at beregningerne udføres mange gange hurtigere og modellerne kan håndtere lange tidsserier...

  8. Chromo-Rayleigh Interactions of Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Yang

    2015-01-01

    For a wide range of models, dark matter can interact with QCD gluons via chromo-Rayleigh interactions. We point out that the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), as a gluon machine, provides a superb probe of such interactions. In this paper, we introduce simplified models to UV-complete two effective dark matter chromo-Rayleigh interactions and identify the corresponding collider signatures, including four jets or a pair of di-jet resonances plus missing transverse energy. After performing collider studies for both the 8 TeV and 14 TeV LHC, we find that the LHC can be more sensitive to dark matter chromo-Rayleigh interactions than direct detection experiments and thus provides the best opportunity for future discovery of this class of models.

  9. A new algorithm for three-dimensional joint inversion of body wave and surface wave data and its application to the Southern California plate boundary region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Hongjian; Zhang, Haijiang; Yao, Huajian; Allam, Amir; Zigone, Dimitri; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Thurber, Clifford; van der Hilst, Robert D.

    2016-05-01

    We introduce a new algorithm for joint inversion of body wave and surface wave data to get better 3-D P wave (Vp) and S wave (Vs) velocity models by taking advantage of the complementary strengths of each data set. Our joint inversion algorithm uses a one-step inversion of surface wave traveltime measurements at different periods for 3-D Vs and Vp models without constructing the intermediate phase or group velocity maps. This allows a more straightforward modeling of surface wave traveltime data with the body wave arrival times. We take into consideration the sensitivity of surface wave data with respect to Vp in addition to its large sensitivity to Vs, which means both models are constrained by two different data types. The method is applied to determine 3-D crustal Vp and Vs models using body wave and Rayleigh wave data in the Southern California plate boundary region, which has previously been studied with both double-difference tomography method using body wave arrival times and ambient noise tomography method with Rayleigh and Love wave group velocity dispersion measurements. Our approach creates self-consistent and unique models with no prominent gaps, with Rayleigh wave data resolving shallow and large-scale features and body wave data constraining relatively deeper structures where their ray coverage is good. The velocity model from the joint inversion is consistent with local geological structures and produces better fits to observed seismic waveforms than the current Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) model.

  10. Modeling of random wave transformation with strong wave-induced coastal currents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Jinhai; H. Mase; Li Tongfei

    2008-01-01

    The propagation and transformation of multi-directional and uni-directional random waves over a coast with complicated bathymetric and geometric features are studied experimentally and numerically. Laboratory investigation indicates that wave energy convergence and divergence cause strong coastal currents to develop and inversely modify the wave fields. A coastal spectral wave model, based on the wave action balance equation with diffraction effect (WABED), is used to simulate the transformation of random waves over the complicated bathymetry. The diffraction effect in the wave model is derived from a parabolic approximation of wave theory, and the mean energy dissipation rate per unit horizontal area due to wave breaking is parameterized by the bore-based formulation with a breaker index of 0.73. The numerically simulated wave field without considering coastal currents is different from that of experiments, whereas model results considering currents clearly reproduce the intensification of wave height in front of concave shorelines.

  11. -Advanced Models for Tsunami and Rogue Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Pravica, D. W.; Randriampiry, N.; Spurr, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    A wavelet ${K}_{q}(t)$ , that satisfies the q-advanced differential equation ${K}_{q}^{\\prime }(t)={K}_{q}(qt)$ for $q>1$ , is used to model N-wave oscillations observed in tsunamis. Although q-advanced ODEs may seem nonphysical, we present an application that model tsunamis, in particular the Japanese tsunami of March 11, 2011, by utilizing a one-dimensional wave equation that is forced by ${F}_{q}(t,x)={K}_{q}{(t)}_{q}\\text{S}\\text{i}\\text{n}(x)$ . The profile ${F}_{q}$ is similar to tsunam...

  12. A Comparison of Nature Waves and Model Waves with Special Reference to Wave Grouping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.

    This paper represents a comparative analyses of the occurrence of wave grouping in field storm waves and laboratory waves with similar power spectra and wave height distribution.......This paper represents a comparative analyses of the occurrence of wave grouping in field storm waves and laboratory waves with similar power spectra and wave height distribution....

  13. Model for predicting mountain wave field uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiens, Florentin; Lott, François; Millet, Christophe; Plougonven, Riwal

    2017-04-01

    Studying the propagation of acoustic waves throughout troposphere requires knowledge of wind speed and temperature gradients from the ground up to about 10-20 km. Typical planetary boundary layers flows are known to present vertical low level shears that can interact with mountain waves, thereby triggering small-scale disturbances. Resolving these fluctuations for long-range propagation problems is, however, not feasible because of computer memory/time restrictions and thus, they need to be parameterized. When the disturbances are small enough, these fluctuations can be described by linear equations. Previous works by co-authors have shown that the critical layer dynamics that occur near the ground produces large horizontal flows and buoyancy disturbances that result in intense downslope winds and gravity wave breaking. While these phenomena manifest almost systematically for high Richardson numbers and when the boundary layer depth is relatively small compare to the mountain height, the process by which static stability affects downslope winds remains unclear. In the present work, new linear mountain gravity wave solutions are tested against numerical predictions obtained with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. For Richardson numbers typically larger than unity, the mesoscale model is used to quantify the effect of neglected nonlinear terms on downslope winds and mountain wave patterns. At these regimes, the large downslope winds transport warm air, a so called "Foehn" effect than can impact sound propagation properties. The sensitivity of small-scale disturbances to Richardson number is quantified using two-dimensional spectral analysis. It is shown through a pilot study of subgrid scale fluctuations of boundary layer flows over realistic mountains that the cross-spectrum of mountain wave field is made up of the same components found in WRF simulations. The impact of each individual component on acoustic wave propagation is discussed in terms of

  14. Modeling and measurement of angle-beam wave propagation in a scatterer-free plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Alexander J.; Michaels, Jennifer E.; Michaels, Thomas E.

    2017-02-01

    Wavefield imaging has been shown to be a powerful tool for improving the understanding and characterization of wave propagation and scattering in plates. The complete measurement of surface displacement over a 2-D grid provided by wavefield imaging has the potential to serve as a useful means of validating ultrasonic models. Here, a preliminary study of ultrasonic angle-beam wave propagation in a scatterer-free plate using a combination of wavefield measurements and 2-D finite element models is described. Both wavefield imaging and finite element analysis are used to study the propagation of waves at a refracted angle of 56.8° propagating in a 6.35 mm thick aluminum plate. Wavefield imaging is performed using a laser vibrometer mounted on an XYZ scanning stage, which is programmed to move point-to-point on a rectilinear grid to acquire waveform data. The commercial finite element software package, PZFlex, which is specifically designed to handle large, complex ultrasonic problems, is used to create a 2-D cross-sectional model of the transducer and plate. For model validation, vertical surface displacements from both the wavefield measurements and the PZFlex finite element model are compared and found to be in excellent agreement. The validated PZFlex model is then used to explain the mechanism of Rayleigh wave generation by the angle-beam wedge. Since the wavefield measurements are restricted to the specimen surface, the cross-sectional PZFlex model is able to provide insights the wavefield data cannot. This study illustrates how information obtained from ultrasonic experiments and modeling results can be combined to improve understanding of angle-beam wave generation and propagation.

  15. Determination of Wave Model Uncertainties used for Probabilistic Reliability Assessments of Wave Energy Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambühl, Simon; Kofoed, Jens Peter; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2014-01-01

    Wave models used for site assessments are subject to model uncertainties, which need to be quantified when using wave model results for probabilistic reliability assessments. This paper focuses on determination of wave model uncertainties. Considered are four different wave models and validation...... data is collected from published scientific research. The bias, the root-mean-square error as well as the scatter index are considered for the significant wave height as well as the mean zero-crossing wave period. Based on an illustrative generic example it is shown how the estimated uncertainties can...

  16. Wave climatology of the Indian Ocean derived from altimetry and wave model

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vethamony, P.; Rao, L.V.G.; Kumar, R.; Sarkar, A.; Mohan, M.; Sudheesh, K.; Karthikeyan, S.B.

    month. Similar procedure is followed for Geosat data for comparison purpose. The wave model, WAVEIN has been run using ECMWF winds to hindcast waves over the Indian Ocean and to compare with Geosat wave parameters. As altimeter does not provide wave...

  17. A Boussinesq Equation-Based Model for Nearshore Wave Breaking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余建星; 张伟; 王广东; 杨树清

    2004-01-01

    Based on the wave breaking model by Li and Wang (1999), this work is to apply Dally' s analytical solution to the wave-height decay irstead of the empirical and semi-empirical hypotheses of wave-height distribution within the wave breaking zone. This enhances the applicability of the model. Computational results of shoaling, location of wave breaking, wave-height decay after wave breaking, set-down and set-up for incident regular waves are shown to have good agreement with experimental and field data.

  18. Discrete particle modelling of granular roll waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Jonathan; Dalziel, Stuart; Vriend, Nathalie

    2016-11-01

    A granular current flowing down an inclined chute or plane can undergo an instability that leads to the formation of surface waves, known as roll waves. Examples of roll waves are found in avalanches and debris flows in landslides, and in many industrial processes. Although related to the Kapitza instability of viscous fluid films, granular roll waves are not yet as well understood. Laboratory experiments typically measure the surface height and velocity of a current as functions of position and time, but they do not give insight into the processes below the surface: in particular, the possible formation of a boundary layer at the free surface as well as the base. To overcome this, we are running discrete particle model (DPM) simulations. Simulations are validated against our laboratory experiments, but they also allow us to examine a much larger range of parameters, such as material properties, chute geometry and particle size dispersity, than that which is possible in the lab. We shall present results from simulations in which we vary particle size and dispersity, and examine the implications on roll wave formation and propagation. Future work will include simulations in which the shape of the chute is varied, both cross-sectionally and in the downstream direction. EPSRC studentship (Tsang) and Royal Society Research Fellowship (Vriend).

  19. Phase Diagram of a Holographic Superconductor Model with s-wave and d-wave

    CERN Document Server

    Nishida, Mitsuhiro

    2014-01-01

    We consider a holographic model with a scalar field, a tensor field and a direct coupling between them as a superconductor with an s-wave and a d-wave. We find a rich phase structure in our model. Depending on the direct coupling, the model exhibits coexistence of the s-wave and the d-wave, and/or order competition, and has a triple point.

  20. CMS-Wave Model: Part 5. Full-plane Wave Transformation and Grid Nesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    are available in previous reports and CHETNs (Lin et al. 2006; Demirbilek et al. 2007). CMS -Wave is part of the Coastal Modeling System ( CMS ...the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ (USACE) Surface-water Modeling System (SMS). The CMS -Wave FP option is available in SMS Version 11.1 and higher...ERDC/CHL CHETN-IV-81 April 2012 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. CMS -Wave Model: Part 5. Full-plane Wave Transformation

  1. Modulational instability arising from collective Rayleigh scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, G R M; McNeil, B W J

    2003-02-01

    It is shown that under certain conditions a collection of dielectric Rayleigh particles suspended in a viscous medium and enclosed in a bidirectional ring cavity pumped by a strong laser field can produce a new modulational instability transverse to the wave-propagation direction. The source of the instability is collective Rayleigh scattering i.e., the spontaneous formation of periodic longitudinal particle-density modulations and a backscattered optical field. Using a linear stability analysis a dispersion relation is derived which determines the region of parameter space in which modulational instability of the backscattered field and the particle distribution occurs. In the linear regime the pump is modulationally stable. A numerical analysis is carried out to observe the dynamics of the interaction in the nonlinear regime. In the nonlinear regime the pump field also becomes modulationally unstable and strong pump depletion occurs.

  2. Finite-difference modeling and dispersion analysis of high-frequency love waves for near-surface applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Xu, Y.; Zeng, C.; Liu, J.

    2010-01-01

    Love-wave propagation has been a topic of interest to crustal, earthquake, and engineering seismologists for many years because it is independent of Poisson's ratio and more sensitive to shear (S)-wave velocity changes and layer thickness changes than are Rayleigh waves. It is well known that Love-wave generation requires the existence of a low S-wave velocity layer in a multilayered earth model. In order to study numerically the propagation of Love waves in a layered earth model and dispersion characteristics for near-surface applications, we simulate high-frequency (>5 Hz) Love waves by the staggered-grid finite-difference (FD) method. The air-earth boundary (the shear stress above the free surface) is treated using the stress-imaging technique. We use a two-layer model to demonstrate the accuracy of the staggered-grid modeling scheme. We also simulate four-layer models including a low-velocity layer (LVL) or a high-velocity layer (HVL) to analyze dispersive energy characteristics for near-surface applications. Results demonstrate that: (1) the staggered-grid FD code and stress-imaging technique are suitable for treating the free-surface boundary conditions for Love-wave modeling, (2) Love-wave inversion should be treated with extra care when a LVL exists because of a lack of LVL information in dispersions aggravating uncertainties in the inversion procedure, and (3) energy of high modes in a low-frequency range is very weak, so that it is difficult to estimate the cutoff frequency accurately, and "mode-crossing" occurs between the second higher and third higher modes when a HVL exists. ?? 2010 Birkh??user / Springer Basel AG.

  3. Universality of energy spectrum in turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Kunlun; Hoeller, Judith; Brown, Eric

    2016-11-01

    We present study of energy spectrum in turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection, in both cylindrical and cubic containers, tilting and non-tilting conditions, and with Rayleigh number ranging from 0 . 5 ×109 to 1 ×1010 . For these different conditions of geometry, tilt, and Rayleigh number, the temperature spectra measured on the system side walls are significantly different from each other. Even for the same condition, the spectrum varies depending on whether the sensors locate in the path of large-scale circulations. However, quite interestingly, once the signals of large-scale circulations are subtracted from the raw temperature, all spectra display a universal shape, regardless of system geometry, tilt, Rayleigh number, and location of sensors. It suggests that one could model the large-scale circulations and small-scale fluctuations separately in turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection.

  4. Wave-to-wire Modelling of Wave Energy Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferri, Francesco

    , but talking about renewable energy partially ravels the problem out. Wave energy is a large, mostly untapped, renewable energy resource. It has the potential to contribute significantly to the future energy mix, but the sector has not yet rolled off into the market in consequence of a number of technical...... and non-technical issues. These can be efficiently summarised in the cost of the energy produced by the various wave energy converters: If compared with other renewable energy technologies the cost of energy from the ocean waves is still significantly higher. Holding the comparison it also important...... to noticed that there is not a clear front runner in the wave energy sector, which fades effort and funding over a too broad frame. In order to assist efficient development and analysis of wave energy converters and therefore to accelerate the sector progression towards commercialisation, a generally...

  5. Generative Modeling for Machine Learning on the D-Wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thulasidasan, Sunil [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Information Sciences Group

    2016-11-15

    These are slides on Generative Modeling for Machine Learning on the D-Wave. The following topics are detailed: generative models; Boltzmann machines: a generative model; restricted Boltzmann machines; learning parameters: RBM training; practical ways to train RBM; D-Wave as a Boltzmann sampler; mapping RBM onto the D-Wave; Chimera restricted RBM; mapping binary RBM to Ising model; experiments; data; D-Wave effective temperature, parameters noise, etc.; experiments: contrastive divergence (CD) 1 step; after 50 steps of CD; after 100 steps of CD; D-Wave (experiments 1, 2, 3); D-Wave observations.

  6. A Comparative Analysis of Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes Model Predictions for Rayleigh-Taylor Instability and Mixing with Constant and Complex Accelerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Oleg

    2016-11-01

    Two-, three- and four-equation, single-velocity, multicomponent Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) models, based on the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate or lengthscale, are used to simulate At = 0 . 5 Rayleigh-Taylor turbulent mixing with constant and complex accelerations. The constant acceleration case is inspired by the Cabot and Cook (2006) DNS, and the complex acceleration cases are inspired by the unstable/stable and unstable/neutral cases simulated using DNS (Livescu, Wei & Petersen 2011) and the unstable/stable/unstable case simulated using ILES (Ramaprabhu, Karkhanis & Lawrie 2013). The four-equation models couple equations for the mass flux a and negative density-specific volume correlation b to the K- ɛ or K- L equations, while the three-equation models use a two-fluid algebraic closure for b. The lengthscale-based models are also applied with no buoyancy production in the L equation to explore the consequences of neglecting this term. Predicted mixing widths, turbulence statistics, fields, and turbulent transport equation budgets are compared among these models to identify similarities and differences in the turbulence production, dissipation and diffusion physics represented by the closures used in these models. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  7. Astrophysical Model Selection in Gravitational Wave Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Matthew R.; Cornish, Neil J.; Littenberg, Tyson B.

    2012-01-01

    Theoretical studies in gravitational wave astronomy have mostly focused on the information that can be extracted from individual detections, such as the mass of a binary system and its location in space. Here we consider how the information from multiple detections can be used to constrain astrophysical population models. This seemingly simple problem is made challenging by the high dimensionality and high degree of correlation in the parameter spaces that describe the signals, and by the complexity of the astrophysical models, which can also depend on a large number of parameters, some of which might not be directly constrained by the observations. We present a method for constraining population models using a hierarchical Bayesian modeling approach which simultaneously infers the source parameters and population model and provides the joint probability distributions for both. We illustrate this approach by considering the constraints that can be placed on population models for galactic white dwarf binaries using a future space-based gravitational wave detector. We find that a mission that is able to resolve approximately 5000 of the shortest period binaries will be able to constrain the population model parameters, including the chirp mass distribution and a characteristic galaxy disk radius to within a few percent. This compares favorably to existing bounds, where electromagnetic observations of stars in the galaxy constrain disk radii to within 20%.

  8. A WEAKLY NONLINEAR WATER WAVE MODEL TAKING INTO ACCOUNT DISPERSION OF WAVE PHASE VELOCITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李瑞杰; 李东永

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a weakly nonlinear water wave model using a mild slope equation and a new explicit formulation which takes into account dispersion of wave phase velocity, approximates Hedges' (1987) nonlinear dispersion relationship, and accords well with the original empirical formula. Comparison of the calculating results with those obtained from the experimental data and those obtained from linear wave theory showed that the present water wave model considering the dispersion of phase velocity is rational and in good agreement with experiment data.

  9. Detailed modeling of mountain wave PSCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Fueglistaler

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs play a key role in polar ozone depletion. In the Arctic, PSCs can occur on the mesoscale due to orographically induced gravity waves. Here we present a detailed study of a mountain wave PSC event on 25-27 January 2000 over Scandinavia. The mountain wave PSCs were intensively observed by in-situ and remote-sensing techniques during the second phase of the SOLVE/THESEO-2000 Arctic campaign. We use these excellent data of PSC observations on 3 successive days to analyze the PSCs and to perform a detailed comparison with modeled clouds. We simulated the 3-dimensional PSC structure on all 3 days with a mesoscale numerical weather prediction (NWP model and a microphysical box model (using best available nucleation rates for ice and nitric acid trihydrate particles. We show that the combined mesoscale/microphysical model is capable of reproducing the PSC measurements within the uncertainty of data interpretation with respect to spatial dimensions, temporal development and microphysical properties, without manipulating temperatures or using other tuning parameters. In contrast, microphysical modeling based upon coarser scale global NWP data, e.g. current ECMWF analysis data, cannot reproduce observations, in particular the occurrence of ice and nitric acid trihydrate clouds. Combined mesoscale/microphysical modeling may be used for detailed a posteriori PSC analysis and for future Arctic campaign flight and mission planning. The fact that remote sensing alone cannot further constrain model results due to uncertainities in the interpretation of measurements, underlines the need for synchronous in-situ PSC observations in campaigns.

  10. Applicability of WaveWatch-III wave model to fatigue assessment of offshore floating structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Tao; Kaminski, Miroslaw Lech

    2016-09-01

    In design and operation of floating offshore structures, one has to avoid fatigue failures caused by action of ocean waves. The aim of this paper is to investigate the applicability of WaveWatch-III wave model to fatigue assessment of offshore floating structures. The applicability was investigated for Bluewaters' FPSO (Floating Production, Storage and Offloading) which had been turret moored at Sable field for half a decade. The waves were predicted as sea-state time series consisting of one wind sea and one swell. The predicted waves were compared with wave data obtained from ERA-interim and buoy measurements. Furthermore, the fatigue calculations were also carried out for main deck and side shell locations. It has been concluded that predicted fatigue damages of main deck using WaveWatch-III are in a very good agreement regardless of differences in predicted wind waves and swells caused by differences in wave system partitioning. When compared to buoy measurements, the model underestimates fatigue damages of side shell by approximately 30 %. The reason for that has been found in wider directional spreading of actual waves. The WaveWatch-III wave model has been found suitable for the fatigue assessment. However, more attention should be paid on relative wave directionality, wave system partitioning and uncertainty analysis in further development.

  11. Deterministic combination of numerical and physical coastal wave models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, H.W.; Schäffer, Hemming Andreas; Jakobsen, K.P.

    2007-01-01

    A deterministic combination of numerical and physical models for coastal waves is developed. In the combined model, a Boussinesq model MIKE 21 BW is applied for the numerical wave computations. A piston-type 2D or 3D wavemaker and the associated control system with active wave absorption provides...

  12. Impact of surface waves in a Regional Climate Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rutgersson, Anna; Sætra, Oyvind; Semedo, Alvaro

    2010-01-01

    A coupled regional atmosphere-wave model system is developed with the purpose of investigating the impact of climate changes on the wave field, as well as feed-back effects of the wave field on the atmospheric parameters. This study focuses on the effects of introducing a two-way atmosphere-wave...... coupling on the atmosphere as well as on wave parameters. The model components are the regional climate model RCA, and the third generation wave model WAM. Two different methods are used for the coupling, using the roughness length and only including the effect of growing sea, and using the wave age...... and introducing the reduction of roughness due to decaying sea (swell). Introducing a two-way coupling results in an altered frequency distribution of wind speed and wave heights. When only including growing sea the impact of waves on the long term mean atmospheric parameters is limited, inducing a reduction...

  13. A simple analytic approximation to the Rayleigh-Bénard stability threshold

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prosperetti, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    The Rayleigh-Bénard linear stability problem is solved by means of a Fourier series expansion. It is found that truncating the series to just the first term gives an excellent explicit approximation to the marginal stability relation between the Rayleigh number and the wave number of the perturbatio

  14. Modeling Pancake Formation with a Coupled Wave-Ice Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeramony, J.; Orzech, M.; Shi, F.; Bateman, S. P.; Calantoni, J.

    2016-12-01

    Recent results from the ONR-sponsored Arctic Sea State DRI cruise (Thomson et al., 2016, EOS, in press) suggest that small-scale pancake ice formation is an important process in the initial recovery and refreezing of the Arctic pack ice each autumn. Ocean surface waves and ambient temperature play significant roles in shaping and/or limiting the pancake growth patterns, which may either facilitate or delay the recovery of the ice pack. Here we apply a phase-resolving, coupled wave-ice system, consisting of a CFD wave model (NHWAVE) and a discrete-element ice model (LIGGGHTS), to investigate the formation processes of pancake ice under different conditions. A series of simulations is run, each beginning with a layer of disconnected ice particles floating on the ocean surface. Wave conditions and ice bonding properties are varied to examine the effects of mild versus stormy conditions, wind waves versus swell, and warmer versus colder temperatures. Model runs are limited to domains of O(1 sq km). Initial tests have shown some success in replicating qualitative results from the Sea State cruise, including the formation of irregularly shaped pancakes from the "frazil" ice layer, changes in formation processes caused by varying ambient temperature (represented through variations in ice bonding strength), occasional rafting of one pancake on top of another, and increased wave attenuation as pancakes grow larger.

  15. Underwater Noise Modelling of Wave Energy Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    Future large-scale implementation of wave energy converts (WECs) will introduce an anthropogenic activity in the ocean which may contribute to underwater noise. The Ocean houses several marine species with acoustic sensibility; consequently the potential impact of the underwater noise needs to be addressed. At present, there are no acoustic impact studies based on acquired data. The WEAM project (Wave Energy Acoustic Monitoring) aims at developing an underwater noise monitoring plan for WECs. The development of an acoustic monitoring plan must consider the sound propagation in the ocean, identify noise sources, understand the operational characteristics and select adequate instrumentation. Any monitoring strategy must involve in-situ measurements. However, the vast distances which sound travels within the ocean, can make in-situ measurements covering the entire area of interest, impracticable. This difficulty can be partially overcome through acoustic numerical modelling. This paper presents a synthetic study, on the application of acoustic forward modelling and the evaluation of the impact of noise produced by wave energy devices on marine mammals using criteria based on audiograms of dolphins, or other species. The idea is to illustrate the application of that methodology, and to show to what extent it allows for estimating distances of impacts due to acoustic noise.

  16. Theoretical investigation of high velocity, temperature compensated Rayleigh waves along AlN/SiC substrates for high sensitivity mass sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliendo, Cinzia

    2012-01-01

    The operation of electroacoustic devices based on surface acoustic waves (SAW) propagation along β-SiC/AlN and amorphous-SiC/AlN substrates is theoretically studied with respect to the AlN film thickness, the SAW propagation direction, temperature and electric boundary conditions. GHz-range, enhanced electroacoustic coupling coefficient, temperature compensated around 20 °C electroacoustic devices are the advantages of SiC/AlN composite structures. These structures are also suitable for the implementation of sensors with improved performances with respect to SAW devices based on bulk single crystal piezoelectric substrates. The structures feasibility was confirmed by structural investigation and quantitative analysis of sputtered amorphous-SiC and AlN films on Si substrates.

  17. Inflationary gravitational waves in collapse scheme models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariani, Mauro, E-mail: mariani@carina.fcaglp.unlp.edu.ar [Facultad de Ciencias Astronómicas y Geofísicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque S/N, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Bengochea, Gabriel R., E-mail: gabriel@iafe.uba.ar [Instituto de Astronomía y Física del Espacio (IAFE), UBA-CONICET, CC 67, Suc. 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); León, Gabriel, E-mail: gleon@df.uba.ar [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria – Pab. I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2016-01-10

    The inflationary paradigm is an important cornerstone of the concordance cosmological model. However, standard inflation cannot fully address the transition from an early homogeneous and isotropic stage, to another one lacking such symmetries corresponding to our present universe. In previous works, a self-induced collapse of the wave function has been suggested as the missing ingredient of inflation. Most of the analysis regarding the collapse hypothesis has been solely focused on the characteristics of the spectrum associated to scalar perturbations, and within a semiclassical gravity framework. In this Letter, working in terms of a joint metric-matter quantization for inflation, we calculate, for the first time, the tensor power spectrum and the tensor-to-scalar ratio corresponding to the amplitude of primordial gravitational waves resulting from considering a generic self-induced collapse.

  18. Inflationary gravitational waves in collapse scheme models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Mariani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The inflationary paradigm is an important cornerstone of the concordance cosmological model. However, standard inflation cannot fully address the transition from an early homogeneous and isotropic stage, to another one lacking such symmetries corresponding to our present universe. In previous works, a self-induced collapse of the wave function has been suggested as the missing ingredient of inflation. Most of the analysis regarding the collapse hypothesis has been solely focused on the characteristics of the spectrum associated to scalar perturbations, and within a semiclassical gravity framework. In this Letter, working in terms of a joint metric-matter quantization for inflation, we calculate, for the first time, the tensor power spectrum and the tensor-to-scalar ratio corresponding to the amplitude of primordial gravitational waves resulting from considering a generic self-induced collapse.

  19. QUADRO: A SUPERVISED DIMENSION REDUCTION METHOD VIA RAYLEIGH QUOTIENT OPTIMIZATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jianqing; Ke, Zheng Tracy; Liu, Han; Xia, Lucy

    We propose a novel Rayleigh quotient based sparse quadratic dimension reduction method-named QUADRO (Quadratic Dimension Reduction via Rayleigh Optimization)-for analyzing high-dimensional data. Unlike in the linear setting where Rayleigh quotient optimization coincides with classification, these two problems are very different under nonlinear settings. In this paper, we clarify this difference and show that Rayleigh quotient optimization may be of independent scientific interests. One major challenge of Rayleigh quotient optimization is that the variance of quadratic statistics involves all fourth cross-moments of predictors, which are infeasible to compute for high-dimensional applications and may accumulate too many stochastic errors. This issue is resolved by considering a family of elliptical models. Moreover, for heavy-tail distributions, robust estimates of mean vectors and covariance matrices are employed to guarantee uniform convergence in estimating non-polynomially many parameters, even though only the fourth moments are assumed. Methodologically, QUADRO is based on elliptical models which allow us to formulate the Rayleigh quotient maximization as a convex optimization problem. Computationally, we propose an efficient linearized augmented Lagrangian method to solve the constrained optimization problem. Theoretically, we provide explicit rates of convergence in terms of Rayleigh quotient under both Gaussian and general elliptical models. Thorough numerical results on both synthetic and real datasets are also provided to back up our theoretical results.

  20. WEMo (Wave Exposure Model): Formulation, Procedures and Validation

    OpenAIRE

    Malhotra, Amit; Mark S. Fonseca

    2007-01-01

    This report describes the working of National Centers for Coastal Ocean Service (NCCOS) Wave Exposure Model (WEMo) capable of predicting the exposure of a site in estuarine and closed water to local wind generated waves. WEMo works in two different modes: the Representative Wave Energy (RWE) mode calculates the exposure using physical parameters like wave energy and wave height, while the Relative Exposure Index (REI) empirically calculates exposure as a unitless index. Detailed working of th...

  1. Surface-wave mode coupling : modelling and inverting waveforms including body-wave phases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marquering, H.A.

    1996-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with a similar problem as addressed by Li & Tanimoto (1993) in the surfacewave mode approach. In this thesis it is shown that surface-wave mode coupling is required when body-wave phases in laterally heterogeneous media are modelled by surface-wave mode summation. An efficie

  2. Wave equation modelling using Julia programming language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ahreum; Ryu, Donghyun; Ha, Wansoo

    2016-04-01

    Julia is a young high-performance dynamic programming language for scientific computations. It provides an extensive mathematical function library, a clean syntax and its own parallel execution model. We developed 2d wave equation modeling programs using Julia and C programming languages and compared their performance. We used the same modeling algorithm for the two modeling programs. We used Julia version 0.3.9 in this comparison. We declared data type of function arguments and used inbounds macro in the Julia program. Numerical results showed that the C programs compiled with Intel and GNU compilers were faster than Julia program, about 18% and 7%, respectively. Taking the simplicity of dynamic programming language into consideration, Julia can be a novel alternative of existing statically typed programming languages.

  3. Optimization of multi-model ensemble forecasting of typhoon waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun-qi Pan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurately forecasting ocean waves during typhoon events is extremely important in aiding the mitigation and minimization of their potential damage to the coastal infrastructure, and the protection of coastal communities. However, due to the complex hydrological and meteorological interaction and uncertainties arising from different modeling systems, quantifying the uncertainties and improving the forecasting accuracy of modeled typhoon-induced waves remain challenging. This paper presents a practical approach to optimizing model-ensemble wave heights in an attempt to improve the accuracy of real-time typhoon wave forecasting. A locally weighted learning algorithm is used to obtain the weights for the wave heights computed by the WAVEWATCH III wave model driven by winds from four different weather models (model-ensembles. The optimized weights are subsequently used to calculate the resulting wave heights from the model-ensembles. The results show that the Optimization is capable of capturing the different behavioral effects of the different weather models on wave generation. Comparison with the measurements at the selected wave buoy locations shows that the optimized weights, obtained through a training process, can significantly improve the accuracy of the forecasted wave heights over the standard mean values, particularly for typhoon-induced peak waves. The results also indicate that the algorithm is easy to implement and practical for real-time wave forecasting.

  4. Horizontal circulation and jumps in Hamiltonian wave models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gagarina, E.; Vegt, van der J.; Bokhove, O.

    2013-01-01

    We are interested in the numerical modeling of wave-current interactions around surf zones at beaches. Any model that aims to predict the onset of wave breaking at the breaker line needs to capture both the nonlinearity of the wave and its dispersion. We have therefore formulated the Hamiltonian dyn

  5. Rayleigh scattering in the atmospheres of hot stars

    CERN Document Server

    Fišák, Jakub; Munzar, Dominik; Kubát, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Rayleigh scattering is a result of an interaction of photons with bound electrons. Rayleigh scattering is mostly neglected in calculations of hot star model atmospheres because most of the hydrogen atoms are ionized and the heavier elements have a lower abundance than hydrogen. In atmospheres of some chemically peculiar stars, helium overabundant regions containing singly ionized helium are present and Rayleigh scattering can be a significant opacity source. We evaluate the contribution of Rayleigh scattering by neutral hydrogen and singly ionized helium in the atmospheres of hot stars with solar composition and in the atmospheres of helium overabundant stars. We computed several series of model atmospheres using the TLUSTY code and emergent fluxes using the SYNSPEC code. These models describe atmospheres of main sequence B-type stars with different helium abundance. We used an existing grid of models for atmospheres with solar chemical composition and we calculated an additional grid for helium-rich stars wi...

  6. Control of spiral waves and turbulent states in a cardiac model by travelling-wave perturbations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王鹏业; 谢平; 尹华伟

    2003-01-01

    We propose a travelling-wave perturbation method to control the spatiotemporal dynamics in a cardiac model.It is numerically demonstrated that the method can successfully suppress the wave instability(alternans in action potential duration) in the one-dimensional case and convert spiral waves and turbulent states to the normal travelling wave states in the two-dimensional case.An experimental scheme is suggested which may provide a new design for a cardiac defibrillator.

  7. Advanced detection technology of Rayleigh wave for detection of abnormal geological structure in excavation face%瑞利波技术超前探测掘进工作面构造异常

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李胜; 祁晓鑫; 李军文

    2015-01-01

    In the front of excavation face, there exist abnormal geological structures such as fault, karst cave, col-lapsed pillars and aquifer, which usually bring about hazards like “pervious to water” and “roof fall” etc. How to accurately and effectively detect the geological structure in the front of excavation face has became a problem ur-gently needed to solve during production in coal mine. TYR (D) Rayleigh wave detector was adopted in advanced detection in driving face 7603 of Wuyang mine. The collected data were processed and analyzed, the conclusion is basically consistent with the engineering verification, thus obtaining good application effect.%掘进工作面前方存在断层、溶洞、陷落柱、含水层等地质构造,常常导致透水、冒顶等灾害性事故。采用YTR(D)瑞利波探测仪对山西潞安集团五阳煤矿7603掘进工作面进行超前探测,并对现场采集的数据进行处理和分析。结果显示,2个测点共发现9处异常区,通过后期工程验证,有7处探测异常区与实际揭露的结果基本一致,探测与实际揭露异常区域位置误差均在4m以内。

  8. Measurement and modeling of bed shear stress under solitary waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jayakumar, S.; Guard, P.A.; Baldock, T.E.

    convolution integration methods forced with the free stream velocity and incorporating a range of eddy viscosity models. Wave friction factors were estimated from skin shear stress at different instances over the wave (viz., time of maximum positive total...

  9. 3D mmWave Channel Model Proposal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomas, Timothy; Nguyen, Huan Cong; R. MacCartney Jr., George

    2014-01-01

    There is growing interest in using millimeter wave (mmWave) frequencies for future access communications based on the enormous amount of available spectrum. To characterize the mmWave channel in urban areas, wideband propagation measurements at 73 GHz have recently been made in New York City. Using...... mmWave channel model is developed with special emphasis on using the ray tracer to determine elevation model parameters. The channel model includes distance-dependent elevation modeling which is critical for the expected 2D arrays which will be employed at mmWave....

  10. Comparison of the bedrock depth from array measurements of Rayleigh waves associated with microtremor and seismic profile obtained the Seismic Reflection Data, Eskisehir Basin, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tün, Muammer; Karabulut, Savaş; Özel, Oğuz

    2015-04-01

    Ground motion estimation for future earthquakes is one of the most challenging problems in seismology and earthquake engineering. The bedrock depth has a considerable seismic risk for the urban area of Eskişehir. In this study, multiple station microtremor measurement methods which are more practical, non-distructive, fast and economical compared to seismic reflection method were implemented. These method using microtremor recordings have become a very useful data for microzonation studies because of their simple acquisition and analysis. Extensive ambient noise measurements were performed in the basin of Eskisehir from June 2010 to spring 2012. We use data recorded by a broadband seismometer and digitizer CMG-6TD, Guralp seismometer. Some of the measurement locations, the CMG-6TD sensor was located into 30 cm-deep holes in the ground to avoid strongly wind-generated, long-period noise. Dominant frequency (f), bed-rock depth (h) and shear-wave velocity (Vs) were determined from Spatial Autocorrelation (SPAC) methods. With the SPAC Method, it is possible to constrain the velocity structure underlying the site using microtremor array measurements. The results obtained were compared to the 96-channel seismic reflection data with explosive energy source. Several seismic reflection surveys with P-Gun seismic source have been performed on the same place with array measurements. We used two types of seismic sources: 36 cartridge Gun. Shot interval was 10 meters, group interval (one geophone per group, 48 geophones in total) was 10 meters, near offset was 10 meters, far offset was 480 meters, CDP interval was 5 meters. We adapted the 'Off-End Spread' technique while using the Gun. Reflection images within the sedimentary section correlate well with the velocity structure obtained from SPAC.

  11. A new statistical model of wave heights based on the concept of wave breaking critical zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jiaxuan; LI Xunqiang; ZHU Shouxian; ZHANG Wenjing; WANG Lei

    2015-01-01

    When waves propagate from deep water to shallow water, wave heights and steepness increase and then waves roll back and break. This phenomenon is called surf. Currently, the present statistical calculation model of surf was derived mainly from the wave energy conservation equation and the linear wave dispersion relation, but it cannot reflect accurately the process which is a rapid increasing in wave height near the broken point. So, the concept of a surf breaking critical zone is presented. And the nearshore is divided as deep water zone, shallow water zone, surf breaking critical zone and after breaking zone. Besides, the calculation formula for the height of the surf breaking critical zone has founded based on flume experiments, thereby a new statistical calculation model on the surf has been established. Using the new model, the calculation error of wave height maximum is reduced from 17.62% to 6.43%.

  12. Lamb wave propagation modeling for structure health monitoring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoyue ZHANG; Shenfang YUAN; Tong HAO

    2009-01-01

    This study aims to model the propagation of Lamb waves used in structure health monitoring. A number of different numerical computational techniques have been developed for wave propagation studies. The local interaction simulation approach, used for modeling sharp interfaces and discontinuities in complex media (LISA/SIM theory), has been effectively applied to numerical simulations of elastic wave interaction. This modeling is based on the local interaction simulation approach theory and is finally accomplished through the finite elements software Ansys11. In this paper, the Lamb waves propagating characteristics and the LISA/SIM theory are introduced. The finite difference equations describing wave propagation used in the LISA/SIM theory are obtained. Then, an anisotropic metallic plate model is modeled and a simulating Lamb waves signal is loaded on. Finally, the Lamb waves propagation modeling is implemented.

  13. WAVE ATTENUATION OVER MUD BED: A PSEUDO-PLASTIC MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Qing-he; Onyx W.H. Wai; Joseph H. W. Lee

    2003-01-01

    A two-layer model, with the upper layer being the perfect fluid and the lower layer being the pseudo-plastic fluid describing water wave attenuation over mud bed, was established. A simplified method based on the principle of equivalent work was applied to solve the boundary value problems. The computational results of the model show that the two-layer perfect fluid model and the perfect-viscous fluid model are all special cases of the present model. The complex nonlinear properties of wave attenuation over mud bed, can be explained by the present model, e.g., the wave dissipation rate decreases with the wave height in certain cases, while the small wave propagates over mud bed with less energy dissipation and large wave attenuates rapidly in other cases. Other factors influencing the wave attenuation were also discussed.

  14. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF THE MAGNETIC RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR INSTABILITY IN THE KIPPENHAHN-SCHLUeTER PROMINENCE MODEL. II. RECONNECTION-TRIGGERED DOWNFLOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillier, Andrew; Isobe, Hiroaki; Shibata, Kazunari [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Berger, Thomas [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2012-09-10

    The launch of the Hinode satellite has allowed high-resolution observations of supersonic bright downflows in quiescent prominences, known as prominence knots. We present observations in the Ca II H spectral line using the Solar Optical Telescope on board the Hinode satellite of a descending plasma knot of size {approx}900 km. The knot initially undergoes ballistic motion before undergoing impulsive accelerations at the same time as experiencing increases in intensity. We also present a subset of our three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations, performed to investigate the nonlinear stability of the Kippenhahn-Shlueter prominence model to the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in which interchange reconnection occurs. The interchange reconnection in the model breaks the force balance along the field lines which initiates the downflows. The downflows propagate with a downward fluid velocity of {approx}15 km s{sup -1} and a characteristic size of {approx}700 km. We conclude that the observed plasma blob and the simulated downflow are driven by the breaking of the force balance along the magnetic field as a result of a change in magnetic topology caused by reconnection of the magnetic field.

  15. The nature of blast-wave-driven interfacial instabilities - important implications for modeling supernovae explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Aaron

    2004-11-01

    In this talk we discuss the nature of late-time, broad-banded instability development at an interface when a strong blast wave travels from a heavier to lighter fluid, as is the case in a supernova explosion. After a short period of Richtmyer-Meshkov growth, the interface is unstable via the Rayleigh-Taylor mechanism, which rapidly becomes the dominant energy source for growth. This situation is distinct from the classical case in two important ways, both of which can be understood in terms of a bubble merger model we have developed for blast-wave-driven systems. Rather than the constant acceleration feeding the instability to spawn ever larger scales and accelerate the growth, the decaying acceleration in the blast-wave case leads to a decay in the RT growth rate, and a freezing in of a preferred largest scale, which is dependent on the precise details of the system. In the language of bubble-merger models, this can be understood in terms of the time for the generation of the next largest scale being longer than the lifetime of the blast wave. Secondly, the continual expansion behind the blast front precludes the emergence of a self-similar regime, independent of the initial conditions, in the planar case. Self-similarity may be recovered in diverging systems but may be difficult to observe in reality because of rather restrictive conditions that must be met. These observations are borne out by hi-resolution numerical simulations using the higher order Godunov AMR hydrocode Raptor in 2 and 3D, and explain other simulations of instability growth in supernovae explosions; the initial "interfacial" structure is likely very important in determining the late-time growth. The model predictions are also consistent with numerous images of natural and manmade explosions.

  16. Rogue waves in a water tank: Experiments and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechuga, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    Recently many rogue waves have been reported as the main cause of ship incidents on the sea. One of the main characteristics of rogue waves is its elusiveness: they present unexpectedly and disappear in the same wave. Some authors (Zakharov and al.2010) are attempting to find the probability of their appearances apart from studyingthe mechanism of the formation. As an effort on this topic we tried the generation of rogue waves in a water wave tank using a symmetric spectrum(Akhmediev et al. 2011) as input on the wave maker. The produced waves were clearly rogue waves with a rate (maximum wave height/ Significant wave height) of 2.33 and a kurtosis of 4.77 (Janssen 2003, Onorato 2006). These results were already presented (Lechuga 2012). Similar waves (in pattern aspect, but without being extreme waves) were described as crossing waves in a water tank(Shemer and Lichter1988). To go on further the next step has been to apply a theoretical model to the envelope of these waves. After some considerations the best model has been an analogue of the Ginzburg-Landau equation. This apparently amazing result is easily explained: We know that the Ginzburg-Landau model is related to some regular structures on the surface of a liquid and also in plasmas, electric and magnetic fields and other media. Another important characteristic of the model is that their solutions are invariants with respectto the translation group. The main aim of this presentation is to extract conclusions of the model and the comparison with the measured waves in the water tank.The nonlinear structure of waves and their regularity make suitable the use of the Ginzburg-Landau model to the envelope of generated waves in the tank,so giving us a powerful tool to cope with the results of our experiment.

  17. Experimental Modeling of the Overtopping Flow on the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parmeggiani, Stefano; Kofoed, Jens Peter; Friis-Madsen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter is currently facing a precommercial phase. At this stage of development a reliable overtopping model is highly required, in order to predict the performance of the device at possible deployment locations. A model formulation derived for an overtopping device...... with general geometry has been used so far. The paper presents an updated formulation drawn through the tank testing of a scaled model the Wave Dragon. The sensitivity analysis of the main features influencing the overtopping flow led to an updated model formulation which can be specifically suited...... for the Wave Dragon....

  18. Experimental Modeling of the Overtopping Flow on the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parmeggiani, Stefano; Kofoed, Jens Peter; Friis-Madsen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter is currently facing a precommercial phase. At this stage of development a reliable overtopping model is highly required, in order to predict the performance of the device at possible deployment locations. A model formulation derived for an overtopping device...... with general geometry has been used so far. The paper presents an updated formulation drawn through the tank testing of a scaled model the Wave Dragon. The sensitivity analysis of the main features influencing the overtopping flow led to an updated model formulation which can be specifically suited...... for the Wave Dragon....

  19. Wave equation dispersion inversion using a difference approximation to the dispersion-curve misfit gradient

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zhendong

    2016-07-26

    We present a surface-wave inversion method that inverts for the S-wave velocity from the Rayleigh wave dispersion curve using a difference approximation to the gradient of the misfit function. We call this wave equation inversion of skeletonized surface waves because the skeletonized dispersion curve for the fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave is inverted using finite-difference solutions to the multi-dimensional elastic wave equation. The best match between the predicted and observed dispersion curves provides the optimal S-wave velocity model. Our method can invert for lateral velocity variations and also can mitigate the local minimum problem in full waveform inversion with a reasonable computation cost for simple models. Results with synthetic and field data illustrate the benefits and limitations of this method. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.

  20. A Reaction-Diffusion Model of Cholinergic Retinal Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansdell, Benjamin; Ford, Kevin; Kutz, J. Nathan

    2014-01-01

    Prior to receiving visual stimuli, spontaneous, correlated activity in the retina, called retinal waves, drives activity-dependent developmental programs. Early-stage waves mediated by acetylcholine (ACh) manifest as slow, spreading bursts of action potentials. They are believed to be initiated by the spontaneous firing of Starburst Amacrine Cells (SACs), whose dense, recurrent connectivity then propagates this activity laterally. Their inter-wave interval and shifting wave boundaries are the result of the slow after-hyperpolarization of the SACs creating an evolving mosaic of recruitable and refractory cells, which can and cannot participate in waves, respectively. Recent evidence suggests that cholinergic waves may be modulated by the extracellular concentration of ACh. Here, we construct a simplified, biophysically consistent, reaction-diffusion model of cholinergic retinal waves capable of recapitulating wave dynamics observed in mice retina recordings. The dense, recurrent connectivity of SACs is modeled through local, excitatory coupling occurring via the volume release and diffusion of ACh. In addition to simulation, we are thus able to use non-linear wave theory to connect wave features to underlying physiological parameters, making the model useful in determining appropriate pharmacological manipulations to experimentally produce waves of a prescribed spatiotemporal character. The model is used to determine how ACh mediated connectivity may modulate wave activity, and how parameters such as the spontaneous activation rate and sAHP refractory period contribute to critical wave size variability. PMID:25474327

  1. Suppression of Rayleigh-Taylor instability by gyroviscosity and sheared axial flow in imploding plasma pinches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Lin; JIAN Guang-de; QIU Xiao-ming

    2007-01-01

    The synergistic stabilizing effect of gyroviscosity and sheared axial flow on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in Z-pinch implosions is studied by means of the incompressible viscid magneto-hydrodynamic equations. The gyroviscosity (or finite Larmor radius) effects are introduced in the momentum equation through an anisotropic ion stress tensor. Dispersion relation with the effect of a density discontinuity is derived. The results indicate that the short-wavelength modes of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability are easily stabilized by the gyroviscosity effects. The long wavelength modes are stabilized by the sufficient sheared axial flow. However, the synergistic effects of the finite Larmor radius and sheared axial flow can heavily mitigate the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. This synergistic effect can compress the Rayleigh-Taylor instability to a narrow wave number region. Even with a sufficient gyroviscosity and large enough flow velocity, the synergistic effect can completely suppressed the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in whole wave number region.

  2. Coupling atmospheric and ocean wave models for storm simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Jianting

    This thesis studies the wind-wave interactions through the coupling between the atmospheric model and ocean surface wave models. Special attention is put on storm simulations in the North Sea for wind energy applications in the coastal zones. The two aspects, namely storm conditions and coastal...... areas, are challenging for the wind-wave coupling system because: in storm cases, the wave field is constantly modified by the fast varying wind field; in coastal zones, the wave field is strongly influenced by the bathymetry and currents. Both conditions have complex, unsteady sea state varying...... with time and space that challenge the current coupled modeling system. The conventional approach of estimating the momentum exchange is through parameterizing the aerodynamic roughness length (z0) with wave parameters such as wave age, steepness, significant wave height, etc. However, it is found in storm...

  3. Faraday pilot-wave dynamics: modelling and computation

    OpenAIRE

    Milewski, Paul A.; Galeano-Rios, Carlos A.; Nachbin, André; Bush, John W. M.

    2015-01-01

    A millimetric droplet bouncing on the surface of a vibrating fluid bath can self-propel by virtue of a resonant interaction with its own wave field. This system represents the first known example of a pilot-wave system of the form envisaged by Louis de Broglie in his double-solution pilot-wave theory. We here develop a fluid model of pilot-wave hydrodynamics by coupling recent models of the droplet’s bouncing dynamics with a more realistic model of weakly viscous quasi-potential wave generati...

  4. Competition between the s-wave and p-wave superconductivity phases in a holographic model

    CERN Document Server

    Nie, Zhang-Yu; Gao, Xin; Zeng, Hui

    2013-01-01

    We build a holographic superconductor model with a scalar triplet charged under an SU(2) gauge field in the bulk. In this model, the s-wave and p-wave condensates can be consistently realized. We find that there are totally four phases in this model, namely, the normal phase without any condensate, s-wave phase, p-wave phase and the s+p coexisting phase. By calculating Gibbs free energy, the s+p coexisting phase turns out to be thermodynamically favored once it can appear. The phase diagram with the dimension of the scalar operator and temperature is drawn. The temperature range for the s+p coexisting phase is very narrow, which shows the competition between the s-wave and p-wave orders in the superconductor model.

  5. Wind waves in tropical cyclones: satellite altimeter observations and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubkin, Pavel; Kudryavtsev, Vladimir; Chapron, Bertrand

    2016-04-01

    Results of investigation of wind-wave generation by tropical cyclones using satellite altimeter data are presented. Tropical cyclones are generally relatively small rapidly moving low pressure systems that are capable of generating severe wave conditions. Translation of a tropical cyclone leads to a prolonged period of time surface waves in the right sector remain under high wind forcing conditions. This effect has been termed extended fetch, trapped fetch or group velocity quasi-resonance. A tropical cyclone wave field is thus likely more asymmetrical than the corresponding wind field: wind waves in the tropical cyclone right sector are more developed with larger heights than waves in the left one. A dataset of satellite altimeter intersections of the Western Pacific tropical cyclones was created for 2010-2013. Data from four missions were considered, i.e., Jason-1, Jason-2, CryoSat-2, SARAL/AltiKa. Measurements in the rear-left and front-right sectors of tropical cyclones were examined for the presence of significant wave asymmetry. An analytical model is then derived to efficiently describe the wave energy distribution in a moving tropical cyclone. The model essentially builds on a generalization of the self-similar wave growth model and the assumption of a strongly dominant single spectral mode in a given quadrant of the storm. The model provides a criterion to anticipate wave enhancement with the generation of trapped abnormal waves. If forced during a sufficient timescale interval, also defined from this generalized self-similar wave growth model, waves can be trapped and large amplification of the wave energy will occur in the front-right storm quadrant. Remarkably, the group velocity and corresponding wavelength of outrunning wave systems will become wind speed independent and solely relate to the translating velocity. The resulting significant wave height also only weakly depends on wind speed, and more strongly on the translation velocity. Satellite

  6. Modeling Technology in Traveling-Wave Fault Location

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Jinrui

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical research and equipment development of traveling-wave fault location seriously depend on digital simulation. Meanwhile, the fault-generated transient traveling wave must be transferred through transmission line, mutual inductor and secondary circuit before it is used. So this paper would maily analyze and summarize the modeling technology of transmission line and mutual inductor on the basis of the research achievement. Firstly several models of transmission line (multiple Π or T line model, Bergeron line model and frequency-dependent line model are compared in this paper with analysis of wave-front characteristics and characteristic frequency of traveling wave. Then modeling methods of current transformer, potential transformer, capacitive voltage transformer, special traveling-wave sensor and secondary cable are given. Finally, based on the difficult and latest research achievements, the future trend of modeling technology in traveling-wave fault location is prospected.  

  7. Numerical modelling in wave energy conversion systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Marjani, A. [Labo. de Turbomachines, Ecole Mohammadia d' Ingenieurs (EMI), Universite Mohammed V Agdal, Av Ibn Sina, B.P. 765 Agdal, Rabat (Morocco); Castro Ruiz, F.; Rodriguez, M.A.; Parra Santos, M.T. [Depto. de Ingenieria Energetica y Fluidomecanica, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Valladolid, Paseo del Cauce s/n, E-47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2008-08-15

    This paper deals with a numerical modelling devoted to predict the flow characteristics in the components of an oscillating water column (OWC) system used for the wave energy capture. In the present paper, the flow behaviour is modelled by using the FLUENT code. Two numerical flow models have been elaborated and tested independently in the geometries of an air chamber and a turbine, which is chosen of a radial impulse type. The flow is assumed to be three-dimensional (3D), viscous, turbulent and unsteady. The FLUENT code is used with a solver of the coupled conservation equations of mass, momentum and energy, with an implicit time scheme and with the adoption of the dynamic mesh and the sliding mesh techniques in areas of moving surfaces. Turbulence is modelled with the k-{epsilon} model. The obtained results indicate that the developed models are well suitable to analyse the air flows both in the air chamber and in the turbine. The performances associated with the energy transfer processes have been well predicted. For the turbine, the numerical results of pressure and torque were compared to the experimental ones. Good agreements between these results have been observed. (author)

  8. Modeling the Buoyancy System of a Wave Energy Power Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Tom S.; Nielsen, Kirsten M.

    2009-01-01

    A nonlinear dynamic model of the buoyancy system in a wave energy power plant is presented. The plant ("Wave Dragon") is a floating device using the potential energy in overtopping waves to produce power. A water reservoir is placed on top of the WD, and hydro turbines lead the water to the sea...

  9. Modelling wave transformation across a fringing reef using swash

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlema, M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the application of the open source non-hydrostatic wave-flow model SWASH to wave propagation over a fringing reef, and the results are discussed and compared with observations obtained from a laboratory experiment subjected to various incident wave conditions. This study focus no

  10. Modelling wave transformation across a fringing reef using SWASH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlema, M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the application of the open source non-hydrostatic wave-flow model SWASH to wave propagation over a fringing reef, and the results are discussed and compared with observations obtained from a laboratory experiment subjected to various incident wave conditions. This study focus no

  11. Modeling the Buoyancy System of a Wave Energy Power Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Tom S.; Nielsen, Kirsten M.

    2009-01-01

    A nonlinear dynamic model of the buoyancy system in a wave energy power plant is presented. The plant ("Wave Dragon") is a floating device using the potential energy in overtopping waves to produce power. A water reservoir is placed on top of the WD, and hydro turbines lead the water to the sea...

  12. Characterization of Transducer Performance and Narrowband Transient Ultrasonic Fields in Metals by Rayleigh-Sommerfeld Backpropagation of Compression Acoustic Waves Measured with Double-Pulsed Tv Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trillo, Cristina; Doval, Ángel F.; Fernández, José L.; Rodríguez-Gómez, Pablo; López-Vázquez, J. Carlos

    2014-10-01

    This article presents a method aimed at the characterization of the narrowband transient acoustic field radiated by an ultrasonic plane transducer into a homogeneous, isotropic and optically opaque prismatic solid, and the assessment of the performance of the acoustic source. The method relies on a previous technique based on the full-field optical measurement of an acoustic wavepacket at the surface of a solid and its subsequent numerical backpropagation within the material. The experimental results show that quantitative transversal and axial profiles of the complex amplitude of the beam can be obtained at any plane between the measurement and excitation surfaces. The reconstruction of the acoustic field at the transducer face, carried out on a defective transducer model, shows that the method could also be suitable for the nondestructive testing of the performance of ultrasonic sources. In all cases, the measurements were performed with the transducer working under realistic loading conditions.

  13. Primordial gravitational waves from the space-condensate inflation model

    CERN Document Server

    Koh, Seoktae; Tumurtushaa, Gansukh

    2015-01-01

    We consider the space-condensate inflation model to study the primordial gravitational waves generated in the early Universe. We calculate the energy spectrum of gravitational waves induced by the space-condensate inflation model for full frequency range with assumption that the phase transition between two consecutive regimes to be abrupt during evolution of the Universe. The suppression of energy spectrum is found in our model for the decreasing frequency of gravitational waves depending on the model parameter. To realize the suppression of energy spectrum of the primordial gravitational waves, we study an existence of the early phase transition during inflation for the space-condensate inflation model.

  14. Graphene-coated rayleigh SAW resonators for NO2 detection

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Stephen M.; Cole, Marina; De Luca, A; Torrisi, F.; Ferrari, A. C.; Udrea, Florin; Gardner, J. W.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a novel low-cost Rayleigh Surface Acoustic Wave Resonator (SAWR) device coated with a graphene layer that is capable of detecting PPM levels of NO2 in air. The sensor comprises two 262 MHz ST-cut quartz based Rayleigh SAWRs arranged in a dual oscillator configuration; where one resonator is coated with gas-sensitive graphene, and the other left uncoated to act as a reference. An array of NMP-dispersed exfoliated reduced graphene oxide dots was deposited...

  15. Rayleigh scattering in the atmospheres of hot stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fišák, J.; Krtička, J.; Munzar, D.; Kubát, J.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Rayleigh scattering is a result of an interaction of photons with bound electrons. Rayleigh scattering is mostly neglected in calculations of hot star model atmospheres because most of the hydrogen atoms are ionized and the heavier elements have a lower abundance than hydrogen. In atmospheres of some chemically peculiar stars, helium overabundant regions containing singly ionized helium are present and Rayleigh scattering can be a significant opacity source. Aims: We evaluate the contribution of Rayleigh scattering by neutral hydrogen and singly ionized helium in the atmospheres of hot stars with solar composition and in the atmospheres of helium overabundant stars. Methods: We computed several series of model atmospheres using the TLUSTY code and emergent fluxes using the SYNSPEC code. These models describe atmospheres of main sequence B-type stars with different helium abundance. We used an existing grid of models for atmospheres with solar chemical composition and we calculated an additional grid for helium-rich stars with N(He)/N(H) = 10. Results: Rayleigh scattering by neutral hydrogen can be neglected in atmospheres of hot stars, while Rayleigh scattering by singly ionized helium can be a non-negligible opacity source in some hot stars, especially in helium-rich stars.

  16. Optimal parametric modelling of measured short waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mandal, S.

    The spectral analysis of measured short waves can efficiently be carried out by the fast Fourier transform technique. Even though many present techniques can be used for the simulation of time series waves, these may not provide accurate...

  17. Numerical modelling of nearshore wave transformation

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chandramohan, P.; Nayak, B.U.; SanilKumar, V.

    A software has been developed for numerical refraction study based on finite amplitude wave theories. Wave attenuation due to shoaling, bottom friction, bottom percolation and viscous dissipation has also been incorporated. The software...

  18. Weakly nonlinear models for internal waves: inverse scattering transform and solitary wave contents

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Shengqian

    2016-01-01

    The time evolution emanating from ``internal dam-break'' initial conditions is studied for a class of models of stratified Euler fluids in configurations close to two-homogeneous layers separated by a thin diffused interface. Direct numerical simulations and experiments in wave tanks show that such initial conditions eventually give rise to coherent structures that are close to solitary-wave solutions moving ahead of a region of dispersive wave motion and turbulent mixing close to the location of the initial dam step. A priori theoretical predictions of the main features of these solitary waves, such as their amplitudes and speeds, appear to be unavailable, even for simplified models of wave evolution in stratified fluids. With the aim of providing estimates of the existence, amplitude and speed of such solitary waves, an approach based on Inverse Scattering Transform (IST) for completely integrable models is developed here and tested against direct numerical simulations of Euler fluids and some of their mode...

  19. A gradient-based model parametrization using Bernstein polynomials in Bayesian inversion of surface wave dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, Jeremy M.; Dosso, Stan E.; Cassidy, John F.; Quijano, Jorge E.; Molnar, Sheri; Dettmer, Jan

    2017-10-01

    This paper develops and applies a Bernstein-polynomial parametrization to efficiently represent general, gradient-based profiles in nonlinear geophysical inversion, with application to ambient-noise Rayleigh-wave dispersion data. Bernstein polynomials provide a stable parametrization in that small perturbations to the model parameters (basis-function coefficients) result in only small perturbations to the geophysical parameter profile. A fully nonlinear Bayesian inversion methodology is applied to estimate shear wave velocity (VS) profiles and uncertainties from surface wave dispersion data extracted from ambient seismic noise. The Bayesian information criterion is used to determine the appropriate polynomial order consistent with the resolving power of the data. Data error correlations are accounted for in the inversion using a parametric autoregressive model. The inversion solution is defined in terms of marginal posterior probability profiles for VS as a function of depth, estimated using Metropolis-Hastings sampling with parallel tempering. This methodology is applied to synthetic dispersion data as well as data processed from passive array recordings collected on the Fraser River Delta in British Columbia, Canada. Results from this work are in good agreement with previous studies, as well as with co-located invasive measurements. The approach considered here is better suited than `layered' modelling approaches in applications where smooth gradients in geophysical parameters are expected, such as soil/sediment profiles. Further, the Bernstein polynomial representation is more general than smooth models based on a fixed choice of gradient type (e.g. power-law gradient) because the form of the gradient is determined objectively by the data, rather than by a subjective parametrization choice.

  20. Modeling of aqueous foam blast wave attenuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domergue L.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of aqueous foams enables the mitigation of blast waves induced by the explosion of energetic materials. The two-phase confinement gives rise to interphase interactions between the gaseous and liquid phases, which role have been emphasized in shock-tube studies with solid foams [1, 2]. Multifluid formalism enables the thermo-mechanical disequilibria between phases to be taken into account. The flow model ensures the correct estimation of the acoustic impedance of the two-phase media. As for the numerical scheme, Riemann solvers are used to describe the microscopic fluid interactions, the summation of which provides the multiphase flux. The role of the different transfer mechanisms is evaluated in the case where the liquid ligaments of the foam matrix have been shattered into droplets by the shock impingement. Characteristics of blast waves in heterogeneous media leads to a decrease of overpressure. The numerical results have been compared favorably to experimental data [3, 4].

  1. Accurate finite element modeling of acoustic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idesman, A.; Pham, D.

    2014-07-01

    In the paper we suggest an accurate finite element approach for the modeling of acoustic waves under a suddenly applied load. We consider the standard linear elements and the linear elements with reduced dispersion for the space discretization as well as the explicit central-difference method for time integration. The analytical study of the numerical dispersion shows that the most accurate results can be obtained with the time increments close to the stability limit. However, even in this case and the use of the linear elements with reduced dispersion, mesh refinement leads to divergent numerical results for acoustic waves under a suddenly applied load. This is explained by large spurious high-frequency oscillations. For the quantification and the suppression of spurious oscillations, we have modified and applied a two-stage time-integration technique that includes the stage of basic computations and the filtering stage. This technique allows accurate convergent results at mesh refinement as well as significantly reduces the numerical anisotropy of solutions. We should mention that the approach suggested is very general and can be equally applied to any loading as well as for any space-discretization technique and any explicit or implicit time-integration method.

  2. A full-wave Helmholtz model for continuous-wave ultrasound transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huttunen, Tomi; Malinen, Matti; Kaipio, Jari P; White, Phillip Jason; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2005-03-01

    A full-wave Helmholtz model of continuous-wave (CW) ultrasound fields may offer several attractive features over widely used partial-wave approximations. For example, many full-wave techniques can be easily adjusted for complex geometries, and multiple reflections of sound are automatically taken into account in the model. To date, however, the full-wave modeling of CW fields in general 3D geometries has been avoided due to the large computational cost associated with the numerical approximation of the Helmholtz equation. Recent developments in computing capacity together with improvements in finite element type modeling techniques are making possible wave simulations in 3D geometries which reach over tens of wavelengths. The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of a full-wave solution of the 3D Helmholtz equation for modeling of continuous-wave ultrasound fields in an inhomogeneous medium. The numerical approximation of the Helmholtz equation is computed using the ultraweak variational formulation (UWVF) method. In addition, an inverse problem technique is utilized to reconstruct the velocity distribution on the transducer which is used to model the sound source in the UWVF scheme. The modeling method is verified by comparing simulated and measured fields in the case of transmission of 531 kHz CW fields through layered plastic plates. The comparison shows a reasonable agreement between simulations and measurements at low angles of incidence but, due to mode conversion, the Helmholtz model becomes insufficient for simulating ultrasound fields in plates at large angles of incidence.

  3. A Continuum Model of Actin Waves in Dictyostelium discoideum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamviwath, Varunyu; Hu, Jifeng; Othmer, Hans G.

    2013-01-01

    Actin waves are complex dynamical patterns of the dendritic network of filamentous actin in eukaryotes. We developed a model of actin waves in PTEN-deficient Dictyostelium discoideum by deriving an approximation of the dynamics of discrete actin filaments and combining it with a signaling pathway that controls filament branching. This signaling pathway, together with the actin network, contains a positive feedback loop that drives the actin waves. Our model predicts the structure, composition, and dynamics of waves that are consistent with existing experimental evidence, as well as the biochemical dependence on various protein partners. Simulation suggests that actin waves are initiated when local actin network activity, caused by an independent process, exceeds a certain threshold. Moreover, diffusion of proteins that form a positive feedback loop with the actin network alone is sufficient for propagation of actin waves at the observed speed of . Decay of the wave back can be caused by scarcity of network components, and the shape of actin waves is highly dependent on the filament disassembly rate. The model allows retraction of actin waves and captures formation of new wave fronts in broken waves. Our results demonstrate that a delicate balance between a positive feedback, filament disassembly, and local availability of network components is essential for the complex dynamics of actin waves. PMID:23741312

  4. Modelling of the Overtopping Flow on the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parmeggiani, Stefano; Pecher, Arthur; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    2010-01-01

    The Wave Dragon is a floating slack-moored Wave Energy Converter of the overtopping type, which is facing now the last phase of development before the commercial exploitation: the deployment of a full-scale demonstrator. In this phase a modelling tool allowing for accurate predictions of the perf......The Wave Dragon is a floating slack-moored Wave Energy Converter of the overtopping type, which is facing now the last phase of development before the commercial exploitation: the deployment of a full-scale demonstrator. In this phase a modelling tool allowing for accurate predictions...

  5. Model Predictive Control of a Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Palle; Pedersen, Tom Søndergård; Nielsen, Kirsten Mølgaard;

    2015-01-01

    In this paper reactive control and Model Predictive Control (MPC) for a Wave Energy Converter (WEC) are compared. The analysis is based on a WEC from Wave Star A/S designed as a point absorber. The model predictive controller uses wave models based on the dominating sea states combined with a model...... connecting undisturbed wave sequences to sequences of torque. Losses in the conversion from mechanical to electrical power are taken into account in two ways. Conventional reactive controllers are tuned for each sea state with the assumption that the converter has the same efficiency back and forth. MPC...

  6. Wave Prediction Model To Study On The Wave Height Variation In Terengganu Coast Of Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Amalina Abdul Latif

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study the significant wave height at the Terengganu and the change of wave height at Kuala Terengganu to Merang shoreline were simulated by using the 2D Near-Shore Wave 2D NSW model. The significant wave height by the 2D NSW model at Kuala Terengganu to Merang shoreline from 2008-2012 were simulated. The model was forced by ECMWF European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecast data. The simulated significant wave height by the 2D NSW model at Airport Kuala Terengganu AWAC station was compared with the observed significant wave height. The mean annual significant wave height indicate the higher wave height with average mean value in a range of 1.08-1.10 m in Kuala Terengganu to Batu Rakit area and lower in Merang area with average mean value in a range of 0.74 m. The detailed 5 years simulation period demonstrates that the strong variability of wave height exists during North-East monsoon. The findings of this study could be useful for the erosive calculation shoreline protection and coastal zone management activities.

  7. Simulation of Typhoon-Driven Waves in the Yangtze Estuary with Multiple-Nested Wave Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Fu-min; Will Perrie; ZHANG Jun-lun; SONG Zhi-yao; Bechara Toulany

    2005-01-01

    Typhoon-generated waves are simulated with two numerical wave models, the SWAN model for the coastal and Yangtze Estuary domain, nested within the WAVEWATCHIII (WW3) for the basin-scale East China Sea domain. Typhoon No. 8114 is chosen because it was very strong, and generated high waves in the Estuary. WW3 was implemented for the East China Sea coarse-resolution computational domain, to simulate the waves over a large spatial scale and provide boundary conditions for SWAN model simulations, implemented on a fine-resolution nested domain for the Yangtze Estuary area. The Takahashi wind model is applied to the simulation of the East China Sea scale (3-hourly) and Yangtze Estuary scale (1-hourly) winds. Simulations of significant wave heights in the East China Sea show that the highest waves are on the right side of the storm track, and maxima tend to occur at the eastern deep-water open boundary of the Yangtze Estuary. In the Yangtze Estuary, incoming swell is dominant over locally generated waves before the typhoon approaches the Estuary. As the typhoon approaches the Estuary, wind waves and swell coexist, and the wave direction is mainly influenced by the swell direction and the complex topography.

  8. Optimized equivalent staggered-grid FD method for elastic wave modelling based on plane wave solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Peng; Huang, Jianping; Li, Zhenchun; Liao, Wenyuan; Qu, Luping; Li, Qingyang; Liu, Peijun

    2017-02-01

    In finite-difference (FD) method, numerical dispersion is the dominant factor influencing the accuracy of seismic modelling. Various optimized FD schemes for scalar wave modelling have been proposed to reduce grid dispersion, while the optimized time-space domain FD schemes for elastic wave modelling have not been fully investigated yet. In this paper, an optimized FD scheme with Equivalent Staggered Grid (ESG) for elastic modelling has been developed. We start from the constant P- and S-wave speed elastic wave equations and then deduce analytical plane wave solutions in the wavenumber domain with eigenvalue decomposition method. Based on the elastic plane wave solutions, three new time-space domain dispersion relations of ESG elastic modelling are obtained, which are represented by three equations corresponding to P-, S- and converted-wave terms in the elastic equations, respectively. By using these new relations, we can study the dispersion errors of different spatial FD terms independently. The dispersion analysis showed that different spatial FD terms have different errors. It is therefore suggested that different FD coefficients to be used to approximate the three spatial derivative terms. In addition, the relative dispersion error in L2-norm is minimized through optimizing FD coefficients using Newton's method. Synthetic examples have demonstrated that this new optimal FD schemes have superior accuracy for elastic wave modelling compared to Taylor-series expansion and optimized space domain FD schemes.

  9. Wave climatology of Lake Erie based on an unstructured-grid wave model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Qianru; Xia, Meng

    2016-10-01

    Hindcast of wave dynamics in Lake Erie during 2002 to 2012 was conducted using a state-of-art finite-volume coastal ocean surface wave model (FVCOM-SWAVE). After model calibration, the surface gravity wave dynamics were examined from the aspects of wave climate and seasonality, inter-basin wave interactions, as well as its potential susceptibility to regional climate change. Compared to the Central and Eastern Basins, the Western Basin has relatively gentle wave climate. The Western Basin and the nearshore areas are most susceptible to the wave-induced bottom orbital oscillations on the seasonal mean scale, and the offshore Central Basin is sensitive to them as well during episodic events. Profound seasonality was found in both mean and extreme wave dynamics during ice-free cycles. Mean significant wave height (SWH) is highest during fall with more occurrences of extreme events (SWH > 3.1 m) and is lowest during summer, which is controlled by wind speed and direction collectively. Besides, swells generated in the Central and Eastern Basins could interact with each other under various wind directions, whereas wave generated in the Central Basin could hardly propagate into the Western Basin. In addition, the regression analysis of surrounding meteorological stations indicates increasing SWH in the Western Basin and decreasing SWH in the Eastern Basin.

  10. Wave Climate and Wave Mixing in the Marginal Ice Zones of Arctic Seas, Observations and Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    PROJECTS Section). With the group of Rogers, observation/modeling study of an energetic wave event in the Arctic marginal zone was conducted ...floe. (right) Surface elevation in the lee of a 5 mm thick polypropylene floe (thick black curves) and incident wave (grey), normalised with respect...Toffoli, A., Marusic, I., Klewicki, J., Hutchins, N., Suslov, S., Walker, D., Chung, D., “A Thermally Stratified Sea-Ice-Wave Interaction Facility”, ARC

  11. An Efficient Hydrodynamic Model for Surface Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Kun; JIN Sheng; LU Gang

    2009-01-01

    In the present study,a semi-implicit finite difference model for non-bydrostatic,free-surface flows is analyzed and discussed.The governing equations are the three-dimensional free-surface Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations defined on a general,irregular domain of arbitrary scale.At outflow,a combination of a sponge layer technique and a radiation boundary condition is applied to minimize wave reflection.The equations are solved with the fractional step method where the hydrostatic pressure component is determined first,while the non-hydrostatic component of the pressure is computed from the pressure Poisson equation in which the coefficient matrix is positive definite and symmetric.The advectiou and horizontal viscosity terms are discretized by use of a semi-Lagrangian approach.The resulting model is computationally efficient and unrestricted to the CFL condition.The developed model is verified against analytical solutions and experimental data,with excellent agreement.

  12. KINEMATIC WAVE PROPERTIES OF ANISOTROPIC DYNAMICS MODEL FOR TRAFFIC FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜锐; 吴清松; 朱祚金

    2002-01-01

    The analyses of kinematic wave properties of a new dynamics model for traffic flow are carried out. The model does not exhibit the problem that one characteristic speed is always greater than macroscopic traffic speed, and therefore satisfies the requirement that traffic flow is anisotropic. Linear stability analysis shows that the model is stable under certain condition and the condition is obtained. The analyses also indicate that the model has a hierarchy of first-and second-order waves, and allows the existence of both smooth traveling wave and shock wave. However, the model has a distinctive criterion of shock wave compared with other dynamics models, and the distinction makes the model more realistic in dealing with some traffic problems such as wrong-way travel analysis.

  13. Theoretical and numerical study of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in magnetized plasmas; Etude theorique et numerique des instabilites rayleigh-taylor en plasmas magnetises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrei, A. Ivanov

    2001-06-15

    In this thesis we're studying both the general case of the 'classic' Rayleigh-Taylor instability (in incompressible fluids) and more specific cases of the instabilities of Rayleigh-Taylor type in magnetized plasmas, in the liners or wire array implosions etc. We have studied the influence of the Hall diffusion of magnetic field on the growth rate of the instability. We have obtained in this work a self-similar solution for the widening of the initial profile of the magnetic field and for the wave of the penetration of magnetic field. After that the subsequent evolution of the magnetic field in plasma opening switches (POS) has been examined. We have shown the possibility of the existence of a strong rarefaction wave for collisional and non-collisional cases. This wave can explain the phenomenon of the opening of POS. The effect of the suppression of Rayleigh-Taylor instability by forced oscillations of the boundary between two fluids permits us to propose some ideas for the experiments of inertial fusion. We have considered the general case of the instability, in other words - two incompressible viscous superposed fluids in a gravitational field. We have obtained an exact analytical expression for the growth rate and then we have analyzed the influence of the parameters of external 'pumping' on the instability. These results can be applied to a wide range of systems, starting from classic hydrodynamics and up to astrophysical plasmas. The scheme of wire arrays has become recently a very popular method to obtain a high power X-radiation or for a high quality implosion in Z-pinches. The experimental studies have demonstrated that the results of implosion are much better for the case of multiple thin wires situated cylindrically than in a usual liner scheme. We have examined the problem modeling the stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability for a wire array system. The reason for instability suppression is the regular spatial modulation of

  14. A hydrodynamic model of nearshore waves and wave-induced currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Khaled Seif

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In This study develops a quasi-three dimensional numerical model of wave driven coastal currents with accounting the effects of the wave-current interaction and the surface rollers. In the wave model, the current effects on wave breaking and energy dissipation are taken into account as well as the wave diffraction effect. The surface roller associated with wave breaking was modeled based on a modification of the equations by Dally and Brown (1995 and Larson and Kraus (2002. Furthermore, the quasi-three dimensional model, which based on Navier-Stokes equations, was modified in association with the surface roller effect, and solved using frictional step method. The model was validated by data sets obtained during experiments on the Large Scale Sediment Transport Facility (LSTF basin and the Hazaki Oceanographical Research Station (HORS. Then, a model test against detached breakwater was carried out to investigate the performance of the model around coastal structures. Finally, the model was applied to Akasaki port to verify the hydrodynamics around coastal structures. Good agreements between computations and measurements were obtained with regard to the cross-shore variation in waves and currents in nearshore and surf zone.

  15. Surface Wave Tomography with Spatially Varying Smoothing Based on Continuous Model Regionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuanming; Yao, Huajian

    2017-03-01

    Surface wave tomography based on continuous regionalization of model parameters is widely used to invert for 2-D phase or group velocity maps. An inevitable problem is that the distribution of ray paths is far from homogeneous due to the spatially uneven distribution of stations and seismic events, which often affects the spatial resolution of the tomographic model. We present an improved tomographic method with a spatially varying smoothing scheme that is based on the continuous regionalization approach. The smoothness of the inverted model is constrained by the Gaussian a priori model covariance function with spatially varying correlation lengths based on ray path density. In addition, a two-step inversion procedure is used to suppress the effects of data outliers on tomographic models. Both synthetic and real data are used to evaluate this newly developed tomographic algorithm. In the synthetic tests, when the contrived model has different scales of anomalies but with uneven ray path distribution, we compare the performance of our spatially varying smoothing method with the traditional inversion method, and show that the new method is capable of improving the recovery in regions of dense ray sampling. For real data applications, the resulting phase velocity maps of Rayleigh waves in SE Tibet produced using the spatially varying smoothing method show similar features to the results with the traditional method. However, the new results contain more detailed structures and appears to better resolve the amplitude of anomalies. From both synthetic and real data tests we demonstrate that our new approach is useful to achieve spatially varying resolution when used in regions with heterogeneous ray path distribution.

  16. Pulsar average wave forms and hollow-cone beam models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backer, D. C.

    1976-01-01

    Pulsar wave forms have been analyzed from observations conducted over a wide radio-frequency range to assess the wave-form morphologies and to measure wave-form widths. The results of the analysis compare favorably with the predictions of a model with a hollow-cone beam of fixed dimensions and with random orientation of both the observer and the cone axis with respect to the pulsar spin axis. A class of three-component wave forms is included in the model by adding a central pencil beam to the hollow-cone hypothesis. The consequences of a number of discrepancies between observations and quantitative predictions of the model are discussed.

  17. Modeling deflagration waves out of hot spots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partom, Yehuda

    2017-01-01

    It is widely accepted that shock initiation and detonation of heterogeneous explosives comes about by a two-step process known as ignition and growth. In the first step a shock sweeping through an explosive cell (control volume) creates hot spots that become ignition sites. In the second step, deflagration waves (or burn waves) propagate out of those hot spots and transform the reactant in the cell into reaction products. The macroscopic (or average) reaction rate of the reactant in the cell depends on the speed of those deflagration waves and on the average distance between neighboring hot spots. Here we simulate the propagation of deflagration waves out of hot spots on the mesoscale in axial symmetry using a 2D hydrocode, to which we add heat conduction and bulk reaction. The propagation speed of the deflagration waves may depend on both pressure and temperature. It depends on pressure for quasistatic loading near ambient temperature, and on temperature at high temperatures resulting from shock loading. From the simulation we obtain deflagration fronts emanating out of the hot spots. For 8 to 13 GPa shocks, the emanating fronts propagate as deflagration waves to consume the explosive between hot spots. For higher shock levels deflagration waves may interact with the sweeping shock to become detonation waves on the mesoscale. From the simulation results we extract average deflagration wave speeds.

  18. Experimental Update of the Overtopping Model Used for the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parmeggiani, Stefano; Kofoed, Jens Peter; Friis-Madsen, Erik

    2013-01-01

    An overtopping model specifically suited for Wave Dragon is needed in order to improve the reliability of its performance estimates. The model shall be comprehensive of all relevant physical processes that affect overtopping and flexible to adapt to any local conditions and device configuration....... An experimental investigation is carried out to update an existing formulation suited for 2D draft-limited, low-crested structures, in order to include the effects on the overtopping flow of the wave steepness, the 3D geometry of Wave Dragon, the wing reflectors, the device motions and the non-rigid connection...... of which can be measured in real-time. Instead of using new fitting coefficients, this approach allows a broader applicability of the model beyond the Wave Dragon case, to any overtopping WEC or structure within the range of tested conditions. Predictions reliability of overtopping over Wave Dragon...

  19. Assessment of the Impact of Middle-Atmosphere Solar Tides on Gravity Waves in a WKB Gravity-Wave Model Based on Wave-Action Phase-Space Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribstein, Bruno; Achatz, Ulrich; Senf, Fabian

    2014-05-01

    abstract Gravity waves (GWs) and solar tides (STs) are main constituents of the dynamical coupling between troposphere and mesosphere-lower-thermosphere (MLT). Via momentum deposition, GWs control to a large extent the mesospheric mean circulation. STs are large scale waves, mostly due to tropospheric and stratospheric diurnal heating processes, that modulate all dynamical fields in the mesosphere. GWs ant STs also interact strongly with each other. Conventional GW parameterizations used to describe this interaction (e.g. [1]) neglect the time-dependence and horizontal gradients of the background flow, with fatal effects (e.g. [2]). We study here the propagation of GWs in a time-dependent middle-atmosphere background flow, using a new (caustics free) WKB GW model (ray tracer). The background flow is composed by a climatological mean and tidal fields extracted from a general circulation model (HAMMONIA, see [3]). In order to avoid caustics, inevitable in classic ray-tracer implementations, we implemented a new wave-action phase-space density conservation scheme [4, 5]. The scheme attaches to each ray a finite volume in the location & wavenumber phase-space. The location-wavenumber volume is conserved during the propagation, responding in shape to the local stretching and squeezing in wave-number space. From the propagation of GWs we evaluate the deposition of momentum and buoyancy. Rayleigh-friction and temperature-relaxation coefficients are also evaluated. In this extension of the study by [2] it is shown, with an amplitude scheme more stable against numerical instabilities, due to the avoidance of caustics, that STs (and so the time dependence of the background flow) modulate the propagation of GWs. Via Rayleigh-friction and temperature-relaxation coefficients, we also quantify how the pseudo-momentum-, momentum-, and enthalpy-deposition of GWs can influence the amplitude and the phase structure of STs. Finally, we compare momentum and buoyancy fluxes from the

  20. A Holographic P-wave Superconductor Model

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, Rong-Gen; Li, Li-Fang

    2014-01-01

    We study a holographic p-wave superconductor model in a four dimensional Einstein-Maxwell-complex vector field theory with a negative cosmological constant. The complex vector field is charged under the Maxwell field. We solve the full coupled equations of motion of the system and find black hole solutions with the vector hair. The vector hairy black hole solutions are dual to a thermal state with the U(1) symmetry as well as the spatial rotational symmetry breaking spontaneously. Depending on two parameters, the mass and charge of the vector field, we find a rich phase structure: zeroth order, first order and second order phase transitions can happen in this model. We also find "retrograde condensation" in which the hairy black hole solution exists only for the temperatures above a critical value with the free energy much larger than the black hole without hair. We construct the phase diagram for this system in terms of the temperature and charge of the vector field.

  1. High order Hamiltonian water wave models with wave-breaking mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurnia, R.; Groesen, van E.

    2014-01-01

    Based on the Hamiltonian formulation of water waves, using Hamiltonian consistent modelling methods, we derive higher order Hamiltonian equations by Taylor expansions of the potential and the vertical velocity around the still water level. The polynomial expansion in wave height is mixed with pseudo

  2. Experimental Modelling of the Overtopping Flow on the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parmeggiani, Stefano; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    The Wave Dragon is a floating slack-moored Wave Energy Converter (WEC) of the overtopping type. Oncoming waves are focused by two wing reflectors towards the ramp of the device, surge-up and overtop into a reservoir placed at a higher level than the surface of the sea. The energy production takes...... place as the water is led back to the sea through a set of low-head hydro-turbines. After many years of development, Wave Dragon (WD) is now facing the phase of pre-commercial demonstration. In this phase it is very important to be able to use the available data to predict the performances of the device...... at different scales and locations. A flexible and comprehensive modelling tool is therefore highly required. Wave Dragon produces power through different steps of energy conversion: 1. Primary energy conversion: overtopping – The energy content of the wave (partly in the kinetic and partly in the potential...

  3. The use of a wave boundary layer model in SWAN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Jianting; Bolaños, Rodolfo; Larsén, Xiaoli Guo

    2017-01-01

    A Wave Boundary Layer Model (WBLM) is implemented in the third-generation ocean wave model SWAN to improve the wind-input source function under idealized, fetch-limited condition. Accordingly, the white capping dissipation parameters are re-calibrated to fit the new wind-input source function...

  4. Development of a coupled wave-flow-vegetation interaction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beudin, Alexis; Kalra, Tarandeep; Ganju, Neil Kamal; Warner, John C.

    2017-01-01

    Emergent and submerged vegetation can significantly affect coastal hydrodynamics. However, most deterministic numerical models do not take into account their influence on currents, waves, and turbulence. In this paper, we describe the implementation of a wave-flow-vegetation module into a Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system that includes a flow model (ROMS) and a wave model (SWAN), and illustrate various interacting processes using an idealized shallow basin application. The flow model has been modified to include plant posture-dependent three-dimensional drag, in-canopy wave-induced streaming, and production of turbulent kinetic energy and enstrophy to parameterize vertical mixing. The coupling framework has been updated to exchange vegetation-related variables between the flow model and the wave model to account for wave energy dissipation due to vegetation. This study i) demonstrates the validity of the plant posture-dependent drag parameterization against field measurements, ii) shows that the model is capable of reproducing the mean and turbulent flow field in the presence of vegetation as compared to various laboratory experiments, iii) provides insight into the flow-vegetation interaction through an analysis of the terms in the momentum balance, iv) describes the influence of a submerged vegetation patch on tidal currents and waves separately and combined, and v) proposes future directions for research and development.

  5. Development of a coupled wave-flow-vegetation interaction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beudin, Alexis; Kalra, Tarandeep S.; Ganju, Neil K.; Warner, John C.

    2017-03-01

    Emergent and submerged vegetation can significantly affect coastal hydrodynamics. However, most deterministic numerical models do not take into account their influence on currents, waves, and turbulence. In this paper, we describe the implementation of a wave-flow-vegetation module into a Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system that includes a flow model (ROMS) and a wave model (SWAN), and illustrate various interacting processes using an idealized shallow basin application. The flow model has been modified to include plant posture-dependent three-dimensional drag, in-canopy wave-induced streaming, and production of turbulent kinetic energy and enstrophy to parameterize vertical mixing. The coupling framework has been updated to exchange vegetation-related variables between the flow model and the wave model to account for wave energy dissipation due to vegetation. This study i) demonstrates the validity of the plant posture-dependent drag parameterization against field measurements, ii) shows that the model is capable of reproducing the mean and turbulent flow field in the presence of vegetation as compared to various laboratory experiments, iii) provides insight into the flow-vegetation interaction through an analysis of the terms in the momentum balance, iv) describes the influence of a submerged vegetation patch on tidal currents and waves separately and combined, and v) proposes future directions for research and development.

  6. A consistent collinear triad approximation for operational wave models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, J. E.; Smit, P. B.; Janssen, T. T.; Holthuijsen, L. H.

    2016-08-01

    In shallow water, the spectral evolution associated with energy transfers due to three-wave (or triad) interactions is important for the prediction of nearshore wave propagation and wave-driven dynamics. The numerical evaluation of these nonlinear interactions involves the evaluation of a weighted convolution integral in both frequency and directional space for each frequency-direction component in the wave field. For reasons of efficiency, operational wave models often rely on a so-called collinear approximation that assumes that energy is only exchanged between wave components travelling in the same direction (collinear propagation) to eliminate the directional convolution. In this work, we show that the collinear approximation as presently implemented in operational models is inconsistent. This causes energy transfers to become unbounded in the limit of unidirectional waves (narrow aperture), and results in the underestimation of energy transfers in short-crested wave conditions. We propose a modification to the collinear approximation to remove this inconsistency and to make it physically more realistic. Through comparison with laboratory observations and results from Monte Carlo simulations, we demonstrate that the proposed modified collinear model is consistent, remains bounded, smoothly converges to the unidirectional limit, and is numerically more robust. Our results show that the modifications proposed here result in a consistent collinear approximation, which remains bounded and can provide an efficient approximation to model nonlinear triad effects in operational wave models.

  7. Modelling of Performance of Caisson Type Breakwaters under Extreme Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güney Doǧan, Gözde; Özyurt Tarakcıoǧlu, Gülizar; Baykal, Cüneyt

    2016-04-01

    Many coastal structures are designed without considering loads of tsunami-like waves or long waves although they are constructed in areas prone to encounter these waves. Performance of caisson type breakwaters under extreme swells is tested in Middle East Technical University (METU) Coastal and Ocean Engineering Laboratory. This paper presents the comparison of pressure measurements taken along the surface of caisson type breakwaters and obtained from numerical modelling of them using IH2VOF as well as damage behavior of the breakwater under the same extreme swells tested in a wave flume at METU. Experiments are conducted in the 1.5 m wide wave flume, which is divided into two parallel sections (0.74 m wide each). A piston type of wave maker is used to generate the long wave conditions located at one end of the wave basin. Water depth is determined as 0.4m and kept constant during the experiments. A caisson type breakwater is constructed to one side of the divided flume. The model scale, based on the Froude similitude law, is chosen as 1:50. 7 different wave conditions are applied in the tests as the wave period ranging from 14.6 s to 34.7 s, wave heights from 3.5 m to 7.5 m and steepness from 0.002 to 0.015 in prototype scale. The design wave parameters for the breakwater were 5m wave height and 9.5s wave period in prototype. To determine the damage of the breakwater which were designed according to this wave but tested under swell waves, video and photo analysis as well as breakwater profile measurements before and after each test are performed. Further investigations are carried out about the acting wave forces on the concrete blocks of the caisson structures via pressure measurements on the surfaces of these structures where the structures are fixed to the channel bottom minimizing. Finally, these pressure measurements will be compared with the results obtained from the numerical study using IH2VOF which is one of the RANS models that can be applied to simulate

  8. Modeling seismic wave propagation across the European plate: structural models and numerical techniques, state-of-the-art and prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Andrea; Danecek, Peter; Molinari, Irene; Postpischl, Luca; Schivardi, Renata; Serretti, Paola; Tondi, Maria Rosaria

    2010-05-01

    Together with the building and maintenance of observational and data banking infrastructures - i.e. an integrated organization of coordinated sensor networks, in conjunction with connected data banks and efficient data retrieval tools - a strategic vision for bolstering the future development of geophysics in Europe should also address the essential issue of improving our current ability to model coherently the propagation of seismic waves across the European plate. This impacts on fundamental matters, such as correctly locating earthquakes, imaging detailed earthquake source properties, modeling ground shaking, inferring geodynamic processes. To this extent, we both need detailed imaging of shallow and deep earth structure, and accurate modeling of seismic waves by numerical methods. Our current abilities appear somewhat limited, but emerging technologies may enable soon a significant leap towards better accuracy and reliability. To contribute to this debate, we present here the state-of-the-art of knowledge of earth structure and numerical wave modeling in the European plate, as the result of a comprehensive study towards the definition of a continental-scale reference model. Our model includes a description of crustal structure (EPcrust) merging information deriving from previous studies - large-scale compilations, seismic prospection, receiver functions, inversion of surface wave dispersion measurements and Green functions from noise correlation. We use a simple description of crustal structure, with laterally-varying sediment and cristalline layers thickness, density, and seismic parameters. This a priori crustal model improves the overall fit to observed Bouguer anomaly maps over CRUST2.0. The new crustal model is then used as a constraint in the inversion for mantle shear wave speed, based on fitting Love and Rayleigh surface wave dispersion. The new mantle model sensibly improves over global S models in the imaging of shallow asthenospheric (slow) anomalies

  9. Improving Short Wave Breaking Behavior In Surfbeat Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelvink, J.; Daly, C.; Vandongeren, A. R.; van Thiel de Vries, J.; McCall, R.

    2009-12-01

    In present surfzone modeling three approaches are widely applied: short-wave resolving models, ‘surfbeat’ models, which resolve wave energy modulations on the time-scale of wave groups and their associated infragravity waves, and wave averaged models. In all three approaches, wave breaking is a process that is highly schematized and governed by several empirical coefficients. In this presentation we will focus on the breaking process in ‘surfbeat’ models, such as XBeach (Roelvink et al, 2009). These models need to describe the short wave dissipation by breaking as a function of the slowly-varying short wave energy or wave height. The model usually applied is that by Roelvink (1993), which combines a probability that waves are breaking as function of wave heigth over water depth ratio H/h with a bore-type dissipation formulation similar to that by Battjes and Janssen (1978). A drawback of such a formulation is that there is no ‘memory’ in the breaking process, and the amount of breaking instantly varies with the water depth (though the wave height itself does have a memory). For cases with bichromatic waves, or for long-period swell, this does not reflect reality enough: waves that start breaking do not instantly stop breaking once the water depth increases, but continue until some lower threshold is reached. This concept was captured in Dally’s (1992) wave-by-wave approach, where individual waves are tracked in a probabilistic setting. We have now implemented a similar formulation in XBeach, where the property that waves are breaking is tracked; it is switched on when H/h exceeds a first criterion; this property is propagated using an advection equation and when H/h gets below a second criterion breaking is switched off. This formulation can do two things the previous one can’t: maintain groupiness inside the surf zone and have a maximum of wave breaking in the trough after a steep bar, as was observed for instance in Arcilla et al’s (1994) test 1

  10. Rogue wave variational modelling through the interaction of two solitary waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidel, Floriane; Bokhove, Onno

    2016-04-01

    The extreme and unexpected characteristics of Rogue waves have made them legendary for centuries. It is only on the 1st of January 1995 that these mariners' tales started to raise scientist's curiosity, when such a wave was recorded in the North Sea; a sudden wall of water hit the Draupner offshore platform, more than twice higher than the other waves, providing evidence of the existence of rogue or freak waves. Since then, studies have shown that these surface gravity waves of high amplitude (at least twice the height of the other sea waves [Dyste et al., 2008]) appear in non-linear dispersive water motion [Drazin and Johnson, 1989], at any depth, and have caused a lot of damage in recent years [Nikolkina and Didenkulova, 2011 ]. So far, most of the studies have tried to determine their probability of occurrence, but no conclusion has been achieved yet, which means that we are currently unenable to predict or avoid these monster waves. An accurate mathematical and numerical water-wave model would enable simulation and observation of this external forcing on boats and offshore structures and hence reduce their threat. In this work, we aim to model rogue waves through a soliton splash generated by the interaction of two solitons coming from different channels at a specific angle. Kodama indeed showed that one way to produce extreme waves is through the intersection of two solitary waves, or one solitary wave and its oblique reflection on a vertical wall [Yeh, Li and Kodama, 2010 ]. While he modelled Mach reflection from Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) theory, we aim to model rogue waves from the three-dimensional potential flow equations and/or their asymptotic equivalent described by Benney and Luke [Benney and Luke, 1964]. These theories have the advantage to allow wave propagation in several directions, which is not the case with KP equations. The initial solitary waves are generated by removing a sluice gate in each channel. The equations are derived through a

  11. Travelling wave analysis of a mathematical model of glioblastoma growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlee, Philip; Nelander, Sven

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we analyse a previously proposed cell-based model of glioblastoma (brain tumour) growth, which is based on the assumption that the cancer cells switch phenotypes between a proliferative and motile state (Gerlee and Nelander, 2012). The dynamics of this model can be described by a system of partial differential equations, which exhibits travelling wave solutions whose wave speed depends crucially on the rates of phenotypic switching. We show that under certain conditions on the model parameters, a closed form expression of the wave speed can be obtained, and using singular perturbation methods we also derive an approximate expression of the wave front shape. These new analytical results agree with simulations of the cell-based model, and importantly show that the inverse relationship between wave front steepness and speed observed for the Fisher equation no longer holds when phenotypic switching is considered.

  12. Theoretical and numerical studies of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in magnetized plasmas; Etude theorique et numerique des instabilites Rayleigh-Taylor en plasmas magnetises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, A.A

    2001-06-01

    The instabilities of Rayleigh-Taylor type are considered in the thesis. The topic of the thesis was inspired by recent advances in the physics of plasma compression, especially with the aid of systems like Z-pinch. Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) plays an important role in the evolution of magnetized plasmas in these experiments, as well as in stellar plasmas and classic fluids. For the phenomena concerning the nuclear fusion the RTI is very often the factor limiting the possibility of compression. In the current work we try to examine in detail the characteristic features of the instabilities of this type in order to eliminate their detrimental influence. In this thesis we are studying both the general case of the 'classic' Rayleigh-Taylor instability (in incompressible fluids) and more specific cases of the instabilities of Rayleigh-Taylor type in magnetized plasmas, in the liners or wire array implosions etc. We have studied the influence of the Hall diffusion of magnetic field on the growth rate of the instability. We have obtained in this work a self-similar solution for the widening of the initial profile of the magnetic field and for the wave of the penetration of magnetic field. After that the subsequent evolution of the magnetic field in plasma opening switches (POS) has been examined. We have shown the possibility of the existence of a strong rarefaction wave for collisional and non-collisional cases. This wave can explain the phenomenon of the opening of POS. The effect of the suppression of Rayleigh-Taylor instability by forced oscillations of the boundary between two fluids permits us to propose some ideas for the experiments of inertial fusion. We have considered the general case of the instability, in other words, two incompressible viscous superposed fluids in a gravitational field. We have obtained an exact analytical expression for the growth rate and then we have analyzed the influence of the parameters of external &apos

  13. Rayleigh--Taylor spike evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schappert, G. T.; Batha, S. H.; Klare, K. A.; Hollowell, D. E.; Mason, R. J.

    2001-09-01

    Laser-based experiments have shown that Rayleigh--Taylor (RT) growth in thin, perturbed copper foils leads to a phase dominated by narrow spikes between thin bubbles. These experiments were well modeled and diagnosed until this '' spike'' phase, but not into this spike phase. Experiments were designed, modeled, and performed on the OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly, D. L. Brown, R. S. Craxton , Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] to study the late-time spike phase. To simulate the conditions and evolution of late time RT, a copper target was fabricated consisting of a series of thin ridges (spikes in cross section) 150 {mu}m apart on a thin flat copper backing. The target was placed on the side of a scale-1.2 hohlraum with the ridges pointing into the hohlraum, which was heated to 190 eV. Side-on radiography imaged the evolution of the ridges and flat copper backing into the typical RT bubble and spike structure including the '' mushroom-like feet'' on the tips of the spikes. RAGE computer models [R. M. Baltrusaitis, M. L. Gittings, R. P. Weaver, R. F. Benjamin, and J. M. Budzinski, Phys. Fluids 8, 2471 (1996)] show the formation of the '' mushrooms,'' as well as how the backing material converges to lengthen the spike. The computer predictions of evolving spike and bubble lengths match measurements fairly well for the thicker backing targets but not for the thinner backings.

  14. Seismic waves estimation and wavefield decomposition: application to ambient vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranò, Stefano; Reller, Christoph; Loeliger, Hans-Andrea; Fäh, Donat

    2012-10-01

    Passive seismic surveying methods represent a valuable tool in local seismic hazard assessment, oil and gas prospection, and in geotechnical investigations. Array processing techniques are used in order to estimate wavefield properties such as dispersion curves of surface waves and ellipticity of Rayleigh waves. However, techniques presently in use often fail to properly merge information from three-components sensors and do not account for the presence of multiple waves. In this paper, a technique for maximum likelihood estimation of wavefield parameters including direction of propagation, velocity of Love waves and Rayleigh waves, and ellipticity of Rayleigh waves is described. This technique models jointly all the measurements and all the wavefield parameters. Furthermore it is possible to model the simultaneous presence of multiple waves. The performance of this technique is evaluated on a high-fidelity synthetic data set and on real data. It is shown that the joint modelling of all the sensor components, decreases the variance of wavenumber estimates and allows the retrieval of the ellipticity value together with an estimate of the prograde/retrograde motion.

  15. Ground Signatures of EMIC Waves obtained From a 3D Global Wave Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, R.; Sydorenko, D.; Zong, Q.; Zhang, L.

    2016-12-01

    EMIC waves generated in the inner magnetosphere are important drivers of radiation belt particle loss. Van Allen Probes and ground observations of EMIC waves suggest that localized magnetospheric sources inject waves that are guided along geomagnetic field lines and then reflected and refracted in the low altitude magnetosphere [Kim, E.-H., and J. R. Johnson (2016), Geophys. Res. Lett., 43, 13-21, doi:10.1002/2015GL066978] before entering the ionosphere. The waves then spread horizontally within the F-region waveguide and propagate to the ground. To understand the observed properties of EMIC waves, a global 3D model of ULF waves in Earth's magnetosphere, ionosphere, and neutral atmosphere has been developed. The simulation domain extends from Earth's surface to a spherical boundary a few tens of thousands of km in radius. The model uses spherical coordinates and incorporates an overset Yin-Yang grid that eliminates the singularity at the polar axis and improves uniformity of the grid in the polar areas [Kageyama, A., and T. Sato (2004), Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., 5, Q09005, doi:10.1029/2004GC000734]. The geomagnetic field in the model is general, but is dipole in this study. The plasma is described as a set of electron and multiple species ion conducting fluids. Realistic 3D density profiles of various ion species as well as thermospheric parameters are provided by the Canadian Ionosphere Atmosphere Model (C-IAM) [Martynenko O.V. et al. (2014), J. Atmos. Solar-Terr. Phys., 120, 51-61, doi:10.1016/j.jastp.2014.08.014]. The global ULF wave model is applied to study propagation of EMIC waves excited in the equatorial plane near L=7. Wave propagation along field lines, reflection and refraction in the zone of critical frequencies, and further propagation through the ionosphere to the ground are discussed.

  16. Evolution of a double-front Rayleigh-Taylor system using a GPU-based high resolution thermal Lattice-Boltzmann model

    CERN Document Server

    Ripesi, P; Schifano, S F; Tripiccione, R

    2014-01-01

    We study the turbulent evolution originated from a system subjected to a Rayleigh-Taylor instability with a double density at high resolution in a 2 dimensional geometry using a highly optimized thermal Lattice Boltzmann code for GPUs. The novelty of our investigation stems from the initial condition, given by the superposition of three layers with three different densities, leading to the development of two Rayleigh-Taylor fronts that expand upward and downward and collide in the middle of the cell. By using high resolution numerical data we highlight the effects induced by the collision of the two turbulent fronts in the long time asymptotic regime. We also provide details on the optimized Lattice-Boltzmann code that we have run on a cluster of GPUs

  17. Hydration of marginal basins and compositional variations within the continental lithospheric mantle inferred from a new global model of shear and compressional velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tesoniero, Andrea; Auer, Ludwig; Boschi, Lapo;

    2015-01-01

    We present a new global model of shear and compressional wave speeds for the entire mantle, partly based on the data set employed for the shear velocity model savani. We invert Rayleigh and Love surface waves up to the sixth overtone in combination with major P and S body wave phases. Mineral...

  18. Sediment mathematical model for sand ridges and sand waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Daming; WANG Xiao; WANG Xin; LI Yangyang

    2016-01-01

    A new theoretical model is formulated to describe internal movement mechanisms of the sand ridges and sand waves based on the momentum equation of a solid-liquid two-phase flow under a shear flow. Coupling this equation with two-dimensional shallow water equations and wave reflection-diffraction equation of mild slope, a two-dimensional coupling model is established and a validation is carried out by observed hydrogeology, tides, waves and sediment. The numerical results are compared with available observations. Satisfactory agreements are achieved. This coupling model is then applied to the Dongfang 1-1 Gas Field area to quantitatively predict the movement and evolution of submarine sand ridges and sand waves. As a result, it is found that the sand ridges and sand waves movement distance increases year by year, but the development trend is stable.

  19. Numerical simulation of Martian historical dynamo: Impact of the Rayleigh number on the dynamo state

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG TianYuan; KUANG WeiJia; MA ShiZhuang

    2009-01-01

    The observed Mars remnant magnetism suggests that there was an active dynamo in the Martian core.We use the MoSST core dynamics model to simulate the Martian historical dynamo,focusing on the variation of the dynamo states with the Rayleigh number Ra (a non-dimensional parameter describing the buoyancy force in the core).Our numerical results show that the mean field length scale does not vary monotonically with the Rayleigh number,and the field morphology at the core mantle boundary changes with Rayleigh number.In particular,it drifts westward with a speed decreasing with Rayleigh number.

  20. Numerical simulation of Martian historical dynamo:Impact of the Rayleigh number on the dynamo state

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The observed Mars remnant magnetism suggests that there was an active dynamo in the Martian core. We use the MoSST core dynamics model to simulate the Martian historical dynamo, focusing on the variation of the dynamo states with the Rayleigh number Ra (a non-dimensional parameter describing the buoyancy force in the core). Our numerical results show that the mean field length scale does not vary monotonically with the Rayleigh number, and the field morphology at the core mantle boundary changes with Rayleigh number. In particular, it drifts westward with a speed decreasing with Rayleigh number.

  1. Establishment of Motion Model for Wave Capture Buoy and Research on Hydrodynamic Performance of Floating-Type Wave Energy Converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Hongtao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Floating-type wave energy converter has the advantages of high wave energy conversion efficiency, strong shock resistance ability in rough sea and stable output power. So it is regarded as a promising energy utilization facility. The research on hydrodynamic performance of wave capture buoys is the precondition and key to the wave energy device design and optimization. A simplified motion model of the buoys in the waves is established. Based on linear wave theory, the equations of motion of buoys are derived according to Newton’s second law. The factors of wave and buoys structural parameters on wave energy absorption efficiency are discussed in the China’s Bohai Sea with short wave period and small wave height. The results show that the main factor which affects the dynamic responses of wave capture buoys is the proximity of the natural frequency of buoys to the wave period. And the incoming wave power takes a backseat role to it at constant wave height. The buoys structural parameters such as length, radius and immersed depth, influence the wave energy absorption efficiency, which play significant factors in device design. The effectiveness of this model is validated by the sea tests with small-sized wave energy devices. The establishment methods of motion model and analysis results are expected to be helpful for designing and manufacturing of floating-type wave energy converter.

  2. Experimental Update of the Overtopping Model Used for the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parmeggiani, Stefano [Wave Dragon Ltd., London (United Kingdom); Kofoed, Jens Peter [Aalborg Univ. (Denmark). Department of Civil Engineering; Friis-Madsen, Erik [Wave Dragon Ltd., London (United Kingdom)

    2013-04-15

    An overtopping model specifically suited for Wave Dragon is needed in order to improve the reliability of its performance estimates. The model shall be comprehensive of all relevant physical processes that affect overtopping and flexible to adapt to any local conditions and device configuration. An experimental investigation is carried out to update an existing formulation suited for 2D draft-limited, low-crested structures, in order to include the effects on the overtopping flow of the wave steepness, the 3D geometry of Wave Dragon, the wing reflectors, the device motions and the non-rigid connection between platform and reflectors. The study is carried out in four phases, each of them specifically targeted at quantifying one of these effects through a sensitivity analysis and at modeling it through custom-made parameters. These are depending on features of the wave or the device configuration, all of which can be measured in real-time. Instead of using new fitting coefficients, this approach allows a broader applicability of the model beyond the Wave Dragon case, to any overtopping WEC or structure within the range of tested conditions. Predictions reliability of overtopping over Wave Dragon increased, as the updated model allows improved accuracy and precision respect to the former version.

  3. Experimental Update of the Overtopping Model Used for the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Friis-Madsen

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available An overtopping model specifically suited for Wave Dragon is needed in order to improve the reliability of its performance estimates. The model shall be comprehensive of all relevant physical processes that affect overtopping and flexible to adapt to any local conditions and device configuration. An experimental investigation is carried out to update an existing formulation suited for 2D draft-limited, low-crested structures, in order to include the effects on the overtopping flow of the wave steepness, the 3D geometry of Wave Dragon, the wing reflectors, the device motions and the non-rigid connection between platform and reflectors. The study is carried out in four phases, each of them specifically targeted at quantifying one of these effects through a sensitivity analysis and at modeling it through custom-made parameters. These are depending on features of the wave or the device configuration, all of which can be measured in real-time. Instead of using new fitting coefficients, this approach allows a broader applicability of the model beyond the Wave Dragon case, to any overtopping WEC or structure within the range of tested conditions. Predictions reliability of overtopping over Wave Dragon increased, as the updated model allows improved accuracy and precision respect to the former version.

  4. Remarks on the Rayleigh-Benard Convection on Spherical Shells

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Shouhong

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of this article is to study the effect of spherical geometry on dynamic transitions and pattern formation for the Rayleigh-Benard convection. The study is mainly motivated by the importance of spherical geometry and convection in geophysical flows. It is shown in particular that the system always undergoes a continuous (Type-I) transition to a $2l_c$-dimensional sphere $S^{2lc}$, where lc is the critical wave length corresponding to the critical Rayleigh number. Furthermore, it has shown in [12] that it is critical to add nonisotropic turbulent friction terms in the momentum equation to capture the large-scale atmospheric and oceanic circulation patterns. We show in particular that the system with turbulent friction terms added undergoes the same type of dynamic transition, and obtain an explicit formula linking the critical wave number (pattern selection), the aspect ratio, and the ratio between the horizontal and vertical turbulent friction coefficients.

  5. Modeling sheet-flow sand transport under progressive surface waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranenburg, W.M.

    2013-01-01

    In the near-shore zone, energetic sea waves generate sheet-flow sand transport. In present day coastal models, wave-induced sheet-flow sand transport rates are usually predicted with semi-empirical transport formulas, based on extensive research on this phenomenon in oscillatory flow tunnels. Howeve

  6. Modeling radar backscatter from breaking waves on the surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melief, H.W.; Greidanus, H.S.F.; Hoogeboom, P.; Genderen, P. van

    2003-01-01

    A model for describing radar sea clutter is proposed. It consists of two parts, an oceanographic and an electromagnetic one. The former contains swell, small capillary and gravity waves as well as breaking wave events. The latter combines ray tracing, Bragg scattering and the Method of Moments. It i

  7. Numerical Modelling of Wind Waves. Problems, Solutions, Verifications, and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Polnikov, Vladislav

    2011-01-01

    The time-space evolution of the field is described by the transport equation for the 2-dimensional wave energy spectrum density, S(x,t), spread in the space, x, and time, t. This equation has the forcing named the source function, F, depending on both the wave spectrum, S, and the external wave-making factors: local wind, W(x, t), and local current, U(x, t). The source function contains certain physical mechanisms responsible for a wave spectrum evolution. It is used to distinguish three terms in function F: the wind-wave energy exchange mechanism, In; the energy conservative mechanism of nonlinear wave-wave interactions, Nl; and the wave energy loss mechanism, Dis. Differences in mathematical representation of the source function terms determine general differences between wave models. The problem is to derive analytical representations for the source function terms said above from the fundamental wave equations. Basing on publications of numerous authors and on the last two decades studies of the author, th...

  8. Attenuation of surface waves due to monsoon rains: A model study for the north Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vethamony, P.; Kumar, B.P.; Sarma, Y.V.B.

    The dynamic interaction of intense rain with waves based on momentum exchange is applied to a second generation wave model to predict wave attenuation during monsoon. The scheme takes into account the characteristics of rain and wave parameters...

  9. Scroll wave dynamics in a model of the heterogeneous heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalov, P. V.; Pravdin, S. F.; Solovyova, O. E.; Panfilov, A. V.

    2016-07-01

    Scroll waves are found in physical, chemical and biological systems and underlie many significant processes including life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. The theory of scroll waves predicts scroll wave dynamics should be substantially affected by heterogeneity of cardiac tissue together with other factors including shape and anisotropy. In this study, we used our recently developed analytical model of the human ventricle to identify effects of shape, anisotropy, and regional heterogeneity of myocardium on scroll wave dynamics. We found that the main effects of apical-base heterogeneity were an increased scroll wave drift velocity and a shift towards the region of maximum action potential duration. We also found that transmural heterogeneity does not substantially affect scroll wave dynamics and only in extreme cases changes the attractor position.

  10. Statistical model on the surface elevation of waves with breaking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In the surface wind drift layer with constant momentum flux, two sets of the consistent surface eleva- tion expressions with breaking and occurrence conditions for breaking are deduced from the first in- tegrals of the energy and vortex variations and the kinetic and mathematic breaking criterions, then the expression of the surface elevation with wave breaking is established by using the Heaviside function. On the basis of the form of the sea surface elevation with wave breaking and the understanding of small slope sea waves, a triple composite function of real sea waves is presented including the func- tions for the breaking, weak-nonlinear and basic waves. The expression of the triple composite func- tion and the normal distribution of basic waves are the expected theoretical model for surface elevation statistics.

  11. Verification of model wave heights with long-term moored buoy data: Application to wave field over the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Samiksha, S.V.; Polnikov, V.G.; Vethamony, P.; Rashmi, R.; Pogarskii, F.; Sudheesh, K.

    for the model comparison. Based on the error estimates of significant wave heights and spectral wave energy, improvement achieved in wave prediction using ModWAM is demonstrated. We find that the ModWAM improved the accuracy of significant wave height prediction...

  12. Stochastic waves in a Brusselator model with nonlocal interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biancalani, Tommaso; Galla, Tobias; McKane, Alan J

    2011-08-01

    We show that intrinsic noise can induce spatiotemporal phenomena such as Turing patterns and traveling waves in a Brusselator model with nonlocal interaction terms. In order to predict and to characterize these stochastic waves we analyze the nonlocal model using a system-size expansion. The resulting theory is used to calculate the power spectra of the stochastic waves analytically and the outcome is tested successfully against simulations. We discuss the possibility that nonlocal models in other areas, such as epidemic spread or social dynamics, may contain similar stochastically induced patterns.

  13. Coupling model for waves propagating over a porous seabed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.C. Liao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The wave–seabed interaction issue is of great importance for the design of foundation around marine infrastructures. Most previous investigations for such a problem have been limited to uncoupled or one-way coupled methods connecting two separated wave and seabed sub models with the continuity of pressures at the seabed surface. In this study, a strongly coupled model was proposed to realize both wave and seabed processes in a same program and to calculate the wave fields and seabed response simultaneously. The information between wave fields and seabed fields were strongly shared and thus results in a more profound investigation of the mechanism of the wave–seabed interaction. In this letter, the wave and seabed models were validated with previous experimental tests. Then, a set of application of present model were discussed in prediction of the wave-induced seabed response. Numerical results show the wave-induced liquefaction area of coupled model is smaller than that of uncoupled model.

  14. Blue Skies, Coffee Creamer, and Rayleigh Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebl, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The first physical explanation of Earths blue sky was fashioned in 1871 by Lord Rayleigh. Many discussions of Rayleigh scattering and approaches to studying it both in and out of the classroom are available. Rayleigh scattering accounts for the blue color of the sky and the orange/red color of the Sun near sunset and sunrise, and a number of…

  15. Blue Skies, Coffee Creamer, and Rayleigh Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebl, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The first physical explanation of Earths blue sky was fashioned in 1871 by Lord Rayleigh. Many discussions of Rayleigh scattering and approaches to studying it both in and out of the classroom are available. Rayleigh scattering accounts for the blue color of the sky and the orange/red color of the Sun near sunset and sunrise, and a number of…

  16. Transient Response Model of Standing Wave Piezoelectric Linear Ultrasonic Motor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Yunlai; CHEN Chao; ZHAO Chunsheng

    2012-01-01

    A transient response model for describing the starting and stopping characteristics of the standing wave piezoelectric linear ultrasonic motor was presented.Based on the contact dynamic model,the kinetic equation of the motor was derived.The starting and stopping characteristics of the standing wave piezoelectric linear ultrasonic motor according to different loads,contact stiffness and inertia mass were described and analyzed,respectively.To validate the transient response model,a standing wave piezoelectric linear ultrasonic motor based on in-plane modes was used to carry out the simulation and experimental study.The corresponding results showed that the simulation of the motor performances based on the proposed model agreed well with the experimental results.This model will helpful to improve the stepping characteristics and the control flexibility of the standing wave piezoelectric linear ultrasonic motor.

  17. Modelling wave-boundary layer interaction for wind power applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, A. D.; Barstad, I.; Gupta, A.; Adakudlu, M.

    2012-04-01

    Marine wind power production facilities are subjected to direct and indirect effects of ocean waves. Direct effects include forces due to wave orbital motions and slamming of the water surface under breaking wave conditions, corrosion and icing due to sea spray, and the effects of wave-generated air bubbles. Indirect effects include include the influence of waves on the aerodynamic sea-surface roughness, air turbulence, the wind velocity profile, and air velocity oscillations, wave-induced currents and sediment transport. Field observations within the boundary layers from floating measurement may have to be corrected to account for biases induced as a result of wave-induced platform motions. To estimate the effect of waves on the atmospheric boundary layer we employ the WRF non-hydrostatic mesoscale atmosphere model, using the default YSU planetary boundary layer (PBL) scheme and the WAM spectral wave model, running simultaneously and coupled using the open-source coupler MCEL which can interpolate between different model grids and timesteps. The model is driven by the WRF wind velocity at 10 m above the surface. The WRF model receives from WAM updated air-sea stress fields computed from the wind input source term, and computes new fields for the Charnock parameter and marine surface aerodynamic roughness. Results from a North Atlantic and Nordic Seas simulation indicate that the two-way coupling scheme alters the 10 metre wind predicted by WRF by up to 10 per cent in comparison with a simulation using a constant Charnock parameter. The changes are greatest in developing situations with passages of fronts, moving depressions and squalls. This may be directly due to roughness length changes, or may be due to changes in the timing of front/depression/squall passages. Ongoing work includes investigating the effect of grid refinement/nesting, employing different PBL schemes, and allowing the wave field to change the direction of the total air-sea stress.

  18. Traveling waves in an optimal velocity model of freeway traffic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Peter; Woods, Andrew

    2001-03-01

    Car-following models provide both a tool to describe traffic flow and algorithms for autonomous cruise control systems. Recently developed optimal velocity models contain a relaxation term that assigns a desirable speed to each headway and a response time over which drivers adjust to optimal velocity conditions. These models predict traffic breakdown phenomena analogous to real traffic instabilities. In order to deepen our understanding of these models, in this paper, we examine the transition from a linear stable stream of cars of one headway into a linear stable stream of a second headway. Numerical results of the governing equations identify a range of transition phenomena, including monotonic and oscillating travelling waves and a time- dependent dispersive adjustment wave. However, for certain conditions, we find that the adjustment takes the form of a nonlinear traveling wave from the upstream headway to a third, intermediate headway, followed by either another traveling wave or a dispersive wave further downstream matching the downstream headway. This intermediate value of the headway is selected such that the nonlinear traveling wave is the fastest stable traveling wave which is observed to develop in the numerical calculations. The development of these nonlinear waves, connecting linear stable flows of two different headways, is somewhat reminiscent of stop-start waves in congested flow on freeways. The different types of adjustments are classified in a phase diagram depending on the upstream and downstream headway and the response time of the model. The results have profound consequences for autonomous cruise control systems. For an autocade of both identical and different vehicles, the control system itself may trigger formations of nonlinear, steep wave transitions. Further information is available [Y. Sugiyama, Traffic and Granular Flow (World Scientific, Singapore, 1995), p. 137].

  19. Comparison of classical and modern theories of longitudinal wave propagation in elastic rods

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Shatalov, M

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available of the rods does not take into consideration its lateral motion and is described in terms of the wave equation. The more elaborated models were proposed by Rayleigh, Love, Bishop, Mindlin-Herrmann, and multimode models in which the lateral effect plays...

  20. On the modeling of wave-enhanced turbulence nearshore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghimi, Saeed; Thomson, Jim; Özkan-Haller, Tuba; Umlauf, Lars; Zippel, Seth

    2016-07-01

    A high resolution k-ω two-equation turbulence closure model, including surface wave forcing was employed to fully resolve turbulence dissipation rate profiles close to the ocean surface. Model results were compared with observations from Surface Wave Instrument Floats with Tracking (SWIFTs) in the nearshore region at New River Inlet, North Carolina USA, in June 2012. A sensitivity analysis for different physical parameters and wave and turbulence formulations was performed. The flux of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) prescribed by wave dissipation from a numerical wave model was compared with the conventional prescription using the wind friction velocity. A surface roughness length of 0.6 times the significant wave height was proposed, and the flux of TKE was applied at a distance below the mean sea surface that is half of this roughness length. The wave enhanced layer had a total depth that is almost three times the significant wave height. In this layer the non-dimensionalized Terray scaling with power of - 1.8 (instead of - 2) was applicable.

  1. Solvable Model of Spiral Wave Chimeras

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martens, Erik Andreas; Laing, Carlo R.; Strogatz, Steven H.

    2010-01-01

    Spiral waves are ubiquitous in two-dimensional systems of chemical or biological oscillators coupled locally by diffusion. At the center of such spirals is a phase singularity, a topological defect where the oscillator amplitude drops to zero. But if the coupling is nonlocal, a new kind of spiral...... can occur, with a circular core consisting of desynchronized oscillators running at full amplitude. Here, we provide the first analytical description of such a spiral wave chimera and use perturbation theory to calculate its rotation speed and the size of its incoherent core....

  2. Computational study of nonlinear plasma waves: 1: Simulation model and monochromatic wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matda, Y.; Crawford, F. W.

    1974-01-01

    An economical low noise plasma simulation model is applied to a series of problems associated with electrostatic wave propagation in a one-dimensional, collisionless, Maxwellian plasma, in the absence of magnetic field. The model is described and tested, first in the absence of an applied signal, and then with a small amplitude perturbation, to establish the low noise features and to verify the theoretical linear dispersion relation at wave energy levels as low as 0.000,001 of the plasma thermal energy. The method is then used to study propagation of an essentially monochromatic plane wave. Results on amplitude oscillation and nonlinear frequency shift are compared with available theories. The additional phenomena of sideband instability and satellite growth, stimulated by large amplitude wave propagation and the resulting particle trapping, are described.

  3. Modeling of Mud-Wave Interaction: Mud-Induced Wave Transport & Wave-Induced Mud Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    seabed. This can be a fairly rapid process (i.e. of the order of tens of seconds, up to a few minutes at most, e.g. Foda and Zhang (1994); Lindenberg...response of cohesive sediments to water waves, PhD-dissertation, University of California, Berkeley, USA. Chou, H.-T., M.A. Foda and J.R. Hunt, 1993...Dingemans, M.W., 1997, Water wave propagation over uneven bottoms; Part I & II, World Scientific, Singapore. Foda , M.A. and S.-Y. Tzang, 1994

  4. Stochastic analysis and modeling of abnormally large waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, Konstantin; Shamin, Roman; Yudin, Aleksandr

    2016-04-01

    In this work stochastics of amplitude characteristics of waves during the freak waves formation was estimated. Also amplitude characteristics of freak wave was modeling with the help of the developed Markov model on the basis of in-situ and numerical experiments. Simulation using the Markov model showed a great similarity of results of in-situ wave measurements[1], results of directly calculating the Euler equations[2] and stochastic modeling data. This work is supported by grant of Russian Foundation for Basic Research (RFBR) n°16-35-00526. 1. K. I. Kuznetsov, A. A. Kurkin, E. N. Pelinovsky and P. D. Kovalev Features of Wind Waves at the Southeastern Coast of Sakhalin according to Bottom Pressure Measurements //Izvestiya, Atmospheric and Oceanic Physics, 2014, Vol. 50, No. 2, pp. 213-220. DOI: 10.1134/S0001433814020066. 2. R.V. Shamin, V.E. Zakharov, A.I. Dyachenko. How probability for freak wave formation can be found // THE EUROPEAN PHYSICAL JOURNAL - SPECIAL TOPICS Volume 185, Number 1, 113-124, DOI: 10.1140/epjst/e2010-01242-y 3.E. N. Pelinovsky, K. I. Kuznetsov, J. Touboul, A. A. Kurkin Bottom pressure caused by passage of a solitary wave within the strongly nonlinear Green-Naghdi model //Doklady Physics, April 2015, Volume 60, Issue 4, pp 171-174. DOI: 10.1134/S1028335815040035

  5. Nonlinear Pressure Wave Analysis by Concentrated Mass Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Satoshi; Kondou, Takahiro; Matsuzaki, Kenichiro

    A pressure wave propagating in a tube often changes to a shock wave because of the nonlinear effect of fluid. Analyzing this phenomenon by the finite difference method requires high computational cost. To lessen the computational cost, a concentrated mass model is proposed. This model consists of masses, connecting nonlinear springs, connecting dampers, and base support dampers. The characteristic of a connecting nonlinear spring is derived from the adiabatic change of fluid, and the equivalent mass and equivalent damping coefficient of the base support damper are derived from the equation of motion of fluid in a cylindrical tube. Pressure waves generated in a hydraulic oil tube, a sound tube and a plane-wave tube are analyzed numerically by the proposed model to confirm the validity of the model. All numerical computational results agree very well with the experimental results carried out by Okamura, Saenger and Kamakura. Especially, the numerical analysis reproduces the phenomena that a pressure wave with large amplitude propagating in a sound tube or in a plane tube changes to a shock wave. Therefore, it is concluded that the proposed model is valid for the numerical analysis of nonlinear pressure wave problem.

  6. 南海瑞雷面波群速度层析成像及其地球动力学意义%Group velocity tomography of Rayleigh waves in South China Sea and its geodynamic implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈立; 薛梅; Le Khanh Phon; 杨挺

    2012-01-01

    complex geological structures. In this study, we give a 3D shear wave velocity structure of South China Sea deduced from surface wave tomography and analyze its geodynamic implications. Due to the newly deployed seismic stations in western and southern South China Sea, we have a better ray path coverage when using the single station method. This is especially true for the coastal region of southern China, where earthquakes occur less frequently and the newly added stations can increase the ray density in this region. We used earthquakes distributed on the periphery of South China Sea and collected earthquake data from 48 stations. We first calculated the group velocity dispersion curves of fundamental mode for Rayleigh waves with periods from 14 s to 130 s using multiple filter technique. Then we conducted subspace inversion to get group velocity distributions for different periods in the region. Finally, on the basis of the relationship between shear wave velocity and group velocity under certain layer structure of the Earth, we obtained the 3D shear wave structures in the form of depth slices and vertical profiles by using a damped least square algorithm. The results show: ①High velocities exist in sea basins where velocity image delineates the shape of sea basins: the high velocities in shallow parts may indicate oceanic characteristics of the sea basin crust, while high velocities in deeper parts may come from high velocity materials which remained after the formation of oceanic crust at expanding ocean ridge. The velocity differences among sea basins are consistent with their heat flow values as well as their ages. The high velocities disappear at depths greater than 60 km, and are replaced by a low-velocity zone in a certain depth range. Beneath the low-velocity zone, a NE-SW high-velocity belt is observed at a depth of 200 km, and may be related to the ancient subduction in this region. ②Surrounding the South China Sea, there are obvious high velocities

  7. Numerical Modelling of Solitary Wave Experiments on Rubble Mound Breakwaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guler, H. G.; Arikawa, T.; Baykal, C.; Yalciner, A. C.

    2016-12-01

    Performance of a rubble mound breakwater protecting Haydarpasa Port, Turkey, has been tested under tsunami attack by physical model tests conducted at Port and Airport Research Institute (Guler et al, 2015). It is aimed to understand dynamic force of the tsunami by conducting solitary wave tests (Arikawa, 2015). In this study, the main objective is to perform numerical modelling of solitary wave tests in order to verify accuracy of the CFD model IHFOAM, developed in OpenFOAM environment (Higuera et al, 2013), by comparing results of the numerical computations with the experimental results. IHFOAM is the numerical modelling tool which is based on VARANS equations with a k-ω SST turbulence model including realistic wave generation, and active wave absorption. Experiments are performed using a Froude scale of 1/30, measuring surface elevation and flow velocity at several locations in the wave channel, and wave pressure around the crown wall of the breakwater. Solitary wave tests with wave heights of H=7.5 cm and H=10 cm are selected which represent the results of the experiments. The first test (H=7.5 cm) is the case that resulted in no damage whereas the second case (H=10 cm) resulted in total damage due to the sliding of the crown wall. After comparison of the preliminary results of numerical simulations with experimental data for both cases, it is observed that solitary wave experiments could be accurately modeled using IHFOAM focusing water surface elevations, flow velocities, and wave pressures on the crown wall of the breakwater (Figure, result of sim. at t=29.6 sec). ACKNOWLEDGEMENTSThe authors acknowledge developers of IHFOAM, further extend their acknowledgements for the partial supports from the research projects MarDiM, ASTARTE, RAPSODI, and TUBITAK 213M534. REFERENCESArikawa (2015) "Consideration of Characteristics of Pressure on Seawall by Solitary Waves Based on Hydraulic Experiments", Jour. of Japan. Soc. of Civ. Eng. Ser. B2 (Coast. Eng.), Vol 71, p I

  8. Morphodynamic modeling of an embayed beach under wave group forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reniers, A. J. H. M.; Roelvink, J. A.; Thornton, E. B.

    2004-01-01

    The morphodynamic response of the nearshore zone of an embayed beach induced by wave groups is examined with a numerical model. The model utilizes the nonlinear shallow water equations to phase resolve the mean and infragravity motions in combination with an advection-diffusion equation for the sediment transport. The sediment transport associated with the short-wave asymmetry is accounted for by means of a time-integrated contribution of the wave nonlinearity using stream function theory. The two-dimensional (2-D) computations consider wave group energy made up of directionally spread, short waves with a zero mean approach angle with respect to the shore normal, incident on an initially alongshore uniform barred beach. Prior to the 2-D computations, the model is calibrated with prototype flume measurements of waves, currents, and bed level changes during erosive and accretive conditions. The most prominent feature of the 2-D model computations is the development of an alongshore quasi-periodic bathymetry of shoals cut by rip channels. Without directional spreading, the smallest alongshore separation of the rip channels is obtained, and the beach response is self-organizing in nature. Introducing a small amount of directional spreading (less than 2°) results in a strong increase in the alongshore length scales as the beach response changes from self-organizing to being quasi-forced. A further increase in directional spreading leads again to smaller length scales. The hypothesized correlation between the observed rip spacing and wave group forced edge waves over the initially alongshore uniform bathymetry is not found. However, there is a correlation between the alongshore length scales of the wave group-induced quasi-steady flow circulations and the eventual alongshore spacing of the rip channels. This suggests that the scouring associated with the quasi-steady flow induced by the initial wave groups triggers the development of rip channels via a positive feedback

  9. Tracing Distortion Product (DP) Waves in a Cochlear Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Egbert; Shera, Christopher A.; Nuttall, Alfred L.

    2013-01-01

    In many cases a cochlear model suffices to explain (by simulation) the properties of waves in the cochlea. This is not so in the case of a distortion product (DP) set up by presenting two primary tones to the cochlea. A three-dimensional model predicts, apart from a DP wave traveling in the apical direction, a DP wave that travels from the region of overlap of the two tone patterns towards the stapes—setting the stapes in motion so as to produce an otoacoustic emission at the DP frequency. Experimental research has shown, however, that the actual DP wave in the cochlea appears to travel in the opposite direction, from near the stapes to the overlap region. This feature has been termed “inverted direction of wave propagation” (IDWP). The forward wave could result from an unknown process such as a “hidden source” near the stapes. In the present study we have disproved this notion, by using a one-dimensional model of the cochlea. It is found that both reverse and forward waves are set up by the source of nonlinearity, in the same way as has been published in an earlier work. The present results reveal that IDWP in the data corresponds to the region where the DP wave, originally created as a reverse wave but reflected from the stapes, has received so much amplification that it starts to dominate over the reverse wave. Hence we conclude that IDWP in a one-dimensional model is a direct manifestation of cochlear amplification. PMID:25284909

  10. US Navy Global and Regional Wave Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    source terms still include some empirical coefficients, required by limitations on current theory and observational capabilities, simplifying...assumptions (e.g., linear wave theory , linear superposition of sinusoids, local homogeneity), and generally chaotic nature of the real ocean. A particular...terms, including the effects of bottom friction, bottom scattering, sea ice, reflection from icebergs and steep shorelines, surf breaking

  11. Alfven Wave Solar Model: Part 1, Coronal Heating

    CERN Document Server

    van der Holst, Bart; Meng, Xing; Jin, Meng; Manchester, Ward B; Toth, Gabor; Gombosi, Tamas I

    2013-01-01

    We present the new Alfven Wave Solar Model (AWSoM), a global model from the upper chromosphere to the corona and the heliosphere. The coronal heating and solar wind acceleration are addressed with low-frequency Alfven wave turbulence. The injection of Alfven wave energy at the inner boundary is such that the Poynting flux is proportional to the magnetic field strength. The three-dimensional magnetic field topology is simulated using data from photospheric magnetic field measurements. This model does not impose open-closed magnetic field boundaries; those develop self-consistently. The physics includes: (1) The model employs three different temperatures, namely the isotropic electron temperature and the parallel and perpendicular ion temperatures. The firehose, mirror, and ion-cyclotron instabilities due to the developing ion temperature anisotropy are accounted for. (2) The Alfven waves are partially reflected by the Alfven speed gradient and the vorticity along the field lines. The resulting counter-propagat...

  12. Wave speeds in the macroscopic extended model for ultrarelativistic gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borghero, F., E-mail: borghero@unica.it [Dip. Matematica e Informatica, Università di Cagliari, Via Ospedale 72, 09124 Cagliari (Italy); Demontis, F., E-mail: fdemontis@unica.it [Dip. Matematica, Università di Cagliari, Viale Merello 92, 09123 Cagliari (Italy); Pennisi, S., E-mail: spennisi@unica.it [Dip. Matematica, Università di Cagliari, Via Ospedale 72, 09124 Cagliari (Italy)

    2013-11-15

    Equations determining wave speeds for a model of ultrarelativistic gases are investigated. This model is already present in literature; it deals with an arbitrary number of moments and it was proposed in the context of exact macroscopic approaches in Extended Thermodynamics. We find these results: the whole system for the determination of the wave speeds can be divided into independent subsystems which are expressed by linear combinations, through scalar coefficients, of tensors all of the same order; some wave speeds, but not all of them, are expressed by square roots of rational numbers; finally, we prove that these wave speeds for the macroscopic model are the same of those furnished by the kinetic model.

  13. Measurement and modelling of bed shear induced by solitary waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    JayaKumar, S.

    to combined waves and current. Ocean Engineering, 29(7): 753-768. Coussot, P., 1997. Mudflow rheology and dynamics, xvi, Balkema, Rotterdam, 255 pp. DHI, 2009. Mike21 flow model - hydrodynamic module - scientific documentation. DHI, Denmark, 60 pp...

  14. Wave speeds in the macroscopic extended model for ultrarelativistic gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borghero, F., E-mail: borghero@unica.it [Dip. Matematica e Informatica, Università di Cagliari, Via Ospedale 72, 09124 Cagliari (Italy); Demontis, F., E-mail: fdemontis@unica.it [Dip. Matematica, Università di Cagliari, Viale Merello 92, 09123 Cagliari (Italy); Pennisi, S., E-mail: spennisi@unica.it [Dip. Matematica, Università di Cagliari, Via Ospedale 72, 09124 Cagliari (Italy)

    2013-11-15

    Equations determining wave speeds for a model of ultrarelativistic gases are investigated. This model is already present in literature; it deals with an arbitrary number of moments and it was proposed in the context of exact macroscopic approaches in Extended Thermodynamics. We find these results: the whole system for the determination of the wave speeds can be divided into independent subsystems which are expressed by linear combinations, through scalar coefficients, of tensors all of the same order; some wave speeds, but not all of them, are expressed by square roots of rational numbers; finally, we prove that these wave speeds for the macroscopic model are the same of those furnished by the kinetic model.

  15. Fully Coupled Electromechanical Elastodynamic Model for Guided Wave Propagation Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Borkowski, Luke; Chattopadhyay, Aditi

    2013-01-01

    Physics-based computational models play a key role in the study of wave propagation for structural health monitoring (SHM) and the development of improved damage detection methodologies. Due to the complex nature of guided waves, accurate and efficient computation tools are necessary to investigate the mechanisms responsible for dispersion, coupling, and interaction with damage. In this paper, a fully coupled electromechanical elastodynamic model for wave propagation in a heterogeneous, anisotropic material system is developed. The final framework provides the full three dimensional displacement and electrical potential fields for arbitrary plate and transducer geometries and excitation waveform and frequency. The model is validated theoretically and proven computationally efficient. Studies are performed with surface bonded piezoelectric sensors to gain insight into the physics of experimental techniques used for SHM. Collocated actuation of the fundamental Lamb wave modes is modeled over a range of frequenc...

  16. A minimalist pilot-wave model for quantum electrodynamics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    W Struyve; H Westman

    2007-01-01

    We present a way to construct a pilot-wave model for quantum electrodynamics. The idea is to introduce beables corresponding only to the bosonic and not to the fermionic degrees of freedom of the quantum state...

  17. Variational modelling of extreme waves through oblique interaction of solitary waves: application to Mach reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidel, Floriane; Bokhove, Onno; Kalogirou, Anna

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we model extreme waves that occur due to Mach reflection through the intersection of two obliquely incident solitary waves. For a given range of incident angles and amplitudes, the Mach stem wave grows linearly in length and amplitude, reaching up to 4 times the amplitude of the incident waves. A variational approach is used to derive the bidirectional Benney-Luke equations, an asymptotic equivalent of the three-dimensional potential-flow equations modelling water waves. This nonlinear and weakly dispersive model has the advantage of allowing wave propagation in two horizontal directions, which is not the case with the unidirectional Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) equation used in most previous studies. A variational Galerkin finite-element method is applied to solve the system numerically in Firedrake with a second-order Störmer-Verlet temporal integration scheme, in order to obtain stable simulations that conserve the overall mass and energy of the system. Using this approach, we are able to get close to the 4-fold amplitude amplification predicted by Miles.

  18. An improved wave-vector frequency-domain method for nonlinear wave modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Yun; Tao, Molei; Cannata, Jonathan

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, a recently developed wave-vector frequency-domain method for nonlinear wave modeling is improved and verified by numerical simulations and underwater experiments. Higher order numeric schemes are proposed that significantly increase the modeling accuracy, thereby allowing for a larger step size and shorter computation time. The improved algorithms replace the left-point Riemann sum in the original algorithm by the trapezoidal or Simpson's integration. Plane waves and a phased array were first studied to numerically validate the model. It is shown that the left-point Riemann sum, trapezoidal, and Simpson's integration have first-, second-, and third-order global accuracy, respectively. A highly focused therapeutic transducer was then used for experimental verifications. Short high-intensity pulses were generated. 2-D scans were conducted at a prefocal plane, which were later used as the input to the numerical model to predict the acoustic field at other planes. Good agreement is observed between simulations and experiments.

  19. Ocean wave prediction using numerical and neural network models

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mandal, S.; Prabaharan, N.

    for first-generation and second- generation models. The updated source function components (second-generation) are established based on extensive analysis and field measurements of wave growth under uni- form fetch-limited wind condition [27... are computed over period where observed data is also available [31]. Three hourly values of Significant wave height (Hs), zero-crossing period, Maximum energy and peak period computed by hindcast model and those based on measured data seems to be quite...

  20. An Arctic Ice/Ocean Coupled Model with Wave Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    ocean waves and sea ice interact, for use in operational models of the Arctic Basin and the adjacent seas; – improve the forecasting capacities of...spectra and modify their directional spread. Being the primary focus of the current project, we are developing innovative methods to model these...during WIFAR (Waves-in-Ice Forecasting for Arctic Operators), a partnership between the Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center (NERSC) in

  1. River dykes investigation using seismic surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitri, Adnand; Jousset, Philippe; Samyn, Kévin; Naylor, Adam

    2010-05-01

    Natural underground caves such as karsts are quite common in the region "Centre", France. These subsurface perturbations can be found underneath the protection dykes around "the Loire" River and the damage caused can create routes for floods. Geophysical methods such as Multi-channel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) can be used for locating voids or karsts systems, but its efficiency on surface with strong topography such as dykes is not certain. Three dimensional Rayleigh wave modelling was used to understand the role of topography in the propagation of surface waves and with the aim of determining the best way for MASW investigations of surfaces with strong topography such as river dykes. Numerical modelling shows that surface waves propagation is not strongly affected by topography for an array parallel to the dyke. For homogeneous models with topography, a diminution of surface waves amplitude is observed while higher propagation modes are amplified in the dispersion curves in the case of heterogeneous models with topography. For an array perpendicular to the dyke, numerical modeling shows that Rayleigh waves' velocity is lower. MASW investigations can then be applied if lateral variations of the topography are not too strong along the seismic line. Diffraction hyperbolas created by a full of water cavity were identified in numerical modelling with topography. According to these elements, a MASW survey has been performed on the dykes of "the Loire" river close to a collapsed cavity and potential karstic systems were discovered.

  2. Investigation of Wave Energy Converter Effects on Near-shore Wave Fields: Model Generation Validation and Evaluation - Kaneohe Bay HI.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Chang, Grace; Jones, Craig

    2014-09-01

    The numerical model, SWAN (Simulating WAves Nearshore) , was used to simulate wave conditions in Kaneohe Bay, HI in order to determine the effects of wave energy converter ( WEC ) devices on the propagation of waves into shore. A nested SWAN model was validated then used to evaluate a range of initial wave conditions: significant wave heights (H s ) , peak periods (T p ) , and mean wave directions ( MWD) . Differences between wave height s in the presence and absence of WEC device s were assessed at locations in shore of the WEC array. The maximum decrease in wave height due to the WEC s was predicted to be approximately 6% at 5 m and 10 m water depths. Th is occurred for model initiation parameters of H s = 3 m (for 5 m water depth) or 4 m (10 m water depth) , T p = 10 s, and MWD = 330deg . Subsequently, bottom orbital velocities were found to decrease by about 6%.

  3. A Stochastic Nonlinear Water Wave Model for Efficient Uncertainty Quantification

    CERN Document Server

    Bigoni, Daniele; Eskilsson, Claes

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge in next-generation industrial applications is to improve numerical analysis by quantifying uncertainties in predictions. In this work we present a stochastic formulation of a fully nonlinear and dispersive potential flow water wave model for the probabilistic description of the evolution waves. This model is discretized using the Stochastic Collocation Method (SCM), which provides an approximate surrogate of the model. This can be used to accurately and efficiently estimate the probability distribution of the unknown time dependent stochastic solution after the forward propagation of uncertainties. We revisit experimental benchmarks often used for validation of deterministic water wave models. We do this using a fully nonlinear and dispersive model and show how uncertainty in the model input can influence the model output. Based on numerical experiments and assumed uncertainties in boundary data, our analysis reveals that some of the known discrepancies from deterministic simulation in compa...

  4. A COMPARATIVE STUDY UNDER PROGRESSIVELY FIRST FAILURE CENSORED RAYLEIGH DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyan Prakash

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study presented in this article for two different asymmetric loss functions is based on simulation. Two-parameter Rayleigh model is considered here as the underline model for evaluating the properties of Bayes estimators under progressive first failure censored data. Known and unknown both cases of location parameter are considered here for Bayes estimation of scale parameter.

  5. Rayleigh scattering in few-mode optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Wu, Hao; Hu, Xiaolong; Zhao, Ningbo; Mo, Qi; Li, Guifang

    2016-01-01

    The extremely low loss of silica fibers has enabled the telecommunication revolution, but single-mode fiber-optic communication systems have been driven to their capacity limits. As a means to overcome this capacity crunch, space-division multiplexing (SDM) using few-mode fibers (FMF) has been proposed and demonstrated. In single-mode optical fibers, Rayleigh scattering serves as the dominant mechanism for optical loss. However, to date, the role of Rayleigh scattering in FMFs remains elusive. Here we establish and experimentally validate a general model for Rayleigh scattering in FMFs. Rayleigh backscattering not only sets the intrinsic loss limit for FMFs but also provides the theoretical foundation for few-mode optical time-domain reflectometry, which can be used to probe perturbation-induced mode-coupling dynamics in FMFs. We also show that forward inter-modal Rayleigh scattering ultimately sets a fundamental limit on inter-modal-crosstalk for FMFs. Therefore, this work not only has implications specifically for SDM systems but also broadly for few-mode fiber optics and its applications in amplifiers, lasers, and sensors in which inter-modal crosstalk imposes a fundamental performance limitation. PMID:27775003

  6. Rayleigh scattering in few-mode optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Wu, Hao; Hu, Xiaolong; Zhao, Ningbo; Mo, Qi; Li, Guifang

    2016-10-01

    The extremely low loss of silica fibers has enabled the telecommunication revolution, but single-mode fiber-optic communication systems have been driven to their capacity limits. As a means to overcome this capacity crunch, space-division multiplexing (SDM) using few-mode fibers (FMF) has been proposed and demonstrated. In single-mode optical fibers, Rayleigh scattering serves as the dominant mechanism for optical loss. However, to date, the role of Rayleigh scattering in FMFs remains elusive. Here we establish and experimentally validate a general model for Rayleigh scattering in FMFs. Rayleigh backscattering not only sets the intrinsic loss limit for FMFs but also provides the theoretical foundation for few-mode optical time-domain reflectometry, which can be used to probe perturbation-induced mode-coupling dynamics in FMFs. We also show that forward inter-modal Rayleigh scattering ultimately sets a fundamental limit on inter-modal-crosstalk for FMFs. Therefore, this work not only has implications specifically for SDM systems but also broadly for few-mode fiber optics and its applications in amplifiers, lasers, and sensors in which inter-modal crosstalk imposes a fundamental performance limitation.

  7. Boussinesq modeling of wave-induced hydrodynamics in coastal wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Agnimitro; Brandt, Steven R.; Chen, Qin; Shi, Fengyan

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, an improved formulation of the vegetation drag force, applicable for the fully nonlinear Boussinesq equations and based on the use of the depth-varying, higher-order expansion of the horizontal velocity, in the quadratic vegetation drag law has been presented. The model uses the same numerical schemes as FUNWAVE TVD but is based on the CACTUS framework. The model is validated for wave height and setup, against laboratory experiments with and without vegetation cover. The wave attenuation results using the improved formulation were compared with those using the first-order reference velocity as well as with analytical solutions using linear wave theory. The analytical solution using the depth-varying velocity, predicted by the linear wave theory, was shown to match the model results with the fully expanded velocity approach very well for all wave cases, except under near-emergent and emergent conditions (when the ratio of stem height to water depth is greater than 0.75) and when the Ursell (Ur) number is less than 5. Simulations during peak storm waves, during Hurricane Isaac, showed that vegetation is very effective in reducing setup on platforms and in reducing the wave energy within the first few hundred meters.

  8. Holographic p-wave superconductor models with Weyl corrections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lu [Institute of Physics and Department of Physics, Hunan Normal University, Changsha, Hunan 410081 (China); Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Quantum Structures and Quantum Control of Ministry of Education, Hunan Normal University, Changsha, Hunan 410081 (China); Pan, Qiyuan, E-mail: panqiyuan@126.com [Institute of Physics and Department of Physics, Hunan Normal University, Changsha, Hunan 410081 (China); Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Quantum Structures and Quantum Control of Ministry of Education, Hunan Normal University, Changsha, Hunan 410081 (China); Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, CP 66318, São Paulo 05315-970 (Brazil); Jing, Jiliang, E-mail: jljing@hunnu.edu.cn [Institute of Physics and Department of Physics, Hunan Normal University, Changsha, Hunan 410081 (China); Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Quantum Structures and Quantum Control of Ministry of Education, Hunan Normal University, Changsha, Hunan 410081 (China)

    2015-04-09

    We study the effect of the Weyl corrections on the holographic p-wave dual models in the backgrounds of AdS soliton and AdS black hole via a Maxwell complex vector field model by using the numerical and analytical methods. We find that, in the soliton background, the Weyl corrections do not influence the properties of the holographic p-wave insulator/superconductor phase transition, which is different from that of the Yang–Mills theory. However, in the black hole background, we observe that similarly to the Weyl correction effects in the Yang–Mills theory, the higher Weyl corrections make it easier for the p-wave metal/superconductor phase transition to be triggered, which shows that these two p-wave models with Weyl corrections share some similar features for the condensation of the vector operator.

  9. A Coupled Atmospheric and Wave Modeling System for Storm Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Jianting; Larsén, Xiaoli Guo; Bolanos, R.

    2015-01-01

    to parametrize z0. The results are validated through QuikScat data and point measurements from an open ocean site Ekosk and a coastal, relatively shallow water site Horns Rev. It is found that the modeling system captures in general better strong wind and strong wave characteristics for open ocean condition than...... Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model with the thirdgeneration ocean wave modelSWAN. This study investigates mainly two issues: spatial resolution and the wind-wave interface parameter roughness length(z0). To study the impact of resolution, the nesting function for both WRF and SWAN is used, with spatial...... (1991) z0 expression gives better results of the signicant wave hight under high sea state conditions....

  10. Analysis of kinematic waves arising in diverging traffic flow models

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Wen-Long

    2010-01-01

    Diverging junctions are important network bottlenecks, and a better understanding of diverging traffic dynamics has both theoretical and practical implications. In this paper, we first introduce a continuous multi-commodity kinematic wave model of diverging traffic and then present a new framework for constructing kinematic wave solutions to its Riemann problem with jump initial conditions. In supply-demand space, the solutions on a link consist of an interior state and a stationary state, subject to admissible conditions such that there are no positive and negative kinematic waves on the upstream and downstream links respectively. In addition, the solutions have to satisfy entropy conditions consistent with various discrete diverge models. In the proposed analytical framework, kinematic waves on each link can be uniquely determined by the stationary and initial conditions, and we prove that the stationary states and boundary fluxes exist and are unique for the Riemann problem of diverge models when all or pa...

  11. Holographic p-wave superconductor models with Weyl corrections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Zhang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We study the effect of the Weyl corrections on the holographic p-wave dual models in the backgrounds of AdS soliton and AdS black hole via a Maxwell complex vector field model by using the numerical and analytical methods. We find that, in the soliton background, the Weyl corrections do not influence the properties of the holographic p-wave insulator/superconductor phase transition, which is different from that of the Yang–Mills theory. However, in the black hole background, we observe that similarly to the Weyl correction effects in the Yang–Mills theory, the higher Weyl corrections make it easier for the p-wave metal/superconductor phase transition to be triggered, which shows that these two p-wave models with Weyl corrections share some similar features for the condensation of the vector operator.

  12. Holographic p-wave superconductor models with Weyl corrections

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Lu; Jing, Jiliang

    2015-01-01

    We study the effect of the Weyl corrections on the holographic p-wave dual models in the backgrounds of AdS soliton and AdS black hole via a Maxwell complex vector field model by using the numerical and analytical methods. We find that, in the soliton background, the Weyl corrections do not influence the properties of the holographic p-wave insulator/superconductor phase transition, which is different from that of the Yang-Mills theory. However, in the black hole background, we observe that similar to the Weyl correction effects in the Yang-Mills theory, the higher Weyl corrections make it easier for the p-wave metal/superconductor phase transition to be triggered, which shows that these two p-wave models with Weyl corrections share some similar features for the condensation of the vector operator.

  13. Extended models of nonlinear waves in liquid with gas bubbles

    CERN Document Server

    Kudryashov, Nikolay A

    2016-01-01

    In this work we generalize the models for nonlinear waves in a gas--liquid mixture taking into account an interphase heat transfer, a surface tension and a