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Sample records for modeling prosthetic heart

  1. A novel technique in a sheep model for evaluating prosthetic heart valve performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puc, M M; Marra, S W; Tran, H S; Cilley, J H; Hewitt, C W; DelRossi, A J

    2001-01-01

    There have been many various animal studies to evaluate the structural integrity and antithrombogenicity of prosthetic heart valves. We were interested in developing a novel sheep model to study the thrombogenicity of mechanical heart valves placed into the systemic circulation but without the need for cardiac bypass. Also, we wanted to minimize the risk ofparaplegia from complete thoracic aortic clamping. Six sheep underwent left lateral thoracotomy for placement of a mechanical heart valve in parallel with the descending thoracic aorta. A valved conduit with a dacron tube graft sutured to the back end was fashioned. Employing partial aortic occlusion with a side-biting clamp, the proximal and distal ends were anastomosed in an end-to-side fashion. Once flow was confirmed through the graft, the native aorta was occulded with umbilical tape. The sheep received no postoperative anticoagulation. The median operative time and estimated blood loss (EBL) was 170 min and 250 cc, respectively. Patency of the valved conduits was confirmed during the initial procedure, and there was no incidence of paraplegia postoperatively. Two animals expired shortly after extubation and at necropsy the valved conduits were patent with preserved valve function. The four survivors were sacrificed a median of 37 days postoperatively. Prior to euthanasia, the valved conduits were evaluated in situ with ultrasound. In all cases, the valves had clot formation at the hinges, which prevented active movement of the leaflets. This novel in vivo technique provides an alternative in testing the thrombogenicity of prosthetic heart valves without cardiac bypass or the risk of paraplegia in an animal that is extremely sensitive to complete aortic cross-clamp.

  2. Multidetector CT imaging of mechanical prosthetic heart valves: quantification of artifacts with a pulsatile in-vitro model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Symersky, P.; Budde, R.P.; Westers, P.; Mol, B.A. de; Prokop, M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) can detect the cause of prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction but is hampered by valve-induced artifacts. We quantified artifacts of four PHV using a pulsatile in-vitro model and assessed the relation to leaflet motion and valve design. METHODS

  3. Multidetector CT imaging of mechanical prosthetic heart valves: quantification of artifacts with a pulsatile in-vitro model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Symersky, P.; Budde, R.P.J.; Westers, P.; de Mol, B.A.J.M.; Prokop, M.

    2011-01-01

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) can detect the cause of prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction but is hampered by valve-induced artifacts. We quantified artifacts of four PHV using a pulsatile in-vitro model and assessed the relation to leaflet motion and valve design. A Medtronic Hall ti

  4. Multidetector CT imaging of mechanical prosthetic heart valves : quantification of artifacts with a pulsatile in-vitro model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Symersky, Petr; Budde, Ricardo P. J.; Westers, Paul; de Mol, Bas A. J. M.; Prokop, Mathias

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) can detect the cause of prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction but is hampered by valve-induced artifacts. We quantified artifacts of four PHV using a pulsatile in-vitro model and assessed the relation to leaflet motion and valve design. Methods

  5. Computed Tomography of Prosthetic Heart Valves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habets, J.

    2012-01-01

    Prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction is an infrequent but potentially life-threatening disease with a heterogeneous clinical presentation. Patients with PHV dysfunction clinically can present with symptoms of congestive heart failure (dyspnea, fatigue, edema), fever, angina pectoris, dizziness d

  6. Multimodality Imaging Assessment of Prosthetic Heart Valves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suchá, D.; Symersky, Petr; Tanis, W; Mali, Willem P Th M; Leiner, Tim; van Herwerden, LA; Budde, Ricardo P J

    2015-01-01

    Echocardiography and fluoroscopy are the main techniques for prosthetic heart valve (PHV) evaluation, but because of specific limitations they may not identify the morphological substrate or the extent of PHV pathology. Cardiac computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have emerg

  7. Multidetector CT imaging of mechanical prosthetic heart valves: quantification of artifacts with a pulsatile in-vitro model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Symersky, Petr [Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Oosterpark 9, P.O box 95500, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Academic Medical Center, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Budde, Ricardo P.J. [University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Westers, Paul [Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Department of Biostatistics, Utrecht (Netherlands); Mol, Bas A.J.M. de [Academic Medical Center, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Technology Eindhoven, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Prokop, Mathias [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2011-10-15

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) can detect the cause of prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction but is hampered by valve-induced artifacts. We quantified artifacts of four PHV using a pulsatile in-vitro model and assessed the relation to leaflet motion and valve design. A Medtronic Hall tilting disc (MH), and Carbomedics (CM), St Jude (SJM), and ON-X bileaflet valves underwent CT in an in-vitro model using retrospective gating with a 64 detector CT system in stationary and pulsatile conditions. Artifacts and radiopaque component volumes were quantified with thresholds based on surrounding structures and valvular components. Hypodense artifacts volumes (mm{sup 3}) were 1,029 {+-} 147, 535 {+-} 53, 371 {+-} 16, and 366 {+-} 18 for the SJM, MH, CM and ON-X valves (p < 0.001 except for the latter two valves p = 0.43). Hyperdense artifact volumes were 3,546 {+-} 141, 2,387 {+-} 103, 2,003 {+-} 102, and 3,033 {+-} 31 for the SJM, MH, CM and ON-X valve, respectively (all differences p < 0.001). Leaflet motion affected hypodense (F = 41.5, p < 0.001) and hyperdense artifacts (F = 53.7, p < 0.001). Closed and moving leaflets were associated with the least and the most artifacts respectively (p < 0.001, both artifact types). Both valve design and leaflet motion affect PHV-induced artifacts. Best imaging results may be expected for the CM valve during phases in which the leaflets are closed. (orig.)

  8. 21 CFR 870.3935 - Prosthetic heart valve holder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve holder. 870.3935 Section 870.3935 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... heart valve holder. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve holder is a device used to hold...

  9. In vivo and in vitro release of lysozyme from cross-linked gelatin hydrogels : a model system for the delivery of antibacterial proteins from prosthetic heart valves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, AJ; van Wachem, PB; van Luyn, MJA; Engbers, GHM; Krijgsveld, J; Zaat, SAJ; Feijen, J

    2000-01-01

    Prosthetic valve endocarditis may be reduced by the local delivery of antibacterial proteins from the Dacron sewing ring of a prosthetic heart valve. Dacron discs were treated with a carbon dioxide gas plasma to improve the hydrophilicity and thereby enabling homogeneous impregnation with gelatin ty

  10. Antithrombotic Therapy in Patients with Prosthetic Heart Valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed HA

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with mechanical valve prostheses require a lifelong anticoagulant treatment. The combined use of Warfarin and low-dose aspirin appears to reduce the risk of valve thrombosis and systemic embolism at a low risk of bleeding. The management of women with prosthetic heart valves during pregnancy poses a particular challenge, as there are no available controlled clinical trials to provide guidelines for effective antithrombotic therapy. Oral anticoagulants, such as Warfarin, cause foetal embryopathy; unfractionated heparin and low-molecular-weight heparin have been reported to be ineffective in preventing thromboembolic complications.This article discusses the available data and the most recent guidelines in the antithrombotic management of patients with prosthetic valves, and antithrombotic therapy in various clinical situations such as pregnant women with prosthetic heart valves, and patients with prosthetic heart valves undergoing noncardiac surgery.

  11. Role of CT in patients with prosthetic heart valves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suchá, D.

    2016-01-01

    Valvular heart disease accounts for a substantial part of the cardiovascular disease worldwide with an estimated prevalence of 2.5% in the Western population aged <65 years and over 13% in the population aged >75 years. Surgical prosthetic heart valve (PHV) replacement is the indicated therapy for

  12. Diagnostic evaluation of left-sided prosthetic heart valve dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habets, Jesse; Budde, Ricardo P.; Symersky, Petr; van den Brink, Renee B.; de Mol, Bas A.; Mali, Willem P.; van Herwerden, Lex A.; Chamuleau, Steven A.

    2011-01-01

    Prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction is a rare, but potentially life-threatening, complication. In clinical practice, PHV dysfunction poses a diagnostic dilemma. Echocardiography and fluoroscopy are the imaging techniques of choice and are routinely used in daily practice. However, these techniq

  13. Diagnostic evaluation of left-sided prosthetic heart valve dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habets, Jesse; Budde, Ricardo P.; Symersky, Petr; van den Brink, Renee B.; de Mol, Bas A.; Mali, Willem P.; van Herwerden, Lex A.; Chamuleau, Steven A.

    2011-01-01

    Prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction is a rare, but potentially life-threatening, complication. In clinical practice, PHV dysfunction poses a diagnostic dilemma. Echocardiography and fluoroscopy are the imaging techniques of choice and are routinely used in daily practice. However, these techniq

  14. Non-invasive imaging of prosthetic heart valves with a focus on endocarditis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.P.J. Budde (Ricardo)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractProsthetic heart valve (PHV) implantation can be a life-saving intervention. However, it does provide the patient with a lifelong chronic condition. Prosthetic heart valves can become dysfunctional due to various causes. The most dreaded complication is PHV endocarditis. Patients with a

  15. Pregnancy with prosthetic heart valves - 30 years' nationwide experience in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Martin; Hjortdal, Vibeke; Vejlstrup, Niels;

    2011-01-01

    Pregnancy in women with prosthetic heart valves remains a risk factor for both mother and fetus, but unselected and unbiased outcome and complication data remain scarce. We analyzed nationwide outcome data from 1977 to 2007 for all pregnancies in women with prosthetic valves.......Pregnancy in women with prosthetic heart valves remains a risk factor for both mother and fetus, but unselected and unbiased outcome and complication data remain scarce. We analyzed nationwide outcome data from 1977 to 2007 for all pregnancies in women with prosthetic valves....

  16. Experimental Validation of a Cardiac Simulator for in vitro Evaluation of Prosthetic Heart Valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovandir Bazan

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: This work describes the experimental validation of a cardiac simulator for three heart rates (60, 80 and 100 beats per minute, under physiological conditions, as a suitable environment for prosthetic heart valves testing in the mitral or aortic position. Methods: In the experiment, an aortic bileaflet mechanical valve and a mitral bioprosthesis were employed in the left ventricular model. A test fluid of 47.6% by volume of glycerin solution in water at 36.5ºC was used as blood analogue fluid. A supervisory control and data acquisition system implemented previously in LabVIEW was applied to induce the ventricular operation and to acquire the ventricular signals. The parameters of the left ventricular model operation were based on in vivo and in vitro data. The waves of ventricular and systemic pressures, aortic flow, stroke volume, among others, were acquired while manual adjustments in the arterial impedance model were also established. Results: The acquired waves showed good results concerning some in vivo data and requirements from the ISO 5840 standard. Conclusion: The experimental validation was performed, allowing, in future studies, characterizing the hydrodynamic performance of prosthetic heart valves.

  17. Identification of critical zones in the flow through prosthetic heart valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, A.; Ledesma, R.; Zenit, R.; Pulos, G.

    2008-11-01

    The hemodynamic properties of prosthetic heart valves can cause blood damage and platelet activation due to the non- physiological flow patterns. Blood recirculation and elevated shear stresses are believed to be responsible for these complications. The objective of this study is to identify and quantify the conditions for which recirculation and high stress zones appear. We have performed a comparative study between a mechanical monoleaflet and biological valve. In order to generate the flow conditions to test the prosthesis, we have built a hydraulic circuit which reproduces the human systemic circulation, on the basis of the Windkessel model. This model is based on an electrical analogy which consists of an arterial resistance and compliance. Using PIV 3D- Stereo measurements, taken downstream from the prosthetic heart valves, we have reconstructed the full phase-averaged tridimensional velocity field. Preliminary results show that critical zones are more prominent in mechanical prosthesis, indicating that valves made with bio-materials are less likely to produce blood trauma. This is in accordance with what is generally found in the literature.

  18. Prosthetic valves in adult patients with congenital heart disease : Rationale and design of the Dutch PROSTAVA study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freling, H. G.; van Slooten, Y. J.; van Melle, J. P.; Mulder, B. J. M.; van Dijk, A. P. J.; Hillege, H. L.; Post, M. C.; Sieswerda, G. Tj; Jongbloed, M. R. M.; Willems, T. P.; Pieper, P. G.

    2012-01-01

    Data on long-term complications in adult patients with congenital heart disease (ACHD) and a prosthetic valve are scarce. Moreover, the influence of prosthetic valves on quality of life (QoL) and functional outcome in ACHD patients with prosthetic valves has not been studied. The primary objective o

  19. Prosthetic valves in adult patients with congenital heart disease: Rationale and design of the Dutch PROSTAVA study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freling, H.G.; Slooten, Y.J. van; Melle, J.P. van; Mulder, B.J.; Dijk, A.P. van; Hillege, H.L.; Post, M.C.; Sieswerda, G.T.; Jongbloed, M.R.; Willems, T.P.; Pieper, P.G.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data on long-term complications in adult patients with congenital heart disease (ACHD) and a prosthetic valve are scarce. Moreover, the influence of prosthetic valves on quality of life (QoL) and functional outcome in ACHD patients with prosthetic valves has not been studied. OBJECTIVES:

  20. Novel imaging strategies for the Detection of Prosthetic Heart Valve Obstruction and Endocarditis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanis, W.

    2014-01-01

    Valvular heart disease is accompanied by a high mortality/morbidity and often requires prosthetic heart valve (PHV) replacement in order to improve quality of life and survival. The major drawback of both mechanical and biological PHV implantations is development of dysfunction, which is a life thre

  1. Coronary artery assessment by multidetector computed tomography in patients with prosthetic heart valves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habets, Jesse; van den Brink, Renee B. A.; Uijlings, Ruben; Spijkerboer, Anje M.; Mali, Willem P. Th. M.; Chamuleau, Steven A. J.; Budde, Ricardo P. J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Patients with prosthetic heart valves may require assessment for coronary artery disease. We assessed whether valve artefacts hamper coronary artery assessment by multidetector CT. Methods ECG-gated or -triggered CT angiograms were selected from our PACS archive based on the presence of p

  2. Laser Doppler anemometry measurements of steady flow through two bi-leaflet prosthetic heart valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovandir Bazan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In vitro hydrodynamic characterization of prosthetic heart valves provides important information regarding their operation, especially if performed by noninvasive techniques of anemometry. Once velocity profiles for each valve are provided, it is possible to compare them in terms of hydrodynamic performance. In this first experimental study using laser doppler anemometry with mechanical valves, the simulations were performed at a steady flow workbench. OBJECTIVE: To compare unidimensional velocity profiles at the central plane of two bi-leaflet aortic prosthesis from St. Jude (AGN 21 - 751 and 21 AJ - 501 models exposed to a steady flow regime, on four distinct sections, three downstream and one upstream. METHODS: To provide similar conditions for the flow through each prosthesis by a steady flow workbench (water, flow rate of 17L/min. and, for the same sections and sweeps, to obtain the velocity profiles of each heart valve by unidimensional measurements. RESULTS: It was found that higher velocities correspond to the prosthesis with smaller inner diameter and instabilities of flow are larger as the section of interest is closer to the valve. Regions of recirculation, stagnation of flow, low pressure, and flow peak velocities were also found. CONCLUSIONS: Considering the hydrodynamic aspect and for every section measured, it could be concluded that the prosthesis model AGN 21 - 751 (RegentTM is superior to the 21 AJ - 501 model (Master Series. Based on the results, future studies can choose to focus on specific regions of the these valves.

  3. Anesthetic management of a patient with prosthetic heart valve for non-cardiac surgery: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh, Goneppanavar; Verma, Swati; Jasvinder, Kaur

    2008-09-30

    Patients with prosthetic heart valves are a challenge to any anesthesiologist due to the risk of infective endocarditis, bleeding and thrombosis. We present anesthetic management of a 58-year-old Indian lady with a prosthetic (mechanical) heart valve who underwent hemireplacement arthroplasty. Patients with prosthetic heart valves, especially those with the mechanical valves are prone for thrombosis and resultant complications if anticoagulation is not maintained properly. However, when they are scheduled for major surgery, they can be best managed by normalising the coagulation profile immediately prior to surgery and restarting the anticoagulation as early as possible.

  4. New electromagnetic methods for the evaluation of prosthetic heart valves (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udpa, Satish

    2002-05-01

    Prosthetic devices are being implanted at record levels as the nation "ages" and advances in prosthetic science are made. Devices that are implanted range from artificial limbs and hips to devices such as heart valves. Periodic evaluation of the state of the devices is of significant interest particularly in the case of prosthetics whose failure can be fatal. An example of such a device is the artificial heart valve. Heart valves are usually replaced when stenosis or incompetence is indicated. This article presents a selection of some new techniques that are being developed for the detection of outlet strut failures in Bjork-Shiley heart valves. Methods that show particular promise include a noninvasive electromagnetic method that relies on the excitation and measurement of the resonant vibration modes of the strut. An alternate approach involves the induction of currents in the outlet strut using a pair of external excitation coils. The field generated by the current induced in the strut perturbs the field generated by the excitation coils. The field perturbations are measured using a catheter-mounted gradiometer. Test results obtained using an experimental rig designed to demonstrate the proof-of-concept are presented.

  5. Prospective ECG triggering reduces prosthetic heart valve-induced artefacts compared with retrospective ECG gating on 256-slice CT.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Symersky, P.; Habets, J.; Westers, P.; Mol, B.A. de; Prokop, M.; Budde, R.P.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) has diagnostic value for the evaluation of prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction but it is hampered by artefacts. We hypothesised that image acquisition using prospective triggering instead of retrospective gating would reduce artefacts related

  6. Prospective ECG triggering reduces prosthetic heart valve-induced artefacts compared with retrospective ECG gating on 256-slice CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Symersky, Petr [Academic Medical Center, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Habets, Jesse; Budde, Ricardo P.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Westers, Paul [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Biostatistics, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Utrecht (Netherlands); Mol, Bas A.J.M. de [Academic Medical Center, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Technology Eindhoven, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Prokop, Mathias [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-06-15

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) has diagnostic value for the evaluation of prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction but it is hampered by artefacts. We hypothesised that image acquisition using prospective triggering instead of retrospective gating would reduce artefacts related to pulsating PHV. In a pulsatile in vitro model, a mono- and bileaflet PHV were imaged using 256 MDCT at 60, 75 and 90 beats per minute (BPM) with either retrospective gating (120 kV, 600 mAs, pitch 0.2, CTDI{sub vol} 39.8 mGy) or prospective triggering (120 kV, 200 mAs, CTDI{sub vol} 13.3 mGy). Two thresholds (>175 and <-45HU), derived from the density of surrounding structures, were used for quantification of hyper- and hypodense artefacts. Image noise and artefacts were compared between protocols. Prospective triggering reduced hyperdense artefacts for both valves at every BPM (P = 0.001 all comparisons). Hypodense artefacts were reduced for the monoleaflet valve at 60 (P = 0.009), 75 (P = 0.016) and 90 BPM (P = 0.001), and for the bileaflet valves at 60 (P = 0.001), 90 (P = 0.001) but not at 75 BPM (P = 0.6). Prospective triggering reduced image noise at 60 (P = 0.001) and 75 (P < 0.03) but not at 90 BPM. Compared with retrospective gating, prospective triggering reduced most artefacts related to pulsating PHV in vitro. circle Computed tomographic images are often degraded by prosthetic heart valve-induced artefacts circle Prospective triggering reduces prosthetic heart valve-induced artefacts in vitro circle Artefact reduction at 90 beats per minute occurs without image noise reduction circle Prospective triggering may improve CT image quality of moving hyperdense structures. (orig.)

  7. Software tool for the prosthetic foot modeling and stiffness optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strbac, Matija; Popović, Dejan B

    2012-01-01

    We present the procedure for the optimization of the stiffness of the prosthetic foot. The procedure allows the selection of the elements of the foot and the materials used for the design. The procedure is based on the optimization where the cost function is the minimization of the difference between the knee joint torques of healthy walking and the walking with the transfemural prosthesis. We present a simulation environment that allows the user to interactively vary the foot geometry and track the changes in the knee torque that arise from these adjustments. The software allows the estimation of the optimal prosthetic foot elasticity and geometry. We show that altering model attributes such as the length of the elastic foot segment or its elasticity leads to significant changes in the estimated knee torque required for a given trajectory.

  8. Software Tool for the Prosthetic Foot Modeling and Stiffness Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matija Štrbac

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the procedure for the optimization of the stiffness of the prosthetic foot. The procedure allows the selection of the elements of the foot and the materials used for the design. The procedure is based on the optimization where the cost function is the minimization of the difference between the knee joint torques of healthy walking and the walking with the transfemural prosthesis. We present a simulation environment that allows the user to interactively vary the foot geometry and track the changes in the knee torque that arise from these adjustments. The software allows the estimation of the optimal prosthetic foot elasticity and geometry. We show that altering model attributes such as the length of the elastic foot segment or its elasticity leads to significant changes in the estimated knee torque required for a given trajectory.

  9. Univariate Risk Factors for Prolonged Mechanical Ventilation in Patients Undergoing Prosthetic Heart Valves Replacement Surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Data from 736 patients undergoing prosthetic heart valve replacement surgery and concomitant surgery (combined surgery) from January 1998 to January 2004 at Union Hospital were retrospectively reviewed. Univariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify risk factors for prolonged mechanical ventilation. The results showed that prolonged cardiopulmonary bypass duration, prolonged aortic cross clamp time and low ejection fraction less than 50 percent (50 %)were found to be independent predictors for prolonged mechanical ventilation. Meanwhile age,weight, and preoperative hospital stay (days) were not found to be associated with prolonged mechanical ventilation. It was concluded that, for age and weight, this might be due to the lower number of old age patients (70 years and above) included in our study and genetic body structure of majority Chinese population that favor them to be in normal weight, respectively.

  10. NT-proBNP and exercise capacity in adult patients with congenital heart disease and a prosthetic valve: a multicentre PROSTAVA study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonbeek, R.C.; Pieper, P.G.; Slooten, Y.J. van; Freling, H.G.; Sieswerda, G.T.; Dijk, A.P.J. van; Jongbloed, M.R.; Post, M.C.; Bouma, B.J.; Berger, R.M.; Ebels, T.; Melle, J.P. van

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: N-terminal Btype natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) is an important biomarker for the detection of heart failure. Adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD) and a prosthetic heart valve are at risk for heart failure. This study aimed to determine the value of NT-proBNP in ACHD patients wit

  11. NT-proBNP and exercise capacity in adult patients with congenital heart disease and a prosthetic valve : a multicentre PROSTAVA study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonbeek, R C; Pieper, P G; van Slooten, Y J; Freling, H G; Sieswerda, G T; van Dijk, A. P. J.; Jongbloed, M R M; Post, M. C.; Bouma, B. J.; Berger, R M F; Ebels, T; van Melle, J P

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: N-terminal B‑type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) is an important biomarker for the detection of heart failure. Adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD) and a prosthetic heart valve are at risk for heart failure. This study aimed to determine the value of NT-proBNP in ACHD patients wi

  12. A 3D velocimetry study of the flow through prosthetic heart valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma, R.; Zenit, R.; Pulos, G.; Sanchez, E.; Juarez, A.

    2006-11-01

    Blood damage commonly appears in medical valve prothesis. It is a mayor concern for the designers and surgeons. It is well known that this damage and other complications result from the modified fluid dynamics through the replacement valve. To evaluate the performance of prosthetic heart valves, it is necessary to study the flow through them. To conduct this study , we have built a flow channel that emulates cardiac conditions and allows optical access such that a 3D-PIV velocimetry system could be used. The experiments are aimed to reconstruct the downstream structure of the flow through a mechanical and a bio-material tricuspid heart valve prothesis. Preliminary results show that the observed coherent structures can be related with haemolysis and trombosis, illnesses commonly found in valve prothesis recipients. The mean flow, the levels of strain rate and the turbulence intensity generated by the valves can also be directly related to blood damage. In general, bio-material made valves tend to reduce these complications.

  13. Reynolds shear stress for textile prosthetic heart valves in relation to fabric design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bark, David L; Yousefi, Atieh; Forleo, Marcio; Vaesken, Antoine; Heim, Frederic; Dasi, Lakshmi P

    2016-07-01

    The most widely implanted prosthetic heart valves are either mechanical or bioprosthetic. While the former suffers from thrombotic risks, the latter suffers from a lack of durability. Textile valves, alternatively, can be designed with durability and to exhibit hemodynamics similar to the native valve, lowering the risk for thrombosis. Deviations from native valve hemodynamics can result in an increased Reynolds Shear Stress (RSS), which has the potential to instigate hemolysis or shear-induced thrombosis. This study is aimed at characterizing flow in multiple textile valve designs with an aim of developing a low profile valve. Valves were created using a shaping process based on heating a textile membrane and placed within a left heart simulator. Turbulence and bulk hemodynamics were assessed through particle imaging velocimetry, along with flow and pressure measurements. Overall, RSS was reduced for low profile valves relative to high profile valves, but was otherwise similar among low profile valves involving different fabric designs. However, leakage was found in 3 of the 4 low profile valve designs driving the fabric design for low profile valves. Through textile design, low profile valves can be created with favorable hemodynamics.

  14. Electro-elastic modeling of a dielectric elastomer diaphragm for a prosthetic blood pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulbourne, Nakhiah C.; Frecker, Mary I.; Mockensturm, Eric

    2004-07-01

    A dielectric elastomer diaphragm is to be designed for potential use in a prosthetic blood pump. Application of an electric field deforms the membrane such that it moves from an initially flat configuration to an inflated state. This motion creates positive displacement of blood from the cardiac chambers thus mimicking the pump-like behavior of the natural heart. A comprehensive large deformation model accounting for the combined dielectric and elastic effect has been formulated. This paper presents recent developments in the model to further incorporate the entire nonlinear range of material elastic behavior and to more accurately represent the applied electric field by keeping the voltage constant as the membrane thickness decreases. The updated model is used to calculate the effects of varying system parameters such as pressure, voltage, prestretch, material constants, and membrane geometry. Analytical results are obtained for biaxially stretched 3M VHB 4905 polyacrylate films.

  15. Management of patients with prosthetic heart valves during non-cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, Bernard D

    2004-01-01

    Non-cardiac surgery in patients with prosthetic heart valves poses the particular hazards of infective endocarditis, increased bleeding risk and the possibility of acute/subacute valve thrombosis or systemic thromboembolism associated with interrupted anticoagulation. Management is complicated by the absence of randomised trials examining peri-operative anticoagulation management. Thromboembolic risk increases substantially when oral anticoagulation is discontinued and valve thrombosis may be inapparent for 1-2 months. This delayed diagnosis makes it difficult to identify the inciting event, either clinically or in experimental trials. Furthermore, the absence of early post-operative events may falsely suggest that peri-operative anticoagulation was safe and adequate. The approach to management therefore remains controversial. Seamless oral anticoagulation is preferred whenever possible and this is safe for a range of minor procedures, including cardiac catheterisation, dental and ophthalmic surgery. Major surgical procedures require withdrawal of oral anticoagulation before surgery to lower the international normalised ratio (INR) to anticoagulation with unfractionated heparin which should be started when the INR is patients and anticoagulation is then resumed post-operatively, though therapeutic levels are not achieved for several days. The determination of which patients require prolonged overlap of heparin and oral anticoagulants is difficult. Clinical judgement is required but these regimes are strongly recommended for those at highest risk of thromboembolism. With strict adherence to these guidelines, the incidence of major complications is low.

  16. Dental procedures, antibiotic prophylaxis, and endocarditis among people with prosthetic heart valves: nationwide population based cohort and a case crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubiana, Sarah; Blotière, Pierre-Olivier; Hoen, Bruno; Lesclous, Philippe; Millot, Sarah; Rudant, Jérémie; Weill, Alain; Coste, Joel; Alla, François; Duval, Xavier

    2017-09-07

    Objective To assess the relation between invasive dental procedures and infective endocarditis associated with oral streptococci among people with prosthetic heart valves.Design Nationwide population based cohort and a case crossover study.Setting French national health insurance administrative data linked with the national hospital discharge database.Participants All adults aged more than 18 years, living in France, with medical procedure codes for positioning or replacement of prosthetic heart valves between July 2008 and July 2014.Main outcome measures Oral streptococcal infective endocarditis was identified using primary discharge diagnosis codes. In the cohort study, Poisson regression models were performed to estimate the rate of oral streptococcal infective endocarditis during the three month period after invasive dental procedures compared with non-exposure periods. In the case crossover study, conditional logistic regression models calculated the odds ratio and 95% confidence intervals comparing exposure to invasive dental procedures during the three month period preceding oral streptococcal infective endocarditis (case period) with three earlier control periods.Results The cohort included 138 876 adults with prosthetic heart valves (285 034 person years); 69 303 (49.9%) underwent at least one dental procedure. Among the 396 615 dental procedures performed, 103 463 (26.0%) were invasive and therefore presented an indication for antibiotic prophylaxis, which was performed in 52 280 (50.1%). With a median follow-up of 1.7 years, 267 people developed infective endocarditis associated with oral streptococci (incidence rate 93.7 per 100 000 person years, 95% confidence interval 82.4 to 104.9). Compared with non-exposure periods, no statistically significant increased rate of oral streptococcal infective endocarditis was observed during the three months after an invasive dental procedure (relative rate 1.25, 95% confidence interval 0.82 to 1

  17. The additional value of three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography in complex aortic prosthetic heart valve endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanis, Wilco; Teske, Arco J; van Herwerden, Lex A; Chamuleau, Steven; Meijboom, Folkert; Budde, Ricardo P J; Cramer, Maarten-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Two-dimensional transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography (2DTTE and 2DTEE) may fail to detect signs of prosthetic heart valve (PHV) endocarditis due to acoustic shadowing. Three-dimensional (3D) TEE may have additional value; however, data are scarce. This study was performed to investigate the additional value of 3DTEE for the detection of aortic PHV endocarditis and the extent of the disease process. Retrospective analysis of complex aortic PHV endocarditis cases that underwent 2DTTE, 2DTEE, and 3DTEE before surgery. Echocardiograms were individually assessed by 2 cardiologists blinded for the outcome. Surgical and pathological inspection served as the reference standard for vegetations and peri-annular extensions (abscesses/mycotic aneurysms). To determine if the proximal coronary arteries were involved in the inflammatory process as well, computed tomography angiography findings were added to reference standard. Fifteen aortic PHV endocarditis cases were identified. According to the reference standard, all 15 cases had peri-annular extensions, 13 of which had a close relationship with the proximal right and/or left coronary artery. In 6 of 15 patients, a vegetation was present. Combined 2DTTE/TEE missed 1/6 vegetations and 1/15 peri-annular extensions. After addition of 3DTEE, all vegetations (6/6) and peri-annular extensions (15/15) were detected, without adding false positives. Compared to 2DTEE, in 3/15 cases, 3DTEE resulted in better delineation of the anatomical relationship of the proximal coronary arteries to the peri-annular extensions. As a result, 3DTEE had an additional value in 5/15 cases. In complex aortic, PHV endocarditis 3DTEE may have additional value compared to 2D echocardiography. © 2014, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Multidetector-row computed tomography for prosthetic heart valve dysfunction : is concomitant non-invasive coronary angiography possible before redo-surgery?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanis, Wilco; Suchá, Dominika; Laufer, Ward; Habets, Jesse; van Herwerden, Lex A.; Symersky, Petr; Chamuleau, Steven; Budde, Ricardo P J

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Retrospective ECG-gated multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) is increasingly used for the assessment of prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction, but is also hampered by PHV-related artefacts/cardiac arrhythmias. Furthermore, it is performed without nitroglycerine or heart rate

  19. Collagen tissue treated with chitosan solutions in carbonic acid for improved biological prosthetic heart valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallyamov, Marat O., E-mail: glm@spm.phys.msu.ru [Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie gory 1–2, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilova 28, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Chaschin, Ivan S. [Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilova 28, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Khokhlova, Marina A. [Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie gory 1–2, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Grigorev, Timofey E. [Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilova 28, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Bakuleva, Natalia P.; Lyutova, Irina G.; Kondratenko, Janna E. [Bakulev Scientific Center for Cardiovascular Surgery of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Roublyevskoe Sh. 135, Moscow 121552 (Russian Federation); Badun, Gennadii A.; Chernysheva, Maria G. [Radiochemistry Division, Faculty of Chemistry, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie gory 1–2, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Khokhlov, Alexei R. [Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie gory 1–2, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilova 28, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2014-04-01

    Calcification of bovine pericardium dramatically shortens typical lifetimes of biological prosthetic heart valves and thus precludes their choice for younger patients. The aim of the present work is to demonstrate that the calcification is to be mitigated by means of treatment of bovine pericardium in solutions of chitosan in carbonic acid, i.e. water saturated with carbon dioxide at high pressure. This acidic aqueous fluid unusually combines antimicrobial properties with absolute biocompatibility as far as at normal pressure it decomposes spontaneously and completely into H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2}. Yet, at high pressures it can protonate and dissolve chitosan materials with different degrees of acetylation (in the range of 16–33%, at least) without any further pretreatment. Even exposure of the bovine pericardium in pure carbonic acid solution without chitosan already favours certain reduction in calcification, somewhat improved mechanical properties, complete biocompatibility and evident antimicrobial activity of the treated collagen tissue. The reason may be due to high extraction ability of this peculiar compressed fluidic mixture. Moreover, exposure of the bovine pericardium in solutions of chitosan in carbonic acid introduces even better mechanical properties and highly pronounced antimicrobial activity of the modified collagen tissue against adherence and biofilm formation of relevant Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains. Yet, the most important achievement is the detected dramatic reduction in calcification for such modified collagen tissues in spite of the fact that the amount of the thus introduced chitosan is rather small (typically ca. 1 wt.%), which has been reliably detected using original tritium labelling method. We believe that these improved properties are achieved due to particularly deep and uniform impregnation of the collagen matrix with chitosan from its pressurised solutions in carbonic acid. - Highlights: • Treatment of GA

  20. 人造机械瓣心音的分析研究%Analysis of Heart Sounds with Artificial Mechanical Prosthetic Heart Valves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张地; 姚尖平; 杜明辉; 杨嵩

    2011-01-01

    在一些致命性心脏病的诊断中,心音听诊是最有效也是应用得最成功的手段之一.鉴于目前机械瓣的使用非常普遍,研究简单有效的机械瓣病变判别方法对于临床诊断来讲具有重要意义.运用希尔波特-黄变换(HHT),针对不同的机械瓣心音进行分析,并设计一种基于Hilbert边界谱特征的提取方法,结合线性判别分析(LDA),对不同的机械瓣心音进行分类.同时,与基于局部最优基特征的分类器分类结果进行比较.分析结果表明,机械瓣心音的各阶Hilbert边界谱具有非常明显不同的分布,基于HHT的分类器识别率达到了97.3%,较基于局部最优基特征分类器的识别率(91.3%)更高.对于人造机械瓣心音而言,HHT是一种有效的分析处理手段.%Auscultation is a widely used efficient technique by cardiologists for detecting some deadly heart diseases. Since the mechanical prosthetic heart valves are widely used today, it is important to develop a simple and efficient method to detect abnormal mechanical valves. In this paper, Hilbert-Huang transform ( HHT) was applied to analyze the heart sounds with different kinds of mechanical prosthetic valves. A Hilbert marginal spectral based feature extraction procedure was also developed. Combined with linear discriminant analysis ( LDA) , the extracted features were used to classify different kinds of heart sounds for mechanical prosthetic heart valves. Experimental results showed that the spectrum of different heart sounds were significantly different. The proposed classifier achieved a recognition rate of 97. 3% , higher than the one based on local discriminant bases (91. 3% ). It is demonstrated that HHT is an efficient analyzing technique for artificial heart valve sounds.

  1. Two-component laser Doppler anemometer for measurement of velocity and turbulent shear stress near prosthetic heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Y R; Yoganathan, A P

    1985-01-01

    The velocity and turbulent shear stress measured in the immediate vicinity of prosthetic heart valves play a vital role in the design and evaluation of these devices. In the past hot wire/film and one-component laser Doppler anemometer (LDA) systems were used extensively to obtain these measurements. Hot wire/film anemometers, however, have some serious disadvantages, including the inability to measure the direction of the flow, the disturbance of the flow field caused by the probe, and the need for frequent calibration. One-component LDA systems do not have these problems, but they cannot measure turbulent shear stresses directly. Since these measurements are essential and are not available in the open literature, a two-component LDA system for measuring velocity and turbulent shear stress fields under pulsatile flow conditions was assembled under an FDA contract. The experimental methods used to create an in vitro data base of velocity and turbulent shear stress fields in the immediate vicinity of prosthetic heart valves of various designs in current clinical use are also discussed.

  2. Modelling heart rate kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakynthinaki, Maria S

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to formulate a simple and at the same time effective mathematical model of heart rate kinetics in response to movement (exercise). Based on an existing model, a system of two coupled differential equations which give the rate of change of heart rate and the rate of change of exercise intensity is used. The modifications introduced to the existing model are justified and discussed in detail, while models of blood lactate accumulation in respect to time and exercise intensity are also presented. The main modification is that the proposed model has now only one parameter which reflects the overall cardiovascular condition of the individual. The time elapsed after the beginning of the exercise, the intensity of the exercise, as well as blood lactate are also taken into account. Application of the model provides information regarding the individual's cardiovascular condition and is able to detect possible changes in it, across the data recording periods. To demonstrate examples of successful numerical fit of the model, constant intensity experimental heart rate data sets of two individuals have been selected and numerical optimization was implemented. In addition, numerical simulations provided predictions for various exercise intensities and various cardiovascular condition levels. The proposed model can serve as a powerful tool for a complete means of heart rate analysis, not only in exercise physiology (for efficiently designing training sessions for healthy subjects) but also in the areas of cardiovascular health and rehabilitation (including application in population groups for which direct heart rate recordings at intense exercises are not possible or not allowed, such as elderly or pregnant women).

  3. Modelling heart rate kinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria S Zakynthinaki

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to formulate a simple and at the same time effective mathematical model of heart rate kinetics in response to movement (exercise. Based on an existing model, a system of two coupled differential equations which give the rate of change of heart rate and the rate of change of exercise intensity is used. The modifications introduced to the existing model are justified and discussed in detail, while models of blood lactate accumulation in respect to time and exercise intensity are also presented. The main modification is that the proposed model has now only one parameter which reflects the overall cardiovascular condition of the individual. The time elapsed after the beginning of the exercise, the intensity of the exercise, as well as blood lactate are also taken into account. Application of the model provides information regarding the individual's cardiovascular condition and is able to detect possible changes in it, across the data recording periods. To demonstrate examples of successful numerical fit of the model, constant intensity experimental heart rate data sets of two individuals have been selected and numerical optimization was implemented. In addition, numerical simulations provided predictions for various exercise intensities and various cardiovascular condition levels. The proposed model can serve as a powerful tool for a complete means of heart rate analysis, not only in exercise physiology (for efficiently designing training sessions for healthy subjects but also in the areas of cardiovascular health and rehabilitation (including application in population groups for which direct heart rate recordings at intense exercises are not possible or not allowed, such as elderly or pregnant women.

  4. Modelling Heart Rate Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakynthinaki, Maria S.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to formulate a simple and at the same time effective mathematical model of heart rate kinetics in response to movement (exercise). Based on an existing model, a system of two coupled differential equations which give the rate of change of heart rate and the rate of change of exercise intensity is used. The modifications introduced to the existing model are justified and discussed in detail, while models of blood lactate accumulation in respect to time and exercise intensity are also presented. The main modification is that the proposed model has now only one parameter which reflects the overall cardiovascular condition of the individual. The time elapsed after the beginning of the exercise, the intensity of the exercise, as well as blood lactate are also taken into account. Application of the model provides information regarding the individual’s cardiovascular condition and is able to detect possible changes in it, across the data recording periods. To demonstrate examples of successful numerical fit of the model, constant intensity experimental heart rate data sets of two individuals have been selected and numerical optimization was implemented. In addition, numerical simulations provided predictions for various exercise intensities and various cardiovascular condition levels. The proposed model can serve as a powerful tool for a complete means of heart rate analysis, not only in exercise physiology (for efficiently designing training sessions for healthy subjects) but also in the areas of cardiovascular health and rehabilitation (including application in population groups for which direct heart rate recordings at intense exercises are not possible or not allowed, such as elderly or pregnant women). PMID:25876164

  5. A novel large animal model for in vivo assessment of polymeric materials for use in prosthetic heart valves%高分子心瓣膜材料的体内评价:一种新型大动物模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张本; 徐同毅; 李鑫; 张锡武; 熊普熹; 龚德军; 徐志云

    2014-01-01

    Objective To develop and implement a novel large animal model without extracorporeal circulation for in vivo assessment of polymeric materials for use in prosthetic heart valves.In this model,the researchers can achieve to implant polymeric materials simultaneously into both of the systemic circulation and pulmonary circulation.Methods Five male sheep,weighing (22.4 ± 1.8) kg,were used.The posterior-lateral incision of left chest was performed.The expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) membrane was made into two monocusp valves,which were implanted into the proximal descending aorta and the left pulmonary artery,respectively.Low-dose aspirin was given daily for 1 month after surgery.After 20 weeks follow-up,the sheep were euthanized.Results All 5 sheep were successfully operated on,and survived 20 weeks after surgery.By autopsy,only one ePTFE membrane in the left pulmonary artery was found totally adherent to the vascular wall,while the others kept mobile.None of the ePTFE membranes were found thrombus,calcification,or degradation by macroscopy and microscopy.The surface of ePTFE membranes in the left pulmonary artery were covered with obvious neointima,leading to thickening and stiffness of the membranes.While,the ePTFE membranes in the descending aorta had no neointima,and kept smooth and flexible.Conclusion This novel large animal model provides an effective,convenient and reliable way for in vivo assessment of polymeric materials used in prosthetic heart valves.Besides,by this model,the researchers can reduce the required number of animals,and assess the polymeric materials by contrast between in the systemic circulation and pulmonary circulation.%目的 建立无需体外循环,同时在体循环和肺循环植入高分子心瓣膜材料的实验模型,对比研究材料在体循环和肺循环中的生物相容性和耐久性.方法 雄性绵羊5只,体质量为(22.4±1.8) kg.左胸后外侧切口,将超微孔膨体聚四氟乙烯(ePTFE)单瓣植入到降

  6. Satisfaction assessment with malleable prosthetic implant of Spectra (AMS) and Genesis (Coloplast) models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casabé, A R; Sarotto, N; Gutierrez, C; Bechara, A J

    2016-11-01

    The malleable prosthetic implant is widely accepted among patients and physicians owing to a lower degree of surgical complexity, its rare mechanic failures and lower cost. We have compared the degree of satisfaction with malleable prosthetic implant in 60 patients, 36 with Spectra (AMS) and 24 with Genesis (Coloplast). For assessment purposes, we implemented the Erectile Dysfunction Inventory of Treatment Satisfaction (EDITS) satisfaction questionnaire adapted for penile prosthetic implants. The mean age and follow-up was 61.7 years (31-82) and 19.9 months (1-61), respectively. Mean EDITS scores did not indicate superiority of one implant over the other, overall satisfaction index being 77.1% and 75.6% for Genesis and Spectra prosthesis, respectively (P=0.4970). Our results revealed that these two models of malleable prostheses present a high level of satisfaction and confirm that the malleable prosthetic implant is an excellent option to treat patients with ED refractory to medical treatment.

  7. Interface mechanics in lower-limb external prosthetics: a review of finite element models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariah, S G; Sanders, J E

    1996-12-01

    The distribution of mechanical stress at the interface between a residual limb and prosthetic socket is an important design consideration in lower-limb prosthetics. Stresses must be distributed so that the amputee is stable and comfortable, while avoiding trauma to the tissues of the residual limb. Numerical estimation of the stresses at the interface through finite element (FE) modeling can potentially provide researchers and prosthetists with a tool to aid in the design of the prosthetic socket. This review addresses FE modeling of interface stresses in lower-limb external prosthetics. The modeling methodologies adopted by analysts are described. Verification of FE estimates of interface stress against experimental data by different analysts is presented and the likely sources of error discussed. While the performance of the models is encouraging, there are definite limitations to all of them, necessitating further improvements. Parametric analysis of the sensitivity of interface stress to model parameters provides a tool to identify model weaknesses and to suggest possible refinements. Parametric analyses by different analysts are also presented and potential refinements discussed. Finally, directions for future work in prosthetic FE modeling are suggested.

  8. sup 99m Tc-labelled anti NCA-95 antibodies in prosthetic heart valve endocarditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bair, H.J.; Becker, W.; Wolf, F. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany)); Volkholz, H.J. (Dept. of Internal Medicine 1, Univ. of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany))

    1991-08-01

    A 54-y old women with earlier replacement of the mitral and aortic valves and clinical signs of localized endocarditis was studied with {sup 99m}Tc-labelled anti NCA-95 antibody. Whereas echocardiographic findings were negative, increased radionuclide uptake was observed left parasternal over the mitral valve as a sign of prosthetic valve endocarditis. This result could be confirmed by a similar study with leukocytes labelled in vitro with {sup 111}In-oxine. (orig.).

  9. Correctness of multi-detector-row computed tomography for diagnosing mechanical prosthetic heart valve disorders using operative findings as a gold standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, I.Chen [Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Taichung (China); Institute of Clinical Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei (China); Lin, Yung-Kai; Chang, Yen; Wang, Chung-Chi; Hsieh, Shih-Rong; Wei, Hao-Ji; Tsai, Hung-Wen [Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Section of Cardiovascular Surgery, Cardiovascular Center, Taichung (China); Fu, Yun-Ching; Jan, Sheng-Ling [Institute of Clinical Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei (China); Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Section of Pediatric Cardiology, Department of Pediatrics, Taichung (China); Wang, Kuo-Yang [Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Section of General Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, Taichung (China); Chung-Shan Medical University, Department of Medicine, Taichung (China); Chen, Min-Chi; Chen, Clayton Chi-Chang [Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Taichung (China); Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Department of Radiological Technology, Taichung (China)

    2009-04-15

    The purpose was to compare the findings of multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) in prosthetic valve disorders using the operative findings as a gold standard. In a 3-year period, we prospectively enrolled 25 patients with 31 prosthetic heart valves. MDCT and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) were done to evaluate pannus formation, prosthetic valve dysfunction, suture loosening (paravalvular leak) and pseudoaneurysm formation. Patients indicated for surgery received an operation within 1 week. The MDCT findings were compared with the operative findings. One patient with a Bjoerk-Shiley valve could not be evaluated by MDCT due to a severe beam-hardening artifact; thus, the exclusion rate for MDCT was 3.2% (1/31). Prosthetic valve disorders were suspected in 12 patients by either MDCT or TTE. Six patients received an operation that included three redo aortic valve replacements, two redo mitral replacements and one Amplatzer ductal occluder occlusion of a mitral paravalvular leak. The concordance of MDCT for diagnosing and localizing prosthetic valve disorders and the surgical findings was 100%. Except for images impaired by severe beam-hardening artifacts, MDCT provides excellent delineation of prosthetic valve disorders. (orig.)

  10. Prosthetic Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Overview CoE for Limb Loss Prevention and Prosthetic Engineering Menu Menu VA Center of Excellence for Limb ... ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Prosthetic Engineering - Overview Our aim is to improve prosthetic prescription ...

  11. Successful Treatment of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in a Child with Trisomy 21 and Complex Congenital Heart Disease with Mechanical Prosthetic Valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saima Alvi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 10-year-old girl with trisomy 21 and complex congenital heart disease presented with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Her chemotherapy required modifications due to poor baseline cardiac status and a mechanical prosthetic heart valve that was dependent on anticoagulation. We describe our management including the use of low-molecular-weight heparin as anticoagulation for a mechanical heart valve, the safe delivery of intrathecal chemotherapy included bridging with unfractionated heparin, and the use of fluoroscopic guidance to minimize the risk of bleeding. Adjustments were made to avoid anthracyclines. The child tolerated therapy well without complications and remains relapse free five years after diagnosis.

  12. Brief report: biomarkers of aortic vascular prosthetic graft infection in a porcine model with Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langerhuus, S. N.; Tønnesen, E. K.; Jensen, K. H.;

    2010-01-01

    Aortic vascular prosthetic graft infection (AVPGI) with Staphylococcus aureus is a feared post-operative complication. This study was conducted to evaluate the clinical signs and potential biomarkers of infection in a porcine AVPGI model. The biomarkers evaluated were: C-reactive protein (CRP...

  13. GIANT PROSTHETIC VALVE THROMBUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth Kumar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical prosthetic valves are predisposed to bleeding, thrombosis & thromboembolic complications. Overall incidence of thromboembolic complications is 1% per year who are on oral anticoagulants, whereas bleeding complications incidence is 0.5% to 6.6% per year. 1, 2 Minimization of Scylla of thromboembolic & Charybdis of bleeding complication needs a balancing act of optimal antithrombotic therapy. We are reporting a case of middle aged male patient with prosthetic mitral valve presenting in heart failure. Patient had discontinued anticoagulants, as he had subdural hematoma in the past. He presented to our institute with a giant prosthetic valve thrombus.

  14. Prosthetic heart valve assessment with multidetector-row CT: imaging characteristics of 91 valves in 83 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habets, Jesse; Mali, Willem P.T.M.; Budde, Ricardo P.J. [UMC Utrecht, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 85500, E01.132, GA, Utrecht (Netherlands); Symersky, Petr [Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Academic Medical Center Amsterdam, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Herwerden, Lex A. van [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Utrecht (Netherlands); Mol, Bas A.J.M. de [Academic Medical Center Amsterdam, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Spijkerboer, Anje M. [Academic Medical Center Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-07-15

    Multidetector CT (MDCT) has shown potential for prosthetic heart valve (PHV) assessment. We assessed the image quality of different PHV types to determine which valves are suitable for MDCT evaluation. All ECG-gated CTs performed in our institutions since 2003 were reviewed for the presence of PHVs. After reconstruction in 3 specific PHV planes, image quality of the supravalvular, perivalvular, subvalvular and valvular regions was scored on a four-point scale (1 = non-diagnostic, 2 = moderate, 3 = good and 4 = excellent) by two independent observers. Eighty-four CT examinations (66 cardiac, 18 limited-dose aortic protocols) of 83 patients with a total of 91 PHVs in the aortic (n = 71), mitral (n = 17), pulmonary (n = 1) and tricuspid (n = 2) position were included. CT was performed on a 16-slice (n = 4), 64-slice (n = 28) or 256-slice (n = 52) MDCT system. Median image quality scores for the supra-, peri- and subvalvular regions and valvular detail were (3.5, 3.3, 3.5 and 3.5, respectively) for bileaflet PHV; (3.0, 3.0, 3.5 and 3.0, respectively) for Medtronic Hall PHV; (1.0, 1.0, 1.0 and 1.0, respectively) for Bjoerk-Shiley and Sorin monoleaflet PHV and (3.5, 3.5, 4.0 and 2.0 respectively) for biological PHV. Currently implanted PHVs have good image quality on MDCT and are suitable for MDCT evaluation. (orig.)

  15. Baseline MDCT findings after prosthetic heart valve implantation provide important complementary information to echocardiography for follow-up purposes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sucha, Dominika; Mali, Willem P.T.M.; Habets, Jesse [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Chamuleau, Steven A.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Symersky, Petr [VU Medical Center, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Meijs, Matthijs F.L. [Thoraxcentrum Twente, Medisch Spectrum Twente, Department of Cardiology, Enschede (Netherlands); Brink, Renee B.A. van den [Academic Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Mol, Bas A.J.M. de [Academic Medical Center, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Herwerden, Lex A. van [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Utrecht (Netherlands); Budde, Ricardo P.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Erasmus University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-04-15

    Recent studies have proposed additional multidetector-row CT (MDCT) for prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction. References to discriminate physiological from pathological conditions early after implantation are lacking. We present baseline MDCT findings of PHVs 6 weeks post implantation. Patients were prospectively enrolled and TTE was performed according to clinical guidelines. 256-MDCT images were systematically assessed for leaflet excursions, image quality, valve-related artefacts, and pathological and additional findings. Forty-six patients were included comprising 33 mechanical and 16 biological PHVs. Overall, MDCT image quality was good and relevant regions remained reliably assessable despite mild-moderate PHV-artefacts. MDCT detected three unexpected valve-related pathology cases: (1) prominent subprosthetic tissue, (2) pseudoaneurysm and (3) extensive pseudoaneurysms and valve dehiscence. The latter patient required valve surgery to be redone. TTE only showed trace periprosthetic regurgitation, and no abnormalities in the other cases. Additional findings were: tilted aortic PHV position (n = 3), pericardial haematoma (n = 3) and pericardial effusion (n = 3). Periaortic induration was present in 33/40 (83 %) aortic valve patients. MDCT allowed evaluation of relevant PHV regions in all valves, revealed baseline postsurgical findings and, despite normal TTE findings, detected three cases of unexpected, clinically relevant pathology. (orig.)

  16. Prosthetic model, but not stiffness or height, affects the metabolic cost of running for athletes with unilateral transtibial amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Owen N; Taboga, Paolo; Grabowski, Alena M

    2017-07-01

    Running-specific prostheses enable athletes with lower limb amputations to run by emulating the spring-like function of biological legs. Current prosthetic stiffness and height recommendations aim to mitigate kinematic asymmetries for athletes with unilateral transtibial amputations. However, it is unclear how different prosthetic configurations influence the biomechanics and metabolic cost of running. Consequently, we investigated how prosthetic model, stiffness, and height affect the biomechanics and metabolic cost of running. Ten athletes with unilateral transtibial amputations each performed 15 running trials at 2.5 or 3.0 m/s while we measured ground reaction forces and metabolic rates. Athletes ran using three different prosthetic models with five different stiffness category and height combinations per model. Use of an Ottobock 1E90 Sprinter prosthesis reduced metabolic cost by 4.3 and 3.4% compared with use of Freedom Innovations Catapult [fixed effect (β) = -0.177; P forces, prolonged ground contact times (β = -4.349; P = 0.012), and decreased leg stiffness (β = 0.071; P forces (β = 0.007; P = 0.003) but was unrelated to stride kinematic symmetry (P ≥ 0.636). Therefore, prosthetic recommendations based on symmetric stride kinematics do not necessarily minimize the metabolic cost of running. Instead, an optimal prosthetic model, which improves overall biomechanics, minimizes the metabolic cost of running for athletes with unilateral transtibial amputations.NEW & NOTEWORTHY The metabolic cost of running for athletes with unilateral transtibial amputations depends on prosthetic model and is associated with lower peak and stance average vertical ground reaction forces, longer contact times, and reduced leg stiffness. Metabolic cost is unrelated to prosthetic stiffness, height, and stride kinematic symmetry. Unlike nonamputees who decrease leg stiffness with increased in-series surface stiffness, biological limb stiffness for athletes with unilateral

  17. Optimal tracking of a sEMG based force model for a prosthetic hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potluri, Chandrasekhar; Anugolu, Madhavi; Yihun, Yimesker; Jensen, Alex; Chiu, Steve; Schoen, Marco P; Naidu, D Subbaram

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a surface electromyographic (sEMG)-based, optimal control strategy for a prosthetic hand. System Identification (SI) is used to obtain the dynamic relation between the sEMG and the corresponding skeletal muscle force. The input sEMG signal is preprocessed using a Half-Gaussian filter and fed to a fusion-based Multiple Input Single Output (MISO) skeletal muscle force model. This MISO system model provides the estimated finger forces to be produced as input to the prosthetic hand. Optimal tracking method has been applied to track the estimated force profile of the Fusion based sEMG-force model. The simulation results show good agreement between reference force profile and the actual force.

  18. Laser induced periodic surface structures on pyrolytic carbon prosthetic heart valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepak, Bogusz D.; Łecka, Katarzyna M.; Płonek, Tomasz; Antończak, Arkadiusz J.

    2016-12-01

    Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) can appear in different forms such as ripples, grooves or cones. Those highly periodic wavy surface features which are frequently smaller than incident light wavelength bring possibility of nanostructuring of many different materials. Furthermore, by changing laser parameters one can obtain wide spectrum of periodicities and geometries. The aim of this research was to determine possibility of nanostructuring pyrolytic carbon (PyC) heart valve leaflets using different irradiation conditions. The study was performed using two laser sources with different pulse duration (15 ps, 450 fs) as well as different wavelengths (1064, 532, 355 nm). Both low and high spatial frequency LIPSS were observed for each set of irradiation parameters. In case femtosecond laser pulses we obtained deep subwavelength ripple period which was even ten times smaller than applied wavelength. Obtained ripple period was ranging from 90 up to 860 nm. Raman spectra revealed the increase of disorder after laser irradiation which was comparable for both pico- and femtosecond laser.

  19. Neural Network Model of Vestibular Nuclei Reaction to Onset of Vestibular Prosthetic Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGiovanna, Jack; Nguyen, T A K; Guinand, Nils; Pérez-Fornos, Angelica; Micera, Silvestro

    2016-01-01

    The vestibular system incorporates multiple sensory pathways to provide crucial information about head and body motion. Damage to the semicircular canals, the peripheral vestibular organs that sense rotational velocities of the head, can severely degrade the ability to perform activities of daily life. Vestibular prosthetics address this problem by using stimulating electrodes that can trigger primary vestibular afferents to modulate their firing rates, thus encoding head movement. These prostheses have been demonstrated chronically in multiple animal models and acutely tested in short-duration trials within the clinic in humans. However, mainly, due to limited opportunities to fully characterize stimulation parameters, there is a lack of understanding of "optimal" stimulation configurations for humans. Here, we model possible adaptive plasticity in the vestibular pathway. Specifically, this model highlights the influence of adaptation of synaptic strengths and offsets in the vestibular nuclei to compensate for the initial activation of the prosthetic. By changing the synaptic strengths, the model is able to replicate the clinical observation that erroneous eye movements are attenuated within 30 minutes without any change to the prosthetic stimulation rate. Although our model was only built to match this time point, we further examined how it affected subsequent pulse rate modulation (PRM) and pulse amplitude modulation (PAM). PAM was more effective than PRM for nearly all stimulation configurations during these acute tests. Two non-intuitive relationships highlighted by our model explain this performance discrepancy. Specifically, the attenuation of synaptic strengths for afferents stimulated during baseline adaptation and the discontinuity between baseline and residual firing rates both disproportionally boost PAM. Comodulation of pulse rate and amplitude has been experimentally shown to induce both excitatory and inhibitory eye movements even at high baseline

  20. Neural network model of vestibular nuclei reaction to onset of vestibular prosthetic stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack eDigiovanna

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The vestibular system incorporates multiple sensory pathways to provide crucial information about head and body motion. Damage to the semicircular canals, the peripheral vestibular organs that sense rotational velocities of the head, can severely degrade the ability to perform activities of daily life. Vestibular prosthetics address this problem by using stimulating electrodes that can trigger primary vestibular afferents to modulate their firing rates, thus encoding head movement. These prostheses have been demonstrated chronically in multiple animal models and acutely tested in short-duration trials within the clinic in humans. However, mainly due to limited opportunities to fully characterize stimulation parameters, there is a lack of understanding of ‘optimal’ stimulation configurations for humans. Here we model possible adaptive plasticity in the vestibular pathway. Specifically, this model highlights the influence of adaptation of synaptic strengths and offsets in the vestibular nuclei to compensate for the initial activation of the prosthetic. By changing the synaptic strengths, the model is able to replicate the clinical observation that erroneous eye movements are attenuated within 30 minutes without any change to the prosthetic stimulation rate. Although our model was only built to match this time-point, we further examined how it affected subsequent pulse rate and pulse amplitude modulation. Pulse amplitude modulation was more effective than pulse rate modulation for nearly all stimulation configurations during these acute tests. Two non-intuitive relationships highlighted by our model explain this performance discrepancy. Specifically the attenuation of synaptic strengths for afferents stimulated during baseline adaptation and the discontinuity between baseline and residual firing rates both disproportionally boost pulse amplitude modulation. Co-modulation of pulse rate and amplitude has been experimentally shown to induce both

  1. Predicting prosthetic prescription after major lower-limb amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Resnik, PT, PhD, OCS

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe prosthetic limb prescription in the first year following lower-limb amputation and examine the relationship between amputation level, geographic region, and prosthetic prescription. We analyzed 2005 to 2010 Department of Veterans Affairs (VA Inpatient and Medical Encounters SAS data sets, Vital Status death data, and National Prosthetic Patient Database data for 9,994 Veterans who underwent lower-limb amputation at a VA hospital. Descriptive statistics and bivariates were examined. Cox proportional hazard models identified factors associated with prosthetic prescription. Analyses showed that amputation level was associated with prosthetic prescription. The hazard ratios (HRs were 1.41 for ankle amputation and 0.46 for transfemoral amputation compared with transtibial amputation. HRs for geographic region were Northeast = 1.49, Upper Midwest = 1.26, and West = 1.39 compared with the South (p < 0.001. African American race, longer length of hospital stay, older age, congestive heart failure, paralysis, other neurological disease, renal failure, and admission from a nursing facility were negatively associated with prosthetic prescription. Being married was positively associated. After adjusting for patient characteristics, people with ankle amputation were most likely to be prescribed a prosthesis and people with transfemoral amputation were least likely. Geographic variation in prosthetic prescription exists in the VA and further research is needed to explain why.

  2. Model for heart failure education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldonado, Analiza; Dutra, Danette; Abriam-Yago, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is the heart's inability to meet the body's need for blood and oxygen. According to the American Heart Association 2013 update, approximately 5.1 million people are diagnosed with HF in the United States in 2006. Heart failure is the most common diagnosis for hospitalization. In the United States, the HF direct and indirect costs are estimated to be US $39.2 billion in 2010. To address this issue, nursing educators designed innovative teaching frameworks on HF management both in academia and in clinical settings. The model was based on 2 resources: the American Association of Heart Failure Nurses (2012) national nursing certification and the award-winning Pierce County Responsive Care Coordination Program. The HF educational program is divided into 4 modules. The initial modules offer foundational levels of Bloom's Taxonomy then progress to incorporate higher-levels of learning when modules 3 and 4 are reached. The applicability of the key components within each module allows formatting to enhance learning in all areas of nursing, from the emergency department to intensive care units to the medical-surgical step-down units. Also applicable would be to provide specific aspects of the modules to nurses who care for HF patients in skilled nursing facility, rehabilitation centers, and in the home-health care setting.

  3. Biomechanical analyses of prosthetic mesh repair in a hiatal hernia model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizai, Patrick Hamid; Schmid, Sofie; Otto, Jens; Klink, Christian Daniel; Roeth, Anjali; Nolting, Jochen; Neumann, Ulf Peter; Klinge, Uwe

    2014-10-01

    Recurrence rate of hiatal hernia can be reduced with prosthetic mesh repair; however, type and shape of the mesh are still a matter of controversy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the biomechanical properties of four conventional meshes: pure polypropylene mesh (PP-P), polypropylene/poliglecaprone mesh (PP-U), polyvinylidenefluoride/polypropylene mesh (PVDF-I), and pure polyvinylidenefluoride mesh (PVDF-S). Meshes were tested either in warp direction (parallel to production direction) or perpendicular to the warp direction. A Zwick testing machine was used to measure elasticity and effective porosity of the textile probes. Stretching of the meshes in warp direction required forces that were up to 85-fold higher than the same elongation in perpendicular direction. Stretch stress led to loss of effective porosity in most meshes, except for PVDF-S. Biomechanical impact of the mesh was additionally evaluated in a hiatal hernia model. The different meshes were used either as rectangular patches or as circular meshes. Circular meshes led to a significant reinforcement of the hiatus, largely unaffected by the orientation of the warp fibers. In contrast, rectangular meshes provided a significant reinforcement only when warp fibers ran perpendicular to the crura. Anisotropic elasticity of prosthetic meshes should therefore be considered in hiatal closure with rectangular patches.

  4. (18)F-FDG-PET/CT angiography in the diagnosis of infective endocarditis and cardiac device infection in adult patients with congenital heart disease and prosthetic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzi, María N; Dos-Subirà, L; Roque, Albert; Fernández-Hidalgo, Nuria; Cuéllar-Calabria, Hug; Pijuan Domènech, Antonia; Gonzàlez-Alujas, María T; Subirana-Domènech, M T; Miranda-Barrio, B; Ferreira-González, Ignacio; González-López, Juan J; Igual, Albert; Maisterra-Santos, Olga; García-Dorado, David; Castell-Conesa, Joan; Almirante, Benito; Escobar Amores, Manuel; Tornos, Pilar; Aguadé-Bruix, Santiago

    2017-12-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) and cardiac device infection (CDI) are a major complication in the growing number of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) reaching adulthood. We aimed to evaluate the added value of (18)F-FDG-PET/CT angiography (PET/CTA) in the diagnosis of IE-CDI in adults with CHD and intravascular or intracardiac prosthetic material, in whom echocardiography (ECHO) and modified Duke Criteria (DC) have limitations because of the patients' complex anatomy. A prospective study was conducted in a referral center with multidisciplinary IE and CHD Units. PET/CTA and ECHO findings were compared in consecutive adult (≥18years) patients with CHD who have prosthetic material and suspected IE-CDI. The initial diagnosis using the DC and the diagnosis with the additional PET/CTA data (DC+PET/CTA) were compared with the final diagnostic consensus established by an expert team at three months. Between November-2012 and April-2017, 25 patients (15 men; median age 40years) were included. Cases were initially classified as definite in 8 (32%), possible in 14 (56%) and rejected in 3 (12%). DC+PET/CTA allowed reclassification of 12/14 (86%) cases initially identified as possible IE. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy of DC at IE suspicion were 39.1%/83.3%/90.4%/25.5%/61.2%, respectively. The diagnostic performance increased significantly with addition of PET/CTA data: 87%/83.3%/95.4%/61.5%/85.1%, respectively. PET/CTA also provided an alternative diagnosis in 3 patients with rejected IE, and detected pulmonary embolisms in 3 patients. PET/CTA was a useful diagnostic tool in the complex group of adult patients with CHD who have cardiac or intravascular prosthetic material and suspected IE or CDI, providing added diagnostic value to the modified DC (increased sensitivity) and improving case classification. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A three-dimensional finite element model of the transibial residual limb and prosthetic socket to predict skin temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peery, Jeffrey T; Klute, Glenn K; Blevins, Joanna J; Ledoux, William R

    2006-09-01

    Amputees who wear prosthetic limbs often experience discomfort from blisters and sores due to mechanical insult; these skin conditions are exacerbated by elevated skin temperatures and excessive perspiration within the prosthetic socket. The goal of this study was to create a tool for developing new prostheses that accommodate varying thermal loads arising from everyday activities. A three-dimensional thermal model of a transtibial residual limb and prosthesis was constructed using the finite element (FE) method. Transverse computerized tomography (CT) scans were used to specify the geometry of the residual limb and socket. Thermal properties from the literature were assigned to both biological tissue and prosthetic socket elements. The purpose of this work was to create a model that would aid in testing the effect of new prosthesis designs on skin temperature. To validate its output, the model was used to predict the skin temperature distribution in a common prosthetic socket system (silicone liner, wool sock, and carbon fiber socket) at rest with no mechanical loading. Skin temperatures were generally elevated near muscle and decreased anteriorly and at the distal end. Experimental temperature measurements taken at the skin-prosthesis interface of five human subjects were used to validate the model. Data extracted from the thermal model at anterior, posterior, lateral, and medial locations were typically within one standard deviation of experimental results; the mean temperatures were within 0.3 degree C for each section and were within 0.1 degree C overall.

  6. Editorial to: Baseline MDCT findings after prosthetic heart valve implantation provide important complementary information to echocardiography for follow-up purposes by Sucha et al

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeters, F.E.C.M. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Kietselaer, B.L.J.H. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2016-04-15

    Over the last years a growing number of prosthetic heart valve (PHV) implantation procedures have been performed in sequence with the aging of the population and improving surgical techniques. Currently, echocardiography is the most important tool in the follow-up and evaluation of complications associated with the PHV (pannus, thrombus, endocarditis). However, echocardiographic examination of PHV associated disease may be hampered by poor acoustic window or scatter artefacts caused by the PHV. PHV related disease such as endocarditis is related with a poor prognosis, especially when complications such as periannular abscess formation occurs. Early treatment of PHV associated disease improves prognosis. Therefore, an unmet clinical need for early detection of complications exists. In the evaluation of PHV (dys)function, multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) has shown to be of additive value. A necessity for MDCT to be implemented in daily practice is to be able to distinguish between normal and pathological features. (orig.)

  7. Prosthetic Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Costs Copays Means Test Health Insurance Make a Payment Annual Income Thresholds Non-VA Care Purchased Care ... center of pressure under the prosthetic foot; enhancing balance and stability of lower limb amputees. Foot-Ankle ...

  8. Rehabilitation and Prosthetic Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Service » Prosthetic & Sensory Aids Service (PSAS) Rehabilitation and Prosthetic Services Menu Menu Rehabilitation and Prosthetics Rehabilitation and ... Enter ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Prosthetic & Sensory Aids Service (PSAS) Our Mission The mission ...

  9. Finite element modeling of the contact interface between trans-tibial residual limb and prosthetic socket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Winson C C; Zhang, Ming; Jia, Xiaohong; Cheung, Jason T M

    2004-10-01

    Finite element method has been identified as a useful tool to understand the load transfer mechanics between a residual limb and its prosthetic socket. This paper proposed a new practical approach in modeling the contact interface with consideration of the friction/slip conditions and pre-stresses applied on the limb within a rectified socket. The residual limb and socket were modeled as two separate structures and their interactions were simulated using automated contact methods. Some regions of the limb penetrated into the socket because of socket modification. In the first step of the simulation, the penetrated limb surface was moved onto the inner surface of the socket and the pre-stresses were predicted. In the subsequent loading step, pre-stresses were kept and loadings were applied at the knee joint to simulate the loading during the stance phase of gait. Comparisons were made between the model using the proposed approach and the model having an assumption that the shape of the limb and the socket were the same which ignored pre-stress. It was found that peak normal and shear stresses over the regions where socket undercuts were made reduced and the stress values over other regions raised in the model having the simplifying assumption.

  10. Multidetector-row computed tomography for prosthetic heart valve dysfunction: is concomitant non-invasive coronary angiography possible before redo-surgery?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanis, Wilco [Haga Teaching Hospital, Department of Cardiology, The Hague (Netherlands); Haga Teaching Hospital, The Hague (Netherlands); Sucha, Dominika; Habets, Jesse [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Laufer, Ward; Chamuleau, Steven [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Herwerden, Lex.A. van [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Utrecht (Netherlands); Symersky, Petr [Vrije Universiteit, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Budde, Ricardo P.J. [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-06-01

    Retrospective ECG-gated multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) is increasingly used for the assessment of prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction, but is also hampered by PHV-related artefacts/cardiac arrhythmias. Furthermore, it is performed without nitroglycerine or heart rate correction. The purpose was to determine whether MDCT performed before potential redo-PHV surgery is feasible for concomitant coronary artery stenosis assessment and can replace invasive coronary angiography (CAG). PHV patients with CAG and MDCT were identified. Based on medical history, two groups were created: (I) patients with no known coronary artery disease (CAD), (II) patients with known CAD. All images were scored for the presence of significant (>50 %) stenosis. CAG was the reference test. Fifty-one patients were included. In group I (n = 38), MDCT accurately ruled out significant stenosis in 19/38 (50 %) patients, but could not replace CAG in the remaining 19/38 (50 %) patients due to non-diagnostic image quality (n = 16) or significant stenosis (n = 3) detection. In group II (n = 13), MDCT correctly found no patients without significant stenosis, requiring CAG imaging in all. MDCT assessed patency in 16/19 (84 %) grafts and detected a hostile anatomy in two. MDCT performed for PHV dysfunction assessment can replace CAG (100 % accurate) in approximately half of patients without previously known CAD. (orig.)

  11. Prosthetic advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Zach T; Potter, Benjamin K; Vandersea, James; Wolf, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Much of the current prosthetic technology is based on developments that have taken place during or directly following times of war. These developments have evolved and improved over the years, and now there are many more available options to provide a comfortable, cosmetic, and highly functional prosthesis. Even so, problems with fit and function persist. Recent developments have addressed some of the limitations faced by some military amputees. On-board microprocessor-controlled joints are making prosthetic arms and legs more responsive to environmental barriers and easier to control by the user. Advances in surgical techniques will allow more intuitive control and secure attachment to the prosthesis. As surgical techniques progress and permeate into standard practice, more sophisticated powered prosthetic devices will become commonplace, helping to restore neuromuscular loss of function. Prognoses following amputation will certainly rise, factoring into the surgeon's decision to attempt to save a limb versus perform an amputation.

  12. CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE: EXPERIMENTAL MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Francesco Corno

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION.Surgically induced, combined volume and pressure overload has been used in rabbits to create a simplified and reproducible model of acute left ventricular (LV failure.MATERIALS AND METHODS.New Zealand white male rabbits (n=24, mean weight 3.1±0.2kg were randomly assigned to either the Control group (n=10 or to the Heart Failure group (HF, n=14. Animals in the Control group underwent sham procedures. Animals in the HF group underwent procedures to induce LV volume overload by inducing severe aortic valve regurgitation with aortic cusp disruption and pressure overload using an occlusive silver clip positioned around the pre-renal abdominal aorta.RESULTS.Following Procedure-1 (volume overload echocardiography confirmed severe aortic regurgitation in all animals in the HF group, with increased mean pulse pressure difference from 18±3mmHg to 38±3mmHg (P

  13. Finite element modelling of an energy-storing prosthetic foot during the stance phase of transtibial amputee gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Xavier; Pillet, Hélenè; Fodé, Pascale; Lavaste, Francois; Skalli, Wafa

    2012-01-01

    Energy-storing prosthetic feet are designed to store energy during mid-stance motion and to recover it during late-stance motion. Gait analysis is the most commonly used method to characterize prosthetic foot behaviour during walking. In using this method, however, the foot is generally modelled as a rigid body. Therefore, it does not take into account the ability of the foot to deform. However, the way this deformation occurs is a key parameter of various foot properties under gait conditions. The purpose of this study is to combine finite element modelling and gait analysis in order to calculate the strain, stress and energy stored in the foot along the stance phase for self-selected and fast walking speeds. A finite element model, validated using mechanical testing, is used with boundary conditions collected experimentally from the gait analysis of a single transtibial amputee. The stress, strain and energy stored in the foot are assessed throughout the stance phase for two walking speed conditions: a self-selected walking speed (SSWS), and a fast walking speed (FWS). The first maximum in the strain energy occurs during heel loading and reaches 3J for SSWS and 7J for FWS at the end of the first double support phase. The second maximum appears at the end of the single support phase, reaching 15J for SSWS and 18J for FWS. Finite element modelling combined with gait analysis allows the calculation of parameters that are not obtainable using gait analysis alone. This modelling can be used in the process of prosthetic feet design to assess the behaviour of a prosthetic foot under specific gait conditions.

  14. Image Processing Strategies Based on a Visual Saliency Model for Object Recognition Under Simulated Prosthetic Vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Li, Heng; Fu, Weizhen; Chen, Yao; Li, Liming; Lyu, Qing; Han, Tingting; Chai, Xinyu

    2016-01-01

    Retinal prostheses have the potential to restore partial vision. Object recognition in scenes of daily life is one of the essential tasks for implant wearers. Still limited by the low-resolution visual percepts provided by retinal prostheses, it is important to investigate and apply image processing methods to convey more useful visual information to the wearers. We proposed two image processing strategies based on Itti's visual saliency map, region of interest (ROI) extraction, and image segmentation. Itti's saliency model generated a saliency map from the original image, in which salient regions were grouped into ROI by the fuzzy c-means clustering. Then Grabcut generated a proto-object from the ROI labeled image which was recombined with background and enhanced in two ways--8-4 separated pixelization (8-4 SP) and background edge extraction (BEE). Results showed that both 8-4 SP and BEE had significantly higher recognition accuracy in comparison with direct pixelization (DP). Each saliency-based image processing strategy was subject to the performance of image segmentation. Under good and perfect segmentation conditions, BEE and 8-4 SP obtained noticeably higher recognition accuracy than DP, and under bad segmentation condition, only BEE boosted the performance. The application of saliency-based image processing strategies was verified to be beneficial to object recognition in daily scenes under simulated prosthetic vision. They are hoped to help the development of the image processing module for future retinal prostheses, and thus provide more benefit for the patients.

  15. Influence of pelvic position on radiographic measurements of the prosthetic acetabular component; An experimental study on a pelvic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thoren, B.; Sahlstedt, B. (Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology)

    1990-03-01

    A change in the position of a prosthetic acetabular component between two different radiographic examinations indicates loosening, and may be observed as tilting or migration of the socket. To determine the apparent changes in socket position caused by improper positioning of the pelvis, a full-scale model of a pelvis with attached prosthetic sockets was examined radiographically in different positions. The projected alignment of the Charnley socket indicator wire against the inter-tuberosity line was markedly influenced by the positioning of the pelvis. An alternative way of measuring the alignment is to use the long axis of the projected ellipse of the outer circumferential groove in the socket polyethylene. The thus defined socket alignment was not influenced by the positioning of the pelvis within the investigated range. No apparent socket migration was recorded within the range of pelvic rotation and inclination studied. (orig.).

  16. Biochemical and molecular characteristics of Listeria monocytogenes isolates from a prosthetic mitral heart valve-bearing patient´s blood cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilma Cintra Leal

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Brazil, listeriosis is not a notifiable disease; thus, the incidence of Brazilian cases remains unknown. Listeria monocytogenes is not always included in automated systems, and its detection depends on the high skill level of microbiology laboratory professionals. This paper describes the characteristics of L. monocytogenes isolates fortuitously obtained from an endocarditis case in Recife, PE, Brazil. Methods: Six bacterial isolates obtained from six blood cultures from a 28-year-old male bearing a prosthetic mitral heart valve were analyzed by PCR using primers specific of L. monocytogenes to confirm a presumptive identification, determine the serotype and presence of the virulence genes (inlA, inlB, inlC, inlJ, hly, plcA, actA, prfA in an attempt to determine the Listeria genotype by PCR-ribotyping. Results: The samples were identified as L. monocytogenes 4b. All investigated virulence genes were amplified by PCR, and the identity of the amplified segments was confirmed by sequencing. A deletion of 105 base pairs was detected in the actA gene. All of the samples generated the same PCR-ribotype pattern, clustered into a single ribotype, and were considered a single strain. Conclusion: L. monocytogenes infection should be considered in endocarditis differential diagnoses, especially among high-risk groups, due to its high pathogenicity and the environmental ubiquity.

  17. BIOCHEMICAL AND MOLECULAR CHARACTERISTICS OF LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES ISOLATES FROM A PROSTHETIC MITRAL HEART VALVE-BEARING PATIENT´S BLOOD CULTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilma Cintra Lea

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Brazil, listeriosis is not a notifiable disease; thus, the incidence of Brazilian cases remains unknown. Listeria monocytogenes is not always included in automated systems, and its detection depends on the high skill level of microbiology laboratory professionals. This paper describes the characteristics of L. monocytogenes isolates fortuitously obtained from an endocarditis case in Recife, PE, Brazil. Methods: Six bacterial isolates obtained from six blood cultures from a 28-year-old male bearing a prosthetic mitral heart valve were analyzed by PCR using primers specific of L. monocytogenes to confirm a presumptive identification, determine the serotype and presence of the virulence genes (inlA, inlB, inlC, inlJ, hly, plcA, actA, prfA in an attempt to determine the Listeria genotype by PCR-ribotyping. Results: The samples were identified as L. monocytogenes 4b. All investigated virulence genes were amplified by PCR, and the identity of the amplified segments was confirmed by sequencing. A deletion of 105 base pairs was detected in the actA gene. All of the samples generated the same PCR-ribotype pattern, clustered into a single ribotype, and were considered a single strain. Conclusion: L. monocytogenes infection should be considered in endocarditis differential diagnoses, especially among high-risk groups, due to its high pathogenicity and the environmental ubiquity.

  18. Modeling and stress analyses of a normal foot-ankle and a prosthetic foot-ankle complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozen, Mustafa; Sayman, Onur; Havitcioglu, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Total ankle replacement (TAR) is a relatively new concept and is becoming more popular for treatment of ankle arthritis and fractures. Because of the high costs and difficulties of experimental studies, the developments of TAR prostheses are progressing very slowly. For this reason, the medical imaging techniques such as CT, and MR have become more and more useful. The finite element method (FEM) is a widely used technique to estimate the mechanical behaviors of materials and structures in engineering applications. FEM has also been increasingly applied to biomechanical analyses of human bones, tissues and organs, thanks to the development of both the computing capabilities and the medical imaging techniques. 3-D finite element models of the human foot and ankle from reconstruction of MR and CT images have been investigated by some authors. In this study, data of geometries (used in modeling) of a normal and a prosthetic foot and ankle were obtained from a 3D reconstruction of CT images. The segmentation software, MIMICS was used to generate the 3D images of the bony structures, soft tissues and components of prosthesis of normal and prosthetic ankle-foot complex. Except the spaces between the adjacent surface of the phalanges fused, metatarsals, cuneiforms, cuboid, navicular, talus and calcaneus bones, soft tissues and components of prosthesis were independently developed to form foot and ankle complex. SOLIDWORKS program was used to form the boundary surfaces of all model components and then the solid models were obtained from these boundary surfaces. Finite element analyses software, ABAQUS was used to perform the numerical stress analyses of these models for balanced standing position. Plantar pressure and von Mises stress distributions of the normal and prosthetic ankles were compared with each other. There was a peak pressure increase at the 4th metatarsal, first metatarsal and talus bones and a decrease at the intermediate cuneiform and calcaneus bones, in

  19. Multidetector-row computed tomography imaging characteristics of mechanical prosthetic valves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Symersky, P.; Budde, R.P.; Prokop, M.; Mol, B.A. de

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM OF THE STUDY: Electrocardiogram-gated multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) imaging may aid in the evaluation of prosthetic valve dysfunction. A pulsatile in vitro model was developed to study the MDCT imaging characteristics of mechanical heart valves (MHVs). METHODS: Bjor

  20. Multidetector-Row Computed Tomography Imaging Characteristics of Mechanical Prosthetic Valves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Symersky, Petr; Budde, Ricardo P. J.; Prokop, Mathias; de Mol, Bas A. J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background and aim of the study: Electrocardiogram-gated multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) imaging may aid in the evaluation of prosthetic valve dysfunction. A pulsatile in vitro model was developed to study the MDCT imaging characteristics of mechanical heart valves (MHVs). Methods: Bjor

  1. Prosthetic Avian Vocal Organ Controlled by a Freely Behaving Bird Based on a Low Dimensional Model of the Biomechanical Periphery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneodo, Ezequiel M.; Perl, Yonatan Sanz; Goller, Franz; Mindlin, Gabriel B.

    2012-01-01

    Because of the parallels found with human language production and acquisition, birdsong is an ideal animal model to study general mechanisms underlying complex, learned motor behavior. The rich and diverse vocalizations of songbirds emerge as a result of the interaction between a pattern generator in the brain and a highly nontrivial nonlinear periphery. Much of the complexity of this vocal behavior has been understood by studying the physics of the avian vocal organ, particularly the syrinx. A mathematical model describing the complex periphery as a nonlinear dynamical system leads to the conclusion that nontrivial behavior emerges even when the organ is commanded by simple motor instructions: smooth paths in a low dimensional parameter space. An analysis of the model provides insight into which parameters are responsible for generating a rich variety of diverse vocalizations, and what the physiological meaning of these parameters is. By recording the physiological motor instructions elicited by a spontaneously singing muted bird and computing the model on a Digital Signal Processor in real-time, we produce realistic synthetic vocalizations that replace the bird's own auditory feedback. In this way, we build a bio-prosthetic avian vocal organ driven by a freely behaving bird via its physiologically coded motor commands. Since it is based on a low-dimensional nonlinear mathematical model of the peripheral effector, the emulation of the motor behavior requires light computation, in such a way that our bio-prosthetic device can be implemented on a portable platform. PMID:22761555

  2. Prosthetic avian vocal organ controlled by a freely behaving bird based on a low dimensional model of the biomechanical periphery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezequiel M Arneodo

    Full Text Available Because of the parallels found with human language production and acquisition, birdsong is an ideal animal model to study general mechanisms underlying complex, learned motor behavior. The rich and diverse vocalizations of songbirds emerge as a result of the interaction between a pattern generator in the brain and a highly nontrivial nonlinear periphery. Much of the complexity of this vocal behavior has been understood by studying the physics of the avian vocal organ, particularly the syrinx. A mathematical model describing the complex periphery as a nonlinear dynamical system leads to the conclusion that nontrivial behavior emerges even when the organ is commanded by simple motor instructions: smooth paths in a low dimensional parameter space. An analysis of the model provides insight into which parameters are responsible for generating a rich variety of diverse vocalizations, and what the physiological meaning of these parameters is. By recording the physiological motor instructions elicited by a spontaneously singing muted bird and computing the model on a Digital Signal Processor in real-time, we produce realistic synthetic vocalizations that replace the bird's own auditory feedback. In this way, we build a bio-prosthetic avian vocal organ driven by a freely behaving bird via its physiologically coded motor commands. Since it is based on a low-dimensional nonlinear mathematical model of the peripheral effector, the emulation of the motor behavior requires light computation, in such a way that our bio-prosthetic device can be implemented on a portable platform.

  3. Unsteady fluid dynamics of several mechanical prosthetic heart valves using a two component laser Doppler anemometer system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akutsu, T; Modi, V J

    1997-10-01

    Five typical mechanical heart valves (Starr-Edwards, Björk-Shiley convexo-concave (c-c), Björk-Shiley monostrut, Bicer-Val, and St. Jude Medical) were tested in the mitral position under the pulsatile flow condition. The test program included measurements of velocity and turbulent stresses at 5 downstream locations. The study was carried out using a sophisticated cardiac simulator in conjunction with a highly sensitive 2 component laser Doppler anemometer (LDA) system. The continuous monitoring of parametric time histories revealed useful details about the complex flow and helped to establish the locations and times of the peak parameter values. Based upon the nondimensional presentation of data, the following general conclusions can be made. First, all the 5 valve designs created elevated turbulent stresses during the accelerating and peak flow phases, presenting the possibility of thromboembolism and perhaps hemolysis. Second, the difference in valve configuration seemed to affect the flow characteristics; third, the bileaflet design of the St. Jude valve appeared to create a lower turbulence stress level.

  4. Local signaling from a retinal prosthetic in a rodent retinitis pigmentosa model in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransen, James W.; Pangeni, Gobinda; Pardue, Machelle T.; McCall, Maureen A.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. In clinical trials, retinitis pigmentosa patients implanted with a retinal prosthetic device show enhanced spatial vision, including the ability to read large text and navigate. New prosthetics aim to increase spatial resolution by decreasing pixel/electrode size and limiting current spread. To examine spatial resolution of a new prosthetic design, we characterized and compared two photovoltaic array (PVA) designs and their interaction with the retina after subretinal implantation in transgenic S334ter line 3 rats (Tg S334ter-3). Approach. PVAs were implanted subretinally at two stages of degeneration and assessed in vivo using extracellular recordings in the superior colliculus (SC). Several aspects of this interaction were evaluated by varying duration, irradiance and position of a near infrared laser focused on the PVA. These characteristics included: activation threshold, response linearity, SC signal topography and spatial localization. The major design difference between the two PVA designs is the inclusion of local current returns in the newer design. Main results. When tested in vivo, PVA-evoked response thresholds were independent of pixel/electrode size, but differ between the new and old PVA designs. Response thresholds were independent of implantation age and duration (⩽7.5 months). For both prosthesis designs, threshold intensities were within established safety limits. PVA-evoked responses require inner retina synaptic transmission and do not directly activate retinal ganglion cells. The new PVA design evokes local retinal activation, which is not found with the older PVA design that lacks local current returns. Significance. Our study provides in vivo evidence that prosthetics make functional contacts with the inner nuclear layer at several stages of degeneration. The new PVA design enhances local activation within the retina and SC. Together these results predict that the new design can potentially harness the inherent processing within

  5. Modelling and Simulation of the Knee Joint with a Depth Sensor Camera for Prosthetics and Movement Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risto, S.; Kallergi, M.

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this project was to model and simulate the knee joint. A computer model of the knee joint was first created, which was controlled by Microsoft's Kinect for Windows. Kinect created a depth map of the knee and lower leg motion independent of lighting conditions through an infrared sensor. A combination of open source software such as Blender, Python, Kinect SDK and NI_Mate were implemented for the creation and control of the simulated knee based on movements of a live physical model. A physical size model of the knee and lower leg was also created, the movement of which was controlled remotely by the computer model and Kinect. The real time communication of the model and the robotic knee was achieved through programming in Python and Arduino language. The result of this study showed that Kinect in the modelling of human kinematics and can play a significant role in the development of prosthetics and other assistive technologies.

  6. [Research status and development trends of the heart valve mechanical properties].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yusheng; Zeng, Pei; Ren, Guorong

    2014-10-01

    The study of mechanical properties on heart valves can provide an important theoretical basis for doctors to repair heart valves and prosthetic valve materials research. In this paper, we present the current status of the mechanical property study methods of heart valve, expound the methods and special requirements about uniaxial tensile test and biaxial tensile test of the heart valve, and further discuss several establishment methods of heart valve constitutive models. We also discuss the development trend of heart valve mechanics.

  7. Validation of a numerical 3-D fluid-structure interaction model for a prosthetic valve based on experimental PIV measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guivier-Curien, Carine; Deplano, Valérie; Bertrand, Eric

    2009-10-01

    A numerical 3-D fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model of a prosthetic aortic valve was developed, based on a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software program using an Arbitrary Eulerian Lagrangian (ALE) formulation. To make sure of the validity of this numerical model, an equivalent experimental model accounting for both the geometrical features and the hydrodynamic conditions was also developed. The leaflet and the flow behaviours around the bileaflet valve were investigated numerically and experimentally by performing particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements. Through quantitative and qualitative comparisons, it was shown that the leaflet behaviour and the velocity fields were similar in both models. The present study allows the validation of a fully coupled 3-D FSI numerical model. The promising numerical tool could be therefore used to investigate clinical issues involving the aortic valve.

  8. Evaluation of 17-mm St. Jude Medical Regent prosthetic aortic heart valves by rest and dobutamine stress echocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minardi Giovanni

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prosthesis used for aortic valve replacement in patients with small aortic root can be too small in relation to body size, thus showing high transvalvular gradients at rest and/or under stress conditions. This study was carried out to evaluate rest and Dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE hemodynamic response of 17-mm St. Jude Medical Regent (SJMR-17 mm in relatively aged patients at mean 24 months follow-up. Methods and results The study population consisted of 19 patients (2 men, 17 women, mean age 69.2 ± 7.3 years. All patients underwent rest Doppler echocardiography before and after surgery and basal and DSE at follow up (infused at rate of 5 micrg/Kg/min and increased by 5 microg/Kg/min at 5 min intervals up to 40 microg/Kg/min. The following parameters were evaluated at rest and/or under DSE: heart rate (HR, ejection fraction (EF, cardiac output (CO, peak and mean velocity and pressure gradients (MxV, MnV, MxPG, MnPG, effective orifice area (EOA, indexed EOA (EOAi, left ventricular mass (LVM, indexed LVM (LVMi, Velocity Time Integral at left ventricular outflow tract (VTI LVOT and transvalvular (Aortic VTI, Doppler velocity index (DVI. At rest MxPG and MnPG were 29.2 ± 7.1 and 16.6 ± 5.8mmHg, respectively; EOA and EOAi resulted 1.14 ± 0.3 cm2 and 0.76 ± 0.2 cm2/m2; DVI was normal (0.50 ± 0.1. At follow-up LVM and LVMi decreased significantly from pre-operative value of 258 ± 43g and 157.4 ± 27.7g/m2 to 191 ± 23.8g and 114.5 ± 10.6g/m2, respectively. DSE increased significantly HR, CO, EF, MxGP (up to 83.4 ± 2 1.9mmHg, MnPG (up to 43.2 ± 12.7mmHg. EOA, EOAi, DVI increased insignificantly (from baseline up to 1.2 ± 0.4 cm2, 0.75 ± 0.3cm2/m2 and 0.48 ± 0.1 respectively. Two patients developed significant intraventricular gradients. Conclusion These data show that SJMR 17-mm prostheses can be safely implanted in aortic position in relatively aged patients, offering a satisfactory hemodynamic

  9. A proposed model of the response of the anophthalmic socket to prosthetic eye wear and its application to the management of mucoid discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, Keith R; Sloan, Brian H; Jacobs, Robert J

    2013-08-01

    Mucoid discharge associated with prosthetic eye wear can be a distressing condition that affects the quality of life of people who have lost an eye. Discharge is the second highest concern of experienced prosthetic eye wearers after health of the companion eye and is prevalent in anophthalmic populations. Specific causes of mucoid discharge such as infections and environmental allergens are well understood, but non-specific causes are unknown and an evidence based protocol for managing non-specific discharge is lacking. Current management is based on prosthesis removal and cleaning, and professional re-polishing of the prosthesis. Tear protein deposits accumulate on prosthetic eyes. These deposits mediate the response of the socket to prosthetic eye wear and their influence (good and bad) is determined by differing cleaning regimes and standards of surface finish. This paper proposes a three-phase model that describes the response of the socket to prosthetic eye wear. The phases are: An initial period of wear of a new (or newly-polished) prosthesis when homeostasis is being established (or re-established) within the socket; a second period (equilibrium phase) where beneficial surface deposits have built up on the prosthesis and wear is safe and comfortable, and a third period (breakdown phase) where there is an increasing likelihood of harm from continued wear. The proposed model provides a rationale for a personal cleaning regime to manage non-specific mucoid discharge. Professional care of prosthetic eyes is also important for the management of discharge and evidence for effective surface finishing is reported in this study. Taken together, the proposed regimes for personal and professional care comprise a protocol for managing discharge associated with prosthetic eye wear. The protocol describes prosthetic eye cleaning methods and frequency, and suggests minimum standards for professional polishing. If confirmed, the protocol has the potential to resolve the

  10. Gaussian mixture model of heart rate variability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso Costa

    Full Text Available Heart rate variability (HRV is an important measure of sympathetic and parasympathetic functions of the autonomic nervous system and a key indicator of cardiovascular condition. This paper proposes a novel method to investigate HRV, namely by modelling it as a linear combination of Gaussians. Results show that three Gaussians are enough to describe the stationary statistics of heart variability and to provide a straightforward interpretation of the HRV power spectrum. Comparisons have been made also with synthetic data generated from different physiologically based models showing the plausibility of the Gaussian mixture parameters.

  11. Mathematical problems in modeling artificial heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed N. U.

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we discuss some problems arising in mathematical modeling of artificial hearts. The hydrodynamics of blood flow in an artificial heart chamber is governed by the Navier-Stokes equation, coupled with an equation of hyperbolic type subject to moving boundary conditions. The flow is induced by the motion of a diaphragm (membrane inside the heart chamber attached to a part of the boundary and driven by a compressor (pusher plate. On one side of the diaphragm is the blood and on the other side is the compressor fluid. For a complete mathematical model it is necessary to write the equation of motion of the diaphragm and all the dynamic couplings that exist between its position, velocity and the blood flow in the heart chamber. This gives rise to a system of coupled nonlinear partial differential equations; the Navier-Stokes equation being of parabolic type and the equation for the membrane being of hyperbolic type. The system is completed by introducing all the necessary static and dynamic boundary conditions. The ultimate objective is to control the flow pattern so as to minimize hemolysis (damage to red blood cells by optimal choice of geometry, and by optimal control of the membrane for a given geometry. The other clinical problems, such as compatibility of the material used in the construction of the heart chamber, and the membrane, are not considered in this paper. Also the dynamics of the valve is not considered here, though it is also an important element in the overall design of an artificial heart. We hope to model the valve dynamics in later paper.

  12. Microprocessor prosthetic knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Dale

    2006-02-01

    This article traces the development of microprocessor prosthetic knees from early research in the 1970s to the present. Read about how microprocessor knees work, functional options, patient selection, and the future of this prosthetic.

  13. Prosthetic Knee Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Google Bookmarks Technorati Yahoo MyWeb Prosthetic Knee Systems Translated into plain language by Helen Osborne of ... Consulting Original article by Bill Dupes Prosthetic knee systems are among the most complex of all components. ...

  14. Use of tenecteplase in recurrent prosthetic valve thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariram, Vuppaladadhiam; Sharma, Nuthi Prashanthi

    2013-11-01

    Prosthetic valve thrombosis (PVT) is a serious complication of mechanical prosthetic heart valves, the available treatment options for which are either thrombolytic therapy or surgery. In patients who have already received streptokinase to treat a previous episode of PVT, the therapeutic options are limited. Herein, the case is reported of an elderly female patient with a second episode of PVT treated successfully with tenecteplase.

  15. Pulsatile prosthetic valve flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, W M; Snyder, A; Alchas, P; Rosenberg, G; Pierce, W S

    1980-01-01

    The laser Doppler system has been established as a useful tool for eliciting the properties of simulated cardiovascular flows, and thus for comparative studies of flow properties of prosthetic valves. Significant differences among valve types and between models of one type have been documented. The complex variations of velocity profiles with time show that comparisons must be made for unsteady pulsatile rather than steady flow, despite the volume and complexity of the data required. Future studies will include methods of compacting the data presentation and improving the details of the experimental stimulation.

  16. A unified deformable (UD) segment model for quantifying total power of anatomical and prosthetic below-knee structures during stance in gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kota Z; Kepple, Thomas M; Stanhope, Steven J

    2012-10-11

    Anatomically-relevant (AR) biomechanical models are traditionally used to quantify joint powers and segmental energies of lower extremity structures during gait. While AR models contain a series of rigid body segments linked together via mechanical joints, prosthetic below-knee structures are often deformable objects without a definable ankle joint. Consequently, the application of AR models for the study of prosthetic limbs has been problematic. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a unified deformable (UD) segment model for quantifying the total power of below-knee structures. Estimates of total below-knee power derived via the UD segment model were compared to those derived via an AR model during stance in gait of eleven healthy subjects. The UD segment model achieved similar results to the AR model. Differences in peak power, total positive work, and total negative work were 1.91±0.31%, 3.97±0.49%, and 1.39±0.33%, relative to the AR model estimates. The main advantage of the UD segment model is that it does not require the definition of an ankle joint or foot structures. Therefore, this technique may be valuable for facilitating direct comparisons between anatomical and disparate prosthetic below-knee structures in future studies.

  17. A model of blended learning in a preclinical course in prosthetic dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reissmann, Daniel R; Sierwald, Ira; Berger, Florian; Heydecke, Guido

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of blending learning that added online tools to traditional learning methods in a preclinical course in prosthetic dentistry at one dental school in Germany. The e-learning modules were comprised of three main components: fundamental principles, additional information, and learning objective tests. Video recordings of practical demonstrations were prepared and cut into sequences meant to achieve single learning goals. The films were accompanied by background information and, after digital processing, were made available online. Additionally, learning objective tests and learning contents were integrated. Evaluations of 71 of 89 students (response rate: 80%) in the course with the integrated e-learning content were available for the study. Compared with evaluation results of the previous years, a substantial and statistically significant increase in satisfaction with learning content (from 30% and 34% to 86%, plearning effect (from 65% and 63% to 83%, pblended learning concept. The results showed that the e-learning tool was appreciated by the students and suggest that learning objective tests can be successfully implemented in blended learning.

  18. Modeling the heart and the circulatory system

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    The book comprises contributions by some of the most respected scientists in the field of mathematical modeling and numerical simulation of the human cardiocirculatory system. The contributions cover a wide range of topics, from the preprocessing of clinical data to the development of mathematical equations, their numerical solution, and both in-vivo and in-vitro validation. They discuss the flow in the systemic arterial tree and the complex electro-fluid-mechanical coupling in the human heart. Many examples of patient-specific simulations are presented. This book is addressed to all scientists interested in the mathematical modeling and numerical simulation of the human cardiocirculatory system.

  19. Multivariate Autoregressive Model Based Heart Motion Prediction Approach for Beating Heart Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Liang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A robotic tool can enable a surgeon to conduct off-pump coronary artery graft bypass surgery on a beating heart. The robotic tool actively alleviates the relative motion between the point of interest (POI on the heart surface and the surgical tool and allows the surgeon to operate as if the heart were stationary. Since the beating heart's motion is relatively high-band, with nonlinear and nonstationary characteristics, it is difficult to follow. Thus, precise beating heart motion prediction is necessary for the tracking control procedure during the surgery. In the research presented here, we first observe that Electrocardiography (ECG signal contains the causal phase information on heart motion and non-stationary heart rate dynamic variations. Then, we investigate the relationship between ECG signal and beating heart motion using Granger Causality Analysis, which describes the feasibility of the improved prediction of heart motion. Next, we propose a nonlinear time-varying multivariate vector autoregressive (MVAR model based adaptive prediction method. In this model, the significant correlation between ECG and heart motion enables the improvement of the prediction of sharp changes in heart motion and the approximation of the motion with sufficient detail. Dual Kalman Filters (DKF estimate the states and parameters of the model, respectively. Last, we evaluate the proposed algorithm through comparative experiments using the two sets of collected vivo data.

  20. Prevention of Prosthetic Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eremin O.V.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Prevention in prosthetic dentistry is not just a regular oral hygiene and the prevention of caries in the early stages of its development. The initial goal of orthopedic and dental should be the ability to convey to the patient's sense of pros-thetics that proteziruya one saved more. An example is included prosthetic dental arch defects with bridges or single artificial crowns on implants that will prevent movement of teeth and the continuity of the dentition

  1. A computational model of cardiovascular physiology and heart sound generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watrous, Raymond L

    2009-01-01

    A computational model of the cardiovascular system is described which provides a framework for implementing and testing quantitative physiological models of heart sound generation. The lumped-parameter cardiovascular model can be solved for the hemodynamic variables on which the heart sound generation process is built. Parameters of the cardiovascular model can be adjusted to represent various normal and pathological conditions, and the acoustic consequences of those adjustments can be explored. The combined model of the physiology of cardiovascular circulation and heart sound generation has promise for application in teaching, training and algorithm development in computer-aided auscultation of the heart.

  2. A novel distributed model of the heart under normal and congestive heart failure conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravanshadi, Samin; Jahed, Mehran

    2013-04-01

    Conventional models of cardiovascular system frequently lack required detail and focus primarily on the overall relationship between pressure, flow and volume. This study proposes a localized and regional model of the cardiovascular system. It utilizes noninvasive blood flow and pressure seed data and temporal cardiac muscle regional activity to predict the operation of the heart under normal and congestive heart failure conditions. The analysis considers specific regions of the heart, namely, base, mid and apex of left ventricle. The proposed method of parameter estimation for hydraulic electric analogy model is recursive least squares algorithm. Based on simulation results and comparison to clinical data, effect of congestive heart failure in the heart is quantified. Accumulated results for simulated ejection fraction percentage of the apex, mid and base regions of the left ventricle in congestive heart failure condition were 39 ± 6, 36 ± 9 and 38 ± 8, respectively. These results are shown to satisfactorily match those found through clinical measurements. The proposed analytical method can in effect be utilized as a preclinical and predictive tool for high-risk heart patients and candidates for heart transplant, assistive device and total artificial heart.

  3. MODELS OF INSULIN RESISTANCE AND HEART FAILURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez, Mauricio; Kohli, Smita; Sabbah, Hani N.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of heart failure (HF) and diabetes mellitus is rapidly increasing and is associated with poor prognosis. In spite of the advances in therapy, HF remains a major health problem with high morbidity and mortality. When HF and diabetes coexist, clinical outcomes are significantly worse. The relationship between these two conditions has been studied in various experimental models. However, the mechanisms for this interrelationship are complex, incompletely understood, and have become a matter of considerable clinical and research interest. There are only few animal models that manifest both HF and diabetes. However, the translation of results from these models to human disease is limited and new models are needed to expand our current understanding of this clinical interaction. In this review, we discuss mechanisms of insulin signaling and insulin resistance, the clinical association between insulin resistance and HF and its proposed pathophysiologic mechanisms. Finally, we discuss available animal models of insulin resistance and HF and propose requirements for future new models. PMID:23456447

  4. Isolated heart models: cardiovascular system studies and technological advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olejnickova, Veronika; Novakova, Marie; Provaznik, Ivo

    2015-07-01

    Isolated heart model is a relevant tool for cardiovascular system studies. It represents a highly reproducible model for studying broad spectrum of biochemical, physiological, morphological, and pharmaceutical parameters, including analysis of intrinsic heart mechanics, metabolism, and coronary vascular response. Results obtained in this model are under no influence of other organ systems, plasma concentration of hormones or ions and influence of autonomic nervous system. The review describes various isolated heart models, the modes of heart perfusion, and advantages and limitations of various experimental setups. It reports the improvements of perfusion setup according to Langendorff introduced by the authors.

  5. Analysis of vector models in quantification of artifacts produced by standard prosthetic inlays in Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT)--a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Różyło-Kalinowska, Ingrid; Miechowicz, Sławomir; Sarna-Boś, Katarzyna; Borowicz, Janusz; Kalinowski, Paweł

    2014-11-17

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a relatively new, but highly efficient imaging method applied first in dentistry in 1998. However, the quality of the obtained slices depends among other things on artifacts generated by dental restorations as well as orthodontic and prosthetic appliances. The aim of the study was to quantify the artifacts produced by standard prosthetic inlays in CBCT images. The material consisted of 17 standard prosthetic inlays mounted in dental roots embedded in resin. The samples were examined by means of a large field of view CBCT unit, Galileos (Sirona, Germany), at 85 kV and 14 mAs. The analysis was performed using Able 3DDoctor software for data in the CT raster space as well as by means of Materialise Magics software for generated vector models (STL). The masks generated in the raster space included the area of the inlays together with image artifacts. The region of interest (ROI) of the raster space is a set of voxels from a selected range of Hounsfield units (109-3071). Ceramic inlay with zirconium dioxide (Cera Post) as well as epoxy resin inlay including silica fibers enriched with zirconium (Easy Post) produced the most intense artifacts. The smallest image distortions were created by titanium inlays, both passive (Harald Nordin) and active (Flexi Flange). Inlays containing zirconium generated the strongest artifacts, thus leading to the greatest distortions in the CBCT images. Carbon fiber inlay did not considerably affect the image quality.

  6. Analysis of Vector Models in Quantification of Artifacts Produced by Standard Prosthetic Inlays in Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT – a Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Różyło-Kalinowska

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT is a relatively new, but highly efficient imaging method applied first in dentistry in 1998. However, the quality of the obtained slices depends among other things on artifacts generated by dental restorations as well as orthodontic and prosthetic appliances. The aim of the study was to quantify the artifacts produced by standard prosthetic inlays in CBCT images. The material consisted of 17 standard prosthetic inlays mounted in dental roots embedded in resin. The samples were examined by means of a large field of view CBCT unit, Galileos (Sirona, Germany, at 85 kV and 14 mAs. The analysis was performed using Able 3DDoctor software for data in the CT raster space as well as by means of Materialise Magics software for generated vector models (STL. The masks generated in the raster space included the area of the inlays together with image artifacts. The region of interest (ROI of the raster space is a set of voxels from a selected range of Hounsfield units (109-3071. Ceramic inlay with zirconium dioxide (Cera Post as well as epoxy resin inlay including silica fibers enriched with zirconium (Easy Post produced the most intense artifacts. The smallest image distortions were created by titanium inlays, both passive (Harald Nordin and active (Flexi Flange. Inlays containing zirconium generated the strongest artifacts, thus leading to the greatest distortions in the CBCT images. Carbon fiber inlay did not considerably affect the image quality.

  7. Evaluation of articular disc loading in the temporomandibular joints after prosthetic and pharmacological treatment in model studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihut, Małgorzata E; Margielewicz, Jerzy; Kijak, Edward; Wiśniewska, Grażyna

    2017-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint dysfunction is often related to excessive load in the stomatognathic system. The objective of the model tests, using numeric calculations, was to assess the articular disc loads in the temporomandibular joints after prosthetic and pharmacological treatment of functional disorders of the masticatory organ. The study involved 10 patients, aged 21-48 years, of both sexes, randomly selected from a group of 120 patients treated with relaxation occlusal splints (60 patients, group I) and intramuscular injection of botulinum toxin type A (60 patients, group II), suffering from temporomandibular joint dysfunction with the dominant muscle component. In all subjects, a specialized functional examination was carried out. Treatment groups: occlusal splint therapy (group I) and intramuscular injection of botulinum toxin type A (group II). An assessment of the loads of 4 disc zones of the temporomandibular joints was carried out based on the results of clinical studies (phase I of the study), and numeric model tests (phase II). In the representatives of the study groups (5 patients in each group), measurements of occlusal forces and an evaluation of tension of the masseter and temporalis muscle were performed. The results of the average load values for all evaluated zones of the right and left articular disc differ in a statistically significant way in favor of group II, with the exception of the external mid part of the discs. In the case of the anterior of the right disc, the load was lower in patients belonging to group I than in those obtained in group II. Botulinum toxin type A significantly reduces the loads within the temporomandibular joints, generated by masseter muscle hypertonia.

  8. Ultrasound imaging in lower limb prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Tania; Solomonidis, Stephan; Sandham, William; Spence, William

    2002-03-01

    The biomechanical interaction between the residual limb and the prosthetic socket determines the quality of fit of the socket in lower limb prosthetics. An understanding of this interaction and the development of quantitative measures to predict the quality of fit of the socket are important for optimal socket design. Finite-element modeling is used widely for biomechanical modeling of the limb/socket interaction and requires information on the internal and external geometry of the residual limb. Volumetric imaging methods such as X-ray computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasound have been used to obtain residual limb shape information. Of these modalities, ultrasound has been introduced most recently and its development for visualization in prosthetics is the least mature. This paper reviews ultrasound image acquisition and processing methods as they have been applied in lower limb prosthetics.

  9. Model human heart or brain signals

    CERN Document Server

    Tuncay, Caglar

    2008-01-01

    A new model is suggested and used to mimic various spatial or temporal designs in biological or non biological formations where the focus is on the normal or irregular electrical signals coming from human heart (ECG) or brain (EEG). The electrical activities in several muscles (EMG) or neurons or other organs of human or various animals, such as lobster pyloric neuron, guinea pig inferior olivary neuron, sepia giant axon and mouse neocortical pyramidal neuron and some spatial formations are also considered (in Appendix). In the biological applications, several elements (cells or tissues) in an organ are taken as various entries in a representative lattice (mesh) where the entries are connected to each other in terms of some molecular diffusions or electrical potential differences. The biological elements evolve in time (with the given tissue or organ) in terms of the mentioned connections (interactions) besides some individual feedings. The anatomical diversity of the species (or organs) is handled in terms o...

  10. Prosthetic Valve Thrombosis: Diagnosis and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Jalaj; Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Pinnamaneni, Sowmya; Sarungbam, Judy; Jain, Diwakar

    2016-01-01

    St. Jude mechanical prosthesis is the most commonly used prosthetic device with least valvular complications with excellent hemodynamics. However, prosthetic valve thrombosis is one of the serious complications, with rates between 0.03% and 0.13% per patient-year depending on the type of anticoagulation used and compliance to the therapy. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is the initial screening tool (class I) that would provide clues for the assessment of valvular hemodynamics. Fluoroscopy is an alternate imaging modality for the assessment of mechanical leaflet motion, especially in patients when prosthetic valves are difficult to image on TTE or transesophageal echocardiography. A complete fluoroscopic evaluation of a prosthetic valve includes assessment of valvular motion and structural integrity. Opening and closing angles can be measured fluoroscopically to determine whether a specific valve is functioning properly. We discuss a case of a 91-year-old man with thrombosis of bileaflet mechanical mitral prosthesis that was demonstrated on real-time fluoroscopy (not evident on TTE). An algorithmic approach to diagnosis and management of prosthetic heart valve thrombosis is outlined.

  11. Ontological Modeling of Transformation in Heart Defect Diagrams

    OpenAIRE

    Viswanath, Venkatesh; Tong, Tuanjie; Dinakarpandian, Deendayal; Lee, Yugyung

    2006-01-01

    The accurate portrayal of a large volume data of variable heart defects is crucial to providing good patient care in pediatric cardiology. Our research aims to span the universe of congenital heart defects by generating illustrative diagrams that enhance data interpretation. To accommodate the range and severity of defects to be represented, we base our diagrams on transformation models applied to a normal heart rather than a static set of defects. These models are based on a domain-specific ...

  12. Animal models of heart failure recent developments and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, M; Ryoke, T; Ross, J

    1997-07-01

    Heart failure is a complex syndrome characterized by inability of the heart to supply sufficient cardiac output to meet the metabolic needs of the body. Over the past few decades, a number of animal models of heart failure have been developed to study questions that cannot be readily studied in the clinical setting. Because the syndrome of heart failure in humans has many underlying causes, ranging from primary myocardial disease (often of unknown etiology) to myocardial failure consequent to ventricular overload with secondary cardiac hypertrophy (as in hypertension, valvular heart disease, or myocardial infarction), no single animal model can successfully mimic the pathophysiology of these clinical settings. Regardless of the original cardiac abnormality, however, the end-stage heart failure syndrome generally presents a picture of cardiac dilation and circulatory congestion associated with maladaptive neurohumoral responses affecting the heart and peripheral circulation, which provide prime targets for new treatment strategies. An ideal animal model of heart failure should mimic the clinical setting as closely as possible, be accessible and reproducible, relatively stable under chronic conditions, and sufficiently economical to permit experiments in a large number of animals. In this review, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of naturally occurring models of heart failure and models in which heart failure is induced in normal animals, focusing in particular on models that are useful for exploring disease mechanisms and interventions to prevent or treat heart failure. Much is being learned from large animals such as the dog and pig, although small animal models (rat and hamster) have many favorable features, and as genetic methods and miniaturized physiologic techniques mature, the mouse is beginning to provide gene-based models of cardiac failure aimed at better understanding of molecular mechanisms. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1997;7:161-167). © 1997

  13. Towards smart prosthetic hand: Adaptive probability based skeletan muscle fatigue model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Parmod; Sebastian, Anish; Potluri, Chandrasekhar; Urfer, Alex; Naidu, D; Schoen, Marco P

    2010-01-01

    Skeletal muscle force can be estimated using surface electromyographic (sEMG) signals. Usually, the surface location for the sensors is near the respective muscle motor unit points. Skeletal muscles generate a spatial EMG signal, which causes cross talk between different sEMG signal sensors. In this study, an array of three sEMG sensors is used to capture the information of muscle dynamics in terms of sEMG signals. The recorded sEMG signals are filtered utilizing optimized nonlinear Half-Gaussian Bayesian filters parameters, and the muscle force signal using a Chebyshev type-II filter. The filter optimization is accomplished using Genetic Algorithms. Three discrete time state-space muscle fatigue models are obtained using system identification and modal transformation for three sets of sensors for single motor unit. The outputs of these three muscle fatigue models are fused with a probabilistic Kullback Information Criterion (KIC) for model selection. The final fused output is estimated with an adaptive probability of KIC, which provides improved force estimates.

  14. Multiscale information modelling for heart morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulla, T.; Imms, R.; Schleich, J. M.; Summers, R.

    2010-07-01

    Science is made feasible by the adoption of common systems of units. As research has become more data intensive, especially in the biomedical domain, it requires the adoption of a common system of information models, to make explicit the relationship between one set of data and another, regardless of format. This is being realised through the OBO Foundry to develop a suite of reference ontologies, and NCBO Bioportal to provide services to integrate biomedical resources and functionality to visualise and create mappings between ontology terms. Biomedical experts tend to be focused at one level of spatial scale, be it biochemistry, cell biology, or anatomy. Likewise, the ontologies they use tend to be focused at a particular level of scale. There is increasing interest in a multiscale systems approach, which attempts to integrate between different levels of scale to gain understanding of emergent effects. This is a return to physiological medicine with a computational emphasis, exemplified by the worldwide Physiome initiative, and the European Union funded Network of Excellence in the Virtual Physiological Human. However, little work has been done on how information modelling itself may be tailored to a multiscale systems approach. We demonstrate how this can be done for the complex process of heart morphogenesis, which requires multiscale understanding in both time and spatial domains. Such an effort enables the integration of multiscale metrology.

  15. Corti's organ physiology-based cochlear model: a microelectronic prosthetic implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Francisco; Fernandez-Ramos, Raquel; Romero-Sanchez, Jorge; Martin, Jose Francisco

    2003-04-01

    Corti"s Organ is an Electro-Mechanical transducer that allows the energy coupling between acoustical stimuli and auditory nerve. Although the structure and funtionality of this organ are complex, state of the art models have been currently developed and tested. Cochlea model presented in this paper is based on the theories of Bekesy and others and concerns on the behaviour of auditory system on frequency-place domain and mechanisms of lateral inhibition. At the same time, present state of technology will permit us developing a microsystem that reproduce this phenomena applied to hearing aid prosthesis. Corti"s Organ is composed of more than 20.000 cilia excited by mean of travelling waves. These waves produce relative pressures distributed along the cochlea, exciting an specific number of cilia in a local way. Nonlinear mechanisms of local adaptation to the intensity (external cilia cells) and lateral inhibition (internal cilia cells) allow the selection of very few elements excited. These transmit a very precise intensity and frequency information. These signals are the only ones coupled to the auditory nerve. Distribution of pressure waves matches a quasilogaritmic law due to Cochlea morphology. Microsystem presented in this paper takes Bark"s law as an approximation to this behaviour consisting on grouped arbitrary elements composed of a set of selective coupled exciters (bank of filters according to Patterson"s model).These sets apply the intensity adaptation principles and lateral inhibition. Elements excited during the process generate a bioelectric signal in the same way than cilia cell. A microelectronic solution is presented for the development of an implantable prosthesis device.

  16. Knee model of hydrodynamic lubrication during the gait cycle and the influence of prosthetic joint conformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascau, Antonio; Guardia, Blanca; Puertolas, José Antonio; Gómez-Barrena, Enrique

    2009-01-01

    The influence of the total joint components' elastic deformation on lubrication is generally accepted, but little is known about the influence of joint conformity under hydrodynamic lubrication based on fluid film interposition. The aim of this study was to evaluate induced pressure and stresses in the knee under fluid film lubrication during the stance phase of walking under various joint conformity conditions. A theoretical two-dimensional (2D) geometric model of knee prosthesis contact, with Dirichlet boundary conditions at both edges, and with a conformity index (CI) of 0, 0.3, 0.5, 0.6, 0.7, 0.8, 0.9, 0.92, 0.94, 0.96, 0.98, 0.99, 0.995, and 1.0, was used to calculate the spatiotemporal lubricant flow on a synovial fluid rheological model. With the instantaneous load as a source term, the Reynolds lubrication equation was subsequently solved following a finite volume approach in two dimensions and three dimensions. Conformity strongly influenced the peak pressure, from 47 MPa with CI = 0 to 1.4 MPa with CI = 1, with a definite behavior change from CI = 0.96. The role of hydrodynamic lubrication was restricted to early steps of the stance phase. With CI conformity > 0.96. The present model suggested the limited modifying effect of hydrodynamic lubrication in total knee replacement systems. However, its role during the early stance phase, coupled with high conformity, helps significantly to decrease compressive stresses on the polyethylene, fostering the beneficial effect of high conformity in a mixed lubrication regime. This beneficial effect may also be of great interest in total knee replacement systems based on materials with less deformation.

  17. Mathematical modeling and mechanical and histopathological testing of porous prosthetic pylon for direct skeletal attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkin, Mark; Raykhtsaum, Grigory; Pilling, John; Shukeylo, Yuri; Moxson, Vladimir; Duz, Volodimir; Lewandowski, John; Connolly, Raymond; Kistenberg, Robert S.; Dalton, John F.; Prilutsky, Boris; Jacobson, Stewart

    2010-01-01

    This article presents recent results in the development of the skin and bone integrated pylon (SBIP) intended for direct skeletal attachment of limb prostheses. In our previous studies of the porous SBIP-1 and SBIP-2 prototypes, the bond site between the porous pylons and residuum bone and skin did not show the inflammation characteristically observed when solid pylons are used. At the same time, porosity diminished the strength of the pylon. To find a reasonable balance between the biological conductivity and the strength of the porous pylon, we developed a mathematical model of the composite permeable structure. A novel manufacturing process was implemented, and the new SBIP-3 prototype was tested mechanically. The minimal strength requirements established earlier for the SBIP were exceeded threefold. The first histopathological analysis of skin, bone, and the implanted SBIP-2 pylons was conducted on two rats and one cat. The histopathological analysis provided new evidence of inflammation-free, deep ingrowth of skin and bone cells throughout the SBIP structure. PMID:19675985

  18. Neuro-based Thumb-tip Force and Joint Angle Modelling for Development of Prosthetic Thumb Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor Anija Jalaludin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Human fingers have a specific role that contributes to different hand functions. Among these fingers, the thumb plays the most special function as an anchor to many hand activities. As a result, the loss of the thumb due to traumatic accidents can be catastrophic as proper hand function will be severely limited. In order to solve this problem, a prosthetic thumb is developed to be worn in complementing the function of the rest of the fingers. The movement of the prosthetic device can be naturally controlled by using electromyogram (EMG signals. In this work, the EMG signals from the human muscles were measured in different thumb configurations and thumb-tip forces in flexion movement. The muscles involved are the Adductor Pollicis (AP, Flexor Pollicis Brevis (FPB, Abductor Pollicis Brevis (APB and First Dorsal Interosseous (FDI. The classification of the EMG signals based on different force and thumb configurations is performed using an Artificial Neural Network (ANN. From a series of experiments, the results show that the neural network efficiently classified the signals and a unique set of EMG signals was generated for each thumb movement and force. Therefore, EMG signals were used to control the prosthetic movement with aid from the developed neural network.

  19. Xenopus: An Emerging Model for Studying Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltenbrun, Erin; Tandon, Panna; Amin, Nirav M.; Waldron, Lauren; Showell, Chris; Conlon, Frank L.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart defects affect nearly 1% of all newborns and are a significant cause of infant death. Clinical studies have identified a number of congenital heart syndromes associated with mutations in genes that are involved in the complex process of cardiogenesis. The African clawed frog, Xenopus, has been instrumental in studies of vertebrate heart development and provides a valuable tool to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying human congenital heart diseases. In this review, we discuss the methodologies that make Xenopus an ideal model system to investigate heart development and disease. We also outline congenital heart conditions linked to cardiac genes that have been well-studied in Xenopus and describe some emerging technologies that will further aid in the study of these complex syndromes. PMID:21538812

  20. Conceptual model for heart failure disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrikopoulou, Efstathia; Abbate, Kariann; Whellan, David J

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this review is to propose a conceptual model for heart failure (HF) disease management (HFDM) and to define the components of an efficient HFDM plan in reference to this model. Articles that evaluated 1 or more of the following aspects of HFDM were reviewed: (1) outpatient clinic follow-up; (2) self-care interventions to enhance patient skills; and (3) remote evaluation of worsening HF either using structured telephone support (STS) or by monitoring device data (telemonitoring). The success of programs in reducing readmissions and mortality were mixed. Outpatient follow-up programs generally resulted in improved outcomes, including decreased readmissions. Based on 1 meta-analysis, specialty clinics improved outcomes and nonspecialty clinics did not. Results from self-care programs were inconsistent and might have been affected by patient cognitive status and educational level, and intervention intensity. Telemonitoring, despite initially promising meta-analyses demonstrating a decrease in the number and duration of HF-related readmissions and all-cause mortality rates at follow-up, has not been shown in randomized trials to consistently reduce readmissions or mortality. However, evidence from device monitoring trials in particular might have been influenced by technology and design issues that might be rectified in future trials. Results from the literature suggest that the ideal HFDM plan would include outpatient follow-up at an HF specialty clinic and continuous education to improve patient self-care. The end result of this plan would lead to better understanding on the part of the patient and improved patient ability to recognize and respond to signs of decompensation. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparison of in vitro flows past a mechanical heart valve in anatomical and axisymmetric aorta models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haya, Laura; Tavoularis, Stavros

    2017-06-01

    Flow characteristics past a bileaflet mechanical heart valve were measured under physiological flow conditions in a straight tube with an axisymmetric expansion, similar to vessels used in previous studies, and in an anatomical model of the aorta. We found that anatomical features, including the three-lobed sinus and the aorta's curvature affected significantly the flow characteristics. The turbulent and viscous stresses were presented and discussed as indicators for potential blood damage and thrombosis. Both types of stresses, averaged over the two axial measurement planes, were significantly lower in the anatomical model than in the axisymmetric one. This difference was attributed to the lower height-to-width ratio and more gradual contraction of the anatomical aortic sinus. The curvature of the aorta caused asymmetries in the velocity and stress distributions during forward flow. Secondary flows resulting from the aorta's curvature are thought to have redistributed the fluid stresses transversely, resulting in a more homogeneous stress distribution in the anatomical aortic root than in the axisymmetric root. The results of this study demonstrate the importance of modelling accurately the aortic geometry in experimental and computational studies of prosthetic devices. Moreover, our findings suggest that grafts used for aortic root replacement should approximate as closely as possible the shape of the natural sinuses.

  2. Stochastic heart-rate model can reveal pathologic cardiac dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuusela, Tom

    2004-03-01

    A simple one-dimensional Langevin-type stochastic difference equation can simulate the heart-rate fluctuations in a time scale from minutes to hours. The model consists of a deterministic nonlinear part and a stochastic part typical of Gaussian noise, and both parts can be directly determined from measured heart-rate data. Data from healthy subjects typically exhibit the deterministic part with two or more stable fixed points. Studies of 15 congestive heart-failure subjects reveal that the deterministic part of pathologic heart dynamics has no clear stable fixed points. Direct simulations of the stochastic model for normal and pathologic cases can produce statistical parameters similar to those of real subjects. Results directly indicate that pathologic situations simplify the heart-rate control system.

  3. Utilisation of three-dimensional printed heart models for operative planning of complex congenital heart defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olejník, Peter; Nosal, Matej; Havran, Tomas; Furdova, Adriana; Cizmar, Maros; Slabej, Michal; Thurzo, Andrej; Vitovic, Pavol; Klvac, Martin; Acel, Tibor; Masura, Jozef

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of the three-dimensional (3D) printing of cardiovascular structures. To explore whether utilisation of 3D printed heart replicas can improve surgical and catheter interventional planning in patients with complex congenital heart defects. Between December 2014 and November 2015 we fabricated eight cardiovascular models based on computed tomography data in patients with complex spatial anatomical relationships of cardiovascular structures. A Bland-Altman analysis was used to assess the accuracy of 3D printing by comparing dimension measurements at analogous anatomical locations between the printed models and digital imagery data, as well as between printed models and in vivo surgical findings. The contribution of 3D printed heart models for perioperative planning improvement was evaluated in the four most representative patients. Bland-Altman analysis confirmed the high accuracy of 3D cardiovascular printing. Each printed model offered an improved spatial anatomical orientation of cardiovascular structures. Current 3D printers can produce authentic copies of patients` cardiovascular systems from computed tomography data. The use of 3D printed models can facilitate surgical or catheter interventional procedures in patients with complex congenital heart defects due to better preoperative planning and intraoperative orientation.

  4. Heart Rate Variability Measures and Models

    CERN Document Server

    Teich, M C; Jost, B M; Vibe-Rheymer, K; Heneghan, C; Teich, Malvin C.; Lowen, Steven B.; Jost, Bradley M.; Vibe-Rheymer, Karin; Heneghan, Conor

    2001-01-01

    We focus on various measures of the fluctuations of the sequence of intervals between beats of the human heart, and how such fluctuations can be used to assess the presence or likelihood of cardiovascular disease. We examine sixteen such measures and their suitability for correctly classifying heartbeat records of various lengths as normal or revealing the presence of cardiac dysfunction, particularly congestive heart failure. Using receiver-operating-characteristic analysis we demonstrate that scale-dependent measures prove substantially superior to scale-independent ones. The wavelet-transform standard deviation at a scale near 32 heartbeat intervals, and its spectral counterpart near 1/32 cycles/interval, turn out to provide reliable results using heartbeat records just minutes long. We further establish for all subjects that the human heartbeat has an underlying stochastic origin rather than arising from a chaotic attractor. Finally, we develop a mathematical point process that emulates the human heartbea...

  5. Rotationally Actuated Prosthetic Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, William E.; Belcher, Jewell G., Jr.; Carden, James R.; Vest, Thomas W.

    1991-01-01

    Prosthetic hand attached to end of remaining part of forearm and to upper arm just above elbow. Pincerlike fingers pushed apart to degree depending on rotation of forearm. Simpler in design, simpler to operate, weighs less, and takes up less space.

  6. Mathematical Modeling of Flow Characteristics in the Embryonic Chick Heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heebøll-Christensen, Jesper

    . Furthermore it is concluded that the observed Liebau effect does depend on the impedance of the tubes, the frequency and position of the compression pump, but above all the characterization of the pumping function. Different pumping functions are employed in the modeling but no defining characteristics...... modified inertia, and resistance due to friction and curvature of the multilayered tubular heart. Through the modeling, flow conditions in the embryonic heart are characterized. The models suggest that eccentric rather than concentric deformation of the beating heart is optimal for mean flows induced...... the models are not conclusive on this point. In addition the Liebau effect is investigated in a simpler system containing two elastic tubes joined to form a liquid filled ring, with a compression pump at an asymmetric location. Through comparison to other reports the system validates model construction...

  7. Inspection of Conductive Prosthetic Replacements using Electromagnetic Methods of Non-Destructive Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Strapacova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the use of electromagnetic methods of non-destructive testing for detecting of inhomogeneities presence in a prosthetic replacement with focus on strut fractures in prosthetic heart valves. In the first part of this paper there are described a basic principle of eddy current testing, heart valve replacement and materials which are usually used for it. The experimental part contains description of simulated problem, obtained simulation results and their interpretation for use in medicine.

  8. Modeling baroreflex regulation of heart rate during orthostatic stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olufsen, Mette; Tran, Hien T.; Ottesen, Johnny T.

    2006-01-01

    . The model uses blood pressure measured in the finger as an input to model heart rate dynamics in response to changes in baroreceptor nerve firing rate, sympathetic and parasympathetic responses, vestibulo-sympathetic reflex, and concentrations of norepinephrine and acetylcholine. We formulate an inverse...

  9. A Quadratic Nonlinear Prediction-Based Heart Motion Model Following Control Algorithm in Robotic-Assisted Beating Heart Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Liang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Off‐pump coronary artery bypass graft surgery outperforms the traditional on‐pump surgery because the assisted robotic tools can cancel the relative motion between the beating heart and the robotic tools, which reduces post‐surgery complications for patients. The challenge for the robot assisted tool when tracking the beating heart is the abrupt change caused by the nonlinear nature of heart motion and high precision surgery requirements. A characteristic analysis of 3D heart motion data through bi‐spectral analysis demonstrates the quadratic nonlinearity in heart motion. Therefore, it is necessary to introduce nonlinear heart motion prediction into the motion tracking control procedures. In this paper, the heart motion tracking problem is transformed into a heart motion model following problem by including the adaptive heart motion model into the controller. Moreover, the model following algorithm with the nonlinear heart motion model embedded inside provides more accurate future reference by the quadratic term of sinusoid series, which could enhance the tracking accuracy of sharp change point and approximate the motion with sufficient detail. The experiment results indicate that the proposed algorithm outperforms the linear prediction‐based model following controller in terms of tracking accuracy (root mean square.

  10. Welding of Prosthetic Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciechowska M.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the techniques of joining metal denture elements, used in prosthetic dentistry: the traditional soldering technique with a gas burner and a new technique of welding with a laser beam; the aim of the study was to make a comparative assessment of the quality of the joints in view of the possibility of applying them in prosthetic structures. Fractographic examinations were conducted along with tensile strength and impact strength tests, and the quality of the joints was assessed compared to the solid metal. The experiments have shown that the metal elements used to make dentures, joined by the technique which employs a laser beam, have better strength properties than those achieved with a gas burner.

  11. Prosthetics in Paediatric Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vulićević Zoran

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Premature loss of teeth in children may lead to both functional and esthetic problems. Missing teeth in both anterior and posterior regions may cause malfunctions in mastication and proper pronunciation. If the missing teeth are not replaced, further complications may occur, including adjacent tooth migration, loss of alveolar bone, and irregular occlusion. Considering the sensitive nature of children, loss of teeth may cause the development of insecurities and low self esteem problems. Due to dynamic nature of growth in children and adolescents, prosthetic appliances must not hinder development of orofacial system, and must meet adequate esthetic and functional standards. Dental prosthetic appliances in paediatrics must be planned with respect to the special conditions that led to tooth loss or damage. Multi-disciplinary approach is needed, under constant supervision of paediatric dentist and orthodontist, as well as regular checkups with clinical and radiographical examinations.

  12. DARPA Revolutionizing Prosthetics 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    therapeutic applications  System performance validation and design compliance  End-to-end interactive simulation  Acquires control signals ( myoelectric ...Cortical Control for Hand Movement CalTech • Higher Cortex Signal /Intent Extraction Otto Bock • Prosthetic Components • Control Bus Architecture...Clinical Support APL • Program Management • System Engineering & Integration • Signal & Image processing • Virtual Reality & Controls RIC • Virtual

  13. Magnets in prosthetic dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, M A; Walmsley, A D; Harris, I R

    2001-08-01

    Magnetic retention is a popular method of attaching removable prostheses to either retained roots or osseointegrated implants. This review chronicles the development of magnets in dentistry and summarizes future research in their use. The literature was researched by using the Science Citation Index and Compendex Web from 1981 to 2000. Articles published before 1981 were hand researched from citations in other publications. Articles that discussed the use of magnets in relation to prosthetic dentistry were selected.

  14. Development of prosthetic skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilaru, Rohit

    The objective of this research was to embed tactile sensors in polyimides. This novel method could be utilized to realize prosthetic skin for sensing different kinds of mechanical stimuli. Tactile sensors have an increasing demand in medical sectors: upper and lower-limb prosthetics and in the industrial sectors: robot end-effectors, grippers and manipulators. The sensors developed are targeted for prosthetic arm tactile sensing applications. Current work presents piezoresistive differential pressure sensors fabricated on flexible polyimide film or substrate. A unique technique to bond a flexible superstrate polyimide layer to a MEMS tactile sensor array is presented in this thesis. The sensor is made of aluminium oxide membrane layer with nichrome piezoresistors as the half-Wheatstone bridge elements. Four different types of sensor designs have been characterized to obtain gauge factor of thin film nichrome. The sensor arrays with and without the superstrate film were simulated for obtaining the maximum stress, average strain and deflection of the membrane. The maximum change in output voltage was 0.8 mV. The gauge factors calculated for tactile sensor with superstrate range between 2.2 to 7.8 and without superstrate range 1.5 to 5.7.

  15. Design and Implementation of Prosthetic Arm using Gear Motor Control Technique with Appropriate Testing

    CERN Document Server

    Neogi, Biswarup; Ghosal, Soumya; Das, Achintya; Tibarewala, D N

    2011-01-01

    Any part of the human body replication procedure commences the prosthetic control science. This paper highlights the hardware design technique of a prosthetic arm with implementation of gear motor control aspect. The prosthetic control arm movement has been demonstrated in this paper applying processor programming and with the successful testing of the designed prosthetic model. The architectural design of the prosthetic arm here has been replaced by lighter material instead of heavy metal, as well as the traditional EMG (electro myographic) signal has been replaced by the muscle strain.

  16. Human interstitial cellular model in therapeutics of heart valve calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Caimei; Tang, Hai; Mei, Zijian; Li, Nichujie; Zeng, Zhi; Darko, Kwame Oteng; Yin, Yulong; Hu, Chien-An Andy; Yang, Xiaoping

    2017-05-23

    Calcific aortic valve disease is a common, severe heart condition that is currently with no proven, effective drug treatment and requires a surgical valve replacement or an entire heart explanation. Thus, developing novel, targeted therapeutic approaches becomes a major goal for cardiovascular disease research. To achieve this goal, isolated heart valve interstitial cells could be an advanced model to explore molecular mechanisms and measure drug efficacy. Based on this progress, molecular mechanisms that harbor components of  inflammation and fibrosis coupled with proteins, for example, BMP-2, TLRs, RANKL, Osteoprotegerin, have been proposed. Small molecules or antibodies targeting these proteins have shown promising efficacy for either reversing or slowing down calcification development in vitro. In this review, we summarize these potential therapeutics with some highlights of interstitial cellular models.

  17. Upper extremity amputations and prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovadia, Steven A; Askari, Morad

    2015-02-01

    Upper extremity amputations are most frequently indicated by severe traumatic injuries. The location of the injury will determine the level of amputation. Preservation of extremity length is often a goal. The amputation site will have important implications on the functional status of the patient and options for prosthetic reconstruction. Advances in amputation techniques and prosthetic reconstructions promote improved quality of life. In this article, the authors review the principles of upper extremity amputation, including techniques, amputation sites, and prosthetic reconstructions.

  18. Laminar structure of the heart: a mathematical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrice, I J; Hunter, P J; Smaill, B H

    1997-05-01

    A mathematical description of cardiac anatomy is presented for use with finite element models of the electrical activation and mechanical function of the heart. The geometry of the heart is given in terms of prolate spheroidal coordinates defined at the nodes of a finite element mesh and interpolated within elements by a combination of linear Lagrange and cubic Hermite basis functions. Cardiac microstructure is assumed to have three axes of symmetry: one aligned with the muscle fiber orientation (the fiber axis); a second set orthogonal to the fiber direction and lying in the newly identified myocardial sheet plane (the sheet axis); and a third set orthogonal to the first two, in the sheet-normal direction. The geometry, fiber-axis direction, and sheet-axis direction of a dog heart are fitted with parameters defined at the nodes of the finite element mesh. The fiber and sheet orientation parameters are defined with respect to the ventricular geometry such that 1) they can be applied to any heart of known dimensions, and 2) they can be used for the same heart at various states of deformation, as is needed, for example, in continuum models of ventricular contraction.

  19. ROC Analysis and a Realistic Model of Heart Rate Variability

    CERN Document Server

    Thurner, S; Teich, M C; Thurner, Stefan; Feurstein, Markus C.; Teich, Malvin C.

    1998-01-01

    We have carried out a pilot study on a standard collection of electrocardiograms from patients who suffer from congestive heart failure, and subjects without cardiac pathology, using receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) analysis. The scale-dependent wavelet-coefficient standard deviation superior to two commonly used measures of cardiac dysfunction when the two classes of patients cannot be completely separated. A jittered integrate-and-fire model with a fractal Gaussian-noise kernel provides a realistic simulation of heartbeat sequences for both heart-failure patients and normal subjects.

  20. Pregnancy in women with prosthetic heart valves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieper, P. G.; Balci, A.; Van Dijk, A. P.

    2008-01-01

    Pregnancy in women with mechanical valve prostheses has a high maternal complication rate including valve thrombosis mid death. Coumarin derivatives are relatively safe for the mother with a lower incidence of valve thrombosis than unfractionated and low-molecular-weight heparin, but carry the risk

  1. Ventricular repolarization in a rat model of global heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krandycheva, Valeria; Kharin, Sergey; Strelkova, Marina; Shumikhin, Konstantin; Sobolev, Aleksey; Shmakov, Dmitry

    2013-07-01

    Isoproterenol in high doses induces infarction-like myocardial damage and structural and functional remodelling of the ventricular myocardium. The purpose of the present study was to investigate ventricular repolarization in a rat model of isoproterenol-induced heart failure. Isoproterenol was administered twice to female Wistar rats (170 mg/kg, s.c., 24 h apart). Four weeks after the injections, cardiac output was measured and unipolar epicardial ventricular electrograms were recorded in situ. Activation-recovery intervals were calculated to assess repolarization. Histological examination of the heart ventricles was also performed. Heart failure in rats treated with isoproterenol was indicated by myocardial histopathological damage and reduced cardiac output. In rats with heart failure, the regional differences in activation-recovery interval prolongation over the ventricular epicardium resulted in increasing heterogeneity in the activation-recovery interval distribution and increasing repolarization heterogeneity of the ventricular subepicardium. Myocardial damage and haemodynamic changes in heart failure induced by isoproterenol were accompanied by significant changes in ventricular repolarization, which were not associated with myocardial hypertrophy.

  2. Modeling heart rate variability including the effect of sleep stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliński, Mateusz; Gierałtowski, Jan; Żebrowski, Jan

    2016-02-01

    We propose a model for heart rate variability (HRV) of a healthy individual during sleep with the assumption that the heart rate variability is predominantly a random process. Autonomic nervous system activity has different properties during different sleep stages, and this affects many physiological systems including the cardiovascular system. Different properties of HRV can be observed during each particular sleep stage. We believe that taking into account the sleep architecture is crucial for modeling the human nighttime HRV. The stochastic model of HRV introduced by Kantelhardt et al. was used as the initial starting point. We studied the statistical properties of sleep in healthy adults, analyzing 30 polysomnographic recordings, which provided realistic information about sleep architecture. Next, we generated synthetic hypnograms and included them in the modeling of nighttime RR interval series. The results of standard HRV linear analysis and of nonlinear analysis (Shannon entropy, Poincaré plots, and multiscale multifractal analysis) show that—in comparison with real data—the HRV signals obtained from our model have very similar properties, in particular including the multifractal characteristics at different time scales. The model described in this paper is discussed in the context of normal sleep. However, its construction is such that it should allow to model heart rate variability in sleep disorders. This possibility is briefly discussed.

  3. Thermoplastics for prosthetic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, R B; Davies, R M

    1981-10-01

    The rapid and accurate thermoforming of plastics for prosthetic applications has been the subject of considerable research and development by the Bioengineering Centre. This paper outlines the progress in the general concepts that have been effected to date. The original below knee (B/K) socket vacuum forming technique has been extended to above knee (A/K) and supracondylar cases, and there have been developments in rotational casting technology. The work is necessarily based on a sound understanding of the properties of the materials concerned and of the associated manufacturing processes. The contribution of the Bioengineering Centre is outlined together with summaries of collaborative work carried out with other organizations.

  4. Functional imaging and modeling of the heart. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachse, F.B. [Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Nora Eccles Harrison Cardiovascular Research and Training Institute; Seemann, G. (eds.) [Karlsruhe Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Biomedizinische Technik

    2007-07-01

    Functional imaging and modeling constitute important research approaches to gaining insights into physiology and pathophysiology of the human heart. Applications of these approaches are promising to support clinical diagnosis and therapy of cardiac diseases, which are the most common cause of death in the western world and a major health problem in Asia. The book contains 48 contributions concerning the following topics: Imaging and image analysis, cardiac electrophysiology, electro- and magnetocardiography, cardiac mechanics and clinical applications, imaging and anatomic modeling.

  5. Modelling a Parasystolic Rhythm in a Heart Transplanted Patient

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, M; Santiago, T; Rebocho, M J; Melo, J; Ducla-Soares, E; Santiago, Teresa

    1999-01-01

    A parasystole from a heart transplanted patient was analysed via the beat to beat - RR interval time series obtained from the electrocardiogram (ECG). The dysrhythmia, resulting from the coexistence of two pacemakers, the sinus node and an ectopic focus, presents distinctive regular patterns with transitions from one pattern to another occurring abruptly. It is shown that the parasystolic rhythm can be simulated by a model involving two oscillators firing at fixed rates, under the restriction that neither is allowed to fire during the other's refractory period. We found that the structure of the generated RR time series is essentially determined by the ratio of the period of the two oscillators. In the case of the heart transplanted patient that has a small heart rate variability as a result of heart denervation, the model could predict the sequence of RR intervals over a considerable period of time (~ 80 beats with an error < 6%). From a physiological point of view, our results imply that the interaction ...

  6. Multifractal heart rate dynamics in human cardiovascular model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotani, Kiyoshi; Takamasu, Kiyoshi; Safonov, Leonid; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2003-05-01

    Human cardiovascular and/or cardio-respiratory systems are shown to exhibit both multifractal and synchronous dynamics, and we recently developed a nonlinear, physiologically plausible model for the synchronization between heartbeat and respiration (Kotani, et al. Phys. Rev. E 65: 051923, 2002). By using the same model, we now show the multifractality in the heart rate dynamics. We find that beat-to-beat monofractal noise (fractional Brownian motion) added to the brain stem cardiovascular areas results in significantly broader singularity spectra for heart rate through interactions between sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems. We conclude that the model proposed here would be useful in studying the complex cardiovascular and/or cardio- respiratory dynamics in humans.

  7. A point-process model of human heartbeat intervals: new definitions of heart rate and heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Riccardo; Matten, Eric C; Alabi, Abdulrasheed A; Brown, Emery N

    2005-01-01

    Heart rate is a vital sign, whereas heart rate variability is an important quantitative measure of cardiovascular regulation by the autonomic nervous system. Although the design of algorithms to compute heart rate and assess heart rate variability is an active area of research, none of the approaches considers the natural point-process structure of human heartbeats, and none gives instantaneous estimates of heart rate variability. We model the stochastic structure of heartbeat intervals as a history-dependent inverse Gaussian process and derive from it an explicit probability density that gives new definitions of heart rate and heart rate variability: instantaneous R-R interval and heart rate standard deviations. We estimate the time-varying parameters of the inverse Gaussian model by local maximum likelihood and assess model goodness-of-fit by Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests based on the time-rescaling theorem. We illustrate our new definitions in an analysis of human heartbeat intervals from 10 healthy subjects undergoing a tilt-table experiment. Although several studies have identified deterministic, nonlinear dynamical features in human heartbeat intervals, our analysis shows that a highly accurate description of these series at rest and in extreme physiological conditions may be given by an elementary, physiologically based, stochastic model.

  8. A VLSI field-programmable mixed-signal array to perform neural signal processing and neural modeling in a prosthetic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamford, Simeon A; Hogri, Roni; Giovannucci, Andrea; Taub, Aryeh H; Herreros, Ivan; Verschure, Paul F M J; Mintz, Matti; Del Giudice, Paolo

    2012-07-01

    A very-large-scale integration field-programmable mixed-signal array specialized for neural signal processing and neural modeling has been designed. This has been fabricated as a core on a chip prototype intended for use in an implantable closed-loop prosthetic system aimed at rehabilitation of the learning of a discrete motor response. The chosen experimental context is cerebellar classical conditioning of the eye-blink response. The programmable system is based on the intimate mixing of switched capacitor analog techniques with low speed digital computation; power saving innovations within this framework are presented. The utility of the system is demonstrated by the implementation of a motor classical conditioning model applied to eye-blink conditioning in real time with associated neural signal processing. Paired conditioned and unconditioned stimuli were repeatedly presented to an anesthetized rat and recordings were taken simultaneously from two precerebellar nuclei. These paired stimuli were detected in real time from this multichannel data. This resulted in the acquisition of a trigger for a well-timed conditioned eye-blink response, and repetition of unpaired trials constructed from the same data led to the extinction of the conditioned response trigger, compatible with natural cerebellar learning in awake animals.

  9. Prosthetic abutment influences bone biomechanical behavior of immediately loaded implants

    OpenAIRE

    Camargos, Germana de Villa; SOTTO-MAIOR,Bruno Salles; Silva,Wander José da; Priscilla Cardoso LAZARI; Del Bel Cury, Altair Antoninha

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to evaluate the influence of the type of prosthetic abutment associated to different implant connection on bone biomechanical behavior of immediately and delayed loaded implants. Computed tomography-based finite element models comprising a mandible with a single molar implant were created with different types of prosthetic abutment (UCLA or conical), implant connection (external hexagon, EH or internal hexagon, IH), and occlusal loading (axial or oblique), for both i...

  10. The Sydney Heart Bank: improving translational research while eliminating or reducing the use of animal models of human heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Remedios, C G; Lal, S P; Li, A; McNamara, J; Keogh, A; Macdonald, P S; Cooke, R; Ehler, E; Knöll, R; Marston, S B; Stelzer, J; Granzier, H; Bezzina, C; van Dijk, S; De Man, F; Stienen, G J M; Odeberg, J; Pontén, F; Linke, W; van der Velden, J

    2017-08-14

    The Sydney Heart Bank (SHB) is one of the largest human heart tissue banks in existence. Its mission is to provide high-quality human heart tissue for research into the molecular basis of human heart failure by working collaboratively with experts in this field. We argue that, by comparing tissues from failing human hearts with age-matched non-failing healthy donor hearts, the results will be more relevant than research using animal models, particularly if their physiology is very different from humans. Tissue from heart surgery must generally be used soon after collection or it significantly deteriorates. Freezing is an option but it raises concerns that freezing causes substantial damage at the cellular and molecular level. The SHB contains failing samples from heart transplant patients and others who provided informed consent for the use of their tissue for research. All samples are cryopreserved in liquid nitrogen within 40 min of their removal from the patient, and in less than 5-10 min in the case of coronary arteries and left ventricle samples. To date, the SHB has collected tissue from about 450 failing hearts (>15,000 samples) from patients with a wide range of etiologies as well as increasing numbers of cardiomyectomy samples from patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The Bank also has hearts from over 120 healthy organ donors whose hearts, for a variety of reasons (mainly tissue-type incompatibility with waiting heart transplant recipients), could not be used for transplantation. Donor hearts were collected by the St Vincent's Hospital Heart and Lung transplantation team from local hospitals or within a 4-h jet flight from Sydney. They were flushed with chilled cardioplegic solution and transported to Sydney where they were quickly cryopreserved in small samples. Failing and/or donor samples have been used by more than 60 research teams around the world, and have resulted in more than 100 research papers. The tissues most commonly requested are

  11. Simulation of heart rate variability model in a network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascaval, Radu C.; D'Apice, Ciro; D'Arienzo, Maria Pia

    2017-07-01

    We consider a 1-D model for the simulation of the blood flow in the cardiovascular system. As inflow condition we consider a model for the aortic valve. The opening and closing of the valve is dynamically determined by the pressure difference between the left ventricular and aortic pressures. At the outflow we impose a peripheral resistance model. To approximate the solution we use a numerical scheme based on the discontinuous Galerkin method. We also considering a variation in heart rate and terminal reflection coefficient due to monitoring of the pressure in the network.

  12. Anticoagulation for Prosthetic Valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Kaneko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Implantation of prosthetic valve requires consideration for anticoagulation. The current guideline recommends warfarin on all mechanical valves. Dabigatran is the new generation anticoagulation medication which is taken orally and does not require frequent monitoring. This drug is approved for treatment for atrial fibrillation and venous thromboembolism, but the latest large trial showed that this drug increases adverse events when used for mechanical valve anticoagulation. On-X valve is the new generation mechanical valve which is considered to require less anticoagulation due to its flow dynamics. The latest study showed that lower anticoagulation level lowers the incidence of bleeding, while the risk of thromboembolism and thrombosis remained the same. Anticoagulation poses dilemma in cases such as pregnancy and major bleeding event. During pregnancy, warfarin can be continued throughout pregnancy and switched to heparin derivative during 6–12 weeks and >36 weeks of gestation. Warfarin can be safely started after 1-2 weeks of discontinuation following major bleeding episode.

  13. Pursuing prosthetic electronic skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chortos, Alex; Liu, Jia; Bao, Zhenan

    2016-09-01

    Skin plays an important role in mediating our interactions with the world. Recreating the properties of skin using electronic devices could have profound implications for prosthetics and medicine. The pursuit of artificial skin has inspired innovations in materials to imitate skin's unique characteristics, including mechanical durability and stretchability, biodegradability, and the ability to measure a diversity of complex sensations over large areas. New materials and fabrication strategies are being developed to make mechanically compliant and multifunctional skin-like electronics, and improve brain/machine interfaces that enable transmission of the skin's signals into the body. This Review will cover materials and devices designed for mimicking the skin's ability to sense and generate biomimetic signals.

  14. Advances in upper extremity prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlotolow, Dan A; Kozin, Scott H

    2012-11-01

    Until recently, upper extremity prostheses had changed little since World War II. In 2006, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency responded to an increasing number of military amputees with the Revolutionizing Prosthetics program. The program has yielded several breakthroughs both in the engineering of new prosthetic arms and in the control of those arms. Direct brain-wave control of a limb with 22° of freedom may be within reach. In the meantime, advances such as individually powered digits have opened the door to multifunctional full and partial hand prostheses. Restoring sensation to the prosthetic limb remains a major challenge to full integration of the limb into a patient's self-image.

  15. 十自由度假手结构设计及动力学建模仿真%Structural Design and Dynamic Modeling and Simulation of 10 DOF Prosthetic Hand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田艳举; 张小栋; 张黎明

    2016-01-01

    针对传统假手运动不够顺畅和不够灵活的缺点,参考人手的结构,设计了一种五指十自由度的假手.该假手采用模块化的设计思想,除拇指外的四指尺寸结构完全相同,每个手指具有2个屈曲自由度;拇指具有屈曲和侧摆2个自由度.在此结构的基础上,针对拇指和食指进行了动力学建模,并通过Matlab数值仿真和ADAMS虚拟实验的对比,验证了动力学模型的正确性.%To address the shortcoming of movement inflexibility of the traditional prosthetic hand,a five-fingered 10-DOF prosthetic hand is designed based on the natural hand.Using the modular design concept, this prosthetic hand's thumb has two DOF:buckling and side-sway,and all of the other four fingers have the same size and structure,each of which has 2 buckling DOF.Then dynamic modeling is performed for the thumb and index finger.The correctness of the dynamic model is verified by comparing the Matlab numerical simulation and the ADAMS virtual experiment.

  16. Comparison of multidetector-row computed tomography to echocardiography and fluoroscopy for evaluation of patients with mechanical prosthetic valve obstruction.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Symersky, P.; Budde, R.P.; Mol, B.A. de; Prokop, M.

    2009-01-01

    For evaluation of prosthetic heart valve obstruction echocardiography and fluoroscopy provide primarily functional information but may not unequivocally establish the cause of dysfunction. Our objective was to evaluate whether multidetector-row computed tomographic (MDCT) imaging could detect the

  17. Tailor-made heart simulation predicts the effect of cardiac resynchronization therapy in a canine model of heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panthee, Nirmal; Okada, Jun-ichi; Washio, Takumi; Mochizuki, Youhei; Suzuki, Ryohei; Koyama, Hidekazu; Ono, Minoru; Hisada, Toshiaki; Sugiura, Seiryo

    2016-07-01

    Despite extensive studies on clinical indices for the selection of patient candidates for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), approximately 30% of selected patients do not respond to this therapy. Herein, we examined whether CRT simulations based on individualized realistic three-dimensional heart models can predict the therapeutic effect of CRT in a canine model of heart failure with left bundle branch block. In four canine models of failing heart with dyssynchrony, individualized three-dimensional heart models reproducing the electromechanical activity of each animal were created based on the computer tomographic images. CRT simulations were performed for 25 patterns of three ventricular pacing lead positions. Lead positions producing the best and the worst therapeutic effects were selected in each model. The validity of predictions was tested in acute experiments in which hearts were paced from the sites identified by simulations. We found significant correlations between the experimentally observed improvement in ejection fraction (EF) and the predicted improvements in ejection fraction (P<0.01) or the maximum value of the derivative of left ventricular pressure (P<0.01). The optimal lead positions produced better outcomes compared with the worst positioning in all dogs studied, although there were significant variations in responses. Variations in ventricular wall thickness among the dogs may have contributed to these responses. Thus CRT simulations using the individualized three-dimensional heart models can predict acute hemodynamic improvement, and help determine the optimal positions of the pacing lead.

  18. Pre-prosthetic surgery: Mandible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaki, Veeramalai Nadu; Balu, Kandasamy; Ramesh, Sadashiva Balakrishnapillai; Arvind, Ramraj Jayabalan; Venkatesan

    2012-01-01

    Pre-prosthetic surgery is that part of oral and maxillofacial surgery which restores oral function and facial form. This is concerned with surgical modification of the alveolar process and its surrounding structures to enable the fabrication of a well-fitting, comfortable, and esthetic dental prosthesis. The ultimate goal of pre-prosthetic surgery is to prepare a mouth to receive a dental prosthesis by redesigning and smoothening bony edges. PMID:23066301

  19. Pre-prosthetic surgery: Mandible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veeramalai Naidu Devaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pre-prosthetic surgery is that part of oral and maxillofacial surgery which restores oral function and facial form. This is concerned with surgical modification of the alveolar process and its surrounding structures to enable the fabrication of a well-fitting, comfortable, and esthetic dental prosthesis. The ultimate goal of pre-prosthetic surgery is to prepare a mouth to receive a dental prosthesis by redesigning and smoothening bony edges.

  20. Prosthetics & Orthotics Manufacturing Initiative (POMI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-21

    technologies pursued in Task 1: Reconfigurable Sockets was determined to have promise in allowing sockets to be adjusted after manufacture . The most likely...overheating in the socket, and this concept may be suitable for commercialization efforts in the future. Prosthetics & Orthotics Manufacturing ...and manufacturing of prosthetic systems to increase durability and comfort, and on giving medical personnel tools to aid in the care of our most

  1. Predicting prosthetic prescription after major lower-limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, Linda; Borgia, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    We describe prosthetic limb prescription in the first year following lower-limb amputation and examine the relationship between amputation level, geographic region, and prosthetic prescription. We analyzed 2005 to 2010 Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Inpatient and Medical Encounters SAS data sets, Vital Status death data, and National Prosthetic Patient Database data for 9,994 Veterans who underwent lower-limb amputation at a VA hospital. Descriptive statistics and bivariates were examined. Cox proportional hazard models identified factors associated with prosthetic prescription. Analyses showed that amputation level was associated with prosthetic prescription. The hazard ratios (HRs) were 1.41 for ankle amputation and 0.46 for transfemoral amputation compared with transtibial amputation. HRs for geographic region were Northeast = 1.49, Upper Midwest = 1.26, and West = 1.39 compared with the South (p amputation were most likely to be prescribed a prosthesis and people with transfemoral amputation were least likely. Geographic variation in prosthetic prescription exists in the VA and further research is needed to explain why.

  2. Animal models to investigate the pathogenesis of rheumatic heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M Rush

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatic fever (RF and rheumatic heart disease (RHD are sequelae of group A streptococcal (GAS infection. Although an autoimmune process has long been considered to be responsible for the initiation of RF/RHD, it is only in the last few decades that the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of the inflammatory condition have been unravelled partly due to experimentation on animal models.RF/RHD is a uniquely human condition and modelling this disease in animals is challenging. Antibody and T cell responses to recombinant GAS M protein (rM and the subsequent interactions with cardiac tissue have been predominantly investigated using a rat autoimmune valvulitis model. In Lewis rats immunized with rM, the development of hallmark histological features akin to RF/RHD, both in the myocardial and in valvular tissue have been reported, with the generation of heart tissue cross reactive antibodies and T cells. However, studies of cardiac function are more challenging in such a model. Recently a Lewis rat model of Sydenham’s chorea (SC and related neuropsychiatric disorders has also been described. Rodent models are very useful for assessing disease mechanisms due to the availability of reagents to precisely determine sequential events following infection with GAS or post-challenge with specific proteins and or carbohydrate preparations from GAS. However, studies of cardiac function are more problematic in such models. In this review an historical overview of animal models previously used and those that are currently available will be discussed in terms of their usefulness in modelling different aspects of the disease process. Ultimately, cardiologists, microbiologists, immunologists and physiologists may have to resort to diverse models to investigate different aspects of RF/RHD.

  3. Prosthetic stomatitis with removable dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozalieva Yu.Yu.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The Research Objective: To study patients with prosthetic stomatitis, who use the removable laminar dentures. Materials: The consultations and treatment of 79 patients aged 47-65 years have been conducted. The patients have been divided into two clinical groups. The first clinical group (39 persons with the performance of immediate prosthet-ics; the second control clinical group (40 persons — the permanent dentures were produced without the preliminary instruction. Results: All the patients, having the laminar dentures without the preliminary use of immediate constructions of dentures, in spite of repeated correction of them, have had changes of dentures and transitory fold. Patients have been exposed to prosthetic stomatitis of different etiology (without trauma; the single-shot or multiple correction of dentures by the method of rebasing with using of cold cure plastics has been made. Conclusion: Structural and functional changes of dentition during the prosthetic stomatitis lead to disorders, associated by the mucositis. Use of the term of «prosthetic stomatitis» reflects etiological and pathogenetic component of changes in the denture-supporting tissues

  4. Prosthetic valve endocarditis and bloodstream infection due to Mycobacterium chimaera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achermann, Yvonne; Rössle, Matthias; Hoffmann, Matthias; Deggim, Vanessa; Kuster, Stefan; Zimmermann, Dieter R; Bloemberg, Guido; Hombach, Michael; Hasse, Barbara

    2013-06-01

    Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) due to fast-growing nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) has been reported anecdotally. Reports of PVE with slowly growing NTM, however, are lacking. We present here one case of PVE and one case of bloodstream infection caused by Mycobacterium chimaera. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR indicated a relatedness of the two M. chimaera strains. Both patients had heart surgery 2 years apart from each other. A nosocomial link was not detected.

  5. Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis and Bloodstream Infection Due to Mycobacterium chimaera

    OpenAIRE

    Achermann, Yvonne; Rössle, Matthias; Hoffmann, Matthias; Deggim, Vanessa; Kuster, Stefan; Zimmermann, Dieter R.; Bloemberg, Guido; Hombach, Michael; Hasse, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) due to fast-growing nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) has been reported anecdotally. Reports of PVE with slowly growing NTM, however, are lacking. We present here one case of PVE and one case of bloodstream infection caused by Mycobacterium chimaera. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR indicated a relatedness of the two M. chimaera strains. Both patients had heart surgery 2 years apart from each other. A nosocomial link was not detected.

  6. A three-dimensional dynamic finite element model of the prosthetic knee joint: simulation of joint laxity and kinematics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barink, M.; Kampen, A. van; Waal Malefijt, M.C. de; Verdonschot, N.J.J.

    2005-01-01

    For testing purposes of prostheses at a preclinical stage, it is very valuable to have a generic modelling tool, which can be used to optimize implant features and to avoid poor designs being launched on to the market. The modelling tool should be fast, efficient, and multi-purpose in nature; a fini

  7. Complication probability models for radiation-induced heart valvular dysfunction: do heart-lung interactions play a role?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Cella

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to compare different normal tissue complication probability (NTCP models for predicting heart valve dysfunction (RVD following thoracic irradiation.All patients from our institutional Hodgkin lymphoma survivors database with analyzable datasets were included (n = 90. All patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with a median total dose of 32 Gy. The cardiac toxicity profile was available for each patient. Heart and lung dose-volume histograms (DVHs were extracted and both organs were considered for Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB and Relative Seriality (RS NTCP model fitting using maximum likelihood estimation. Bootstrap refitting was used to test the robustness of the model fit. Model performance was estimated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC.Using only heart-DVHs, parameter estimates were, for the LKB model: D50 = 32.8 Gy, n = 0.16 and m = 0.67; and for the RS model: D50 = 32.4 Gy, s = 0.99 and γ = 0.42. AUC values were 0.67 for LKB and 0.66 for RS, respectively. Similar performance was obtained for models using only lung-DVHs (LKB: D50 = 33.2 Gy, n = 0.01, m = 0.19, AUC = 0.68; RS: D50 = 24.4 Gy, s = 0.99, γ = 2.12, AUC = 0.66. Bootstrap result showed that the parameter fits for lung-LKB were extremely robust. A combined heart-lung LKB model was also tested and showed a minor improvement (AUC = 0.70. However, the best performance was obtained using the previously determined multivariate regression model including maximum heart dose with increasing risk for larger heart and smaller lung volumes (AUC = 0.82.The risk of radiation induced valvular disease cannot be modeled using NTCP models only based on heart dose-volume distribution. A predictive model with an improved performance can be obtained but requires the inclusion of heart and lung volume terms, indicating that heart

  8. Numerical simulation of steady turbulent flow through trileaflet aortic heart valves--II. Results on five models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, D M; Yoganathan, A P; Williams, F P

    1985-01-01

    Turbulent flow simulations are run for five aortic trileaflet valve geometries, ranging from a valve leaflet orifice area of 1.1 cm2 (Model A1--very stenotic) to 5.0 cm2 (Model A5--natural valve). The simulated data compares well with experimental measurements made downstream of various aortic trileaflet valves by Woo (PhD Thesis, 1984). The location and approximate width and length of recirculation regions are correctly predicted. The less stenotic valve models reattach at the end of the aortic sinus region, 1.1 diameters downstream of the valve. The central jet exiting the less stenotic valve models is not significantly different from fully developed flow, and therefore recovers very quickly downstream of the reattachment point. The more stenotic valves disturb the flow to a greater degree, generating recirculation regions large enough to escape the sinuses and reattach further downstream. Peak turbulent shear stress values downstream of the aortic valve models which approximated prosthetic valves are 125 and 300 Nm-2, very near experimental observations of 150 to 350 Nm-2. The predicted Reynolds stress profiles also present the correct shape, a double peak profile, with the location of the peak occurring at the location of maximum velocity gradient, which occurs near the recirculation region. The pressure drop across model A2 (leaflet orifice area 1.6 cm2) is 20 mmHg at 1.6 diameters downstream. This compares well with values ranging from 19.5 to 26.2 mmHg for valves of similar orifice areas. The pressure drop decreases with decreasing valve stenosis, to a negligible value across the least stenotic valve model. Based on the good agreement between experimental measurements of velocity, shear stress and pressure drop, compared to the simulated data, the model has the potential to be a valuable tool in the analysis of heart valve designs.

  9. Retinal prosthetics, optogenetics, and chemical photoswitches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marc, Robert; Pfeiffer, Rebecca; Jones, Bryan

    2014-10-15

    Three technologies have emerged as therapies to restore light sensing to profoundly blind patients suffering from late-stage retinal degenerations: (1) retinal prosthetics, (2) optogenetics, and (3) chemical photoswitches. Prosthetics are the most mature and the only approach in clinical practice. Prosthetic implants require complex surgical intervention and provide only limited visual resolution but can potentially restore navigational ability to many blind patients. Optogenetics uses viral delivery of type 1 opsin genes from prokaryotes or eukaryote algae to restore light responses in survivor neurons. Targeting and expression remain major problems, but are potentially soluble. Importantly, optogenetics could provide the ultimate in high-resolution vision due to the long persistence of gene expression achieved in animal models. Nevertheless, optogenetics remains challenging to implement in human eyes with large volumes, complex disease progression, and physical barriers to viral penetration. Now, a new generation of photochromic ligands or chemical photoswitches (azobenzene-quaternary ammonium derivatives) can be injected into a degenerated mouse eye and, in minutes to hours, activate light responses in neurons. These photoswitches offer the potential for rapidly and reversibly screening the vision restoration expected in an individual patient. Chemical photoswitch variants that persist in the cell membrane could make them a simple therapy of choice, with resolution and sensitivity equivalent to optogenetics approaches. A major complexity in treating retinal degenerations is retinal remodeling: pathologic network rewiring, molecular reprogramming, and cell death that compromise signaling in the surviving retina. Remodeling forces a choice between upstream and downstream targeting, each engaging different benefits and defects. Prosthetics and optogenetics can be implemented in either mode, but the use of chemical photoswitches is currently limited to downstream

  10. Prosthetic hand control using motion discrimination from EMG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurisu, Naoyuki; Tsujiuchi, Nobutaka; Koizumi, Takayuki

    2009-01-01

    In this report, we improve the motion discrimination method from electromyogram (EMG) for a prosthetic hand and propose prosthetic hand control. In the past, we proved that a motion discrimination method using conic models could discriminate three hand motions without the incorrect discriminations that the elbow motions cause. In this research, to increase discrimination accuracy of motion discrimination using conic models, we propose a feature extraction method using quadratic polynomials. Additionally, because many prosthetic hands using motion discrimination have constant motion speed that can't be controlled, we propose an angular velocity generation method using multiple regression models. We verified these methods by controlling the 3D hand model. In the experiment, the proposed method could discriminate five motions at a rate of above 90 percent without the incorrect discriminations that elbow motions cause. Moreover, the wrist joint angle of the 3D hand model could be controlled by standard variation of 3[deg] or less.

  11. [Prosthetic dental alloys. 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero Engelmbright, M A

    1990-11-01

    A wide variety of restoration materials for prosthetic odontology is now available to the dental surgeon, either of the covalent type (acrylic resins), metallic (alloys), ionic (porcelains), or a combination of them, as in the so-called composites, such as the composite resins, or as ceramics-metals mixtures. An example of the latter is a product called Miracle-Mix, a glass ionomere cement reinforced with an amalgam alloy. In those cases where the blend is done by a synterization process, the material is called Cermet. The above-listed alternatives clearly evidence day-to-day advances in odontology, with researchers and manufacturers engaged the world over in improving existing products or developing new ones to enrich the dentist's armamentarium. As a side effect of this constant renewal, those dentists who have failed to update their knowledge fall behind in their practice as they persist in using products they have known for years, and may be deceived by advertisements of too-often unreliable products. It is, therefore, important to be aware of available products and their latest improvements.

  12. [Prosthetic dental alloys (2)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero Englembright, M A

    1990-12-01

    A wide variety of restoration materials for prosthetic odontology is now available to the dental surgeon, either of the covalent type (acrylic resins), metallic (alloys), ionic (porcelains), or a combination of them, as in the so-called composites, such as the composite resins, or as ceramics-metals mixtures. An example of the latter is a product called Miracle-Mix, a glass ionomere cement reinforced with an amalgam alloy. In those cases where the blend is done by a synterization process, the material is called Cermet. The above-listed alternatives clearly evidence day-to-day advances in odontology, with researchers and manufacturers engaged the world over in improving existing products or developing new ones to enrich the dentist's armamentarium. As a side effect of this constant renewal, those dentists who have failed to update their knowledge fall behind in their practice as they persist in using products they have known for years, and may be deceived by advertisements of too-often unreliable products. It is, therefore, important to be aware of available products and their latest improvements.

  13. Amputations and prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzur, M S

    1999-01-01

    The author presents in a condensed way an overview of the principles of limb amputations and further treatment of patients who underwent such a procedure. The metabolic cost of walking, load transfer, and wound healing are reviewed in a concise manner. Particular attention is given to blood supply to the wound and methods to determine adequate perfusion with a clear analysis of the pro and cons of the Doppler method. Pediatric amputations, because of their specificity, are considered apart. Disarticulation of limbs is the method of choice in children, because of it retains growth potential of the bone and prevents bony overgrowth of the stump. The article discusses the main indications for limb amputations: trauma, peripheral vascular disease, musculoskeletal tumors and gas gangrene. In every case the specificity of the amputation is considered by the author. Postoperative care is also presented, with a short description of possible complications. Pain is the most common and treatment strategies should be similar to those used in treating patients with major reflex sympathetic causalgia. Edema, joint contracture, wound failure and dermatologic problems are all shortly reviewed. The last part of the article treats with the principles of prosthetics in both the upper and lower limb. These principles are presented basing on the level of amputation: for the upper limb hand, transradial, transhumeral amputations and shoulder disarticulation. For the lower limb foot and ankle, transtibial and transfemoral amputations are considered.

  14. Prosthetic helping hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vest, Thomas W. (Inventor); Carden, James R. (Inventor); Norton, William E. (Inventor); Belcher, Jewell G. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A prosthetic device for below-the-elbow amputees, having a C-shaped clamping mechanism for grasping cylindrical objects, is described. The clamping mechanism is pivotally mounted to a cuff that fits on the amputee's lower arm. The present invention is utilized by placing an arm that has been amputated below the elbow into the cuff. The clamping mechanism then serves as a hand whenever it becomes necessary for the amputee to grasp a cylindrical object such as a handle, a bar, a rod, etc. To grasp the cylindrical object, the object is jammed against the opening in the C-shaped spring, causing the spring to open, the object to pass to the center of the spring, and the spring to snap shut behind the object. Various sizes of clamping mechanisms can be provided and easily interchanged to accommodate a variety of diameters. With the extension that pivots and rotates, the clamping mechanism can be used in a variety of orientations. Thus, this invention provides the amputee with a clamping mechanism that can be used to perform a number of tasks.

  15. Multiscale modeling and surgical planning for single ventricle heart patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Alison

    2011-11-01

    Single ventricle heart patients are among the most challenging for pediatric cardiologists to treat, and typically undergo a palliative course of three open-heart surgeries starting immediately after birth. We will present recent tools for modeling blood flow in single ventricle heart patients using a multiscale approach that couples a 3D Navier-Stokes domain to a 0D closed loop lumped parameter network comprised of circuit elements. This coupling allows us to capture the effect of changes in local geometry, such as shunt sizes, on global circulatory dynamics, such as cardiac output. A semi-implicit numerical method is formulated to solve the coupled system in which flow and pressure information is passed between the two domains at the inlets and outlets of the model. A finite element method with outflow stabilization is applied in the 3D Navier-Stokes domain, and the LPN system of ordinary differential equations is solved numerically using a Runge-Kutta method. These tools are coupled via automated scripts to a derivative-free optimization method. Optimization is used to systematically explore surgical designs using clinically relevant cost functions for two stages of single ventricle repair. First, we will present results from optimization of the first stage Blalock Taussig Shunt. Second, we will present results from optimization of a new Y-graft design for the third stage of single ventricle repair called the Fontan surgery. The Y-graft is shown, in simulations, to successfully improve hepatic flow distribution, a known clinical problem. Preliminary clinical experience with the Y-graft will be discussed.

  16. Mathematical modeling applied to the left ventricle of heart

    CERN Document Server

    Ranjbar, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Background: How can mathematics help us to understand the mechanism of the cardiac motion? The best known approach is to take a mathematical model of the fibered structure, insert it into a more-or-less complex model of cardiac architecture, and then study the resulting fibers of activation that propagate through the myocardium. In our paper, we have attempted to create a novel software capable of demonstrate left ventricular (LV) model in normal hearts. Method: Echocardiography was performed on 70 healthy volunteers. Data evaluated included: velocity (radial, longitudinal, rotational and vector point), displacement (longitudinal and rotational), strain rate (longitudinal and circumferential) and strain (radial, longitudinal and circumferential) of all 16 LV myocardial segments. Using these data, force vectors of myocardial samples were estimated by MATLAB software, interfaced in the echocardiograph system. Dynamic orientation contraction (through the cardiac cycle) of every individual myocardial fiber could ...

  17. MULTI MODEL DATA MINING APPROACH FOR HEART FAILURE PREDICTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka H U

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Developing predictive modelling solutions for risk estimation is extremely challenging in health-care informatics. Risk estimation involves integration of heterogeneous clinical sources having different representation from different health-care provider making the task increasingly complex. Such sources are typically voluminous, diverse, and significantly change over the time. Therefore, distributed and parallel computing tools collectively termed big data tools are in need which can synthesize and assist the physician to make right clinical decisions. In this work we propose multi-model predictive architecture, a novel approach for combining the predictive ability of multiple models for better prediction accuracy. We demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed work on data from Framingham Heart study. Results show that the proposed multi-model predictive architecture is able to provide better accuracy than best model approach. By modelling the error of predictive models we are able to choose sub set of models which yields accurate results. More information was modelled into system by multi-level mining which has resulted in enhanced predictive accuracy.

  18. Rodent heart failure models do not reflect the human circulating microRNA signature in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegter, Eline L; Ovchinnikova, Ekaterina S; Silljé, Herman H W; Meems, Laura M G; van der Pol, Atze; van der Velde, A Rogier; Berezikov, Eugene; Voors, Adriaan A; de Boer, Rudolf A; van der Meer, Peter

    2017-01-01

    We recently identified a set of plasma microRNAs (miRNAs) that are downregulated in patients with heart failure in comparison with control subjects. To better understand their meaning and function, we sought to validate these circulating miRNAs in 3 different well-established rat and mouse heart failure models, and correlated the miRNAs to parameters of cardiac function. The previously identified let-7i-5p, miR-16-5p, miR-18a-5p, miR-26b-5p, miR-27a-3p, miR-30e-5p, miR-199a-3p, miR-223-3p, miR-423-3p, miR-423-5p and miR-652-3p were measured by means of quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in plasma samples of 8 homozygous TGR(mREN2)27 (Ren2) transgenic rats and 8 (control) Sprague-Dawley rats, 6 mice with angiotensin II-induced heart failure (AngII) and 6 control mice, and 8 mice with ischemic heart failure and 6 controls. Circulating miRNA levels were compared between the heart failure animals and healthy controls. Ren2 rats, AngII mice and mice with ischemic heart failure showed clear signs of heart failure, exemplified by increased left ventricular and lung weights, elevated end-diastolic left ventricular pressures, increased expression of cardiac stress markers and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction. All miRNAs were detectable in plasma from rats and mice. No significant differences were observed between the circulating miRNAs in heart failure animals when compared to the healthy controls (all P>0.05) and no robust associations with cardiac function could be found. The previous observation that miRNAs circulate in lower levels in human patients with heart failure could not be validated in well-established rat and mouse heart failure models. These results question the translation of data on human circulating miRNA levels to experimental models, and vice versa the validity of experimental miRNA data for human heart failure.

  19. Hemodynamic simulation of the heart using a 2D model and MR data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adeler, Pernille Thorup

    2002-01-01

    Computational models of the blood flow in the heart are a useful tool for studying the functioning of the heart. The purpose of this thesis is to achieve a better understanding of hemodynamics of the normal and diseased hearts through the use of a computational model and magnetic resonance (MR......) data. We present a 2D computational model of the blood flow in the left side of the heart. The work is based on Peskin and McQueen's 2D model dimensioned to data on the dog heart, which we improve and adjust using physiological knowledge and MR velocity data to achieve a model of the human heart...... parameter values. This is our reference model, which gives representative simulation results. We compare a simulation using our reference model with an MR velocity data set obtained from a healthy human. The comparison is carried out for the intraventricular velocity field and the velocity time curves over...

  20. Development of a non-linear finite element modelling of the below-knee prosthetic socket interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M; Lord, M; Turner-Smith, A R; Roberts, V C

    1995-12-01

    A non-linear finite element model has been established to predict the pressure and shear stress distribution at the limb-socket interface in below-knee amputees with consideration of the skin-liner interface friction and slip. In this model, the limb tissue and socket liner were respectively meshed into 954 and 450 three-dimensional eight-node isoparametric brick elements, based on measurements of an individual's amputated limb surface; the bone was meshed into three-dimensional six-node triangular prism elements, based on radiographic measurements of the individual's residual limb. The socket shell was assumed to be a rigid boundary. An important feature of this model is the use of 450 interface elements (ABAQUS INTER4) which mimic the interface friction condition. The results indicate that a maximum pressure of 226 kPa, shear stress of 53 kPa and less than 4 mm slip exist at the skin-liner interface when the full body weight of 800 N is applied to the limb. The results also show that the coefficient of friction is a very sensitive parameter in determining the interface pressures, shear stresses and slip. With the growth of coefficient of friction, the shear stresses will increase, while the pressure and slip will decrease.

  1. Mechanical analysis of congestive heart failure caused by bundle branch block based on an electromechanical canine heart model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dou Jianhong; Xia Ling; Zhang Yu; Shou Guofa [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Wei Qing; Liu Feng; Crozier, Stuart [School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia)], E-mail: xialing@zju.edu.cn

    2009-01-21

    Asynchronous electrical activation, induced by bundle branch block (BBB), can cause reduced ventricular function. However, the effects of BBB on the mechanical function of heart are difficult to assess experimentally. Many heart models have been developed to investigate cardiac properties during BBB but have mainly focused on the electrophysiological properties. To date, the mechanical function of BBB has not been well investigated. Based on a three-dimensional electromechanical canine heart model, the mechanical properties of complete left and right bundle branch block (LBBB and RBBB) were simulated. The anatomical model as well as the fiber orientations of a dog heart was reconstructed from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor MRI (DT-MRI). Using the solutions of reaction-diffusion equations and with a strategy of parallel computation, the asynchronous excitation propagation and intraventricular conduction in BBB was simulated. The mechanics of myocardial tissues were computed with time-, sarcomere length-dependent uniaxial active stress initiated at the time of depolarization. The quantification of mechanical intra- and interventricular asynchrony of BBB was then investigated using the finite-element method with an eight-node isoparametric element. The simulation results show that (1) there exists inter- and intraventricular systolic dyssynchrony during BBB; (2) RBBB may have more mechanical synchrony and better systolic function of the left ventricle (LV) than LBBB; (3) the ventricles always move toward the early-activated ventricle; and (4) the septum experiences higher stress than left and right ventricular free walls in BBB. The simulation results validate clinical and experimental recordings of heart deformation and provide regional quantitative estimates of ventricular wall strain and stress. The present work suggests that an electromechanical heart model, incorporating real geometry and fiber orientations, may be helpful for better

  2. Mechanical analysis of congestive heart failure caused by bundle branch block based on an electromechanical canine heart model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Jianhong; Xia, Ling; Zhang, Yu; Shou, Guofa; Wei, Qing; Liu, Feng; Crozier, Stuart

    2009-01-01

    Asynchronous electrical activation, induced by bundle branch block (BBB), can cause reduced ventricular function. However, the effects of BBB on the mechanical function of heart are difficult to assess experimentally. Many heart models have been developed to investigate cardiac properties during BBB but have mainly focused on the electrophysiological properties. To date, the mechanical function of BBB has not been well investigated. Based on a three-dimensional electromechanical canine heart model, the mechanical properties of complete left and right bundle branch block (LBBB and RBBB) were simulated. The anatomical model as well as the fiber orientations of a dog heart was reconstructed from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor MRI (DT-MRI). Using the solutions of reaction-diffusion equations and with a strategy of parallel computation, the asynchronous excitation propagation and intraventricular conduction in BBB was simulated. The mechanics of myocardial tissues were computed with time-, sarcomere length-dependent uniaxial active stress initiated at the time of depolarization. The quantification of mechanical intra- and interventricular asynchrony of BBB was then investigated using the finite-element method with an eight-node isoparametric element. The simulation results show that (1) there exists inter- and intraventricular systolic dyssynchrony during BBB; (2) RBBB may have more mechanical synchrony and better systolic function of the left ventricle (LV) than LBBB; (3) the ventricles always move toward the early-activated ventricle; and (4) the septum experiences higher stress than left and right ventricular free walls in BBB. The simulation results validate clinical and experimental recordings of heart deformation and provide regional quantitative estimates of ventricular wall strain and stress. The present work suggests that an electromechanical heart model, incorporating real geometry and fiber orientations, may be helpful for better

  3. Mechanical prosthetic valve disease is related with an increase in depression and anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turker, Yasemin; Ongel, Kurtulus; Ozaydin, Mehmet; Turker, Yasin; Yildirim Bas, Funda; Akkaya, Mehmet

    2015-02-01

    Patients with organic disease can present with psychiatric symptoms. We hypothesized that since patients with prosthetic heart valve require frequent hospital followup and are at higher risk for complications, the incidence of depression and anxiety is higher in these patients. This cross-sectional study prospectively studied 98 consecutive patients with mechanical prosthetic heart valve. All patients fulfilled prosthetic heart valve evaluation form, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAS). Complete blood count, basic metabolic panel and echocardiogram results were collected for all the patients. Using the BDI, there were 26 patients (27%) with no depression, 20 (20%) with mild depression, 38 (39%) with moderate, 4 (4%) with severe and 10 (10%) patients with very severe depression. Avarege score was 18.3±11.4 on BDI and 19.1±11.1 on HAS. The depression level was positively associated with prothrombin time (p les than 0.001) and international normalized ratio (INR) level (p les than 0.001). Hamilton Anxiety Scale was significantly correlated with comorbidities (r: 0.344; p=0.002), blood transfusion (r: 0.370; p les than 0.001), obesity (r: 0.319; p=0.007) and Beck Depression Scale was correlated with comorbidities (r: 0.328; p=0.002), in patients with prosthetic heart valve disease. Patients with prosthetic heart valve have higher prevalence of depression and higher scores of anxiety and depression. Early recognition and appropriate treatment of depression and anxiety may decrease the morbidity in prosthetic heart valve disease. Besides, use of new oral anticoagulant agents that do not need INR check, could decrease anxiety and depression in the future.

  4. Pre-clinical In Vitro and In Vivo Models for Heart Valve Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taramasso, Maurizio; Emmert, Maximilian Y; Reser, Diana; Guidotti, Andrea; Cesarovic, Nikola; Campagnol, Marino; Addis, Alessandro; Nietlispach, Fabian; Hoerstrup, Simon P; Maisano, Francesco

    2015-07-01

    Heart valve disease is a frequently encountered pathology, related to high morbidity and mortality rates. Animal models are interesting to investigate the causality but also underlying mechanisms and potential treatments of human heart valve diseases. Strongly believing that both in vivo and ex vivo models are fundamental to support research and development of new technologies, we here report some examples of heart valve disease models, which in our experience have been actively used to support the development of new valve therapies.

  5. Effect of heart rate on the hemodynamics of bileaflet mechanical heart valves' prostheses (St. Jude Medical) in the aortic position and in the opening phase: A computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahandardoost, Mehdi; Fradet, Guy; Mohammadi, Hadi

    2016-03-01

    To date, to the best of the authors' knowledge, in almost all of the studies performed around the hemodynamics of bileaflet mechanical heart valves, a heart rate of 70-72 beats/min has been considered. In fact, the heart rate of ~72 beats/min does not represent the entire normal physiological conditions under which the aortic or prosthetic valves function. The heart rates of 120 or 50 beats/min may lead to hemodynamic complications, such as plaque formation and/or thromboembolism in patients. In this study, the hemodynamic performance of the bileaflet mechanical heart valves in a wide range of normal and physiological heart rates, that is, 60-150 beats/min, was studied in the opening phase. The model considered in this study was a St. Jude Medical bileaflet mechanical heart valve with the inner diameter of 27 mm in the aortic position. The hemodynamics of the native valve and the St. Jude Medical valve were studied in a variety of heart rates in the opening phase and the results were carefully compared. The results indicate that peak values of the velocity profile downstream of the valve increase as heart rate increases, as well as the location of the maximum velocity changes with heart rate in the St. Jude Medical valve model. Also, the maximum values of shear stress and wall shear stresses downstream of the valve are proportional to heart rate in both models. Interestingly, the maximum shear stress and wall shear stress values in both models are in the same range when heart rate is valve model when heart rate is >90 beats/min (up to ~40% growth compared to that of the native valve). The findings of this study may be of importance in the hemodynamic performance of bileaflet mechanical heart valves. They may also play an important role in design improvement of conventional prosthetic heart valves and the design of the next generation of prosthetic valves, such as percutaneous valves.

  6. Gaitography applied to prosthetic walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roerdink, Melvyn; Cutti, Andrea G; Summa, Aurora; Monari, Davide; Veronesi, Davide; van Ooijen, Mariëlle W; Beek, Peter J

    2014-11-01

    During walking on an instrumented treadmill with an embedded force platform or grid of pressure sensors, center-of-pressure (COP) trajectories exhibit a characteristic butterfly-like shape, reflecting the medio-lateral and anterior-posterior weight shifts associated with alternating steps. We define "gaitography" as the analysis of such COP trajectories during walking (the "gaitograms"). It is currently unknown, however, if gaitography can be employed to characterize pathological gait, such as lateralized gait impairments. We therefore registered gaitograms for a heterogeneous sample of persons with a trans-femoral and trans-tibial amputation during treadmill walking at a self-selected comfortable speed. We found that gaitograms directly visualize between-person differences in prosthetic gait in terms of step width and the relative duration of prosthetic and non-prosthetic single-support stance phases. We further demonstrated that one should not only focus on the gaitogram's shape but also on the time evolution along that shape, given that the COP evolves much slower in the single-support phase than in the double-support phase. Finally, commonly used temporal and spatial prosthetic gait characteristics were derived, revealing both individual and systematic differences in prosthetic and non-prosthetic step lengths, step times, swing times, and double-support durations. Because gaitograms can be rapidly collected in an unobtrusive and markerless manner over multiple gait cycles without constraining foot placement, clinical application of gaitography seems both expedient and appealing. Studies examining the repeatability of gaitograms and evaluating gaitography-based gait characteristics against a gold standard with known validity and reliability are required before gaitography can be clinically applied.

  7. Practical tips and tricks for assessing prosthetic valves and detecting paravalvular regurgitation using cardiac CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Ailbhe C; Martos, Ramon; Murtagh, Gillian; Ryan, Edmund Ronan; McCreery, Charles; Keane, David; Quinn, Martin; Dodd, Jonathan D

    2014-01-01

    Paravalvular leaks are an uncommon but serious complication of prosthetic valves. Transthoracic echocardiography is used in the assessment of prosthetic valves but can be limited by acoustic shadowing from the prosthesis and poor acoustic windowing. Small case series have previously shown cardiac CT to have promising results in detecting paravalvular leaks. We assessed 32 valves in our institution on cardiac CT using echocardiography results as standard and developed methods for improved evaluation of prosthetic valves. These include optimizing prescan drug therapy for heart rate control, optimum window and center adjustments, and carefully selected image planes to best demonstrate the valve ring and valve annulus. Recognition of surgical material is also important to recognize. In this review, we provide a detailed description of these techniques with imaging examples of prosthetic valve evaluation using cardiac CT. Copyright © 2014 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A prognostic model for the thirty-day mortality risk after adult heart transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjang, Y.S.; Suarthana, E.; Körfer, R.; Tenderich, G.; Grobbee, D.E.; van der Heijden, G.J.M.G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To develop a prognostic model for the thirty-day mortality risk after adult heart transplantation. Methods: In this report we developed a prediction model for the 30-day mortality risk after adult heart transplantation. Logistic regression analysis was used to develop the model in 1,262

  9. Cardiovascular cast model fabrication and casting effectiveness evaluation in fetus with severe congenital heart disease or normal heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Cao, Hai-yan; Xie, Ming-xing; He, Lin; Han, Wei; Hong, Liu; Peng, Yuan; Hu, Yun-fei; Song, Ben-cai; Wang, Jing; Wang, Bin; Deng, Cheng

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the application and effectiveness of vascular corrosion technique in preparing fetal cardiovascular cast models, 10 normal fetal heart specimens with other congenital disease (control group) and 18 specimens with severe congenital heart disease (case group) from induced abortions were enrolled in this study from March 2013 to June 2015 in our hospital. Cast models were prepared by injecting casting material into vascular lumen to demonstrate real geometries of fetal cardiovascular system. Casting effectiveness was analyzed in terms of local anatomic structures and different anatomical levels (including overall level, atrioventricular and great vascular system, left-sided and right-sided heart), as well as different trimesters of pregnancy. In our study, all specimens were successfully casted. Casting effectiveness analysis of local anatomic structures showed a mean score from 1.90±1.45 to 3.60±0.52, without significant differences between case and control groups in most local anatomic structures except left ventricle, which had a higher score in control group (P=0.027). Inter-group comparison of casting effectiveness in different anatomical levels showed no significant differences between the two groups. Intra-group comparison also revealed undifferentiated casting effectiveness between atrioventricular and great vascular system, or left-sided and right-sided heart in corresponding group. Third-trimester group had a significantly higher perfusion score in great vascular system than second-trimester group (P=0.046), while the other anatomical levels displayed no such difference. Vascular corrosion technique can be successfully used in fabrication of fetal cardiovascular cast model. It is also a reliable method to demonstrate three-dimensional anatomy of severe congenital heart disease and normal heart in fetus.

  10. Progressive mitochondrial protein lysine acetylation and heart failure in a model of Friedreich's ataxia cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stram, Amanda R; Wagner, Gregory R; Fogler, Brian D; Pride, P Melanie; Hirschey, Matthew D; Payne, R Mark

    2017-01-01

    The childhood heart disease of Friedreich's Ataxia (FRDA) is characterized by hypertrophy and failure. It is caused by loss of frataxin (FXN), a mitochondrial protein involved in energy homeostasis. FRDA model hearts have increased mitochondrial protein acetylation and impaired sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) deacetylase activity. Protein acetylation is an important regulator of cardiac metabolism and loss of SIRT3 increases susceptibility of the heart to stress-induced cardiac hypertrophy and ischemic injury. The underlying pathophysiology of heart failure in FRDA is unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine in detail the physiologic and acetylation changes of the heart that occur over time in a model of FRDA heart failure. We predicted that increased mitochondrial protein acetylation would be associated with a decrease in heart function in a model of FRDA. A conditional mouse model of FRDA cardiomyopathy with ablation of FXN (FXN KO) in the heart was compared to healthy controls at postnatal days 30, 45 and 65. We evaluated hearts using echocardiography, cardiac catheterization, histology, protein acetylation and expression. Acetylation was temporally progressive and paralleled evolution of heart failure in the FXN KO model. Increased acetylation preceded detectable abnormalities in cardiac function and progressed rapidly with age in the FXN KO mouse. Acetylation was also associated with cardiac fibrosis, mitochondrial damage, impaired fat metabolism, and diastolic and systolic dysfunction leading to heart failure. There was a strong inverse correlation between level of protein acetylation and heart function. These results demonstrate a close relationship between mitochondrial protein acetylation, physiologic dysfunction and metabolic disruption in FRDA hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and suggest that abnormal acetylation contributes to the pathophysiology of heart disease in FRDA. Mitochondrial protein acetylation may represent a therapeutic target for early intervention.

  11. Valvular interstitial cell seeded poly(glycerol sebacate) scaffolds: toward a biomimetic in vitro model for heart valve tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoumi, Nafiseh; Johnson, Katherine L; Howell, M Christian; Engelmayr, George C

    2013-04-01

    Tissue engineered replacement heart valves may be capable of overcoming the lack of growth potential intrinsic to current non-viable prosthetics, and thus could potentially serve as permanent replacements in the surgical repair of pediatric valvular lesions. However, the evaluation of candidate combinations of cells and scaffolds lacks a biomimetic in vitro model with broadly tunable, anisotropic and elastomeric structural-mechanical properties. Toward establishing such an in vitro model, in the current study, porcine aortic and pulmonary valvular interstitial cells (i.e. biomimetic cells) were cultivated on anisotropic, micromolded poly(glycerol sebacate) scaffolds (i.e. biomimetic scaffolds). Following 14 and 28 days of static culture, cell-seeded scaffolds and unseeded controls were assessed for their mechanical properties, and cell-seeded scaffolds were further characterized by confocal fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy, and by collagen and DNA assays. Poly(glycerol sebacate) micromolding yielded scaffolds with anisotropic stiffnesses resembling those of native valvular tissues in the low stress-strain ranges characteristic of physiologic valvular function. Scaffold anisotropy was largely retained upon cultivation with valvular interstitial cells; while the mechanical properties of unseeded scaffolds progressively diminished, cell-seeded scaffolds either retained or exceeded initial mechanical properties. Retention of mechanical properties in cell-seeded scaffolds paralleled the accretion of collagen, which increased significantly from 14 to 28 days. This study demonstrates that valvular interstitial cells can be cultivated on anisotropic poly(glycerol sebacate) scaffolds to yield biomimetic in vitro models with which clinically relevant cells and future scaffold designs can be evaluated.

  12. A computational method for comparing the behavior and possible failure of prosthetic implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, C.; Hollerbach, K.; Perfect, S.; Underhill, K.

    1995-05-01

    Prosthetic joint implants currently in use exhibit high Realistic computer modeling of prosthetic implants provides an opportunity for orthopedic biomechanics researchers and physicians to understand possible in vivo failure modes, without having to resort to lengthy and costly clinical trials. The research presented here is part of a larger effort to develop realistic models of implanted joint prostheses. The example used here is the thumb carpo-metacarpal (cmc) joint. The work, however, can be applied to any other human joints for which prosthetic implants have been designed. Preliminary results of prosthetic joint loading, without surrounding human tissue (i.e., simulating conditions under which the prosthetic joint has not yet been implanted into the human joint), are presented, based on a three-dimensional, nonlinear finite element analysis of three different joint implant designs.

  13. Prosthetics & Orthotics Manufacturing Initiative (POMI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-21

    regions either smeared unacceptably or the joint between the disparate regions was unacceptably weak during thermoforming events. The solution was to...The thin sheets were able to survive the thermoforming process and function as sensors. Prosthetics & Orthotics Manufacturing Initiative (POMI

  14. Prosthetic Hand Lifts Heavy Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carden, James R.; Norton, William; Belcher, Jewell G.; Vest, Thomas W.

    1991-01-01

    Prosthetic hand designed to enable amputee to lift diverse heavy objects like rocks and logs. Has simple serrated end effector with no moving parts. Prosthesis held on forearm by system of flexible straps. Features include ruggedness, simplicity, and relatively low cost.

  15. Dynamic heart model for the mathematical cardiac torso (MCAT) phantom to represent the invariant total heart volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretorius, P. H.; King, Michael A.; Tsui, Benjamin M.; LaCroix, Karen; Xia, Weishi

    1998-07-01

    This manuscript documents the alteration of the heart model of the MCAT phantom to better represent cardiac motion. The objective of the inclusion of motion was to develop a digital simulation of the heart such that the impact of cardiac motion on single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging could be assessed and methods of quantitating cardiac function could be investigated. The motion of the dynamic MCAT's heart is modeled by a 128 time frame volume curve. Eight time frames are averaged together to obtain a gated perfusion acquisition of 16 time frames and ensure motion within every time frame. The position of the MCAT heart was changed during contraction to rotate back and forth around the long axis through the center of the left ventricle (LV) using the end systolic time frame as turning point. Simple respiratory motion was also introduced by changing the orientation of the heart model in a 2 dimensional (2D) plane with every time frame. The averaging effect of respiratory motion in a specific time frame was modeled by randomly selecting multiple heart locations between two extreme orientations. Non-gated perfusion phantoms were also generated by averaging over all time frames. Maximal chamber volumes were selected to fit a profile of a normal healthy person. These volumes were changed during contraction of the ventricles such that the increase in volume in the atria compensated for the decrease in volume in the ventricles. The myocardium were modeled to represent shortening of muscle fibers during contraction with the base of the ventricles moving towards a static apex. The apical region was modeled with moderate wall thinning present while myocardial mass was conserved. To test the applicability of the dynamic heart model, myocardial wall thickening was measured using maximum counts and full width half maximum measurements, and compared with published trends. An analytical 3D projector, with attenuation and detector response included, was used

  16. Animal models of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction

    OpenAIRE

    Conceição, G.; Heinonen, I.; Lourenço, A. P.; Duncker, D. J.; Falcão-Pires, I.

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) constitutes a clinical syndrome in which the diagnostic criteria of heart failure are not accompanied by gross disturbances of systolic function, as assessed by ejection fraction. In turn, under most circumstances, diastolic function is impaired. Although it now represents over 50 % of all patients with heart failure, the mechanisms of HFpEF remain understood, precluding effective therapy. Understanding the pathophysiology of HFpEF has be...

  17. Estudo comparativo das características fluidodinâmicas de próteses valvulares biológicas de pericárdio bovino de perfil alto e baixo Comparative study of fluid dynamic characteristics in high and low biological prosthetic heart valves from bovine pericardium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aron J. P Andrade

    1989-12-01

    Full Text Available O comportamento fluidodinâmico e a vida útil média de uma prótese valvular cardíaca são características muito importantes na escolha do modelo de prótese a ser implantada em um determinado paciente. Por esse motivo, foi realizado um estudo comparativo entre as válvulas biológicas de perfil alto e baixo, para se verificarem possíveis alterações na vida média, gradiente de pressão e refluxo, causadas pela diminuição do perfil dessas próteses. Com o auxílio de um duplicador de pulso, foram analisadas cinco próteses de perfil alto e cinco de perfil baixo, todas tamanho 29, fabricadas no Instituto Dante Pazzanese de Cardiologia (IDPC. Mantendo-se a freqüência de batimentos em 100 bpm e a diferença de pressão em 1000 mmHg, verificou-se que a vida útil média da válvula de perfil baixo permaneceu equivalente à de perfil alto. Em outro equipamento, denominado simulador cardíaco, as próteses foram submetidas a condições semelhantes às condições fisiológicas de funcionamento para uma freqüência cardíaca de 75 bpm. Os resultados mostraram que o volume de retorno necessário para fechamento (refluxo, nas válvulas de perfil baixo, é menor do que nas de perfil alto. Isso traz um melhor aproveitamento do efeito de bombeamento do coração. As perdas de carga das válvulas foram comparadas através dos gradientes máximos de pressão visibilizados com a sobreposição dos sinais de pressão. Observou-se que as válvulas de perfil baixo oferecem menos resistência ao fluxo; assim, quando são implantadas, possibilitam uma passagem mais livre e desobstruída do sangue.The fluid dynamic performance and lifetime of a prosthetic heart valve are one of the most important characteristics to determine the choice of what prosthesis must be applied to a patient. Because of this, two different biological prosthetic heart valves profiles (one high profile and other low profile were studied, to verify possible alterations of working

  18. Imaging techniques for visualizing and phenotyping congenital heart defects in murine models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoqin; Tobita, Kimimasa; Francis, Richard J B; Lo, Cecilia W

    2013-06-01

    Mouse model is ideal for investigating the genetic and developmental etiology of congenital heart disease. However, cardiovascular phenotyping for the precise diagnosis of structural heart defects in mice remain challenging. With rapid advances in imaging techniques, there are now high throughput phenotyping tools available for the diagnosis of structural heart defects. In this review, we discuss the efficacy of four different imaging modalities for congenital heart disease diagnosis in fetal/neonatal mice, including noninvasive fetal echocardiography, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), micro-magnetic resonance imaging (micro-MRI), and episcopic fluorescence image capture (EFIC) histopathology. The experience we have gained in the use of these imaging modalities in a large-scale mouse mutagenesis screen have validated their efficacy for congenital heart defect diagnosis in the tiny hearts of fetal and newborn mice. These cutting edge phenotyping tools will be invaluable for furthering our understanding of the developmental etiology of congenital heart disease.

  19. [Surgical Treatment of Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminishi, Yuichiro; Akutsu, Hirohiko; Sugaya, Akira; Kurumisawa, Soki; Takazawa, Ippei; Sato, Hirotaka; Muraoka, Arata; Aizawa, Kei; Ohki, Shinichi; Saito, Tsutomu; Kawahito, Koji; Misawa, Yoshio

    2015-11-01

    Between 2003 and 2014, at Jichi Medical University Hospital, 11 patients with prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) underwent re-operation. There was 1 in-hospital death and 2 late deaths. The cause of death was cirrhosis, heart failure and sepsis, respectively. Emergency surgery, previous double valve replacement (DVR) and Staphylococcus infection were common risk factors for all 3 cases. Two cases of patients that survived who underwent mitral valve replacement (MVR) and DVR for PVE after DVR were treated with multiple antibiotic courses for bacteremia associated with hemodialysis and colon cancer. One patient who underwent DVR after mitral valve plasty which was complicated with cerebral hemorrhage, had survived and was discharged. Of the aortic PVE patients, 2 cases of aortic valve replacement (AVR) using a mechanical valve, 1 case of aortic root replacement (ARR) using a mechanical valve, and 1 ARR using the homograft, were considered cured and never relapsed. A patient with aortic PVE, who underwent AVR after cesarean section for heart failure in birth period, has received ARR twice with the mechanical valve for recurrent pseudo-aneurysm of the left ventricular outflow tract. Since hemodialysis and colon cancer is a risk factor for recurrent PVE, it is necessary to consider the long-term administration of antibiotics after surgery.

  20. Nanoscale Properties of Neural Cell Prosthetic and Astrocyte Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, D. A.; Ayres, V. M.; Delgado-Rivera, R.; Ahmed, I.; Meiners, S. A.

    2009-03-01

    Preliminary data from in-vivo investigations (rat model) suggest that a nanofiber prosthetic device of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2)-modified nanofibers can correctly guide regenerating axons across an injury gap with aligned functional recovery. Scanning Probe Recognition Microscopy (SPRM) with auto-tracking of individual nanofibers is used for investigation of the key nanoscale properties of the nanofiber prosthetic device for central nervous system tissue engineering and repair. The key properties under SPRM investigation include nanofiber stiffness and surface roughness, nanofiber curvature, nanofiber mesh density and porosity, and growth factor presentation and distribution. Each of these factors has been demonstrated to have global effects on cell morphology, function, proliferation, morphogenesis, migration, and differentiation. The effect of FGF-2 modification on the key nanoscale properties is investigated. Results from the nanofiber prosthetic properties investigations are correlated with astrocyte response to unmodified and FGF-2 modified scaffolds, using 2D planar substrates as a control.

  1. Prosthetic abutment influences bone biomechanical behavior of immediately loaded implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargos, Germana de Villa; Sotto-Maior, Bruno Salles; Silva, Wander José da; Lazari, Priscilla Cardoso; Del Bel Cury, Altair Antoninha

    2016-05-31

    This study aimed to evaluate the influence of the type of prosthetic abutment associated to different implant connection on bone biomechanical behavior of immediately and delayed loaded implants. Computed tomography-based finite element models comprising a mandible with a single molar implant were created with different types of prosthetic abutment (UCLA or conical), implant connection (external hexagon, EH or internal hexagon, IH), and occlusal loading (axial or oblique), for both immediately and delayed loaded implants. Analysis of variance at 95%CI was used to evaluate the peak maximum principal stress and strain in bone after applying a 100 N occlusal load. The results showed that the type of prosthetic abutment influences bone stress/strain in only immediately loaded implants. Attachment of conical abutments to IH implants exhibited the best biomechanical behavior, with optimal distribution and dissipation of the load in peri-implant bone.

  2. Prosthetic abutment influences bone biomechanical behavior of immediately loaded implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germana de Villa CAMARGOS

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aimed to evaluate the influence of the type of prosthetic abutment associated to different implant connection on bone biomechanical behavior of immediately and delayed loaded implants. Computed tomography-based finite element models comprising a mandible with a single molar implant were created with different types of prosthetic abutment (UCLA or conical, implant connection (external hexagon, EH or internal hexagon, IH, and occlusal loading (axial or oblique, for both immediately and delayed loaded implants. Analysis of variance at 95%CI was used to evaluate the peak maximum principal stress and strain in bone after applying a 100 N occlusal load. The results showed that the type of prosthetic abutment influences bone stress/strain in only immediately loaded implants. Attachment of conical abutments to IH implants exhibited the best biomechanical behavior, with optimal distribution and dissipation of the load in peri-implant bone.

  3. "Heart Smart"--A Staff Development Model for a School-Based Cardiovascular Health Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Anne M.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Heart disease risk factors appear in early childhood, making health education vital to prevent the development of cardiopulmonary disease. The Heart Smart Program, a model health education program, is designed to meet this objective. The development, implementation, and evaluation of a school staff development model are described. (JL)

  4. COMPUTER MODELING IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF ARTIFICIAL VENTRICLES OF HEART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Belyaev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In article modern researches of processes of development of artificial ventricles of heart are described. Advanta- ges of application computer (CAD/CAE technologies are shown by development of artificial ventricles of heart. The systems developed with application of the given technologies are submitted. 

  5. Animal models of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Conceição; I. Heinonen (Ilkka); A.P. Lourenço; D.J.G.M. Duncker (Dirk); I. Falcão-Pires

    2016-01-01

    textabstractHeart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) constitutes a clinical syndrome in which the diagnostic criteria of heart failure are not accompanied by gross disturbances of systolic function, as assessed by ejection fraction. In turn, under most circumstances, diastolic function

  6. The application of digitization of "HSB color model" in pigment teeth's prosthetic restoration%“HSB色彩模型”的数字化在色素牙修复中的应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章加宇; 孙应明; 张梦洁; 吴梦

    2012-01-01

    目的:运用“HSB色彩模型”的数字化,提高临床色素牙修复的协调性与精确度.方法:选取2001年6月~2010年6月我科32例色素牙修复患者,共48颗瓷修复体.运用数码相机采集与患者色素牙相近明度的Vita 3D-Master26色比色板中的标准色片的数码照.依据孟塞尔(Munse11)颜色系统,通过“HSB色彩模型”H、S、B数字化,确定最小色差的特定色色片组合,指导瓷粉重组与调配,并对修复体色质效果满意度评价.结果:48颗色素牙修复体中,46颗色质良好,与邻牙色质协调,成功率96%.经卡方检验,x2=23.85,P<0.05,运用“HSB色彩模型”的数字化指导瓷粉重组修复与标准色片比色修复的满意程度有显著差异.结论:运用“HSB色彩模型”的数字化,通过最小色差的组合色片指导瓷粉重组,修复体能完全覆盖所有色素牙的颜色区域,该方法科学、量化、方便、精确.%Objective The aim of this study is to improve coordination and accuracy of clinical pigment teeth in dental restoration by using the digitization of "the HSB color model". Methods 32 cases of pigment in patients with dental restoration were chosen during June 2001 to June 2010 with a total of 48 ceramic restorations.The digital photos of the brightness of the standard color chip in Vita 3D-Master26 color swatch which were similar to patient's pigment teeth were collected by digital camera.The combination of minimum chromatic aberration color film was determined and guide the porcelain powder reorganization and deployment by the digitization of HSB color model according to Munsell (Munsell) color system,then the satisfactory of dental prosthetic restoration's color quality was evaluated. Results 46 dental prosthetic restorations' color quality were in coordination with adjacent teeth's color quality during 48 dental prosthetic restorations.The success rate was 96% There were significant differences of satisfaction between porcelain powder

  7. Isolated working heart: description of models relevant to radioisotopic and pharmacological assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depre, Christophe E-mail: cdepre@heart.med.uth.tmc.edu

    1998-11-01

    Isolated heart preparations are used to study physiological and metabolic parameters of the heart independently of its environment. Several preparations of isolated perfused heart are currently used, mainly the retrograde perfusion system and the working heart model. Both models allow investigations of the metabolic regulation of the heart in various physiological conditions (changes in workload, hormonal influences, substrate competition). These systems may also reproduce different pathological conditions, such as ischemia, reperfusion and hypoxia. Quantitation of metabolic activity can be performed with specific radioactive tracers. Finally, the effects of various drugs on cardiac performance and resistance to ischemia can be studied as well. Heart perfusion also revealed efficient methods to determine the tracer/tracee relation for radioisotopic analogues used with Positron Emission Tomography.

  8. Good and bad consequences of altered fatty acid metabolism in heart failure: evidence from mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdurrachim, Desiree; Luiken, Joost J F P; Nicolay, Klaas; Glatz, Jan F C; Prompers, Jeanine J; Nabben, Miranda

    2015-05-01

    The shift in substrate preference away from fatty acid oxidation (FAO) towards increased glucose utilization in heart failure has long been interpreted as an oxygen-sparing mechanism. Inhibition of FAO has therefore evolved as an accepted approach to treat heart failure. However, recent data indicate that increased reliance on glucose might be detrimental rather than beneficial for the failing heart. This review discusses new insights into metabolic adaptations in heart failure. A particular focus lies on data obtained from mouse models with modulations of cardiac FA metabolism at different levels of the FA metabolic pathway and how these differently affect cardiac function. Based on studies in which these mouse models were exposed to ischaemic and non-ischaemic heart failure, we discuss whether and when modulations in FA metabolism are protective against heart failure.

  9. Parametric analysis using the finite element method to investigate prosthetic interface stresses for persons with trans-tibial amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver-Thorn, M B; Childress, D S

    1996-07-01

    A finite element (FE) model of the below-knee residual limb and prosthetic socket was created to investigate the effects of parameter variations on the interface stress distribution during static stance. This model was based upon geometric approximations of anthropometric residual limb geometry. The model was not specific to an individual with amputation, but could be scaled to approximate the limb of a particular subject. Parametric analyses were conducted to investigate the effects of prosthetic socket design and residual limb geometry on the residual limb/prosthetic socket interface stresses. Behavioral trends were illustrated via sensitivity analysis. The results of the parametric analyses indicate that the residual limb/prosthetic socket interface stresses are affected by variations in both prosthetic design and residual limb geometry. Specifically, the analyses indicate: 1) the residual limb/prosthetic liner interface pressures are relatively insensitive to the socket stiffness; 2) the stiffness of the prosthetic liner influences the interface stress distribution for both the unrectified and patellar-tendon-bearing (PTB) rectified models-the external load state appears to influence the interface pressure distribution, while the prosthetic socket rectification appears to influence the interface shear stress distribution; 3) the interface pressures are very sensitive to the prosthetic rectification; 4) the shape and relative bulk of soft tissue may significantly influence the interface pressure distribution; 5) the interface pressure distribution is also influenced by the residual limb length; and 6) the stiffness/compliance of the residual limb soft tissues may significantly alter the interface pressure distribution.

  10. PIV validation of blood-heart valve leaflet interaction modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminsky, R; Dumont, K; Weber, H; Schroll, M; Verdonck, P

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this study was to validate the 2D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results of a moving heart valve based on a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) algorithm with experimental measurements. Firstly, a pulsatile laminar flow through a monoleaflet valve model with a stiff leaflet was visualized by means of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The inflow data sets were applied to a CFD simulation including blood-leaflet interaction. The measurement section with a fixed leaflet was enclosed into a standard mock loop in series with a Harvard Apparatus Pulsatile Blood Pump, a compliance chamber and a reservoir. Standard 2D PIV measurements were made at a frequency of 60 bpm. Average velocity magnitude results of 36 phase-locked measurements were evaluated at every 10 degrees of the pump cycle. For the CFD flow simulation, a commercially available package from Fluent Inc. was used in combination with inhouse developed FSI code based on the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) method. Then the CFD code was applied to the leaflet to quantify the shear stress on it. Generally, the CFD results are in agreement with the PIV evaluated data in major flow regions, thereby validating the FSI simulation of a monoleaflet valve with a flexible leaflet. The applicability of the new CFD code for quantifying the shear stress on a flexible leaflet is thus demonstrated.

  11. Parameter Estimation Technique of Nonlinear Prosthetic Hand System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H.Jali

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper illustrated the parameter estimation technique of motorized prosthetic hand system. Prosthetic hands have become importance device to help amputee to gain a normal functional hand. By integrating various types of actuators such as DC motor, hydraulic and pneumatic as well as mechanical part, a highly useful and functional prosthetic device can be produced. One of the first steps to develop a prosthetic device is to design a control system. Mathematical modeling is derived to ease the control design process later on. This paper explained the parameter estimation technique of a nonlinear dynamic modeling of the system using Lagrangian equation. The model of the system is derived by considering the energies of the finger when it is actuated by the DC motor. The parameter estimation technique is implemented using Simulink Design Optimization toolbox in MATLAB. All the parameters are optimized until it achieves a satisfactory output response. The results show that the output response of the system with parameter estimation value produces a better response compare to the default value

  12. Prevention of Adhesion to Prosthetic Mesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    van ’t Riet, Martijne; de Vos van Steenwijk, Peggy J.; Bonthuis, Fred; Marquet, Richard L.; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Jeekel, Johannes; Bonjer, H. Jaap

    2003-01-01

    Objective To assess whether use of antiadhesive liquids or coatings could prevent adhesion formation to prosthetic mesh. Summary Background Data Incisional hernia repair frequently involves the use of prosthetic mesh. However, concern exists about development of adhesions between viscera and the mesh, predisposing to intestinal obstruction or enterocutaneous fistulas. Methods In 91 rats, a defect in the muscular abdominal wall was created, and mesh was fixed intraperitoneally to cover the defect. Rats were divided in five groups: polypropylene mesh only (control group), addition of Sepracoat or Icodextrin solution to polypropylene mesh, Sepramesh (polypropylene mesh with Seprafilm coating), and Parietex composite mesh (polyester mesh with collagen coating). Seven and 30 days postoperatively, adhesions were assessed and wound healing was studied by microscopy. Results Intraperitoneal placement of polypropylene mesh was followed by bowel adhesions to the mesh in 50% of the cases. A mean of 74% of the mesh surface was covered by adhesions after 7 days, and 48% after 30 days. Administration of Sepracoat or Icodextrin solution had no influence on adhesion formation. Coated meshes (Sepramesh and Parietex composite mesh) had no bowel adhesions. Sepramesh was associated with a significant reduction of the mesh surface covered by adhesions after 7 and 30 days. Infection was more prevalent with Parietex composite mesh, with concurrent increased mesh surface covered by adhesions after 30 days (78%). Conclusions Sepramesh significantly reduced mesh surface covered by adhesions and prevented bowel adhesion to the mesh. Parietex composite mesh prevented bowel adhesions as well but increased infection rates in the current model. PMID:12496539

  13. 新型高分子材料介入肺动脉瓣膜的动物实验%Transcatheter pulmonary valve replacement in sheep : 1-month evaluation of a novel polymeric prosthetic heart valve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张本; 徐同毅; 李鑫; 陈翔; 张志钢; 韩林; 徐志云

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate valvular functionality after transcatheter pulmonary valve replacement in sheep using a novel polymeric prosthetic pulmonary valve.Methods In this study,we designed a novel polymeric trileaflet transcatheter pulmonary valve with a balloon-expandable stent,and the valve leaflet was made of 0.1 mm expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE).We chose bovine pericardium valve as control.Pulmonary valve stents were implanted in situ by right ventricular apical approach in 8 healthy sheep(6 for polymeric valve and 2 for bovine pericardium valve) weighing an average of(22.8 ± 2.2) kg.Angiography was performed after implantation to assess immediate valvular function.Color Doppler echocardiography and 64-row computed tomography were used to assess valvular function 4 weeks after implantation.Results Implantation was successful in 8 sheep.Angiography at implantation showed one polymeric valve was located below the ideal position and most of the stent was in the outflow tract of right ventricle.While,all the other prosthetic valves demonstrated orthotopic position and exhibited normal open and close functionality.Echocardiography 4 weeks after implantation showed all the prosthetic valves exhibited normal functionality and no significant insufficiency.The peak-peak transvalvular pressure gradient of the polymeric valves was (18.8 ± 6.0) mmHg,while that of two bovine pericardium valves were 9 mmHg and 20 mmHg.CT 4 weeks after implantation demonstrated orthotopic position of the stents except the above-mentioned one and all the stents had no deformation.Conclusion The success rate of transcatheter pulmonary valve replacement by right ventricular apical approach is satisfactory.The early valvular functionality of the novel ePTFE pulmonary valve after transcatheter pulmonary valve replacement in sheep is good.%目的 评价自主研制的新型高分子材料介入肺动脉瓣膜动物体内原位置换后的早期实验效果.方法 选用超微孔聚四氟

  14. Metformin improves cardiac function in a nondiabetic rat model of post-MI heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yin, Meimei; van der Horst, Iwan C. C.; van Melle, Joost P.; Qian, Cheng; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Sillje, Herman H. W.; de Boer, Rudolf A.

    2011-01-01

    Yin M, van der Horst IC, van Melle JP, Qian C, van Gilst WH, Sillje HH, de Boer RA. Metformin improves cardiac function in a nondiabetic rat model of post-MI heart failure. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 301: H459-H468, 2011. First published May 13, 2011; doi:10.1152/ajpheart.00054.2011.-Metformin

  15. Development of an Ex Vivo, Beating Heart Model for CT Myocardial Perfusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelgrim, Gert Jan; Das, Marco; Haberland, Ulrike; Slump, Cees; Handayani, Astri; van Tuijl, Sjoerd; Stijnen, Marco; Klotz, Ernst; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To test the feasibility of a CT-compatible, ex vivo, perfused porcine heart model for myocardial perfusion CT imaging. Methods. One porcine heart was perfused according to Langendorff. Dynamic perfusion scanning was performed with a second-generation dual source CT scanner. Circulatory pa

  16. Validation of the prosthetic esthetic index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özhayat, Esben B; Dannemand, Katrine

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In order to diagnose impaired esthetics and evaluate treatments for these, it is crucial to evaluate all aspects of oral and prosthetic esthetics. No professionally administered index currently exists that sufficiently encompasses comprehensive prosthetic esthetics. This study aimed...... to validate a new comprehensive index, the Prosthetic Esthetic Index (PEI), for professional evaluation of esthetics in prosthodontic patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The content, criterion, and construct validity; the test-retest, inter-rater, and internal consistency reliability; and the sensitivity...

  17. Modeling study of the failing heart and its interaction with an implantable rotary blood pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Deepa P; Luo, Chuan; Ma, Tony S; Clark, John W

    2011-01-01

    The effectiveness of clinical diagnosis and treatment of heart failure is a direct function of clinical signs that can be measured in a patient within cost and safety constraints. Large-scale mathematical modeling can be a key tool in revealing important, measurable clinical signs of heart failure, furthering medical understanding and development of treatment. In the first part of this study we have created two models of left heart failure--diastolic and systolic, using our human cardiovascular-respiratory system (H-CRS) model, and we present a comparison of the two types with emphasis on novel and differentiating clinical signs, such as tricuspid flow and septal motion. In the event of compromised left ventricular performance, mechanical left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) are often implanted to augment or completely replace the pumping action of the left ventricle (LV). One such type is the implantable rotary blood pump (iRBP). Several design issues related to the iRBP are difficult to study experimentally due to procedure complexity and limitations in animal models of heart failure [2]. Therefore, modeling has become a key tool in iRBP development. In the second part of this study, we have introduced an iRBP model based on [1]-[2] in the systolic failing heart to study the interactions. We consider optimal motor settings for different levels of LV assistance, the effects of the iRBP on the right heart, septum, and pulmonary circulation. Our model results align with those reported in [1]-[2]. Improvement in cardiac output, pulmonary congestion, and heart work are seen with the iRBP. We observe lowered septal assistance to RV and LV ejection with increasing pump speeds, elevating right ventricular (RV) work, reducing LVET, and causing ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony in ejection. These results suggest right heart compromise via the septum's reduced role with the introduction of an iRBP. This work emphasizes the critical role of modeling in heart failure and

  18. Computer Aided Facial Prosthetics Manufacturing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng H.K.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Facial deformities can impose burden to the patient. There are many solutions for facial deformities such as plastic surgery and facial prosthetics. However, current fabrication method of facial prosthetics is high-cost and time consuming. This study aimed to identify a new method to construct a customized facial prosthetic. A 3D scanner, computer software and 3D printer were used in this study. Results showed that the new developed method can be used to produce a customized facial prosthetics. The advantages of the developed method over the conventional process are low cost, reduce waste of material and pollution in order to meet the green concept.

  19. Oral prosthetics from a Nordic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokstad, Asbjørn

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe oral prosthetics in a context intended for other, primarily Nordic, health professionals and health authorities. An article describing oral prosthetics for the general public was formulated on the basis of recent data and publications in prosthodontics from Scandinavian authors. A draft was presented to the educational committee of the Scandinavian Society for Prosthetic Dentistry for verification and consensus. Following modifications and amendments by representatives from the 11 dental schools in the Nordic countries, the educational committee has approved the present article. The report consists of four sections describing oral prosthetics, prosthetic therapy, undergraduate teaching in oral prosthetics, and advanced oral prosthetics, from a Nordic perspective. The report appraises the various factors in context with demographic, cultural, and professional circumstances and suggests strategies for improvement of present conditions. The relationship between the undergraduate curriculum in oral prosthetics and the public need for advanced oral prosthetics must continuously be monitored so that patients can obtain optimal care from the profession.

  20. Circuit For Control Of Electromechanical Prosthetic Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed circuit for control of electromechanical prosthetic hand derives electrical control signals from shoulder movements. Updated, electronic version of prosthesis, that includes two hooklike fingers actuated via cables from shoulder harness. Circuit built around favored shoulder harness, provides more dexterous movement, without incurring complexity of computer-controlled "bionic" or hydraulically actuated devices. Additional harness and potentiometer connected to similar control circuit mounted on other shoulder. Used to control stepping motor rotating hand about prosthetic wrist to one of number of angles consistent with number of digital outputs. Finger-control signals developed by circuit connected to first shoulder harness transmitted to prosthetic hand via sliprings at prosthetic wrist joint.

  1. An automatic and accurate method of full heart segmentation from CT image based on linear gradient model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zili

    2017-07-01

    Heart segmentation is an important auxiliary method in the diagnosis of many heart diseases, such as coronary heart disease and atrial fibrillation, and in the planning of tumor radiotherapy. Most of the existing methods for full heart segmentation treat the heart as a whole part and cannot accurately extract the bottom of the heart. In this paper, we propose a new method based on linear gradient model to segment the whole heart from the CT images automatically and accurately. Twelve cases were tested in order to test this method and accurate segmentation results were achieved and identified by clinical experts. The results can provide reliable clinical support.

  2. Non-linear rotation-free shell finite-element models for aortic heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmanov, Anvar; Stolarski, Henryk; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2017-01-04

    Hyperelastic material models have been incorporated in the rotation-free, large deformation, shell finite element (FE) formulation of (Stolarski et al., 2013) and applied to dynamic simulations of aortic heart valve. Two models used in the past in analysis of such problem i.e. the Saint-Venant and May-Newmann-Yin (MNY) material models have been considered and compared. Uniaxial tests for those constitutive equations were performed to verify the formulation and implementation of the models. The issue of leaflets interactions during the closing of the heart valve at the end of systole is considered. The critical role of using non-linear anisotropic model for proper dynamic response of the heart valve especially during the closing phase is demonstrated quantitatively. This work contributes an efficient FE framework for simulating biological tissues and paves the way for high-fidelity flow structure interaction simulations of native and bioprosthetic aortic heart valves. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. A Quality Function Deployment (QFD approach to designing a prosthetic myoelectric hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Sofía Olaya Escobar

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a Quality Function Deployment (QFD model based on computing with words. It is specifically used in the House of Quality (HOQ construction phase. It illustrates the methodology employed in designing a prosthetic myoelectric hand.

  4. Late prosthetic valve endocarditis due to Cardiobacterium hominis, an unusual complication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivaprakasha S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by Cardiobacterium hominis in a patient who had undergone atrial septal defect closure and mitral valve replacement of the heart in 1978. He presented with pyrexia of unknown origin and congestive cardiac failure. Investigations revealed infective endocarditis of prosthetic valve in mitral portion. Blood culture samples grew C. hominis . The patient was empirically started on vancomycin and gentamicin intravenously and ceftriaxone was added after isolation of the organism. Though subsequent blood cultures were negative, patient remained in congestive cardiac failure and died due to complications.

  5. Simulation Techniques and Prosthetic Approach Towards Biologically Efficient Artificial Sense Organs- An Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Neogi, Biswarup; Mukherjee, Soumyajit; Das, Achintya; Tibarewala, D N

    2011-01-01

    An overview of the applications of control theory to prosthetic sense organs including the senses of vision, taste and odor is being presented in this paper. Simulation aspect nowadays has been the centre of research in the field of prosthesis. There have been various successful applications of prosthetic organs, in case of natural biological organs dis-functioning patients. Simulation aspects and control modeling are indispensible for knowing system performance, and to generate an original approach of artificial organs. This overview focuses mainly on control techniques, by far a theoretical overview and fusion of artificial sense organs trying to mimic the efficacies of biologically active sensory organs. Keywords: virtual reality, prosthetic vision, artificial

  6. Reduced prosthetic stiffness lowers the metabolic cost of running for athletes with bilateral transtibial amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Owen N; Taboga, Paolo; Grabowski, Alena Marie

    2017-01-19

    Inspired by the spring-like action of biological legs, running-specific prostheses are designed to enable athletes with lower-limb amputations to run. Yet, manufacturer recommendations for prosthetic stiffness and height may not optimize running performance. Therefore, we investigated the effects of using different prosthetic configurations on the metabolic cost and biomechanics of running. Five athletes with bilateral transtibial amputations each performed fifteen trials on a force-measuring treadmill at 2.5 or 3.0 m/s. Athletes ran using each of three different prosthetic models (Freedom Catapult FX6, Össur Flex-Run, and Ottobock 1E90 Sprinter) with five combinations of stiffness categories (manufacturer recommended and ± 1) and heights (International Paralympic Committee's maximum competition height and ± 2 cm) while we measured metabolic rates and ground reaction forces. Overall, prosthetic stiffness (fixed effect (β)=0.036; p=0.008) but not height (p≥0.089) affected the net metabolic cost of transport; less stiff prostheses reduced metabolic cost. While controlling for prosthetic stiffness (kN/m), using the Flex-Run (β=-0.139; p=0.044) and 1E90 Sprinter prostheses (β=-0.176; p=0.009) reduced net metabolic costs by 4.3% to 4.9% compared to using the Catapult prostheses, respectively. The metabolic cost of running improved when athletes used prosthetic configurations that decreased peak horizontal braking ground reaction forces (β=2.786; p=0.001), stride frequencies (β=0.911; p<0.001), and leg stiffness values (β=0.053; p=0.009). Remarkably, athletes did not maintain overall leg stiffness across prosthetic stiffness conditions. Rather, the in-series prosthetic stiffness governed overall leg stiffness. The metabolic cost of running in athletes with bilateral transtibial amputations is influenced by prosthetic model and stiffness, but not height.

  7. Time-variant modelling of heart rate responses to exercise intensity during road cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefever, Joris; Berckmans, Daniel; Aerts, Jean-Marie

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if heart rate responses to training intensity during road cycling could be modelled with compact time-variant mathematical model structures. The model performance was evaluated in terms of model order (complexity), number of inputs and parameter estimation methods used (time-invariant vs. time-variant). Thirteen male cyclists performed two identical cycling tests of 27 km on the road. Uphill sections were introduced to induce dynamic variations in heart rate. The heart rate and training intensity, represented by power output and road inclination, were measured in real-time. Taking only power as system input allowed to explain the variations in heart rate in an accurate way R2 T = 0.86 ± 0.08, since adding the road inclination as an additional input did not significantly improve the modelling performance R2 T = 0.87 ± 0.08, P = 0.32. Furthermore, we demonstrated that models with first-order dynamics accurately describes the heart rate responses to power variations R2 T = 0.86 ± 0.08, but that more complex second-order model structures R2 T = 0.88 ± 0.08 were significantly better than the first-order model structures (P = 0.028). Finally, the heart rate dynamics appeared to be time-variant, since the time-variant model structures R2 T = 0.89 ± 0.07 were significantly better than the time-invariant model structures R2 T = 0.84 ± 0.08, P = 0.0002. So, compact time-variant second-order model structures could be used to model the heart rate response to training intensity as a basis for training optimisation.

  8. Make Your Own Working Models of Heart Valves!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Margaret L.

    2014-01-01

    Heart valves play a vital role in efficient circulation of the blood, and the details of their physical structure are related crucially to their function. However, it can be challenging for the learner to make the mental connection between anatomical structures of valves and the changing pressure gradients that the valves experience and come to an…

  9. Interactions of Prosthetic and Natural Vision in Animals With Local Retinal Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorach, Henri; Lei, Xin; Galambos, Ludwig; Kamins, Theodore; Mathieson, Keith; Dalal, Roopa; Huie, Philip; Harris, James; Palanker, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Prosthetic restoration of partial sensory loss leads to interactions between artificial and natural inputs. Ideally, the rehabilitation should allow perceptual fusion of the two modalities. Here we studied the interactions between normal and prosthetic vision in a rodent model of local retinal degeneration. Methods Implantation of a photovoltaic array in the subretinal space of normally sighted rats induced local degeneration of the photoreceptors above the chip, and the inner retinal neurons in this area were electrically stimulated by the photovoltaic implant powered by near-infrared (NIR) light. We studied prosthetic and natural visually evoked potentials (VEP) in response to simultaneous stimulation by NIR and visible light patterns. Results We demonstrate that electrical and natural VEPs summed linearly in the visual cortex, and both responses decreased under brighter ambient light. Responses to visible light flashes increased over 3 orders of magnitude of contrast (flash/background), while for electrical stimulation the contrast range was limited to 1 order of magnitude. The maximum amplitude of the prosthetic VEP was three times lower than the maximum response to a visible flash over the same area on the retina. Conclusions Ambient light affects prosthetic responses, albeit much less than responses to visible stimuli. Prosthetic representation of contrast in the visual scene can be encoded, to a limited extent, by the appropriately calibrated stimulus intensity, which also depends on the ambient light conditions. Such calibration will be important for patients combining central prosthetic vision with natural peripheral sight, such as in age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26618643

  10. Rotationally actuated prosthetic helping hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, William E. (Inventor); Belcher, Jewell G., Jr. (Inventor); Carden, James R. (Inventor); West, Thomas W. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A prosthetic device has been developed for below-the-elbow amputees. The device consists of a cuff, a stem, a housing, two hook-like fingers, an elastic band for holding the fingers together, and a brace. The fingers are pivotally mounted on a housing that is secured to the amputee's upper arm with the brace. The stem, which also contains a cam, is rotationally mounted within the housing and is secured to the cuff, which fits over the amputee's stump. By rotating the cammed stem between the fingers with the lower arm, the amputee can open and close the fingers.

  11. The Influence of a High Salt Diet on a Rat Model of Isoproterenol-Induced Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rat models of heart failure (HF) show varied pathology and time to disease outcome, dependent on induction method. We found that subchronic (4 weeks) isoproterenol (ISO) infusion exacerbated cardiomyopathy in Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure (SHHF) rats. Others have shown...

  12. Pentamidine rescues contractility and rhythmicity in a Drosophila model of myotonic dystrophy heart dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouli Chakraborty

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Up to 80% of individuals with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1 will develop cardiac abnormalities at some point during the progression of their disease, the most common of which is heart blockage of varying degrees. Such blockage is characterized by conduction defects and supraventricular and ventricular tachycardia, and carries a high risk of sudden cardiac death. Despite its importance, very few animal model studies have focused on the heart dysfunction in DM1. Here, we describe the characterization of the heart phenotype in a Drosophila model expressing pure expanded CUG repeats under the control of the cardiomyocyte-specific driver GMH5-Gal4. Morphologically, expression of 250 CUG repeats caused abnormalities in the parallel alignment of the spiral myofibrils in dissected fly hearts, as revealed by phalloidin staining. Moreover, combined immunofluorescence and in situ hybridization of Muscleblind and CUG repeats, respectively, confirmed detectable ribonuclear foci and Muscleblind sequestration, characteristic features of DM1, exclusively in flies expressing the expanded CTG repeats. Similarly to what has been reported in humans with DM1, heart-specific expression of toxic RNA resulted in reduced survival, increased arrhythmia, altered diastolic and systolic function, reduced heart tube diameters and reduced contractility in the model flies. As a proof of concept that the fly heart model can be used for in vivo testing of promising therapeutic compounds, we fed flies with pentamidine, a compound previously described to improve DM1 phenotypes. Pentamidine not only released Muscleblind from the CUG RNA repeats and reduced ribonuclear formation in the Drosophila heart, but also rescued heart arrhythmicity and contractility, and improved fly survival in animals expressing 250 CUG repeats.

  13. Pentamidine rescues contractility and rhythmicity in a Drosophila model of myotonic dystrophy heart dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Mouli; Selma-Soriano, Estela; Magny, Emile; Couso, Juan Pablo; Pérez-Alonso, Manuel; Charlet-Berguerand, Nicolas; Artero, Ruben; Llamusi, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Up to 80% of individuals with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) will develop cardiac abnormalities at some point during the progression of their disease, the most common of which is heart blockage of varying degrees. Such blockage is characterized by conduction defects and supraventricular and ventricular tachycardia, and carries a high risk of sudden cardiac death. Despite its importance, very few animal model studies have focused on the heart dysfunction in DM1. Here, we describe the characterization of the heart phenotype in a Drosophila model expressing pure expanded CUG repeats under the control of the cardiomyocyte-specific driver GMH5-Gal4. Morphologically, expression of 250 CUG repeats caused abnormalities in the parallel alignment of the spiral myofibrils in dissected fly hearts, as revealed by phalloidin staining. Moreover, combined immunofluorescence and in situ hybridization of Muscleblind and CUG repeats, respectively, confirmed detectable ribonuclear foci and Muscleblind sequestration, characteristic features of DM1, exclusively in flies expressing the expanded CTG repeats. Similarly to what has been reported in humans with DM1, heart-specific expression of toxic RNA resulted in reduced survival, increased arrhythmia, altered diastolic and systolic function, reduced heart tube diameters and reduced contractility in the model flies. As a proof of concept that the fly heart model can be used for in vivo testing of promising therapeutic compounds, we fed flies with pentamidine, a compound previously described to improve DM1 phenotypes. Pentamidine not only released Muscleblind from the CUG RNA repeats and reduced ribonuclear formation in the Drosophila heart, but also rescued heart arrhythmicity and contractility, and improved fly survival in animals expressing 250 CUG repeats. PMID:26515653

  14. Pentamidine rescues contractility and rhythmicity in a Drosophila model of myotonic dystrophy heart dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Mouli; Selma-Soriano, Estela; Magny, Emile; Couso, Juan Pablo; Pérez-Alonso, Manuel; Charlet-Berguerand, Nicolas; Artero, Ruben; Llamusi, Beatriz

    2015-12-01

    Up to 80% of individuals with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) will develop cardiac abnormalities at some point during the progression of their disease, the most common of which is heart blockage of varying degrees. Such blockage is characterized by conduction defects and supraventricular and ventricular tachycardia, and carries a high risk of sudden cardiac death. Despite its importance, very few animal model studies have focused on the heart dysfunction in DM1. Here, we describe the characterization of the heart phenotype in a Drosophila model expressing pure expanded CUG repeats under the control of the cardiomyocyte-specific driver GMH5-Gal4. Morphologically, expression of 250 CUG repeats caused abnormalities in the parallel alignment of the spiral myofibrils in dissected fly hearts, as revealed by phalloidin staining. Moreover, combined immunofluorescence and in situ hybridization of Muscleblind and CUG repeats, respectively, confirmed detectable ribonuclear foci and Muscleblind sequestration, characteristic features of DM1, exclusively in flies expressing the expanded CTG repeats. Similarly to what has been reported in humans with DM1, heart-specific expression of toxic RNA resulted in reduced survival, increased arrhythmia, altered diastolic and systolic function, reduced heart tube diameters and reduced contractility in the model flies. As a proof of concept that the fly heart model can be used for in vivo testing of promising therapeutic compounds, we fed flies with pentamidine, a compound previously described to improve DM1 phenotypes. Pentamidine not only released Muscleblind from the CUG RNA repeats and reduced ribonuclear formation in the Drosophila heart, but also rescued heart arrhythmicity and contractility, and improved fly survival in animals expressing 250 CUG repeats.

  15. The blower: a useful tool to complete thrombectomy of the mechanical prosthetic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroussi, Aziz Alami; Sami, Ibrahim Mohamed; Leguerrier, Alain; Verhoye, Jean Phillippe

    2006-05-01

    Thrombectomy could be an excellent approach on one condition (ie, that all parts of the thrombus are removed). We propose to use a tool (ie, the blower) to complete thrombectomy of the prosthetic mechanical valve. The blower is a vaporizer that mixes air and heparinized saline with regulator of flow and proportion used in beating heart surgery. For thrombectomy, we have modified the air-water mixing part and intensity until we obtained a jet that enabled us to remove the micro thrombus that covered the prosthetic valve and surrounding tissues. The blower completely cleaned the prosthetic valve. With this tool, thrombectomy seems easier, more complete, and more reliable with the advantages of short cross-clamping time.

  16. Cochlear Implant Using Neural Prosthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shweta; Singh, Shashi kumar; Dubey, Pratik Kumar

    2012-10-01

    This research is based on neural prosthetic device. The oldest and most widely used of these electrical, and often computerized, devices is the cochlear implant, which has provided hearing to thousands of congenitally deaf people in this country. Recently, the use of the cochlear implant is expanding to the elderly, who frequently suffer major hearing loss. More cutting edge are artificial retinas, which are helping dozens of blind people see, and ìsmartî artificial arms and legs that amputees can maneuver by thoughts alone, and that feel more like real limbs.Research, which curiosity led to explore frog legs dancing during thunderstorms, a snail shapedorgan in the inner ear, and how various eye cells react to light, have fostered an understanding of how to ìtalkî to the nervous system. That understanding combined with the miniaturization of electronics and enhanced computer processing has enabled prosthetic devices that often can bridge the gap in nerve signaling that is caused by disease or injury.

  17. Finite element analysis of the contact interface between trans-femoral stump and prosthetic socket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linlin; Zhu, Ming; Shen, Ling; Zheng, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Transfemoral amputees need prosthetic devices after amputation surgery, and the interface pressure between the residual limb and prosthetic socket has a significant effect on an amputee's satisfaction and comfort. The purpose of this study was to build a nonlinear finite element model to investigate the interface pressure between the above-knee residual limb and its prosthetic socket. The model was three-dimensional (3D) with consideration of nonlinear boundary conditions. Contact analysis was used to simulate the friction conditions between skin and the socket. The normal stresses up to 80.57 kPa at the distal end of the soft tissue. The longitudinal and circumferential shear stress distributions at the limb-socket interface were also simulated. This study explores the influences of load transfer between trans-femoral residual limb and its prosthetic socket.

  18. Aortic banding in rat as a model to investigate malnutrition associated with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Héliès-Toussaint, Cécile; Moinard, Christophe; Rasmusen, Carole; Tabbi-Anneni, Imène; Cynober, Luc; Grynberg, Alain

    2005-05-01

    Heart failure is a severe pathology, which has displayed a dramatic increase in the occurrence of patients with chronic heart disease in developed countries, as a result of increases in the population's average age and in survival time. This pathology is associated with severe malnutrition, which worsens the prognosis. Although the cachexia associated with chronic heart failure is a well-known complication, there is no reference animal model of malnutrition related to heart failure. This study was designed to evaluate the nutritional status of rats in a model of loss of cardiac function obtained by ascending aortic banding. Cardiac overload led to the development of cardiac hypertrophy, which decompensates to heart failure, with increased brain natriuretic peptide levels. The rats displayed hepatic dysfunction and an associated renal hypotrophy and renal failure, evidenced by the alteration in renal function markers such as citrullinemia, creatininemia, and uremia. Malnutrition has been evidenced by the alteration of protein and amino acid metabolism. A muscular atrophy with decreased protein content and increased amino acid concentrations in both plasma and muscle was observed. These rats with heart failure displayed a multiorgan failure and malnutrition, which reflected the clinical situation of human chronic heart failure.

  19. Observation on Therapeutic Effect of Warfarin on 103 Pregnant Women with Prosthetic Mechanical Heart Valves Throughout Pregnancy%心脏瓣膜置换术后妇女妊娠全程口服华法令抗凝观察103例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    匡锋; 周新民; 尹邦良; 谢立; 伍源

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the anticoagulation effect of warfarin on pregnant women with prosthetic mechanical heart valves during the whole course of pregnancy and their fetuses. Methods Follow-up survey was carried out on 103 pregnant women with prosthetic mechanical heart valves treated in the Second Xiangya Hospital of Central South University from April 1998 to June 2010. Their age ranged from 19 and 38 years (26.4±3.8 years). All the 103 pregnant women were given oral administration of warfarin during the whole course of pregnancy. The average dose of domestic warfarin was 3.30±0. 43 mg/d (87 eases), while the average dose of imported warfarin was 2.90±1.05 mg/d (16 cases). Results None of the patients suffered from serious embolic events. One patient suffered from spontaneous peritoneal hemorrhage. There were 4 cases of intrauterine deaths, and 5 cases of fetal malformation including 1 case of Down's syndrome and 4 cases of hydrocephalus. Six cases of low birth weight infants and 1 case of ABO hemolytic disease were also found. All the other neonates were healthy with normal weight. No pregnant women suffered from postpartum hemorrhage. Conclusion Oral administration of low dose warfarin (<5 mg/d) during the whole course of pregnancy is a relative safe and effective anticoagulation protocol.%目的 探讨心脏机械瓣膜置换术后的妊娠妇女全程使用华法令抗凝对孕妇及胎儿的影响.方法 随访1998年4月至2010年6月中南大学湘雅二医院103例心脏机械瓣膜置换术后妇女妊娠阶段抗凝治疗的情况,年龄19~38岁(26.4±3.8岁).103例机械瓣置换患者整个妊娠期均采用口服华法令抗凝治疗,其中国产华法令用量为3.30±0.43 mg/d(87例),进口华法令用量为2.90±1.05 mg/d(16例).结果 103例患者妊娠期间均无严重栓塞并发症,发生腹腔自发性出血1例;宫内死胎4例;出生的新生儿中发生胎儿畸形5例,其中21-三体综合征1例,脑积水4

  20. Oxidative Damage in the Aging Heart: an Experimental Rat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Gustavo Lenci; Neto, Francisco Filipak; Ribeiro, Ciro Alberto de Oliveira; Liebel, Samuel; de Fraga, Rogério; Bueno, Ronaldo da Rocha Loures

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Several theories have been proposed to explain the cause of ‘aging’; however, the factors that affect this complex process are still poorly understood. Of these theories, the accumulation of oxidative damage over time is among the most accepted. Particularly, the heart is one of the most affected organs by oxidative stress. The current study, therefore, aimed to investigate oxidative stress markers in myocardial tissue of rats at different ages. Methods: Seventy-two rats were distributed into 6 groups of 12 animals each and maintained for 3, 6, 9, 12, 18 and 24 months. After euthanasia, the heart was removed and the levels of non-protein thiols, lipid peroxidation, and protein carbonylation, as well as superoxide dismutase and catalase activities were determined. Results: Superoxide dismutase, catalase activity and lipid peroxidation were reduced in the older groups of animals, when compared with the younger group. However, protein carbonylation showed an increase in the 12-month group followed by a decrease in the older groups. In addition, the levels of non-protein thiols were increased in the 12-month group and not detected in the older groups. Conclusion: Our data showed that oxidative stress is not associated with aging in the heart. However, an increase in non-protein thiols may be an important factor that compensates for the decrease of superoxide dismutase and catalase activity in the oldest rats, to maintain appropriate antioxidant defenses against oxidative insults. PMID:27006709

  1. Neuro-adaptive control in beating heart surgery based on the viscoelastic tissue model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setareh Rezakhani

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the problem of 3D heart motion in beating heart surgery is resolved by proposing a parallel force-motion controller. Motion controller is designed based on neuro-adaptive approach to compensate 3D heart motion and deal with uncertainity in dynamic parameters, while an implicit force control is implemented by considering a viscoelastic tissue model. Stability analysis is proved through Lypanov’s stability theory and Barballet’s lemma. Simulation results, for D2M2 robot, which is done in nominal case and viscoelastic parameter mismatches demonstrate the robust performance of the controller.

  2. TU-EF-304-04: A Heart Motion Model for Proton Scanned Beam Chest Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, B; Kiely, J Blanco; Lin, L; Freedman, G; Both, S [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Vennarini, S [Operativa di Protonterapia, Azienda Provinciale per i Servizi Sanitari, Trento, Trento (Italy); Santhanam, A; Low, D [University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To model fast-moving heart surface motion as a function of cardiac-phase in order to compensate for the lack of cardiac-gating in evaluating accurate dose to coronary structures. Methods: Ten subjects were prospectively imaged with a breath-hold, cardiac-gated MRI protocol to determine heart surface motion. Radial and planar views of the heart were resampled into a 3-dimensional volume representing one heartbeat. A multi-resolution optical flow deformable image registration algorithm determined tissue displacement during the cardiac-cycle. The surface of the heart was modeled as a thin membrane comprised of voxels perpendicular to a pencil beam scanning (PBS) beam. The membrane’s out-of-plane spatial displacement was modeled as a harmonic function with Lame’s equations. Model accuracy was assessed with the root mean squared error (RMSE). The model was applied to a cohort of six chest wall irradiation patients with PBS plans generated on phase-sorted 4DCT. Respiratory motion was separated from the cardiac motion with a previously published technique. Volumetric dose painting was simulated and dose accumulated to validate plan robustness (target coverage variation accepted within 2%). Maximum and mean heart surface dose assessed the dosimetric impact of heart and coronary artery motion. Results: Average and maximum heart surface displacements were 2.54±0.35mm and 3.6mm from the end-diastole phase to the end-systole cardiac-phase respectively. An average RMSE of 0.11±0.04 showed the model to be accurate. Observed errors were greatest between the circumflex artery and mitral valve level of the heart anatomy. Heart surface displacements correspond to a 3.6±1.0% and 5.1±2.3% dosimetric impact on the maximum and mean heart surface DVH indicators respectively. Conclusion: Although heart surface motion parallel to beam’s direction was substantial, its maximum dosimetric impact was 5.1±2.3%. Since PBS delivers low doses to coronary structures relative to

  3. Simulation Techniques and Prosthetic Approach Towards Biologically Efficient Artificial Sense Organs- An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Neogi, Biswarup; Ghosal, Soumya; Mukherjee, Soumyajit; Das, Achintya; Tibarewala, D. N.

    2011-01-01

    An overview of the applications of control theory to prosthetic sense organs including the senses of vision, taste and odor is being presented in this paper. Simulation aspect nowadays has been the centre of research in the field of prosthesis. There have been various successful applications of prosthetic organs, in case of natural biological organs dis-functioning patients. Simulation aspects and control modeling are indispensible for knowing system performance, and to generate an original a...

  4. Prosthetic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pokpong Amornvit

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ocular trauma can be caused by road traffic accidents, falls, assaults, or work-related accidents. Enucleation is often indicated after ocular injury or for the treatment of intraocular tumors, severe ocular infections, and painful blind eyes. Rehabilitation of an enucleated socket without an intraocular implant or with an inappropriately sized implant can result in superior sulcus deepening, enophthalmos, ptosis, ectropion, and lower lid laxity, which are collectively known as post-enucleation socket syndrome. This clinical report describes the rehabilitation of post-enucleation socket syndrome with a modified ocular prosthesis. Modifications to the ocular prosthesis were performed to correct the ptosis, superior sulcus deepening, and enophthalmos. The rehabilitation procedure produced satisfactory results.

  5. Acute Heart Failure Registry: Risk Assessment Model in Decompensated Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Anne; Rodrigues, Bruno; Nunes, Sara; Baptista, Rui; Marmelo, Bruno; Moreira, Davide; Gama, Pedro; Nunes, Luís; Santos, Oliveira; Cabral, Costa

    2016-01-01

    Background Heart failure (HF) is a highly prevalent syndrome. Although the long-term prognostic factors have been identified in chronic HF, this information is scarcer with respect to patients with acute HF. despite available data in the literature on long-term prognostic factors in chronic HF, data on acute HF patients are more scarce. Objectives To develop a predictor of unfavorable prognostic events in patients hospitalized for acute HF syndromes, and to characterize a group at higher risk regarding their clinical characteristics, treatment and outcomes. Methods cohort study of 600 patients admitted for acute HF, defined according to the European Society of Cardiology criteria. Primary endpoint for score derivation was defined as all-cause mortality and / or rehospitalization for HF at 12 months. For score validation, the following endpoints were used: all-cause mortality and / or readmission for HF at 6, 12 and 24 months. The exclusion criteria were: high output HF; patients with acute myocardial infraction, acute myocarditis, infectious endocarditis, pulmonary infection, pulmonary artery hypertension and severe mitral stenosis. Results 505 patients were included, and prognostic predicting factors at 12 months were identified. One or two points were assigned according to the odds ratio (OR) obtained (p < 0.05). After the total score value was determined, a 4-point cut-off was determined for each ROC curve at 12 months. Two groups were formed according to the number of points, group A < 4 points, and group B = 4 points. Group B was composed of older patients, with higher number of comorbidities and predictors of the combined endpoint at 6, 12 and 24 months, as linearly represented in the survival curves (Log rank). Conclusions This risk score enabled the identification of a group with worse prognosis at 12 months.

  6. Application of Artificial Neural Networks in the Heart Electrical Axis Position Conclusion Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakanovskaya, L. N.

    2016-08-01

    The article touches upon building of a heart electrical axis position conclusion model using an artificial neural network. The input signals of the neural network are the values of deflections Q, R and S; and the output signal is the value of the heart electrical axis position. Training of the network is carried out by the error propagation method. The test results allow concluding that the created neural network makes a conclusion with a high degree of accuracy.

  7. Patient-specific pediatric silicone heart valve models based on 3D ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilina, Anna; Lasso, Andras; Jolley, Matthew A.; Wohler, Brittany; Nguyen, Alex; Scanlan, Adam; Baum, Zachary; McGowan, Frank; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2017-03-01

    PURPOSE: Patient-specific heart and valve models have shown promise as training and planning tools for heart surgery, but physically realistic valve models remain elusive. Available proprietary, simulation-focused heart valve models are generic adult mitral valves and do not allow for patient-specific modeling as may be needed for rare diseases such as congenitally abnormal valves. We propose creating silicone valve models from a 3D-printed plastic mold as a solution that can be adapted to any individual patient and heart valve at a fraction of the cost of direct 3D-printing using soft materials. METHODS: Leaflets of a pediatric mitral valve, a tricuspid valve in a patient with hypoplastic left heart syndrome, and a complete atrioventricular canal valve were segmented from ultrasound images. A custom software was developed to automatically generate molds for each valve based on the segmentation. These molds were 3D-printed and used to make silicone valve models. The models were designed with cylindrical rims of different sizes surrounding the leaflets, to show the outline of the valve and add rigidity. Pediatric cardiac surgeons practiced suturing on the models and evaluated them for use as surgical planning and training tools. RESULTS: Five out of six surgeons reported that the valve models would be very useful as training tools for cardiac surgery. In this first iteration of valve models, leaflets were felt to be unrealistically thick or stiff compared to real pediatric leaflets. A thin tube rim was preferred for valve flexibility. CONCLUSION: The valve models were well received and considered to be valuable and accessible tools for heart valve surgery training. Further improvements will be made based on surgeons' feedback.

  8. A Simplified 3D Model of Whole Heart Electrical Activity and 12-Lead ECG Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siniša Sovilj

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a computationally efficient three-dimensional bidomain model of torso-embedded whole heart electrical activity, with spontaneous initiation of activation in the sinoatrial node, incorporating a specialized conduction system with heterogeneous action potential morphologies throughout the heart. The simplified geometry incorporates the whole heart as a volume source, with heart cavities, lungs, and torso as passive volume conductors. We placed four surface electrodes at the limbs of the torso: , , and and six electrodes on the chest to simulate the Einthoven, Goldberger-augmented and precordial leads of a standard 12-lead system. By placing additional seven electrodes at the appropriate torso positions, we were also able to calculate the vectorcardiogram of the Frank lead system. Themodel was able to simulate realistic electrocardiogram (ECG morphologies for the 12 standard leads, orthogonal , , and leads, as well as the vectorcardiogram under normal and pathological heart states. Thus, simplified and easy replicable 3D cardiac bidomain model offers a compromise between computational load and model complexity and can be used as an investigative tool to adjust cell, tissue, and whole heart properties, such as setting ischemic lesions or regions of myocardial infarction, to readily investigate their effects on whole ECG morphology.

  9. Allograftic bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells transplanted into heart infarcted model of rabbit to renovate infarcted heart

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王建安; 李长岭; 樊友启; 何红; 孙勇

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the directed transplantation of allograftic bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in myocardial infarcted (MI) model rabbits. Materials and Methods: Rabbits were divided into 3 groups, heart infarcted model with MSCs transplanted treatment (MSCs group, n=12), heart infarcted model with PBS injection (control group, n=20), sham operation with PBS injection (sham group, n=17). MSCs labelled by BrdUrd were injected into the MI area of the MSCs group. The same volume of PBS was injected into the MI area of the control group and sham group. The mortality, LVIDd, LVIDs and LVEF of the two groups were compared 4 weeks later. Tropomyosin inhibitory component (Tn Ⅰ) and BrdUrd immunohistochemistry identified the engrafted cells 4 weeks after transplantation. Result: The mortality of the MSCs group was 16.7% (2/12), and remarkably lower than the control group's mortality [35% (7/20) (P<0.05)]. Among the animals that survived for 4 weeks, the LVIDd and LVIDs of the MSCs group after operation were 1.17±0.21cm and 0.74±0.13cm, and remarkably lower than those of the model group, which were 1.64±0.14cm and 1.19±0.12cm (P<0.05); the LVEF of the MSCs group after operation was 63±6%, and remarkably higher than that of the model group, which was 53±6% (P<0.05). Among the 10 cases of animals that survived for 4 weeks in the MSCs group, in 8 cases (80%), the transplanted cells survived in the non MI, MI region and its periphery, and even farther away; part of them differentiated into cardiomyocytes; in 7 cases (70%), the transplanted cells participated in the formation of blood vessel tissue in the MI region. Conclusion: Transplanted allograftic MSCs can survive and differentiate into cardiomyocytes, form the blood vessels in the MI region. MSCs transplantation could improve the heart function after MI.

  10. Allograftic bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells transplanted into heart infarcted model of rabbit to renovate infarcted heart

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王建安; 李长岭; 樊友启; 何红; 孙勇

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the directed transplantation of allograftic bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in myocardial infarcted (MI) model rabbits. Materials and Methods: Rabbits were divided into 3 groups, heart infarcted model with MSCs transplanted treatment (MSCs group, n=12), heart infarcted model with PBS injection (control group, n=20), sham operation with PBS injection (sham group, n=l 7). MSCs labelled by BrdUrd were injected into the MI area of the MSCs group. The same volume of PBS was injected into the MI area of the control group and sham group. The mortality, LVIDd, LVIDs and LVEF Of the two groups were compared 4 weeks later. Tropomyosin inhibitory component (Tn I) and BrdUrd immunohistochemistry identified the engrafted cells 4 weeks after transplantation. Result: The mortality of the MSCs group was 16.7% (2/12), and remarkably lower than the control group's mortality [35% (7/20) (P<0.05)].Among the animals that survived for 4 weeks, the LVIDd and LVIDs of the MSCs group after operation were 1.17±0.21 cm and 0.74±0.13 cm, and remarkably lower than those of the model group, which were 1.64±0.14 cm and 1.19±0.12 cm (P<0.05); the LVEF of the MSCs group after operation was 63±6%, and remarkably higher than that of the model group,which was 53±6% (P<0.05). Among the 10 cases of animals that survived for 4 weeks in the MSCs group, in 8 cases (80%),the transplanted cells survived in the non MI, MI region and its periphery, and even farther away; part of them differentiated into cardiomyocytes; in 7 cases (70%), the transplanted cells participated in the formation of blood vessel tissue in the MI region. Conclusion: Transplanted allograftic MSCs can survive and differentiate into cardiomyocytes, form the blood vessels in the MI region. MSCs transplantation could improve the heart function after MI.

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Heart Failure Using a Swine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-21

    the  Adult:  a  report  of  the   American  College  of   Cardiology /American  Heart  Association  Task  Force  on...Myocardial  effects  of  repetitive  episodes  of  rapid  ventricular  pacing  in  conscious   dogs :   surgical  creation...continues to be a complex and multifaceted challenge for care providers and researchers to understand and manage. The American College of Cardiology

  12. Usefulness of the Seattle Heart Failure Model to identify adults with congenital heart disease at high risk of poor outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanescu, Ada; Macklin, Eric A; Lin, Elaine; Dudzinski, David M; Johnson, Jacob; Kennedy, Kevin F; Jacoby, Daniel; DeFaria Yeh, Doreen; Lewis, Gregory D; Yeh, Robert W; Liberthson, Richard; Lui, George; Bhatt, Ami B

    2014-03-01

    Our objective was to determine whether the Seattle Heart Failure Model (SHFM) differentiates patients with adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) at high versus low risk for cardiovascular outcomes and poor exercise capacity. The ACHD population is growing and presents increasingly for care in the community and at tertiary centers. Few strategies exist to identify the patients with ACHD at high risk for heart failure and mortality.We studied 153 adults with transposition of the great arteries, Ebstein anomaly, tetralogy of Fallot, double outlet right ventricle, and single ventricle from 2 ACHD centers. The primary outcome was cardiovascular death, with a secondary composite outcome of death, transplant, ventricular assist device, cardiovascular admission, and treatment for arrhythmia. We defined risk groups based on SHFM 5-year predicted survival: high (predicted survival risk (>85%). Ten patients had the primary outcome of death, and 46 the combined end point. The hazard of death in the SHFM high- versus the intermediate-risk group was 7.09 (95% confidence interval 1.5 to 33.4, p = 0.01; no deaths in the low-risk group) and the hazard of the composite outcome between the high- versus low-risk group was 6.64 (95% confidence interval 2.5 to 17.6, p = 0.0001). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed greater probability of all-cause mortality (p = 0.003) in the high-risk group. In conclusion, the SHFM can help identify subjects with ACHD at risk for adverse outcome and poor cardiopulmonary efficiency. This may add to the care of patients with ACHD in the community and streamline care at tertiary centers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Application of the health belief model in promotion of self-care in heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghianimoghadam, Mohammad Hosein; Shogafard, Golamreza; Sanati, Hamid Reza; Baghianimoghadam, Behnam; Mazloomy, Seyed Saeed; Askarshahi, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a condition due to a problem with the structure or function of the heart impairs its ability to supply sufficient blood flow to meet the body's needs. In developing countries, around 2% of adults suffer from heart failure, but in people over the age of 65, this rate increases to 6-10%. In Iran, around 3.3% of adults suffer from heart failure. The Health Belief Model (HBM) is one of the most widely used models in public health theoretical framework. This was a cohort experimental study, in which education as intervention factor was presented to case group. 180 Heart failure patients were randomly selected from patients who were referred to the Shahid Rajaee center of Heart Research in Tehran and allocated to two groups (90 patients in the case group and 90 in the control group). HBM was used to compare health behaviors. The questionnaire included 69 questions. All data were collected before and 2 months after intervention. About 38% of participants don't know what, the heart failure is and 43% don't know that using the salt is not suitable for them. More than 40% of participants didn't weigh any time their selves. There was significant differences between the mean grades score of variables (perceived susceptibility, perceived threat, knowledge, Perceived benefits, Perceived severity, self-efficacy Perceived barriers, cues to action, self- behavior) in the case and control groups after intervention that was not significant before it. Based on our study and also many other studies, HBM has the potential to be used as a tool to establish educational programs for individuals and communities. Therefore, this model can be used effectively to prevent different diseases and their complications including heart failure.

  14. Development of prosthetic arm with pneumatic prosthetic hand and tendon-driven wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Hiroyuki; Tsujiuchi, Nobutaka; Koizumi, Takayuki; Kan, Hiroto; Hirano, Masanori; Nakamura, Yoichiro

    2009-01-01

    Recently, various prosthetic arms have been developed, but few are both attractive and functional. Considering human coexistence, prosthetic arms must be both safe and flexible. In this research, we developed a novel prosthetic arm with a five-fingered prosthetic hand using our original pneumatic actuators and a slender tendon-driven wrist using a wire drive and two small motors. Because the prosthetic hand's driving source is comprised of small pneumatic actuators, the prosthetic hand is safe when it makes contact with people; it can also operate flexibly. In addition, the arm has a tendon-driven wrist to expand its motion space and to perform many operations. First, we explain the pneumatic hand's drive mechanism and its tendon-driven wrist. Next, we identify the characteristics of the hand and the wrist and construct a control system for this arm and verify its control performance.

  15. Is the demand-control model still a usefull tool to assess work-related psychosocial risk for ischemic heart disease? Results from 14 year follow up in the Copenhagen City Heart study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Netterstrøm, Bo; Kristensen, Tage S; Jensen, Gorm;

    2010-01-01

    To test the usefulness of the Demand-Control Model as predictor for ischemic heart disease (IHD).......To test the usefulness of the Demand-Control Model as predictor for ischemic heart disease (IHD)....

  16. Women with heart disease: can the common-sense model of illness help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shifren, Kim

    2003-04-01

    Noncompliance with cardiac rehabilitation programs is a major concern for female coronary heart disease patients. In this article I argue for the use of the common-sense model of illness in developing interventions to increase compliance with cardiac rehabilitation programs among women with heart disease. First, the common-sense model of illness is discussed. Second, a personal narrative technique that addresses the key components of the common-sense model of illness is presented. I recommend that a modified version of the personal narrative technique be used to increase women's compliance with cardiac rehabilitation programs because this technique is well suited for women's health issues.

  17. Renal and cardiac neuropeptide Y and NPY receptors in a rat model of congestive heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callanan, Ean Y; Lee, Edward W; Tilan, Jason U; Winaver, Joseph; Haramati, Aviad; Mulroney, Susan E; Zukowska, Zofia

    2007-12-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is coreleased with norepinephrine and stimulates vasoconstriction, vascular and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy via Y1 receptors (R) and angiogenesis via Y2R. Although circulating NPY is elevated in heart failure, NPY's role remains unclear. Activation of the NPY system was determined in Wistar rats with the aortocaval (A-V) fistula model of high-output heart failure. Plasma NPY levels were elevated in A-V fistula animals (115.7 +/- 15.3 vs. 63.1 +/- 17.4 pM in sham, P renal failure (urinary Na(+) excretion renal blood flow (RBF), and death within 5-7 days (DECOMP). Cardiac and renal tissue NPY decreased with heart failure, proportionate to the severity of renal complications. Cardiac and renal Y1R mRNA expression also decreased (1.5-fold, P failure. In contrast, Y2R expression increased up to 72-fold in the heart and 5.7-fold in the kidney (P failure and cardiac hypertrophy. Changes in receptor expression were confirmed since the Y1R agonist, [Leu31, Pro34]-NPY, had no effect on RBF, whereas the Y2R agonist (13-36)-NPY increased RBF to compensate for disease. Thus, in this model of heart failure, cardiac and renal NPY Y1 receptors decrease and Y2 receptors increase, suggesting an increased effect of NPY on the receptors involved in cardiac remodeling and angiogenesis, and highlighting an important regulatory role of NPY in congestive heart failure.

  18. Alternans in genetically modified Langendorff-perfused murine hearts modeling catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian N Sabir

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between alternans and arrhythmogenicity was studied in genetically modified murine hearts modeling catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT during Langendorff perfusion, before and after treatment with catecholamines and a β-adrenergic antagonist. Heterozygous (RyR2p/s and homozygous (RyR2s/s RyR2-P2328S hearts, and wild-type (WT controls, were studied before and after treatment with epinephrine (100 nM and 1 µM and propranolol (100 nM. Monophasic action potential recordings demonstrated significantly greater incidences of arrhythmia in RyR2s/p and RyR2s/s hearts as compared to WTs. Arrhythmogenicity in RyR2s/s hearts was associated with alternans, particularly at short baseline cycle lengths. Both phenomena were significantly accentuated by treatment with epinephrine and significantly diminished by treatment with propranolol, in full agreement with clinical expectations. These changes took place, however, despite an absence of changes in action potential durations, ventricular effective refractory periods or restitution curve characteristics. Furthermore pooled data from all hearts in which arrhythmia occurred demonstrated significantly greater alternans magnitudes, but similar restitution curve slopes, to hearts that did not demonstrate arrhythmia. These findings thus further validate the RyR2-P2328S murine heart as a model for human CPVT, confirming an alternans phenotype in common with murine genetic models of the Brugada syndrome and the congenital long-QT syndrome type 3. In contrast to these latter similarities, however, this report demonstrates the dissociation of alternans from changes in the properties of restitution curves for the first time in a murine model of a human arrhythmic syndrome.

  19. Development of an Ex Vivo, Beating Heart Model for CT Myocardial Perfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gert Jan Pelgrim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To test the feasibility of a CT-compatible, ex vivo, perfused porcine heart model for myocardial perfusion CT imaging. Methods. One porcine heart was perfused according to Langendorff. Dynamic perfusion scanning was performed with a second-generation dual source CT scanner. Circulatory parameters like blood flow, aortic pressure, and heart rate were monitored throughout the experiment. Stenosis was induced in the circumflex artery, controlled by a fractional flow reserve (FFR pressure wire. CT-derived myocardial perfusion parameters were analysed at FFR of 1 to 0.10/0.0. Results. CT images did not show major artefacts due to interference of the model setup. The pacemaker-induced heart rhythm was generally stable at 70 beats per minute. During most of the experiment, blood flow was 0.9–1.0 L/min, and arterial pressure varied between 80 and 95 mm/Hg. Blood flow decreased and arterial pressure increased by approximately 10% after inducing a stenosis with FFR ≤ 0.50. Dynamic perfusion scanning was possible across the range of stenosis grades. Perfusion parameters of circumflex-perfused myocardial segments were affected at increasing stenosis grades. Conclusion. An adapted Langendorff porcine heart model is feasible in a CT environment. This model provides control over physiological parameters and may allow in-depth validation of quantitative CT perfusion techniques.

  20. A new beating-heart off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting training model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, Wobbe; Kuijpers, Michiel; Bijleveld, Aanke; De Maat, Gijs E.; Koene, Bart M.; Erasmus, Michiel E.; Natour, Ehsan; Mariani, Massimo A.

    OBJECTIVES: Training models are essential in mastering the skills required for off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB). We describe a new, high-fidelity, effective and reproducible beating-heart OPCAB training model in human cadavers. METHODS: Human cadavers were embalmed according to the

  1. Mathematical model of the anatomy and fibre orientation field of the left ventricle of the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pravdin, Sergey F; Berdyshev, Vitaly I; Panfilov, Alexander V; Katsnelson, Leonid B; Solovyova, Olga; Markhasin, Vladimir S

    2013-06-18

    One of the main factors affecting propagation of electrical waves and contraction in ventricles of the heart is anisotropy of cardiac tissue. Anisotropy is determined by orientation of myocardial fibres. Determining fibre orientation field and shape of the heart is important for anatomically accurate modelling of electrical and mechanical function of the heart. The aim of this paper is to introduce a theoretical rule-based model for anatomy and fibre orientation of the left ventricle (LV) of the heart and to compare it with experimental data. We suggest explicit analytical formulae that allow us to obtain the left ventricle form and its fibre direction field. The ventricle band concept of cardiac architecture given by Torrent-Guasp is chosen as the model postulate. In our approach, anisotropy of the heart is derived from some general principles. The LV is considered as a set of identical spiral surfaces, each of which can be produced from the other by rotation around one vertical axis. Each spiral surface is filled with non-intersecting curves which represent myocardial fibres.For model verification, we use experimental data on fibre orientation in human and canine hearts. LV shape and anisotropy are represented by explicit analytical expressions in a curvilinear 3-D coordinate system. The derived fibre orientation field shows good qualitative agreement with experimental data. The model reveals the most thorough quantitative simulation of fibre angles at the LV middle zone. Our analysis shows that the band concept can generate realistic anisotropy of the LV. Our model shows good qualitative agreement between the simulated fibre orientation field and the experimental data on LV anisotropy, and the model can be used for various numerical simulations to study the effects of anisotropy on cardiac excitation and mechanical function.

  2. A New Animal Model for Investigation of Mechanical Unloading in Hypertrophic and Failing Hearts: Combination of Transverse Aortic Constriction and Heterotopic Heart Transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Schaefer

    Full Text Available Previous small animal models for simulation of mechanical unloading are solely performed in healthy or infarcted hearts, not representing the pathophysiology of hypertrophic and dilated hearts emerging in heart failure patients. In this article, we present a new and economic small animal model to investigate mechanical unloading in hypertrophic and failing hearts: the combination of transverse aortic constriction (TAC and heterotopic heart transplantation (hHTx in rats.To induce cardiac hypertrophy and failure in rat hearts, three-week old rats underwent TAC procedure. Three and six weeks after TAC, hHTx with hypertrophic and failing hearts in Lewis rats was performed to induce mechanical unloading. After 14 days of mechanical unloading animals were euthanatized and grafts were explanted for further investigations.50 TAC procedures were performed with a survival of 92% (46/50. When compared to healthy rats left ventricular surface decreased to 5.8±1.0 mm² (vs. 9.6± 2.4 mm² (p = 0.001 after three weeks with a fractional shortening (FS of 23.7± 4.3% vs. 28.2± 1.5% (p = 0.01. Six weeks later, systolic function decreased to 17.1± 3.2% vs. 28.2± 1.5% (p = 0.0001 and left ventricular inner surface increased to 19.9±1.1 mm² (p = 0.0001. Intraoperative graft survival during hHTx was 80% with 46 performed procedures (37/46. All transplanted organs survived two weeks of mechanical unloading.Combination of TAC and hHTx in rats offers an economic and reproducible small animal model enabling serial examination of mechanical unloading in a truly hypertrophic and failing heart, representing the typical pressure overloaded and dilated LV, occurring in patients with moderate to severe heart failure.

  3. Bi-ventricular finite element model of right ventricle overload in the healthy rat heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masithulela, Fulufhelo

    2016-11-25

    The recognition of RV overpressure is critical to human life, as this may signify morbidity and mortality. Right ventricle (RV) dysfunction is understood to have an impact on the performance of the left ventricle (LV), but the mechanisms remain poorly understood. It is understood that ventricular compliance has the ability to affect cardiac performance. In this study, a bi-ventricular model of the rat heart was used in preference to other, single-ventricle models. Finite element analysis (FEA) of the bi-ventricular model provides important information on the function of the healthy heart. The passive myocardium was modelled as a nearly incompressible, hyperelastic, transversely isotropic material using finite element (FE) methods. Bi-ventricular geometries of healthy rat hearts reconstructed from magnetic resonance images were imported in Abaqus©. In simulating the normal passive filling of the rat heart, pressures of 4.8 kPa and 0.0098 kPa were applied to the inner walls of the LV and RV respectively. In addition, to simulate the overpressure of the RV, pressures of 2.4 kPa and 4.8 kPa were applied to the endocardial walls of the LV and RV respectively. As boundary conditions, the circumferential and longitudinal displacements at the base were set to zero. The radial displacements at the base were left free. The results show that the average circumferential stress at the mid-wall in the overloaded model increased from 2.8 kPa to 18.2 kPa. The average longitudinal stress increased from 1.5 kPa to 9.7 kPa. Additionally, in the radial direction, the average stress increased from 0.1 kPa to 0.6 kPa in the mid-wall. The average circumferential strain was found to be 0.138 and 0.100 on the endocardium of the over pressured and healthy model respectively. The average circumferential stress at the epicardium, mid-wall and endocardium in the case of a normal heart is 10 times lower than in the overloaded heart model. The finite analysis method is able to provide

  4. Robustness and perturbation in the modeled cascade heart rate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, D. C.

    2003-03-01

    In this study, numerical experiments are conducted to examine the robustness of using cascade to describe the multifractal heart rate variability (HRV) by perturbing the hierarchical time scale structure and the multiplicative rule of the cascade. It is shown that a rigid structure of the multiple time scales is not essential for the multifractal scaling in healthy HRV. So long as there exists a tree structure for the multiplication to take place, a multifractal HRV and related properties can be captured by using the cascade. But the perturbation of the multiplicative rule can lead to a qualitative change. In particular, a multifractal to monofractal HRV transition can result after the product law is perturbed to an additive one at the fast time scale. We suggest that this explains the similar HRV scaling transition in the parasympathetic nervous system blockade.

  5. Advanced prosthetic techniques for below knee amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staats, T B

    1985-02-01

    Recent advances in the evaluation of the amputation stump, the materials that are available for prosthetic application, techniques of improving socket fit, and prosthetic finishings promise to dramatically improve amputee function. Precision casting techniques for providing optimal fit of the amputation stump using materials such as alginate are described. The advantages of transparent check sockets for fitting the complicated amputation stump are described. Advances in research that promise to provide more functional prosthetic feet and faster and more reliable socket molding are the use of CAD-CAM (computer aided design-computer aided manufacturing) and the use of gait analysis techniques to aid in the alignment of the prosthesis after socket fitting. Finishing techniques to provide a more natural appearing prosthesis are described. These advances will gradually spread to the entire prosthetic profession.

  6. DME Prosthetics Orthotics, and Supplies Fee Schedule

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Durable Medical Equipment, Prosthetics-Orthotics, and Supplies Fee Schedule. The list contains the fee schedule amounts, floors, and ceilings for all procedure codes...

  7. Creative mechanism design for a prosthetic hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wen-Tung; Tseng, Ching-Huan; Wu, Long-Long

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, an auxiliary methodology called the creative mechanism design is introduced into the innovation of gripping devices for prosthetic hands. This methodology is a systematic approach based on modification of existing devices for the generation of all possible topological structures of mechanisms and mechanical devices. An existing gripping device (Teh Lin ATG-5F prosthetic hand) constructed by a planar six-bar linkage with one degree of freedom is dealt with by using this methodology. Through the processes of generalization, number synthesis, specialization and particularization for the existing design, five new mechanisms are created in this study to apply to anthropomorphic prosthetic hands. The results show that the methodology for creative mechanism design is a powerful tool for creating new categories of mechanisms to avoid existing designs that have patent protection and can help designers in the conceptual phase. Also, this methodology is validated as a useful way to improve prosthetic hands for amputees.

  8. Finite Element Analysis of Fracture Toughness of Pyrolytic Carbon in Prosthetic Heart Valve%人工心瓣热解炭断裂韧性有限元分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张建辉; 邢兴

    2012-01-01

    This article used ANSYS to conduct simulation analysis of compact tension and 3 points bending test for the isotropic pyrolytic carbon and pyrolytic carbon-coated graphite composite material used in heart valve prosthesis, calculated the plane strain fracture toughness KIC and compared the calculated results with the results of related experiments, then analyzed the effectiveness of the method that used ANSYS to calculate KIC as well as the influence of the thickness ratio of the coating and substrate and crack tip radius for the KIC of pyrolytic carbon-coated graphite composite material. Results showed that the KIC of the pure pyrolytic carbon and graphite material were respectively 1. 176 MPa √m and 1. 415 MPa √m, which were close to the results of related experiments, verifying the accuracy of using ANSYS to calculate KIC ; the KIC of composite material of pyrolytic carbon-coated graphite reduced with the increase of thickness ratio for the coating and substrate. The fracture toughness of composite material was better than that of pure pyrolytic carbon or graphite composite material when the thickness ratio of coating and substrate was on the low side; pyrolitic carbon-coated graphite had a limit notch root radius p0, which was about 5 μm, when the notch root radius p >p0, the measured value of KIC was proportional to p1/2 , and when p < po, the measured value of KIC was in line with the value of samples with sharp crack.%利用有限元分析软件ANSYS,对人工心瓣各向同性热解炭和热解炭包覆石墨复合材料进行紧凑拉伸以及三点弯曲实验仿真分析,计算材料的平面应变断裂韧性KIC,并将计算结果与相关实验结果进行对比,分析利用ANSYS计算KIC方法的有效性,以及涂层与基体厚度比、裂纹尖端半径对热解炭包覆石墨复合材料KIC值的影响.结果表明,纯热解炭和石墨材料的ANSYS计算KIC值分别为1.176 MPa√m以及1.415 MPa√m,与相关实验结果接近,验证

  9. Adjustment and Characterization of an Original Model of Chronic Ischemic Heart Failure in Pig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Barandon

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We present and characterize an original experimental model to create a chronic ischemic heart failure in pig. Two ameroid constrictors were placed around the LAD and the circumflex artery. Two months after surgery, pigs presented a poor LV function associated with a severe mitral valve insufficiency. Echocardiography analysis showed substantial anomalies in radial and circumferential deformations, both on the anterior and lateral surface of the heart. These anomalies in function were coupled with anomalies of perfusion observed in echocardiography after injection of contrast medium. No demonstration of myocardial infarction was observed with histological analysis. Our findings suggest that we were able to create and to stabilize a chronic ischemic heart failure model in the pig. This model represents a useful tool for the development of new medical or surgical treatment in this field.

  10. Huge Left Atrium Accompanied by Normally Functioning Prosthetic Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabzi, Feridoun

    2015-01-01

    Giant left atria are defined as those measuring larger than 8 cm and are typically found in patients who have rheumatic mitral valve disease with severe regurgitation. Enlargement of the left atrium may create compression of the surrounding structures such as the esophagus, pulmonary veins, respiratory tract, lung, inferior vena cava, recurrent laryngeal nerve, and thoracic vertebrae and lead to dysphagia, respiratory dysfunction, peripheral edema, hoarse voice, or back pain. However, a huge left atrium is usually associated with rheumatic mitral valve disease but is very rare in a normally functioning prosthetic mitral valve, as was the case in our patient. A 46-year-old woman with a past medical history of mitral valve replacement and chronic atrial fibrillation was admitted to our hospital with a chief complaint of cough and shortness of breath, worsened in the last month. Physical examination showed elevated jugular venous pressure, respiratory distress, cardiac cachexia, heart failure, hepatomegaly, and severe edema in the legs. Chest radiography revealed an inconceivably huge cardiac sell-out. Transthoracic echocardiography demonstrated a huge left atrium, associated with thrombosis, and normal function of the prosthetic mitral valve. Cardiac surgery with left atrial exploration for the extraction of the huge thrombosis and De Vega annuloplasty for tricuspid regurgitation were carried out. The postoperative course was eventful due to right ventricular failure and low cardiac output syndrome; and after two days, the patient expired with multiple organ failure. Thorough literature review showed that our case was the largest left atrium (20 × 22 cm) reported thus far in adults with a normal prosthetic mitral valve function.

  11. Huge Left Atrium Accompanied by Normally Function- ing Prosthetic Valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feridoun Sabzi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Giant left atria are defined as those measuring larger than 8 cm and are typically found in patients who have rheumatic mitral valve disease with severe regurgitation. Enlargement of the left atrium may create compression of the surrounding structures such as the esophagus, pulmonary veins, respiratory tract, lung, inferior vena cava, recurrent laryngeal nerve, and thoracic vertebrae and lead to dysphagia, respiratory dysfunction, peripheral edema, hoarse voice, or back pain. However, a huge left atrium is usually associated with rheumatic mitral valve disease but is very rare in a normally functioning prosthetic mitral valve, as was the case in our patient. A 46-year-old woman with a past medical history of mitral valve replacement and chronic atrial fibrillation was admitted to our hospital with a chief complaint of cough and shortness of breath, worsened in the last month. Physical examination showed elevated jugular venous pressure, respiratory distress, cardiac cachexia, heart failure, hepatomegaly, and severe edema in the legs. Chest radiography revealed an inconceivably huge cardiac sell-out. Transthoracic echocardiography demonstrated a huge left atrium, associated with thrombosis, and normal function of the prosthetic mitral valve. Cardiac surgery with left atrial exploration for the extraction of the huge thrombosis and De Vega annuloplasty for tricuspid regurgitation were carried out. The postoperative course was eventful due to right ventricular failure and low cardiac output syndrome; and after two days, the patient expired with multiple organ failure. Thorough literature review showed that our case was the largest left atrium (20 × 22 cm reported thus far in adults with a normal prosthetic mitral valve function.

  12. Tenecteplase in prosthetic mitral valve thrombosis

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    In the few reported cases of prosthetic mitral valve thrombosis, where surgical intervention was considered as high risk, fibrinolytic therapy had proved life saving. The authors present clinical, laboratory, and imaging data from such a patient, with prosthetic mitral valve thrombosis and its successful management with tenecteplase. The use of tenecteplase as a viable fibrinolytic agent for the first time was justified, due to the lack of immunogenicity concerns compared to streptokinase.

  13. Tenecteplase in prosthetic mitral valve thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyub Ghori, Masood; Bakir, Sherif; Ellahham, Samer; Al Nassir, Adnan; Al Zubaidi, Abdulmajeed; Augustin, Norbert; Abdelaziz, Moataz Ayman; Turrin, Nicolas Patrick; Al Mahmeed, Wael Abdulrahman

    2011-04-01

    In the few reported cases of prosthetic mitral valve thrombosis, where surgical intervention was considered as high risk, fibrinolytic therapy had proved life saving. The authors present clinical, laboratory, and imaging data from such a patient, with prosthetic mitral valve thrombosis and its successful management with tenecteplase. The use of tenecteplase as a viable fibrinolytic agent for the first time was justified, due to the lack of immunogenicity concerns compared to streptokinase.

  14. Surgical and Prosthetic Rehabilitation of Combination Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Carlino

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this report is to analyze the clinical symptoms, ethologic factors, and prosthetic rehabilitation in a case of Combination Syndrome (CS. The treatment of CS can be conventional or surgical, with or without the bone reconstruction of maxilla. The correct prosthetic treatment helps this kind of patients to restore the physiologic occlusion plane to allow a correct masticatory and aesthetic function. Management of this kind of patients can be a challenge for a dental practitioner.

  15. Advances in lower-limb prosthetic technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laferrier, Justin Z; Gailey, Robert

    2010-02-01

    The boundaries once faced by individuals with amputations are quickly being overcome through biotechnology. Although there are currently no prosthetics capable of replicating anatomic function, there have been radical advancements in prosthetic technology, medical science, and rehabilitation in the past 30 years, vastly improving functional mobility and quality of life for individuals with lower-limb amputations. What once seemed impossible is rapidly becoming reality. The future seems limitless, and the replication of anatomic function now seems possible.

  16. Beyond the Mammalian Heart: Fish and Amphibians as a Model for Cardiac Repair and Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle Jewhurst

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The epidemic of heart disease, the leading cause of death worldwide, is made worse by the fact that the adult mammalian heart is especially poor at repair. Damage to the mammal heart—such as that caused by myocardial infarction—leads to scarring, resulting in cardiac dysfunction and heart failure. In contrast, the hearts of fish and urodele amphibians are capable of complete regeneration of cardiac tissue from multiple types of damage, with full restoration of functionality. In the last decades, research has revealed a wealth of information on how these animals are able to perform this remarkable feat, and non-mammalian models of heart repair have become a burgeoning new source of data on the morphological, cellular, and molecular processes necessary to heal cardiac damage. In this review we present the major findings from recent research on the underlying mechanisms of fish and amphibian heart regeneration. We also discuss the tools and techniques that have been developed to answer these important questions.

  17. Rechargeable wireless EMG sensor for prosthetic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichter, P A; Lange, E H; Riehle, T H; Anderson, S M; Hedin, D S

    2010-01-01

    Surface electrodes in modern myoelectric prosthetics are often embedded in the prosthesis socket and make contact with the skin. These electrodes detect and amplify muscle action potentials from voluntary contractions of the muscle in the residual limb and are used to control the prosthetic's movement and function. There are a number of performance-related deficiencies associated with external electrodes including the maintenance of sufficient electromyogram (EMG) signal amplitude, extraneous noise acquisition, and proper electrode interface maintenance that are expected to be improved or eliminated using the proposed implanted sensors. This research seeks to investigate the design components for replacing external electrodes with fully-implantable myoelectric sensors that include a wireless interface to the prosthetic limbs. This implanted technology will allow prosthetic limb manufacturers to provide products with increased performance, capability, and patient-comfort. The EMG signals from the intramuscular recording electrode are amplified and wirelessly transmitted to a receiver in the prosthetic limb. Power to the implant is maintained using a rechargeable battery and an inductive energy transfer link from the prosthetic. A full experimental system was developed to demonstrate that a wireless biopotential sensor can be designed that meets the requirements of size, power, and performance for implantation.

  18. A boolean model of the cardiac gene regulatory network determining first and second heart field identity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Herrmann

    Full Text Available Two types of distinct cardiac progenitor cell populations can be identified during early heart development: the first heart field (FHF and second heart field (SHF lineage that later form the mature heart. They can be characterized by differential expression of transcription and signaling factors. These regulatory factors influence each other forming a gene regulatory network. Here, we present a core gene regulatory network for early cardiac development based on published temporal and spatial expression data of genes and their interactions. This gene regulatory network was implemented in a Boolean computational model. Simulations reveal stable states within the network model, which correspond to the regulatory states of the FHF and the SHF lineages. Furthermore, we are able to reproduce the expected temporal expression patterns of early cardiac factors mimicking developmental progression. Additionally, simulations of knock-down experiments within our model resemble published phenotypes of mutant mice. Consequently, this gene regulatory network retraces the early steps and requirements of cardiogenic mesoderm determination in a way appropriate to enhance the understanding of heart development.

  19. A Boolean Model of the Cardiac Gene Regulatory Network Determining First and Second Heart Field Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dao; Kestler, Hans A.; Kühl, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Two types of distinct cardiac progenitor cell populations can be identified during early heart development: the first heart field (FHF) and second heart field (SHF) lineage that later form the mature heart. They can be characterized by differential expression of transcription and signaling factors. These regulatory factors influence each other forming a gene regulatory network. Here, we present a core gene regulatory network for early cardiac development based on published temporal and spatial expression data of genes and their interactions. This gene regulatory network was implemented in a Boolean computational model. Simulations reveal stable states within the network model, which correspond to the regulatory states of the FHF and the SHF lineages. Furthermore, we are able to reproduce the expected temporal expression patterns of early cardiac factors mimicking developmental progression. Additionally, simulations of knock-down experiments within our model resemble published phenotypes of mutant mice. Consequently, this gene regulatory network retraces the early steps and requirements of cardiogenic mesoderm determination in a way appropriate to enhance the understanding of heart development. PMID:23056457

  20. Four-dimensional modeling of the heart for image guidance of minimally invasive cardiac surgeries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierzbicki, Marcin; Drangova, Maria; Guiraudon, Gerard; Peters, Terry

    2004-05-01

    Minimally invasive surgery of the beating heart can be associated with two major limitations: selecting port locations for optimal target coverage from x-rays and angiograms, and navigating instruments in a dynamic and confined 3D environment using only an endoscope. To supplement the current surgery planning and guidance strategies, we continue developing VCSP - a virtual reality, patient-specific, thoracic cavity model derived from 3D pre-procedural images. In this work, we apply elastic image registration to 4D cardiac images to model the dynamic heart. Our method is validated on two image modalities, and for different parts of the cardiac anatomy. In a helical CT dataset of an excised heart phantom, we found that the artificial motion of the epicardial surface can be extracted to within 0.93 +/- 0.33 mm. For an MR dataset of a human volunteer, the error for different heart structures such as the myocardium, right and left atria, right ventricle, aorta, vena cava, and pulmonary artery, ranged from 1.08 +/- 0.18 mm to 1.14 +/- 0.22 mm. These results indicate that our method of modeling the motion of the heart is not only easily adaptable but also sufficiently accurate to meet the requirements for reliable cardiac surgery training, planning, and guidance.

  1. Large-scale integrated model is useful for understanding heart mechanisms and developments of medical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washio, Takumi; Okada, Jun-ichi; Sugiura, Seiryo; Hisada, Toshiaki

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the need for a large-scale integrated computer heart model to understand cardiac pathophysiology and to assist in the development of novel treatments through our experiences with the "UT-heart" simulator. The UT-heart simulator is a multi-scale, multi-physics heart simulator that integrates and visualizes our knowledge of cardiac function in various aspects and scales. To demonstrate the usefulness of this model, we focus especially on two problems in cardiac anatomy and physiology. In the first application, the mechanistic implication of complex fiber and laminar structures is analyzed with respect to optimality of pumping performance. In the second application, the coronary circulation is analyzed, to identify factors that determine the behavior of the microcirculatory system. These two examples indicate not only the importance of the integration technique, but also the need to resolve structural complexities of the heart in the modeling. This leads naturally to incorporating high performance computing in medical therapy.

  2. A simple model for 1/f spectra in heart rate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, James P.; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2007-06-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) measures cycle-to-cycle correlations in the instantaneous oscillation period of the heart. In this paper it is shown that a simple model process, consisting of a sum of uncoupled sinusoidal oscillators with slightly different frequencies, has a HRV spectrum with a 1/f scaling over a range of frequencies. This implies that the appearance of 1/f HRV spectra in experiments should not be considered evidence of oscillator coupling or other more complex dynamics. The origin of the 1/f scaling in the model is examined analytically, and its dependence upon the sampling of low-amplitude fluctuations of the process is highlighted.

  3. Prosthetic Tricuspid Valve Thrombosis: Three Case Reports and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Yaminisharif

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A common complication of prosthetic heart valves is thrombosis. Although the incidence of prosthetic valve thrombosis (PVT in the tricuspid position is high, there are not enough data on the management of it, in contrast to left-sided PVT. Here, we describe three cases of tricuspid PVT with three different management approaches: thrombolytic therapy; close observation with oral anticoagulants; and surgery. The first case was a woman who suffered from recurrent PVT, for which we successfully used Tenecteplase for second and third episodes. We employed Tenecteplase in this case for the first time in the therapy of tricuspid PVT. The second case had fixed leaflets in open position while being symptomless. At six months' follow-up, with the patient having taken oral anticoagulants, the motion of the leaflets was restricted and she was symptom- free. The last case was a woman who had a large thrombus in the right atrium immediately after mitral and tricuspid valvular replacement. The patient underwent re-replacement surgery and a new biological valve was implanted in the tricuspid position. Also, we review the literature on the pathology, signs and symptoms, diagnosis, and management of tricuspid PVT.

  4. Prosthetic Leg Control in the Nullspace of Human Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Robert D.; Martin, Anne E.

    2016-01-01

    Recent work has extended the control method of virtual constraints, originally developed for autonomous walking robots, to powered prosthetic legs for lower-limb amputees. Virtual constraints define desired joint patterns as functions of a mechanical phasing variable, which are typically enforced by torque control laws that linearize the output dynamics associated with the virtual constraints. However, the output dynamics of a powered prosthetic leg generally depend on the human interaction forces, which must be measured and canceled by the feedback linearizing control law. This feedback requires expensive multi-axis load cells, and actively canceling the interaction forces may minimize the human's influence over the prosthesis. To address these limitations, this paper proposes a method for projecting virtual constraints into the nullspace of the human interaction terms in the output dynamics. The projected virtual constraints naturally render the output dynamics invariant with respect to the human interaction forces, which instead enter into the internal dynamics of the partially linearized prosthetic system. This method is illustrated with simulations of a transfemoral amputee model walking with a powered knee-ankle prosthesis that is controlled via virtual constraints with and without the proposed projection. PMID:27746585

  5. Simulation of the contraction of the ventricles in a human heart model including atria and pericardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Thomas; Wieners, Christian; Seemann, Gunnar; Steen, Henning; Dössel, Olaf

    2014-06-01

    During the contraction of the ventricles, the ventricles interact with the atria as well as with the pericardium and the surrounding tissue in which the heart is embedded. The atria are stretched, and the atrioventricular plane moves toward the apex. The atrioventricular plane displacement (AVPD) is considered to be a major contributor to the ventricular function, and a reduced AVPD is strongly related to heart failure. At the same time, the epicardium slides almost frictionlessly on the pericardium with permanent contact. Although the interaction between the ventricles, the atria and the pericardium plays an important role for the deformation of the heart, this aspect is usually not considered in computational models. In this work, we present an electromechanical model of the heart, which takes into account the interaction between ventricles, pericardium and atria and allows to reproduce the AVPD. To solve the contact problem of epicardium and pericardium, a contact handling algorithm based on penalty formulation was developed, which ensures frictionless and permanent contact. Two simulations of the ventricular contraction were conducted, one with contact handling of pericardium and heart and one without. In the simulation with contact handling, the atria were stretched during the contraction of the ventricles, while, due to the permanent contact with the pericardium, their volume increased. In contrast to that, in the simulations without pericardium, the atria were also stretched, but the change in the atrial volume was much smaller. Furthermore, the pericardium reduced the radial contraction of the ventricles and at the same time increased the AVPD.

  6. Do telemonitoring projects of heart failure fit the Chronic Care Model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemse, Evi; Adriaenssens, Jef; Dilles, Tinne; Remmen, Roy

    2014-07-01

    This study describes the characteristics of extramural and transmural telemonitoring projects on chronic heart failure in Belgium. It describes to what extent these telemonitoring projects coincide with the Chronic Care Model of Wagner. The Chronic Care Model describes essential components for high-quality health care. Telemonitoring can be used to optimise home care for chronic heart failure. It provides a potential prospective to change the current care organisation. This qualitative study describes seven non-invasive home-care telemonitoring projects in patients with heart failure in Belgium. A qualitative design, including interviews and literature review, was used to describe the correspondence of these home-care telemonitoring projects with the dimensions of the Chronic Care Model. The projects were situated in primary and secondary health care. Their primary goal was to reduce the number of readmissions for chronic heart failure. None of these projects succeeded in a final implementation of telemonitoring in home care after the pilot phase. Not all the projects were initiated to accomplish all of the dimensions of the Chronic Care Model. A central role for the patient was sparse. Limited financial resources hampered continuation after the pilot phase. Cooperation and coordination in telemonitoring appears to be major barriers but are, within primary care as well as between the lines of care, important links in follow-up. This discrepancy can be prohibitive for deployment of good chronic care. Chronic Care Model is recommended as basis for future.

  7. Progressive mitochondrial protein lysine acetylation and heart failure in a model of Friedreich’s ataxia cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stram, Amanda R.; Wagner, Gregory R.; Fogler, Brian D.; Pride, P. Melanie; Hirschey, Matthew D.; Payne, R. Mark

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The childhood heart disease of Friedreich’s Ataxia (FRDA) is characterized by hypertrophy and failure. It is caused by loss of frataxin (FXN), a mitochondrial protein involved in energy homeostasis. FRDA model hearts have increased mitochondrial protein acetylation and impaired sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) deacetylase activity. Protein acetylation is an important regulator of cardiac metabolism and loss of SIRT3 increases susceptibility of the heart to stress-induced cardiac hypertrophy and ischemic injury. The underlying pathophysiology of heart failure in FRDA is unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine in detail the physiologic and acetylation changes of the heart that occur over time in a model of FRDA heart failure. We predicted that increased mitochondrial protein acetylation would be associated with a decrease in heart function in a model of FRDA. Methods A conditional mouse model of FRDA cardiomyopathy with ablation of FXN (FXN KO) in the heart was compared to healthy controls at postnatal days 30, 45 and 65. We evaluated hearts using echocardiography, cardiac catheterization, histology, protein acetylation and expression. Results Acetylation was temporally progressive and paralleled evolution of heart failure in the FXN KO model. Increased acetylation preceded detectable abnormalities in cardiac function and progressed rapidly with age in the FXN KO mouse. Acetylation was also associated with cardiac fibrosis, mitochondrial damage, impaired fat metabolism, and diastolic and systolic dysfunction leading to heart failure. There was a strong inverse correlation between level of protein acetylation and heart function. Conclusion These results demonstrate a close relationship between mitochondrial protein acetylation, physiologic dysfunction and metabolic disruption in FRDA hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and suggest that abnormal acetylation contributes to the pathophysiology of heart disease in FRDA. Mitochondrial protein acetylation may represent a

  8. Cetacean Swimming with Prosthetic Limbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode-Oke, Ayodeji; Ren, Yan; Dong, Haibo; Fish, Frank

    2016-11-01

    During entanglement in fishing gear, dolphins can suffer abrasions and amputations of flukes and fins. As a result, if the dolphin survives the ordeal, swimming performance is altered. Current rehabilitation technques is the use of prosthesis to regain swimming ability. In this work, analyses are focused on two dolphins with locomotive impairment; Winter (currently living in Clearwater Marine Aquarium in Florida) and Fuji (lived in Okinawa Churaumi Aquarium in Japan). Fuji lost about 75% of its fluke surface to necrosis (death of cells) and Winter lost its tail due to amputation. Both dolphins are aided by prosthetic tails that mimic the shape of a real dolphin tail. Using 3D surface reconstruction techniques and a high fidelity Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) flow solver, we were able to elucidate the kinematics and hydrodynamics and fluke deformation of these swimmers to clarify the effectiveness of prostheses in helping the dolphins regain their swimming ability. Associated with the performance, we identified distinct features in the wake structures that can explain this gap in the performance compared to a healthy dolphin. This work was supported by ONR MURI Grant Number N00014-14-1-0533.

  9. Cortical control for prosthetic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Andrew B.; Kipke, D. W.; Perepelkin, P. D.

    1996-05-01

    The work presented in this session is part of a project to develop an arm-control system based on neuronal activity recorded from the cerebral cortex. This will make it possible for amputees or paralyzed individuals to move a prosthetic arm or, using functional neural stimulation, their own limbs as effortlessly and with as much skill as intact individuals. We are developing and testing this system in monkeys and hope to have a prototype working in the next couple of years. This project has been made more feasible because we have been able, in the last 15 years to extract, from the brain, a signal that represents arm trajectory accurately. In this paper, we describe how this technique was developed and how we use this as the basis for our control signal. An alternative approach using a self-organizing feature map, an algorithm to deduce arm configuration given an endpoint trajectory and the development of a telemetry system to transmit the neuronal data is described in subsequent papers.

  10. [25 years of organized ambulatory heart sport in Luxembourg. The development of a sustained rehabilitation model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delagardelle, Charles; Feiereisen, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    underlying atherosclerotic processes, thereby reducing morbidity and mortality". The responsible ESC cardiologists agree with the international community that fighting CVD risk factors is at least as important as the whole arsenal of modern heart surgery and interventional cardiology. The core activity of ambulatory heart sport groups remains physical activity, and nowadays 6 different activities can be offered (one activity each day of the week): exercise lesson, swimming, walking, cycling, Nordic Walking and water gymnastics On the other hand comprehensive prevention programs, especially concerning CVD risk factors are also endorsed by the ambulatory heart sport groups of Luxembourg via regular meetings, conferences, brochures and symposia. One advantage of the ambulatory heart sport movement in Luxembourg, in contrast to the German model, is the direct financial allowance of the health ministry, which permits a lifelong activity to all the active members. Another advantage is that all the regional groups are directed by clinical cardiologists knowing the patients very closely. One weak point is that only about 5-10% of all potential candidates adhere to the ambulatory heart sport groups but nearly 50% of the active members are practicing for more than 5 years. These regularly active patients are a positive selection of well committed cardiac patients who, most of the time, control CVD risk factors with scrutiny. The ESC has recommended creating so called "Heart Houses" where all the aspects of comprehensive prevention and rehabilitation can be offered. Their main concern is to develop a sustained strategy which is desperately missing for the moment. A lot of the active members of the heart sport groups of Luxembourg achieve such a sustained activity and, therefore, these heart sport groups can be considered as very cost effective models of sustained rehabilitation. After a 25 years activity the ambulatory heart sport movement of Luxemburg has reached the outstanding goal

  11. Amphibian embryos as a model system for organ engineering: in vitro induction and rescue of the heart anlage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunz, H

    1999-07-01

    Beating hearts can be induced under in vitro conditions when the dorsal blastopore lip (including the zone of Spemann organizer) is treated with Suramin. In contrast, untreated organizer forms dorsal mesodermal derivatives as notochord and somites. When those in vitro produced heart precursor tissues are transplanted ectopically in the posterior trunk area of early larvae, secondary beating heart structures will be formed. Furthermore, the replacement of the heart primordium of the host embryo by heart tissue induced under in vitro conditions will result in the rescue of the heart anlage. This model could be a valuable tool for the study of the multi-step molecular mechanisms of heart structure induction under in vitro conditions and vasculogenesis after transplantation into the host embryo.

  12. Evidence on the global measurement model of the minnesota living with heart failure questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garin, Olatz; Ferrer, Montse; Pont, Angels; Wiklund, Ingela; Van Ganse, Eric; Vilagut, Gemma; Almansa, Josue; Ribera, Aida; Alonso, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire (MLHFQ) is the most widely used health-related quality of life measure in both clinical and research settings. Nevertheless, its measurement model has never been confirmed. This study aims to fill that gap with a large international

  13. Numerical model of total artificial heart hemodynamics and the effect of its size on stress accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marom, Gil; Chiu, Wei-Che; Slepian, Marvin J; Bluestein, Danny

    2014-01-01

    The total artificial heart (TAH) is a bi-ventricular mechanical circulatory support device that replaces the heart in patients with end-stage congestive heart failure. The device acts as blood pump via pneumatic activation of diaphragms altering the volume of the ventricular chambers. Flow in and out of the ventricles is controlled by mechanical heart valves. The aim of this study is to evaluate the flow regime in the TAH and to estimate the thrombogenic potential during systole. Toward that goal, three numerical models of TAHs of differing sizes, that include the deforming diaphragm and the blood flow from the left chamber to the aorta, are introduced. A multiphase model with injection of platelet particles is employed to calculate their trajectories. The shear stress accumulation in the three models are calculated along the platelets trajectories and their probability density functions, which represent the `thrombogenic footprint' of the device are compared. The calculated flow regime successfully captures the mitral regurgitation and the flows that open and close the aortic valve during systole. Physiological velocity magnitudes are found in all three models, with higher velocities and increased stress accumulation predicted for smaller devices.

  14. A Cultural Model of Learning: Chinese "Heart and Mind for Wanting T Learn."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin

    2002-01-01

    Examined the Chinese model of learning using the Chinese term, "hao-xue-xin" (heart and mind for wanting to learn.) College students described ideal learners. They considered learning a process of moral striving (self-perfection) that stressed seeking knowledge and cultivating passion for lifelong learning, fostering diligence, enduring…

  15. Segmentation of the heart and great vessels in CT images using a model-based adaptation framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecabert, Olivier; Peters, Jochen; Walker, Matthew J; Ivanc, Thomas; Lorenz, Cristian; von Berg, Jens; Lessick, Jonathan; Vembar, Mani; Weese, Jürgen

    2011-12-01

    Recently, model-based methods for the automatic segmentation of the heart chambers have been proposed. An important application of these methods is the characterization of the heart function. Heart models are, however, increasingly used for interventional guidance making it necessary to also extract the attached great vessels. It is, for instance, important to extract the left atrium and the proximal part of the pulmonary veins to support guidance of ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation treatment. For cardiac resynchronization therapy, a heart model including the coronary sinus is needed. We present a heart model comprising the four heart chambers and the attached great vessels. By assigning individual linear transformations to the heart chambers and to short tubular segments building the great vessels, variable sizes of the heart chambers and bending of the vessels can be described in a consistent way. A configurable algorithmic framework that we call adaptation engine matches the heart model automatically to cardiac CT angiography images in a multi-stage process. First, the heart is detected using a Generalized Hough Transformation. Subsequently, the heart chambers are adapted. This stage uses parametric as well as deformable mesh adaptation techniques. In the final stage, segments of the large vascular structures are successively activated and adapted. To optimize the computational performance, the adaptation engine can vary the mesh resolution and freeze already adapted mesh parts. The data used for validation were independent from the data used for model-building. Ground truth segmentations were generated for 37 CT data sets reconstructed at several cardiac phases from 17 patients. Segmentation errors were assessed for anatomical sub-structures resulting in a mean surface-to-surface error ranging 0.50-0.82mm for the heart chambers and 0.60-1.32mm for the parts of the great vessels visible in the images.

  16. Establishment and improvement of model of vascularized heart-thymus composite transplantation in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG Hai-bo; XIA Sui-sheng; WEN Hao; HUANG Zu-fa; YE Qi-fa

    2005-01-01

    Objective To establish and improve the model of heart-thymus composite transplantation. Methods Vascularized both lobes of the thymus is transplanted heterotopically with the heart as a composite graft in rats.This technique was developed and assessed, and viability of the grafts was evaluated histologically. Results Donor operation costed 38. 5 ± 3. 52 min, vascular anastomosis costed 25.0 ± 3. 28 min, operating successful rate was 90%, acute rejection was observed in SD-Wistar group, viable thymus with normal microarchitecture was maintained in Wistar-Wistar group. Conclusions The improved novel technique for combined heart-thymus transplantation is a valuable method for study of the role of thymus in transplantation immunity.

  17. Adaptive prosthetics for the lower extremity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, K

    2001-06-01

    The potential for lifestyle recovery is tremendous for most lower extremity amputees. The amazing and ever-expanding array of adaptive prosthetics can help make the devastating loss of amputation more bearable for patients, their families, and their health care team. The new amputee, in a state of shock and grief, does not know what his or her prosthetic options are. It is crucial that the surgeon is knowledgeable about what the patient can have and what the patient needs to ask for. Dana Bowman stated: Ideally, the new amputee should say to their doctor, "I'd like my leg to be lightweight, flexible, durable, comfortable. I want to do sports or I want to ride bikes with my kids." Whatever it is they like to do. I was told I would never be able to wear two dynamic feet and that my sky diving days were over. I said, "Well how do you know? Can't I try?" It took years to find out what I could have and then to find people to help me get it. The prosthetic prescription the physician writes is the patient's gateway to the kind of prosthetics that will enable him or her to pursue the activities of their life. Often, new amputees end up with the bare minimum prosthesis, which can cause problems with comfort and mobility. A poorly designed or badly fitting prosthesis is as disabling as the actual amputation. When the surgeon can help the amputee and his or her family understand what kind of prosthetic choices are available, it establishes an optimistic outlook that is highly beneficial to the entire recovery process physically and mentally. "When I lost my leg, if someone would have told me that I could at least try to run again, that would have meant a lot," said Brian Frasure. "Getting that positive mental attitude is every bit as important as having good medical and prosthetic care." By asking probing questions about the patient's preamputation lifestyle and postamputation goals, the physician can write a prescription for truly adaptive prosthetics. The surgeon should

  18. Heart Modeling, Computational Physiology and the IUPS Physiome Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Peter J.

    The Physiome Project of the International Union of Physiological Sciences (IUPS) is attempting to provide a comprehensive framework for modelling the human body using computational methods which can incorporate the biochemistry, biophysics and anatomy of cells, tissues and organs. A major goal of the project is to use computational modelling to analyse integrative biological function in terms of underlying structure and molecular mechanisms. To support that goal the project is developing XML markup languages (CellML & FieldML) for encoding models, and software tools for creating, visualizing and executing these models. It is also establishing web-accessible physiological databases dealing with model-related data at the cell, tissue, organ and organ system levels. Two major developments in current medicine are, on the one hand, the much publicised genomics (and soon proteomics) revolution and, on the other, the revolution in medical imaging in which the physiological function of the human body can be studied with a plethora of imaging devices such as MRI, CT, PET, ultrasound, electrical mapping, etc. The challenge for the Physiome Project is to link these two developments for an individual - to use complementary genomic and medical imaging data, together with computational modelling tailored to the anatomy, physiology and genetics of that individual, for patient-specific diagnosis and treatment.

  19. Bone marrow cell migration to the heart in a chimeric mouse model of acute chagasic disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irion, Camila Iansen; Paredes, Bruno Diaz; Brasil, Guilherme Visconde; da Cunha, Sandro Torrentes; Paula, Luis Felipe; Carvalho, Alysson Roncally; de Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Campos; Carvalho, Adriana Bastos; Goldenberg, Regina Coeli dos Santos

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Chagas disease is a public health problem caused by infection with the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. There is currently no effective therapy for Chagas disease. Although there is some evidence for the beneficial effect of bone marrow-derived cells in chagasic disease, the mechanisms underlying their effects in the heart are unknown. Reports have suggested that bone marrow cells are recruited to the chagasic heart; however, studies using chimeric mouse models of chagasic cardiomyopathy are rare. OBJECTIVES The aim of this study was to investigate the migration of bone marrow cells to the heart after T. cruzi infection in a model of chagasic disease in chimeric mice. METHODS To obtain chimerical mice, wild-type (WT) C57BL6 mice were exposed to full body irradiation (7 Gy), causing bone marrow ablation. Then, bone marrow cells from green fluorescent protein (GFP)-transgenic mice were infused into the mice. Graft effectiveness was confirmed by flow cytometry. Experimental mice were divided into four groups: (i) infected chimeric (iChim) mice; (ii) infected WT (iWT) mice, both of which received 3 × 104 trypomastigotes of the Brazil strain; (iii) non-infected chimeric (Chim) mice; and (iv) non-infected WT mice. FINDINGS At one-month post-infection, iChim and iWT mice showed first degree atrioventricular block with decreased heart rate and treadmill exercise parameters compared to those in the non-infected groups. MAIN CONCLUSIONS iChim mice showed an increase in parasitaemia, myocarditis, and the presence of amastigote nests in the heart tissue compared to iWT mice. Flow cytometry analysis did not detect haematopoietic progenitor cells in the hearts of infected mice. Furthermore, GFP+ cardiomyocytes were not detected in the tissues of chimeric mice. PMID:28767980

  20. Simulation of Exercise-Induced Syncope in a Heart Model with Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaž Sever

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe aortic valve stenosis (AVS can cause an exercise-induced reflex syncope (RS. The precise mechanism of this syncope is not known. The changes in hemodynamics are variable, including arrhythmias and myocardial ischemia, and one of the few consistent changes is a sudden fall in systemic and pulmonary arterial pressures (suggesting a reduced vascular resistance followed by a decline in heart rate. The contribution of the cardioinhibitory and vasodepressor components of the RS to hemodynamics was evaluated by a computer model. This lumped-parameter computer simulation was based on equivalent electronic circuits (EECs that reflect the hemodynamic conditions of a heart with severe AVS and a concomitantly decreased contractility as a long-term detrimental consequence of compensatory left ventricular hypertrophy. In addition, the EECs model simulated the resetting of the sympathetic nervous tone in the heart and systemic circuit during exercise and exercise-induced syncope, the fluctuating intra-thoracic pressure during respiration, and the passive relaxation of ventricle during diastole. The results of this simulation were consistent with the published case reports of exertional syncope in patients with AVS. The value of the EEC model is its ability to quantify the effect of a selective and gradable change in heart rate, ventricular contractility, or systemic vascular resistance on the hemodynamics during an exertional syncope in patients with severe AVS.

  1. Simulation of exercise-induced syncope in a heart model with severe aortic valve stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sever, Matjaž; Ribarič, Samo; Kordaš, Marjan

    2012-01-01

    Severe aortic valve stenosis (AVS) can cause an exercise-induced reflex syncope (RS). The precise mechanism of this syncope is not known. The changes in hemodynamics are variable, including arrhythmias and myocardial ischemia, and one of the few consistent changes is a sudden fall in systemic and pulmonary arterial pressures (suggesting a reduced vascular resistance) followed by a decline in heart rate. The contribution of the cardioinhibitory and vasodepressor components of the RS to hemodynamics was evaluated by a computer model. This lumped-parameter computer simulation was based on equivalent electronic circuits (EECs) that reflect the hemodynamic conditions of a heart with severe AVS and a concomitantly decreased contractility as a long-term detrimental consequence of compensatory left ventricular hypertrophy. In addition, the EECs model simulated the resetting of the sympathetic nervous tone in the heart and systemic circuit during exercise and exercise-induced syncope, the fluctuating intra-thoracic pressure during respiration, and the passive relaxation of ventricle during diastole. The results of this simulation were consistent with the published case reports of exertional syncope in patients with AVS. The value of the EEC model is its ability to quantify the effect of a selective and gradable change in heart rate, ventricular contractility, or systemic vascular resistance on the hemodynamics during an exertional syncope in patients with severe AVS.

  2. Modulation of grasping force in prosthetic hands using neural network-based predictive control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasluosta, Cristian F; Chiu, Alan W L

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the implementation of a neural network-based predictive control system for driving a prosthetic hand. Nonlinearities associated with the electromechanical aspects of prosthetic devices present great challenges for precise control of this type of device. Model-based controllers may overcome this issue. Moreover, given the complexity of these kinds of electromechanical systems, neural network-based modeling arises as a good fit for modeling the fingers' dynamics. The results of simulations mimicking potential situations encountered during activities of daily living demonstrate the feasibility of this technique.

  3. Simplified 2D Bidomain Model of Whole Heart Electrical Activity and ECG Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sovilj, Siniša; Magjarević, Ratko; Abed, Amr Al; Lovell, Nigel H.; Dokos, Socrates

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was the development of a geometrically simple and highly computationally-efficient two dimensional (2D) biophysical model of whole heart electrical activity, incorporating spontaneous activation of the sinoatrial node (SAN), the specialized conduction system, and realistic surface ECG morphology computed on the torso. The FitzHugh-Nagumo (FHN) equations were incorporated into a bidomain finite element model of cardiac electrical activity, which was comprised of a simplified geometry of the whole heart with the blood cavities, the lungs and the torso as an extracellular volume conductor. To model the ECG, we placed four electrodes on the surface of the torso to simulate three Einthoven leads VI, VII and VIII from the standard 12-lead system. The 2D model was able to reconstruct ECG morphology on the torso from action potentials generated at various regions of the heart, including the sinoatrial node, atria, atrioventricular node, His bundle, bundle branches, Purkinje fibers, and ventricles. Our 2D cardiac model offers a good compromise between computational load and model complexity, and can be used as a first step towards three dimensional (3D) ECG models with more complex, precise and accurate geometry of anatomical structures, to investigate the effect of various cardiac electrophysiological parameters on ECG morphology.

  4. Intrinsic dynamics of heart regulatory systems on short time-scales: from experiment to modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Khovanov, I A; McClintock, P V E; Stefanovska, A

    2009-01-01

    We discuss open problems related to the stochastic modeling of cardiac function. The work is based on an experimental investigation of the dynamics of heart rate variability (HRV) in the absence of respiratory perturbations. We consider first the cardiac control system on short time scales via an analysis of HRV within the framework of a random walk approach. Our experiments show that HRV on timescales of less than a minute takes the form of free diffusion, close to Brownian motion, which can be described as a non-stationary process with stationary increments. Secondly, we consider the inverse problem of modeling the state of the control system so as to reproduce the experimentally observed HRV statistics of. We discuss some simple toy models and identify open problems for the modelling of heart dynamics.

  5. Raoultella ornithinolytica: An unusual pathogen for prosthetic joint infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seng, Piseth; Theron, Françoise; Honnorat, Estelle; Prost, Didier; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Stein, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    We herein report the first case of a prosthetic joint infection caused by Raoultella ornithinolytica in an immunocompetent patient. The clinical outcome was favorable after a two-stage prosthetic exchange and a six-month course of antimicrobial therapy.

  6. Simulation of Cardiac Arrhythmias Using a 2D Heterogeneous Whole Heart Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Minimol; Chakravarthy, V Srinivasa; Guhathakurta, Soma

    2015-01-01

    Simulation studies of cardiac arrhythmias at the whole heart level with electrocardiogram (ECG) gives an understanding of how the underlying cell and tissue level changes manifest as rhythm disturbances in the ECG. We present a 2D whole heart model (WHM2D) which can accommodate variations at the cellular level and can generate the ECG waveform. It is shown that, by varying cellular-level parameters like the gap junction conductance (GJC), excitability, action potential duration (APD) and frequency of oscillations of the auto-rhythmic cell in WHM2D a large variety of cardiac arrhythmias can be generated including sinus tachycardia, sinus bradycardia, sinus arrhythmia, sinus pause, junctional rhythm, Wolf Parkinson White syndrome and all types of AV conduction blocks. WHM2D includes key components of the electrical conduction system of the heart like the SA (Sino atrial) node cells, fast conducting intranodal pathways, slow conducting atriovenctricular (AV) node, bundle of His cells, Purkinje network, atrial, and ventricular myocardial cells. SA nodal cells, AV nodal cells, bundle of His cells, and Purkinje cells are represented by the Fitzhugh-Nagumo (FN) model which is a reduced model of the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron model. The atrial and ventricular myocardial cells are modeled by the Aliev-Panfilov (AP) two-variable model proposed for cardiac excitation. WHM2D can prove to be a valuable clinical tool for understanding cardiac arrhythmias.

  7. Adaptive sports technology and biomechanics: prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luigi, Arthur Jason; Cooper, Rory A

    2014-08-01

    With the technologic advances in medicine and an emphasis on maintaining physical fitness, the population of athletes with impairments is growing. It is incumbent upon health care practitioners to make every effort to inform these individuals of growing and diverse opportunities and to encourage safe exercise and athletic participation through counseling and education. Given the opportunities for participation in sports for persons with a limb deficiency, the demand for new, innovative prosthetic designs is challenging the clinical and technical expertise of the physician and prosthetist. When generating a prosthetic prescription, physicians and prosthetists should consider the needs and preferences of the athlete with limb deficiency, as well as the functional demands of the chosen sporting activity. The intent of this article is to provide information regarding the current advancements in the adaptive sports technology and biomechanics in the field of prosthetics, and to assist clinicians and their patients in facilitating participation in sporting activities.

  8. Changes in lower extremity prosthetic practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trower, Ted A

    2006-02-01

    In recent years, much attention has been given to the revolution in new materials for prosthetics and the components that they have made possible. The average weight of a delivered prosthesis has decreased, currently available components offer improved function and superior symmetry of gait, and limb interfaces provide superior skin protection and comfort. The focus on the features of these components sometimes has led to neglect of the basic elements of prosthetic design--the fit and the alignment. If the fit and alignment are on the mark, an amputee can function at remarkably high levels with rudimentary components. This article discusses the basics of lower extremity prosthetic practice and addresses challenges for the future.

  9. Three-dimentional simulation of flow-induced platelet activation in artificial heart valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayat, Mohammadali; Asgharzadeh, Hafez; Borazjani, Iman

    2015-11-01

    Since the advent of heart valve, several valve types such as mechanical and bio-prosthetic valves have been designed. Mechanical Heart Valves (MHV) are durable but suffer from thromboembolic complications that caused by shear-induced platelet activation near the valve region. Bio-prosthetic Heart Valves (BHV) are known for better hemodynamics. However, they usually have a short average life time. Realistic simulations of heart valves in combination with platelet activation models can lead to a better understanding of the potential risk of thrombus formation in such devices. In this study, an Eulerian approach is developed to calculate the platelet activation in three-dimensional simulations of flow through MHV and BHV using a parallel overset-curvilinear immersed boundary technique. A curvilinear body-fitted grid is used for the flow simulation through the anatomic aorta, while the sharp-interface immersed boundary method is used for simulation of the Left Ventricle (LV) with prescribed motion. In addition, dynamics of valves were calculated numerically using under-relaxed strong-coupling algorithm. Finally, the platelet activation results for BMV and MHV are compared with each other.

  10. Developmental Changes in the ECG of a Hamster Model of Muscular Dystrophy and Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Thomas G; Kale, Ajit; McCue, Scott; Bhagavan, Hemmi N; Vandongen, Case

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant autonomic signaling is being increasingly recognized as an important symptom in neuromuscular disorders. The δ-sarcoglycan-deficient BIO TO-2 hamster is recognized as a good model for studying mechanistic pathways and sequelae in muscular dystrophy and heart failure, including autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction. Recent studies using the TO-2 hamster model have provided promising preclinical results demonstrating the efficacy of gene therapy to treat skeletal muscle weakness and heart failure. Methods to accelerate preclinical testing of gene therapy and new drugs for neuromuscular diseases are urgently needed. The purpose of this investigation was to demonstrate a rapid non-invasive screen for characterizing the ANS imbalance in dystrophic TO-2 hamsters. Electrocardiograms were recorded non-invasively in conscious ∼9-month old TO-2 hamsters (n = 10) and non-myopathic F1B control hamsters (n = 10). Heart rate was higher in TO-2 hamsters than controls (453 ± 12 bpm vs. 311 ± 25 bpm, P imbalance with increased sympathetic tone and decreased parasympathetic tone in dystrophic TO-2 hamsters. Similar observations in newborn hamsters indicate autonomic nervous dysfunction may occur quite early in life in neuromuscular diseases. Our findings of autonomic abnormalities in newborn hamsters with a mutation in the δ-sarcoglycan gene suggest approaches to correct modulation of the heart rate as prevention or therapy for muscular dystrophies.

  11. Provision, organization and models of heart valve clinics within The United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, S; Pavitt, C; Lloyd, G; Chambers, J B

    2015-02-01

    Specialist clinics are recommended for the assessment and follow-up of patients with heart valve disease. We sought to identify the current provision of specialist valve clinics in UK. A database of all UK National Health Service hospitals was created. An online survey was distributed to each hospital to examine the model of heart valve clinic, patient population, provision of advanced imaging modalities and biochemical markers and provision of patient information services. Valve clinics were run in 48/228 (21%) hospitals, in 27/45 (60%) tertiary centres and 21/183 (11%) district hospitals. The survey was completed by 34 (71%). A consultant cardiologist ran the clinic in 19 (56%), a cardiac sonographer in 8 (24%), a nurse specialist in 3 (9%) and a hybrid model was used in 4 (12%). Patients with native valve disease were seen in 32 (94%), after heart valve surgery in 19 (56%), pre-/post-transcatheter valve intervention in 10 (29%) and with Marfan syndrome in 9(26%). Stress echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and positron emission tomography were available in 21 (62%), 19 (56%), 22 (65%) and 6 (18%) hospitals, respectively. There is an underprovision of specialist heart valve clinics within the UK, and there is a 5-fold difference between cardiac centres and district general hospitals. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Association of Physicians. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Optimising the prescription of prosthetic technologies (opptec): Outcome measures for evidence based prosthetic practice and use

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryall, Dr Nicola

    2010-01-01

    This study provided a forum for patients and service providers to voice their opinions in what they believe to be the important predictors and outcomes involved in successful rehabilitation following limb loss. To develop a consensus on the most important outcomes and factors to address for both the lower limb and upper limb prosthetic prescription process, the above data relating to lower limb and upper prosthetics were subsequently used in the next phase of the research involving two Delphi surveys of 23 and 53 experts within the lower limb and upper limb amputation and prosthetic field respectively, including users, service providers and researchers.\\r\

  13. Rat Heterotopic Heart Transplantation Model to Investigate Unloading-Induced Myocardial Remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xuebin; Segiser, Adrian; Carrel, Thierry P.; Tevaearai Stahel, Hendrik T.; Most, Henriette

    2016-01-01

    Unloading of the failing left ventricle in order to achieve myocardial reverse remodeling and improvement of contractile function has been developed as a strategy with the increasing frequency of implantation of left ventricular assist devices in clinical practice. But, reverse remodeling remains an elusive target, with high variability and exact mechanisms still largely unclear. The small animal model of heterotopic heart transplantation (hHTX) in rodents has been widely implemented to study the effects of complete and partial unloading on cardiac failing and non-failing tissue to better understand the structural and molecular changes that underlie myocardial recovery. We herein review the current knowledge on the effects of volume unloading the left ventricle via different methods of hHTX in rats, differentiating between changes that contribute to functional recovery and adverse effects observed in unloaded myocardium. We focus on methodological aspects of heterotopic transplantation, which increase the correlation between the animal model and the setting of the failing unloaded human heart. Last, but not least, we describe the late use of sophisticated techniques to acquire data, such as small animal MRI and catheterization, as well as ways to assess unloaded hearts under “reloaded” conditions. While giving regard to certain limitations, heterotopic rat heart transplantation certainly represents the crucial model to mimic unloading-induced changes in the heart and as such the intricacies and challenges deserve highest consideration. Careful translational research will further improve our knowledge of the reverse remodeling process and how to potentiate its effect in order to achieve recovery of contractile function in more patients.

  14. Remodeling of the heart in hypertrophy in animal models with myosin essential light chain mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna eKazmierczak

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac hypertrophy represents one of the most important cardiovascular problems yet the mechanisms responsible for hypertrophic remodeling of the heart are poorly understood. In this report we aimed to explore the molecular pathways leading to two different phenotypes of cardiac hypertrophy in transgenic mice carrying mutations in the human ventricular myosin essential light chain (ELC. Mutation-induced alterations in the heart structure and function were studied in two transgenic (Tg mouse models carrying the A57G (alanine to glycine substitution or lacking the N-terminal 43 amino acid residues (Δ43 from the ELC sequence. The first model represents an HCM disease as the A57G mutation was shown to cause malignant HCM outcomes in humans. The second mouse model is lacking the region of the ELC that was shown to be important for a direct interaction between the ELC and actin during muscle contraction. Our earlier studies demonstrated that >7 month old Tg-Δ43 mice developed substantial cardiac hypertrophy with no signs of histopathology or fibrosis. Tg mice did not show abnormal cardiac function compared to Tg-WT expressing the full length human ventricular ELC. Previously reported pathological morphology in Tg-A57G mice included extensive disorganization of myocytes and interstitial fibrosis with no abnormal increase in heart mass observed in >6 month-old animals. In this report we show that strenuous exercise can trigger hypertrophy and pathologic cardiac remodeling in Tg-A57G mice as early as 3 months of age. In contrast, no exercise-induced changes were noted for Tg-Δ43 hearts and the mice maintained a non-pathological cardiac phenotype. Based on our results, we suggest that exercise-elicited heart remodeling in Tg-A57G mice follows the pathological pathway leading to HCM, while it induces no abnormal response in Tg-Δ43 mice.

  15. Model for the heart beat-to-beat time series during meditation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capurro, A.; Diambra, L.; Malta, C. P.

    2003-09-01

    We present a model for the respiratory modulation of the heart beat-to-beat interval series. The model consists of a pacemaker, that simulates the membrane potential of the sinoatrial node, modulated by a periodic input signal plus correlated noise that simulates the respiratory input. The model was used to assess the waveshape of the respiratory signals needed to reproduce in the phase space the trajectory of experimental heart beat-to-beat interval data. The data sets were recorded during meditation practices of the Chi and Kundalini Yoga techniques. Our study indicates that in the first case the respiratory signal has the shape of a smoothed square wave, and in the second case it has the shape of a smoothed triangular wave.

  16. Fluid-structure interaction modeling of aortic valve stenosis at different heart rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahraseman, Hamidreza Ghasemi; Languri, Ehsan Mohseni; Yahyapourjalaly, Niloofar; Espino, Daniel M

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a model to measure the cardiac output and stroke volume at different aortic stenosis severities using a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) simulation at rest and during exercise. The geometry of the aortic valve is generated using echocardiographic imaging. An Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian mesh was generated in order to perform the FSI simulations. Pressure loads on ventricular and aortic sides were applied as boundary conditions. FSI modeling results for the increment rate of cardiac output and stroke volume to heart rate, were about 58.6% and -14%, respectively, at each different stenosis severity. The mean gradient of curves of cardiac output and stroke volume to stenosis severity were reduced by 57% and 48%, respectively, when stenosis severity varied from healthy to critical stenosis. Results of this paper confirm the promising potential of computational modeling capabilities for clinical diagnosis and measurements to predict stenosed aortic valve parameters including cardiac output and stroke volume at different heart rates.

  17. The Prosthetic Experience Between Body and Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Morten

    2018-01-01

    for an experience-based analysis of experimental practices operating between body and technology. These practices, which, rather than falling into the category of science fiction or horror cinema as some recent critique from post-human studies would have it, are pointing towards a genealogy of prosthetic experience......In this paper, I argue that a prosthetic aesthetic instigated by experimental art practices operate with and within a ‘second nature’ – in-between science and art. Drawing on theories from Dewey and Edelman and examples from Da Vinci, Brancusi, Man Ray, Dali and Stelarc, I am calling...

  18. Design and properties of maxillofacial prosthetic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreopoulos, A G; Theophanides, T

    1993-11-01

    Maxillofacial reconstruction by prosthetic means is a valuable contribution that medicine offers to the public. Materials design and properties are the main problems faced by scientists in this field. Materials used for intraoral prostheses are not ideal, but they have been perfected to the point of practical use. Denture resins, gold, chromium-cobalt alloys, and porcelain are widely used and produce acceptable results in the oral cavity. In this review, the properties and performance of some polymeric materials used in maxillofacial prosthetics are discussed, and new trends in research and development are also reported.

  19. [Prosthetic rehabilitation: needs in Senegalese dental offices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbodj, E B; Diouf, M; Faye, D; Ndiaye, A; Seck, M T; Ndiaye, C; Diallo, P D

    2011-12-01

    Knowledge of dental prosthetic needs will develop strategies for prevention and treatment through a package of individual, community and professional policies. The aim of this study was to evaluate prosthetic needs in Senegalese dental offices. The survey was conducted among people aged 15 years and more attending Senegalese dental clinics. The mean number of missing teeth was 4.4. Only 55.3% of the sample expressed the need for dentures and 81.8% had a diagnosed need for prosthesis. A statistically significant difference was noticed between the needs diagnosed and the expressed needs (p dental offices.

  20. Mesofluidic controlled robotic or prosthetic finger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, Randall F; Jansen, John F; Love, Lonnie J

    2013-11-19

    A mesofluidic powered robotic and/or prosthetic finger joint includes a first finger section having at least one mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a first actuator, a second mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a second actuator and a second prosthetic finger section pivotally connected to the first finger section by a joint pivot, wherein the first actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger to provide a first mechanical advantage relative to the joint point and wherein the second actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger section to provide a second mechanical advantage relative to the joint point.

  1. Observations and modeling of deterministic properties of human heart rate variability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J J Zebrowski; R Baranowski

    2005-04-01

    Simple models show that in Type-I intermittency a characteristic U-shaped probability distribution is obtained for the laminar phase length. The laminar phase length distribution characteristic for Type-I intermittency may be obtained in human heart rate variability data for some cases of pathology. The heart and its regulatory systems are presumed to be both noisy and non-stationary. Although the effect of additive noise on the laminar phase distribution in Type-I intermittency is well-known, the effect of neither multiplicative noise nor non-stationarity have been studied. We first discuss the properties of two classes of models of Type-I intermittency: (a) the control parameter of the logistic map is changed dichotomously from a value within the intermittency range to just below the bifurcation point and back; (b) the control parameter is changed randomly within the same parameter range as in the model class (a). We show that the properties of both models are different from those obtained for Type-I intermittency in the presence of additive noise. The two models help to explain some of the features seen in the intermittency in human heart rate variability.

  2. Comparative roll-over analysis of prosthetic feet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curtze, Carolin; Hof, At L.; van Keeken, Helco G.; Halbertsma, Jan P. K.; Postema, Klaas; Otten, Bert

    2009-01-01

    A prosthetic foot is a key element of a prosthetic leg, literally forming the basis for a stable and efficient amputee gait. We determined the roll-over characteristics of a broad range of prosthetic feet and examined the effect of a variety of shoes on these characteristics. The body weight of a pe

  3. Scroll wave dynamics in a model of the heterogeneous heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalov, P. V.; Pravdin, S. F.; Solovyova, O. E.; Panfilov, A. V.

    2016-07-01

    Scroll waves are found in physical, chemical and biological systems and underlie many significant processes including life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. The theory of scroll waves predicts scroll wave dynamics should be substantially affected by heterogeneity of cardiac tissue together with other factors including shape and anisotropy. In this study, we used our recently developed analytical model of the human ventricle to identify effects of shape, anisotropy, and regional heterogeneity of myocardium on scroll wave dynamics. We found that the main effects of apical-base heterogeneity were an increased scroll wave drift velocity and a shift towards the region of maximum action potential duration. We also found that transmural heterogeneity does not substantially affect scroll wave dynamics and only in extreme cases changes the attractor position.

  4. Soft and Hard Tissue Management in Implant Therapy—Part II: Prosthetic Concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Francesco Manicone

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The ongoing pursuit of aesthetic excellence in the field of implant therapy has incorporated prosthetic concepts in the early treatment-planning phase, as well as the previously discussed surgical concepts. The literature has addressed these prosthetic and laboratory approaches required to enhance and perfect the soft and hard tissue management (SHTM. After surgically providing an acceptable hard tissue architecture and adequate timing of loading of the implant, the prosthetic phase is responsible for the soft tissue modeling, through correctly planned and executed procedures, which induce a satisfactory soft tissue profile by considering the microvasculature, the abutment connection and positioning, and the implementation of an adequate provisional phase. The objectives are the modeling of the soft tissues through the use of a conforming periorestorative interface which will produce desired and stable results.

  5. THE ROLE OF MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASES IN PROCESSES OF HEART RE-MODELING IN CHILDREN WITH RESTRICTIVE CARDIOMYOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.V. Bershova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCMP is heart disorder with unclear etiology; it can be characterized as disease with disorder of diastolic myocardium function of left ventricle, conditioned by restriction. The chronic heart failure as a syndrome of RCMP can develop as a result of disbalance in system of complex biochemical, structural, and geometrical mechanisms of myocardium re-modeling. Extra cellular matrix play significant role in heart structure and geometry breaking. The destruction of heart is realized by matrix metalloproteinases (MMP. The activity of MMP, in its turn, is controlled by its tissue inhibitors. The present study analyzed the role of MMP in process of collagen’s synthesis and catabolism deregulation, myocardium fibrosis, change of heart chambers, and development of diastolic dysfunction in children with RCMP.Key words: children, chronic heart failure, restrictive cardiomyopathy, matrix metalloproteinases.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2009;8(5:36-39

  6. Identification of hypertrophy- and heart failure-associated genes by combining in vitro and in vivo models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, Bo; Yu, Hongjuan; Zwartbol, Maarten; Ruifrok, Willem P.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Sillje, Herman H. W.

    2012-01-01

    Lu B, Yu H, Zwartbol M, Ruifrok WP, van Gilst WH, de Boer RA, Sillje HHW. Identification of hypertrophy- and heart failure-associated genes by combining in vitro and in vivo models. Physiol Genomics 44: 443-454, 2012. First published February 21, 2012; doi:10.1152/physiolgenomics. 00148.2011.-Heart

  7. VIRTUAL 3-D MODELLING OF AIRWAYS IN CONGENITAL HEART DEFECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Speggiorin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The involvement of the airway is not uncommon in the presence of complex cardiovascular malformations. In these cases, a careful inspection of the relationship between the airway and the vasculature is paramount to plan the surgical procedure. Three-dimentional printing enhanced the visualization of the cardio-vascualr structure. Unfortunately IT does not allow to remove selected anatomy to improve the visualization of the surrounding ones. Computerized modelling (CM of has the potential to fill this gap by allowing a dynamic handling of different anatomies, increasing the exposure of vessels or bronchi to show their relationship.. We started to use this technique to plan the surgical repair in these complex cases where the airway is affected. This technique is routinely used in our Institution as an additional tool in the pre-surgical assessment. We report 4 cases in which the airways were compressed by vascular structures : ascending aorta in 1, left pulmonary artery sling in 1, Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA in 1 and major aorto-pulmonary collateral artery in 1. We believe this technique can enhance the understanding of the causes of airway involvement and facilitate the creation of an appropriate surgical plan.

  8. Cardiac tissue structure. Electric field interactions in polarizing the heart: 3D computer models and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entcheva, Emilia

    1998-11-01

    The goal of this research is to investigate the interactions between the cardiac tissue structure and applied electric fields in producing complex polarization patterns. It is hypothesized that the response of the heart in the conditions of strong electric shocks, as those applied in defibrillation, is dominated by mechanisms involving the cardiac muscle structure perceived as a continuum. Analysis is carried out in three-dimensional models of the heart with detailed fiber architecture. Shock-induced transmembrane potentials are calculated using the bidomain model in its finite element implementation. The major new findings of this study can be summarized as follows: (1) The mechanisms of polarization due to cardiac fiber curvature and fiber rotation are elucidated in three-dimensional ellipsoidal hearts of variable geometry; (2) Results are presented showing that the axis of stimulation and the polarization axis on a whole heart level might differ significantly due to geometric and anisotropic factors; (3) Virtual electrode patterns are demonstrated numerically inside the ventricular wall in internal defibrillation conditions. The role of the tissue-bath interface in shaping the shock-induced polarization is revealed; (4) The generation of 3D phase singularity scrolls by shock-induced intramural virtual electrode patterns is proposed as evidence for a possible new mechanism for the failure to defibrillate. The results of this study emphasize the role of unequal anisotropy in the intra- and extracellular domains, as well as the salient fiber architecture characteristics, such as curvature and transmural rotation, in polarizing the myocardium. Experimental support of the above findings was actively sought and found in recent optical mapping studies using voltage-sensitive dyes. If validated in vivo, these findings would significantly enrich the prevailing concepts about the mechanisms of stimulation and defibrillation of the heart.

  9. Developmental Changes in the ECG of a Hamster Model of Muscular Dystrophy and Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Gerard Hampton

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant autonomic signaling is being increasingly recognized as an important symptom in neuromuscular disorders. The delta-sarcoglycan-deficient BIO TO-2 hamster is recognized as a good model for studying mechanistic pathways and sequelae in muscular dystrophy and heart failure, including autonomic nervous system dysfunction. Recent studies using the TO-2 hamster model have provided promising preclinical results demonstrating the efficacy of gene therapy to treat skeletal muscle weakness and heart failure. Methods to accelerate preclinical testing of gene therapy and new drugs for neuromuscular diseases are urgently needed. The purpose of this investigation was to demonstrate a rapid non-invasive screen for characterizing the autonomic nervous system imbalance in dystrophic TO-2 hamsters. Electrocardiograms were recorded non-invasively in conscious ~9-month old TO-2 hamsters (n=10 and non-myopathic F1B control hamsters (n=10. Heart rate was higher in TO-2 hamsters than controls (453 ± 12 bpm vs. 311 ± 25 bpm, P<0.01. Time domain heart rate variability, an index of parasympathetic tone, was lower in TO-2 hamsters (12.2 ± 3.7 bpm vs. 38.2 ± 6.8, P<0.05, as was the coefficient of variance of the RR interval (2.8 ± 0.9 % vs. 16.2 ± 3.4 %, P<0.05 compared to control hamsters. Power spectral analysis demonstrated reduced high frequency and low frequency contributions, indicating autonomic imbalance with increased sympathetic tone and decreased parasympathetic tone in dystrophic TO-2 hamsters. Similar observations in newborn hamsters indicate autonomic nervous dysfunction may occur quite early in life in neuromuscular diseases. Our findings of autonomic abnormalities in newborn hamsters with a mutation in the delta-sarcoglycan gene suggest approaches to correct modulation of the heart rate as prevention or therapy for muscular dystrophies.

  10. Losartan prevents heart fibrosis induced by long-term intensive exercise in an animal model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Gay-Jordi

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: Recently it has been shown that long-term intensive exercise practice is able to induce myocardial fibrosis in an animal model. Angiotensin II is a profibrotic hormone that could be involved in the cardiac remodeling resulting from endurance exercise. OBJECTIVE: This study examined the antifibrotic effect of losartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist, in an animal model of heart fibrosis induced by long-term intense exercise. METHODS AND RESULTS: Male Wistar rats were randomly distributed into 4 experimental groups: Exercise, Exercise plus losartan, Sedentary and Sedentary plus losartan. Exercise groups were conditioned to run vigorously for 16 weeks. Losartan was orally administered daily before each training session (50 mg/kg/day. Time-matched sedentary rats served as controls. After euthanasia, heart hypertrophy was evaluated by histological studies; ventricular collagen deposition was quantified by histological and biochemical studies; and messenger RNA and protein expression of transforming growth factor-β1, fibronectin-1, matrix metalloproteinase-2, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1, procollagen-I and procollagen-III was evaluated in all 4 cardiac chambers. Daily intensive exercise caused hypertrophy in the left ventricular heart wall and originated collagen deposition in the right ventricle. Additionally long-term intensive exercise induced a significant increase in messenger RNA expression and protein synthesis of the major fibrotic markers in both atria and in the right ventricle. Losartan treatment was able to reduce all increases in messenger RNA expression and protein levels caused by exercise, although it could not completely reverse the heart hypertrophy. CONCLUSIONS: Losartan treatment prevents the heart fibrosis induced by endurance exercise in training animals.

  11. Do telemonitoring projects of heart failure fit the Chronic Care Model?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evi Willemse

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the characteristics of extramural and transmural telemonitoring projects on chronic heart failure in Belgium. It describes to what extent these telemonitoring projects coincide with the Chronic Care Model of Wagner. Background: The Chronic Care Model describes essential components for high-quality health care. Telemonitoring can be used to optimise home care for chronic heart failure. It provides a potential prospective to change the current care organisation. Methods: This qualitative study describes seven non-invasive home-care telemonitoring projects in patients with heart failure in Belgium. A qualitative design, including interviews and literature review, was used to describe the correspondence of these home-care telemonitoring projects with the dimensions of the Chronic Care Model. Results: The projects were situated in primary and secondary health care. Their primary goal was to reduce the number of readmissions for chronic heart failure. None of these projects succeeded in a final implementation of telemonitoring in home care after the pilot phase. Not all the projects were initiated to accomplish all of the dimensions of the Chronic Care Model. A central role for the patient was sparse. Conclusion: Limited financial resources hampered continuation after the pilot phase. Cooperation and coordination in telemonitoring appears to be major barriers but are, within primary care as well as between the lines of care, important links in follow-up. This discrepancy can be prohibitive for deployment of good chronic care. Chronic Care Model is recommended as basis for future.

  12. Do telemonitoring projects of heart failure fit the Chronic Care Model?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evi Willemse

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the characteristics of extramural and transmural telemonitoring projects on chronic heart failure in Belgium. It describes to what extent these telemonitoring projects coincide with the Chronic Care Model of Wagner.Background: The Chronic Care Model describes essential components for high-quality health care. Telemonitoring can be used to optimise home care for chronic heart failure. It provides a potential prospective to change the current care organisation.Methods: This qualitative study describes seven non-invasive home-care telemonitoring projects in patients with heart failure in Belgium. A qualitative design, including interviews and literature review, was used to describe the correspondence of these home-care telemonitoring projects with the dimensions of the Chronic Care Model.Results: The projects were situated in primary and secondary health care. Their primary goal was to reduce the number of readmissions for chronic heart failure. None of these projects succeeded in a final implementation of telemonitoring in home care after the pilot phase. Not all the projects were initiated to accomplish all of the dimensions of the Chronic Care Model. A central role for the patient was sparse.Conclusion: Limited financial resources hampered continuation after the pilot phase. Cooperation and coordination in telemonitoring appears to be major barriers but are, within primary care as well as between the lines of care, important links in follow-up. This discrepancy can be prohibitive for deployment of good chronic care. Chronic Care Model is recommended as basis for future.

  13. Model for the respiratory modulation of the heart beat-to-beat time interval series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capurro, Alberto; Diambra, Luis; Malta, C. P.

    2005-09-01

    In this study we present a model for the respiratory modulation of the heart beat-to-beat interval series. The model consists of a set of differential equations used to simulate the membrane potential of a single rabbit sinoatrial node cell, excited with a periodic input signal with added correlated noise. This signal, which simulates the input from the autonomous nervous system to the sinoatrial node, was included in the pacemaker equations as a modulation of the iNaK current pump and the potassium current iK. We focus at modeling the heart beat-to-beat time interval series from normal subjects during meditation of the Kundalini Yoga and Chi techniques. The analysis of the experimental data indicates that while the embedding of pre-meditation and control cases have a roughly circular shape, it acquires a polygonal shape during meditation, triangular for the Kundalini Yoga data and quadrangular in the case of Chi data. The model was used to assess the waveshape of the respiratory signals needed to reproduce the trajectory of the experimental data in the phase space. The embedding of the Chi data could be reproduced using a periodic signal obtained by smoothing a square wave. In the case of Kundalini Yoga data, the embedding was reproduced with a periodic signal obtained by smoothing a triangular wave having a rising branch of longer duration than the decreasing branch. Our study provides an estimation of the respiratory signal using only the heart beat-to-beat time interval series.

  14. Piperidine-based glycodendrons as protein N-glycan prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudak, Jason E; Belardi, Brian; Appel, Mason J; Solania, Angelo; Robinson, Peter V; Bertozzi, Carolyn R

    2016-10-15

    The generation of homogeneously glycosylated proteins is essential for defining glycoform-specific activity and improving protein-based therapeutics. We present a novel glycodendron prosthetic which can be site-selectively appended to recombinant proteins to create 'N-glycosylated' glycoprotein mimics. Using computational modeling, we designed the dendrimer scaffold and protein attachment point to resemble the native N-glycan architecture. Three piperidine-melamine glycodendrimers were synthesized via a chemoenzymatic route and attached to human growth hormone and the Fc region of human IgG. These products represent a new class of engineered biosimilars bearing novel glycodendrimer structures.

  15. A simple clinical model for planning transfusion quantities in heart surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biagioli Bonizella

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients undergoing heart surgery continue to be the largest demand on blood transfusions. The need for transfusion is based on the risk of complications due to poor cell oxygenation, however large transfusions are associated with increased morbidity and risk of mortality in heart surgery patients. The aim of this study was to identify preoperative and intraoperative risk factors for transfusion and create a reliable model for planning transfusion quantities in heart surgery procedures. Methods We performed an observational study on 3315 consecutive patients who underwent cardiac surgery between January 2000 and December 2007. To estimate the number of packs of red blood cells (PRBC transfused during heart surgery, we developed a multivariate regression model with discrete coefficients by selecting dummy variables as regressors in a stepwise manner. Model performance was assessed statistically by splitting cases into training and testing sets of the same size, and clinically by investigating the clinical course details of about one quarter of the patients in whom the difference between model estimates and actual number of PRBC transfused was higher than the root mean squared error. Results Ten preoperative and intraoperative dichotomous variables were entered in the model. Approximating the regression coefficients to the nearest half unit, each dummy regressor equal to one gave a number of half PRBC. The model assigned 4 units for kidney failure requiring preoperative dialysis, 2.5 units for cardiogenic shock, 2 units for minimum hematocrit at cardiopulmonary bypass less than or equal to 20%, 1.5 units for emergency operation, 1 unit for preoperative hematocrit less than or equal to 40%, cardiopulmonary bypass time greater than 130 minutes and type of surgery different from isolated artery bypass grafting, and 0.5 units for urgent operation, age over 70 years and systemic arterial hypertension. Conclusions The regression

  16. Contribution of prosthetic treatment considerations for dental extractions of permanent teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Barrera, Miguel Ángel; Medina-Solís, Carlo Eduardo; Casanova-Rosado, Juan Fernando; Mendoza-Rodríguez, Martha; Escoffié-Ramírez, Mauricio; Casanova-Rosado, Alejandro José; Navarrete-Hernández, José de Jesús; Maupomé, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    Background. Tooth loss is an easily identifiable outcome that summarizes a complex suite of factors in an individual's history of dental disease and its treatment by dental services over a lifetime. Assessment of overall tooth loss data is essential for epidemiologically evaluating the adequacy of dental care provided at a systems level, as well as for placing in context tooth loss for non-disease causes. For example, when derived from prosthetic treatment planning, the latter may unfortunately lead to some teeth being extracted (pulled) for the sake of better comprehensive clinical results. The objective of the present manuscript was to identify the contribution to overall tooth loss, by extraction of permanent teeth because of prosthetic treatment reasons. Material and Methods. A cross-sectional study included sex, age, total number of extractions performed by subject, sextant (anterior vs. posterior), group of teeth (incisors, canines, premolars and molars), upper or lower arch, and the main reason underlying extraction (extraction for any reason vs. prosthetic treatment), in patients 18 years of age and older seeking care at a dental school clinic in Mexico. A multivariate logistic regression model was generated. Results. A total of 749 teeth were extracted in 331 patients; 161 teeth (21.5% of total) were extracted for explicit prosthetic treatment indications. As age increased, the likelihood of having an extraction for prosthetic reasons increased 3% (OR = 1.03, p dental school clinical environment; age, sex, type of tooth, and the total number of extractions moderated such pattern.

  17. FEM Analysis of Mandibular Prosthetic Overdenture Supported by Dental Implants: Evaluation of Different Retention Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicciù, M.; Cervino, G.; Bramanti, E.; Lauritano, F.; Lo Gudice, G.; Scappaticci, L.; Rapparini, A.; Guglielmino, E.; Risitano, G.

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation of total edentulous jaws patients is today a common technique that clinicians approach in their daily practice. The use of dental implants for replacing missing teeth is going to be a safe technique and the implant-prosthetic materials give the possibility of having long-term clinical success. Aim of this work is to evaluate the mechanical features of three different prosthetic retention systems. By applying engineering systems of investigations like FEM and von Mises analyses, how the dental implant material holds out against the masticatory strength during the chewing cycles has been investigated. Three common dental implant overdenture retention systems have been investigated. The ball attachment system, the locator system, and the common dental abutment have been processed by Ansys Workbench 15.0 and underwent FEM and von Mises investigations. The elastic features of the materials used in the study have been taken from recent literature data. Results revealed different response for both types of device, although locator system showed better results for all conditions of loading. The data of this virtual model show all the features of different prosthetic retention systems under the masticatory load. Clinicians should find the better prosthetic solution related to the patients clinical condition in order to obtain long-term results. PMID:26798405

  18. FEM Analysis of Mandibular Prosthetic Overdenture Supported by Dental Implants: Evaluation of Different Retention Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cicciù

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prosthetic rehabilitation of total edentulous jaws patients is today a common technique that clinicians approach in their daily practice. The use of dental implants for replacing missing teeth is going to be a safe technique and the implant-prosthetic materials give the possibility of having long-term clinical success. Aim of this work is to evaluate the mechanical features of three different prosthetic retention systems. By applying engineering systems of investigations like FEM and von Mises analyses, how the dental implant material holds out against the masticatory strength during the chewing cycles has been investigated. Three common dental implant overdenture retention systems have been investigated. The ball attachment system, the locator system, and the common dental abutment have been processed by Ansys Workbench 15.0 and underwent FEM and von Mises investigations. The elastic features of the materials used in the study have been taken from recent literature data. Results revealed different response for both types of device, although locator system showed better results for all conditions of loading. The data of this virtual model show all the features of different prosthetic retention systems under the masticatory load. Clinicians should find the better prosthetic solution related to the patients clinical condition in order to obtain long-term results.

  19. Towards Personalized Cardiology: Multi-Scale Modeling of the Failing Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amr, Ali; Neumann, Dominik; Georgescu, Bogdan; Seegerer, Philipp; Kamen, Ali; Haas, Jan; Frese, Karen S.; Irawati, Maria; Wirsz, Emil; King, Vanessa; Buss, Sebastian; Mereles, Derliz; Zitron, Edgar; Keller, Andreas; Katus, Hugo A.; Comaniciu, Dorin; Meder, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite modern pharmacotherapy and advanced implantable cardiac devices, overall prognosis and quality of life of HF patients remain poor. This is in part due to insufficient patient stratification and lack of individualized therapy planning, resulting in less effective treatments and a significant number of non-responders. Methods and Results State-of-the-art clinical phenotyping was acquired, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and biomarker assessment. An individualized, multi-scale model of heart function covering cardiac anatomy, electrophysiology, biomechanics and hemodynamics was estimated using a robust framework. The model was computed on n=46 HF patients, showing for the first time that advanced multi-scale models can be fitted consistently on large cohorts. Novel multi-scale parameters derived from the model of all cases were analyzed and compared against clinical parameters, cardiac imaging, lab tests and survival scores to evaluate the explicative power of the model and its potential for better patient stratification. Model validation was pursued by comparing clinical parameters that were not used in the fitting process against model parameters. Conclusion This paper illustrates how advanced multi-scale models can complement cardiovascular imaging and how they could be applied in patient care. Based on obtained results, it becomes conceivable that, after thorough validation, such heart failure models could be applied for patient management and therapy planning in the future, as we illustrate in one patient of our cohort who received CRT-D implantation. PMID:26230546

  20. Aortic allografts in treatment of aortic valve and ascending aorta prosthetic endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Spiridonov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim – to assess short- and long-term results of aortic root replacement using aortic allografts in patients with prosthetic endocarditis. Materials and methods. Since February 2009 until June 2016 aortic valve and ascending aorta replacement using aortic allografts was performed in 26 patients with prosthetic endocarditis. In 50 % of cases at initial operation aortic valve replacement was performed, in another 50 % of cases – aortic valve and ascending aorta replacement. Echocardiography was performed 10 days, 3, 6 and 12 months, 2, 3 and 5 years after surgery. Analysis of long-term results included all cases of deaths, prosthesis-related complications and recurrence of endocarditis. Results. 30-day mortality was 23.1 %. Extracorporeal membranous oxygenation (ECMO was used only in 5 patients (19.2 %. Four patients were weaned from ECMO. We did not observe any allograft-related complications. During follow-up period there were no cases of reoperation due to structural allograft failure. Relapse of infection occurred in 1 patient (3.8 % four years after the operation and led to lethal outcome. Conclusion. Reoperations using allografts are an effective surgical treatment of prosthetic endocarditis. In majority of cases prosthetic endocarditis was caused by gram-positive cocci (Staphylococcus. In 84.6 % of cases it was associated with destruction of paravalvular structures and abscesses formation. Heart failure was a causative factor of different complications in these patients, which required ECMO in 19.2 % of patients. In 80 % of cases patients were weaned from ECMO. Allografts using for the treatment of prosthetic endocarditis is associated with high resistance to infection and with a significant rate of freedom from recurrence of endocarditis within 3 years after surgery.

  1. Can a first-order exponential decay model fit heart rate recovery after resistance exercise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels-Ferreira, Rhenan; de Sousa, Élder D; Trevizani, Gabriela A; Silva, Lilian P; Nakamura, Fábio Y; Forjaz, Cláudia L M; Lima, Jorge Roberto P; Peçanha, Tiago

    2015-03-01

    The time-constant of postexercise heart rate recovery (HRRτ ) obtained by fitting heart rate decay curve by a first-order exponential fitting has being used to assess cardiac autonomic recovery after endurance exercise. The feasibility of this model was not tested after resistance exercise (RE). The aim of this study was to test the goodness of fit of the first-order exponential decay model to fit heart rate recovery (HRR) after RE. Ten healthy subjects participated in the study. The experimental sessions occurred in two separated days and consisted of performance of 1 set of 10 repetitions at 50% or 80% of the load achieved on the one-repetition maximum test [low-intensity (LI) and high-intensity (HI) sessions, respectively]. Heart rate (HR) was continuously registered before and during exercise and also for 10 min of recovery. A monoexponential equation was used to fit the HRR curve during the postexercise period using different time windows (i.e. 30, 60, 90, … 600 s). For each time window, (i) HRRτ was calculated and (ii) variation of HR explained by the model (R(2) goodness of fit index) was assessed. The HRRτ showed stabilization from 360 and 420 s on LI and HI, respectively. Acceptable R(2) values were observed from the 360 s on LI (R(2) > 0.65) and at all tested time windows on HI (R(2) > 0.75). In conclusion, this study showed that using a minimum length of monitoring (~420 s) HRR after RE can be adequately modelled by a first-order exponential fitting. © 2014 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Consumer satisfaction in prosthetics and orthotics facilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertzen, J.H.B.; Gankema, H.G.J.; Groothoff, J.W.; Dijkstra, P.U.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess consumer/patient satisfaction with the services of the prosthetics and orthotics (P&O) facilities in the north of the Netherlands, using a modified SERVQUAL questionnaire. In this questionnaire, consumer interests and experiences are assessed on a 5-point Likert s

  3. The Prosthetic Experience Between Body and Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Morten

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, I argue that a prosthetic aesthetic instigated by experimental art practices operate with and within a ‘second nature’ – in-between science and art. Drawing on theories from Dewey and Edelman and examples from Da Vinci, Brancusi, Man Ray, Dali and Stelarc, I am calling for an exper...

  4. Proceedings, 1972 Carahan Conference on Electronic Prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, John S., Ed.; DeVore, R. William, Ed.

    Presented are 28 papers given at a 1972 conference on electronic prosthetics for the handicapped. Among the papers are the following titles: "Therapy for Cerebral Palsy Employing Artifician Sense Organs for Alternatives to Proprioceptive Feedback"; "Excessive Neuromuscular Time Delay as a Possible Cause of Poor Hand-Eye Coordination and…

  5. The Role of 3-D Heart Models in Planning and Executing Interventional Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Elena K; Olivieri, Laura J

    2017-09-01

    Percutaneous interventions aimed at addressing congenital and structural heart disease are simultaneously becoming more common and more complex as time progresses. An increasing number of heart defects that had previously required open heart surgery can now be successfully addressed in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. Adequate preprocedural preparation for these novel, complex procedures is critical to ensure their success. Diagnostic data can be collected before the intervention and displayed in multiple formats during the procedure. Advanced cardiac imaging, including cardiac magnetic resonance and cardiac computed tomography form the basis of this preparatory information. Novel methods of displaying these images are becoming more widespread and more useful, including 3-D printed models, 3-D digital models displayed on a virtual or augmented reality system and 3-D digital models overlaid onto a fluoroscopy system. In this review we summarize these state-of-the-art technologies and how they are able to help interventional cardiologists push the boundaries of what is possible in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. All rights reserved.

  6. Mining heart disease risk factors in clinical text with named entity recognition and distributional semantic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbain, Jay

    2015-12-01

    We present the design, and analyze the performance of a multi-stage natural language processing system employing named entity recognition, Bayesian statistics, and rule logic to identify and characterize heart disease risk factor events in diabetic patients over time. The system was originally developed for the 2014 i2b2 Challenges in Natural Language in Clinical Data. The system's strengths included a high level of accuracy for identifying named entities associated with heart disease risk factor events. The system's primary weakness was due to inaccuracies when characterizing the attributes of some events. For example, determining the relative time of an event with respect to the record date, whether an event is attributable to the patient's history or the patient's family history, and differentiating between current and prior smoking status. We believe these inaccuracies were due in large part to the lack of an effective approach for integrating context into our event detection model. To address these inaccuracies, we explore the addition of a distributional semantic model for characterizing contextual evidence of heart disease risk factor events. Using this semantic model, we raise our initial 2014 i2b2 Challenges in Natural Language of Clinical data F1 score of 0.838 to 0.890 and increased precision by 10.3% without use of any lexicons that might bias our results.

  7. Recent advancements in prosthetic hand technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikia, Angana; Mazumdar, Sushmi; Sahai, Nitin; Paul, Sudip; Bhatia, Dinesh; Verma, Suresh; Rohilla, Punit Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Recently, significant advances over the past decade have been made in robotics, artificial intelligence and other cognitive related fields, allowing development of highly sophisticated bio-mimetic robotics systems. In addition, enormous number of robots have been designed and assembled by explicitly realising their biological oriented behaviours. To enhance skill behaviours and adequate grasping abilities in these devices, a new phase of dexterous hands has been developed recently with bio-mimetically oriented and bio-inspired functionalities. The aim in writing this review paper is to present a detailed insight towards the development of the bio-mimetic based dexterous robotic multi-fingered artificial hand. An "ideal" upper limb prosthesis should be perceived as a part of their natural body by the amputee and should replicate sensory-motor capabilities of the amputated limb. Upper-limb amputations are most often the result of sudden trauma to the body, although they also can be caused by malignancy, congenital deficiencies and vascular diseases. This paper discusses the different bio-mimetic approaches using a framework that permits for a common description of biological and technical based hand manipulation behaviour. In particular, the review focuses on a number of developments in the inspired robotic systems. In conclusion, the study found that a huge amount of research efforts in terms of kinematics, dynamics, modelling and control methodologies are being put in to improve the present hand technology, thereby providing more functionality to the prosthetic limb of the amputee. This would improve their quality-of-life and help in performing activities of daily living (ADL) tasks with comparative ease in the near future.

  8. Effects of candesartan on electrical remodeling in the hearts of inherited dilated cardiomyopathy model mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuminori Odagiri

    Full Text Available Inherited dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM is characterized by dilatation and dysfunction of the ventricles, and often results in sudden death or heart failure (HF. Although angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs have been used for the treatment of HF, little is known about the effects on postulated electrical remodeling that occurs in inherited DCM. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of candesartan, one of the ARBs, on cardiac function and electrical remodeling in the hearts of inherited DCM model mice (TNNT2 ΔK210. DCM mice were treated with candesartan in drinking water for 2 months from 1 month of age. Control, non-treated DCM mice showed an enlargement of the heart with prolongation of QRS and QT intervals, and died at t1/2 of 70 days. Candesartan dramatically extended the lifespan of DCM mice, suppressed cardiac dilatation, and improved the functional parameters of the myocardium. It also greatly suppressed prolongation of QRS and QT intervals and action potential duration (APD in the left ventricular myocardium and occurrence of ventricular arrhythmia. Expression analysis revealed that down-regulation of Kv4.2 (Ito channel protein, KChIP2 (auxiliary subunit of Kv4.2, and Kv1.5 (IKur channel protein in DCM was partially reversed by candesartan administration. Interestingly, non-treated DCM heart had both normal-sized myocytes with moderately decreased Ito and IKur and enlarged cells with greatly reduced K+ currents (Ito, IKur IK1 and Iss. Treatment with candesartan completely abrogated the emergence of the enlarged cells but did not reverse the Ito, and IKur in normal-sized cells in DCM hearts. Our results indicate that candesartan treatment suppresses structural remodeling to prevent severe electrical remodeling in inherited DCM.

  9. Heart Health - Brave Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Brave Heart Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... you can have a good life after a heart attack." Lifestyle Changes Surviving—and thriving—after such ...

  10. Fast Parameters Estimation in Medication Efficacy Assessment Model for Heart Failure Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinzi Ren

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Heart failure (HF is a common and potentially fatal condition. Cardiovascular research has focused on medical therapy for HF. Theoretical modelling could enable simulation and evaluation of the effectiveness of medications. Furthermore, the models could also help predict patients’ cardiac response to the treatment which will be valuable for clinical decision-making. Methods. This study presents a fast parameters estimation algorithm for constructing a cardiovascular model for medicine evaluation. The outcome of HF treatment is assessed by hemodynamic parameters and a comprehensive index furnished by the model. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs were used as a model drug in this study. Results. Our simulation results showed different treatment responses to enalapril and lisinopril, which are both ACEI drugs. A dose-effect was also observed in the model simulation. Conclusions. Our results agreed well with the findings from clinical trials and previous literature, suggesting the validity of the model.

  11. Computed Flow Through An Artificial Heart Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Stewart E.; Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, Cetin; Chang, I-Dee

    1994-01-01

    Report discusses computations of blood flow through prosthetic tilting disk valve. Computational procedure developed in simulation used to design better artificial hearts and valves by reducing or eliminating following adverse flow characteristics: large pressure losses, which prevent hearts from working efficiently; separated and secondary flows, which causes clotting; and high turbulent shear stresses, which damages red blood cells. Report reiterates and expands upon part of NASA technical memorandum "Computed Flow Through an Artificial Heart and Valve" (ARC-12983). Also based partly on research described in "Numerical Simulation of Flow Through an Artificial Heart" (ARC-12478).

  12. Dynamic Facial Prosthetics for Sufferers of Facial Paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fergal Coulter

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThis paper discusses the various methods and the materialsfor the fabrication of active artificial facial muscles. Theprimary use for these will be the reanimation of paralysedor atrophied muscles in sufferers of non-recoverableunilateral facial paralysis.MethodThe prosthetic solution described in this paper is based onsensing muscle motion of the contralateral healthy musclesand replicating that motion across a patient’s paralysed sideof the face, via solid state and thin film actuators. Thedevelopment of this facial prosthetic device focused onrecreating a varying intensity smile, with emphasis ontiming, displacement and the appearance of the wrinklesand folds that commonly appear around the nose and eyesduring the expression.An animatronic face was constructed with actuations beingmade to a silicone representation musculature, usingmultiple shape-memory alloy cascades. Alongside theartificial muscle physical prototype, a facial expressionrecognition software system was constructed. This formsthe basis of an automated calibration and reconfigurationsystem for the artificial muscles following implantation, soas to suit the implantee’s unique physiognomy.ResultsAn animatronic model face with silicone musculature wasdesigned and built to evaluate the performance of ShapeMemory Alloy artificial muscles, their power controlcircuitry and software control systems. A dual facial motionsensing system was designed to allow real time control overmodel – a piezoresistive flex sensor to measure physicalmotion, and a computer vision system to evaluate real toartificial muscle performance.Analysis of various facial expressions in real subjects wasmade, which give useful data upon which to base thesystems parameter limits.ConclusionThe system performed well, and the various strengths andshortcomings of the materials and methods are reviewedand considered for the next research phase, when newpolymer based artificial muscles are constructed

  13. Structural Model of psychological risk and protective factors affecting on quality of life in patients with coronary heart disease: A psychocardiology model

    OpenAIRE

    Zohreh Khayyam Nekouei; Alireza Yousefy; Hamid Taher Neshat Doost; Gholamreza Manshaee; Masoumeh Sadeghei

    2014-01-01

    Background: Conducted researches show that psychological factors may have a very important role in the etiology, continuity and consequences of coronary heart diseases. This study has drawn the psychological risk and protective factors and their effects in patients with coronary heart diseases (CHD) in a structural model. It aims to determine the structural relations between psychological risk and protective factors with quality of life in patients with coronary heart disease. Materials and M...

  14. Rate Control Management of Atrial Fibrillation: May a Mathematical Model Suggest an Ideal Heart Rate?

    CERN Document Server

    Anselmino, Matteo; Camporeale, Carlo; Saglietto, Andrea; Gaita, Fiorenzo; Ridolfi, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Background. Despite the routine prescription of rate control therapy for atrial fibrillation (AF), clinical evidence demonstrating a heart rate target is lacking. Aim of the present study was to run a mathematical model simulating AF episodes with a different heart rate (HR) to predict hemodynamic parameters for each situation. Methods. The lumped model, representing the pumping heart together with systemic and pulmonary circuits, was run to simulate AF with HR of 50, 70, 90, 110 and 130 bpm, respectively. Results. Left ventricular pressure increased by 56.7%, from 33.92+-37.56 mmHg to 53.15+-47.56 mmHg, and mean systemic arterial pressure increased by 27.4%, from 82.66+-14.04 mmHg to 105.29+-7.63 mmHg, at the 50 and 130 bpm simulations, respectively. Stroke volume (from 77.45+-8.5 to 39.09+-8.08 mL), ejection fraction (from 61.1+-4.4 to 39.32+-5.42%) and stroke work (SW, from 0.88+-0.04 to 0.58+-0.09 J) decreased by 49.5, 35.6 and 34.2%, at the 50 and 130 bpm simulations, respectively. In addition, oxygen co...

  15. Genetic Dissection of Cardiac Remodeling in an Isoproterenol-Induced Heart Failure Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Jen-Chu Wang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to understand the genetic control of cardiac remodeling using an isoproterenol-induced heart failure model in mice, which allowed control of confounding factors in an experimental setting. We characterized the changes in cardiac structure and function in response to chronic isoproterenol infusion using echocardiography in a panel of 104 inbred mouse strains. We showed that cardiac structure and function, whether under normal or stress conditions, has a strong genetic component, with heritability estimates of left ventricular mass between 61% and 81%. Association analyses of cardiac remodeling traits, corrected for population structure, body size and heart rate, revealed 17 genome-wide significant loci, including several loci containing previously implicated genes. Cardiac tissue gene expression profiling, expression quantitative trait loci, expression-phenotype correlation, and coding sequence variation analyses were performed to prioritize candidate genes and to generate hypotheses for downstream mechanistic studies. Using this approach, we have validated a novel gene, Myh14, as a negative regulator of ISO-induced left ventricular mass hypertrophy in an in vivo mouse model and demonstrated the up-regulation of immediate early gene Myc, fetal gene Nppb, and fibrosis gene Lgals3 in ISO-treated Myh14 deficient hearts compared to controls.

  16. Time-resolved PIV technique for high temporal resolution measurement of mechanical prosthetic aortic valve fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminsky, R; Morbiducci, U; Rossi, M; Scalise, L; Verdonck, P; Grigioni, M

    2007-02-01

    Prosthetic heart valves (PHVs) have been used to replace diseased native valves for more than five decades. Among these, mechanical PHVs are the most frequently implanted. Unfortunately, these devices still do not achieve ideal behavior and lead to many complications, many of which are related to fluid mechanics. The fluid dynamics of mechanical PHVs are particularly complex and the fine-scale characteristics of such flows call for very accurate experimental techniques. Adequate temporal resolution can be reached by applying time-resolved PIV, a high-resolution dynamic technique which is able to capture detailed chronological changes in the velocity field. The aim of this experimental study is to investigate the evolution of the flow field in a detailed time domain of a commercial bileaflet PHV in a mock-loop mimicking unsteady conditions, by means of time-resolved 2D Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The investigated flow field corresponded to the region immediately downstream of the valve plane. Spatial resolution as in "standard" PIV analysis of prosthetic valve fluid dynamics was used. The combination of a Nd:YLF high-repetition-rate double-cavity laser with a high frame rate CMOS camera allowed a detailed, highly temporally resolved acquisition (up to 10000 fps depending on the resolution) of the flow downstream of the PHV. Features that were observed include the non-homogeneity and unsteadiness of the phenomenon and the presence of large-scale vortices within the field, especially in the wake of the valve leaflets. Furthermore, we observed that highly temporally cycle-resolved analysis allowed the different behaviors exhibited by the bileaflet valve at closure to be captured in different acquired cardiac cycles. By accurately capturing hemodynamically relevant time scales of motion, time-resolved PIV characterization can realistically be expected to help designers in improving PHV performance and in furnishing comprehensive validation with experimental data

  17. Stochastic optimization for modeling physiological time series: application to the heart rate response to exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakynthinaki, M. S.; Stirling, J. R.

    2007-01-01

    Stochastic optimization is applied to the problem of optimizing the fit of a model to the time series of raw physiological (heart rate) data. The physiological response to exercise has been recently modeled as a dynamical system. Fitting the model to a set of raw physiological time series data is, however, not a trivial task. For this reason and in order to calculate the optimal values of the parameters of the model, the present study implements the powerful stochastic optimization method ALOPEX IV, an algorithm that has been proven to be fast, effective and easy to implement. The optimal parameters of the model, calculated by the optimization method for the particular athlete, are very important as they characterize the athlete's current condition. The present study applies the ALOPEX IV stochastic optimization to the modeling of a set of heart rate time series data corresponding to different exercises of constant intensity. An analysis of the optimization algorithm, together with an analytic proof of its convergence (in the absence of noise), is also presented.

  18. Kramers-Moyal coefficients in the analysis and modeling of heart rate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petelczyc, M.; Żebrowski, J. J.; Baranowski, R.

    2009-09-01

    Modeling of recorded time series may be used as a method of analysis for heart rate variability studies. In particular, the extraction of the first two Kramers-Moyal coefficients has been used in this context. Recently, the method was applied to a wide range of signal analysis: from financial data to physiological and biological time series. Modeling of the signal is important for the prediction and interpretation of the dynamics underlying the process. The method requires the determination of the Markov time. Obtaining the drift and diffusion term of the Kramers-Moyal expansion is crucial for the modeling of the original time series with the Langevin equation. Both Tabar [Comput. Sci. Eng. 8, 54 (2006)] and T. Kuusela [Phys. Rev. E 69, 031916 (2004)] suggested that these terms may be used to distinguish healthy subjects from those with heart failure. The research groups applied a somewhat different methodology and obtained substantially different ranges of the Markov time. We show that the two studies may be considered consistent with each other as Kuusela analyzed 24 h recordings while Tabar analyzed daytime and nighttime recordings, separately. However, both groups suggested using the Langevin equation for modeling of time series which requires the fluctuation force to be a Gaussian. We analyzed heart rate variability recordings for ten young male (age 26-4+3y ) healthy subjects. 24 h recordings were analyzed and 6-h-long daytime and nighttime fragments were selected. Similar properties of the data were observed in all recordings but all the nighttime data and seven of the ten 24 h series exhibited higher-order, non-negligible Kramers-Moyal coefficients. In such a case, the reconstruction of the time series using the Langevin equation is impossible. The non-negligible higher-order coefficients are due to autocorrelation in the data. This effect may be interpreted as a result of a physiological phenomenon (especially occurring for nighttime data): respiratory

  19. Prosthetic leg powered by MR brake and SMA wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, The; Munguia, Vicente; Calderon, Jose

    2014-04-01

    Current knee designs for prosthetic legs rely on electric motors for both moving and stationary states. The electric motors draw an especially high level of current to sustain a fixed position. The advantage of using magnetorheological (MR) fluid is that it requires less current and can have a variable braking torque. Besides, the proposed prosthetic leg is actuated by NiTinol wire, a popular shape memory alloy (SMA). The incorporation of NiTinol gives the leg more realistic weight distribution with appropriate arrangement of the batteries and wires. The prosthesis in this research was designed with MR brake as stopping component and SMA wire network as actuating component at the knee. The MR brake was designed with novel non-circular shape for the rotor that improved the braking torque while minimizing the power consumption. The design also helped simplify the control of braking process. The SMA wire network was design so that the knee motion was actively rotated in both directions. The SMA wires were arranged and played very similar role as the leg's muscles. The study started with the overall solid design of the knee including both MR and SMA parts. Theoretical models were derived and programmed in Simulink for both components. The simulation was capable of predicting the power required for moving the leg or hold it in a fixed position for a certain amount of time. Subsequently, the design was prototyped and tested to validate the theoretical prediction. The theoretical models were updated accordingly to correlate with the experimental data.

  20. Accuracy of Seattle Heart Failure Model and HeartMate II Risk Score in Non-Inotrope-Dependent Advanced Heart Failure Patients: Insights From the ROADMAP Study (Risk Assessment and Comparative Effectiveness of Left Ventricular Assist Device and Medical Management in Ambulatory Heart Failure Patients).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanfear, David E; Levy, Wayne C; Stehlik, Josef; Estep, Jerry D; Rogers, Joseph G; Shah, Keyur B; Boyle, Andrew J; Chuang, Joyce; Farrar, David J; Starling, Randall C

    2017-05-01

    Timing of left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation in advanced heart failure patients not on inotropes is unclear. Relevant prediction models exist (SHFM [Seattle Heart Failure Model] and HMRS [HeartMate II Risk Score]), but use in this group is not established. ROADMAP (Risk Assessment and Comparative Effectiveness of Left Ventricular Assist Device and Medical Management in Ambulatory Heart Failure Patients) is a prospective, multicenter, nonrandomized study of 200 advanced heart failure patients not on inotropes who met indications for LVAD implantation, comparing the effectiveness of HeartMate II support versus optimal medical management. We compared SHFM-predicted versus observed survival (overall survival and LVAD-free survival) in the optimal medical management arm (n=103) and HMRS-predicted versus observed survival in all LVAD patients (n=111) using Cox modeling, receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) curves, and calibration plots. In the optimal medical management cohort, the SHFM was a significant predictor of survival (hazard ratio=2.98; Prisk subgroups. In non-inotrope-dependent advanced heart failure patients receiving optimal medical management, the SHFM was predictive of overall survival but underestimated the risk of clinical worsening and LVAD implantation. Among LVAD patients, the HMRS had marginal discrimination and underestimated survival post-LVAD implantation. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01452802. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Large animal model of functional tricuspid regurgitation in pacing induced end-stage heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowski, Marcin; Proudfoot, Alistair G; Langholz, David; Eberhart, Lenora; Brown, Michael; Schubert, Hans; Wodarek, Jeremy; Timek, Tomasz A

    2017-06-01

    Functional tricuspid regurgitation (FTR) is common in patients with advanced heart failure and frequently complicates left ventricular assist device implantation yet remains poorly understood. We set out to establish large animal model of FTR that could serve as a research platform to investigate the pathogenesis of FTR associated with end-stage heart failure. : Through right thoracotomy, ten adult sheep underwent implantation of pacemaker with epicardial LV lead, five sonomicrometry crystals on the right ventricle, and left and right ventricular telemetry pressure sensors during a beating heart off-pump procedure. After 5 ± 1 days of recovery, baseline haemodynamic, echocardiographic and sonomicrometry data were collected. Animals were paced thereafter at a rate of 220-240 beats/min until the development of heart failure and concomitant tricuspid regurgitation. : Three animals died during early recovery period and one during the pacing phase. Six surviving animals were paced for a mean of 14 ± 5 days. Cardiac function was significantly depressed compared to baseline, with LV ejection fraction falling from 69 ± 2% to 22 ± 4% ( P  < 0.001) and RV fractional area change from 52 ± 11% to 25 ± 9% ( P  = 0.005). All animals developed significant enlargement of tricuspid annulus (from 29.5 ± 1.6 to 36.5 ± 4.5 mm; P  = 0.01) and right ventricle (from 21.9 ± 0.2 to 30.3 ± 0.6 mm; P  = 0.03). Sonomicrometry derived contractility of RV free wall was depressed and at least moderate tricuspid insufficiency developed in all animals. : Biventricular dysfunction, tricuspid annular dilatation and significant FTR were observed in our model of ovine tachycardia induced cardiomyopathy. This animal model reflects the clinical situation of end-stage heart failure patients presenting for mechanical support.

  2. Time-dependent sleep stage transition model based on heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Toki; Mizuno, Osamu; Tanaka, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    A new model is proposed to automatically classify sleep stages using heart rate variability (HRV). The generative model, based on the characteristics that the distribution and the transition probabilities of sleep stages depend on the elapsed time from the beginning of sleep, infers the sleep stage with a Gibbs sampler. Experiments were conducted using a public data set consisting of 45 healthy subjects and the model's classification accuracy was evaluated for three sleep stages: wake state, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, and non-REM sleep. Experimental results demonstrated that the model provides more accurate sleep stage classification than conventional (naive Bayes and Support Vector Machine) models that do not take the above characteristics into account. Our study contributes to improve the quality of sleep monitoring in the daily life using easy-to-wear HRV sensors.

  3. Multiscale model of the human cardiovascular system: Description of heart failure and comparison of contractility indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosta, S; Negroni, J; Lascano, E; Dauby, P C

    2017-02-01

    A multiscale model of the cardiovascular system is presented. Hemodynamics is described by a lumped parameter model, while heart contraction is described at the cellular scale. An electrophysiological model and a mechanical model were coupled and adjusted so that the pressure and volume of both ventricles are linked to the force and length of a half-sarcomere. Particular attention was paid to the extreme values of the sarcomere length, which must keep physiological values. This model is able to reproduce healthy behavior, preload variations experiments, and ventricular failure. It also allows to compare the relevance of standard cardiac contractility indices. This study shows that the theoretical gold standard for assessing cardiac contractility, namely the end-systolic elastance, is actually load-dependent and therefore not a reliable index of cardiac contractility.

  4. A New Transgenic Mouse Model of Heart Failure and Cardiac Cachexia Raised by Sustained Activation of Met Tyrosine Kinase in the Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Valentina; Gatti, Stefano; Gallo, Simona; Medico, Enzo; Cantarella, Daniela; Cimino, James; Ponzetto, Antonio; Crepaldi, Tiziana

    2016-01-01

    Among other diseases characterized by the onset of cachexia, congestive heart failure takes a place of relevance, considering the high prevalence of this pathology in most European countries and in the United States, and is undergoing a rapid increase in developing countries. Actually, only few models of cardiac cachexia exist. Difficulties in the recruitment and follow-up of clinical trials implicate that new reproducible and well-characterized animal models are pivotal in developing therapeutic strategies for cachexia. We generated a new model of cardiac cachexia: a transgenic mouse expressing Tpr-Met receptor, the activated form of c-Met receptor of hepatocyte growth factor, specifically in the heart. We showed that the cardiac-specific induction of Tpr-Met raises a cardiac hypertrophic remodelling, which progresses into concentric hypertrophy with concomitant increase in Gdf15 mRNA levels. Hypertrophy progresses to congestive heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, characterized by reduced body weight gain and food intake and skeletal muscle wasting. Prevention trial by suppressing Tpr-Met showed that loss of body weight could be prevented. Skeletal muscle wasting was also associated with altered gene expression profiling. We propose transgenic Tpr-Met mice as a new model of cardiac cachexia, which will constitute a powerful tool to understand such complex pathology and test new drugs/approaches at the preclinical level.

  5. A New Transgenic Mouse Model of Heart Failure and Cardiac Cachexia Raised by Sustained Activation of Met Tyrosine Kinase in the Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Sala

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Among other diseases characterized by the onset of cachexia, congestive heart failure takes a place of relevance, considering the high prevalence of this pathology in most European countries and in the United States, and is undergoing a rapid increase in developing countries. Actually, only few models of cardiac cachexia exist. Difficulties in the recruitment and follow-up of clinical trials implicate that new reproducible and well-characterized animal models are pivotal in developing therapeutic strategies for cachexia. We generated a new model of cardiac cachexia: a transgenic mouse expressing Tpr-Met receptor, the activated form of c-Met receptor of hepatocyte growth factor, specifically in the heart. We showed that the cardiac-specific induction of Tpr-Met raises a cardiac hypertrophic remodelling, which progresses into concentric hypertrophy with concomitant increase in Gdf15 mRNA levels. Hypertrophy progresses to congestive heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, characterized by reduced body weight gain and food intake and skeletal muscle wasting. Prevention trial by suppressing Tpr-Met showed that loss of body weight could be prevented. Skeletal muscle wasting was also associated with altered gene expression profiling. We propose transgenic Tpr-Met mice as a new model of cardiac cachexia, which will constitute a powerful tool to understand such complex pathology and test new drugs/approaches at the preclinical level.

  6. Modeling the Human Scarred Heart In Vitro : Toward New Tissue Engineered Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deddens, Janine C.; Sadeghi, Amir Hossein; Hjortnaes, Jesper; van Laake, Linda W.; Buijsrogge, Marc; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Khademhosseini, Ali; Sluijter, Joost P G

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac remodeling is critical for effective tissue healing, however, excessive production and deposition of extracellular matrix components contribute to scarring and failing of the heart. Despite the fact that novel therapies have emerged, there are still no lifelong solutions for this problem. An

  7. Low-Cost Optical Mapping Systems for Panoramic Imaging of Complex Arrhythmias and Drug-Action in Translational Heart Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Peter; Calvo, Conrado J.; Alfonso-Almazán, José M.; Quintanilla, Jorge G.; Chorro, Francisco J.; Yan, Ping; Loew, Leslie M.; Filgueiras-Rama, David; Millet, José

    2017-02-01

    Panoramic optical mapping is the primary method for imaging electrophysiological activity from the entire outer surface of Langendorff-perfused hearts. To date, it is the only method of simultaneously measuring multiple key electrophysiological parameters, such as transmembrane voltage and intracellular free calcium, at high spatial and temporal resolution. Despite the impact it has already had on the fields of cardiac arrhythmias and whole-heart computational modeling, present-day system designs precludes its adoption by the broader cardiovascular research community because of their high costs. Taking advantage of recent technological advances, we developed and validated low-cost optical mapping systems for panoramic imaging using Langendorff-perfused pig hearts, a clinically-relevant model in basic research and bioengineering. By significantly lowering financial thresholds, this powerful cardiac electrophysiology imaging modality may gain wider use in research and, even, teaching laboratories, which we substantiated using the lower-cost Langendorff-perfused rabbit heart model.

  8. Continuous observation on heart-disease-model mice using biomagnetic measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Y.; Oikawa, T.; Saitoh, Y.; Ono, Y.; Ishiyama, A.; Kasai, N.; Odawara, A.; Chinone, K.

    2008-02-01

    Magnetocardiography (MCG) is a non-invasive method that can contribute to elucidating heart disease mechanisms and the verification of pharmacological effects. The object of our study is to show the potential of MCG for such study in mice. By using the developed MCG system, which adopts a single channel superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer with the spatial resolution of 500 μm, we continuously measured MCGs for 2 heart-disease-model mice with a high incidence of cardiac infarction from 7-weeks-old to death. An abnormal MCG appeared 1 or 2 weeks before death. The abnormal MCG changes indicate that the damaged place in the ventricles was different for each individual. In addition, we have developed a method to obtain MCGs for newborn mice in particular because they are small and frail. The MCGs of newborn mice were similar to those of adult mice. This study proved the potential of MCG for detecting abnormal cardiac excitation at the early stage of cardiac infarction and monitoring the progress of heart disease in detail from infancy to old age in mice.

  9. Matching prosthetics order records in VA National Prosthetics Patient Database to healthcare utilization databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mark W; Su, Pon; Phibbs, Ciaran S

    2010-01-01

    The National Prosthetics Patient Database (NPPD) is the national Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) dataset that records characteristics of individual prosthetic and assistive devices. It remains unknown how well NPPD records can be matched to encounter records for the same individuals in major VA utilization databases. We compared the count of prosthetics records in the NPPD with the count of prosthetics-related procedures for the same individuals recorded in major VA utilization databases. We then attempted to match the NPPD records to the utilization records by person and date. In general, 40% to 60% of the NPPD records could be matched to outpatient utilization records within a 14-day window around the NPPD dataset entry date. Match rates for inpatient data were lower: 10% to 16% within a 14-day window. The NPPD will be particularly important for studies of certain veteran groups, such as those with spinal cord injury or blast-related polytraumatic injury. Health services researchers should use both the NPPD and utilization databases to develop a full understanding of prosthetics use by individual patients.

  10. History of the prosthetic treatment of impotence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretan, P N

    1989-02-01

    Early records of observations of the os penis or baculum in mammals go back to Aristotle. These heritable cartilaginous supports were noted to help the penis during copulation. Prosthetic surgery for treatment of impotence was born from the initial experience with the use of the "artificial os penis" (rib cartilage) in post-traumatic reconstruction in 1936. Slow progress was made with the use of extracavernosal acrylic stents, followed by intracavernosal polypropylene rods, and finally the silicone prosthesis over the next 20 years. The introduction in 1973 of the inert silicone semirigid prosthesis and inflatable prosthesis met with great successes. Most recently (1985), there has been development of self-contained prostheses that are technically more simple to insert. Today, much more is known about specific organic causes of impotence that are amenable to many successful nonprosthetic alternative therapies, adding more stimuli to continued innovations in prosthetic surgery for erectile dysfunction.

  11. Design of a Compact, Reconfigurable, Prosthetic Wrist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Zinck

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The design of a prosthetic wrist is the result of compromises between the function and the practicality of the device. Conventional prosthetic wrists use a single degree of freedom to produce pro/supination of the hand. It has not been demonstrated that this is the most functional alignment for a single axis. Previous work by the authors suggests that if the wrist must have only one rotatory axis then a more oblique orientation would be more functional. To test this idea, a compact wrist with a single axis and spherical design has been made that will allow any axis of rotation to be selected and the functional performance of the resulting arm be tested.

  12. Measuring the color of maxillofacial prosthetic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, X; Johnston, W M; Seghi, R R

    2010-12-01

    Color information from different color-measuring systems varies during color matching in maxillofacial prosthetics. We studied the hypothesis that a non-contact measuring system and 4 contact color-measuring instruments perform comparably in accuracy and precision on measurements of pigmented maxillofacial elastomer specimens having human skin colors. Measurement comparisons in accuracy on opaque standard color patches were made in Phase I. In Phase II, the system with the best accuracy was used as the reference instrument, and comparisons in accuracy and precision on elastomer specimens were made. The CIEDE2000 color difference formula was used. Repeated-measures ANOVA with Tukey testing and linear regression analysis for CIELAB and color differences among the instruments were performed. The contact measuring systems perform differently in accuracy, possibly due to edge loss and other factors, but performed comparably in precision with the non-contact measuring instrument. This non-contact system is recommended for color measurement of maxillofacial prosthetic materials.

  13. Role of balance ability and confidence in prosthetic use for mobility of people with lower-limb loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Christopher Kevin; Chen, Christine C; Benoy, Stephany A; Rahal, Rana T; Blackwell, Wren M

    2014-01-01

    For people with lower-limb loss, impaired balance is common and limits prosthetic function within the community. This cross-sectional study (1) analyzed relationships among prosthetic use for mobility, balance ability and confidence, and amputation-related variables and (2) determined multivariate models to identify level of prosthetic use. Subjects included 46 community-dwelling adults (mean age 56.2 yr) with limb loss (91.3% unilateral) of varied levels (52.2% transtibial) and etiologies (69.6% vascular). A three-variable linear regression model including balance ability, balance confidence, and years since amputation explained 63.7% of variance in the Houghton scale of prosthetic use score. A logistic regression model including the 14-task Berg Balance Scale, balance confidence, years since amputation, age, and number of comorbidities correctly differentiated between people who had reached a satisfactory level of prosthetic use or not 89.1% of the time. The first three variables demonstrated moderate accuracy with positive likelihood ratios from 2.34 to 4.35. The regression model was further reduced to correctly classify 87.0% of cases with three balance ability tasks (retrieving objects from floor, turning to look behind, and placing alternate foot on stool), balance confidence, and numbers of comorbidities. Logistic models that include balance ability, balance confidence, and numbers of comorbidities can identify level of prosthetic use in people with lower-limb loss. Increased balance confidence and ability when retrieving objects from floor, turning to look behind, and placing alternate foot on stool were most indicative of successful prosthetic use for mobility.

  14. Role of Computational Modelling in Planning and Executing Interventional Procedures for Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slesnick, Timothy C

    2017-09-01

    Increasingly, computational modelling and numerical simulations are used to help plan complex surgical and interventional cardiovascular procedures in children and young adults with congenital heart disease. From its origins more than 30 years ago, surgical planning with analysis of flow hemodynamics and energy loss/efficiency has helped design and implement many modifications to existing techniques. On the basis of patient-specific medical imaging, surgical planning allows accurate model production that can then be manipulated in a virtual surgical environment, with the proposed solutions finally tested with advanced computational fluid dynamics to evaluate the results. Applications include a broad range of congenital heart disease, including patients with single-ventricle anatomy undergoing staged palliation, those with arch obstruction, with double outlet right ventricle, or with tetralogy of Fallot. In the present work, we focus on clinical applications of this exciting field. We describe the framework for these techniques, including brief descriptions of the engineering principles applied and the interaction between "benchtop" data with medical decision-making. We highlight some early insights learned from pioneers over the past few decades, including refinements in Fontan baffle geometries and configurations. Finally, we offer a glimpse into exciting advances that are presently being explored, including use of modelling for transcatheter interventions. In this era of personalized medicine, computational modelling and surgical planning allows patient-specific tailoring of interventions to optimize clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. New developments in prosthetic arm systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vujaklija I

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Ivan Vujaklija,1 Dario Farina,1 Oskar C Aszmann2 1Institute of Neurorehabilitation Systems, Bernstein Focus Neurotechnology Göttingen, University Medical Center Göttingen, Georg-August University, Göttingen, Germany; 2Christian Doppler Laboratory for Restoration of Extremity Function, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria Abstract: Absence of an upper limb leads to severe impairments in everyday life, which can further influence the social and mental state. For these reasons, early developments in cosmetic and body-driven prostheses date some centuries ago, and they have been evolving ever since. Following the end of the Second World War, rapid developments in technology resulted in powered myoelectric hand prosthetics. In the years to come, these devices were common on the market, though they still suffered high user abandonment rates. The reasons for rejection were trifold – insufficient functionality of the hardware, fragile design, and cumbersome control. In the last decade, both academia and industry have reached major improvements concerning technical features of upper limb prosthetics and methods for their interfacing and control. Advanced robotic hands are offered by several vendors and research groups, with a variety of active and passive wrist options that can be articulated across several degrees of freedom. Nowadays, elbow joint designs include active solutions with different weight and power options. Control features are getting progressively more sophisticated, offering options for multiple sensor integration and multi-joint articulation. Latest developments in socket designs are capable of facilitating implantable and multiple surface electromyography sensors in both traditional and osseointegration-based systems. Novel surgical techniques in combination with modern, sophisticated hardware are enabling restoration of dexterous upper limb

  16. Prosthetic management of an ocular defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddesh Kumar Chintal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The disfigurement associated with the loss of an eye can cause significant physical and emotional problems. Various treatment modalities are available, one of which is implants. Although implant has a superior outcome, it may not be advisable in all patients due to economic factors. The present article describes the prosthetic management of an ocular defect with a custom-made ocular prosthesis.

  17. Maxillofacial Prosthetic Materials- An Inclination Towards Silicones

    OpenAIRE

    Mitra, Aparajita; Choudhary, Sunita; Garg, Hemlata; H.G., Jagadeesh

    2014-01-01

    There have been constant searches and researches which are taking place in the field of dental materials to best suit the ideal selection criteria to satisfy the functionality, biocompatibility, aesthetics as well as the durability as a maxillofacial material. Among all the different materials, Silicone is the most popularly used, but still studies are carried out to overcome their weaknesses and to come out with a material which can be labeled as the “ideal maxillofacial prosthetic material”...

  18. Prosthetic Hand With Two Gripping Fingers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, William E.; Belcher, Jewell B.; Vest, Thomas W.; Carden, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Prosthetic hand developed for amputee who retains significant portion of forearm. Outer end of device is end effector including two fingers, one moved by rotating remaining part of forearm about its longitudinal axis. Main body of end effector is end member supporting fingers, roller bearing assembly, and rack-and-pinion mechanism. Advantage of rack-and-pinion mechanism enables user to open or close gap between fingers with precision and force.

  19. Tactile Sensing Reflexes for Advanced Prosthetic Hands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Quad Chart 37 1. INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this research is to equip a myoelectric prosthetic hand with contact detecting sensors and a...controller to perform contact detection reflex (11-13 mos.) 80% • Program controller to perform software functions for clinical studies (12-13 mos.) 60...candidates have been ordered, and are having pressure relief holes laser drilled . A custom flexible component board that holds the pressure sensor

  20. Drosophila in the Heart of Understanding Cardiac Diseases: Modeling Channelopathies and Cardiomyopathies in the Fruitfly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouarda Taghli-Lamallem

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases and, among them, channelopathies and cardiomyopathies are a major cause of death worldwide. The molecular and genetic defects underlying these cardiac disorders are complex, leading to a large range of structural and functional heart phenotypes. Identification of molecular and functional mechanisms disrupted by mutations causing channelopathies and cardiomyopathies is essential to understanding the link between an altered gene and clinical phenotype. The development of animal models has been proven to be efficient for functional studies in channelopathies and cardiomyopathies. In particular, the Drosophila model has been largely applied for deciphering the molecular and cellular pathways affected in these inherited cardiac disorders and for identifying their genetic modifiers. Here we review the utility and the main contributions of the fruitfly models for the better understanding of channelopathies and cardiomyopathies. We also discuss the investigated pathological mechanisms and the discoveries of evolutionarily conserved pathways which reinforce the value of Drosophila in modeling human cardiac diseases.

  1. [Optogenetics and prosthetic treatment of retinal degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirpichnikov, M P; Ostrovskiy, M A

    2015-01-01

    This is a review of the current state of optogenetics-based research in the field of ophthalmology and physiology of vision. Optogenetics employs an interdisciplinary approach that amalgamates gene engineering, optics, and physiology. It involves exogenous expression of a light-activated protein in a very particular retinal cell enabling regulation (stimulation vs. inhibition) of its physiological activity. The experience with gene therapy came in very useful for optogenetics. However, unlike gene therapy, which is aimed at repairing damaged genes or replacing them with healthy ones, optogenetics is focused on protein genes delivery for further molecular control of the cell. In retina, the loss of photoreceptors is not necessarily followed by neuronal loss (at least ganglion cells remain intact), which determines the practicability of prosthetic treatment. Clinical trials can now be considered, owing to the first successful conversion of ganglion cells of mouse degenerative retinas into artificial photoreceptive cells with ON and OFF receptive fields, which is crucial for spatial vision. The following issues are reviewed here in detail: 1. Choice of cell targets within the degenerative retina. 2. Strategy of utilizing the existing light-sensitive agents and development of new optogenetic tools. 3. Gene delivery and expression in retinal cells. 4. Methods of evaluating the treatment success. 5. Selection criteria for optogenetic prosthetics. The conclusion discusses currently unsolved problems and prospects for optogenetic approaches to retinal prosthetics.

  2. A Rodent Model of Cardiac Donation After Circulatory Death and Novel Biomarkers of Cardiac Viability During Ex Vivo Heart Perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, Mark J; Miller, Sally D; Cheung, Anson; Bashir, Jamil; Wong, Stephanie; Seidman, Michael A; Boyd, John H

    2017-08-01

    Organ donation after circulatory death (DCD) is increasingly being used as a means of addressing the organ supply/demand mismatch in solid organ transplantation. There is reluctance to use DCD hearts, due to an inability to precisely identify hearts that have suffered irreversible injury. We investigated novel biomarkers and clinically relevant endpoints across a spectrum of warm ischemic times, before and during ex vivo heart perfusion (EVHP), to identify features associated with a nonviable cardiac phenotype. Donor rats sustained a hypoxic cardiac arrest, followed by variable acirculatory standoff periods (DCD groups). Left ventricular function, histochemical injury, and differences in left ventricular gene expression were studied before, and during, EVHP. As warm ischemic time exposure increased in DCD groups, fewer hearts were functional during EVHP, and ventricular function was increasingly impaired. Histochemical assessment identified severely injured hearts during EVHP. A novel gene expression signature identified severely injured hearts during EVHP (upregulation of c-Jun, 3.19 (2.84-3.60); P = 0.0014; HMOX-1, 3.87 (2.72-5.50); P = 0.0037; and Hsp90, 7.66 (6.32-9.27); P < 0.0001 in DCD20), and may be useful in identifying high-risk hearts at the point of harvest (Hsp90). We demonstrate that our preclinical model recapitulates the cardio-respiratory decompensation observed in humans, and that EVHP appears necessary to unmask distinguishing features of severely injured DCD hearts. Furthermore, we outline a clinically relevant multimodal approach to assessing candidate DCD hearts. Novel mRNA signatures correlated with elevations in cardiac Troponin-I in severely injured hearts during EVHP, and may also detect injury at the point of harvest.

  3. Viscoelastic behaviour of human blood and polyacrylamide model fluids for heart valve testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerche, Dietmar; Vlastos, Georgios; Koch, Brigitte; Pohl, Manfred; Affeld, Klaus

    1993-06-01

    New heart valves and other cardiovascular assist systems have to be tested for hydrodynamic performance. In place of human blood simple model fluids like glycerol solutions are employed often due to ethical and practical reasons. But blood exhibits complex non-Newtonian and viscoelastic behaviour. Rheological blood properties are reviewed based on literature and own experimental results. Furthermore we studied polymer solutions with respect to blood-like flow behaviour. Rheology was assessed by means of the low shear rotational viscometer (LS 40, Mettler-Toledo, Switzerland) under stationary and dynamic shear conditions (variation of frequency and angular displacement).

  4. Toronto Heart Attack Collaborative: an administrative model that facilitated a successful city-wide integration initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Justin; McLellan, Barry; Escaf, Marnie; Dzavik, Vladimir; Michaud, Susan; Newton, Janet; Newman, Erone

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a description of the administrative model that enabled a city-wide integration effort between Greater Toronto Area hospitals and Toronto Emergency Medical Services in the care of patients within the city of Toronto with ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). This administrative structure, known as the Toronto Heart Attack Collaborative (THAC), enabled universal 24/7 access to primary percutaneous coronary intervention within Toronto, improving patient efficacy and outcomes. The lessons and administrative enablers from this experience may be useful for regions that are embarking on multi-centre integration efforts. This article presents a five-year perspective on the THAC integration effort.

  5. Novel Model of Pulmonary Artery Banding Leading to Right Heart Failure in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Masataka Hirata; Daiki Ousaka; Sadahiko Arai; Michihiro Okuyama; Suguru Tarui; Junko Kobayashi; Shingo Kasahara; Shunji Sano

    2015-01-01

    Background. Congenital heart diseases often involve chronic pressure overload of the right ventricle (RV) which is a major cause of RV dysfunction. Pulmonary artery (PA) banding has been used to produce animal models of RV dysfunction. We have devised a new and easier method of constricting the PA and compared it directly with the partial ligation method. Methods. Eight-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats (240–260 g) were divided into three groups: sham operation, partial pulmonary artery ligat...

  6. A practical approach to parameter estimation applied to model predicting heart rate regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olufsen, Mette; Ottesen, Johnny T.

    2013-01-01

    baroreceptor feedback regulation of heart rate during head-up tilt. The three methods include: structured analysis of the correlation matrix, analysis via singular value decomposition followed by QR factorization, and identification of the subspace closest to the one spanned by eigenvectors of the model...... Hessian. Results showed that all three methods facilitate identification of a parameter subset. The “best” subset was obtained using the structured correlation method, though this method was also the most computationally intensive. Subsets obtained using the other two methods were easier to compute...

  7. Involvement of Kytococcus schroeteri in a case of prosthetic valve endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella D’Andria

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a fourth case of prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by the newly described micrococcal species: Kytococcus schroeteri. A 38-year old male was admitted to our hospital with suspected prosthetic valve endocarditis. In three blood cultures and in the prosthetic heart valve culture grew the same type of microrganism, initially identified as Micrococcus luteus. Presuntive assignment to the genus Kytococcus was suggested by the arginina dihydrolase activity and by the resistence to penicillin, oxacillin and methicillin, characteristics which are not shared by other micrococci. Further biochemical tests confirmed that the isolates belonged to the genus Kytococcus (negative reaction for oxydase, esculin and urease, positive for catalase and arginine dihydrolase species schroeteri (alpha-glucosidase positive. The patient was treated with vancomycin, gentamicin and rifampicin. After the valve replacement, on the 20th day of hospitalization, the patient’s biological parameters returned to normal values, and after one mounth the resolution of the disease was completed. The diagnosis of four cases by K. schroeteri endocarditis, described within a short period of time (2003-2006, might indicate a specific pathogenicity of this new species. In case of endocarditis diagnosis, the suspect of the genus Kytococcus involvement should be considered each time the aerobic Gram positive cocci, with arginina dihidrolase activiy and the resistence to penicillin, oxacillin and methicillin, are isolated by significative biological samples.

  8. Analysis of the Influence of the Electrical Asynchrony on Regional Mechanics of the Infarcted Left Ventricle Using Electromechanical Heart Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Xia, Ling; Zhang, Xin

    Asynchronous electrical activation, as induced by myocardial infarction, causes various abnormalities in left ventricle function. The influence of the electrical asynchrony on regional mechanics of the left ventricle is simulated using a mechanical heart model and an electrical heart model. The mechanical model accounts for the ventricular geometry, the fiber nature of the myocardial tissue, and the dependency of the activation sequence of the ventricular wall. The electrical model is based on a heart-torso model with realistic geometry, and different action potential waveforms with variables in duration are used to simulate the abnormal electrical activation after myocardial infarction. Regional deformation, strain and stress are calculated during systole phase. The preliminary results show that asynchronous electrical activation, as an important factor, significantly affects regional mechanical performance of the infarcted left ventricle, it indicates heterogeneous contraction pattern and elevated systolic stresses near the injured region. The simulated results are compared with solutions obtained in the literature. This simulation suggests that such coupled heart models can be used to assess the mechanical function of the left ventricle with diseases such as myocardial infarction, and more realistic models of cardiac function are essential for clinical evaluation of heart disease.

  9. Below knee prosthetic socket designs and suspension systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, M L

    2000-08-01

    The prosthetic socket must act as a customized connection between the residual limb's surrounding tissues and the prosthetic components. The socket must be designed to control weight bearing, suspension, and ambulation stability. When making a below-the-knee socket, the prosthetist attempts to maximize loading and minimize displacements, such as vertical, transverse, or rotational. This article discusses the engineering designs or shapes of the two basic forms of below-the-knee prosthetic sockets used today.

  10. 100 top-cited scientific papers in limb prosthetics

    OpenAIRE

    Eshraghi, Arezoo; Osman, Noor Azuan Abu; Gholizadeh, Hossein; Ali, Sadeeq; Shadgan, Babak

    2013-01-01

    Research has tremendously contributed to the developments in both practical and fundamental aspects of limb prosthetics. These advancements are reflected in scientific articles, particularly in the most cited papers. This article aimed to identify the 100 top-cited articles in the field of limb prosthetics and to investigate their main characteristics. Articles related to the field of limb prosthetics and published in the Web of Knowledge database of the Institute for Scientific Information (...

  11. Prosthetic options available for the diabetic lower limb amputee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitragari, Gautham; Mahler, David B; Sumpio, Brandon J; Blume, Peter A; Sumpio, Bauer E

    2014-01-01

    Although the rate of lower limb amputation in patients with diabetes is decreasing, amputation still remains a major complication of diabetes. Prosthetics have been long used to help amputees ambulate. The last decade has seen many advances in prostheses with the enhanced understanding of the mechanics of ambulation and improved use of technology. This review describes the different types of prosthetic options available for below knee, ankle, and foot amputees, emphasizing the latest advances in prosthetic design.

  12. Modeling treatment of ischemic heart disease with partially observable Markov decision processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauskrecht, M; Fraser, H

    1998-01-01

    Diagnosis of a disease and its treatment are not separate, one-shot activities. Instead they are very often dependent and interleaved over time, mostly due to uncertainty about the underlying disease, uncertainty associated with the response of a patient to the treatment and varying cost of different diagnostic (investigative) and treatment procedures. The framework of Partially observable Markov decision processes (POMDPs) developed and used in operations research, control theory and artificial intelligence communities is particularly suitable for modeling such a complex decision process. In the paper, we show how the POMDP framework could be used to model and solve the problem of the management of patients with ischemic heart disease, and point out modeling advantages of the framework over standard decision formalisms.

  13. Double-wire sternal closure technique in bovine animal models for total artificial heart implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimov, Jamshid H; Sunagawa, Gengo; Golding, Leonard A R; Moazami, Nader; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka

    2015-08-01

    In vivo preclinical testing of mechanical circulatory devices requires large animal models that provide reliable physiological and hemodynamic conditions by which to test the device and investigate design and development strategies. Large bovine species are commonly used for mechanical circulatory support device research. The animals used for chronic in vivo support require high-quality care and excellent surgical techniques as well as advanced methods of postoperative care. These techniques are constantly being updated and new methods are emerging.We report results of our double steel-wire closure technique in large bovine models used for Cleveland Clinic's continuous-flow total artificial heart development program. This is the first report of double-wire sternal fixation used in large bovine models.

  14. An extremely lightweight fingernail worn prosthetic interface device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetkin, Oguz; Ahluwalia, Simranjit; Silva, Dinithi; Kasi-Okonye, Isioma; Volker, Rachael; Baptist, Joshua R.; Popa, Dan O.

    2016-05-01

    Upper limb prosthetics are currently operated using several electromyography sensors mounted on an amputee's residual limb. In order for any prosthetic driving interface to be widely adopted, it needs to be responsive, lightweight, and out of the way when not being used. In this paper we discuss the possibility of replacing such electrodes with fingernail optical sensor systems mounted on the sound limb. We present a prototype device that can detect pinch gestures and communicate with the prosthetic system. The device detects the relative position of fingers to each other by measuring light transmitted via tissue. Applications are not limited to prosthetic control, but can be extended to other human-machine interfaces.

  15. In vitro study of biofilm growth on biologic prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellows, Charles; Smith, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Biologic prosthetics are increasingly used for the repair of abdominal wall hernia defects but can become infected as a result of peri- or early post-operative bacterial contamination. Data evaluating biofilm formation on biologic prosthetics is lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of different biologic prosthetics on the growth behavior of two different bacterial species and their ability to form biofilms. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or Pseudomrnonas aeruginosa were incubated on disks of two biologic prosthetics-human acellular dermis (ADM), and porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS). The bacteria were allowed to attach to the prosthetics and propagate into mature biofilms for 24 hours at 370C. Images of biofilms were obtained using confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The number of viable cells and the biofilm biomass were quantified by colony forming units (CFUs) and crystal violet staining respectively. Analysis of variance was performed to compare the mean values for the different prosthetics. Each biologic matrix had a distinct surface characteristic. SEM visualized mature biofilms characterized by highly organized multi-cellular structures on surface of both biologic prosthetics. Quantification of bacterial growth over time showed that ADM had the lowest CFUs and biofilm biomass at 24 hours post-inoculation compared to SIS for both bacterial strains. MRSA and P. aeruginosa can form mature biofilms on biologic prosthetics but the relative abundance of the biofilm varies on different prosthetic constructs. Biologic material composition and manufacturing methods may influence bacterial adherence.

  16. The role of osteoblasts in peri-prosthetic osteolysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, S C

    2013-08-01

    Peri-prosthetic osteolysis and subsequent aseptic loosening is the most common reason for revising total hip replacements. Wear particles originating from the prosthetic components interact with multiple cell types in the peri-prosthetic region resulting in an inflammatory process that ultimately leads to peri-prosthetic bone loss. These cells include macrophages, osteoclasts, osteoblasts and fibroblasts. The majority of research in peri-prosthetic osteolysis has concentrated on the role played by osteoclasts and macrophages. The purpose of this review is to assess the role of the osteoblast in peri-prosthetic osteolysis. In peri-prosthetic osteolysis, wear particles may affect osteoblasts and contribute to the osteolytic process by two mechanisms. First, particles and metallic ions have been shown to inhibit the osteoblast in terms of its ability to secrete mineralised bone matrix, by reducing calcium deposition, alkaline phosphatase activity and its ability to proliferate. Secondly, particles and metallic ions have been shown to stimulate osteoblasts to produce pro inflammatory mediators in vitro. In vivo, these mediators have the potential to attract pro-inflammatory cells to the peri-prosthetic area and stimulate osteoclasts to absorb bone. Further research is needed to fully define the role of the osteoblast in peri-prosthetic osteolysis and to explore its potential role as a therapeutic target in this condition.

  17. 21 CFR 890.3420 - External limb prosthetic component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... total prosthesis. Examples of external limb prosthetic components include the following: Ankle, foot... shoulder joint components; and cable and prosthesis suction valves. (b) Classification. Class I...

  18. Design of a prosthetic hand with remote actuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Kurt; Perez-Gracia, Alba

    2012-01-01

    One of the main issues of prosthetic hands is to be able to fulfill all the specifications about speed, torque, weight and inertia while placing all the components within the prosthetic hand. This is especially true when full dexterity is required in the prosthesis. In this paper, a new design for a prosthetic hand is presented, which uses remote actuation in order to satisfy most of those requirements. The actuators are to be located in the back of the subject and the transmission is implemented via cables. Other characteristics of this new prosthetic hand include torque limitation and the possibility of switching between underactuated and fully actuated functions.

  19. Dental prosthetic status and prosthetic need of the institutionalized elderly living in geriatric homes in mangalore: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Rekha P; Hegde, Vijaya

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. To promote oral health among the elderly, we need to know their prosthetic status and prosthetic need. Hence, a survey of prosthetic status and need of elderly inmates of old age homes in Mangalore was done. Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional study was undertaken, and 133 subjects aged 60 years and above were examined (54.9% males and 45.1% females). Results. Eighty-eight percent of those examined were fully edentulous, and only 12% had complete dentures; none of the study subjects had partial dentures. Prosthetic status was significantly associated with gender (P = .024), while prosthetic need and gender were not significantly associated (P = .395). Conclusions. A high unmet need for prosthetic care existed among the institutionalized elderly surveyed.

  20. The Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) can predict outcomes in ambulatory patients with advanced heart failure who have been referred for cardiac transplantation evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Szyguła-Jurkiewicz, Bożena; Zakliczyński, Michał; Andrejczuk, Mariusz; Mościński, Mateusz; Zembala, Marian

    2014-01-01

    Risk stratification in heart failure (HF) patients is an important element for management. There are several risk stratification models that can be used to predict the prognosis of patients with HF, such as Aaronson's scale, CVM-HF (CardioVascular Medicine Heart Failure), the Seattle Heart Failure Model (SHFM) and the Munich score. These models fail to adequately address the impact of multiorgan dysfunction on prognosis. The classical Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score consists of...

  1. An Electromechanical Left Ventricular Wedge Model to Study the Effects of Deformation on Repolarization during Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. M. Rocha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure is a major and costly problem in public health, which, in certain cases, may lead to death. The failing heart undergo a series of electrical and structural changes that provide the underlying basis for disturbances like arrhythmias. Computer models of coupled electrical and mechanical activities of the heart can be used to advance our understanding of the complex feedback mechanisms involved. In this context, there is a lack of studies that consider heart failure remodeling using strongly coupled electromechanics. We present a strongly coupled electromechanical model to study the effects of deformation on a human left ventricle wedge considering normal and hypertrophic heart failure conditions. We demonstrate through a series of simulations that when a strongly coupled electromechanical model is used, deformation results in the thickening of the ventricular wall that in turn increases transmural dispersion of repolarization. These effects were analyzed in both normal and failing heart conditions. We also present transmural electrograms obtained from these simulations. Our results suggest that the waveform of electrograms, particularly the T-wave, is influenced by cardiac contraction on both normal and pathological conditions.

  2. Simulation of blood flow through an artificial heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiris, Cetin; Chang, I-Dee; Rogers, Stuart E.; Kwak, Dochan

    1991-01-01

    A numerical simulation of the incompressible viscous flow through a prosthetic tilting disk heart valve is presented in order to demonstrate the current capability to model unsteady flows with moving boundaries. Both steady state and unsteady flow calculations are done by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in 3-D generalized curvilinear coordinates. In order to handle the moving boundary problems, the chimera grid embedding scheme which decomposes a complex computational domain into several simple subdomains is used. An algebraic turbulence model for internal flows is incorporated to reach the physiological values of Reynolds number. Good agreement is obtained between the numerical results and experimental measurements. It is found that the tilting disk valve causes large regions of separated flow, and regions of high shear.

  3. CRITERIA FOR THE EVALUATION AND ESTIMATION OF IATROGENIC PROSTHETIC FACTORS – SEMIOLOGY AND SYMPTOMATOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. LUCA

    2013-12-01

    common functional occlusion, tolerated by the patient, even if not in a perfect equilibrium with all components of the dento-maxillary apparatus. Discussion: The present study involved clinical examination and interpretation of the signs induced by iatrogenic prosthetic works. The main contribution to such signs was brought by the abrased antagonistic teeth, which is actually the first symptom in most of the cases. The causes leading to the occurrence of these clincal pathological signs are represented by an incorrect realization of the occlusal morphology (from the part of the dental technician and by the absence of a pro‑ fessional occlusal equilibrium. The trophic chain of these iatrogenies assumes several stages, starting from the pre‑ paration of the prosthetic dies (the occlusal space, to the impression technique and materials, patterns’ mounting in the articulator (which prevents a complete simulation of the mandibular movements inside the masticatory system, ending with the final modelling of the prosthetic work. Conclusions: Realization of prosthetic works in full, active colaboration with the dental technician and for each case in part, along with a minute analysis of the works made in the oral cavity, may eliminate several of the conditions favourizing the manifestation of some undesired destruc‑ tive factors. Checking of the occlusion at regular time inter‑ vals, as periodical stomatological controls, should become customary for any stomatologist.

  4. Wave front fragmentation due to ventricular geometry in a model of the rabbit heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Jack M.

    2002-09-01

    The role of the heart's complex shape in causing the fragmentation of activation wave fronts characteristic of ventricular fibrillation (VF) has not been well studied. We used a finite element model of cardiac propagation capable of simulating functional reentry on curved two-dimensional surfaces to test the hypothesis that uneven surface curvature can cause local propagation block leading to proliferation of reentrant wave fronts. We found that when reentry was induced on a flat sheet, it rotated in a repeatable meander pattern without breaking up. However, when a model of the rabbit ventricles was formed from the same medium, reentrant wave fronts followed complex, nonrepeating trajectories. Local propagation block often occurred when wave fronts propagated across regions where the Gaussian curvature of the surface changed rapidly. This type of block did not occur every time wave fronts crossed such a region; rather, it only occurred when the wave front was very close behind the previous wave in the cycle and was therefore propagating into relatively inexcitable tissue. Close wave front spacing resulted from nonstationary reentrant propagation. Thus, uneven surface curvature and nonstationary reentrant propagation worked in concert to produce wave front fragmentation and complex activation patterns. None of the factors previously thought to be necessary for local propagation block (e.g., heterogeneous refractory period, steep action potential duration restitution) were present. We conclude that the complex geometry of the heart may be an important determinant of VF activation patterns.

  5. Mechanism-based modeling of reduced inotropic responsiveness to digoxin in endotoxemic rat hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Myoungki; Weiss, Michael

    2005-05-02

    The mechanisms by which endotoxemia affects myocardial contractility and responsiveness to inotropic drugs are not well understood. We examined the positive inotropic effect of digoxin in single-pass Langendorff-perfused hearts from rats after in vivo pretreatment with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 4 mg/kg, i.p., 4 h before heart isolation). Using a mathematical modeling approach that allows differentiation between effects elicited at the receptor and postreceptor level, we studied uptake, receptor binding and effectuation kinetics after three consecutive digoxin doses (15, 30, and 45 microg) in the absence and presence of the reverse mode Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange (NCX) inhibitor KB-R7943 (0.1 microM) in perfusate. LPS significantly depressed baseline contractility and the inotropic response to digoxin without affecting its uptake mechanism. Compared with the control group, the slope of the functional receptor occupancy (stimulus)-to-response relationship was reduced by 44% in the LPS group. Model analysis revealed a significant correlation between changes in digoxin action and LPS-induced febrile response: digoxin receptor affinity increased and the response/stimulus ratio decreased with rise in body temperature, respectively. In contrast, the diminished responsiveness to digoxin observed after NCX inhibition in the control group was not further attenuated in the LPS group. These results support the hypothesis that postreceptor events may be responsible for the diminished contractile response to digoxin during endotoxemia.

  6. Metformin prevents the development of chronic heart failure in the SHHF rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cittadini, Antonio; Napoli, Raffaele; Monti, Maria Gaia; Rea, Domenica; Longobardi, Salvatore; Netti, Paolo Antonio; Walser, Marion; Samà, Mariateresa; Aimaretti, Gianluca; Isgaard, Jörgen; Saccà, Luigi

    2012-04-01

    Insulin resistance is a recently identified mechanism involved in the pathophysiology of chronic heart failure (CHF). We investigated the effects of two insulin-sensitizing drugs (metformin and rosiglitazone) in a genetic model of spontaneously hypertensive, insulin-resistant rats (SHHF). Thirty SHHF rats were randomized into three treatment groups as follows: 1) metformin (100 mg/kg per day), 2) rosiglitazone (2 mg/kg per day), and 3) no drug. Ten Sprague-Dawley rats served as normal controls. At the end of the treatment period (12 months), the cardiac phenotype was characterized by histology, echocardiography, and isolated perfused heart studies. Metformin attenuated left ventricular (LV) remodeling, as shown by reduced LV volumes, wall stress, perivascular fibrosis, and cardiac lipid accumulation. Metformin improved both systolic and diastolic indices as well as myocardial mechanical efficiency, as shown by improved ability to convert metabolic energy into mechanical work. Metformin induced a marked activation of AMP-activated protein kinase, endothelial nitric oxide synthase, and vascular endothelial growth factor and reduced tumor necrosis factor-α expression and myocyte apoptosis. Rosiglitazone did not affect LV remodeling, increased perivascular fibrosis, and promoted further cardiac lipid accumulation. In conclusion, long-term treatment with metformin, but not with rosiglitazone, prevents the development of severe CHF in the SHHF model by a wide-spectrum interaction that involves molecular, structural, functional, and metabolic-energetic mechanisms.

  7. Advanced Prosthetic Gait Training Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    distance up spine near T7 spinous process Spine_Rigid Intersection of spine and the point between the shoulder joints LowNeck Base of the neck near C7...spinous process UpperNeck Top of the neck near C1 spinous process LCLAV, RCLAV Approximately one-fourth distance between manubrium and acromion...capture data between the human subjects and the Santos biomechanical model that may affect the way clinicians score the gait data when using Santos

  8. 8. Are nurse-led prosthetic valve anticoagulation clinics effective?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Obeid

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Valvular heart disease is a major and serious healthcare issue. There is an increasing evidence that Nurse-led anticoagulation clinics may improve patients’ management and care.This is a retrospective comparison study that included the first 94 patients enrolled in the Nurse Led Prosthetic Valve Anticoagulation Clinic (PVATC in King Abdul-Aziz Cardiac Centre between April and June 2013, and received Warfarin by General Cardiology Clinics for one year pre enrollment in PVATC, and one year after. Time in Therapeutic Range (TTR of the International Normalized Ratio (INR was calculated and compared between pre and post PVATC enrolment. Other data including demographics and comorbidities were collected and analyzed. Mean age of patients was 53 ± 12.5 years and males were 56%. Atrial fibrillation was found in 37%, Diabetes Mellitus in 28% and Hypertension in 34%. Mean TTR was 72% pre enrollment in PVATC as compared to 78.9% after (P < 0.006. Median TTR was 75% pre, and 81.5% after attending the PVATC (P < 0.0001. 56% of patients pre enrollment had TTR values above 70% threshold, compared to 75% after enrollment. Nurse-Led PVATC has significant impact on the care provided to patients receiving anticoagulation treatment.

  9. The forward and inverse problem of cardiac magnetic fields based on concentric ellipsoid torso-heart model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Hua, Ning; Tang, Xue-Zheng; Lu, Hong; Ma, Ping; Tang, Fa-Kuan

    2010-08-01

    This paper constructs a concentric ellipsoid torso-heart model by boundary element method and investigates the impacts of model structures on the cardiac magnetic fields generated by both equivalent primary source-a current dipole and volume currents. Then by using the simulated magnetic fields based on the torso-heart model as input, the cardiac current sources-an array of current dipoles by optimal constrained linear inverse method are constructed. Next, the current dipole array reconstruction considering boundaries are compared with that in an unbounded homogeneous medium. Furthermore, the influence of random noise on reconstruction is also considered and the reconstructing effect is judged by several reconstructing parameters.

  10. Visualization of the hinge flow in a 5:1 scaled model of the medtronic parallel bileaflet heart valve prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, T. M.; Fontaine, A. A.; Ellis, J. T.; Walton, S. P.; Yoganathan, A. P.

    In this work, a flow visualization experiment was performed to elucidate features of the retrograde hinge flow through a 5:1 scaled model of the Medtronic Parallel bileaflet heart valve. It was hypothesized that this model would provide detailed flow information facilitating identification of flow structures associated with thrombus formation in this valve. The experimental protocol was designed to ensure fluid dynamic similarity between the model and prototype heart valves. Flow was visualized using dye injection. The detailed flow structures observed showed the hinge's inflow channel was the most suspect region for thrombus formation. Here a complex helical structure was observed.

  11. A Mobile Motion Analysis System Using Intertial Sensors for Analysis of Lower Limb Prosthetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, John Kyle P [ORNL; Ericson, Milton Nance [ORNL; Farquhar, Ethan [ORNL; Lind, Randall F [ORNL; Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Soldiers returning from the global war on terror requiring lower leg prosthetics generally have different concerns and requirements than the typical lower leg amputee. These subjects are usually young, wish to remain active and often desire to return to active military duty. As such, they demand higher performance from their prosthetics, but are at risk for chronic injury and joint conditions in their unaffected limb. Motion analysis is a valuable tool in assessing the performance of new and existing prosthetic technologies as well as the methods in fitting these devices to both maximize performance and minimize risk of injury for the individual soldier. We are developing a mobile, low-cost motion analysis system using inertial measurement units (IMUs) and two custom force sensors that detect ground reaction forces and moments on both the unaffected limb and prosthesis. IMUs were tested on a robot programmed to simulate human gait motion. An algorithm which uses a kinematic model of the robot and an extended Kalman filter (EKF) was used to convert the rates and accelerations from the gyro and accelerometer into joint angles. Compared to encoder data from the robot, which was considered the ground truth in this experiment, the inertial measurement system had a RMSE of <1.0 degree. Collecting kinematic and kinetic data without the restrictions and expense of a motion analysis lab could help researchers, designers and prosthetists advance prosthesis technology and customize devices for individuals. Ultimately, these improvements will result in better prosthetic performance for the military population.

  12. A five-fingered underactuated prosthetic hand: hardware and its control scheme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Jing-dong; JIANG Li; CAI He-gao; LIU hong

    2008-01-01

    A five-fingered underactuated prosthetic hand controlled by surface EMG (electromyographic) sig-nals is presented in this paper. The prosthetic hand was designed with simplicity, lightweight and dexterity on the requirement of anthropomorphic hands. Underactuated self-adaptive theory was adopted to decrease the number of motors and weight. The control part of the prosthetic hand was based on a surface EMG motion pat-tern classifier which combines LM-based (Levenberg-Marquardt) neural network with the parametric AR ( au-toregressive) model. This motion pattern classifier can successfully identify the flexions of the thumb, the index finger and the middle finger by measuring the surface EMG signals through two electrodes mounted on the flexor digitorum profundus and flexor pollicis longus. Furthermore, via continuously controlling a single finger' s mo-tion, the five-fingered underactuated prosthetic hand can achieve more prehensile postures such as power grasp,centralized grip, fingertip grasp, cylindrical grasp, etc. The experimental results show that the classifier has a great potential application to the control of bionic man-machine systems because of its fast learning speed, high recognition capability and strong robustness.

  13. A geometrical optimization of a magneto-rheological rotary brake in a prosthetic knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsson, K. H.; Jonsdottir, F.; Thorsteinsson, F.

    2010-03-01

    Magneto-rheological (MR) fluids have been successfully introduced to prosthetic devices. One such device is a biomechanical prosthetic knee that uses MR fluids to actively control its rotary stiffness. The brake is rotational, utilizing the MR fluid in shear mode. In this study, the geometrical design of the MR brake is addressed. This includes the design of the magnetic circuit and the geometry of the fluid chamber. Mathematical models are presented that describe the rotary torque of the brake. A novel perfluorinated polyether (PFPE)-based MR fluid is introduced, whose properties are tailored for the prosthetic knee. On-state and off-state rheological measurements of the MR fluid are presented. The finite element method is used to evaluate the magnetic flux density in the MR fluid. The design is formulated as an optimization problem, aiming to maximize the braking torque. A parametric study is carried out for several design parameters. Subsequently, a multi-objective optimization problem is defined that considers three design objectives: the field-induced braking torque, the off-state rotary stiffness and the weight of the brake. Trade-offs between the three design objectives are investigated which provides a basis for informed design decisions on furthering the success of the MR prosthetic knee.

  14. Characteristics of a volume-adjustable compression chamber for transradial prosthetic interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Yuanjun; Li, Xiang; Luo, Yun

    2016-07-01

    In the transradial limb-socket contact interface, the physiological properties and prosthetic operating habits of the residual limb might affect the comfort and functionality of the prosthesis. To enhance the comfort and functionality of the interface, a frame-type socket with four volume-adjustable compression chambers was proposed for the transradial amputation level. The contact pressure of the limb-socket interface was adjusted by the volume changes in the chambers and controlled by a vacuum pump and the corresponding control system. The parameters of the chamber were designed in accordance with the biomechanics of the forearm soft tissue. The chamber with a negative stiffness characteristic was theoretically compared with the chamber with a positive stiffness characteristic. The results showed that the former had a superior performance to the latter in safety and pump performance requirements. A physical model of the transradial frame-type prosthetic interface was also manufactured with four negative stiffness chambers. The experimental results showed that this new prosthetic interface achieved more fitting time and better performance in comfort and functionality than the fixed frame-type socket. This new prosthetic interface with volume-adjustable compression chambers might be an alternative choice for transradial amputees.

  15. Organization of ventricular fibrillation in the human heart: experiments and models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Tusscher, K H W J; Mourad, A; Nash, M P; Clayton, R H; Bradley, C P; Paterson, D J; Hren, R; Hayward, M; Panfilov, A V; Taggart, P

    2009-05-01

    Sudden cardiac death is a major health problem in the industrialized world. The lethal event is typically ventricular fibrillation (VF), during which the co-ordinated regular contraction of the heart is overthrown by a state of mechanical and electrical anarchy. Understanding the excitation patterns that sustain VF is important in order to identify potential therapeutic targets. In this paper, we studied the organization of human VF by combining clinical recordings of electrical excitation patterns on the epicardial surface during in vivo human VF with simulations of VF in an anatomically and electrophysiologically detailed computational model of the human ventricles. We find both in the computational studies and in the clinical recordings that epicardial surface excitation patterns during VF contain around six rotors. Based on results from the simulated three-dimensional excitation patterns during VF, which show that the total number of electrical sources is 1.4 +/- 0.12 times greater than the number of epicardial rotors, we estimate that the total number of sources present during clinically recorded VF is 9.0 +/- 2.6. This number is approximately fivefold fewer compared with that observed during VF in dog and pig hearts, which are of comparable size to human hearts. We explain this difference by considering differences in action potential duration dynamics across these species. The simpler spatial organization of human VF has important implications for treatment and prevention of this dangerous arrhythmia. Moreover, our findings underline the need for integrated research, in which human-based clinical and computational studies complement animal research.

  16. The Murine Model of Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB Develops Cardiopathies over Time Leading to Heart Failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Giacomo Schiattarella

    Full Text Available Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS IIIB is a lysosomal disease due to the deficiency of the enzyme α-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGLU required for heparan sulfate (HS degradation. The disease is characterized by mild somatic features and severe neurological disorders. Very little is known on the cardiac dysfunctions in MPS IIIB. In this study, we used the murine model of MPS IIIB (NAGLU knockout mice, NAGLU(-/- in order to investigate the cardiac involvement in the disease. Echocardiographic analysis showed a marked increase in left ventricular (LV mass, reduced cardiac function and valvular defects in NAGLU(-/- mice as compared to wild-type (WT littermates. The NAGLU(-/- mice exhibited a significant increase in aortic and mitral annulus dimension with a progressive elongation and thickening of anterior mitral valve leaflet. A severe mitral regurgitation with reduction in mitral inflow E-wave-to-A-wave ratio was observed in 32-week-old NAGLU(-/- mice. Compared to WT mice, NAGLU(-/- mice exhibited a significantly lower survival with increased mortality observed in particular after 25 weeks of age. Histopathological analysis revealed a significant increase of myocardial fiber vacuolization, accumulation of HS in the myocardial vacuoles, recruitment of inflammatory cells and collagen deposition within the myocardium, and an increase of LV fibrosis in NAGLU(-/- mice compared to WT mice. Biochemical analysis of heart samples from affected mice showed increased expression levels of cardiac failure hallmarks such as calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, connexin43, α-smooth muscle actin, α-actinin, atrial and brain natriuretic peptides, and myosin heavy polypeptide 7. Furthermore, heart samples from NAGLU(-/- mice showed enhanced expression of the lysosome-associated membrane protein-2 (LAMP2, and the autophagic markers Beclin1 and LC3 isoform II (LC3-II. Overall, our findings demonstrate that NAGLU(-/- mice develop heart disease, valvular

  17. Dysfunction of the CNS-heart axis in mouse models of Huntington's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Mielcarek

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac remodelling and contractile dysfunction occur during both acute and chronic disease processes including the accumulation of insoluble aggregates of misfolded amyloid proteins that are typical features of Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's disease (HD. While HD has been described mainly as a neurological disease, multiple epidemiological studies have shown that HD patients exhibit a high incidence of cardiovascular events leading to heart failure, and that this is the second highest cause of death. Given that huntingtin is ubiquitously expressed, cardiomyocytes may be at risk of an HD-related dysfunction. In mice, the forced expression of an expanded polyQ repeat under the control of a cardiac specific promoter led to severe heart failure followed by reduced lifespan. However the mechanism leading to cardiac dysfunction in the clinical and pre-clinical HD settings remains unknown. To unravel this mechanism, we employed the R6/2 transgenic and HdhQ150 knock-in mouse models of HD. We found that pre-symptomatic animals developed connexin-43 relocation and a significant deregulation of hypertrophic markers and Bdnf transcripts. In the symptomatic animals, pronounced functional changes were visualised by cardiac MRI revealing a contractile dysfunction, which might be a part of dilatated cardiomyopathy (DCM. This was accompanied by the re-expression of foetal genes, apoptotic cardiomyocyte loss and a moderate degree of interstitial fibrosis. To our surprise, we could identify neither mutant HTT aggregates in cardiac tissue nor a HD-specific transcriptional dysregulation, even at the end stage of disease. We postulate that the HD-related cardiomyopathy is caused by altered central autonomic pathways although the pathogenic effects of mutant HTT acting intrinsically in the heart may also be a contributing factor.

  18. Dysfunction of the CNS-heart axis in mouse models of Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielcarek, Michal; Inuabasi, Linda; Bondulich, Marie K; Muller, Thomas; Osborne, Georgina F; Franklin, Sophie A; Smith, Donna L; Neueder, Andreas; Rosinski, Jim; Rattray, Ivan; Protti, Andrea; Bates, Gillian P

    2014-08-01

    Cardiac remodelling and contractile dysfunction occur during both acute and chronic disease processes including the accumulation of insoluble aggregates of misfolded amyloid proteins that are typical features of Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's disease (HD). While HD has been described mainly as a neurological disease, multiple epidemiological studies have shown that HD patients exhibit a high incidence of cardiovascular events leading to heart failure, and that this is the second highest cause of death. Given that huntingtin is ubiquitously expressed, cardiomyocytes may be at risk of an HD-related dysfunction. In mice, the forced expression of an expanded polyQ repeat under the control of a cardiac specific promoter led to severe heart failure followed by reduced lifespan. However the mechanism leading to cardiac dysfunction in the clinical and pre-clinical HD settings remains unknown. To unravel this mechanism, we employed the R6/2 transgenic and HdhQ150 knock-in mouse models of HD. We found that pre-symptomatic animals developed connexin-43 relocation and a significant deregulation of hypertrophic markers and Bdnf transcripts. In the symptomatic animals, pronounced functional changes were visualised by cardiac MRI revealing a contractile dysfunction, which might be a part of dilatated cardiomyopathy (DCM). This was accompanied by the re-expression of foetal genes, apoptotic cardiomyocyte loss and a moderate degree of interstitial fibrosis. To our surprise, we could identify neither mutant HTT aggregates in cardiac tissue nor a HD-specific transcriptional dysregulation, even at the end stage of disease. We postulate that the HD-related cardiomyopathy is caused by altered central autonomic pathways although the pathogenic effects of mutant HTT acting intrinsically in the heart may also be a contributing factor.

  19. The Aachen miniaturized heart-lung machine--first results in a small animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnoering, Heike; Arens, Jutta; Sachweh, Joerg S; Veerman, Melanie; Tolba, Rene; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Vazquez-Jimenez, Jaime F

    2009-11-01

    Congenital heart surgery most often incorporates extracorporeal circulation. Due to foreign surface contact and the administration of foreign blood in many children, inflammatory response and hemolysis are important matters of debate. This is particularly an issue in premature and low birth-weight newborns. Taking these considerations into account, the Aachen miniaturized heart-lung machine (MiniHLM) with a total static priming volume of 102 mL (including tubing) was developed and tested in a small animal model. Fourteen female Chinchilla Bastard rabbits were operated on using two different kinds of circuits. In eight animals, a conventional HLM with Dideco Kids oxygenator and Stöckert roller pump (Sorin group, Milan, Italy) was used, and the Aachen MiniHLM was employed in six animals. Outcome parameters were hemolysis and blood gas analysis including lactate. The rabbits were anesthetized, and a standard median sternotomy was performed. The ascending aorta and the right atrium were cannulated. After initiating cardiopulmonary bypass, the aorta was cross-clamped, and cardiac arrest was induced by blood cardioplegia. Blood samples for hemolysis and blood gas analysis were drawn before, during, and after cardiopulmonary bypass. After 1 h aortic clamp time, all animals were weaned from cardiopulmonary bypass. Blood gas analysis revealed adequate oxygenation and perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass, irrespective of the employed perfusion system. The use of the Aachen MiniHLM resulted in a statistically significant reduced decrease in fibrinogen during cardiopulmonary bypass. A trend revealing a reduced increase in free hemoglobin during bypass in the MiniHLM group could also be observed. This newly developed Aachen MiniHLM with low priming volume, reduced hemolysis, and excellent gas transfer (O(2) and CO(2)) may reduce circuit-induced complications during heart surgery in neonates.

  20. Effects of Local Heart Irradiation in a Glutathione S-Transferase Alpha 4-Null Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerma, Marjan; Singh, Preeti; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Tripathi, Preeti; Sharma, Sunil; Singh, Sharda P

    2015-06-01

    Glutathione S-transferase alpha 4 (GSTA4-4) is one of the enzymes responsible for the removal of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), an electrophilic product of lipid peroxidation in cellular membranes during oxidative stress. 4-HNE is a direct activator of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), a transcription factor with many target genes encoding antioxidant and anti-electrophile enzymes. We have previously shown that Gsta4-null mice on a 129/Sv background exhibited increased activity of Nrf2 in the heart. Here we examined the sensitivity of this Gsta4-null mouse model towards cardiac function and structure loss due to local heart irradiation. Male Gsta4-null and wild-type mice were exposed to a single X-ray dose of 18 Gy to the heart. Six months after irradiation, immunohistochemical staining for respiratory complexes 2 and 5 indicated that radiation exposure had caused most pronounced alterations in mitochondrial morphology in Gsta4-null mice. On the other hand, wild-type mice showed a decline in cardiac function and an increase in plasma levels of troponin-I, while no such changes were observed in Gsta4-null mice. Radiation-induced Nrf2-target gene expression only in Gsta4-null mice. In conclusion, although loss of GSTA4-4 led to enhanced susceptibility of cardiac mitochondria to radiation-induced loss of morphology, cardiac function was preserved in Gsta4-null mice. We propose that this protection against cardiac function loss may occur, at least in part, by upregulation of the Nrf2 pathway.

  1. 3D engineered cardiac tissue models of human heart disease: learning more from our mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralphe, J Carter; de Lange, Willem J

    2013-02-01

    Mouse engineered cardiac tissue constructs (mECTs) are a new tool available to study human forms of genetic heart disease within the laboratory. The cultured strips of cardiac cells generate physiologic calcium transients and twitch force, and respond to electrical pacing and adrenergic stimulation. The mECT can be made using cells from existing mouse models of cardiac disease, providing a robust readout of contractile performance and allowing a rapid assessment of genotype-phenotype correlations and responses to therapies. mECT represents an efficient and economical extension to the existing tools for studying cardiac physiology. Human ECTs generated from iPSCMs represent the next logical step for this technology and offer significant promise of an integrated, fully human, cardiac tissue model.

  2. Solid Dynamic Models for Analysis of Stress and Strain in Human Hearts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu Guan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a solid model based on four-dimensional trivariate B-spline for strain and stress analysis of ventricular myocardium. With a series of processing steps in the four-dimensional medical images, the feature points of ventricular inner and outer wall are obtained. A B-spline surface is then used to build the dynamic deformation model of the myocardial walls. With such a surface model, a hexahedron control mesh can be constructed by sweeping the cloud data, and the ventricular solid model is built by fitting the trivariate B-spline parameters. Based on these models, a method of isogeometric analysis can be applied to calculate the stress and strain continuously distributed in the ventricle. The model is represented smoothly in the cylindrical coordinate system and is easy to measure myocardium dynamics for finding abnormal motion. Experiments are carried out for comparing the stress and strain distribution. It is found that the solid model can determine ventricular dynamics which can well reflect the deformation distribution in the heart and imply early clues of cardiac diseases.

  3. 76 FR 18472 - Medicare Program; Revisions to the Durable Medical Equipment, Prosthetics, Orthotics, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-04

    ... the Act. Prosthetic devices are defined in this section of the Act as ``devices (other than dental... lens.'' Other examples of prosthetic devices include cardiac pacemakers, cochlear implants,...

  4. A new automated method for analysis of gated-SPECT images based on a three-dimensional heart shaped model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomsky, Milan; Richter, Jens; Johansson, Lena

    2005-01-01

    A new automated method for quantification of left ventricular function from gated-single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images has been developed. The method for quantification of cardiac function (CAFU) is based on a heart shaped model and the active shape algorithm. The model...

  5. Prosthetic knee design by simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollerbach, K; Hollister, A

    1999-07-30

    Although 150,000 total knee replacement surgeries are performed annually in North America, current designs of knee prostheses have mechanical problems that include a limited range of motion, abnormal gait patterns, patellofemoral joint dysfunction, implant loosening or subsidence, and excessive wear. These problems fall into three categories: failure to reproduce normal joint kinematics, which results in altered limb function; bone-implant interface failure; and material failure. Modern computer technology can be used to design, prototype, and test new total knee implants. The design team uses the full range of CAD-CAM to design and produce implant prototypes for mechanical and clinical testing. Closer approximation of natural knee kinematics and kinetics is essential for improved patient function and diminished implant loads. Current knee replacement designs are based on 19th Century theories that the knee moves about a variable axis of rotation. Recent research has shown, however, that knee motion occurs about two fixed, offset axes of rotation. These aces are not perpendicular to the long axes of the bones or to each other, and the axes do not intersect. Bearing surfaces of mechanisms that move about axes of rotation are surfaces of revolution of those axes which advanced CAD technology can produce. Solids with surfaces of revolution for the two axes of rotation for the knee have been made using an HP9000 workstation and Structural Ideas Master Series CAD software at ArthroMotion. The implant's CAD model should closely replicate movements of the normal knee. The knee model will have a range of flexion-extension (FE) from -5 to 120 degrees. Movements include varus, valgus, internal and external rotation, as well as flexion and extension. The patellofemoral joint is aligned perpendicular to the FE axis and replicates the natural joint more closely than those of existing prostheses. The bearing surfaces will be more congruent than current designs and should

  6. Early biomarkers of doxorubicin-induced heart injury in a mouse model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, Varsha G., E-mail: varsha.desai@fda.hhs.gov [Personalized Medicine Branch, Division of Systems Biology, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Kwekel, Joshua C.; Vijay, Vikrant; Moland, Carrie L. [Personalized Medicine Branch, Division of Systems Biology, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Herman, Eugene H. [Toxicology and Pharmacology Branch, Developmental Therapeutics Program, Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis, The National Cancer Institute, 9609 Medical Center Drive, Rockville, MD 20850-9734 (United States); Lee, Taewon [Department of Mathematics, Korea University, Sejong, Chungnam 339-700 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Tao [Personalized Medicine Branch, Division of Systems Biology, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Lewis, Sherry M. [Office of Scientific Coordination, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Davis, Kelly J.; Muskhelishvili, Levan [Toxicologic Pathology Associates, National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Kerr, Susan [Arkansas Heart Hospital, Little Rock, AR 72211 (United States); Fuscoe, James C. [Personalized Medicine Branch, Division of Systems Biology, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Cardiac troponins, which are used as myocardial injury markers, are released in plasma only after tissue damage has occurred. Therefore, there is a need for identification of biomarkers of earlier events in cardiac injury to limit the extent of damage. To accomplish this, expression profiling of 1179 unique microRNAs (miRNAs) was performed in a chronic cardiotoxicity mouse model developed in our laboratory. Male B6C3F{sub 1} mice were injected intravenously with 3 mg/kg doxorubicin (DOX; an anti-cancer drug), or saline once a week for 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 weeks, resulting in cumulative DOX doses of 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 mg/kg, respectively. Mice were euthanized a week after the last dose. Cardiac injury was evidenced in mice exposed to 18 mg/kg and higher cumulative DOX dose whereas examination of hearts by light microscopy revealed cardiac lesions at 24 mg/kg DOX. Also, 24 miRNAs were differentially expressed in mouse hearts, with the expression of 1, 1, 2, 8, and 21 miRNAs altered at 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 mg/kg DOX, respectively. A pro-apoptotic miR-34a was the only miRNA that was up-regulated at all cumulative DOX doses and showed a significant dose-related response. Up-regulation of miR-34a at 6 mg/kg DOX may suggest apoptosis as an early molecular change in the hearts of DOX-treated mice. At 12 mg/kg DOX, up-regulation of miR-34a was associated with down-regulation of hypertrophy-related miR-150; changes observed before cardiac injury. These findings may lead to the development of biomarkers of earlier events in DOX-induced cardiotoxicity that occur before the release of cardiac troponins. - Highlights: • Upregulation of miR-34a before doxorubicin-induced cardiac tissue injury • Apoptosis might be an early event in mouse heart during doxorubicin treatment. • Expression of miR-150 declined before doxorubicin-induced cardiac tissue injury.

  7. Orthopedic Prosthetic Infections: Plastic Surgery Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meaike, Jesse D; Kaufman, Matthew G; Izaddoost, Shayan A

    2016-05-01

    Orthopedic prosthetic infections are potentially devastating complications. Plastic surgeons are frequently consulted to aid in the management of the soft tissue defects that are created by these infections. A review of the existing literature was performed to identify established treatment methods for soft tissue coverage of orthopedic hardware infections for a variety of anatomic locations. The following treatment guidelines and soft tissue reconstructive options were identified as viable options for the management of exposed or infected orthopedic hardware. This review provides descriptions of the various soft tissue reconstructive options available as well as adjunctive treatment methods.

  8. Injectible bodily prosthetics employing methacrylic copolymer gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallapragada, Surya K.; Anderson, Brian C.

    2007-02-27

    The present invention provides novel block copolymers as structural supplements for injectible bodily prosthetics employed in medical or cosmetic procedures. The invention also includes the use of such block copolymers as nucleus pulposus replacement materials for the treatment of degenerative disc disorders and spinal injuries. The copolymers are constructed by polymerization of a tertiary amine methacrylate with either a (poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(propylene oxide)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) polymer, such as the commercially available Pluronic.RTM. polymers, or a poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether polymer.

  9. Devising the prosthetic prescription and typical examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passero, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    Limb deficiency has a significant impact on the involved person, with upper limb absence presenting a materially different set of issues than lower limb absence. The primary objectives in fitting a patient with a prosthesis are to enhance their independence in performing daily activities, and to improve their quality of life. For lower limb absence, the primary issues are safety, stability, and the ability to ambulate in a manner consistent with their overall health. The primary objectives in prescribing upper limb prosthetics are function, durability, appearance, comfort, and usability of the device. This article discusses the nuances associated with managing these patients.

  10. Divergent electrophysiologic profile of fluconazole and voriconazole in an experimental whole-heart model of proarrhythmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frommeyer, Gerrit; Fischer, Christina; Lange, Philipp S; Leitz, Patrick; Fehr, Michael; Bogossian, Harilaos; Milberg, Peter; Eckardt, Lars

    2016-04-05

    In several case reports a prolongation of the QT-interval and even proarrhythmic effects of fluconazole and voriconazole were reported. The aim of the present study was to investigate if application of fluconazole or voriconazole has the potential to provoke polymorphic ventricular tachycardia in a sensitive model of proarrhythmia. In female rabbits, fluconazole (10, 30 and 50 µM, n=6) and voriconazole (10, 30 and 50 µM, n=6) were infused after obtaining baseline data. Eight endocardial and epicardial monophasic action potentials and a simultaneously recorded 12-lead ECG showed a significant QT prolongation after application of fluconazole as compared with baseline (10 µM:+12 ms, 30 µM:+22 ms, 50 µM:+37 ms; Pfluconazole induced a significant increase (30 µM:+15 ms, 50 µM:+16 ms; Pfluconazole led to the reproducible induction of EADs in 4 of 6 hearts and polymorphic ventricular tachycardia in 3 of 6 hearts (36 episodes). In the present study, voriconazole demonstrated a safe electrophysiologic profile despite significant QT prolongation. In contrast, fluconazole led to a more marked prolongation of myocardial repolarization combined with a more marked increase of dispersion of repolarization. These results imply that application of fluconazole might be torsadogenic and the QT-interval should be closely monitored.

  11. Age-dependent diastolic heart failure in an in vivo Drosophila model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, Matthew P; Peters, Christian J; Zhou, Shiwei; Williams, Hannah H; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh Nung

    2017-01-01

    While the signals and complexes that coordinate the heartbeat are well established, how the heart maintains its electromechanical rhythm over a lifetime remains an open question with significant implications to human health. Reasoning that this homeostatic challenge confronts all pulsatile organs, we developed a high resolution imaging and analysis toolset for measuring cardiac function in intact, unanesthetized Drosophila melanogaster. We demonstrate that, as in humans, normal aging primarily manifests as defects in relaxation (diastole) while preserving contractile performance. Using this approach, we discovered that a pair of two-pore potassium channel (K2P) subunits, largely dispensable early in life, are necessary for terminating contraction (systole) in aged animals, where their loss culminates in fibrillatory cardiac arrest. As the pumping function of its heart is acutely dispensable for survival, Drosophila represents a uniquely accessible model for understanding the signaling networks maintaining cardiac performance during normal aging. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20851.001 PMID:28328397

  12. Prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by Acinetobacter calcoaceticus subsp. lwoffi.

    OpenAIRE

    Weinberger, I. (Ingeburg); Davidson, E.; Rotenberg, Z; Fuchs, J; Agmon, J

    1987-01-01

    Acinetobacter spp. are uncommon etiologic agents of prosthetic valve endocarditis. Two patients with Acinetobacter calcoaceticus subsp. lwoffi prosthetic valve endocarditis are described. The patients were successfully treated with antibiotics (cefotaxime sodium and gentamicin sulfate); thus, we suggest medical treatment rather than early valve replacement in this particular type of infection.

  13. Prosthetic Rehabilitation in Children: An Alternative Clinical Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nádia Carolina Teixeira Marques

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Complete and partial removable dentures have been used successfully in numerous patients with oligodontia and/or anodontia. However, there is little information in the literature regarding the principles and guidelines to prosthetic rehabilitation for growing children. This case report describes the management of a young child with oligodontia as well as the treatment planning and the prosthetic rehabilitation technique.

  14. Stiffness and hysteresis properties of some prosthetic feet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Jaarsveld, H.W.L.; Grootenboer, H.J.; de Vries, J.; Koopman, Hubertus F.J.M.

    1990-01-01

    A prosthetic foot is an important element of a prosthesis, although it is not always fully recognized that the properties of the foot, along with the prosthetic knee joint and the socket, are in part responsible for the stability and metabolic energy cost during walking. The stiffness and the hyster

  15. Raoultella ornithinolytica: An unusual pathogen for prosthetic joint infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piseth Seng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We herein report the first case of a prosthetic joint infection caused by Raoultella ornithinolytica in an immunocompetent patient. The clinical outcome was favorable after a two-stage prosthetic exchange and a six-month course of antimicrobial therapy.

  16. Stiffness and hysteresis properties of some prosthetic feet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaarsveld, van H.W.L.; Grootenboer, H.J.; Vries, de J.; Koopman, H.F.J.M.

    1990-01-01

    A prosthetic foot is an important element of a prosthesis, although it is not always fully recognized that the properties of the foot, along with the prosthetic knee joint and the socket, are in part responsible for the stability and metabolic energy cost during walking. The stiffness and the hyst

  17. Prosthetic prescription in the Netherlands : an interview with clinical experts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Linde, H; Geertzen, JHB; Hofstad, CJ; Postema, K

    2004-01-01

    In the process of guideline development for prosthetic prescription in the Netherlands the authors made a study of the daily clinical practice of lower limb prosthetics. Besides the evidence-based knowledge from literature the more implicit knowledge from clinical experts is of importance for guidel

  18. Principles of obstacle avoidance with a transfemoral prosthetic limb

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Keeken, Helco G.; Vrieling, Aline H.; Hof, At L.; Postema, Klaas; Otten, Bert

    2012-01-01

    In this study, conditions that enable a prosthetic knee flexion strategy in transfemoral amputee subjects during obstacle avoidance were investigated. This study explored the hip torque principle and the static ground principle as object avoidance strategies. A prosthetic limb simulator device was u

  19. Rate control management of atrial fibrillation: may a mathematical model suggest an ideal heart rate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Anselmino

    Full Text Available Despite the routine prescription of rate control therapy for atrial fibrillation (AF, clinical evidence demonstrating a heart rate target is lacking. Aim of the present study was to run a mathematical model simulating AF episodes with a different heart rate (HR to predict hemodynamic parameters for each situation.The lumped model, representing the pumping heart together with systemic and pulmonary circuits, was run to simulate AF with HR of 50, 70, 90, 110 and 130 bpm, respectively.Left ventricular pressure increased by 57%, from 33.92±37.56 mmHg to 53.15±47.56 mmHg, and mean systemic arterial pressure increased by 27%, from 82.66±14.04 mmHg to 105.3±7.6 mmHg, at the 50 and 130 bpm simulations, respectively. Stroke volume (from 77.45±8.50 to 39.09±8.08 mL, ejection fraction (from 61.10±4.40 to 39.32±5.42% and stroke work (SW, from 0.88±0.04 to 0.58±0.09 J decreased by 50, 36 and 34%, at the 50 and 130 bpm simulations, respectively. In addition, oxygen consumption indexes (rate pressure product - RPP, tension time index per minute - TTI/min, and pressure volume area per minute - PVA/min increased from the 50 to the 130 bpm simulation, respectively, by 186% (from 5598±1939 to 15995±3219 mmHg/min, 56% (from 2094±265 to 3257±301 mmHg s/min and 102% (from 57.99±17.90 to 117.4±26.0 J/min. In fact, left ventricular efficiency (SW/PVA decreased from 80.91±2.91% at 50 bpm to 66.43±3.72% at the 130 bpm HR simulation.Awaiting compulsory direct clinical evidences, the present mathematical model suggests that lower HRs during permanent AF relates to improved hemodynamic parameters, cardiac efficiency, and lower oxygen consumption.

  20. SUMO-1 gene transfer improves cardiac function in a large-animal model of heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilemann, Lisa; Lee, Ahyoung; Ishikawa, Kiyotake; Aguero, Jaume; Rapti, Kleopatra; Santos-Gallego, Carlos; Kohlbrenner, Erik; Fish, Kenneth M; Kho, Changwon; Hajjar, Roger J

    2013-11-13

    Recently, the impact of small ubiquitin-related modifier 1 (SUMO-1) on the regulation and preservation of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium adenosine triphosphatase (SERCA2a) function was discovered. The amount of myocardial SUMO-1 is decreased in failing hearts, and its knockdown results in severe heart failure (HF) in mice. In a previous study, we showed that SUMO-1 gene transfer substantially improved cardiac function in a murine model of pressure overload-induced HF. Toward clinical translation, we evaluated in this study the effects of SUMO-1 gene transfer in a swine model of ischemic HF. One month after balloon occlusion of the proximal left anterior descending artery followed by reperfusion, the animals were randomized to receive either SUMO-1 at two doses, SERCA2a, or both by adeno-associated vector type 1 (AAV1) gene transfer via antegrade coronary infusion. Control animals received saline infusions. After gene delivery, there was a significant increase in the maximum rate of pressure rise [dP/dt(max)] that was most pronounced in the group that received both SUMO-1 and SERCA2a. The left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) improved after high-dose SUMO-1 with or without SERCA2a gene delivery, whereas there was a decline in LVEF in the animals receiving saline. Furthermore, the dilatation of LV volumes was prevented in the treatment groups. SUMO-1 gene transfer therefore improved cardiac function and stabilized LV volumes in a large-animal model of HF. These results support the critical role of SUMO-1 in SERCA2a function and underline the therapeutic potential of SUMO-1 for HF patients.

  1. Pharmacodynamic models for the cardiovascular effects of moxonidine in patients with congestive heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brynne, Lena; McNay, John L; Schaefer, Hans G; Swedberg, Karl; Wiltse, Curtis G; Karlsson, Mats O

    2001-01-01

    Aims To assess the pharmacodynamics of moxonidine in patients with functional NYHA Class II-III congestive heart failure (CHF). Methods A parallel population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) analysis was performed to assess the effect of moxonidine (0.1, 0.2, 0.3 mg twice daily) and placebo treatment on plasma noradrenaline (NA) levels, standing systolic blood pressure (SBP), and heart rate (HR) over 12 weeks in 97 patients with CHF using a parallel group design with dose escalation. A sequential analysis was also developed, where the relative changes in NA concentration were related to both SBP and HR. Results In the parallel PD analysis, an effect delay was shown for all three end points (NA, SBP, and HR). An inhibitory Emax model was used to characterize the concentration-effect relationships. For SBP and HR, the EC50 value increased over time. For NA, there was a positive baseline drift over the 12 weeks; this was interpreted as disease progression. Moxonidine delayed this increase by 9.8 weeks. For SBP, there was a circadian pattern at baseline. In the sequential PD analysis, the relationship between the drug response (NA) and SBP or HR was best described by an inhibitory Emax model. No effect delays between the response and effects were found. Conclusions Effects of moxonidine on NA, SBP, and HR could be quantified by an effect compartment model in the presence of disease progression and circadian variations. Disease progression, as judged by increasing NA levels with time, was delayed by moxonidine. A direct relationship was found between NA and SBP/HR. PMID:11167663

  2. Contribution of prosthetic treatment considerations for dental extractions of permanent teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel Fernández-Barrera

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Tooth loss is an easily identifiable outcome that summarizes a complex suite of factors in an individual’s history of dental disease and its treatment by dental services over a lifetime. Assessment of overall tooth loss data is essential for epidemiologically evaluating the adequacy of dental care provided at a systems level, as well as for placing in context tooth loss for non-disease causes. For example, when derived from prosthetic treatment planning, the latter may unfortunately lead to some teeth being extracted (pulled for the sake of better comprehensive clinical results. The objective of the present manuscript was to identify the contribution to overall tooth loss, by extraction of permanent teeth because of prosthetic treatment reasons. Material and Methods. A cross-sectional study included sex, age, total number of extractions performed by subject, sextant (anterior vs. posterior, group of teeth (incisors, canines, premolars and molars, upper or lower arch, and the main reason underlying extraction (extraction for any reason vs. prosthetic treatment, in patients 18 years of age and older seeking care at a dental school clinic in Mexico. A multivariate logistic regression model was generated. Results. A total of 749 teeth were extracted in 331 patients; 161 teeth (21.5% of total were extracted for explicit prosthetic treatment indications. As age increased, the likelihood of having an extraction for prosthetic reasons increased 3% (OR = 1.03, p < 0.001. Women (OR = 1.57, p < 0.05 were more likely to be in this situation, and molars (OR = 2.70, p < 0.001 were most at risk. As the total number of extractions increased, the risk of having an extraction for prosthetic reasons decreased (OR = 0.94, p < 0.05. Conclusions. A significant amount (21.5% of the extractions of permanent teeth were performed for prosthetic reasons in this dental school clinical environment; age, sex, type of tooth, and the total number of extractions

  3. Experimental and failure analysis of the prosthetic finger joint implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Sanjiv H.

    Small joint replacement arthroplasty of the hand is a well accepted surgical procedure to restore function and cosmesis in an individual with a crippled hand. Silicone elastomers have been used as prosthetic material in various small hand joints for well over three decades. Although the clinical science aspects of silicone elastomer failure are well known, the physical science aspects of prosthetic failure are scant and vague. In the following thesis, using both an animal model, and actual retrieved specimens which have failed in human service, experimental and failure analysis of silicone finger joints are presented. Fractured surfaces of retrieved silicone trapezial implants, and silicone finger joint implants were studied with both FESEM and SEM; the mode of failure for silicone trapezium is by wear polishing, whereas the finger joint implants failed either by fatigue fracture or tearing of the elastomer, or a combination of both. Thermal analysis revealed that the retrieved elastomer implants maintained its viscoelastic properties throughout the service period. In order to provide for a more functional and physiologic arthroplasty a novel finger joint (Rolamite prosthesis) is proposed using more recently developed thermoplastic polymers. The following thesis also addresses the outcome of the experimental studies of the Rolamite prosthesis in a rabbit animal model, in addition to the failure analysis of the thermoplastic polymers while in service in an in vivo synovial environment. Results of retrieved Rolamite specimens suggest that the use for thermoplastic elastomers such as block copolymer based elastomers in a synovial environment such as a mammalian joint may very well be limited.

  4. Effects of Family-Center Empowerment Model on the Lifestyle of Heart Failure Patients: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Rakhshan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Cardiovascular diseases are the most prevalent disorders in developed countries and heart failure is the major one among them. This disease is caused by numerous factors and one of the most considerable risk factors is unhealthy lifestyle. So the aim of this research was to study the effect of family-center empowerment model on the lifestyle of heart failure patients. Methods: This is a randomized controlled clinical trial on 70 heart failure patients referring to Hazrate Fatemeh heart clinic in Shiraz. After convenience sampling the patients were divided into two control and intervention groups using block randomization Method. The intervention based on family-center empowerment model was performed during 5 sessions. Research tools are lifestyle and demographic information questionnaires. Results: Both intervention and control groups were similar regarding their demographic information (P>0.001.Before the intervention on lifestyle, all measures of the two groups were equal (P>0.001 but after the intervention; statistically significant differences were reported in all dimensions of lifestyle, the total lifestyle score in the intervention group was 70.09±16.38 and in the control group -6.03±16.36 (P<0.001. Conclusion: Performing the family-center empowerment model for heart failure patients is practically possible, leading to improvement or refinement of their and their families’ lifestyle.

  5. Computational modelling for congenital heart disease: how far are we from clinical translation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biglino, Giovanni; Capelli, Claudio; Bruse, Jan; Bosi, Giorgia M; Taylor, Andrew M; Schievano, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Computational models of congenital heart disease (CHD) have become increasingly sophisticated over the last 20 years. They can provide an insight into complex flow phenomena, allow for testing devices into patient-specific anatomies (pre-CHD or post-CHD repair) and generate predictive data. This has been applied to different CHD scenarios, including patients with single ventricle, tetralogy of Fallot, aortic coarctation and transposition of the great arteries. Patient-specific simulations have been shown to be informative for preprocedural planning in complex cases, allowing for virtual stent deployment. Novel techniques such as statistical shape modelling can further aid in the morphological assessment of CHD, risk stratification of patients and possible identification of new ‘shape biomarkers’. Cardiovascular statistical shape models can provide valuable insights into phenomena such as ventricular growth in tetralogy of Fallot, or morphological aortic arch differences in repaired coarctation. In a constant move towards more realistic simulations, models can also account for multiscale phenomena (eg, thrombus formation) and importantly include measures of uncertainty (ie, CIs around simulation results). While their potential to aid understanding of CHD, surgical/procedural decision-making and personalisation of treatments is undeniable, important elements are still lacking prior to clinical translation of computational models in the field of CHD, that is, large validation studies, cost-effectiveness evaluation and establishing possible improvements in patient outcomes. PMID:27798056

  6. Increased sodium/calcium exchanger activity enhances beta-adrenergic-mediated increase in heart rate: Whole-heart study in a homozygous sodium/calcium exchanger overexpressor mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaese, Sven; Bögeholz, Nils; Pauls, Paul; Dechering, Dirk; Olligs, Jan; Kölker, Katharina; Badawi, Sascha; Frommeyer, Gerrit; Pott, Christian; Eckardt, Lars

    2017-08-01

    The cardiac sodium/calcium (Na(+)/Ca(2+)) exchanger (NCX) contributes to diastolic depolarization in cardiac pacemaker cells. Increased NCX activity has been found in heart failure and atrial fibrillation. The influence of increased NCX activity on resting heart rate, beta-adrenergic-mediated increase in heart rate, and cardiac conduction properties is unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of NCX overexpression in a homozygous transgenic whole-heart mouse model (NCX-OE) on sinus and AV nodal function. Langendorff-perfused, beating whole hearts of NCX-OE and the corresponding wild-type (WT) were studied ± isoproterenol (ISO; 0.2 μM). Epicardial ECG, AV nodal Wenckebach cycle length (AVN-WCL), and retrograde AVN-WCL were obtained. At baseline, basal heart rate was unaltered between NCX-OE and WT (WT: cycle length [CL] 177.6 ± 40.0 ms, no. of hearts [n] = 20; NCX-OE: CL 185.9 ± 30.5 ms, n = 18; P = .21). In the presence of ISO, NCX-OE exhibited a significantly higher heart rate compared to WT (WT: CL 133.4 ± 13.4 ms, n = 20; NCX-OE: CL 117.7 ± 14.2 ms, n = 18; P heart rate. Mechanistically, increased NCX inward mode activity may promote acceleration of diastolic depolarization in sinus nodal pacemaker cells, thus enhancing chronotropy in NCX-OE. These findings suggest a novel potential therapeutic target for heart rate control in the presence of increased NCX activity, such as heart failure. Copyright © 2017 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. 3D reconstruction of the structure of a residual limb for customising the design of a prosthetic socket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuxian, Zheng; Wanhua, Zhao; Bingheng, Lu

    2005-01-01

    Aiming at overcoming the limitations of the plaster-casting method in traditional prosthetic socket fabrication, the idea of reconstructing the 3D models for bones and skin of the residual limb is proposed. Given the two-dimensional obtained image through CT scanning, using image processing and reverse engineering techniques, the 3D solid model of the residual limb can be successfully reconstructed. The new approach can reproduce both the internal and the external structure of the residual limb. It can moreover avoid making a positive mould by the way of manual modifications. In addition to this, it can provide a scientific basis for the individualization of prosthetic socket design.

  8. The use of underactuation in prosthetic grasping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Kyberd

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Underactuation as a method of driving prosthetic hands has a long history. The pragmatic requirements of such a device to be light enough to be worn and used regularly have meant that any multi degree of freedom prosthetic hand must have fewer actuators than the usable degrees of freedom. Aesthetics ensures that while the hand needs five fingers, five actuators have considerable mass, and only in recent years has it even been possible to construct a practical anthropomorphic hand with five motors. Thus there is an important trade off as to which fingers are driven, and which joints on which fingers are actuated, and how the forces are distributed to create a functional device. This paper outlines some of the historical solutions created for this problem and includes those designs of recent years that are now beginning to be used in the commercial environment.

    This paper was presented at the IFToMM/ASME International Workshop on Underactuated Grasping (UG2010, 19 August 2010, Montréal, Canada.

  9. The Prosthetic Workflow in the Digital Era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Tordiglione

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this retrospective study was to clinically evaluate the benefits of adopting a full digital workflow for the implementation of fixed prosthetic restorations on natural teeth. To evaluate the effectiveness of these protocols, treatment plans were drawn up for 15 patients requiring rehabilitation of one or more natural teeth. All the dental impressions were taken using a Planmeca PlanScan® (Planmeca OY, Helsinki, Finland intraoral scanner, which provided digital casts on which the restorations were digitally designed using Exocad® (Exocad GmbH, Germany, 2010 software and fabricated by CAM processing on 5-axis milling machines. A total of 28 single crowns were made from monolithic zirconia, 12 vestibular veneers from lithium disilicate, and 4 three-quarter vestibular veneers with palatal extension. While the restorations were applied, the authors could clinically appreciate the excellent match between the digitally produced prosthetic design and the cemented prostheses, which never required any occlusal or proximal adjustment. Out of all the restorations applied, only one exhibited premature failure and was replaced with no other complications or need for further scanning. From the clinical experience gained using a full digital workflow, the authors can confirm that these work processes enable the fabrication of clinically reliable restorations, with all the benefits that digital methods bring to the dentist, the dental laboratory, and the patient.

  10. Is the Prosthetic Homologue Necessary for Embodiment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornfeld, Chelsea; Swanston, Michelle; Cassella, Joseph; Beasley, Casey; Green, Jacob; Moshayev, Yonatan; Wininger, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Embodiment is the process by which patients with limb loss come to accept their peripheral device as a natural extension of self. However, there is little guidance as to how exacting the prosthesis must be in order for embodiment to take place: is it necessary for the prosthetic hand to look just like the absent hand? Here, we describe a protocol for testing whether an individual would select a hand that looks like their own from among a selection of five hands, and whether the hand selection (regardless of homology) is consistent across multiple exposures to the same (but reordered) set of candidate hands. Pilot results using healthy volunteers reveals that hand selection is only modestly consistent, and that selection of the prosthetic homologue is atypical (61 of 192 total exposures). Our protocol can be executed in minutes, and makes use of readily available equipment and softwares. We present both a face-to-face and a virtual protocol, for maximum flexibility of implementation. PMID:28066228

  11. The Prosthetic Workflow in the Digital Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Franco, Michele; Bosetti, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to clinically evaluate the benefits of adopting a full digital workflow for the implementation of fixed prosthetic restorations on natural teeth. To evaluate the effectiveness of these protocols, treatment plans were drawn up for 15 patients requiring rehabilitation of one or more natural teeth. All the dental impressions were taken using a Planmeca PlanScan® (Planmeca OY, Helsinki, Finland) intraoral scanner, which provided digital casts on which the restorations were digitally designed using Exocad® (Exocad GmbH, Germany, 2010) software and fabricated by CAM processing on 5-axis milling machines. A total of 28 single crowns were made from monolithic zirconia, 12 vestibular veneers from lithium disilicate, and 4 three-quarter vestibular veneers with palatal extension. While the restorations were applied, the authors could clinically appreciate the excellent match between the digitally produced prosthetic design and the cemented prostheses, which never required any occlusal or proximal adjustment. Out of all the restorations applied, only one exhibited premature failure and was replaced with no other complications or need for further scanning. From the clinical experience gained using a full digital workflow, the authors can confirm that these work processes enable the fabrication of clinically reliable restorations, with all the benefits that digital methods bring to the dentist, the dental laboratory, and the patient. PMID:27829834

  12. Is the prosthetic homologue necessary for embodiment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea Dornfeld

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Embodiment is the process by which patients with limb loss come to accept their peripheral device as a natural extension of self. However, there is little guidance as to how exacting the prosthesis must be in order for embodiment to take place: is it necessary for the prosthetic hand to look just like the absent hand? Here, we describe a protocol for testing whether an individual would select a hand that looks like their own from among a selection of 5 hands, and whether the hand selection (regardless of homology is consistent across multiple exposures to the same (but reordered set of candidate hands. Pilot results using healthy volunteers reveals that hand selection is only modestly consistent, and that selection of the prosthetic homologue is atypical (61 of 192 total exposures. Our protocol can be executed in minutes, and makes use of readily available equipment and softwares. We present both a face-to-face and a virtual protocol, for maximum flexibility of implementation.

  13. Surgical and prosthetic treatment for microphthalmia syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wavreille, O; François Fiquet, C; Abdelwahab, O; Laumonier, E; Wolber, A; Guerreschi, P; Pellerin, P

    2013-03-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the long-term outcomes of prosthetic treatment and orbital expansion in the management of microphthalmia syndromes. We did a retrospective single-centre study of all cases of microphthalmia treated between 1989 and 2010. The patients were divided into three groups: isolated microphthalmia, microphthalmia associated with micro-orbitism, and complex microphthalmia syndrome. To evaluate the results a score was computed for each patient by assessing the length of the palpebral fissure, the depth of the conjunctival fornix, and local complications together with an evaluation of the satisfaction of patients and their families. Forty-four children were included (27 boys and 17 girls). Twenty-seven had unilateral microphthalmia (61%) and 17 bilateral microphthalmia (39%). Twelve patients were lost to follow up. The mean duration of follow-up was 12 years (range 4-21). Management involved an ocular conformer in only 31 patients (71%). The treatment was deemed satisfactory in all except 10 children. Surgical treatment with orbital expansion permitted good symmetry of the orbital cavities with a final mean difference of 9% (range 3-17) compared with the initial 16.8% (range 13.6-20.3). The prosthetic treatment gives satisfactory results. Despite limited indications and difficult follow-up, our experience emphasises the value of surgical treatment for severe micro-orbitism.

  14. Nitinol for Prosthetic and Orthotic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Emma; Buis, Arjan

    2011-07-01

    As global populations age, conditions such as stroke and diabetes require individuals to use rehabilitation technology for many years to come due to chronic musculoskeletal, sensory, and other physical impairments. One in four males currently aged 45 will experience a stroke within 40 years and will often require access to prolonged rehabilitation. In addition, worldwide, one individual loses a limb every 30 s due to the complications of diabetes. As a result, innovative ideas are required to devise more effective prosthetic and orthotic devices to enhance quality of life. While Nitinol has already found much favor within the biomedical industry, one area, which has not yet exploited its unique properties, is in the field of physical rehabilitation, ranging from prosthetic and orthotic devices to assistive technology such as wheelchairs. Improved intervention capabilities based on materials such as Nitinol have the potential to vastly improve patients' quality of life and in the case of orthoses, may even reduce the severity of the condition over time. It is hoped that this study will spark discussion and interest for the materials community in a field which has yet to be fully exploited.

  15. Engineering 3D bio-artificial heart muscle: the acellular ventricular extracellular matrix model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nikita M; Tao, Ze-Wei; Mohamed, Mohamed A; Hogan, Matt K; Gutierrez, Laura; Birla, Ravi K

    2015-01-01

    Current therapies in left ventricular systolic dysfunction and end-stage heart failure include mechanical assist devices or transplant. The development of a tissue-engineered integrative platform would present a therapeutic option that overcomes the limitations associated with current treatment modalities. This study provides a foundation for the fabrication and preliminary viability of the acellular ventricular extracellular matrix (AVEM) model. Acellular ventricular extracellular matrix was fabricated by culturing 4 million rat neonatal cardiac cells around an excised acellular ventricular segment. Acellular ventricular extracellular matrix generated a maximum spontaneous contractile force of 388.3 μN and demonstrated a Frank-Starling relationship at varying pretensions. Histologic assessment displayed cell cohesion and adhesion within the AVEM as a result of passive cell seeding.

  16. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of left valvular heart diseases during atrial fibrillation

    CERN Document Server

    Scarsoglio, Stefania; Gaita, Fiorenzo; Ridolfi, Luca; Anselmino, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Although atrial fibrillation (AF), a common arrhythmia, frequently presents in patients with underlying valvular disease, its hemodynamic contributions are not fully understood. The present work aimed to computationally study how physical conditions imposed by pathologic valvular anatomy act on AF hemodynamics. We simulated AF with different severity grades of left-sided valvular diseases and compared the cardiovascular effects that they exert during AF, compared to lone AF. The fluid dynamics model used here has been recently validated for lone AF and relies on a lumped parameterization of the four heart chambers, together with the systemic and pulmonary circulation. Three different grades of severity (mild, moderate, severe) were analyzed for each of the four valvulopathies (aortic stenosis, mitral stenosis, aortic regurgitation, mitral regurgitation). Regurgitation was hemodynamically more relevant than stenosis, as the latter led to inefficient cardiac flow, while the former introduced more drastic fluid ...

  17. Low Cardiac Output Leads Hepatic Fibrosis in Right Heart Failure Model Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshitaka Fujimoto

    Full Text Available Hepatic fibrosis progresses with right heart failure, and becomes cardiac cirrhosis in a severe case. Although its causal factor still remains unclear. Here we evaluated the progression of hepatic fibrosis using a pulmonary artery banding (PAB-induced right heart failure model and investigated whether cardiac output (CO is responsible for the progression of hepatic fibrosis.Five-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats divided into the PAB and sham-operated control groups. After 4 weeks from operation, we measured CO by echocardiography, and hepatic fibrosis ratio by pathological examination using a color analyzer. In the PAB group, CO was significantly lower by 48% than that in the control group (78.2±27.6 and 150.1±31.2 ml/min, P<0.01. Hepatic fibrosis ratio and serum hyaluronic acid, an index of hepatic fibrosis, were significantly increased in the PAB group than those in the control group (7.8±1.7 and 1.0±0.2%, P<0.01, 76.2±27.5 and 32.7±7.5 ng/ml, P<0.01. Notably, the degree of hepatic fibrosis significantly correlated a decrease in CO. Immunohistological analysis revealed that hepatic stellate cells were markedly activated in hypoxic areas, and HIF-1α positive hepatic cells were increased in the PAB group. Furthermore, by real-time PCR analyses, transcripts of profibrotic and fibrotic factors (TGF-β1, CTGF, procollargen I, procollargen III, MMP 2, MMP 9, TIMP 1, TIMP 2 were significantly increased in the PAB group. In addition, western blot analyses revealed that the protein level of HIF-1α was significantly increased in the PAB group than that in the control group (2.31±0.84 and 1.0±0.18 arbitrary units, P<0.05.Our study demonstrated that low CO and tissue hypoxia were responsible for hepatic fibrosis in right failure heart model rats.

  18. Beneficial effect of prolonged heme oxygenase 1 activation in a rat model of chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Collino

    2013-07-01

    We and others have previously demonstrated that heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1 induction by acute hemin administration exerts cardioprotective effects. Here, we developed a rat model of heart failure to investigate whether a long-term induction of HO-1 by chronic hemin administration exerted protective effects. Sprague Dawley rats that underwent permanent ligation of the left coronary artery were closely monitored for survival rate analysis and sacrificed on day 28 post-operation. Administration of hemin (4 mg/kg body weight every other day for 4 weeks induced a massive increase in HO-1 expression and activity, as shown by the increased levels of the two main metabolic products of heme degradation, bilirubin and carbon monoxide (CO. These effects were associated with significant improvement in survival and reduced the extension of myocardial damage. The ischemic hearts of the hemin-treated animals displayed reduced oxidative stress and apoptosis in comparison with the non-treated rats, as shown by the decreased levels of lipid peroxidation, free-radical-induced DNA damage, caspase-3 activity and Bax expression. Besides, chronic HO-1 activation suppressed the elevated levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO activity, interleukin 1β (IL-1β production and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα production that were evoked by the ischemic injury, and increased the plasma level of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Interestingly, HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP-IX; 1 mg/kg lowered bilirubin and CO concentrations to control values, thus abolishing all the cardioprotective effects of hemin. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that chronic HO-1 activation by prolonged administration of hemin improves survival and exerts protective effects in a rat model of myocardial ischemia by exerting a potent antioxidant activity and disrupting multiple levels of the apoptotic and inflammatory cascade.

  19. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of left valvular heart diseases during atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarsoglio, Stefania; Saglietto, Andrea; Gaita, Fiorenzo; Ridolfi, Luca; Anselmino, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Although atrial fibrillation (AF), a common arrhythmia, frequently presents in patients with underlying valvular disease, its hemodynamic contributions are not fully understood. The present work aimed to computationally study how physical conditions imposed by pathologic valvular anatomy act on AF hemodynamics. We simulated AF with different severity grades of left-sided valvular diseases and compared the cardiovascular effects that they exert during AF, compared to lone AF. The fluid dynamics model used here has been recently validated for lone AF and relies on a lumped parameterization of the four heart chambers, together with the systemic and pulmonary circulation. The AF modelling involves: (i) irregular, uncorrelated and faster heart rate; (ii) atrial contractility dysfunction. Three different grades of severity (mild, moderate, severe) were analyzed for each of the four valvulopathies (AS, aortic stenosis, MS, mitral stenosis, AR, aortic regurgitation, MR, mitral regurgitation), by varying-through the valve opening angle-the valve area. Regurgitation was hemodynamically more relevant than stenosis, as the latter led to inefficient cardiac flow, while the former introduced more drastic fluid dynamics variation. Moreover, mitral valvulopathies were more significant than aortic ones. In case of aortic valve diseases, proper mitral functioning damps out changes at atrial and pulmonary levels. In the case of mitral valvulopathy, the mitral valve lost its regulating capability, thus hemodynamic variations almost equally affected regions upstream and downstream of the valve. In particular, the present study revealed that both mitral and aortic regurgitation strongly affect hemodynamics, followed by mitral stenosis, while aortic stenosis has the least impact among the analyzed valvular diseases. The proposed approach can provide new mechanistic insights as to which valvular pathologies merit more aggressive treatment of AF. Present findings, if clinically confirmed

  20. Temporal profile of calcineurin phosphatase activity during acute allograft rejection in the heterotopic rat heart transplantation model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karamperis, N; Koefoed-Nielsen, P B; Marcussen, N

    2008-01-01

    if it can be utilized as a pharmacodynamic marker to identify and monitor the rejection process. METHODS: The heterotopic cervical rat heart transplantation model was used (dark Agouti to Lewis). We performed 25 control isogeneic and 46 allogeneic transplantations. Rats were sacrificed at various...... as a pharmacodynamic biomarker of acute allograft rejection in the heterotopic rat heart transplantation model. Further research is required in order to reveal the precise role of CaN during acute allograft rejection....... postoperative time points. CaN activity was measured in isolated peripheral blood and spleen mononuclear cells and in graft heart homogenates. CaN activity was measured as the release of radiolabeled phosphate from a previously phosphorylated 19 amino acid peptide. RESULTS: We have shown that CaN's activity...

  1. Bioartificial heart: a human-sized porcine model--the way ahead.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Weymann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A bioartificial heart is a theoretical alternative to transplantation or mechanical left ventricular support. Native hearts decellularized with preserved architecture and vasculature may provide an acellular tissue platform for organ regeneration. We sought to develop a tissue-engineered whole-heart neoscaffold in human-sized porcine hearts. METHODS: We decellularized porcine hearts (n = 10 by coronary perfusion with ionic detergents in a modified Langendorff circuit. We confirmed decellularization by histology, transmission electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy, quantified residual DNA by spectrophotometry, and evaluated biomechanical stability with ex-vivo left-ventricular pressure/volume studies, all compared to controls. We then mounted the decellularized porcine hearts in a bioreactor and reseeded them with murine neonatal cardiac cells and human umbilical cord derived endothelial cells (HUVEC under simulated physiological conditions. RESULTS: Decellularized hearts lacked intracellular components but retained specific collagen fibers, proteoglycan, elastin and mechanical integrity; quantitative DNA analysis demonstrated a significant reduction of DNA compared to controls (82.6±3.2 ng DNA/mg tissue vs. 473.2±13.4 ng DNA/mg tissue, p<0.05. Recellularized porcine whole-heart neoscaffolds demonstrated re-endothelialization of coronary vasculature and measurable intrinsic myocardial electrical activity at 10 days, with perfused organ culture maintained for up to 3 weeks. CONCLUSIONS: Human-sized decellularized porcine hearts provide a promising tissue-engineering platform that may lead to future clinical strategies in the treatment of heart failure.

  2. Modeling a healthy and a person with heart failure conditions using the object-oriented modeling environment Dymola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinke, Stefanie; Pereira, Carina; Leonhardt, Steffen; Walter, Marian

    2015-10-01

    Several mathematical models of different physiological systems are spread through literature. They serve as tools which improve the understanding of (patho-) physiological processes, may help to meet clinical decisions and can even enhance medical therapies. These models are typically implemented in a signal-flow-oriented simulation environment and focus on the behavior of one specific subsystem. Neglecting other physiological subsystems and using a technical description of the physiology hinders the exchange with and acceptance of clinicians. By contrast, this paper presents a new model implemented in a physical, object-oriented modeling environment which includes the cardiovascular, respiratory and thermoregulatory system. Simulation results for a healthy subject at rest and at the onset of exercise are given, showing the validity of the model. Finally, simulation results showing the interaction of the cardiovascular system with a ventricular assist device in case of heart failure are presented showing the flexibility and mightiness of the model and the simulation environment. Thus, we present a new model including three important physiological systems and one medical device implemented in an innovative simulation environment.

  3. Methods for the development and assessment of atrial fibrillation and heart failure dog models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jon F Urban; Renee L Gerhart; Jason R Krzeszak; Corey R Leet; Linnea R Lentz; Carolyn B McClay

    2011-01-01

    Objective To report Medtronic experiences with the development of animal models for atrial fibrillation(AF)and chronic heart failure(CHF)using high-rate pacing for AF and microemboli for CHF.Methods For the AF model,an atrial lead was attached to a Medtronic Synergy neurostimulator,which was programmed to stimulate at 50 Hz in an on-off duty cycle.Atrial natnuretic peptide(ANP),brain natriuretic peptide(BNP)and N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide(NT-proBNP)wen; assayed at select time points.For CHF model,a serial injection of 90 μm polystyrene microspheres at 62,400 beads/mL(Polybead,Polysciences,Inc.)was performed to induce global ischemia,either with weekly monitoring and embolization schedule(group 1,n = 25)or with biweekly monitoring and emboliation schedule (group 2,n=36).Echocardiograms were used along with ventriculograms and magnetic resonance imaging scans weekly to assess cardiac function and ANP,BNP and NT-proBNP were monitored.Results For the AF model,the days to sustained AF for four animals following surgery were 7,25,21 and 19,respectively; For the CHF model,the days to meet CHF endpoints were 116 in group 1 and 89 in group 2.For both AF and CHF models,NT-proBNP correlated well with the development of disease states.Conclusion Our experience for the development and assessment of AF and CHF dog models may help researchers who are in search for animal model for assessing the safety and efficacy of a device-based therapy.

  4. Follow the heart or the head? The interactive influence model of emotion and cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiayi eLuo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The experience of emotion has a powerful influence on daily-life decision making. Following Plato’s description of emotion and reason as two horses pulling us in opposite directions, modern dual-system models of decision making endorse the antagonism between reason and emotion. Decision making is perceived as the competition between an emotion system that is automatic but prone to error and a reason system that is slow but rational. The reason system (in the head reins in our impulses (from the heart and overrides our snap judgments. However, from Darwin’s evolutionary perspective, emotion is adaptive, guiding us to make sound decisions in uncertainty. In this review, we provide a new model, called The interactive influence model of emotion & cognition, to elaborate the relationship of emotion and reason in decision making. Specifically, in our model, we identify factors that determine when emotions override reason and delineate the type of contexts in which emotions help or hurt decision making. We then illustrate how cognition modulates emotion and how they cooperate to affect decision making.

  5. Follow the heart or the head? The interactive influence model of emotion and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jiayi; Yu, Rongjun

    2015-01-01

    The experience of emotion has a powerful influence on daily-life decision making. Following Plato's description of emotion and reason as two horses pulling us in opposite directions, modern dual-system models of decision making endorse the antagonism between reason and emotion. Decision making is perceived as the competition between an emotion system that is automatic but prone to error and a reason system that is slow but rational. The reason system (in "the head") reins in our impulses (from "the heart") and overrides our snap judgments. However, from Darwin's evolutionary perspective, emotion is adaptive, guiding us to make sound decisions in uncertainty. Here, drawing findings from behavioral economics and neuroeconomics, we provide a new model, labeled "The interactive influence model of emotion and cognition," to elaborate the relationship of emotion and reason in decision making. Specifically, in our model, we identify factors that determine when emotions override reason and delineate the type of contexts in which emotions help or hurt decision making. We then illustrate how cognition modulates emotion and how they cooperate to affect decision making.

  6. Effect of heart rate on CT angiography using the enhanced cardiac model of the 4D NCAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segars, W. P.; Taguchi, K.; Fung, G. S. K.; Fishman, E. K.; Tsui, B. M. W.

    2006-03-01

    We investigate the effect of heart rate on the quality and artifact generation in coronary artery images obtained using multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) with the purpose of finding the optimal time resolution for data acquisition. To perform the study, we used the 4D NCAT phantom, a computer model of the normal human anatomy and cardiac and respiratory motions developed in our laboratory. Although capable of being far more realistic, the 4D NCAT cardiac model was originally designed for low-resolution imaging research, and lacked the anatomical detail to be applicable to high-resolution CT. In this work, we updated the cardiac model to include a more detailed anatomy and physiology based on high-resolution clinical gated MSCT data. To demonstrate its utility in high-resolution dynamic CT imaging research, the enhanced 4D NCAT was then used in a pilot simulation study to investigate the effect of heart rate on CT angiography. The 4D NCAT was used to simulate patients with different heart rates (60-120 beats/minute) and with various cardiac plaques of known size and location within the coronary arteries. For each simulated patient, MSCT projection data was generated with data acquisition windows ranging from 100 to 250 ms centered within the quiet phase (mid-diastole) of the heart using an analytical CT projection algorithm. CT images were reconstructed from the projection data, and the contrast of the plaques was then measured to assess the effect of heart rate and to determine the optimal time resolution required for each case. The 4D NCAT phantom with its realistic model for the cardiac motion was found to provide a valuable tool from which to optimize CT cardiac applications. Our results indicate the importance of optimizing the time resolution with regard to heart rate and plaque location for improved CT images at a reduced patient dose.

  7. SERCA2 Haploinsufficiency in a Mouse Model of Darier Disease Causes a Selective Predisposition to Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Vikram; Lorenz, John N; Lasko, Valerie M; Nieman, Michelle L; Huang, Wei; Wang, Yigang; Wieczorek, David W; Shull, Gary E

    2015-01-01

    Null mutations in one copy of ATP2A2, the gene encoding sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase isoform 2 (SERCA2), cause Darier disease in humans, a skin condition involving keratinocytes. Cardiac function appears to be unimpaired in Darier disease patients, with no evidence that SERCA2 haploinsufficiency itself causes heart disease. However, SERCA2 deficiency is widely considered a contributing factor in heart failure. We therefore analyzed Atp2a2 heterozygous mice to determine whether SERCA2 haploinsufficiency can exacerbate specific heart disease conditions. Despite reduced SERCA2a levels in heart, Atp2a2 heterozygous mice resembled humans in exhibiting normal cardiac physiology. When subjected to hypothyroidism or crossed with a transgenic model of reduced myofibrillar Ca(2+)-sensitivity, SERCA2 deficiency caused no enhancement of the disease state. However, when combined with a transgenic model of increased myofibrillar Ca(2+)-sensitivity, SERCA2 haploinsufficiency caused rapid onset of hypertrophy, decompensation, and death. These effects were associated with reduced expression of the antiapoptotic Hax1, increased levels of the proapoptotic genes Chop and Casp12, and evidence of perturbations in energy metabolism. These data reveal myofibrillar Ca(2+)-sensitivity to be an important determinant of the cardiac effects of SERCA2 haploinsufficiency and raise the possibility that Darier disease patients are more susceptible to heart failure under certain conditions.

  8. Bending and Twisting the Embryonic Heart: A Computational Model for C-Looping Based on Realistic Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfei eShi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The morphogenetic process of cardiac looping transforms the straight heart tube into a curved tube that resembles the shape of the future four-chambered heart. Although great progress has been made in identifying the molecular and genetic factors involved in looping, the physical mechanisms that drive this process have remained poorly understood. Recent work, however, has shed new light on this complicated problem. After briefly reviewing the current state of knowledge, we propose a relatively comprehensive hypothesis for the mechanics of the first phase of looping, termed c-looping, as the straight heart tube deforms into a c-shaped tube. According to this hypothesis, differential hypertrophic growth in the myocardium supplies the main forces that cause the heart tube to bend ventrally, while regional growth and contraction in the omphalomesenteric veins (primitive atria and compressive loads exerted by the splanchnopleuric membrane drive rightward torsion. A computational model based on realistic embryonic heart geometry is used to test this hypothesis. The behavior of the model is in reasonable agreement with available experimental data from control and perturbed embryos, offering support for our hypothesis. The results also suggest, however, that several other mechanisms contribute secondarily to normal looping, and we speculate that these mechanisms play backup roles when looping is perturbed. Finally, some outstanding questions are discussed for future study.

  9. Hybrid mathematical model of cardiomyocyte turnover in the adult human heart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy A Elser

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: The capacity for cardiomyocyte regeneration in the healthy adult human heart is fundamentally relevant for both myocardial homeostasis and cardiomyopathy therapeutics. However, estimates of cardiomyocyte turnover rates conflict greatly, with a study employing C14 pulse-chase methodology concluding 1% annual turnover in youth declining to 0.5% with aging and another using cell population dynamics indicating substantial, age-increasing turnover (4% increasing to 20%. OBJECTIVE: Create a hybrid mathematical model to critically examine rates of cardiomyocyte turnover derived from alternative methodologies. METHODS AND RESULTS: Examined in isolation, the cell population analysis exhibited severe sensitivity to a stem cell expansion exponent (20% variation causing 2-fold turnover change and apoptosis rate. Similarly, the pulse-chase model was acutely sensitive to assumptions of instantaneous incorporation of atmospheric C14 into the body (4-fold impact on turnover in young subjects while numerical restrictions precluded otherwise viable solutions. Incorporating considerations of primary variable sensitivity and controversial model assumptions, an unbiased numerical solver identified a scenario of significant, age-increasing turnover (4-6% increasing to 15-22% with age that was compatible with data from both studies, provided that successive generations of cardiomyocytes experienced higher attrition rates than predecessors. CONCLUSIONS: Assignment of histologically-observed stem/progenitor cells into discrete regenerative phenotypes in the cell population model strongly influenced turnover dynamics without being directly testable. Alternatively, C14 trafficking assumptions and restrictive models in the pulse-chase model artificially eliminated high-turnover solutions. Nevertheless, discrepancies among recent cell turnover estimates can be explained and reconciled. The hybrid mathematical model provided herein permits further examination of

  10. Derivation and validation of a 30-day heart failure readmission model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Lisa M; Gavin, Michael; Piatkowski, Gail; Chang, James D; Mukamal, Kenneth J

    2014-11-01

    In 2006, there were >1 million hospital admissions for heart failure (HF), and the estimated cost to the United States in 2009 was >$37.2 billion. Better models to target aggressive therapy to patients at the highest risk for readmission are clearly needed. We studied 3,413 consecutive admissions for HF based on discharge diagnosis codes from October 2007 to August 2011 from a single academic center. We randomly generated derivation and validation sets in a 3:1 ratio. We used generalized estimating equations to develop our models, accounting for repeated hospitalizations and the Hosmer-Lemeshow test to examine model calibration. The 30-day readmission rate was 24.2% in the derivation set. Of 25 candidate variables, the best fitting model included creatinine, troponin, hematocrit, and hyponatremia at discharge; race; zip code of residence; discharge hour; and number of hospitalizations in the previous year. Insignificant variables included intravenous diuretic use on day of discharge, discharge service, diabetes, atrial fibrillation, age, and gender. The risk of 30-day readmission increased with increasing decile of predicted risk in both the validation and derivation cohorts. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the model was 0.69 in the derivation set and 0.66 in the validation set. In conclusion, we derived and validated a simple model relating discharge-specific characteristics at risk of 30-day readmission. Application of this approach may facilitate targeted intervention to reduce the burden of rehospitalization in patients with HF, but our results suggest that the best readmission models may require incorporation of both clinical and local system factors for optimal prediction.

  11. Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... type of heart disease you have. Symptoms of heart disease in your blood vessels (atherosclerotic disease) Cardiovascular disease ... can sometimes be found early with regular evaluations. Heart disease symptoms caused by abnormal heartbeats (heart arrhythmias) A ...

  12. Automated hexahedral mesh generation from biomedical image data: applications in limb prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariah, S G; Sanders, J E; Turkiyyah, G M

    1996-06-01

    A general method to generate hexahedral meshes for finite element analysis of residual limbs and similar biomedical geometries is presented. The method utilizes skeleton-based subdivision of cross-sectional domains to produce simple subdomains in which structured meshes are easily generated. Application to a below-knee residual limb and external prosthetic socket is described. The residual limb was modeled as consisting of bones, soft tissue, and skin. The prosthetic socket model comprised a socket wall with an inner liner. The geometries of these structures were defined using axial cross-sectional contour data from X-ray computed tomography, optical scanning, and mechanical surface digitization. A tubular surface representation, using B-splines to define the directrix and generator, is shown to be convenient for definition of the structure geometries. Conversion of cross-sectional data to the compact tubular surface representation is direct, and the analytical representation simplifies geometric querying and numerical optimization within the mesh generation algorithms. The element meshes remain geometrically accurate since boundary nodes are constrained to lie on the tubular surfaces. Several element meshes of increasing mesh density were generated for two residual limbs and prosthetic sockets. Convergence testing demonstrated that approximately 19 elements are required along a circumference of the residual limb surface for a simple linear elastic model. A model with the fibula absent compared with the same geometry with the fibula present showed differences suggesting higher distal stresses in the absence of the fibula. Automated hexahedral mesh generation algorithms for sliced data represent an advancement in prosthetic stress analysis since they allow rapid modeling of any given residual limb and optimization of mesh parameters.

  13. Structural correlation method for model reduction and practical estimation of patient specific parameters illustrated on heart rate regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottesen, Johnny T; Mehlsen, Jesper; Olufsen, Mette S

    2014-11-01

    We consider the inverse and patient specific problem of short term (seconds to minutes) heart rate regulation specified by a system of nonlinear ODEs and corresponding data. We show how a recent method termed the structural correlation method (SCM) can be used for model reduction and for obtaining a set of practically identifiable parameters. The structural correlation method includes two steps: sensitivity and correlation analysis. When combined with an optimization step, it is possible to estimate model parameters, enabling the model to fit dynamics observed in data. This method is illustrated in detail on a model predicting baroreflex regulation of heart rate and applied to analysis of data from a rat and healthy humans. Numerous mathematical models have been proposed for prediction of baroreflex regulation of heart rate, yet most of these have been designed to provide qualitative predictions of the phenomena though some recent models have been developed to fit observed data. In this study we show that the model put forward by Bugenhagen et al. can be simplified without loss of its ability to predict measured data and to be interpreted physiologically. Moreover, we show that with minimal changes in nominal parameter values the simplified model can be adapted to predict observations from both rats and humans. The use of these methods make the model suitable for estimation of parameters from individuals, allowing it to be adopted for diagnostic procedures.

  14. Resistance training improves hemodynamic function, collagen deposition and inflammatory profiles: experimental model of heart failure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alves, Jadson P; Nunes, Ramiro B; Stefani, Giuseppe P; Dal Lago, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    .... Therefore, this study evaluated the influence of a resistance training program on hemodynamic function, maximum strength gain, collagen deposition and inflammatory profile in chronic heart failure rats...

  15. A COMPARATIVE STUDY ON THE EFFECTS OF THE POLYMER PROSTHETIC BASE PRESSURE OVER THE PROSTHETIC FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.T. Cigu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Partially mobile polymeric prostheses constitute absolutely necessary therapeutical means in all forms of partial edentations. As known, polymeric partial prostheses constitute temporary solutions for the treatment of edentaton states. Nowadays, this treatment includes traditional acrylic prostheses, as well as elastic prostheses made of different material systems. Such a system is Valplast, which uses a polyamide for the realization of the prosthetic base. Both the rigid and the elastic materials are nowadays under debate, different – positive or negative – opinions being uttered in relation with their utilization. The scope of the present study is to support the intensive application of the elastic materials. Extremely important is the identification of the intrinsic qualities of the materials influencing the behaviour in the oral cavity, especially the effects of pressure upon the biological structures of the prosthetic field.

  16. Dietary manipulation and social isolation alter disease progression in a murine model of coronary heart disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumiko Nakagawa-Toyama

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mice with a deficiency in the HDL receptor SR-BI and low expression of a modified apolipoprotein E gene (SR-BI KO/ApoeR61(h/h called 'HypoE' when fed an atherogenic, 'Paigen' diet develop occlusive, atherosclerotic coronary arterial disease (CHD, myocardial infarctions (MI, and heart dysfunction and die prematurely (50% mortality ~40 days after initiation of this diet. Because few murine models share with HypoE mice these cardinal, human-like, features of CHD, HypoE mice represent a novel, small animal, diet-inducible and genetically tractable model for CHD. To better describe the properties of this model, we have explored the effects of varying the composition and timing of administration of atherogenic diets, as well as social isolation vs. group housing, on these animals. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: HypoE mice were maintained on a standard lab chow diet (control until two months of age. Subsequently they received one of three atherogenic diets (Paigen, Paigen without cholate, Western or control diet for varying times and were housed in groups or singly, and we determined the plasma cholesterol levels, extent of cardiomegaly and/or survival. The rate of disease progression could be reduced by lowering the severity of the atherogenic diet and accelerated by social isolation. Disease could be induced by Paigen diets either containing or free of cholate. We also established conditions under which CHD could be initiated by an atherogenic diet and then subsequently, by replacing this diet with standard lab chow, hypercholesterolemia could be reduced and progression to early death prevented. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: HypoE mice provide a powerful, surgery-free, diet-'titratable' small animal model that can be used to study the onset of recovery from occlusive, atherosclerotic CHD and heart failure due to MI. HypoE mice can be used for the analysis of the effects of environment (diet, social isolation on a variety of features of

  17. Myocardial infarction with aortic banding. A combined rat model of heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthonio, R L; van Veldhuisen, D J; Scholtens, E; van Bekkum, C; de Boer, E; van Gilst, W H

    1997-09-01

    The effect of additional abdominal aortic banding on parameters of heart failure was studied in male Wistar rats with myocardial infarction. Contractile function was studied 8-9 weeks after operation, with an isoprenaline dose response protocol, in a retrograde Langendorff perfusion. Also, plasma noradrenaline concentration, infarct size and morphology were determined. Compared with controls, myocardial infarction/aortic banding animals showed a decreased contractile function, both at baseline and after maximal isoprenaline stimulation, and elevated noradrenaline levels (1316 +/- 94) vs 1909 +/- 174 pg/ml, both p Emax was significantly decreased. In aortic banding rats, contractile parameters were not significantly impaired, compared with controls. Both myocardial infarction and the myocardial infarction/aortic banding animals, but not aortic banding rats, had a significantly increased heart weight (1.4 +/- 0.04 g for controls vs 1.7 +/- 0.08 g for myocardial infarction and 2.0 +/- 0.12 g for myocardial infarction/aortic banding), and left ventricular cavity volume (19 +/- 1.4 mm3 for controls vs 49 +/- 5.5 mm3 for myocardial infarction and 48 +/- 4.3 mm3 for myocardial infarction/aortic banding) compared to control animals. Infarct size was 36.0% and 39.4% for the myocardial infarction and myocardial infarction/aortic banding animals, respectively. We conclude that myocardial infarction/aortic banding provides a new experimental model, which may yield important information and pathophysiology which allow evaluation of changes that may mimic clinical myocardial infarction with concomitant hypertension.

  18. 78 FR 48941 - Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special-Disabilities Programs, Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-12

    ... AFFAIRS Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special-Disabilities Programs, Notice of Meeting The..., that a meeting of the Federal Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special-Disabilities Programs will... Veterans Affairs on VA's prosthetics programs designed to provide state-of-the- art prosthetics and...

  19. 77 FR 65609 - Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special-Disabilities Programs; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-29

    ... AFFAIRS Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special-Disabilities Programs; Notice of Meeting The..., that a meeting of the Federal Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special-Disabilities Programs will... Veterans Affairs on VA's prosthetics programs designed to provide state-of-the- art prosthetics and...

  20. 76 FR 21107 - Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special-Disabilities Programs; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-14

    ... AFFAIRS Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special-Disabilities Programs; Notice of Meeting The...) that a meeting of the Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special-Disabilities Programs will be held... Veterans Affairs on VA's prosthetics programs designed to provide state-of-the art prosthetics and...

  1. 78 FR 69176 - Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special-Disabilities Programs; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-18

    ... AFFAIRS Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special-Disabilities Programs; Notice of Meeting The..., that a meeting of the Federal Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special-Disabilities Programs will... Veterans Affairs on VA's prosthetics programs designed to provide state-of-the- art prosthetics and...

  2. Decrease in heart rate after longitudinal participation in the Groningen Active Living Model (GALM) recreational sports programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Johan; Lemmink, Koen; Scherder, Erik; Stewart, Roy; King, Abby; Stevens, Martin

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate changes in heart rate during submaximal exercise as an index of cardiovascular function in older adults participating in the Groningen Active Living Model recreational sports programme who were sedentary or underactive at baseline. A repeated measurement desi

  3. Decrease in heart rate after longitudinal participation in the Groningen Active Living Model (GALM) recreational sports programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Johan; Lemmink, Koen; Scherder, Erik; Stewart, Roy; King, Abby; Stevens, Martin

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate changes in heart rate during submaximal exercise as an index of cardiovascular function in older adults participating in the Groningen Active Living Model recreational sports programme who were sedentary or underactive at baseline. A repeated measurement

  4. Longitudinal changes in heart rate after participating in the Groningen Active Living Model (GALM) recreational sports programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erik Scherder; Abby King; Roy Stewart; Dr. Johan de Jong; Koen A.P.M. Lemmink

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate changes in heart rate during submaximal exercise as an index of cardiovascular function in older adults participating in the Groningen Active Living Model recreational sports programme who were sedentary or underactive at baseline. A repeated measurement

  5. Inverse problems in reduced order models of cardiovascular haemodynamics: aspects of data assimilation and heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, Sanjay; Corsini, Chiara; Baker, Catriona; Hsia, Tain-Yen; Pennati, Giancarlo; Vignon-Clementel, Irene E

    2017-01-01

    Inverse problems in cardiovascular modelling have become increasingly important to assess each patient individually. These problems entail estimation of patient-specific model parameters from uncertain measurements acquired in the clinic. In recent years, the method of data assimilation, especially the unscented Kalman filter, has gained popularity to address computational efficiency and uncertainty consideration in such problems. This work highlights and presents solutions to several challenges of this method pertinent to models of cardiovascular haemodynamics. These include methods to (i) avoid ill-conditioning of the covariance matrix, (ii) handle a variety of measurement types, (iii) include a variety of prior knowledge in the method, and (iv) incorporate measurements acquired at different heart rates, a common situation in the clinic where the patient state differs according to the clinical situation. Results are presented for two patient-specific cases of congenital heart disease. To illustrate and validate data assimilation with measurements at different heart rates, the results are presented on a synthetic dataset and on a patient-specific case with heart valve regurgitation. It is shown that the new method significantly improves the agreement between model predictions and measurements. The developed methods can be readily applied to other pathophysiologies and extended to dynamical systems which exhibit different responses under different sets of known parameters or different sets of inputs (such as forcing/excitation frequencies).

  6. Structural correlation method for model reduction and practical estimation of patient specific parameters illustrated on heart rate regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, Johnny T.; Mehlsen, Jesper; Olufsen, Mette

    2014-01-01

    We consider the inverse and patient specific problem of short term (seconds to minutes) heart rate regulation specified by a system of nonlinear ODEs and corresponding data. We show how a recent method termed the structural correlation method (SCM) can be used for model reduction and for obtaining...

  7. A coronary heart disease risk model for predicting the effect of potent antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1 infected men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    May, Margaret; Sterne, Jonathan A C; Shipley, Martin;

    2007-01-01

    Many HIV-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) experience metabolic complications including dyslipidaemia and insulin resistance, which may increase their coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. We developed a prognostic model for CHD tailored to the changes in risk factors...

  8. Integrating affective and cognitive correlates of heart rate variability: A structural equation modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Sarah L; Selby, Edward A; Bates, Marsha E; Contrada, Richard J

    2015-10-01

    High frequency heart rate variability (HRV) is a measure of neurocardiac communication thought to reflect predominantly parasympathetic cardiac regulation. Low HRV has been associated empirically with clinical and subclinical levels of anxiety and depression and, more recently, high levels of HRV have been associated with better performance on some measures of executive functioning (EF). These findings have offered support for theories proposing HRV as an index measure of a broad, self-regulatory capacity underlying aspects of emotion regulation and executive control. This study sought to test that proposition by using a structural equation modeling approach to examine the relationships of HRV to negative affect (NA) and EF in a large sample of U.S. adults ages 30s-80s. HRV was modeled as a predictor of an NA factor (self-reported trait anxiety and depression symptoms) and an EF factor (performance on three neuropsychological tests tapping facets of executive abilities). Alternative models also were tested to determine the utility of HRV for predicting NA and EF, with and without statistical control of demographic and health-related covariates. In the initial structural model, HRV showed a significant positive relationship to EF and a nonsignificant relationship to NA. In a covariate-adjusted model, HRV's associations with both constructs were nonsignificant. Age emerged as the only significant predictor of NA and EF in the final model, showing inverse relationships to both. Findings may reflect population and methodological differences from prior research; they also suggest refinements to the interpretations of earlier findings and theoretical claims regarding HRV.

  9. Viability of Controlling Prosthetic Hand Utilizing Electroencephalograph (EEG) Dataset Signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskon, Azizi; A/L Thanakodi, Suresh; Raihan Mazlan, Mohd; Mohd Haziq Azhar, Satria; Nooraya Mohd Tawil, Siti

    2016-11-01

    This project presents the development of an artificial hand controlled by Electroencephalograph (EEG) signal datasets for the prosthetic application. The EEG signal datasets were used as to improvise the way to control the prosthetic hand compared to the Electromyograph (EMG). The EMG has disadvantages to a person, who has not used the muscle for a long time and also to person with degenerative issues due to age factor. Thus, the EEG datasets found to be an alternative for EMG. The datasets used in this work were taken from Brain Computer Interface (BCI) Project. The datasets were already classified for open, close and combined movement operations. It served the purpose as an input to control the prosthetic hand by using an Interface system between Microsoft Visual Studio and Arduino. The obtained results reveal the prosthetic hand to be more efficient and faster in response to the EEG datasets with an additional LiPo (Lithium Polymer) battery attached to the prosthetic. Some limitations were also identified in terms of the hand movements, weight of the prosthetic, and the suggestions to improve were concluded in this paper. Overall, the objective of this paper were achieved when the prosthetic hand found to be feasible in operation utilizing the EEG datasets.

  10. The cost effectiveness and cost utility of valsartan in chronic heart failure therapy in Italy: a probabilistic markov model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradelli, Lorenzo; Iannazzo, Sergio; Zaniolo, Orietta

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the cost effectiveness and cost utility of the use of valsartan in addition to standard therapy for the treatment of patients with chronic heart failure with low left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). The study was conducted by means of a cohort simulation based on a probabilistic Markov model and projecting the 23-month follow-up results of the Val-HeFT (Valsartan Heart Failure Trial) study over a 10-year time horizon. The model included four states (New York Heart Association [NYHA] classes II, III, IV, and death), and had a cycle duration of 1 month. Probabilistic simulations were performed using the WinBUGS software for Bayesian analysis. The distribution of patient parameters (sex, age, use of beta-adrenoceptor antagonists, and ACE inhibitors) in the simulated population were derived from the Italian heart failure patient population. Individual mortality data were derived from general mortality data by multiplying by a NYHA state-specific relative risk, while the probability of changing NYHA class was taken from the Val-HeFT data. Costs (2007 values) were calculated from the perspective of the Italian Health Service (IHS) and included costs for drugs and heart failure hospitalizations. Quality-of-life (QOL) weights were obtained by using published health-related QOL data for heart failure patients. A 3.5% annual discount rate was applied. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis was performed on each parameter using original-source 95% confidence interval (CI) values, or a +/-10% range when 95% CI values were unavailable. For the 10-year time horizon, patients were estimated to live for an average of 2.3 years or 1.7 quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), with slight increases in the valsartan group. In this group, hospitalizations for worsening heart failure were predicted to be significantly reduced and overall treatment costs per patient to decrease by about and U20AC;550. In subgroup analyses, valsartan lost dominance in patients in NYHA II, and in

  11. An alien in the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Yashwant; Kalavakunta, Jagadeesh K; Gupta, Vishal

    2016-07-01

    We report a case of a 38-year-old-man who presented with altered mental status. The patient was diagnosed with infective endocarditis (IE) originating from the GORE HELEX septal occluder device, which was placed 15 months earlier for symptomatic atrial septal defect. Brain imaging revealed shower emboli phenomena from the known IE. The patient developed hydrocephalus for which external ventriculostomy was performed. Improved neurological status warranted open heart surgery. The patient was later confirmed to be an intravenous drugs abuser, prejudicing IE. This case highlights the importance of meticulously monitoring patients with suspected high-risk behavior with an implanted intracardiac prosthetic device.

  12. An alien in the heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yashwant Agrawal

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 38-year-old-man who presented with altered mental status. The patient was diagnosed with infective endocarditis (IE originating from the GORE HELEX septal occluder device, which was placed 15 months earlier for symptomatic atrial septal defect. Brain imaging revealed shower emboli phenomena from the known IE. The patient developed hydrocephalus for which external ventriculostomy was performed. Improved neurological status warranted open heart surgery. The patient was later confirmed to be an intravenous drugs abuser, prejudicing IE. This case highlights the importance of meticulously monitoring patients with suspected high-risk behavior with an implanted intracardiac prosthetic device.

  13. Pulmonary Microwave Ablation Near the Heart: Antenna Positioning Can Mitigate Cardiac Complications in a Porcine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carberry, George A; Nocerino, Elisabetta; Mason, Peter J; Schwahn, Denise J; Hetzel, Scott; Turnquist, Alyssa M; Lee, Fred T; Brace, Christopher L

    2017-03-01

    Purpose To determine how close to the heart pulmonary microwave ablation can be performed without causing cardiac tissue injury or significant arrhythmia. Materials and Methods The study was performed with approval from the institutional animal care and use committee. Computed tomographic fluoroscopically guided microwave ablation of the lung was performed in 12 swine. Antennas were randomized to either parallel (180° ± 20°) or perpendicular (90° ± 20°) orientation relative to the heart surface and to distances of 0-10 mm from the heart. Ablations were performed at 65 W for 5 minutes or until a significant arrhythmia (asystole, heart block, bradycardia, supraventricular or ventricular tachycardia) developed. Heart tissue was evaluated with vital staining and histologic examination. Data were analyzed with mixed effects logistic regression, receiver operating characteristic curves, and the Fisher exact test. Results Thirty-four pulmonary microwave ablations were performed with the antenna a median distance of 4 mm from the heart in both perpendicular (n = 17) and parallel (n = 17) orientation. Significant arrhythmias developed during six (18%) ablations. Cardiac tissue injury occurred with 17 ablations (50%). Risk of arrhythmia and tissue injury decreased with increasing antenna distance from the heart with both antenna orientations. No cardiac complication occurred with a distance of greater than or equal to 4.4 mm from the heart. The ablation zone extended to the pleural surface adjacent to the heart in 71% of parallel and 17% of perpendicular ablations performed 5-10 mm from the heart. Conclusion Microwave lung ablations performed more than or equal to 5 mm from the heart were associated with a low risk of cardiac complications. (©) RSNA, 2016.

  14. N-acetylcysteine attenuates the development of cardiac fibrosis and remodeling in a mouse model of heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giam, Beverly; Chu, Po-Yin; Kuruppu, Sanjaya; Smith, A Ian; Horlock, Duncan; Kiriazis, Helen; Du, Xiao-Jun; Kaye, David M; Rajapakse, Niwanthi W

    2016-04-01

    Oxidative stress plays a central role in the pathogenesis of heart failure. We aimed to determine whether the antioxidantN-acetylcysteine can attenuate cardiac fibrosis and remodeling in a mouse model of heart failure. Minipumps were implanted subcutaneously in wild-type mice (n = 20) and mice with cardiomyopathy secondary to cardiac specific overexpression of mammalian sterile 20-like kinase 1 (MST-1;n = 18) to administerN-acetylcysteine (40 mg/kg per day) or saline for a period of 8 weeks. At the end of this period, cardiac remodeling and function was assessed via echocardiography. Fibrosis, oxidative stress, and expression of collagen types I andIIIwere quantified in heart tissues. Cardiac perivascular and interstitial fibrosis were greater by 114% and 209%, respectively, inMST-1 compared to wild type (P ≤ 0.001). InMST-1 mice administeredN-acetylcysteine, perivascular and interstitial fibrosis were 40% and 57% less, respectively, compared to those treated with saline (P ≤ 0. 03). Cardiac oxidative stress was 119% greater inMST-1 than in wild type (P cardiac fibrosis and related remodeling in the setting of heart failure potentially by reducing oxidative stress. This study provides the basis to investigate the role ofN-acetylcysteine in chronic heart failure.

  15. Prosthetic finger phalanges with lifelike skin compliance for low-force social touching interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Shuzhi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prosthetic arms and hands that can be controlled by the user's electromyography (EMG signals are emerging. Eventually, these advanced prosthetic devices will be expected to touch and be touched by other people. As realistic as they may look, the currently available prosthetic hands have physical properties that are still far from the characteristics of human skins because they are much stiffer. In this paper, different configurations of synthetic finger phalanges have been investigated for their skin compliance behaviour and have been compared with the phalanges of the human fingers and a phalanx from a commercially available prosthetic hand. Methods Handshake tests were performed to identify which areas on the human hand experience high contact forces. After these areas were determined, experiments were done on selected areas using an indenting probe to obtain the force-displacement curves. Finite element simulations were used to compare the force-displacement results of the synthetic finger phalanx designs with that of the experimental results from the human and prosthetic finger phalanges. The simulation models were used to investigate the effects of (a varying the internal topology of the finger phalanx and (b varying different materials for the internal and external layers. Results and Conclusions During handshake, the high magnitudes of contact forces were observed at the areas where the full grasping enclosure of the other person's hand can be achieved. From these areas, the middle phalanges of the (a little, (b ring, and (c middle fingers were selected. The indentation experiments on these areas showed that a 2 N force corresponds to skin tissue displacements of more than 2 mm. The results from the simulation model show that introducing an open pocket with 2 mm height on the internal structure of synthetic finger phalanges increased the skin compliance of the silicone material to 235% and the polyurethane material to

  16. Maxillofacial prosthetic materials- an inclination towards silicones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Aparajita; Choudhary, Sunita; Garg, Hemlata; H G, Jagadeesh

    2014-12-01

    There have been constant searches and researches which are taking place in the field of dental materials to best suit the ideal selection criteria to satisfy the functionality, biocompatibility, aesthetics as well as the durability as a maxillofacial material. Among all the different materials, Silicone is the most popularly used, but still studies are carried out to overcome their weaknesses and to come out with a material which can be labeled as the "ideal maxillofacial prosthetic material". This article comprises the materials which were and are in use and the reason for their unpopularity. It also gives us a scope to understand the major fields where the materials lack and thus needs improvement to render an individual with the best maxillo-facial prosthesis.

  17. Upper limb prosthetic use in Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, H; Marincek, C

    1994-04-01

    The article deals with the use of different types of upper limb prostheses in Slovenia. Four hundred and fourteen upper limb amputees were sent a questionnaire on the type of their prosthesis, its use and reasons for non-use, respectively. The replies were subject to statistical analysis. Most of the questioned upper limb amputees (70%) wear a prosthesis only for cosmesis. The use of a prosthesis depends on the level of upper limb amputation, loss of the dominant hand, and time from amputation. Prosthetic success appears to be unrelated to age at the time of amputation and the rehabilitation programme. The most frequent reason for not wearing a prosthesis is heat and consequent sweating of the stump. More than a third of amputees are dissatisfied with their prostheses.

  18. A Miniature Force Sensor for Prosthetic Hands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Robert; Chu, Mars; Diftler, Myron; Martin, Toby; Valvo, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Tactile sensing is an important part of the development of new prosthetic hands. A number of approaches to establishing an afferent pathway back to the patient for tactile information are becoming available including tactors and direct stimulation of the afferent nerves. Tactile information can also be used by low-level control systems that perform simple tasks for the patient such as establishing a stable grasp and maintaining the grasping forces needed to hold an object. This abstract reports on the design of a small fingertip load cell based on semi-conductor strain gauges. Since this load cell is so small (measuring only 8.5mm in diameter and 6.25 mm in height), it easily fits into the tip of an anthropomorphic mechatronic hand. This load cell is tested by comparing a time series of force and moment data with reference data acquired from a much larger high-precision commercial load cell.

  19. [Improving the speech with a prosthetic construction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalpers, M J; Engelen, M; van der Stappen, J A A M; Weijs, W L J; Takes, R P; van Heumen, C C M

    2016-03-01

    A 12-year-old boy had problems with his speech due to a defect in the soft palate. This defect was caused by the surgical removal of a synovial sarcoma. Testing with a nasometer revealed hypernasality above normal values. Given the size and severity of the defect in the soft palate, the possibility of improving the speech with speech therapy was limited. At a centre for special dentistry an attempt was made with a prosthetic construction to improve the performance of the palate and, in that way, the speech. This construction consisted of a denture with an obturator attached to it. With it, an effective closure of the palate could be achieved. New measurements with acoustic nasometry showed scores within the normal values. The nasality in the speech largely disappeared. The obturator is an effective and relatively easy solution for palatal insufficiency resulting from surgical resection. Intrusive reconstructive surgery can be avoided in this way.

  20. Gait analysis in lower-limb amputation and prosthetic rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquenazi, Alberto

    2014-02-01

    Gait analysis combined with sound clinical judgment plays an important role in elucidating the factors involved in the pathologic prosthetic gait and the selection and effects of available interventions to optimize it. Detailed clinical evaluation of walking contributes to the analysis of the prosthetic gait, but evaluation in the gait laboratory using kinetic and kinematic data is often necessary to quantify and identify the particular contributions of the variables impacting the gait with confidence and assess the results of such intervention. The same approach can be considered when selecting prosthetic components and assessing leg length in this patient population.