WorldWideScience

Sample records for modeling plant-atmosphere carbon

  1. The Soil-Plant-Atmosphere Continuum of Mangroves: A Simple Ecohydrological model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perri, Saverio; Viola, Francesco; Valerio Noto, Leonardo; Molini, Annalisa

    2016-04-01

    Mangroves represent the only forest able to grow at the interface between a terrestrial and a marine habitat. Although globally they have been estimated to account only for 1% of carbon sequestration from forests, as coastal ecosystems they account for about 14% of carbon sequestration by the global ocean. Despite the continuously increasing number of hydrological and ecological field observations, the ecohydrology of mangroves remains largely understudied. Modeling mangrove response to variations in environmental conditions needs to take into account the effect of waterlogging and salinity on transpiration and CO2 assimilation. However, similar ecohydrological models for halophytes are not yet documented in the literature. In this contribution we adapt a Soil-Plant-Atmosphere Continuum (SPAC) model to the mangrove ecosystems. Such SPAC model is based on a macroscopic approach and the transpiration rate is hence obtained by solving the plant and leaf water balance and the leaf energy balance, taking explicitly into account the role of osmotic water potential and salinity in governing plant resistance to water fluxes. Exploiting the well-known coupling of transpiration and CO2 exchange through the stomatal conductance, we also estimate the CO2 assimilation rate. The SPAC is hence tested against experimental data obtained from the literature, showing the reliability and effectiveness of this minimalist approach in reproducing observed processes. Results show that the developed SPAC model is able to realistically simulate the main ecohydrological traits of mangroves, indicating the salinity as a crucial limiting factor for mangrove trees transpiration and CO2 assimilation.

  2. Modelling soil-plant-atmosphere interactions by coupling the regional weather model WRF to mechanistic plant models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, C.; Hoffmann, P.; Priesack, E.

    2012-04-01

    Climate change causes altering distributions of meteorological factors influencing plant growth and its interactions between the land surface and the atmosphere. Recent studies show, that uncertainties in regional and global climate simulations are also caused by lacking descriptions of the soil-plant-atmosphere system. Therefore, we couple a mechanistic soil-plant model to a regional climate and forecast model. The detailed simulation of the water and energy exchanges, especially the transpiration of grassland and forests stands, are the key features of the modelling framework. The Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) (Skamarock 2008) is an open source mesoscale numerical weather prediction model. The WRF model was modified in a way, to either choose its native, static land surface model NOAH or the mechanistic eco-system model Expert-N 5.0 individually for every single grid point within the simulation domain. The Expert-N 5.0 modelling framework provides a highly modular structure, enabling the development and use of a large variety of different plant and soil models, including heat transfer, nitrogen uptake/turnover/transport as well as water uptake/transport and crop management. To represent the key landuse types grassland and forest, we selected two mechanistic plant models: The Hurley Pasture model (Thornley 1998) and a modified TREEDYN3 forest simulation model (Bossel 1996). The models simulate plant growth, water, nitrogen and carbon flows for grassland and forest stands. A mosaic approach enables Expert-N to use high resolution land use data e.g. CORINE Land Cover data (CLC, 2006) for the simulation, making it possible to simulate different land use distributions within a single grid cell. The coupling results are analyzed for plausibility and compared with the results of the default land surface model NOAH (Fei Chen and Jimy Dudhia 2010). We show differences between the mechanistic and the static model coupling, with focus on the feedback effects

  3. Interweaving monitoring activities and model development towards enhancing knowledge of the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romano, N.; Angulo-Jaramillo, M.; Javaux, M.; Ploeg, van der M.J.

    2012-01-01

    The guest editors summarize the advances and challenges associated with monitoring and modeling of the soil–plant–atmosphere continuum. They introduce the contributions in the special section, with an emphasis on the scale addressed in each study. The study of water pathways from the soil to the

  4. Interweaving monitoring activities and model development towards enhancing knowledge of the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romano, N.; Angulo-Jaramillo, M.; Javaux, M.; Ploeg, van der M.J.

    2012-01-01

    The guest editors summarize the advances and challenges associated with monitoring and modeling of the soil–plant–atmosphere continuum. They introduce the contributions in the special section, with an emphasis on the scale addressed in each study. The study of water pathways from the soil to the atm

  5. Modeling stomatal conductance in the earth system: linking leaf water-use efficiency and water transport along the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonan, G. B.; Williams, M.; Fisher, R. A.; Oleson, K. W.

    2014-09-01

    The Ball-Berry stomatal conductance model is commonly used in earth system models to simulate biotic regulation of evapotranspiration. However, the dependence of stomatal conductance (gs) on vapor pressure deficit (Ds) and soil moisture must be empirically parameterized. We evaluated the Ball-Berry model used in the Community Land Model version 4.5 (CLM4.5) and an alternative stomatal conductance model that links leaf gas exchange, plant hydraulic constraints, and the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum (SPA). The SPA model simulates stomatal conductance numerically by (1) optimizing photosynthetic carbon gain per unit water loss while (2) constraining stomatal opening to prevent leaf water potential from dropping below a critical minimum. We evaluated two optimization algorithms: intrinsic water-use efficiency (ΔAn /Δgs, the marginal carbon gain of stomatal opening) and water-use efficiency (ΔAn /ΔEl, the marginal carbon gain of transpiration water loss). We implemented the stomatal models in a multi-layer plant canopy model to resolve profiles of gas exchange, leaf water potential, and plant hydraulics within the canopy, and evaluated the simulations using leaf analyses, eddy covariance fluxes at six forest sites, and parameter sensitivity analyses. The primary differences among stomatal models relate to soil moisture stress and vapor pressure deficit responses. Without soil moisture stress, the performance of the SPA stomatal model was comparable to or slightly better than the CLM Ball-Berry model in flux tower simulations, but was significantly better than the CLM Ball-Berry model when there was soil moisture stress. Functional dependence of gs on soil moisture emerged from water flow along the soil-to-leaf pathway rather than being imposed a priori, as in the CLM Ball-Berry model. Similar functional dependence of gs on Ds emerged from the ΔAn/ΔEl optimization, but not the ΔAn /gs optimization. Two parameters (stomatal efficiency and root hydraulic

  6. From plant to field: a novel mechanistic approach to modeling soil-plant-atmosphere interactions at the watershed scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manoli, G.; Bonetti, S.; Scudiero, E.

    concentration in the topsoil is addressed by considering osmotic stress and inhibition of the photosynthetic efficiency. The model is applied to a 25 ha basin cultivated with maize crop on the Venice coastland to investigate the ecohydrological processes and feedbacks occurring at the site. The model is applied...... at the basin scale to understand the impact of land elevation, soil heterogeneities, and seawater contamination on crop dynamics. To our knowledge, this is the first time that a fully 3-D hydrologic model is coupled with the stomatal optimization theory and applied at the field scale to simulate vegetation...

  7. Monitoring and modeling of water flow and solute transport in the soil-plant-atmosphere system of poplar trees to evaluate the effectiveness of phytoremediation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palladino, Mario; Di Fiore, Paola; Speranza, Giuseppe; Sica, Benedetto; Romano, Nunzio

    2015-04-01

    This work is part of a series of studies being carried out within the EU-Life+ project ECOREMED (Implementation of eco-compatible protocols for agricultural soil remediation in Litorale Domizio-Agro Aversano NIPS). The project refers to Litorale Domitio-Agro Aversano that has been identified as National Interest Priority Site (NIPS) and includes some polluted agricultural land belonging to more than 61 municipalities in the Naples and Caserta provinces of the Campania Region. The major aim of the project is to define an operating protocol for agriculture-based bioremediation of contaminated agricultural soils, also including the use of plant extracting pollutants to be used as biomasses for renewable energy production. This contribution specifically address the question of evaluating the effectiveness of phytoremediation actions selected by the project in the pilot area of Trentola-Ducenta and will provide some preliminary results of monitoring and modeling activities. A physical and hydraulic characterization has been carried out in this area where poplar trees were planted. Monitoring of water flow, root water uptake and solute transport in the soil-plant-atmosphere is under way with reference to two trees using capacitance soil moisture and matric potential sensors located at three different soil depths, whereas plant water status and evapotranspiration fluxes are indirectly estimated using fast-responding stem dendrometers.

  8. Modeling stomatal conductance in the Earth system: linking leaf water-use efficiency and water transport along the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. B. Bonan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The empirical Ball–Berry stomatal conductance model is commonly used in Earth system models to simulate biotic regulation of evapotranspiration. However, the dependence of stomatal conductance (gs on vapor pressure deficit (Ds and soil moisture must both be empirically parameterized. We evaluated the Ball–Berry model used in the Community Land Model version 4.5 (CLM4.5 and an alternative stomatal conductance model that links leaf gas exchange, plant hydraulic constraints, and the soil–plant–atmosphere continuum (SPA to numerically optimize photosynthetic carbon gain per unit water loss while preventing leaf water potential dropping below a critical minimum level. We evaluated two alternative optimization algorithms: intrinsic water-use efficiency (Δ An/Δ gs, the marginal carbon gain of stomatal opening and water-use efficiency (Δ An/Δ El, the marginal carbon gain of water loss. We implemented the stomatal models in a multi-layer plant canopy model, to resolve profiles of gas exchange, leaf water potential, and plant hydraulics within the canopy, and evaluated the simulations using: (1 leaf analyses; (2 canopy net radiation, sensible heat flux, latent heat flux, and gross primary production at six AmeriFlux sites spanning 51 site–years; and (3 parameter sensitivity analyses. Without soil moisture stress, the performance of the SPA stomatal conductance model was generally comparable to or somewhat better than the Ball–Berry model in flux tower simulations, but was significantly better than the Ball–Berry model when there was soil moisture stress. Functional dependence of gs on soil moisture emerged from the physiological theory linking leaf water-use efficiency and water flow to and from the leaf along the soil-to-leaf pathway rather than being imposed a priori, as in the Ball–Berry model. Similar functional dependence of gs on Ds emerged from the water-use efficiency optimization. Sensitivity analyses showed that two

  9. Improvement in soil-plant-atmosphere modelling of {sup 14}C dynamics and the application of two models to data from a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limer, Laura M.C. [Quintessa Limited, 633/635 Birchwood Boulevard, WA3 7QU, Warrington (United Kingdom); Le Dizes-Maurel, Severine; Maro, Denis [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), PRP-ENV, SERIS, LM2E, Cadarache, Saint-Paul Lez Durance (France); Klos, Ryk [Aleksandria Sciences Limited, S7 2DD, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Norden, Maria [Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, SE-171 16, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-07-01

    The need to address radiological impacts from {sup 14}C released to the biosphere has been recognised for some time. However, because of its role in biological processes and its ecological cycling, the standard methods employed to model long-term radionuclide transport and accumulation in the biosphere cannot be used satisfactorily for {sup 14}C. The degree of complexity in any {sup 14}C model used must be balanced against the availability of supporting data and the assessment context. In 2011, the model SSPAM14C was developed on behalf of the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM), with the intention to usage in both long-term and short-term release assessments (Limer et al., 2013). As part of the model testing it was applied to data collected during laboratory experiments performed by Imperial College London in the 1990's (Tucker and Shaw, 1997). Independently, IRSN has also been developing its own {sup 14}C model, TOCATTA (Le Dizes et al., 2012), and has previously tested it against field data collected by IRSN, between 2006 and 2008, in the vicinity of the La Hague nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in France (Aulagnier et al., 2012). The main conclusion drawn from these comparisons highlighted the need to develop an hourly time step model of {sup 14}C transfer based more thoroughly on knowledge arising from plant physiology, soil science and meteorology (Farquhar and von Caemmerer, 1982). These models have undergone further development, and have been applied here to the La Hague field data as it represents a medium term data set with both short term variation and a sizeable time series of measurements against which to compare the models. By increasing the temporal resolution of the IRSN model, a new version called TOCATTA-ccan simulate the impact of intermittent {sup 14}C releases occurring either the day or night (Aulagnier et al., 2013). Simplification of the soil sub-model in SSPAM14C is also shown to be justified for application to operational release

  10. Coupled simulation of soil water-heat-carbon-nitrogen process and crop growth at soil-plant-atmosphere continuum system%土壤-作物-大气系统水热碳氮过程耦合模型构建

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁浩; 胡克林; 李保国; 刘海涛

    2014-01-01

    The quantitative description of soil water flow, carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycles, and crop growth processes at soil-plant-atmosphere continuum system is important for improving water and N use efficiencies and decision-making of crop production and environmental protection in the North China Plain (NCP). The objective of this study was to develop a water and N management model for intensive cropping systems and agricultural management practices in NCP. Based on the previous research findings, a coupled model (Soil Water Heat Carbon and Nitrogen Simulation, WHCNS) model was established. The model included 5 main modules:soil water, soil heat, soil C, soil N, and crop growth. The Penman-Montheith method from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nation was used to calculate the reference crop evapotranspiration. The method for simulating soil water movement and heat transfer was directly introduced from the HYDRUS1D and RZWQM models. The PS123 model from the Netherlands was used to simulate crop growth. The simulation of C and N cycles was done by the Daisy model from Denmark. The model ran on a daily time step and was driven by the meteorological and crop biological variables, and agricultural management practices. The soil water infiltration and redistribution processes were described by Green-Ampt and Richard’s equations, respectively. Soil N transport simulation was based on the modified convection-dispersion equation. The source-sink term of N transformation and transport included mineralization of soil organic N, immobilization in biomass, urea hydrolysis, ammonia volatilization, nitrification, denitrification, and crop uptake. The compensatory absorption mechanism was introduced in crop water and N uptake. The organic matter pools were divided into 3 active and 3 stabile C pools. The improved version of the PS123 model was applied to simulate crop development stage, dry matter production and allocation, and crop yield. The crop yield under

  11. Modelling Sublimation of Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, Brian

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author reports results in their efforts to model sublimation of carbon dioxide and the associated kinetics order and parameter estimation issues in their model. They have offered the reader two sets of data and several approaches to determine the rate of sublimation of a piece of solid dry ice. They presented several models…

  12. Modelling Sublimation of Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, Brian

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author reports results in their efforts to model sublimation of carbon dioxide and the associated kinetics order and parameter estimation issues in their model. They have offered the reader two sets of data and several approaches to determine the rate of sublimation of a piece of solid dry ice. They presented several models…

  13. A toy terrestrial carbon flow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parton, William J.; Running, Steven W.; Walker, Brian

    1992-01-01

    A generalized carbon flow model for the major terrestrial ecosystems of the world is reported. The model is a simplification of the Century model and the Forest-Biogeochemical model. Topics covered include plant production, decomposition and nutrient cycling, biomes, the utility of the carbon flow model for predicting carbon dynamics under global change, and possible applications to state-and-transition models and environmentally driven global vegetation models.

  14. Multiscale Modeling with Carbon Nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiti, A

    2006-02-21

    Technologically important nanomaterials come in all shapes and sizes. They can range from small molecules to complex composites and mixtures. Depending upon the spatial dimensions of the system and properties under investigation computer modeling of such materials can range from equilibrium and nonequilibrium Quantum Mechanics, to force-field-based Molecular Mechanics and kinetic Monte Carlo, to Mesoscale simulation of evolving morphology, to Finite-Element computation of physical properties. This brief review illustrates some of the above modeling techniques through a number of recent applications with carbon nanotubes: nano electromechanical sensors (NEMS), chemical sensors, metal-nanotube contacts, and polymer-nanotube composites.

  15. Carbon export algorithm advancements in models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çağlar Yumruktepe, Veli; Salihoğlu, Barış

    2015-04-01

    The rate at which anthropogenic CO2 is absorbed by the oceans remains a critical question under investigation by climate researchers. Construction of a complete carbon budget, requires better understanding of air-sea exchanges and the processes controlling the vertical and horizontal transport of carbon in the ocean, particularly the biological carbon pump. Improved parameterization of carbon sequestration within ecosystem models is vital to better understand and predict changes in the global carbon cycle. Due to the complexity of processes controlling particle aggregation, sinking and decomposition, existing ecosystem models necessarily parameterize carbon sequestration using simple algorithms. Development of improved algorithms describing carbon export and sequestration, suitable for inclusion in numerical models is an ongoing work. Existing unique algorithms used in the state-of-the art ecosystem models and new experimental results obtained from mesocosm experiments and open ocean observations have been inserted into a common 1D pelagic ecosystem model for testing purposes. The model was implemented to the timeseries stations in the North Atlantic (BATS, PAP and ESTOC) and were evaluated with datasets of carbon export. Targetted topics of algorithms were PFT functional types, grazing and vertical movement of zooplankton, and remineralization, aggregation and ballasting dynamics of organic matter. Ultimately it is intended to feed improved algorithms to the 3D modelling community, for inclusion in coupled numerical models.

  16. A Thermal Model for Carbon Nanotube Interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsin, Kaji Muhammad; Srivastava, Ashok; Sharma, Ashwani K.; Mayberry, Clay

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we have studied Joule heating in carbon nanotube based very large scale integration (VLSI) interconnects and incorporated Joule heating influenced scattering in our previously developed current transport model. The theoretical model explains breakdown in carbon nanotube resistance which limits the current density. We have also studied scattering parameters of carbon nanotube (CNT) interconnects and compared with the earlier work. For 1 µm length single-wall carbon nanotube, 3 dB frequency in S12 parameter reduces to ~120 GHz from 1 THz considering Joule heating. It has been found that bias voltage has little effect on scattering parameters, while length has very strong effect on scattering parameters.

  17. Liquid surface model for carbon nanotube energetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Mathew, Maneesh; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2008-01-01

    In the present paper we developed a model for calculating the energy of single-wall carbon nanotubes of arbitrary chirality. This model, which we call as the liquid surface model, predicts the energy of a nanotube with relative error less than 1% once its chirality and the total number of atoms...... the calculated energies we determine the elastic properties of the single-wall carbon nanotubes (Young modulus, curvature constant) and perform a comparison with available experimental measurements and earlier theoretical predictions....

  18. Thermodynamic limits set relevant constraints to the soil-plant-atmosphere system and to optimality in terrestrial vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleidon, Axel; Renner, Maik

    2016-04-01

    The soil-plant-atmosphere system is a complex system that is strongly shaped by interactions between the physical environment and vegetation. This complexity appears to demand equally as complex models to fully capture the dynamics of the coupled system. What we describe here is an alternative approach that is based on thermodynamics and which allows for comparatively simple formulations free of empirical parameters by assuming that the system is so complex that its emergent dynamics are only constrained by the thermodynamics of the system. This approach specifically makes use of the second law of thermodynamics, a fundamental physical law that is typically not being considered in Earth system science. Its relevance to land surface processes is that it fundamentally sets a direction as well as limits to energy conversions and associated rates of mass exchange, but it requires us to formulate land surface processes as thermodynamic processes that are driven by energy conversions. We describe an application of this approach to the surface energy balance partitioning at the diurnal scale. In this application the turbulent heat fluxes of sensible and latent heat are described as the result of a convective heat engine that is driven by solar radiative heating of the surface and that operates at its thermodynamic limit. The predicted fluxes from this approach compare very well to observations at several sites. This suggests that the turbulent exchange fluxes between the surface and the atmosphere operate at their thermodynamic limit, so that thermodynamics imposes a relevant constraint to the land surface-atmosphere system. Yet, thermodynamic limits do not entirely determine the soil-plant-atmosphere system because vegetation affects these limits, for instance by affecting the magnitude of surface heating by absorption of solar radiation in the canopy layer. These effects are likely to make the conditions at the land surface more favorable for photosynthetic activity

  19. Modelling the phenology and carbon budget of major crops at the field scale, supported by remote sensing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sus, O.; Williams, M.

    2009-04-01

    Reducing uncertainties involved in estimating the carbon balance of croplands, which are most directly, intensively and continuously affected by human intervention (i.e. land-use), is an important step towards more precisely evaluating the overall terrestrial carbon balance. Human appropriation of the land surface and its production has direct consequences on issues such as the sustainability of ecosystem services and biogeophysical as well as biogeochemical parameters of affected areas. Moreover, cropland management and phenology explains a major component of the seasonality of carbon fluxes between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere of agricultural regions. To address key research questions, crop functional types (CFTs) along with land management issues, need to be considered within state-of-the-art land surface models. In this study, we embedded a crop modelling approach within the Soil-Plant-Atmosphere model (SPA) in order to build a true cropland carbon mass balance model with an explicit carbon allocation and storage pattern. SPA is a process-based model that simulates ecosystem photosynthesis and water balance at fine temporal and spatial scales and has been intensively applied to and tested against natural ecosystems and their observed carbon fluxes. Here, new carbon pools (root, leaf, stem, storage organ) have been introduced into SPA and linked with a new dynamic carbon allocation pattern, which further allows for the remobilization of carbohydrates. The crop modelling philosophy in terms of assimilates partitioning and crop development is based on Penning de Vries et al., with the simulation of crop developmental rate further having been refined using a modified Wang and Engel model. SPA now realistically simulates the carbon fluxes and stocks, evolution of LAI, phenology and evapotranspiration for three major crop types (winter/spring wheat and barley, maize). We compared modelled values of carbon fluxes against observations measured at the

  20. Confronting model predictions of carbon fluxes with measurements of Amazon forests subjected to experimental drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Thomas L; Galbraith, David R; Christoffersen, Bradley O; Harper, Anna; Imbuzeiro, Hewlley M A; Rowland, Lucy; Almeida, Samuel; Brando, Paulo M; da Costa, Antonio Carlos Lola; Costa, Marcos Heil; Levine, Naomi M; Malhi, Yadvinder; Saleska, Scott R; Sotta, Eleneide; Williams, Mathew; Meir, Patrick; Moorcroft, Paul R

    2013-10-01

    Considerable uncertainty surrounds the fate of Amazon rainforests in response to climate change. Here, carbon (C) flux predictions of five terrestrial biosphere models (Community Land Model version 3.5 (CLM3.5), Ecosystem Demography model version 2.1 (ED2), Integrated BIosphere Simulator version 2.6.4 (IBIS), Joint UK Land Environment Simulator version 2.1 (JULES) and Simple Biosphere model version 3 (SiB3)) and a hydrodynamic terrestrial ecosystem model (the Soil-Plant-Atmosphere (SPA) model) were evaluated against measurements from two large-scale Amazon drought experiments. Model predictions agreed with the observed C fluxes in the control plots of both experiments, but poorly replicated the responses to the drought treatments. Most notably, with the exception of ED2, the models predicted negligible reductions in aboveground biomass in response to the drought treatments, which was in contrast to an observed c. 20% reduction at both sites. For ED2, the timing of the decline in aboveground biomass was accurate, but the magnitude was too high for one site and too low for the other. Three key findings indicate critical areas for future research and model development. First, the models predicted declines in autotrophic respiration under prolonged drought in contrast to measured increases at one of the sites. Secondly, models lacking a phenological response to drought introduced bias in the sensitivity of canopy productivity and respiration to drought. Thirdly, the phenomenological water-stress functions used by the terrestrial biosphere models to represent the effects of soil moisture on stomatal conductance yielded unrealistic diurnal and seasonal responses to drought.

  1. Dynamics models of soil organic carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGLi-xia; PANJian-jun

    2003-01-01

    As the largest pool of terrestrial organic carbon, soils interact strongly with atmosphere composition, climate, and land change. Soil organic carbon dynamics in ecosystem plays a great role in global carbon cycle and global change. With development of mathematical models that simulate changes in soil organic carbon, there have been considerable advances in understanding soil organic carbon dynamics. This paper mainly reviewed the composition of soil organic matter and its influenced factors, and recommended some soil organic matter models worldwide. Based on the analyses of the developed results at home and abroad, it is suggested that future soil organic matter models should be developed toward based-process models, and not always empirical ones. The models are able to reveal their interaction between soil carbon systems, climate and land cover by technique and methods of GIS (Geographical Information System) and RS (Remote Sensing). These models should be developed at a global scale, in dynamically describing the spatial and temporal changes of soil organic matter cycle. Meanwhile, the further researches on models should be strengthen for providing theory basis and foundation in making policy of green house gas emission in China.

  2. Nonequilibrium Thermodynamic Model of Manganese Carbonate Oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝瑞霞; 彭省临

    1999-01-01

    Manganese carbonate can be converted to many kinds of manganese oxides when it is aerated in air and oxygen.Pure manganese carbonate can be changed into Mn3O4 and γ-MnOOH,and manganese carbonate ore can be converted to MnO2 under the air-aerating and oxygen-aerating circumstances.The oxidation process of manganese carbonate is a changing process of mineral association,and is also a converting process of valence of manganese itself.Not only equilibrium stat,but also nonequilibrium state are involved in this whole process,This process is an irreversible heterogeneous complex reaction,and oberys the nonequilibrium thermodynamic model,The oxidation rate of manganese cabonate is controlled by many factors,especially nonmanganese metallic ions which play an important role in the oxidation process of manganese carbonate.

  3. Mathematical models of carbon-carbon composite deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovin, N. N.; Kuvyrkin, G. N.

    2016-09-01

    Mathematical models of carbon-carbon composites (CCC) intended for describing the processes of deformation of structures produced by using CCC under high-temperature loading are considered. A phenomenological theory of CCC inelastic deformation is proposed, where such materials are considered as homogeneous ones with effective characteristics and where their high anisotropy of mechanical characteristics and different ways of resistance to extension and compression are taken into account. Micromechanical models are proposed for spatially reinforced CCC, where the difference between mechanical characteristics of components and the reinforcement scheme are taken into account. Themodel parameters are determined from the results of experiments of composite macrospecimens in the directions typical of the material. A version of endochronictype theory with several internal times "launched" for each composite component and related to some damage accumulation mechanisms is proposed for describing the inelastic deformation. Some practical examples are considered.

  4. Emerging Carbon Nanotube Electronic Circuits, Modeling, and Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Yao Xu; Ashok Srivastava; Sharma, Ashwani K.

    2010-01-01

    Current transport and dynamic models of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors are presented. A model of single-walled carbon nanotube as interconnect is also presented and extended in modeling of single-walled carbon nanotube bundles. These models are applied in studying the performances of circuits such as the complementary carbon nanotube inverter pair and carbon nanotube as interconnect. Cadence/Spectre simulations show that carbon nanotube field-effect transistor circuits can operate a...

  5. A Thermal Model for Carbon Nanotube Interconnects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clay Mayberry

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we have studied Joule heating in carbon nanotube based very large scale integration (VLSI interconnects and incorporated Joule heating influenced scattering in our previously developed current transport model. The theoretical model explains breakdown in carbon nanotube resistance which limits the current density. We have also studied scattering parameters of carbon nanotube (CNT interconnects and compared with the earlier work. For 1 µm length single-wall carbon nanotube, 3 dB frequency in S12 parameter reduces to ~120 GHz from 1 THz considering Joule heating. It has been found that bias voltage has little effect on scattering parameters, while length has very strong effect on scattering parameters.

  6. Fracture of Carbon Nanotube - Amorphous Carbon Composites: Molecular Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Benjamin D.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Odegard, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising candidates for use as reinforcements in next generation structural composite materials because of their extremely high specific stiffness and strength. They cannot, however, be viewed as simple replacements for carbon fibers because there are key differences between these materials in areas such as handling, processing, and matrix design. It is impossible to know for certain that CNT composites will represent a significant advance over carbon fiber composites before these various factors have been optimized, which is an extremely costly and time intensive process. This work attempts to place an upper bound on CNT composite mechanical properties by performing molecular dynamics simulations on idealized model systems with a reactive forcefield that permits modeling of both elastic deformations and fracture. Amorphous carbon (AC) was chosen for the matrix material in this work because of its structural simplicity and physical compatibility with the CNT fillers. It is also much stiffer and stronger than typical engineering polymer matrices. Three different arrangements of CNTs in the simulation cell have been investigated: a single-wall nanotube (SWNT) array, a multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) array, and a SWNT bundle system. The SWNT and MWNT array systems are clearly idealizations, but the SWNT bundle system is a step closer to real systems in which individual tubes aggregate into large assemblies. The effect of chemical crosslinking on composite properties is modeled by adding bonds between the CNTs and AC. The balance between weakening the CNTs and improving fiber-matrix load transfer is explored by systematically varying the extent of crosslinking. It is, of course, impossible to capture the full range of deformation and fracture processes that occur in real materials with even the largest atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. With this limitation in mind, the simulation results reported here provide a plausible upper limit on

  7. Deep Soil: Quantifying and Modeling Subsurface Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, J. N.; Devine, W.; Harrison, R. B.

    2014-12-01

    Some soil carbon datasets that are spatially rich, such as the USDA Forest Service Inventory and Analysis National Program dataset, sample soil to only 20 cm (8 inches), despite evidence that substantial stores of soil C can be found deeper in the soil profile. The maximum extent of tree rooting is typically many meters deep and provides: direct exchange with the soil solution; redistribution of water from deep horizons toward the surface during times of drought; resources for active microbial communities in deep soil around root channels; and direct carbon inputs through exudates and root turnover. This study examined soil carbon to a depth of 2.5 meters across 22 soils in Pacific Northwest Douglas-fir forests. Excavations at 20 additional sites took place in summer 2014, greatly expanding the spatial coverage and extent of the data set. Forest floor and mineral soil bulk density samples were collected at depths of 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 meters. Pool estimates from systematic sampling depths shallower than 1.5 m yielded significantly smaller estimates than the total soil stock to 2.5 meters (P<0.01). On average, only 5% of soil C was found in the litter layer, 35% was found below 0.5 meter, and 21% was found below 1.0 meter. Due to the difficulty of excavating and measuring deep soil carbon, a series of nonlinear mixed effect models were fit to the data to predict deep soil carbon stocks given sampling to 1.0 meter. A model using an inverse polynomial function predicted soil carbon to 2.5 meters with -5.6% mean error. The largest errors occurred in Andisols with non-crystalline minerals, which can adsorb large quantities of carbon on mineral surfaces and preserve it from decomposition. An accurate spatial dataset of soil depth to bedrock would be extremely useful to constrain models of the vertical distribution of soil carbon. Efforts to represent carbon in spatial models would benefit from considering the vertical distribution of carbon in soil. Sampling

  8. Liquid surface model for carbon nanotube energetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Mathew, Maneesh; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2008-01-01

    In the present paper we developed a model for calculating the energy of single-wall carbon nanotubes of arbitrary chirality. This model, which we call as the liquid surface model, predicts the energy of a nanotube with relative error less than 1% once its chirality and the total number of atoms...... are known. The parameters of the liquid surface model and its potential applications are discussed. The model has been suggested for open end and capped nanotubes. The influence of the catalytic nanoparticle, atop which nanotubes grow, on the nanotube stability is also discussed. The suggested model gives...... an important insight in the energetics and stability of nanotubes of different chirality and might be important for the understanding of nanotube growth process. For the computations we use empirical Brenner and Tersoff potentials and discuss their applicability to the study of carbon nanotubes. From...

  9. Modelling the carbon and nitrogen cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costas A Varotsos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The issues of air pollution are inextricably linked to the mechanisms underlying the physicochemical functioning of the biosphere which together with the atmosphere, the cryosphere, the lithosphere, and the hydrosphere constitute the climate system. We herewith present a review of the achievements and unresolved problems concerning the modeling of the biochemical cycles of basic chemicals of the climate system, such as carbon and nitrogen. Although the achievements in this area can roughly describe the carbon and nitrogen cycles, serious problems still remain associated with the accuracy and precision of the processes and assessments employed in the relevant modeling.

  10. Seismic modeling of carbonate outcrops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stafleu, J.; Schlager, W.; Campbell, E.; Everts, A.J. (Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam (Netherlands))

    1993-09-01

    Traditionally, seismic modeling has concentrated on one-dimensional borehole modeling and two-dimensional forward modeling of basic structural-stratigraphic schemes, which are directly compared with real seismic data. Two-dimensional seismic models based on outcrop observations may aid in bridging the gap between the detail of the outcrop and the low resolution of seismic lines. Examples include the Dolomites (north Italy), the High Atlas (Morocco), the Vercors (southeast France) and the Last chance Canyon (New Mexico). The seismic models generally are constructed using the following procedure: (1) construction of a detailed lithological model based on direct outcrop observations; (2) division of the lithological model into lithostratigraphic units, using master bedding planes and important facies transitions as boundaries; (3) assignment of petrophysical properties of these lithostratigraphic units; (4) computation of time sections of reflectivity, using different modeling techniques; and (5) convolution with source wavelets of different frequencies. The lithological detail modeled in the case studies lead to some striking results, particularly the discovery of pseudo-unconformities. Pseudo-unconformities are unconformities in seismics, but correspond to rapid changes of dip and facies in outcrop. None of the outcrop geometries studied were correctly portrayed seismically at 25 Hz frequency. However, in some instances the true relationship would emerge gradually at frequencies of 50 to 100 Hz. These results demonstrate that detailed, outcrop-derived/seismic models can reveal what stratigraphic relationships and features are likely to be resolved under ideal or less ideal conditions, and what pitfalls may befall the interpreter of real seismic data.

  11. The contributions of Lewis Fry Richardson to drainage theory, soil physics, and the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, John; Raats, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The EGU Division on Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics awards the Lewis Fry Richardson Medal. Richardson's significance is highlighted in http://www.egu.eu/awards-medals/portrait-lewis-fry-richardson/, but his contributions to soil physics and to numerical solutions of heat and diffusion equations are not mentioned. We would like to draw attention to those little known contributions. Lewis Fry Richardson (1881-1953) made important contributions to many fields including numerical weather prediction, finite difference solutions of partial differential equations, turbulent flow and diffusion, fractals, quantitative psychology and studies of conflict. He invented numerical weather prediction during World War I, although his methods were not successfully applied until 1950, after the invention of fast digital computers. In 1922 he published the book `Numerical weather prediction', of which few copies were sold and even fewer were read until the 1950s. To model heat and mass transfer in the atmosphere, he did much original work on turbulent flow and defined what is now known as the Richardson number. His technique for improving the convergence of a finite difference calculation is known as Richardson extrapolation, and was used by John Philip in his 1957 semi-analytical solution of the Richards equation for water movement in unsaturated soil. Richardson's first papers in 1908 concerned the numerical solution of the free surface problem of unconfined flow of water in saturated soil, arising in the design of drain spacing in peat. Later, for the lower boundary of his atmospheric model he needed to understand the movement of heat, liquid water and water vapor in what is now called the vadose zone and the soil plant atmosphere system, and to model coupled transfer of heat and flow of water in unsaturated soil. Finding little previous work, he formulated partial differential equations for transient, vertical flow of liquid water and for transfer of heat and water vapor. He

  12. Soil physics with Python transport in the soil-plant-atmosphere system

    CERN Document Server

    Bittelli, Marco; Tomei, Fausto

    2015-01-01

    This volume presents numerical methods to solve soil physics problems using computers. It starts with the theory and then shows how to use Python code to solve the problems. Most soil physics books focus on deriving rather than solving the differential equations for mass and energy transport in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. The focus of this book is on solutions. Agricultural and biological scientists usually have a good working knowledge of algebra and calculus, but not of differential equations. Here numerical procedures are used to solve differential equations.

  13. Soil Carbon and Nitrogen Cycle Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, D.; Chaoka, S.; Kumar, P.; Quijano, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    Second generation bioenergy crops, such as miscanthus (Miscantus × giganteus) and switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), are regarded as clean energy sources, and are an attractive option to mitigate the human-induced climate change. However, the global climate change and the expansion of perennial grass bioenergy crops have the power to alter the biogeochemical cycles in soil, especially, soil carbon storages, over long time scales. In order to develop a predictive understanding, this study develops a coupled hydrological-soil nutrient model to simulate soil carbon responses under different climate scenarios such as: (i) current weather condition, (ii) decreased precipitation by -15%, and (iii) increased temperature up to +3C for four different crops, namely miscanthus, switchgrass, maize, and natural prairie. We use Precision Agricultural Landscape Modeling System (PALMS), version 5.4.0, to capture biophysical and hydrological components coupled with a multilayer carbon and ¬nitrogen cycle model. We apply the model at daily time scale to the Energy Biosciences Institute study site, located in the University of Illinois Research Farms, in Urbana, Illinois. The atmospheric forcing used to run the model was generated stochastically from parameters obtained using available data recorded in Bondville Ameriflux Site. The model simulations are validated with observations of drainage and nitrate and ammonium concentrations recorded in drain tiles during 2011. The results of this study show (1) total soil carbon storage of miscanthus accumulates most noticeably due to the significant amount of aboveground plant carbon, and a relatively high carbon to nitrogen ratio and lignin content, which reduce the litter decomposition rate. Also, (2) the decreased precipitation contributes to the enhancement of total soil carbon storage and soil nitrogen concentration because of the reduced microbial biomass pool. However, (3) an opposite effect on the cycle is introduced by the increased

  14. Effective models for excitons in carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia; Duclos, Pierre; Ricaud, Benjamin

    2007-01-01

    We analyse the low lying spectrum of a model of excitons in carbon nanotubes. Consider two particles with opposite charges and a Coulomb self-interaction, placed on an infinitely long cylinder. If the cylinder radius becomes small, the low lying spectrum of their relative motion is well described...

  15. Effective models for excitons in carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia; Duclos, Pierre; Ricaud, Benjamin

    We analyse the low lying spectrum of a model of excitons in carbon nanotubes. Consider two particles with a Coulomb self-interaction, placed on an infinitely long cylinder. If the cylinder radius becomes small, the low lying spectrum is well described by a one-dimensional effective Hamiltonian...

  16. Selenium Cycling Across Soil-Plant-Atmosphere Interfaces: A Critical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, Lenny H.E.; Vriens, Bas; Jones, Gerrad D.; Schneider, Leila S.; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth; Bañuelos, Gary S.

    2015-01-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential element for humans and animals, which occurs ubiquitously in the environment. It is present in trace amounts in both organic and inorganic forms in marine and freshwater systems, soils, biomass and in the atmosphere. Low Se levels in certain terrestrial environments have resulted in Se deficiency in humans, while elevated Se levels in waters and soils can be toxic and result in the death of aquatic wildlife and other animals. Human dietary Se intake is largely governed by Se concentrations in plants, which are controlled by root uptake of Se as a function of soil Se concentrations, speciation and bioavailability. In addition, plants and microorganisms can biomethylate Se, which can result in a loss of Se to the atmosphere. The mobilization of Se across soil-plant-atmosphere interfaces is thus of crucial importance for human Se status. This review gives an overview of current knowledge on Se cycling with a specific focus on soil-plant-atmosphere interfaces. Sources, speciation and mobility of Se in soils and plants will be discussed as well as Se hyperaccumulation by plants, biofortification and biomethylation. Future research on Se cycling in the environment is essential to minimize the adverse health effects associated with unsafe environmental Se levels. PMID:26035246

  17. Selenium Cycling Across Soil-Plant-Atmosphere Interfaces: A Critical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenny H.E. Winkel

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Selenium (Se is an essential element for humans and animals, which occurs ubiquitously in the environment. It is present in trace amounts in both organic and inorganic forms in marine and freshwater systems, soils, biomass and in the atmosphere. Low Se levels in certain terrestrial environments have resulted in Se deficiency in humans, while elevated Se levels in waters and soils can be toxic and result in the death of aquatic wildlife and other animals. Human dietary Se intake is largely governed by Se concentrations in plants, which are controlled by root uptake of Se as a function of soil Se concentrations, speciation and bioavailability. In addition, plants and microorganisms can biomethylate Se, which can result in a loss of Se to the atmosphere. The mobilization of Se across soil-plant-atmosphere interfaces is thus of crucial importance for human Se status. This review gives an overview of current knowledge on Se cycling with a specific focus on soil-plant-atmosphere interfaces. Sources, speciation and mobility of Se in soils and plants will be discussed as well as Se hyperaccumulation by plants, biofortification and biomethylation. Future research on Se cycling in the environment is essential to minimize the adverse health effects associated with unsafe environmental Se levels.

  18. Selenium cycling across soil-plant-atmosphere interfaces: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, Lenny H E; Vriens, Bas; Jones, Gerrad D; Schneider, Leila S; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth; Bañuelos, Gary S

    2015-05-29

    Selenium (Se) is an essential element for humans and animals, which occurs ubiquitously in the environment. It is present in trace amounts in both organic and inorganic forms in marine and freshwater systems, soils, biomass and in the atmosphere. Low Se levels in certain terrestrial environments have resulted in Se deficiency in humans, while elevated Se levels in waters and soils can be toxic and result in the death of aquatic wildlife and other animals. Human dietary Se intake is largely governed by Se concentrations in plants, which are controlled by root uptake of Se as a function of soil Se concentrations, speciation and bioavailability. In addition, plants and microorganisms can biomethylate Se, which can result in a loss of Se to the atmosphere. The mobilization of Se across soil-plant-atmosphere interfaces is thus of crucial importance for human Se status. This review gives an overview of current knowledge on Se cycling with a specific focus on soil-plant-atmosphere interfaces. Sources, speciation and mobility of Se in soils and plants will be discussed as well as Se hyperaccumulation by plants, biofortification and biomethylation. Future research on Se cycling in the environment is essential to minimize the adverse health effects associated with unsafe environmental Se levels.

  19. ON THE CONTINUUM MODELING OF CARBON NANOTUBES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张鹏; 黄永刚; Philippe H.Geubelle; 黄克智

    2002-01-01

    We have recently proposed a nanoscale continuum theory for carbonnanotubes. The theory links continuum analysis with atomistic modeling by incor-porating interatomic potentials and atomic structures of carbon nanotubes directlyinto the constitutive law. Here we address two main issues involved in setting upthe nanoscale continuum theory for carbon nanotubes, namely the multi-body in-teratomic potentials and the lack of centrosymmetry in the nanotube structure. Weexplain the key ideas behind these issues in establishing a nanoscale continuum theoryin terms of interatomic potentials and atomic structures.

  20. Multiphase Sequestration Geochemistry: Model for Mineral Carbonation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Mark D.; McGrail, B. Peter; Schaef, Herbert T.; Hu, Jian Z.; Hoyt, David W.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Wurstner, Signe K.

    2011-04-01

    Carbonation of formation minerals converts low viscosity supercritical CO2 injected into deep saline reservoirs for geologic sequestration into an immobile form. Until recently the scientific focus of mineralization reactions with reservoir rocks has been those that follow an aqueous-mediated dissolution/precipitation mechanism, driven by the sharp reduction in pH that occurs with CO2 partitioning into the aqueous phase. For sedimentary basin formations the kinetics of aqueous-mediated dissolution/precipitation reactions are sufficiently slow to make the role of mineralization trapping insignificant over a century period. For basaltic saline formations aqueous-phase mineralization progresses at a substantially higher rate, making the role of mineralization trapping significant, if not dominant, over a century period. The overlooked mineralization reactions for both sedimentary and basaltic saline formations, however, are those that occur in liquid or supercritical CO2 phase; where, dissolved water appears to play a catalyst role in the formation of carbonate minerals. A model is proposed in this paper that describes mineral carbonation over sequestration reservoir conditions ranging from dissolved CO2 in aqueous brine to dissolved water in supercritical CO2. The model theory is based on a review of recent experiments directed at understanding the role of water in mineral carbonation reactions of interest in geologic sequestration systems occurring under low water contents.

  1. Soil fauna: key to new carbon models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filser, Juliane; Faber, Jack H.; Tiunov, Alexei V.; Brussaard, Lijbert; Frouz, Jan; De Deyn, Gerlinde; Uvarov, Alexei V.; Berg, Matty P.; Lavelle, Patrick; Loreau, Michel; Wall, Diana H.; Querner, Pascal; Eijsackers, Herman; José Jiménez, Juan

    2016-11-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is key to maintaining soil fertility, mitigating climate change, combatting land degradation, and conserving above- and below-ground biodiversity and associated soil processes and ecosystem services. In order to derive management options for maintaining these essential services provided by soils, policy makers depend on robust, predictive models identifying key drivers of SOM dynamics. Existing SOM models and suggested guidelines for future SOM modelling are defined mostly in terms of plant residue quality and input and microbial decomposition, overlooking the significant regulation provided by soil fauna. The fauna controls almost any aspect of organic matter turnover, foremost by regulating the activity and functional composition of soil microorganisms and their physical-chemical connectivity with soil organic matter. We demonstrate a very strong impact of soil animals on carbon turnover, increasing or decreasing it by several dozen percent, sometimes even turning C sinks into C sources or vice versa. This is demonstrated not only for earthworms and other larger invertebrates but also for smaller fauna such as Collembola. We suggest that inclusion of soil animal activities (plant residue consumption and bioturbation altering the formation, depth, hydraulic properties and physical heterogeneity of soils) can fundamentally affect the predictive outcome of SOM models. Understanding direct and indirect impacts of soil fauna on nutrient availability, carbon sequestration, greenhouse gas emissions and plant growth is key to the understanding of SOM dynamics in the context of global carbon cycling models. We argue that explicit consideration of soil fauna is essential to make realistic modelling predictions on SOM dynamics and to detect expected non-linear responses of SOM dynamics to global change. We present a decision framework, to be further developed through the activities of KEYSOM, a European COST Action, for when mechanistic SOM models

  2. An isopycnic ocean carbon cycle model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Assmann

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The carbon cycle is a major forcing component in the global climate system. Modelling studies, aiming to explain recent and past climatic changes and to project future ones, increasingly include the interaction between the physical and biogeochemical systems. Their ocean components are generally z-coordinate models that are conceptually easy to use but that employ a vertical coordinate that is alien to the real ocean structure. Here, we present first results from a newly-developed isopycnic carbon cycle model and demonstrate the viability of using an isopycnic physical component for this purpose. As expected, the model represents well the interior ocean transport of biogeochemical tracers and produces realistic tracer distributions. Difficulties in employing a purely isopycnic coordinate lie mainly in the treatment of the surface boundary layer which is often represented by a bulk mixed layer. The most significant adjustments of the ocean biogeochemistry model HAMOCC, for use with an isopycnic coordinate, were in the representation of upper ocean biological production. We present a series of sensitivity studies exploring the effect of changes in biogeochemical and physical processes on export production and nutrient distribution. Apart from giving us pointers for further model development, they highlight the importance of preformed nutrient distributions in the Southern Ocean for global nutrient distributions. The sensitivity studies show that iron limitation for biological particle production, the treatment of light penetration for biological production, and the role of diapycnal mixing result in significant changes of nutrient distributions and liniting factors of biological production.

  3. Soil carbon model alternatives for ECHAM5/JSBACH climate model: Evaluation and impacts on global carbon cycle estimates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thum, T.; Raisanen, P.; Sevanto, S.

    2011-01-01

    model formulation produced soil carbon stock estimates that were much closer to measured values. It also captured better the seasonal cycle of the direct CO2 exchange measurements at the three grassland sites considered (RMS error reduced by 12%), while for the five forest sites also analyzed......The response of soil organic carbon to climate change might lead to significant feedbacks affecting global warming. This response can be studied by coupled climate-carbon cycle models but so far the description of soil organic carbon cycle in these models has been quite simple. In this work we used...... the coupled climate-carbon cycle model ECHAM5/JSBACH (European Center/Hamburg Model 5/Jena Scheme for Biosphere-Atmosphere Coupling in Hamburg) with two different soil carbon modules, namely (1) the original soil carbon model of JSBACH called CBALANCE and (2) a new soil carbon model Yasso07, to study...

  4. Silicon Carbide Derived Carbons: Experiments and Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kertesz, Miklos [Georgetown University, Washington DC 20057

    2011-02-28

    The main results of the computational modeling was: 1. Development of a new genealogical algorithm to generate vacancy clusters in diamond starting from monovacancies combined with energy criteria based on TBDFT energetics. The method revealed that for smaller vacancy clusters the energetically optimal shapes are compact but for larger sizes they tend to show graphitized regions. In fact smaller clusters of the size as small as 12 already show signatures of this graphitization. The modeling gives firm basis for the slit-pore modeling of porous carbon materials and explains some of their properties. 2. We discovered small vacancy clusters and their physical characteristics that can be used to spectroscopically identify them. 3. We found low barrier pathways for vacancy migration in diamond-like materials by obtaining for the first time optimized reaction pathways.

  5. Modelling soil organic carbon in Danish agricultural soils suggests low potential for future carbon sequestration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taghizadeh-Toosi, Arezoo; Olesen, Jørgen Eivind

    2016-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) is in active exchange with the atmosphere. The amount of organic carbon (OC) input into the soil and SOC turnover rate are important for predicting the carbon (C) sequestration potential of soils subject to changes in land-use and climate. The C-TOOL model was developed...

  6. Quantifying the Water Flow through the Soil-Plant-Atmosphere System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Besnik Gjongecaj

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to quantify the flow of water in the soil plant atmosphere system by using and correlating various methods of measurements, an experimental study was undertaken. The study was carried out in the region of “The Field of Kosovo”, in two climatic particular areas, Komoran and Vushtri, significantly different from each other. Meteorological stations were set up in each area and as a part of it, in each case, the evaporimeter Pan A and an atmometer were installed. Each meteorological station was equipped with the necessary devices to measure the sun radiation, relative humidity, wind speed and temperature. A particular computer program was prepared to convert automatically the data measured by the devices into potential evapotranspiration, expressed as mm evaporated water per day, calculated based on the Penman-Monteith formulae. The potential evapotranspiration calculated based on the Penman-Monteith method indicated, during the entire time of investigation, higher values comparing with the results taken from the atmometer and the Pan A evaporimeter methods. The differences were significant in both, Komoran and Vushtri.

  7. First principles model of carbonate compaction creep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keszthelyi, Daniel; Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2016-05-01

    Rocks under compressional stress conditions are subject to long-term creep deformation. From first principles we develop a simple micromechanical model of creep in rocks under compressional stress that combines microscopic fracturing and pressure solution. This model was then upscaled by a statistical mechanical approach to predict strain rate at core and reservoir scale. The model uses no fitting parameter and has few input parameters: effective stress, temperature, water saturation porosity, and material parameters. Material parameters are porosity, pore size distribution, Young's modulus, interfacial energy of wet calcite, the dissolution, and precipitation rates of calcite, and the diffusion rate of calcium carbonate, all of which are independently measurable without performing any type of deformation or creep test. Existing long-term creep experiments were used to test the model which successfully predicts the magnitude of the resulting strain rate under very different effective stress, temperature, and water saturation conditions. The model was used to predict the observed compaction of a producing chalk reservoir.

  8. Information for seasonal models of carbon fluxes in agroecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, A.W.; DeAngelis, D.L.

    1987-04-01

    This report is a compilation of information useful for constructing regionally differentiated models of seasonal carbon fluxes in the terrestrial biosphere. Two classes of information are presented. First, extant agroecosystem models that simulate the flux of carbon in a stand or whole field are reviewed. Second, empirical data on seasonal carbon fluxes are compiled. These reviews and compilations are extensive, but not exhaustive. No attempt is made to evaluate the usefulness of seasonal models and data.

  9. Modeling of HiPco Process for Carbon Nanotube Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokcen, T.; Dateo, C. E.; Meyyappan, M.; Colbert, D. T.; Smith, D. T.; Smith, K.; Smalley, R. E.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    High-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPco) reactor, developed at Rice University, is used to produce single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) from gas-phase reactions of iron carbonyl and nickel carbonyl in carbon monoxide at high pressures (10 - 100 atm). Computational modeling is used to better understand the HiPco process. In the present model, decomposition of the precursor, metal cluster formation and growth, and carbon nanotube growth are addressed. Decomposition of precursor molecules is necessary to initiate metal cluster formation. The metal clusters serve as catalysts for carbon nanotube growth. Diameter of metal clusters and number of atoms in these clusters are some of the essential information for predicting carbon nanotube formation and growth, which is then modeled by Boudouard reaction (2CO ---> C(s) + CO2) with metal catalysts. The growth kinetic model is integrated with a two-dimensional axisymmetric reactor flow model to predict reactor performance.

  10. Modelling carbon overconsumption and the formation of extracellular particulate organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schartau, M.; Engel, A.; Schröter, J.; Thoms, S.; Völker, C.; Wolf-Gladrow, D.

    2007-07-01

    During phytoplankton growth a fraction of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) assimilated by phytoplankton is exuded in the form of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), which can be transformed into extracellular particulate organic carbon (POC). A major fraction of extracellular POC is associated with carbon of transparent exopolymer particles (TEP; carbon content = TEPC) that form from dissolved polysaccharides (PCHO). The exudation of PCHO is linked to an excessive uptake of DIC that is not directly quantifiable from utilisation of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), called carbon overconsumption. Given these conditions, the concept of assuming a constant stoichiometric carbon-to-nitrogen (C:N) ratio for estimating new production of POC from DIN uptake becomes inappropriate. Here, a model of carbon overconsumption is analysed, combining phytoplankton growth with TEPC formation. The model describes two modes of carbon overconsumption. The first mode is associated with DOC exudation during phytoplankton biomass accumulation. The second mode is decoupled from algal growth, but leads to a continuous rise in POC while particulate organic nitrogen (PON) remains constant. While including PCHO coagulation, the model goes beyond a purely physiological explanation of building up carbon rich particulate organic matter (POM). The model is validated against observations from a mesocosm study. Maximum likelihood estimates of model parameters, such as nitrogen- and carbon loss rates of phytoplankton, are determined. The optimisation yields results with higher rates for carbon exudation than for the loss of organic nitrogen. It also suggests that the PCHO fraction of exuded DOC was 63±20% during the mesocosm experiment. Optimal estimates are obtained for coagulation kernels for PCHO transformation into TEPC. Model state estimates are consistent with observations, where 30% of the POC increase was attributed to TEPC formation. The proposed model is of low complexity and is applicable

  11. Modelling carbon overconsumption and the formation of extracellular particulate organic carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schartau

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available During phytoplankton growth a fraction of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC assimilated by phytoplankton is exuded in the form of dissolved organic carbon (DOC, which can be transformed into extracellular particulate organic carbon (POC. A major fraction of extracellular POC is associated with carbon of transparent exopolymer particles (TEP; carbon content = TEPC that form from dissolved polysaccharides (PCHO. The exudation of PCHO is linked to an excessive uptake of DIC that is not directly quantifiable from utilisation of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN, called carbon overconsumption. Given these conditions, the concept of assuming a constant stoichiometric carbon-to-nitrogen (C:N ratio for estimating new production of POC from DIN uptake becomes inappropriate. Here, a model of carbon overconsumption is analysed, combining phytoplankton growth with TEPC formation. The model describes two modes of carbon overconsumption. The first mode is associated with DOC exudation during phytoplankton biomass accumulation. The second mode is decoupled from algal growth, but leads to a continuous rise in POC while particulate organic nitrogen (PON remains constant. While including PCHO coagulation, the model goes beyond a purely physiological explanation of building up carbon rich particulate organic matter (POM. The model is validated against observations from a mesocosm study. Maximum likelihood estimates of model parameters, such as nitrogen- and carbon loss rates of phytoplankton, are determined. The optimisation yields results with higher rates for carbon exudation than for the loss of organic nitrogen. It also suggests that the PCHO fraction of exuded DOC was 63±20% during the mesocosm experiment. Optimal estimates are obtained for coagulation kernels for PCHO transformation into TEPC. Model state estimates are consistent with observations, where 30% of the POC increase was attributed to TEPC formation. The proposed model is of low complexity and is

  12. Modelling carbon overconsumption and the formation of extracellular particulate organic carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Völker

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available During phytoplankton growth a fraction of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC assimilated by phytoplankton is exuded in the form of dissolved organic carbon (DOC, which can be transformed into extracellular particulate organic carbon (POC. A major fraction of extracellular POC is associated with carbon of transparent exopolymer particles (TEP; carbon content = TEPC that form from dissolved polysaccharides (PCHO. The exudation of PCHO is linked to an excessive uptake of DIC that is not directly quantifiable from utilisation of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN, called carbon overconsumption. Given these conditions, the concept of assuming a constant stoichiometric carbon-to-nitrogen (C:N ratio for estimating new production of POC from DIN uptake becomes inappropriate. Here, a model of carbon overconsumption is analysed, combining phytoplankton growth with TEPC formation. The model describes two modes of carbon overconsumption. The first mode is associated with DOC exudation during phytoplankton biomass accumulation. The second mode is decoupled from algal growth, but leads to a continuous rise in POC while particulate organic nitrogen (PON remains constant. While including PCHO coagulation, the model goes beyond a purely physiological explanation of building up carbon rich particulate organic matter (POM. The model is validated against observations from a mesocosm study. Maximum likelihood estimates of model parameters, such as nitrogen- and carbon loss rates of phytoplankton, are determined. The optimisation yields results with higher rates for carbon exudation than for the loss of organic nitrogen. It also suggests that the PCHO fraction of exuded DOC was 63±20% during the mesocosm experiment. Optimal estimates are obtained for coagulation kernels for PCHO transformation into TEPC. Model state estimates are consistent with observations, where 30% of the POC increase was attributed to TEPC formation. The proposed model is of low complexity and is

  13. Modelling Seasonal Carbon Dynamics on Fen Peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebels, Michael; Beyer, Madlen; Augustin, Jürgen; Roppel, Mario; Juszczak, Radoszlav; Serba, Tomasz

    2010-05-01

    In Germany more than 99 % of fens have lost their carbon and nutrient sink function due to heavy drainage and agricultural land use especially during the last decades and thus resulted in compression and heavy peat loss (CHARMAN 2002; JOOSTEN & CLARKE 2002; SUCCOW & JOOSTEN 2001; AUGUSTIN et al. 1996; KUNTZE 1993). Therefore fen peatlands play an important part (4-5 %) in the national anthropogenic trace gas budget. But only a small part of drained and agricultural used fens in NE Germany can be restored. Knowledge of the influence of land use to trace gas exchange is important for mitigation of the climate impact of the anthropogenic peatland use. We study carbon exchanges between soil and atmosphere on several fen peatland use areas at different sites in NE-Germany. Our research covers peatlands of supposed strongly climate forcing land use (cornfield and intensive pasture) and of probably less forcing, alternative types (meadow and extensive pasture) as well as rewetted (formerly drained) areas and near-natural sites like a low-degraded fen and a wetted alder woodland. We measured trace gas fluxes with manual and automatic chambers in periodic routines since spring 2007. The used chamber technique bases on DROESLER (2005). In total we now do research at 22 sites situated in 5 different locations covering agricultural, varying states of rewetted and near-natural treatments. We present results of at least 2 years of measurements on our site of varying types of agricultural land use. There we found significant differences in the annual carbon balances depending on the genesis of the observed sites and the seasonal dynamics. Annual balances were constructed by applying single respiration and photosynthesis CO2 models for each measurement campaign. These models were based on LLOYD-TAYLOR (1994) and Michaelis-Menten-Kinetics respectively. Crosswise comparison of different site treatments combined with the seasonal environmental observations give good hints for the

  14. Soil carbon model alternatives for ECHAM5/JSBACH climate model: Evaluation and impacts on global carbon cycle estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thum, T.; RäIsäNen, P.; Sevanto, S.; Tuomi, M.; Reick, C.; Vesala, T.; Raddatz, T.; Aalto, T.; JäRvinen, H.; Altimir, N.; Pilegaard, K.; Nagy, Z.; Rambal, S.; Liski, J.

    2011-06-01

    The response of soil organic carbon to climate change might lead to significant feedbacks affecting global warming. This response can be studied by coupled climate-carbon cycle models but so far the description of soil organic carbon cycle in these models has been quite simple. In this work we used the coupled climate-carbon cycle model ECHAM5/JSBACH (European Center/Hamburg Model 5/Jena Scheme for Biosphere-Atmosphere Coupling in Hamburg) with two different soil carbon modules, namely (1) the original soil carbon model of JSBACH called CBALANCE and (2) a new soil carbon model Yasso07, to study the interaction between climate variability and soil organic carbon. Equivalent ECHAM5/JSBACH simulations were conducted using both soil carbon models, with freely varying atmospheric CO2 for the last 30 years (1977-2006). In this study, anthropogenic CO2 emissions and ocean carbon cycle were excluded. The new model formulation produced soil carbon stock estimates that were much closer to measured values. It also captured better the seasonal cycle of the direct CO2 exchange measurements at the three grassland sites considered (RMS error reduced by 12%), while for the five forest sites also analyzed, the results were ambiguous and the RMS error was 12% larger for Yasso07 than for CBALANCE. As a response to climatic changes, Yasso07 showed greater release of soil carbon to the atmosphere than the original model formulation during the years 1977-2006. This emphasizes the need for better understanding the processes affecting soil carbon stocks and their turnover rates to predict the climatic feedbacks.

  15. Using a diagnostic soil-plant-atmosphere model for monitoring drought at field to continental scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drought assessment is a complex undertaking, requiring monitoring of deficiencies in multiple components of the hydrologic budget. Precipitation anomalies reflect variability in water supply to the land surface, while soil moisture, groundwater and surface water anomalies reflect deficiencies in mo...

  16. Nanoscale Continuum Modelling of Carbon Nanotubes by Polyhedral Finite Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logah Perumal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As the geometry of a cell of carbon nanotube is hexagonal, a new approach is presented in modelling of single-walled carbon nanotubes using polyhedral finite elements. Effect of varying length, diameter, and thickness of carbon nanotubes on Young’s modulus is studied. Both armchair and zigzag configurations are modelled and simulated in Mathematica. Results from current approach found good agreement with the other published data.

  17. Carbon Management In the Post-Cap-and-Trade Carbon Economy: An Economic Model for Limiting Climate Change by Managing Anthropogenic Carbon Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGroff, F. A.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we discuss an economic model for comprehensive carbon management that focuses on changes in carbon flux in the biosphere due to anthropogenic activity. The two unique features of the model include: 1. A shift in emphasis from primarily carbon emissions, toward changes in carbon flux, mainly carbon extraction, and 2. A carbon price vector (CPV) to express the value of changes in carbon flux, measured in changes in carbon sequestration, or carbon residence time. The key focus with the economic model is the degree to which carbon flux changes due to anthropogenic activity. The economic model has three steps: 1. The CPV metric is used to value all forms of carbon associated with any anthropogenic activity. In this paper, the CPV used is a logarithmic chronological scale to gauge expected carbon residence (or sequestration) time. In future economic models, the CPV may be expanded to include other factors to value carbon. 2. Whenever carbon changes form (and CPV) due to anthropogenic activity, a carbon toll is assessed as determined by the change in the CPV. The standard monetary unit for carbon tolls are carbon toll units, or CTUs. The CTUs multiplied by the quantity of carbon converted (QCC) provides the total carbon toll, or CT. For example, CT = (CTU /mole carbon) x (QCC moles carbon). 3. Whenever embodied carbon (EC) attributable to a good or service moves via trade to a jurisdiction with a different CPV metric, a carbon toll (CT) is assessed representing the CPV difference between the two jurisdictions. This economic model has three clear advantages. First, the carbon pricing and cost scheme use existing and generally accepted accounting methodologies to ensure the veracity and verifiability of carbon management efforts with minimal effort and expense using standard, existing auditing protocols. Implementing this economic model will not require any new, special, unique, or additional training, tools, or systems for any entity to achieve their minimum

  18. Simulated Carbon Cycling in a Model Microbial Mat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, K. L.; Potter, C. S.

    2006-12-01

    We present here the novel addition of detailed organic carbon cycling to our model of a hypersaline microbial mat ecosystem. This ecosystem model, MBGC (Microbial BioGeoChemistry), simulates carbon fixation through oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthesis, and the release of C and electrons for microbial heterotrophs via cyanobacterial exudates and also via a pool of dead cells. Previously in MBGC, the organic portion of the carbon cycle was simplified into a black-box rate of accumulation of simple and complex organic compounds based on photosynthesis and mortality rates. We will discuss the novel inclusion of fermentation as a source of carbon and electrons for use in methanogenesis and sulfate reduction, and the influence of photorespiration on labile carbon exudation rates in cyanobacteria. We will also discuss the modeling of decomposition of dead cells and the ultimate release of inorganic carbon. The detailed modeling of organic carbon cycling is important to the accurate representation of inorganic carbon flux through the mat, as well as to accurate representation of growth models of the heterotrophs under different environmental conditions. Because the model ecosystem is an analog of ancient microbial mats that had huge impacts on the atmosphere of early earth, this MBGC can be useful as a biological component to either early earth models or models of other planets that potentially harbor life.

  19. The uncertainty of modeled soil carbon stock change for Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtonen, Aleksi; Heikkinen, Juha

    2013-04-01

    Countries should report soil carbon stock changes of forests for Kyoto Protocol. Under Kyoto Protocol one can omit reporting of a carbon pool by verifying that the pool is not a source of carbon, which is especially tempting for the soil pool. However, verifying that soils of a nation are not a source of carbon in given year seems to be nearly impossible. The Yasso07 model was parametrized against various decomposition data using MCMC method. Soil carbon change in Finland between 1972 and 2011 were simulated with Yasso07 model using litter input data derived from the National Forest Inventory (NFI) and fellings time series. The uncertainties of biomass models, litter turnoverrates, NFI sampling and Yasso07 model were propagated with Monte Carlo simulations. Due to biomass estimation methods, uncertainties of various litter input sources (e.g. living trees, natural mortality and fellings) correlate strongly between each other. We show how original covariance matrices can be analytically combined and the amount of simulated components reduce greatly. While doing simulations we found that proper handling correlations may be even more essential than accurate estimates of standard errors. As a preliminary results, from the analysis we found that both Southern- and Northern Finland were soil carbon sinks, coefficient of variations (CV) varying 10%-25% when model was driven with long term constant weather data. When we applied annual weather data, soils were both sinks and sources of carbon and CVs varied from 10%-90%. This implies that the success of soil carbon sink verification depends on the weather data applied with models. Due to this fact IPCC should provide clear guidance for the weather data applied with soil carbon models and also for soil carbon sink verification. In the UNFCCC reporting carbon sinks of forest biomass have been typically averaged for five years - similar period for soil model weather data would be logical.

  20. Modelling erosion and its interaction with soil organic carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyesiku-Blakemore, Joseph; Verrot, Lucile; Geris, Josie; Zhang, Ganlin; Peng, Xinhua; Hallett, Paul; Smith, Jo

    2017-04-01

    Water driven soil erosion removes and relocates a significant quantity of soil organic carbon. In China the quantity of carbon removed from the soil through water erosion has been reported to be 180+/-80 Mt y-1 (Yue et al., 2011). Being able to effectively model the movement of such a large quantity of carbon is important for the assessment of soil quality and carbon storage in the region and further afield. A large selection of erosion models are available and much work has been done on evaluating the performance of these in developed countries (Merritt et al., 2006). Fewer studies have evaluated the application of these models on soils in developing countries. Here we evaluate and compare the performance of two of these models, WEPP (Laflen et al., 1997) and RUSLE (Renard et al., 1991), for simulations of soil erosion and deposition at the slope scale on a Chinese Red Soil under cultivation using measurements taken at the site. We also describe work to dynamically couple the movement of carbon presented in WEPP to a model of soil organic matter and nutrient turnover, ECOSSE (Smith et al., 2010). This aims to improve simulations of both erosion and carbon cycling by using the simulated rates of erosion to alter the distribution of soil carbon, the depth of soil and the clay content across the slopes, changing the simulated rate of carbon turnover. This, in turn, affects the soil carbon available to be eroded in the next timestep, so improving estimates of carbon erosion. We compare the simulations of this coupled modelling approach with those of the unaltered ECOSSE and WEPP models to determine the importance of coupling erosion and turnover models on the simulation of carbon losses at catchment scale.

  1. Model-based estimation of the global carbon budget and its uncertainty from carbon dioxide and carbon isotope records

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kheshgi, Haroon S. [Corporate Research Laboratories, Exxon Research and Engineering Company, Annandale, New Jersey (United States); Jain, Atul K. [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Illinois, Urbana (United States); Wuebbles, Donald J. [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Illinois, Urbana (United States)

    1999-12-27

    A global carbon cycle model is used to reconstruct the carbon budget, balancing emissions from fossil fuel and land use with carbon uptake by the oceans, and the terrestrial biosphere. We apply Bayesian statistics to estimate uncertainty of carbon uptake by the oceans and the terrestrial biosphere based on carbon dioxide and carbon isotope records, and prior information on model parameter probability distributions. This results in a quantitative reconstruction of past carbon budget and its uncertainty derived from an explicit choice of model, data-based constraints, and prior distribution of parameters. Our estimated ocean sink for the 1980s is 17{+-}7 Gt C (90% confidence interval) and is comparable to the estimate of 20{+-}8 Gt C given in the recent Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change assessment [Schimel et al., 1996]. Constraint choice is tested to determine which records have the most influence over estimates of the past carbon budget; records individually (e.g., bomb-radiocarbon inventory) have little effect since there are other records which form similar constraints. (c) 1999 American Geophysical Union.

  2. Contribution of different grass species to plant-atmosphere ammonia exchange in intensively managed grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, M.; Herrmann, B.; Jones, S.; Neftel, A.; Sutton, M. A.; Schjoerring, J. K.

    2009-01-01

    Species diversity in grasslands usually declines with increasing input of nitrogen from fertilizers or atmospheric deposition. Conversely, species diversity may also impact the build-up of soil and plant nitrogen pools. One important pool is NH3/NH4+ which also can be exchanged between plant leaves and the atmosphere. Limited information is available on how plant-atmosphere ammonia exchange is related to species diversity in grasslands. We have here investigated grass species abundance and different foliar nitrogen pools in 4-year-old intensively managed grassland. Apoplastic pH and NH4+ concentrations of the 8 most abundant species (Lolium perenne, Phleum pratense, Festuca pratensis, Lolium multiflorum, Poa pratensis, Dactylis glomerata, Holcus lanatus, Bromus mollis) were used to calculate stomatal NH3 compensation points. Apoplastic NH4+ concentrations differed considerably among the species, ranging from 13 to 117 μM, with highest values in Festuca pratensis. Also apoplastic pH values varied, from pH 6.0 in Phleum pratense to 6.9 in Dactylis glomerata. The observed differences in apoplastic NH4+ and pH resulted in a large span of predicted values for the stomatal NH3 compensation point which ranged between 0.20 and 6.57 nmol mol-1. Three species (Lolium perenne, Festuca pratensis and Dactylis glomerata) had sufficiently high NH3 compensation point and abundance to contribute to the bi-directional NH3 fluxes recorded over the whole field. The other 5 grass species had NH3 compensation points considerably below the atmospheric NH3 concentration and were thus not likely to contribute to NH3 emission but only to NH3 uptake from the atmosphere. Evaluated across species, leaf bulk-tissue NH4+ concentrations correlated well (r2=0.902) with stomatal NH3 compensation points calculated on the basis of the apoplastic bioassay. This suggests that leaf tissue NH4+ concentrations combined with data for the frequency distribution of the corresponding species can be used for

  3. Modeling Carbon Chain Anions in L1527

    CERN Document Server

    Harada, Nanase

    2008-01-01

    The low-mass protostellar region L1527 is unusual because it contains observable abundances of unsaturated carbon-chain molecules including CnH radicals, H2Cn carbenes, cyanopolyynes, and the negative ions C4H- and C6H-, all of which are more associated with cold cores than with protostellar regions. Sakai et al. suggested that these molecules are formed in L1527 from the chemical precursor methane, which evaporates from the grains during the heat-up of the region. With the gas-phase osu.03.2008 network extended to include negative ions of the families Cn-, and CnH-, as well as the newly detected C3N-, we modeled the chemistry that occurs following methane evaporation at T~ 25-30 K. We are able to reproduce most of the observed molecular abundances in L1527 at a time of ~5000 yr. At later times, the overall abundance of anions become greater than that of electrons, which has an impact on many organic species and ions. The anion-to-neutral ratio in our calculation is in good agreement with observation for C6H-...

  4. Evaluation of black carbon estimations in global aerosol models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, D.; Schulz, M.; McNaughton, C.; Spackman, J.R.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Krol, M.C.

    2009-01-01

    We evaluate black carbon (BC) model predictions from the AeroCom model intercomparison project by considering the diversity among year 2000 model simulations and comparing model predictions with available measurements. These model-measurement intercomparisons include BC surface and aircraft concentr

  5. Modeling of the thyme: Liquid carbon dioxide extraction system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeković Zoran P.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The extraction of thyme (Thymus vulgaris L by liquid carbon dioxide was investigated. The obtained extracts were analyzed by HPLC and GC-MS methods, and their composition was compared with that of the essential oil obtained by steam distillation and by supercritical carbon dioxide at 100 bar and 40°C. To model extraction of the thyme - liquid carbon dioxide system, we used the Reverchon - Sesti Osseo equation, as well as our modified equation.

  6. A statistical mechanics model of carbon nanotube macro-films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotube macro-films are two-dimensional films with micrometer thickness and centimeter by centimeter in-plane dimension.These carbon nanotube macroscopic assemblies have attracted significant attention from the material and mechanics communities recently because they can be easily handled and tailored to meet specific engineering needs.This paper reports the experimental methods on the preparation and characterization of single-walled carbon nanotube macro-films,and a statistical mechanics model on ...

  7. A universal model for nanoporous carbon supercapacitors applicable to diverse pore regimes, carbon materials, and electrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jingsong; Sumpter, Bobby G; Meunier, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    Supercapacitors, commonly called electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs), are emerging as a novel type of energy-storage device with the potential to substitute batteries in applications that require high power densities. In response to the latest experimental breakthrough in nanoporous carbon supercapacitors, we propose a heuristic theoretical model that takes pore curvature into account as a replacement for the EDLC model, which is based on a traditional parallel-plate capacitor. When the pore size is in the mesopore regime (2-50 nm), counterions enter mesoporous carbon materials and approach the pore wall to form an electric double-cylinder capacitor (EDCC); in the micropore regime (50 nm) at which pores are large enough so that pore curvature is no longer significant, the EDCC model can be reduced naturally to the EDLC model. We present density functional theory calculations and detailed analyses of available experimental data in various pore regimes, which show the significant effects of pore curvature on the supercapacitor properties of nanoporous carbon materials. It is shown that the EDCC/EWCC model is universal for carbon supercapacitors with diverse carbon materials, including activated carbon materials, template carbon materials, and novel carbide-derived carbon materials, and with diverse electrolytes, including organic electrolytes, such as tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate (TEABF(4)) and tetraethylammonium methylsulfonate (TEAMS) in acetonitrile, aqueous H(2)SO(4) and KOH electrolytes, and even an ionic liquid electrolyte, such as 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (EMI-TFSI). The EDCC/EWCC model allows the supercapacitor properties to be correlated with pore size, specific surface area, Debye length, electrolyte concentration and dielectric constant, and solute ion size It may lend support for the systematic optimization of the properties of carbon supercapacitors through experiments. On the basis of the insight

  8. Simulation of terrestrial carbon cycle balance model in Tibet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGJianlin:; HUDan; SUNZibao

    2003-01-01

    Based on climate material, the simplified terrestrial carbon cycle balance (TCCB) model was established, which is semi-mechanism and semi-statistics. Through TCCB model, our estimate indicates that the southeastern part of the Tibetan Plateau has much higher carbon content, and we have calculated the litter carbon pool, NPP, carbon fluxes and described their spatial characteristics in this region. Based on the TCCB model simulation, NPP in Tibet is 1.73 × 108tC/a, soil organic input rate is 0.66 × l08 tC/a, litter mineralization rate is 1.07× l08tC/a, vegetation litterfall rate is 1.73× l08 tC/a, the litter carbon pool is 7.26 × l08 tC, and soil decomposition rate is 309.54 × l08tC/a. The carbon budget was also analyzed based on the estimates of carbon pool and fluxes. The spatial distributions of carbon pools and carbon fluxes in different compartments of terrestrial ecosystem were depicted with map respectively in Tibet. The distribution of NPP, vegetation litterfall rate, litter, litter mineralization rate, soil organic input rate and the soil decomposition rate were abstracted with temperature, precipitation, fractional vegetation and land feature.

  9. CarbonTracker-Lagrange: A model-data assimilation system for North American carbon flux estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Chen, Huilin; van der Velde, Ivar; Andrews, Arlyn; Sweeney, Colm; Baker, Ian; Ju, Weimin; van der Laan-Luijkx, Ingrid; Tans, Pieter; Peters, Wouter

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the regional carbon fluxes is of great importance for climate-related studies. To derive these carbon fluxes, atmospheric inverse modeling methods are often used. Different from global inverse modeling, regional studies need to deal with lateral boundary conditions (BCs) at the outer atmospheric domain studied. Also, regional inverse modeling systems typically use a higher spatial resolution and can be more computation-intensive. In this study, we implement a regional inverse modeling system for atmospheric CO₂ based on the CarbonTracker framework. We combine it with a high-resolution Lagrangian transport model, the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport model driven by the Weather Forecast and Research meteorological fields (WRF-STILT). The new system uses independent information from aircraft CO₂ profiles to optimize lateral BCs, while simultaneously optimizing biosphere fluxes with near-surface CO₂ observations from tall towers. This Lagrangian transport model with precalculated footprints is computational more efficient than using an Eulerian model. We take SiBCASA biosphere model results as prior NEE from the terrestrial biosphere. Three different lateral BCs, derived from CarbonTracker North America mole fraction fields, CarbonTracker Europe mole fraction fields and an empirical BC from NOAA aircraft profiles, are employed to investigate the influence of BCs. To estimate the uncertainties of the optimized fluxes from the system and to determine the impacts of system setup on biosphere flux covariances, BC uncertainties and model-data mismatches, we tested various prior biosphere fluxes and BCs. To estimate the transport uncertainties, we also tested an alternative Lagrangian transport model Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory Model driven by the North American Mesoscale Forecast System meteorological fields (HYSPLIT-NAM12). Based on the above tests, we achieved an ensemble of inverse estimates from our system

  10. Soil-plant-atmosphere conditions regulating convective cloud formation above southeastern US pine plantations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoli, Gabriele; Domec, Jean-Christophe; Novick, Kimberly; Oishi, Andrew Christopher; Noormets, Asko; Marani, Marco; Katul, Gabriel

    2016-06-01

    Loblolly pine trees (Pinus taeda L.) occupy more than 20% of the forested area in the southern United States, represent more than 50% of the standing pine volume in this region, and remove from the atmosphere about 500 g C m-2 per year through net ecosystem exchange. Hence, their significance as a major regional carbon sink can hardly be disputed. What is disputed is whether the proliferation of young plantations replacing old forest in the southern United States will alter key aspects of the hydrologic cycle, including convective rainfall, which is the focus of the present work. Ecosystem fluxes of sensible (Hs) and latent heat (LE) and large-scale, slowly evolving free atmospheric temperature and water vapor content are known to be first-order controls on the formation of convective clouds in the atmospheric boundary layer. These controlling processes are here described by a zero-order analytical model aimed at assessing how plantations of different ages may regulate the persistence and transition of the atmospheric system between cloudy and cloudless conditions. Using the analytical model together with field observations, the roles of ecosystem Hs and LE on convective cloud formation are explored relative to the entrainment of heat and moisture from the free atmosphere. Our results demonstrate that cloudy-cloudless regimes at the land surface are regulated by a nonlinear relation between the Bowen ratio Bo=Hs/LE and root-zone soil water content, suggesting that young/mature pines ecosystems have the ability to recirculate available water (through rainfall predisposition mechanisms). Such nonlinearity was not detected in a much older pine stand, suggesting a higher tolerance to drought but a limited control on boundary layer dynamics. These results enable the generation of hypotheses about the impacts on convective cloud formation driven by afforestation/deforestation and groundwater depletion projected to increase following increased human population in the

  11. Carbon Capture and Storage: Model Regulatory Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    Energy-related carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions are set to double by 2050 unless decisive action is taken. International Energy Agency (IEA) analysis demonstrates, however, that it is possible -- in the same timeframe to 2050 -- to reduce projected greenhouse-gas emissions to half 2005 levels, but this will require an energy technology revolution, involving the aggressive deployment of a portfolio of low-carbon energy technologies.

  12. A global predictive model of carbon in mangrove soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardine, Sunny L.; Siikamäki, Juha V.

    2014-10-01

    Mangroves are among the most threatened and rapidly vanishing natural environments worldwide. They provide a wide range of ecosystem services and have recently become known for their exceptional capacity to store carbon. Research shows that mangrove conservation may be a low-cost means of reducing CO2 emissions. Accordingly, there is growing interest in developing market mechanisms to credit mangrove conservation projects for associated CO2 emissions reductions. These efforts depend on robust and readily applicable, but currently unavailable, localized estimates of soil carbon. Here, we use over 900 soil carbon measurements, collected in 28 countries by 61 independent studies, to develop a global predictive model for mangrove soil carbon. Using climatological and locational data as predictors, we explore several predictive modeling alternatives, including machine-learning methods. With our predictive model, we construct a global dataset of estimated soil carbon concentrations and stocks on a high-resolution grid (5 arc min). We estimate that the global mangrove soil carbon stock is 5.00 ± 0.94 Pg C (assuming a 1 meter soil depth) and find this stock is highly variable over space. The amount of carbon per hectare in the world’s most carbon-rich mangroves (approximately 703 ± 38 Mg C ha-1) is roughly a 2.6 ± 0.14 times the amount of carbon per hectare in the world’s most carbon-poor mangroves (approximately 272 ± 49 Mg C ha-1). Considerable within country variation in mangrove soil carbon also exists. In Indonesia, the country with the largest mangrove soil carbon stock, we estimate that the most carbon-rich mangroves contain 1.5 ± 0.12 times as much carbon per hectare as the most carbon-poor mangroves. Our results can aid in evaluating benefits from mangrove conservation and designing mangrove conservation policy. Additionally, the results can be used to project changes in mangrove soil carbon stocks based on changing climatological predictors, e.g. to

  13. Nucleation and electrolytic deposition of lead on model carbon electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cericola, D.; Spahr, M.

    2016-08-01

    There is a general consensus in the lead acid battery industry for the use of carbon additives as a functional component in the negative paste to boost the battery performance with regards to charge acceptance and cycle life especially for upcoming automotive and energy storage applications. Several mechanisms are discussed in the scientific literature and the affinity of the carbon surfaces to lead species seems to play a key role. With a set of experiments on model carbon electrodes we gave evidence to the fact that some carbon materials promote spontaneous nucleation of lead crystals. We propose a mechanism such that the carbon, as soon as in a lead containing environment, immobilizes some lead on its surface. Such immobilized lead acts as nucleation seed for the deposition of lead when a current is passed through the material. It is therefore possible to differentiate and select the carbon materials based on their ability to form nucleation seeds.

  14. Toward more realistic projections of soil carbon dynamics by Earth system models: SOIL CARBON MODELING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Yiqi; Ahlstrom, Anders; Allison, Steven D.; Batjes, Niels H.; Brovkin, Victor; Carvalhais, N.; Chappell, Adrian; Ciais, Philippe; Davidson, Eric A.; Finzi, Adien; Georgiou, Katerina; Guenet, Bertrand; Hararuk, Oleksandra; Harden, Jennifer W.; He, Yujie; Hopkins, Francesca; Jiang, Lifen; Koven, C.; Jackson, Robert B.; Jones, Chris D.; Lara, Mark J.; Liang, Junyi; McGuire, A. David; Parton, William J.; Peng, Changhui; Randerson, J.; Salazar, Alejandro; Sierra , Carlos A.; Smith, Matthew J.; Tian, Hanqin; Todd-Brown, Katherine EO; Torn, Margaret S.; van Groenigen, Kees Jan; Wang, Ying Ping; West, Tristram O.; Wei, Yaxing; Wieder, William R.; Xia, Jianyang; Xu, Xia; Xu, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Tao

    2016-01-21

    Soil carbon (C) is a critical component of Earth system models (ESMs) and its diverse representations are a major source of the large spread across models in the terrestrial C sink from the 3rd to 5th assessment reports of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Improving soil C projections is of a high priority for Earth system modeling in the future IPCC and other assessments. To achieve this goal, we suggest that (1) model structures should reflect real-world processes, (2) parameters should be calibrated to match model outputs with observations, and (3) external forcing variables should accurately prescribe the environmental conditions that soils experience. Firstly, most soil C cycle models simulate C input from litter production and C release through decomposition. The latter process has traditionally been represented by 1st-order decay functions, regulated primarily by temperature, moisture, litter quality, and soil texture. While this formulation well captures macroscopic SOC dynamics, better understanding is needed of their underlying mechanisms as related to microbial processes, depth-dependent environmental controls, and other processes that strongly affect soil C dynamics. Secondly, incomplete use of observations in model parameterization is a major cause of bias in soil C projections from ESMs. Optimal parameter calibration with both pool- and flux-based datasets through data assimilation is among the highest priorities for near-term research to reduce biases among ESMs. Thirdly, external variables are represented inconsistently among ESMs, leading to differences in modeled soil C dynamics. We recommend the implementation of traceability analyses to identify how external variables and model parameterizations influence SOC dynamics in different ESMs. Overall, projections of the terrestrial C sink can be substantially improved when reliable datasets are available to select the most representative model structure, constrain parameters, and

  15. Black Carbon Measurement and Modeling in the Arabian Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawad, Faisal Al; Khoder, Mamdouh; Almazroui, Mansour; Alghamdi, Mansour; Lihavainen, Heikki; Hyvarinen, Antti; Henriksson, Svante

    2017-04-01

    Black carbon is an important atmospheric aerosol as an effective factor in public health, changing the global and regional climate, and reducing visibility. Black carbon absorbs light, warms the atmosphere, and modifies cloud droplets and the amount of precipitation. In spite of this significance, knowledge of black carbon over the Arabian Peninsula is hard to find in literature until recently. The total mass of black carbon and wind direction and speeds were measured continuously at Hada Al-Sham, Saudi Arabia for the year 2013. In addition, a state of the art global aerosol - climate model (ECHAM5-HAM) was used to determine black carbon climatology over the Arabian Peninsula. Simulation of the model was carried out for the years eight years (2004 - 2011). The daily mean values of the concentrations of black carbon had a minimum of 15.0 ng/m3 and a maximum of 6372 ng/m3 with a mean of at 1899 ng/m3. The diurnal pattern of black carbon showed higher values overnight, and steady low values during daytimes caused by sea and land breezes. Seasons of black carbon vary over the Arabian Peninsula, and the longest is in the Northern Region where it lasts from July to October. High concentrations of black carbon at Hada Al-Sham was observed with a mean of 1.9 µm/m3, and seasons of black carbon vary widely across the Arabian Peninsula. Assessment of the effects of black carbon over the Arabian Peninsula on the global radiation balance. Initiating a black carbon monitoring network is highly recommended to assess its impacts on health, environment, and climate.

  16. Modeling the carbon isotope composition of bivalve shells (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanek, C.

    2010-12-01

    The stable carbon isotope composition of bivalve shells is a valuable archive of paleobiological and paleoenvironmental information. Previous work has shown that the carbon isotope composition of the shell is related to the carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the ambient water in which a bivalve lives, as well as metabolic carbon derived from bivalve respiration. The contribution of metabolic carbon varies among organisms, but it is generally thought to be relatively low (e.g., organism and high (>90%) in the shells from terrestrial organisms. Because metabolic carbon contains significantly more C-12 than DIC, negative excursions from the expected environmental (DIC) signal are interpreted to reflect an increased contribution of metabolic carbon in the shell. This observation contrasts sharply with modeled carbon isotope compositions for shell layers deposited from the inner extrapallial fluid (EPF). Previous studies have shown that growth lines within the inner shell layer of bivalves are produced during periods of anaerobiosis when acidic metabolic byproducts (e.g., succinic acid) are neutralized (or buffered) by shell dissolution. This requires the pH of EPF to decrease below ambient levels (~7.5) until a state of undersaturation is achieved that promotes shell dissolution. This condition may occur when aquatic bivalves are subjected to external stressors originating from ecological (predation) or environmental (exposure to atm; low dissolved oxygen; contaminant release) pressures; normal physiological processes will restore the pH of EPF when the pressure is removed. As a consequence of this process, a temporal window should also exist in EPF at relatively low pH where shell carbonate is deposited at a reduced saturation state and precipitation rate. For example, EPF chemistry should remain slightly supersaturated with respect to aragonite given a drop of one pH unit (6.5), but under closed conditions, equilibrium carbon isotope

  17. Atomistic modeling of carbon Cottrell atmospheres in bcc iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, R. G. A.; Perez, M.; Becquart, C. S.; Domain, C.

    2013-01-01

    Atomistic simulations with an EAM interatomic potential were used to evaluate carbon-dislocation binding energies in bcc iron. These binding energies were then used to calculate the occupation probability of interstitial sites in the vicinity of an edge and a screw dislocation. The saturation concentration due to carbon-carbon interactions was also estimated by atomistic simulations in the dislocation core and taken as an upper limit for carbon concentration in a Cottrell atmosphere. We obtained a maximum concentration of 10 ± 1 at.% C at T = 0 K within a radius of 1 nm from the dislocation lines. The spatial carbon distributions around the line defects revealed that the Cottrell atmosphere associated with an edge dislocation is denser than that around a screw dislocation, in contrast with the predictions of the classical model of Cochardt and colleagues. Moreover, the present Cottrell atmosphere model is in reasonable quantitative accord with the three-dimensional atom probe data available in the literature.

  18. Allometric models for estimating biomass and carbon in Alnus acuminata

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    William Fonseca; Laura Ruíz; Marylin Rojas; Federico Allice

    2013-01-01

    ... (leaves, branches, stem and root) and total tree biomass in Alnus acuminata (Kunth) in Costa Rica. Additionally, models were developed to estimate biomass and carbon in trees per hectare and for total plant biomass per hectare...

  19. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Deposition on Model Environmental Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deposition of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) on model environmental surfaces was investigated using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). Deposition behaviors of MWNTs on positively and negatively charged surfaces were in good agreement with Der...

  20. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Deposition on Model Environmental Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deposition of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) on model environmental surfaces was investigated using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). Deposition behaviors of MWNTs on positively and negatively charged surfaces were in good agreement with Der...

  1. One dimensional models of excitons in carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia Decebal; Duclos, P.; Pedersen, Thomas Garm

    Excitons in carbon nanotubes may be modeled by two oppositely charged particles living on the surface of a cylinder. We derive three one dimensional effective Hamiltonians which become exact as the radius of the cylinder vanishes. Two of them are solvable.......Excitons in carbon nanotubes may be modeled by two oppositely charged particles living on the surface of a cylinder. We derive three one dimensional effective Hamiltonians which become exact as the radius of the cylinder vanishes. Two of them are solvable....

  2. Modeling the phase diagram of carbon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghiringhelli, L.M.; Los, J.H.; Meijer, E.J.; Fasolino, A.; Frenkel, D.

    2005-01-01

    We determined the phase diagram involving diamond, graphite, and liquid carbon using a recently developed semiempirical potential. Using accurate free-energy calculations, we computed the solid-solid and solid-liquid phase boundaries for pressures and temperatures up to 400 GPa and 12 000 K, respect

  3. Biodistribution of Carbon Nanotubes in Animal Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Møller, Peter Horn; Clausen, Per Axel

    2017-01-01

    The many interesting physical and chemical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNT) make it one of the most commercially attractive materials in the era of nanotechnology. Here, we review the recent publications on in vivo biodistribution of pristine and functionalized forms of single-walled and multi...

  4. Biodistribution of Carbon Nanotubes in Animal Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Møller, Peter; Clausen, Per Axel

    2017-01-01

    The many physical and chemical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNT) make it one of the most commercially attractive materials in the era of nanotechnology. Here, we review the recent publications on in vivo biodistribution of pristine and functionalized forms of single-walled and multi-walled CNT...

  5. Using measurements for evaluation of black carbon modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gilardoni

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The ever increasing use of air quality and climate model assessments to underpin economic, public health, and environmental policy decisions makes effective model evaluation critical. This paper discusses the properties of black carbon and light attenuation and absorption observations that are the key to a reliable evaluation of black carbon model and compares parametric and nonparametric statistical tools for the quantification of the agreement between models and observations. Black carbon concentrations are simulated with TM5/M7 global model from July 2002 to June 2003 at four remote sites (Alert, Jungfraujoch, Mace Head, and Trinidad Head and two regional background sites (Bondville and Ispra. Equivalent black carbon (EBC concentrations are calculated using light attenuation measurements from January 2000 to December 2005. Seasonal trends in the measurements are determined by fitting sinusoidal functions and the representativeness of the period simulated by the model is verified based on the scatter of the experimental values relative to the fit curves. When the resolution of the model grid is larger than 1°×1°, it is recommended to verify that the measurement site is representative of the grid cell. For this purpose, equivalent black carbon measurements at Alert, Bondville and Trinidad Head are compared to light absorption and elemental carbon measurements performed at different sites inside the same model grid cells. Comparison of these equivalent black carbon and elemental carbon measurements indicates that uncertainties in black carbon optical properties can compromise the comparison between model and observations. During model evaluation it is important to examine the extent to which a model is able to simulate the variability in the observations over different integration periods as this will help to identify the most appropriate timescales. The agreement between model and observation is accurately described by the overlap of

  6. Using measurements for evaluation of black carbon modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gilardoni

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The ever increasing use of air quality and climate model assessments to underpin economic, public health, and environmental policy decisions makes effective model evaluation critical. This paper discusses the properties of black carbon and light attenuation and absorption observations that are the key to a reliable evaluation of black carbon model and compares parametric and nonparametric statistical tools for the quantification of the agreement between models and observations. Black carbon concentrations are simulated with TM5/M7 global model from July 2002 to June 2003 at four remote sites (Alert, Jungfraujoch, Mace Head, and Trinidad Head and two regional background sites (Bondville and Ispra. Equivalent black carbon (EBC concentrations are calculated using light attenuation measurements from January 2000 to December 2005. Seasonal trends in the measurements are determined by fitting sinusoidal functions and the representativeness of the period simulated by the model is verified based on the scatter of the experimental values relative to the fit curves. When the resolution of the model grid is larger than 1° × 1°, it is recommended to verify that the measurement site is representative of the grid cell. For this purpose, equivalent black carbon measurements at Alert, Bondville and Trinidad Head are compared to light absorption and elemental carbon measurements performed at different sites inside the same model grid cells. Comparison of these equivalent black carbon and elemental carbon measurements indicates that uncertainties in black carbon optical properties can compromise the comparison between model and observations. During model evaluation it is important to examine the extent to which a model is able to simulate the variability in the observations over different integration periods as this will help to identify the most appropriate timescales. The agreement between model and observation is accurately described by the overlap of

  7. Computable General Equilibrium Techniques for Carbon Tax Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Amin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Lacking of proper environmental models environmental pollution is now a solemn problem in many developing countries particularly in Malaysia. Some empirical studies of worldwide reveal that imposition of a carbon tax significantly decreases carbon emissions and does not dramatically reduce economic growth. To our knowledge there has not been any research done to simulate the economic impact of emission control policies in Malaysia. Approach: Therefore this study developed an environmental computable general equilibrium model for Malaysia and investigated carbon tax policy responses in the economy applying exogenously different degrees of carbon tax into the model. Three simulations were carried out using a Malaysian social accounting matrix. Results: The carbon tax policy illustrated that a 1.21% reduction of carbon emission reduced the nominal GDP by 0.82% and exports by 2.08%; 2.34% reduction of carbon emission reduced the nominal GDP by 1.90% and exports by 3.97% and 3.40% reduction of carbon emission reduced the nominal GDP by 3.17% and exports by 5.71%. Conclusion/Recommendations: Imposition of successively higher carbon tax results in increased government revenue from baseline by 26.67, 53.07 and 79.28% respectively. However, fixed capital investment increased in scenario 1a by 0.43% and decreased in scenarios 1b and 1c by 0.26 and 1.79% respectively from the baseline. According to our policy findings policy makers should consider 1st (scenario 1a carbon tax policy. This policy results in achieving reasonably good environmental impacts without losing the investment, fixed capital investment, investment share of nominal GDP and government revenue.

  8. Carbon footprint calculation model for the Mexican food equivalent system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Ruiz Cerrillo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the impact environment trough the anthropogenic action has been contributed to the fast production of greenhouse gases effect (GHG, a way to estimate the quantity of these substances is the carbon footprint (CF, nowadays it does not exist enough models for the calculation of food carbon footprint. Objective: the aim of this study was to design a calculation model for the measurement of the carbon footprint on the Mexican food equivalent system. Methods: it was about a retrospective study, a bibliographic review was made with original and review articles in different specialized researchers, there were included publications in English and Spanish, also published from 2000 to 2016. Results: a reference table was proposed for the food carbon footprint calculation on the Mexican food equivalent system trough the carbon intensity indicator, which is determined by the grams of emissions equivalents of carbon dioxide (CO2 in relation with the energetic contribution of each food equivalent. Conclusion: in a conclusion manner, estimating food carbon footprint is still a challenge, mean while the calculation models proposal is important to estimate the production of GHG trough a more sustainable food system.

  9. Using a Modified Soil-Plant-Atmosphere Scheme (MSPAS) to Simulate the Interaction between Land Surface Processes and Atmospheric Boundary Layer in Semi-Arid Regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘树华; 乐旭; 胡非; 刘辉志

    2004-01-01

    This paper uses a Modified Soil-Plant-Atmosphere Scheme (MSPAS) to study the interaction between land surface and atmospheric boundary layer processes. The scheme is composed of two main parts:atmospheric boundary layer processes and land surface processes. Compared with SiB and BATS, which are famous for their detailed parameterizations of physical variables, this simplified model is more convenient and saves much more computation time. Though simple, the feasibility of the model is well proved in this paper. The numerical simulation results from MSPAS show good agreement with reality. The scheme is used to obtain reasonable simulations for diurnal variations of heat balance, potential temperature of boundary layer, and wind field, and spatial distributions of temperature, specific humidity, vertical velocity,turbulence kinetic energy, and turbulence exchange coefficient over desert and oasis. In addition, MSPAS is used to simulate the interaction between desert and oasis at night, and again it obtains reasonable results.This indicates that MSPAS can be used to study the interaction between land surface processes and the atmospheric boundary layer over various underlying surfaces and can be extended for regional climate and numerical weather prediction study.

  10. The integration of 3D electrical resistivity tomography and ET flux measurements to characterize water mass balance in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanella, Daniela; Boaga, Jacopo; Perri, Maria Teresa; Consoli, Simona; Cassiani, Giorgio

    2014-05-01

    subsoil interactions between biomass, hydrosphere and atmosphere. This case study demonstrates that 3D micro-ERT is capable of characterizing the pathways of water distribution, and provides spatial information on root zone suction regions. The reliability of the method may suggest its integration into farm water management surveys to delineate zones of excessive water loss due to deep drainage and to improve the positioning of point measurement methods for measuring soil moisture, thereby improving irrigation scheduling. The integration with plant transpiration and local evapo-transpiration makes available a full set of complementing data to constrain predictive models for the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum.

  11. Using Radiocarbon to Test Models of Ecosystem Carbon Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumbore, S.; Lin, H.; Randerson, J.

    2007-05-01

    The radiocarbon content of carbon stored in and respired by ecosystems provides a direct measure of ecosystem carbon dynamics that can be directly compared to model predictions. Because carbon cycles through ecosystems on a variety of timescales, the mean age of C in standing biomass and soil organic matter pools is older than the mean age of microbially respired carbon. In turn, each pathway for C transit through ecosystems my respond differently to edaphic conditions; for example, soil organic matter mean age is controlled by factors affecting stabilization of C on very long timescales, such as mineralogy, while a factor like litter quality that effects decomposition rates reflects vegetation and climate characteristics. We compare the radiocarbon signature of heterotrophically respired CO2 across a number of ecosystems with models predicted using the CASA ecosystem model. The major controls of microbially respired CO2 from ecosystems include the residence time of C in living plant pools (i.e. the age of C in litter inputs to soil) and factors that control decomposition rates (litter quality and climate). Major differences between model and measured values at low latitudes are related to how woody debris pools are treated differently in models and measurements. The time lag between photosynthesis and respiration is a key ecosystem property that defines its potential to store or release carbon given variations in annual net primary production. Radiocarbon provides a rare case where models can be directly compared with measurements to provide a test of this parameter.

  12. Nano-QSPR Modelling of Carbon-Based Nanomaterials Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salahinejad, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of chemical and physical properties of nanomaterials is of critical importance in a broad variety of nanotechnology researches. There is an increasing interest in computational methods capable of predicting properties of new and modified nanomaterials in the absence of time-consuming and costly experimental studies. Quantitative Structure- Property Relationship (QSPR) approaches are progressive tools in modelling and prediction of many physicochemical properties of nanomaterials, which are also known as nano-QSPR. This review provides insight into the concepts, challenges and applications of QSPR modelling of carbon-based nanomaterials. First, we try to provide a general overview of QSPR implications, by focusing on the difficulties and limitations on each step of the QSPR modelling of nanomaterials. Then follows with the most significant achievements of QSPR methods in modelling of carbon-based nanomaterials properties and their recent applications to generate predictive models. This review specifically addresses the QSPR modelling of physicochemical properties of carbon-based nanomaterials including fullerenes, single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT), multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) and graphene.

  13. A carbon balance model for the great dismal swamp ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleeter, Rachel; Sleeter, Benjamin M.; Williams, Brianna; Hogan, Dianna; Hawbaker, Todd J.; Zhu, Zhiliang

    2017-01-01

    BackgroundCarbon storage potential has become an important consideration for land management and planning in the United States. The ability to assess ecosystem carbon balance can help land managers understand the benefits and tradeoffs between different management strategies. This paper demonstrates an application of the Land Use and Carbon Scenario Simulator (LUCAS) model developed for local-scale land management at the Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge. We estimate the net ecosystem carbon balance by considering past ecosystem disturbances resulting from storm damage, fire, and land management actions including hydrologic inundation, vegetation clearing, and replanting.ResultsWe modeled the annual ecosystem carbon stock and flow rates for the 30-year historic time period of 1985–2015, using age-structured forest growth curves and known data for disturbance events and management activities. The 30-year total net ecosystem production was estimated to be a net sink of 0.97 Tg C. When a hurricane and six historic fire events were considered in the simulation, the Great Dismal Swamp became a net source of 0.89 Tg C. The cumulative above and below-ground carbon loss estimated from the South One and Lateral West fire events totaled 1.70 Tg C, while management activities removed an additional 0.01 Tg C. The carbon loss in below-ground biomass alone totaled 1.38 Tg C, with the balance (0.31 Tg C) coming from above-ground biomass and detritus.ConclusionsNatural disturbances substantially impact net ecosystem carbon balance in the Great Dismal Swamp. Through alternative management actions such as re-wetting, below-ground biomass loss may have been avoided, resulting in the added carbon storage capacity of 1.38 Tg. Based on two model assumptions used to simulate the peat system, (a burn scar totaling 70 cm in depth, and the soil carbon accumulation rate of 0.36 t C/ha−1/year−1 for Atlantic white cedar), the total soil carbon loss from the

  14. Synthesis, model and stability of helically coiled carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fejes, Dora; Raffai, Manuella; Hernadi, Klara

    2013-01-01

    Structural model of helically coiled carbon nanotubes is proposed. It is constructed by means of topological coordinate method. Relaxation and cohesive energy calculation are performed by molecular mechanics, using second-generation bond order potential for hydrocarbons introduced by D. W. Brenner....... Our experiments focused on the production and development of catalysts for the synthesis of helically coiled CNTs (carbon nanotubes). The catalysts were tested in the decomposition of acetylene by CCVD (Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition) method. The carbon deposit was imaged by TEM (Transmission...

  15. Inorganic carbon dominates total dissolved carbon concentrations and fluxes in British rivers: Application of the THINCARB model - Thermodynamic modelling of inorganic carbon in freshwaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvie, Helen P; King, Stephen M; Neal, Colin

    2017-01-01

    River water-quality studies rarely measure dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) routinely, and there is a gap in our knowledge of the contributions of DIC to aquatic carbon fluxes and cycling processes. Here, we present the THINCARB model (THermodynamic modelling of INorganic CARBon), which uses widely-measured determinands (pH, alkalinity and temperature) to calculate DIC concentrations, speciation (bicarbonate, HCO3(-); carbonate, CO3(2-); and dissolved carbon dioxide, H2CO3(⁎)) and excess partial pressures of carbon dioxide (EpCO2) in freshwaters. If calcium concentration measurements are available, THINCARB also calculates calcite saturation. THINCARB was applied to the 39-year Harmonised Monitoring Scheme (HMS) dataset, encompassing all the major British rivers discharging to the coastal zone. Model outputs were combined with the HMS dissolved organic carbon (DOC) datasets, and with spatial land use, geology, digital elevation and hydrological datasets. We provide a first national-scale evaluation of: the spatial and temporal variability in DIC concentrations and fluxes in British rivers; the contributions of DIC and DOC to total dissolved carbon (TDC); and the contributions to DIC from HCO3(-) and CO3(2-) from weathering sources and H2CO3(⁎) from microbial respiration. DIC accounted for >50% of TDC concentrations in 87% of the HMS samples. In the seven largest British rivers, DIC accounted for an average of 80% of the TDC flux (ranging from 57% in the upland River Tay, to 91% in the lowland River Thames). DIC fluxes exceeded DOC fluxes, even under high-flow conditions, including in the Rivers Tay and Tweed, draining upland peaty catchments. Given that particulate organic carbon fluxes from UK rivers are consistently lower than DOC fluxes, DIC fluxes are therefore also the major source of total carbon fluxes to the coastal zone. These results demonstrate the importance of accounting for DIC concentrations and fluxes for quantifying carbon transfers from land

  16. A carbon footprint simulation model for the cork oak sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demertzi, Martha, E-mail: marthademertzi@ua.pt [Center for Environmental and Marine Studies (CESAM), Department of Environment and Planning, University of Aveiro, Campus Universitário de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Paulo, Joana Amaral, E-mail: joanaap@isa.ulisboa.pt [Center of Forest Studies (CEF), Superior Institute of Agronomy (ISA), Tapada da Ajuda, University of Lisbon, 1349-017 Lisbon (Portugal); Arroja, Luís, E-mail: arroja@ua.pt [Center for Environmental and Marine Studies (CESAM), Department of Environment and Planning, University of Aveiro, Campus Universitário de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Dias, Ana Cláudia, E-mail: acdias@ua.pt [Center for Environmental and Marine Studies (CESAM), Department of Environment and Planning, University of Aveiro, Campus Universitário de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2016-10-01

    In the present study, a simulation model for the calculation of the carbon footprint of the cork oak sector (CCFM) is developed for the first time. A life cycle approach is adopted including the forest management, manufacturing, use and end-of-life stages. CCFM allows the user to insert the cork type used as raw material and its respective quantity and the distances in-between the various stages. The user can choose among different end-of-life destination options for the used cork products. The option of inserting different inputs, allows the use of the present simulation model for different cork oak systems, in different countries and with different conditions. CCFM allows the identification of the stages and products with the greatest carbon footprint and thus, a better management of the sector from an environmental perspective. The Portuguese cork oak sector is used as an application example of the model. The results obtained showed that the agglomeration industry is the hotspot for the carbon footprint of the cork sector mainly due to the production of the resins that are mixed with the cork granules for the production of agglomerated cork products. The consideration of the biogenic carbon emissions and sequestration of carbon at the forest in the carbon footprint, resulted to a great decrease of the sector's carbon footprint. Future actions for improvement are suggested in order to decrease the carbon footprint of the entire cork sector. It was found that by decreasing by 10% the emission factor of the agglomeration and transformation industries, substituting the transport trucks by more recent ones and by decreasing by 10% the cork products reaching the landfilling end-of-life destinations (while increasing the quantities reaching incineration and recycling), a decrease of the total CF (excluding the biogenic emissions and sequestration) of the entire cork industry by 10% can be achieved. - Highlights: • A carbon footprint simulation model (CCFM) for

  17. Modeling of carbon nanotubes, graphene and their composites

    CERN Document Server

    Silvestre, Nuno

    2014-01-01

    This book contains ten chapters, authored by world experts in the field of simulation at nano-scale and aims to demonstrate the potentialities of computational techniques to model the mechanical behavior of nano-materials, such as carbon nanotubes, graphene and their composites. A large part of the research currently being conducted in the fields of materials science and engineering mechanics is devoted to carbon nanotubes, graphene and their applications. In this process, computational modeling is a very attractive research tool due to the difficulties in manufacturing and testing of nano-materials. Both atomistic modeling methods, such as molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics, and continuum modeling methods are being intensively used. Continuum modeling offers significant advantages over atomistic modeling such as the reduced computational effort, the capability of modeling complex structures and bridging different analysis scales, thus enabling modeling from the nano- to the macro-scale. On the oth...

  18. Underestimation of boreal soil carbon stocks by mathematical soil carbon models linked to soil nutrient status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ťupek, Boris; Ortiz, Carina A.; Hashimoto, Shoji; Stendahl, Johan; Dahlgren, Jonas; Karltun, Erik; Lehtonen, Aleksi

    2016-08-01

    Inaccurate estimate of the largest terrestrial carbon pool, soil organic carbon (SOC) stock, is the major source of uncertainty in simulating feedback of climate warming on ecosystem-atmosphere carbon dioxide exchange by process-based ecosystem and soil carbon models. Although the models need to simplify complex environmental processes of soil carbon sequestration, in a large mosaic of environments a missing key driver could lead to a modeling bias in predictions of SOC stock change.We aimed to evaluate SOC stock estimates of process-based models (Yasso07, Q, and CENTURY soil sub-model v4) against a massive Swedish forest soil inventory data set (3230 samples) organized by a recursive partitioning method into distinct soil groups with underlying SOC stock development linked to physicochemical conditions.For two-thirds of measurements all models predicted accurate SOC stock levels regardless of the detail of input data, e.g., whether they ignored or included soil properties. However, in fertile sites with high N deposition, high cation exchange capacity, or moderately increased soil water content, Yasso07 and Q models underestimated SOC stocks. In comparison to Yasso07 and Q, accounting for the site-specific soil characteristics (e. g. clay content and topsoil mineral N) by CENTURY improved SOC stock estimates for sites with high clay content, but not for sites with high N deposition.Our analysis suggested that the soils with poorly predicted SOC stocks, as characterized by the high nutrient status and well-sorted parent material, indeed have had other predominant drivers of SOC stabilization lacking in the models, presumably the mycorrhizal organic uptake and organo-mineral stabilization processes. Our results imply that the role of soil nutrient status as regulator of organic matter mineralization has to be re-evaluated, since correct SOC stocks are decisive for predicting future SOC change and soil CO2 efflux.

  19. Mechanical testing and modelling of carbon-carbon composites for aircraft disc brakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Luke R.

    The objective of this study is to improve the understanding of the stress distributions and failure mechanisms experienced by carbon-carbon composite aircraft brake discs using finite element (FE) analyses. The project has been carried out in association with Dunlop Aerospace as an EPSRC CASE studentship. It therefore focuses on the carbon-carbon composite brake disc material produced by Dunlop Aerospace, although it is envisaged that the approach will have broader applications for modelling and mechanical testing of carbon-carbon composites in general. The disc brake material is a laminated carbon-carbon composite comprised of poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN) derived carbon fibres in a chemical vapour infiltration (CVI) deposited matrix, in which the reinforcement is present in both continuous fibre and chopped fibre forms. To pave the way for the finite element analysis, a comprehensive study of the mechanical properties of the carbon-carbon composite material was carried out. This focused largely, but not entirely, on model composite materials formulated using structural elements of the disc brake material. The strengths and moduli of these materials were measured in tension, compression and shear in several orientations. It was found that the stress-strain behaviour of the materials were linear in directions where there was some continuous fibre reinforcement, but non-linear when this was not the case. In all orientations, some degree of non-linearity was observed in the shear stress-strain response of the materials. However, this non-linearity was generally not large enough to pose a problem for the estimation of elastic moduli. Evidence was found for negative Poisson's ratio behaviour in some orientations of the material in tension. Additionally, the through-thickness properties of the composite, including interlaminar shear strength, were shown to be positively related to bulk density. The in-plane properties were mostly unrelated to bulk density over the range of

  20. A carbon footprint simulation model for the cork oak sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demertzi, Martha; Paulo, Joana Amaral; Arroja, Luís; Dias, Ana Cláudia

    2016-10-01

    In the present study, a simulation model for the calculation of the carbon footprint of the cork oak sector (CCFM) is developed for the first time. A life cycle approach is adopted including the forest management, manufacturing, use and end-of-life stages. CCFM allows the user to insert the cork type used as raw material and its respective quantity and the distances in-between the various stages. The user can choose among different end-of-life destination options for the used cork products. The option of inserting different inputs, allows the use of the present simulation model for different cork oak systems, in different countries and with different conditions. CCFM allows the identification of the stages and products with the greatest carbon footprint and thus, a better management of the sector from an environmental perspective. The Portuguese cork oak sector is used as an application example of the model. The results obtained showed that the agglomeration industry is the hotspot for the carbon footprint of the cork sector mainly due to the production of the resins that are mixed with the cork granules for the production of agglomerated cork products. The consideration of the biogenic carbon emissions and sequestration of carbon at the forest in the carbon footprint, resulted to a great decrease of the sector's carbon footprint. Future actions for improvement are suggested in order to decrease the carbon footprint of the entire cork sector. It was found that by decreasing by 10% the emission factor of the agglomeration and transformation industries, substituting the transport trucks by more recent ones and by decreasing by 10% the cork products reaching the landfilling end-of-life destinations (while increasing the quantities reaching incineration and recycling), a decrease of the total CF (excluding the biogenic emissions and sequestration) of the entire cork industry by 10% can be achieved.

  1. Carbon Isotopes in Ocean and Land Carbon Cycle Models: Atmospheric Forcing Data and Applications for CMIP6 and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graven, H. D.; Allison, C. E.; Etheridge, D. M.; Hammer, S.; Keeling, R. F.; Krummel, P. B.; Langenfelds, R. L.; Levin, I.; Rubino, M.; Trudinger, C. M.; Vaughn, B. H.; White, J. W. C.

    2016-12-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of ocean and land carbon reservoirs is influenced by fossil fuel burning, carbon residence time, and fractionation associated with biological and physical processes. Additionally, 14C produced during nuclear weapons testing in the 1950s and 60s has enriched 14C/C ratios in decadally overturning reservoirs. Comparisons of simulated 14C and 13C dynamics between models and with observations can provide insights to key processes in the global carbon cycle including air-sea gas exchange, ocean mixing, terrestrial drought response, and vegetation and soil carbon turnover rates. However, the inclusion of carbon isotopes in large-scale model intercomparisons has so far been limited. One study, the Ocean Carbon Cycle Model Intercomparison Project 2 (OCMIP2), used simulations of ocean 14C to identify biases in model ocean circulation that affect simulated anthropogenic CO2 uptake and marine biogeochemistry. Within the context of CMIP6, we are working to advance the use of carbon isotopes for carbon cycle science, model evaluation and model intercomparison. The variables requested for DECK, OMIP and C4MIP simulations in CMIP6 include stocks and fluxes of 14C and 13C (for models that simulate 14C and 13C). We will present the historical and future atmospheric forcing datasets for Δ14C and δ13C in CO2 that we are making available to modeling groups as part of CMIP6. The historical data uses atmospheric measurements and ice core and tree ring records. For future atmospheric forcing, we use a simple carbon cycle model with CO2 emissions and atmospheric CO2 concentration for different scenarios from ScenarioMIP. We will also describe potential applications for carbon isotope simulations from CMIP6 or other modeling activities. In particular, we will present an evaluation of terrestrial carbon turnover with simulations of bomb-derived 14C inventories in simplified off-line models based on carbon stocks and fluxes in CMIP5 terrestrial models.

  2. One-dimensional models of excitons in carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia Decebal; Duclos, Pierre; Pedersen, Thomas Garm

    2004-01-01

    Excitons in carbon nanotubes may be modeled by two oppositely charged particles living on the surface of a cylinder. We derive three one-dimensional effective Hamiltonians which become exact as the radius of the cylinder vanishes. Two of them are solvable.......Excitons in carbon nanotubes may be modeled by two oppositely charged particles living on the surface of a cylinder. We derive three one-dimensional effective Hamiltonians which become exact as the radius of the cylinder vanishes. Two of them are solvable....

  3. Organic carbon stock modelling for the quantification of the carbon sinks in terrestrial ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, Pilar; Algeet, Nur; Oyonarte, Cecilio

    2017-04-01

    Given the recent environmental policies derived from the serious threats caused by global change, practical measures to decrease net CO2 emissions have to be put in place. Regarding this, carbon sequestration is a major measure to reduce atmospheric CO2 concentrations within a short and medium term, where terrestrial ecosystems play a basic role as carbon sinks. Development of tools for quantification, assessment and management of organic carbon in ecosystems at different scales and management scenarios, it is essential to achieve these commitments. The aim of this study is to establish a methodological framework for the modeling of this tool, applied to a sustainable land use planning and management at spatial and temporal scale. The methodology for carbon stock estimation in ecosystems is based on merger techniques between carbon stored in soils and aerial biomass. For this purpose, both spatial variability map of soil organic carbon (SOC) and algorithms for calculation of forest species biomass will be created. For the modelling of the SOC spatial distribution at different map scales, it is necessary to fit in and screen the available information of soil database legacy. Subsequently, SOC modelling will be based on the SCORPAN model, a quantitative model use to assess the correlation among soil-forming factors measured at the same site location. These factors will be selected from both static (terrain morphometric variables) and dynamic variables (climatic variables and vegetation indexes -NDVI-), providing to the model the spatio-temporal characteristic. After the predictive model, spatial inference techniques will be used to achieve the final map and to extrapolate the data to unavailable information areas (automated random forest regression kriging). The estimated uncertainty will be calculated to assess the model performance at different scale approaches. Organic carbon modelling of aerial biomass will be estimate using LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging

  4. Multiscale modeling of PVDF matrix carbon fiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greminger, Michael; Haghiashtiani, Ghazaleh

    2017-06-01

    Self-sensing carbon fiber reinforced composites have the potential to enable structural health monitoring that is inherent to the composite material rather than requiring external or embedded sensors. It has been demonstrated that a self-sensing carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite can be created by using the piezoelectric polymer polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) as the matrix material and using a Kevlar layer to separate two carbon fiber layers. In this configuration, the electrically conductive carbon fiber layers act as electrodes and the Kevlar layer acts as a dielectric to prevent the electrical shorting of the carbon fiber layers. This composite material has been characterized experimentally for its effective d 33 and d 31 piezoelectric coefficients. However, for design purposes, it is desirable to obtain a predictive model of the effective piezoelectric coefficients for the final smart composite material. Also, the inverse problem can be solved to determine the degree of polarization obtained in the PVDF material during polarization by comparing the effective d 33 and d 31 values obtained in experiment to those predicted by the finite element model. In this study, a multiscale micromechanics and coupled piezoelectric-mechanical finite element modeling approach is introduced to predict the mechanical and piezoelectric performance of a plain weave carbon fiber reinforced PVDF composite. The modeling results show good agreement with the experimental results for the mechanical and electrical properties of the composite. In addition, the degree of polarization of the PVDF component of the composite is predicted using this multiscale modeling approach and shows that there is opportunity to drastically improve the smart composite’s performance by improving the polarization procedure.

  5. A Modeled Carbon Emission Analysis Of Rampal Power Plant In Bangladesh And A Review Of Carbon Reduction Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gour Chand Mazumder

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available todays most important concern of Bangladesh is power generation. Government has planned a 1320 MW coal-fired power station at Rampal near Sundarbans. Environmentalists have indicated that this plant will face environmental issues. So we tried finding the capability of Sundarbans to face carbon emissions. We figured out approximate carbon emission of that power plant using an arbitrary operational model. We found 3.16MKg of carbon emission daily. We used mangroves carbon sequestration rate to calculate the carbon tolerance level of Sundarbans and found approximately 4.2 MKg of carbon per day.The amount of emission we found here is marginal with the ability of Sundarbans as it is already contributing to sequester carbon from other sources. We studied and showed technology wise carbon reductions. It is possible to reduce 90 to 95 carbon emissioby using these technologies. We recommend these advanced technologies to ensure sundarbans environmental safety.

  6. Allometric models for estimating biomass and carbon in Alnus acuminata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Fonseca

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to quantify the climate change mitigation potential of forest plantations, information on total biomass and its growth rate is required. Depending on the method used, the study of the biomass behavior can be a complex and expensive activity. The main objective of this research was to develop allometric models to estimate biomass for different tree components (leaves, branches, stem and root and total tree biomass in Alnus acuminata (Kunth in Costa Rica. Additionally, models were developed to estimate biomass and carbon in trees per hectare and for total plant biomass per hectare (trees + herbaceous vegetation + necromass. To construct the tree models, 41 sampling plots were evaluated in seven sites from which 47 trees with a diametric from 4.5 to 44.5 cm were selected to be harvested. In the selected models for the stem, root and total tree biomass, a r 2 >93.87 % was accomplished, while the r 2aj for leaves and branches was 88 %. For the biomass and carbon models for total trees and total plant biomass per hectare the r2 was >99 %. Average biomass expansion factor was 1.22 for aboveground and 1.43 for total biomass (when the root was included. The carbon fraction in plant biomass varied between 32.9 and 46.7 % and the percentage of soil carbon was 3 %.

  7. Modelling of structure and properties of soft carbons with application to carbon anode baking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gundersen, Oeyvind

    1998-11-01

    This work deals with topics related to modelling and control of ring furnaces for the baking of carbon anodes used in aluminium electrolysis. Anodes made of a granular coke and coal tar pitch are used in aluminium electrolysis. The anode properties are imperative for successful operation of the aluminium smelters. After mixing and forming the anode paste, heat treatment of the carbon blocks takes place in so-called ring furnaces. A ring furnace consists of a series of heat treatment sections where each section is loaded with a batch of anodes. The heat treatment of the anodes in a section consumes a lot of energy, and the anode properties partly depend on the heat treatment program. Previous work in the field of ring furnace modelling, operation and control is shortly reviewed. Both petroleum coke and coal tar pitch belong to the group of soft carbons. Models for structural parameters and porosity of soft carbons are developed. Furthermore, a new model for pyrolysis of coal tar pitch is proposed. Based on the models for pyrolysis, structure and porosity, new models for properties of single phase carbons and composite anodes are developed. These models are suitable for use in optimization of the baking process. A detailed mathematical model of a part of the heat treatment process is formulated in three spatial dimensions. The model is based on first principle descriptions of fundamental physical and chemical phenomena and the resulting model appears as a set of partial differential equations. The spatial differential operators are discretized by using the finite volume approach. In this way, a high dimensional nonlinear state space model is obtained. The model has been simulated using the method of lines. A vector of quantities which describes the anode properties is defined. This property vector constitutes a systematic definition of anode quality where the quality parameters are calculated as nonlinear transformations of the state space vector. Models are derived

  8. A kinetic model of carbon burnout in pulverized coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurt, R.; Jian-Kuan Sun; Lunden, M. [Brown University, Providence, RI (United States). Division of Engineering

    1998-04-01

    The degree of carbon burnout is an important operating characteristic of full-scale suspension-fired coal combustion systems affecting boiler efficiency, electrostatic precipitator operation and the value of fly ash as a saleable product. Prediction of carbon loss requires special char combustion kinetics valid through the very high conversions targeted in industry (typically {gt} 99.5%), and valid for a wide-range of particle temperature histories occurring in full-scale furnaces. The paper presents high-temperature kinetic data for five coal chars in the form of time-resolved burning profiles that include the late stages of combustion. It then describes the development and validation of the Carbon Burnout Kinetic Model (CBK), a coal-general kinetics package that is specifically designed to predict the total extent of carbon burnout and ultimate fly ash carbon content for prescribed temperature/oxygen histories typical of pulverized coal combustion systems. The model combines the single-film treatment of cha oxidation with quantitative descriptions of thermal annealing, statistical kinetics, statistical densities, and ash inhibition in the late stages of combustion. In agreement with experimental observations, the CBK model predicts (1) low reactivities for unburned carbon residues extracted from commercial ash samples, (2) reactivity loss in the late stages of laboratory combustion, (3) the observed sensitivity of char reactivity to high-temperature heat treatment on second and subsecond time scales, and (4) the global reaction inhibition by mineral matter in the late stages of combustion observed in single-particle imaging studies. The model ascribes these various char deactivation phenomena to the combined effects of thermal annealing, ash inhibition, and the preferential consumption of more reactive particles (statistical kinetics), the relative contributions of which vary greatly with combustion conditions. 39 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs., 1 app.

  9. Modelling the soil carbon cycle of pine ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakane, K. [Hiroshima, Univ., Dept. of Environ. Studies, Fac. of Integrated Arts and Sciences, Higashi Hiroshima (Japan)

    1994-12-31

    Soil carbon cycling rates and carbon budgets were calculated for stands of four pine species. Pinus sylvestris (at Jaedraaas, Sweden), P. densiflora (Hiroshima, Japan), P. elliottii (Florida, USA) and P. radiata (Canberra, Australia), using a simulation model driven by daily observations of mean air temperature and precipitation. Inputs to soil carbon through litterfall differ considerably among the four pine forests, but the accumulation of the A{sub 0} layer and humus in mineral soil is less variable. Decomposition of the A{sub 0} layer and humus is fastest for P. densiflora and slowest for P. sylvestris stands with P. radiata and P. elliottii intermediate. The decomposition rate is lower for the P. elliottii stand than for P. densiflora in spite of its higher temperatures and slightly higher precipitation. Seasonal changes in simulated soil carbon are observed only for the A{sub 0} layer at the P. densiflora site. Simulated soil respiration rates vary seasonally in three stands (P. sylvestris, P. densiflora and P. radiata). In simulations for pine trees planted on bare soil, all soil organic matter fractions except the humus in mineral soil recover to half their asymptotic values within 30 to 40 years of planting for P. sylvestris and P. densiflora, compared with 10 to 20 years for P. radiata and P. elliottii. The simulated recovery of soil carbon following clear-cutting is fastest for the P. elliottii stand and slowest for P. sylvestris. Management of P. elliottii and P. radiata stands on 40-years rotations is sustainable because carbon removed through harvest is restored in the interval between successive clear-cuts. However p. densiflora and P. sylvestris stands may be unable to maintain soil carbon under such a short rotation. High growth rates of P. elliottii and p. radiata stands in spite of relatively poor soil conditions and slow carbon cycling may be related to the physiological responses of species to environmental conditions. (Abstract Truncated)

  10. Molten carbonate fuel cells. Modeling, analysis, simulation, and control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundmacher, K.; Kienle, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Dynamik Komplexer Technischer Systeme, Magdeburg (Germany); Pesch, H.J. [Bayreuth Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Ingenieurmathematik; Berndt, J.F. [IPF Beteiligungsgesellschaft Berndt KG, Reilingen (Germany); Huppmann, G. (eds.) [MTU CFC Solutions GmbH, Muenchen (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    This book presents model-based concepts for process analysis and control on a generalized basis. It is structured as follows: Part I - DESIGN AND OPERATION: MTU's Carbonate Fuel Cell HotModule; Operational Experiences. Part II - MODEL-BASED PROCESS ANALYSIS: MCFC Reference Model; Index Analysis of Models; Parameter Identification; Steady State Process Analysis; Hot spot formation and steady state multiplicities; Conceptual design an Reforming concepts. Part III - OPTIMIZATION AND ADVANCED CONTROL: Model reduction and State estimation; Optimal Control Strategies; Optimization of Reforming Catalyst Distribution.

  11. Modeling stable isotope and organic carbon in hillslope stormflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusek, Jaromir; Vogel, Tomas; Dohnal, Michal; Marx, Anne; Jankovec, Jakub; Sanda, Martin; Votrubova, Jana; Barth, Johannes A. C.; Cislerova, Milena

    2016-04-01

    Reliable prediction of water movement and fluxes of dissolved substances (such as stable isotopes and organic carbon) at both the hillslope and the catchment scales remains a challenge due to complex boundary conditions and soil spatial heterogeneity. In addition, microbially mediated transformations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) are known to affect balance of DOC in soils, hence the transformations need to be included in a conceptual model of a DOC transport. So far, only few studies utilized stable isotope information in modeling and even fewer linked dissolved carbon fluxes to mixing and/or transport models. In this study, stormflow dynamics of oxygen-18 isotope and dissolved organic carbon was analyzed using a physically based modeling approach. One-dimensional dual-continuum vertical flow and transport model, based on Richards and advection-dispersion equations, was used to simulate the subsurface transport processes in a forest soil during several observed rainfall-runoff episodes. The transport of heat in the soil profile was described by conduction-advection equation. Water flow and transport of solutes and heat were assumed to take place in two mutually communicating porous domains, the soil matrix and the network of preferential pathways. The rate of microbial transformations of DOC was assumed to depend on soil water content and soil temperature. Oxygen-18 and dissolved organic carbon concentrations were observed in soil pore water, hillslope stormflow (collected in the experimental hillslope trench), and stream discharge (at the catchment outlet). The modeling was used to analyze the transformation of input solute signals into output hillslope signals observed in the trench stormflow. Signatures of oxygen-18 isotope in hillslope stormflow as well as isotope concentration in soil pore water were predicted reasonably well. Due to complex nature of microbial transformations, prediction of DOC rate and transport was associated with a high uncertainty.

  12. Modeling adaptation of carbon use efficiency in microbial communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven D Allison

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In new microbial-biogeochemical models, microbial carbon use efficiency (CUE is often assumed to decline with increasing temperature. Under this assumption, soil carbon losses under warming are small because microbial biomass declines. Yet there is also empirical evidence that CUE may adapt (i.e. become less sensitive to warming, thereby mitigating negative effects on microbial biomass. To analyze potential mechanisms of CUE adaptation, I used two theoretical models to implement a tradeoff between microbial uptake rate and CUE. This rate-yield tradeoff is based on thermodynamic principles and suggests that microbes with greater investment in resource acquisition should have lower CUE. Microbial communities or individuals could adapt to warming by reducing investment in enzymes and uptake machinery. Consistent with this idea, a simple analytical model predicted that adaptation can offset 50% of the warming-induced decline in CUE. To assess the ecosystem implications of the rate-yield tradeoff, I quantified CUE adaptation in a spatially-structured simulation model with 100 microbial taxa and 12 soil carbon substrates. This model predicted much lower CUE adaptation, likely due to additional physiological and ecological constraints on microbes. In particular, specific resource acquisition traits are needed to maintain stoichiometric balance, and taxa with high CUE and low enzyme investment rely on low-yield, high-enzyme neighbors to catalyze substrate degradation. In contrast to published microbial models, simulations with greater CUE adaptation also showed greater carbon storage under warming. This pattern occurred because microbial communities with stronger CUE adaptation produced fewer degradative enzymes, despite increases in biomass. Thus the rate-yield tradeoff prevents CUE adaptation from driving ecosystem carbon loss under climate warming.

  13. Computer Modeling of Carbon Metabolism Enables Biofuel Engineering (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-09-01

    In an effort to reduce the cost of biofuels, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has merged biochemistry with modern computing and mathematics. The result is a model of carbon metabolism that will help researchers understand and engineer the process of photosynthesis for optimal biofuel production.

  14. Modeling equilibrium adsorption of organic micropollutants onto activated carbon

    KAUST Repository

    De Ridder, David J.

    2010-05-01

    Solute hydrophobicity, polarizability, aromaticity and the presence of H-bond donor/acceptor groups have been identified as important solute properties that affect the adsorption on activated carbon. However, the adsorption mechanisms related to these properties occur in parallel, and their respective dominance depends on the solute properties as well as carbon characteristics. In this paper, a model based on multivariate linear regression is described that was developed to predict equilibrium carbon loading on a specific activated carbon (F400) for solutes reflecting a wide range of solute properties. In order to improve prediction accuracy, groups (bins) of solutes with similar solute properties were defined and solute removals were predicted for each bin separately. With these individual linear models, coefficients of determination (R2) values ranging from 0.61 to 0.84 were obtained. With the mechanistic approach used in developing this predictive model, a strong relation with adsorption mechanisms is established, improving the interpretation and, ultimately, acceptance of the model. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Large uncertainty in soil carbon modelling related to carbon input calculation method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keel, Sonja; Leifeld, Jens; Mayer, Jochen

    2017-01-01

    The application of dynamic models to report changes in soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks, for example as part of greenhouse gas inventories, is becoming increasingly important. Most of these models rely on input data from harvest residues or decaying plant parts and also organic fertilizer, together...... referred to as soil carbon inputs (C). The soil C inputs from plants are derived from measured agricultural yields using allometric equations. Here we compared the results of five previously published equations. Our goal was to test whether the choice of method is critical for modelling soil C and if so......, which of these equations is most suitable for Swiss conditions. For this purpose we used the five equations to calculate soil C inputs based on yield data from a Swiss long-term cropping experiment. Estimated annual soil C inputs from various crops were averaged from 28 years and four fertilizer...

  16. Modeling Corrosion Reactions of Steel in a Dilute Carbonate Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliyan, Faysal Fayez; Alfantazi, Akram

    2016-02-01

    This research models the corrosion reactions of a high-strength steel in an aerated, dilute, carbonate solution during a single-cycle voltammetry. Based on a previous study (Eliyan et al. in J Mater Eng Perform 24(6):1-8, 2015) and a literature survey, the corrosion reactions of the cathodic reduction, anodic dissolution, and passivation, as well as the interfacial interactions and the chemistry of the corrosion products are illustrated in schematics. The paper provides a visual guide on the corrosion reactions for steel in carbonate solutions based on the available mechanistic details that were reported and are still being investigated in literature.

  17. Effects of heat and drought on carbon and water dynamics in a regenerating semi-arid pine forest: a combined experimental and modeling approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. K. Ruehr

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing summer temperatures and a reduction in precipitation will enhance drought stress in Mediterranean and semi-arid ecosystems. Predicting the net effects on forests' carbon and water balance will depend on our ability to disentangle the sensitivity of component fluxes responding to increasing soil and atmospheric drought. Here we studied carbon and water dynamics in a semi-arid regenerating ponderosa pine forest using field observations and process based modeling. Field observations of two summer dry seasons were used to calibrate a soil-plant-atmosphere (SPA model. In addition, the ecosystem's response to reduced soil drought was quantified based on a field watering experiment and evaluated with the model. Further, the SPA model was used to estimate the relative effects of increasing soil and atmospheric drought over time, by simulating temperature and precipitation scenarios for 2040 and 2080. The seasonality and drought response of ecosystem fluxes was well captured by the calibrated SPA model. Dramatic increases in summer water availability during seasonal drought had a small effect on pine physiology in both the watering experiment and the model. This clearly demonstrates that atmospheric drought induced a strong limitation on carbon uptake in young ponderosa pine due to tight regulation of stomatal conductance. Moreover, simulations showed that net ecosystem exchange (NEE and gross primary productivity (GPP were about three times more affected by summer heat and increased evaporative demand than by reductions in summer precipitation. Annual NEE decreased by 38% in response to extreme summer conditions as predicted to occur in 2080 (June–August: +4.5 °C, because of a strong decline in GPP (−17% while heterotrophic respiration was relatively unaffected (−1%. Considering warming trends across all seasons (September–May: +3 °C and June–August: +4.5 °C, the negative drought effects were largely compensated by an earlier

  18. Effects of heat and drought on carbon and water dynamics in a regenerating semi-arid pine forest: a combined experimental and modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruehr, N. K.; Law, B. E.; Quandt, D.; Williams, M.

    2014-01-01

    Increasing summer temperatures and a reduction in precipitation will enhance drought stress in Mediterranean and semi-arid ecosystems. Predicting the net effects on forests' carbon and water balance will depend on our ability to disentangle the sensitivity of component fluxes responding to increasing soil and atmospheric drought. Here we studied carbon and water dynamics in a semi-arid regenerating ponderosa pine forest using field observations and process based modeling. Field observations of two summer dry seasons were used to calibrate a soil-plant-atmosphere (SPA) model. In addition, the ecosystem's response to reduced soil drought was quantified based on a field watering experiment and evaluated with the model. Further, the SPA model was used to estimate the relative effects of increasing soil and atmospheric drought over time, by simulating temperature and precipitation scenarios for 2040 and 2080. The seasonality and drought response of ecosystem fluxes was well captured by the calibrated SPA model. Dramatic increases in summer water availability during seasonal drought had a small effect on pine physiology in both the watering experiment and the model. This clearly demonstrates that atmospheric drought induced a strong limitation on carbon uptake in young ponderosa pine due to tight regulation of stomatal conductance. Moreover, simulations showed that net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and gross primary productivity (GPP) were about three times more affected by summer heat and increased evaporative demand than by reductions in summer precipitation. Annual NEE decreased by 38% in response to extreme summer conditions as predicted to occur in 2080 (June-August: +4.5 °C), because of a strong decline in GPP (-17%) while heterotrophic respiration was relatively unaffected (-1%). Considering warming trends across all seasons (September-May: +3 °C and June-August: +4.5 °C), the negative drought effects were largely compensated by an earlier initiation of favorable

  19. Sorption of organic compounds to activated carbons. Evaluation of isotherm models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pikaar, I.; Koelmans, A.A.; Noort, van P.C.M.

    2006-01-01

    Sorption to 'hard carbon' (black carbon, coal, kerogen) in soils and sediments is of major importance for risk assessment of organic pollutants. We argue that activated carbon (AC) may be considered a model sorbent for hard carbon. Here, we evaluate six sorption models on a literature dataset for so

  20. Modeling Carbon and Hydrocarbon Molecular Structures in EZTB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungwon; vonAllmen, Paul

    2007-01-01

    A software module that models the electronic and mechanical aspects of hydrocarbon molecules and carbon molecular structures on the basis of first principles has been written for incorporation into, and execution within, the Easy (Modular) Tight-Binding (EZTB) software infrastructure, which is summarized briefly in the immediately preceding article. Of particular interest, this module can model carbon crystals and nanotubes characterized by various coordinates and containing defects, without need to adjust parameters of the physical model. The module has been used to study the changes in electronic properties of carbon nanotubes, caused by bending of the nanotubes, for potential utility as the basis of a nonvolatile, electriccharge- free memory devices. For example, in one application of the module, it was found that an initially 50-nmlong carbon, (10,10)-chirality nanotube, which is a metallic conductor when straight, becomes a semiconductor with an energy gap of .3 meV when bent to a lateral displacement of 4 nm at the middle.

  1. Past and present of sediment and carbon biogeochemical cycling models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. T. Mackenzie

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The global carbon cycle is part of the much more extensive sedimentary cycle that involves large masses of carbon in the Earth's inner and outer spheres. Studies of the carbon cycle generally followed a progression in knowledge of the natural biological, then chemical, and finally geological processes involved, culminating in a more or less integrated picture of the biogeochemical carbon cycle by the 1920s. However, knowledge of the ocean's carbon cycle behavior has only within the last few decades progressed to a stage where meaningful discussion of carbon processes on an annual to millennial time scale can take place. In geologically older and pre-industrial time, the ocean was generally a net source of CO2 emissions to the atmosphere owing to the mineralization of land-derived organic matter in addition to that produced in situ and to the process of CaCO3 precipitation. Due to rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations because of fossil fuel combustion and land use changes, the direction of the air-sea CO2 flux has reversed, leading to the ocean as a whole being a net sink of anthropogenic CO2. The present thickness of the surface ocean layer, where part of the anthropogenic CO2 emissions are stored, is estimated as of the order of a few hundred meters. The oceanic coastal zone net air-sea CO2 exchange flux has also probably changed during industrial time. Model projections indicate that in pre-industrial times, the coastal zone may have been net heterotrophic, releasing CO2 to the atmosphere from the imbalance between gross photosynthesis and total respiration. This, coupled with extensive CaCO3 precipitation in coastal zone environments, led to a net flux of CO2 out of the system. During industrial time the coastal zone ocean has tended to reverse its trophic status toward a non-steady state situation of net autotrophy, resulting in net uptake of anthropogenic CO2 and storage of carbon in the coastal ocean, despite the significant calcification

  2. Explicit Pore Pressure Material Model in Carbon-Cloth Phenolic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Lemini, Danton; Ehle, Curt

    2003-01-01

    An explicit material model that uses predicted pressure in the pores of a carbon-cloth phenolic (CCP) composite has been developed. This model is intended to be used within a finite-element model to predict phenomena specific to CCP components of solid-fuel-rocket nozzles subjected to high operating temperatures and to mechanical stresses that can be great enough to cause structural failures. Phenomena that can be predicted with the help of this model include failures of specimens in restrained-thermal-growth (RTG) tests, pocketing erosion, and ply lifting

  3. Soil carbon management in large-scale Earth system modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olin, S.; Lindeskog, M.; Pugh, T. A. M.

    2015-01-01

    .5. Our results show that the potential for carbon sequestration due to typical cropland management practices such as no-till management and cover crops proposed in previous studies is not realised, globally or over larger climatic regions. Our results highlight important considerations to be made when......Croplands are vital ecosystems for human well-being and provide important ecosystem services such as crop yields, retention of nitrogen and carbon storage. On large (regional to global)-scale levels, assessment of how these different services will vary in space and time, especially in response...... to cropland management, are scarce. We explore cropland management alternatives and the effect these can have on future C and N pools and fluxes using the land-use-enabled dynamic vegetation model LPJ-GUESS (Lund–Potsdam–Jena General Ecosystem Simulator). Simulated crop production, cropland carbon storage...

  4. Modeling the uncertainty of estimating forest carbon stocks in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. X. Yue

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Earth surface systems are controlled by a combination of global and local factors, which cannot be understood without accounting for both the local and global components. The system dynamics cannot be recovered from the global or local controls alone. Ground forest inventory is able to accurately estimate forest carbon stocks at sample plots, but these sample plots are too sparse to support the spatial simulation of carbon stocks with required accuracy. Satellite observation is an important source of global information for the simulation of carbon stocks. Satellite remote-sensing can supply spatially continuous information about the surface of forest carbon stocks, which is impossible from ground-based investigations, but their description has considerable uncertainty. In this paper, we validated the Lund-Potsdam-Jena dynamic global vegetation model (LPJ, the Kriging method for spatial interpolation of ground sample plots and a satellite-observation-based approach as well as an approach for fusing the ground sample plots with satellite observations and an assimilation method for incorporating the ground sample plots into LPJ. The validation results indicated that both the data fusion and data assimilation approaches reduced the uncertainty of estimating carbon stocks. The data fusion had the lowest uncertainty by using an existing method for high accuracy surface modeling to fuse the ground sample plots with the satellite observations (HASM-SOA. The estimates produced with HASM-SOA were 26.1 and 28.4 % more accurate than the satellite-based approach and spatial interpolation of the sample plots, respectively. Forest carbon stocks of 7.08 Pg were estimated for China during the period from 2004 to 2008, an increase of 2.24 Pg from 1984 to 2008, using the preferred HASM-SOA method.

  5. Determining organic carbon distributions in soil particle size fractions as a precondition of lateral carbon transport modeling at large scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindewolf, Marcus; Seher, Wiebke; Pfeffer, Eduard; Schultze, Nico; Amorim, Ricardo S. S.; Schmidt, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    The erosional transport of organic carbon has an effect on the global carbon budget, however, it is uncertain, whether erosion is a sink or a source for carbon in the atmosphere. Continuous erosion leads to a massive loss of top soils including the loss of organic carbon historically accumulated in the soil humus fraction. The colluvial organic carbon could be protected from further degradation depending on the depth of the colluvial cover and local decomposing conditions. Another part of eroded soils and organic carbon will enter surface water bodies and might be transported over long distances. The selective nature of soil erosion results in a preferential transport of fine particles while less carbonic larger particles remain on site. Consequently organic carbon is enriched in the eroded sediment compared to the origin soil. As a precondition of process based lateral carbon flux modeling, carbon distribution on soil particle size fractions has to be known. In this regard the present study refers to the determination of organic carbon contents on soil particle size separates by a combined sieve-sedimentation method for different tropical and temperate soils Our results suggest high influences of parent material and climatic conditions on carbon distribution on soil particle separates. By applying these results in erosion modeling a test slope was simulated with the EROSION 2D simulation software covering certain land use and soil management scenarios referring to different rainfall events. These simulations allow first insights on carbon loss and depletion on sediment delivery areas as well as carbon gains and enrichments on deposition areas on the landscape scale and could be used as a step forward in landscape scaled carbon redistribution modeling.

  6. Modelling of cycling of lithium battery with microporous carbon electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Portnyagin

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Charge/discharge cycles of lithium cell with microporous carbon electrode under potentiodynamic control have been modelled. Predictions of the models with variable and constant diffusion coefficient neglecting the electric field inside the particle (CPM, DFM are compared to the predictions of the models with variable and constant diffusion coefficient in which electrostatic interaction inside the particles of carbon electrode (CPME, DFME is taken into account. There is observed a considerable difference between both. Electrostatic interactions of lithium ions with each other and the charge distributed inside the particle promote intercalation during the discharge of the cell and deintercalation during the charge. The dependance of the effect of hysteresis during the cycling of the cell on the rate of change of the applied voltage is studied. The larger is the speed of change of the applied voltage the more effective is hysteresis. We have also obtained concentration profiles at different stages of charge/discharge process.

  7. An energy balance model of carbon's effect on climate change

    CERN Document Server

    Benney, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    Due to climate change, the interest of studying our climatic system using mathematical modeling has become tremendous in recent years. One well-known model is Budyko's system, which represents the coupled evolution of two variables, the ice-line and the average earth surface temperature. The system depends on natural parameters, such as the earth albedo, and the amount A of carbon in the atmosphere. We introduce a 3-dimensional extension of this model in which we regard A as the third coupled variable of the system. We analyze the phase space and dependence on parameters, looking for Hopf bifurcations and the birth of cycling behavior. We interpret the cycles as climatic oscillations triggered by the sensitivity in our regulation of carbon emissions at extreme temperatures.

  8. Phenology as a strategy for carbon optimality: a global model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Caldararu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Phenology is essential to our understanding of biogeochemical cycles and the climate system. We develop a global mechanistic model of leaf phenology based on the hypothesis that phenology is a strategy for optimal carbon gain at the canopy level so that trees adjust leaf gains and losses in response to environmental factors such as light, temperature and soil moisture, to achieve maximum carbon assimilation. We fit this model to five years of satellite observations of leaf area index (LAI using a Bayesian fitting algorithm. We show that our model is able to reproduce phenological patterns for all vegetation types and use it to explore variations in growing season length and the climate factors that limit leaf growth for different biomes. Phenology in wet tropical areas is limited by leaf age physiological constraints while at higher latitude leaf seasonality is limited by low temperature and light availability. Leaf growth in grassland regions is limited by water availability but often in combination with other factors. This model will advance the current understanding of phenology for ecosystem carbon models and our ability to predict future phenological behaviour.

  9. Modelling carbon dynamics from urban land conversion: fundamental model of city in relation to a local carbon cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schellnhuber Hans-Joachim

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main task is to estimate the qualitative and quantitative contribution of urban territories and precisely of the process of urbanization to the Global Carbon Cycle (GCC. Note that, on the contrary to many investigations that have considered direct anthropogenic emission of CO2(urbanized territories produce ca. 96–98% of it, we are interested in more subtle, and up until the present time, weaker processes associated with the conversion of the surrounding natural ecosystems and landscapes into urban lands. Such conversion inevitably takes place when cities are sprawling and additional "natural" lands are becoming "urbanized". Results In order to fulfil this task, we first develop a fundamental model of urban space, since the type of land cover within a city makes a difference for a local carbon cycle. Hence, a city is sub-divided by built-up, „green" (parks, etc. and informal settlements (favelas fractions. Another aspect is a sub-division of the additional two regions, which makes the total number reaching eight regions, while the UN divides the world by six. Next, the basic model of the local carbon cycle for urbanized territories is built. We consider two processes: carbon emissions as a result of conversion of natural lands caused by urbanization; and the transformation of carbon flows by "urbanized" ecosystems; when carbon, accumulated by urban vegetation, is exported to the neighbouring territories. The total carbon flow in the model depends, in general, on two groups of parameters. The first includes the NPP, and the sum of living biomass and dead organic matter of ecosystems involved in the process of urbanization, and namely them we calculate here, using a new more realistic approach and taking into account the difference in regional cities' evolution. Conclusion There is also another group of parameters, dealing with the areas of urban territories, and their annual increments. A method of dynamic forecasting

  10. Modeling water adsorption in carbon micropores: study of water in carbon molecular sieves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, S W

    2006-01-17

    Measurements of water adsorption equilibrium in a carbon molecular sieve are undertaken in order to gain insight into the nature of water adsorption in carbon micropores. The measurements are taken at low concentrations to emphasize the role of oxygen-containing functional groups in the adsorption of water. Comparisons are made with previously published water adsorption data at higher concentrations to provide a data set spanning a wide range of loading. The assembled data set provides an opportunity for comparison of various theories for prediction of water adsorption in carbon micropores. Shortcomings of current theories are outlined, and an analytical theory that is free of these deficiencies is proposed in this investigation. With the consideration of micropore volume and pore size distribution, the experimental data and proposed isotherm model are consistent with previous studies of Takeda carbon molecular sieves. Also investigated is the uptake kinetics of water, which is characterized by a Fickian diffusion mechanism. The Maxwell-Stefan formulation is applied to characterize the dependence of the diffusional mobility upon loading.

  11. Three-Phase Carbon Fiber Amine Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes Epoxy Composite: Processing, Characterisation, and Multiscale Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper discusses the key issues of carbon nanotube (CNT dispersion and effect of functionalisation on the mechanical properties of multiscale carbon epoxy composites. In this study, CNTs were added in epoxy matrix and further reinforced with carbon fibres. Predetermined amounts of optimally amine functionalised CNTs were dispersed in epoxy matrix, and unidirectional carbon fiber laminates were produced. The effect of the presence of CNTs (1.0 wt% in the resin was reflected by pronounced increase in Young’s modulus, inter-laminar shear strength, and flexural modulus by 51.46%, 39.62%, and 38.04%, respectively. However, 1.5 wt% CNT loading in epoxy resin decreased the overall properties of the three-phase composites. A combination of Halpin-Tsai equations and micromechanics modeling approach was also used to evaluate the mechanical properties of multiscale composites and the differences between the predicted and experimental values are reported. These multiscale composites are likely to be used for potential missile and aerospace structural applications.

  12. Multi-scale Rule-of-Mixtures Model of Carbon Nanotube/Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Lamina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankland, Sarah-Jane V.; Roddick, Jaret C.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2005-01-01

    A unidirectional carbon fiber/epoxy lamina in which the carbon fibers are coated with single-walled carbon nanotubes is modeled with a multi-scale method, the atomistically informed rule-of-mixtures. This multi-scale model is designed to include the effect of the carbon nanotubes on the constitutive properties of the lamina. It included concepts from the molecular dynamics/equivalent continuum methods, micromechanics, and the strength of materials. Within the model both the nanotube volume fraction and nanotube distribution were varied. It was found that for a lamina with 60% carbon fiber volume fraction, the Young's modulus in the fiber direction varied with changes in the nanotube distribution, from 138.8 to 140 GPa with nanotube volume fractions ranging from 0.0001 to 0.0125. The presence of nanotube near the surface of the carbon fiber is therefore expected to have a small, but positive, effect on the constitutive properties of the lamina.

  13. The decrease of carbonation efficiency of CaO along calcination-carbonation cycles: Experiments and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouquet, E.; Leyssens, G.; Schonnenbeck, C.; Gilot, P. [Laboratoire de Gestion des Risques et Environnement, Mulhouse (France)

    2009-05-15

    Successive calcination-carbonation cycles, using CaO as sorbent, have been performed either in a classical fixed bed reactor or using a thermogravimetric analyser. Significant differences in carbonation efficiencies were obtained, possibly due to different conditions prevailing for CaO sintering during the calcination stage. The effect of the presence of CO{sub 2} on sintering was confirmed. A simple model of the decay of the carbonation capacity along cycles based on the specific surface area of non-sintered micrograins of CaO is able to predict the decrease of the extent of conversion obtained after 40 carbonations along calcination-carbonation cycles. The asymptotic extent of conversion is obtained when all the micrograins present within a grain are sintered. A detailed model of the carbonation shows that the voids present between the micrograins are filled up by carbonate when a critical thickness of the carbonate layer around each micrograin reaches 43 nm. Then, carbonation becomes controlled by diffusion at the scale of the whole grain, with the CO{sub 2} diffusion coefficient decreasing (at 650 {sup o}C) from 2 x 10{sup -12} to 6.5 x 10{sup -14} m{sup 2}/s as carbonation proceeds from 50% conversion to 76% (first cycle). This scale change for diffusion is responsible for the drastic decrease of the carbonation rate after the voids between micrograins are filled up.

  14. Carbon fiber dispersion models used for risk analysis calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    For evaluating the downwind, ground level exposure contours from carbon fiber dispersion, two fiber release scenarios were chosen. The first is the fire and explosion release in which all of the fibers are released instantaneously. This model applies to accident scenarios where an explosion follows a short-duration fire in the aftermath of the accident. The second is the plume release scenario in which the total mass of fibers is released into the fire plume. This model applies to aircraft accidents where only a fire results. These models are described in detail.

  15. Anisotropic rock physics models for interpreting pore structures in carbonate reservoirs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Sheng-Jie; Shao Yu; Chen Xu-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    We developed an anisotropic effective theoretical model for modeling the elastic behavior of anisotropic carbonate reservoirs by combining the anisotropic self-consistent approximation and differential effective medium models. By analyzing the measured data from carbonate samples in the TL area, a carbonate pore-structure model for estimating the elastic parameters of carbonate rocks is proposed, which is a prerequisite in the analysis of carbonate reservoirs. A workfl ow for determining elastic properties of carbonate reservoirs is established in terms of the anisotropic effective theoretical model and the pore-structure model. We performed numerical experiments and compared the theoretical prediction and measured data. The result of the comparison suggests that the proposed anisotropic effective theoretical model can account for the relation between velocity and porosity in carbonate reservoirs. The model forms the basis for developing new tools for predicting and evaluating the properties of carbonate reservoirs.%♦Corresponding author: Li Sheng-Jie (Email: Richard@cup.edu.cn)

  16. Integrated Experimental and Modeling Studies of Mineral Carbonation as a Mechanism for Permanent Carbon Sequestration in Mafic/Ultramafic Rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhengrong [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Qiu, Lin [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Zhang, Shuang [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Bolton, Edward [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Bercovici, David [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Ague, Jay [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Karato, Shun-Ichiro [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Oristaglio, Michael [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Zhu, Wen-Iu [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Lisabeth, Harry [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Johnson, Kevin [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2014-09-30

    A program of laboratory experiments, modeling and fieldwork was carried out at Yale University, University of Maryland, and University of Hawai‘i, under a DOE Award (DE-FE0004375) to study mineral carbonation as a practical method of geologic carbon sequestration. Mineral carbonation, also called carbon mineralization, is the conversion of (fluid) carbon dioxide into (solid) carbonate minerals in rocks, by way of naturally occurring chemical reactions. Mafic and ultramafic rocks, such as volcanic basalt, are natural candidates for carbonation, because the magnesium and iron silicate minerals in these rocks react with brines of dissolved carbon dioxide to form carbonate minerals. By trapping carbon dioxide (CO2) underground as a constituent of solid rock, carbonation of natural basalt formations would be a secure method of sequestering CO2 captured at power plants in efforts to mitigate climate change. Geochemical laboratory experiments at Yale, carried out in a batch reactor at 200°C and 150 bar (15 MPa), studied carbonation of the olivine mineral forsterite (Mg2SiO4) reacting with CO2 brines in the form of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) solutions. The main carbonation product in these reactions is the carbonate mineral magnesite (MgCO3). A series of 32 runs varied the reaction time, the reactive surface area of olivine grains and powders, the concentration of the reacting fluid, and the starting ratio of fluid to olivine mass. These experiments were the first to study the rate of olivine carbonation under passive conditions approaching equilibrium. The results show that, in a simple batch reaction, olivine carbonation is fastest during the first 24 hours and then slows significantly and even reverses. A natural measure of the extent of carbonation is a quantity called the carbonation fraction, which compares the amount of carbon removed from solution, during a run, to the maximum amount

  17. Assessing carbon stocks and modelling win-win scenarios of carbon sequestration through land-use changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponce-Hernandez, R.; Koohafkan, P.; Antoine, J. (eds.)

    2004-07-01

    This publication presents a methodology and software tools for assessing carbon stocks and modelling scenarios of carbon sequestration that were developed and tested in pilot field studies in Mexico and Cuba. The models and tools enable the analysis of land use change scenarios in order to identify in a given area (watershed or district) land use alternatives and land management practices that simultaneously maximize food production, maximize soil carbon sequestration, maximize biodiversity conservation and minimize land degradation. The objective is to develop and implement 'win-win' options that satisfy the multiple goals of farmers, land users and other stakeholders in relation to food security, carbon sequestration, biodiversity and land conservation.

  18. Wetting and Non-Wetting Models of Black Carbon Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, B. F.; Laura, S.

    2006-12-01

    We present the results of recent modeling studies on the activation of black carbon (BC) aerosol to form cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). We use a model of BC activation based on a general modification of the Koehler equation for insoluble activation in which we introduce a term based on the activity of water adsorbed on the particle surface. We parameterize the model using the free energy of adsorption, a parameter directly comparable to laboratory measurements of water adsorption on carbon. Although the model of the water- surface interaction is general, the form of the activation equation that results depends upon a further model of the distribution of water on the particle. One possible model involves the symmetric growth of a water shell around the isoluble particle core (wetting). This model predicts upper and lower bounding curves for the activation supersaturation given by the range of water interaction energies from hydrophobic to hydrophilic which are in agreement with a large body of recent activation data. The resulting activation diameters are from 3 to 10 times smaller than activation of soluble particles of identical dry diameter. Another possible model involves an exluded liquid droplet growing in contact with the particle (non-wetting). The geometry of this model much more resembles classic assumptions of heterogeneous nucleation theory. This model can yield extremely high activation supersaturation as a function of diameter, as has been observed in some experiments, and enables calculations in agreement with some of these results. We discuss these two geometrical models of water growth, the different behaviors predicted by the resulting activation equation, and the means to determine which model of growth is appropriate for a given BC particle characterized by either water interaction energy or morphology. These simple models enable an efficient and physically reasonable means to calculate the activation of BC aerosol to form CCN based upon a

  19. Consolidating soil carbon turnover models by improved estimates of belowground carbon input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghizadeh-Toosi, Arezoo; Christensen, Bent T.; Glendining, Margaret; Olesen, Jørgen E.

    2016-09-01

    World soil carbon (C) stocks are third only to those in the ocean and earth crust, and represent twice the amount currently present in the atmosphere. Therefore, any small change in the amount of soil organic C (SOC) may affect carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations in the atmosphere. Dynamic models of SOC help reveal the interaction among soil carbon systems, climate and land management, and they are also frequently used to help assess SOC dynamics. Those models often use allometric functions to calculate soil C inputs in which the amount of C in both above and below ground crop residues are assumed to be proportional to crop harvest yield. Here we argue that simulating changes in SOC stocks based on C input that are proportional to crop yield is not supported by data from long-term experiments with measured SOC changes. Rather, there is evidence that root C inputs are largely independent of crop yield, but crop specific. We discuss implications of applying fixed belowground C input regardless of crop yield on agricultural greenhouse gas mitigation and accounting.

  20. Sediment carbon fate in phreatic karst (Part 2): Numerical model development and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husic, A.; Fox, J.; Ford, W.; Agouridis, C.; Currens, J.; Taylor, C.

    2017-06-01

    The authors develop a numerical model to elucidate time-distributed processes controlling sediment carbon fate in phreatic karst. Sediment carbon processes simulated in the new numerical model include in-conduit erosion and deposition, sediment carbon transport, surficial fine grained laminae evolution, carbon pool mixing, microbial oxidation, and the understudied process of sediment carbon exchange during equilibrium transport. The authors perform a model evaluation procedure that includes generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation to quantify uncertainty of the model results. Modeling results suggest that phreatic karst conduits sustain sediment transport activity long after surface storm events cease. The sustained sediment transport has the potential to shift the baseflow sediment yield of the phreatic karst to be on par with stormflow sediment yield. The sustained activity is suggested to promote the exchange of sediment carbon between the water column and subsurface karst deposits during equilibrium sediment transport conditions. In turn, the sediment carbon exchange impacts the mixing of new and old carbon pools and the flux of carbon from phreatic karst. Integrated numerical model results from this study support the concept that phreatic karst act as a biologically active conveyor of sediment carbon that temporarily stores sediment, turns over carbon at higher rates than surface streams, and recharges degraded carbon back to the fluvial system. The numerical modeling method adopted in this paper shows the efficacy of coupling carbon isotope fingerprinting with water quality modeling to study sediment carbon in phreatic karst.

  1. Model Establishment for Simulating Soil Organic Carbon Dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yao; LIU Shi-liang; SHEN Qi-rong; ZONG Liang-gang

    2002-01-01

    Assuming that decomposition of organic matter in soils follows the first-order kinetics reaction,a computer model was developed to simulate soil organic matter dynamics. Organic matter in soils is divided up into two parts that include incorporated organic carbon from crop residues or other organic fertilizer and soil intrinsic carbon. The incorporated organic carbon was assumed to consist of two components, labile-C and resistant-C. The model was represented by a differential equation of dCi/dt = Ki× fT × fw × fs × Ci ( i = l,r, S ) and an integral equation of Cit = Cio × EXP ( Ki X fT X fw X fs X t ). Effect of soil parameters of temperature, moisture and texture on the decomposition was functioned by the fT, fw and fs, respectively.Data from laboratory incubation experiments were used to determine the first-order decay rate Ki and the fraction of labile-C of crop residues by employing a nonlinear method. The values of K for the components of labile-C and resistant-C and the soil intrinsic carbon were evaluated to be 0. 025,0. 080 × 10-2 and 0. 065 ×10-3d-1, respectively. The labile-C fraction of wheat straw, wheat roots, rice straw and rice roots were0.50, 0.25, 0.40 and 0.20, respectively. These values are related to the initial residue carbon-to-nitrogen ratio ( C/N) and lignin content.

  2. Soil carbon management in large-scale Earth system modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olin, S.; Lindeskog, M.; Pugh, T. A. M.;

    2015-01-01

    Croplands are vital ecosystems for human well-being and provide important ecosystem services such as crop yields, retention of nitrogen and carbon storage. On large (regional to global)-scale levels, assessment of how these different services will vary in space and time, especially in response to...... modelling C–N interactions in agricultural ecosystems under future environmental change and the effects these have on terrestrial biogeochemical cycles....

  3. Computer-Aided Process Model For Carbon/Phenolic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letson, Mischell A.; Bunker, Robert C.

    1996-01-01

    Computer program implements thermochemical model of processing of carbon-fiber/phenolic-matrix composite materials into molded parts of various sizes and shapes. Directed toward improving fabrication of rocket-engine-nozzle parts, also used to optimize fabrication of other structural components, and material-property parameters changed to apply to other materials. Reduces costs by reducing amount of laboratory trial and error needed to optimize curing processes and to predict properties of cured parts.

  4. Analyzing the ecosystem carbon and hydrologic characteristics of forested wetland using a biogeochemical process model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jianbo Cui; Changsheng Li; Carl Trettin

    2005-01-01

    A comprehensive biogeochemical model, Wetland-DNDC, was applied to analyze the carbon and hydrologic characteristics of forested wetland ecosystem at Minnesota (MN) and Florida (FL) sites. The model simulates the flows of carbon, energy, and water in forested wetlands. Modeled carbon dynamics depends on physiological plant factors, the size of plant pools,...

  5. Ab Initio Thermodynamic Model for Magnesium Carbonates and Hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaka, Anne M.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2014-03-28

    An ab initio thermodynamic framework for predicting properties of hydrated magnesium carbonate minerals has been developed using density-functional theory linked to macroscopic thermodynamics through the experimental chemical potentials for MgO, water, and CO2. Including semiempirical dispersion via the Grimme method and small corrections to the generalized gradient approximation of Perdew, Burke, and Ernzerhof for the heat of formation yields a model with quantitative agreement for the benchmark minerals brucite, magnesite, nesquehonite, and hydromagnesite. The model shows how small differences in experimental conditions determine whether nesquehonite, hydromagnesite, or magnesite is the result of laboratory synthesis from carbonation of brucite, and what transformations are expected to occur on geological time scales. Because of the reliance on parameter-free first principles methods, the model is reliably extensible to experimental conditions not readily accessible to experiment and to any mineral composition for which the structure is known or can be hypothesized, including structures containing defects, substitutions, or transitional structures during solid state transformations induced by temperature changes or processes such as water, CO2, or O2 diffusion. Demonstrated applications of the ab initio thermodynamic framework include an independent means to evaluate differences in thermodynamic data for lansfordite, predicting the properties of Mg analogs of Ca-based hydrated carbonates monohydrocalcite and ikaite which have not been observed in nature, and an estimation of the thermodynamics of barringtonite from the stoichiometry and a single experimental observation.

  6. Ab initio thermodynamic model for magnesium carbonates and hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaka, Anne M; Felmy, Andrew R

    2014-09-04

    An ab initio thermodynamic framework for predicting properties of hydrated magnesium carbonate minerals has been developed using density-functional theory linked to macroscopic thermodynamics through the experimental chemical potentials for MgO, water, and CO2. Including semiempirical dispersion via the Grimme method and small corrections to the generalized gradient approximation of Perdew, Burke, and Ernzerhof for the heat of formation yields a model with quantitative agreement for the benchmark minerals brucite, magnesite, nesquehonite, and hydromagnesite. The model shows how small differences in experimental conditions determine whether nesquehonite, hydromagnesite, or magnesite is the result of laboratory synthesis from carbonation of brucite, and what transformations are expected to occur on geological time scales. Because of the reliance on parameter-free first-principles methods, the model is reliably extensible to experimental conditions not readily accessible to experiment and to any mineral composition for which the structure is known or can be hypothesized, including structures containing defects, substitutions, or transitional structures during solid state transformations induced by temperature changes or processes such as water, CO2, or O2 diffusion. Demonstrated applications of the ab initio thermodynamic framework include an independent means to evaluate differences in thermodynamic data for lansfordite, predicting the properties of Mg analogues of Ca-based hydrated carbonates monohydrocalcite and ikaite, which have not been observed in nature, and an estimation of the thermodynamics of barringtonite from the stoichiometry and a single experimental observation.

  7. Modeling of hydrogen adsorption on activated carbon and SWNT nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benard, P.; Chahine, R. [Quebec Univ., Hydrogen Research Institute, Trois Rivieres, PQ (Canada)

    1999-12-01

    The physical properties of hydrogen adsorption on activated carbon over a temperature range of 77 to 273 degrees K and pressure range 0 to 6 MPa are discussed. Results show that for the hydrogen/activated carbon system over a wide temperature and pressure range the Langmuir model is adequate, however, at low temperatures and high pressures a new approach is required, one that takes into account excess adsorption and adsorbate-adsorbate interactions. Under these conditions the Ono-Kondo approach is more appropriate. The adsorption properties of hydrogen on single-walled nanotubes (SWNT) were also studied using the Stan and Cole potential to account for the effect of the cylindrical geometry of the nanotubes on the adsorption properties. Comparison of the adsorption properties of activated carbon and SWNTs showed that the larger specific surfaces on activated carbon can lead to larger adsorption effects at higher pressures, even though the adsorption energy is smaller. SWNTs are effective only at low pressures. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Kinetic modelling of central carbon metabolism in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peskov, Kirill; Mogilevskaya, Ekaterina; Demin, Oleg

    2012-09-01

    In the present study, we developed a detailed kinetic model of Escherichia coli central carbon metabolism. The main model assumptions were based on the results of metabolic and regulatory reconstruction of the system and thorough model verification with experimental data. The development and verification of the model included several stages, which allowed us to take into account both in vitro and in vivo experimental data and avoid the ambiguity that frequently occurs in detailed models of biochemical pathways. The choice of the level of detail for the mathematical description of enzymatic reaction rates and the evaluation of parameter values were based on available published data. Validation of the complete model of the metabolic pathway describing specific physiological states was based on fluxomics and metabolomics data. In particular, we developed a model that describes aerobic growth of E. coli in continuous culture with a limiting concentration of glucose. Such modification of the model was used to integrate experimental metabolomics data obtained in steady-state conditions for wild-type E. coli and genetically modified strains, e.g. knockout of the pyruvate kinase gene (pykA). Following analysis of the model behaviour, and comparison of the coincidence between predicted and experimental data, it was possible to investigate the functional and regulatory properties of E. coli central carbon metabolism. For example, a novel metabolic regulatory mechanism for 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase inhibition by phosphoenolpyruvate was hypothesized, and the flux ratios between the reactions catalysed by enzyme isoforms were predicted. The mathematical model described here has been submitted to the JWS Online Cellular Systems Modelling Database and can be accessed at http://jjj.biochem.sun.ac.za/database/peskov/index.html © 2012 The Authors Journal compilation © 2012 FEBS.

  9. A New Theoretical Model of a Carbon Nanotube Strain Sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Wei; KANG Yi-Lan; LEI Zhen-Kun; QIN Qing-Hua; LI Qiu

    2009-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are potential strain sensors due to their excellent mechanical and spectral properties.A new theoretical model of a CNT strain sensor is obtained by applying the polarized Raman properties of CNTs,which calculates the synthetic contributions of Raman spectra from the CNTs in random directions.By using this theoretical model,the analytic relationship between planar strain components and the Raman shift increment of uniformly dispersed CNTs is obtained,which is applicable for accurately characterizing the strain in random directions on the surface of a measured microsystem.

  10. The "Carbon Data Explorer": Web-Based Space-Time Visualization of Modeled Carbon Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billmire, M.; Endsley, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    The visualization of and scientific "sense-making" from large datasets varying in both space and time is a challenge; one that is still being addressed in a number of different fields. The approaches taken thus far are often specific to a given academic field due to the unique questions that arise in different disciplines, however, basic approaches such as geographic maps and time series plots are still widely useful. The proliferation of model estimates of increasing size and resolution further complicates what ought to be a simple workflow: Model some geophysical phenomen(on), obtain results and measure uncertainty, organize and display the data, make comparisons across trials, and share findings. A new tool is in development that is intended to help scientists with the latter parts of that workflow. The tentatively-titled "Carbon Data Explorer" (http://spatial.mtri.org/flux-client/) enables users to access carbon science and related spatio-temporal science datasets over the web. All that is required to access multiple interactive visualizations of carbon science datasets is a compatible web browser and an internet connection. While the application targets atmospheric and climate science datasets, particularly spatio-temporal model estimates of carbon products, the software architecture takes an agnostic approach to the data to be visualized. Any atmospheric, biophysical, or geophysical quanity that varies in space and time, including one or more measures of uncertainty, can be visualized within the application. Within the web application, users have seamless control over a flexible and consistent symbology for map-based visualizations and plots. Where time series data are represented by one or more data "frames" (e.g. a map), users can animate the data. In the "coordinated view," users can make direct comparisons between different frames and different models or model runs, facilitating intermodal comparisons and assessments of spatio-temporal variability. Map

  11. Biomass models to estimate carbon stocks for hardwood tree species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz-Peinado, R.; Montero, G.; Rio, M. del

    2012-11-01

    To estimate forest carbon pools from forest inventories it is necessary to have biomass models or biomass expansion factors. In this study, tree biomass models were developed for the main hardwood forest species in Spain: Alnus glutinosa, Castanea sativa, Ceratonia siliqua, Eucalyptus globulus, Fagus sylvatica, Fraxinus angustifolia, Olea europaea var. sylvestris, Populus x euramericana, Quercus canariensis, Quercus faginea, Quercus ilex, Quercus pyrenaica and Quercus suber. Different tree biomass components were considered: stem with bark, branches of different sizes, above and belowground biomass. For each species, a system of equations was fitted using seemingly unrelated regression, fulfilling the additivity property between biomass components. Diameter and total height were explored as independent variables. All models included tree diameter whereas for the majority of species, total height was only considered in the stem biomass models and in some of the branch models. The comparison of the new biomass models with previous models fitted separately for each tree component indicated an improvement in the accuracy of the models. A mean reduction of 20% in the root mean square error and a mean increase in the model efficiency of 7% in comparison with recently published models. So, the fitted models allow estimating more accurately the biomass stock in hardwood species from the Spanish National Forest Inventory data. (Author) 45 refs.

  12. Modeling of Carbon Migration During JET Injection Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strachan, J. D.; Likonen, J.; Coad, P.; Rubel, M.; Widdowson, A.; Airila, M.; Andrew, P.; Brezinsek, S.; Corrigan, G.; Esser, H. G.; Jachmich, S.; Kallenbach, A.; Kirschner, A.; Kreter, A.; Matthews, G. F.; Philipps, V.; Pitts, R. A.; Spence, J.; Stamp, M.; Wiesen, S.

    2008-10-15

    JET has performed two dedicated carbon migration experiments on the final run day of separate campaigns (2001 and 2004) using {sup 13}CH{sub 4} methane injected into repeated discharges. The EDGE2D/NIMBUS code modelled the carbon migration in both experiments. This paper describes this modelling and identifies a number of important migration pathways: (1) deposition and erosion near the injection location, (2) migration through the main chamber SOL, (3) migration through the private flux region aided by E x B drifts, and (4) neutral migration originating near the strike points. In H-Mode, type I ELMs are calculated to influence the migration by enhancing erosion during the ELM peak and increasing the long-range migration immediately following the ELM. The erosion/re-deposition cycle along the outer target leads to a multistep migration of {sup 13}C towards the separatrix which is called 'walking'. This walking created carbon neutrals at the outer strike point and led to {sup 13}C deposition in the private flux region. Although several migration pathways have been identified, quantitative analyses are hindered by experimental uncertainty in divertor leakage, and the lack of measurements at locations such as gaps and shadowed regions.

  13. Modeling the kinetics of carbon coagulation in explosives detonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ree, F. H.; Viecelli, J. A.; Glosli, J. N.

    1998-05-01

    A typical insensitive high explosive such as LX-17 has a large carbon content. The detonation behavior of these explosives is affected by a slow coagulation of carbon atoms by diffusion and their possible transformation from one chemical bonding type to another. We have used the Brenner bond order potential to compute the melting line of diamond at high pressure and high temperature by molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations, with the goal to refine the potential for the study of the kinetics of the graphite diamond transition. The slow diffusion-controlled kinetics of carbon clusters has been examined by including a time-dependent surface correction to the Gibbs free energy of these clusters in the nonequilibrium CHEQ code. We also propose a new explosive burn model which incorporates a partial release of the heat of detonation in a fast reaction zone, followed by a diffusion-limited release of the remaining energy. Hydrodynamic applications of the new burn model to LX-17 show that computed expansion and compression results both agree closely with experimental data.

  14. Electron percolation in realistic models of carbon nanotube networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoneau, Louis-Philippe; Villeneuve, Jérémie; Rochefort, Alain

    2015-09-01

    The influence of penetrable and curved carbon nanotubes (CNT) on the charge percolation in three-dimensional disordered CNT networks have been studied with Monte-Carlo simulations. By considering carbon nanotubes as solid objects but where the overlap between their electron cloud can be controlled, we observed that the structural characteristics of networks containing lower aspect ratio CNT are highly sensitive to the degree of penetration between crossed nanotubes. Following our efficient strategy to displace CNT to different positions to create more realistic statistical models, we conclude that the connectivity between objects increases with the hard-core/soft-shell radii ratio. In contrast, the presence of curved CNT in the random networks leads to an increasing percolation threshold and to a decreasing electrical conductivity at saturation. The waviness of CNT decreases the effective distance between the nanotube extremities, hence reducing their connectivity and degrading their electrical properties. We present the results of our simulation in terms of thickness of the CNT network from which simple structural parameters such as the volume fraction or the carbon nanotube density can be accurately evaluated with our more realistic models.

  15. Convergent modeling of past soil organic carbon stocks but divergent projections

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Z.; Wang, E; Zheng, H.; J. A. Baldock; O. J. Sun; Shao, Q.

    2015-01-01

    Soil carbon models are important tool to understand soil carbon balance and project carbon stocks in terrestrial ecosystems, particularly under global change. The initialization and/or parameterization of soil carbon models can vary among studies even when the same model and dataset are used, causing potential uncertainties in projections. Although a few studies have assessed such uncertainties, it is yet unclear what these uncertainties are correlated with ...

  16. Doped carbon nanotubes as a model system of biased graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szirmai, P.; Márkus, B. G.; Dóra, B.; Fábián, G.; Koltai, J.; Zólyomi, V.; Kürti, J.; Náfrádi, B.; Forró, L.; Pichler, T.; Simon, F.

    2017-08-01

    Albeit difficult to access experimentally, the density of states (DOS) is a key parameter in solid-state systems, which governs several important phenomena including transport, magnetism, thermal, and thermoelectric properties. We study DOS in an ensemble of potassium intercalated single-wall carbon nanotubes and show, using electron spin resonance spectroscopy, that a sizable number of electron states are present, which gives rise to a Fermi-liquid behavior in this material. A comparison between theoretical and the experimental DOS indicates that it does not display significant correlation effects, even though the pristine nanotube material shows a Luttinger-liquid behavior. We argue that the carbon nanotube ensemble essentially maps out the whole Brillouin zone of graphene, thus it acts as a model system of biased graphene.

  17. Kinetic modelling and mechanism of dye adsorption on unburned carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, S.B.; Li, H.T. [Curtin University of Technology, Perth, WA (Australia). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2007-07-01

    Textile dyeing processes are among the most environmentally unfriendly industrial processes by producing coloured wastewaters. The adsorption method using unburned carbon from coal combustion residue was studied for the decolourisation of typical acidic and basic dyes. It was discovered that the unburned carbon showed high adsorption capacity at 1.97 x 10{sup -4} and 5.27 x 10{sup -4} mol/g for Basic Violet 3 and Acid Black 1, respectively. The solution pH, particle size and temperature significantly influenced the adsorption capacity. Higher solution pH favoured the adsorption of basic dye while reduced the adsorption of acid dye. The adsorption of dye increased with increasing temperature but decreased with increasing particle size. Sorption kinetic data indicated that the adsorption kinetics followed the pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption mechanism consisted of two processes, external diffusion and intraparticle diffusion, and the external diffusion was the dominating process.

  18. Extent of partial ice cover due to carbon cycle feedback in a zonal energy balance model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Huntingford

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A global carbon cycle is introduced into a zonally averaged energy balance climate model. The physical model components are similar to those of Budyko (1969 and Sellers (1969. The new carbon components account for atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and the terrestrial and oceanic storage of carbon. Prescribing values for the sum of these carbon components, it is found that inclusion of a closed carbon cycle reduces the range of insolation over which stable partial ice cover solutions may occur. This highly simplified climate model also predicts that the estimated release of carbon from fossil fuel burning over the next hundred years could result in the eventual melting of the ice sheets. Keywords: climate, carbon cycle,zonal model, earth system modelling

  19. Energy modelling towards low carbon development of Beijing in 2030

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Guangling; Guerrero, Josep M.; Jiang, Kejun

    2017-01-01

    Beijing, as the capital of China, is under the high pressure of climate change and pollution. The consumption of non-renewable energy is one of the most important sources of the CO2 emissions, which cause climate changes. This paper presents a study on the energy system modelling towards renewable...... energy and low carbon development for the city of Beijing. The analysis of energy system modelling is organized in two steps to explore the alternative renewable energy system in Beijing. Firstly, a reference energy system of Beijing is created based on the available data in 2014. The Energy......PLAN, an energy system analysis tool, is chosen to develop the reference energy model. Secondly, this reference model is used to investigate the alternative energy system for integrating renewable energies. Three scenarios are developed towards the energy system of Beijing in 2030, which are: (i) reference...

  20. A heterogeneous model for gas transport in carbon molecular sieves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, L P; Yuan, Y X; Farooq, S; Bhatia, S K

    2005-01-18

    A dual resistance model with distribution of either barrier or pore diffusional activation energy is proposed in this work for gas transport in carbon molecular sieve (CMS) micropores. This is a novel approach in which the equilibrium is homogeneous, but the kinetics is heterogeneous. The model seems to provide a possible explanation for the concentration dependence of the thermodynamically corrected barrier and pore diffusion coefficients observed in previous studies from this laboratory on gas diffusion in CMS. The energy distribution is assumed to follow the gamma distribution function. It is shown that the energy distribution model can fully capture the behavior described by the empirical model established in earlier studies to account for the concentration dependence of thermodynamically corrected barrier and pore diffusion coefficients. A methodology is proposed for extracting energy distribution parameters, and it is further shown that the extracted energy distribution parameters can effectively predict integral uptake and column breakthrough profiles over a wide range of operating pressures.

  1. Validation and Scenario Analysis of a Soil Organic Carbon Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yao; LIU Shi-liang; SHEN Qi-rong; ZONG Liang-gang; JIANG Ding-an; HUANG Hong-guang

    2002-01-01

    A model developed by the authors was validated against independent data sets. The data sets were obtained from field experiments of crop residue decomposition and a 7-year soil improvement in Yixing City, Jiangsu Province. Model validation indicated that soil organic carbon dynamics can be simulated from the weather variables of temperature, sunlight and precipitation, soil clay content and bulk density, grain yield of previous crops, qualities and quantities of the added organic matter. Model simulation in general agreed with the measurements. The comparison between computed and measured resulted in correlation coefficient γ2 values of 0.9291 * * * (n = 48) and 0. 6431 * * (n = 65) for the two experiments, respectively. Model prediction under three scenarios of no additional organic matter input, with an annual incorporation of rice and wheat straw at rates of 6.75t/ha and 9.0t/ha suggested that the soil organic carbon in Wanshi Township of Yixing City would be from an initial value of 7.85g/kg in 1983 to 6.30g/kg, 11.42g/kg and 13g/kg in 2014, respectively. Consequently, total nitrogen content of the soil was predicted to be respectively 0.49g/kg,0.89g/kg and 1.01g/kg under the three scenarios.

  2. Multi-scale modeling of carbon capture systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kress, Joel David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-03

    The development and scale up of cost effective carbon capture processes is of paramount importance to enable the widespread deployment of these technologies to significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The U.S. Department of Energy initiated the Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) in 2011 with the goal of developing a computational toolset that would enable industry to more effectively identify, design, scale up, operate, and optimize promising concepts. The first half of the presentation will introduce the CCSI Toolset consisting of basic data submodels, steady-state and dynamic process models, process optimization and uncertainty quantification tools, an advanced dynamic process control framework, and high-resolution filtered computationalfluid- dynamics (CFD) submodels. The second half of the presentation will describe a high-fidelity model of a mesoporous silica supported, polyethylenimine (PEI)-impregnated solid sorbent for CO2 capture. The sorbent model includes a detailed treatment of transport and amine-CO2- H2O interactions based on quantum chemistry calculations. Using a Bayesian approach for uncertainty quantification, we calibrate the sorbent model to Thermogravimetric (TGA) data.

  3. Greenhouse gas emissions and stocks of soil carbon and nitrogen from a 20-year fertilised wheat-maize intercropping system: A model approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xubo; Xu, Minggang; Liu, Jian; Sun, Nan; Wang, Boren; Wu, Lianhai

    2016-02-01

    Accurate modelling of agricultural management impacts on greenhouse gas emissions and the cycling of carbon and nitrogen is complicated due to interactions between various processes and the disturbance caused by field management. In this study, a process-based model, the Soil-Plant-Atmosphere Continuum System (SPACSYS), was used to simulate the effects of different fertilisation regimes on crop yields, the dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (SN) stocks from 1990 to 2010, and soil CO2 (2007-2010) and N2O (2007-2008) emissions based on a long-term fertilisation experiment with a winter-wheat (Triticum Aestivum L.) and summer-maize (Zea mays L.) intercropping system in Eutric Cambisol (FAO) soil in southern China. Three fertilisation treatments were 1) unfertilised (Control), 2) chemical nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium (NPK), and 3) NPK plus pig manure (NPKM). Statistical analyses indicated that the SPACSYS model can reasonably simulate the yields of wheat and maize, the evolution of SOC and SN stocks and soil CO2 and N2O emissions. The simulations showed that the NPKM treatment had the highest values of crop yields, SOC and SN stocks, and soil CO2 and N2O emissions were the lowest from the Control treatment. Furthermore, the simulated results showed that manure amendment along with chemical fertiliser applications led to both C (1017 ± 470 kg C ha(-1) yr(-1)) and N gains (91.7 ± 15.1 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1)) in the plant-soil system, while the Control treatment caused a slight loss in C and N. In conclusion, the SPACSYS model can accurately simulate the processes of C and N as affected by various fertilisation treatments in the red soil. Furthermore, application of chemical fertilisers plus manure could be a suitable management for ensuring crop yield and sustaining soil fertility in the red soil region, but the ratio of chemical fertilisers to manure should be optimized to reduce C and N losses to the environment.

  4. Modeling of CVI process in fabrication of carbon/carbon composites by an artificial neural network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李爱军; 李贺军; 李克智; 顾正彬

    2003-01-01

    The chemical vapor infiltration(CVI) process in fabrication of carbon-carbon composites is very complex and highly inefficient, which adds considerably to the cost of fabrication and limits the application of the material. This paper tries to use a supervised artificial neural network(ANN) to model the nonlinear relationship between parameters of isothermal CVI(ICVI) processes and physical properties of C/C composites. A model for preprocessing dataset and selecting its topology is developed using the Levenberg-Marquardt training algorithm and trained with comprehensive dataset of tubal C/C components collected from experimental data and abundant simulated data obtained by the finite element method. A basic repository on the domain knowledge of CVI processes is established via sufficient data mining by the network. With the help of the repository stored in the trained network, not only the time-dependent effects of parameters in CVI processes but also their coupling effects can be analyzed and predicted. The results show that the ANN system is effective and successful for optimizing CVI processes in fabrication of C/C composites.

  5. Evaluation of black carbon estimations in global aerosol models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zhao

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available We evaluate black carbon (BC model predictions from the AeroCom model intercomparison project by considering the diversity among year 2000 model simulations and comparing model predictions with available measurements. These model-measurement intercomparisons include BC surface and aircraft concentrations, aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD retrievals from AERONET and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI and BC column estimations based on AERONET. In regions other than Asia, most models are biased high compared to surface concentration measurements. However compared with (column AAOD or BC burden retreivals, the models are generally biased low. The average ratio of model to retrieved AAOD is less than 0.7 in South American and 0.6 in African biomass burning regions; both of these regions lack surface concentration measurements. In Asia the average model to observed ratio is 0.7 for AAOD and 0.5 for BC surface concentrations. Compared with aircraft measurements over the Americas at latitudes between 0 and 50N, the average model is a factor of 8 larger than observed, and most models exceed the measured BC standard deviation in the mid to upper troposphere. At higher latitudes the average model to aircraft BC ratio is 0.4 and models underestimate the observed BC loading in the lower and middle troposphere associated with springtime Arctic haze. Low model bias for AAOD but overestimation of surface and upper atmospheric BC concentrations at lower latitudes suggests that most models are underestimating BC absorption and should improve estimates for refractive index, particle size, and optical effects of BC coating. Retrieval uncertainties and/or differences with model diagnostic treatment may also contribute to the model-measurement disparity. Largest AeroCom model diversity occurred in northern Eurasia and the remote Arctic, regions influenced by anthropogenic sources. Changing emissions, aging, removal, or optical properties within a single model

  6. Single Plant Root System Modeling under Soil Moisture Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabusaki, S.; Fang, Y.; Chen, X.; Scheibe, T. D.

    2016-12-01

    A prognostic Virtual Plant-Atmosphere-Soil System (vPASS) model is being developed that integrates comprehensively detailed mechanistic single plant modeling with microbial, atmospheric, and soil system processes in its immediate environment. Three broad areas of process module development are targeted: Incorporating models for root growth and function, rhizosphere interactions with bacteria and other organisms, litter decomposition and soil respiration into established porous media flow and reactive transport models Incorporating root/shoot transport, growth, photosynthesis and carbon allocation process models into an integrated plant physiology model Incorporating transpiration, Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) emission, particulate deposition and local atmospheric processes into a coupled plant/atmosphere model. The integrated plant ecosystem simulation capability is being developed as open source process modules and associated interfaces under a modeling framework. The initial focus addresses the coupling of root growth, vascular transport system, and soil under drought scenarios. Two types of root water uptake modeling approaches are tested: continuous root distribution and constitutive root system architecture. The continuous root distribution models are based on spatially averaged root development process parameters, which are relatively straightforward to accommodate in the continuum soil flow and reactive transport module. Conversely, the constitutive root system architecture models use root growth rates, root growth direction, and root branching to evolve explicit root geometries. The branching topologies require more complex data structures and additional input parameters. Preliminary results are presented for root model development and the vascular response to temporal and spatial variations in soil conditions.

  7. Multiphase modeling of geologic carbon sequestration in saline aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandilla, Karl W; Celia, Michael A; Birkholzer, Jens T; Cihan, Abdullah; Leister, Evan C

    2015-01-01

    Geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) is being considered as a climate change mitigation option in many future energy scenarios. Mathematical modeling is routinely used to predict subsurface CO2 and resident brine migration for the design of injection operations, to demonstrate the permanence of CO2 storage, and to show that other subsurface resources will not be degraded. Many processes impact the migration of CO2 and brine, including multiphase flow dynamics, geochemistry, and geomechanics, along with the spatial distribution of parameters such as porosity and permeability. In this article, we review a set of multiphase modeling approaches with different levels of conceptual complexity that have been used to model GCS. Model complexity ranges from coupled multiprocess models to simplified vertical equilibrium (VE) models and macroscopic invasion percolation models. The goal of this article is to give a framework of conceptual model complexity, and to show the types of modeling approaches that have been used to address specific GCS questions. Application of the modeling approaches is shown using five ongoing or proposed CO2 injection sites. For the selected sites, the majority of GCS models follow a simplified multiphase approach, especially for questions related to injection and local-scale heterogeneity. Coupled multiprocess models are only applied in one case where geomechanics have a strong impact on the flow. Owing to their computational efficiency, VE models tend to be applied at large scales. A macroscopic invasion percolation approach was used to predict the CO2 migration at one site to examine details of CO2 migration under the caprock.

  8. Optimising the FAMOUS climate model: inclusion of global carbon cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. T. Williams

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available FAMOUS fills an important role in the hierarchy of climate models, both explicitly resolving atmospheric and oceanic dynamics yet being sufficiently computationally efficient that either very long simulations or large ensembles are possible. An improved set of carbon cycle parameters for this model has been found using a perturbed physics ensemble technique. This is an important step towards building the "Earth System" modelling capability of FAMOUS, which is a reduced resolution, and hence faster running, version of the Hadley Centre Climate model, HadCM3. Two separate 100 member perturbed parameter ensembles were performed; one for the land surface and one for the ocean. The land surface scheme was tested against present day and past representations of vegetation and the ocean ensemble was tested against observations of nitrate. An advantage of using a relatively fast climate model is that a large number of simulations can be run and hence the model parameter space (a large source of climate model uncertainty can be more thoroughly sampled. This has the associated benefit of being able to assess the sensitivity of model results to changes in each parameter. The climatologies of surface and tropospheric air temperature and precipitation are improved relative to previous versions of FAMOUS. The improved representation of upper atmosphere temperatures is driven by improved ozone concentrations near the tropopause and better upper level winds.

  9. Energy modeling towards low carbon development of Beijing in 2030

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Guangling; Chen, Sha; Guerrero, Josep M.

    2017-01-01

    renewable energy and low carbon development for the city of Beijing. The analysis of energy system modeling is organized in two steps to explore the potential renewable energy alternative in Beijing. Firstly, a reference energy system of Beijing is created based on the available data in 2014. The Energy......PLAN, an energy system analysis tool, is chosen to develop the reference energy model. Secondly, this reference model is used to investigate the alternative energy system for integrating renewable energies. Three scenarios are developed towards the energy system of Beijing in 2030, which are: (i) reference...... scenario 2030, (ii) BAU (business as usual) scenario 2030 and (iii) RES (renewable energies) scenario 2030. The results shows that the share of renewables can increase to 100% of electricity and heat production in the RE scenario. The primary fuel consumption is reduced to 155.9 TWh, which is 72 % of fuel...

  10. Modeling of Carbon Monoxide Removal by Corona Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Jingwei; SUN Yabing; ZHAO Dayong; ZHENG Zheng; XU Yuewu; YANG Haifeng; ZHU Hongbiao; ZHOU Xiaoxia

    2009-01-01

    Modeling of carbon monoxide (CO) removal by a corona plasma was conducted in this study.The purification efficiency of CO was calculated theoretically and the factors affecting the removal of CO were analyzed.The results showed that the main removal mechanisms of CO were direct dissociation by generated high-energy electrons and indirect oxidation by generated hydroxyl radicals.The purification efficiency of CO was dependent on the plasma parameters,indoor air humidity and initial concentration of CO.Good consistency between the theoretical calculation and the experimental results was observed.

  11. Memristive model of hysteretic field emission from carbon nanotube arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorodetskiy, Dmitriy V.; Gusel'nikov, Artem V.; Shevchenko, Sergey N.; Kanygin, Mikhail A.; Okotrub, Alexander V.; Pershin, Yuriy V.

    2016-01-01

    Some instances of electron field emitters are characterized by frequency-dependent hysteresis in their current-voltage characteristics. We argue that such emitters can be classified as memristive systems and introduce a general framework to describe their response. As a specific example of our approach, we consider field emission from a carbon nanotube array. Our experimental results demonstrate a low-field hysteresis, which is likely caused by an electrostatic alignment of some of the nanotubes in the applied field. We formulate a memristive model of such phenomena, whose results are in agreement with the experimental results.

  12. Model of Carbon Wire Heating in Accelerator Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Sapinski, M

    2008-01-01

    A heat flow equation with beam-induced heating and various cooling processes for a carbon wire passing through a particle beam is solved. Due to equation nonlinearity a numerical approach based on discretization of the wire movement is used. Heating of the wire due to the beam-induced electromagnetic field is taken into account. An estimation of the wire sublimation rate is made. The model is tested on SPS, LEP and Tevatron Main Injector data. Results are discussed and conclusions about limits of Wire Scanner operation on LHC beams are drawn.

  13. Evaluation of Black Carbon Estimations in Global Aerosol Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, D.; Schulz, M.; Kinne, Stefan; McNaughton, C. S.; Spackman, J. R.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T.; Bond, Tami C.; Boucher, Olivier; Chin, M.; Clarke, A. D.; De Luca, N.; Dentener, F.; Diehl, T.; Dubovik, O.; Easter, Richard C.; Fahey, D. W.; Feichter, J.; Fillmore, D.; Freitag, S.; Ghan, Steven J.; Ginoux, P.; Gong, S.; Horowitz, L.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Klimont, Z.; Kondo, Yutaka; Krol, M.; Liu, Xiaohong; Miller, R.; Montanaro, V.; Moteki, N.; Myhre, G.; Penner, J.; Perlwitz, Ja; Pitari, G.; Reddy, S.; Sahu, L.; Sakamoto, H.; Schuster, G.; Schwarz, J. P.; Seland, O.; Stier, P.; Takegawa, Nobuyuki; Takemura, T.; Textor, C.; van Aardenne, John; Zhao, Y.

    2009-11-27

    We evaluate black carbon (BC) model predictions from the AeroCom model intercomparison project by considering the diversity among year 2000 model simulations and comparing model predictions with available measurements. These model-measurement intercomparisons include BC surface and aircraft concentrations, aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) from AERONET and OMI retrievals and BC column estimations based on AERONET. In regions other than Asia, most models are biased high compared to surface concentration measurements. However compared with (column) AAOD or BC burden retreivals, the models are generally biased low. The average ratio of model to retrieved AAOD is less than 0.7 in South American and 0.6 in African biomass burning regions; both of these regions lack surface concentration measurements. In Asia the average model to observed ratio is 0.6 for AAOD and 0.5 for BC surface concentrations. Compared with aircraft measurements over the Americas at latitudes between 0 and 50N, the average model is a factor of 10 larger than observed, and most models exceed the measured BC standard deviation in the mid to upper troposphere. At higher latitudes the average model to aircraft BC is 0.6 and underestimate the observed BC loading in the lower and middle troposphere associated with springtime Arctic haze. Low model bias for AAOD but overestimation of surface and upper atmospheric BC concentrations at lower latitudes suggests that most models are underestimating BC absorption and should improve estimates for refractive index, particle size, and optical effects of BC coating. Retrieval uncertainties and/or differences with model diagnostic treatment may also contribute to the model-measurement disparity. Largest AeroCom model diversity occurred in northern Eurasia and the remote Arctic, regions influenced by anthropogenic sources. Changing emissions, aging, removal, or optical properties within a single model generated a smaller change in model predictions than the

  14. Evaluation of black carbon estimations in global aerosol models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Koch

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available We evaluate black carbon (BC model predictions from the AeroCom model intercomparison project by considering the diversity among year 2000 model simulations and comparing model predictions with available measurements. These model-measurement intercomparisons include BC surface and aircraft concentrations, aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD from AERONET and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI retrievals and BC column estimations based on AERONET. In regions other than Asia, most models are biased high compared to surface concentration measurements. However compared with (column AAOD or BC burden retreivals, the models are generally biased low. The average ratio of model to retrieved AAOD is less than 0.7 in South American and 0.6 in African biomass burning regions; both of these regions lack surface concentration measurements. In Asia the average model to observed ratio is 0.6 for AAOD and 0.5 for BC surface concentrations. Compared with aircraft measurements over the Americas at latitudes between 0 and 50 N, the average model is a factor of 10 larger than observed, and most models exceed the measured BC standard deviation in the mid to upper troposphere. At higher latitudes the average model to aircraft BC is 0.6 and underestimates the observed BC loading in the lower and middle troposphere associated with springtime Arctic haze. Low model bias for AAOD but overestimation of surface and upper atmospheric BC concentrations at lower latitudes suggests that most models are underestimating BC absorption and should improve estimates for refractive index, particle size, and optical effects of BC coating. Retrieval uncertainties and/or differences with model diagnostic treatment may also contribute to the model-measurement disparity. Largest AeroCom model diversity occurred in northern Eurasia and the remote Arctic, regions influenced by anthropogenic sources. Changing emissions, aging, removal, or optical properties within a single model generated a

  15. Model Persamaan Massa Karbon Akar Pohon dan Root-Shoot Ratio Massa Karbon (Equation Models of Tree Root Carbon Mass and Root-Shoot Carbon Mass Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias .

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The case study was conducted in the area of Acacia mangium plantation at BKPH Parung Panjang, KPH Bogor. The objective of the study was to formulate equation models of tree root carbon mass and root to shoot carbon mass ratio of the plantation. It was found that carbon content in the parts of tree biomass (stems, branches, twigs, leaves, and roots was different, in which the highest and the lowest carbon content was in the main stem of the tree and in the leaves, respectively. The main stem and leaves of tree accounted for 70% of tree biomass. The root-shoot ratio of root biomass to tree biomass above the ground and the root-shoot ratio of root biomass to main stem biomass was 0.1443 and 0.25771, respectively, in which 75% of tree carbon mass was in the main stem and roots of tree. It was also found that the root-shoot ratio of root carbon mass to tree carbon mass above the ground and the root-shoot ratio of root carbon mass to tree main stem carbon mass was 0.1442 and 0.2034, respectively. All allometric equation models of tree root carbon mass of A. mangium have a high goodness-of-fit as indicated by its high adjusted R2.Keywords: Acacia mangium, allometric, root-shoot ratio, biomass, carbon mass

  16. Equivalent-Continuum Modeling With Application to Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odegard, Gregory M.; Gates, Thomas S.; Nicholson, Lee M.; Wise, Kristopher E.

    2002-01-01

    A method has been proposed for developing structure-property relationships of nano-structured materials. This method serves as a link between computational chemistry and solid mechanics by substituting discrete molecular structures with equivalent-continuum models. It has been shown that this substitution may be accomplished by equating the vibrational potential energy of a nano-structured material with the strain energy of representative truss and continuum models. As important examples with direct application to the development and characterization of single-walled carbon nanotubes and the design of nanotube-based devices, the modeling technique has been applied to determine the effective-continuum geometry and bending rigidity of a graphene sheet. A representative volume element of the chemical structure of graphene has been substituted with equivalent-truss and equivalent continuum models. As a result, an effective thickness of the continuum model has been determined. This effective thickness has been shown to be significantly larger than the interatomic spacing of graphite. The effective thickness has been shown to be significantly larger than the inter-planar spacing of graphite. The effective bending rigidity of the equivalent-continuum model of a graphene sheet was determined by equating the vibrational potential energy of the molecular model of a graphene sheet subjected to cylindrical bending with the strain energy of an equivalent continuum plate subjected to cylindrical bending.

  17. Modeling the grazing effect on dry grassland carbon cycling with modified Biome-BGC grazing model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Geping; Han, Qifei; Li, Chaofan; Yang, Liao

    2014-05-01

    Identifying the factors that determine the carbon source/sink strength of ecosystems is important for reducing uncertainty in the global carbon cycle. Arid grassland ecosystems are a widely distributed biome type in Xinjiang, Northwest China, covering approximately one-fourth the country's land surface. These grasslands are the habitat for many endemic and rare plant and animal species and are also used as pastoral land for livestock. Using the modified Biome-BGC grazing model, we modeled carbon dynamics in Xinjiang for grasslands that varied in grazing intensity. In general, this regional simulation estimated that the grassland ecosystems in Xinjiang acted as a net carbon source, with a value of 0.38 Pg C over the period 1979-2007. There were significant effects of grazing on carbon dynamics. An over-compensatory effect in net primary productivity (NPP) and vegetation carbon (C) stock was observed when grazing intensity was lower than 0.40 head/ha. Grazing resulted in a net carbon source of 23.45 g C m-2 yr-1, which equaled 0.37 Pg in Xinjiang in the last 29 years. In general, grazing decreased vegetation C stock, while an increasing trend was observed with low grazing intensity. The soil C increased significantly (17%) with long-term grazing, while the soil C stock exhibited a steady trend without grazing. These findings have implications for grassland ecosystem management as it relates to carbon sequestration and climate change mitigation, e.g., removal of grazing should be considered in strategies that aim to increase terrestrial carbon sequestrations at local and regional scales. One of the greatest limitations in quantifying the effects of herbivores on carbon cycling is identifying the grazing systems and intensities within a given region. We hope our study emphasizes the need for large-scale assessments of how grazing impacts carbon cycling. Most terrestrial ecosystems in Xinjiang have been affected by disturbances to a greater or lesser extent in the past

  18. DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) HYDROXIDE DEPLETION MODEL FOR CARBON DIOXIDE ABSORPTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OGDEN DM; KIRCH NW

    2007-10-31

    This document generates a supernatant hydroxide ion depletion model based on mechanistic principles. The carbon dioxide absorption mechanistic model is developed in this report. The report also benchmarks the model against historical tank supernatant hydroxide data and vapor space carbon dioxide data. A comparison of the newly generated mechanistic model with previously applied empirical hydroxide depletion equations is also performed.

  19. Carbon-Chain Species in Warm-up Models

    CERN Document Server

    Hassel, George E; Herbst, Eric

    2011-01-01

    In previous warm-up chemical models of the low-mass star-forming region L1527, we investigated the evolution of carbon-chain unsaturated hydrocarbon species when the envelope temperature is slightly elevated to $T\\approx 30$ K. These models demonstrated that enhanced abundances of such species can be explained by gas-phase ion-molecule chemistry following the partial sublimation of methane from grain surfaces. We also concluded that the abundances of hydrocarbon radicals such as the C$_{\\rm n}$H family should be further enhanced as the temperatures increase to higher values, but this conclusion stood in contrast with the lack of unambiguous detection of these species toward hot core and corino sources. Meanwhile, observational surveys have identified C$_2$H, C$_4$H, CH$_3$CCH, and CH$_3$OH toward hot corinos (especially IRAS 16293-2422) as well as towards L1527, with lower abundances for the carbon chain radicals and higher abundances for the other two species toward the hot corinos. In addition, the {\\it Her...

  20. Deployment models for commercialized carbon capture and storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Richard A; Monroe, Larry S; Friedman, Julio S

    2011-01-01

    Even before technology matures and the regulatory framework for carbon capture and storage (CCS) has been developed, electrical utilities will need to consider the logistics of how widespread commercial-scale operations will be deployed. The framework of CCS will require utilities to adopt business models that ensure both safe and affordable CCS operations while maintaining reliable power generation. Physical models include an infrastructure with centralized CO(2) pipelines that focus geologic sequestration in pooled regional storage sites or supply CO(2) for beneficial use in enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and a dispersed plant model with sequestration operations which take place in close proximity to CO(2) capture. Several prototypical business models, including hybrids of these two poles, will be in play including a self-build option, a joint venture, and a pay at the gate model. In the self-build model operations are vertically integrated and utility owned and operated by an internal staff of engineers and geologists. A joint venture model stresses a partnership between the host site utility/owner's engineer and external operators and consultants. The pay to take model is turn-key external contracting to a third party owner/operator with cash positive fees paid out for sequestration and cash positive income for CO(2)-EOR. The selection of a business model for CCS will be based in part on the desire of utilities to be vertically integrated, source-sink economics, and demand for CO(2)-EOR. Another element in this decision will be how engaged a utility decides to be and the experience the utility has had with precommercial R&D activities. Through R&D, utilities would likely have already addressed or at least been exposed to the many technical, regulatory, and risk management issues related to successful CCS. This paper provides the framework for identifying the different physical and related prototypical business models that may play a role for electric utilities in

  1. A probability model for the strength of carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Frank Xu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A longstanding controversy exists on the form of the probability distribution for the strength of carbon nanotubes: is it Weibull, lognormal, or something else? We present a theory for CNT strength through integration of weakest link scaling, flaw statistics, and brittle fracture. The probability distribution that arises exhibits multiple regimes, each of which takes the form of a Weibull distribution. Our model not only gives a possible resolution to the debate but provides a way to attain reliable estimates of CNT strength for materials design from practical-sized (non-asymptotic data sets of CNT strength. Last, the model offers an explanation for the severe underestimation of CNT strength from strength tests of CNT bundles.

  2. Conductive polymer foams with carbon nanofillers – Modeling percolation behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Maxian

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A new numerical model considering nanofiller random distribution in a porous polymeric matrix was developed to predict electrical percolation behavior in systems incorporating 1D-carbon nanotubes (CNTs and/or 2D-graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs. The numerical model applies to porous systems with closed-cell morphology. The percolation threshold was found to decrease with increasing porosity due to filler repositioning as a result of foaming. CNTs were more efficient in forming a percolative network than GNPs. High-aspect ratio (AR and randomly oriented fillers were more prone to form a network. Reduced percolation values were determined for misaligned fillers as they connect better in a network compared to aligned ones. Hybrid CNT-GNP fillers show synergistic effects in forming electrically conductive networks by comparison with single fillers.

  3. Carbon dioxide stripping in aquaculture -- part III: model verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colt, John; Watten, Barnaby; Pfeiffer, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Based on conventional mass transfer models developed for oxygen, the use of the non-linear ASCE method, 2-point method, and one parameter linear-regression method were evaluated for carbon dioxide stripping data. For values of KLaCO2 < approximately 1.5/h, the 2-point or ASCE method are a good fit to experimental data, but the fit breaks down at higher values of KLaCO2. How to correct KLaCO2 for gas phase enrichment remains to be determined. The one-parameter linear regression model was used to vary the C*CO2 over the test, but it did not result in a better fit to the experimental data when compared to the ASCE or fixed C*CO2 assumptions.

  4. Large uncertainty in soil carbon modelling related to carbon input calculation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keel, Sonja G.; Leifeld, Jens; Taghizadeh-Toosi, Arezoo; Oleson, Jørgen E.

    2016-04-01

    A model-based inventory for carbon (C) sinks and sources in agricultural soils is being established for Switzerland. As part of this project, five frequently used allometric equations that estimate soil C inputs based on measured yields are compared. To evaluate the different methods, we calculate soil C inputs for a long-term field trial in Switzerland. This DOK experiment (bio-Dynamic, bio-Organic, and conventional (German: Konventionell)) compares five different management systems, that are applied to identical crop rotations. Average calculated soil C inputs vary largely between allometric equations and range from 1.6 t C ha-1 yr-1 to 2.6 t C ha-1 yr-1. Among the most important crops in Switzerland, the uncertainty is largest for barley (difference between highest and lowest estimate: 3.0 t C ha-1 yr-1). For the unfertilized control treatment, the estimated soil C inputs vary less between allometric equations than for the treatment that received mineral fertilizer and farmyard manure. Most likely, this is due to the higher yields in the latter treatment, i.e. the difference between methods might be amplified because yields differ more. To evaluate the influence of these allometric equations on soil C dynamics we simulate the DOK trial for the years 1977-2004 using the model C-TOOL (Taghizadeh-Toosi et al. 2014) and the five different soil C input calculation methods. Across all treatments, C-TOOL simulates a decrease in soil C in line with the experimental data. This decline, however, varies between allometric equations (-2.4 t C ha-1 to -6.3 t C ha-1 for the years 1977-2004) and has the same order of magnitude as the difference between treatments. In summary, the method to estimate soil C inputs is identified as a significant source of uncertainty in soil C modelling. Choosing an appropriate allometric equation to derive the input data is thus a critical step when setting up a model-based national soil C inventory. References Taghizadeh-Toosi A et al. (2014) C

  5. Spin-Up and Tuning of the Global Carbon Cycle Model Inside the GISS ModelE2 GCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleinov, Igor; Kiang, Nancy Y.; Romanou, Anastasia

    2015-01-01

    Planetary carbon cycle involves multiple phenomena, acting at variety of temporal and spacial scales. The typical times range from minutes for leaf stomata physiology to centuries for passive soil carbon pools and deep ocean layers. So, finding a satisfactory equilibrium state becomes a challenging and computationally expensive task. Here we present the spin-up processes for different configurations of the GISS Carbon Cycle model from the model forced with MODIS observed Leaf Area Index (LAI) and prescribed ocean to the prognostic LAI and to the model fully coupled to the dynamic ocean and ocean biology. We investigate the time it takes the model to reach the equilibrium and discuss the ways to speed up this process. NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies General Circulation Model (GISS ModelE2) is currently equipped with all major algorithms necessary for the simulation of the Global Carbon Cycle. The terrestrial part is presented by Ent Terrestrial Biosphere Model (Ent TBM), which includes leaf biophysics, prognostic phenology and soil biogeochemistry module (based on Carnegie-Ames-Stanford model). The ocean part is based on the NASA Ocean Biogeochemistry Model (NOBM). The transport of atmospheric CO2 is performed by the atmospheric part of ModelE2, which employs quadratic upstream algorithm for this purpose.

  6. Integrated Experimental and Modeling Studies of Mineral Carbonation as a Mechanism for Permanent Carbon Sequestration in Mafic/Ultramafic Rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhengrong [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Qiu, Lin [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Zhang, Shuang [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Bolton, Edward [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Bercovici, David [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Ague, Jay [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Karato, Shun-Ichiro [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Oristaglio, Michael [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Zhu, Wen-Iu [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Lisabeth, Harry [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Johnson, Kevin [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2014-09-30

    A program of laboratory experiments, modeling and fieldwork was carried out at Yale University, University of Maryland, and University of Hawai‘i, under a DOE Award (DE-FE0004375) to study mineral carbonation as a practical method of geologic carbon sequestration. Mineral carbonation, also called carbon mineralization, is the conversion of (fluid) carbon dioxide into (solid) carbonate minerals in rocks, by way of naturally occurring chemical reactions. Mafic and ultramafic rocks, such as volcanic basalt, are natural candidates for carbonation, because the magnesium and iron silicate minerals in these rocks react with brines of dissolved carbon dioxide to form carbonate minerals. By trapping carbon dioxide (CO2) underground as a constituent of solid rock, carbonation of natural basalt formations would be a secure method of sequestering CO2 captured at power plants in efforts to mitigate climate change. Geochemical laboratory experiments at Yale, carried out in a batch reactor at 200°C and 150 bar (15 MPa), studied carbonation of the olivine mineral forsterite (Mg2SiO4) reacting with CO2 brines in the form of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) solutions. The main carbonation product in these reactions is the carbonate mineral magnesite (MgCO3). A series of 32 runs varied the reaction time, the reactive surface area of olivine grains and powders, the concentration of the reacting fluid, and the starting ratio of fluid to olivine mass. These experiments were the first to study the rate of olivine carbonation under passive conditions approaching equilibrium. The results show that, in a simple batch reaction, olivine carbonation is fastest during the first 24 hours and then slows significantly and even reverses. A natural measure of the extent of carbonation is a quantity called the carbonation fraction, which compares the amount of carbon removed from solution, during a run, to the maximum amount

  7. From monitoring to modeling: using biomass observation for benchmarking terrestrial carbon cycle models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulter, B.; Ciais, P.; Chevallier, F.; Delbart, N.; Lafont, S.; Maignan, F.; Saatchi, S.; Sitch, S.

    2012-04-01

    Biomass is a key ecosystem property linking biogeochemical fluxes with the accumulation of carbon in terrestrial ecosystems. The spatial and temporal distribution of aboveground biomass has implications for climate stability and other ecosystem services, including timber supplies. Globally, terrestrial forest ecosystems store ~380 Pg C in aboveground biomass, which is about 45% compared to the amount of carbon in the atmosphere as CO2. Model-data comparisons of aboveground biomass have so far been limited because of a lack of wall-to-wall coverage of observations, which has recently been resolved from satellite remote sensing and an intensification of forest inventory networks. Here, we compare aboveground biomass estimates among an ensemble of terrestrial carbon cycle models, and benchmark these estimates with inventory and satellite-based estimates. We then use the distribution of biomass estimates to evaluate bias in net ecosystem exchange caused by uncertainty from carbon turnover rates. By identifying model structure and the parameters linked to carbon turnover, improvements can be made to more realistically simulate aboveground biomass.

  8. Kinetic modelling of molecular hydrogen transport in microporous carbon materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankel, Marlies; Zhang, Hong; Nguyen, Thanh X; Bhatia, Suresh K; Gray, Stephen K; Smith, Sean C

    2011-05-07

    The proposal of kinetic molecular sieving of hydrogen isotopes is explored by employing statistical rate theory methods to describe the kinetics of molecular hydrogen transport in model microporous carbon structures. A Lennard-Jones atom-atom interaction potential is utilized for the description of the interactions between H(2)/D(2) and the carbon framework, while the requisite partition functions describing the thermal flux of molecules through the transition state are calculated quantum mechanically in view of the low temperatures involved in the proposed kinetic molecular sieving application. Predicted kinetic isotope effects for initial passage from the gas phase into the first pore mouth are consistent with expectations from previous modeling studies, namely, that at sufficiently low temperatures and for sufficiently narrow pore mouths D(2) transport is dramatically favored over H(2). However, in contrast to expectations from previous modeling, the absence of any potential barrier along the minimum energy pathway from the gas phase into the first pore mouth yields a negative temperature dependence in the predicted absolute rate coefficients-implying a negative activation energy. In pursuit of the effective activation barrier, we find that the minimum potential in the cavity is significantly higher than in the pore mouth for nanotube-shaped models, throwing into question the common assumption that passage through the pore mouths should be the rate-determining step. Our results suggest a new mechanism that, depending on the size and shape of the cavity, the thermal activation barrier may lie in the cavity rather than at the pore mouth. As a consequence, design strategies for achieving quantum-mediated kinetic molecular sieving of H(2)/D(2) in a microporous membrane will need, at the very least, to take careful account of cavity shape and size in addition to pore-mouth size in order to ensure that the selective step, namely passage through the pore mouth, is also

  9. Developing an Enzyme Mediated Soil Organic Carbon Decomposition Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, M. A.; Post, W. M.; Wang, G.; Jagadamma, S.; Steinweg, J. M.; Schadt, C. W.

    2012-12-01

    We developed the Microbial-ENzyme-mediated Decomposition (MEND) model in order to mechanistically model the decomposition of soil organic carbon (C). This presentation is an overview of the concept and development of the model and of the design of complementary lab-scale experiments. The model divides soil C into five pools of particulate, mineral-associated, dissolved, microbial, and enzyme organic C (Wang et al. 2012). There are three input types - cellulose, lignin, and dissolved C. Decomposition is mediated via microbial extracellular enzymes using the Michaelis-Menten equation, resulting in the production of a common pool of dissolved organic C. Parameters for the Michaelis-Menten equation are obtained through a literature review (Wang and Post, 2012a). The dissolved C is taken up by microbial biomass and proportioned according to microbial maintenance and growth, which were recalculated according to Wang and Post (2012b). The model allows dissolved C to undergo adsorption and desorption reactions with the mineral-associated C, which was also parameterized based upon a literature review and complementary laboratory experiments. In the lab, four 14C-labeled substrates (cellulose, fatty acid, glucose, and lignin-like) were incubated with either the particulate C pool, the mineral-associated C pool, or to bulk soils. The rate of decomposition was measured via the production of 14CO2 over time, along with incorporation into microbial biomass, production of dissolved C, and estimation of sorbed C. We performed steady-state and dynamic simulations and sensitivity analyses under temperature increases of 1-5°C for a period of 100 y. Simulations indicated an initial decrease in soil organic C consisting of both cellulose and lignin pools. Over longer time intervals (> 6 y), however, a shrinking microbial population, a concomitant decrease in enzyme production, and a decrease in microbial carbon use efficiency together decreased CO2 production and resulted in greater

  10. The mathematical model for synthesis process management of the carbon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chistyakova, T. B.; Petrov, D. N.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, key difficulties of management process for carbon nanostructure synthesis are described. Tasks of optimum control of the carbon nanostructure synthesis process and management in case of emergency situations are formulated. The mathematical model of carbon nanostructure synthesis is offered. The equations for calculation of quantitative, qualitative indexes, indicators of safety and operability of engineering procedure are provided. The necessity of mathematical model use for carbon nanostructure synthesis is caused by improvement of the quality, the quantity, a decrease in the cost value of carbon nanostructures and an increase in safety of the engineering procedure of their obtaining. Testing and approbation of the mathematical model for carbon nanostructure synthesis are executed on a fullerene industrial production line. Suitability of the mathematical model of carbon nanostructure synthesis for production control in the mode of optimum control and management in case of emergency situations is confirmed. The obtained solution is recommended for implementation on the enterprises of a similar purpose.

  11. A structured approach for selecting carbon capture process models : A case study on monoethanolamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Spek, Mijndert; Ramirez, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Carbon capture and storage is considered a promising option to mitigate CO2 emissions. This has resulted in many R&D efforts focusing at developing viable carbon capture technologies. During carbon capture technology development, process modeling plays an important role. Selecting an appropriate pro

  12. A structured approach for selecting carbon capture process models : A case study on monoethanolamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Spek, Mijndert; Ramirez, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Carbon capture and storage is considered a promising option to mitigate CO2 emissions. This has resulted in many R&D efforts focusing at developing viable carbon capture technologies. During carbon capture technology development, process modeling plays an important role. Selecting an appropriate

  13. A structured approach for selecting carbon capture process models : A case study on monoethanolamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Spek, Mijndert; Ramirez, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Carbon capture and storage is considered a promising option to mitigate CO2 emissions. This has resulted in many R&D efforts focusing at developing viable carbon capture technologies. During carbon capture technology development, process modeling plays an important role. Selecting an appropriate pro

  14. Modeling the Impact of Carbon Dioxide Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Carbonate Aquifer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacon, Diana H.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Dai, Zhenxue; Keating, Elizabeth; Brown, Christopher F.

    2016-01-01

    Multiphase, reactive transport modeling was used to identify the mechanisms controlling trace metal release under elevated CO2 conditions from a well-characterized carbonate aquifer. Modeling was conducted for two experimental scenarios: batch experiments to simulate sudden, fast, and short-lived release of CO2 as would occur in the case of well failure during injection, and column experiments to simulate more gradual leaks such as those occurring along undetected faults, fractures, or well linings. Observed and predicted trace metal concentrations are compared to groundwater concentrations from this aquifer to determine the potential for leaking CO2 to adversely impact drinking water quality. Finally, a three-dimensional multiphase flow and reactive-transport simulation of CO2 leakage from an abandoned wellbore into a generalized model of the shallow, unconfined portion of the aquifer is used to determine potential impacts on groundwater quality. As a measure of adverse impacts on groundwater quality, both the EPA’s MCL limits and the maximum trace metal concentration observed in the aquifer were used as threshold values.

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance and molecular modeling study of exocyclic carbon-carbon double bond polarization in benzylidene barbiturates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-Villar, J. Daniel; Vieira, Andreia A.

    2013-02-01

    Benzylidene barbiturates are important materials for the synthesis of heterocyclic compounds with potential for the development of new drugs. The reactivity of benzylidene barbiturates is mainly controlled by their exocyclic carbon-carbon double bond. In this work, the exocyclic double bond polarization was estimated experimentally by NMR and correlated with the Hammett σ values of the aromatic ring substituents and the molecular modeling calculated atomic charge difference. It is demonstrated that carbon chemical shift differences and NBO charge differences can be used to predict their reactivity.

  16. Modelling soil carbon flows and stocks following a carbon balance approach at regional scale for the EU-27

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesschen, Jan Peter; Sikirica, Natasa; Bonten, Luc; Dibari, Camilla; Sanchez, Berta; Kuikman, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Soil Organic Carbon (SOC) is a key parameter to many soil functions and services. SOC is essential to support water retention and nutrient buffering and mineralization in the soil as well as to enhance soil biodiversity. Consequently, loss of SOC or low SOC levels might threaten soil productivity or even lead to a collapse of a farming system. Identification of areas in Europe with critically low SOC levels or with a negative carbon balance is a challenge in order to apply the appropriate strategies to restore these areas or prevent further SOC losses. The objective of this study is to assess current soil carbon flows and stocks at a regional scale; we follow a carbon balance approach which we developed within the MITERRA-Europe model. MITERRA-Europe is an environmental impact assessment model and calculates nitrogen and greenhouse emission on a deterministic and annual basis using emission and leaching factors at regional level (NUTS2, comparable to province level) in the EU27. The model already contained a soil carbon module based on the IPCC stock change approach. Within the EU FP7 SmartSoil project we developed a SOC balance approach, for which we quantified the input of carbon (manure, crop residues, other organic inputs) and the losses of carbon (decomposition, leaching and erosion). The calculations rules from the Roth-C model were used to estimate SOC decomposition. For the actual soil carbon stocks we used the data from the LUCAS soil sample survey. LUCAS collected soil samples in 2009 at about 22000 locations across the EU, which were analysed for a range of soil properties. Land management practices are accounted for, based on data from the EU wide Survey on Agricultural Production Methods in the 2010 Farm Structure Survey. The survey comprises data on the application of soil tillage, soil cover, crop rotation and irrigation. Based on the simulated soil carbon balance and the actual carbon stocks from LUCAS we now can identify regions within the EU that

  17. AN INTEGRATED MODELING FRAMEWORK FOR CARBON MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anand B. Rao; Edward S. Rubin; Michael B. Berkenpas

    2004-03-01

    CO{sub 2} capture and storage (CCS) is gaining widespread interest as a potential method to control greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel sources, especially electric power plants. Commercial applications of CO{sub 2} separation and capture technologies are found in a number of industrial process operations worldwide. Many of these capture technologies also are applicable to fossil fuel power plants, although applications to large-scale power generation remain to be demonstrated. This report describes the development of a generalized modeling framework to assess alternative CO{sub 2} capture and storage options in the context of multi-pollutant control requirements for fossil fuel power plants. The focus of the report is on post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture using amine-based absorption systems at pulverized coal-fired plants, which are the most prevalent technology used for power generation today. The modeling framework builds on the previously developed Integrated Environmental Control Model (IECM). The expanded version with carbon sequestration is designated as IECM-cs. The expanded modeling capability also includes natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plants and integrated coal gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems as well as pulverized coal (PC) plants. This report presents details of the performance and cost models developed for an amine-based CO{sub 2} capture system, representing the baseline of current commercial technology. The key uncertainties and variability in process design, performance and cost parameters which influence the overall cost of carbon mitigation also are characterized. The new performance and cost models for CO{sub 2} capture systems have been integrated into the IECM-cs, along with models to estimate CO{sub 2} transport and storage costs. The CO{sub 2} control system also interacts with other emission control technologies such as flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems for SO{sub 2} control. The integrated model is applied to

  18. Molecular Modeling and Adsorption Properties of Ordered Silica-Templated CMK Mesoporous Carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Surendra Kumar; Pellenq, Roland J-M; Gubbins, Keith E; Peng, Xuan

    2017-03-07

    Realistic molecular models of silica-templated CMK-1, CMK-3, and CMK-5 carbon materials have been developed by using carbon rods and carbon pipes that were obtained by adsorbing carbon in a model MCM-41 pore. The interactions between the carbon atoms with the silica matrix were described using the PN-Traz potential, and the interaction between the carbon atoms was calculated by the reactive empirical bond order (REBO) potential. Carbon rods and pipes with different thicknesses were obtained by changing the silica-carbon interaction strength, the temperature, and the chemical potential of carbon vapor adsorption. These equilibrium structures were further used to obtain the atomic models of CMK-1, CMK-3, and CMK-5 materials using the same symmetry as found in TEM pictures. These models are further refined and made more realistic by adding interconnections between the carbon rods and carbon pipes. We calculated the geometric pore size distribution of the different models of CMK-5 and found that the presence of interconnections results in some new features in the pore size distribution. Argon adsorption properties were investigated using GCMC simulations to characterize these materials at 77 K. We found that the presence of interconnection results greatly improves the agreement with available experimental data by shifting the capillary condensation to lower pressures. Adding interconnections also induces smoother adsorption/condensation isotherms, and desorption/evaporation curves show a sharp jump. These features reflex the complexity of the nanovoids in CMKs in terms of their pore morphology and topology.

  19. Carbon stock and carbon turnover in boreal and temperate forests - Integration of remote sensing data and global vegetation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurner, Martin; Beer, Christian; Carvalhais, Nuno; Forkel, Matthias; Tito Rademacher, Tim; Santoro, Maurizio; Tum, Markus; Schmullius, Christiane

    2016-04-01

    Long-term vegetation dynamics are one of the key uncertainties of the carbon cycle. There are large differences in simulated vegetation carbon stocks and fluxes including productivity, respiration and carbon turnover between global vegetation models. Especially the implementation of climate-related mortality processes, for instance drought, fire, frost or insect effects, is often lacking or insufficient in current models and their importance at global scale is highly uncertain. These shortcomings have been due to the lack of spatially extensive information on vegetation carbon stocks, which cannot be provided by inventory data alone. Instead, we recently have been able to estimate northern boreal and temperate forest carbon stocks based on radar remote sensing data. Our spatially explicit product (0.01° resolution) shows strong agreement to inventory-based estimates at a regional scale and allows for a spatial evaluation of carbon stocks and dynamics simulated by global vegetation models. By combining this state-of-the-art biomass product and NPP datasets originating from remote sensing, we are able to study the relation between carbon turnover rate and a set of climate indices in northern boreal and temperate forests along spatial gradients. We observe an increasing turnover rate with colder winter temperatures and longer winters in boreal forests, suggesting frost damage and the trade-off between frost adaptation and growth being important mortality processes in this ecosystem. In contrast, turnover rate increases with climatic conditions favouring drought and insect outbreaks in temperate forests. Investigated global vegetation models from the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISI-MIP), including HYBRID4, JeDi, JULES, LPJml, ORCHIDEE, SDGVM, and VISIT, are able to reproduce observation-based spatial climate - turnover rate relationships only to a limited extent. While most of the models compare relatively well in terms of NPP, simulated

  20. Multi-Sensor Model-Data Assimilation for Improved Modeling of Savanna Carbon and Water Budgets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, D. J.; Renzullo, L. J.; Guerschman, J.; Hill, M. J.

    2007-12-01

    Model-data assimilation methods are increasingly being used to improve model predictions of carbon pools and fluxes, soil profile moisture contents, and evapotranspiration at catchment to regional scales. In this talk, I will discuss the development of model-data assimilation methods for application to parameter and state estimation problems in the context of savanna carbon and water cycles. A particular focus of this talk will be on the integration of in situ datasets and multiple types of satellite observations with radiative transfer, surface energy balance, and carbon budget models. An example will be drawn from existing work demonstrating regional estimation of soil profile moisture content based on multiple satellite sensors. The data assimilation scheme comprised a forward model, observation operators, multiple observation datasets and an optimization scheme. The forward model propagates model state variables in time based on climate forcing, initial conditions and model parameters and includes processes governing evapotranspiration, water budget and carbon cycle processes. The observation operators calculate modeled land surface temperature and microwave brightness temperatures based on the state variables of profile soil moisture and soil surface layer soil moisture at less than 2.5 cm depth. Satellite observations used in the assimilation scheme are surface brightness temperatures from AMSR-E (passive microwave at 6.9GHz at horizontal polarization) and from AVHRR (thermal channels 4 & 5 from NOAA-18), and land surface reflectances from MODIS Terra (channels 1 and 2 at 250m resolution). These three satellite sensors overpass at approximately the same time of day and provide independent observations of the land surface at different wavelengths. The observed brightness temperatures are used as constraints on the coupled energy balance/microwave radiative transfer model, and a canopy optical model was inverted to retrieve leaf area indices from observed

  1. What moves the European carbon market? Insights from conditional jump models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronwald, Marc; Ketterer, Janina [Munich Univ. (Germany). Ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research

    2012-04-15

    This paper is concerned with carbon price volatility and the underlying causes of large price movements in the European emissions trading market. Based on the application of a combined jump-GARCH model the behavior of EUA prices is characterized. The jump- GARCH model explains the unsteady carbon price movement well and, moreover, shows that between 40 and 60 percent of the carbon price variance are triggered by jumps. Information regarding EUA supply and news from international carbon markets are identified as important drivers of these price spikes. These results can lead regulators the way if smoother carbon prices are desired.

  2. A Semi-Empirical Two Step Carbon Corrosion Reaction Model in PEM Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Alan; Colbow, Vesna; Harvey, David; Rogers, Erin; Wessel, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    The cathode CL of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) was exposed to high potentials, 1.0 to 1.4 V versus a reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE), that are typically encountered during start up/shut down operation. While both platinum dissolution and carbon corrosion occurred, the carbon corrosion effects were isolated and modeled. The presented model separates the carbon corrosion process into two reaction steps; (1) oxidation of the carbon surface to carbon-oxygen groups, and (2) further corrosion of the oxidized surface to carbon dioxide/monoxide. To oxidize and corrode the cathode catalyst carbon support, the CL was subjected to an accelerated stress test cycled the potential from 0.6 VRHE to an upper potential limit (UPL) ranging from 0.9 to 1.4 VRHE at varying dwell times. The reaction rate constants and specific capacitances of carbon and platinum were fitted by evaluating the double layer capacitance (Cdl) trends. Carbon surface oxidation increased the Cdl due to increased specific capacitance for carbon surfaces with carbon-oxygen groups, while the second corrosion reaction decreased the Cdl due to loss of the overall carbon surface area. The first oxidation step differed between carbon types, while both reaction rate constants were found to have a dependency on UPL, temperature, and gas relative humidity.

  3. Multiscale Modeling of Thermal Conductivity of Polymer/Carbon Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Thomas C.; Frankland, Sarah-Jane V.; Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation was used to estimate the interfacial thermal (Kapitza) resistance between nanoparticles and amorphous and crystalline polymer matrices. Bulk thermal conductivities of the nanocomposites were then estimated using an established effective medium approach. To study functionalization, oligomeric ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymers were chemically bonded to a single wall carbon nanotube. The results, in a poly(ethylene-vinyl acetate) matrix, are similar to those obtained previously for grafted linear hydrocarbon chains. To study the effect of noncovalent functionalization, two types of polyethylene matrices. -- aligned (extended-chain crystalline) vs. amorphous (random coils) were modeled. Both matrices produced the same interfacial thermal resistance values. Finally, functionalization of edges and faces of plate-like graphite nanoparticles was found to be only modestly effective in reducing the interfacial thermal resistance and improving the composite thermal conductivity

  4. Factorial Based Response Surface Modeling with Confidence Intervals for Optimizing Thermal Optical Transmission Analysis of Atmospheric Black Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    We demonstrate how thermal-optical transmission analysis (TOT) for refractory light-absorbing carbon in atmospheric particulate matter was optimized with empirical response surface modeling. TOT employs pyrolysis to distinguish the mass of black carbon (BC) from organic carbon (...

  5. Aboveground biomass and carbon stocks modelling using non-linear regression model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ain Mohd Zaki, Nurul; Abd Latif, Zulkiflee; Nazip Suratman, Mohd; Zainee Zainal, Mohd

    2016-06-01

    Aboveground biomass (AGB) is an important source of uncertainty in the carbon estimation for the tropical forest due to the variation biodiversity of species and the complex structure of tropical rain forest. Nevertheless, the tropical rainforest holds the most extensive forest in the world with the vast diversity of tree with layered canopies. With the usage of optical sensor integrate with empirical models is a common way to assess the AGB. Using the regression, the linkage between remote sensing and a biophysical parameter of the forest may be made. Therefore, this paper exemplifies the accuracy of non-linear regression equation of quadratic function to estimate the AGB and carbon stocks for the tropical lowland Dipterocarp forest of Ayer Hitam forest reserve, Selangor. The main aim of this investigation is to obtain the relationship between biophysical parameter field plots with the remotely-sensed data using nonlinear regression model. The result showed that there is a good relationship between crown projection area (CPA) and carbon stocks (CS) with Pearson Correlation (p < 0.01), the coefficient of correlation (r) is 0.671. The study concluded that the integration of Worldview-3 imagery with the canopy height model (CHM) raster based LiDAR were useful in order to quantify the AGB and carbon stocks for a larger sample area of the lowland Dipterocarp forest.

  6. Siberian Arctic black carbon sources constrained by model and observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winiger, Patrik; Andersson, August; Eckhardt, Sabine; Stohl, Andreas; Semiletov, Igor P.; Dudarev, Oleg V.; Charkin, Alexander; Shakhova, Natalia; Klimont, Zbigniew; Heyes, Chris; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2017-02-01

    Black carbon (BC) in haze and deposited on snow and ice can have strong effects on the radiative balance of the Arctic. There is a geographic bias in Arctic BC studies toward the Atlantic sector, with lack of observational constraints for the extensive Russian Siberian Arctic, spanning nearly half of the circum-Arctic. Here, 2 y of observations at Tiksi (East Siberian Arctic) establish a strong seasonality in both BC concentrations (8 ngṡm-3 to 302 ngṡm-3) and dual-isotope-constrained sources (19 to 73% contribution from biomass burning). Comparisons between observations and a dispersion model, coupled to an anthropogenic emissions inventory and a fire emissions inventory, give mixed results. In the European Arctic, this model has proven to simulate BC concentrations and source contributions well. However, the model is less successful in reproducing BC concentrations and sources for the Russian Arctic. Using a Bayesian approach, we show that, in contrast to earlier studies, contributions from gas flaring (6%), power plants (9%), and open fires (12%) are relatively small, with the major sources instead being domestic (35%) and transport (38%). The observation-based evaluation of reported emissions identifies errors in spatial allocation of BC sources in the inventory and highlights the importance of improving emission distribution and source attribution, to develop reliable mitigation strategies for efficient reduction of BC impact on the Russian Arctic, one of the fastest-warming regions on Earth.

  7. A global model of carbon-nutrient interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Berrien, III; Gildea, Patricia; Vorosmarty, Charles; Mellilo, Jerry M.; Peterson, Bruce J.

    1985-01-01

    The global biogeochemical model presented has two primary objectives. First, it characterizes natural elemental cycles and their linkages for the four elements significant to Earth's biota: C, N, S, and P. Second, it describes changes in these cycles due to human activity. Global nutrient cycles were studied within the drainage basins of several major world rivers on each continent. The initial study region was the Mississippi drainage basin, concentrating on carbon and nitrogen. The model first establishes the nutrient budgets of the undisturbed ecosystems in a study region. It then uses a data set of land use histories for that region to document the changes in these budgets due to land uses. Nutrient movement was followed over time (1800 to 1980) for 30 ecosystems and 10 land use categories. A geographically referenced ecological information system (GREIS) was developed to manage the digital global data bases of 0.5 x 0.5 grid cells needed to run the model: potential vegetation, drainage basins, precipitation, runoff, contemporary land cover, and FAO soil maps of the world. The results show the contributions of land use categories to river nutrient loads on a continental scale; shifts in nutrient cycling patterns from closed, steady state systems to mobile transient or open, steady state systems; soil organic matter depletion patterns in U.S. agricultural lands; changing nutrient ratios due to land use changes; and the effect of using heavy fertilizer on aquatic systems.

  8. A coupled carbon and plant hydraulic model to predict ecosystem carbon and water flux responses to disturbance and environmental change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, D. S.; Ewers, B. E.; Roberts, D. E.; McDowell, N. G.; Pendall, E.; Frank, J. M.; Reed, D. E.; Massman, W. J.; Mitra, B.

    2011-12-01

    Changing climate drivers including temperature, humidity, precipitation, and carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations directly control land surface exchanges of CO2 and water. In a profound way these responses are modulated by disturbances that are driven by or exacerbated by climate change. Predicting these changes is challenging given that the feedbacks between environmental controls, disturbances, and fluxes are complex. Flux data in areas of bark beetle outbreaks in the western U.S.A. show differential declines in carbon and water flux in response to the occlusion of xylem by associated fungi. For example, bark beetle infestation at the GLEES AmeriFlux site manifested in a decline in summer water use efficiency to 60% in the year after peak infestation compared to previous years, and no recovery of carbon uptake following a period of high vapor pressure deficit. This points to complex feedbacks between disturbance and differential ecosystem reaction and relaxation responses. Theory based on plant hydraulics and extending to include links to carbon storage and exhaustion has potential for explaining these dynamics with simple, yet rigorous models. In this spirit we developed a coupled model that combines an existing model of canopy water and carbon flow, TREES [e.g., Loranty et al., 2010], with the Sperry et al., [1998] plant hydraulic model. The new model simultaneously solves carbon uptake and losses along with plant hydraulics, and allows for testing specific hypotheses on feedbacks between xylem dysfunction, stomatal and non-stomatal controls on photosynthesis and carbon allocation, and autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration. These are constrained through gas exchange, root vulnerability to cavitation, sap flux, and eddy covariance data in a novel model complexity-testing framework. Our analysis focuses on an ecosystem gradient spanning sagebrush to subalpine forests. Our modeling results support hypotheses on feedbacks between hydraulic dysfunction and 1) non

  9. Stable Isotope Studies of Crop Carbon and Water Relations: A Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Cong-zhi; ZHANG Jia-bao; ZHAO Bing-zi; ZHANG Hui; HUANG Ping

    2009-01-01

    Crop carbon and water relations research is important in the studies of water saving agriculture,breeding program,and energy and material cycles in soil plant atmosphere continuum (SPAC).The purpose of this paper is to review the current state of knowledge on stable isotopes of carbon,oxygen,and hydrogen in the research of crop carbon and water relations,such as carbon isotope discrimination (△13C) during carbon fixation process by photosynthesis,application of △13C in crop water use efficiency (WUE) and breeding programs,oxygen isotope enrichment during leaf water transpiration,CO2 fixation by photosynthesis and release by respiration,application of hydrogen isotope composition (δD) and oxygen isotope composition (δ18O) for determination of water source used by a crop,stable isotope coupling Keeling plot for investigating the carbon and water flux in ecosystem,energy and material cycle in SPAC and correlative integrative models on stable isotope.These aspects contain most of the stable isotope researches on crop carbon and water relations which have been widely explored internationally while less referred in China.Based on the reviewed literatures,some needs for future research are suggested.

  10. Simulating carbon exchange using a regional atmospheric model coupled to an advanced land-surface model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. W. Ter Maat

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a case study to investigate what the main controlling factors are that determine atmospheric carbon dioxide content for a region in the centre of The Netherlands. We use the Regional Atmospheric Modelling System (RAMS, coupled with a land surface scheme simulating carbon, heat and momentum fluxes (SWAPS-C, and including also submodels for urban and marine fluxes, which in principle should include the dominant mechanisms and should be able to capture the relevant dynamics of the system. To validate the model, observations are used that were taken during an intensive observational campaign in central Netherlands in summer 2002. These include flux-tower observations and aircraft observations of vertical profiles and spatial fluxes of various variables.

    The simulations performed with the coupled regional model (RAMS-SWAPS-C are in good qualitative agreement with the observations. The station validation of the model demonstrates that the incoming shortwave radiation and surface fluxes of water and CO2 are well simulated. The comparison against aircraft data shows that the regional meteorology (i.e. wind, temperature is captured well by the model. Comparing spatially explicitly simulated fluxes with aircraft observed fluxes we conclude that in general latent heat fluxes are underestimated by the model compared to the observations but that the latter exhibit large variability within all flights. Sensitivity experiments demonstrate the relevance of the urban emissions of carbon dioxide for the carbon balance in this particular region. The same tests also show the relation between uncertainties in surface fluxes and those in atmospheric concentrations.

  11. The large influence of climate model bias on terrestrial carbon cycle simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlström, Anders; Schurgers, Guy; Smith, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    Global vegetation models and terrestrial carbon cycle models are widely used for projecting the carbon balance of terrestrial ecosystems. Ensembles of such models show a large spread in carbon balance predictions, ranging from a large uptake to a release of carbon by the terrestrial biosphere, constituting a large uncertainty in the associated feedback to atmospheric CO2 concentrations under global climate change. Errors and biases that may contribute to such uncertainty include ecosystem model structure, parameters and forcing by climate output from general circulation models (GCMs) or the atmospheric components of Earth system models (ESMs), e.g. as prepared for use in IPCC climate change assessments. The relative importance of these contributing factors to the overall uncertainty in carbon cycle projections is not well characterised. Here we investigate the role of climate model-derived biases by forcing a single global ecosystem-carbon cycle model, with original climate outputs from 15 ESMs and GCMs from the CMIP5 ensemble. We show that variation among the resulting ensemble of present and future carbon cycle simulations propagates from biases in annual means of temperature, precipitation and incoming shortwave radiation. Future changes in carbon pools, and thus land carbon sink trends, are also affected by climate biases, although to a smaller extent than the absolute size of carbon pools. Our results suggest that climate biases could be responsible for a considerable fraction of the large uncertainties in ESM simulations of land carbon fluxes and pools, amounting to about 40% of the range reported for ESMs. We conclude that climate bias-induced uncertainties must be decreased to make accurate coupled atmosphere-carbon cycle projections.

  12. Carbon Abundances In The Light Of 3D Model Stellar Atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collet, Remo

    ) hydrodynamic modelling of stellar atmospheres and stellar spectra. In this contribution, I describe quantitatively the impact of realistic, time-dependent, 3D hydrodynamic model atmospheres on the spectroscopic determination of carbon abundances from CH molecular lines for stars with a wide range of stellar...... carbon abundance corrections on the oxygen abundance in carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars and show that such corrections are extremely sensitive to the atmospheric C/O ratio....

  13. Modeling of the HiPco process for carbon nanotube production. II. Reactor-scale analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokcen, Tahir; Dateo, Christopher E.; Meyyappan, M.

    2002-01-01

    The high-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPco) process, developed at Rice University, has been reported to produce single-walled carbon nanotubes from gas-phase reactions of iron carbonyl in carbon monoxide at high pressures (10-100 atm). Computational modeling is used here to develop an understanding of the HiPco process. A detailed kinetic model of the HiPco process that includes of the precursor, decomposition metal cluster formation and growth, and carbon nanotube growth was developed in the previous article (Part I). Decomposition of precursor molecules is necessary to initiate metal cluster formation. The metal clusters serve as catalysts for carbon nanotube growth. The diameter of metal clusters and number of atoms in these clusters are some of the essential information for predicting carbon nanotube formation and growth, which is then modeled by the Boudouard reaction with metal catalysts. Based on the detailed model simulations, a reduced kinetic model was also developed in Part I for use in reactor-scale flowfield calculations. Here this reduced kinetic model is integrated with a two-dimensional axisymmetric reactor flow model to predict reactor performance. Carbon nanotube growth is examined with respect to several process variables (peripheral jet temperature, reactor pressure, and Fe(CO)5 concentration) with the use of the axisymmetric model, and the computed results are compared with existing experimental data. The model yields most of the qualitative trends observed in the experiments and helps to understanding the fundamental processes in HiPco carbon nanotube production.

  14. Convergent modeling of past soil organic carbon stocks but divergent projections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Luo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Soil carbon models are important tool to understand soil carbon balance and project carbon stocks in terrestrial ecosystems, particularly under global change. The initialization and/or parameterization of soil carbon models can vary among studies even when the same model and dataset are used, causing potential uncertainties in projections. Although a few studies have assessed such uncertainties, it is yet unclear what these uncertainties are correlated with and how they change across varying environmental and management conditions. Here, applying a process-based biogeochemical model to 90 individual field experiments (ranging from 5 to 82 years of experimental duration across the Australian cereal-growing regions, we demonstrated that well-designed calibration procedures enabled the model to accurately simulate changes in measured carbon stocks, but did not guarantee convergent forward projections (100 years. Major causes of the projection uncertainty were due to insufficient understanding of how microbial processes and soil carbon composition change to modulate carbon turnover. For a given site, the uncertainty significantly increased with the magnitude of future carbon input and years of the projection. Across sites, the uncertainty correlated positively with temperature, but negatively with rainfall. On average, a 331% uncertainty in projected carbon sequestration ability can be inferred in Australian agricultural soils. This uncertainty would increase further if projections were made for future warming and drying conditions. Future improvement in soil carbon modeling should focus on how microbial community and its carbon use efficiency change in response to environmental changes, better quantification of composition of soil carbon and its change, and how the soil carbon composition will affect its turnover time.

  15. Radiative Transfer Modeling of MESSENGER VIR Spectra of Mercury: Detection and Mapping of Submicroscopic Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trang, D.; Lucey, P. G.; Izenberg, N.

    2015-12-01

    The composition of Mercury is elusive because the planet is optically dark and exhibits a relatively featureless red visible and near-infrared spectrum. Studies have invoked opaque minerals and space weathering to explain these characteristics. In this study we used radiative transfer modeling of MESSENGER VIRS data to show that carbon is required to explain the detailed shape of the spectrum of Mercury from 0.3-1.5 µm. In this model, we assume the regolith comprises a high albedo host mineral, which contains nanophase and microphase iron and carbon. We varied the abundance of nanophase and microphase iron and carbon to fit the observed spectra. We found that the nanophase and microphase iron alone inadequately fits the visible portion of the observed spectra. By adding carbon, we find that nanophase and microphase iron and nanophase amorphous carbon fit the VIRS spectra consistently. We produced a global nanophase amorphous carbon map as well as nanophase and microphase iron maps. From the carbon map (see figure), we find that nanophase amorphous carbon is sensitive to geologic features associated with space weathering, such as fresh crater rays. Thus, amorphous carbon is a new indicator for regolith maturity. We also observe that the global average submicroscopic carbon content is 1.4±0.3 wt.% C, which is consistent with MESSENGER Gamma-Ray Spectrometer measurements. Using this abundance, we can constrain the source of water and carbon on Mercury. Assuming the water ice in the poles is derived from wet impactors, both asteroids and comets, and knowing C/H ratios of those sources, the surface nanophase carbon layer can be no thicker than 10 m if all carbon is derived from an exogenous source. It is almost certain the space weathered regolith on Mercury is thicker than 10 m, so the majority of carbon on Mercury must be endogenous. Figure: Nanophase amorphous carbon map. In this map, fresh craters and their rays are distinguishable by the lower proportion of

  16. Modeling carbon dynamics and social drivers of bioenergy agroecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Natalie D.

    Meeting society's energy needs through bioenergy feedstock production presents a significant and urgent challenge, as it can aid in achieving energy independence goals and mitigating climate change. With federal biofuel production standards to be met within the next decade, and with no commercial scale production or markets currently in place, many questions regarding the sustainability and social feasibility of bioenergy still persist. Clarifying these uncertainties requires the incorporation of biogeochemical, biophysical, and socioeconomic modeling tools. Chapter 2 validated the biogeochemical cycling model AGRO-BGC by comparing model estimates with empirical observations from corn and perennial C4 grass systems across Wisconsin and Illinois. AGRO-BGC, in its first application to an annual cropping system, was found to be a robust model for simulating carbon dynamics of an annual cropping system. Chapter 3 investigated the long-term implications of bioenergy feedstock harvest on soil productivity and erosion in annual corn and perennial switchgrass agroecosystems using AGRO-BGC and the soil erosion model RUSLE2. Modeling environments included biophysical landscape characteristics and management practices of bioenergy feedstock production systems. This study found that intensifying aboveground residue harvest reduces soil productivity over time, and the magnitude of these losses is greater in corn than in switchgrass systems. Results of this study will aid in the design of sustainable bioenergy feedstock management practices. Chapter 4 provided evidence that combining biophysical crop canopy characteristics with satellite-derived vegetation indices offers suitable estimates of crop canopy phenology for corn and soybeans in Southwest Wisconsin farms. LANDSAT based vegetation indices, when combined with a light use efficiency model, provide yield estimates in agreement with farmer reports, providing an efficient and accurate means of estimating crop yields from

  17. Modeling forest carbon and nitrogen cycles based on long term carbon stock field measurement in the Delaware River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, B.; Pan, Y.; McCullough, K.; Plante, A. F.; Birdsey, R.

    2015-12-01

    Process-based models are a powerful approach to test our understanding of biogeochemical processes, to extrapolate ground survey data from limited plots to the landscape scale and to simulate the effects of climate change, nitrogen deposition, elevated atmospheric CO2, increasing natural disturbances and land use change on ecological processes. However, in most studies, the models are calibrated using ground measurements from only a few sites, though they may be extrapolated to much larger areas. Estimation accuracy can be improved if the models are parameterized using long-term carbon stock data from multiple sites representative of the simulated region. In this study, vegetation biomass and soil carbon stocks, and changes in these stocks over a recent decade, were measured in 61 forested plots located in three small watersheds in the Delaware River Basin (DRB). On average, total vegetation biomass was 160.2 Mg C ha-1 and the soil carbon stock was 76.6 Mg C ha-1, measured during 2012-2014. The biomass carbon stock increased by 2.45 Mg C ha-1 yr-1 from 2001-2003 to 2012-2014. This dataset was subsequently used to parameterize the PnET-CN model at the individual plot basis, and averaged parameters among plots were then applied to generate new watershed-scale model parameters for each of the three watersheds. The parameterized model was further validated by the field measurements in each of the major forest types. The spatial distribution of forest carbon pools and fluxes in three watersheds were mapped based on the simulation results from the newly parameterized PnET-CN model. The model will also be run under different scenarios to test the effects of climate change, altered atmospheric composition, land use change, and their interactions within the three watersheds and across the whole DRB.

  18. PALADYN, a comprehensive land surface-vegetation-carbon cycle model of intermediate complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willeit, Matteo; Ganopolski, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    PALADYN is presented, a new comprehensive and computationally efficient land surface-vegetation-carbon cycle model designed to be used in Earth system models of intermediate complexity for long-term simulations and paleoclimate studies. The model treats in a consistent manner the interaction between atmosphere, terrestrial vegetation and soil through the fluxes of energy, water and carbon. Energy, water and carbon are conserved. The model explicitly treats permafrost, both in physical processes and as important carbon pool. The model distinguishes 9 surface types of which 5 are different vegetation types, bare soil, land ice, lake and ocean shelf. Including the ocean shelf allows to treat continuous changes in sea level and shelf area associated with glacial cycles. Over each surface type the model solves the surface energy balance and computes the fluxes of sensible, latent and ground heat and upward shortwave and longwave radiation. It includes a single snow layer. The soil model distinguishes between three different macro surface types which have their own soil column: vegetation and bare soil, ice sheet and ocean shelf. The soil is vertically discretized into 5 layers where prognostic equations for temperature, water and carbon are consistently solved. Phase changes of water in the soil are explicitly considered. A surface hydrology module computes precipitation interception by vegetation, surface runoff and soil infiltration. The soil water equation is based on Darcy's law. Given soil water content, the wetland fraction is computed based on a topographic index. Photosynthesis is computed using a light use efficiency model. Carbon assimilation by vegetation is coupled to the transpiration of water through stomatal conductance. The model includes a dynamic vegetation module with 5 plant functional types competing for the gridcell share with their respective net primary productivity. Each macro surface type has its own carbon pools represented by a litter, a fast

  19. Deterministic Modelling of Carbon Nanotube Near-Infrared Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellisario, Darin

    2015-03-01

    With solution-process-ability, scale-able fabrication and purification, and cheap input materials, semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) networks represent promising materials for near-IR solar cell (SC) applications. This promise has motivated a body of work not only developing solar cells but also exploring alignment/deposition methods and SWNT photovoltaic (PV) physics. Despite this interest, there is to date no quantitative model of SWNT solar cell operation analogous to bulk semiconductor p-n junction PVs, allowing a rigorous understanding of the physical tradeoffs driving experimental observations and informing what research will enable technological progress. In this work we have derived the steady state operation of planar heterojunction SWNT PVs from the fundamental light absorption, exciton transport, and free carrier transport behaviors of single nanotubes. Our method can treat arbitrary distributions of nanotube chiralities, lengths, orientations, defect types and concentration, bundle fraction and size, density, dielectric environment, electrode combinations, etc. We achieve this by treating individual SWNT properties as random variables, and describing the network by the dependent distributions of those properties, yielding coupled stochastic differential equations for light absorption, exciton transport, and free carrier transport. Applying the model to monochiral (6,5) films in aligned and isotropic configurations, we find that there is a strongly optimal film thickness at a given nanotube network density and orientation, reflecting an inherent tradeoff between light absorption (i.e. exciton generation) and diffusion to the electrodes. This optimal shifts lower with increasing density, and is ultra-thin (design.

  20. Modeling adsorbate-induced property changes of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groß, Lynn; Bahlke, Marc Philipp; Steenbock, Torben; Klinke, Christian; Herrmann, Carmen

    2017-05-05

    Because of their potential for chemical functionalization, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising candidates for the development of devices such as nanoscale sensors or transistors with novel gating mechanisms. However, the mechanisms underlying the property changes due to functionalization of CNTs still remain subject to debate. Our goal is to reliably model one possible mechanism for such chemical gating: adsorption directly on the nanotubes. Within a Kohn-Sham density functional theory framework, such systems would ideally be described using periodic boundary conditions. Truncating the tube and saturating the edges in practice often offers a broader selection of approximate exchange-correlation functionals and analysis methods. By comparing the two approaches systematically for NH3 and NO2 adsorbates on semiconducting and metallic CNTs, we find that while structural properties are less sensitive to the details of the model, local properties of the adsorbate may be as sensitive to truncation as they are to the choice of exchange-correlation functional, and are similarly challenging to compute as adsorption energies. This suggests that these adsorbate effects are nonlocal. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Modelling clustering of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaber, Clemens F.; Filippov, Alexander E.; Heinlein, Thorsten; Schneider, Jörg J.; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research demonstrated that arrays of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) exhibit strong frictional properties. Experiments indicated a strong decrease of the friction coefficient from the first to the second sliding cycle in repetitive measurements on the same VACNT spot, but stable values in consecutive cycles. VACNTs form clusters under shear applied during friction tests, and self-organization stabilizes the mechanical properties of the arrays. With increasing load in the range between 300 µN and 4 mN applied normally to the array surface during friction tests the size of the clusters increases, while the coefficient of friction decreases. To better understand the experimentally obtained results, we formulated and numerically studied a minimalistic model, which reproduces the main features of the system with a minimum of adjustable parameters. We calculate the van der Waals forces between the spherical friction probe and bunches of the arrays using the well-known Morse potential function to predict the number of clusters, their size, instantaneous and mean friction forces and the behaviour of the VACNTs during consecutive sliding cycles and at different normal loads. The data obtained by the model calculations coincide very well with the experimental data and can help in adapting VACNT arrays for biomimetic applications. PMID:26464787

  2. An elastic model for bioinspired design of carbon nanotube bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Zuoqi; Xu, Yuanjie; Zhang, Yongwei

    2015-04-01

    Collagen fibers provide a good example of making strong micro- or mesoscale fibers from nanoscale tropocollagen molecules through a staggered and cross-linked organization in a bottom-up manner. Mimicking the architectural features of collagen fibers has been shown to be a promising approach to develop carbon nanotube (CNT) fibers of high performance. In the present work, an elastic model is developed to describe the load transfer and failure propagation within the bioinspired CNT bundles, and to establish the relations of the mechanical properties of the bundles with a number of geometrical and physical parameters such as the CNT aspect ratio and longitudinal gap, interface cross-link density, and the functionalization-induced degradation in CNTs, etc. With the model, the stress distributions along the CNT-CNT interface as well as in every individual CNT are well captured, and the failure propagation along the interface and its effects on the mechanical properties of the CNT bundles are predicted. The work may provide useful guidelines for the design of novel CNT fibers in practice.

  3. Regional Mapping, Modelling, and Monitoring of Tree Aboveground Biomass Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudak, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Airborne lidar collections are preferred for mapping aboveground biomass carbon (AGBC), while historical Landsat imagery are preferred for monitoring decadal scale forest cover change. Our modelling approach tracks AGBC change regionally using Landsat time series metrics; training areas are defined by airborne lidar extents within which AGBC is accurately mapped with high confidence. Geospatial topographic and climate layers are also included in the predictive model. Validation is accomplished using systematically sampled Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) plot data that have been independently collected, processed and summarized at the county level. Our goal is to demonstrate that spatially and temporally aggregated annual AGBC map predictions show no bias when compared to annual county-level summaries across the Northwest USA. A prominent source of bias is trees outside forest; much of the more arid portions of our study area meet the FIA definition of non-forest because the tree cover does not exceed their minimum tree cover threshold. We employ detailed tree cover maps derived from high-resolution aerial imagery to extend our AGBC predictions into non-forest areas. We also employ Landsat-derived annual disturbance maps into our mapped AGBC predictions prior to aggregation and validation.

  4. Estimating forest carbon dynamics in South Korea from 1954 to 2050 - coupling global forestry model and forest soil carbon model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jongyeol; Kim, Moonil; Lakyda, Ivan; Pietsch, Stephan; Shvidenko, Anatoly; Kraxner, Florian; Forsell, Nicklas; Son, Yowhan

    2016-04-01

    There have been demands on reporting national forest carbon (C) inventories to mitigate global climate change. Global forestry models estimate growth of stem volume and C at various spatial and temporal scales but they do not consider dead organic matter (DOM) C. In this study, we simulated national forest C dynamics in South Korea with a calibrated global forestry model (G4M model) and a module of DOM C dynamics in Korean forest C model (FBDC model). 3890 simulation units (1-16 km2) were established in entire South Korea. Growth functions of stem for major tree species (Pinus densiflora, P. rigida, Larix kaempferi, Quercus variabilis, Q. mongolica, and Q. acutissima) were estimated by internal mechanism of G4M model and Korean yield tables. C dynamics in DOMs were determined by balance between input and output (decomposition) of DOMs in the FBDC model. Annual input of DOM was estimated by multiplying C stock of biomass compartment with turnover rate. Decomposition of DOM was estimated by C stock of DOM, mean air temperature, and decay rate. C stock in each C pool was initialized by spin-up process with consideration of severe deforestation by Japanese exploitation and Korean War. No disturbance was included in the simulation process. Total forest C stock (Tg C) and mean C density (Mg C ha-1) decreased from 657.9 and 112.1 in 1954 to 607.2 and 103.4 in 1973. Especially, C stock in mineral soil decreased at a rate of 0.5 Mg C ha-1 yr-1 during the period due to suppression of regeneration. However, total forest C stock (Tg C) and mean C density (Mg C ha-1) gradually increased from 607.0 and 103.4 in 1974 to 1240.7 and 211.3 in 2015 due to the national reforestation program since 1973. After the reforestation program, Korean forests became C sinks. Model estimates were also verified by comparison of these estimates and national forest inventory data (2006-2010). High similarity between the model estimates and the inventory data showed a reliability of down

  5. Uncertainities in carbon dioxide radiative forcing in atmospheric general circulation models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cess, R.D.; Zhang, M.H. (State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)); Potter, G.L.; Gates, W.L.; Taylor, K.E. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA (United States)); Colman, R.A.; Fraser, J.R.; McAvaney, B.J. (Bureau of Meterorology Research Centre, Victoria (Australia)); Dazlich, D.A.; Randall, D.A. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)); Del Genio, A.D.; Lacis, A.A. (Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York, NY (United States)); Esch, M.; Roeckner, E. (Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg (Germany)); Galin, V. (Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)); Hack, J.J.; Kiehl, J.T. (National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)); Ingram, W.J. (Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, Berkshire (United Kingdom)); Le Treut, H.; Lli, Z.X. (Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique, Paris (France)); Liang, X.Z.; Wang, W.C. (State Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (United States)); Mahfouf,

    1993-11-19

    Global warming, caused by an increase in the concentrations of greenhouse gases, is the direct result of greenhouse gas-induced radiative forcing. When a doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide is considered, this forcing differed substantially among 15 atmospheric general circulation models. Although there are several potential causes, the largest contributor was the carbon dioxide radiation parameterizations of the models.

  6. State-of-the-art models for the phase diagram of carbon and diamond nucleation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghiringhelli, L.M.; Valeriani, C.; Los, J.H.; Meijer, E.J.; Fasolino, A.; Frenkel, D.

    2008-01-01

    We review recent developments in the modelling of the phase diagram and the kinetics of crystallization of carbon. In particular, we show that a particular class of bond-order potentials (the so-called LCBOP models) account well for many of the known structural and thermodynamic properties of carbon

  7. Modelling Holocene carbon accumulation and methane emissions of boreal wetlands – an Earth system model approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Schuldt

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the Last Glacial Maximum, boreal wetlands have accumulated substantial amounts of peat, estimated at 180–621 Pg of carbon. Wetlands have significantly affected the atmospheric greenhouse gas composition in the past and will play a significant role in future changes of atmospheric CO2 and CH4 concentrations. In order to investigate those changes with an Earth system model, biogeochemical processes in boreal wetlands need to be accounted for. Thus, a model of peat accumulation and decay was developed and included in the land surface model JSBACH of the Max Planck Institute Earth System Model (MPI-ESM. Here we present the evaluation of model results from 6000 yr BP to the pre-industrial period. Over this period of time, 240 Pg of peat carbon accumulated in the model in the areas north of 40° N. Simulated peat accumulation rates agree well with those reported for boreal wetlands. The model simulates CH4 emissions of 49.3 Tg CH4 yr−1 for 6000 yr BP and 51.5 Tg CH4 yr−1 for pre-industrial times. This is within the range of estimates in the literature, which range from 32 to 112 Tg CH4 yr−1 for boreal wetlands. The modelled methane emission for the West Siberian Lowlands and Hudson Bay Lowlands agree well with observations. The rising trend of methane emissions over the last 6000 yr is in agreement with measurements of Antarctic and Greenland ice cores.

  8. Chemical analysis and molecular models for calcium-oxygen-carbon interactions in black carbon found in fertile Amazonian anthrosoils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archanjo, Braulio S; Araujo, Joyce R; Silva, Alexander M; Capaz, Rodrigo B; Falcão, Newton P S; Jorio, Ado; Achete, Carlos A

    2014-07-01

    Carbon particles containing mineral matter promote soil fertility, helping it to overcome the rather unfavorable climate conditions of the humid tropics. Intriguing examples are the Amazonian Dark Earths, anthropogenic soils also known as "Terra Preta de Índio'' (TPI), in which chemical recalcitrance and stable carbon with millenary mean residence times have been observed. Recently, the presence of calcium and oxygen within TPI-carbon nanoparticles at the nano- and mesoscale ranges has been demonstrated. In this work, we combine density functional theory calculations, scanning transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, and high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of TPI-carbons to elucidate the chemical arrangements of calcium-oxygen-carbon groups at the molecular level in TPI. The molecular models are based on graphene oxide nanostructures in which calcium cations are strongly adsorbed at the oxide sites. The application of material science techniques to the field of soil science facilitates a new level of understanding, providing insights into the structure and functionality of recalcitrant carbon in soil and its implications for food production and climate change.

  9. Evaluating the Carbon Cycle of a Coupled Atmosphere-Biosphere Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delire, C; Foley, J A; Thompson, S

    2002-08-21

    We investigate how well a coupled biosphere-atmosphere model, CCM3-IBIS, can simulate the functioning of the terrestrial biosphere and the carbon cycling through it. The simulated climate is compared to observations, while the vegetation cover and the carbon cycle are compared to an offline version of the biosphere model IBIS forced with observed climatic variables. The simulated climate presents some local biases that strongly affect the vegetation (e.g., a misrepresentation of the African monsoon). Compared to the offline model, the coupled model simulates well the globally averaged carbon fluxes and vegetation pools. The zonal mean carbon fluxes and the zonal mean seasonal cycle are also well represented except between 0{sup o} and 20{sup o}N due to the misrepresentation of the African monsoon. These results suggest that, despite regional biases in climate and ecosystem simulations, this coupled atmosphere-biosphere model can be used to explore geographic and temporal variations in the global carbon cycle.

  10. Modeling Water and Carbon Budgets in Current and Future Agricultural Land Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewniak, B.; Song, J.; Prell, J.; Kotamarthi, R.; Jacob, R.

    2008-12-01

    Biofuels are a key component of renewable energy mix proposed as a substitute to fossil fuels. Biofuels are suggested as both economical and having potential for reducing atmospheric emissions of carbon from the transportation sector, by building up soil carbon levels when planted on lands where these levels have been reduced by intensive tillage. The purpose of this research is to develop a carbon-nitrogen based crop module (CNC) for the community land model (CLM) and to improve the characterization of the below and above ground carbon sequestration for bioenergy crops. The CNC simulates planting, growing, maturing and harvesting stages for three major crops: maize, soybean and wheat. In addition, dynamic root module is implemented to simulate fine root distribution and development based on relative availability of soil water and nitrogen in the root zone. Coupled CLM-CNC models is used to study crop yields, geographic locations for bioenergy crop production and soil carbon changes. Bioenergy crop cultivation is based on current crop cultivation and future land use change dataset. Soil carbon change has been simulated based on carbon input to the soil from the leaf, stem and root, and carbon emission from soil carbon decomposition. Simulated water and carbon fluxes have been compared with field observations and soil carbon content has been examined under different harvest practices.

  11. Soils apart from equilibrium – consequences for soil carbon balance modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Wutzler

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Many projections of the soil carbon sink or source are based on kinetically defined carbon pool models. Parameters of these models are often determined in a way that the steady state of the model matches observed carbon stocks. The underlying simplifying assumption is that observed carbon stocks are near equilibrium. This assumption is challenged by observations of very old soils that do still accumulate carbon. In this modelling study we explored the consequences of the case where soils are apart from equilibrium. Calculation of equilibrium states of soils that are currently accumulating small amounts of carbon were performed using the Yasso model. It was found that already very small current accumulation rates cause big changes in theoretical equilibrium stocks, which can virtually approach infinity. We conclude that soils that have been disturbed several centuries ago are not in equilibrium but in a transient state because of the slowly ongoing accumulation of the slowest pool. A first consequence is that model calibrations to current carbon stocks that assume equilibrium state, overestimate the decay rate of the slowest pool. A second consequence is that spin-up runs (simulations until equilibrium overestimate stocks of recently disturbed sites. In order to account for these consequences, we propose a transient correction. This correction prescribes a lower decay rate of the slowest pool and accounts for disturbances in the past by decreasing the spin-up-run predicted stocks to match an independent estimate of current soil carbon stocks. Application of this transient correction at a Central European beech forest site with a typical disturbance history resulted in an additional carbon fixation of 5.7±1.5 tC/ha within 100 years. Carbon storage capacity of forest soils is potentially much higher than currently assumed. Simulations that do not adequately account for the transient state of soil carbon stocks neglect a substantial amount of

  12. Carbon budget estimation of a subarctic catchment using a dynamic ecosystem model at high spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, J.; Miller, P. A.; Persson, A.; Olefeldt, D.; Pilesjo, P.; Heliasz, M.; Jackowicz-Korczynski, M.; Yang, Z.; Smith, B.; Callaghan, T. V.; Christensen, T. R.

    2015-05-01

    A large amount of organic carbon is stored in high-latitude soils. A substantial proportion of this carbon stock is vulnerable and may decompose rapidly due to temperature increases that are already greater than the global average. It is therefore crucial to quantify and understand carbon exchange between the atmosphere and subarctic/arctic ecosystems. In this paper, we combine an Arctic-enabled version of the process-based dynamic ecosystem model, LPJ-GUESS (version LPJG-WHyMe-TFM) with comprehensive observations of terrestrial and aquatic carbon fluxes to simulate long-term carbon exchange in a subarctic catchment at 50 m resolution. Integrating the observed carbon fluxes from aquatic systems with the modeled terrestrial carbon fluxes across the whole catchment, we estimate that the area is a carbon sink at present and will become an even stronger carbon sink by 2080, which is mainly a result of a projected densification of birch forest and its encroachment into tundra heath. However, the magnitudes of the modeled sinks are very dependent on future atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Furthermore, comparisons of global warming potentials between two simulations with and without CO2 increase since 1960 reveal that the increased methane emission from the peatland could double the warming effects of the whole catchment by 2080 in the absence of CO2 fertilization of the vegetation. This is the first process-based model study of the temporal evolution of a catchment-level carbon budget at high spatial resolution, including both terrestrial and aquatic carbon. Though this study also highlights some limitations in modeling subarctic ecosystem responses to climate change, such as aquatic system flux dynamics, nutrient limitation, herbivory and other disturbances, and peatland expansion, our study provides one process-based approach to resolve the complexity of carbon cycling in subarctic ecosystems while simultaneously pointing out the key model developments for capturing

  13. Carbon Back Sputter Modeling for Hall Thruster Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilland, James H.; Williams, George J.; Burt, Jonathan M.; Yim, John Tamin

    2016-01-01

    Lifetime requirements for electric propulsion devices, including Hall Effect thrusters, are continually increasing, driven in part by NASA's inclusion of this technology in it's exploration architecture. NASA will demonstrate high-power electric propulsion system on the Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Demonstration Mission (SEP TDM). The Asteroid Redirect Robotic mission is one candidate SEP TDM, which is projected to require tens of thousands of thruster life. As thruster life is increased, for example through the use of improved magnetic field designs, the relative influence of facility effects increases. One such effect is the sputtering and redeposition, or back sputter, of facility materials by the high energy thruster plumes. In support of wear testing for the Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding (HERMeS) project, the back sputter from a Hall effect thruster plume has been modeled for the NASA Glenn Research Center's Vacuum Facility 5. The predicted wear at a near-worst case condition of 600 V, 12.5 kW was found to be on the order of 1 micron/kh in a fully carbon-lined chamber. A more detailed numerical Monte Carlo code was also modified to estimate back sputter for a detailed facility and pumping configuration. This code demonstrated similar back sputter rate distributions, but is not yet accurately modeling the magnitudes. The modeling has been benchmarked to recent HERMeS wear testing, using multiple microbalance measurements. These recent measurements have yielded values on the order of 1.5 - 2 micron/kh at 600 V and 12.5 kW.

  14. Model Sensitivity Studies of the Decrease in Atmospheric Carbon Tetrachloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipperfield, Martyn P.; Liang, Qing; Rigby, Matt; Hossaini, Ryan; Montzka, Stephen A.; Dhomse, Sandip; Feng, Wuhu; Prinn, Ronald G.; Weiss, Ray F.; Harth, Christina M.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) is an ozone-depleting substance, which is controlled by the Montreal Protocol and for which the atmospheric abundance is decreasing. However, the current observed rate of this decrease is known to be slower than expected based on reported CCl4 emissions and its estimated overall atmospheric lifetime. Here we use a three-dimensional (3-D) chemical transport model to investigate the impact on its predicted decay of uncertainties in the rates at which CCl4 is removed from the atmosphere by photolysis, by ocean uptake and by degradation in soils. The largest sink is atmospheric photolysis (74% of total), but a reported 10% uncertainty in its combined photolysis cross section and quantum yield has only a modest impact on the modelled rate of CCl4 decay. This is partly due to the limiting effect of the rate of transport of CCl4 from the main tropospheric reservoir to the stratosphere, where photolytic loss occurs. The model suggests large interannual variability in the magnitude of this stratospheric photolysis sink caused by variations in transport. The impact of uncertainty in the minor soil sink (9%of total) is also relatively small. In contrast, the model shows that uncertainty in ocean loss (17%of total) has the largest impact on modelled CCl4 decay due to its sizeable contribution to CCl4 loss and large lifetime uncertainty range (147 to 241 years). With an assumed CCl4 emission rate of 39 Gg year(exp -1), the reference simulation with the best estimate of loss processes still underestimates the observed CCl4 (overestimates the decay) over the past 2 decades but to a smaller extent than previous studies. Changes to the rate of CCl4 loss processes, in line with known uncertainties, could bring the model into agreement with in situ surface and remote-sensing measurements, as could an increase in emissions to around 47 Gg year(exp -1). Further progress in constraining the CCl4 budget is partly limited by systematic biases between

  15. Selective Removal of Nitrosamines from a Model Amine Carbon-Capture Waterwash Using Low-Cost Activated-Carbon Sorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widger, Leland R; Combs, Megan; Lohe, Amit R; Lippert, Cameron A; Thompson, Jesse G; Liu, Kunlei

    2017-09-19

    Nitrosamines generated in the amine solvent loop of postcombustion carbon capture systems are potent carcinogens, and their emission could pose a serious threat to the environment or human health. Nitrosamine emission control strategies are critical for the success of amine-based carbon capture as the technology approaches industrial-scale deployment. Waterwash systems have been used to control volatile and aerosol emissions, including nitrosamines, from carbon-capture plants, but it is still necessary to remove or destroy nitrosamines in the circulating waterwash to prevent their subsequent emission into the environment. In this study, a cost-effective method for selectively removing nitrosamines from the absorber waterwash effluent with activated-carbon sorbents was developed to reduce the environmental impact associated with amine-based carbon capture. The results show that the commercial activated-carbon sorbents tested have a high capacity and selectivity for nitrosamines over the parent solvent amines, with capacities up to 190 mg/g carbon, under simulated amine waterwash conditions. To further reduce costs, an aerobic thermal sorbent regeneration step was also examined due to the low thermal stability of nitrosamines. To model the effect of oxidation on the sorbent performance, thermal- and acid-oxidized sorbents were also prepared from the commercial sorbents and analyzed. The chemical and physical properties of nitrosamines, the parent amine, and the influence of the physical properties of the carbon sorbents on nitrosamine adsorption was examined. Key sorbent properties included the sorbent hydrophilicity and hydrophobicity, surface pKa of the sorbent, and chemical structure of the parent amine and nitrosamine.

  16. Modeling carbon cycle dynamics and response to drought in semi-arid ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, T. W.; Fox, A. M.; Krofcheck, D. J.; Litvak, M. E.

    2012-12-01

    The southwestern United States is presently experiencing a multi-year drought. Though the carbon uptake per unit area of the semi-arid biomes in this region is smaller than that of more temperate biomes, these biomes cover roughly 40 percent of the world's land surface, and thus make a significant contribution to the global terrestrial biological carbon cycle. Here we test the ability of two land surface model structures to diagnose the carbon cycle dynamics of semi-arid landscapes during the ongoing extreme drought. We use the New Mexico Elevation Gradient (NMEG) as a testbed for these modeling experiments. The NMEG comprises eight eddy covariance towers observing ecosystems ranging from desert grassland ( 1600 m elevation) to alpine mixed coniferous forest ( 3000 m elevation). During the drought the ecosystems observed by these towers saw their annual net carbon uptake decline between 33 and 100 percent (50 to 150 gC m^{-2} year^{-1}), with two of the eight sites becoming net sources of carbon to the atmosphere and one transitioning from a net carbon sink to carbon-neutral. We parametrize a simple light-use efficiency (LUE)-based model (Vegetation Photosynthesis and Respiration Model, VPRM) and a complex model which simulates many land surface processes (Community Land Model, CLM). We explore the capacity of both models to diagnose the terrestrial carbon cycle in semi-arid biomes where water availability is highly episodic.

  17. Disentangling residence time and temperature sensitivity of microbial decomposition in a global soil carbon model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exbrayat, J.-F.; Pitman, A. J.; Abramowitz, G.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies have identified the first-order representation of microbial decomposition as a major source of uncertainty in simulations and projections of the terrestrial carbon balance. Here, we use a reduced complexity model representative of current state-of-the-art models of soil organic carbon decomposition. We undertake a systematic sensitivity analysis to disentangle the effect of the time-invariant baseline residence time (k) and the sensitivity of microbial decomposition to temperature (Q10) on soil carbon dynamics at regional and global scales. Our simulations produce a range in total soil carbon at equilibrium of ~ 592 to 2745 Pg C, which is similar to the ~ 561 to 2938 Pg C range in pre-industrial soil carbon in models used in the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). This range depends primarily on the value of k, although the impact of Q10 is not trivial at regional scales. As climate changes through the historical period, and into the future, k is primarily responsible for the magnitude of the response in soil carbon, whereas Q10 determines whether the soil remains a sink, or becomes a source in the future mostly by its effect on mid-latitude carbon balance. If we restrict our simulations to those simulating total soil carbon stocks consistent with observations of current stocks, the projected range in total soil carbon change is reduced by 42% for the historical simulations and 45% for the future projections. However, while this observation-based selection dismisses outliers, it does not increase confidence in the future sign of the soil carbon feedback. We conclude that despite this result, future estimates of soil carbon and how soil carbon responds to climate change should be more constrained by available data sets of carbon stocks.

  18. Multi-century Changes to Global Climate and Carbon Cycle: Results from a Coupled Climate and Carbon Cycle Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bala, G; Caldeira, K; Mirin, A; Wickett, M; Delire, C

    2005-02-17

    In this paper, we use a coupled climate and carbon cycle model to investigate the global climate and carbon cycle changes out to year 2300 that would occur if CO{sub 2} emissions from all the currently estimated fossil fuel resources were released to the atmosphere. By year 2300, the global climate warms by about 8 K and atmospheric CO{sub 2} reaches 1423 ppmv. The warming is higher than anticipated because the sensitivity to radiative forcing increases as the simulation progresses. In our simulation, the rate of emissions peak at over 30 PgC yr{sup -1} early in the 22nd century. Even at year 2300, nearly 50% of cumulative emissions remain in the atmosphere. In our simulations both soils and living biomass are net carbon sinks throughout the simulation. Despite having relatively low climate sensitivity and strong carbon uptake by the land biosphere, our model projections suggest severe long-term consequences for global climate if all the fossil-fuel carbon is ultimately released to the atmosphere.

  19. Multi-century Changes to Global Climate and Carbon Cycle: Results from a Coupled Climate and Carbon Cycle Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bala, G; Caldeira, K; Mirin, A; Wickett, M; Delire, C

    2005-02-17

    In this paper, we use a coupled climate and carbon cycle model to investigate the global climate and carbon cycle changes out to year 2300 that would occur if CO{sub 2} emissions from all the currently estimated fossil fuel resources were released to the atmosphere. By year 2300, the global climate warms by about 8 K and atmospheric CO{sub 2} reaches 1423 ppmv. The warming is higher than anticipated because the sensitivity to radiative forcing increases as the simulation progresses. In our simulation, the rate of emissions peak at over 30 PgC yr{sup -1} early in the 22nd century. Even at year 2300, nearly 50% of cumulative emissions remain in the atmosphere. In our simulations both soils and living biomass are net carbon sinks throughout the simulation. Despite having relatively low climate sensitivity and strong carbon uptake by the land biosphere, our model projections suggest severe long-term consequences for global climate if all the fossil-fuel carbon is ultimately released to the atmosphere.

  20. Evaluation of approaches focused on modelling of organic carbon stocks using the RothC model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koco, Štefan; Skalský, Rastislav; Makovníková, Jarmila; Tarasovičová, Zuzana; Barančíková, Gabriela

    2014-05-01

    The aim of current efforts in the European area is the protection of soil organic matter, which is included in all relevant documents related to the protection of soil. The use of modelling of organic carbon stocks for anticipated climate change, respectively for land management can significantly help in short and long-term forecasting of the state of soil organic matter. RothC model can be applied in the time period of several years to centuries and has been tested in long-term experiments within a large range of soil types and climatic conditions in Europe. For the initialization of the RothC model, knowledge about the carbon pool sizes is essential. Pool size characterization can be obtained from equilibrium model runs, but this approach is time consuming and tedious, especially for larger scale simulations. Due to this complexity we search for new possibilities how to simplify and accelerate this process. The paper presents a comparison of two approaches for SOC stocks modelling in the same area. The modelling has been carried out on the basis of unique input of land use, management and soil data for each simulation unit separately. We modeled 1617 simulation units of 1x1 km grid on the territory of agroclimatic region Žitný ostrov in the southwest of Slovakia. The first approach represents the creation of groups of simulation units based on the evaluation of results for simulation unit with similar input values. The groups were created after the testing and validation of modelling results for individual simulation units with results of modelling the average values of inputs for the whole group. Tests of equilibrium model for interval in the range 5 t.ha-1 from initial SOC stock showed minimal differences in results comparing with result for average value of whole interval. Management inputs data from plant residues and farmyard manure for modelling of carbon turnover were also the same for more simulation units. Combining these groups (intervals of initial

  1. Design of Higher Education Teaching Models and Carbon Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caird, Sally; Lane, Andy; Swithenby, Ed; Roy, Robin; Potter, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This research aims to examine the main findings of the SusTEACH study of the carbon-based environmental impacts of 30 higher education (HE) courses in 15 UK institutions, based on an analysis of the likely energy consumption and carbon emissions of a range of face-to-face, distance, online and information and communication technology…

  2. Parameterizing A Surface Water Model for Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The unique electronic, mechanical, and structural properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has lead to increasing production of these versatile materials; currently, the use of carbon-based nanomaterials in consumer products is second only to that of nano-scale silver. Although ther...

  3. A new biogeochemical model to simulate regional scale carbon emission from lakes, ponds and wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Tina; Brakebusch, Matthias; Gustafsson, Erik; Beer, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Small aquatic systems are receiving increasing attention for their role in global carbon cycling. For instance, lakes and ponds in permafrost are net emitters of carbon to the atmosphere, and their capacity to process and emit carbon is significant on a landscape scale, with a global flux of 8-103 Tg methane per year which amounts to 5%-30% of all natural methane emissions (Bastviken et al 2011). However, due to the spatial and temporal highly localised character of freshwater methane emissions, fluxes remain poorly qualified and are difficult to upscale based on field data alone. While many models exist to model carbon cycling in individual lakes and ponds, we perceived a lack of models that can work on a larger scale, over a range of latitudes, and simulate regional carbon emission from a large number of lakes, ponds and wetlands. Therefore our objective was to develop a model that can simulate carbon dioxide and methane emission from freshwaters on a regional scale. Our resulting model provides an additional tool to assess current aquatic carbon emissions as well as project future responses to changes in climatic drivers. To this effect, we have combined an existing large-scale hydrological model (the Variable Infiltration Capacity Macroscale Hydrologic Model (VIC), Liang & Lettenmaier 1994), an aquatic biogeochemical model (BALTSEM, Savchuk et al., 2012; Gustafsson et al., 2014) and developed a new methane module for lakes. The resulting new process-based biogeochemical model is designed to model aquatic carbon emission on a regional scale, and to perform well in high-latitude environments. Our model includes carbon, oxygen and nutrient cycling in lake water and sediments, primary production and methanogenesis. Results of calibration and validation of the model in two catchments (Torne-Kalix in Northern Sweden and of a large arctic river catchment) will be presented.

  4. Sources of uncertainties in modelling Black Carbon at the global scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Cavalli

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of the global black carbon cycle is essentially qualitative due to uncertainties in our knowledge of the properties of black carbon. This work investigates uncertainties related to modelling black carbon: due to the use of different schemes for BC ageing and its removal rate in the global Transport-Chemistry model TM5 and due to the uncertainties in the definition and quantification of observed black carbon, which propagate through to both the emission inventories, and the measurements used for the model evaluation.

    The schemes for the atmospheric processing of black carbon that have been tested with the model are (i a simple approach considering black carbon as bulk aerosol and a simple treatment in the removal and (ii a more complete description of microphysical aging within an aerosol dynamics model, where removal is coupled to the microphysical properties of the aerosol. In the first approach a fixed 70% of black carbon is scavenged in clouds and removed when rain is present. The second leads to a global average of 40% black carbon that is scavenged in clouds and subsequently removed by rain, thus resulting in a longer lifetime. This difference is reflected in comparisons between both sets of modelled results and the measurements. Close to the sources, both anthropogenic and vegetation fire source regions, the model results do not differ significantly, showing that the emissions are the prevailing mechanism determining the concentrations and the choice of the aerosol scheme does not influence the levels. In more remote areas such as oceanic and polar regions the differences can be orders of magnitude, due to the differences between the two schemes. The more complete description reproduces the seasonal trend of the black carbon observations in those areas, although not always the magnitude of the signal, while the more simplified approach underestimates black carbon concentrations by orders of magnitude.

  5. Porous-grain-upper-boundary model and its application to Tarim Basin carbonates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Yu-Qian; Ma Hong-Da; Shi Kai-Bo; Cao Hong; Huang Lu-Zhong; Yao Feng-Chang; Hu Tian-Yue

    2013-01-01

    Most of the carbonates in the Tarim Basin in northwest China are low-porosity and low-permeability rocks. Owing to the complexity of porosity in carbonates, conventional rock-physics models do not describe the relation between velocity and porosity for the Tarim Basin carbonates well. We propose the porous-grain-upper-boundary (PGU) model for estimating the relation between velocity and porosity for low-porosity carbonates. In this model, the carbonate sediments are treated as packed media of porous elastic grains, and the carbonate pores are divided into isolated and connected pores The PGU model is modified from the porous-grain-stiff-sand (PGST) model by replacing the critical porosity with the more practical isolated porosity. In the implementation, the effective elastic constants of the porous grains are calculated by using the differential effective medium (DEM) model. Then, the elastic constants of connected porous grains in dry rocks are calculated by using the modified upper Hashin-Shtrikman bound. The application to the Tarim carbonates shows that relative to other conventional effective medium models the PGU model matches the well log data well.

  6. An experimental and modeling study of diethyl carbonate oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Nakamura, Hisashi

    2015-04-01

    Diethyl carbonate (DEC) is an attractive biofuel that can be used to displace petroleum-derived diesel fuel, thereby reducing CO2 and particulate emissions from diesel engines. A better understanding of DEC combustion characteristics is needed to facilitate its use in internal combustion engines. Toward this goal, ignition delay times for DEC were measured at conditions relevant to internal combustion engines using a rapid compression machine (RCM) and a shock tube. The experimental conditions investigated covered a wide range of temperatures (660-1300K), a pressure of 30bar, and equivalence ratios of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 in air. To provide further understanding of the intermediates formed in DEC oxidation, species concentrations were measured in a jet-stirred reactor at 10atm over a temperature range of 500-1200K and at equivalence ratios of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0. These experimental measurements were used to aid the development and validation of a chemical kinetic model for DEC.The experimental results for ignition in the RCM showed near negative temperature coefficient (NTC) behavior. Six-membered alkylperoxy radical (RO˙2) isomerizations are conventionally thought to initiate low-temperature branching reactions responsible for NTC behavior, but DEC has no such possible 6- and 7-membered ring isomerizations. However, its molecular structure allows for 5-, 8- and 9-membered ring RO˙2 isomerizations. To provide accurate rate constants for these ring structures, ab initio computations for RO˙2⇌Q˙OOH isomerization reactions were performed. These new RO˙2 isomerization rate constants have been implemented in a chemical kinetic model for DEC oxidation. The model simulations have been compared with ignition delay times measured in the RCM near the NTC region. Results of the simulation were also compared with experimental results for ignition in the high-temperature region and for species concentrations in the jet-stirred reactor. Chemical kinetic insights into the

  7. The biological carbon pump in the ocean: Reviewing model representations and its feedbacks on climate perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hülse, Dominik; Arndt, Sandra; Ridgwell, Andy; Wilson, Jamie

    2016-04-01

    The ocean-sediment system, as the biggest carbon reservoir in the Earth's carbon cycle, plays a crucial role in regulating atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and climate. Therefore, it is essential to constrain the importance of marine carbon cycle feedbacks on global warming and ocean acidification. Arguably, the most important single component of the ocean's carbon cycle is the so-called "biological carbon pump". It transports carbon that is fixed in the light-flooded surface layer of the ocean to the deep ocean and the surface sediment, where it is degraded/dissolved or finally buried in the deep sediments. Over the past decade, progress has been made in understanding different factors that control the efficiency of the biological carbon pump and their feedbacks on the global carbon cycle and climate (i.e. ballasting = ocean acidification feedback; temperature dependant organic matter degradation = global warming feedback; organic matter sulphurisation = anoxia/euxinia feedback). Nevertheless, many uncertainties concerning the interplay of these processes and/or their relative significance remain. In addition, current Earth System Models tend to employ empirical and static parameterisations of the biological pump. As these parametric representations are derived from a limited set of present-day observations, their ability to represent carbon cycle feedbacks under changing climate conditions is limited. The aim of my research is to combine past carbon cycling information with a spatially resolved global biogeochemical model to constrain the functioning of the biological pump and to base its mathematical representation on a more mechanistic approach. Here, I will discuss important aspects that control the efficiency of the ocean's biological carbon pump, review how these processes of first order importance are mathematically represented in existing Earth system Models of Intermediate Complexity (EMIC) and distinguish different approaches to approximate

  8. Monte-Carlo simulations of methane/carbon dioxide and ethane/carbon dioxide mixture adsorption in zeolites and comparison with matrix treatment of statistical mechanical lattice model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Lawrence J.; Furgani, Akrem; Jalili, Sayed; Manos, George

    2009-05-01

    Adsorption isotherms have been computed by Monte-Carlo simulation for methane/carbon dioxide and ethane/carbon dioxide mixtures adsorbed in the zeolite silicalite. These isotherms show remarkable differences with the ethane/carbon dioxide mixtures displaying strong adsorption preference reversal at high coverage. To explain the differences in the Monte-Carlo mixture isotherms an exact matrix calculation of the statistical mechanics of a lattice model of mixture adsorption in zeolites has been made. The lattice model reproduces the essential features of the Monte-Carlo isotherms, enabling us to understand the differing adsorption behaviour of methane/carbon dioxide and ethane/carbon dioxide mixtures in zeolites.

  9. A Carbon Flux Super Site. New Insights and Innovative Atmosphere-Terrestrial Carbon Exchange Measurements and Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leclerc, Monique Y. [The University of Georgia Research Foundation, Athens, GA (United States)

    2014-11-17

    This final report presents the main activities and results of the project “A Carbon Flux Super Site: New Insights and Innovative Atmosphere-Terrestrial Carbon Exchange Measurements and Modeling” from 10/1/2006 to 9/30/2014. It describes the new AmeriFlux tower site (Aiken) at Savanna River Site (SC) and instrumentation, long term eddy-covariance, sodar, microbarograph, soil and other measurements at the site, and intensive field campaigns of tracer experiment at the Carbon Flux Super Site, SC, in 2009 and at ARM-CF site, Lamont, OK, and experiments in Plains, GA. The main results on tracer experiment and modeling, on low-level jet characteristics and their impact on fluxes, on gravity waves and their influence on eddy fluxes, and other results are briefly described in the report.

  10. Random vs realistic amorphous carbon models for high resolution microscopy and electron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricolleau, C., E-mail: Christian.Ricolleau@univ-paris-diderot.fr; Alloyeau, D. [Laboratoire Matériaux et Phénomènes Quantiques, CNRS-UMR 7162, Université Paris Diderot-Paris 7, Case 7021, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Le Bouar, Y.; Amara, H.; Landon-Cardinal, O. [Laboratoire d' Etude des Microstructures, UMR CNRS/Onera, 29, avenue de la Division Leclerc, 92322 Châtillon (France)

    2013-12-07

    Amorphous carbon and amorphous materials in general are of particular importance for high resolution electron microscopy, either for bulk materials, generally covered with an amorphous layer when prepared by ion milling techniques, or for nanoscale objects deposited on amorphous substrates. In order to quantify the information of the high resolution images at the atomic scale, a structural modeling of the sample is necessary prior to the calculation of the electron wave function propagation. It is thus essential to be able to reproduce the carbon structure as close as possible to the real one. The approach we propose here is to simulate a realistic carbon from an energetic model based on the tight-binding approximation in order to reproduce the important structural properties of amorphous carbon. At first, we compare this carbon with the carbon obtained by randomly generating the carbon atom positions. In both cases, we discuss the limit thickness of the phase object approximation. In a second step, we show the influence of both carbons models on (i) the contrast of Cu, Ag, and Au single atoms deposited on carbon and (ii) the determination of the long-range order parameter in CoPt bimetallic nanoalloys.

  11. Controls over Ocean Mesopelagic Interior Carbon Storage (COMICS: fieldwork, synthesis and modelling efforts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard John Sanders

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The ocean’s biological carbon pump plays a central role in regulating atmospheric CO2 levels. In particular, the depth at which sinking organic carbon is broken down and respired in the mesopelagic zone is critical, with deeper remineralisation resulting in greater carbon storage. Until recently, however, a balanced budget of the supply and consumption of organic carbon in the mesopelagic had not been constructed in any region of the ocean, and the processes controlling organic carbon turnover are still poorly understood. Large-scale data syntheses suggest that a wide range of factors can influence remineralisation depth including upper-ocean ecological interactions, and interior dissolved oxygen concentration and temperature. However these analyses do not provide a mechanistic understanding of remineralisation, which increases the challenge of appropriately modelling the mesopelagic carbon dynamics. In light of this, the UK Natural Environment Research Council has funded a programme with this mechanistic understanding as its aim, drawing targeted fieldwork right through to implementation of a new parameterisation for mesopelagic remineralisation within an IPCC class global biogeochemical model. The Controls over Ocean Mesopelagic Interior Carbon Storage (COMICS programme will deliver new insights into the processes of carbon cycling in the mesopelagic zone and how these influence ocean carbon storage. Here we outline the programme’s rationale, its goals, planned fieldwork and modelling activities, with the aim of stimulating international collaboration.

  12. Oxidation of Carbon Fibers in a Cracked Ceramic Matrix Composite Modeled as a Function of Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Cawley, James D.; Eckel, Andrew J.

    2003-01-01

    The oxidation model simulates the oxidation of the reinforcing carbon fibers within a ceramic matrix composite material containing as-fabricated microcracks. The physics-based oxidation model uses theoretically and experimentally determined variables as input for the model. The model simulates the ingress of oxygen through microcracks into a two-dimensional plane within the composite material. Model input includes temperature, oxygen concentration, the reaction rate constant, the diffusion coefficient, and the crack opening width as a function of the mechanical and thermal loads. The model is run in an iterative process for a two-dimensional grid system in which oxygen diffuses through the porous and cracked regions of the material and reacts with carbon in short time steps. The model allows the local oxygen concentrations and carbon volumes from the edge to the interior of the composite to be determined over time. Oxidation damage predicted by the model was compared with that observed from microstructural analysis of experimentally tested composite material to validate the model for two temperatures of interest. When the model is run for low-temperature conditions, the kinetics are reaction controlled. Carbon and oxygen reactions occur relatively slowly. Therefore, oxygen can bypass the carbon near the outer edge and diffuse into the interior so that it saturates the entire composite at relatively high concentrations. The kinetics are limited by the reaction rate between carbon and oxygen. This results in an interior that has high local concentrations of oxygen and a similar amount of consumed carbon throughout the cross section. When the model is run for high-temperature conditions, the kinetics are diffusion controlled. Carbon and oxygen reactions occur very quickly. The carbon consumes oxygen as soon as it is supplied. The kinetics are limited by the relatively slow rate at which oxygen is supplied in comparison to the relatively fast rate at which carbon and

  13. Ecosystem carbon storage capacity as affected by disturbance regimes: A general theoretical model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weng, Ensheng [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Luo, Yiqi [University of Oklahoma; Wang, Weile [NASA Ames Research Center; Wang, Han [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Hayes, Daniel J [ORNL; McGuire, A. David [University of Alaska; Hastings, Alan [University of California, Davis; Schimel, David [NEON Inc.

    2012-01-01

    Disturbances have been recognized as a key factor shaping terrestrial ecosystem states and dynamics. A general model that quantitatively describes the relationship between carbon storage and disturbance regime is critical for better understanding large scale terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics. We developed a model (REGIME) to quantify ecosystem carbon storage capacities (E[x]) under varying disturbance regimes with an analytical solution E[x] = U {center_dot} {tau}{sub E} {center_dot} {lambda}{lambda} + s {tau} 1, where U is ecosystem carbon influx, {tau}{sub E} is ecosystem carbon residence time, and {tau}{sub 1} is the residence time of the carbon pool affected by disturbances (biomass pool in this study). The disturbance regime is characterized by the mean disturbance interval ({lambda}) and the mean disturbance severity (s). It is a Michaelis-Menten-type equation illustrating the saturation of carbon content with mean disturbance interval. This model analytically integrates the deterministic ecosystem carbon processes with stochastic disturbance events to reveal a general pattern of terrestrial carbon dynamics at large scales. The model allows us to get a sense of the sensitivity of ecosystems to future environmental changes just by a few calculations. According to the REGIME model, for example, approximately 1.8 Pg C will be lost in the high-latitude regions of North America (>45{sup o} N) if fire disturbance intensity increases around 5.7 time the current intensity to the end of the twenty-first century, which will require around 12% increases in net primary productivity (NPP) to maintain stable carbon stocks. If the residence time decreased 10% at the same time additional 12.5% increases in NPP are required to keep current C stocks. The REGIME model also lays the foundation for analytically modeling the interactions between deterministic biogeochemical processes and stochastic disturbance events.

  14. Stable isotope composition of atmospheric carbon monoxide. A modelling study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gromov, Sergey S.

    2014-11-01

    This study aims at an improved understanding of the stable carbon and oxygen isotope composition of the carbon monoxide (CO) in the global atmosphere by means of numerical simulations. At first, a new kinetic chemistry tagging technique for the most complete parameterisation of isotope effects has been introduced into the Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy) framework. Incorporated into the ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) general circulation model, an explicit treatment of the isotope effects on the global scale is now possible. The expanded model system has been applied to simulate the chemical system containing up to five isotopologues of all carbon- and oxygen-bearing species, which ultimately determine the δ{sup 13}C, δ{sup 18}O and Δ{sup 17}O isotopic signatures of atmospheric CO. As model input, a new stable isotope-inclusive emission inventory for the relevant trace gases has been compiled. The uncertainties of the emission estimates and of the resulting simulated mixing and isotope ratios have been analysed. The simulated CO mixing and stable isotope ratios have been compared to in-situ measurements from ground-based observatories and from the civil-aircraft-mounted CARIBIC-1 measurement platform. The systematically underestimated {sup 13}CO/{sup 12}CO ratios of earlier, simplified modelling studies can now be partly explained. The EMAC simulations do not support the inferences of those studies, which suggest for CO a reduced input of the highly depleted in {sup 13}C methane oxidation source. In particular, a high average yield of 0.94 CO per reacted methane (CH{sub 4}) molecule is simulated in the troposphere, to a large extent due to the competition between the deposition and convective transport processes affecting the CH{sub 4} to CO reaction chain intermediates. None of the other factors, assumed or disregarded in previous studies, however hypothesised to have the potential in enriching tropospheric CO in {sup 13}C, were found significant

  15. Computational modeling of ring textures in mesophase carbon fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Andrade Lima Luiz Rogério Pinho

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fibers are widely used in many industrial applications due the fact of their excellent properties. Carbonaceous mesophases are liquid crystalline precursor materials that can be spun into high performance carbon fibers using the melt spinning process, which is a flow cascade consisting of pressure driven flow-converging die flow-free surface extensional spinline flow that modifies the precursor molecular orientation structure. Carbon fiber property optimization requires a better understanding of the principles that control the structure development during the fiber formation processes and the rheological processing properties. This paper presents the elastic and continuum theory of liquid crystalsand computer simulations of structure formation for pressure-driven flow of carbonaceous liquid crystalline precursors used in the industrial carbon fiber spinning process. The simulations results capture the formation of characteristic fiber macro-textures and provide new knowledge on the role of viscous and elastic effects in the spinning process.

  16. Urban Traffic Congestion Pricing Model with the Consideration of Carbon Emissions Cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available As one of the most effective traffic demand management opinions, congestion pricing can reduce private car travel demand and the associated carbon dioxide emissions. First, we summarized the status quo of transport carbon dioxide emission charges and congestion pricing, and then, we analyzed the characteristics of urban transport carbon dioxide emissions. Then, we proposed a (pricing framework in which carbon emission costs would be considered as part of the generalized cost of travel. Based on this framework, this paper developed a bi-level mathematical model to optimize consumer surplus, using congestion and carbon emission charges as the control variables. A dissect search algorithm was used to solve the bi-level program model, and a numerical example was given to illustrate the methodology. This paper incorporates the emission pricing into the congestion pricing model, while considering two modes, and puts forward suitable proposals for the implementation of an urban traffic congestion pricing policy in China.

  17. Model for the Effect of Fiber Bridging on the Fracture Resistance of Reinforced-Carbon-Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kwai S.; Lee, Yi-Der; Hudak, Stephen J., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    A micromechanical methodology has been developed for analyzing fiber bridging and resistance-curve behavior in reinforced-carbon-carbon (RCC) panels with a three-dimensional (3D) composite architecture and a silicon carbide (SiC) surface coating. The methodology involves treating fiber bridging traction on the crack surfaces in terms of a weight function approach and a bridging law that relates the bridging stress to the crack opening displacement. A procedure has been developed to deduce material constants in the bridging law from the linear portion of the K-resistance curve. This report contains information on the application of procedures and outcomes.

  18. Disentangling residence time and temperature sensitivity of microbial decomposition in a global soil carbon model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-F. Exbrayat

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have identified the first-order parameterization of microbial decomposition as a major source of uncertainty in simulations and projections of the terrestrial carbon balance. Here, we use a reduced complexity model representative of the current state-of-the-art parameterization of soil organic carbon decomposition. We undertake a systematic sensitivity analysis to disentangle the effect of the time-invariant baseline residence time (k and the sensitvity of microbial decomposition to temperature (Q10 on soil carbon dynamics at regional and global scales. Our simulations produce a range in total soil carbon at equilibrium of ~ 592 to 2745 Pg C which is similar to the ~ 561 to 2938 Pg C range in pre-industrial soil carbon in models used in the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project. This range depends primarily on the value of k, although the impact of Q10 is not trivial at regional scales. As climate changes through the historical period, and into the future, k is primarily responsible for the magnitude of the response in soil carbon, whereas Q10 determines whether the soil remains a sink, or becomes a source in the future mostly by its effect on mid-latitudes carbon balance. If we restrict our simulations to those simulating total soil carbon stocks consistent with observations of current stocks, the projected range in total soil carbon change is reduced by 42% for the historical simulations and 45% for the future projections. However, while this observation-based selection dismisses outliers it does not increase confidence in the future sign of the soil carbon feedback. We conclude that despite this result, future estimates of soil carbon, and how soil carbon responds to climate change should be constrained by available observational data sets.

  19. Modeling of carbon and nitrogen gaseous emissions from cattle manure compost windrows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windrow composting of cattle manure is a significant source of gaseous emissions, which include ammonia (NH3) and the greenhouse gases (GHGs) of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O). A manure compost model was developed to simulate carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) processes includ...

  20. Modeling of a self-healing process in blast furnace slag cement exposed to accelerated carbonation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zemskov, S.V.; Ahmad, B.; Copuroglu, O.; Vermolen, F.J.

    2013-01-01

    In the current research, a mathematical model for the post-damage improvement of the carbonated blast furnace slag cement (BFSC) exposed to accelerated carbonation is constructed. The study is embedded within the framework of investigating the effect of using lightweight expanded clay aggregate, whi

  1. Sources of uncertainties in modelling black carbon at the global scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vignati, E.; Karl, M.; Krol, M.C.; Wilson, J.; Stier, P.; Cavalli, F.

    2010-01-01

    Our understanding of the global black carbon (BC) cycle is essentially qualitative due to uncertainties in our knowledge of its properties. This work investigates two source of uncertainties in modelling black carbon: those due to the use of different schemes for BC ageing and its removal rate in th

  2. Sources of uncertainties in modelling black carbon at the global scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vignati, E.; Karl, M.; Krol, M.C.; Wilson, J.; Stier, P.; Cavalli, F.

    2010-01-01

    Our understanding of the global black carbon (BC) cycle is essentially qualitative due to uncertainties in our knowledge of its properties. This work investigates two source of uncertainties in modelling black carbon: those due to the use of different schemes for BC ageing and its removal rate in

  3. Quantification of soil organic carbon sequestration potential in cropland:A model approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Agroecosystems have a critical role in the terrestrial carbon cycling process.Soil organic carbon(SOC) in cropland is of great importance for mitigating atmospheric carbon dioxide increases and for global food security.With an understanding of soil carbon saturation,we analyzed the datasets from 95 global long-term agricultural experiments distributed across a vast area spanning wide ranges of temperate,subtropical and tropical climates.We then developed a statistical model for estimating SOC sequestration potential in cropland.The model is driven by air temperature,precipitation,soil clay content and pH,and explains 58% of the variation in the observed soil carbon saturation(n=76).Model validation using independent data observed in China yielded a correlation coefficient R2 of 0.74(n=19,P<0.001).Model sensitivity analysis suggested that soils with high clay content and low pH in the cold,humid regions possess a larger carbon sequestration potential than other soils.As a case study,we estimated the SOC sequestration potential by applying the model in Henan Province.Model estimations suggested that carbon(C) density at the saturation state would reach an average of 32 t C ha-1 in the top 0-20 cm soil depth.Using SOC density in the 1990s as a reference,cropland soils in Henan Province are expected to sequester an additional 100 Tg C in the future.

  4. Modelling black spruce primary production and carbon allocation in the Quebec boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennaretti, Fabio; Guiot, Joel; Berninger, Frank; Boucher, Etienne; Gea-Izquierdo, Guillermo

    2017-04-01

    Boreal ecosystems are crucial carbon stores that must be urgently quantified and preserved. Their future evolution is extremely important for the global carbon budget. Here, we will show the progresses achieved with the MAIDEN forest ecophysiological model in simulating carbon fluxes of black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.) forests, the most representative ecosystem of the North American boreal biome. Starting from daily minimum-maximum air temperature, precipitation and CO2 atmospheric concentration, MAIDEN models the phenological (5 phenological phases are simulated each year) and meteorological controls on gross primary production (GPP) and carbon allocation to stem. The model is being calibrated on eddy covariance and tree-ring data. We will discuss the model's performance and the modifications introduced in MAIDEN to adapt the model to temperature sensitive forests of the boreal region.

  5. Simulating the carbon balance in reclaimed forest ecosystems with the FORECAST model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welham, C. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Forest Sciences, Forest Ecosystem Simulation Group; ForRx Consulting, Belcarra, BC (Canada); 3GreenTree Ecosystem Services Ltd., Belcarra, BC (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Large emission sources are beginning to report their carbon footprint on an annual basis as a result of government mandates, shareholder demand for disclosure of a company's risk to climate change, and as part of corporate social responsibility initiatives. Oil sands mining is a carbon intensive activity from the perspective of carbon dioxide emissions. The intensity of carbon emissions can be mitigated through technological and process innovations. However, reclamation is the only mining-related activity that directly removes atmospheric carbon dioxide. This presentation described a modeling exercise that had 3 principal objectives, notably to simulate the carbon balance in a developing reclaimed upland forest ecosystem; to explore the relative change in carbon pools over time; and to compare the carbon balance of the reclaimed ecosystem to its natural analogue. The presentation provided a description of the model and methodology and discussed the simulation protocol. Imperial Oil's Kearl Lake operation, which was used as a test case, showed that approximately 83,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide per hectare can be sequestered per year as a result of reclamation. tabs., figs.

  6. Interannual variability of carbon cycle implied by a 2-D atmospheric transport model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Can; XU Li; SHAO Min; ZHANG Ren-jian

    2004-01-01

    A 2-dimensional atmospheric transport model is deployed in a simplified CO2 inverse study. Calculated carbon flux distribution for the interval from 1981 to 1997 confirms the existence of a terrestrial carbon sink in mid-high latitude area of North Hemisphere. Strong interannual variability exists in carbon flux patterns, implying a possible link with ENSO and other natural episodes such as Pinatubo volcano eruption in 1991. Mechanism of this possible link was investigated with statistic method. Correlation analysis indicated that in North Hemisphere, climatic factors such as temperature and precipitation, to some extend, could influence the carbon cycle process of land and ocean, thus cause considerable change in carbon flux distribution. In addition, correlation study also demonstrated the possible important role of Asian terrestrial ecosystems in carbon cycle.

  7. Global Biogeochemistry Models and Global Carbon Cycle Research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Covey, C; Caldeira, K; Guilderson, T; Cameron-Smith, P; Govindasamy, B; Swanston, C; Wickett, M; Mirin, A; Bader, D

    2005-05-27

    The climate modeling community has long envisioned an evolution from physical climate models to ''earth system'' models that include the effects of biology and chemistry, particularly those processes related to the global carbon cycle. The widely reproduced Box 3, Figure 1 from the 2001 IPCC Scientific Assessment schematically describes that evolution. The community generally accepts the premise that understanding and predicting global and regional climate change requires the inclusion of carbon cycle processes in models to fully simulate the feedbacks between the climate system and the carbon cycle. Moreover, models will ultimately be employed to predict atmospheric concentrations of CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases as a function of anthropogenic and natural processes, such as industrial emissions, terrestrial carbon fixation, sequestration, land use patterns, etc. Nevertheless, the development of coupled climate-carbon models with demonstrable quantitative skill will require a significant amount of effort and time to understand and validate their behavior at both the process level and as integrated systems. It is important to consider objectively whether the currently proposed strategies to develop and validate earth system models are optimal, or even sufficient, and whether alternative strategies should be pursued. Carbon-climate models are going to be complex, with the carbon cycle strongly interacting with many other components. Off-line process validation will be insufficient. As was found in coupled atmosphere-ocean GCMs, feedbacks between model components can amplify small errors and uncertainties in one process to produce large biases in the simulated climate. The persistent tropical western Pacific Ocean ''double ITCZ'' and upper troposphere ''cold pole'' problems are examples. Finding and fixing similar types of problems in coupled carbon-climate models especially will be difficult, given

  8. Model-Based Extracted Water Desalination System for Carbon Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dees, Elizabeth M. [General Electric Global Research Center, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Moore, David Roger [General Electric Global Research Center, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Li, Li [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Kumar, Manish [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2017-05-28

    Over the last 1.5 years, GE Global Research and Pennsylvania State University defined a model-based, scalable, and multi-stage extracted water desalination system that yields clean water, concentrated brine, and, optionally, salt. The team explored saline brines that ranged across the expected range for extracted water for carbon sequestration reservoirs (40,000 up to 220,000 ppm total dissolved solids, TDS). In addition, the validated the system performance at pilot scale with field-sourced water using GE’s pre-pilot and lab facilities. This project encompassed four principal tasks, in addition to Project Management and Planning: 1) identify a deep saline formation carbon sequestration site and a partner that are suitable for supplying extracted water; 2) conduct a techno-economic assessment and down-selection of pre-treatment and desalination technologies to identify a cost-effective system for extracted water recovery; 3) validate the downselected processes at the lab/pre-pilot scale; and 4) define the scope of the pilot desalination project. Highlights from each task are described below: Deep saline formation characterization The deep saline formations associated with the five DOE NETL 1260 Phase 1 projects were characterized with respect to their mineralogy and formation water composition. Sources of high TDS feed water other than extracted water were explored for high TDS desalination applications, including unconventional oil and gas and seawater reverse osmosis concentrate. Technoeconomic analysis of desalination technologies Techno-economic evaluations of alternate brine concentration technologies, including humidification-dehumidification (HDH), membrane distillation (MD), forward osmosis (FO), turboexpander-freeze, solvent extraction and high pressure reverse osmosis (HPRO), were conducted. These technologies were evaluated against conventional falling film-mechanical vapor recompression (FF-MVR) as a baseline desalination process. Furthermore, a

  9. Modelling past, present and future peatland carbon accumulation across the pan-Arctic region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Nitin; Miller, Paul A.; Smith, Benjamin

    2017-09-01

    Most northern peatlands developed during the Holocene, sequestering large amounts of carbon in terrestrial ecosystems. However, recent syntheses have highlighted the gaps in our understanding of peatland carbon accumulation. Assessments of the long-term carbon accumulation rate and possible warming-driven changes in these accumulation rates can therefore benefit from process-based modelling studies. We employed an individual-based dynamic global ecosystem model with dynamic peatland and permafrost functionalities and patch-based vegetation dynamics to quantify long-term carbon accumulation rates and to assess the effects of historical and projected climate change on peatland carbon balances across the pan-Arctic region. Our results are broadly consistent with published regional and global carbon accumulation estimates. A majority of modelled peatland sites in Scandinavia, Europe, Russia and central and eastern Canada change from carbon sinks through the Holocene to potential carbon sources in the coming century. In contrast, the carbon sink capacity of modelled sites in Siberia, far eastern Russia, Alaska and western and northern Canada was predicted to increase in the coming century. The greatest changes were evident in eastern Siberia, north-western Canada and in Alaska, where peat production hampered by permafrost and low productivity due the cold climate in these regions in the past was simulated to increase greatly due to warming, a wetter climate and higher CO2 levels by the year 2100. In contrast, our model predicts that sites that are expected to experience reduced precipitation rates and are currently permafrost free will lose more carbon in the future.

  10. Spatiotemporal modeling of soil organic carbon stocks across a subtropical region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Christopher Wade; Grunwald, Sabine; Myers, David Brenton

    2013-09-01

    Given the significance and complex nature of soil organic carbon in the context of the global carbon cycle, the need exists for more accurate and economically feasible means of soil organic carbon analysis and its underlying spatial variation at regional scale. The overarching goal of this study was to assess both the spatial and temporal variability of soil organic carbon within a subtropical region of Florida, USA. Specifically, the objectives were to: i) quantify regional soil organic carbon stocks for historical and current conditions and ii) determine whether the soils have acted as a net sink or a net source for atmospheric carbon-dioxide over an approximate 40 year time period. To achieve these objectives, geostatistical interpolation models were used in conjunction with "historical" and "current" datasets to predict soil organic carbon stocks for the upper 20 cm soil profile of the study area. Soil organic carbon estimates derived from the models ranged from 102 to 108 Tg for historical conditions and 211 to 320 Tg for current conditions, indicating that soils in the study area have acted as a net sink for atmospheric carbon over the last 40 years. A paired resampling of historical sites supported the geostatistical estimates, and resulted in an average increase of 0.8 g carbon m(-2) yr(-1) across all collocated samples. Accurately assessing the spatial and temporal state of soil organic carbon at regional scale is critical to further our understanding of global carbon stocks and provide a baseline so that the effects sustainable land use policy can be evaluated.

  11. Modeling high adsorption capacity and kinetics of organic macromolecules on super-powdered activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Ando, Naoya; Yoshida, Tomoaki; Kurotobi, Ryuji; Matsushita, Taku; Ohno, Koichi

    2011-02-01

    The capacity to adsorb natural organic matter (NOM) and polystyrene sulfonates (PSSs) on small particle-size activated carbon (super-powdered activated carbon, SPAC) is higher than that on larger particle-size activated carbon (powdered-activated carbon, PAC). Increased adsorption capacity is likely attributable to the larger external surface area because the NOM and PSS molecules do not completely penetrate the adsorbent particle; they preferentially adsorb near the outer surface of the particle. In this study, we propose a new isotherm equation, the Shell Adsorption Model (SAM), to explain the higher adsorption capacity on smaller adsorbent particles and to describe quantitatively adsorption isotherms of activated carbons of different particle sizes: PAC and SPAC. The SAM was verified with the experimental data of PSS adsorption kinetics as well as equilibrium. SAM successfully characterized PSS adsorption isotherm data for SPACs and PAC simultaneously with the same model parameters. When SAM was incorporated into an adsorption kinetic model, kinetic decay curves for PSSs adsorbing onto activated carbons of different particle sizes could be simultaneously described with a single kinetics parameter value. On the other hand, when SAM was not incorporated into such an adsorption kinetic model and instead isotherms were described by the Freundlich model, the kinetic decay curves were not well described. The success of the SAM further supports the adsorption mechanism of PSSs preferentially adsorbing near the outer surface of activated carbon particles.

  12. Initial stage of growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes: modeling and simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, I; Yu, Ming; Jayanthi, C S; Wu, S Y

    2014-03-19

    Because there are different pathways to grow carbon nanotubes (CNTs), a common mechanism for the synthesis of CNTs does not likely exist. However, after carbon atoms are liberated from carbon-containing precursors by catalysts or from pure carbon systems, a common feature, the nucleation of CNTs by electron mediation, does appear. We studied this feature using the initial stage of growth of single wall CNTs (SWCNTs) by transition metal nano-particle catalysts as the working example. To circumvent the bottleneck due to the size and simulation time, we used a model in which the metal droplet is represented by a jellium, and the effect of collisions between the carbon atoms and atoms of the catalyst is captured by charge transfers between the jellium and the carbon. The simulations were performed using a transferable semi-empirical Hamiltonian to model the interactions between carbon atoms in jellium. We annealed different initial configurations of carbon clusters in jellium as well as in a vacuum. We found that in jellium, elongated open tubular structures, precursors to the growth of SWCNTs, are formed. Our model was also shown to be capable of mimicking the continued growth when more atoms were placed near the open end of the tubular structure.

  13. GROWTH CHARACTERS AND MODEL OF PYROLYTIC CARBON IN CHEMICAL VAPOR INFILTRATION PROCESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Chemical Vapor Infiltration (CVI) processes are the essential techniques for fabrication of high performance carbon-carbon composites. Based on the polarized light and scanning electron analysis, the authors study the micro-morphology and texture characteristics of pyrolytic carbon deposited in CVI process, as well as the growth behavior of pyrolytic carbon. The research shows that Rough Laminar (RL) texture has the hierarchical and self-similar structural features, which reflects the stage-growth and self-similar behavior during the growth course of pyrolytic carbon. According to the two growth features, a laminated growth model of pyrolytic carbon is proposed with the concept of Cone-Growth Units (CGU). The laminated growth model can provide a fine description for the growth course of RL pyrolytic carbon. The model indicates that formation, developing and combination of local high-order structures (such as CGU structures) are the essential factors for the growth of RL texture. Smooth Laminar (SL) texture and ISO carbon come into being with long-range orderliness and isotropy structure respectively, which no local high-orderliness intermediate involves in.

  14. A vapor-liquid-solid model for chemical vapor deposition growth of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Kaili; Feng, Chen; Liu, Kai; Fan, Shoushan

    2007-01-01

    Although carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with a variety of morphologies have been successfully synthesized, there is no clear physical picture of the growth process. Correspondingly, the growth mechanism is still not clear up to now. Here we suggest a VLS model for the growth process of CNTs, which involves a liquid or liquid-like state catalyst. The basic idea is that, due to the high thermal conductivity and nanometer size of the catalyst and the fast diffusion of carbon atoms in it, both the temperature and the carbon atom distribution across it are uniform. The supersaturation level can be expressed as a function of the carbon concentration and temperature, which determines the nucleation dynamics and growth kinetics. Based on this model, the growth rate equation was obtained to describe the growth kinetics of carbon nanotubes, which shows good accordance with the experimental results.

  15. Modeling of the HiPco process for carbon nanotube production. I. Chemical kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dateo, Christopher E.; Gokcen, Tahir; Meyyappan, M.

    2002-01-01

    A chemical kinetic model is developed to help understand and optimize the production of single-walled carbon nanotubes via the high-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPco) process, which employs iron pentacarbonyl as the catalyst precursor and carbon monoxide as the carbon feedstock. The model separates the HiPco process into three steps, precursor decomposition, catalyst growth and evaporation, and carbon nanotube production resulting from the catalyst-enhanced disproportionation of carbon monoxide, known as the Boudouard reaction: 2 CO(g)-->C(s) + CO2(g). The resulting detailed model contains 971 species and 1948 chemical reactions. A second model with a reduced reaction set containing 14 species and 22 chemical reactions is developed on the basis of the detailed model and reproduces the chemistry of the major species. Results showing the parametric dependence of temperature, total pressure, and initial precursor partial pressures are presented, with comparison between the two models. The reduced model is more amenable to coupled reacting flow-field simulations, presented in the following article.

  16. Development of models for predicting carbon mineralization and associated phytotoxicity in compost-amended soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Danielle N; Vandergheynst, Jean S; Rumsey, Thomas R

    2008-12-01

    Phytotoxicity of compost-amended soil is related to carbon mineralization associated with compost decomposition. The objective of this research was to determine if compost carbon mineralization potential, estimated using compost respiration rate measurements, could be combined with carbon mineralization kinetic models to predict phytotoxicity of compost-amended soil. First-order, second-order, and Monod kinetic models that include compost carbon mineralization potential, compost amendment rate, incubation time, and temperature were developed and compared for their ability to predict carbon mineralization kinetics. Experiments utilized two soil types amended with 0%, 5%, and 50% (v/v) food waste and green waste composts, incubated at 20 degrees C, 25 degrees C, 30 degrees C, 35 degrees C, and 45 degrees C for model development and under a diurnal temperature cycle from 20 degrees C to 30 degrees C for model validation. For most cases, a first-order model had an equivalent or better fit to the data than the other models. Mineralizable carbon estimated using the first-order model was significantly correlated to the probability of phytotoxicity in compost-amended soil.

  17. Sources of uncertainties in modelling black carbon at the global scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Vignati

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of the global black carbon (BC cycle is essentially qualitative due to uncertainties in our knowledge of its properties. This work investigates two source of uncertainties in modelling black carbon: those due to the use of different schemes for BC ageing and its removal rate in the global Transport-Chemistry model TM5 and those due to the uncertainties in the definition and quantification of the observations, which propagate through to both the emission inventories, and the measurements used for the model evaluation.

    The schemes for the atmospheric processing of black carbon that have been tested with the model are (i a simple approach considering BC as bulk aerosol and a simple treatment of the removal with fixed 70% of in-cloud black carbon concentrations scavenged by clouds and removed when rain is present and (ii a more complete description of microphysical ageing within an aerosol dynamics model, where removal is coupled to the microphysical properties of the aerosol, which results in a global average of 40% in-cloud black carbon that is scavenged in clouds and subsequently removed by rain, thus resulting in a longer atmospheric lifetime. This difference is reflected in comparisons between both sets of modelled results and the measurements. Close to the sources, both anthropogenic and vegetation fire source regions, the model results do not differ significantly, indicating that the emissions are the prevailing mechanism determining the concentrations and the choice of the aerosol scheme does not influence the levels. In more remote areas such as oceanic and polar regions the differences can be orders of magnitude, due to the differences between the two schemes. The more complete description reproduces the seasonal trend of the black carbon observations in those areas, although not always the magnitude of the signal, while the more simplified approach underestimates black carbon concentrations by orders of

  18. Sources of uncertainties in modelling black carbon at the global scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignati, E.; Karl, M.; Krol, M.; Wilson, J.; Stier, P.; Cavalli, F.

    2010-03-01

    Our understanding of the global black carbon (BC) cycle is essentially qualitative due to uncertainties in our knowledge of its properties. This work investigates two source of uncertainties in modelling black carbon: those due to the use of different schemes for BC ageing and its removal rate in the global Transport-Chemistry model TM5 and those due to the uncertainties in the definition and quantification of the observations, which propagate through to both the emission inventories, and the measurements used for the model evaluation. The schemes for the atmospheric processing of black carbon that have been tested with the model are (i) a simple approach considering BC as bulk aerosol and a simple treatment of the removal with fixed 70% of in-cloud black carbon concentrations scavenged by clouds and removed when rain is present and (ii) a more complete description of microphysical ageing within an aerosol dynamics model, where removal is coupled to the microphysical properties of the aerosol, which results in a global average of 40% in-cloud black carbon that is scavenged in clouds and subsequently removed by rain, thus resulting in a longer atmospheric lifetime. This difference is reflected in comparisons between both sets of modelled results and the measurements. Close to the sources, both anthropogenic and vegetation fire source regions, the model results do not differ significantly, indicating that the emissions are the prevailing mechanism determining the concentrations and the choice of the aerosol scheme does not influence the levels. In more remote areas such as oceanic and polar regions the differences can be orders of magnitude, due to the differences between the two schemes. The more complete description reproduces the seasonal trend of the black carbon observations in those areas, although not always the magnitude of the signal, while the more simplified approach underestimates black carbon concentrations by orders of magnitude. The sensitivity to wet

  19. Carbon mass-balance modeling and carbon isotope exchange processes in the Curonian Lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barisevičiūtė, Rūta; Žilius, Mindaugas; Ertürk, Ali; Petkuvienė, Jolita

    2016-04-01

    The Curonian lagoon one of the largest coastal lagoons in Europe is located in the southeastern part of the Baltic Sea and lies along the Baltic coast of Lithuania and the Kaliningrad region of Russia. It is influenced by a discharge of the Nemunas and other smaller rivers and saline water of the Baltic Sea. The narrow (width 0.4 km, deep 8-14 m) Klaipėda Strait is the only way for fresh water run-off and brackish water intrusions. This research is focused on carbon isotope fractionations related with air - water exchange, primary production and organic carbon sedimentation, mineralization and uptake from both marine and terrestrial sources.

  20. Heterogeneous nucleation of ice on model carbon surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinero, V.; Lupi, L.; Hudait, A.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonaceous particles account for 10% of the particulate matter in the atmosphere. The experimental investigation of heterogeneous freezing of water droplets by carbonaceous particles reveals widespread ice freezing temperatures. The origin of the soot and its oxidation and aging modulate its ice nucleation ability, however, it is not known which structural and chemical characteristics of soot account for the variability in ice nucleation efficiency. We find that atomically flat carbon surfaces promote heterogeneous nucleation of ice, while molecularly rough surfaces with the same hydrophobicity do not. We investigate a large set of graphitic surfaces of various dimensions and radii of curvature consistent with those of soot in experiments, and find that variations in nanostructures alone could account for the spread in the freezing temperatures of ice on soot in experiments. A characterization of the nanostructure of soot is needed to predict its ice nucleation efficiency. Atmospheric oxidation and aging of soot modulates its ice nucleation ability. It has been suggested that an increase in the ice nucleation ability of aged soot results from an increase in the hydrophilicity of the surfaces upon oxidation. Oxidation, however, also impacts the nanostructure of soot, making it difficult to assess the separate effects of soot nanostructure and hydrophilicity in experiments. We investigate the effect of changes in hydrophilicity of model graphitic surfaces on the freezing temperature of ice. Our results indicate that the hydrophilicity of the surface is not in general a good predictor of ice nucleation ability. We find a correlation between the ability of a surface to promote nucleation of ice and the layering of liquid water at the surface. The results of this work suggest that ordering of liquid water in contact with the surface plays an important role in the heterogeneous ice nucleation mechanism. References: L. Lupi, A. Hudait and V. Molinero, J. Am. Chem. Soc

  1. Modelling the effects of nitrogen deposition and carbon dioxide enrichment on forest carbon balance

    OpenAIRE

    Dezi, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    Atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2]) has increased over the last 250 years, mainly due to human activities. Of total anthropogenic emissions, almost 31% has been sequestered by the terrestrial biosphere. A considerable contribution to this sink comes from temperate and boreal forest ecosystems of the northern hemisphere, which contain a large amount of carbon (C) stored as biomass and soil organic matter. Several potential drivers for this forest C sequestration have been proposed, including...

  2. Sources of uncertainties in modelling black carbon at the global scale

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Our understanding of the global black carbon (BC) cycle is essentially qualitative due to uncertainties in our knowledge of its properties. This work investigates two source of uncertainties in modelling black carbon: those due to the use of different schemes for BC ageing and its removal rate in the global Transport-Chemistry model TM5 and those due to the uncertainties in the definition and quantification of the observations, which propagate through to both the emission inventories, and the...

  3. Advanced modeling to accelerate the scale up of carbon capture technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, David C.; Sun, XIN; Storlie, Curtis B.; Bhattacharyya, Debangsu

    2015-06-01

    In order to help meet the goals of the DOE carbon capture program, the Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) was launched in early 2011 to develop, demonstrate, and deploy advanced computational tools and validated multi-scale models to reduce the time required to develop and scale-up new carbon capture technologies. This article focuses on essential elements related to the development and validation of multi-scale models in order to help minimize risk and maximize learning as new technologies progress from pilot to demonstration scale.

  4. Modeling carbon sequestration potential in Mollisols under climate change scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon sequestration in agricultural soils, besides its importance in mitigating global climate change, impacts and will be impacted by provisioning, regulating and supporting agroecosystem services. The objectives of this study were to (1) provide an improved understanding of the role of projected ...

  5. Modeling of amorphous carbon structures with arbitrary structural constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jornada, F H; Gava, V; Martinotto, A L; Cassol, L A; Perottoni, C A

    2010-10-06

    In this paper we describe a method to generate amorphous structures with arbitrary structural constraints. This method employs the simulated annealing algorithm to minimize a simple yet carefully tailored cost function (CF). The cost function is composed of two parts: a simple harmonic approximation for the energy-related terms and a cost that penalizes configurations that do not have atoms in the desired coordinations. Using this approach, we generated a set of amorphous carbon structures spawning nearly all the possible combinations of sp, sp(2) and sp(3) hybridizations. The bulk moduli of this set of amorphous carbons structures was calculated using Brenner's potential. The bulk modulus strongly depends on the mean coordination, following a power-law behavior with an exponent ν = 1.51 ± 0.17. A modified cost function that segregates carbon with different hybridizations is also presented, and another set of structures was generated. With this new set of amorphous materials, the correlation between the bulk modulus and the mean coordination weakens. The method proposed can be easily modified to explore the effects on the physical properties of the presence of hydrogen, dangling bonds, and structural features such as carbon rings.

  6. Carbon accounting of forest bioenergy: from model calibrations to policy options (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamers, P.

    2013-12-01

    knowledge in the field by comparing different state-of-the-art temporal forest carbon modeling efforts, and discusses whether or to what extent a deterministic ';carbon debt' accounting is possible and appropriate. It concludes upon the possible scientific and eventually political choices in temporal carbon accounting for regulatory frameworks including alternative options to address unintentional carbon losses within forest ecosystems/bioenergy systems.

  7. Deep-Water Resedimented Carbonate Exploration Play Types: Controls and Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minzoni, M.; Janson, X.; Kerans, C.; Playton, T.; Winefield, P.; Burgess, P. M.

    2016-12-01

    Deepwater resedimented deposits have been described in both modern and ancient carbonate sequences, many with good reservoir potential, for example the giant Cretaceous Poza Rica field in Mexico ( 40 MMBoe), the Mississippian Tangiz field in Kazakhstan, and several fields in the U.S. Permian basin (several Tcf gas). Nevertheless, carbonate slope and basin systems remain poorly understood when compared to their siliciclastic counterparts. Legacy published and unpublished work, combined with a global database of surface and sub-surface examples of resedimented carbonates, has highlighted that downslope resedimentation of carbonate material is in large part controlled by the evolution of the parent platform margin, which in turn is best characterized in terms of various controlling processes such as the carbonate factory type, tectonic setting, eustatic variations, and prevailing wind direction and ocean current patterns. Two generic play types emerge: (i) attached carbonate slope play -developed immediately adjacent to the parent carbonate platform and dominated by rock fall and platform collapse deposits or in situ boundstone; and (ii) detached carbonate slope play - deposited further from the platform margin via channelized turbidity currents and other mass-flow processes. High-rising, steep, bypass platform margins with collapse scars and grain-dominated factories have the highest potential to generate channelized and detached deep-water reservoirs with high initial porosity and permeability. Best reservoirs are aragonitic grainstones transported from the platform into the adjacent basin, and undergoing dissolution in submarine undersaturated water with early formation of secondary porosity to further enhance reservoir properties. Any exploration model aiming at identifying potential resedimented carbonate plays should be based on carbonate platform configurations and factory types favorable for re-sedimentation of large sedimentary bodies and preservation or

  8. Micromechanics Modeling of Functionally Graded Interphase Regions in Carbon Nanotube-Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Gary D.; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.; Frankland, Sarah Jane V.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2006-01-01

    The effective elastic properties of a unidirectional carbon fiber/epoxy lamina in which the carbon fibers are coated with single-walled carbon nanotubes are modeled herein through the use of a multi-scale method involving the molecular dynamics/equivalent continuum and micromechanics methods. The specific lamina representative volume element studied consists of a carbon fiber surrounded by a region of epoxy containing a radially varying concentration of carbon nanotubes which is then embedded in the pure epoxy matrix. The variable concentration of carbon nanotubes surrounding the carbon fiber results in a functionally graded interphase region as the properties of the interphase region vary according to the carbon nanotube volume fraction. Molecular dynamics and equivalent continuum methods are used to assess the local effective properties of the carbon nanotube/epoxy comprising the interphase region. Micromechanics in the form of the Mori-Tanaka method are then applied to obtain the global effective properties of the graded interphase region wherein the carbon nanotubes are randomly oriented. Finally, the multi-layer composite cylinders micromechanics approach is used to obtain the effective lamina properties from the lamina representative volume element. It was found that even very small quantities of carbon nanotubes (0.36% of lamina by volume) coating the surface of the carbon fibers in the lamina can have a significant effect (8% increase) on the transverse properties of the lamina (E22, k23, G23 and G12) with almost no affect on the lamina properties in the fiber direction (E11 and v12).

  9. Sediment carbon fate in phreatic karst (Part 1): Conceptual model development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husic, A.; Fox, J.; Agouridis, C.; Currens, J.; Ford, W.; Taylor, C.

    2017-06-01

    Recent research has paid increased attention to quantifying the fate of carbon pools within fluvial networks, but few, if any, studies consider the fate of sediment organic carbon in fluviokarst systems despite that karst landscapes cover 12% of the earth's land surface. The authors develop a conceptual model of sediment carbon fate in karst terrain with specific emphasis upon phreatic karst conduits, i.e., those located below the groundwater table that have the potential to trap surface-derived sediment and turnover carbon. To assist with their conceptual model development, the authors study a phreatic system and apply a mixture of methods traditional and novel to karst studies, including electrical resistivity imaging, well drilling, instantaneous velocimetry, dye tracing, stage recording, discrete and continuous sediment and water quality sampling, and elemental and stable carbon isotope fingerprinting. Results show that the sediment transport carrying capacity of the phreatic karst water is orders of magnitude less than surface streams during storm-activated periods promoting deposition of fine sediments in the phreatic karst. However, the sediment transport carrying capacity is sustained long after the hydrologic event has ended leading to sediment resuspension and prolonged transport. The surficial fine grained laminae occurs in the subsurface karst system; but unlike surface streams, the light-limited conditions of the subsurface karst promotes constant heterotrophy leading to carbon turnover. The coupling of the hydrological processes leads to a conceptual model that frames phreatic karst as a biologically active conveyor of sediment carbon that recharges degraded organic carbon back to surface streams. For example, fluvial sediment is estimated to lose 30% of its organic carbon by mass during a one year temporary residence within the phreatic karst. It is recommended that scientists consider karst pathways when attempting to estimate organic matter stocks

  10. Constitutive model depending upon temperature and strain rate of carbon constructional quality steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨柳; 罗迎社

    2008-01-01

    The basic factors relating to the rheological stress in the constitutive equations were introduced.Carbon constructional quality steels were regarded as a kind of elastic-viscoplastic materials under high temperature and the elastic-viscoplastic constitutive models were summarized.A series of tension experiments under the same temperature and different strain rates,and the same strain rate and different temperatures were done on 20 steel,35 steel and 45 steel.52 groups of rheological stress-strain curves were obtained.The experimental results were analyzed theoretically.The rheological stress constitutive models of carbon steels were built combining the strong points of the Perzyna model and Johnson-Cook model.Comparing the calculation results conducted from the model with the experiment results,the results proves that the model can reflect the temperature effect and strain rate effect of carbon constructional quality steels better.

  11. Simulating crop phenology in the Community Land Model and its impact on energy and carbon fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    A reasonable representation of crop phenology and biophysical processes in land surface models is necessary to accurately simulate energy, water and carbon budgets at the field, regional, and global scales. However, the evaluation of crop models that can be coupled to earth system models is relative...

  12. A dynamic mathematical model for packed columns in carbon capture plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaspar, Jozsef; Jørgensen, John Bagterp; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a dynamic mathematical model for the absorption and desorption columns in a carbon capture plant. Carbon capture plants must be operated in synchronization with the operation of thermal power plants. Dynamic and flexible operation of the carbon capture plant is important...... simulation using monoethanolamine (MEA) and piperazine (PZ) as solvent. MEA is considered as the base-case solvent in the carbon capture business. The effect of changes in the flue gas flow rate and changes in the available steam are investigated to determine their influence on the performance of the capture...... process. The response of the model is shown in terms of capture efficiency and purity of the CO2 product stream. The model is aimed for rigorous dynamic simulation in the context of optimization and control strategy development....

  13. Decomposition by ectomycorrhizal fungi alters soil carbon storage in a simulation model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, J. A. M.; Jiang, J.; Post, W. M.

    2015-01-01

    that ectomycorrhizal fungi can also be active decomposers when plant carbon allocation to fungi is low. Here, we reviewed the literature on ectomycorrhizal decomposition and we developed a simulation model of the plant-mycorrhizae interaction where a reduction in plant productivity stimulates ectomycorrhizal fungi...... to decompose soil organic matter. Our review highlights evidence demonstrating the potential for ectomycorrhizal fungi to decompose soil organic matter. Our model output suggests that ectomycorrhizal activity accounts for a portion of carbon decomposed in soil, but this portion varied with plant productivity...... and the mycorrhizal carbon uptake strategy simulated. Lower organic matter inputs to soil were largely responsible for reduced soil carbon storage. Using mathematical theory, we demonstrated that biotic interactions affect predictions of ecosystem functions. Specifically, we developed a simple function to model...

  14. Modeling Carbon Dioxide, pH and Un-Ionized Ammonia Relationships in Serial Reuse Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watten, Barnaby J.; Rust, Michael; Colt, John

    2009-01-01

    In serial reuse systems, excretion of metabolic carbon dioxide has a significant impact on ambient pH, carbon dioxide, and un-ionized ammonia concentrations. This impact depends strongly on alkalinity, water flow rate, feeding rate, and loss of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. A reduction in pH from metabolic carbon dioxide can significantly reduce the un-ionized ammonia concentration and increase the carbon dioxide concentrations compared to those parameters computed from influent pH. The ability to accurately predict pH in serial reuse systems is critical to their design and effective operation. A trial and error solution to the alkalinity–pH system was used to estimate important water quality parameters in serial reuse systems. Transfer of oxygen and carbon dioxide across the air–water interface, at overflow weirs, and impacts of substrate-attached algae and suspended bacteria were modeled. Gas transfer at the weirs was much greater than transfer across the air–water boundary. This simulation model can rapidly estimate influent and effluent concentrations of dissolved oxygen, carbon dioxide, and un-ionized ammonia as a function of water temperature, elevation, water flow, and weir type. The accuracy of the estimates strongly depends on assumed pollutional loading rates and gas transfer at the weirs. The current simulation model is based on mean daily loading rates; the impacts of daily variation loading rates are discussed. Copies of the source code and executable program are available free of charge.

  15. Carbon Management and Decision Support Systems for the CASA Ecosystem Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klooster, S.; Potter, C.; Fladeland, M.; Genovese, V.; Kramer, M.

    2003-12-01

    Ecosystem modeling and satellite remote sensing can link human activities such as land use change and forest management to the spatial distribution of carbon pools and fluxes at regional scales. The main objectives of this research and application are to: 1) evaluate major forest and agricultural sinks of atmospheric carbon dioxide in the U. S. using NASA EOS satellite data and ecosystem modeling, 2) support the U. S. Government interagency program for registration of voluntary greenhouse gas emissions reductions under section 1605(b) of the 1992 Energy Policy Act, and 3) develop an internet-based decision support system (DSS) of carbon sequestration in U. S. ecosystems for users nationwide. We report on the first results of this DSS to assess the impacts of forest stand age on potential carbon sequestration, as predicted by the CASA (Carnegie Ames Stanford Approach) biosphere model. Estimates of carbon storage in woody plant pools are compared before and after adjustment for management of stand age based on U. S. Forest Service map products. These predictions of historical forest carbon storage are subsequently compared to the potential annual increment of ecosystem carbon gain or loss under conditions of future climate variation.

  16. Modelling Cr(VI) removal by a combined carbon-activated sludge system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orozco, A. Micaela Ferro [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo en Criotecnologia de Alimentos (CIDCA), CONICET, Fac. de Cs. Exactas, UNLP. 47 y 116 (B1900AJJ), La Plata (Argentina); Contreras, Edgardo M. [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo en Criotecnologia de Alimentos (CIDCA), CONICET, Fac. de Cs. Exactas, UNLP. 47 y 116 (B1900AJJ), La Plata (Argentina)], E-mail: econtrer@quimica.unlp.edu.ar; Zaritzky, Noemi E. [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo en Criotecnologia de Alimentos (CIDCA), CONICET, Fac. de Cs. Exactas, UNLP. 47 y 116 (B1900AJJ), La Plata (Argentina); Fac. de Ingenieria, UNLP. 47 y 1 (B1900AJJ), La Plata (Argentina)

    2008-01-15

    The combined carbon-activated sludge process has been proposed as an alternative to protect the biomass against toxic substances in wastewaters; however, the information about the effect of powdered-activated carbon (PAC) addition in activated sludge reactors for the treatment of wastewaters containing Cr(VI) is limited. The objectives of the present study were: (a) to evaluate the removal of hexavalent chromium by (i) activated sludge microorganisms in aerobic batch reactors, (ii) powdered-activated carbon, and (iii) the combined action of powdered-activated carbon and biomass; (b) to propose mathematical models that interpret the experimental results. Different Cr(VI) removal systems were tested: (S1) biomass (activated sludge), (S2) PAC, and (S3) the combined activated carbon-biomass system. A Monod-based mathematical model was used to describe the kinetics of Cr(VI) removal in the system S1. A first-order kinetics with respect to Cr(VI) and PAC respectively, was proposed to model the removal of Cr(VI) in the system S2. Cr(VI) removal in the combined carbon-biomass system (S3) was faster than both Cr(VI) removal using PAC or activated sludge individually. Results showed that the removal of Cr(VI) using the activated carbon-biomass system (S3) was adequately described by combining the kinetic equations proposed for the systems S1 and S2.

  17. Modeling of Hydration, Compressive Strength, and Carbonation of Portland-Limestone Cement (PLC) Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Yong

    2017-01-26

    Limestone is widely used in the construction industry to produce Portland limestone cement (PLC) concrete. Systematic evaluations of hydration kinetics, compressive strength development, and carbonation resistance are crucial for the rational use of limestone. This study presents a hydration-based model for evaluating the influences of limestone on the strength and carbonation of concrete. First, the hydration model analyzes the dilution effect and the nucleation effect of limestone during the hydration of cement. The degree of cement hydration is calculated by considering concrete mixing proportions, binder properties, and curing conditions. Second, by using the gel-space ratio, the compressive strength of PLC concrete is evaluated. The interactions among water-to-binder ratio, limestone replacement ratio, and strength development are highlighted. Third, the carbonate material contents and porosity are calculated from the hydration model and are used as input parameters for the carbonation model. By considering concrete microstructures and environmental conditions, the carbon dioxide diffusivity and carbonation depth of PLC concrete are evaluated. The proposed model has been determined to be valid for concrete with various water-to-binder ratios, limestone contents, and curing periods.

  18. Modeling of Hydration, Compressive Strength, and Carbonation of Portland-Limestone Cement (PLC Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Yong Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Limestone is widely used in the construction industry to produce Portland limestone cement (PLC concrete. Systematic evaluations of hydration kinetics, compressive strength development, and carbonation resistance are crucial for the rational use of limestone. This study presents a hydration-based model for evaluating the influences of limestone on the strength and carbonation of concrete. First, the hydration model analyzes the dilution effect and the nucleation effect of limestone during the hydration of cement. The degree of cement hydration is calculated by considering concrete mixing proportions, binder properties, and curing conditions. Second, by using the gel–space ratio, the compressive strength of PLC concrete is evaluated. The interactions among water-to-binder ratio, limestone replacement ratio, and strength development are highlighted. Third, the carbonate material contents and porosity are calculated from the hydration model and are used as input parameters for the carbonation model. By considering concrete microstructures and environmental conditions, the carbon dioxide diffusivity and carbonation depth of PLC concrete are evaluated. The proposed model has been determined to be valid for concrete with various water-to-binder ratios, limestone contents, and curing periods.

  19. A mechanistic modelling and data assimilation approach to estimate the carbon/chlorophyll and carbon/nitrogen ratios in a coupled hydrodynamical-biological model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Faugeras

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The principal objective of hydrodynamical-biological models is to provide estimates of the main carbon fluxes such as total and export oceanic production. These models are nitrogen based, that is to say that the variables are expressed in terms of their nitrogen content. Moreover models are calibrated using chlorophyll data sets. Therefore carbon to chlorophyll (C:Chl and carbon to nitrogen (C:N ratios have to be assumed. This paper addresses the problem of the representation of these ratios. In a 1D framework at the DYFAMED station (NW Mediterranean Sea we propose a model which enables the estimation of the basic biogeochemical fluxes and in which the spatio-temporal variability of the C:Chl and C:N ratios is fully represented in a mechanical way. This is achieved through the introduction of new state variables coming from the embedding of a phytoplankton growth model in a more classical Redfieldian NNPZD-DOM model (in which the C:N ratio is assumed to be a constant. Following this modelling step, the parameters of the model are estimated using the adjoint data assimilation method which enables the assimilation of chlorophyll and nitrate data sets collected at DYFAMED in 1997.Comparing the predictions of the new Mechanistic model with those of the classical Redfieldian NNPZD-DOM model which was calibrated with the same data sets, we find that both models reproduce the reference data in a comparable manner. Both fluxes and stocks can be equally well predicted by either model. However if the models are coinciding on an average basis, they are diverging from a variability prediction point of view. In the Mechanistic model biology adapts much faster to its environment giving rise to higher short term variations. Moreover the seasonal variability in total production differs from the Redfieldian NNPZD-DOM model to the Mechanistic model. In summer the Mechanistic model predicts higher production values in carbon unit than the Redfieldian NNPZD

  20. A carbon dioxide stripping model for mammalian cell culture in manufacturing scale bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Zizhuo; Lewis, Amanda M; Borys, Michael C; Li, Zheng Jian

    2017-06-01

    Control of carbon dioxide within the optimum range is important in mammalian bioprocesses at the manufacturing scale in order to ensure robust cell growth, high protein yields, and consistent quality attributes. The majority of bioprocess development work is done in laboratory bioreactors, in which carbon dioxide levels are more easily controlled. Some challenges in carbon dioxide control can present themselves when cell culture processes are scaled up, because carbon dioxide accumulation is a common feature due to longer gas-residence time of mammalian cell culture in large scale bioreactors. A carbon dioxide stripping model can be used to better understand and optimize parameters that are critical to cell culture processes at the manufacturing scale. The prevailing carbon dioxide stripping models in literature depend on mass transfer coefficients and were applicable to cell culture processes with low cell density or at stationary/cell death phase. However, it was reported that gas bubbles are saturated with carbon dioxide before leaving the culture, which makes carbon dioxide stripping no longer depend on a mass transfer coefficient in the new generation cell culture processes characterized by longer exponential growth phase, higher peak viable cell densities, and higher specific production rate. Here, we present a new carbon dioxide stripping model for manufacturing scale bioreactors, which is independent of carbon dioxide mass transfer coefficient, but takes into account the gas-residence time and gas CO2 saturation time. The model was verified by CHO cell culture processes with different peak viable cell densities (7 to 12 × 10(6)  cells mL(-1) ) for two products in 5,000-L and 25,000-L bioreactors. The model was also applied to a next generation cell culture process to optimize cell culture conditions and reduce carbon dioxide levels at manufacturing scale. The model provides a useful tool to understand and better control cell culture carbon dioxide

  1. Enhanced understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle through multiple constraints in model-data-integration approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalhais, N.; Forkel, M.; Oijen, M. V.; Keenan, T. F.; MacBean, N.; Rolinski, S.; Peylin, P. P.; Schuermann, G. J.; Zaehle, S.; Reichstein, M.

    2015-12-01

    The representation of exchanges of carbon, water and energy between the land surface and the atmosphere still reveals significant model limitations in explaining temporal and spatial variability. Despite agreement between models for contemporaneous periods, prognostic simulations reveal a strong between-model divergence regarding the role of the land surface in the global carbon cycle. The integration of multiple data-streams in inverse modelling approaches for parameterization and model evaluation, ultimately leads to model improvement. Here we explore multiple-constraint approaches ranging from in situ to regional and global spatial scales. Constraints include stocks and fluxes of water and carbon. We show that integrating multiple datasets contributes to a better representation of ecosystem dynamics in different models, from forest and dynamic vegetation models to land surface schemes. At site scale, model-data comparisons reveal substantial differences in the modelled temporal dynamics of carbon stocks and turnover times and their relationships with climate, especially at annual scales. Inter-annual variability remains a problem for all models, even after parameter optimization. At regional and global scales, the integration of multiple data-streams to constrain albedo, phenology and primary productivity patterns yields a significant improvement in regional simulations of vegetation dynamics, from seasons to longer-term trends. The role of environmental controls and vegetation dynamics in explaining recent trends in the amplitude of the seasonal cycle of atmospheric CO2 is evaluated using an improved dynamic vegetation model. We conclude by identifying major challenges in model-data-integration: to explore the information content in longer time series; avoid confounding effects of missing processes on parameter estimation; set up cost functions for multivariate-data integration; quantification of uncertainties arising from data bias, model structure, and

  2. Modeling Soil Organic Carbon for Agricultural Land Use Under Various Management Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotamarthi, V. R.; Drewniak, B.; Song, J.; Prell, J.; Jacob, R. L.

    2009-12-01

    Bioenergy is generating tremendous interest as an alternative energy source that is both environmentally friendly and economically competitive. The amount of land designated for agriculture is expected to expand, including changes in the current distribution of crops, as demand for biofuels increases as a carbon neutral alternative fuel source. However, the influence of agriculture on the carbon cycle is complex, and varies depending on land use change and management practices. The purpose of this research is to integrate agriculture in the carbon-nitrogen based Community Land Model (CLM) to evaluate the above and below ground carbon storage for corn, soybean, and wheat crop lands. The new model, CLM-Crop simulates carbon allocation during four growth stages, a soybean nitrogen fixation scheme, fertilizer, and harvest practices. We present results from this model simulation, which includes the impact of a new dynamic roots module to simulate the changing root structure and depth with growing season based on the availability of water and nitrogen in the root zone and a retranslocation scheme to simulate redistribution of nitrogen from leaves, roots, and stems to grain during organ development for crop yields, leaf area index (LAI), carbon allocation, and changes in soil carbon budgets under various practices such as fertilizer and residue management. Simulated crop yields for corn, soybean and wheat are in general agreement with measurements. Initial model results indicate a loss of soil organic carbon over cultivated lands after removal of natural vegetation which continues in the following years. Soil carbon in crop lands is a strong function of the residue management and has the potential to impact crop yields significantly.

  3. Modelling of deposited black carbon with the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART in backward mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhardt, Sabine; Cassiani, Massimo; Sollum, Espen; Evangeliou, Nikolaos; Stohl, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Lagrangian particle dispersion models are popular tools to simulate the dispersion of trace gases, aerosols or radionuclides in the atmosphere. If they consider only linear processes, they are self-adjoint, i.e., they can be run forward and backward in time without changes to the source code. Backward simulations are very efficient if the number of receptors is smaller than the number of sources, and they are well suited to establish source-receptor (s-r) relationships for measurements of various trace substances in air. However, not only the air concentrations are of interest, but also the s-r relationships for deposition are important for interpreting measurement data. E.g., deposition of dust is measured regularly in ice cores, partly also as a proxy to understand changes in aridity in dust source regions. Contamination of snow by black carbon (BC) aerosols has recently become a hot topic because of the potential impact of BC on the snow albedo. To interpret such deposition measurements and study the sources of the deposited substance, it would be convenient to have a model that is capable of efficient s-r relationship calculations for such types of measurements. We present here the implementation of such an algorithm into the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART, and test the new scheme by comparisons with results from forward simulations as well as comparisons with measurements. As an application, we analyse source regions for elemental carbon (EC) measured in snow over the years 2014-2016 in the Russian Arctic. Simulations using an annual constant black carbon inventory based on ECLIPSE V5 and GFED (Global Fire Emission Database), have been performed. The meteorological data used in the simulation are 3 hourly operational data from the European Centre of Medium Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) on a 1 degree grid resolution and 138 vertical levels. The model is able to capture very well the measured concentrations. Gas flaring and residential

  4. AgroC - Development and evaluation of a model for carbon fluxes in agroecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klosterhalfen, Anne; Herbst, Michael; Schmidt, Marius; Weihermüller, Lutz; Vanderborght, Jan; Vereecken, Harry

    2015-04-01

    Agroecosystems are highly sensitive to climate change. To predict and describe the processes, interactions and feedbacks in the plant-soil-system a model accounting for both compartments at an appropriate level of complexity is required. To describe the processes of crop development, crop growth, water flux, heat transport, and carbon cycling three process models were coupled: the one-dimensional soil water, heat and CO2 transport model SOILCO2, the carbon turnover model RothC, and the plant growth model SUCROS. Thereby, the main focus was on the full description of the CO2 flux into the atmosphere via plant and soil processes and finally on simulating the net ecosystem exchange. Additionally, the model was modified to work at the temporal resolution between 1 and 24 hours. For model evaluation a winter wheat and a grassland data set obtained within the TERENO Rur catchment (North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany) was used. For model initialisation soil carbon fractions were available. Plant specific parameters and soil thermal properties were taken from literature. Measured soil water contents, soil temperatures, crop measurements, autotrophic, and heterotrophic chamber-based respiration measurements were used for validation and calibration. The coupled agroecosystem model AgroC described the crop development and heat transport reasonably well. Minor adjustments had to be made for carbon cycling, and to adapt the model to site specific conditions. Therefore, the soil hydraulic properties for soil water transport had to be determined by inverse modelling.

  5. Geographical Detector Model for Influencing Factors of Industrial Sector Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Inner Mongolia, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina Wu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Studying the influencing factors of carbon dioxide emissions is not only practically but also theoretically crucial for establishing regional carbon-reduction policies, developing low-carbon economy and solving the climate problems. Therefore, we used a geographical detector model which is consists of four parts, i.e., risk detector, factor detector, ecological detector and interaction detector to analyze the effect of these social economic factors, i.e., GDP, industrial structure, urbanization rate, economic growth rate, population and road density on the increase of energy consumption carbon dioxide emissions in industrial sector in Inner Mongolia northeast of China. Thus, combining with the result of four detectors, we found that GDP and population more influence than economic growth rate, industrial structure, urbanization rate and road density. The interactive effect of any two influencing factors enhances the increase of the carbon dioxide emissions. The findings of this research have significant policy implications for regions like Inner Mongolia.

  6. Evaluating carbon fluxes of global forest ecosystems by using an individual tree-based model FORCCHN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jianyong; Shugart, Herman H; Yan, Xiaodong; Cao, Cougui; Wu, Shuang; Fang, Jing

    2017-02-14

    The carbon budget of forest ecosystems, an important component of the terrestrial carbon cycle, needs to be accurately quantified and predicted by ecological models. As a preamble to apply the model to estimate global carbon uptake by forest ecosystems, we used the CO2 flux measurements from 37 forest eddy-covariance sites to examine the individual tree-based FORCCHN model's performance globally. In these initial tests, the FORCCHN model simulated gross primary production (GPP), ecosystem respiration (ER) and net ecosystem production (NEP) with correlations of 0.72, 0.70 and 0.53, respectively, across all forest biomes. The model underestimated GPP and slightly overestimated ER across most of the eddy-covariance sites. An underestimation of NEP arose primarily from the lower GPP estimates. Model performance was better in capturing both the temporal changes and magnitude of carbon fluxes in deciduous broadleaf forest than in evergreen broadleaf forest, and it performed less well for sites in Mediterranean climate. We then applied the model to estimate the carbon fluxes of forest ecosystems on global scale over 1982-2011. This application of FORCCHN gave a total GPP of 59.41±5.67 and an ER of 57.21±5.32PgCyr(-1) for global forest ecosystems during 1982-2011. The forest ecosystems over this same period contributed a large carbon storage, with total NEP being 2.20±0.64PgCyr(-1). These values are comparable to and reinforce estimates reported in other studies. This analysis highlights individual tree-based model FORCCHN could be used to evaluate carbon fluxes of forest ecosystems on global scale.

  7. Spatial modeling of the carbon stock of forest trees in Heilongjiang Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang Liu; Lianjun Zhang; Fengri Li; Xingji Jin

    2014-01-01

    Heilongjiang province is the largest forest zone in China and the forest coverage rate is 46%. Forests of Heilongjiang province play an important role in the forest ecosystem of China. In this study we investi-gated the spatial distribution of forest carbon storage in Heilongjiang province using 3083 plots sampled in 2010. We attempted to fit two global models, ordinary least squares model (OLS) , linear mixed model (LMM), and a local model, geographically weighted regression model (GWR), to the relationship between forest carbon content and stand, environment, and climate factors. Five predictors significantly affected forest carbon storage and spatial distribution, viz. average diameter of stand (DBH), number of trees per hectare (TPH), elevation (Elev), slope (Slope) and the product of precipitation and temperature (Rain_Temp). The GWR model outperformed the two global models in both model fitting and prediction because it successfully reduced both spatial auto-correlation and heterogeneity in model residuals. More importantly, the GWR model provided localized model coefficients for each location in the study area, which allowed us to evaluate the influences of local stand conditions and topographic features on tree and stand growth, and forest carbon stock. It also helped us to better understand the impacts of silvi-cultural and management activities on the amount and changes of forest carbon storage across the province. The detailed information can be readily incorporated with the mapping ability of GIS software to provide excellent tools for assessing the distribution and dynamics of the for-est-carbon stock in the next few years.

  8. Conceptual design of an integrated technology model for carbon policy assessment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backus, George A.; Dimotakes, Paul E. (NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA)

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the conceptual design of a technology choice model for understanding strategies to reduce carbon intensity in the electricity sector. The report considers the major modeling issues affecting technology policy assessment and defines an implementable model construct. Further, the report delineates the basis causal structure of such a model and attempts to establish the technical/algorithmic viability of pursuing model development along with the associated analyses.

  9. Basin-scale Modeling of Geological Carbon Sequestration: Model Complexity, Injection Scenario and Sensitivity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, X.; Bandilla, K.; Celia, M. A.; Bachu, S.

    2013-12-01

    Geological carbon sequestration can significantly contribute to climate-change mitigation only if it is deployed at a very large scale. This means that injection scenarios must occur, and be analyzed, at the basin scale. Various mathematical models of different complexity may be used to assess the fate of injected CO2 and/or resident brine. These models span the range from multi-dimensional, multi-phase numerical simulators to simple single-phase analytical solutions. In this study, we consider a range of models, all based on vertically-integrated governing equations, to predict the basin-scale pressure response to specific injection scenarios. The Canadian section of the Basal Aquifer is used as a test site to compare the different modeling approaches. The model domain covers an area of approximately 811,000 km2, and the total injection rate is 63 Mt/yr, corresponding to 9 locations where large point sources have been identified. Predicted areas of critical pressure exceedance are used as a comparison metric among the different modeling approaches. Comparison of the results shows that single-phase numerical models may be good enough to predict the pressure response over a large aquifer; however, a simple superposition of semi-analytical or analytical solutions is not sufficiently accurate because spatial variability of formation properties plays an important role in the problem, and these variations are not captured properly with simple superposition. We consider two different injection scenarios: injection at the source locations and injection at locations with more suitable aquifer properties. Results indicate that in formations with significant spatial variability of properties, strong variations in injectivity among the different source locations can be expected, leading to the need to transport the captured CO2 to suitable injection locations, thereby necessitating development of a pipeline network. We also consider the sensitivity of porosity and

  10. An Integrated Model of Market-Driven Dynamics of Carbon in Exurban Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, D. G.; Sun, S.; Currie, W.; Nassauer, J. I.; Page, S. E.; Parker, D. C.; Riolo, R. L.; Robinson, D. T.

    2012-12-01

    As coupled human-environment system, exurban land-use systems and their ecological and social outcomes are driven by interactions between the human actors and natural processes at play. Carbon storage in exurban land-use systems is driven by interactions among market forces driving land-use change, developer and resident decisions about land cover and land management, and ecosystem processes affecting ecosystem function. Whether or not vegetation in these landscapes contribute to carbon sinks that mitigate global change, and their future trajectory, depends on dynamics in both human and biophysical processes. Understanding these interactions in a coupled human and natural system might best be advanced by iterating between data collection efforts on various aspects of the system (including the states and changes in the social and natural aspects of the system) and modeling in ways that explicitly represents social and natural processes and their interactions. A challenge is to build models that are both explicable based on existing process knowledge and supportable by existing or newly collected data. We coupled an agent-based model of developer and resident decision making about landscape structure and management with a biogeochemical model of carbon flux and storage to evaluate the drivers of and possible mechanisms to achieve increased carbon storage. Model-based experiments demonstrate the (a) effects of various residential land management strategies on carbon storage, suggesting that removals of litter have a larger effect on overall carbon storage than additions of fertilizer and irrigation; (b) effects of subsidies or payments for increased carbon storage paid to developers can result in choices about development types that result in increased carbon storage, but that the effects are highly sensitive to the price of carbon and the basis for calculating payments. The experiments highlight the need for integrated modeling, but also point to specific needs for

  11. Waste oil shale ash as a novel source of calcium for precipitated calcium carbonate: Carbonation mechanism, modeling, and product characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velts, O., E-mail: olga.velts@ttu.ee [Laboratory of Inorganic Materials, Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, Tallinn 19086 (Estonia); Laboratory of Separation Technology, Lappeenranta University of Technology, P.O. Box 20, Lappeenranta FI-53851 (Finland); Uibu, M.; Kallas, J.; Kuusik, R. [Laboratory of Inorganic Materials, Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, Tallinn 19086 (Estonia)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} A method for converting oil shale waste ash into precipitated CaCO{sub 3} is elucidated. {yields} We discuss the mechanism of hazardous alkaline ash leachates carbonation. {yields} We report a model describing precipitation of CaCO{sub 3} from multi-ionic ash leachates. {yields} Model enables simulation of reactive species concentration profiles. {yields} Product contained {approx}96% CaCO{sub 3} with 4-10 {mu}m size calcite or/and vaterite particles. - Abstract: In this paper, a method for converting lime-containing oil shale waste ash into precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC), a valuable commodity is elucidated. The mechanism of ash leachates carbonation was experimentally investigated in a stirred semi-batch barboter-type reactor by varying the CO{sub 2} partial pressure, gas flow rate, and agitation intensity. A consistent set of model equations and physical-chemical parameters is proposed to describe the CaCO{sub 3} precipitation process from oil shale ash leachates of complex composition. The model enables the simulation of reactive species (Ca{sup 2+}, CaCO{sub 3}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, CaSO{sub 4}, OH{sup -}, CO{sub 2}, HCO{sub 3}{sup -}, H{sup +}, CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}) concentration profiles in the liquid, gas, and solid phases as well as prediction of the PCC formation rate. The presence of CaSO{sub 4} in the product may also be evaluated and used to assess the purity of the PCC product. A detailed characterization of the PCC precipitates crystallized from oil shale ash leachates is also provided. High brightness PCC (containing up to {approx}96% CaCO{sub 3}) with mean particle sizes ranging from 4 to 10 {mu}m and controllable morphology (such as rhombohedral calcite or coexisting calcite and spherical vaterite phases) was obtained under the conditions studied.

  12. Forest carbon uptake in North America's aging temperate deciduous forests: A data-theory-model mismatch?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, C. M.; Curtis, P.; Bond-Lamberty, B. P.; Hardiman, B. S.; Scheuermann, C. M.; Nave, L. E.; Nadelhoffer, K. J.

    2015-12-01

    Century-old temperate deciduous forests in the US upper Midwest and Northeast power much of North America's terrestrial carbon sink, but these forests' carbon uptake capacity is expected to soon decline. But will this really happen? We marshal empirical data and ecological theory to show that declines in carbon uptake are not imminent in regrown temperate deciduous forests during coming decades, despite long-held assumptions and modeling results that predict declining carbon uptake during middle stages of ecosystem development. Age and production data for temperate deciduous forests, synthesized from published literature, do not provide evidence for declining net primary and ecosystem production (NPP and NEP, respectively) within the age-range most regional forests will occupy over the next half-century. Ecological theory suggests a mechanism for sustained carbon uptake in the region's aging forests in which high-frequency, low-severity disturbances maintain NPP and NEP by increasing ecosystem complexity. This theoretical model is supported by observations from the Forest Accelerated Succession Experiment in Michigan, USA, but such mechanisms sustaining production in old forests are not broadly represented in ecosystem models. Ecosystems experiencing low-frequency, high-severity disturbances that simplify ecosystem complexity do exhibit declining production during middle stages of succession, but we suggest that such scenarios have exerted a disproportionate influence on prevailing modeling and ecological assumptions regarding age-related declines in forest production. We conclude that there is wide ecological space for forests to sustain high rates of carbon uptake during middle stages of ecosystem development, and that advancing mechanistic understanding of long-term forest carbon cycle dynamics is essential to modeling the continent's future carbon sink strength.

  13. Quantifying peat carbon accumulation in Alaska using a process-based biogeochemistry model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sirui; Zhuang, Qianlai; Yu, Zicheng; Bridgham, Scott; Keller, Jason K.

    2016-08-01

    This study uses an integrated modeling framework that couples the dynamics of hydrology, soil thermal regime, and ecosystem carbon and nitrogen to quantify the long-term peat carbon accumulation in Alaska during the Holocene. Modeled hydrology, soil thermal regime, carbon pools and fluxes, and methane emissions are evaluated using observation data at several peatland sites in Minnesota, Alaska, and Canada. The model is then applied for a 10,000 year (15 ka to 5 ka; 1 ka = 1000 cal years before present) simulation at four peatland sites. We find that model simulations match the observed carbon accumulation rates at fen sites during the Holocene (R2 = 0.88, 0.87, 0.38, and -0.05 using comparisons in 500 year bins). The simulated (2.04 m) and observed peat depths (on average 1.98 m) were also compared well (R2 = 0.91). The early Holocene carbon accumulation rates, especially during the Holocene thermal maximum (HTM) (35.9 g C m- 2 yr- 1), are estimated up to 6 times higher than the rest of the Holocene (6.5 g C m- 2 yr- 1). Our analysis suggests that high summer temperature and the lengthened growing season resulted from the elevated insolation seasonality, along with wetter-than-before conditions might be major factors causing the rapid carbon accumulation in Alaska during the HTM. Our sensitivity tests indicate that, apart from climate, initial water table depth and vegetation canopy are major drivers to the estimated peat carbon accumulation. When the modeling framework is evaluated for various peatland types in the Arctic, it can quantify peatland carbon accumulation at regional scales.

  14. The modeling of carbon isotope kinetics and its application to the evaluation of natural gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianqing LI; Xianming XIAO; Yongchun TANG; Hui TIAN; Qiang ZHOU; Yunfeng YANG; Peng DONG; Yan WANG; Zhihong SONG

    2008-01-01

    The modeling of carbon isotope kinetics of natural gas is an issue driving pioneering research in the oil and gas geochemistry in China and internationally.Combined with the sedimentary burial history and basin geothermal history,the modeling of carbon isotope kinetics provides a new and effective means for the determination of the origin and accumulation history of natural gas pools.In this paper,we introduce the modeling of carbon isotope kinetics of natural gas formation and its applications to the assessment of natural gas maturity,the determination of the gas source,the history of gas accumulation,and the oil-gas ratio.It is shown that this approach is of great value for these applications.The carbon isotopic characteristics of natural gas are not only affected by the gas source and maturity of the source rock,but also are related to the accumulation condition and geothermal gradient in a basin.There are obvious differences in the characteristics of carbon isotope ratios between instantaneous gas and cumulative gas.Different basins have different kinetic models of carbon isotope fractionation,which depends on the gas source condition,the accumulation history and the sedimentary-tectonic history.Since the origin of natural gas in the superimposed basin in China is very complicated,and the natural gas pool is characterized by multiphase and variable gas-sources,this paper may provide a new perspective on the study and evaluation of natural gas.

  15. Carbon budget estimation of a subarctic catchment using a dynamic ecosystem model at high spatial resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tang

    2015-01-01

    Eriophorum, Sphagnum and then tundra heath during the observation periods. The catchment-level carbon fluxes from aquatic systems are dominated by CO2 emissions from streams. Integrated across the whole catchment, we estimate that the area is a carbon sink at present, and will become an even stronger carbon sink by 2080, which is mainly a result of a projected densification of birch forest and its encroachment into tundra heath. However, the magnitudes of the modelled sinks are very dependent on future atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Furthermore, comparisons of global warming potentials between two simulations with and without CO2 increase since 1960 reveal that the increased methane emission from the peatland could double the warming effects of the whole catchment by 2080 in the absence of CO2 fertilization of the vegetation. This is the first process-based model study of the temporal evolution of a catchment-level carbon budget at high spatial resolution, integrating comprehensive and diverse fluxes including both terrestrial and aquatic carbon. Though this study also highlights some limitations in modelling subarctic ecosystem responses to climate change including aquatic system flux dynamics, nutrient limitation, herbivory and other disturbances and peatland expansion, our application provides a mechanism to resolve the complexity of carbon cycling in subarctic ecosystems while simultaneously pointing out the key model developments for capturing complex subarctic processes.

  16. Modelling the effect of wettability distributions on oil recovery from microporous carbonate reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallel, W.; van Dijke, M. I. J.; Sorbie, K. S.; Wood, R.; Jiang, Z.; Harland, S.

    2016-09-01

    Carbonate-hosted hydrocarbon reservoirs are known to be weakly- to moderately oil-wet, but the pore-scale wettability distribution is poorly understood. Moreover, micropores, which often dominate in carbonate reservoirs, are usually assumed to be water-wet and their role in multi-phase flow is neglected. Modelling the wettability of carbonates using pore network models is challenging, because of our inability to attribute appropriate chemical characteristics to the pore surfaces and over-simplification of the pore shapes. Here, we implement a qualitatively plausible wettability alteration scenario in a two-phase flow network model that captures a diversity of pore shapes. The model qualitatively reproduces patterns of wettability alteration recently observed in microporous carbonates via high-resolution imaging. To assess the combined importance of pore-space structure and wettability on petrophysical properties, we consider a homogeneous Berea sandstone network and a heterogeneous microporous carbonate network, whose disconnected coarse-scale pores are connected through a sub-network of fine-scale pores. Results demonstrate that wettability effects are significantly more profound in the carbonate network, as the wettability state of the micropores controls the oil recovery.

  17. U.S. Eastern Continental Shelf Carbon Cycling (USECoS): Modeling, Data Assimilation, and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannino, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Although the oceans play a major role in the uptake of fossil fuel CO2 from the atmosphere, there is much debate about the contribution from continental shelves, since many key shelf fluxes are not yet well quantified: the exchange of carbon across the land-ocean and shelf-slope interfaces, air-sea exchange of CO2, burial, and biological processes including productivity. Our goal is to quantify these carbon fluxes along the eastern U.S. coast using models quantitatively verified by comparison to observations, and to establish a framework for predicting how these fluxes may be modified as a result of climate and land use change. Our research questions build on those addressed with previous NASA funding for the USECoS (U.S. Eastern Continental Shelf Carbon Cycling) project. We have developed a coupled biogeochemical ocean circulation model configured for this study region and have extensively evaluated this model with both in situ and remotely-sensed data. Results indicate that to further reduce uncertainties in the shelf component of the global carbon cycle, future efforts must be directed towards 1) increasing the resolution of the physical model via nesting and 2) making refinements to the biogeochemical model and quantitatively evaluating these via the assimilation of biogeochemical data (in situ and remotely-sensed). These model improvements are essential for better understanding and reducing estimates of uncertainties in current and future carbon transformations and cycling in continental shelf systems. Our approach and science questions are particularly germane to the carbon cycle science goals of the NASA Earth Science Research Program as well as the U.S. Climate Change Research Program and the North American Carbon Program. Our interdisciplinary research team consists of scientists who have expertise in the physics and biogeochemistry of the U.S. eastern continental shelf, remote-sensing data analysis and data assimilative numerical models.

  18. U.S. Eastern Continental Shelf Carbon Cycling (USECoS): Modeling, Data Assimilation, and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannino, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Although the oceans play a major role in the uptake of fossil fuel CO2 from the atmosphere, there is much debate about the contribution from continental shelves, since many key shelf fluxes are not yet well quantified: the exchange of carbon across the land-ocean and shelf-slope interfaces, air-sea exchange of CO2, burial, and biological processes including productivity. Our goal is to quantify these carbon fluxes along the eastern U.S. coast using models quantitatively verified by comparison to observations, and to establish a framework for predicting how these fluxes may be modified as a result of climate and land use change. Our research questions build on those addressed with previous NASA funding for the USECoS (U.S. Eastern Continental Shelf Carbon Cycling) project. We have developed a coupled biogeochemical ocean circulation model configured for this study region and have extensively evaluated this model with both in situ and remotely-sensed data. Results indicate that to further reduce uncertainties in the shelf component of the global carbon cycle, future efforts must be directed towards 1) increasing the resolution of the physical model via nesting and 2) making refinements to the biogeochemical model and quantitatively evaluating these via the assimilation of biogeochemical data (in situ and remotely-sensed). These model improvements are essential for better understanding and reducing estimates of uncertainties in current and future carbon transformations and cycling in continental shelf systems. Our approach and science questions are particularly germane to the carbon cycle science goals of the NASA Earth Science Research Program as well as the U.S. Climate Change Research Program and the North American Carbon Program. Our interdisciplinary research team consists of scientists who have expertise in the physics and biogeochemistry of the U.S. eastern continental shelf, remote-sensing data analysis and data assimilative numerical models.

  19. Translating Forest Change to Carbon Emissions and Removals By Linking Disturbance Products, Biomass Maps, and Carbon Cycle Modeling in a Comprehensive Carbon Monitoring Framework for the Conterminous US Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, C. A.; Gu, H.

    2016-12-01

    Protecting forest carbon stores and uptake is central to national and international policies aimed at mitigating climate change. The success of such polices relies on high quality, accurate reporting (Tier 3) that earns the greatest financial value of carbon credits and hence incentivizes forest conservation and protection. Methods for Tier 3 Measuring, Reporting, and Verification (MRV) are still in development, generally involving some combination of direct remote sensing, ground based inventorying, and computer modeling, but have tended to emphasize assessments of live aboveground carbon stocks with a less clear connection to the real target of MRV which is carbon emissions and removals. Most existing methods are also ambiguous as to the mechanisms that underlie carbon accumulation, and any have limited capacity for forecasting carbon dynamics over time. This paper reports on the design and implementation of a new method for Tier 3 MRV, decision support, and forecasting that is being applied to assess forest carbon dynamics across the conterminous US. The method involves parameterization of a carbon cycle model (CASA) to match yield data from the US forest inventory (FIA). A range of disturbance types and severities are imposed in the model to estimate resulting carbon emissions, carbon uptake, and carbon stock changes post-disturbance. Resulting trajectories are then applied to landscapes at the 30-m pixel level based on two remote-sensing based data products. One documents the year, type, and severity of disturbance in recent decades. The second documents aboveground biomass which is used to estimate time since disturbance and associated carbon fluxes and stocks. Results will highlight high-resolution (30 m) annual carbon stocks and fluxes from 1990 to 2010 for select regions of interest across the US. Spatial analyses reveal regional patterns in US forest carbon stocks and fluxes as they respond to forest types, climate, and disturbances. Temporal analyses

  20. Carbon dioxide stripping in aquaculture -- part II: development of gas transfer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colt, John; Watten, Barnaby; Pfeiffer, Tim

    2012-01-01

    The basic mass transfer equation for gases such as oxygen and carbon dioxide can be derived from integration of the driving force equation. Because of the physical characteristics of the gas transfer processes, slightly different models are used for aerators tested under the non steady-state procedures, than for packed columns, or weirs. It is suggested that the standard condition for carbon dioxide should be 20 °C, 1 atm, CCO2=20 mg/kg, and XCO2=0.000285. The selection of the standard condition for carbon dioxide based on a fixed mole fraction ensures that standardized carbon dioxide transfer rates will be comparable even though the value of C*CO2 in the atmosphere is increasing with time. The computation of mass transfer for carbon dioxide is complicated by the impact of water depth and gas phase enrichment on the saturation concentration within the unit, although the importance of either factor depends strongly on the specific type of aerator. For some types of aerators, the most accurate gas phase model remains to be determined for carbon dioxide. The assumption that carbon dioxide can be treated as a non-reactive gas in packed columns may apply for cold acidic waters but not for warm alkaline waters.

  1. Circuit models for Salisbury screens made from unidirectional carbon fiber composite sandwich structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Elliot J.; Lenzing, Erik H.; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2016-05-01

    Carbon fiber composite materials have many useful structural material properties. The electromagnetic perfor- mance of these materials is of great interest for future applications. The work presented in this paper deals with the construction of Salisbury screen microwave absorbers made from unidirectional carbon fiber composite sand- wich structures. Specifically, absorbers centered at 7.25 GHz and 12.56 GHz are investigated. Circuit models are created to match the measured performance of the carbon fiber Salisbury screens using a genetic algorithm to extract lumped element circuit values. The screens presented in this paper utilize unidirectional carbon fiber sheets in place of the resistive sheet utilized in the classic Salisbury screen. The theory, models, prototypes, and measurements of these absorbers are discussed.

  2. On the elastic properties of carbon nanotube-based composites: modelling and characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Thostenson, E T

    2003-01-01

    The exceptional mechanical and physical properties observed for carbon nanotubes has stimulated the development of nanotube-based composite materials, but critical challenges exist before we can exploit these extraordinary nanoscale properties in a macroscopic composite. At the nanoscale, the structure of the carbon nanotube strongly influences the overall properties of the composite. The focus of this research is to develop a fundamental understanding of the structure/size influence of carbon nanotubes on the elastic properties of nanotube-based composites. Towards this end, the nanoscale structure and elastic properties of a model composite system of aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in a polystyrene matrix were characterized, and a micromechanical approach for modelling of short fibre composites was modified to account for the structure of the nanotube reinforcement to predict the elastic modulus of the nanocomposite as a function of the constituent properties, reinforcement geometry and nanot...

  3. Simulation of carbon dioxide insufflation via a diffuser in an open surgical wound model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cater, John E; van der Linden, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Flow within a model surgical opening during insufflation with heated carbon dioxide was studied using computational fluid dynamics. A volume of fluid method was used to simulate the mixture of ambient air and carbon dioxide gas. The negative buoyancy of the carbon dioxide caused it to fill the wound and form a protective layer on the internal surfaces for a range of flow rates, temperatures, and angles of patient inclination. It was observed that the flow remained attached to the surface of the model due to the action of the Coanda effect. A flow rate of 10 L/min was sufficient to maintain a warm carbon dioxide barrier for a moderately sized surgical incision for all likely angles of inclination.

  4. Modelling the atmosphere of the carbon-rich Mira RU Vir

    CERN Document Server

    Rau, G; Hron, J; Aringer, B; Groenewegen, M A T; Nowotny, W

    2015-01-01

    Context. We study the atmosphere of the carbon-rich Mira RU Vir using the mid-infrared high spatial resolution interferometric observations from VLTI/MIDI. Aims. The aim of this work is to analyse the atmosphere of the carbon-rich Mira RU Vir, with state of the art models, in this way deepening the knowledge of the dynamic processes at work in carbon-rich Miras. Methods. We compare spectro-photometric and interferometric measurements of this carbon-rich Mira AGB star, with the predictions of different kinds of modelling approaches (hydrostatic model atmospheres plus MOD-More Of Dusty, self-consistent dynamic model atmospheres). A geometric model fitting tool is used for a first interpretation of the interferometric data. Results. The results show that a joint use of different kind of observations (photometry, spectroscopy, interferometry) is essential to shed light on the structure of the atmosphere of a carbon-rich Mira. The dynamic model atmospheres fit well the ISO spectrum in the wavelength range {\\lambda...

  5. Multi-Phase CFD Modeling of Solid Sorbent Carbon Capture System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, Emily M.; DeCroix, David; Breault, Ronald W.; Xu, Wei; Huckaby, E. D.; Saha, Kringan; Darteville, Sebastien; Sun, Xin

    2013-07-30

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations are used to investigate a low temperature post-combustion carbon capture reactor. The CFD models are based on a small scale solid sorbent carbon capture reactor design from ADA-ES and Southern Company. The reactor is a fluidized bed design based on a silica-supported amine sorbent. CFD models using both Eulerian-Eulerian and Eulerian-Lagrangian multi-phase modeling methods are developed to investigate the hydrodynamics and adsorption of carbon dioxide in the reactor. Models developed in both FLUENT® and BARRACUDA are presented to explore the strengths and weaknesses of state of the art CFD codes for modeling multi-phase carbon capture reactors. The results of the simulations show that the FLUENT® Eulerian-Lagrangian simulations (DDPM) are unstable for the given reactor design; while the BARRACUDA Eulerian-Lagrangian model is able to simulate the system given appropriate simplifying assumptions. FLUENT® Eulerian-Eulerian simulations also provide a stable solution for the carbon capture reactor given the appropriate simplifying assumptions.

  6. Multi-phase CFD modeling of solid sorbent carbon capture system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, E. M.; DeCroix, D.; Breault, Ronald W. [U.S. DOE; Xu, W.; Huckaby, E. David [U.S. DOE

    2013-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations are used to investigate a low temperature post-combustion carbon capture reactor. The CFD models are based on a small scale solid sorbent carbon capture reactor design from ADA-ES and Southern Company. The reactor is a fluidized bed design based on a silica-supported amine sorbent. CFD models using both Eulerian–Eulerian and Eulerian–Lagrangian multi-phase modeling methods are developed to investigate the hydrodynamics and adsorption of carbon dioxide in the reactor. Models developed in both FLUENT® and BARRACUDA are presented to explore the strengths and weaknesses of state of the art CFD codes for modeling multi-phase carbon capture reactors. The results of the simulations show that the FLUENT® Eulerian–Lagrangian simulations (DDPM) are unstable for the given reactor design; while the BARRACUDA Eulerian–Lagrangian model is able to simulate the system given appropriate simplifying assumptions. FLUENT® Eulerian–Eulerian simulations also provide a stable solution for the carbon capture reactor given the appropriate simplifying assumptions.

  7. Compound Hertzian Chain Model for Copper-Carbon Nanocomposites' Absorption Spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Kokabi, Alireza; Saeedi, Saman; Moftakharzadeh, Ali; Vesaghi, Mohammad Ali; Fardmanesh, Mehdi

    2011-01-01

    The infrared range optical absorption mechanism of Carbon-Copper composite thin layer coated on the Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) buffer layer has been investigated. By consideration of weak interactions between copper nanoparticles in their network, optical absorption is modeled using their coherent dipole behavior induced by the electromagnetic radiation. The copper nanoparticles in the bulk of carbon are assumed as a chain of plasmonic dipoles, which have coupling resonance. Considering nearest neighbor interactions for this metallic nanoparticles, surface plasmon resonance frequency ({\\omega}\

  8. CARBON BALANCE OF FOREST ECOSYSTEMS UNDER GLOBAL WARMING: LANDSCAPE-ECOLOGICAL PREDICTIVE MODELING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erland Kolomyts

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of application of landscape-ecological methods for evaluation of biotic regulation of the carbon cycle in forest ecosystems. Methods for constructing analytical and cartographic empirical-statistical models for identification of forest associations and zonal/regional types of forest formations capable of stabilizing the continental biosphere under changing climate are described. Possible biotic regulation of the carbon cycle under known scenarios of future greenhouse warming is suggested. The maps on the carbon content and its changes in the forests of the Oka river basin are presented.

  9. Spatial sensitivity of inorganic carbon to model setup: North Sea and Baltic Sea with ECOSMO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castano Primo, Rocio; Schrum, Corinna; Daewel, Ute

    2015-04-01

    In ocean biogeochemical models it is critical to capture the key processes adequately so they do not only reproduce the observations but that those processes are reproduced correctly. One key issue is the choice of parameters, which in most cases are estimates with large uncertainties. This can be the product of actual lack of detailed knowledge of the process, or the manner the processes are implemented, more or less complex. In addition, the model sensitivity is not necessarily homogenous across the spatial domain modelled, which adds another layer of complexity to biogeochemical modelling. In the particular case of the inorganic carbon cycle, there are several sets of carbonate constants that can be chosen. The calculated air-sea CO2 flux is largely dependent on the parametrization chosen. In addition, the different parametrizations all the underlying processes that in some way impact the carbon cycle beyond the carbonate dissociation and fluxes give results that can be significantly different. Examples of these processes are phytoplankton growth rates or remineralization rates. Despite their geographical proximity, the North and Baltic Seas exhibit very different dynamics. The North Sea receives important inflows of Atlantic waters, while the Baltic Sea is an almost enclosed system, with very little exchange from the North Sea. Wind, tides, and freshwater supply act very differently, but dominantly structure the ecosystem dynamics on spatial and temporal scales. The biological community is also different. Cyanobacteria, which are important due to their ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen, and they are only present in the Baltic Sea. These differentiating features have a strong impact in the biogeochemical cycles and ultimately shape the variations in the carbonate chemistry. Here the ECOSMO model was employed on the North Sea and Baltic Sea. The model is set so both are modelled at the same time, instead of having them run separately. ECOSMO is a 3-D coupled

  10. A New Empirical Model for Estimation of sp3 Fraction in Diamond-Like Carbon Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Hai-Yang; WANG Li-Wu; JIANG Hui; HUANG Ning-Kang

    2007-01-01

    A new empirical model to estimate the content of sp3 in diamond-like carbon (DLC) films is presented, based on the conventional Raman spectra excited by 488nm or 514nm visible light for different carbons. It is found that bandwidth of the G peak is related to the sp3 fraction. A wider bandwidth of the G peak shows a higher sp3 fraction in DLC films.

  11. Temperature response functions introduce high uncertainty in modelled carbon stocks in cold temperature regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Portner

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Models of carbon cycling in terrestrial ecosystems contain formulations for the dependence of respiration on temperature, but the sensitivity of predicted carbon pools and fluxes to these formulations and their parameterization is not understood. Thus, we made an uncertainty analysis of soil organic matter decomposition with respect to its temperature dependency using the ecosystem model LPJ-GUESS.

    We used five temperature response functions (Exponential, Arrhenius, Lloyd-Taylor, Gaussian, Van't Hoff. We determined the parameter uncertainty ranges of the functions by nonlinear regression analysis based on eight experimental datasets from northern hemisphere ecosystems. We sampled over the uncertainty bounds of the parameters and run simulations for each pair of temperature response function and calibration site. The uncertainty in both long-term and short-term soil carbon dynamics was analyzed over an elevation gradient in southern Switzerland.

    The function of Lloyd-Taylor turned out to be adequate for modelling the temperature dependency of soil organic matter decomposition, whereas the other functions either resulted in poor fits (Exponential, Arrhenius or were not applicable for all datasets (Gaussian, Van't Hoff. There were two main sources of uncertainty for model simulations: (1 the uncertainty in the parameter estimates of the response functions, which increased with increasing temperature and (2 the uncertainty in the simulated size of carbon pools, which increased with elevation, as slower turn-over times lead to higher carbon stocks and higher associated uncertainties. The higher uncertainty in carbon pools with slow turn-over rates has important implications for the uncertainty in the projection of the change of soil carbon stocks driven by climate change, which turned out to be more uncertain for higher elevations and hence higher latitudes, which are of key importance for the global terrestrial carbon

  12. Recent Site-Wide Transport Modeling Related to the Carbon Tetrachloride Plume at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergeron, Marcel P.; Cole, C R.

    2005-11-01

    Carbon tetrachloride transport in the unconfined aquifer system at the Hanford Site has been the subject of follow-on studies since the Carbon Tetrachloride Innovative Treatment Remediation Demonstration (ITRD) Program was completed in FY 2002. These scoping analyses were undertaken to provide support for strategic planning and guidance for the more robust modeling needed to obtain a final record of decision (ROD) for the carbon tetrachloride plume in the 200 West Area. This report documents the technical approach and the results of these follow-on, site-wide scale-modeling efforts. The existing site-wide groundwater model was used in this effort. The work extended that performed as part of the ITRD modeling study in which a 200 West Area scale submodel was developed to examine arrival concentrations at an arbitrary boundary between the 200 E and 200 W areas. These scoping analyses extended the analysis to predict the arrival of the carbon tetrachloride plume at the Columbia River. The results of these analyses illustrate the importance of developing field-scale estimates of natural attenuation parameters, abiotic degradation rate and soil/water equilibrium sorption coefficient, for carbon tetrachloride. With these parameters set to zero, carbon tetrachloride concentrations will exceed the compliance limit of 5 ?g/L outside the 200 Area Plateau Waste Management Area, and the aquifer source loading and area of the aquifer affected will continue to grow until arrival rates of carbon tetrachloride equal source release rates, estimated at 33 kg/yr. Results of this scoping analysis show that the natural attenuation parameters are critical in predicting the future movement of carbon tetrachloride from the 200 West Area. Results also show the significant change in predictions between continual source release from the vadose zone and complete source removal.

  13. Modeling electrostatically induced collapse transitions in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shklyaev, Oleg E; Mockensturm, Eric; Crespi, Vincent H

    2011-04-15

    Molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate how a mechanically bistable single-walled carbon nanotube can act as a variable-shaped capacitor. If the voltage is tuned so that collapsed and inflated states are degenerate, the tube's susceptibility to diverse external stimuli--temperature, voltage, trapped atoms--diverges following a universal curve, yielding an exceptionally sensitive sensor or actuator. The boundary between collapsed and inflated states can shift hundreds of angstroms in response to a single gas atom inside the tube. Several potential nanoelectromechanical devices could be based on this electrically tuned crossover between near-degenerate collapsed and inflated configurations.

  14. Water flow and solute transport in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum: Upscaling from rhizosphere to root zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarovitch, Naftali; Perelman, Adi; Guerra, Helena; Vanderborght, Jan; Pohlmeier, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Root water and nutrient uptake are among the most important processes considered in numerical models simulating water content and fluxes in the subsurface, as they control plant growth and production as well as water flow and nutrient transport out of the root zone. Root water uptake may lead to salt accumulation at the root-soil interface, resulting in rhizophere salt concentrations much higher than in the bulk soil. This salt accumulation is caused by soluble salt transport towards the roots by mass flow through the soil, followed by preferential adsorption of specific nutrients by active uptake, thereby excluding most other salts at the root-soil interface or in the root apoplast. The salinity buildup can lead to large osmotic pressure gradients across the roots thereby effectively reducing root water uptake. The initial results from rhizoslides (capillary paper growth system) show that sodium concentration is decreasing with distance from the root, compared with the bulk that remained more stable. When transpiration rate was decreased under high salinity levels, sodium concentration was more homogenous compared with low salinity levels. Additionally, sodium and gadolinium distributions were measured nondestructively around tomato roots using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This technique could also observe the root structure and water content around single roots. Results from the MRI confirm the solutes concentration pattern around roots and its relation to their initial concentration. We conclude that local water potentials at the soil-root interface differ from bulk potentials. These relative differences increase with decreasing root density, decreasing initial salt concentration and increasing transpiration rate. Furthermore, since climate may significantly influence plant response to salinity a dynamic climate-coupled salinity reduction functions are critical in while using macroscopic numerical models.

  15. A MERGE model with endogenous technological change and the cost of carbon stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kypreos, Socrates [Laboratory of Energy Systems Analysis, The Energy Departments, Energy Economics Group, Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232, Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2007-11-15

    Two stylized backstop systems with endogenous technological learning (ETL) are introduced in the ''model for evaluating regional and global effects'' (MERGE): one for the electric and the other for the non-electric markets. Then the model is applied to analyze the impacts of ETL on carbon-mitigation policy, contrasting the resulting impacts with the situation without ETL. We model research and development (R and D) spending and learning subsidies for the demonstration and deployment stage as control variables, and we investigate the ability of this extra spending to create path-dependent experience and knowledge to aid in the implementation of carbon-free technologies. Based on model estimations and sensitivity analyses, we conclude that increased commitments for the development of new technologies to advance along their learning curves has a potential for substantial reductions in the cost of mitigating climate change and thereby helping to reach safe concentrations of carbon in the atmosphere. (author)

  16. Mechanistic controls of surface warming by ocean heat and carbon uptake: Experiments using idealised ocean models with and without overturning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katavouta, Anna; Williams, Richard; Goodwin, Philip

    2017-04-01

    Transient climate response to emissions (TCRE) is an empirically derived index that relates global surface warming to cumulative carbon emissions in Earth system models. TCRE is nearly constant (i.e. surface warming is proportional to carbon emissions), and independent of the emissions pathway and model complexity, for reasons that are not yet fully understood. In our view, this proportionality is driven by ocean ventilation. To explore the link between TCRE and ocean heat and carbon uptake, we use an idealised 1-D atmosphere-ocean model with three layers (i.e., atmosphere, ocean mixed layer, interior ocean) with or without circulation. The model is forced using idealised carbon emission scenarios and drives the temperature and carbon concentration for each layer. The experiments reveal that an increase in carbon emissions eventually leads to ocean declining heat uptake, which causes the dependence of surface warming on radiative forcing from anthropogenic carbon to increase with time. In contrast, an increase in carbon emissions amplifies the ocean carbon uptake which acts to decrease the dependence of radiative forcing on carbon emissions. These two partially compensating effects lead to the nearly linear dependence between surface temperature and cumulative carbon emissions. The linear dependence holds in experiments with and without circulation. However, the TCRE value depends on the circulation and associated ventilation of heat and carbon. Hence, differences in circulation patterns amongst climate models may be responsible for the spread in their response.

  17. Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Modeling of Mechanical Behavior for Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube Turfs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad A1-Khedher; Charles Pezeshki; Jeanne McHale; GFritz Knorr

    2011-01-01

    Several characterization methods have been developed to investigate the mechanical and structural properties of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs). Establishing analytical models at nanoscale to interpret these properties is complicated due to the nonuniformity and irregularity in quality of as-grown samples.In this paper, we propose a new methodology to investigate the correlation between indentation resistance of multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) turfs, Raman spectra and the geometrical properties of the turf structure using adaptive neuro-fuzzy phenomenological modeling. This methodology yields a novel approach for modeling at the nanoscale by evaluating the effect of structural morphologies on nanomaterial properties using Raman spectroscopy.

  18. Establishment of CSR Matter-Element Evaluation Model in Perspective of Low Carbon Economy in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Furong

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available With the development of CSR concept, more and more enterprises begin to bring CSR into practice. Especially in the era of low-carbon economy develops quickly, CSR practice is going to mature. In order to make a scientific evaluation on CSR and promote the comprehensive development of CSR, this study develop a new CSR evaluation model under requires of low-carbon economy development. This CSR evaluation model combined G1 weighting method with the Matter-Element Model and finally verified by an example. What we do in this study will provide a good guidance for the development of CSR evaluation and practices.

  19. The effect of empirical potential functions on modeling of amorphous carbon using molecular dynamics method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Longqiu, E-mail: longqiuli@gmail.com [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001 (China); Xu, Ming; Song, Wenping [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001 (China); Ovcharenko, Andrey [Western Digital Corporation, San Jose, CA (United States); Zhang, Guangyu; Jia, Ding [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001 (China)

    2013-12-01

    Empirical potentials have a strong effect on the hybridization and structure of amorphous carbon and are of great importance in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In this work, amorphous carbon at densities ranging from 2.0 to 3.2 g/cm{sup 3} was modeled by a liquid quenching method using Tersoff, 2nd REBO, and ReaxFF empirical potentials. The hybridization, structure and radial distribution function G(r) of carbon atoms were analyzed as a function of the three potentials mentioned above. The ReaxFF potential is capable to model the change of the structure of amorphous carbon and MD results are in a good agreement with experimental results and density function theory (DFT) at low density of 2.6 g/cm{sup 3} and below. The 2nd REBO potential can be used when amorphous carbon has a very low density of 2.4 g/cm{sup 3} and below. Considering the computational efficiency, the Tersoff potential is recommended to model amorphous carbon at a high density of 2.6 g/cm{sup 3} and above. In addition, the influence of the quenching time on the hybridization content obtained with the three potentials is discussed.

  20. Estimating carbon and showing impacts of drought using satellite data in regression-tree models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyte, Stephen; Wylie, Bruce K.; Howard, Danny; Dahal, Devendra; Gilmanov, Tagir G.

    2018-01-01

    Integrating spatially explicit biogeophysical and remotely sensed data into regression-tree models enables the spatial extrapolation of training data over large geographic spaces, allowing a better understanding of broad-scale ecosystem processes. The current study presents annual gross primary production (GPP) and annual ecosystem respiration (RE) for 2000–2013 in several short-statured vegetation types using carbon flux data from towers that are located strategically across the conterminous United States (CONUS). We calculate carbon fluxes (annual net ecosystem production [NEP]) for each year in our study period, which includes 2012 when drought and higher-than-normal temperatures influence vegetation productivity in large parts of the study area. We present and analyse carbon flux dynamics in the CONUS to better understand how drought affects GPP, RE, and NEP. Model accuracy metrics show strong correlation coefficients (r) (r ≥ 94%) between training and estimated data for both GPP and RE. Overall, average annual GPP, RE, and NEP are relatively constant throughout the study period except during 2012 when almost 60% less carbon is sequestered than normal. These results allow us to conclude that this modelling method effectively estimates carbon dynamics through time and allows the exploration of impacts of meteorological anomalies and vegetation types on carbon dynamics.

  1. A Model for the Decrease in Amplitude of Carbon Isotope Excursions Throughout the Phanerozoic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachan, A.; Lau, K. V.; Saltzman, M.; Thomas, E.; Kump, L. R.; Payne, J.

    2016-12-01

    The geological cycling of carbon ties the ocean-­atmosphere carbon pool to Earth's biosphere and sedimentary reservoirs. Perturbations to this coupled system are recorded in the carbon-isotopic (δ13C) composition of marine carbonates. Large amplitude δ13C variations with durations of 0.5 - 10 m.y. are typically treated as individual events and interpreted accordingly. However, a recent compilation of Phanerozoic data reveals a decline in the variance of the δ13C record over time, suggesting a common underlying control. Here we propose that the redox structure of the continental shelves was a key determinant of the sensitivity of the geologic carbon cycle: when oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) were large, shallow, and prone to expansion, recurrent physical forcings (such as sea level and tectonics) would have had the capacity to drive large changes in the areal extent of OMZs, resulting in a strong leverage on δ13C values. Using a simple model of the geologic carbon cycle, we demonstrate that interactions between the carbon and phosphate cycles can result in amplification of recurrent forcings with periods in the 0.5 - 10 m.y. range. Thus, rather than requiring that physical forcings have their largest amplitude of variation on those time scales, enhanced sensitivity of the carbon cycle can account for the characteristic duration of δ13C excursions. Biologically mediated aspects of geologic carbon cycling, including the depth of bioturbation and evolution of pelagic calcifiers, likely drove a decline in the depth and extent of ocean anoxia over the Phanerozoic resulting in the stabilization of the geologic carbon cycle.

  2. Nitrate removal using different carbon substrates in a laboratory model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Seyyed Ebrahim; Heidarpour, Manouchehr; Mostafazadeh-Fard, Behrouz

    2011-01-01

    Agricultural fields have been frequently identified as major contributors of nitrate leaching into surface and ground waters. Tile drains can act as direct pathways, transferring leached nitrate to surface water. Bioreactor filters are useful for the removal of nitrate from drainage waters; however, these filters require an external carbon supply to sustain denitrification. In this study, four organic carbon sources including wood, barley straw, rice husks, and date palm leaf, were used to enhance denitrification and the effects of water velocity and influent nitrate concentration on the nitrate removal were evaluated. Cumulative nitrate removal was highest for the date palm leaf treatments and was lowest for the wood treatments. The effects were in decreasing order for date palm leaf, barley straw, rice husks, and wood, respectively. The performance of the biofilters improved with increasing influent nitrate concentration and decreasing water velocity, allowing for high nitrate removal rates to be achieved. The results showed that all of the treatments had reduced the effluent nitrate concentrations below the USEPA maximum contaminant level for drinking water of 45 mg L(-1) nitrate at the end of the study.

  3. Microbial Priming and Protected Carbon Responses to Elevated CO2 at Local to Global Scales: a New Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulman, B. N.; Oishi, C.; Shevliakova, E.; Pacala, S. W.

    2013-12-01

    The soil carbon formulations commonly used in global carbon cycle models and Earth System models (ESMs) are based on first-order decomposition equations, where turnover of carbon is determined only by the size of the carbon pool and empirical functions of responses to temperature and moisture. These models do not include microbial dynamics or protection of carbon in microaggregates and mineral complexes, making them incapable of simulating important soil processes like priming and the influence of soil physical structure on carbon turnover. We present a new soil carbon dynamics model - Carbon, Organisms, Respiration, and Protection in the Soil Environment (CORPSE) - that explicitly represents microbial biomass and protected carbon pools. The model includes multiple types of carbon with different chemically determined turnover rates that interact with a single dynamic microbial biomass pool, allowing the model to simulate priming effects. The model also includes the formation and turnover of protected carbon that is inaccessible to microbial decomposers. The rate of protected carbon formation increases with microbial biomass. CORPSE has been implemented both as a stand-alone model and as a component of the NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) ESM. We calibrated the model against measured soil carbon stocks from the Duke FACE experiment. The model successfully simulated the seasonal pattern of heterotrophic CO2 production. We investigated the roles of priming and protection in soil carbon accumulation by running the model using measured inputs of leaf litter, fine roots, and root exudates from the ambient and elevated CO2 plots at the Duke FACE experiment. Measurements from the experiment showed that elevated CO2 caused enhanced root exudation, increasing soil carbon turnover in the rhizosphere due to priming effects. We tested the impact of increased root exudation on soil carbon accumulation by comparing model simulations of carbon accumulation under

  4. Interactive mathematical model of self-healing in carbonated cementitious materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zemskov, S.V.; Copuroglu, O.; Vermolen, F.J.

    2013-01-01

    A mathematical model for the post-damage recovery of carbonated cement is described. The model is based on a two-dimensional initial-boundary value problem for a system of partial differential equations. The study is embedded within the framework of investigating the effect of using lightweight expa

  5. Application of carbonation model for service life design to Serbian environmental conditions and engineering practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukovic, M.; Ignjatovic, I.

    2012-01-01

    This paper highlights the application of carbonation model for service life design to local, Serbian environmental conditions and engineering practice. The basis of service life design using probabilistic approach and the deterioration model are presented. According to the data obtained from differe

  6. A fungal growth model fitted to carbon-limited dynamics of Rhizoctonia solani

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeger, M.J.; Lamour, A.; Gilligan, C.A.; Otten, W.

    2008-01-01

    Here, a quasi-steady-state approximation was used to simplify a mathematical model for fungal growth in carbon-limiting systems, and this was fitted to growth dynamics of the soil-borne plant pathogen and saprotroph Rhizoctonia solani. The model identified a criterion for invasion into

  7. Correlating N2 and CH4 adsorption on microporous carbon using a new analytical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jielun; Chen, S.; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.

    1998-01-01

    A new pore size distribution (PSD) model is developed to readily describe PSDs of microporous materials with an analytical expression. Results from this model can be used to calculate the corresponding adsorption isotherm to compare the calculated isotherm to the experimental isotherm. This aspect of the model provides another check on the validity of the model's results. The model is developed on the basis of a 3-D adsorption isotherm equation that is derived from statistical mechanical principles. Least-squares error minimization is used to solve the PSD without any preassumed distribution function. In comparison with several well-accepted analytical methods from the literature, this 3-D model offers a relatively realistic PSD description for select reference materials, including activated-carbon fibers. N2 and CH4 adsorption is correlated using the 3-D model for commercial carbons BPL and AX-21. Predicted CH4 adsorption isotherms at 296 K based on N2 adsorption at 77 K are in reasonable agreement with experimental CH4 isotherms. Use of the model is also described for characterizing PSDs of tire-derived activated carbons and coal-derived activated carbons for air-quality control applications.

  8. How important is a detailed hydrological representation when modelling soil carbon dynamics in Chinese red soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyesiku-Blakemore, Joseph; Verrot, Lucile; Geris, Josie; Zhang, Ganlin; Peng, Xinhua; Hallett, Paul; Smith, Jo

    2017-04-01

    Soil carbon and nitrogen processing are strongly influenced by the hydrology of soils. When simulating these processes models represent soil hydrology in some way. The hydrological components of soil carbon and nitrogen models vary greatly in their complexity, as does the burden of simulation time and data requirements. Hydrology specific models, such as Hydrus, have more detailed representations of soil hydrology than those used in some soil carbon and nitrogen models, such as ECOSSE, and can provide a more accurate and precise description of the movement and content of water in soil. Moisture content is one of the key variables controlling the processing of carbon and nitrogen in soil models. A higher soil moisture content results in increased methane production through the anaerobic decomposition of soil carbon pools. It also alters the rate at which aerobic decomposition occurs, with low and high soil moisture contents limiting the decomposition of SOC. An inaccurate estimate of soil moisture will introduce errors in the estimated rates of model SOC transformations, which would result in errors in the simulated SOC. In order to shed light on this uncertainty we use the same input data to simulate soil moisture contents in a Red Soil region of China, using both the ECOSSE model and Hydrus 2D. We compare the simulations of both models with measurements of soil moisture at the site and each other. We highlight where the models differ and identify the conditions under which errors are likely to occur. We then simulate SOC dynamics using the ECOSSE model and its original hydrology with the ECOSSE model simulations using the Hydrus 2D simulations. This shows the importance of including a detailed representation of soil moisture when simulating soil organic matter dynamics.

  9. New insights into the organic carbon export in the Mediterranean Sea from 3-D modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Guyennon

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Mediterranean Sea is one of the most oligotrophic regions of the oceans, and nutrients have been shown to limit both phytoplankton and bacterial activities. This has direct implications on the stock of dissolved organic carbon (DOC, whose high variability has already been well-documented even if measurements are still sparse and are associated with important uncertainties. We here propose a Mediterranean Basin-scale view of the export of organic carbon, under its dissolved and particulate forms. For this purpose, we have used a coupled model combining a mechanistic biogeochemical model (Eco3M-MED and a high-resolution (eddy-resolving hydrodynamic simulation (NEMO-MED12. This is the first Basin-scale application of the biogeochemical model Eco3M-MED and is shown to reproduce the main spatial and seasonal biogeochemical characteristics of the Mediterranean Sea. Model estimations of carbon export are of the same order of magnitude as estimations from in situ observations, and their respective spatial patterns are consistent with each other. As for surface chlorophyll, nutrient concentrations, and productivity, strong differences between the Western and Eastern Basins are evidenced by the model for organic carbon export, with only 39% of organic carbon (particulate and dissolved export taking place in the Western Basin. The major result is that except for the Alboran Sea, dissolved organic carbon (DOC contribution to organic carbon export is higher than that of particulate (POC in the whole Basin, especially in the Eastern Basin. This paper also investigates the seasonality of DOC and POC exports as well as the differences in the processes involved in DOC and POC exports.

  10. The role of residence time in diagnostic models of global carbon storage capacity: model decomposition based on a traceable scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yizhao, Chen; Jianyang, Xia; Zhengguo, Sun; Jianlong, Li; Yiqi, Luo; Chengcheng, Gang; Zhaoqi, Wang

    2015-11-06

    As a key factor that determines carbon storage capacity, residence time (τE) is not well constrained in terrestrial biosphere models. This factor is recognized as an important source of model uncertainty. In this study, to understand how τE influences terrestrial carbon storage prediction in diagnostic models, we introduced a model decomposition scheme in the Boreal Ecosystem Productivity Simulator (BEPS) and then compared it with a prognostic model. The result showed that τE ranged from 32.7 to 158.2 years. The baseline residence time (τ'E) was stable for each biome, ranging from 12 to 53.7 years for forest biomes and 4.2 to 5.3 years for non-forest biomes. The spatiotemporal variations in τE were mainly determined by the environmental scalar (ξ). By comparing models, we found that the BEPS uses a more detailed pool construction but rougher parameterization for carbon allocation and decomposition. With respect to ξ comparison, the global difference in the temperature scalar (ξt) averaged 0.045, whereas the moisture scalar (ξw) had a much larger variation, with an average of 0.312. We propose that further evaluations and improvements in τ'E and ξw predictions are essential to reduce the uncertainties in predicting carbon storage by the BEPS and similar diagnostic models.

  11. The ORCA West Coast Regional Project - Use of Top-Down Modeling in a Regional Carbon Budget Approach to Estimate Gross Carbon Fluxes for Oregon-California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goeckede, M.; Turner, D. P.; Law, B. E.

    2007-12-01

    The ORCA project aims at determining the regional carbon balance of Oregon and northern California, with a special focus on the effect of disturbance history and climate variability on carbon sources and sinks. ORCA provides a regional test of the overall NACP strategy by demonstrating bottom-up and model-data fusion approaches to derive carbon balances at subregional to regional scales. The top-down modeling component of ORCA focuses on coupling simple process models for gross primary productivity (GPP), autotrophic (RA) and heterotrophic respiration (RH) with atmospheric transport modeling to interpret measured carbon dioxide concentration data. This approach builds on high-resolution remote sensing products (e.g. Landsat, MODIS) as well as re-analysis meteorological datasets (EDAS-40, DayMet) to drive the models. We couple BRAMS (Brazilian Regional Atmospheric Modeling System) mesoscale modeling to the STILT (Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport) footprint model to identify sources and sinks for carbon that influence observed carbon dioxide concentrations at measurement sites in the ORCA domain. This approach of linking surface fluxes to time series of atmospheric data allows one to extract information from the latter for process model optimization, with the objective of obtaining regionally representative parameter settings for different combinations of ecoregion and land cover type. We present a proof-of-concept of the ORCA top-down modeling approach by comparing modeled to measured carbon dioxide concentration data. This comparison also addresses the uncertainties introduced by different components of this approach. To demonstrate the effect of the improved process model parameterization, the results are compared with regional fluxes derived by the ORCA bottom-up modeling component.

  12. Soil water stable isotopes reveal evaporation dynamics at the soil-plant-atmosphere interface of the critical zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprenger, Matthias; Tetzlaff, Doerthe; Soulsby, Chris

    2017-07-01

    to assess plant water uptake patterns within the critical zone or applying them to calibrate tracer-aided hydrological models either at the plot to the catchment scale.

  13. New opportunities for integrating mechanisms into soil carbon models for global simulations (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torn, M. S.; Riley, W. J.; Contributions From: The Lake Constance Think Tank On Global Change; Feedback From Organic Carbon Dynamics-An Esf Workshop

    2010-12-01

    Numerical models of soil carbon cycling are being used to attribute carbon sinks, predict climate-ecosystem feedbacks, and evaluate climate mitigation strategies such as biofuels and sequestration. Current conceptions of SOC cycling and its expression in mathematical models rest heavily on the concept of recalcitrance - that some organic structures are intrinsically inert. However, recent research enabled by isotopic, spectroscopic, and molecular marker tools finds little evidence that recalcitrance, for example through selective preservation of plant derived material or resynthesis products, determines the long residence time of some OC in soils in a generalizable way. More likely, rates of carbon cycling are determined by the interaction of the organic matter and the soil environment including microorganisms, mineralogy, and climate. This does not mean compound chemistry is not important, rather that it does not act in isolation of other factors. Without the foundational principle that chemical composition defines the rate of decomposition, many tenets of old models are not supported, for example regarding decomposition response to change in temperature or plant species composition. Much progress could be made in the near term to improve soil carbon models by, for example, improving representations of oxygen diffusion and limitation, root carbon inputs, isotopic tracers, and making depth- or transport-related processes explicit. In other areas, new research is needed to translate recent findings into new parameters, for example, to replace texture with parameters for reactive mineral surface area to represent organo-mineral interaction. For the next generation of land model in the Community Earth System Model (was Community Climate System Model), we are developing new representations of many of these processes based on new data and understandings, to enable more accurate assessment of the vulnerability of soil organic carbon to predicted global climate change.

  14. Parametric Study of ReaxFF Simulation Parameters for Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Reactive Carbon Gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Benjamin D; Bandyopadhyay, Ananyo; Wise, Kristopher E; Odegard, Gregory M

    2012-09-11

    The development of innovative carbon-based materials can be greatly facilitated by molecular modeling techniques. Although the Reax Force Field (ReaxFF) can be used to simulate the chemical behavior of carbon-based systems, the simulation settings required for accurate predictions have not been fully explored. Using the ReaxFF, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to simulate the chemical behavior of pure carbon and hydrocarbon reactive gases that are involved in the formation of carbon structures such as graphite, buckyballs, amorphous carbon, and carbon nanotubes. It is determined that the maximum simulation time step that can be used in MD simulations with the ReaxFF is dependent on the simulated temperature and selected parameter set, as are the predicted reaction rates. It is also determined that different carbon-based reactive gases react at different rates, and that the predicted equilibrium structures are generally the same for the different ReaxFF parameter sets, except in the case of the predicted formation of large graphitic structures with the Chenoweth parameter set under specific conditions.

  15. Natural Ocean Carbon Cycle Sensitivity to Parameterizations of the Recycling in a Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanou, A.; Romanski, J.; Gregg, W. W.

    2014-01-01

    Sensitivities of the oceanic biological pump within the GISS (Goddard Institute for Space Studies ) climate modeling system are explored here. Results are presented from twin control simulations of the air-sea CO2 gas exchange using two different ocean models coupled to the same atmosphere. The two ocean models (Russell ocean model and Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model, HYCOM) use different vertical coordinate systems, and therefore different representations of column physics. Both variants of the GISS climate model are coupled to the same ocean biogeochemistry module (the NASA Ocean Biogeochemistry Model, NOBM), which computes prognostic distributions for biotic and abiotic fields that influence the air-sea flux of CO2 and the deep ocean carbon transport and storage. In particular, the model differences due to remineralization rate changes are compared to differences attributed to physical processes modeled differently in the two ocean models such as ventilation, mixing, eddy stirring and vertical advection. GISSEH(GISSER) is found to underestimate mixed layer depth compared to observations by about 55% (10 %) in the Southern Ocean and overestimate it by about 17% (underestimate by 2%) in the northern high latitudes. Everywhere else in the global ocean, the two models underestimate the surface mixing by about 12-34 %, which prevents deep nutrients from reaching the surface and promoting primary production there. Consequently, carbon export is reduced because of reduced production at the surface. Furthermore, carbon export is particularly sensitive to remineralization rate changes in the frontal regions of the subtropical gyres and at the Equator and this sensitivity in the model is much higher than the sensitivity to physical processes such as vertical mixing, vertical advection and mesoscale eddy transport. At depth, GISSER, which has a significant warm bias, remineralizes nutrients and carbon faster thereby producing more nutrients and carbon at depth, which

  16. Adsorption Models and Structural Characterization for Activated Carbon Fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Chuan-juan; WANG Ru-zhu; OLIVEIRA R.G.; HU Jin-qiang

    2009-01-01

    The nitrogen adsorption isotherms at 77.69 K were measured for two samples of activated carbon fibers and their microstructures were investigated. Among established isotherm equations, the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation showed the best agreement with the experimental data, while the Langmuir equation showed a large deviation when employed at low relative pressures. The MP method, t-method and αs-method were used to analyze the pore size distribution. The calculated average pore widths and BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) surface areas for the sample A-13 were 0.86 nm and 1 286.60 m2/g, while for the sample A-16, they were 0.82 nm and 1 490.64 m2/g. The sample with larger pore width was more suitable to be used as additive in chemical heat pumps, while the other one could be used as adsorbent in adsorption refrigeration systems.

  17. A simple, mass balance model of carbon flow in a controlled ecological life support system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Jay L.

    1989-01-01

    Internal cycling of chemical elements is a fundamental aspect of a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS). Mathematical models are useful tools for evaluating fluxes and reservoirs of elements associated with potential CELSS configurations. A simple mass balance model of carbon flow in CELSS was developed based on data from the CELSS Breadboard project at Kennedy Space Center. All carbon reservoirs and fluxes were calculated based on steady state conditions and modelled using linear, donor-controlled transfer coefficients. The linear expression of photosynthetic flux was replaced with Michaelis-Menten kinetics based on dynamical analysis of the model which found that the latter produced more adequate model output. Sensitivity analysis of the model indicated that accurate determination of the maximum rate of gross primary production is critical to the development of an accurate model of carbon flow. Atmospheric carbon dioxide was particularly sensitive to changes in photosynthetic rate. The small reservoir of CO2 relative to large CO2 fluxes increases the potential for volatility in CO2 concentration. Feedback control mechanisms regulating CO2 concentration will probably be necessary in a CELSS to reduce this system instability.

  18. Mathematical modeling and simulation of gel drying with supercritical carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEKSANDAR ORLOVIC

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical models of alumina/silica gel supercritical drying with carbon dioxide were studied using supercritical drying experimental data. An alumina/silica gel with zinc chloride was synthesized and dried with superciritical carbon dioxide, and its weight change wasmonitored as a function of drying time. The pore size distribution of the obtained aerogel was determined using the BET method and nitrogen adsorption/desorption. Themathematical model of the supercritical drying of the wet gel was represented as unsteady and one-dimensional diffusion of solvent through the aerogel pores filled with supercitical carbon dioxide. Parallel pore model and pores in series model were developed on the basis of the measured porous structure of the aerogel. It was found that these models which use different effective diffusivity value for each pore size were in much better agreement with the experimental data than models which use an overall effective diffusivity. The local effective diffusivity coefficients were calculated using different tortuosity values for each pore size, and they were distributed according to the pore size distribution data. Model simulations of the superciritical drying with carbon dioxide confirmed that the drying temperature and gel particle diameter have a significant influence on the drying time.

  19. Carbon and nitrogen flows during a bloom of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi: Modelling a mesocosm experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joassin, P.; Delille, B.; Soetaert, K.; Harlay, J.; Borges, A. V.; Chou, L.; Riebesell, U.; Suykens, K.; Grégoire, M.

    2011-04-01

    A dynamic model has been developed to represent biogeochemical variables and processes observed during experimental blooms of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi induced in mesocosms over a period of 23 days. The model describes carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) cycling through E. huxleyi and the microbial loop, and computes pH and the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO 2) from dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total alkalinity (TA). The main innovations are: 1) the representation of E. huxleyi dynamics using an unbalanced growth model in carbon and nitrogen, 2) the gathering of formulations describing typical processes involved in the export of carbon such as primary production, calcification, cellular dissolved organic carbon (DOC) excretion, transparent exopolymer (TEP) formation and viral lyses, and 3) an original and validated representation of the calcification process as a function of the net primary production with a modulation by the intra-cellular N:C ratio mimicking the effect of nutrients limitation on the onset of calcification. It is shown that this new mathematical formulation of calcification provides a better representation of the dynamics of TA, DIC and calcification rates derived from experimental data compared to classicaly used formulations (e.g. function of biomass or of net primary production without any modulation term). In a first step, the model has been applied to the simulations of present pCO 2 conditions. It adequately reproduces the observations for chemical and biological variables and provides an overall view of carbon and nitrogen dynamics. Carbon and nitrogen budgets are derived from the model for the different phases of the bloom, highlighting three distinct phases, reflecting the evolution of the cellular C:N ratio and the interaction between hosts and viruses. During the first phase, inorganic nutrients are massively consumed by E. huxleyi increasing its biomass. Uptakes of carbon and nitrogen are

  20. A climate sensitive model of carbon transfer through atmosphere, vegetation and soil in managed forest ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loustau, D.; Moreaux, V.; Bosc, A.; Trichet, P.; Kumari, J.; Rabemanantsoa, T.; Balesdent, J.; Jolivet, C.; Medlyn, B. E.; Cavaignac, S.; Nguyen-The, N.

    2012-12-01

    For predicting the future of the forest carbon cycle in forest ecosystems, it is necessary to account for both the climate and management impacts. Climate effects are significant not only at a short time scale but also at the temporal horizon of a forest life cycle e.g. through shift in atmospheric CO2 concentration, temperature and precipitation regimes induced by the enhanced greenhouse effect. Intensification of forest management concerns an increasing fraction of temperate and tropical forests and untouched forests represents only one third of the present forest area. Predicting tools are therefore needed to project climate and management impacts over the forest life cycle and understand the consequence of management on the forest ecosystem carbon cycle. This communication summarizes the structure, main components and properties of a carbon transfer model that describes the processes controlling the carbon cycle of managed forest ecosystems. The model, GO+, links three main components, (i) a module describing the vegetation-atmosphere mass and energy exchanges in 3D, (ii) a plant growth module and a (iii) soil carbon dynamics module in a consistent carbon scheme of transfer from atmosphere back into the atmosphere. It was calibrated and evaluated using observed data collected on coniferous and broadleaved forest stands. The model predicts the soil, water and energy balance of entire rotations of managed stands from the plantation to the final cut and according to a range of management alternatives. It accounts for the main soil and vegetation management operations such as soil preparation, understorey removal, thinnings and clearcutting. Including the available knowledge on the climatic sensitivity of biophysical and biogeochemical processes involved in atmospheric exchanges and carbon cycle of forest ecosystems, GO+ can produce long-term backward or forward simulations of forest carbon and water cycles under a range of climate and management scenarios. This

  1. Modelling soil carbon fate under erosion process in vineyard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novara, Agata; Scalenghe, Riccardo; Minacapilli, Mario; Maltese, Antonino; Capodici, Fulvio; Borgogno Mondino, Enrico; Gristina, Luciano

    2017-04-01

    Soil erosion processes in vineyards beyond water runoff and sediment transport have a strong effect on soil organic carbon loss (SOC) and redistribution along the slope. The variation of SOC across the landscape determines a difference in soil fertility and vine productivity. The aim of this research was to study erosion of a Mediterranean vineyard, develop an approach to estimate the SOC loss, correlate the vines vigor with sediment and carbon erosion. The study was carried out in a Sicilian (Italy) vineyard, planted in 2011. Along the slope, six pedons were studied by digging 6 pits up to 60cm depth. Soil was sampled in each pedon every 10cm and SOC was analyzed. Soil erosion, detachment and deposition areas were measured by pole height method. The vigor of vegetation was expressed in term of NDVI (Normalized difference Vegetation Index) derived from a satellite image (RapidEye) acquired at berry pre-veraison stage (July) and characterized by 5 spectral bands in the shortwave region, including a band in the red wavelength (R, 630-685 nm) and in the near infrared (NIR, 760-850 nm) . Results showed that soil erosion, sediments redistribution and SOC across the hill was strongly affected by topographic features, slope and curvature. The erosion rate was 46Mg ha-1 y-1 during the first 6 years since planting. The SOC redistribution was strongly correlated with the detachment or deposition area as highlighted by pole height measurements. The approach developed to estimate the SOC loss showed that during the whole study period the off-farm SOC amounts to 1.6Mg C ha-1. As highlighted by NDVI results, the plant vigor is strong correlated with SOC content and therefore, developing an accurate NDVI approach could be useful to detect the vineyard areas characterized by low fertility due to erosion process.

  2. The coupled effects of carbon and nitrogen on soil decomposition: A theoretical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darby, B.; Finzi, A.

    2013-12-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) plays a crucial role in the carbon (C) cycle, holding 2.5 times more carbon than plant biomass. Ecosystem models predict that climate warming will stimulate decomposition of soil carbon stocks, in turn leading to positive feedbacks on warming. Recent empirical studies and modeling work has revealed the importance of microbial physiology and exoenzyme kinetics in driving SOM decomposition. Existing mathematical models describe the microbial processes and biophysics involved in the decomposition. However, although decomposition by nitrogen-degrading enzymes is included in some models, nitrogen (N) does not drive model behavior and there are no reaction kinetics associated with the depolymerization or uptake of N. Additionally, very few empirically measured kinetic values exist for N-degrading enzymes or the uptake of N by microbes. This study proposes a theoretical model of SOM decomposition based on the principles of exoenzyme kinetics and microbial biophysics that explicitly links C and N through microbial uptake and SOM decomposition kinetics and by placing stoichiometric constraints on microbial growth and exoenzyme production. After constructing the model framework, the model was then used to test soil-carbon responses to warming, and to explore the importance of N uptake and depolymerization kinetics in driving decomposition. The model predictions suggest that the response of kinetics to temperature are more important than microbial responses in determining decomposition rates. Additionally, variations in the kinetics of N depolymerization affected decomposition rates, whereas N uptake kinetics and their effect on enzyme production had almost no effect. The model outputs were also compared to a C-only model framework in order to assess the effects of N on model behavior. The incorporation of N into a SOM decomposition model produced different, and in some cases, contradictory results as compared to a C-only model. Overall, these

  3. A new nonlinear model for analyzing the behaviour of carbon nanotube-based resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farokhi, Hamed; Païdoussis, Michael P.; Misra, Arun K.

    2016-09-01

    The present study develops a new size-dependent nonlinear model for the analysis of the behaviour of carbon nanotube-based resonators. In particular, based on modified couple stress theory, the fully nonlinear equations of motion of the carbon nanotube-based resonator are derived using Hamilton's principle, taking into account both the longitudinal and transverse displacements. Molecular dynamics simulation is then performed in order to verify the validity of the developed size-dependent continuum model at the nano scale. The nonlinear partial differential equations of motion of the system are discretized by means of the Galerkin technique, resulting in a high-dimensional reduced-order model of the system. The pseudo-arclength continuation technique is employed to examine the nonlinear resonant behaviour of the carbon nanotube-based resonator. A new universal pull-in formula is also developed for predicting the occurrence of the static pull-in and validated using numerical simulations.

  4. A Low-Carbon-Based Bilevel Optimization Model for Public Transit Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Sun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To satisfy the demand of low-carbon transportation, this paper studies the optimization of public transit network based on the concept of low carbon. Taking travel time, operation cost, energy consumption, pollutant emission, and traffic efficiency as the optimization objectives, a bilevel model is proposed in order to maximize the benefits of both travelers and operators and minimize the environmental cost. Then the model is solved with the differential evolution (DE algorithm and applied to a real network of Baoji city. The results show that the model can not only ensure the benefits of travelers and operators, but can also reduce pollutant emission and energy consumption caused by the operations of buses, which reflects the concept of low carbon.

  5. Experimental Investigation and Simplistic Geochemical Modeling of CO2 Mineral Carbonation Using the Mount Tawai Peridotite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omeid Rahmani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the potential of CO2 mineral carbonation of brucite (Mg(OH2 derived from the Mount Tawai peridotite (forsterite based (Mg2SiO4 to produce thermodynamically stable magnesium carbonate (MgCO3 was evaluated. The effect of three main factors (reaction temperature, particle size, and water vapor were investigated in a sequence of experiments consisting of aqueous acid leaching, evaporation to dryness of the slurry mass, and then gas-solid carbonation under pressurized CO2. The maximum amount of Mg converted to MgCO3 is ~99%, which occurred at temperatures between 150 and 175 °C. It was also found that the reduction of particle size range from >200 to <75 µm enhanced the leaching rate significantly. In addition, the results showed the essential role of water vapor in promoting effective carbonation. By increasing water vapor concentration from 5 to 10 vol %, the mineral carbonation rate increased by 30%. This work has also numerically modeled the process by which CO2 gas may be sequestered, by reaction with forsterite in the presence of moisture. In both experimental analysis and geochemical modeling, the results showed that the reaction is favored and of high yield; going almost to completion (within about one year with the bulk of the carbon partitioning into magnesite and that very little remains in solution.

  6. Empirical Research on China’s Carbon Productivity Decomposition Model Based on Multi-Dimensional Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianchang Lu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Based on the international community’s analysis of the present CO2 emissions situation, a Log Mean Divisia Index (LMDI decomposition model is proposed in this paper, aiming to reflect the decomposition of carbon productivity. The model is designed by analyzing the factors that affect carbon productivity. China’s contribution to carbon productivity is analyzed from the dimensions of influencing factors, regional structure and industrial structure. It comes to the conclusions that: (a economic output, the provincial carbon productivity and energy structure are the most influential factors, which are consistent with China’s current actual policy; (b the distribution patterns of economic output, carbon productivity and energy structure in different regions have nothing to do with the Chinese traditional sense of the regional economic development patterns; (c considering the regional protectionism, regional actual situation need to be considered at the same time; (d in the study of the industrial structure, the contribution value of industry is the most prominent factor for China’s carbon productivity, while the industrial restructuring has not been done well enough.

  7. Development of a predictive model to determine micropollutant removal using granular activated carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. de Ridder

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of organic micropollutants in drinking water and its sources has opened up a field of study related to monitoring concentration levels in water sources, evaluating their toxicity and estimating their removal in drinking water treatment processes. Because a large number of organic micropollutants is currently present (although in relatively low concentrations in drinking water sources, a method should be developed to select which micropollutants has to be evaluated with priority. In this paper, a screening model is presented that can predict solute removal by activated carbon, in ultrapure water and in natural water. Solute removal prediction is based on a combination of solute hydrophobicity (expressed as log D, the pH corrected log Kow, solute charge and the carbon dose. Solute molecular weight was also considered as model input parameter, but this solute property appeared to relate insufficiently to solute removal.

    Removal of negatively charged solutes by preloaded activated carbon was reduced while the removal of positively charged solutes was increased, compared with freshly regenerated activated carbon. Differences in charged solute removal by freshly regenerated activated carbon were small, indicating that charge interactions are an important mechanism in adsorption onto preloaded carbon. The predicted solute removal was within 20 removal-% deviation of experimentally measured values for most solutes.

  8. Development of a predictive model to determine micropollutant removal using granular activated carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. de Ridder

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of organic micropollutants in drinking water and its sources has opened up a field of study related to monitoring concentration levels in water sources, evaluating their toxicity and estimating their removal in drinking water treatment processes. Because a large number of organic micropollutants is currently present (although in relatively low concentrations in drinking water sources, a method should be developed to select which micropollutants has to be evaluated with priority. In this paper, a screening model is presented that can predict solute removal by activated carbon, in ultrapure water and in natural water. Solute removal prediction is based on a combination of solute hydrophobicity (expressed as log D, the pH corrected log Kow, solute charge and the carbon dose. Solute molecular weight was also considered as model input parameter, but this solute property appeared to relate insufficiently to solute removal.

    Removal of negatively charged solutes by preloaded activated carbon was reduced while the removal of positively charged solutes was increased, compared with freshly regenerated activated carbon. Differences in charged solute removal by freshly regenerated activated carbon were small, indicating that charge interactions are an important mechanism in adsorption onto preloaded carbon. The predicted solute removal was within 20 removal-% deviation of experimentally measured values.

  9. [Prediction of spatial distribution of forest carbon storage in Heilongjiang Province using spatial error model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Li, Feng-Ri; Zhen, Zhen

    2014-10-01

    Abstract: Based on the data from Chinese National Forest Inventory (CNFI) and Key Ecological Benefit Forest Monitoring plots (5075 in total) in Heilongjiang Province in 2010 and concurrent meteorological data coming from 59 meteorological stations located in Heilongjiang, Jilin and Inner Mongolia, this paper established a spatial error model (SEM) by GeoDA using carbon storage as dependent variable and several independent variables, including diameter of living trees (DBH), number of trees per hectare (TPH), elevation (Elev), slope (Slope), and product of precipitation and temperature (Rain_Temp). Global Moran's I was computed for describing overall spatial autocorrelations of model results at different spatial scales. Local Moran's I was calculated at the optimal bandwidth (25 km) to present spatial distribution residuals. Intra-block spatial variances were computed to explain spatial heterogeneity of residuals. Finally, a spatial distribution map of carbon storage in Heilongjiang was visualized based on predictions. The results showed that the distribution of forest carbon storage in Heilongjiang had spatial effect and was significantly influenced by stand, topographic and meteorological factors, especially average DBH. SEM could solve the spatial autocorrelation and heterogeneity well. There were significant spatial differences in distribution of forest carbon storage. The carbon storage was mainly distributed in Zhangguangcai Mountain, Xiao Xing'an Mountain and Da Xing'an Mountain where dense, forests existed, rarely distributed in Songnen Plains, while Wanda Mountain had moderate-level carbon storage.

  10. A single domain direct carbon fuel cell (DCFC) 2-D modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elleuch, A.; Boussetta, A.; Halouani, K. [Sfax Univ., Sfax (Tunisia). Inst. Preparatoire aux Etudes d' Ingenieurs de Sfax, Micro-Electro-Thermal Systems, Industrial Energy Systems Group; Sahraoui, M. [Tunis Univ., Tunis (Tunisia). LASMAP EPT IPEIT

    2010-07-01

    There has been a renewed interest in cells fuelled with solid carbon because they promise increased conversion efficiencies for coal-based power generation with less production of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). In addition, the CO{sub 2} produced in a direct carbon fuel cell (DCFC) is capture-ready for sequestration. The DCFC is a special type of high temperature fuel cell in which solid carbon directly reacts with oxygen to form CO{sub 2} and electricity. This paper presented a numerical 2-D model that simulates the transport of gaseous species, electrochemical kinetics, energy transport, and ionic current distribution for all regions of the DCFC. The governing differential equations were solved over a single computational domain, which consisted of a cathode gas channel, cathode gas diffusion layer, and cathode catalyst layer for the cathode side of the cell, a simple bloc for the anode side as well as the molten carbonate electrolyte. The coupled set of differential equations was solved using a FORTRAN code, and was readily adaptable in terms of geometry and material property definitions. The results showed temperature, carbon dioxide and oxygen concentration profile in all DCFC compartments. It was concluded that the model contributes to a better understanding of the heat and mass transfer mechanisms occurring within the cell. 10 refs., 3 tabs., 8 figs.

  11. Moving Low-Carbon Transportation in Xinjiang: Evidence from STIRPAT and Rigid Regression Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiefang Dong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid economic development of the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, the area’s transport sector has witnessed significant growth, which in turn has led to a large increase in carbon dioxide emissions. As such, calculating of the carbon footprint of Xinjiang’s transportation sector and probing the driving factors of carbon dioxide emissions are of great significance to the region’s energy conservation and environmental protection. This paper provides an account of the growth in the carbon emissions of Xinjiang’s transportation sector during the period from 1989 to 2012. We also analyze the transportation sector’s trends and historical evolution. Combined with the STIRPAT (Stochastic Impacts by Regression on Population, Affluence and Technology model and ridge regression, this study further quantitatively analyzes the factors that influence the carbon emissions of Xinjiang’s transportation sector. The results indicate the following: (1 the total carbon emissions and per capita carbon emissions of Xinjiang’s transportation sector both continued to rise rapidly during this period; their average annual growth rates were 10.8% and 9.1%, respectively; (2 the carbon emissions of the transportation sector come mainly from the consumption of diesel and gasoline, which accounted for an average of 36.2% and 2.6% of carbon emissions, respectively; in addition, the overall carbon emission intensity of the transportation sector showed an “S”-pattern trend within the study period; (3 population density plays a dominant role in increasing carbon dioxide emissions. Population is then followed by per capita GDP and, finally, energy intensity. Cargo turnover has a more significant potential impact on and role in emission reduction than do private vehicles. This is because road freight is the primary form of transportation used across Xinjiang, and this form of transportation has low energy efficiency. These findings have important

  12. Modeling relationships between water table depth and peat soil carbon loss in Southeast Asian plantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Kimberly M.; Goodman, Lael K.; May-Tobin, Calen C.

    2015-07-01

    Plantation-associated drainage of Southeast Asian peatlands has accelerated in recent years. Draining exposes the upper peat layer to oxygen, leading to elevated decomposition rates and net soil carbon losses. Empirical studies indicate positive relationships between long-term water table (WT) depth and soil carbon loss rate in peatlands. These correlations potentially enable using WT depth as a proxy for soil carbon losses from peatland plantations. Here, we compile data from published research assessing WT depth and carbon balance in tropical plantations on peat. We model net carbon loss from subsidence studies, as well as soil respiration (heterotrophic and total) from closed chamber studies, as a function of WT depth. WT depth across all 12 studies and 59 sites is 67 ± 20 cm (mean ± standard deviation). Mean WT depth is positively related to net carbon loss, as well as soil respiration rate. Our models explain 45% of net carbon loss variation and 45-63% of soil respiration variation. At a 70 cm WT depth, the subsidence model suggests net carbon loss of 20 tC ha-1 yr-1 (95% confidence interval (CI) 18-22 tC ha-1 yr-1) for plantations drained for >2 yr. Closed chamber-measured total soil respiration at this depth is 20 tC-CO2 ha-1 yr-1 (CI 17-24 tC-CO2 ha-1 yr-1) while heterotrophic respiration is 17 tC-CO2 ha-1 yr-1 (CI 14-20 tC-CO2 ha-1 yr-1), ˜82% of total respiration. While land use is not a significant predictor of soil respiration, WT depths are greater at acacia (75 ± 16 cm) than oil palm (59 ± 15 cm) sample sites. Improved spatio-temporal sampling of the full suite of peat soil carbon fluxes—including fluvial carbon export and organic fertilizer inputs—will clarify multiple mechanisms leading to carbon loss and gain, supporting refined assessments of the global warming potential of peatland drainage.

  13. Introducing a decomposition rate modifier in the Rothamsted Carbon Model to predict soil organic carbon stocks in saline soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setia, Raj; Smith, Pete; Marschner, Petra; Baldock, Jeff; Chittleborough, David; Smith, Jo

    2011-08-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) models such as the Rothamsted Carbon Model (RothC) have been used to estimate SOC dynamics in soils over different time scales but, until recently, their ability to accurately predict SOC stocks/carbon dioxide (CO(2)) emissions from salt-affected soils has not been assessed. Given the large extent of salt-affected soils (19% of the 20.8 billion ha of arable land on Earth), this may lead to miss-estimation of CO(2) release. Using soils from two salt-affected regions (one in Punjab, India and one in South Australia), an incubation study was carried out measuring CO(2) release over 120 days. The soils varied both in salinity (measured as electrical conductivity (EC) and calculated as osmotic potential using EC and water content) and sodicity (measured as sodium adsorption ratio, SAR). For soils from both regions, the osmotic potential had a significant positive relationship with CO(2)-C release, but no significant relationship was found between SAR and CO(2)-C release. The monthly cumulative CO(2)-C was simulated using RothC. RothC was modified to take into account reductions in plant inputs due to salinity. A subset of non-salt-affected soils was used to derive an equation for a "lab-effect" modifier to account for changes in decomposition under lab conditions and this modifier was significantly related with pH. Using a subset of salt-affected soils, a decomposition rate modifier (as a function of osmotic potential) was developed to match measured and modelled CO(2)-C release after correcting for the lab effect. Using this decomposition rate modifier, we found an agreement (R(2) = 0.92) between modelled and independently measured data for a set of soils from the incubation experiment. RothC, modified by including reduced plant inputs due to salinity and the salinity decomposition rate modifier, was used to predict SOC stocks of soils in a field in South Australia. The predictions clearly showed that SOC stocks are reduced in saline soils

  14. Energy Utilization Evaluation of Carbon Performance in Public Projects by FAHP and Cloud Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Li

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available With the low-carbon economy advocated all over the world, how to use energy reasonably and efficiently in public projects has become a major issue. It has brought many open questions, including which method is more reasonable in evaluating the energy utilization of carbon performance in public projects when the evaluation information is fuzzy; whether an indicator system can be constructed; and which indicators have more impact on carbon performance. This article aims to solve these problems. We propose a new carbon performance evaluation system for energy utilization based on project processes (design, construction, and operation. Fuzzy Analytic Hierarchy Process (FAHP is used to accumulate the indicator weights and cloud model is incorporated when the indicator value is fuzzy. Finally, we apply our indicator system to a case study of the Xiangjiang River project in China, which demonstrates the applicability and efficiency of our method.

  15. Nitrogen restrictions buffer modeled interactions of water with the carbon cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuanyuan; Gerber, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Terrestrial carbon and water cycles are coupled at multiple spatiotemporal scales and are crucial to carbon sequestration. Water related climate extremes, such as drought and intense precipitation, can substantially affect the carbon cycle. Meanwhile, nitrogen is a limiting resource to plant and has therefore the potential to alter the coupling of water and carbon cycles on land. Here we assess the effect of nitrogen limitation on the response of the terrestrial carbon cycle to moisture anomalies using Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory's land surface model LM3V-N. We analyzed the response of three central carbon fluxes: net primary productivity (NPP), heterotrophic respiration (Rh), and net ecosystem productivity (NEP, the difference between NPP and Rh) and how these fluxes were altered under anomalies of the standardized precipitation and evapotranspiration index (SPEI). We found that globally, the correlations between each of the carbon flux and SPEI depended on the timescale and a strong legacy effect of SPEI anomalies on Rh. Consideration of nitrogen constraints reduced anomalies in carbon fluxes in response to extreme dry/wet events. This nitrogen-induced buffer constrained the growth of plants under wet extremes and allowed for enhanced growth during droughts. Extra gain of soil moisture from the downregulation of canopy transpiration by nitrogen limitation and shifts in the relative importance of water and nitrogen limitation during dry/wet extreme events are possible mechanisms contributing to the buffering of modeled NPP and NEP. Responses of Rh to moisture anomalies were much weaker compared to NPP, and N buffering effects were less evident.

  16. Modeling boron separation from water by activated carbon, impregnated and unimpregnated

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ristic, M.; Grbavcic, Z. [Belgrade Univ., Belgrade (BA). Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy; Marinovic, V. [Belgrade Univ., Belgrade (BA). Ist. of Technical Science of the Serbian Academy of Science and Arts

    2000-10-01

    The sorption of boron from boric acid water solution by impregnated activated carbon has been studied. Barium, calcium, mannitol, tartaric acid and citric acid were used as chemical active materials. All processes were performed in a chromatographic continuous system at 22{sup 0} C. Experimental results show that activated carbon impregnated with mannitol is effective in removing boron from water. The separation of boron from the wastewater from a factory for producing enameled dishes by activated carbon impregnated with mannitol was also performed. Two models have been applied to describe published and new data on boron sorption by impregnated activated carbon. Both of them are based on the analysis of boron concentration response to the step input function. This led to a mathematical model that quite successfully described impregnation effects on adsorption capacities. [Italian] E' stato studiato l'assorbimento del boro, mediante carbone attivo impregnato, da soluzioni acquose di acido borico. Quali materiali chimici attivi sono stati utilizzati: bario, calcio, mannitolo, acido tartarico ed acido citrico. Tutti i processi sono stati condotti in un sistema cromatografico continuo a 22{sup 0}C. I risultati sperimentali mostrano che il carbone attivo impregnato con mannitolo e' efficace nella rimozione del boro dall'acqua. E' anche stata effettuata la separazione del boro da acque di scarico di un'industria per la produzione di piatti smaltati mediante carbone attivo impregnato con mannitolo. Sono stati applicati due modelli per descrivere i risultati, pubblicati e nuovi, dell'assorbimento del boro mediante carbone attivo impregnato. Entrambi sono basati sull'analisi della risposta alla concentrazione di boro successivamente incrementata a stadi. Cio' porta ad un modello matematico che descrive abbastanza soddisfacentemente gli effetti dell'impregnazione sulla capacita' di assorbimento.

  17. LSER model for organic compounds adsorption by single-walled carbon nanotubes: Comparison with multi-walled carbon nanotubes and activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiangquan; Sun, Weiling; Ni, Jinren

    2015-11-01

    LSER models for organic compounds adsorption by single and multi-walled carbon nanotubes and activated carbon were successfully developed. The cavity formation and dispersion interactions (vV), hydrogen bond acidity interactions (bB) and π-/n-electron interactions (eE) are the most influential adsorption mechanisms. SWCNTs is more polarizable, less polar, more hydrophobic, and has weaker hydrogen bond accepting and donating abilities than MWCNTs and AC. Compared with SWCNTs and MWCNTs, AC has much less hydrophobic and less hydrophilic adsorption sites. The regression coefficients (e, s, a, b, v) vary in different ways with increasing chemical saturation. Nonspecific interactions (represented by eE and vV) have great positive contribution to organic compounds adsorption, and follow the order of SWCNTs > MWCNTs > AC, while hydrogen bond interactions (represented by aA and bB) demonstrate negative contribution. These models will be valuable for understanding adsorption mechanisms, comparing adsorbent characteristics, and selecting the proper adsorbents for certain organic compounds.

  18. Modeling and optimization of the combined carbon dioxide reforming and partial oxidation of natural gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larentis, A.L.; De Resende, N.S.; Salim, V.M.M.; Pinto, J.C. [Programa de Engenharia Quimica/COPPE/Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Cidade Universitaria, CP 68502, RJ, 21945-970 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2001-07-13

    The optimization of the combined carbon dioxide reforming and partial methane oxidation over a 1% Pt/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst was studied in order to produce synthesis gas with hydrogen/carbon monoxide ratio close to 1, for applications in metallurgical and polycarbonates processes and for production of oxygenated compounds and hydrocarbons. The study was performed with the help of experimental design and two mathematical modeling approaches: empirical and phenomenological. Empirical polynomial models were employed to analyze the effects of the process variables on the response factors and the final correlation coefficients obtained were above 95%. The phenomenological model was obtained from individual mass balances and the obtained correlation coefficients were above 95% for CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}, 90% for CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O and near 70% for H{sub 2} and CO. The empirical modeling approach was found to be more efficient, simpler and led to better results than those obtained with the phenomenological model approach. Therefore, the empirical modeling was used for optimization of the process operation conditions. At an oxygen/methane ratio of 0.55gmol/gmol and temperature of 950C, optimized process conditions were obtained with complete methane conversion, maximum carbon monoxide selectivity of 43% and minimum hydrogen/carbon monoxide ratio of 1.3, in absence of water.

  19. Identifying Opportunities to Reduce Uncertainty in a National-Scale Forest Carbon Accounting Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, C. H.; Metsaranta, J. M.; Kurz, W.; Hilger, A.

    2013-12-01

    Assessing the quality of forest carbon budget models used for national and international reporting of greenhouse gas emissions is essential, but model evaluations are rarely conducted mainly because of lack of appropriate, independent ground plot data sets. Ecosystem carbon stocks for all major pools estimated from data collected for 696 ground plots from Canada's new National Forest Inventory (NFI) were used to assess plot-level carbon stocks predicted by the Carbon Budget Model of the Canadian Forest Sector 3 (CBM-CFS3) -- a model compliant with the most complex (Tier-3) approach in the reporting guidelines of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. The model is the core of Canada's National Forest Carbon Monitoring, Accounting, and Reporting System. At the landscape scale, a major portion of total uncertainty in both C stock and flux estimation is associated with biomass productivity, turnover, and soil and dead organic matter modelling parameters, which can best be further evaluated using plot-level data. Because the data collected for the ground plots were comprehensive we were able to compare carbon stock estimates for 13 pools also estimated by the CBM-CFS3 (all modelled pools excepting coarse and fine root biomass) using the classical comparison statistics of mean difference and correlation. Using a Monte Carlo approach we were able to determine the contribution of aboveground biomass, deadwood and soil pool error to modeled ecosystem total error, as well as the contribution of pools that are summed to estimate aboveground biomass, deadwood and soil, to the error of these three subtotal pools. We were also able to assess potential sources of error propagation in the computational sequence of the CBM-CFS3. Analysis of the data grouped by the 16 dominant tree species allowed us to isolate the leading species where further research would lead to the greatest reductions in uncertainty for modeling of carbon stocks using the CBM-CFS3. This analysis

  20. Desert dust and anthropogenic aerosol interactions in the Community Climate System Model coupled-carbon-climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Mahowald

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Coupled-carbon-climate simulations are an essential tool for predicting the impact of human activity onto the climate and biogeochemistry. Here we incorporate prognostic desert dust and anthropogenic aerosols into the CCSM3.1 coupled carbon-climate model and explore the resulting interactions with climate and biogeochemical dynamics through a series of transient anthropogenic simulations (20th and 21st centuries and sensitivity studies. The inclusion of prognostic aerosols into this model has a small net global cooling effect on climate but does not significantly impact the globally averaged carbon cycle; we argue that this is likely to be because the CCSM3.1 model has a small climate feedback onto the carbon cycle. We propose a mechanism for including desert dust and anthropogenic aerosols into a simple carbon-climate feedback analysis to explain the results of our and previous studies. Inclusion of aerosols has statistically significant impacts on regional climate and biogeochemistry, in particular through the effects on the ocean nitrogen cycle and primary productivity of altered iron inputs from desert dust deposition.

  1. An optimal control model for reducing and trading of carbon emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Huaying; Liang, Jin

    2016-03-01

    A stochastic optimal control model of reducing and trading for carbon emissions is established in this paper. With considerations of reducing the carbon emission growth and the price of the allowances in the market, an optimal policy is searched to have the minimum total costs to achieve the agreement of emission reduction targets. The model turns to a two-dimension HJB equation problem. By the methods of reducing dimension and Cole-Hopf transformation, a semi-closed form solution of the corresponding HJB problem under some assumptions is obtained. For more general cases, the numerical calculations, analysis and comparisons are presented.

  2. Modelling a century of soil redistribution processes and carbon delivery from small watersheds using a multi-class sediment transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilken, Florian; Fiener, Peter; Van Oost, Kristof

    2017-02-01

    Over the last few decades, soil erosion and carbon redistribution modelling has received a lot of attention due to large uncertainties and conflicting results. For a physically based representation of event dynamics, coupled soil and carbon erosion models have been developed. However, there is a lack of research utilizing models which physically represent preferential erosion and transport of different carbon fractions (i.e. mineral bound carbon, carbon encapsulated by aggregates and particulate organic carbon). Furthermore, most of the models that have a high temporal resolution are applied to relatively short time series (selective process which entrains primary particles, while (ii) rill erosion is non-selective and entrains aggregates, (iii) that particulate organic matter is predominantly encapsulated in aggregates, and (iv) that the export enrichment in carbon is highest during events dominated by interrill erosion and decreases with event size.

  3. Evaluation of the DayCent model to predict carbon fluxes in French crop sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisaki, Kenji; Martin, Manuel P.; Zhang, Yao; Bernoux, Martial; Chapuis-Lardy, Lydie

    2017-04-01

    Croplands in temperate regions are an important component of the carbon balance and can act as a sink or a source of carbon, depending on pedoclimatic conditions and management practices. Therefore the evaluation of carbon fluxes in croplands by modelling approach is relevant in the context of global change. This study was part of the Comete-Global project funded by the multi-Partner call FACCE JPI. Carbon fluxes, net ecosystem exchange (NEE), leaf area index (LAI), biomass, and grain production were simulated at the site level in three French crop experiments from the CarboEurope project. Several crops were studied, like winter wheat, rapeseed, barley, maize, and sunflower. Daily NEE was measured with eddy covariance and could be partitioned between gross primary production (GPP) and total ecosystem respiration (TER). Measurements were compared to DayCent simulations, a process-based model predicting plant production and soil organic matter turnover at daily time step. We compared two versions of the model: the original one with a simplified plant module and a newer version that simulates LAI. Input data for modelling were soil properties, climate, and management practices. Simulations of grain yields and biomass production were acceptable when using optimized crop parameters. Simulation of NEE was also acceptable. GPP predictions were improved with the newer version of the model, eliminating temporal shifts that could be observed with the original model. TER was underestimated by the model. Predicted NEE was more sensitive to soil tillage and nitrogen applications than measured NEE. DayCent was therefore a relevant tool to predict carbon fluxes in French crops at the site level. The introduction of LAI in the model improved its performance.

  4. Modeling the binding affinity of structurally diverse industrial chemicals to carbon using the artificial intelligence approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shikha; Basant, Nikita; Rai, Premanjali; Singh, Kunwar P

    2015-11-01

    Binding affinity of chemical to carbon is an important characteristic as it finds vast industrial applications. Experimental determination of the adsorption capacity of diverse chemicals onto carbon is both time and resource intensive, and development of computational approaches has widely been advocated. In this study, artificial intelligence (AI)-based ten different qualitative and quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models (MLPN, RBFN, PNN/GRNN, CCN, SVM, GEP, GMDH, SDT, DTF, DTB) were established for the prediction of the adsorption capacity of structurally diverse chemicals to activated carbon following the OECD guidelines. Structural diversity of the chemicals and nonlinear dependence in the data were evaluated using the Tanimoto similarity index and Brock-Dechert-Scheinkman statistics. The generalization and prediction abilities of the constructed models were established through rigorous internal and external validation procedures performed employing a wide series of statistical checks. In complete dataset, the qualitative models rendered classification accuracies between 97.04 and 99.93%, while the quantitative models yielded correlation (R(2)) values of 0.877-0.977 between the measured and the predicted endpoint values. The quantitative prediction accuracies for the higher molecular weight (MW) compounds (class 4) were relatively better than those for the low MW compounds. Both in the qualitative and quantitative models, the Polarizability was the most influential descriptor. Structural alerts responsible for the extreme adsorption behavior of the compounds were identified. Higher number of carbon and presence of higher halogens in a molecule rendered higher binding affinity. Proposed QSPR models performed well and outperformed the previous reports. A relatively better performance of the ensemble learning models (DTF, DTB) may be attributed to the strengths of the bagging and boosting algorithms which enhance the predictive accuracies. The

  5. Channeling of fast ions through the bent carbon nanotubes: The extended two-fluid hydrodynamic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Karbunar; Duško, Borka; Ivan, Radović; Zoran, L. Mišković

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the interactions of charged particles with straight and bent single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) under channeling conditions in the presence of dynamic polarization of the valence electrons in carbon. This polarization is described by a cylindrical, two-fluid hydrodynamic model with the parameters taken from the recent modelling of several independent experiments on electron energy loss spectroscopy of carbon nano-structures. We use the hydrodynamic model to calculate the image potential for protons moving through four types of SWNTs at a speed of 3 atomic units. The image potential is then combined with the Doyle-Turner atomic potential to obtain the total potential in the bent carbon nanotubes. Using that potential, we also compute the spatial and angular distributions of protons channeled through the bent carbon nanotubes, and compare the results with the distributions obtained without taking into account the image potential. Project supported by the Funds from the Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development of the Republic of Serbia (Grant No. 45005). Z. L. Mišković thanks the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada for Finacial Support.

  6. Plant diversity effects on ecosystem evapotranspiration and carbon uptake: a controlled environment (Ecotron) and modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milcu, Alexandru; Roy, Jacques

    2016-04-01

    Effects of species and functional diversity of plants on ecosystem evapotranspiration and carbon fluxes have been rarely assessed simultaneously. Here we present the results from an experiment that combined a lysimeter setup in a controlled environment facility (Ecotron) with large ecosystem samples/ monoliths originating from a long-term biodiversity experiment ("The Jena Experiment") and a modelling approach. We aimed at (1) quantifying the impact of plant species richness (4 vs. 16 species) on day- and night-time ecosystem water vapor fluxes and carbon uptake, (2) partitioning ecosystem evapotranspiration into evaporation and plant transpiration using the Shuttleworth and Wallace (SW) energy partitioning model, and (3) identifying the most parsimonious predictors of water vapor vapor and CO2 fluxes using plant functional trait-based metrics such as functional diversity and community weighted means. The SW model indicated that at low plant species richness, a higher proportion of the available energy was diverted to evaporation (a non-productive flux), while at higher species richness the proportion of ecosystem transpiration (a production-related water flux) increased. This led to an increased carbon gain per amount of water vapor loss (i.e. increased water use efficiency). While the LAI controlled the carbon and water fluxes, we also found that the diversity of plant functional traits, and in particular of leaf nitrogen concentration are potential important predictors of ecosystem transpiration and carbon uptake and consequently significantly contributed to increase in water use efficiency in communities with higher plant diversity.

  7. Energy-Related Carbon Emissions of China’s Model Environmental Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Lo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper identifies three types of model environmental cities in China and examines their levels of energy-related carbon emissions using a bottom-up accounting system. Model environmental cities are identified as those that have been recently awarded official recognition from the central government for their efforts in environmental protection. The findings show that, on average, the Low-Carbon Cities have lower annual carbon emissions, carbon intensities, and per capita emissions than the Eco-Garden Cities and the Environmental Protection Cities. Compared internationally, the Eco-Garden Cities and the Environmental Protection Cities have per capita emissions that are similar to those of American cities whereas per capita emissions from the Low-Carbon Cities are similar to those of European cities. The result indicates that addressing climate change is not a priority for some model environmental cities. Policy changes are needed to prioritize climate mitigation in these cities, considering that climate change is a cross-cutting environmental issue with wide-ranging impact.

  8. Inverse modeling of the terrestrial carbon flux in China with flux covariance among inverted regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Jiang, F.; Chen, J. M.; Ju, W.; Wang, H.

    2011-12-01

    Quantitative understanding of the role of ocean and terrestrial biosphere in the global carbon cycle, their response and feedback to climate change is required for the future projection of the global climate. China has the largest amount of anthropogenic CO2 emission, diverse terrestrial ecosystems and an unprecedented rate of urbanization. Thus information on spatial and temporal distributions of the terrestrial carbon flux in China is of great importance in understanding the global carbon cycle. We developed a nested inversion with focus in China. Based on Transcom 22 regions for the globe, we divide China and its neighboring countries into 17 regions, making 39 regions in total for the globe. A Bayesian synthesis inversion is made to estimate the terrestrial carbon flux based on GlobalView CO2 data. In the inversion, GEOS-Chem is used as the transport model to develop the transport matrix. A terrestrial ecosystem model named BEPS is used to produce the prior surface flux to constrain the inversion. However, the sparseness of available observation stations in Asia poses a challenge to the inversion for the 17 small regions. To obtain additional constraint on the inversion, a prior flux covariance matrix is constructed using the BEPS model through analyzing the correlation in the net carbon flux among regions under variable climate conditions. The use of the covariance among different regions in the inversion effectively extends the information content of CO2 observations to more regions. The carbon flux over the 39 land and ocean regions are inverted for the period from 2004 to 2009. In order to investigate the impact of introducing the covariance matrix with non-zero off-diagonal values to the inversion, the inverted terrestrial carbon flux over China is evaluated against ChinaFlux eddy-covariance observations after applying an upscaling methodology.

  9. Modeling and simulation of an anode carbon baking furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ø. Gundersen

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available The anode temperature profile in a Hydro Aluminium baking furnace is obtained by solving the three dimensional heat equation. The main heat transfer and chemical processes are taken into account. Due to symmetry, one half of a pit is modeled. Along the gas path, submodels are derived for the under-pit area, pit area and under-lid area. For the gas flow, a stationary model is derived, whereas the heat equations are dynamically solved. The numerical model is derived from the control volume formulation.

  10. Acute carbon monoxide poisoning: animal models: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penney, D G

    1990-05-31

    Animals have been used for well over a century in an attempt to understand the toxicology, physiology, and pathology of acute carbon monoxide poisoning. Whether the toxic effects of this gas result from primary hypoxia, as in hypoxic hypoxia to which it is frequently compared, or from direct tissue effects since it enters cells and binds to certain vital components, remains a point of controversy. Acute severe poisoning in man and animals affects primarily the cardiovascular and nervous systems, and frequently produces neurologic dysfunction. Morphologically, tissue damage is usually confined to the white matter. The root cause is at best poorly understood and major investigative efforts have been made toward its elucidation. Many studies with rats, cats and primates indicate a major role for CO-induced hypotension, which serves to compromise blood flow and exacerbate acidosis. The likely cellular mechanisms in this process are only now becoming apparent. This review critically examines the recent as well as a few older CO-animal studies. In scope, they fall into several broad categories: general cardiopulmonary effects, metabolic and tissue effects, general resistance (i.e. tolerance), effects on the central nervous system including blood flow, neurochemistry, morphology and behavior, and finally, experimental therapeutic approaches.

  11. Modelled interglacial carbon cycle dynamics during the Holocene, the Eemian and Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinen, Thomas; Brovkin, Victor; Munhoven, Guy

    2016-11-01

    Trends in the atmospheric concentration of CO2 during three recent interglacials - the Holocene, the Eemian and Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 11 - are investigated using an earth system model of intermediate complexity, which we extended with process-based modules to consider two slow carbon cycle processes - peat accumulation and shallow-water CaCO3 sedimentation (coral reef formation). For all three interglacials, model simulations considering peat accumulation and shallow-water CaCO3 sedimentation substantially improve the agreement between model results and ice core CO2 reconstructions in comparison to a carbon cycle set-up neglecting these processes. This enables us to model the trends in atmospheric CO2, with modelled trends similar to the ice core data, forcing the model only with orbital and sea level changes. During the Holocene, anthropogenic CO2 emissions are required to match the observed rise in atmospheric CO2 after 3 ka BP but are not relevant before this time. Our model experiments show a considerable improvement in the modelled CO2 trends by the inclusion of the slow carbon cycle processes, allowing us to explain the CO2 evolution during the Holocene and two recent interglacials consistently using an identical model set-up.

  12. Estimating California ecosystem carbon change using process model and land cover disturbance data: 1951-2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Vogelmann, J.E.; Zhu, Z.; Key, C.H.; Sleeter, B.M.; Price, D.T.; Chen, J.M.; Cochrane, M.A.; Eidenshink, J.C.; Howard, S.M.; Bliss, N.B.; Jiang, H.

    2011-01-01

    Land use change, natural disturbance, and climate change directly alter ecosystem productivity and carbon stock level. The estimation of ecosystem carbon dynamics depends on the quality of land cover change data and the effectiveness of the ecosystem models that represent the vegetation growth processes and disturbance effects. We used the Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS) and a set of 30- to 60-m resolution fire and land cover change data to examine the carbon changes of California's forests, shrublands, and grasslands. Simulation results indicate that during 1951-2000, the net primary productivity (NPP) increased by 7%, from 72.2 to 77.1TgCyr-1 (1 teragram=1012g), mainly due to CO2 fertilization, since the climate hardly changed during this period. Similarly, heterotrophic respiration increased by 5%, from 69.4 to 73.1TgCyr-1, mainly due to increased forest soil carbon and temperature. Net ecosystem production (NEP) was highly variable in the 50-year period but on average equalled 3.0TgCyr-1 (total of 149TgC). As with NEP, the net biome production (NBP) was also highly variable but averaged -0.55TgCyr-1 (total of -27.3TgC) because NBP in the 1980s was very low (-5.34TgCyr-1). During the study period, a total of 126Tg carbon were removed by logging and land use change, and 50Tg carbon were directly removed by wildland fires. For carbon pools, the estimated total living upper canopy (tree) biomass decreased from 928 to 834TgC, and the understory (including shrub and grass) biomass increased from 59 to 63TgC. Soil carbon and dead biomass carbon increased from 1136 to 1197TgC. Our analyses suggest that both natural and human processes have significant influence on the carbon change in California. During 1951-2000, climate interannual variability was the key driving force for the large interannual changes of ecosystem carbon source and sink at the state level, while logging and fire were the dominant driving forces for carbon balances in several specific

  13. Computational modeling of elastic properties of carbon nanotube/polymer composites with interphase regions. Part II: Mechanical modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Fei

    2014-01-01

    We present two modeling approaches for predicting the macroscopic elastic properties of carbon nanotubes/polymer composites with thick interphase regions at the nanotube/matrix frontier. The first model is based on local continuum mechanics; the second one is based on hybrid local/non-local continuum mechanics. The key computational issues, including the peculiar homogenization technique and treatment of periodical boundary conditions in the non-local continuum model, are clarified. Both models are implemented through a three-dimensional geometric representation of the carbon nanotubes network, which has been detailed in Part I. Numerical results are shown and compared for both models in order to test convergence and sensitivity toward input parameters. It is found that both approaches provide similar results in terms of homogenized quantities but locally can lead to very different microscopic fields. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Black carbon ageing in the Canadian Centre for Climate modelling and analysis atmospheric general circulation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Croft

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Black carbon (BC particles in the atmosphere have important impacts on climate. The amount of BC in the atmosphere must be carefully quantified to allow evaluation of the climate effects of this type of aerosol. In this study, we present the treatment of BC aerosol in the developmental version of the 4th generation Canadian Centre for Climate modelling and analysis (CCCma atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM. The focus of this work is on the conversion of insoluble BC to soluble/mixed BC by physical and chemical ageing. Physical processes include the condensation of sulphuric and nitric acid onto the BC aerosol, and coagulation with more soluble aerosols such as sulphates and nitrates. Chemical processes that may age the BC aerosol include the oxidation of organic coatings by ozone. Four separate parameterizations of the ageing process are compared to a control simulation that assumes no ageing occurs. These simulations use 1 an exponential decay with a fixed 24h half-life, 2 a condensation and coagulation scheme, 3 an oxidative scheme, and 4 a linear combination of the latter two ageing treatments. Global BC burdens are 2.15, 0.15, 0.11, 0.21, and 0.11TgC for the control run, and four ageing schemes, respectively. The BC lifetimes are 98.1, 6.6, 5.0, 9.5, and 4.9 days, respectively. The sensitivity of modelled BC burdens, and concentrations to the factor of two uncertainty in the emissions inventory is shown to be greater than the sensitivity to the parameterization used to represent the BC ageing, except for the oxidation based parameterization. A computationally efficient parameterization that represents the processes of condensation, coagulation, and oxidation is shown to simulate BC ageing well in the CCCma AGCM. As opposed to the globally fixed ageing time scale, this treatment of BC ageing is responsive to varying atmospheric composition.

  15. Measures of Microbial Biomass for Soil Carbon Decomposition Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, M. A.; Dabbs, J.; Steinweg, J. M.; Schadt, C. W.; Kluber, L. A.; Wang, G.; Jagadamma, S.

    2014-12-01

    Explicit parameterization of the decomposition of plant inputs and soil organic matter by microbes is becoming more widely accepted in models of various complexity, ranging from detailed process models to global-scale earth system models. While there are multiple ways to measure microbial biomass, chloroform fumigation-extraction (CFE) is commonly used to parameterize models.. However CFE is labor- and time-intensive, requires toxic chemicals, and it provides no specific information about the composition or function of the microbial community. We investigated correlations between measures of: CFE; DNA extraction yield; QPCR base-gene copy numbers for Bacteria, Fungi and Archaea; phospholipid fatty acid analysis; and direct cell counts to determine the potential for use as proxies for microbial biomass. As our ultimate goal is to develop a reliable, more informative, and faster methods to predict microbial biomass for use in models, we also examined basic soil physiochemical characteristics including texture, organic matter content, pH, etc. to identify multi-factor predictive correlations with one or more measures of the microbial community. Our work will have application to both microbial ecology studies and the next generation of process and earth system models.

  16. Nutrient limitation reduces land carbon uptake in simulations with a model of combined carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Goll

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial carbon (C cycle models applied for climate projections simulate a strong increase in net primary productivity (NPP due to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration during the 21st century. These models usually neglect the limited availability of nitrogen (N and phosphorus (P, nutrients that commonly limit plant growth and soil carbon turnover. To investigate how the projected C sequestration is altered when stoichiometric constraints on C cycling are considered, we incorporated a P cycle into the land surface model JSBACH (Jena Scheme for Biosphere–Atmosphere Coupling in Hamburg, which already includes representations of coupled C and N cycles.

    The model reveals a distinct geographic pattern of P and N limitation. Under the SRES (Special Report on Emissions Scenarios A1B scenario, the accumulated land C uptake between 1860 and 2100 is 13% (particularly at high latitudes and 16% (particularly at low latitudes lower in simulations with N and P cycling, respectively, than in simulations without nutrient cycles. The combined effect of both nutrients reduces land C uptake by 25% compared to simulations without N or P cycling. Nutrient limitation in general may be biased by the model simplicity, but the ranking of limitations is robust against the parameterization and the inflexibility of stoichiometry. After 2100, increased temperature and high CO2 concentration cause a shift from N to P limitation at high latitudes, while nutrient limitation in the tropics declines. The increase in P limitation at high-latitudes is induced by a strong increase in NPP and the low P sorption capacity of soils, while a decline in tropical NPP due to high autotrophic respiration rates alleviates N and P limitations. The quantification of P limitation remains challenging. The poorly constrained processes of soil P sorption and biochemical mineralization are identified as the main uncertainties in the strength of P limitation

  17. Measurement of metal bioaccessibility in vegetables to improve human exposure assessments: field study of soil-plant-atmosphere transfers in urban areas, South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, TianTian; Dumat, Camille; Pierart, Antoine; Shahid, Muhammad; Kang, Yuan; Li, Ning; Bertoni, Georges; Laplanche, Christophe

    2016-12-01

    The quality of cultivated consumed vegetables in relation to environmental pollution is a crucial issue for urban and peri-urban areas, which host the majority of people at the global scale. In order to evaluate the fate of metals in urban soil-plant-atmosphere systems and their consequences on human exposure, a field study was conducted at two different sites near a waste incinerator (site A) and a highway (site B). Metal concentrations were measured in the soil, settled atmospheric particulate matter (PM) and vegetables. A risk assessment was performed using both total and bioaccessible metal concentrations in vegetables. Total metal concentrations in PM were (mg kg(-1)): (site A) 417 Cr, 354 Cu, 931 Zn, 6.3 Cd and 168 Pb; (site B) 145 Cr, 444 Cu, 3289 Zn, 2.9 Cd and 396 Pb. Several total soil Cd and Pb concentrations exceeded China's Environmental Quality Standards. At both sites, there was significant metal enrichment from the atmosphere to the leafy vegetables (correlation between Pb concentrations in PM and leaves: r = 0.52, p plant species. Total Cr, Cd and Pb concentrations in vegetables were therefore above or just under the maximum limit levels for foodstuffs according to Chinese and European Commission regulations. High metal bioaccessibility in the vegetables (60-79 %, with maximum value for Cd) was also observed. The bioaccessible hazard index was only above 1 for site B, due to moderate Pb and Cd pollution from the highway. In contrast, site A was considered as relatively safe for urban agriculture.

  18. Evaluation of Finite-Rate GasSurface Interaction Models for a Carbon Based Ablator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq; Goekcen, Tahir

    2015-01-01

    Two sets of finite-rate gas-surface interaction model between air and the carbon surface are studied. The first set is an engineering model with one-way chemical reactions, and the second set is a more detailed model with two-way chemical reactions. These two proposed models intend to cover the carbon surface ablation conditions including the low temperature rate-controlled oxidation, the mid-temperature diffusion-controlled oxidation, and the high temperature sublimation. The prediction of carbon surface recession is achieved by coupling a material thermal response code and a Navier-Stokes flow code. The material thermal response code used in this study is the Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal-response and Ablation Program, which predicts charring material thermal response and shape change on hypersonic space vehicles. The flow code solves the reacting full Navier-Stokes equations using Data Parallel Line Relaxation method. Recession analyses of stagnation tests conducted in NASA Ames Research Center arc-jet facilities with heat fluxes ranging from 45 to 1100 wcm2 are performed and compared with data for model validation. The ablating material used in these arc-jet tests is Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator. Additionally, computational predictions of surface recession and shape change are in good agreement with measurement for arc-jet conditions of Small Probe Reentry Investigation for Thermal Protection System Engineering.

  19. Carbon emissions, logistics volume and GDP in China: empirical analysis based on panel data model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaopeng; Ren, Dongfang; Shi, Jiaxing

    2016-12-01

    This paper studies the relationship among carbon emissions, GDP, and logistics by using a panel data model and a combination of statistics and econometrics theory. The model is based on the historical data of 10 typical provinces and cities in China during 2005-2014. The model in this paper adds the variability of logistics on the basis of previous studies, and this variable is replaced by the freight turnover of the provinces. Carbon emissions are calculated by using the annual consumption of coal, oil, and natural gas. GDP is the gross domestic product. The results showed that the amount of logistics and GDP have a contribution to carbon emissions and the long-term relationships are different between different cities in China, mainly influenced by the difference among development mode, economic structure, and level of logistic development. After the testing of panel model setting, this paper established a variable coefficient model of the panel. The influence of GDP and logistics on carbon emissions is obtained according to the influence factors among the variables. The paper concludes with main findings and provides recommendations toward rational planning of urban sustainable development and environmental protection for China.

  20. Assessing FPAR Source and Parameter Optimization Scheme in Application of a Diagnostic Carbon Flux Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, D P; Ritts, W D; Wharton, S; Thomas, C; Monson, R; Black, T A

    2009-02-26

    The combination of satellite remote sensing and carbon cycle models provides an opportunity for regional to global scale monitoring of terrestrial gross primary production, ecosystem respiration, and net ecosystem production. FPAR (the fraction of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by the plant canopy) is a critical input to diagnostic models, however little is known about the relative effectiveness of FPAR products from different satellite sensors nor about the sensitivity of flux estimates to different parameterization approaches. In this study, we used multiyear observations of carbon flux at four eddy covariance flux tower sites within the conifer biome to evaluate these factors. FPAR products from the MODIS and SeaWiFS sensors, and the effects of single site vs. cross-site parameter optimization were tested with the CFLUX model. The SeaWiFs FPAR product showed greater dynamic range across sites and resulted in slightly reduced flux estimation errors relative to the MODIS product when using cross-site optimization. With site-specific parameter optimization, the flux model was effective in capturing seasonal and interannual variation in the carbon fluxes at these sites. The cross-site prediction errors were lower when using parameters from a cross-site optimization compared to parameter sets from optimization at single sites. These results support the practice of multisite optimization within a biome for parameterization of diagnostic carbon flux models.

  1. Modelling carbon cycle of agro-forest ecosystems in Lombardy (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colombo R

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a methodology for the estimation of Gross Primary Production (GPP, Net Primary Production (NPP and Net Ecosystem Production (NEP for the main agricultural and forest ecosystems of the Lombardia Region (Italy. The MOD17 model was parameterized according to the different agro-forestry ecosystems and applied at regional scale by using satellite data with a spatial resolution of 250m. The high spatial resolution along with fine classification agro-forestry ecosystems has allowed to accurately analyze the carbon budget of an extremely fragmented and complex environment such as the Lombardia Region. Modeling results showed the role of the forests in the carbon budget at regional scale and represent important information layer for the spatial analysis and for inferring the inter-annual variability of carbon sequestration due to impacts of extreme events and recent climate change (e.g., drought, heat wave, flooding, fires.

  2. Parameter Uncertainty in CGE Modeling of the Macroeconomic Impact of Carbon Reduction in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Can; CHEN Jining

    2006-01-01

    Formal methods are used to characterize the uncertainty in the computable general equilibrium (CGE) model outputs to assess the use of the CGE model of China (integrated energy-economy-environment dynamic CGE, TEDCGE) for carbon tax policy issues. Monte Carlo experiment was used for the parameter uncertainty propagation and unconditional sensitivity analysis, using the variance of the conditional expectation (VCE) as the importance index to identify critical uncertainties. The results illustrate the statistical characteristics of TEDCGE outputs and sensitivities of the TEDCGE outputs to 50 uncertain elasticities. The results show that the carbon tax level for a predefined emission reduction goal is quite sensitive to both capital-energy substitution elasticity and inter-fuel substitution elasticity in the production function, while the key parameter for the GDP reduction rate was only the inter-fuel substitution elasticity. Among the various sectors, heavy industry and electricity are most vitally affected by a carbon tax.

  3. Heat mass transfer model of fouling process of calcium carbonate on heat transfer surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A new heat mass transfer model was developed to predict the fouling process of calcium carbonate on heat transfer surface. The model took into account not only the crystallization fouling but also the particle fouling which was formed on the heat transfer surface by the suspension particles of calcium carbonate in the su- persaturated solution. Based on experimental results of the fouling process, the deposition and removal rates of the mixing fouling were expressed. Furthermore, the coupling effect of temperature with the fouling process was considered in the physics model. As a result the fouling resistance varying with time was obtained to describe the fouling process and the prediction was compared with experimental data under same conditions. The results showed that the present model could give a good prediction of fouling process, and the deviation was less than 15% of the experimental data in most cases. The new model is credible to predict the fouling process.

  4. Carbonate precipitation by the thermophilic archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus: a model of carbon flow for an ancient microorganism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ostrom

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Microbial carbonate precipitation experiments were conducted using the archaeon bacteria Archaeoglobus fulgidus to determine chemical and isotopic fractionation of organic and inorganic carbon into mineral phases. Carbonate precipitation was induced in two different experiments using A. fulgidus to determine the relative abundance of organically derived carbon incorporated into carbonate minerals as well as to define any distinct phases or patterns that could be attributed to the precipitation process. One experiment used a medium containing 13C-depleted organic carbon and 13C-enriched inorganic carbon, and the other used a 14C-labeled organic carbon source. Results indicated that 0.9–24.8% organic carbon was incorporated into carbonates precipitated by A. fulgidus and that this process was mediated primarily by pH and CO2 emission from cells. Data showed that the carbon in the CO2 produced from this microorganism is incorporated into carbonates and that the rate at which precipitation occurs and the dynamics of the carbonate precipitation process are strongly mediated by the specific steps involved in the biochemical process for lactate oxidation by A. fulgidus.

  5. Carbonate precipitation by the thermophilic archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus: A model of carbon flow for an ancient microorganism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, L.L.; Van Cleave, K. A.; Ostrom, P.

    2008-01-01

    Microbial carbonate precipitation experiments were conducted using the archaeon bacteria Archaeoglobus fulgidus to determine chemical and isotopic fractionation of organic and inorganic carbon into mineral phases. Carbonate precipitation was induced in two different experiments using A. fulgidus to determine the relative abundance of organically derived carbon incorporated into carbonate minerals as well as to define any distinct phases or patterns that could be attributed to the precipitation process. One experiment used a medium containing 13C-depleted organic carbon and 13C-enriched inorganic carbon, and the other used a 14C-labeled organic carbon source. Results indicated that 0.9 - 24.8% organic carbon was incorporated into carbonates precipitated by A. fulgidus and that this process was mediated primarily by pH and CO2 emission from cells. Data showed that the carbon in the CO2 produced from this microorganism is incorporated into carbonates and that the rate at which precipitation occurs and the dynamics of the carbonate precipitation process are strongly mediated by the specific steps involved in the biochemical process for lactate oxidation by A. fulgidus.

  6. The solar photospheric abundance of carbon.Analysis of atomic carbon lines with the CO5BOLD solar model

    CERN Document Server

    Caffau, E; Bonifacio, P; Faraggiana, R; Steffen, M; Freytag, B; Kamp, I; Ayres, T R

    2010-01-01

    The use of hydrodynamical simulations, the selection of atomic data, and the computation of deviations from local thermodynamical equilibrium for the analysis of the solar spectra have implied a downward revision of the solar metallicity. We are in the process of using the latest simulations computed with the CO5BOLD code to reassess the solar chemical composition. We determine the solar photospheric carbon abundance by using a radiation-hydrodynamical CO5BOLD model, and compute the departures from local thermodynamical equilibrium by using the Kiel code. We measure equivalent widths of atomic CI lines on high resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio solar atlases. Deviations from local thermodynamic equilibrium are computed in 1D with the Kiel code. Our recommended value for the solar carbon abundance, relies on 98 independent measurements of observed lines and is A(C)=8.50+-0.06, the quoted error is the sum of statistical and systematic error. Combined with our recent results for the solar oxygen and nitrogen...

  7. Evaluation of the carbon cycle components in the Norwegian Earth System Model (NorESM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Tjiputra

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The recently developed Norwegian Earth System Model (NorESM is employed for simulations contributing to the CMIP5 (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 experiments and the fifth assessment report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC-AR5. In this manuscript, we focus on evaluating the ocean and land carbon cycle components of the NorESM, based on the preindustrial control and historical simulations. Many of the observed large scale ocean biogeochemical features are reproduced satisfactorily by the NorESM. When compared to the climatological estimates from the World Ocean Atlas (WOA, the model simulated temperature, salinity, oxygen, and phosphate distributions agree reasonably well in both the surface layer and deep water structure. However, the model simulates a relatively strong overturning circulation strength that leads to noticeable model-data bias, especially within the North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW. This strong overturning circulation slightly distorts the structure of the biogeochemical tracers at depth. Advancements in simulating the oceanic mixed layer depth with respect to the previous generation model particularly improve the surface tracer distribution as well as the upper ocean biogeochemical processes, particularly in the Southern Ocean. Consequently, near-surface ocean processes such as biological production and air–sea gas exchange, are in good agreement with climatological observations. The NorESM adopts the same terrestrial model as the Community Earth System Model (CESM1. It reproduces the general pattern of land-vegetation gross primary productivity (GPP when compared to the observationally based values derived from the FLUXNET network of eddy covariance towers. While the model simulates well the vegetation carbon pool, the soil carbon pool is smaller by a factor of three relative to the observational based estimates. The simulated annual mean terrestrial GPP and total respiration are slightly

  8. A heat transfer model for incorporating carbon foam fabrics in firefighter's garment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgafy, Ahmed; Mishra, Sarthak

    2014-04-01

    In the present work, a numerical study was performed to predict and investigate the performance of a thermal protection system for firefighter's garment consisting of carbon foam fabric in both the outer shell and the thermal liner elements. Several types of carbon foam with different thermal conductivity, porosity, and density were introduced to conduct a parametric study. Additionally, the thickness of the introduced carbon foam fabrics was varied to acquire optimum design. Simulation was conducted for a square planar 2D geometry of the clothing comprising of different fabric layers and a double precision pressure-based implicit solver, under transient state condition was used. The new anticipated thermal protection system was tested under harsh thermal environmental conditions that firefighters are exposed to. The parametric study showed that employing carbon foam fabric with one set of designed parameters, weight reduction of 33 % in the outer shell, 56 % in the thermal liner and a temperature reduction of 2 % at the inner edge of the garment was achieved when compared to the traditional firefighter garment model used by Song et al. (Int J Occup Saf Ergon 14:89-106, 2008). Also, carbon foam fabric with another set of designed parameters resulted in a weight reduction of 25 % in the outer shell, 28 % in the thermal liner and a temperature reduction of 6 % at the inner edge of the garment. As a result, carbon foam fabrics make the firefighter's garment more protective, durable, and lighter in weight.

  9. Modelling the nonlinear behaviour of double walled carbon nanotube based resonator with curvature factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ajay M.; Joshi, Anand Y.

    2016-10-01

    This paper deals with the nonlinear vibration analysis of a double walled carbon nanotube based mass sensor with curvature factor or waviness, which is doubly clamped at a source and a drain. Nonlinear vibrational behaviour of a double-walled carbon nanotube excited harmonically near its primary resonance is considered. The double walled carbon nanotube is harmonically excited by the addition of an excitation force. The modelling involves stretching of the mid plane and damping as per phenomenon. The equation of motion involves four nonlinear terms for inner and outer tubes of DWCNT due to the curved geometry and the stretching of the central plane due to the boundary conditions. The vibrational behaviour of the double walled carbon nanotube with different surface deviations along its axis is analyzed in the context of the time response, Poincaré maps and Fast Fourier Transformation diagrams. The appearance of instability and chaos in the dynamic response is observed as the curvature factor on double walled carbon nanotube is changed. The phenomenon of Periodic doubling and intermittency are observed as the pathway to chaos. The regions of periodic, sub-harmonic and chaotic behaviour are clearly seen to be dependent on added mass and the curvature factors in the double walled carbon nanotube. Poincaré maps and frequency spectra are used to explicate and to demonstrate the miscellany of the system behaviour. With the increase in the curvature factor system excitations increases and results in an increase of the vibration amplitude with reduction in excitation frequency.

  10. Representation of Dissolved Organic Carbon in the JULES Dynamic Global Vegetation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhavali, Mahdi; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Guenet, Bertrand; Ciais, Philip

    2017-04-01

    Current global models of the carbon cycle consider only vertical gas exchanges between terrestrial or oceanic reservoirs and the atmosphere, hence not considering lateral transport of carbon from the continent to the oceans. This also means that such models implicitly consider that all the CO2 which is not respired to the atmosphere is stored on land, hence overestimating the land sink of carbon. Moving toward a boundless carbon cycle that is integrating the whole continuum from land to ocean to atmosphere is needed in order to better understand Earth's carbon cycle and to make more reliable projection of its future. Here we present an original representation of Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) processes in the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES). The standard version of JULES represent energy, water and carbon cycles and exchanges with the atmosphere, but only account for water run-off, not including export of carbon from terrestrial ecosystems to the aquatic environments. The aim of the project is to include in JULES a representation of DOC production in terrestrial soils, due to incomplete decomposition of organic matter, its decomposition to the atmosphere, and its export to the river network by leaching. In new developed version of JULES (JULES-DOCM), DOC pools, based on their decomposition rate, are classified into labile and recalcitrant within 3 meters of soil. Based on turnover rate, DOC coming from plant material pools and microbial biomass is directed to labile pool, while DOC from humus is directed to recalcitrant pool. Both of these pools have free (dissolved) and locked (adsorbed) form where just the free pool is subjected to decomposition and leaching. DOC production and decomposition are controlled by rate modifiers (moisture, temperature, vegetation fraction and decomposition rate) at each soil layer. Decomposed DOC is released to the atmosphere following a fixed carbon use efficiency. Leaching accounts for both surface (runoff) and

  11. A simplified adsorption model for water vapor adsorption on activated carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚小龙; 李立清; 李海龙; 马卫武

    2014-01-01

    A simplified model was developed to describe the water vapor adsorption on activated carbon. The development of the simplified model was started from the original model proposed by DO and his co-workers. Two different kinds of carbon materials were prepared for water vapor adsorption, and the adsorption experiments were conducted at different temperatures (20-50 °C) and relative humidities (5%-99%) to test the model. It is shown that the amount of adsorbed water vapor in micropore decreases with the temperature increasing, and the water molecules form larger water clusters around the functional group as the temperature is up to a higher value. The simplified model describes reasonably well for all the experimental data. According to the fitted values, the parameters of simplified model were represented by the temperature and then the model was used to calculate the water vapor adsorption amount at 25 °C and 35 °C. The results show that the model can get relatively accurate values to calculate the water vapor adsorption on activated carbon.

  12. Carbonate fracture stratigraphy: An integrated outcrop and 2D discrete element modelling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Guy; Finch, Emma

    2013-04-01

    Constraining fracture stratigraphy is important as natural fractures control primary fluid flow in low matrix permeability naturally fractured carbonate hydrocarbon reservoirs. Away from the influence of folds and faults, stratigraphic controls are known to be the major control on fracture networks. The fracture stratigraphy of carbonate nodular-chert rhythmite successions are investigated using a Discrete Element Modelling (DEM) technique and validated against observations from outcrops. Comparisons are made to the naturally fractured carbonates of the Eocene Thebes Formation exposed in the west central Sinai of Egypt, which form reservoir rocks in the nearby East Ras Budran Field. DEM allows mechanical stratigraphy to be defined as the starting conditions from which forward numerical modelling can generate fracture stratigraphy. DEM can incorporate both stratigraphic and lateral heterogeneity, and enable mechanical and fracture stratigraphy to be characterised separately. Stratally bound stratified chert nodules below bedding surfaces generate closely spaced lateral heterogeneity in physical properties at stratigraphic mechanical interfaces. This generates extra complexity in natural fracture networks in addition to that caused by bed thickness and lithological physical properties. A series of representative geologically appropriate synthetic mechanical stratigraphic models were tested. Fracture networks generated in 15 DEM experiments designed to isolate and constrain the effects of nodular chert rhythmites on carbonate fracture stratigraphy are presented. The discrete element media used to model the elastic strengths of rocks contain 72,866 individual elements. Mechanical stratigraphies and the fracture networks generated are placed in a sequence stratigraphic framework. Nodular chert rhythmite successions are shown to be a distinct type of naturally fractured carbonate reservoir. Qualitative stratigraphic rules for predicting the distribution, lengths, spacing

  13. Geochemical modeling and assessment of leaching from carbonated municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Chen, Qi; Jamro, Imtiaz Ali; Li, Rundong; Li, Yanlong; Li, Shaobai; Luan, Jingde

    2016-06-01

    Municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ashes are characterized by high calcium oxide (CaO) content. Carbon dioxide (CO2) adsorption by MSWI fly ash was discussed based on thermogravimetry (TG)/differential thermal analysis (DTA), minerology analysis, and adapting the Stenoir equation. TG/DTA analysis showed that the weight gain of the fly ash below 440 °C was as high as 5.70 %. An adapted Stenoir equation for MSWI fly ash was discussed. The chloride in MSWI fly ash has a major impact on CO2 adsorption by MSWI fly ash or air pollution control (APC) residues. Geochemical modeling of the critical trace elements copper (Cu), cadmium (Cd), zinc (Zn), lead (Pb), and antimony (Sb) before and after carbonation was performed using a thermodynamic equilibrium model for solubility and a surface complexation model for metal sorption. Leaching of critical trace elements was generally found to be strongly dependent on the degree of carbonation attained, and their solubility appeared to be controlled by several minerals. Adsorption on ferrum (Fe) and aluminum (Al) colloids was also responsible for removal of the trace elements Cd, Pb, and Sb. We used Hakanson's potential ecological risk index (HPERI) to evaluate the risk of trace element leaching in general. The results demonstrate that the ecological risk showed a V-shaped dependency on pH; the optimum pH of the carbonated fly ash was found to be 10.3-11, resulting from the optimum carbonation (liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratio = 0.25, carbonation duration = ∼30-48 h). The dataset and modeling results presented here provide a contribution to assessing the leaching behavior of MSWI fly ash under a wide range of conditions.

  14. Branched pore kinetic model analysis of geosmin adsorption on super-powdered activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Ando, Naoya; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Matsushita, Taku; Ohno, Koichi

    2009-07-01

    Super-powdered activated carbon (S-PAC) is activated carbon of much finer particle size than powdered activated carbon (PAC). Geosmin is a naturally occurring taste and odor compound that impairs aesthetic quality in drinking water. Experiments on geosmin adsorption on S-PAC and PAC were conducted, and the results using adsorption kinetic models were analyzed. PAC pulverization, which produced the S-PAC, did not change geosmin adsorption capacity, and geosmin adsorption capacities did not differ between S-PAC and PAC. Geosmin adsorption kinetics, however, were much higher on S-PAC than on PAC. A solution to the branched pore kinetic model (BPKM) was developed, and experimental adsorption kinetic data were analyzed by BPKM and by a homogeneous surface diffusion model (HSDM). The HSDM describing the adsorption behavior of geosmin required different surface diffusivity values for S-PAC and PAC, which indicated a decrease in surface diffusivity apparently associated with activated carbon particle size. The BPKM, consisting of macropore diffusion followed by mass transfer from macropore to micropore, successfully described the batch adsorption kinetics on S-PAC and PAC with the same set of model parameter values, including surface diffusivity. The BPKM simulation clearly showed geosmin removal was improved as activated carbon particle size decreased. The simulation also implied that the rate-determining step in overall mass transfer shifted from intraparticle radial diffusion in macropores to local mass transfer from macropore to micropore. Sensitivity analysis showed that adsorptive removal of geosmin improved with decrease in activated carbon particle size down to 1microm, but further particle size reduction produced little improvement.

  15. Modelling of quenching process of medium-carbon steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kulawik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper refers to numerical modelling of the hardening process of steel C45. In the algorithm the heat transfer equation, equilibrium equations and macroscopic model of phase transformations, basis of CCT diagrams, are used. Coupling between basic phenomena of hardening process is considered, in particular the influence of latent heat on the fields of temperature, and also thermal, structural and plastic strains and transformation - induced plasticity in the model is taken into account as well. The method of calculating the phase transformation during heating applied by the authors uses data from the continuous heating diagram (CHT. The homogenization line of austenite determines the end of heating. The influence of austenisation temperature on the kinetics of transformations is taken into account. To calculate the increase of martensite content Koistinen-Marburger formula is used. Field of stresses and strains are obtained from solutions of finite element method equations of equilibrium in increment form.

  16. Analyzing the causes and spatial pattern of the European 2003 carbon flux anomaly using seven models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vetter

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Globally, the year 2003 is associated with one of the largest atmospheric CO2 rises on record. In the same year, Europe experienced an anomalously strong flux of CO2 from the land to the atmosphere associated with an exceptionally dry and hot summer in Western and Central Europe. In this study we analyze the magnitude of this carbon flux anomaly and key driving ecosystem processes using simulations of seven terrestrial ecosystem models of different complexity and types (process-oriented and diagnostic. We address the following questions: (1 how large were deviations in the net European carbon flux in 2003 relative to a short-term baseline (1998–2002 and to longer-term variations in annual fluxes (1980 to 2005, (2 which European regions exhibited the largest changes in carbon fluxes during the growing season 2003, and (3 which ecosystem processes controlled the carbon balance anomaly .

    In most models the prominence of 2003 anomaly in carbon fluxes declined with lengthening of the reference period from one year to 16 years. The 2003 anomaly for annual net carbon fluxes ranged between 0.35 and –0.63 Pg C for a reference period of one year and between 0.17 and –0.37 Pg C for a reference period of 16 years for the whole Europe.

    In Western and Central Europe, the anomaly in simulated net ecosystem productivity (NEP over the growing season in 2003 was outside the 1σ variance bound of the carbon flux anomalies for 1980–2005 in all models. The estimated anomaly in net carbon flux ranged between –42 and –158 Tg C for Western Europe and between 24 and –129 Tg C for Central Europe depending on the model used. All models responded to a dipole pattern of the climate anomaly in 2003. In Western and Central Europe NEP was reduced due to heat and drought. In contrast, lower than normal temperatures and higher air humidity decreased NEP over Northeastern Europe. While models agree on the sign of changes in

  17. Carbon sequestration via reaction with basaltic rocks: geochemical modeling and experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Thomas, Burt; Bischoff, James L.; Palandri, James

    2012-01-01

    Basaltic rocks are potential repositories for sequestering carbon dioxide (CO2) because of their capacity for trapping CO2 in carbonate minerals. We carried out a series of thermodynamic equilibrium models and high pressure experiments, reacting basalt with CO2-charged fluids over a range of conditions from 50 to 200 °C at 300 bar. Results indicate basalt has a high reactivity to CO2 acidified brine. Carbon dioxide is taken up from solution at all temperatures from 50 to 200 °C, 300 bar, but the maximum extent and rate of reaction occurs at 100 °C, 300 bar. Reaction path simulations utilizing the geochemical modeling program CHILLER predicted an equilibrium carbonate alteration assemblage of calcite, magnesite, and siderite, but the only secondary carbonate identified in the experiments was a ferroan magnesite. The amount of uptake at 100 °C, 300 bar ranged from 8% by weight for a typical tholeite to 26% for a picrite. The actual amount of CO2 uptake and extent of rock alteration coincides directly with the magnesium content of the rock suggesting that overall reaction extent is controlled by bulk basalt Mg content. In terms of sequestering CO2, an average basaltic MgO content of 8% is equivalent to 2.6 × 108 metric ton CO2/km3 basalt.

  18. Multi-model analysis of terrestrial carbon cycles in Japan: reducing uncertainties in model outputs among different terrestrial biosphere models using flux observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ichii

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial biosphere models show large uncertainties when simulating carbon and water cycles, and reducing these uncertainties is a priority for developing more accurate estimates of both terrestrial ecosystem statuses and future climate changes. To reduce uncertainties and improve the understanding of these carbon budgets, we investigated the ability of flux datasets to improve model simulations and reduce variabilities among multi-model outputs of terrestrial biosphere models in Japan. Using 9 terrestrial biosphere models (Support Vector Machine-based regressions, TOPS, CASA, VISIT, Biome-BGC, DAYCENT, SEIB, LPJ, and TRIFFID, we conducted two simulations: (1 point simulations at four flux sites in Japan and (2 spatial simulations for Japan with a default model (based on original settings and an improved model (based on calibration using flux observations. Generally, models using default model settings showed large deviations in model outputs from observation with large model-by-model variability. However, after we calibrated the model parameters using flux observations (GPP, RE and NEP, most models successfully simulated seasonal variations in the carbon cycle, with less variability among models. We also found that interannual variations in the carbon cycle are mostly consistent among models and observations. Spatial analysis also showed a large reduction in the variability among model outputs, and model calibration using flux observations significantly improved the model outputs. These results show that to reduce uncertainties among terrestrial biosphere models, we need to conduct careful validation and calibration with available flux observations. Flux observation data significantly improved terrestrial biosphere models, not only on a point scale but also on spatial scales.

  19. Evaluation and selection of sensing materials for carbon dioxide (CO2) sensor by molecular modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, X.P.; Wong, C.K.Y.; Yuan, C.A.; Zhang, G.Q.

    2011-01-01

    We report a molecular modeling study to evaluate and select conducting polymers (CPs) as the sensing materials of carbon dioxide (CO2) sensor. The interaction between polymer and gas and the adsorption of the gas molecules in the polymer matrix are investigated. Polymers considered for this work

  20. Evaluation and selection of sensing materials for carbon dioxide (CO 2) sensor by molecular modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, X.P.; Wong, C.K.Y.; Yuan, C.A.; Zhang, G.Q.

    2011-01-01

    We report a molecular modeling study to evaluate and select conducting polymers (CPs) as the sensing materials of carbon dioxide (CO2) sensor. The interaction between polymer and gas and the adsorption of the gas molecules in the polymer matrix are investigated. Polymers considered for this work

  1. Reactive transport modelling of biogeochemical processes and carbon isotope geochemistry inside a landfill leachate plume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Breukelen, Boris M; Griffioen, Jasper; Röling, Wilfred F M; van Verseveld, Henk W

    2004-06-01

    The biogeochemical processes governing leachate attenuation inside a landfill leachate plume (Banisveld, the Netherlands) were revealed and quantified using the 1D reactive transport model PHREEQC-2. Biodegradation of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was simulated assuming first-order oxidation of two DOC fractions with different reactivity, and was coupled to reductive dissolution of iron oxide. The following secondary geochemical processes were required in the model to match observations: kinetic precipitation of calcite and siderite, cation exchange, proton buffering and degassing. Rate constants for DOC oxidation and carbonate mineral precipitation were determined, and other model parameters were optimized using the nonlinear optimization program PEST by means of matching hydrochemical observations closely (pH, DIC, DOC, Na, K, Ca, Mg, NH4, Fe(II), SO4, Cl, CH4, saturation index of calcite and siderite). The modelling demonstrated the relevance and impact of various secondary geochemical processes on leachate plume evolution. Concomitant precipitation of siderite masked the act of iron reduction. Cation exchange resulted in release of Fe(II) from the pristine anaerobic aquifer to the leachate. Degassing, triggered by elevated CO2 pressures caused by carbonate precipitation and proton buffering at the front of the plume, explained the observed downstream decrease in methane concentration. Simulation of the carbon isotope geochemistry independently supported the proposed reaction network.

  2. Evaluation and selection of sensing materials for carbon dioxide (CO 2) sensor by molecular modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, X.P.; Wong, C.K.Y.; Yuan, C.A.; Zhang, G.Q.

    2011-01-01

    We report a molecular modeling study to evaluate and select conducting polymers (CPs) as the sensing materials of carbon dioxide (CO2) sensor. The interaction between polymer and gas and the adsorption of the gas molecules in the polymer matrix are investigated. Polymers considered for this work inc

  3. Evaluation and selection of sensing materials for carbon dioxide (CO2) sensor by molecular modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, X.P.; Wong, C.K.Y.; Yuan, C.A.; Zhang, G.Q.

    2011-01-01

    We report a molecular modeling study to evaluate and select conducting polymers (CPs) as the sensing materials of carbon dioxide (CO2) sensor. The interaction between polymer and gas and the adsorption of the gas molecules in the polymer matrix are investigated. Polymers considered for this work inc

  4. Ecosystem modeling of methane and carbon dioxide fluxes for boreal forest sites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Christopher Potter; Jill Bubier; Patrick Crill; Peter Lafleur

    2001-01-01

      Resume : Les flux quotidiens predits par un modele ecosystemique pour l'eau, le dioxyde de carbone et le methane ont ete compares aux mesures prises sur le terrain en 1994 et 1996 dans le cadre de l'etude...

  5. Saturation of the third-order polarizability of carbon nanotubes characterized by a dipole interaction model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensen, L; Astrand, PO; Mikkelsen, KV

    An atomic dipole interaction model has been used for calculating the second hyperpolarizability of carbon nanotubes on a length scale up to 75 nm. It is demonstrated that an atomistic representation of mesoscale systems such as nanotubes can be used to obtain a cubic response property up to a size

  6. MODELLING OF CARBON MONOXIDE AIR POLLUTION IN LARG CITIES BY EVALUETION OF SPECTRAL LANDSAT8 IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hamzelo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Air pollution in large cities is one of the major problems that resolve and reduce it need multiple applications and environmental management. Of The main sources of this pollution is industrial activities, urban and transport that enter large amounts of contaminants into the air and reduces its quality. With Variety of pollutants and high volume manufacturing, local distribution of manufacturing centers, Testing and measuring emissions is difficult. Substances such as carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, and unburned hydrocarbons and lead compounds are substances that cause air pollution and carbon monoxide is most important. Today, data exchange systems, processing, analysis and modeling is of important pillars of management system and air quality control. In this study, using the spectral signature of carbon monoxide gas as the most efficient gas pollution LANDSAT8 images in order that have better spatial resolution than appropriate spectral bands and weather meters،SAM classification algorithm and Geographic Information System (GIS , spatial distribution of carbon monoxide gas in Tehran over a period of one year from the beginning of 2014 until the beginning of 2015 at 11 map have modeled and then to the model valuation ،created maps were compared with the map provided by the Tehran quality comparison air company. Compare involved plans did with the error matrix and results in 4 types of care; overall, producer, user and kappa coefficient was investigated. Results of average accuracy were about than 80%, which indicates the fit method and data used for modeling.

  7. Modelling of Carbon Monoxide Air Pollution in Larg Cities by Evaluetion of Spectral LANDSAT8 Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzelo, M.; Gharagozlou, A.; Sadeghian, S.; Baikpour, S. H.; Rajabi, A.

    2015-12-01

    Air pollution in large cities is one of the major problems that resolve and reduce it need multiple applications and environmental management. Of The main sources of this pollution is industrial activities, urban and transport that enter large amounts of contaminants into the air and reduces its quality. With Variety of pollutants and high volume manufacturing, local distribution of manufacturing centers, Testing and measuring emissions is difficult. Substances such as carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, and unburned hydrocarbons and lead compounds are substances that cause air pollution and carbon monoxide is most important. Today, data exchange systems, processing, analysis and modeling is of important pillars of management system and air quality control. In this study, using the spectral signature of carbon monoxide gas as the most efficient gas pollution LANDSAT8 images in order that have better spatial resolution than appropriate spectral bands and weather meters،SAM classification algorithm and Geographic Information System (GIS ), spatial distribution of carbon monoxide gas in Tehran over a period of one year from the beginning of 2014 until the beginning of 2015 at 11 map have modeled and then to the model valuation ،created maps were compared with the map provided by the Tehran quality comparison air company. Compare involved plans did with the error matrix and results in 4 types of care; overall, producer, user and kappa coefficient was investigated. Results of average accuracy were about than 80%, which indicates the fit method and data used for modeling.

  8. Estimating global carbon uptake by lichens and bryophytes with a process-based model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porada, P.; Weber, B.; Elbert, W.; Pöschl, U.; Kleidon, A.

    2013-11-01

    Lichens and bryophytes are abundant globally and they may even form the dominant autotrophs in (sub)polar ecosystems, in deserts and at high altitudes. Moreover, they can be found in large amounts as epiphytes in old-growth forests. Here, we present the first process-based model which estimates the net carbon uptake by these organisms at the global scale, thus assessing their significance for biogeochemical cycles. The model uses gridded climate data and key properties of the habitat (e.g. disturbance intervals) to predict processes which control net carbon uptake, namely photosynthesis, respiration, water uptake and evaporation. It relies on equations used in many dynamical vegetation models, which are combined with concepts specific to lichens and bryophytes, such as poikilohydry or the effect of water content on CO2 diffusivity. To incorporate the great functional variation of lichens and bryophytes at the global scale, the model parameters are characterised by broad ranges of possible values instead of a single, globally uniform value. The predicted terrestrial net uptake of 0.34 to 3.3 Gt yr-1 of carbon and global patterns of productivity are in accordance with empirically-derived estimates. Considering that the assimilated carbon can be invested in processes such as weathering or nitrogen fixation, lichens and bryophytes may play a significant role in biogeochemical cycles.

  9. Estimating global carbon uptake by lichens and bryophytes with a process-based model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Porada

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Lichens and bryophytes are abundant globally and they may even form the dominant autotrophs in (subpolar ecosystems, in deserts and at high altitudes. Moreover, they can be found in large amounts as epiphytes in old-growth forests. Here, we present the first process-based model which estimates the net carbon uptake by these organisms at the global scale, thus assessing their significance for biogeochemical cycles. The model uses gridded climate data and key properties of the habitat (e.g. disturbance intervals to predict processes which control net carbon uptake, namely photosynthesis, respiration, water uptake and evaporation. It relies on equations used in many dynamical vegetation models, which are combined with concepts specific to lichens and bryophytes, such as poikilohydry or the effect of water content on CO2 diffusivity. To incorporate the great functional variation of lichens and bryophytes at the global scale, the model parameters are characterised by broad ranges of possible values instead of a single, globally uniform value. The predicted terrestrial net carbon uptake of 0.34 to 3.3 (Gt C yr−1 and global patterns of productivity are in accordance with empirically-derived estimates. Considering that the assimilated carbon can be invested in processes such as weathering or nitrogen fixation, lichens and bryophytes may play a significant role in biogeochemical cycles.

  10. Distribution and Orientation of Carbon Fibers in Polylactic Acid Parts Produced by Fused Deposition Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofstätter, Thomas; W. Gutmann, Ingomar; Koch, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is the understanding of the fiber orientation by investigations in respect to the inner configuration of a polylactic acid matrix reinforced with short carbon fibers after a fused deposition modeling extrusion process. The final parts were analyzed by X-ray, tomography, and ...

  11. Economic modelling approaches to cost estimates for the control of carbon dioxide emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Z.X.; Folmer, H.

    1998-01-01

    This article gives an assessment of the relative strengths and weaknesses of a variety of economic modelling approaches commonly used for cost estimates for limiting carbon emissions, including the ad hoc approach, dynamic optimization approach, input-output approach, macroeconomic approach, computa

  12. Modeling of the Electro-Mechanical Response of Carbon Nanotubes: Molecular Dynamics and Transport Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svizhenko, Alexel; Anantram, M. P.; Maiti, Amitesh

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on the modeling of the electromechanical response of carbon nanotubes, utilizing molecular dynamics and transport calculations. The topics include: 1) Simulations of the experiment; 2) Effect of diameter, length and temperature; and 3) Study of sp3 coordination-"The Table experiment".

  13. Analyzing the ecosystem carbon dynamics of four European coniferous forests using a biogeochemistry model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Churkina, G.; Tenhunen, J.; Thornton, P.; Falge, E.; Elbers, J.A.; Erhard, M.; Grünwald, T.; Kowalski, A.; Rannik, Ü.; Sprinz, D.

    2003-01-01

    This paper provides the first steps toward a regional-scale analysis of carbon (C) budgets. We explore the ability of the ecosystem model BIOME-BGC to estimate the daily and annual C dynamics of four European coniferous forests and shifts in these dynamics in response to changing environmental

  14. Black carbon fractal morphology and short-wave radiative impact: a modelling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kahnert

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the impact of the morphological properties of freshly emitted black carbon aerosols on optical properties and on radiative forcing. To this end, we model the optical properties of fractal black carbon aggregates by use of numerically exact solutions to Maxwell's equations within a spectral range from the UVC to the mid-IR. The results are coupled to radiative transfer computations, in which we consider six realistic case studies representing different atmospheric pollution conditions and surface albedos. The spectrally integrated radiative impacts of black carbon are compared for two different fractal morphologies, which brace the range of recently reported experimental observations of black carbon fractal structures. We also gauge our results by performing corresponding calculations based on the homogeneous sphere approximation, which is commonly employed in climate models. We find that at top of atmosphere the aggregate models yield radiative impacts that can be as much as 2 times higher than those based on the homogeneous sphere approximation. An aggregate model with a low fractal dimension can predict a radiative impact that is higher than that obtained with a high fractal dimension by a factor ranging between 1.1–1.6. Although the lower end of this scale seems like a rather small effect, a closer analysis reveals that the single scattering optical properties of more compact and more lacy aggregates differ considerably. In radiative flux computations there can be a partial cancellation due to the opposing effects of different error sources. However, this cancellation effect can strongly depend on atmospheric conditions and is therefore quite unpredictable. We conclude that the fractal morphology of black carbon aerosols and their fractal parameters can have a profound impact on their radiative forcing effect, and that the use of the homogeneous sphere model introduces unacceptably high biases in radiative impact studies. We

  15. Household energy consumption and carbon emissions for sustainable cities – A critical review of modelling approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G. Oladokun

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to conduct a review of how household energy consumption and carbon emissions (HECCE modelling paradigms have evolved over the years. This is achieved by adopting the literature review methodology for the study. The paper first reviewed the previous studies that are serving as the theoretical framework underpinning the HECCE models. Further to this, the paper identified an array of energy models that have evolved over the years together with their capability of analysing energy consumption and their associated carbon emission trends in housing sector of the economy. The results of the study showed that econometric (mainly top-down, building physics, and statistical (mainly bottom-up methods are the existing approaches that have found application in modelling HECCE issues. However, a number of limitations were noticed in these existing modelling techniques. These are (1 lack of transparency in the model algorithms, (2 inability to account for the complex, interdependencies, and dynamic nature of the issue of energy consumption and carbon emissions, (3 limited evidence to show for the occupants–dwelling interactions, and (4 lack of enough capacity to accommodate qualitative data input. And as such, the study concluded that there is the need to scout for more robust and sophisticated modelling approaches that take into consideration the kind of complexity involved in issues relating to HECCE.

  16. A Model-Based Analysis of Nitrogen Deposition: Effects on Forest Carbon Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezi, S.; Medlyn, B. E.; Tonon, G.; Magnani, F.

    2009-04-01

    Over the last 150 years nitrogen deposition has increased, especially in the northern hemisphere, mainly due to the use of fossil fuels, deforestation and agricultural practices. Although the impact of this increase on the terrestrial carbon cycle is still uncertain, it is likely that this large perturbation of the global nitrogen cycle will have important effects on carbon cycling, particularly via impacts on forest carbon storage. In the present work we investigated qualitatively the overall response of forest carbon sequestration to nitrogen deposition, and the relative importance of different mechanisms that bring about this response. For this purpose we used the G'DAY forest carbon-nitrogen cycling model (Comins and McMurtrie 1993), introducing some new assumptions which focus on the effect of nitrogen deposition. Specifically the new assumptions are: (i) foliar litterfall and specific leaf area (SLA) are functions of leaf nitrogen concentration; (ii) belowground C allocation is a function of net primary production (NPP); (iii) forest canopies can directly take up nitrogen; (iv) management of forests occurs; (v) leaching occurs only for nitrate nitrogen. We investigated the effect of each assumption on net ecosystem production (NEP), with a step increase in nitrogen deposition from a steady state of 0.4 gN m-2 yr-1 to 2 gN m-2 yr-1, and then running the old and new model versions for different nitrogen deposition levels. Our analysis showed that nitrogen deposition can have a large effect on forest carbon storage at ecosystem level. In particular the effect of the assumptions (ii), (iii) and (iv) seem to be of greater importance, giving rise to a markedly higher level of forest carbon sequestration than in their absence. On the contrary assumptions (i) and (v) seem not to have any particular effect on the NEP simulated. Finally, running the models for different levels of nitrogen deposition showed that estimating forest carbon exchange without taking into

  17. General hypothesis and shell model for the synthesis of semiconductor nanotubes, including carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, S. Noor

    2010-09-01

    Semiconductor nanotubes, including carbon nanotubes, have vast potential for new technology development. The fundamental physics and growth kinetics of these nanotubes are still obscured. Various models developed to elucidate the growth suffer from limited applicability. An in-depth investigation of the fundamentals of nanotube growth has, therefore, been carried out. For this investigation, various features of nanotube growth, and the role of the foreign element catalytic agent (FECA) in this growth, have been considered. Observed growth anomalies have been analyzed. Based on this analysis, a new shell model and a general hypothesis have been proposed for the growth. The essential element of the shell model is the seed generated from segregation during growth. The seed structure has been defined, and the formation of droplet from this seed has been described. A modified definition of the droplet exhibiting adhesive properties has also been presented. Various characteristics of the droplet, required for alignment and organization of atoms into tubular forms, have been discussed. Employing the shell model, plausible scenarios for the formation of carbon nanotubes, and the variation in the characteristics of these carbon nanotubes have been articulated. The experimental evidences, for example, for the formation of shell around a core, dipole characteristics of the seed, and the existence of nanopores in the seed, have been presented. They appear to justify the validity of the proposed model. The diversities of nanotube characteristics, fundamentals underlying the creation of bamboo-shaped carbon nanotubes, and the impurity generation on the surface of carbon nanotubes have been elucidated. The catalytic action of FECA on growth has been quantified. The applicability of the proposed model to the nanotube growth by a variety of mechanisms has been elaborated. These mechanisms include the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism, the oxide-assisted growth mechanism, the self

  18. Carbon Sequestration in Saline Aquifers: Modeling Diffusive and Convective Transport Of a Carbon-­Dioxide Cap

    KAUST Repository

    Allen, Rebecca

    2011-05-01

    An increase in the earth’s surface temperature has been directly linked to the rise of carbon dioxide (CO2) levels In the atmosphere and an enhanced greenhouse effect. CO2 sequestration is one of the proposed mitigation Strategies in the effort to reduce atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Globally speaking, saline aquifers provide an adequate storage capacity for the world’s carbon emissions, and CO2 sequestration projects are currently underway in countries such as Norway, Germany, Japan, USA, and others. Numerical simulators serve as predictive tools for CO2 storage, yet must model fluid transport behavior while coupling different transport processes together accurately. With regards to CO2 sequestration, an extensive amount of research has been done on the diffusive-convective transport that occurs under a cap of CO2-saturated fluid, which results after CO2 is injected into an aquifer and spreads laterally under an area of low permeability. The diffusive-convective modeling reveals an enhanced storage capacity in saline aquifers, due to the density increase between pure fluid and CO2‐saturated fluid. This work presents the transport modeling equations that are used for diffusive- convective modeling. A cell-centered finite difference method is used, and simulations are run using MATLAB. Two cases are explored in order to compare the results from this work’s self-generated code with the results published in literature. Simulation results match relatively well, and the discrepancy for a delayed onset time of convective transport observed in this work is attributed to numerical artifacts. In fact, onset time in this work is directly attributed to the instability of the physical system: this instability arises from non-linear coupling of fluid flow, transport, and convection, but is triggered by numerical errors in these simulations. Results from this work enable the computation of a value for the numerical constant that appears in the onset time equation that

  19. A Nonlocal Model for Carbon Nanotubes under Axial Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Barretta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Various beam theories are formulated in literature using the nonlocal differential constitutive relation proposed by Eringen. A new variational framework is derived in the present paper by following a consistent thermodynamic approach based on a nonlocal constitutive law of gradient-type. Contrary to the results obtained by Eringen, the new model exhibits the nonlocality effect also for constant axial load distributions. The treatment can be adopted to get new benchmarks for numerical analyses.

  20. Mechanical Properties of Graphene Nanoplatelet/Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Hybrid Composites: Multiscale Modeling and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadden, C. M.; Klimek-McDonald, D. R.; Pineda, E. J.; King, J. A.; Reichanadter, A. M.; Miskioglu, I.; Gowtham, S.; Odegard, G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Because of the relatively high specific mechanical properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composite materials, they are often used as structural components in aerospace applications. Graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) can be added to the epoxy matrix to improve the overall mechanical properties of the composite. The resulting GNP/carbon fiber/epoxy hybrid composites have been studied using multiscale modeling to determine the influence of GNP volume fraction, epoxy crosslink density, and GNP dispersion on the mechanical performance. The hierarchical multiscale modeling approach developed herein includes Molecular Dynamics (MD) and micromechanical modeling, and it is validated with experimental testing of the same hybrid composite material system. The results indicate that the multiscale modeling approach is accurate and provides physical insight into the composite mechanical behavior. Also, the results quantify the substantial impact of GNP volume fraction and dispersion on the transverse mechanical properties of the hybrid composite, while the effect on the axial properties is shown to be insignificant.

  1. Mechanical Properties of Graphene Nanoplatelet Carbon Fiber Epoxy Hybrid Composites: Multiscale Modeling and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadden, Cameron M.; Klimek-McDonald, Danielle R.; Pineda, Evan J.; King, Julie A.; Reichanadter, Alex M.; Miskioglu, Ibrahim; Gowtham, S.; Odegard, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    Because of the relatively high specific mechanical properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composite materials, they are often used as structural components in aerospace applications. Graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) can be added to the epoxy matrix to improve the overall mechanical properties of the composite. The resulting GNP/carbon fiber/epoxy hybrid composites have been studied using multiscale modeling to determine the influence of GNP volume fraction, epoxy crosslink density, and GNP dispersion on the mechanical performance. The hierarchical multiscale modeling approach developed herein includes Molecular Dynamics (MD) and micromechanical modeling, and it is validated with experimental testing of the same hybrid composite material system. The results indicate that the multiscale modeling approach is accurate and provides physical insight into the composite mechanical behavior. Also, the results quantify the substantial impact of GNP volume fraction and dispersion on the transverse mechanical properties of the hybrid composite, while the effect on the axial properties is shown to be insignificant.

  2. Mathematical modeling and validation of the carburizing of low carbon steels