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Sample records for modeling phase ii

  1. Application of Bayesian hierarchical models for phase I/II clinical trials in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yada, Shinjo; Hamada, Chikuma

    2017-03-01

    Treatment during cancer clinical trials sometimes involves the combination of multiple drugs. In addition, in recent years there has been a trend toward phase I/II trials in which a phase I and a phase II trial are combined into a single trial to accelerate drug development. Methods for the seamless combination of phases I and II parts are currently under investigation. In the phase II part, adaptive randomization on the basis of patient efficacy outcomes allocates more patients to the dose combinations considered to have higher efficacy. Patient toxicity outcomes are used for determining admissibility to each dose combination and are not used for selection of the dose combination itself. In cases where the objective is not to find the optimum dose combination solely for efficacy but regarding both toxicity and efficacy, the need exists to allocate patients to dose combinations with consideration of the balance of existing trade-offs between toxicity and efficacy. We propose a Bayesian hierarchical model and an adaptive randomization with consideration for the relationship with toxicity and efficacy. Using the toxicity and efficacy outcomes of patients, the Bayesian hierarchical model is used to estimate the toxicity probability and efficacy probability in each of the dose combinations. Here, we use Bayesian moving-reference adaptive randomization on the basis of desirability computed from the obtained estimator. Computer simulations suggest that the proposed method will likely recommend a higher percentage of target dose combinations than a previously proposed method.

  2. Phase II Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuknecht, Nate [Project Manager; White, David [Principle Investigator; Hoste, Graeme [Research Engineer

    2014-09-11

    The SkyTrough DSP will advance the state-of-the-art in parabolic troughs for utility applications, with a larger aperture, higher operating temperature, and lower cost. The goal of this project was to develop a parabolic trough collector that enables solar electricity generation in the 2020 marketplace for a 216MWe nameplate baseload power plant. This plant requires an LCOE of 9¢/kWhe, given a capacity factor of 75%, a fossil fuel limit of 15%, a fossil fuel cost of $6.75/MMBtu, $25.00/kWht thermal storage cost, and a domestic installation corresponding to Daggett, CA. The result of our optimization was a trough design of larger aperture and operating temperature than has been fielded in large, utility scale parabolic trough applications: 7.6m width x 150m SCA length (1,118m2 aperture), with four 90mm diameter × 4.7m receivers per mirror module and an operating temperature of 500°C. The results from physical modeling in the System Advisory Model indicate that, for a capacity factor of 75%: The LCOE will be 8.87¢/kWhe. SkyFuel examined the design of almost every parabolic trough component from a perspective of load and performance at aperture areas from 500 to 2,900m2. Aperture-dependent design was combined with fixed quotations for similar parts from the commercialized SkyTrough product, and established an installed cost of $130/m2 in 2020. This project was conducted in two phases. Phase I was a preliminary design, culminating in an optimum trough size and further improvement of an advanced polymeric reflective material. This phase was completed in October of 2011. Phase II has been the detailed engineering design and component testing, which culminated in the fabrication and testing of a single mirror module. Phase II is complete, and this document presents a summary of the comprehensive work.

  3. Microscopic model for the neutron dynamic structure factor of solid methane in phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin Yunchang, E-mail: yunchang.shin@yale.ed [Department of Physics, Indiana University Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Mike Snow, W.; Liu, C.Y.; Lavelle, C.M.; Baxter, David V. [Department of Physics, Indiana University Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States)

    2010-08-21

    We have constructed a microscopic model for the neutron dynamic structure factor S(Q,{omega}) of solid methane in phase II. We expect this model to apply for neutron energies below 1 eV at pressures near 1 bar and temperatures below 20 K where methane possesses both free rotation and hindered rotation modes of the tetrahedral molecules in the unit cell. The model treats the motions of molecular translations, intra-molecular vibrations and the free and hindered rotations of methane molecule as independent. Total scattering cross-sections calculated from the model agree with the cross-section measurements for incident neutron energies of 0.5 meV-1 eV. The effective density of states is extracted from the model. We also present the quantitative calculation of the separate contributions of the two different rotational modes to the inelastic cross-section for different methane temperatures in phase II.

  4. Equilibrium and kinetic modelling of cadmium (II) biosorption by Dried Biomass Aphanothece sp. from aqueous phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awalina; Harimawan, A.; Haryani, G. S.; Setiadi, T.

    2017-05-01

    The Biosorption of cadmium (II) ions on dried biomass of Aphanothece sp.which previously grown in a photobioreactor system with atmospheric carbon dioxide fed input, was studied in a batch system with respect to initial pH, biomass concentration, contact time, and temperature. The biomass exhibited the highest cadmium (II) uptake capacity at 30ºC, initial pH of 8.0±0.2 in 60 minute and initial cadmium (II) ion concentration of 7.76 mg/L. Maximum biosorption capacities were 16.47 mg/g, 54.95 mg/g and 119.05 mg/g at range of initial cadmium (II) 0.96-3.63 mg/L, 1.99-8.10 mg/L and 6.48-54.38 mg/L, respectively. Uptake kinetics follows the pseudo-second order model while equilibrium is best described by Langmuir isotherm model. Isotherms have been used to determine thermodynamic parameter process (free energy change, enthalpy change and entropy change). FTIR analysis of microalgae biomass revealed the presence of amino acids, carboxyl, hydroxyl, sulfhydryl and carbonyl groups, which are responsible for biosorption of metal ions. During repeated sorption/desorption cycles, the ratio of Cd (II) desorption to biosorption decreased from 81% (at first cycle) to only 27% (at the third cycle). Nevertheless, due to its higher biosorption capability than other adsorbent, Aphanothece sp appears to be a good biosorbent for removing metal Cd (II) ions from aqueous phase.

  5. Alternative Models of Service, Centralized Machine Operations. Phase II Report. Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technology Management Corp., Alexandria, VA.

    A study was conducted to determine if the centralization of playback machine operations for the national free library program would be feasible, economical, and desirable. An alternative model of playback machine services was constructed and compared with existing network operations considering both cost and service. The alternative model was…

  6. Aerosols at the Poles: An AeroCom Phase II Multi-Model Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sand, M.; Samset, B. H.

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols from anthropogenic and natural sources reach the Polar Regions through long-range transport. By scattering and absorbing solar radiation, aerosols perturb the energy balance in the region and may have played a significant role in recent Arctic warming. Aerosols in Polar regions are however, poorly constrained in present day global climate models. Here we compare aerosol burdens from simulations with 16 global aerosol models from the Aerocom phase II model inter-comparison project with available observations at both Poles. We show that the annual mean multi-model median Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) is not a bad representation of the measured AOD in Arctic, even though the model spread is large. The models tend to underestimate the spring maximum and overestimate the summer/autumn minimum. We also document the geographical distribution and seasonal cycle of aerosol burdens and shortwave anthropogenic direct radiative forcing (DRF) of the total aerosol and the individual aerosol species; black carbon (BC), sulfate, and primary organic aerosols from fossil/bio fuel and biomass burning, dust and sea-salt. A subset of models has also reported nitrate and secondary organic aerosols. The models produce an annual mean median AOD 0.07 in the Arctic and 0.01 the Antarctic. The Arctic modeled annual mean DRF is slightly negative -0.12 Wm-2, dominated by a positive black carbon DRF during spring and a negative sulfate DRF during summer. We perform sensitivity experiments with one of the Aerocom models (GISS modelE) to investigate how regional emissions of BC and sulfate and the lifetime of BC influence the Arctic and Antarctic aerosol burdens.

  7. Final Report: Phase II Nevada Water Resources Data, Modeling, and Visualization (DMV) Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackman, Thomas [Desert Research Institute; Minor, Timothy [Desert Research Institute; Pohll, Gregory [Desert Research Institute

    2013-07-22

    Water is unquestionably a critical resource throughout the United States. In the semi-arid west -- an area stressed by increase in human population and sprawl of the built environment -- water is the most important limiting resource. Crucially, science must understand factors that affect availability and distribution of water. To sustain growing consumptive demand, science needs to translate understanding into reliable and robust predictions of availability under weather conditions that could be average but might be extreme. These predictions are needed to support current and long-term planning. Similar to the role of weather forecast and climate prediction, water prediction over short and long temporal scales can contribute to resource strategy, governmental policy and municipal infrastructure decisions, which are arguably tied to the natural variability and unnatural change to climate. Change in seasonal and annual temperature, precipitation, snowmelt, and runoff affect the distribution of water over large temporal and spatial scales, which impact the risk of flooding and the groundwater recharge. Anthropogenic influences and impacts increase the complexity and urgency of the challenge. The goal of this project has been to develop a decision support framework of data acquisition, digital modeling, and 3D visualization. This integrated framework consists of tools for compiling, discovering and projecting our understanding of processes that control the availability and distribution of water. The framework is intended to support the analysis of the complex interactions between processes that affect water supply, from controlled availability to either scarcity or deluge. The developed framework enables DRI to promote excellence in water resource management, particularly within the Lake Tahoe basin. In principle, this framework could be replicated for other watersheds throughout the United States. Phase II of this project builds upon the research conducted during

  8. Options Study - Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Wigeland; T. Taiwo; M. Todosow; W. Halsey; J. Gehin

    2010-09-01

    The Options Study has been conducted for the purpose of evaluating the potential of alternative integrated nuclear fuel cycle options to favorably address the issues associated with a continuing or expanding use of nuclear power in the United States. The study produced information that can be used to inform decisions identifying potential directions for research and development on such fuel cycle options. An integrated nuclear fuel cycle option is defined in this study as including all aspects of the entire nuclear fuel cycle, from obtaining natural resources for fuel to the ultimate disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) or radioactive wastes. Issues such as nuclear waste management, especially the increasing inventory of used nuclear fuel, the current uncertainty about used fuel disposal, and the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation have contributed to the reluctance to expand the use of nuclear power, even though it is recognized that nuclear power is a safe and reliable method of producing electricity. In this Options Study, current, evolutionary, and revolutionary nuclear energy options were all considered, including the use of uranium and thorium, and both once-through and recycle approaches. Available information has been collected and reviewed in order to evaluate the ability of an option to clearly address the challenges associated with the current implementation and potential expansion of commercial nuclear power in the United States. This Options Study is a comprehensive consideration and review of fuel cycle and technology options, including those for disposal, and is not constrained by any limitations that may be imposed by economics, technical maturity, past policy, or speculated future conditions. This Phase II report is intended to be used in conjunction with the Phase I report, and much information in that report is not repeated here, although some information has been updated to reflect recent developments. The focus in this Options Study was to

  9. Final Report: Phase II Nevada Water Resources Data, Modeling, and Visualization (DMV) Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackman, Thomas [Desert Research Institute; Minor, Timothy [Desert Research Institute; Pohll, Gregory [Desert Research Institute

    2013-07-22

    Water is unquestionably a critical resource throughout the United States. In the semi-arid west -- an area stressed by increase in human population and sprawl of the built environment -- water is the most important limiting resource. Crucially, science must understand factors that affect availability and distribution of water. To sustain growing consumptive demand, science needs to translate understanding into reliable and robust predictions of availability under weather conditions that could be average but might be extreme. These predictions are needed to support current and long-term planning. Similar to the role of weather forecast and climate prediction, water prediction over short and long temporal scales can contribute to resource strategy, governmental policy and municipal infrastructure decisions, which are arguably tied to the natural variability and unnatural change to climate. Change in seasonal and annual temperature, precipitation, snowmelt, and runoff affect the distribution of water over large temporal and spatial scales, which impact the risk of flooding and the groundwater recharge. Anthropogenic influences and impacts increase the complexity and urgency of the challenge. The goal of this project has been to develop a decision support framework of data acquisition, digital modeling, and 3D visualization. This integrated framework consists of tools for compiling, discovering and projecting our understanding of processes that control the availability and distribution of water. The framework is intended to support the analysis of the complex interactions between processes that affect water supply, from controlled availability to either scarcity or deluge. The developed framework enables DRI to promote excellence in water resource management, particularly within the Lake Tahoe basin. In principle, this framework could be replicated for other watersheds throughout the United States. Phase II of this project builds upon the research conducted during

  10. Model based design and analysis of phase II HIV-1 trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekić, Dinko; Röshammar, Daniel; Simonsson, Ulrika S H

    2013-08-01

    This work explores the advantages of a model based drug development (MBDD) approach for the design and analysis of antiretroviral phase II trials. Two different study settings were investigated: (1) a 5-arm placebo-controlled parallel group dose-finding/proof of concept (POC) study and (2) a comparison of investigational drug and competitor. Studies were simulated using a HIV-1 dynamics model in NONMEM. The Monte-Carlo Mapped Power method determined the sample size required for detecting a dose-response relationship and a significant difference in effect compared to the competitor using a MBDD approach. Stochastic simulation and re-estimation were used for evaluation of model parameter precision and bias given different sample sizes. Results were compared to those from an unpaired, two-sided t test and ANOVA (p ≤ 0.05). In all scenarios, the MBDD approach resulted in smaller study sizes and more precisely estimated treatment effect than conventional statistical analysis. Using a MBDD approach, a sample size of 15 patients could be used to show POC and estimate ED50 with a good precision (relative standard error, 25.7 %). A sample size of 10 patients per arm was needed using the MBDD approach for detecting a difference in treatment effect of ≥20 % at 80 % power, a 3.4-fold reduction in sample size compared to a t test. The MBDD approach can be used to achieve more precise dose-response characterization facilitating decision making and dose selection. If necessitated, the sample size needed to reach a desired power can potentially be reduced compared to traditional statistical analyses. This may allow for comparison against competitors already in early clinical studies.

  11. Implementation of “PLST” Assessment Model to Detect Development of Language Skill in Early Childhood (Phase II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelva Rolina

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This research will be done for 3 years (3 phases. The first year had been done on 2013 ago. 2014 is the second year of research (phase II. Research phase of this study (second year, namely development phase: the prototype of model is developed to be a model. The activities carried out in phase II include: expert validation test, readability test, revision, kindergarten teacher training, limited trial, and the trial was extended to find models that fit between the theoretical concepts with empirical data in the field. And finally (second year, from all kindergarten which be the sample study, it was found that all kindergarten were using the general assessment without special assessment for development of children’s language, so it is necessary to create assessment “PLST” to detect the development of language skill for early childhood (kindergarten student. It has to continue in second to third year. The final research, which is at the end of the third year (phase III is expected to match model assessment “PLST” as well as the guidance in learning in kindergarten, which can be used by teachers to detect and monitor the development of language skills, identifying the amount of vocabulary and sentences are mastered children, and the stages of language development next. To achieve these objectives, the researcher adopted a model of research, development, and diffusion by Hopkins & Clark (Havelock, 1976

  12. Solid phase transformations II

    CERN Document Server

    Čermák, J

    2009-01-01

    This topical volume includes ten invited papers that cover selected areas of the field of solid phase transformations. The first two contributions represent a burgeoning branch; that of the computer simulation of physical phenomena. The following three articles deal with the thermodynamics of phase transformations as a basic theory for describing the phenomenology of phase changes in matter. The next paper describes the interconnections between structural stability and the electronic structure of phases. Two further articles are devoted to displacive transformations; a field where there are ma

  13. Combustion 2000: Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    1999-11-01

    The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: thermal efficiency (HHV) {ge} 47%; NOx, SOx, and particulates {le} 10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard); coal providing {ge} 65% of heat input; all solid wastes benign; and cost of electricity {le} 90% of present plants. Phase 1, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase 1 also included preliminary R and D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This Phase, Phase 2, had as its initial objective the development of a complete design base for the construction and operation of a HIPPS prototype plant to be constructed in Phase 3. As part of a descoping initiative, the Phase 3 program has been eliminated and work related to the commercial plant design has been ended. The rescoped program retained a program of engineering research and development focusing on high temperature heat exchangers, e.g. HITAF development (Task 2); a rescoped Task 6 that is pertinent to Vision 21 objectives and focuses on advanced cycle analysis and optimization, integration of gas turbines into complex cycles, and repowering designs; and preparation of the Phase 2 Technical Report (Task 8). This rescoped program deleted all subsystem testing (Tasks 3, 4,and 5) and the development of a site-specific engineering design and test plan for the HIPPS prototype plant (Task 7). Work reported herein is from: Task 2.1 HITAF Combustors; Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; and Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

  14. Phase II Contaminant Transport Parameters for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeNovio, Nicole M.; Bryant, Nathan; King, Chrissi B.; Bhark, Eric; Drellack, Sigmund L.; Pickens, John F.; Farnham, Irene; Brooks, Keely M.; Reimus, Paul; Aly, Alaa

    2005-04-01

    This report documents pertinent transport data and data analyses as part of the Phase II Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) for Frenchman Flat (FF) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 98. The purpose of this data compilation and related analyses is to provide the primary reference to support parameterization of the Phase II FF CAU transport model.

  15. Phase II Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John McCord

    2004-12-01

    This report documents pertinent hydrologic data and data analyses as part of the Phase II Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) for Frenchman Flat (FF) Corrective Action Unit (CAU): CAU 98. The purpose of this data compilation and related analyses is to provide the primary reference to support the development of the Phase II FF CAU groundwater flow model.

  16. Equilibrium and kinetic modelling of cadmium(II) biosorption by nonliving algal biomass Oedogonium sp. from aqueous phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, V K; Rastogi, A

    2008-05-01

    The biosorption of cadmium(II) ions on Oedogonium sp. is studied in a batch system with respect to initial pH, algal dose, contact time and the temperature. The algal biomass exhibited the highest cadmium(II) uptake capacity at 25 degrees C, at the initial pH value of 5.0 in 55 min and at the initial cadmium(II) ion concentration of 200 mg L(-1). Biosorption capacity decreased from 88.9 to 80.4 mg g(-1) with an increase in temperature from 25 to 45 degrees C at this initial cadmium(II) concentration. Uptake kinetics follows the pseudo-second-order model and equilibrium is well described by Langmuir isotherm. Isotherms have been used to determine thermodynamic parameters of the process, viz., free energy change, enthalpy change and entropy change. FTIR analysis of algal biomass revealed the presence of amino, carboxyl, hydroxyl and carbonyl groups, which are responsible for biosorption of metal ions. Acid pretreatments did not substantially increase metal sorption capacity but alkali like NaOH pretreatment slightly enhanced the metal removal ability of the biomass. During repeated sorption/desorption cycles at the end of fifth cycle, Cd(II) sorption decreased by 18%, with 15-20% loss of biomass. Nevertheless, Oedogonium sp. appears to be a good sorbent for removing metal Cd(II) from aqueous phase.

  17. Equilibrium and kinetic modelling of cadmium(II) biosorption by nonliving algal biomass Oedogonium sp. from aqueous phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, V.K. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India)], E-mail: vinodfcy@iitr.ernet.in; Rastogi, A. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India)

    2008-05-01

    The biosorption of cadmium(II) ions on Oedogonium sp. is studied in a batch system with respect to initial pH, algal dose, contact time and the temperature. The algal biomass exhibited the highest cadmium(II) uptake capacity at 25 deg. C, at the initial pH value of 5.0 in 55 min and at the initial cadmium(II) ion concentration of 200 mg L{sup -1}. Biosorption capacity decreased from 88.9 to 80.4 mg g{sup -1} with an increase in temperature from 25 to 45 deg. C at this initial cadmium(II) concentration. Uptake kinetics follows the pseudo-second-order model and equilibrium is well described by Langmuir isotherm. Isotherms have been used to determine thermodynamic parameters of the process, viz., free energy change, enthalpy change and entropy change. FTIR analysis of algal biomass revealed the presence of amino, carboxyl, hydroxyl and carbonyl groups, which are responsible for biosorption of metal ions. Acid pretreatments did not substantially increase metal sorption capacity but alkali like NaOH pretreatment slightly enhanced the metal removal ability of the biomass. During repeated sorption/desorption cycles at the end of fifth cycle, Cd(II) sorption decreased by 18%, with 15-20% loss of biomass. Nevertheless, Oedogonium sp. appears to be a good sorbent for removing metal Cd(II) from aqueous phase.

  18. A dynamical systems analysis of afferent control in a neuromechanical model of locomotion: II. Phase asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spardy, Lucy E; Markin, Sergey N; Shevtsova, Natalia A; Prilutsky, Boris I; Rybak, Ilya A; Rubin, Jonathan E

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we analyze a closed loop neuromechanical model of locomotor rhythm generation. The model is composed of a spinal central pattern generator (CPG) and a single-joint limb, with CPG outputs projecting via motoneurons to muscles that control the limb and afferent signals from the muscles feeding back to the CPG. In a preceding companion paper (Spardy et al 2011 J. Neural Eng. 8 065003), we analyzed how the model generates oscillations in the presence or absence of feedback, identified curves in a phase plane associated with the limb that signify where feedback levels induce phase transitions within the CPG, and explained how increasing feedback strength restores oscillations in a model representation of spinal cord injury; from these steps, we derived insights about features of locomotor rhythms in several scenarios and made predictions about rhythm responses to various perturbations. In this paper, we exploit our analytical observations to construct a reduced model that retains important characteristics from the original system. We prove the existence of an oscillatory solution to the reduced model using a novel version of a Melnikov function, adapted for discontinuous systems, and also comment on the uniqueness and stability of this solution. Our analysis yields a deeper understanding of how the model must be tuned to generate oscillations and how the details of the limb dynamics shape overall model behavior. In particular, we explain how, due to the feedback signals in the model, changes in the strength of a tonic supra-spinal drive to the CPG yield asymmetric alterations in the durations of different locomotor phases, despite symmetry within the CPG itself.

  19. Development and Validation of Methodology to Model Flow in Ventilation Systems Commonly Found in Nuclear Facilities - Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strons, Philip [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bailey, James L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Davis, John [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Grudzinski, James [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hlotke, John [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-03-01

    In this report we present the results of the Phase II analysis and testing of the flow patterns encountered in the Alpha Gamma Hot Cell Facility (AGHCF), as well as the results from an opportunity to expand upon field test work from Phase I by the use of a Class IIIb laser. The addition to the Phase I work is covered before proceeding to the results of the Phase II work, followed by a summary of findings.

  20. Groundwater flow modelling under ice sheet conditions in Greenland (phase II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaquet, Olivier; Namar, Rabah; Siegel, Pascal [In2Earth Modelling Ltd, Lausanne (Switzerland); Jansson, Peter [Dept. of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology, Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-11-15

    Within the framework of the GAP project, this second phase of geosphere modelling has enabled the development of an improved regional model that has led to a better representation of groundwater flow conditions likely to occur under ice sheet conditions. New data in relation to talik geometry and elevation, as well as to deformation zones were integrated in the geosphere model. In addition, more realistic hydraulic properties were considered for geosphere modelling; they were taken from the Laxemar site in Sweden. The geological medium with conductive deformation zones was modelled as a 3D continuum with stochastically hydraulic properties. Surface and basal glacial meltwater rates provided by a dynamic ice sheet model were assimilated into the groundwater flow model using mixed boundary conditions. The groundwater flow system is considered to be governed by infiltration of glacial meltwater in heterogeneous faulted crystalline rocks in the presence of permafrost and taliks. The characterisation of the permafrost-depth distribution was achieved using a coupled description of flow and heat transfer under steady state conditions. Using glaciological concepts and satellite data, an improved stochastic model was developed for the description at regional scale for the subglacial permafrost distribution in correlation with ice velocity and bed elevation data. Finally, the production of glacial meltwater by the ice sheet was traced for the determination of its depth and lateral extent. The major improvements are related to the type and handling of the subglacial boundary conditions. The use of meltwater rates provided by an ice sheet model applied as input to a mixed boundary condition enables to produce a more plausible flow field in the Eastern part of the domain, in comparison to previous modelling results (Jaquet et al. 2010). In addition, the integration of all potential taliks within the modelled domain provides a better characterisation of the likely groundwater

  1. Preliminary CALS Phase II Architecture. Volume 19

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-03

    IDEF ICAM Definition Languages 5 IDEFO ICAM Definition Language: Activity Modeling IDEFIX ICAM Definition Language: Data Modeling 3 IDS Integrated Design...level. At the Conceptual Description level, data are defined by an integrated semantic data model, such as those produced using the IDEFIX modeling...Architecture with the dominate focus on the data dictionary for the IWSDB, represented by an IDEFIX semantic data model. It is at this level that CALS Phase II

  2. Evaluation of the aerosol vertical distribution in global aerosol models through comparison against CALIOP measurements: AeroCom phase II results: AEROSOL PROFILES IN AEROCOM II GCM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koffi, Brigitte [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Ispra Italy; Schulz, Michael [Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Oslo Norway; Bréon, François-Marie [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement, Gif-sur-Yvette France; Dentener, Frank [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Ispra Italy; Steensen, Birthe Marie [Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Oslo Norway; Griesfeller, Jan [Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Oslo Norway; Winker, David [NASA Langley Research Center, MS/475, Hampton Virginia USA; Balkanski, Yves [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement, Gif-sur-Yvette France; Bauer, Susanne E. [Center for Climate Systems Research, Columbia University, New York New York USA; NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York New York USA; Bellouin, Nicolas [Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, Reading UK; Berntsen, Terje [Department of Geosciences, University of Oslo, Oslo Norway; Center for International Climate and Environmental Research-Oslo (CICERO), Oslo Norway; Bian, Huisheng [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt Maryland USA; Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore Country Maryland USA; Chin, Mian [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt Maryland USA; Diehl, Thomas [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Ispra Italy; Easter, Richard [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Ghan, Steven [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Hauglustaine, Didier A. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement, Gif-sur-Yvette France; Iversen, Trond [Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Oslo Norway; Department of Geosciences, University of Oslo, Oslo Norway; Kirkevåg, Alf [Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Oslo Norway; Liu, Xiaohong [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Now at University of Wyoming, Laramie Wyoming USA; Lohmann, Ulrike [ETH-Zentrum, Zürich Switzerland; Myhre, Gunnar [Center for International Climate and Environmental Research-Oslo (CICERO), Oslo Norway; Rasch, Phil [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt Maryland USA; Seland, Øyvind [Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Oslo Norway; Skeie, Ragnhild B. [Center for International Climate and Environmental Research-Oslo (CICERO), Oslo Norway; Steenrod, Stephen D. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt Maryland USA; Stier, Philip [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford UK; Tackett, Jason [Science Systems and Applications, Inc., Hampton Virginia USA; Takemura, Toshihiko [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka Japan; Tsigaridis, Kostas [Center for Climate Systems Research, Columbia University, New York New York USA; NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York New York USA; Vuolo, Maria Raffaella [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement, Gif-sur-Yvette France; Now at National Institute for Agronomic Research, Thiverval-Grignon France; Yoon, Jinho [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Now at Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju Korea; Zhang, Kai [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg Germany

    2016-06-27

    The ability of eleven models in simulating the aerosol vertical distribution from regional to global scales, as part of the second phase of the AeroCom model inter-comparison initiative (AeroCom II) is assessed and compared to results of the first phase. The evaluation is performed using a global monthly gridded dataset of aerosol extinction profiles built on purpose from the CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) Layer Product 3.01. Results over 12 sub-continental regions show that five models improved whereas three degraded in reproducing the Zα 0-6 km mean extinction height diagnostic, which is computed over the 0-6 km altitude range for each studied region and season. While the models’ performance remains highly variable, it has generally improved in terms of inter-regional diversity and seasonality. The biases in Zα 0-6 km have notably decreased in the U.S. and European industrial and downwind maritime regions, whereas the timing of the Zα 0-6 km peak season has improved for all but two models. However, most of the models now show a Zα 0-6 km underestimation over land, notably in the dust and biomass burning regions in Asia and Africa. At global scale, the AeroCom II models better reproduce the Zα 0-6 km latitudinal variability over ocean than over land. Hypotheses for the (changes in the) the performance of the individual models and for the inter-model diversity are discussed. We also provide an analysis of the CALIOP limitations and uncertainties that can contribute to the differences between the simulations and observations.

  3. Modeled black carbon radiative forcing and atmospheric lifetime in AeroCom Phase II constrained by aircraft observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Herber, A.; Kondo, Y.; Li, S.-M.; Moteki, N.; Koike, M.; Oshima, N.; Schwarz, J. P.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S. E.; Bellouin, N.; Berntsen, T. K.; Bian, H.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R. C.; Ghan, S. J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevåg, A.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lin, G.; Liu, X.; Penner, J. E.; Schulz, M.; Seland, Ø.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Zhang, K.

    2014-08-01

    Atmospheric black carbon (BC) absorbs solar radiation, and exacerbates global warming through exerting positive radiative forcing (RF). However, the contribution of BC to ongoing changes in global climate is under debate. Anthropogenic BC emissions, and the resulting distribution of BC concentration, are highly uncertain. In particular, long range transport and processes affecting BC atmospheric lifetime are poorly understood. Here we discuss whether recent assessments may have overestimated present day BC radiative forcing in remote regions. We compare vertical profiles of BC concentration from four recent aircraft measurement campaigns to simulations by 13 aerosol models participating in the AeroCom Phase II intercomparision. An atmospheric lifetime of BC of less than 5 days is shown to be essential for reproducing observations in remote ocean regions, in line with other recent studies. Adjusting model results to measurements in remote regions, and at high altitudes, leads to a 25% reduction in AeroCom Phase II median direct BC forcing, from fossil fuel and biofuel burning, over the industrial era. The sensitivity of modeled forcing to BC vertical profile and lifetime highlights an urgent need for further flight campaigns, close to sources and in remote regions, to provide improved quantification of BC effects for use in climate policy.

  4. Modelled black carbon radiative forcing and atmospheric lifetime in AeroCom Phase II constrained by aircraft observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Herber, A.; Kondo, Y.; Li, S.-M.; Moteki, N.; Koike, M.; Oshima, N.; Schwarz, J. P.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S. E.; Bellouin, N.; Berntsen, T. K.; Bian, H.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R. C.; Ghan, S. J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevåg, A.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lin, G.; Liu, X.; Penner, J. E.; Schulz, M.; Seland, Ø.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Zhang, K.

    2014-11-01

    Atmospheric black carbon (BC) absorbs solar radiation, and exacerbates global warming through exerting positive radiative forcing (RF). However, the contribution of BC to ongoing changes in global climate is under debate. Anthropogenic BC emissions, and the resulting distribution of BC concentration, are highly uncertain. In particular, long-range transport and processes affecting BC atmospheric lifetime are poorly understood. Here we discuss whether recent assessments may have overestimated present-day BC radiative forcing in remote regions. We compare vertical profiles of BC concentration from four recent aircraft measurement campaigns to simulations by 13 aerosol models participating in the AeroCom Phase II intercomparison. An atmospheric lifetime of BC of less than 5 days is shown to be essential for reproducing observations in remote ocean regions, in line with other recent studies. Adjusting model results to measurements in remote regions, and at high altitudes, leads to a 25% reduction in AeroCom Phase II median direct BC forcing, from fossil fuel and biofuel burning, over the industrial era. The sensitivity of modelled forcing to BC vertical profile and lifetime highlights an urgent need for further flight campaigns, close to sources and in remote regions, to provide improved quantification of BC effects for use in climate policy.

  5. Modeled black carbon radiative forcing and atmospheric lifetime in AeroCom Phase II constrained by aircraft observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. H. Samset

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric black carbon (BC absorbs solar radiation, and exacerbates global warming through exerting positive radiative forcing (RF. However, the contribution of BC to ongoing changes in global climate is under debate. Anthropogenic BC emissions, and the resulting distribution of BC concentration, are highly uncertain. In particular, long range transport and processes affecting BC atmospheric lifetime are poorly understood. Here we discuss whether recent assessments may have overestimated present day BC radiative forcing in remote regions. We compare vertical profiles of BC concentration from four recent aircraft measurement campaigns to simulations by 13 aerosol models participating in the AeroCom Phase II intercomparision. An atmospheric lifetime of BC of less than 5 days is shown to be essential for reproducing observations in remote ocean regions, in line with other recent studies. Adjusting model results to measurements in remote regions, and at high altitudes, leads to a 25% reduction in AeroCom Phase II median direct BC forcing, from fossil fuel and biofuel burning, over the industrial era. The sensitivity of modeled forcing to BC vertical profile and lifetime highlights an urgent need for further flight campaigns, close to sources and in remote regions, to provide improved quantification of BC effects for use in climate policy.

  6. Status of Gerda Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Victoria [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The GERDA experiment is designed to search for neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of {sup 76}Ge. In Phase I of the experiment a background index (BI) of 10{sup -2} cts/(keV.kg.yr) was reached. No signal has been found and a lower limit on the half-life of 2.1.10{sup 25} yr (at 90% C.L.) is extracted. The aim of Phase II is to double the Ge mass and further reduce the BI by an order of magnitude to explore half-lives of about 10{sup 26} yr. Thirty new Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors have been produced. These detectors are distinct for their improved energy resolution and enhanced pulse shape discrimination of signal from background events. Further background reduction will be reached by an active veto to read out argon scintillation light. The Phase II commissioning showed that two of the major background components, external γ-rays from {sup 214}Bi and {sup 208}Tl decays, can be suppressed up to two orders of magnitude. This talk presents the current status of the GERDA Phase II upgrade.

  7. Product-Improvement Test (Phase II), Jetcal Tester, Model H119A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-03-05

    1520-220-20. • ~~i~~aic. M Ii a• masb ., .f~~M * paa* •~ ~~~~~~~~~~D AT E tYP ED NAM E, lOADS. 0* TITk J 1 .l.NATU.e L. D. Griffin , Supv., Quality

  8. Climatepipes: User-friendly data access, data manipulation, data analysis and visualization of community climate models Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhary, Aashish [Kitware, Inc., Clifton Park, NY (United States)

    2015-09-02

    In Phase I, we successfully developed a web-based tool that provides workflow and form-based interfaces for accessing, querying, and visualizing interesting datasets from one or more sources. For Phase II of the project, we have implemented mechanisms for supporting more elaborate and relevant queries.

  9. Viscoelastic Model for Lung Parenchyma for Multi-Scale Modeling of Respiratory System, Phase II: Dodecahedral Micro-Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freed, Alan D.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Carson, James P.; Jacob, Rick E.

    2012-03-01

    In the first year of this contractual effort a hypo-elastic constitutive model was developed and shown to have great potential in modeling the elastic response of parenchyma. This model resides at the macroscopic level of the continuum. In this, the second year of our support, an isotropic dodecahedron is employed as an alveolar model. This is a microscopic model for parenchyma. A hopeful outcome is that the linkage between these two scales of modeling will be a source of insight and inspiration that will aid us in the final year's activity: creating a viscoelastic model for parenchyma.

  10. Phase II Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregg Ruskuaff

    2010-01-01

    This document, the Phase II Frenchman Flat transport report, presents the results of radionuclide transport simulations that incorporate groundwater radionuclide transport model statistical and structural uncertainty, and lead to forecasts of the contaminant boundary (CB) for a set of representative models from an ensemble of possible models. This work, as described in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) Underground Test Area (UGTA) strategy (FFACO, 1996; amended 2010), forms an essential part of the technical basis for subsequent negotiation of the compliance boundary of the Frenchman Flat corrective action unit (CAU) by Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Underground nuclear testing via deep vertical shafts was conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) from 1951 until 1992. The Frenchman Flat area, the subject of this report, was used for seven years, with 10 underground nuclear tests being conducted. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NNSA/NSO initiated the UGTA Project to assess and evaluate the effects of underground nuclear tests on groundwater at the NTS and vicinity through the FFACO (1996, amended 2010). The processes that will be used to complete UGTA corrective actions are described in the “Corrective Action Strategy” in the FFACO Appendix VI, Revision No. 2 (February 20, 2008).

  11. The AquaDEB project: Physiological flexibility of aquatic animals analysed with a generic dynamic energy budget model (phase II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alunno-Bruscia, Marianne; van der Veer, Henk W.; Kooijman, Sebastiaan A. L. M.

    2011-11-01

    This second special issue of the Journal of Sea Research on development and applications of Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) theory concludes the European Research Project AquaDEB (2007-2011). In this introductory paper we summarise the progress made during the running time of this 5 years' project, present context for the papers in this volume and discuss future directions. The main scientific objectives in AquaDEB were (i) to study and compare the sensitivity of aquatic species (mainly molluscs and fish) to environmental variability within the context of DEB theory for metabolic organisation, and (ii) to evaluate the inter-relationships between different biological levels (individual, population, ecosystem) and temporal scales (life cycle, population dynamics, evolution). AquaDEB phase I focussed on quantifying bio-energetic processes of various aquatic species ( e.g. molluscs, fish, crustaceans, algae) and phase II on: (i) comparing of energetic and physiological strategies among species through the DEB parameter values and identifying the factors responsible for any differences in bioenergetics and physiology; (ii) considering different scenarios of environmental disruption (excess of nutrients, diffuse or massive pollution, exploitation by man, climate change) to forecast effects on growth, reproduction and survival of key species; (iii) scaling up the models for a few species from the individual level up to the level of evolutionary processes. Apart from the three special issues in the Journal of Sea Research — including the DEBIB collaboration (see vol. 65 issue 2), a theme issue on DEB theory appeared in the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B (vol 365, 2010); a large number of publications were produced; the third edition of the DEB book appeared (2010); open-source software was substantially expanded (over 1000 functions); a large open-source systematic collection of ecophysiological data and DEB parameters has been set up; and a series of DEB

  12. Explicit Finite Element Modeling of Multilayer Composite Fabric for Gas Turbine Engine Containment Systems, Phase II. Part 3; Material Model Development and Simulation of Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, J.; Erlich, D.; Shockey, D.

    2009-01-01

    A team consisting of Arizona State University, Honeywell Engines, Systems & Services, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Glenn Research Center, and SRI International collaborated to develop computational models and verification testing for designing and evaluating turbine engine fan blade fabric containment structures. This research was conducted under the Federal Aviation Administration Airworthiness Assurance Center of Excellence and was sponsored by the Aircraft Catastrophic Failure Prevention Program. The research was directed toward improving the modeling of a turbine engine fabric containment structure for an engine blade-out containment demonstration test required for certification of aircraft engines. The research conducted in Phase II began a new level of capability to design and develop fan blade containment systems for turbine engines. Significant progress was made in three areas: (1) further development of the ballistic fabric model to increase confidence and robustness in the material models for the Kevlar(TradeName) and Zylon(TradeName) material models developed in Phase I, (2) the capability was improved for finite element modeling of multiple layers of fabric using multiple layers of shell elements, and (3) large-scale simulations were performed. This report concentrates on the material model development and simulations of the impact tests.

  13. A quantitative phase field model for hydride precipitation in zirconium alloys: Part II. Modeling of temperature dependent hydride precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Zhihua [The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Shenzhen Research Institute, Shenzhen (China); PolyU Base (Shenzhen) Limited, Shenzhen (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Hao, Mingjun [The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Shenzhen Research Institute, Shenzhen (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Guo, Xianghua [State Key Laboratory of Explosion and Safety Science, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Tang, Guoyi [Advanced Materials Institute, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Shi, San-Qiang, E-mail: mmsqshi@polyu.edu.hk [The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Shenzhen Research Institute, Shenzhen (China); PolyU Base (Shenzhen) Limited, Shenzhen (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2015-04-15

    A quantitative free energy functional developed in Part I (Shi and Xiao, 2014 [1]) was applied to model temperature dependent δ-hydride precipitation in zirconium in real time and real length scale. At first, the effect of external tensile load on reorientation of δ-hydrides was calibrated against experimental observations, which provides a modification factor for the strain energy in free energy formulation. Then, two types of temperature-related problems were investigated. In the first type, the effect of temperature transient was studied by cooling the Zr–H system at different cooling rates from high temperature while an external tensile stress was maintained. At the end of temperature transients, the average hydride size as a function of cooling rate was compared to experimental data. In the second type, the effect of temperature gradients was studied in a one or two dimensional temperature field. Different boundary conditions were applied. The results show that the hydride precipitation concentrated in low temperature regions and that it eventually led to the formation of hydride blisters in zirconium. A brief discussion on how to implement the hysteresis of hydrogen solid solubility on hydride precipitation and dissolution in the developed phase field scheme is also presented.

  14. ATLAS Phase-II trigger upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Sankey, Dave; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    This talk for ACES summarises the current status of the ATLAS Phase-II trigger upgrade, describing and comparing the two architectures under consideration, namely the two hardware level system described in the Phase-II Upgrade Scoping Document and the more recent single hardware level system.

  15. Phase II clinical development of new drugs

    CERN Document Server

    Ting, Naitee; Ho, Shuyen; Cappelleri, Joseph C

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on how to appropriately plan and develop a Phase II program, and how to design Phase II clinical trials and analyze their data. It provides a comprehensive overview of the entire drug development process and highlights key questions that need to be addressed for the successful execution of Phase II, so as to increase its success in Phase III and for drug approval. Lastly it warns project team members of the common potential pitfalls and offers tips on how to avoid them.

  16. Centrifuge workers study. Phase II, completion report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooten, H.D.

    1994-09-01

    Phase II of the Centrifuge Workers Study was a follow-up to the Phase I efforts. The Phase I results had indicated a higher risk than expected among centrifuge workers for developing bladder cancer when compared with the risk in the general population for developing this same type of cancer. However, no specific agent could be identified as the causative agent for these bladder cancers. As the Phase II Report states, Phase I had been limited to workers who had the greatest potential for exposure to substances used in the centrifuge process. Phase II was designed to expand the survey to evaluate the health of all employees who had ever worked in Centrifuge Program Departments 1330-1339 but who had not been interviewed in Phase I. Employees in analytical laboratories and maintenance departments who provided support services for the Centrifuge Program were also included in Phase II. In December 1989, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), now known as Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), was contracted to conduct a follow-up study (Phase II). Phase H of the Centrifuge Workers Study expanded the survey to include all former centrifuge workers who were not included in Phase I. ORISE was chosen because they had performed the Phase I tasks and summarized the corresponding survey data therefrom.

  17. Experiment, modeling and optimization of liquid phase adsorption of Cu(II) using dried and carbonized biomass of Lyngbya majuscula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushwaha, Deepika; Dutta, Susmita

    2017-05-01

    The present work aims at evaluation of the potential of cyanobacterial biomass to remove Cu(II) from simulated wastewater. Both dried and carbonized forms of Lyngbya majuscula, a cyanobacterial strain, have been used for such purpose. The influences of different experimental parameters viz., initial Cu(II) concentration, solution pH and adsorbent dose have been examined on sorption of Cu(II). Kinetic and equilibrium studies on Cu(II) removal from simulated wastewater have been done using both dried and carbonized biomass individually. Pseudo-second-order model and Langmuir isotherm have been found to fit most satisfactorily to the kinetic and equilibrium data, respectively. Maximum 87.99 and 99.15 % of Cu(II) removal have been achieved with initial Cu(II) concentration of 10 and 25 mg/L for dried and carbonized algae, respectively, at an adsorbent dose of 10 g/L for 20 min of contact time and optimum pH 6. To optimize the removal process, Response Surface Methodology has been employed using both the dried and carbonized biomass. Removal with initial Cu(II) concentration of 20 mg/L, with 0.25 g adsorbent dose in 50 mL solution at pH 6 has been found to be optimum with both the adsorbents. This is the first ever attempt to make a comparative study on Cu(II) removal using both dried algal biomass and its activated carbon. Furthermore, regeneration of matrix was attempted and more than 70% and 80% of the adsorbent has been regenerated successfully in the case of dried and carbonized biomass respectively upto the 3rd cycle of regeneration study.

  18. Upgrades for GERDA Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisel, Mark

    2014-09-01

    The Germanium Detector Array (GERDA) experiment is searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay (0 νββ) of 76Ge. It is a process that violates lepton number conservation and is predicted to occur in extensions of the standard model of particle physics. GERDA is located underground in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS), Italy. An array of bare high-purity germanium detectors enriched in 76Ge is operated in a cryostat with 64 m3 of liquid argon supplemented by a 3 m thick shield of water. The experiment aims at exploring the 0 νββ decay up to a half life of 2 .1026 yr in two phases: Phase I of the experiment has been concluded last year. No signal is observed and the so far best limit is derived for the half life of the 0 νββ decay of 76Ge, T1/20ν power. Low mass detector holders, cold front-end electronics, contacting and cabling schemes are redesigned for ultra low mass and radiopurity. In addition, a retractable liquid argon veto will be installed to efficiently suppress background events that induce scintillation in the liquid argon. A hybrid solution of photomultiplier tubes and silicon photomultipliers coupled to scintillating fibres was chosen. This talk gives an account of the results and these challenging modifications to meet our design goals. The Germanium Detector Array (GERDA) experiment is searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay (0 νββ) of 76Ge. It is a process that violates lepton number conservation and is predicted to occur in extensions of the standard model of particle physics. GERDA is located underground in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS), Italy. An array of bare high-purity germanium detectors enriched in 76Ge is operated in a cryostat with 64 m3 of liquid argon supplemented by a 3 m thick shield of water. The experiment aims at exploring the 0 νββ decay up to a half life of 2 .1026 yr in two phases: Phase I of the experiment has been concluded last year. No signal is observed and the so far best

  19. PRognostic factor of Early Death In phase II Trials or the end of 'sufficient life expectancy' as an inclusion criterion? (PREDIT model).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grellety, Thomas; Cousin, Sophie; Letinier, Louis; Bosco-Lévy, Pauline; Hoppe, Stéphanie; Joly, Damien; Penel, Nicolas; Mathoulin-Pelissier, Simone; Italiano, Antoine

    2016-10-04

    Optimizing patient selection is a necessary step to design better clinical trials. 'Life expectancy' is a frequent inclusion criterion in phase II trial protocols, a measure that is subjective and often difficult to estimate. The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with early death in patients included in phase II studies. We retrospectively collected medical records of patients with advanced solid tumors included in phase II trials in two French Comprehensive Cancer Centers (Bordeaux, Center 1 set; Lille, Center 2 set). We analyzed patients' baseline characteristics. Predictive factors associated with early death (mortality at 3 months) were identified by logistic regression. We built a model (PREDIT, PRognostic factor of Early Death In phase II Trials) based on prognostic factors isolated from the final multivariate model. Center 1 and 2 sets included 303 and 227 patients, respectively. Patients from Center 1 and 2 sets differed in tumor site, urological (26 % vs 15 %) and gastrointestinal (18 % vs 28 %) and in lung metastasis incidence (10 % vs 49 %). Overall survival (OS) at 3 months was 88 % (95 % CI [83.5; 91.0], Center 1 set) and 91 % (95 % CI [86.7; 94.2], Center 2 set). Presence of a 'life expectancy' inclusion criterion did not improve the 3-month OS (HR 0.6, 95 % CI [0.2; 1.2], p = 0.2325). Independent factors of early death were an ECOG score of 2 (OR 13.3, 95%CI [4.1; 43.4]), hyperleukocytosis (OR 5.5, 95 % CI [1.9; 16.3]) and anemia (OR 2.8, 95 % CI [1.1; 7.1]). Same predictive factors but with different association levels were found in the Center 2 set. Using the Center 1 set, ROC analysis shows a good discrimination to predict early death (AUC: 0.89 at 3 months and 0.86 at 6 months). Risk modeling in two independent cancer populations based on simple clinical parameters showed that baseline ECOG of 2, hyperleukocytosis and anemia are strong early-death predictive factors. This model allows identifying patients who may

  20. Evaluation of the aerosol vertical distribution in global aerosol models through comparison against CALIOP measurements: AeroCom phase II results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffi, Brigitte; Schulz, Michael; Bréon, François-Marie; Dentener, Frank; Steensen, Birthe Marie; Griesfeller, Jan; Winker, David; Balkanski, Yves; Bauer, Susanne E.; Bellouin, Nicolas; Berntsen, Terje; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steven; Hauglustaine, Didier A.; Iversen, Trond; Kirkevâg, Alf; Liu, Xiaohong; Lohmann, Ulrike; Myhre, Gunnar; Rasch, Phil; Seland, Åyvind; Skeie, Ragnhild B.; Steenrod, Stephen D.; Stier, Philip; Tackett, Jason; Takemura, Toshihiko; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Vuolo, Maria Raffaella; Yoon, Jinho; Zhang, Kai

    2016-06-01

    The ability of 11 models in simulating the aerosol vertical distribution from regional to global scales, as part of the second phase of the AeroCom model intercomparison initiative (AeroCom II), is assessed and compared to results of the first phase. The evaluation is performed using a global monthly gridded data set of aerosol extinction profiles built for this purpose from the CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) Layer Product 3.01. Results over 12 subcontinental regions show that five models improved, whereas three degraded in reproducing the interregional variability in Zα0-6 km, the mean extinction height diagnostic, as computed from the CALIOP aerosol profiles over the 0-6 km altitude range for each studied region and season. While the models' performance remains highly variable, the simulation of the timing of the Zα0-6 km peak season has also improved for all but two models from AeroCom Phase I to Phase II. The biases in Zα0-6 km are smaller in all regions except Central Atlantic, East Asia, and North and South Africa. Most of the models now underestimate Zα0-6 km over land, notably in the dust and biomass burning regions in Asia and Africa. At global scale, the AeroCom II models better reproduce the Zα0-6 km latitudinal variability over ocean than over land. Hypotheses for the performance and evolution of the individual models and for the intermodel diversity are discussed. We also provide an analysis of the CALIOP limitations and uncertainties contributing to the differences between the simulations and observations.

  1. Modeling of fluidized-bed combustion of coal: Phase II, final reports. Volume 1. Model evolution and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louis, J.F.; Tung, S.E.

    1980-10-01

    The Energy Laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (M.I.T.), under Department of Energy (DOE) sponsorship, has been engaged in the development of a comprehensive mechanistic model of Fluidized Bed Combustors (FBC). The primary aims of this modeling effort are the generation and to the extent possible, validation of an analytical framework for the design and scale-up of fluidized bed combustors. In parallel with this modeling effort, M.I.T. also embarked upon the development of an FBC-Data Base Management System (FBC-DBMS) aimed at facilitating the coordination, interpretation and utilization of the experimental data that are or will become available from diverse sources, as well as in the identification of areas of large uncertainty or having a paucity of experimental results. The synergistic operation of the FBC-Model and FBC-Data Base promises to offer a powerful tool for the design and optimization of FBC's and represents the ultimate goal of the M.I.T. effort. The modeling effort was initially focused upon evaluation and application of state-of-the-art models. The initial system model was divided into five basic components: fluid dynamics, combustion, sulfur capture, heat transfer and emissions. Due to the technical complexity of modeling FBC operation and the initial primitive nature of models for these components, it was deemed necessary to be able to incorporate evolutionary improvements in understanding and correlating FBC phenomena: the M.I.T. system model is, therefore, modular in nature, i.e., each sub-model can be replaced by an updated or equivalent sub-model without necessitating reprogramming of the entire system model.

  2. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. II: Multi layered cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, H.; McCoy, Renata; Klein, Stephen A.; Xie, Shaocheng; Luo, Yali; Avramov, Alexander; Chen, Mingxuan; Cole, Jason N.; Falk, Michael; Foster, Mike; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Harrington, Jerry Y.; Hoose, Corinna; Khrairoutdinov, Marat; Larson, Vince; Liu, Xiaohong; McFarquhar, Greg; Poellot, M. R.; Von Salzen, Knut; Shipway, Ben; Shupe, Matthew D.; Sud, Yogesh C.; Turner, David D.; Veron, Dana; Walker, Gregory K.; Wang, Zhien; Wolf, Audrey; Xu, Kuan-Man; Yang, Fanglin; Zhang, G.

    2009-05-21

    Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud resolving model simulations of a deep, multi-layered, mixed-phase cloud system observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. This cloud system was associated with strong surface turbulent sensible and latent heat fluxes as cold air flowed over the open Arctic Ocean, combined with a low pressure system that supplied moisture at mid-level. The simulations, performed by 13 single-column and 4 cloud-resolving models, generally overestimate the liquid water path and strongly underestimate the ice water path, although there is a large spread among the models. This finding is in contrast with results for the single-layer, low-level mixed-phase stratocumulus case in Part I of this study, as well as previous studies of shallow mixed-phase Arctic clouds, that showed an underprediction of liquid water path. The overestimate of liquid water path and underestimate of ice water path occur primarily when deeper mixed-phase clouds extending into the mid-troposphere were observed. These results suggest important differences in the ability of models to simulate Arctic mixed-phase clouds that are deep and multi-layered versus shallow and single-layered. In general, the cloud-resolving models and models with a more sophisticated, two-moment treatment of the cloud microphysics produce a somewhat smaller liquid water path that is closer to observations. The cloud-resolving models also tend to produce a larger cloud fraction than the single column models. The liquid water path and especially the cloud fraction have a large impact on the cloud radiative forcing at the surface, which is dominated by the longwave flux for this case.

  3. A Comparison of Phase II Study Strategies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sally Hunsberger; Yingdong Zhao; Richard Simon

    2009-01-01

    .... In this article, we compare different phase II study strategies to determine the most efficient drug development path in terms of number of patients and length of time to conclusion of drug efficacy on overall survival...

  4. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part II: Multi-layered cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, H; McCoy, R B; Klein, S A; Xie, S; Luo, Y; Avramov, A; Chen, M; Cole, J; Falk, M; Foster, M; Genio, A D; Harrington, J; Hoose, C; Khairoutdinov, M; Larson, V; Liu, X; McFarquhar, G; Poellot, M; Shipway, B; Shupe, M; Sud, Y; Turner, D; Veron, D; Walker, G; Wang, Z; Wolf, A; Xu, K; Yang, F; Zhang, G

    2008-02-27

    Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a deep, multi-layered, mixed-phase cloud system observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. This cloud system was associated with strong surface turbulent sensible and latent heat fluxes as cold air flowed over the open Arctic Ocean, combined with a low pressure system that supplied moisture at mid-level. The simulations, performed by 13 single-column and 4 cloud-resolving models, generally overestimate the liquid water path and strongly underestimate the ice water path, although there is a large spread among the models. This finding is in contrast with results for the single-layer, low-level mixed-phase stratocumulus case in Part I of this study, as well as previous studies of shallow mixed-phase Arctic clouds, that showed an underprediction of liquid water path. The overestimate of liquid water path and underestimate of ice water path occur primarily when deeper mixed-phase clouds extending into the mid-troposphere were observed. These results suggest important differences in the ability of models to simulate Arctic mixed-phase clouds that are deep and multi-layered versus shallow and single-layered. In general, models with a more sophisticated, two-moment treatment of the cloud microphysics produce a somewhat smaller liquid water path that is closer to observations. The cloud-resolving models tend to produce a larger cloud fraction than the single-column models. The liquid water path and especially the cloud fraction have a large impact on the cloud radiative forcing at the surface, which is dominated by the longwave flux for this case.

  5. Small Business Innovation Research GRC Phase I, Phase II, and Post-Phase II Opportunity Assessment for 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2016-01-01

    This report outlines the 2015 Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) Phase I, Phase II, and Post-Phase II opportunity contract award results associated with NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD), Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD), Science Mission Directorate (SMD), and Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) for NASA Glenn Research Center. The report also highlights the number of Phase I, Phase II, and Post-Phase II contracts awarded by mission directorate. The 2015 Phase I contract awards to companies in Ohio and their corresponding technologies are also discussed.

  6. Modeling phase equilibria for acid gas mixtures using the CPA equation of state. Part II: Binary mixtures with CO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsivintzelis, Ioannis; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Michelsen, Michael Locht

    2011-01-01

    In Part I of this series of articles, the study of H2S mixtures has been presented with CPA. In this study the phase behavior of CO2 containing mixtures is modeled. Binary mixtures with water, alcohols, glycols and hydrocarbons are investigated. Both phase equilibria (vapor–liquid and liquid......, alcohols and glycols) are considered, the importance of cross-association is investigated. The cross-association is accounted for either via combining rules or using a cross-solvation energy obtained from experimental spectroscopic or calorimetric data or from ab initio calculations. In both cases two...

  7. Low Noise Borehole Triaxial Seismometer Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, James D; McClung, David W

    2006-11-06

    This report describes the preliminary design and the effort to date of Phase II of a Low Noise Borehole Triaxial Seismometer for use in networks of seismic stations for monitoring underground nuclear explosions. The design uses the latest technology of broadband seismic instrumentation. Each parameter of the seismometer is defined in terms of the known physical limits of the parameter. These limits are defined by the commercially available components, and the physical size constraints. A theoretical design is proposed, and a preliminary prototype model of the proposed instrument has been built. This prototype used the sensor module of the KS2000. The installation equipment (hole locks, etc.) has been designed and one unit has been installed in a borehole. The final design of the sensors and electronics and leveling mechanism is in process. Noise testing is scheduled for the last quarter of 2006.

  8. Revisiting dosing regimen using PK/PD modeling: the MODEL1 phase I/II trial of docetaxel plus epirubicin in metastatic breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hénin, Emilie; Meille, Christophe; Barbolosi, Dominique; You, Benoit; Guitton, Jérôme; Iliadis, Athanassios; Freyer, Gilles

    2016-04-01

    The MODEL1 trial is the first model-driven phase I/II dose-escalation study of densified docetaxel plus epirubicin administration in metastatic breast cancer patients, a regimen previously known to induce unacceptable life-threatening toxicities. The primary objective was to determine the maximum tolerated dose of this densified regimen. Study of the efficacy was a secondary objective. Her2-negative, hormone-resistant metastatic breast cancer patients were treated with escalating doses of docetaxel plus epirubicin every 2 weeks for six cycles with granulocyte colony stimulating factor support. A total of 16 patients were treated with total doses ranging from 85 to 110 mg of docetaxel plus epirubicin per cycle. Dose escalation was controlled by a non-hematological toxicity model. Dose densification was guided by a model of neutrophil kinetics, able to optimize docetaxel plus epirubicin dosing with respect to pre-defined acceptable levels of hematological toxicity while ensuring maximal efficacy. The densified treatment was safe since hematological toxicity was much lower compared to previous findings, and other adverse events were consistent with those observed with this regimen. The maximal tolerated dose was 100 mg given every 2 weeks. The response rate was 45 %; median progression-free survival was 10.4 months, whereas 54.6 months of median overall survival was achieved. The optimized docetaxel plus epirubicin dosing regimen led to fewer toxicities associated with higher efficacy as compared with standard or empirical densified dosing. This study suggests that model-driven dosage adjustment can lead to improved efficacy-toxicity balance in patients with cancer when several anticancer drugs are combined.

  9. Phase II Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John McCord

    2006-05-01

    The Phase II Frenchman Flat groundwater flow model is a key element in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) corrective action strategy for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Frenchman Flat corrective action unit (CAU). The objective of this integrated process is to provide an estimate of the vertical and horizontal extent of contaminant migration for each CAU to predict contaminant boundaries. A contaminant boundary is the model-predicted perimeter that defines the extent of radionuclide-contaminated groundwater from underground testing above background conditions exceeding the ''Safe Drinking Water Act'' (SDWA) standards. The contaminant boundary will be composed of both a perimeter boundary and a lower hydrostratigraphic unit (HSU) boundary. The computer model will predict the location of this boundary within 1,000 years and must do so at a 95 percent level of confidence. Additional results showing contaminant concentrations and the location of the contaminant boundary at selected times will also be presented. These times may include the verification period, the end of the five-year proof-of-concept period, as well as other times that are of specific interest. This report documents the development and implementation of the groundwater flow model for the Frenchman Flat CAU. Specific objectives of the Phase II Frenchman Flat flow model are to: (1) Incorporate pertinent information and lessons learned from the Phase I Frenchman Flat CAU models. (2) Develop a three-dimensional (3-D), mathematical flow model that incorporates the important physical features of the flow system and honors CAU-specific data and information. (3) Simulate the steady-state groundwater flow system to determine the direction and magnitude of groundwater fluxes based on calibration to Frenchman Flat hydrogeologic data. (4) Quantify the uncertainty in the direction and magnitude of groundwater flow due to uncertainty in

  10. Chemical models of interstellar gas-grain processes. II - The effect of grain-catalysed methane on gas phase evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Paul D.; Charnley, S. B.

    1991-01-01

    The effects on gas phase chemistry which result from the continuous desorption of methane molecules from grain surfaces are studied. Significant and sustained enhancements in the abundances of several complex hydrocarbon molecules are found, in good agreement with their observed values in TMC-1. The overall agreement is, however, just as good for the case of zero CH4 desorption efficiency. It is thus impossible to determine from the models whether or not the grain-surface production of methane is responsible for the observed abundances of some hydrocarbon molecules.

  11. SLUDGE BATCH 6 PHASE II FLOWSHEET SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koopman, D.; Best, D.

    2010-03-30

    Two Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) runs were used to demonstrate that a fairly wide window of acid stoichiometry was available for processing SB6 Phase II flowsheet simulant (Tank 40 simulant) while still meeting the dual goals of acceptable nitrate destruction and controlled hydrogen generation. Phase II was an intermediate flowsheet study for the projected composition of Tank 40 after transfer of SB6/Tank 51 sludge to the heel of SB5. The composition was based on August 2009 projections. A window of about 50% in total acid was found between acceptable nitrite destruction and excessive hydrogen generation.

  12. LHC Experiments Phase II - TDRs Approval Process

    CERN Document Server

    Forti, F

    2017-01-01

    The overall review process and steps of Phase II were described in CERN-LHCC-2015-077. As experiments submit detailed technical design reports (TDRs), the LHCC and UCG work in close connection to ensure a timely review of the scientific and technical feasibility as well as of the budget and schedule of the upgrade programme.

  13. ARAC results from phase II of the European tracer experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pace, J.C.; Nasstrom, J.S.

    1997-07-01

    A comparison is provided of the results of calculations by the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) during two phases of the European Tracer Experiment (ETEX). In phase I of ETEX, participants generated predictions in real time of the concentration of inert tracer gases released from a site in Western France. Each participating group based their predictions on the meteorological data they had available. In phase II, all participants were required to recalculate predictions based on the same meteorological data, which was generated and supplied by the European Centre for Medium- Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). ARAC used ECMWF data and also made additional changes to its model configuration,, with the result that ARAC`s accuracy during phase II was much better than for phase I. Experiments described in this paper examine the effect of each of these changes, and show that each change contributed to the improvement.

  14. The Long Valley Well: Phase II operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finger, J.T.

    1992-01-01

    Phase II of the Long Valley Exploratory Well was completed to a depth of 7588 feet in November 1991. The drilling comprised two sub-phases: (1) drilling 17-1/2 inch hole from the Phase I casing shoe at 2558 feet to a depth of 7130 feet, plugging back to 6826 feet, and setting 13-3/8 inch casing at 6825 feet, all during August--September 1991; and (2) returning in November to drill a 3.85-inch core hole deviated out of the previous wellbore at 6868 feet and extending to 7588 feet. Ultimate depth of the well is planned to be 20,000 feet, or at a bottomhole temperature of 500{degrees}C, whichever comes first. Total cost of this drilling phase was approximately $2.3 million, and funding was shared about equally between the California Energy Commission and the Department of Energy. Phase II scientific work will commence in July 1992 and will be supported by DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, DOE Geothermal Division, and other funding sources.

  15. The Long Valley Well - Phase II Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finger, John T.

    1992-03-24

    Phase II of the Long Valley Exploratory Well was completed to a depth of 7588 feet in November 1991. The drilling comprised two sub-phases: (1) drilling 17-1/2 inch hole from the Phase I casing shoe at 2558 feet to a depth of 7130 feet, plugging back to 6826 feet, and setting 13-3/8 inch casing at 6825 feet, all during August-September 1991; and (2) returning in November to drill a 3.85-inch core hole deviated out of the previous wellbore at 6808 feet and extending to 7588 feet. Ultimate depth of the well is planned to be 20,000 feet, or at a bottomhole temperature of 500 C, whichever comes first. Total cost of this drilling phase was approximately $2.3 million, and funding was shared about equally between the California Energy Commission and the Department of Energy. Phase II scientific work will commence in July 1992 and will be supported by DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, DOE Geothermal Division, and other funding sources.

  16. CMS Forward Calorimeters Phase II Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Bilki, Burak

    2014-01-01

    The Phase II Upgrade of the CMS forward calorimeters (electromagnetic and hadronic) originates from the fact that these calorimeters will not be sufficiently performant with the expected High Luminosity LHC conditions, planned to be started in 2025. The major challenge is to preserve/improve the high performance of the current forward detectors with new devices that can withstand the unprecedented radiation levels and disentangle the very large event pileup. CMS elected two design concepts to be presented in the Phase II Upgrade Technical Proposal Shashlik electromagnetic calorimeter + Hadronic Endcap Rebuild, and High Granularity Calorimeter. The former concept is based on reconstructing the endcap electromagnetic calorimeter with a shashlik design and replacing the active media of the endcap hadron calorimeter with radiation tolerant active media with a possibility to extend the coverage. The latter concept is concentrating on constructing a high granularity (both longitudinally and laterally) calorimeter ...

  17. Status of the GERDA Phase II upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Victoria [Max-Planck-Insitut für Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-06-21

    The GERDA experiment is designed to search for neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of {sup 76}Ge. In Phase I of the experiment a background index of 10{sup −2} cts/(keV·kg·yr) was reached. A lower limit on the half-life of the 0νββ decay of {sup 76}Ge was set to 2.1·10{sup 25} yr (at 90% C.L.). The aim of Phase II is to reach a sensitivity of the half-life of about 10{sup 26} yr. To increase the exposure thirty new Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors have been produced. These detectors are distinct for their improved energy resolution and enhanced pulse shape discrimination of signal from background events. Further background reduction will be reached by a light instrumentation to read out argon scintillation light. In April 2015 the light instrumentation together with eight BEGe detectors has been successfully deployed in the GERDA cryostat. In a commissioning run it was shown that two of the major background components, external γ-rays from {sup 214}Bi and {sup 208}Tl decays, were suppressed up to two orders of magnitude. We are confident to reach a background index of 10{sup −3} cts/(keV·kg·yr) which is the design goal for GERDA Phase II.

  18. 77 FR 38804 - Wireline Competition Bureau Seeks Comment on Model Design and Data Inputs for Phase II of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... economic) value. The model would determine the residual value of the network by the value the business can... wireline network technology and design the model should use to calculate costs. This question includes the... seeks comment on whether the model should estimate the total costs of serving the entire service area...

  19. 78 FR 76791 - Availability of Version 4.0 of the Connect America Fund Phase II Cost Model; Adopting Current...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-19

    ... provide additional protection from harsh weather. This version modifies the prior methodology used for..., which provides more detail on the current model architecture, processing steps, and data sources...

  20. A stochastic damage model for the rupture prediction of a multi-phase solid. I - Parametric studies. II - Statistical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lua, Yuan J.; Liu, Wing K.; Belytschko, Ted

    1992-01-01

    A stochastic damage model for predicting the rupture of a brittle multiphase material is developed, based on the microcrack-macrocrack interaction. The model, which incorporates uncertainties in locations, orientations, and numbers of microcracks, characterizes damage by microcracking and fracture by macrocracking. A parametric study is carried out to investigate the change of the stress intensity at the macrocrack tip by the configuration of microcracks. The inherent statistical distribution of the fracture toughness arising from the intrinsic random nature of microcracks is explored using a statistical approach. For this purpose, a computer simulation model is introduced, which incorporates a statistical characterization of geometrical parameters of a random microcrack array.

  1. Spray Forming Aluminum - Final Report (Phase II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. D. Leon

    1999-07-08

    The U.S. Department of Energy - Office of Industrial Technology (DOE) has an objective to increase energy efficient and enhance competitiveness of American metals industries. To support this objective, ALCOA Inc. entered into a cooperative program to develop spray forming technology for aluminum. This Phase II of the DOE Spray Forming Program would translate bench scale spray forming technology into a cost effective world class process for commercialization. Developments under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC07-94ID13238 occurred during two time periods due to budgetary constraints; April 1994 through September 1996 and October 1997 and December 1998. During these periods, ALCOA Inc developed a linear spray forming nozzle and specific support processes capable of scale-up for commercial production of aluminum sheet alloy products. Emphasis was given to alloys 3003 and 6111, both being commercially significant alloys used in the automotive industry. The report reviews research performed in the following areas: Nozzel Development, Fabrication, Deposition, Metal Characterization, Computer Simulation and Economics. With the formation of a Holding Company, all intellectual property developed in Phases I and II of the Project have been documented under separate cover for licensing to domestic producers.

  2. Transformation impacts of dissolved and solid phase Fe(II) on trichloroethylene (TCE) reduction in an iron-reducing bacteria (IRB) mixed column system: a mathematical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Yeunook; Kim, Dooil; Cho, Hyun-Hee; Singhal, Naresh; Park, Jae-Woo

    2012-12-01

    In this research, we conducted trichloroethylene (TCE) reduction in a column filled with iron and iron-reducing bacteria (IRB) and developed a mathematical model to investigate the critical reactions between active species in iron/IRB/contaminant systems. The formation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) in this system with IRB and zero-valent iron (ZVI, Fe(0)) coated with a ferric iron (Fe(III)) crust significantly affected TCE reduction and IRB respiration in various ways. This study presents a new framework for transformation property and reducing ability of both dissolved (Fe(II)(dissolved)) and solid form ferrous iron (Fe(II)(solid)). Results showed that TCE reduction was strongly depressed by Fe(II)(solid) rather than by other inhibitors (e.g., Fe(III) and lactate), suggesting that Fe(II)(solid) might reduce IRB activation due to attachment to IRB cells. Newly exposed Fe(0) from the released Fe(II)(dissolved) was a strong contributor to TCE reduction compared to Fe(II)(solid). In addition, our research confirmed that less Fe(II)(solid) production strongly supported long-term TCE reduction because it may create an easier TCE approach to Fe(0) or increase IRB growth. Our findings will aid the understanding of the contributions of iron media (e.g., Fe(II)(solid), Fe(II)(dissolved), Fe(III), and Fe(0)) to IRB for decontamination in natural groundwater systems.

  3. Modeling and 3D Visualization for Evaluation of Anti-Terrorism/Force Protection Alternatives: Phase II Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-21

    Jeffrey Weekley NPS MOVES Doug Weihnacht Kinection David Zeltzer Northrop Grumman Corporation 51 NAVAL INSTALLATION SECURITY MODELING AND...interception points in time ( v0,v1, v2 ,t0 ) 66 // against the 6 sided volume 67 // should return 2 points, or null 68 public Vec4d...17. J. D. Miller John Hopkins University – Applied Physics Laboratory Laurel, MD 18. Doug Weihnacht Kinection Santa Cruz, CA 19. Pete Swan

  4. Modelled Black Carbon Radiative Forcing and Atmospheric Lifetime in AeroCom Phase II Constrained by Aircraft Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Herber, Andreas; Kondo, Yutaka; Li, Shao-Meng; Moteki, N.; Koike, Makoto; Oshima, N.; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Bellouin, N.; Berntsen, T.; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, M.; Diehl, Thomas; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Lin, Guang; Liu, Xiaohong; Penner, Joyce E.; Schulz, M.; Seland, O.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Zhang, Kai

    2014-11-27

    Black carbon (BC) aerosols absorb solar radiation, and are generally held to exacerbate global warming through exerting a positive radiative forcing1. However, the total contribution of BC to the ongoing changes in global climate is presently under debate2-8. Both anthropogenic BC emissions and the resulting spatial and temporal distribution of BC concentration are highly uncertain2,9. In particular, long range transport and processes affecting BC atmospheric lifetime are poorly understood, leading to large estimated uncertainty in BC concentration at high altitudes and far from emission sources10. These uncertainties limit our ability to quantify both the historical, present and future anthropogenic climate impact of BC. Here we compare vertical profiles of BC concentration from four recent aircraft measurement campaigns with 13 state of the art aerosol models, and show that recent assessments may have overestimated present day BC radiative forcing. Further, an atmospheric lifetime of BC of less than 5 days is shown to be essential for reproducing observations in transport dominated remote regions. Adjusting model results to measurements in remote regions, and at high altitudes, leads to a 25% reduction in the multi-model median direct BC forcing from fossil fuel and biofuel burning over the industrial era.

  5. Multiwavelength modelling the SED of supersoft X-ray sources. II. RS Ophiuchi: From the explosion to the SSS phase

    CERN Document Server

    Skopal, Augustin

    2014-01-01

    RS Oph is a recurrent symbiotic nova that undergoes nova-like outbursts on a time scale of 20 years. Its two last eruptions (1985 and 2006) were subject of intensive multiwavelengths observational campaign from the X-rays to the radio. This contribution aims to determine physical parameters and the ionization structure of the nova from its explosion to the first emergence of the supersoft X-rays (day 26) by using the method of multiwavelength modelling the SED. From the very beginning of the eruption, the model SED revealed the presence of both a strong stellar and nebular component of radiation in the spectrum. During the first 4 days, the nova evinced a biconical ionization structure. The $\\sim 8200$ K warm and 160 - 200 R$_{\\odot}$ extended pseudo-photosphere encompassed the white dwarf (WD) around its equator to the latitude $>40^{\\circ}$. The remaining space around the WD's poles was ionized, producing a strong nebular continuum with the emission measure $EM \\sim 2.3 \\times 10^{62}$ cm$^{-3}$ via the fas...

  6. Modeling of liquid phases

    CERN Document Server

    Soustelle, Michel

    2015-01-01

    This book is part of a set of books which offers advanced students successive characterization tool phases, the study of all types of phase (liquid, gas and solid, pure or multi-component), process engineering, chemical and electrochemical equilibria, and the properties of surfaces and phases of small sizes. Macroscopic and microscopic models are in turn covered with a constant correlation between the two scales. Particular attention has been given to the rigor of mathematical developments. This second volume in the set is devoted to the study of liquid phases.

  7. What controls the vertical distribution of aerosol? Relationships between process sensitivity in HadGEM3-UKCA and inter-model variation from AeroCom Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipling, Z.; Stier, P.; Johnson, C. E.; Mann, G. W.; Bellouin, N.; Bauer, S. E.; Bergman, T.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T.; Ghan, S. J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevåg, A.; Kokkola, H.; Liu, X.; Luo, G.; van Noije, T.; Pringle, K. J.; von Salzen, K.; Schulz, M.; Seland, Ø.; Skeie, R. B.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Zhang, K.

    2015-09-01

    The vertical profile of aerosol is important for its radiative effects, but weakly constrained by observations on the global scale, and highly variable among different models. To investigate the controlling factors, we investigate the effects of individual processes in one particular model (HadGEM3-UKCA), and compare the resulting diversity of aerosol vertical profiles with the inter-model diversity from the AeroCom Phase II control experiment. In this way we show that (in this model at least) the vertical profile is controlled by a relatively small number of processes, although these vary among aerosol components and particle sizes. We also show that sufficiently coarse variations in these processes can produce a similar diversity to that among different models in terms of the global mean profile and zonal-mean vertical position. However, there are features of certain models' profiles that cannot be reproduced, suggesting the influence of further structural differences between models. Convective transport is found to be very important in controlling the vertical profile of all aerosol components by mass. In-cloud scavenging is very important for all except mineral dust. Growth by condensation is important for sulphate and carbonaceous aerosol (along with aqueous oxidation for the former and ageing by soluble material for the latter). The vertical extent of biomass-burning emissions into the free troposphere is also important for the profile of carbonaceous aerosol. Boundary-layer mixing plays a dominant role for sea-salt and mineral dust, which are emitted only from the surface. Dry deposition and below-cloud scavenging are important for the profile of mineral dust only. In this model, the microphysical processes of nucleation, condensation and coagulation dominate the vertical profile of the smallest particles by number, while the profiles of larger particles are controlled by the same processes as the component mass profiles, plus the size distribution of

  8. What controls the vertical distribution of aerosol? Relationships between process sensitivity in HadGEM3-UKCA and inter-model variation from AeroCom Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipling, Zak; Stier, Philip; Johnson, Colin E.; Mann, Graham W.; Bellouin, Nicolas; Bauer, Susanne E.; Bergman, Tommi; Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Ghan, Steven J.; Iversen, Trond; Kirkevåg, Alf; Kokkola, Harri; Liu, Xiaohong; Luo, Gan; van Noije, Twan; Pringle, Kirsty J.; von Salzen, Knut; Schulz, Michael; Seland, Øyvind; Skeie, Ragnhild B.; Takemura, Toshihiko; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Zhang, Kai

    2016-02-01

    The vertical profile of aerosol is important for its radiative effects, but weakly constrained by observations on the global scale, and highly variable among different models. To investigate the controlling factors in one particular model, we investigate the effects of individual processes in HadGEM3-UKCA and compare the resulting diversity of aerosol vertical profiles with the inter-model diversity from the AeroCom Phase II control experiment. In this way we show that (in this model at least) the vertical profile is controlled by a relatively small number of processes, although these vary among aerosol components and particle sizes. We also show that sufficiently coarse variations in these processes can produce a similar diversity to that among different models in terms of the global-mean profile and, to a lesser extent, the zonal-mean vertical position. However, there are features of certain models' profiles that cannot be reproduced, suggesting the influence of further structural differences between models. In HadGEM3-UKCA, convective transport is found to be very important in controlling the vertical profile of all aerosol components by mass. In-cloud scavenging is very important for all except mineral dust. Growth by condensation is important for sulfate and carbonaceous aerosol (along with aqueous oxidation for the former and ageing by soluble material for the latter). The vertical extent of biomass-burning emissions into the free troposphere is also important for the profile of carbonaceous aerosol. Boundary-layer mixing plays a dominant role for sea salt and mineral dust, which are emitted only from the surface. Dry deposition and below-cloud scavenging are important for the profile of mineral dust only. In this model, the microphysical processes of nucleation, condensation and coagulation dominate the vertical profile of the smallest particles by number (e.g. total CN > 3 nm), while the profiles of larger particles (e.g. CN > 100 nm) are controlled by the

  9. What Controls the Vertical Distribution of Aerosol? Relationships Between Process Sensitivity in HadGEM3-UKCA and Inter-Model Variation from AeroCom Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipling, Zak; Stier, Philip; Johnson, Colin E.; Mann, Graham W.; Bellouin, Nicolas; Bauer, Susanne E.; Bergman, Tommi; Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Ghan, Steven J.; Tsigaridis, Kostas

    2016-01-01

    The vertical profile of aerosol is important for its radiative effects, but weakly constrained by observations on the global scale, and highly variable among different models. To investigate the controlling factors in one particular model, we investigate the effects of individual processes in HadGEM3-UKCA and compare the resulting diversity of aerosol vertical profiles with the inter-model diversity from the AeroCom Phase II control experiment. In this way we show that (in this model at least) the vertical profile is controlled by a relatively small number of processes, although these vary among aerosol components and particle sizes. We also show that sufficiently coarse variations in these processes can produce a similar diversity to that among different models in terms of the global-mean profile and, to a lesser extent, the zonal-mean vertical position. However, there are features of certain models' profiles that cannot be reproduced, suggesting the influence of further structural differences between models. In HadGEM3-UKCA, convective transport is found to be very important in controlling the vertical profile of all aerosol components by mass. In-cloud scavenging is very important for all except mineral dust. Growth by condensation is important for sulfate and carbonaceous aerosol (along with aqueous oxidation for the former and ageing by soluble material for the latter). The vertical extent of biomass-burning emissions into the free troposphere is also important for the profile of carbonaceous aerosol. Boundary-layer mixing plays a dominant role for sea salt and mineral dust, which are emitted only from the surface. Dry deposition and below-cloud scavenging are important for the profile of mineral dust only. In this model, the microphysical processes of nucleation, condensation and coagulation dominate the vertical profile of the smallest particles by number (e.g. total CN >3 nm), while the profiles of larger particles (e.g. CN>100 nm) are controlled by the

  10. Xenobiotic metabolism capacities of human skin in comparison with a 3D-epidermis model and keratinocyte-based cell culture as in vitro alternatives for chemical testing: phase II enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götz, Christine; Pfeiffer, Roland; Tigges, Julia; Ruwiedel, Karsten; Hübenthal, Ulrike; Merk, Hans F; Krutmann, Jean; Edwards, Robert J; Abel, Josef; Pease, Camilla; Goebel, Carsten; Hewitt, Nicola; Fritsche, Ellen

    2012-05-01

    The 7th Amendment to the EU Cosmetics Directive prohibits the use of animals in cosmetic testing for certain endpoints, such as genotoxicity. Therefore, skin in vitro models have to replace chemical testing in vivo. However, the metabolic competence neither of human skin nor of alternative in vitro models has so far been fully characterized, although skin is the first-pass organ for accidentally or purposely (cosmetics and pharmaceuticals) applied chemicals. Thus, there is an urgent need to understand the xenobiotic-metabolizing capacities of human skin and to compare these activities to models developed to replace animal testing. We have measured the activity of the phase II enzymes glutathione S-transferase, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase and N-acetyltransferase in ex vivo human skin, the 3D epidermal model EpiDerm 200 (EPI-200), immortalized keratinocyte-based cell lines (HaCaT and NCTC 2544) and primary normal human epidermal keratinocytes. We show that all three phase II enzymes are present and highly active in skin as compared to phase I. Human skin, therefore, represents a more detoxifying than activating organ. This work systematically compares the activities of three important phase II enzymes in four different in vitro models directly to human skin. We conclude from our studies that 3D epidermal models, like the EPI-200 employed here, are superior over monolayer cultures in mimicking human skin xenobiotic metabolism and thus better suited for dermatotoxicity testing. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Inability of positive phase II clinical trials of investigational treatments to subsequently predict positive phase III clinical trials in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Jacob J; Yust-Katz, Shlomit; Patel, Akash J; Cachia, David; Liu, Diane; Park, Minjeong; Yuan, Ying; A Kent, Thomas; de Groot, John F

    2017-07-31

    Glioblastoma is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults, but effective therapies are lacking. With the scarcity of positive phase III trials, which are increasing in cost, we examined the ability of positive phase II trials to predict statistically significant improvement in clinical outcomes of phase III trials. A PubMed search was conducted to identify phase III clinical trials performed in the past 25 years for patients with newly diagnosed or recurrent glioblastoma. Trials were excluded if they did not examine an investigational chemotherapy or agent, if they were stopped early owing to toxicity, if they lacked prior phase II studies, or if a prior phase II study was negative. Seven phase III clinical trials in newly diagnosed glioblastoma and 4 phase III clinical trials in recurrent glioblastoma met the inclusion criteria. Only 1 (9%) phase III study documented an improvement in overall survival and changed the standard of care. The high failure rate of phase III trials demonstrates the urgent need to increase the reliability of phase II trials of treatments for glioblastoma. Strategies such as the use of adaptive trial designs, Bayesian statistics, biomarkers, volumetric imaging, and mathematical modeling warrant testing. Additionally, it is critical to increase our expectations of phase II trials so that positive findings increase the probability that a phase III trial will be successful.

  12. Global phase diagram of disordered type-II Weyl semimetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yijia; Liu, Haiwen; Jiang, Hua; Xie, X. C.

    2017-07-01

    With electron and hole pockets touching at the Weyl node, type-II Weyl semimetal is a newly proposed topological state distinct from its type-I cousin. We numerically study the localization effect for tilted type-I as well as type-II Weyl semimetals and give the global phase diagram. For disordered type-I Weyl semimetal, an intermediate three-dimensional quantum anomalous Hall phase is confirmed between Weyl semimetal phase and diffusive metal phase. However, this intermediate phase is absent for disordered type-II Weyl semimetal. Besides, along the direction of tilt, comparing to its type-I cousin, type-II Weyl semimetal typically possesses longer normalized localization length and therefore it is more robust against disorder. Near the phase boundary between the type-I and the type-II Weyl semimetals, infinitesimal disorder will induce an insulating phase so that, in this region, the concept of Weyl semimetal is meaningless for real materials.

  13. Utility-based optimization of phase II/III programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, Marietta; Kieser, Meinhard; Götte, Heiko; Schüler, Armin

    2016-01-30

    Phase II and phase III trials play a crucial role in drug development programs. They are costly and time consuming and, because of high failure rates in late development stages, at the same time risky investments. Commonly, sample size calculation of phase III is based on the treatment effect observed in phase II. Therefore, planning of phases II and III can be linked. The performance of the phase II/III program crucially depends on the allocation of the resources to phases II and III by appropriate choice of the sample size and the rule applied to decide whether to stop the program after phase II or to proceed. We present methods for a program-wise phase II/III planning that aim at determining optimal phase II sample sizes and go/no-go decisions in a time-to-event setting. Optimization is based on a utility function that takes into account (fixed and variable) costs of the drug development program and potential gains after successful launch. The proposed methods are illustrated by application to a variety of scenarios typically met in oncology drug development.

  14. The Phase II ATLAS ITk Pixel Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Terzo, Stefano; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The entire tracking system of the ATLAS experiment will be replaced during the LHC Phase II shutdown (foreseen to take place around 2025) by an all-silicon detector called the "ITk" (Inner Tracker). The innermost portion of ITk will consist of a pixel detector with five layers in the barrel region and and ring-shaped supports in the endcap regions. It will be instrumented with new sensor and readout electronics technologies to improve the tracking performance and cope with the HL-LHC environment, which will be severe in terms of occupancy and radiation. The total surface area of silicon in the new pixel system could measure up to 14 m$^2$ , depending on the final layout choice, which is expected to take place in early 2017. Several layout options are being investigated at the moment, including some with novel inclined support structures in the barrel-endcap overlap region and others with very long innermost barrel layers. Forward coverage could be as high as $|\\eta| < 4$. Supporting structures will be ...

  15. Phase II Final Scientific/Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigg, Reid; McPherson, Brian; Lee, Rober

    2011-08-01

    The Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP) one of seven regional partnerships sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) carried out five field pilot tests in its Phase II Carbon Sequestration Demonstration effort, to validate the most promising sequestration technologies and infrastructure concepts, including three geologic pilot tests and two terrestrial pilot programs. This field testing demonstrated the efficacy of proposed sequestration technologies to reduce or offset greenhouse gas emissions in the region. Risk mitigation, optimization of monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) protocols, and effective outreach and communication were additional critical goals of these field validation tests. The program included geologic pilot tests located in Utah, New Mexico, Texas, and a region-wide terrestrial analysis. Each geologic sequestration test site was intended to include injection of a minimum of ~75,000 tons/year CO{sub 2}, with minimum injection duration of one year. These pilots represent medium- scale validation tests in sinks that host capacity for possible larger-scale sequestration operations in the future. These validation tests also demonstrated a broad variety of carbon sink targets and multiple value-added benefits, including testing of enhanced oil recovery and sequestration, enhanced coalbed methane production and a geologic sequestration test combined with a local terrestrial sequestration pilot. A regional terrestrial sequestration demonstration was also carried out, with a focus on improved terrestrial MVA methods and reporting approaches specific for the Southwest region.

  16. Design of Phase II Non-inferiority Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sin-Ho

    2017-09-01

    With the development of inexpensive treatment regimens and less invasive surgical procedures, we are confronted with non-inferiority study objectives. A non-inferiority phase III trial requires a roughly four times larger sample size than that of a similar standard superiority trial. Because of the large required sample size, we often face feasibility issues to open a non-inferiority trial. Furthermore, due to lack of phase II non-inferiority trial design methods, we do not have an opportunity to investigate the efficacy of the experimental therapy through a phase II trial. As a result, we often fail to open a non-inferiority phase III trial and a large number of non-inferiority clinical questions still remain unanswered. In this paper, we want to develop some designs for non-inferiority randomized phase II trials with feasible sample sizes. At first, we review a design method for non-inferiority phase III trials. Subsequently, we propose three different designs for non-inferiority phase II trials that can be used under different settings. Each method is demonstrated with examples. Each of the proposed design methods is shown to require a reasonable sample size for non-inferiority phase II trials. The three different non-inferiority phase II trial designs are used under different settings, but require similar sample sizes that are typical for phase II trials.

  17. 40 CFR 72.44 - Phase II repowering extensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Phase II repowering extensions. 72.44... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Compliance Plan and Compliance Options § 72.44 Phase II repowering... January 1, 1991 by the Secretary of Energy. (2) A repowering extension does not exempt the owner...

  18. 40 CFR 73.21 - Phase II repowering allowances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Phase II repowering allowances. 73.21... (CONTINUED) SULFUR DIOXIDE ALLOWANCE SYSTEM Allowance Allocations § 73.21 Phase II repowering allowances. (a) Repowering allowances. In addition to allowances allocated under § 73.10(b), the Administrator will...

  19. Progress at the La Grande complex phase II in Quebec

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levay, J.; Caron, O.; Parent, L. (Societe d' Energie de la Baie James (SEBJ), Montreal (Canada))

    1993-08-01

    Phase II of the La Grande complex in Quebec, Canada, is now under construction (see Water Power and Dam Construction January 1990 and Handbook 1993). This article gives an update on progress at the schemes that comprise the major elements of Phase II. (author)

  20. MICS Asia Phase II - Sensitivity to the aerosol module

    CERN Document Server

    Sartelet, Karine; Sportisse, Bruno

    2007-01-01

    In the framework of the model inter-comparison study - Asia Phase II (MICS2), where eight models are compared over East Asia, this paper studies the influence of different parameterizations used in the aerosol module on the aerosol concentrations of sulfate and nitrate in PM10. An intracomparison of aerosol concentrations is done for March 2001 using different configurations of the aerosol module of one of the model used for the intercomparison. Single modifications of a reference setup for model configurations are performed and compared to a reference case. These modifications concern the size distribution, i.e. the number of sections, and physical processes, i.e. coagulation, condensation/evaporation, cloud chemistry, heterogeneous reactions and sea-salt emissions. Comparing monthly averaged concentrations at different stations, the importance of each parameterization is first assessed. It is found that sulfate concentrations are little sensitive to sea-salt emissions and to whether condensation is computed...

  1. Using phase II data for the analysis of phase III studies: An application in rare diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandel, Simon; Neuenschwander, Beat; Röver, Christian; Friede, Tim

    2017-06-01

    Clinical research and drug development in orphan diseases are challenging, since large-scale randomized studies are difficult to conduct. Formally synthesizing the evidence is therefore of great value, yet this is rarely done in the drug-approval process. Phase III designs that make better use of phase II data can facilitate drug development in orphan diseases. A Bayesian meta-analytic approach is used to inform the phase III study with phase II data. It is particularly attractive, since uncertainty of between-trial heterogeneity can be dealt with probabilistically, which is critical if the number of studies is small. Furthermore, it allows quantifying and discounting the phase II data through the predictive distribution relevant for phase III. A phase III design is proposed which uses the phase II data and considers approval based on a phase III interim analysis. The design is illustrated with a non-inferiority case study from a Food and Drug Administration approval in herpetic keratitis (an orphan disease). Design operating characteristics are compared to those of a traditional design, which ignores the phase II data. An analysis of the phase II data reveals good but insufficient evidence for non-inferiority, highlighting the need for a phase III study. For the phase III study supported by phase II data, the interim analysis is based on half of the patients. For this design, the meta-analytic interim results are conclusive and would justify approval. In contrast, based on the phase III data only, interim results are inconclusive and require further evidence. To accelerate drug development for orphan diseases, innovative study designs and appropriate methodology are needed. Taking advantage of randomized phase II data when analyzing phase III studies looks promising because the evidence from phase II supports informed decision-making. The implementation of the Bayesian design is straightforward with public software such as R.

  2. BADD phase II: DDS information management architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Thomas P.; DeCleene, Brian T.; Speckert, Glen; Voorhees, Harry L.

    1997-06-01

    The DARPA Battlefield Awareness and Data Dissemination (BADD) Phase II Program will provide the next generation multimedia information management architecture to support the warfighter. One goal of this architecture is proactive dissemination of information to the warfighter through strategies such as multicast and 'smart push and pull' designed to minimize latency and make maximum use of available communications bandwidth. Another goal is to support integration of information from widely distributed legacy repositories. This will enable the next generation of battlefield awareness applications to form a common operational view of the battlefield to aid joint service and/or multi-national peacekeeping forces. This paper discusses the approach we are taking to realize such an architecture for BADD. Our architecture and its implementation, known as the Distributed Dissemination Serivces (DDS) are based on two key concepts: a global database schema and an intelligent, proactive caching scheme. A global schema provides a common logical view of the information space in which the warfighter operates. This schema (or subsets of it) is shared by all warfighters through a distributed object database providing local access to all relevant metadata. This approach provides both scalability to a large number of warfighters, and it supports tethered as well as autonomous operations. By utilizing DDS information integration services that provide transparent access to legacy databases, related information from multiple 'stovepipe' systems are now available to battlefield awareness applications. The second key concept embedded in our architecture is an intelligent, hierarchical caching system supported by proactive dissemination management services which push both lightweight and heavyweight data such as imagery and video to warfighters based on their information profiles. The goal of this approach is to transparently and proactively stage data which is likely to be requested by

  3. Modeling of α/β for late rectal toxicity from a randomized phase II study: conventional versus hypofractionated scheme for localized prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arcangeli Giorgio

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, the use of hypo-fractionated treatment schemes for the prostate cancer has been encouraged due to the fact that α/β ratio for prostate cancer should be low. However a major concern on the use of hypofractionation is the late rectal toxicity, it is important to be able to predict the risk of toxicity for alternative treatment schemes, with the best accuracy. The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the response of rectum wall to changes in fractionation and to quantify the α/β ratio for late rectal toxicity Methods 162 patients with localized prostate cancer, treated with conformal radiotherapy, were enrolled in a phase II randomized trial. The patients were randomly assigned to 80 Gy in 40 fractions over 8 weeks (arm A or 62 Gy in 20 fractions over 5 weeks (arm B. The median follow-up was 30 months. The late rectal toxicity was evaluated using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG scale. It was assumed ≥ Grade 2 (G2 toxicity incidence as primary end point. Fit of toxicity incidence by the Lyman-Burman-Kutcher (LKB model was performed. Results The crude incidence of late rectal toxicity ≥ G2 was 14% and 12% for the standard arm and the hypofractionated arm, respectively. The crude incidence of late rectal toxicity ≥ G2 was 14.0% and 12.3% for the arm A and B, respectively. For the arm A, volumes receiving ≥ 50 Gy (V50 and 70 Gy (V70 were 38.3 ± 7.5% and 23.4 ± 5.5%; for arm B, V38 and V54 were 40.9 ± 6.8% and 24.5 ± 4.4%. An α/β ratio for late rectal toxicity very close to 3 Gy was found. Conclusion The ≥ G2 late toxicities in both arms were comparable, indicating the feasibility of hypofractionated regimes in prostate cancer. An α/β ratio for late rectal toxicity very close to 3 Gy was found.

  4. Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Phase II Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freshley, M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hubbard, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Flach, G. [Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL), Aiken, SC (United States); Freedman, V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Agarwal, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Andre, B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Bott, Y. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chen, X. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Davis, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Faybishenko, B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gorton, I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Murray, C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Moulton, D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Meyer, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rockhold, M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shoshani, A. [LBNL; Steefel, C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wainwright, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Waichler, S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-09-28

    quality assurance. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications through a suite of demonstrations being conducted by the Site Applications Thrust. In 2010, the Phase I Demonstration focused on testing initial ASCEM capabilities. The Phase II Demonstration, completed in September 2012, focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site Deep Vadose Zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of ASCEM capabilities on a site with relatively sparse data, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations included in this Phase II report included addressing attenuation-based remedies at the Savannah River Site F-Area, to exercise linked ASCEM components under data-dense and complex geochemical conditions, and conducting detailed simulations of a representative waste tank. This report includes descriptive examples developed by the Hanford Site Deep Vadose Zone, the SRS F-Area Attenuation-Based Remedies for the Subsurface, and the Waste Tank Performance Assessment working groups. The integrated Phase II Demonstration provides test cases to accompany distribution of the initial user release (Version 1.0) of the ASCEM software tools to a limited set of users in 2013. These test cases will be expanded with each new release, leading up to the release of a version that is qualified for regulatory applications in the 2015 time frame.

  5. Using phase II data for the analysis of phase III studies: an application in rare diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Wandel, Simon; Neuenschwander, Beat; Friede, Tim; Röver, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Clinical research and drug development in orphan diseases is challenging, since large-scale randomized studies are difficult to conduct. Formally synthesizing the evidence is therefore of great value, yet this is rarely done in the drug approval process. Phase III designs that make better use of phase II data can facilitate drug development in orphan diseases. A Bayesian meta-analytic approach is used to inform the phase III study with phase II data. It is particularly attractive, since uncer...

  6. Three-dimensional mixed-wet random pore-scale network modeling of two- and three-phase flow in porous media. II. Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piri, Mohammad; Blunt, Martin J

    2005-02-01

    We use the model described in Piri and Blunt [Phys. Rev. E 71, 026301 (2005)] to predict two- and three-phase relative permeabilities of Berea sandstone using a random network to represent the pore space. We predict measured relative permeabilities for two-phase flow in a water-wet system. We then successfully predict the steady-state oil, water, and gas three-phase relative permeabilities measured by Oak (Proceedings of the SPE/DOE Seventh Symposium on Enhanced Oil Recovery, Tulsa, OK, 1990). We also study secondary and tertiary gas injection into media of different wettability and initial oil saturation and interpret the results in terms of pore-scale displacement processes.

  7. Savanna ecosystem project: phase I summary and phase II progress

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Huntely, BJ

    1978-07-01

    Full Text Available A summary of the results of the first phase (mid 1974 to mid 1976) of the South African Savanna Ecosystem Project being undertaken at Nylsvley in the northern Transvaal is presented. Phase I of this ten year study of the structure and functioning...

  8. Modelling ruptures of buried high-pressure dense-phase CO2 pipelines in carbon capture and storage applications - Part II. A full-scale rupture

    OpenAIRE

    Wareing, CJ; Fairweather, M.; Falle, SAEG; Woolley, RM

    2015-01-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) presents a short-term option for significantly reducing the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) released into the atmosphere. National Grid initiated the COOLTRANS research programme to consider the CCS pipeline transportation of high-pressure dense-phase CO2, including the development and application of a mathematical model for predicting the sonic near-field dispersion of pure CO2 following pipeline venting or failure. In Part I (Wareing et al., 2015a) validation...

  9. Performance of the LAr scintillation veto of Gerda Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiesinger, Christoph [Physik-Department and Excellence Cluster Universe, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Strasse, 85748 Garching (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    Gerda is an experiment to search for the neutrinoless double beta decay in {sup 76}Ge. Results of Phase I have been published in summer 2013 and Gerda has been upgraded to Phase II. To reach the aspired background index of ∝10{sup -3} cts/(keV.kg.yr) for Phase II active background-suppression techniques are applied, including an active liquid argon (LAr) veto. It has been demonstrated with the LArGe test facility that the detection of argon scintillation light can be used to effectively suppress background events in the germanium detectors, which simultaneously deposit energy in the LAr. The light instrumentation consisting of photomultiplier tubes (PMT) and wavelength-shifting fibers connected to silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) has been installed in Gerda. In this talk the low background design of the LAr veto and its performance during Phase II start-up is reported.

  10. ENERGY DEPOSITION STUDIES FOR POSSIBLE INNOVATIVE PHASE II COLLIMATOR DESIGNS

    CERN Document Server

    Lari, L; Brugger, M; Cerutti, F; Ferrari, A; Vlachoudis, V; Weiler, T

    2009-01-01

    Due to the known limitations of Phase I LHC collimators in stable physics conditions, the LHC collimation system will be complemented by additional 30 Phase II collimators. The Phase II collimation system is designed to improve cleaning efficiency and to minimize the collimator-induced impedance with the main function of protecting the Super Conducting (SC) magnets from quenching due to beam particle losses. To fulfil these requirements, different possible innovative collimation designs were taken in consideration. Advanced jaw materials, including new composite materials (e.g. Cu–Diamond), jaw SiC insertions, coating foil, in-jaw instrumentation (e.g. BPM) and improved mechanical robustness of the jaw are the main features of these new promising Phase II collimator designs developed at CERN. The FLUKA Monte Carlo code is extensively used to evaluate the behavior of these collimators in the most radioactive areas of LHC, supporting the mechanical integration. These studies aim to identify the possible criti...

  11. Energy Deposition Studies for Possible Innovative Phase II Collimator Designs

    CERN Document Server

    Lari, L; Brugger, M; Cerutti, F; Ferrari, A; Vlachoudis, V; Weiler, T

    2010-01-01

    Due to the known limitations of Phase I LHC collimators in stable physics conditions, the LHC collimation system will be complemented by additional 30 Phase II collimators. The Phase II collimation system is designed to improve cleaning efficiency and to minimize the collimator-induced impedance with the main function of protecting the Super Conducting (SC) magnets from quenching due to beam particle losses. To fulfil these requirements, different possible innovative collimation designs were taken in consideration. Advanced jaw materials, including new composite materials (e.g. Cu–Diamond), jaw SiC insertions, coating foil, in-jaw instrumentation (e.g. BPM) and improved mechanical robustness of the jaw are the main features of these new promising Phase II collimator designs developed at CERN. The FLUKA Monte Carlo code is extensively used to evaluate the behavior of these collimators in the most radioactive areas of LHC, supporting the mechanical integration. These studies aim to identify the possible criti...

  12. Future physics potential of CMS Phase II detector

    CERN Document Server

    Pozzobon, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    To extend the LHC physics program, it is foreseen to operate the LHC in the future with an unprecedented high luminosity. To maintain the experiment’s physics potential in such harsh environment, the detector will need to be upgraded. At the same time the detector acceptance will be extended and new features such as a L1 track trigger will be implemented. Simulation studies evaluated the performance of the new, proposed detector components in comparison to the present detector with the expected aging after 1000 fb$^{-1}$. The impact of the expected Phase II performance on representative physics channels is studied. The sensitivity to find new physics beyond the SM is significantly improved and will allow to extend the SUSY reach, search for dark matter and exotic long-lived signatures. Precision Higgs and standard model measurements will gain substantially due to the improved performance.

  13. Lunar Quest in Second Life, Lunar Exploration Island, Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireton, F. M.; Day, B. H.; Mitchell, B.; Hsu, B. C.

    2010-12-01

    Linden Lab’s Second Life is a virtual 3D metaverse created by users. At any one time there may be 40,000-50,000 users on line. Users develop a persona and are seen on screen as a human figure or avatar. Avatars move through Second Life by walking, flying, or teleporting. Users form communities or groups of mutual interest such as music, computer graphics, and education. These groups communicate via e-mail, voice, and text within Second Life. Information on downloading the Second Life browser and joining can be found on the Second Life website: www.secondlife.com. This poster details Phase II in the development of Lunar Exploration Island (LEI) located in Second Life. Phase I LEI highlighted NASA’s LRO/LCROSS mission. Avatars enter LEI via teleportation arriving at a hall of flight housing interactive exhibits on the LRO/ LCROSS missions including full size models of the two spacecraft and launch vehicle. Storyboards with information about the missions interpret the exhibits while links to external websites provide further information on the mission, both spacecraft’s instrument suites, and related EPO. Other lunar related activities such as My Moon and NLSI EPO programs. A special exhibit was designed for International Observe the Moon Night activities with links to websites for further information. The sim includes several sites for meetings, a conference stage to host talks, and a screen for viewing NASATV coverage of mission and other televised events. In Phase II exhibits are updated to reflect on-going lunar exploration highlights, discoveries, and future missions. A new section of LEI has been developed to showcase NASA’s Lunar Quest program. A new exhibit hall with Lunar Quest information has been designed and is being populated with Lunar Quest information, spacecraft models (LADEE is in place) and kiosks. A two stage interactive demonstration illustrates lunar phases with static and 3-D stations. As NASA’s Lunar Quest program matures further

  14. The role of technology in reducing health care costs. Phase II and phase III.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cilke, John F.; Parks, Raymond C.; Funkhouser, Donald Ray; Tebo, Michael A.; Murphy, Martin D.; Hightower, Marion Michael; Gallagher, Linda K.; Craft, Richard Layne, II; Garcia, Rudy John

    2004-04-01

    In Phase I of this project, reported in SAND97-1922, Sandia National Laboratories applied a systems approach to identifying innovative biomedical technologies with the potential to reduce U.S. health care delivery costs while maintaining care quality. The effort provided roadmaps for the development and integration of technology to meet perceived care delivery requirements and an economic analysis model for development of care pathway costs for two conditions: coronary artery disease (CAD) and benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). Phases II and III of this project, which are presented in this report, were directed at detailing the parameters of telemedicine that influence care delivery costs and quality. These results were used to identify and field test the communication, interoperability, and security capabilities needed for cost-effective, secure, and reliable health care via telemedicine.

  15. STAGING OF FUEL CELLS - PHASE II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Per Onnerud; Suresh Sriramulu

    2002-08-29

    TIAX has executed a laboratory-based development program aiming at the improvement of stationary fuel cell systems. The two-year long development program resulted in an improved understanding of staged fuel cells and inorganic proton conductors through evaluation of results from a number of laboratory tasks: (1) Development of a fuel cell modeling tool--Multi-scale model was developed, capable of analyzing the effects of materials and operating conditions; and this model allowed studying various ''what-if'' conditions for hypothetically staged fuel cells; (2) Study of new high temperature proton conductor--TIAX discovery of a new class of sulfonated inorganics capable of conducting protons when exposed to water; and study involved synthesis and conductivity measurements of novel compounds up to 140 C; (3) Electrochemical fuel cell measurements--the feasibility of staged fuel cells was tested in TIAX's fuel cell laboratories experimental design was based on results from modeling.

  16. ALTERNATE REDUCTANT COLD CAP EVALUATION FURNACE PHASE II TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, F.; Stone, M.; Miller, D.

    2014-09-03

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) conducted a Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE) to determine the optimum alternate reductant flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Specifically, two proposed flowsheets (nitric–formic–glycolic and nitric–formic–sugar) were evaluated based upon results from preliminary testing. Comparison of the two flowsheets among evaluation criteria indicated a preference towards the nitric–formic–glycolic flowsheet. Further research and development of this flowsheet eliminated the formic acid, and as a result, the nitric–glycolic flowsheet was recommended for further testing. Based on the development of a roadmap for the nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet, Waste Solidification Engineering (WS-E) issued a Technical Task Request (TTR) to address flammability issues that may impact the implementation of this flowsheet. Melter testing was requested in order to define the DWPF flammability envelope for the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Cold Cap Evaluation Furnace (CEF), a 1/12th scale DWPF melter, was selected by the SRR Alternate Reductant project team as the melter platform for this testing. The overall scope was divided into the following sub-tasks as discussed in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP):  Phase I - A nitric–formic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled) to baseline the CEF cold cap and vapor space data to the benchmark melter flammability models;  Phase II - A nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled and bubbled) to: o Define new cold cap reactions and global kinetic parameters in support of the melter flammability model development; o Quantify off-gas surging potential of the feed; o Characterize off-gas condensate for complete organic and inorganic carbon species. After charging the CEF with cullet from Phase I CEF testing, the melter was slurry-fed with glycolic flowsheet based SB6-Frit 418 melter feed at 36

  17. Alternate Reductant Cold Cap Evaluation Furnace Phase II Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, F. C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Stone, M. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Miller, D. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-09-03

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) conducted a Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE) to determine the optimum alternate reductant flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Specifically, two proposed flowsheets (nitric–formic–glycolic and nitric–formic–sugar) were evaluated based upon results from preliminary testing. Comparison of the two flowsheets among evaluation criteria indicated a preference towards the nitric–formic–glycolic flowsheet. Further research and development of this flowsheet eliminated the formic acid, and as a result, the nitric–glycolic flowsheet was recommended for further testing. Based on the development of a roadmap for the nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet, Waste Solidification Engineering (WS-E) issued a Technical Task Request (TTR) to address flammability issues that may impact the implementation of this flowsheet. Melter testing was requested in order to define the DWPF flammability envelope for the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Cold Cap Evaluation Furnace (CEF), a 1/12th scale DWPF melter, was selected by the SRR Alternate Reductant project team as the melter platform for this testing. The overall scope was divided into the following sub-tasks as discussed in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP): Phase I - A nitric–formic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled) to baseline the CEF cold cap and vapor space data to the benchmark melter flammability models; Phase II - A nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled and bubbled) to: Define new cold cap reactions and global kinetic parameters in support of the melter flammability model development; Quantify off-gas surging potential of the feed; Characterize off-gas condensate for complete organic and inorganic carbon species. After charging the CEF with cullet from Phase I CEF testing, the melter was slurry-fed with glycolic flowsheet based SB6-Frit 418 melter feed at 36% waste

  18. Conditionally unbiased estimation in phase II/III clinical trials with early stopping for futility

    OpenAIRE

    Kimani, Peter K.; Todd, Susan; Stallard, Nigel

    2013-01-01

    Seamless phase II/III clinical trials combine traditional phases II and III into a single trial that is conducted in two stages, with stage 1 used to answer phase II objectives such as treatment selection and stage 2 used for the confirmatory analysis, which is a phase III objective. Although seamless phase II/III clinical trials are efficient because the confirmatory analysis includes phase II data from stage 1, inference can pose statistical challenges. In this paper, we consider point esti...

  19. Adaptive Processing Experiment (APE) Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-05-01

    FI LTE.R -R 9 0R L• k k.9 0Ms EPPMR PHASE AMPL,I (t) ( r)GR•S ) (Zi) ( flt3 POWfER) (DEGRFES) (Ob) tF(IpE A0TfR bFt-Iý- E. AF tLk EIJN• AFTER , ---,,1...t.In I ,4P -. 3/ ,a?-.•O*O9 -34,57 o1o)110O 0 .- . 614 . - " 13,𔃼h a w, 3b " 3 v5• S -01 ,19 -tgo (19.52 TUTAI 87 ,, ,21 .11 6,, .71 -34,,74SNET PF...38,95 a08 *t0 70,o so0 󈧽 -sob D8• -Sq,74 -37,5q 007 614 € 75,t) .7n ,76 .,tok) -.36,03 -37a01 ’nh o16 80,0 .76 o0P- u,. , () -32, 1,2• -36,79 aO b

  20. 78 FR 8184 - DEEPWATER HORIZON Oil Spill; Final Phase II Early Restoration Plan and Environmental Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    ... Early Restoration Plan and Environmental Review (Phase II ERP/ER) describing the second set of... availability of the Phase II ERP/ER. ADDRESSES: Obtaining Documents: You may download the Phase II ERP/ER and... the Phase II ERP/ER at any of the public repositories listed at...

  1. Military Family Coping Project - Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    and 13th Sustainment Command which are prepared for rapid deployment. Fort Hood also facilitates the training and support requirements for many... Extraversion subscales all entered simultaneously. The model predicting depressed mood was significant (R² = .64, Adj R² = .61, F (2,24) = 21.6,p < .001...mediacommunications/news.php?action=story&story=109624. 15 Training /Student Projects In addition to the research mission of the project, we

  2. Performance of BEGe detectors for GERDA Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazzaro, Andrea [Physik-Department E15, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    After the end of the data-taking for GERDA Phase I, the apparatus has been upgraded to fulfill the requirements of the second phase. Phase II sensitivity will be driven by 30 custom made BEGe detectors. This detectors are now available and can be operated in phaseII configuration in the GERDA cryostat together with the liquid argon scintillation veto. The performances of BEGe detectors in liquid argon are presented in this talk. Besides the spectroscopy capability, the focus will be placed on the expectations in terms of background rejection via pulse shape discrimination (PSD). In particular the main goal the BEGe's pulse shape analysis is to discriminate surface events produced by beta emitters (e.g. {sup 42}K) present in the liquid Ar.

  3. Projectile Foundation Moment Generation Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-01

    simulated bore contact area . The shaded portion of that region is the nylon which is to simulate the obturator or sealing band. The center of the model...inches. There are two sides to the frame, and thus,the stress area is 6 square inches. At a load of 10,000 pounds, the maximum deflection that we...AMCCOI4 Mr. B. Brodman ATTN: DRSMC-LCU(D), Dr. T. Hung Mr. E. Barrieres DRSMC-SCA(D), Mr. R. Davitt Mr. W. Gadomski DRSMC-LCU-M(D), Mr. E. Malatesta Mr

  4. Modeling interactions of Hg(II) and bauxitic soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerasooriya, Rohan; Tobschall, Heinz J; Bandara, Atula

    2007-11-01

    The adsorptive interactions of Hg(II) with gibbsite-rich soils (hereafter SOIL-g) were modeled by 1-pK surface complexation theory using charge distribution multi-site ion competition model (CD MUSIC) incorporating basic Stern layer model (BSM) to account for electrostatic effects. The model calibrations were performed for the experimental data of synthetic gibbsite-Hg(II) adsorption. When [NaNO(3)] > or = 0.01M, the Hg(II) adsorption density values, of gibbsite, Gamma(Hg(II)), showed a negligible variation with ionic strength. However, Gamma(Hg(II)) values show a marked variation with the [Cl(-)]. When [Cl(-)] > or = 0.01M, the Gamma(Hg(II)) values showed a significant reduction with the pH. The Hg(II) adsorption behavior in NaNO(3) was modeled assuming homogeneous solid surface. The introduction of high affinity sites, i.e., >Al(s)OH at a low concentration (typically about 0.045 sites nm(-2)) is required to model Hg(II) adsorption in NaCl. According to IR spectroscopic data, the bauxitic soil (SOIL-g) is characterized by gibbsite and bayerite. These mineral phases were not treated discretely in modeling of Hg(II) and soil interactions. The CD MUSIC/BSM model combination can be used to model Hg(II) adsorption on bauxitic soil. The role of organic matter seems to play a role on Hg(II) binding when pH>8. The Hg(II) adsorption in the presence of excess Cl(-) ions required the selection of high affinity sites in modeling.

  5. Spectral modeling of Type II SNe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessart, Luc

    2015-08-01

    The red supergiant phase represents the final stage of evolution in the life of moderate mass (8-25Msun) massive stars. Hidden from view, the core changes considerably its structure, progressing through the advanced stages of nuclear burning, and eventually becomes degenerate. Upon reaching the Chandrasekhar mass, this Fe or ONeMg core collapses, leading to the formation of a proto neutron star. A type II supernova results if the shock that forms at core bounce, eventually wins over the envelope accretion and reaches the progenitor surface.The electromagnetic display of such core-collapse SNe starts with this shock breakout, and persists for months as the ejecta releases the energy deposited initially by the shock or continuously through radioactive decay. Over a timescale of weeks to months, the originally optically-thick ejecta thins out and turns nebular. SN radiation contains a wealth of information about the explosion physics (energy, explosive nucleosynthesis), the progenitor properties (structure and composition). Polarised radiation also offers signatures that can help constrain the morphology of the ejecta.In this talk, I will review the current status of type II SN spectral modelling, and emphasise that a proper solution requires a time dependent treatment of the radiative transfer problem. I will discuss the wealth of information that can be gleaned from spectra as well as light curves, from both the early times (photospheric phase) and late times (nebular phase). I will discuss the diversity of Type SNe properties and how they are related to the diversity of red supergiant stars from which they originate.SN radiation offers an alternate means of constraining the properties of red-supergiant stars. To wrap up, I will illustrate how SNe II-P can also be used as probes, for example to constrain the metallicity of their environment.

  6. Definition of the Semisubmersible Floating System for Phase II of OC4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Masciola, M.; Song, H.; Goupee, A.; Coulling, A.; Luan, C.

    2014-09-01

    Phase II of the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration Continuation (OC4) project involved modeling of a semisubmersible floating offshore wind system as shown below. This report documents the specifications of the floating system, which were needed by the OC4 participants for building aero-hydro-servo-elastic models.

  7. The SafeBoosC phase II clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riera, Joan; Hyttel-Sorensen, Simon; Bravo, María Carmen

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The SafeBoosC phase II randomised clinical trial recently demonstrated the benefits of a combination of cerebral regional tissue oxygen saturation (rStO2) by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and a treatment guideline to reduce the oxygen imbalance in extremely preterm infants. AIMS...

  8. The SafeBoosC Phase II Randomised Clinical Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellicer, Adelina; Greisen, Gorm; Benders, Manon

    2013-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy-derived regional tissue oxygen saturation of haemoglobin (rStO2) reflects venous oxygen saturation. If cerebral metabolism is stable, rStO2 can be used as an estimate of cerebral oxygen delivery. The SafeBoosC phase II randomised clinical trial hypothesises that the bur...

  9. 40 CFR 790.52 - Phase II test rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Phase II test rule. 790.52 Section 790.52 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT... Federal Register requesting comments on the ability of the proposed study plan to ensure that data from...

  10. The SafeBoosC phase II clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riera, Joan; Hyttel-Sorensen, Simon; Bravo, María Carmen

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The SafeBoosC phase II randomised clinical trial recently demonstrated the benefits of a combination of cerebral regional tissue oxygen saturation (rStO2) by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and a treatment guideline to reduce the oxygen imbalance in extremely preterm infants. AIMS: ...

  11. Probability of success for phase III after exploratory biomarker analysis in phase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götte, Heiko; Kirchner, Marietta; Sailer, Martin Oliver

    2017-02-23

    The probability of success or average power describes the potential of a future trial by weighting the power with a probability distribution of the treatment effect. The treatment effect estimate from a previous trial can be used to define such a distribution. During the development of targeted therapies, it is common practice to look for predictive biomarkers. The consequence is that the trial population for phase III is often selected on the basis of the most extreme result from phase II biomarker subgroup analyses. In such a case, there is a tendency to overestimate the treatment effect. We investigate whether the overestimation of the treatment effect estimate from phase II is transformed into a positive bias for the probability of success for phase III. We simulate a phase II/III development program for targeted therapies. This simulation allows to investigate selection probabilities and allows to compare the estimated with the true probability of success. We consider the estimated probability of success with and without subgroup selection. Depending on the true treatment effects, there is a negative bias without selection because of the weighting by the phase II distribution. In comparison, selection increases the estimated probability of success. Thus, selection does not lead to a bias in probability of success if underestimation due to the phase II distribution and overestimation due to selection cancel each other out. We recommend to perform similar simulations in practice to get the necessary information about the risk and chances associated with such subgroup selection designs.

  12. Performance of the LAr scintillation veto of GERDA Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiesinger, Christoph [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Dept. E15, James-Franck-Strasse, 85748 Garching (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    Gerda is an experiment to search for the neutrinoless double beta decay in {sup 76}Ge. Results of Phase I have been published in summer 2013 and Gerda is upgraded to Phase II. To reach the aspired background index of ≤ 10{sup -3} cts/(keV.kg.yr) for Phase II active background-suppression techniques are applied, including an active liquid argon (LAr) veto. It has been demonstrated with the LArGe test facility that the detection of argon scintillation light can be used to effectively suppress background events in the germanium, which simultaneously deposit energy in the LAr. The light instrumentation consisting of photomultiplier tubes (PMT) and wavelength-shifting fibers connected to silicon multipliers (SiPM) has been installed in Gerda. In this talk the low background design of the LAr veto and its performance during the commissioning runs are reported.

  13. 78 FR 30951 - SBIR/STTR Phase I to Phase II Transition Benchmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    ... ADMINISTRATION SBIR/STTR Phase I to Phase II Transition Benchmarks AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration...; Amended. SUMMARY: The Small Business Administration (SBA) is soliciting comments on proposed amendments to... Director, Office of Innovation, Small Business Administration, 409 Third Street SW., Washington, DC...

  14. Thymostimulin in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: A phase II trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behl Susanne

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thymostimulin is a thymic peptide fraction with immune-mediated cytotoxicity against hepatocellular carcinoma in vitro. In a phase II trial, we investigated safety and efficacy including selection criteria for best response in advanced or metastasised hepatocellular carcinoma. Methods 44 patients (84 % male, median age 69 years not suitable or refractory to conventional therapy received thymostimulin 75 mg subcutaneously five times per week for a median of 8.2 months until progression or complete response. 3/44 patients were secondarily accessible to local ablation or chemoembolisation. Primary endpoint was overall survival, secondary endpoint tumor response or progression-free survival. A multivariate Cox's regression model was used to identify variables affecting survival. Results Median survival was 11.5 months (95% CI 7.9–15.0 with a 1-, 2- and 3-year survival of 50%, 23% and 9%. In the univariate analysis, a low Child-Pugh-score (p = 0.01, a low score in the Okuda- and CLIP-classification (p Conclusion Outcome in our study rather depended on liver function and intrahepatic tumor growth (presence of liver cirrhosis and Okuda stage in addition to response to thymostimulin, while an invasive HCC phenotype had no influence in the multivariate analysis. Thymostimulin could therefore be considered a safe and promising candidate for palliative treatment in a selected target population with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma, in particular as component of a multimodal therapy concept. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN29319366.

  15. OSAS Surgery and Postoperative Discomfort: Phase I Surgery versus Phase II Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Gasparini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This study aims to investigate the reasons that discourage the patients affected by OSAS to undergo orthognathic surgery and compares the postoperative discomfort of phase I (soft tissue surgery and phase II (orthognathic surgery procedures for treatment of OSAS. Material and Methods. A pool of 46 patients affected by OSAS was divided into two groups: “surgery patients” who accepted surgical treatments of their condition and “no surgery patients” who refused surgical procedures. The “surgery patients” group was further subdivided into two arms: patients who accepted phase I procedures (IP and those who accepted phase II (IIP. To better understand the motivations behind the refusal of II phase procedures, we asked the patients belonging to both the IP group and “no surgery” group to indicate the main reason that influenced their decision to avoid II phase procedures. We also monitored and compared five parameters of postoperative discomfort: pain, painkiller assumption, length of hospitalization, foreign body sensation, and diet assumption following IP and IIP procedures. Results. The main reason to avoid IIP procedures was the concern of a more severe postoperative discomfort. Comparison of the postoperative discomfort following IP versus IIP procedures showed that the former scored worse in 4 out of 5 parameters analyzed. Conclusion. IIP procedures produce less postoperative discomfort. IIP procedures, namely, orthognathic surgery, should be the first choice intervention in patients affected by OSAS and dentoskeletal malformation.

  16. Microbial Dark Matter Phase II: Stepping deeper into unknown territory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarett, Jessica; Dunfield, Peter; Peura, Sari; Wielen, Paul van der; Hedlund, Brian; Elshahed, Mostafa; Kormas, Konstantinos; Stott, Andreas Teske8, Matt; Birkeland, Nils-Kare; Zhang, Chuanlun; Rengefors, Karin; Lindemann, Stephen; Ravin, Nikolai V.; Spear, John; Hallam, Steven; Crowe, Sean; Steele, Jillian; Goudeau, Danielle; Malmstrom, Rex; Kyrpides, Nikos; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Woyke, Tanja

    2014-10-27

    Currently available microbial genomes are of limited phylogenetic breadth due to our historical inability to cultivate most microorganisms in the laboratory. The first phase of the Microbial Dark Matter project used single-cell genomics to sequence 201 single cells from uncultivated lineages, and was able to resolve new superphyla and reveal novel metabolic features in bacteria and archaea. However, many fundamental questions about the evolution and function of microbes remain unanswered, and many candidate phyla remain uncharacterized. Phase II of the Microbial Dark Matter project will target candidate phyla with no sequenced representatives at a variety of new sites using a combination of single-cell sequencing and shotgun metagenomics approaches.

  17. Egyptian wind energy resources study. Phase II. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, W.L.

    1979-11-01

    The data gathered in Egypt in Phase I of the program indicated favorable wind energy possibilities along the Mediterranean Coast west of Alexandria and along the Red Sea south of Suez. There did not appear to be inland areas of high promise. It was decided that in Phase II, several continuous wind recording instruments would be established on the North Coast and Red Sea Coasts. Locations finally selected for the North Coast (South Coast of the Mediterranean) were distributed from Mersa Matruh to Borg El Arab, a coastal community about seventy kilometers west of Alexandria. The recorded data from the monitoring stations are presented.

  18. Small Business Innovation Research, Post-Phase II Opportunity Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2015-01-01

    This report outlines current Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Post-Phase II opportunity contract award results for the SBIR technology program from 2007 to 2011 for NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD), Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD), Science Mission Directorate (SMD), and Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD). The report provides guidelines for incorporating SBIR technology into NASA programs and projects and provides a quantitative overview of the post-Phase II award patterns that correspond with each mission directorate at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). In recent years, one of NASA's goals has been to not only transfer SBIR technologies to commercial industries, but to ensure that NASA mission directorates incorporate SBIR technologies into their program and project activities. Before incorporating technologies into MD programs, it is important to understand each mission directorate structure because each directorate has different objectives and needs. The directorate program structures follow.

  19. Urban Integrated Industrial Cogeneration Systems Analysis. Phase II final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    Through the Urban Integrated Industrial Cogeneration Systems Analysis (UIICSA), the City of Chicago embarked upon an ambitious effort to identify the measure the overall industrial cogeneration market in the city and to evaluate in detail the most promising market opportunities. This report discusses the background of the work completed during Phase II of the UIICSA and presents the results of economic feasibility studies conducted for three potential cogeneration sites in Chicago. Phase II focused on the feasibility of cogeneration at the three most promising sites: the Stockyards and Calumet industrial areas, and the Ford City commercial/industrial complex. Each feasibility case study considered the energy load requirements of the existing facilities at the site and the potential for attracting and serving new growth in the area. Alternative fuels and technologies, and ownership and financing options were also incorporated into the case studies. Finally, site specific considerations such as development incentives, zoning and building code restrictions and environmental requirements were investigated.

  20. The effect of quercetin phase II metabolism on its MRP1 and MRP2 inhibiting potential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zanden, van J.J.; Woude, van der H.; Vaessen, J.; Usta, M.; Wortelboer, H.M.; Cnubben, N.H.P.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2007-01-01

    The present study characterises the effect of phase II metabolism, especially methylation and glucuronidation, of the model flavonoid quercetin on its capacity to inhibit human MRP1 and MRP2 activity in Sf9 inside-out vesicles. The results obtained reveal that 3¿-O-methylation does not affect the MR

  1. The effect of quercetin phase II metabolism on its MRP1 and MRP2 inhibiting potential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zanden, J.J. van; Woude, H. van der; Vaessen, J.; Usta, M.; Wortelboer, H.M.; Cnubben, N.H.P.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2007-01-01

    The present study characterises the effect of phase II metabolism, especially methylation and glucuronidation, of the model flavonoid quercetin on its capacity to inhibit human MRP1 and MRP2 activity in Sf9 inside-out vesicles. The results obtained reveal that 3′-O-methylation does not affect the MR

  2. An Acoustic Plate Mode Sensor for Biowarfare Toxins, Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-10-01

    04401 REPORT DATE: October 1997 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual, Phase II PREPARED FOR: U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command Fort Detrick, Maryland...conducting research using animals, the investigator(s) adhered to the "Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals," prepared by the Committee on...Still, PMS (1) exhibited better than 75% of the binding from (6). Meanwhile, carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), which should have dramatically increased

  3. Generation of phase II in vitro metabolites using homogenized horse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jenny K Y; Chan, George H M; Leung, David K K; Tang, Francis P W; Wan, Terence S M

    2016-02-01

    The successful use of homogenized horse liver for the generation of phase I in vitro metabolites has been previously reported by the authors' laboratory. Prior to the use of homogenized liver, the authors' laboratory had been using mainly horse liver microsomes for carrying out equine in vitro metabolism studies. Homogenized horse liver has shown significant advantages over liver microsomes for in vitro metabolism studies as the procedures are much quicker and have higher capability for generating more in vitro metabolites. In this study, the use of homogenized liver has been extended to the generation of phase II in vitro metabolites (glucuronide and/or sulfate conjugates) using 17β-estradiol, morphine, and boldenone undecylenate as model substrates. It was observed that phase II metabolites could also be generated even without the addition of cofactors. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of the successful use of homogenized horse liver for the generation of phase II metabolites. It also demonstrates the ease with which both phase I and phase II metabolites can now be generated in vitro simply by using homogenized liver without the need for ultracentrifuges or tedious preparation steps.

  4. Modeling of phased array transducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Rais; Kundu, Tribikram; Placko, Dominique

    2005-04-01

    Phased array transducers are multi-element transducers, where different elements are activated with different time delays. The advantage of these transducers is that no mechanical movement of the transducer is needed to scan an object. Focusing and beam steering is obtained simply by adjusting the time delay. In this paper the DPSM (distributed point source method) is used to model the ultrasonic field generated by a phased array transducer and to study the interaction effect when two phased array transducers are placed in a homogeneous fluid. Earlier investigations modeled the acoustic field for conventional transducers where all transducer points are excited simultaneously. In this research, combining the concepts of delayed firing and the DPSM, the phased array transducers are modeled semi-analytically. In addition to the single transducer modeling the ultrasonic fields from two phased array transducers placed face to face in a fluid medium is also modeled to study the interaction effect. The importance of considering the interaction effect in multiple transducer modeling is discussed, pointing out that neighboring transducers not only act as ultrasonic wave generators but also as scatterers.

  5. Mercury Oxidation via Catalytic Barrier Filters Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wayne Seames; Michael Mann; Darrin Muggli; Jason Hrdlicka; Carol Horabik

    2007-09-30

    In 2004, the Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory awarded the University of North Dakota a Phase II University Coal Research grant to explore the feasibility of using barrier filters coated with a catalyst to oxidize elemental mercury in coal combustion flue gas streams. Oxidized mercury is substantially easier to remove than elemental mercury. If successful, this technique has the potential to substantially reduce mercury control costs for those installations that already utilize baghouse barrier filters for particulate removal. Completed in 2004, Phase I of this project successfully met its objectives of screening and assessing the possible feasibility of using catalyst coated barrier filters for the oxidation of vapor phase elemental mercury in coal combustion generated flue gas streams. Completed in September 2007, Phase II of this project successfully met its three objectives. First, an effective coating method for a catalytic barrier filter was found. Second, the effects of a simulated flue gas on the catalysts in a bench-scale reactor were determined. Finally, the performance of the best catalyst was assessed using real flue gas generated by a 19 kW research combustor firing each of three separate coal types.

  6. Preliminary Exploratory Study of Different Phase II Collimators

    CERN Document Server

    Lari, L; Bertarelli, A; Bracco, C; Brugger, M; Cerutti, F; Dallocchio, Alessandro; Doyle, E; Ferrari, A; Keller, L; Lundgren, S; Markiewicz, T; Mauri, M; Roesler, S; Sarchiapone, L; Smith, J; Vlachoudis, V

    2008-01-01

    The LHC collimation system is installed and commissioned in different phases, following the natural evolution of the LHC performance. To improve cleaning efficiency towards the end of the low beta squeeze at 7TeV, and in stable physics conditions, it is foreseen to complement the 30 highly robust Phase I secondary collimators with low impedance Phase II collimators. At this stage, their design is not yet finalized. Possible options include metallic collimators, graphite jaws with a movable metallic foil, or collimators with metallic rotating jaws. As part of the evaluation of the different designs, the FLUKA Monte Carlo code is extensively used for calculating energy deposition and studying material damage and activation. This report outlines the simulation approach and defines the critical quantities involved.

  7. Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-152) - Idaho Model Watershed Habitat Projects – Zeigler Riparian Fence Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Shannon C. [Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Portland, OR (United States)

    2004-06-30

    The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to fund the installation of approximately 600 feet of jack post and pole fence along a side channel to the Salmon River in Custer County, Idaho. In 2003 BPA funded the installation of approximately 1,300 feet of riparian fence along the Salmon River at this site. The proposed 600-foot fence addition will meet or exceed BPA’s minimum requirement of a 35-foot setback. This addition will connect with the Phase I fence and will protect a spring and side channel from livestock disturbance. The goal of this project is to enhance salmon and steelhead rearing and migration habitat through exclusion fencing.

  8. Structure of intermediate phase II of LiNH2 under high pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamawaki, Hiroshi; Fujihisa, Hiroshi; Gotoh, Yoshito; Nakano, Satoshi

    2014-08-21

    A new intermediate phase (phase II) was found between phases I and III in LiNH2 in the pressure range of 10 to 13 GPa through the analysis of infrared and powder X-ray diffraction measurements to 25 GPa at room temperature. This result agreed with the prediction of a stable phase between phases I and III through theoretical calculations. Powder X-ray diffraction measurement and DFT calculation showed that this phase has a monoclinic structure with space group C2/c (Z = 8), which is the same structure as that of a slightly tilted crystal lattice of the Fddd structural model. The enthalpy of the C2/c structure was also found to be almost the same as that of the Fddd structure.

  9. High-resolution mineralogical and rock magnetic study of ferromagnetic phases in metabasites from Oscar II Land, Western Spitsbergen—towards reliable model linking mineralogical and palaeomagnetic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burzyński, Mariusz; Michalski, Krzysztof; Nejbert, Krzysztof; Domańska-Siuda, Justyna; Manby, Geoffrey

    2017-07-01

    Typical 'whole rock' rock magnetic analyses are limited to the identification of the magnetic properties of the mixture of all ferromagnetic minerals within the samples. In this contribution standard 'whole rock' rock magnetic studies of two types of metabasites (metadolerites and metavolcanics) from the metamorphic Proterozoic-Lower Palaeozoic complex of Oscar II Land (Western Spitsbergen) are followed by separation of Fe-containing fractions and conducting magnetic analyses on Fe-containing separates. The main aim here is to determine if any ferromagnetic carriers of a palaeomagnetic signal preceding the Caledonian metamorphism persisted in the metabasites. A comprehensive set of applied methods has allowed for the precise identification of the ferromagnetic carriers and have revealed their textural context in the investigated rocks. The results of mineralogical and rock magnetic analyses of separates confirmed a dominance of low coercivity magnetite/maghemite and pyrrhotite in the metadolerites while in the metavolcanics the existence of magnetite/maghemite and hematite was highlighted. Our investigations support the hypothesis that Caledonian metamorphic remineralization has completely replaced the primary magmatic - Proterozoic/Lower Palaeozoic ferromagnetic minerals in the metadolerites. In the case of the metavolcanics, however, the existence of the ferromagnetic pre-Caledonian relicts cannot be excluded. Furthermore, this approach provided a unique opportunity for conducting rock magnetic experiments on natural mono-ferromagnetic fractions. The described methodologies and results of this study form a new approach that can be applied in further palaeomagnetic and petrographic studies of metamorphosed rock complexes of Svalbard.

  10. Physics Detector Simulation Facility Phase II system software description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scipioni, B.; Allen, J.; Chang, C.; Huang, J.; Liu, J.; Mestad, S.; Pan, J.; Marquez, M.; Estep, P.

    1993-05-01

    This paper presents the Physics Detector Simulation Facility (PDSF) Phase II system software. A key element in the design of a distributed computing environment for the PDSF has been the separation and distribution of the major functions. The facility has been designed to support batch and interactive processing, and to incorporate the file and tape storage systems. By distributing these functions, it is often possible to provide higher throughput and resource availability. Similarly, the design is intended to exploit event-level parallelism in an open distributed environment.

  11. DECOVALEX - Mathematical models of coupled T-H-M processes for nuclear waste repositories. Executive summary for Phases I,II and III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, L.; Stephansson, O. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden); Tsang, C.F. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Kautsky, F. [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1996-06-01

    This executive summary presents the motivation, structure, objectives, methodologies and results of the first stage of the international DECOVALEX project - DECOVALEX I (1992-1995). The acronym stands for Development of Coupled Models and their Validation against Experiment in Nuclear Waste Isolation, and the project is an international effort to develop mathematical models, numerical methods and computer codes for coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical processes in fractured rocks and buffer materials for geological isolation of spent nuclear fuel and other radioactive wastes, and validate them against laboratory and field experiments. 24 refs.

  12. Miniature free-piston homogeneous charge compression ignition engine-compressor concept - Part II: modeling HCCI combustion in small scales with detailed homogeneous gas phase chemical kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aichlmayr, H.T.; Kittelson, D.B.; Zachariah, M.R. [The University of Minnesota, Minneapolis (United States). Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Chemistry

    2002-10-01

    Operational maps for crankshaft-equipped miniature homogeneous charge compression ignition engines are established using performance estimation, detailed chemical kinetics, and diffusion models for heat transfer and radical loss. In this study, radical loss was found to be insignificant. In contrast, heat transfer was found to be increasingly significant for 10, 1, and 0.1 W engines, respectively. Also, temperature-pressure trajectories and ignition delay time maps are used to explore relationships between engine operational parameters and HCCI. Lastly, effects of engine operating conditions and design on the indicated fuel conversion efficiency are investigated. (author)

  13. Explicit Finite Element Modeling of Multilayer Composite Fabric for Gas Turbine Engine Containment Systems, Phase II. Part 2; Ballistic Impact Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revilock, D. M.; Pereira, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    This report summarizes the ballistic impact testing that was conducted to provide validation data for the development of numerical models of blade-out events in fabric containment systems. The ballistic impact response of two different fiber materials - Kevlar(TradeName) 49 and Zylon(TradeName) AS (as spun) was studied by firing metal projectiles into dry woven fabric specimens using a gas gun. The shape, mass, orientation, and velocity of the projectile were varied and recorded. In most cases, the tests were designed so the projectile would perforate the specimen, allowing measurement of the energy absorbed by the fabric. The results for both Zylon and Kevlar presented here represent a useful set of data for the purposes of establishing and validating numerical models to predict the response of fabrics under conditions that simulate those of a jet engine blade-release situation. In addition, some useful empirical observations were made regarding the effects of projectile orientation and the relative performance of the different fabric materials.

  14. Phase Transition in Tensor Models

    CERN Document Server

    Delepouve, Thibault

    2015-01-01

    Generalizing matrix models, tensor models generate dynamical triangulations in any dimension and support a $1/N$ expansion. Using the intermediate field representation we explicitly rewrite a quartic tensor model as a field theory for a fluctuation field around a vacuum state corresponding to the resummation of the entire leading order in $1/N$ (a resummation of the melonic family). We then prove that the critical regime in which the continuum limit in the sense of dynamical triangulations is reached is precisely a phase transition in the field theory sense for the fluctuation field.

  15. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) determination of phase II metabolites of the mycotoxin zearalenone in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    BERTHILLER, F.; WERNER, U.; SULYOK, M.; KRSKA, R.; HAUSER, M.-T.; SCHUHMACHER, R.

    2010-01-01

    The biotransformation products of zearalenone, a Fusarium mycotoxin, were elucidated using the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. After treatment of plant seedlings with 50 μM zearalenone, both the liquid media and the plant extracts were analysed by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). An array of 17 different metabolites, most prominently glucosides, malonylglucosides, di-hexose- and hexose–pentose disaccharides of zearalenone, and α- and β-zearalenol, were detected in the samples. Time courses for the different zearalenone metabolites were recorded and they give a closer insight into the metabolism kinetics. A scheme proposing the zearalenone metabolism in A. thaliana is given. The aspect of food safety regarding the (potential) occurrence of masked mycotoxins in agricultural commodities is discussed. PMID:17071522

  16. Modeling of fluidized-bed combustion of coal: Phase II, final reports. Volume VII. FBC Data-Base-Management System (FBC-DBMS) users manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louis, J.F.; Tung, S.E.

    1980-10-01

    The primary goal of the Fluidized Bed Combustor Data Base (FBCDB) is to establish a data repository for the express use of designers and research personnel involved in FBC development. FBCDB is implemented on MIT's 370/168 computer, using the Model 204 Data Base Management System (DBMS) developed by Computer Corporation of America. DBMS is a software that provides an efficient way of storing, retrieving, updating and manipulating data using an English-like query language. The primary content of FBCDB is a collection of data points defined by the value of a number of specific FBC variables. A user may interactively access the data base from a computer terminal at any location, retrieve, examine, and manipulate the data as well as produce tables or graphs of the results. More than 20 program segments are currently available in M204 User Language to simplify the user interface for the FBC design or research personnel. However, there are still many complex and advanced retrieving as well as applications programs to be written for this purpose. Although there are currently 71 entries, and about 2000 groups reposited in the system, this size of data is only an intermediate portion of our selection. The usefulness of the system at the present time is, therefore, limited. This version of FBCDB will be released on a limited scale to obtain review and comments. The document is intended as a reference guide to the use of FBCDB. It has been structured to introduce the user to the basics of FBCDB, summarize what the available segments in FBCDB can do, and give detailed information on the operation of FBCDB. This document represents a preliminary draft of a Users Manual. The draft will be updated when the data base system becomes fully implemented. Any suggestions as to how this manual may be improved will be appreciated.

  17. Modeling of fluidized-bed combustion of coal: Phase II, final reports. Volume VI. FBC-Data Base-Management-System (FBC-DBMS) development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louis, J.F.; Tung, S.E.

    1980-10-01

    The primary goal of the Fluidized Bed Combustor Data Base, (FBCDB), situated in MIT's Energy laboratory, is to establish a data repository for the express use of designers and research personnel involved in FBC development. DBMS is a software that provides an efficient way of storing, retrieving, updating and manipulating data using an English-like query language. It is anticipated that the FBCDB would play an active and a direct role in the development of FBC technology as well as in the FBC commercial application. After some in-house experience and after a careful and extensive review of commercially available database systems, it was determined that the Model 204 DBMS by Computer Corporation of America was the most suitable to our needs. The setup of a prototype in-house database also allowed us to investigate and understand fully the particular problems involved in coordinating FBC development with a DBMS. Various difficult aspects were encountered and solutions had been sought. For instance, we found that it was necessary to rename the variables to avoid repetition as well as to increase usefulness of our database and, hence, we had designed a classification system for which variables were classified under category to achieve standardization of variable names. The primary content of FBCDB is a collection of data points defined by the value of a number of specific FBC variables. A user may interactively access the database from a computer terminal at any location, retrieve, examine, and manipulate the data as well as produce tables or graphs of the results.

  18. Phase Computations and Phase Models for Discrete Molecular Oscillators.

    OpenAIRE

    Demir, Alper; Şuvak, Önder

    2012-01-01

    RESEARCH Open Access Phase computations and phase models for discrete molecular oscillators Onder Suvak* and Alper Demir Abstract Background: Biochemical oscillators perform crucial functions in cells, e.g., they set up circadian clocks. The dynamical behavior of oscillators is best described and analyzed in terms of the scalar quantity, phase. A rigorous and useful definition for phase is based on the so-called isochrons of oscillators. Phase computation techniques for ...

  19. Dissecting the Phase Response of a Model Bursting Neuron

    CERN Document Server

    Sherwood, William Erik

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the phase response properties of the Hindmarsh-Rose model of neuronal bursting using burst phase response curves (BPRCs) computed with an infinitesimal perturbation approximation and by direct simulation of synaptic input. The resulting BPRCs have a significantly more complicated structure than the usual Type I and Type II PRCs of spiking neuronal models, and they exhibit highly timing-sensitive changes in the number of spikes per burst that lead to large magnitude phase responses. We use fast-slow dissection and isochron calculations to analyze the phase response dynamics in both weak and strong perturbation regimes.

  20. Polymorphisms of phase I and phase II enzymes and breast cancer risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina eJustenhoven

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a complex disease which is provoked by a multitude of exogenous and endogenous factors including genetic variations. Recent genome-wide association studies identified a set of more than 18 novel low penetrant susceptibility loci, however, a limitation of this powerful approach is the hampered analysis of polymorphisms in DNA sequences with a high degree of similarity to other genes or pseudo genes. Since this common feature affects the majority of the highly polymorphic genes encoding phase I and II enzyme the retrieval of specific genotype data requires adapted amplification methods. With regard to breast cancer these genes are of certain interest due to their involvement in the metabolism of carcinogens like exogenous genotoxic compounds or steroid hormones. The present review summarizes the observed effects of functional genetic variants of phase I and II enzymes in well designed case control studies to shed light on their contribution to breast cancer risk.

  1. What controls the vertical distribution of aerosol? Relationships between process sensitivity in HadGEM3–UKCA and inter-model variation from AeroCom Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kipling, Zak; Stier, Philip; Johnson, Colin E.; Mann, Graham W.; Bellouin, Nicolas; Bauer, Susanne E.; Bergman, Tommi; Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Ghan, Steven J.; Iversen, Trond; Kirkevåg, Alf; Kokkola, Harri; Liu, Xiaohong; Luo, Gan; van Noije, Twan; Pringle, Kirsty J.; von Salzen, Knut; Schulz, Michael; Seland, Øyvind; Skeie, Ragnhild B.; Takemura, Toshihiko; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Zhang, Kai

    2016-02-01

    The vertical profile of aerosol is important for its radiative effects, but weakly constrained by observations on the global scale, and highly variable among different models. To investigate the controlling factors in one particular model, we investigate the effects of individual processes in HadGEM3–UKCA and compare the resulting diversity of aerosol vertical profiles with the inter-model diversity from the AeroCom Phase II control experiment.

    In this way we show that (in this model at least) the vertical profile is controlled by a relatively small number of processes, although these vary among aerosol components and particle sizes. We also show that sufficiently coarse variations in these processes can produce a similar diversity to that among different models in terms of the global-mean profile and, to a lesser extent, the zonal-mean vertical position. However, there are features of certain models' profiles that cannot be reproduced, suggesting the influence of further structural differences between models.

    In HadGEM3–UKCA, convective transport is found to be very important in controlling the vertical profile of all aerosol components by mass. In-cloud scavenging is very important for all except mineral dust. Growth by condensation is important for sulfate and carbonaceous aerosol (along with aqueous oxidation for the former and ageing by soluble material for the latter). The vertical extent of biomass-burning emissions into the free troposphere is also important for the profile of carbonaceous aerosol. Boundary-layer mixing plays a dominant role for sea salt and mineral dust, which are emitted only from the surface. Dry deposition and below-cloud scavenging are important for the profile of mineral dust only.

    In this model, the microphysical processes of nucleation, condensation and coagulation dominate the vertical profile of the smallest particles by number (e.g. total CN > 3 nm), while the profiles of larger particles (e

  2. Phase I/II adaptive design for drug combination oncology trials

    OpenAIRE

    Wages, Nolan A.; Conaway, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Existing statistical methodology on dose finding for combination chemotherapies has focused on toxicity considerations alone in finding a maximum tolerated dose combination to recommend for further testing of efficacy in a phase II setting. Recently, there has been increasing interest in integrating phase I and phase II trials in order to facilitate drug development. In this article, we propose a new adaptive phase I/II method for dual-agent combinations that takes into account both toxicity ...

  3. Implementation of neutron phase contrast imaging at FRM-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Klaus

    2008-11-12

    At ANTARES, the beam line for neutron imaging at the Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM-II) in Garching, the option to do phase contrast imaging besides conventional absorption based neutron imaging was implemented and successfully used for the non-destructive testing of various types of objects. The used propagation-based technique is based on the interference of neutron waves in the detector plane that were differently strong diffracted by the sample. A comparison with other phase-sensitive neutron imaging techniques highlights assets and drawbacks of the different methods. In preliminary measurements at ANTARES and the spallation source SINQ at PSI in Villigen, the influence of the beam geometry, the neutron spectrum and the detector on the quality of the phase contrast measurements were investigated systematically. It was demonstrated that gamma radiation and epithermal neutrons in the beam contribute severely to background noise in measurements, which motivated the installation of a remotely controlled filter wheel for a quick and precise positioning of different crystal filters in the beam. By the installation of a similar aperture wheel, a quick change between eight different beam geometries was made possible. Besides pinhole and slit apertures, coded apertures based on non redundant arrays were investigated. The possibilities, which arise by the exploitation of the real part of the refractive index in neutron imaging, were demonstrated in experiments with especially designed test samples and in measurements with ordinary, industrial components. (orig.)

  4. PHASE II VAULT TESTING OF THE ARGONNE RFID SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willoner, T.; Turlington, R.; Koenig, R.

    2012-06-25

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (Environmental Management [EM], Office of Packaging and Transportation [EM-45]) Packaging and Certification Program (DOE PCP) has developed a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tracking and monitoring system, called ARG-US, for the management of nuclear materials packages during transportation and storage. The performance of the ARG-US RFID equipment and system has been fully tested in two demonstration projects in April 2008 and August 2009. With the strong support of DOE-SR and DOE PCP, a field testing program was completed in Savannah River Site's K-Area Material Storage (KAMS) Facility, an active Category I Plutonium Storage Facility, in 2010. As the next step (Phase II) of continued vault testing for the ARG-US system, the Savannah River Site K Area Material Storage facility has placed the ARG-US RFIDs into the 910B storage vault for operational testing. This latest version (Mark III) of the Argonne RFID system now has the capability to measure radiation dose and dose rate. This paper will report field testing progress of the ARG-US RFID equipment in KAMS, the operability and reliability trend results associated with the applications of the system, and discuss the potential benefits in enhancing safety, security and materials accountability. The purpose of this Phase II K Area test is to verify the accuracy of the radiation monitoring and proper functionality of the ARG-US RFID equipment and system under a realistic environment in the KAMS facility. Deploying the ARG-US RFID system leads to a reduced need for manned surveillance and increased inventory periods by providing real-time access to status and event history traceability, including environmental condition monitoring and radiation monitoring. The successful completion of the testing program will provide field data to support a future development and testing. This will increase Operation efficiency and cost effectiveness for vault operation. As the next step

  5. EXODUS II: A finite element data model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoof, L.A.; Yarberry, V.R.

    1994-09-01

    EXODUS II is a model developed to store and retrieve data for finite element analyses. It is used for preprocessing (problem definition), postprocessing (results visualization), as well as code to code data transfer. An EXODUS II data file is a random access, machine independent, binary file that is written and read via C, C++, or Fortran library routines which comprise the Application Programming Interface (API).

  6. River water quality modelling: II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shanahan, P.; Henze, Mogens; Koncsos, L.

    1998-01-01

    The U.S. EPA QUAL2E model is currently the standard for river water quality modelling. While QUAL2E is adequate for the regulatory situation for which it was developed (the U.S. wasteload allocation process), there is a need for a more comprehensive framework for research and teaching. Moreover......, and to achieve robust model calibration. Mass balance problems arise from failure to account for mass in the sediment as well as in the water column and due to the fundamental imprecision of BOD as a state variable. (C) 1998 IAWQ Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  7. Pipe Overpack Container Fire Testing: Phase I & II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa, Victor G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ammerman, Douglas J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lopez, Carlos [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gill, Walter [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The Pipe Overpack Container (POC) was developed at Rocky Flats to transport plutonium residues with higher levels of plutonium than standard transuranic (TRU) waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal. In 1996 Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) conducted a series of tests to determine the degree of protection POCs provided during storage accident events. One of these tests exposed four of the POCs to a 30-minute engulfing pool fire, resulting in one of the 7A drum overpacks generating sufficient internal pressure to pop off its lid and expose the top of the pipe container (PC) to the fire environment. The initial contents of the POCs were inert materials, which would not generate large internal pressure within the PC if heated. However, POCs are now being used to store combustible TRU waste at Department of Energy (DOE) sites. At the request of DOE’s Office of Environmental Management (EM) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), starting in 2015 SNL conducted a new series of fire tests to examine whether PCs with combustibles would reach a temperature that would result in (1) decomposition of inner contents and (2) subsequent generation of sufficient gas to cause the PC to over-pressurize and release its inner content. Tests conducted during 2015 and 2016, and described herein, were done in two phases. The goal of the first phase was to see if the PC would reach high enough temperatures to decompose typical combustible materials inside the PC. The goal of the second test phase was to determine under what heating loads (i.e., incident heat fluxes) the 7A drum lid pops off from the POC drum. This report will describe the various tests conducted in phase I and II, present preliminary results from these tests, and discuss implications for the POCs.

  8. Small Business Innovation Research. Abstracts of Phase II awards, 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2000-12-01

    The SBIR program enables DOE to obtain effective, innovative solutions to important problems through the private sector, which has a commercial incentive to pursue the resulting technology and bring it to the marketplace. The growing number of awardees, many of them started in business in response to SBIR solicitations, is becoming a significant resource for the solution of high risk, high technology problems for the Department. As detailed below, this publication describes the technical efforts and commercialization possibilities for SBIR Phase II awards in Fiscal Year (FY) 2000. It is intended for the educated layman, and maybe of particular interest to potential investors who wish to get in on the ground floor of exciting opportunities.

  9. The NEA Forum on Stakeholder Confidence - Phase I Lessons and Phase II Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Peter [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa (Canada). Uranium and Radioactive Waste Div.; Pescatore, Claudio [Nuclear Energy Agency, Paris (France)

    2006-09-15

    The Forum on Stakeholder Confidence (FSC) was created under a mandate from the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Radioactive Waste Management Committee (RWMC) to facilitate the sharing of international experience in addressing the societal dimension of radioactive waste management. It explores means of ensuring an effective dialogue with the public, and considers ways to strengthen confidence in decision-making processes. The Forum was launched in August 2000 and completed its first phase in 00 . Major findings and principles for action were published under the title of 'Learning and Adapting to Societal Requirements'. Activities of the FSC were also reported at Valdor 2003. In the second mandate of the FSC, there is continued use of a variety of tools and formats to allow dialogue among stakeholders in an atmosphere of mutual trust: national workshops and community visits, topical sessions, and desk and interview studies. In Phase II, the FSC is exploring: the link between research, development and demonstration and stakeholder confidence; cultural and organisational changes in RWM institutions; the role of media relations and outreach opportunities; tools and processes to help society prepare and manage decisions through stakeholder involvement; and increasing the value of waste management facilities to local communities. Workshops have been held in Germany and Spain. A large set of publications makes both Phase I and Phase II findings widely available.

  10. Phase I Report, US DOE GRED II Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbank Engineering Ltd.

    2003-04-23

    Noramex Corporation Inc, a Nevada company, owns a 100% interest in geothermal leases at the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, Humboldt County, Nevada. The company is exploring the site for a geothermal resource suitable for development for electric power generation or In the spring of 2002, Noramex drilled the first geothermal observation hole at Blue Mountain, under a cost-share program with the U.S Department of Energy (DOE), under the DOE's Geothermal Exploration and Resource Definition (GRED) program, (Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC04-00AL66972). DEEP BLUE No.1 was drilled to a total depth of 672.1 meters (2205 feet) and recorded a maximum temperature of 144.7 C (292.5 F). Noramex Corporation will now drill a second slim geothermal observation test hole at Blue Mountain, designated DEEP BLUE No.2. The hole will be drilled under a cost-share program with the DOE, under the DOE's Geothermal Exploration and Resource Definition II (GRED II) program, (Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC04-2002AL68297). This report comprises Phase I of Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC04-2002AL68297 of the GRED II program. The report provides an update on the status of resource confirmation at the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, incorporating the results from DEEP BLUE No.1, and provides the technical background for a second test hole. The report also outlines the proposed drilling program for slim geothermal observation test hole DEEP BLUE No.2.

  11. Validation of the THIRST steam generator thermalhydraulic code against the CLOTAIRE phase II experimental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietralik, J.M.; Campagna, A.O.; Frisina, V.C

    1999-04-01

    Steam generator thermalhydraulic codes are frequently used to calculate both global and local parameters inside a stern generator. The global parameters include heat transfer output, recirculation ratio, outlet temperatures, and pressure drops for operating and abnormal conditions. The local parameters are used in further analyses of flow-induced vibration, fretting wear, sludge deposition, and flow-accelerated corrosion. For these purposes, detailed, 3-dimensional 2-phase flow and heat transfer parameters are needed. To make the predictions more accurate and reliable, the codes need to be validated in geometries representative of real conditions. One such study is an international co-operative experimental program called CLOTAIRE, which is based in France. The CANDU Owners Group(COG) participated in the first two phases of the program. The results of the validation of Phase 1 were presented at the 1994 Steam Generator and Heat Exchanger Conference, and the results of the validation of Phase II are the subject of this report. THIRST is a thermalhydraulic, finite-volume code used to predict flow and heat transfer in steam generators. The local results of CLOTAIRE Phase II were used to validate the code. The results consist of the measurements of void fraction and axial gas-phase velocity in the U-bend region. The measurements were done using bi-optical probes. A comparison of global results indicates that the THIRST predictions, with the Chisholm void fraction model, are within 2% to 3% of the experimental results. Using THIRST with the homogeneous void fraction model, the global results were less accurate but still gave very good predictions; the greatest error was 10% for the separator pressure drop. Comparisons of the local predictions for void fraction and axial gas-phase velocity show good agreement. The Chisholm void fraction model generally gives better agreement with the experimental data, whereas the homogeneous model tends to overpredict the void fraction

  12. Validation of the THIRST steam generator thermalhydraulic code against the CLOTAIRE phase II experimental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietralik, J.M.; Campagna, A.O.; Frisina, V.C. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    1998-07-01

    Steam generator thermalhydraulic codes are used frequently to calculate both global and local parameters inside the steam generator. The former include heat transfer output, recirculation ratio, outlet temperatures, and pressure drops for operating and abnormal conditions. The latter are used in further analyses of flow-induced vibration, fretting wear, sludge deposition, and flow accelerated corrosion. For these purposes, detailed, three-dimensional two-phase flow and heat transfer parameters are needed. To make the predictions more accurate and reliable, the codes need to be validated in geometries representative of real conditions. One such study is an international cooperative experimental program called CLOTAIRE based in France. COG participated in the first two phases of the program; the results of the validation of Phase 1 were presented at the 1994 Steam Generator and Heat Exchanger Conference, and the results of the validation of Phase II are the subject of this paper. THIRST is a thermalhydraulic, finite volume code to predict the flow and heat transfer in steam generators. The local results of CLOTAIRE Phase II have been used to validate the code. These consist of the measurements of void fraction and axial gas-phase velocity in the U-bend region. The measurements were done using bi-optical probes. A comparison of global results indicates that the THIRST predictions, with the Chisholm void fraction model, are within 2 to 3% of the experimental results. Using THIRST with the homogeneous void fraction model, the global results were less accurate but still well predicted with the greatest error of 10% for the separator pressure drop. Comparisons of the local predictions for void fraction and axial gas-phase show good agreement. The Chisholm void fraction model generally gives better agreement with the experimental data while the homogeneous model tends to overpredict the void fraction and underpredict the gas velocity. (author)

  13. The Development of New Measures of Cognitive Variables in Elementary School Children (Phase II). Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, J. William; And Others

    This report covers Phase II of a two-phase project concerned with the development of new measures of cognitive variables in elementary school children. The four tasks undertaken in Phase II were: (1) prepare, revise and describe instruments designed to measure the cognitive variables categorized as concept formation, language development, logical…

  14. Supo Thermal Model Development II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wass, Alexander Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-14

    This report describes the continuation of the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model of the Supo cooling system described in the report, Supo Thermal Model Development1, by Cynthia Buechler. The goal for this report is to estimate the natural convection heat transfer coefficient (HTC) of the system using the CFD results and to compare those results to remaining past operational data. Also, the correlation for determining radiolytic gas bubble size is reevaluated using the larger simulation sample size. The background, solution vessel geometry, mesh, material properties, and boundary conditions are developed in the same manner as the previous report. Although, the material properties and boundary conditions are determined using the appropriate experiment results for each individual power level.

  15. Easier Phase IIs: Recent Improvements to the Gemini User Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Bryan; Nuñez, A.

    2013-01-01

    During 2011 and 2012 Gemini Observatory undertook a significant project to improve the software tools used by investigators to propose for and prepare observations. The main goal was to make the definition of observation details (the Phase II process) easier and faster. The main initiatives included rewriting the observing proposal tool (Phase I Tool) and making several major improvements to the Observing Tool, including automatic settings for arc and flat exposures, automatic guide star selection for all instruments and wavefront sensors, and more complete initial template observations with capabilities for simultaneous editing of many observations. This poster explains these major changes as well as outlines future development plans. The Gemini Observatory is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil), and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).

  16. Rooftop PV system. Final technical progress report, Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    Under this four-year PV:BONUS Program, ECD and United Solar are developing and demonstrating two new lightweight flexible building integrated Photovoltaic (BIPV) modules specifically designed as exact replacements for conventional asphalt shingles and standing seam metal roofing. These modules can be economically and aesthetically integrated into new residential and commercial buildings, and address the even larger roofing replacement market. The modules are designed to be installed by roofing contractors without special training which minimizes the installation and balance of system costs. The modules will be fabricated from high-efficiency, multiple-junction a-Si alloy solar cells developed by ECD and United Solar. Under the Phase I Program, which ended in March 1994, we developed two different concept designs for rooftop PV modules: (1) the United Solar overlapping (asphalt shingle replacement) shingle-type modules and (2) the ECD metal roof-type modules. We also developed a plan for fabricating, testing and demonstrating these modules. Candidate demonstration sites for our rooftop PV modules were identified and preliminary engineering designs for these demonstrations were developed; a marketing study plan was also developed. The major objectives of the Phase II Program, which started in June 1994 was (1) to develop, test, and qualify these new rooftop modules; (2) to develop mechanical and electrical engineering specifications for the demonstration projects; and (3) to develop a marketing/commercialization plan.

  17. MHD seed recovery and regeneration, Phase II. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    This final report summarizes the work performed by the Space and Technology Division of the TRW Space and Electronics Group for the U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center for the Econoseed process. This process involves the economical recovery and regeneration of potassium seed used in the MHD channel. The contract period of performance extended from 1987 through 1994 and was divided into two phases. The Phase II test results are the subject of this Final Report. However, the Phase I test results are presented in summary form in Section 2.3 of this Final Report. The Econoseed process involves the treatment of the potassium sulfate in spent MHD seed with an aqueous calcium formate solution in a continuously stirred reactor system to solubilize, as potassium formate, the potassium content of the seed and to precipitate and recover the sulfate as calcium sulfate. The slurry product from this reaction is centrifuged to separate the calcium sulfate and insoluble seed constituents from the potassium formate solution. The dilute solids-free potassium formate solution is then concentrated in an evaporator. The concentrated potassium formate product is a liquid which can be recycled as a spray into the MHD channel. Calcium formate is the seed regenerant used in the Econoseed process. Since calcium formate is produced in the United States in relatively small quantities, a new route to the continuous production of large quantities of calcium formate needed to support an MHD power industry was investigated. This route involves the reaction of carbon monoxide gas with lime solids in an aqueous medium.

  18. Scenarios for Deep Carbon Emission Reductions from Electricity by 2050 in Western North America using the Switch Electric Power Sector Planning Model: California's Carbon Challenge Phase II, Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, James; Mileva, Ana; Johnston, Josiah; Kammen, Daniel; Wei, Max; Greenblatt, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    This study used a state-of-the-art planning model called SWITCH for the electric power system to investigate the evolution of the power systems of California and western North America from present-day to 2050 in the context of deep decarbonization of the economy. Researchers concluded that drastic power system carbon emission reductions were feasible by 2050 under a wide range of possible futures. The average cost of power in 2050 would range between $149 to $232 per megawatt hour across scenarios, a 21 to 88 percent increase relative to a business-as-usual scenario, and a 38 to 115 percent increase relative to the present-day cost of power. The power system would need to undergo sweeping change to rapidly decarbonize. Between present-day and 2030 the evolution of the Western Electricity Coordinating Council power system was dominated by implementing aggressive energy efficiency measures, installing renewable energy and gas-fired generation facilities and retiring coal-fired generation. Deploying wind, solar and geothermal power in the 2040 timeframe reduced power system emissions by displacing gas-fired generation. This trend continued for wind and solar in the 2050 timeframe but was accompanied by large amounts of new storage and long-distance high-voltage transmission capacity. Electricity storage was used primarily to move solar energy from the daytime into the night to charge electric vehicles and meet demand from electrified heating. Transmission capacity over the California border increased by 40 - 220 percent by 2050, implying that transmission siting, permitting, and regional cooperation will become increasingly important. California remained a net electricity importer in all scenarios investigated. Wind and solar power were key elements in power system decarbonization in 2050 if no new nuclear capacity was built. The amount of installed gas capacity remained relatively constant between present-day and 2050, although carbon capture and sequestration was

  19. Investigational drugs in phase I and phase II clinical trials for thalassemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta, Irene; Scaramellini, Natalia; Cappellini, Maria Domenica

    2017-07-01

    Regular transfusion and iron chelation are the current treatment of severe forms of thalassemia. As a consequence of this demanding supportive treatment, there are several unmet therapeutic needs. Due to a deeper understanding in the pathophysiology of thalassemia, new therapeutic strategies have been developed that are now in pre-clinical and clinical trials. Areas covered: Activin receptor ligand traps (luspatercept and sotatercept), drugs targeting ineffective erythropoiesis, showed encouraging results in Phase I and II clinical trials. A phase III clinical trial is currently ongoing. Ruxolitinib, a Jak2 inhibitor, has been tested to limit stress erythropoiesis in a phase II clinical trial. In addition, improvement in iron chelation has been developed. Moreover, several trials of gene therapy are currently active in different countries with different lentiviral vectors. Expert opinion: The most promising molecules are the activin receptor ligand traps. Together with gene therapy these could be an alternative to bone marrow transplant, aiming towards a curative strategy. The main limit to gene therapy seems to be the conditioning regimen, thus an in vivo gene therapy would be more suitable. At pre-clinical level gene editing is showing extremely encouraging results.

  20. Phased Retrofits in Existing Homes in Florida Phase II: Shallow Plus Retrofits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, K. [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, Cocoa, FL (United States); Parker, D. [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, Cocoa, FL (United States); Martin, E. [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, Cocoa, FL (United States); Chasar, D. [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, Cocoa, FL (United States); Amos, B. [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, Cocoa, FL (United States)

    2016-02-03

    The BAPIRC team and Florida Power and Light (FPL) electric utility pursued a pilot phased energy-efficiency retrofit program in Florida by creating detailed data on the energy and economic performance of two levels of retrofit - simple and deep. For this Phased Deep Retrofit (PDR) project, a total of 56 homes spread across the utility partner's territory in east central Florida, southeast Florida, and southwest Florida were instrumented between August 2012 and January 2013, and received simple pass-through retrofit measures during the period of March 2013 - June 2013. Ten of these homes received a deeper package of retrofits during August 2013 - December 2013. A full account of Phase I of this project, including detailed home details and characterization, is found in Parker et al, 2015 (currently in draft). Phase II of this project, which is the focus of this report, applied the following additional retrofit measures to select homes that received a shallow retrofit in Phase I: a) Supplemental mini-split heat pump (MSHP) (6 homes); b) Ducted and space coupled Heat Pump Water Heater (8 homes); c) Exterior insulation finish system (EIFS) (1 homes); d) Window retrofit (3 homes); e) Smart thermostat (21 homes: 19 NESTs; 2 Lyrics); f) Heat pump clothes dryer (8 homes); g) Variable speed pool pump (5 homes).

  1. Phase II Audit Report - Energy & Water Audits of LLNL Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horst, B I; Jacobs, P C; Pierce, S M

    2005-08-03

    This report describes Phase II of a project conducted for the Mechanical Utilities Division (UTel), Energy Management Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) by Architectural Energy Corporation (AEC). The overall project covers energy efficiency and water conservation auditing services for 215 modular and prefabricated buildings at LLNL. The primary goal of this project is to demonstrate compliance with DOE Order 430.2A, Contractor Requirements Document section 2.d (2) Document, to demonstrate annual progress of at least 10 percent toward completing energy and water audits of all facilities. Although this project covers numerous buildings, they are all similar in design and use. The approach employed for completing audits for these facilities involves a ''model-similar building'' approach. In the model-similar building approach, similarities between groups of buildings are established and quantified. A model (or test case) building is selected and analyzed for each model-similar group using a detailed DOE-2 simulation. The results are extended to the group of similar buildings based on careful application of quantified similarities, or ''extension measures''. This approach leverages the relatively minor effort required to evaluate one building in some detail to a much larger population of similar buildings. The facility wide energy savings potential was calculated for a select set of measures that have reasonable payback based on the detailed building analysis and are otherwise desirable to the LLNL facilities staff. The selected measures are: (1) HVAC Tune-up. This is considered to be a ''core measure'', based on the energy savings opportunity and the impact on thermal comfort. All HVAC units in the study are assumed to be tuned up under this measure. See the Appendix for a detailed calculation by building and HVAC unit. (2) HVAC system scheduling. This is also considered to be a &apos

  2. Mercury Phase II Study - Mercury Behavior in Salt Processing Flowsheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, V. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States); Shah, H. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States). Sludge and Salt Planning; Bannochie, C. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Wilmarth, W. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-07-25

    Mercury (Hg) in the Savannah River Site Liquid Waste System (LWS) originated from decades of canyon processing where it was used as a catalyst for dissolving the aluminum cladding of reactor fuel. Approximately 60 metric tons of mercury is currently present throughout the LWS. Mercury has long been a consideration in the LWS, from both hazard and processing perspectives. In February 2015, a Mercury Program Team was established at the request of the Department of Energy to develop a comprehensive action plan for long-term management and removal of mercury. Evaluation was focused in two Phases. Phase I activities assessed the Liquid Waste inventory and chemical processing behavior using a system-by-system review methodology, and determined the speciation of the different mercury forms (Hg+, Hg++, elemental Hg, organomercury, and soluble versus insoluble mercury) within the LWS. Phase II activities are building on the Phase I activities, and results of the LWS flowsheet evaluations will be summarized in three reports: Mercury Behavior in the Salt Processing Flowsheet (i.e. this report); Mercury Behavior in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Flowsheet; and Mercury behavior in the Tank Farm Flowsheet (Evaporator Operations). The evaluation of the mercury behavior in the salt processing flowsheet indicates, inter alia, the following: (1) In the assembled Salt Batches 7, 8 and 9 in Tank 21, the total mercury is mostly soluble with methylmercury (MHg) contributing over 50% of the total mercury. Based on the analyses of samples from 2H Evaporator feed and drop tanks (Tanks 38/43), the source of MHg in Salt Batches 7, 8 and 9 can be attributed to the 2H evaporator concentrate used in assembling the salt batches. The 2H Evaporator is used to evaporate DWPF recycle water. (2) Comparison of data between Tank 21/49, Salt Solution Feed Tank (SSFT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), and Tank 50 samples suggests that the total mercury as well as speciated

  3. Cupola modeling research: Phase 2 (Year one), Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-11-20

    Objective was to develop a mathematical model of the cupola furnace (cast iron production) in on-line and off-line process control and optimization. In Phase I, the general structure of the heat transfer, fluid flow, and chemical models were laid out, providing reasonable descriptions of cupola behavior with a one-dimensional representation. Work was also initiated on a two-dimensional model. Phase II was focused on perfecting the one-dimensional model. The contributions include these from MIT, Michigan University, and GM.

  4. An Overview of 2014 SBIR Phase I and Phase II Materials Structures for Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.; Morris, Jessica R.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program focuses on technological innovation by investing in development of innovative concepts and technologies to help NASA mission directorates address critical research needs for Agency programs. This report highlights nine of the innovative SBIR 2014 Phase I and Phase II projects that emphasize one of NASA Glenn Research Center's six core competencies-Materials and Structures for Extreme Environments. The technologies cover a wide spectrum of applications such as high temperature environmental barrier coating systems, deployable space structures, solid oxide fuel cells, and self-lubricating hard coatings for extreme temperatures. Each featured technology describes an innovation, technical objective, and highlights NASA commercial and industrial applications. This report provides an opportunity for NASA engineers, researchers, and program managers to learn how NASA SBIR technologies could help their programs and projects, and lead to collaborations and partnerships between the small SBIR companies and NASA that would benefit both.

  5. Profit based phase II sample size determination when adaptation by design is adopted

    OpenAIRE

    Martini, D.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Adaptation by design consists in conservatively estimating the phase III sample size on the basis of phase II data, and can be applied in almost all therapeutic areas; it is based on the assumption that the effect size of the drug is the same in phase II and phase III trials, that is a very common scenario assumed in product development. Adaptation by design reduces the probability on underpowered experiments and can improve the overall success probability of phase II and III tria...

  6. A Quadruple-Phase Strong Mg II Absorber at z~0.9902 Toward PG 1634+706

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, J; Bond, N A; Zonak, S G; Churchill, C W

    2003-01-01

    The z=0.9902 system along the quasar PG 1634+706 line of sight is a strong MgII absorber (W(2796)>0.3A) with only weak CIV absorption (it is ``CIV-deficient''). To study this system, we used high-resolution spectra from both HST/STIS (R=30,000) and Keck/HIRES (R=45,000). These spectra cover key transitions, such as MgI, MgII, FeII, SiII, CII, SiIII, CIII, SiIV, and CIV. Assuming a Haardt and Madau extragalactic background spectrum, we modeled the system with a combination of photoionization and collisional ionization. Based on a comparison of synthetic spectra to the data profiles, we infer the existence of the following four phases of gas: i) Seven MgII clouds have sizes of 1-1000pc and densities of 0.002-0.1/cm^3, with a gradual decrease in density from blue to red. The MgII phase gives rise to most of the CIV absorption and resembles the warm, ionized inter-cloud medium of the Milky Way; ii) Instead of arising in the same phase as MgII, MgI is produced in separate, narrow components with b~0.75km/s. These ...

  7. Micromegas R&D for ATLAS MUON PHASE II Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Farina, Edoardo Maria; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    In the framework of the ATLAS Phase II Upgrade, a proposal to extend the detector acceptance of the muon system to high η has been put forward (namely up to | η| ~ 4). Extension of the muon coverage has been demonstrated to enhance physics performance. The proposed location for the new detector is in between the end-cap calorimeter cryostat and the JD shielding; in this region there is no magnetic field applied, the aim of the new detector is therefore to only tag muons without performing any momentum measurement. The new η tagger should cope with extremely high particle rate, that has been calculated, by means of simulations, to be 9 MHz at R = 25 cm and 0.4 MHz at R = 60 cm for μ = 200, where μ stands for the number of pp collisions per bunch crossing. The required spatial resolution at the inner edge of the detector has been estimated in few hundreds micrometres. One of the most promising candidate technology for the new detector is the MicroMegaS one, which has already been adopted for the NSW upgrad...

  8. CHAOS II: Gas-Phase Abundances in NGC 5194

    CERN Document Server

    Croxall, Kevin V; Berg, Danielle; Skillman, Evan D; Moustakas, John

    2015-01-01

    We have observed NGC5194 (M51a) as part of the CHemical Abundances of Spirals (CHAOS) project. Using the Multi Object Double Spectrographs (MODS) on the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) we are able to measure one or more of the temperature-sensitive auroral lines ([O III] 4363, [N II] 5755, [S III] 6312) and thus measure "direct" gas-phase abundances in 29 individual HII regions. [O III] 4363 is only detected in two HII regions both of which show indications of excitation by shocks. We compare our data to previous direct abundances measured in NGC5194 and find excellent agreement for all but one region (Delta[log(O/H)] ~ 0.04). We find no evidence of trends in Ar/O, Ne/O, or S/O within NGC5194 or compared to other galaxies. We find modest negative gradients in both O/H and N/O with very little scatter (sigma = -0.62) suggests secondary nitrogen production is responsible for a significantly larger fraction of nitrogen (e.g., factor of 8-10) relative to primary production mechanisms than predicted by theoretica...

  9. Part 3: Pharmacogenetic Variability in Phase II Anticancer Drug Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deenen, Maarten J.; Cats, Annemieke; Beijnen, Jos H.

    2011-01-01

    Equivalent drug doses may lead to wide interpatient variability in drug response to anticancer therapy. Known determinants that may affect the pharmacological response to a drug are, among others, nongenetic factors, including age, gender, use of comedication, and liver and renal function. Nonetheless, these covariates do not explain all the observed interpatient variability. Differences in genetic constitution among patients have been identified to be important factors that contribute to differences in drug response. Because genetic polymorphism may affect the expression and activity of proteins encoded, it is a key covariate that is responsible for variability in drug metabolism, drug transport, and pharmacodynamic drug effects. We present a series of four reviews about pharmacogenetic variability. This third part in the series of reviews is focused on genetic variability in phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes (glutathione S-transferases, uridine diphosphoglucuronosyl transferases, methyltransferases, sulfotransferases, and N-acetyltransferases) and discusses the effects of genetic polymorphism within the genes encoding these enzymes on anticancer drug therapy outcome. Based on the literature reviewed, opportunities for patient-tailored anticancer therapy are proposed. PMID:21659608

  10. Yakima River Basin Phase II Fish Screen Evaluations, 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, Jessica A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, Mickie A.

    2003-03-01

    In 2002, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met National Marine Fisheries Service criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage and whether bypass outfall conditions allowed fish to safely return to the river. In addition, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2002, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the National Marine Fisheries Service. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to increase safe juvenile fish passage. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris should be improved at some sites.

  11. The Phase II ATLAS Pixel Upgrade: The Inner Tracker (ITk)

    CERN Document Server

    Flick, Tobias; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The entire tracking system of the ATLAS experiment will be replaced during the LHC Phase II shutdown (foreseen to take place around 2025) by an all-silicon detector called the ITk (Inner Tracker). The pixel detector will comprise the five innermost layers, and will be instrumented with new sensor and readout electronics technologies to improve the tracking performance and cope with the HL-LHC environment, which will be severe in terms of occupancy and radiation. The total surface area of silicon in the new pixel system could measure up to 14 m^2, depending on the final layout choice, which is expected to take place in early 2017. Four layout options are being investigated at the moment, two with forward coverage to eta < 3.2 and two to eta < 4. For each coverage option, a layout with long barrel staves and a layout with novel inclined support structures in the barrel-endcap overlap region are considered. All potential layouts include modules mounted on ring-shaped supports in the endcap regions. Support...

  12. Characterization of ToxCast Phase II compounds disruption of ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The development of multi-well microelectrode array (mwMEA) systems has increased in vitro screening throughput making them an effective method to screen and prioritize large sets of compounds for potential neurotoxicity. In the present experiments, a multiplexed approach was used to determine compound effects on both neural function and cell health in primary cortical networks grown on mwMEA plates following exposure to ~1100 compounds from EPA’s Phase II ToxCast libraries. On DIV 13, baseline activity (40 min) was recorded prior to exposure to each compound at 40 µM. DMSO and the GABAA antagonist bicuculline (BIC) were included as controls on each mwMEA plate. Changes in spontaneous network activity (mean firing rate; MFR) and cell viability (lactate dehydrogenase; LDH and CellTiter Blue; CTB) were assessed within the same well following compound exposure. Activity calls (“hits”) were established using the 90th and 20th percentiles of the compound-induced change in MFR (medians of triplicates) across all tested compounds; compounds above (top 10% of compounds increasing MFR), and below (bottom 20% of compounds decreasing MFR) these thresholds, respectively were considered hits. MFR was altered beyond one of these thresholds by 322 compounds. Four compound categories accounted for 66% of the hits, including: insecticides (e.g. abamectin, lindane, prallethrin), pharmaceuticals (e.g. haloperidol, reserpine), fungicides (e.g. hexaconazole, fenamidone), and h

  13. Measurements of the neutron brightness from a phase II solid methane moderator at the LENS neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin Yunchang, E-mail: yunchang.shin@yale.ed [Department of Physics, Indiana University Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Lavelle, C.M.; Mike Snow, W.; Baxter, David V.; Tong Xin; Yan Haiyang [Department of Physics, Indiana University Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); Leuschner, Mark [ProCure 420 North Walnut Street Bloomington, IN 47404 (United States)

    2010-08-21

    Measurements of the neutron brightness from a solid methane moderator were performed at the Low Energy Neutron Source (LENS) at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) to characterize the source and to test our new neutron scattering model of phase II solid methane . A time-of-flight method was used to measure the neutron energy spectrum from the moderator in the energy range of 0.1 meV {approx}1eV. Neutrons were counted with a high efficiency {sup 3}He detector. The solid methane in the moderator occupied phase II and the energy spectra were measured at 20 K and 4 K. We tested our newly developed scattering kernels for phase II solid methane by calculating the neutron brightness expected from the methane moderator at the LENS neutron source using MCNP (Monte Carlo N-particle Transport Code). Within the accuracy of our approximate approach, our model correctly predicts the neutron brightness at both temperatures.

  14. ADVANCED SIMULATION CAPABILITY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT- CURRENT STATUS AND PHASE II DEMONSTRATION RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, R.

    2013-02-26

    The U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Soil and Groundwater, is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high-performance computing tool facilitates integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. The ASCEM project continues to make significant progress in development of computer software capabilities with an emphasis on integration of capabilities in FY12. Capability development is occurring for both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and High-Performance Computing (HPC) Multiprocess Simulator. The Platform capabilities provide the user interface and tools for end-to-end model development, starting with definition of the conceptual model, management of data for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and processing of model output, including visualization. The HPC capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with Platform, and verification and model confidence testing. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications in a set of demonstrations as part of Site Applications Thrust Area activities. The Phase I demonstration focusing on individual capabilities of the initial toolsets was completed in 2010. The Phase II demonstration completed in 2012 focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site deep vadose zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of capabilities, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations

  15. Phase I (CATTS Theory), Phase II (Milne Point), Phase III (Hydrate Ridge)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2009-10-31

    This study introduces a new type of cumulative seismic attribute (CATT) which quantifies gas hydrates resources in Hydrate Ridge offshore Oregon. CATT is base on case-specific transforms that portray hydrated reservoir properties. In this study we used a theoretical rock physics model to correct measured velocity log data.

  16. A steerable/distance enhanced penetrometer delivery system: Phase II. Topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amini, A.; Shenhar, J.; Lum, K.D.

    1996-05-01

    This report summarizes the phase II work on the Position Location Device (POLO) for penetrometers. Phase II was carried out to generate an integrated design of a full-scale steerable/distance enhanced penetrometer delivery system. Steering provides for the controlled and directional use of the penetrometer, while vibratory thrusting can provide greater penetration ability.

  17. TNX GeoSiphon Cell (TGSC-1) Phase II Single Cell Deployment/Demonstration Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phifer, M.A.

    1999-04-15

    This Phase II final report documents the Phase II testing conducted from June 18, 1998 through November 13, 1998, and it focuses on the application of the siphon technology as a sub-component of the overall GeoSiphon Cell technology. [Q-TPL-T-00004

  18. Near-term electric-vehicle program. Phase II. Mid-term review summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-07-27

    The general objective of the Near-Term Electric Vehicle Program is to confirm that, in fact, the complete spectrum of requirements placed on the automobile (e.g., safety, producibility, utility, etc.) can still be satisfied if electric power train concepts are incorporated in lieu of contemporary power train concepts, and that the resultant set of vehicle characteristics are mutually compatible, technologically achievable, and economically achievable. The focus of the approach to meeting this general objective involves the design, development, and fabrication of complete electric vehicles incorporating, where necessary, extensive technological advancements. A mid-term summary is presented of Phase II which is a continuation of the preliminary design study conducted in Phase I of the program. Information is included on vehicle performance and performance simulation models; battery subsystems; control equipment; power systems; vehicle design and components for suspension, steering, and braking; scale model testing; structural analysis; and vehicle dynamics analysis. (LCL)

  19. Removal of Cadmium(II and Lead(II ions from aqueous phase on sodic bentonite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Stella Gaona Galindo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the adsorption of Cd2+and Pb2+ions using sodic bentonite clay type Fluidgel modified. The Fluidgelbefore and after chemical modification and thermal activation was characterized by different techniques including X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, Fourier transform infrared, surface area, helium pycnometry, cation exchange capacity and scanning electron microscopy. Pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order and intra-particle diffusion models were used to analyze the kinetic curves. Equilibrium data were analyzed using Langmuir and Freundlich models. The thermodynamic study indicated that lead adsorption process is endothermic and interactions between clays and solutions of lead occurred spontaneously, while cadmium adsorption revealed an exothermic and spontaneous nature. The maximum removal efficiencies were 97.62% for Cd(II using Fluidgelmodified chemically and 91.08% for lead by Fluidgel modified chemical and thermally.

  20. Impact of Phase II cardiac rehabilitation on abnormal heart rate recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Liang Chou

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: There are multiple factors of cardiopulmonary exercise tests that cannot be used to predict the effect of Phase II CR on the improvement of abnormal HRR. Forty-one percent of patients with abnormal HRR could improve after Phase II CR, but all of the patients could have improved exercise capacity regardless of whether or not HRR improved. We can conclude that HRR and exercise capacity change independently. However, it is important to closely follow-up during Phase III CR for patients with persistently abnormal HRR after Phase II CR has been completed.

  1. In vivo induction of phase II detoxifying enzymes, glutathione transferase and quinone reductase by citrus triterpenoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Hassan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several cell culture and animal studies demonstrated that citrus bioactive compounds have protective effects against certain types of cancer. Among several classes of citrus bioactive compounds, limonoids were reported to prevent different types of cancer. Furthermore, the structures of citrus limonoids were reported to influence the activity of phase II detoxifying enzymes. The purpose of the study was to evaluate how variations in the structures of citrus limonoids (namely nomilin, deacetyl nomilin, and isoobacunoic acid and a mixture of limonoids would influence phase II enzyme activity in excised tissues from a mouse model. Methods In the current study, defatted sour orange seed powder was extracted with ethyl acetate and subjected to silica gel chromatography. The HPLC, NMR and mass spectra were used to elucidate the purity and structure of compounds. Female A/J mice were treated with three limonoids and a mixture in order to evaluate their effect on phase II enzymes in four different tissues. Assays for glutathione S-transferase and NAD(PH: quinone reductase (QR were used to evaluate induction of phase II enzymatic activity. Results The highest induction of GST against 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB was observed in stomach (whole, 58% by nomilin, followed by 25% isoobacunoic acid and 19% deacetyl nomilin. Deacetyl nomilin in intestine (small as well as liver significantly reduced GST activity against CDNB. Additionally isoobacunoic acid and the limonoid mixture in liver demonstrated a significant reduction of GST activity against CDNB. Nomilin significantly induced GST activity against 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO, intestine (280% and stomach (75% while deacetyl nomilin showed significant induction only in intestine (73%. Induction of GST activity was also observed in intestine (93% and stomach (45% treated with the limonoid mixture. Finally, a significant induction of NAD(PH: quinone reductase (QR activity was

  2. Solar heating and cooling of mobile homes, Phase II. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobsen, A.A.

    1976-12-01

    The specific objectives of the Phase II program were: (1) through system testing, confirm the feasibility of a solar heated and cooled mobile home; (2) update system performance analysis and provide solar heating and cooling computer model verification; (3) evaluate the performance of both an absorption and a Rankine air conditioning system; (4) perform a consumer demand analysis through field survey to ascertain the acceptance of solar energy into the mobile home market; and (5) while at field locations to conduct the consumer demand analysis, gather test data from various U.S. climatic zones. Results are presented and discussed. (WHK)

  3. Comparative assessment of three-phase oil relative permeability models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranaee, Ehsan; Riva, Monica; Porta, Giovanni M.; Guadagnini, Alberto

    2016-07-01

    We assess the ability of 11 models to reproduce three-phase oil relative permeability (kro) laboratory data obtained in a water-wet sandstone sample. We do so by considering model performance when (i) solely two-phase data are employed to render predictions of kro and (ii) two and three-phase data are jointly used for model calibration. In the latter case, a Maximum Likelihood (ML) approach is used to estimate model parameters. The tested models are selected among (i) classical models routinely employed in practical applications and implemented in commercial reservoir software and (ii) relatively recent models which are considered to allow overcoming some drawbacks of the classical formulations. Among others, the latter set of models includes the formulation recently proposed by Ranaee et al., which has been shown to embed the critical effects of hysteresis, including the reproduction of oil remobilization induced by gas injection in water-wet media. We employ formal model discrimination criteria to rank models according to their skill to reproduce the observed data and use ML Bayesian model averaging to provide model-averaged estimates (and associated uncertainty bounds) of kro by taking advantage of the diverse interpretive abilities of all models analyzed. The occurrence of elliptic regions is also analyzed for selected models in the framework of the classical fractional flow theory of displacement. Our study confirms that model outcomes based on channel flow theory and classical saturation-weighted interpolation models do not generally yield accurate reproduction of kro data, especially in the regime associated with low oil saturations, where water alternating gas injection (WAG) techniques are usually employed for enhanced oil recovery. This negative feature is not observed in the model of Ranaee et al. (2015) due to its ability to embed key effects of pore-scale phase distributions, such as hysteresis effects and cycle dependency, for modeling kro observed

  4. Zinc(II) oxide solubility and phase behavior in aqueous sodium phosphate solutions at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziemniak, S.E.; Jones, M.E.; Combs, K.E.S.

    1990-02-01

    A platinum-lined, flowing autoclave facility is used to investigate the solubility/phase behavior of zinc(II) oxide in aqueous sodium phosphate solutions at temperatures between 290 and 560 K. ZnO solubilities are observed to increase continuously with temperature and phosphate concentration. At higher phosphate concentrations, a solid phase transformation to NaZnPO{sub 4} is observed. NaZnPO{sub 4} solubilities are retrograde with temperature. The measured solubility behavior is examined via a Zn(II) ion hydrolysis/complexing model and thermodynamic functions for the hydrolysis/complexing reaction equilibria are obtained from a least-squares analysis of the data. The existence of two new zinc(II) ion complexes is reported for the first time: Zn(OH){sub 2}(HPO{sub 4}){sup 2{minus}} and Zn(OH){sub 3}(H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}){sup 2{minus}}. A summary of thermochemical properties for species in the systems ZnO-H{sub 2}O and ZnO-Na{sub 2}O-P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-H{sub 2}O is also provided. 21 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. A spatial assessment of ecosystem services in Europe - Phase II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maes, Joachim; Hauck, Jennifer; Paracchini,, Maria Luisa

    Mainstreaming ecosystem services in EU decision making processes requires a solid conceptual and methodological framework for mapping and assessing ecosystem services that serve the multiple objectives addressed by policies. The PRESS-2 study (PEER Research on Ecosystem Service – Phase 2) provides...... such an analytical framework which enables the operationalization of the present scientific knowledge base of environmental data and models for application by the EU and Member States for mapping and assessment of ecosystem services. This study was structured along three strands of work: policy and scenario analysis......, mapping and valuation. Linking the maps of ecosystem service supply to monetary valuation allowed an analysis of the expected impact of policy measures on benefits derived from ecosystem services. The recreation case, which Marianne participated in, presents evidence that millions of people visited...

  6. A spatial assessment of ecosystem services in Europe - Phase II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maes, Joachim; Hauck, Jennifer; Paracchini,, Maria Luisa

    , mapping and valuation. Linking the maps of ecosystem service supply to monetary valuation allowed an analysis of the expected impact of policy measures on benefits derived from ecosystem services. The recreation case, which Marianne participated in, presents evidence that millions of people visited......Mainstreaming ecosystem services in EU decision making processes requires a solid conceptual and methodological framework for mapping and assessing ecosystem services that serve the multiple objectives addressed by policies. The PRESS-2 study (PEER Research on Ecosystem Service – Phase 2) provides...... such an analytical framework which enables the operationalization of the present scientific knowledge base of environmental data and models for application by the EU and Member States for mapping and assessment of ecosystem services. This study was structured along three strands of work: policy and scenario analysis...

  7. Mineral vein dynamics modelling (FRACS II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urai, J.; Virgo, S.; Arndt, M. [RWTH Aachen (Germany); and others

    2016-08-15

    The Mineral Vein Dynamics Modeling group ''FRACS'' started out as a team of 7 research groups in its first phase and continued with a team of 5 research groups at the Universities of Aachen, Tuebingen, Karlsruhe, Mainz and Glasgow during its second phase ''FRACS 11''. The aim of the group was to develop an advanced understanding of the interplay between fracturing, fluid flow and fracture healing with a special emphasis on the comparison of field data and numerical models. Field areas comprised the Oman mountains in Oman (which where already studied in detail in the first phase), a siliciclastic sequence in the Internal Ligurian Units in Italy (closed to Sestri Levante) and cores of Zechstein carbonates from a Lean Gas reservoir in Northern Germany. Numerical models of fracturing, sealing and interaction with fluid that were developed in phase I where expanded in phase 11. They were used to model small scale fracture healing by crystal growth and the resulting influence on flow, medium scale fracture healing and its influence on successive fracturing and healing, as well as large scale dynamic fluid flow through opening and closing fractures and channels as a function of fluid overpressure. The numerical models were compared with structures in the field and we were able to identify first proxies for mechanical vein-hostrock properties and fluid overpressures versus tectonic stresses. Finally we propose a new classification of stylolites based on numerical models and observations in the Zechstein cores and continued to develop a new stress inversion tool to use stylolites to estimate depth of their formation.

  8. Prediction of potential mushroom yield by visible and near-infrared spectroscopy using fresh phase II compost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, H S S; Kilpatrick, M; Lyons, G

    2005-08-01

    Potential mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) yield of phase II compost is determined by interactions of key quality parameters including dry matter, nitrogen dry matter, ammonia, pH, conductivity, thermophilic microorganisms, C : N ratio, fiber fractions, ash, and certain minerals. This study was aimed at generating robust visible and near-infrared (Vis-NIR) calibrations for predicting potential yield, using spectra from fresh phase II compost. Four compost comparative trials were carried out during the winter and summer months of 2001-2003, under controlled experimental conditions employing six commercially prepared composts, with eight replicate (8 bag) plots per treatment (48 x 8 = 384). The substrates were prepared by windrow or bunker phase I, followed by phase II production. The fresh samples were scanned for Vis-NIR (400-2498 nm) spectra, averaged, transformed, and regressed against the recorded yield by employing a modified partial least squares algorithm. The best calibration model generated from the database explained 84% of yield variation within the data set with a standard error of calibration of 13.75 kg/tonne of fresh compost. The model was successfully tested for robustness with yield results obtained from a validation trial, carried out under similar experimental conditions in early 2004, and the standard error of prediction was 18.21 kg/tonne, which was slightly higher than the mean experimental error (17.94 kg/tonne) of the trial. The accuracy of the model is acceptable for estimating potential yield by classifying phase II substrate as poor (180-220 kg), medium (220-260 kg), and high (260-300 kg) yielding compost. The yield prediction model is being transferred to a new instrument based at Loughgall for routine evaluation of commercial phase II samples.

  9. Biomarkers in phase I–II chemoprevention trials: lessons from the NCI experience

    OpenAIRE

    Szabo, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Early phase clinical trials are an essential component of chemopreventive drug development to identify signals of drug efficacy that can subsequently be explored definitively in phase III trials. Whereas phase I trials focus on safety and identification of optimal dose and schedule for cancer prevention, phase II trials focus on intermediate endpoints that are variably related to cancer development. The United States National Cancer Institute supports a programme devoted to early phase cancer...

  10. Phase computations and phase models for discrete molecular oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Biochemical oscillators perform crucial functions in cells, e.g., they set up circadian clocks. The dynamical behavior of oscillators is best described and analyzed in terms of the scalar quantity, phase. A rigorous and useful definition for phase is based on the so-called isochrons of oscillators. Phase computation techniques for continuous oscillators that are based on isochrons have been used for characterizing the behavior of various types of oscillators under the influence of perturbations such as noise. Results In this article, we extend the applicability of these phase computation methods to biochemical oscillators as discrete molecular systems, upon the information obtained from a continuous-state approximation of such oscillators. In particular, we describe techniques for computing the instantaneous phase of discrete, molecular oscillators for stochastic simulation algorithm generated sample paths. We comment on the accuracies and derive certain measures for assessing the feasibilities of the proposed phase computation methods. Phase computation experiments on the sample paths of well-known biological oscillators validate our analyses. Conclusions The impact of noise that arises from the discrete and random nature of the mechanisms that make up molecular oscillators can be characterized based on the phase computation techniques proposed in this article. The concept of isochrons is the natural choice upon which the phase notion of oscillators can be founded. The isochron-theoretic phase computation methods that we propose can be applied to discrete molecular oscillators of any dimension, provided that the oscillatory behavior observed in discrete-state does not vanish in a continuous-state approximation. Analysis of the full versatility of phase noise phenomena in molecular oscillators will be possible if a proper phase model theory is developed, without resorting to such approximations. PMID:22687330

  11. Predicted Geology of the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley Phase II Drilling Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2009-04-20

    Pahute Mesa–Oasis Valley (PM-OV) Phase II drilling will occur within an area that encompasses approximately 117 square kilometers (45 square miles) near the center of the Phase I PM-OV hydrostratigraphic framework model area. The majority of the investigation area lies within dissected volcanic terrain between Pahute Mesa on the north and Timber Mountain on the south. This area consists of a complex distribution of volcanic tuff and lava of generally rhyolitic composition erupted from nearby calderas and related vents. Several large buried volcanic structural features control the distribution of volcanic units in the investigation area. The Area 20 caldera, including its structural margin and associated caldera collapse collar, underlies the northeastern portion of the investigation area. The southern half of the investigation area lies within the northwestern portion of the Timber Mountain caldera complex, including portions of the caldera moat and resurgent dome. Another significant structural feature in the area is the west-northwest-trending Northern Timber Mountain moat structural zone, which bisects the northern portion of the investigation area and forms a structural bench. The proposed wells of the UGTA Phase II drilling initiative can be grouped into four generalized volcanic structural domains based on the stratigraphic distribution and structural position of the volcanic rocks in the upper 1,000 meters (3,300 feet) of the crust, a depth that represents the approximate planned total depths of the proposed wells.

  12. Biomarker-Guided Adaptive Trial Designs in Phase II and Phase III: A Methodological Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranta Antoniou

    Full Text Available Personalized medicine is a growing area of research which aims to tailor the treatment given to a patient according to one or more personal characteristics. These characteristics can be demographic such as age or gender, or biological such as a genetic or other biomarker. Prior to utilizing a patient's biomarker information in clinical practice, robust testing in terms of analytical validity, clinical validity and clinical utility is necessary. A number of clinical trial designs have been proposed for testing a biomarker's clinical utility, including Phase II and Phase III clinical trials which aim to test the effectiveness of a biomarker-guided approach to treatment; these designs can be broadly classified into adaptive and non-adaptive. While adaptive designs allow planned modifications based on accumulating information during a trial, non-adaptive designs are typically simpler but less flexible.We have undertaken a comprehensive review of biomarker-guided adaptive trial designs proposed in the past decade. We have identified eight distinct biomarker-guided adaptive designs and nine variations from 107 studies. Substantial variability has been observed in terms of how trial designs are described and particularly in the terminology used by different authors. We have graphically displayed the current biomarker-guided adaptive trial designs and summarised the characteristics of each design.Our in-depth overview provides future researchers with clarity in definition, methodology and terminology for biomarker-guided adaptive trial designs.

  13. Microgrid Design, Development and Demonstration - Final Report for Phase I and Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bose, Sumit; Krok, Michael

    2011-02-08

    This document constitutes GE’s final report for the Microgrid Design, Development and Demonstration program for DOE’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Award DE-FC02-05CH11349. It contains the final report for Phase I in Appendix I, and the results the work performed in Phase II. The program goal was to develop and demonstrate a Microgrid Energy Management (MEM) framework for a broad set of Microgrid applications that provides unified controls, protection, and energy management. This project contributed to the achievement of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Renewable and Distributed Systems Integration Program goals by developing a fully automated power delivery microgrid network that: - Reduces carbon emissions and emissions of other air pollutants through increased use of optimally dispatched renewable energy, - Increases asset use through integration of distributed systems, - Enhances reliability, security, and resiliency from microgrid applications in critical infrastructure protection, constrained areas of the electric grid, etc. - Improves system efficiency with on-site, distributed generation and improved economic efficiency through demand-side management.

  14. The Phase-II ATLAS ITk pixel upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzo, S.

    2017-07-01

    The entire tracking system of the ATLAS experiment will be replaced during the LHC Phase-II shutdown (foreseen to take place around 2025) by an all-silicon detector called the ``ITk'' (Inner Tracker). The innermost portion of ITk will consist of a pixel detector with five layers in the barrel region and ring-shaped supports in the end-cap regions. It will be instrumented with new sensor and readout electronics technologies to improve the tracking performance and cope with the HL-LHC environment, which will be severe in terms of occupancy and radiation levels. The new pixel system could include up to 14 m2 of silicon, depending on the final layout, which is expected to be decided in 2017. Several layout options are being investigated at the moment, including some with novel inclined support structures in the barrel end-cap overlap region and others with very long innermost barrel layers. Forward coverage could be as high as |eta| carbon-based materials cooled by evaporative carbon dioxide circulated in thin-walled titanium pipes embedded in the structures. Planar, 3D, and CMOS sensors are being investigated to identify the optimal technology, which may be different for the various layers. The RD53 Collaboration is developing the new readout chip. The pixel off-detector readout electronics will be implemented in the framework of the general ATLAS trigger and DAQ system. A readout speed of up to 5 Gb/s per data link will be needed in the innermost layers going down to 640 Mb/s for the outermost. Because of the very high radiation level inside the detector, the first part of the transmission has to be implemented electrically, with signals converted for optical transmission at larger radii. Extensive tests are being carried out to prove the feasibility of implementing serial powering, which has been chosen as the baseline for the ITk pixel system due to the reduced material in the servicing cables foreseen for this option.

  15. Structural mechanisms of the Ih–II and II → Ic transitions between the crystalline phases of aqueous ice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheligovskaya, E. A., E-mail: lmm@phyche.ac.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    Structural mechanisms are proposed for experimentally observed phase transitions between crystalline modifications of aqueous ice, Ih and II, as well as II and Ic. It is known that the Ih–II transition occurs with the conservation of large structural units (hexagonal channels) common for these ices. It is shown that the Ih → II transition may occur with the conservation of 5/6 of all hydrogen bonds in crystal, including all hydrogen bonds in the retained channels (3/4 of the total number of bonds in crystal) and 1/3 of the bonds between these channels (1/12 of the total number). The transformation of other hydrogen bonds between the retained channels leads to the occurrence of proton order in ice II. A structural mechanism is proposed to explain the transformation of single crystals of ice Ih either into single crystals of ice II or into crystalline twins of ice II with c axes rotated by 180° with respect to each other, which is often observed at the Ih → II transition. It is established that up to 7/12 of all hydrogen bonds are retained at the irreversible cooperative II → Ic transition.

  16. Solid-phase extraction of Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions from environmental samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran, Celal [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Art and Science, Karadeniz Technical University, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Gundogdu, Ali [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Art and Science, Karadeniz Technical University, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Bulut, Volkan Numan [Department of Chemistry, Giresun Faculty of Art and Science, Karadeniz Technical University, 28049 Giresun (Turkey); Soylak, Mustafa [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Art and Science, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)]. E-mail: soylak@erciyes.edu.tr; Elci, Latif [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Art and Science, Pamukkale University, 20020 Denizli (Turkey); Sentuerk, Hasan Basri [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Art and Science, Karadeniz Technical University, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Tuefekci, Mehmet [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Art and Science, Karadeniz Technical University, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey)

    2007-07-19

    A new method using a column packed with Amberlite XAD-2010 resin as a solid-phase extractant has been developed for the multi-element preconcentration of Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Cd(II), and Pb(II) ions based on their complex formation with the sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (Na-DDTC) prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometric (FAAS) determinations. Metal complexes sorbed on the resin were eluted by 1 mol L{sup -1} HNO{sub 3} in acetone. Effects of the analytical conditions over the preconcentration yields of the metal ions, such as pH, quantity of Na-DDTC, eluent type, sample volume and flow rate, foreign ions etc. have been investigated. The limits of detection (LOD) of the analytes were found in the range 0.08-0.26 {mu}g L{sup -1}. The method was validated by analyzing three certified reference materials. The method has been applied for the determination of trace elements in some environmental samples.

  17. Chitosan film loaded with silver nanoparticles-sorbent for solid phase extraction of Al(III), Cd(II), Cu(II), Co(II), Fe(III), Ni(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djerahov, Lubomir; Vasileva, Penka; Karadjova, Irina; Kurakalva, Rama Mohan; Aradhi, Keshav Krishna

    2016-08-20

    The present study describes the ecofriendly method for the preparation of chitosan film loaded with silver nanoparticles (CS-AgNPs) and application of this film as efficient sorbent for separation and enrichment of Al(III), Cd(II), Cu(II), Co(II), Fe(III), Ni(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II). The stable CS-AgNPs colloid was prepared by dispersing the AgNPs sol in chitosan solution at appropriate ratio and further used to obtain a cast film with very good stability under storage and good mechanical strength for easy handling in aqueous medium. The incorporation of AgNPs in the structure of CS film and interaction between the polymer matrix and nanoparticles were confirmed by UV-vis and FTIR spectroscopy. The homogeneously embedded AgNPs (average diameter 29nm, TEM analysis) were clearly observed throughout the film by SEM. The CS-AgNPs nanocomposite film shows high sorption activity toward trace metals under optimized chemical conditions. The results suggest that the CS-AgNPs nanocomposite film can be feasibly used as a novel sorbent material for solid-phase extraction of metal pollutants from surface waters.

  18. Line emission from H II blister models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    Numerical techniques to calculate the thermal and geometric properties of line emission from H II 'blister' regions are presented. It is assumed that the density distributions of the H II regions are a function of two dimensions, with rotational symmetry specifying the shape in three-dimensions. The thermal and ionization equilibrium equations of the problem are solved by spherical modeling, and a spherical sector approximation is used to simplify the three-dimensional treatment of diffuse ionizing radiation. The global properties of H II 'blister' regions near the edges of a molecular cloud are simulated by means of the geometry/density distribution, and the results are compared with observational data. It is shown that there is a monotonic increase of peak surface brightness from the i = 0 deg (pole-on) observational position to the i = 90 deg (edge-on) position. The enhancement of the line peak intensity from the edge-on to the pole-on positions is found to depend on the density, stratification, ionization, and electron temperature weighting. It is found that as i increases, the position of peak line brightness of the lower excitation species is displaced to the high-density side of the high excitation species.

  19. A design of phase II cancer trials using total and complete response endpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ying; Jin, Hua; Lamborn, Kathleen R

    2005-10-30

    Phase II clinical trials in oncology are used for initial evaluation of the therapeutic efficacy of a new treatment regimen. Simon's two-stage design based on total response (TR) rate is commonly used for such trials. Several authors have proposed alternative strategies to consider either response and toxicity or response and early progression. Because TR consists of both partial response (PR) and complete response (CR) and these two types of responses have different effects on subsequent patient outcome, Lin and Chen proposed a flexible design that is based on a weighted average of PR and CR rates as a way to recognize the differential significance of the two levels of response. Panageas and colleagues, on the other hand, used a trinomial model and direct search to consider a rejection region for PR and CR separately. In this paper, we reformat their hypotheses to assess efficacy based on TR and CR. A new two-stage optimum phase II trial design based on TR and CR is developed. We provide guides on searching the stopping and rejecting regions and on determining sample size. An example of a phase II trial for glioblastomas treatment is presented. In this trial, physicians would be interested in either stable disease (SD), PR, or CR as an indication of efficacy. However, because PR and CR rarely occur, observation of any PR or CR will lean towards acceptance of the treatment. Our design has the advantage of being close to the traditional Simon two-stage design while still having the flexibility to treat responses (PR and CR in this example) differently than SD.

  20. The multifaceted Type II-L supernova 2014G from pre-maximum to nebular phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terreran, G.; Jerkstrand, A.; Benetti, S.; Smartt, S. J.; Ochner, P.; Tomasella, L.; Howell, D. A.; Morales-Garoffolo, A.; Harutyunyan, A.; Kankare, E.; Arcavi, I.; Cappellaro, E.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Hosseinzadeh, G.; Kangas, T.; Pastorello, A.; Tartaglia, L.; Turatto, M.; Valenti, S.; Wiggins, P.; Yuan, F.

    2016-10-01

    We present multiband ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared photometry, along with visual-wavelength spectroscopy, of supernova (SN) 2014G in the nearby galaxy NGC 3448 (25 Mpc). The early-phase spectra show strong emission lines of the high ionization species He II/N IV/C IV during the first 2-3 d after explosion, traces of a metal-rich circumstellar material (CSM) probably due to pre-explosion mass-loss events. These disappear by day 9 and the spectral evolution then continues matching that of normal Type II SNe. The post-maximum light curve declines at a rate typical of Type II-L class. The extensive photometric coverage tracks the drop from the photospheric stage and constrains the radioactive tail, with a steeper decline rate than that expected from the 56Co decay if γ-rays are fully trapped by the ejecta. We report the appearance of an unusual feature on the blue side of H α after 100 d, which evolves to appear as a flat spectral feature linking H α and the [O I] doublet. This may be due to interaction of the ejecta with a strongly asymmetric, and possibly bipolar CSM. Finally, we report two deep spectra at ˜190 and 340 d after explosion, the latter being arguably one of the latest spectra for a Type II-L SN. By modelling the spectral region around the [Ca II], we find a supersolar Ni/Fe production. The strength of the [O I] λλ6300,6363 doublet, compared with synthetic nebular spectra, suggests a progenitor with a zero-age main-sequence mass between 15 and 19 M⊙.

  1. HLW Salt Disposition Alternatives Preconceptual Phase II Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piccolo, S.F.

    1999-07-09

    The purpose of the report is to summarize the process used to identify the Short List alternatives that will be evaluated during Phase III and to document the results of the selection process. The Phase III evaluation will result in the determination of the preferred alternative(s) to be used for final disposition of the HLW salt to a permitted waste form.

  2. Phase II Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeff Wurtz

    2009-07-01

    This Phase II CAIP describes new work needed to potentially reduce uncertainty and achieve increased confidence in modeling results. This work includes data collection and data analysis to refine model assumptions, improve conceptual models of flow and transport in a complex hydrogeologic setting, and reduce parametric and structural uncertainty. The work was prioritized based on the potential to reduce model uncertainty and achieve an acceptable level of confidence in the model predictions for flow and transport, leading to model acceptance by NDEP and completion of the Phase II CAI stage of the UGTA strategy.

  3. Phenology for Resource Management and Decision Making: Phase I and II Program Evaluation and Final Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the work completed on Phase I and II of the Project from September 1, 2014 through February 14, 2017. Included are the Goals and Objectives...

  4. Trimodality therapy for malignant pleural mesothelioma: Results from an EORTC phase II multicentre trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.E.Y. van Schil (Paul); P. Baas (Paul); R.M. Gaafar (Rabab); A.W.P.M. Maat (Alex); F. Van De Pol (Francien); B. Hasane (B.); H.M. Klomp (Houke); A.M. Abdelrahman (A.); J. Welche (J.); J.P. van Meerbeeck (Jan)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC; protocol 08031) phase II trial investigated the feasibility of trimodality therapy consisting of induction chemotherapy followed by extrapleural pneumonectomy and post-operative radiotherapy in patients with malignant

  5. Hopelessness across phases of bipolar I or II disorder: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valtonen, Hanna M; Suominen, Kirsi; Haukka, Jari; Mantere, Outi; Arvilommi, Petri; Leppämäki, Sami; Isometsä, Erkki T

    2009-05-01

    Hopelessness, a key risk factor for suicidal behaviour overall, has been studied little among bipolar disorder (BD) patients. For purposes of prevention, it is important to know whether it is predominantly a patient's permanent trait or merely reflects the highly variable illness states. We investigated the degree to which hopelessness is trait- or state-related during the course of BD. The Jorvi Bipolar Study (JoBS) is a naturalistic prospective study representing psychiatric in- and outpatients with DSM-IV BD I and II. Repeated measurements with the Beck Hopelessness Scale of 188 patients at baseline, 6 months and 18 months were analysed using a linear regression model with general estimation equations. Factors covarying with hopelessness during follow-up were investigated. Levels of hopelessness varied markedly between illness phases, being highest in depressive and mixed phases, and lowest in euthymia, hypomania or mania. Hopelessness was independently associated with concurrent severity of depression (estimate 0.231, phopelessness during follow-up was previous hopelessness (0.403, pdepressive mixed phases. Hopelessness was measured at only three time-points. Level of hopelessness varies markedly between patients in different phases of BD, but is also, to a degree, a permanent feature. Among BD patients, hopelessness appears to be both a trait- and state-related characteristic.

  6. Functional design criteria for project W-252, phase II liquid effluent treatment and disposal. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatch, C.E.

    1995-05-01

    This document is the Functional Design Criteria for Project W-252. Project W-252 provides the scope to provide BAT/AKART (best available technology...) to 200 Liquid Effluent Phase II streams (B-Plant). This revision (Rev. 2) incorporates a major descoping of the project. The descoping was done to reflect a combination of budget cutting measures allowed by a less stringent regulatory posture toward the Phase II streams

  7. Curriculum for Evidence Based Medicine for MBBS II phase Graduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saxena R

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Evidence based medicine is the training of health care professionals to access, assess and apply the best scientific evidence to clinical practice. EBM is the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of current best evidence along with clinical expertise and patient values in making decisions about the case of individual patients. The current undergraduate curriculum of health profession is based on past knowledge accumulated for years. The scientific relevance of the mostly outdated information has never been questioned. The students passively absorb this available knowledge and apply it in their future professional life. There is no active learning on their part, by way of positive enquiry and critical analysis of the curriculum imposed on them. This has an undesirable impact on their competency as health professionals and the quality of the health care imparted by them. Hence there is need for emphasis on the teaching of EBM skills in undergraduate, postgraduate, and continuing medical education programs. Early introduction of EBM in the undergraduate medical curriculum, in the form of a short course, using various modes of instruction, enhances the competence of critical thinking and also influences change in attitude towards EBM positively in medical students. The EBM course is planned to introduce in the curriculum of medical undergraduates at the beginning of second phase when they enter clinical posting. Total number of student would be 100 per batch and the course duration will be of 1 year. Educational methods program incorporates multiple teaching methods like lectures, discussion sessions, demonstration, case based learning, timely feedback, real life exposure, role modeling and peer evaluation.

  8. River Protection Project Integrated safety management system phase II verification report, volumes I and II - 8/19/99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SHOOP, D.S.

    1999-09-10

    The Department of Energy policy (DOE P 450.4) is that safety is integrated into all aspects of the management and operations of its facilities. In simple and straightforward terms, the Department will ''Do work safely.'' The purpose of this River Protection Project (RPP) Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) Phase II Verification was to determine whether ISMS programs and processes are implemented within RFP to accomplish the goal of ''Do work safely.'' The goal of an implemented ISMS is to have a single integrated system that includes Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) requirements in the work planning and execution processes to ensure the protection of the worker, public, environment, and federal property over the RPP life cycle. The ISMS is comprised of the (1) described functions, components, processes, and interfaces (system map or blueprint) and (2) personnel who are executing those assigned roles and responsibilities to manage and control the ISMS. Therefore, this review evaluated both the ''paper'' and ''people'' aspects of the ISMS to ensure that the system is implemented within RPP. Richland Operations Office (RL) conducted an ISMS Phase I Verification of the TWRS from September 28-October 9, 1998. The resulting verification report recommended that TWRS-RL and the contractor proceed with Phase II of ISMS verification given that the concerns identified from the Phase I verification review are incorporated into the Phase II implementation plan.

  9. BOP2: Bayesian optimal design for phase II clinical trials with simple and complex endpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Heng; Lee, J Jack; Yuan, Ying

    2017-09-20

    We propose a flexible Bayesian optimal phase II (BOP2) design that is capable of handling simple (e.g., binary) and complicated (e.g., ordinal, nested, and co-primary) endpoints under a unified framework. We use a Dirichlet-multinomial model to accommodate different types of endpoints. At each interim, the go/no-go decision is made by evaluating a set of posterior probabilities of the events of interest, which is optimized to maximize power or minimize the number of patients under the null hypothesis. Unlike other existing Bayesian designs, the BOP2 design explicitly controls the type I error rate, thereby bridging the gap between Bayesian designs and frequentist designs. In addition, the stopping boundary of the BOP2 design can be enumerated prior to the onset of the trial. These features make the BOP2 design accessible to a wide range of users and regulatory agencies and particularly easy to implement in practice. Simulation studies show that the BOP2 design has favorable operating characteristics with higher power and lower risk of incorrectly terminating the trial than some existing Bayesian phase II designs. The software to implement the BOP2 design is freely available at www.trialdesign.org. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Study of the transverse beam motion in the DARHT Phase II accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Fawley, W M; Houck, T L

    1998-08-20

    The accelerator for the second-axis of the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) facility will accelerate a 4-kA, 3-MeV, 2--µs long electron current pulse to 20 MeV. The energy variation of the beam within the flat-top portion of the current pulse is (plus or equal to) 0.5%. The performance of the DARHT Phase II radiographic machine requires the transverse beam motion to be much less than the beam spot size which is about 1.5 mm diameter on the x-ray converter. In general, the leading causes of the transverse beam motion in an accelerator are the beam breakup instability (BBU) and the corkscrew motion. We have modeled the transverse beam motion in the DARHT Phase II accelerator with various magnetic tunes and accelerator cell configurations by using the BREAKUP code. The predicted sensitivity of corkscrew motion and BBU growth to different tuning algorithms will be presented.

  11. A Phase I/II Study Combining Erlotinib and Dasatinib for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Kathryn A.; Lee, J. Jack; Harun, Nusrat; Tang, Ximing; Price, Justina; Kawedia, Jitesh D.; Tran, Hai T.; Erasmus, Jeremy J.; Blumenschein, George R.; William, William N.; Wistuba, Ignacio I.

    2014-01-01

    Background. EGFR and Src are frequently activated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In preclinical models, combining EGFR and Src inhibition has additive synergistic effects. We conducted a phase I/II trial of the combination of Src inhibitor dasatinib with EGFR inhibitor erlotinib to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), pharmacokinetic drug interactions, biomarkers, and efficacy in NSCLC. Methods. The phase I 3+3 dose-escalation study enrolled patients with solid tumors to determine the MTD. The phase II trial enrolled patients with advanced NSCLC who had undergone no previous treatments to determine progression-free survival (PFS) and response. Pharmacokinetic and tissue biomarker analyses were performed. Results. MTD was 150 mg of erlotinib and 70 mg of dasatinib daily based on 12 patients treated in the phase I portion. No responses were observed in phase I. The 35 NSCLC patients treated in phase II had an overall disease control rate of 59% at 6 weeks. Five patients (15%) had partial responses; all had activating EGFR mutations. Median PFS was 3.3 months. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers did not correlate with outcomes. Conclusion. The combination of erlotinib and dasatinib is safe and feasible in NSCLC. The results of this study do not support use of this combination in molecularly unselected NSCLC. PMID:25170013

  12. 2009-2010 USACE Vicksburg District Lidar: Mississippi Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Phase two will consist of post processing of the data collected. Aeroquest Optimal, Inc. shall process the digital elevation data from a precision airborne (LIDAR)...

  13. An Overview of Materials Structures for Extreme Environments Efforts for 2015 SBIR Phases I and II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2017-01-01

    Technological innovation is the overall focus of NASA's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. The program invests in the development of innovative concepts and technologies to help NASA's mission directorates address critical research and development needs for Agency projects. This report highlights innovative SBIR 2015 Phase I and II projects that specifically address areas in Materials and Structures for Extreme Environments, one of six core competencies at NASA Glenn Research Center. Each article describes an innovation, defines its technical objective, and highlights NASA applications as well as commercial and industrial applications. Ten technologies are featured: metamaterials-inspired aerospace structures, metallic joining to advanced ceramic composites, multifunctional polyolefin matrix composite structures, integrated reacting fluid dynamics and predictive materials degradation models for propulsion system conditions, lightweight inflatable structural airlock (LISA), copolymer materials for fused deposition modeling 3-D printing of nonstandard plastics, Type II strained layer superlattice materials development for space-based focal plane array applications, hydrogenous polymer-regolith composites for radiation-shielding materials, a ceramic matrix composite environmental barrier coating durability model, and advanced composite truss printing for large solar array structures. This report serves as an opportunity for NASA engineers, researchers, program managers, and other personnel to learn about innovations in this technology area as well as possibilities for collaboration with innovative small businesses that could benefit NASA programs and projects.

  14. Benzocaine polymorphism: pressure-temperature phase diagram involving forms II and III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gana, Inès; Barrio, Maria; Do, Bernard; Tamarit, Josep-Lluís; Céolin, René; Rietveld, Ivo B

    2013-11-18

    Understanding the phase behavior of an active pharmaceutical ingredient in a drug formulation is required to avoid the occurrence of sudden phase changes resulting in decrease of bioavailability in a marketed product. Benzocaine is known to possess three crystalline polymorphs, but their stability hierarchy has so far not been determined. A topological method and direct calorimetric measurements under pressure have been used to construct the topological pressure-temperature diagram of the phase relationships between the solid phases II and III, the liquid, and the vapor phase. In the process, the transition temperature between solid phases III and II and its enthalpy change have been determined. Solid phase II, which has the highest melting point, is the more stable phase under ambient conditions in this phase diagram. Surprisingly, solid phase I has not been observed during the study, even though the scarce literature data on its thermal behavior appear to indicate that it might be the most stable one of the three solid phases.

  15. Phase Field Modeling Using PetIGA

    KAUST Repository

    Vignal, Philippe A.

    2013-06-01

    Phase field modeling has become a widely used framework in the computational material science community. Its ability to model different problems by defining appropriate phase field parameters and relating it to a free energy functional makes it highly versatile. Thermodynamically consistent partial differential equations can then be generated by assuming dissipative dynamics, and setting up the problem as one of minimizing this free energy. The equations are nonetheless challenging to solve, and having a highly efficient and parallel framework to solve them is necessary. In this work, a brief review on phase field models is given, followed by a short analysis of the Phase Field Crystal Model solved with Isogeometric Analysis us- ing PetIGA. We end with an introduction to a new modeling concept, where free energy functions are built with a periodic equilibrium structure in mind.

  16. Langley's CSI evolutionary model: Phase O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belvin, W. Keith; Elliott, Kenny B.; Horta, Lucas G.; Bailey, Jim P.; Bruner, Anne M.; Sulla, Jeffrey L.; Won, John; Ugoletti, Roberto M.

    1991-01-01

    A testbed for the development of Controls Structures Interaction (CSI) technology to improve space science platform pointing is described. The evolutionary nature of the testbed will permit the study of global line-of-sight pointing in phases 0 and 1, whereas, multipayload pointing systems will be studied beginning with phase 2. The design, capabilities, and typical dynamic behavior of the phase 0 version of the CSI evolutionary model (CEM) is documented for investigator both internal and external to NASA. The model description includes line-of-sight pointing measurement, testbed structure, actuators, sensors, and real time computers, as well as finite element and state space models of major components.

  17. Installation Restoration Program. Phase II. Confirmation/Quantification Stage I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-02-24

    level below ground: vmA Temp. Addres Fahr . * Teat delivery.: pm _________________________________or -- - r Pump’ _7 Ral= _ Owner’s...esapletLea Or abadomat Of the 11." W= OWEI is oft drlled ole: - Tota2- Ii-e ,1 . p of well: at ag wter lev below O-0 Temp. Fahr . M eat er...Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). In addition, UBTL is currently licensed by the Center for Disease Control (CDC) to perform

  18. Phase diagram of a truncated tetrahedral model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krcmar, Roman; Gendiar, Andrej; Nishino, Tomotoshi

    2016-08-01

    Phase diagram of a discrete counterpart of the classical Heisenberg model, the truncated tetrahedral model, is analyzed on the square lattice, when the interaction is ferromagnetic. Each spin is represented by a unit vector that can point to one of the 12 vertices of the truncated tetrahedron, which is a continuous interpolation between the tetrahedron and the octahedron. Phase diagram of the model is determined by means of the statistical analog of the entanglement entropy, which is numerically calculated by the corner transfer matrix renormalization group method. The obtained phase diagram consists of four different phases, which are separated by five transition lines. In the parameter region, where the octahedral anisotropy is dominant, a weak first-order phase transition is observed.

  19. Hybrid model for QCD deconfining phase boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, P. K.; Singh, C. P.

    2012-06-01

    Intensive search for a proper and realistic equations of state (EOS) is still continued for studying the phase diagram existing between quark gluon plasma (QGP) and hadron gas (HG) phases. Lattice calculations provide such EOS for the strongly interacting matter at finite temperature (T) and vanishing baryon chemical potential (μB). These calculations are of limited use at finite μB due to the appearance of notorious sign problem. In the recent past, we had constructed a hybrid model description for the QGP as well as HG phases where we make use of a new excluded-volume model for HG and a thermodynamically-consistent quasiparticle model for the QGP phase and used them further to get QCD phase boundary and a critical point. Since then many lattice calculations have appeared showing various thermal and transport properties of QCD matter at finite T and μB=0. We test our hybrid model by reproducing the entire data for strongly interacting matter and predict our results at finite μB so that they can be tested in future. Finally we demonstrate the utility of the model in fixing the precise location, the order of the phase transition and the nature of CP existing on the QCD phase diagram. We thus emphasize the suitability of the hybrid model as formulated here in providing a realistic EOS for the strongly interacting matter.

  20. Phases and phase transitions in the algebraic microscopic shell model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgieva A. I.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We explore the dynamical symmetries of the shell model number conserving algebra, which define three types of pairing and quadrupole phases, with the aim to obtain the prevailing phase or phase transition for the real nuclear systems in a single shell. This is achieved by establishing a correspondence between each of the pairing bases with the Elliott’s SU(3 basis that describes collective rotation of nuclear systems. This allows for a complete classification of the basis states of different number of particles in all the limiting cases. The probability distribution of the SU(3 basis states within theirs corresponding pairing states is also obtained. The relative strengths of dynamically symmetric quadrupole-quadrupole interaction in respect to the isoscalar, isovector and total pairing interactions define a control parameter, which estimates the importance of each term of the Hamiltonian in the correct reproduction of the experimental data for the considered nuclei.

  1. PHASE CHAOS IN THE DISCRETE KURAMOTO MODEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maistrenko, V.; Vasylenko, A.; Maistrenko, Y.;

    2010-01-01

    The paper describes the appearance of a novel, high-dimensional chaotic regime, called phase chaos, in a time-discrete Kuramoto model of globally coupled phase oscillators. This type of chaos is observed at small and intermediate values of the coupling strength. It arises from the nonlinear inter...

  2. Grassmann phase space methods for fermions. II. Field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton, B.J., E-mail: bdalton@swin.edu.au [Centre for Quantum and Optical Science, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Jeffers, J. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4ONG (United Kingdom); Barnett, S.M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-15

    In both quantum optics and cold atom physics, the behaviour of bosonic photons and atoms is often treated using phase space methods, where mode annihilation and creation operators are represented by c-number phase space variables, with the density operator equivalent to a distribution function of these variables. The anti-commutation rules for fermion annihilation, creation operators suggests the possibility of using anti-commuting Grassmann variables to represent these operators. However, in spite of the seminal work by Cahill and Glauber and a few applications, the use of Grassmann phase space methods in quantum-atom optics to treat fermionic systems is rather rare, though fermion coherent states using Grassmann variables are widely used in particle physics. This paper presents a phase space theory for fermion systems based on distribution functionals, which replace the density operator and involve Grassmann fields representing anti-commuting fermion field annihilation, creation operators. It is an extension of a previous phase space theory paper for fermions (Paper I) based on separate modes, in which the density operator is replaced by a distribution function depending on Grassmann phase space variables which represent the mode annihilation and creation operators. This further development of the theory is important for the situation when large numbers of fermions are involved, resulting in too many modes to treat separately. Here Grassmann fields, distribution functionals, functional Fokker–Planck equations and Ito stochastic field equations are involved. Typical applications to a trapped Fermi gas of interacting spin 1/2 fermionic atoms and to multi-component Fermi gases with non-zero range interactions are presented, showing that the Ito stochastic field equations are local in these cases. For the spin 1/2 case we also show how simple solutions can be obtained both for the untrapped case and for an optical lattice trapping potential.

  3. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM LANDFILL GAS: PHASE II. PRETREATMENT SYSTEM PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report describes Phase II of a demonstration of the utilization of commercial phosphoric acid fuel cells to recover energy from landfill gas. This phase consisted primarily of the construction and testing of a Gas Pretreatment Unit (GPU) whose function is to remove those impu...

  4. Phase I/II study on docetaxel, gemcitabine and prednisone in castrate refractory metastatic prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Hansen, Trine Zeeberg; Bentzen, Lise Nørgaard; Hansen, Steinbjoern

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: We assessed the efficacy and toxicity of a fixed dose of docetaxel and prednisone, combined with escalating doses of gemcitabine (DGP). The primary endpoint was PSA response. METHODS: Fifteen patients were enrolled in the phase I and 50 patients entered the phase II. Patients were given ...

  5. Phase I/II study on docetaxel, gemcitabine and prednisone in castrate refractory metastatic prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Hansen, Trine Zeeberg; Bentzen, Lise Nørgaard; Hansen, Steinbjoern;

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: We assessed the efficacy and toxicity of a fixed dose of docetaxel and prednisone, combined with escalating doses of gemcitabine (DGP). The primary endpoint was PSA response. METHODS: Fifteen patients were enrolled in the phase I and 50 patients entered the phase II. Patients were given...

  6. An Experimental Evaluation of Hyperactivity and Food Additives. 1977-Phase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, J. Preston; And Others

    Phase II of a study on the effectiveness of B. Feingold's recommended diet for hyperactive children involved the nine children (mean age 9 years) who had shown the "best" response to diet manipulation in Phase I. Each child served as his own control and was challenged with specified amounts of placebo and artificial color containing food…

  7. Implementation of a Proficiency-Based Diploma System in Maine: Phase II--District Level Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvernail, David L.; Stump, Erika K.; McCafferty, Anita Stewart; Hawes, Kathryn M.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the findings from Phase II of a study of Maine's implementation of a proficiency-based diploma system. At the request of the Joint Standing Committee on Education and Cultural Affairs of the Maine Legislature, the Maine Policy Research Institute (MEPRI) has conducted a two-phased study of the implementation of Maine law…

  8. The comfortable driving model revisited: Traffic phases and phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Knorr, Florian

    2013-01-01

    We study the spatiotemporal patterns resulting from different boundary conditions for a microscopic traffic model and contrast it with empirical results. By evaluating the time series of local measurements, the local traffic states are assigned to the different traffic phases of Kerner's three-phase traffic theory. For this classification we use the rule-based FOTO-method, which provides `hard' rules for this assignment. Using this approach, our analysis shows that the model is indeed able to reproduce three qualitatively different traffic phases: free flow (F), synchronized traffic (S), and wide moving jams (J). In addition, we investigate the likelihood of transitions between the three traffic phases. We show that a transition from free flow (F) to a wide moving jam (J) often involves an intermediate transition; first from free flow F to synchronized flow S and then from synchronized flow to a wide moving jam. This is supported by the fact that the so called F->S transition (from free flow to synchronized t...

  9. Modeling phase noise in multifunction subassemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Obtaining requisite phase noise performance in hardware containing multifunction circuitry requires accurate modeling of the phase noise characteristics of each signal path component, including both absolute (oscillator) and residual (non-oscillator) circuit contributors. This includes prediction of both static and vibration-induced phase noise. The model (usually in spreadsheet form) is refined as critical components are received and evaluated. Additive (KTBF) phase noise data can be reasonably estimated, based on device drive level and noise figure. However, accurate determination of component near-carrier (multiplicative) and vibration-induced noise usually must be determined via measurement. The model should also include the effects of noise introduced by IC voltage regulators and properly discriminate between common versus independent signal path residual noise contributors. The modeling can be easily implemented using a spreadsheet.

  10. Phase-II trials in osteosarcoma recurrences: A systematic review of past experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omer, Natacha; Le Deley, Marie-Cécile; Piperno-Neumann, Sophie; Marec-Berard, Perrine; Italiano, Antoine; Corradini, Nadège; Bellera, Carine; Brugières, Laurence; Gaspar, Nathalie

    2017-04-01

    The most appropriate design of Phase-II trials evaluating new therapies in osteosarcoma remains poorly defined. To study consistency in phase-II clinical trials evaluating new therapies for osteosarcoma recurrences with respect to eligibility criteria, response assessment, end-points, statistical design and reported results. Systematic review of clinical trials registered on clinicaltrials.gov, clinicaltrialsregister.eu and French National Cancer Institute website or referenced in PubMed and American Society of Clinical Oncology websites, between 2003 and 2016, using the following criteria: (osteosarcoma OR bone sarcoma) AND (Phase-II). Among the 99 trials identified, 80 were Phase-II, 17 I/II and 2 II/III, evaluating mostly targeted therapy (n = 40), and chemotherapy alone (n = 26). Results were fully (n = 28) or partially (abstract, n = 6) published. Twenty-four trials were dedicated to osteosarcoma, 22 had an osteosarcoma stratum. Twenty-eight out of 99 trials refer to the age range observed at recurrence (28%). Overall, 65 trials were run in multicentre settings, including 17 international trials. Only 9 trials were randomised. The primary end-point was tumour response in 71 trials (response rate, n = 40 or best response, n = 31), with various definitions (complete + partial ± minor response and stable disease), mainly evaluated with RECIST criteria (n = 69); it was progression-free survival in 24 trials and OS in 3. In single-arm trials evaluating response rate, the null hypothesis tested (when available, n = 12) varied from 5% to 25%. No robust historical data can currently be derived from past efficacy Phase-II trials. There is an urgent need to develop international randomised Phase-II trials across all age ranges with standardised primary end-point. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Robust growth of avirulent phase II Coxiella burnetii in bone marrow-derived murine macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockrell, Diane C.; Long, Carrie M.; Robertson, Shelly J.; Shannon, Jeffrey G.; Miller, Heather E.; Myers, Lara; Larson, Charles L.; Starr, Tregei; Beare, Paul A.

    2017-01-01

    Published data show that murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) restrict growth of avirulent phase II, but not virulent phase I, Coxiella burnetii. Growth restriction of phase II bacteria is thought to result from potentiated recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns, which leads to production of inhibitory effector molecules. Past studies have used conditioned medium from L-929 murine fibroblasts as a source of macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) to promote differentiation of bone marrow-derived myeloid precursors into macrophages. However, uncharacterized components of conditioned medium, such as variable amounts of type I interferons, can affect macrophage activation status and their permissiveness for infection. In the current study, we show that the C. burnetii Nine Mile phase II (NMII) strain grows robustly in primary macrophages from C57BL/6J mice when bone marrow cells are differentiated with recombinant murine M-CSF (rmM-CSF). Bacteria were readily internalized by BMDM, and replicated within degradative, LAMP1-positive vacuoles to achieve roughly 3 logs of growth over 6 days. Uninfected BMDM did not appreciably express CD38 or Egr2, markers of classically (M1) and alternatively (M2) activated macrophages, respectively, nor did infection change the lack of polarization. In accordance with an M0 phenotype, infected BMDM produced moderate amounts of TNF and nitric oxide. Similar NMII growth results were obtained using C57BL/6J myeloid progenitors immortalized with an estrogen-regulated Hoxb8 (ER-Hoxb8) oncogene. To demonstrate the utility of the ER-Hoxb8 system, myeloid progenitors from natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (Nramp1) C57BL/6J knock-in mice were transduced with ER-Hoxb8, and macrophages were derived from immortalized progenitors using rmM-CSF and infected with NMII. No difference in growth was observed when compared to macrophages from wild type mice, indicating depletion of metal ions by the Nramp1

  12. North Atlantic simulations in Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments phase II (CORE-II). Part II: Inter-annual to decadal variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danabasoglu, Gokhan; Yeager, Steve G.; Kim, Who M.; Behrens, Erik; Bentsen, Mats; Bi, Daohua; Biastoch, Arne; Bleck, Rainer; Böning, Claus; Bozec, Alexandra; Canuto, Vittorio M.; Cassou, Christophe; Chassignet, Eric; Coward, Andrew C.; Danilov, Sergey; Diansky, Nikolay; Drange, Helge; Farneti, Riccardo; Fernandez, Elodie; Fogli, Pier Giuseppe; Forget, Gael; Fujii, Yosuke; Griffies, Stephen M.; Gusev, Anatoly; Heimbach, Patrick; Howard, Armando; Ilicak, Mehmet; Jung, Thomas; Karspeck, Alicia R.; Kelley, Maxwell; Large, William G.; Leboissetier, Anthony; Lu, Jianhua; Madec, Gurvan; Marsland, Simon J.; Masina, Simona; Navarra, Antonio; Nurser, A. J. George; Pirani, Anna; Romanou, Anastasia; Salas y Mélia, David; Samuels, Bonita L.; Scheinert, Markus; Sidorenko, Dmitry; Sun, Shan; Treguier, Anne-Marie; Tsujino, Hiroyuki; Uotila, Petteri; Valcke, Sophie; Voldoire, Aurore; Wang, Qiang; Yashayaev, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Simulated inter-annual to decadal variability and trends in the North Atlantic for the 1958-2007 period from twenty global ocean - sea-ice coupled models are presented. These simulations are performed as contributions to the second phase of the Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments (CORE-II). The study is Part II of our companion paper (Danabasoglu et al., 2014) which documented the mean states in the North Atlantic from the same models. A major focus of the present study is the representation of Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) variability in the participating models. Relationships between AMOC variability and those of some other related variables, such as subpolar mixed layer depths, the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), and the Labrador Sea upper-ocean hydrographic properties, are also investigated. In general, AMOC variability shows three distinct stages. During the first stage that lasts until the mid- to late-1970s, AMOC is relatively steady, remaining lower than its long-term (1958-2007) mean. Thereafter, AMOC intensifies with maximum transports achieved in the mid- to late-1990s. This enhancement is then followed by a weakening trend until the end of our integration period. This sequence of low frequency AMOC variability is consistent with previous studies. Regarding strengthening of AMOC between about the mid-1970s and the mid-1990s, our results support a previously identified variability mechanism where AMOC intensification is connected to increased deep water formation in the subpolar North Atlantic, driven by NAO-related surface fluxes. The simulations tend to show general agreement in their temporal representations of, for example, AMOC, sea surface temperature (SST), and subpolar mixed layer depth variabilities. In particular, the observed variability of the North Atlantic SSTs is captured well by all models. These findings indicate that simulated variability and trends are primarily dictated by the atmospheric datasets which

  13. North Atlantic Simulations in Coordinated Ocean-Ice Reference Experiments Phase II (CORE-II) . Part II; Inter-Annual to Decadal Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danabasoglu, Gokhan; Yeager, Steve G.; Kim, Who M.; Behrens, Erik; Bentsen, Mats; Bi, Daohua; Biastoch, Arne; Bleck, Rainer; Boening, Claus; Bozec, Alexandra; Canuto, Vittorio M.; Howard, Armando M.; Kelley, Maxwell

    2015-01-01

    Simulated inter-annual to decadal variability and trends in the North Atlantic for the 1958-2007 period from twenty global ocean - sea-ice coupled models are presented. These simulations are performed as contributions to the second phase of the Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments (CORE-II). The study is Part II of our companion paper (Danabasoglu et al., 2014) which documented the mean states in the North Atlantic from the same models. A major focus of the present study is the representation of Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) variability in the participating models. Relationships between AMOC variability and those of some other related variables, such as subpolar mixed layer depths, the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), and the Labrador Sea upper-ocean hydrographic properties, are also investigated. In general, AMOC variability shows three distinct stages. During the first stage that lasts until the mid- to late-1970s, AMOC is relatively steady, remaining lower than its long-term (1958-2007) mean. Thereafter, AMOC intensifies with maximum transports achieved in the mid- to late-1990s. This enhancement is then followed by a weakening trend until the end of our integration period. This sequence of low frequency AMOC variability is consistent with previous studies. Regarding strengthening of AMOC between about the mid-1970s and the mid-1990s, our results support a previously identified variability mechanism where AMOC intensification is connected to increased deep water formation in the subpolar North Atlantic, driven by NAO-related surface fluxes. The simulations tend to show general agreement in their representations of, for example, AMOC, sea surface temperature (SST), and subpolar mixed layer depth variabilities. In particular, the observed variability of the North Atlantic SSTs is captured well by all models. These findings indicate that simulated variability and trends are primarily dictated by the atmospheric datasets which include

  14. Phase II Water Rental Pilot Project: Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stovall, Stacey H.

    1994-08-01

    The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented in 1991 as part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to quantify resident fish and wildlife impacts resulting from salmon flow augmentation releases made from the upper Snake River Basin. Phase I summarized existing resource information and provided management recommendations to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat resulting from storage releases for the I improvement of an adromous fish migration. Phase II includes the following: (1) a summary of recent biological, legal, and political developments within the basin as they relate to water management issues, (2) a biological appraisal of the Snake River between American Falls Reservoir and the city of Blackfoot to examine the effects of flow fluctuation on fish and wildlife habitat, and (3) a preliminary accounting of 1993--1994 flow augmentation releases out of the upper Snake, Boise, and Payette river systems. Phase III will include the development of a model in which annual flow requests and resident fish and wildlife suitability information are interfaced with habitat time series analysis to provide an estimate of resident fish and wildlife resources.

  15. Technical Analysis of the Hydrogen Energy Station Concept, Phase I and Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TIAX, LLC

    2005-05-04

    patterns would be most viable for an energy station, TIAX developed several criteria for selecting a representative set of technology configurations. TIAX applied these criteria to all possible technology configurations to determine an optimized set for further analysis, as shown in Table ES-1. This analysis also considered potential energy station operational scenarios and their impact upon hydrogen and power production. For example, an energy station with a 50-kWe reformer could generate enough hydrogen to serve up to 12 vehicles/day (at 5 kg/fill) or generate up to 1,200 kWh/day, as shown in Figure ES-1. Buildings that would be well suited for an energy station would utilize both the thermal and electrical output of the station. Optimizing the generation and utilization of thermal energy, hydrogen, and electricity requires a detailed look at the energy transfer within the energy station and the transfer between the station and nearby facilities. TIAX selected the Baseline configuration given in Table ES-1 for an initial analysis of the energy and mass transfer expected from an operating energy station. Phase II The purpose of this technical analysis was to analyze the development of a hydrogen-dispensing infrastructure for transportation applications through the installation of a 50-75 kW stationary fuel cell-based energy station at federal building sites. The various scenarios, costs, designs and impacts of such a station were quantified for a hypothetical cost-shared program that utilizes a natural gas reformer to provide hydrogen fuel for both the stack(s) and a limited number of fuel cell powered vehicles, with the possibility of using cogeneration to support the building heat load.

  16. Research safety vehicle program (Phase II) specification review. Volume II. Final technical report, Jul 1975--Nov 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugliese, S.M.

    1977-02-01

    In Phase I of the Research Safety Vehicle Program (RSV), preliminary design and performance specifications were developed for a mid-1980's vehicle that integrates crashworthiness and occupant safety features with material resource conservation, economy, and producibility. Phase II of the program focused on development of the total vehicle design via systems engineering and integration analyses. As part of this effort, it was necessary to continuously review the Phase I recommended performance specification in relation to ongoing design/test activities. This document contains the results of analyses of the Phase I specifications. The RSV is expected to satisfy all of the producibility and safety related specifications, i.e., handling and stability systems, crashworthiness, occupant protection, pedestrian/cyclist protection, etc.

  17. Neutron background signal in superheated droplet detectors of the Phase II SIMPLE dark matter search

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandes, A C; Felizardo, M; Girard, T A; Ramos, A R; Marques, J G; Prudêncio, M I; Marques, R; Carvalho, F P; Lázaro, I

    2015-01-01

    The simulation of the neutron background for Phase II of the SIMPLE direct dark matter search experiment is described, including further improvements relatively to previously reported data. Spontaneous fission and decay-induced (\\alpha,n) reactions originating in $^{238}$U and $^{232}$Th naturally present in the experiment materials were considered. The model employs the Monte Carlo MCNP neutron transport code, using a realistic geometry description and measured radioassays and material compositions as input. Tabled (\\alpha,n) yields, measured detection efficiencies and evaluated cross section data were used. The energy distribution of the recoiling nuclei is dealt with a distinct code. A thorough uncertainty analysis of the simulated results is performed that addresses statistical and most non-statistical uncertainties. The estimated recoil event rate is 0.367 $\\pm$ 0.002(stat.) $\\pm$ 0.064 (non-stat.) evt/kgd, a 10$\\%$ increase in the previous reported result.

  18. Phase transitions in Group III-V and II-VI semiconductors at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, S. C.; Liu, C. Y.; Spain, I. L.; Skelton, E. F.

    1979-01-01

    The structures and transition pressures of Group III-V and II-VI semiconductors and of a pseudobinary system (Ga/x/In/1-x/Sb) have been investigated. Results indicate that GaP, InSb, GaSb, GaAs and possible AlP assume Metallic structures at high pressures; a tetragonal, beta-Sn-like structure is adopted by only InSb and GaSb. The rocksalt phase is preferred in InP, InAs, AlSb, ZnO and ZnS. The model of Van Vechten (1973) gives transition pressures which are in good agreement with measured values, but must be refined to account for the occurrence of the ionic rocksalt structure in some compounds. In addition, discrepancies between the theoretical scaling values for volume changes at the semiconductor-to-metal transitions are observed.

  19. Dark-photon search using data from CRESST-II Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angloher, G.; Bauer, P.; Iachellini, N.F.; Hauff, D.; Kiefer, M.; Mancuso, M.; Petricca, F.; Proebst, F.; Seidel, W.; Stodolsky, L.; Strauss, R.; Tanzke, A.; Wuestrich, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Bento, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Universidade de Coimbra, Departamento de Fisica, Coimbra (Portugal); Bucci, C.; Gorla, P.; Pagliarone, C. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (Italy); Canonica, L. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (Italy); Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Defay, X.; Feilitzsch, F. v.; Lanfranchi, J.C.; Muenster, A.; Potzel, W.; Schoenert, S.; Thi, H.H.T.; Ulrich, A.; Wawoczny, S.; Willers, M.; Zoeller, A. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department and Excellence Cluster Universe, Garching (Germany); Erb, A. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department and Excellence Cluster Universe, Garching (Germany); Walther-Meissner-Institut fuer Tieftemperaturforschung, Garching (Germany); Guetlein, A.; Kluck, H.; Puig, R.; Schieck, J.; Tuerkoglu, C. [Institut fuer Hochenergiephysik der Oesterreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, Vienna (Austria); Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna (Austria); Jochum, J.; Loebell, J.; Strandhagen, C.; Uffinger, M.; Usherov, I. [Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Kraus, H. [University of Oxford, Department of Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom); Reindl, F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); INFN-Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Schaeffner, K. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (Italy); GSSI-Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy)

    2017-05-15

    Identifying the nature and origin of dark matter is one of the major challenges for modern astro and particle physics. Direct dark-matter searches aim at an observation of dark-matter particles interacting within detectors. The focus of several such searches is on interactions with nuclei as provided e.g. by weakly interacting massive particles. However, there is a variety of dark-matter candidates favoring interactions with electrons rather than with nuclei. One example are dark photons, i.e., long-lived vector particles with a kinetic mixing to standard-model photons. In this work we present constraints on this kinetic mixing based on data from CRESST-II Phase 2 corresponding to an exposure before cuts of 52 kg-days. These constraints improve the existing ones for dark-photon masses between 0.3 and 0.7 keV/c{sup 2}. (orig.)

  20. Nonequilibrium stationary states and phase transitions in directed Ising models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godrèche, Claude; Bray, Alan J.

    2009-12-01

    We study the nonequilibrium properties of directed Ising models with non-conserved dynamics, in which each spin is influenced by only a subset of its nearest neighbours. We treat the following models: (i) the one-dimensional chain; (ii) the two-dimensional square lattice; (iii) the two-dimensional triangular lattice and (iv) the three-dimensional cubic lattice. We raise and answer the question: (a) under what conditions is the stationary state described by the equilibrium Boltzmann-Gibbs distribution? We show that, for models (i), (ii) and (iii), in which each spin 'sees' only half of its neighbours, there is a unique set of transition rates, namely with exponential dependence in the local field, for which this is the case. For model (iv), we find that any rates satisfying the constraints required for the stationary measure to be Gibbsian should satisfy detailed balance, ruling out the possibility of directed dynamics. We finally show that directed models on lattices of coordination number z>=8 with exponential rates cannot accommodate a Gibbsian stationary state. We conjecture that this property extends to any form of the rates. We are thus led to the conclusion that directed models with Gibbsian stationary states only exist in dimensions one and two. We then raise the question: (b) do directed Ising models, augmented by Glauber dynamics, exhibit a phase transition to a ferromagnetic state? For the models considered above, the answers are open problems, with the exception of the simple cases (i) and (ii). For Cayley trees, where each spin sees only the spins further from the root, we show that there is a phase transition provided the branching ratio, q, satisfies q>=3.

  1. Comparing two tetraalkylammonium ionic liquids. II. Phase transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Thamires A.; Paschoal, Vitor H.; Faria, Luiz F. O.; Ribeiro, Mauro C. C.; Ferreira, Fabio F.; Costa, Fanny N.; Giles, Carlos

    2016-06-01

    Phase transitions of the ionic liquids n-butyl-trimethylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [N1114][NTf2], and methyl-tributylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [N1444][NTf2], were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, and Raman spectroscopy. XRD and Raman spectra were obtained as a function of temperature at atmospheric pressure, and also under high pressure at room temperature using a diamond anvil cell (DAC). [N1444][NTf2] experiences glass transition at low temperature, whereas [N1114][NTf2] crystallizes or not depending on the cooling rate. Both the ionic liquids exhibit glass transition under high pressure. XRD and low-frequency Raman spectra provide a consistent physical picture of structural ordering-disordering accompanying the thermal events of crystallization, glass transition, cold crystallization, pre-melting, and melting. Raman spectra in the high-frequency range of some specific cation and anion normal modes reveal conformational changes of the molecular structures along phase transitions.

  2. Photoionization models for giant h ii regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gra´zyna Stasi´nska

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Revisamos las fuentes de incertidumbre en los modelos de fotoionizaci on de regiones H II gigantes. Tambi en discutimos el problema de la temperatura electr onica a la luz de los ajustes de modelos en tres regiones H II gigantes.

  3. Final Report Auto/Steel Partnership Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cady, C.M.; Chen, S.R.; Gray, G.T. III

    1999-06-09

    This is the final report in which effects of strain-rate, temperature, and stress-state on the yield stress and the strain hardening behavior of many common steels used in automobile construction were investigated. The yield and flow stresses were found to exhibit very high rate sensitivities for most of the steels while the hardening rates were found to be insensitive to strain rate and temperature at lower temperatures or at higher strain rates. This behavior is consistent with the observation that overcoming the intrinsic Peierls stress is shown to be the rate-controlling mechanism in these materials at low temperatures. The dependence of the yield stress on temperature and strain rate was found to decrease while the strain hardening rate increased. The Mechanical Threshold Stress (MTS) model was adopted to model the stress-strain behavior of the steels. Parameters for the constitutive relations were derived for the MTS model and also for the Johnson-Cook (JC) and the Zerilli-Armstrong (ZA) models. The results of this study substantiate the applicability of these models for describing the high strain-rate deformation of these materials. The JC and ZA models, however, due to their use of a power strain hardening law were found to yield constitutive relations for the materials which are strongly dependent on the range of strains for which the models were optimized.

  4. Project 8 Phase II: Improved beta decay electrons reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guigue, Mathieu; Project 8 Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Project 8 collaboration aims to measure the absolute neutrino mass scale using a cyclotron radiation emission spectroscopy technique on the beta decays of tritium. The second phase of the project will measure a differential spectrum of tritium beta decays and extract the tritium endpoint value with an eV or sub-eV scale precision. Monoenergetic electrons emitted by gaseous 83mKr atoms can be used to determine the coefficient between the cyclotron frequency and the electron energy and to optimize the instrument configuration for the tritium measurement. We present the progress on the processing of the electron cyclotron radiation signal to reconstruct the beta decay spectrum of krypton and tritium.

  5. Phase Transition in the Simplest Plasma Model

    CERN Document Server

    Iosilevskiy, Igor

    2009-01-01

    We have investigated the phase transition of the gas-liquid type, with an upper critical point, in a variant of the One Component Plasma model (OCP) that has a uniform but compressible compensating background. We have calculated the parameters of the critical and triple points, spinodals, and two-phase coexistence curves (binodals). We have analyzed the connection of this simplest plasma phase transition with anomalies in the spatial charge profiles of equilibrium non-uniform plasma in the local-density approximations of Thomas-Fermi or Poisson-Boltzmann-type.

  6. Phase Equilibria and Transition in Mixtures of a Homopolymer and a Block Copolymer. II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-26

    AD-A124 929 PHASE EQUILIBRIA AND TRANSITION IN MIXTURES OF A In- NOMOPOLYMER AND’A BLOCK..(U) CINCINNATI UNJY ON DEPT OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND...REPORT NO. 7 v2 L Phase Equilibria and Transition in Mixtures of a Homopolymer and a Block Copolymer II. The Phase Diagram by R. J. Roe and W. C. Zin...homopolymers as in our systems. The phase equilibria at temperatures above the "pseudo-triple point" BCD can be interpreted in terms of the free energy of

  7. Preliminary Phase Field Computational Model Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yulan [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hu, Shenyang Y. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xu, Ke [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Suter, Jonathan D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McCloy, John S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Johnson, Bradley R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-12-15

    This interim report presents progress towards the development of meso-scale models of magnetic behavior that incorporate microstructural information. Modeling magnetic signatures in irradiated materials with complex microstructures (such as structural steels) is a significant challenge. The complexity is addressed incrementally, using the monocrystalline Fe (i.e., ferrite) film as model systems to develop and validate initial models, followed by polycrystalline Fe films, and by more complicated and representative alloys. In addition, the modeling incrementally addresses inclusion of other major phases (e.g., martensite, austenite), minor magnetic phases (e.g., carbides, FeCr precipitates), and minor nonmagnetic phases (e.g., Cu precipitates, voids). The focus of the magnetic modeling is on phase-field models. The models are based on the numerical solution to the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. From the computational standpoint, phase-field modeling allows the simulation of large enough systems that relevant defect structures and their effects on functional properties like magnetism can be simulated. To date, two phase-field models have been generated in support of this work. First, a bulk iron model with periodic boundary conditions was generated as a proof-of-concept to investigate major loop effects of single versus polycrystalline bulk iron and effects of single non-magnetic defects. More recently, to support the experimental program herein using iron thin films, a new model was generated that uses finite boundary conditions representing surfaces and edges. This model has provided key insights into the domain structures observed in magnetic force microscopy (MFM) measurements. Simulation results for single crystal thin-film iron indicate the feasibility of the model for determining magnetic domain wall thickness and mobility in an externally applied field. Because the phase-field model dimensions are limited relative to the size of most specimens used in

  8. Mercury Phase II Study - Mercury Behavior in Salt Processing Flowsheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, V. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States); Shah, H. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States). Sludge and Salt Planning; Bannochie, C. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Wilmarth, W. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-07-25

    Mercury (Hg) in the Savannah River Site Liquid Waste System (LWS) originated from decades of canyon processing where it was used as a catalyst for dissolving the aluminum cladding of reactor fuel. Approximately 60 metric tons of mercury is currently present throughout the LWS. Mercury has long been a consideration in the LWS, from both hazard and processing perspectives. In February 2015, a Mercury Program Team was established at the request of the Department of Energy to develop a comprehensive action plan for long term management and removal of mercury. Evaluation was focused in two Phases. Phase I activities assessed the Liquid Waste inventory and chemical processing behavior using a system by system review methodology and determined the speciation of the different mercury forms (Hg+, Hg++, elemental Hg, organomercury, and soluble versus insoluble mercury) within the LWS. The evaluation of the mercury behavior in the salt processing flowsheet indicates: • In the assembled Salt Batches 7, 8 and 9 in Tank 21, the total mercury is mostly soluble with methylmercury (MHg) contributing over 50% of the total mercury. Based on the analyses of samples from 2H Evaporator feed and drop tanks (Tanks 38/43), the source of MHg in Salt Batches 7, 8 and 9 can be attributed to the 2H evaporator concentrate used in assembling the salt batches. The 2H Evaporator is used to evaporate DWPF recycle water. • Comparison of data between Tank 21/49, Salt Solution Feed Tank (SSFT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), and Tank 50 samples suggests that the total mercury as well as speciated forms in the assembled salt batches in Tanks 21/49 pass through the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) / Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) process to Tank 50 with no significant change in the mercury chemistry. • In Tank 50, Decontaminated Salt Solution (DSS) from ARP/MCU is the major contributor to the total mercury including MHg. More information can be found about what

  9. HYDRODYNAMICAL MODELS OF TYPE II-P SUPERNOVA LIGHT CURVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Bersten

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present progress in light curve models of type II-P supernovae (SNe II-P obtained using a newly devel- oped, one-dimensional hydrodynamic code. Using simple initial models (polytropes, we reproduced the global behavior of the observed light curves and we analyzed the sensitivity of the light curves to the variation of free parameters.

  10. OCCIDENTAL VERTICAL MODIFIED IN SITU PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY OF OIL FROM OIL SHALE. PHASE II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Reid M.

    1980-09-01

    The progress presented in this report covers the period June 1, 1980 through August 31, 1980 under the work scope for.Phase II of the DOE/Occidental Oil Shale, Inc. (OOSI) Cooperative Agreement. The major activities at OOSI 1s Logan Wash site during the quarter were: mining the voids at all levels for Retorts 7, 8 and 8x; completing Mini-Retort (MR) construction; continuing surface facility construction; tracer testing the MR 1 s; conducting Retorts 7 & 8 related Rock Fragmentation tests; setting up and debugging the Sandia B-61 trailer; and preparing the Phase II instrumentation plan.

  11. Serologic survey for Coxiella burnetii phase II antibodies among slaughterhouse workers in Kerman, southeast of Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Khalili; Morteza Mosavi; Hamzeh Ghobadian Diali; Hossein Norouzian Mirza

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the presence of antibodies against phase II among slaughterhouse workers in Kerman, southeast of Iran.Methods:sorbent assay using phase II Coxiella burnetii as the antigen [kit (Virion\\Serion, Wurzburg, Germany) according to the manufacturer’s protocol].Results:The antibody titers of the serum samples were measured by enzyme-linked immuno Conclusions: Our findings suggest that slaughterhouse workers in Kerman area have a higher risk of infection and should consider potential infection with Coxiella burnetii. The positive rate of IgG antibody was 68% in the slaughterhouse workers.

  12. RadSTraM: Radiological Source Tracking and Monitoring, Phase II Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Tracy A [ORNL; Walker, Randy M [ORNL; Hill, David E [ORNL; Gross, Ian G [ORNL; Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL; Abercrombie, Robert K [ORNL

    2008-12-01

    This report focuses on the technical information gained from the Radiological Source Tracking and Monitoring (RadSTraM) Phase II investigation and its implications. The intent of the RadSTraM project was to determine the feasibility of tracking radioactive materials in commerce, particularly International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Category 3 and 4 materials. Specifically, Phase II of the project addressed tracking radiological medical isotopes in commerce. These categories of materials are susceptible to loss or theft but the problem is not being addressed by other agencies.

  13. Phase Diagram of the Frustrated Hubbard Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitzler, R.; Tong, N.-H.; Pruschke, Th.; Bulla, R.

    2004-07-01

    The Mott-Hubbard metal-insulator transition in the paramagnetic phase of the one-band Hubbard model has long been used to describe similar features in real materials like V2O3. In this Letter we investigate the antiferromagnetic phase of this model with frustration. At T=0 we find a first-order transition from a paramagnetic metal to an antiferromagnetic insulator. We show that even in the presence of strong magnetic frustration, the paramagnetic metal-insulator transition is hidden inside an extended antiferromagnetic region. This raises the question of whether the one-band Hubbard model with frustration is sufficient to describe the phase diagram of V2O3 or similar transition metal oxides even qualitatively.

  14. ATLAS Calorimeters: Run-2 performance and Phase-II upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS detector was designed and built to study proton-proton collisions produced at the LHC at centre-of-mass energies up to 14 TeV and instantaneous luminosities up to 10^{34} cm^{−2} s^{−1}. A liquid argon (LAr)-lead sampling calorimeter is employed as electromagnetic calorimeter and hadronic calorimter, except in the barrel region, where a scintillator-steel sampling calorimeter (TileCal) is used as hadronic calorimter. This presentation will give first an overview of the detector operation and data quality, as well as the achieved performance of the ATLAS calorimetry system. Additionally, the upgrade projects of the ATLAS calorimeter system for the high luminosity phase of the LHC (HL-LHC) will be presented. For the HL-LHC, the instantaneous luminosity is expected to increase up to L ≃ 7.5 × 10^{34} cm^{−2} s^{−1} and the average pile-up up to 200 interactions per bunch crossing. The major R&D item is the upgrade of the electronics for both LAr and Tile calorimeters in order to cope wit...

  15. The Phase II Upgrade of the ATLAS Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    This presentation will show the status of the upgrade projects of the ATLAS calorimeter system for the high luminosity phase of the LHC (HL-LHC). For the HL-LHC, the instantaneous luminosity is expected to increase up to L ≃ 7.5 × 1034 cm−2 s−1 and the average pile-up up to 200 interactions per bunch crossing. The Liquid Argon (LAr) calorimeter electronics will need to be replaced to cope with these challenging conditions: the expected radiation doses will indeed exceed the qualification range of the current readout system, and the upgraded trigger system will require much longer data storage in the electronics (up to 60 us), that the current system cannot sustain. The status of the R&D of the low-power ASICs (pre-amplifier, shaper, ADC, serializer and transmitters) and of the readout electronics design will be discussed. Moreover, a High Granularity Timing Detector (HGTD) is proposed to be added in front of the LAr calorimeters in the end-cap region (2.4 <|eta|< 4.2) for pile-up mitigation a...

  16. ATLAS calorimeters: Run-2 performances and Phase-II upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS detector was designed and built to study proton-proton collisions produced at the LHC at centre-of-mass energies up to 14 TeV and instantaneous luminosities up to $10^{34} cm^{-2} s^{-1}$. A Liquid Argon-lead sampling (LAr) calorimeter is employed as electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters, except in the barrel region, where a scintillator-steel sampling calorimeter (TileCal) is used as hadronic calorimeter. This presentation gives first an overview of the detector operation and data quality, as well as of the achieved performances of the ATLAS calorimetry system. Additionally the upgrade projects of the ATLAS calorimeter system for the high luminosity phase of the LHC (HL-LHC) are presented. For the HL-LHC, the instantaneous luminosity is expected to increase up to $L \\simeq 7.5 × 10^{34} cm^{-2} s^{-1}$ and the average pile-up up to 200 interactions per bunch crossing. The major R&D item is the upgrade of the electronics for both LAr and Tile calorimeters in order to cope with longer latenc...

  17. MHD coal combustor technology. Final report, phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-09-01

    The design, performance, and testing of a 20-MW coal combustor for scaleup to 50 MW for use in an MHD generator are described. The design incorporates the following key features: (1) a two-stage combustor with an intermediate slag separator to remove slag at a low temperture, thus minimizing enthalpy losses required for heating and vaporizing the slag; (2) a first-stage pentad (four air streams impinging on one coal stream) injector design with demonstrated efficient mixing, promoting high carbon burnout; (3) a two-section first-stage combustion chamber; the first stage using a thin slag-protected refractory layer and the second section using a thick refractory layer, both to minimize heat losses; (4) a refractory lining in the slag separator to minimize heat losses; (5) a second-stage combustor, which provided both de-swirl of the combustion products exiting from the slag separator and simple mixing of the vitiated secondary air and seed; (6) a dense-phase coal feed system to minimize cold carrier gas entering the first-stage combustors; (7) a dry seed injection system using pulverized K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ with a 1% amorphous, fumed silicon dioxide additive to enhance flowability, resulting in rapid vaporization and ionization and ensuring maximum performance; and (8) a performance evaluation module (PEM) of rugged design based on an existing, successfully-fired unit. (WHK)

  18. The Phase-II ATLAS ITk Pixel Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00349918; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The entire tracking system of the ATLAS experiment will be replaced during the LHC Phase~2 shutdown (foreseen to take place around 2025) by an all-silicon detector called the ``ITk'' (Inner Tracker). The innermost portion of ITk will consist of a pixel detector with five layers in the barrel region and ring-shaped supports in the end-cap regions. It will be instrumented with new sensor and readout electronics technologies to improve the tracking performance and cope with the HL-LHC environment, which will be severe in terms of occupancy and radiation levels. The new pixel system could include up to 14 $\\mathrm{m^2}$ of silicon, depending on the final layout, which is expected to be decided in 2017. Several layout options are being investigated at the moment, including some with novel inclined support structures in the barrel end-cap overlap region and others with very long innermost barrel layers. Forward coverage could be as high as |eta| $<4$. Supporting structures will be based on low mass, highly stabl...

  19. Valve development for coal gasification plants: Phase I to Phase II transition. Quarterly technical program report, May--July 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellezza, D.

    1978-08-01

    This is the eighth in a series of Quarterly Technical Progress Reports relating to the Valve Development for Coal Gasification Plants Program. This document discusses engineering progress during the period of May to July 1978. The work described herein represents a continuation of the Phase I seat development effort for the Task III valve and the continuation of design engineering effort, necessary to prepare detail manufacturing drawings for use in the production of prototype valves during Phase II of this program. Work performed during this quarter consists of: valve design, thermal and stress analysis of valves, design detailing and specifications, quality assurance planning and various tests as outlined.

  20. An FPGA-based trigger for the phase II of the MEG experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldini, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Pisa (Italy); Bemporad, C.; Cei, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa (Italy); Galli, L.; Grassi, M.; Morsani, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Pisa (Italy); Nicolò, D., E-mail: donato.nicolo@pi.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa (Italy); Ritt, S. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen AG (Switzerland); Venturini, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Pisa (Italy); Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa (Italy)

    2016-07-11

    For the phase II of MEG, we are going to develop a combined trigger and DAQ system. Here we focus on the former side, which operates an on-line reconstruction of detector signals and event selection within 450 μs from event occurrence. Trigger concentrator boards (TCB) are under development to gather data from different crates, each connected to a set of detector channels, to accomplish higher-level algorithms to issue a trigger in the case of a candidate signal event. We describe the major features of the new system, in comparison with phase I, as well as its performances in terms of selection efficiency and background rejection. - Highlights: • A new, two-level trigger scheme for the phase-II of the MEG experiment is presented. • Improvements with respect to phase-I are underlined. • The role of detector upgrades and the use of a new generation of FPGA as well are emphasized.

  1. Measured Aperture-Array Noise Temperature of the Mark II Phased Array Feed for ASKAP

    CERN Document Server

    Chippendale, A P; Beresford, R J; Hampson, G A; Shaw, R D; Hayman, D B; Macleod, A; Forsyth, A R; Hay, S G; Leach, M; Cantrall, C; Brothers, M L; Hotan, A W

    2015-01-01

    We have measured the aperture-array noise temperature of the first Mk. II phased array feed that CSIRO has built for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder telescope. As an aperture array, the Mk. II phased array feed achieves a beam equivalent noise temperature less than 40 K from 0.78 GHz to 1.7 GHz and less than 50 K from 0.7 GHz to 1.8 GHz for a boresight beam directed at the zenith. We believe these are the lowest reported noise temperatures over these frequency ranges for ambient-temperature phased arrays. The measured noise temperature includes receiver electronics noise, ohmic losses in the array, and stray radiation from sidelobes illuminating the sky and ground away from the desired field of view. This phased array feed was designed for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder to demonstrate fast astronomical surveys with a wide field of view for the Square Kilometre Array.

  2. Radiative forcing of the direct aerosol effect from AeroCom Phase II simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhre, G.; Samset, B. H.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T. K.; Bian, H.; Bellouin, N.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R. C.; Feichter, J.; Ghan, S. J.; Hauglustaine, D.; Iversen, T.; Kinne, S.; Kirkevåg, A.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lin, G.; Liu, X.; Lund, M. T.; Luo, G.; Ma, X.; van Noije, T.; Penner, J. E.; Rasch, P. J.; Ruiz, A.; Seland, Ø.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Wang, P.; Wang, Z.; Xu, L.; Yu, H.; Yu, F.; Yoon, J.-H.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, H.; Zhou, C.

    2013-02-01

    We report on the AeroCom Phase II direct aerosol effect (DAE) experiment where 16 detailed global aerosol models have been used to simulate the changes in the aerosol distribution over the industrial era. All 16 models have estimated the radiative forcing (RF) of the anthropogenic DAE, and have taken into account anthropogenic sulphate, black carbon (BC) and organic aerosols (OA) from fossil fuel, biofuel, and biomass burning emissions. In addition several models have simulated the DAE of anthropogenic nitrate and anthropogenic influenced secondary organic aerosols (SOA). The model simulated all-sky RF of the DAE from total anthropogenic aerosols has a range from -0.58 to -0.02 Wm-2, with a mean of -0.27 Wm-2 for the 16 models. Several models did not include nitrate or SOA and modifying the estimate by accounting for this with information from the other AeroCom models reduces the range and slightly strengthens the mean. Modifying the model estimates for missing aerosol components and for the time period 1750 to 2010 results in a mean RF for the DAE of -0.35 Wm-2. Compared to AeroCom Phase I (Schulz et al., 2006) we find very similar spreads in both total DAE and aerosol component RF. However, the RF of the total DAE is stronger negative and RF from BC from fossil fuel and biofuel emissions are stronger positive in the present study than in the previous AeroCom study. We find a tendency for models having a strong (positive) BC RF to also have strong (negative) sulphate or OA RF. This relationship leads to smaller uncertainty in the total RF of the DAE compared to the RF of the sum of the individual aerosol components. The spread in results for the individual aerosol components is substantial, and can be divided into diversities in burden, mass extinction coefficient (MEC), and normalized RF with respect to AOD. We find that these three factors give similar contributions to the spread in results.

  3. Predicting Pattern Tooling and Casting Dimensions for Investment Casting, Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nick Cannell (EMTEC); Adrian S. Sabau (ORNL)

    2005-09-30

    The investment casting process allows the production of complex-shape parts and close dimensional tolerances. One of the most important phases in the investment casting process is the design of the pattern die. Pattern dies are used to create wax patterns by injecting wax into dies. The first part of the project involved preparation of reports on the state of the art at that time for all the areas under consideration (die-wax, wax-shell, and shell-alloy). The primary R&D focus during Phase I was on the wax material since the least was known about it. The main R&D accomplishments during this phase were determination of procedures for obtaining the thermal conductivity and viscoelastic properties of an unfilled wax and validating those procedures. Phase II focused on die-wax and shell-alloy systems. A wax material model was developed based on results obtained during the previous R&D phase, and a die-wax model was successfully incorporated into and used in commercial computer programs. Current computer simulation programs have complementary features. A viscoelastic module was available in ABAQUS but unavailable in ProCAST, while the mold-filling module was available in ProCAST but unavailable in ABAQUS. Thus, the numerical simulation results were only in good qualitative agreement with experimental results, the predicted shrinkage factors being approximately 2.5 times larger than those measured. Significant progress was made, and results showed that the testing and modeling of wax material had great potential for industrial applications. Additional R&D focus was placed on one shell-alloy system. The fused-silica shell mold and A356 aluminum alloy were considered. The experimental part of the program was conducted at ORNL and commercial foundries, where wax patterns were injected, molds were invested, and alloys were poured. It was very important to obtain accurate temperature data from actual castings, and significant effort was made to obtain temperature profiles in

  4. [Orthodontics in general practice 3. Angle Class II/1 malocclusion: one-phase treatment treatment preferred to two-phase treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, M.A.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    With regard to the optimal treatment timing for children with an Angle Class II division 1 malocclusion, there is an ongoing controversy on the effectiveness of a two-phase or a one-phase therapy. Two-phase treatment involves a first phase to correct the jaw relationship starting at the age of 7 to

  5. Pleiades Experiments on the NIF: Phase II-C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benstead, James [Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), Berkshire (United Kingdom); Morton, John [Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), Berkshire (United Kingdom); Guymer, Thomas [Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), Berkshire (United Kingdom); Garbett, Warren [Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), Berkshire (United Kingdom); Stevenson, Mark [Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), Berkshire (United Kingdom); Moore, Alastair [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kline, John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Schmidt, Derek [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Perry, Ted [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lanier, Nick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Workman, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-06-08

    Pleiades was a radiation transport campaign fielded at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) between 2011 and 2014. The primary goals of the campaign were to develop and characterise a reproducible ~350eV x-ray drive and to constrain a number of material data properties required to successfully model the propagation of radiation through two low-density foam materials. A further goal involved the development and qualification of diagnostics for future radiation transport experiments at NIF. Pleiades was a collaborative campaign involving teams from both AWE and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  6. Comparison with CLPX II airborne data using DMRT model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X.; Liang, D.; Andreadis, K.M.; Tsang, L.; Josberger, E.G.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we considered a physical-based model which use numerical solution of Maxwell Equations in three-dimensional simulations and apply into Dense Media Radiative Theory (DMRT). The model is validated in two specific dataset from the second Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX II) at Alaska and Colorado. The data were all obtain by the Ku-band (13.95GHz) observations using airborne imaging polarimetric scatterometer (POLSCAT). Snow is a densely packed media. To take into account the collective scattering and incoherent scattering, analytical Quasi-Crystalline Approximation (QCA) and Numerical Maxwell Equation Method of 3-D simulation (NMM3D) are used to calculate the extinction coefficient and phase matrix. DMRT equations were solved by iterative solution up to 2nd order for the case of small optical thickness and full multiple scattering solution by decomposing the diffuse intensities into Fourier series was used when optical thickness exceed unity. It was shown that the model predictions agree with the field experiment not only co-polarization but also cross-polarization. For Alaska region, the input snow structure data was obtain by the in situ ground observations, while for Colorado region, we combined the VIC model to get the snow profile. ??2009 IEEE.

  7. Pasta phases within the QMC model

    CERN Document Server

    Grams, Guilherme; Panda, Prafulla K; Providência, Constança; Menezes, Débora P

    2016-01-01

    In this work the low density regions of nuclear and neutron star matter are studied. The search for the existence of pasta phases in this region is performed within the context of the quark-meson coupling (QMC) model, which incorporates quark degrees of freedom. Fixed proton fractions are considered, as well as nuclear matter in beta equilibrium at zero temperature. We discuss the recent attempts to better understand the surface energy in the coexistence phases regime and we present results that show the existence of the pasta phases subject to some choices of the surface energy coefficient. We also analyze the influence of the nuclear pasta on some neutron star properties. The equation of state containing the pasta phase will be part of a complete grid for future use in supernova simulations.

  8. Liquid phase sintering, II: Computer study of skeletal settling and solid phase extrication in a microgravity environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Z.S.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A two-dimensional numerical method based on the Brownian motion model and on the Densification model for simulation of liquid phase sintering in microgravity environment will be developed. Both models will be based on domain topology (two-dimensional particle representation and control volume methodology and on three submodels for domain translation, solid skeleton formation and domain extrication. This method will be tested in order to conduct a study of diffusion phenomena and microgravitational effects on microstructural evolution influenced by skeletal settling combined with solid-phase extrication during liquid phase sintering of porous W-Ni system.

  9. Mass spectrometric evaluation of mephedrone in vivo human metabolism: identification of phase I and phase II metabolites, including a novel succinyl conjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozo, Óscar J; Ibáñez, María; Sancho, Juan V; Lahoz-Beneytez, Julio; Farré, Magí; Papaseit, Esther; de la Torre, Rafael; Hernández, Félix

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, many new designer drugs have emerged, including the group of cathinone derivatives. One frequently occurring drug is mephedrone; although mephedrone was originally considered as a "legal high" product, it is currently banned in most Western countries. Despite the banning, abuse of the drug and seizures are continuously reported. Although the metabolism of mephedrone has been studied in rats or in vitro using human liver microsomes, to the best of our knowledge, no dedicated study with human volunteers has been performed for studying the in vivo metabolism of mephedrone in humans. Therefore, the aim of this study was to establish the actual human metabolism of mephedrone and to compare it with other models. For this purpose, urine samples of two healthy volunteers, who ingested 200 mg mephedrone orally, were taken before administration and 4 hours after substance intake. The discovery and identification of the phase I and phase II metabolites of mephedrone were based on ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry, operating in the so-called MS(E) mode. Six phase I metabolites and four phase II metabolites were identified, four of them not previously reported in the literature. The structure of four of the detected metabolites was confirmed by synthesis of the suggested compounds. Remarkably, a mephedrone metabolite conjugated with succinic acid has been identified and confirmed by synthesis. According to the reviewed literature, this is the first time that this type of conjugate is reported for human metabolism.

  10. On Affine Fusion and the Phase Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Walton

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A brief review is given of the integrable realization of affine fusion discovered recently by Korff and Stroppel. They showed that the affine fusion of the su(n Wess-Zumino-Novikov-Witten (WZNW conformal field theories appears in a simple integrable system known as the phase model. The Yang-Baxter equation leads to the construction of commuting operators as Schur polynomials, with noncommuting hopping operators as arguments. The algebraic Bethe ansatz diagonalizes them, revealing a connection to the modular S matrix and fusion of the su(n WZNW model. The noncommutative Schur polynomials play roles similar to those of the primary field operators in the corresponding WZNW model. In particular, their 3-point functions are the su(n fusion multiplicities. We show here how the new phase model realization of affine fusion makes obvious the existence of threshold levels, and how it accommodates higher-genus fusion.

  11. Phase transitions and topology in 2+k XY mean-field models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelani, L; Ruocco, G

    2007-11-01

    The thermodynamics and topology of mean-field models with 2+k body interaction terms (generalizing XY model) are derived. Focusing on two particular cases (2+4 and 2+6 body interaction terms), a comparison between thermodynamic (phase transition energy, thermodynamically forbidden energy regions) and topological (singularity and curvature of saddle entropy) properties is performed. We find that (i) a topological change is present at the phase transition energy; however, (ii) only one topological change occurs, also for those models exhibiting two phase transitions; (iii) the order of a phase transition is not completely signaled by the curvature of topological quantities.

  12. Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Rutledge

    2011-02-01

    The Southwest Regional Partnership (SWP) on Carbon Sequestration designed and deployed a medium-scale field pilot test of geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in the Aneth oil field. Greater Aneth oil field, Utah's largest oil producer, was discovered in 1956 and has produced over 455 million barrels of oil (72 million m3). Located in the Paradox Basin of southeastern Utah, Greater Aneth is a stratigraphic trap producing from the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation. Because it represents an archetype oil field of the western U.S., Greater Aneth was selected as one of three geologic pilots to demonstrate combined enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and CO2 sequestration under the auspices of the SWP on Carbon Sequestration, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy. The pilot demonstration focuced on the western portion of the Aneth Unit as this area of the field was converted from waterflood production to CO2 EOR starting in late 2007. The Aneth Unit is in the northwestern part of the field and has produced 149 million barrels (24 million m3) of the estimated 450 million barrels (71.5 million m3) of the original oil in place - a 33% recovery rate. The large amount of remaining oil makes the Aneth Unit ideal to demonstrate both CO2 storage capacity and EOR by CO2 flooding. This report summarizes the geologic characterization research, the various field monitoring tests, and the development of a geologic model and numerical simulations conducted for the Aneth demonstration project. The Utah Geological Survey (UGS), with contributions from other Partners, evaluated how the surface and subsurface geology of the Aneth Unit demonstration site will affect sequestration operations and engineering strategies. The UGS-research for the project are summarized in Chapters 1 through 7, and includes (1) mapping the surface geology including stratigraphy, faulting, fractures, and deformation bands, (2) describing the local Jurassic and Cretaceous stratigraphy, (3) mapping the

  13. 40 CFR 73.10 - Initial allocations for phase I and phase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... State name Plant name Boiler Column A final phase 1 allocation Column B auction and sales reserve... Plant name Unit Allowances for 2000 through 2009column (A) Allowances for 2010 and thereaftercolumn (B...

  14. Phase II Final Report Computer Optimization of Electron Guns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Lawrence Ives; Thuc Bui; Hien Tran; Michael Read; Adam Attarian; William Tallis

    2011-04-15

    This program implemented advanced computer optimization into an adaptive mesh, finite element, 3D, charged particle code. The routines can optimize electron gun performance to achieve a specified current, beam size, and perveance. It can also minimize beam ripple and electric field gradients. The magnetics optimization capability allows design of coil geometries and magnetic material configurations to achieve a specified axial magnetic field profile. The optimization control program, built into the charged particle code Beam Optics Analyzer (BOA) utilizes a 3D solid modeling package to modify geometry using design tables. Parameters within the graphical user interface (currents, voltages, etc.) can be directly modified within BOA. The program implemented advanced post processing capability for the optimization routines as well as the user. A Graphical User Interface allows the user to set up goal functions, select variables, establish ranges of variation, and define performance criteria. The optimization capability allowed development of a doubly convergent multiple beam gun that could not be designed using previous techniques.

  15. Computerized Operator Support System – Phase II Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulrich, Thomas A.; Boring, Ronald L.; Lew, Roger T.; Thomas, Kenneth D.

    2015-02-01

    A computerized operator support system (COSS) prototype for nuclear control room process control is proposed and discussed. The COSS aids operators in addressing rapid plant upsets that would otherwise result in the shutdown of the power plant and interrupt electrical power generation, representing significant costs to the owning utility. In its current stage of development the prototype demonstrates four advanced functions operators can use to more efficiently monitor and control the plant. These advanced functions consist of: (1) a synthesized and intuitive high level overview display of system components and interrelations, (2) an enthalpy-based mathematical chemical and volume control system (CVCS) model to detect and diagnose component failures, (3) recommended strategies to mitigate component failure effects and return the plant back to pre-fault status, and (4) computer-based procedures to walk the operator through the recommended mitigation actions. The COSS was demonstrated to a group of operators and their feedback was collected. The operators responded positively to the COSS capabilities and features and indicated the system would be an effective operator aid. The operators also suggested several additional features and capabilities for the next iteration of development. Future versions of the COSS prototype will include additional plant systems, flexible computer-based procedure presentation formats, and support for simultaneous component fault diagnosis and dual fault synergistic mitigation action strategies to more efficiently arrest any plant upsets.

  16. Specific threonine-4 phosphorylation and function of RNA polymerase II CTD during M phase progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintermair, Corinna; Voß, Kirsten; Forné, Ignasi; Heidemann, Martin; Flatley, Andrew; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Imhof, Axel; Eick, Dirk

    2016-06-06

    Dynamic phosphorylation of Tyr1-Ser2-Pro3-Thr4-Ser5-Pro6-Ser7 heptad-repeats in the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the large subunit coordinates progression of RNA polymerase (Pol) II through the transcription cycle. Here, we describe an M phase-specific form of Pol II phosphorylated at Thr4, but not at Tyr1, Ser2, Ser5, and Ser7 residues. Thr4 phosphorylated Pol II binds to centrosomes and midbody and interacts with the Thr4-specific Polo-like kinase 1. Binding of Pol II to centrosomes does not require the CTD but may involve subunits of the non-canonical R2TP-Prefoldin-like complex, which bind to and co-localize with Pol II at centrosomes. CTD Thr4 mutants, but not Ser2 and Ser5 mutants, display severe mitosis and cytokinesis defects characterized by multipolar spindles and polyploid cells. We conclude that proper M phase progression of cells requires binding of Pol II to centrosomes to facilitate regulation of mitosis and cytokinesis in a CTD Thr4-P dependent manner.

  17. Pentostatin in T-cell malignancies - a phase II trial of the EORTC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, AD; Suciu, S; Stryckmans, P; De Cataldo, F; Willemze, R; Thaler, J; Peetermans, M; Dohner, H; Solbu, G; Dardenne, M; Zittoun, R

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Within this phase II EORTC trial, we have investigated the safety and efficacy of pentostatin in lymphoid malignancies. We have previously reported the results in T- and B-cell prolymphocytic leukemia, B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) and hairy cell leukemia. This report focuses

  18. Webcam Delivery of the Camperdown Program for Adolescents Who Stutter: A Phase II Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Brenda; O'Brian, Sue; Lowe, Robyn; Onslow, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This Phase II clinical trial examined stuttering adolescents' responsiveness to the Webcam-delivered Camperdown Program. Method: Sixteen adolescents were treated by Webcam with no clinic attendance. Primary outcome was percentage of syllables stuttered (%SS). Secondary outcomes were number of sessions, weeks and hours to maintenance,…

  19. Pentostatin in T-cell malignancies - a phase II trial of the EORTC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, AD; Suciu, S; Stryckmans, P; De Cataldo, F; Willemze, R; Thaler, J; Peetermans, M; Dohner, H; Solbu, G; Dardenne, M; Zittoun, R

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Within this phase II EORTC trial, we have investigated the safety and efficacy of pentostatin in lymphoid malignancies. We have previously reported the results in T- and B-cell prolymphocytic leukemia, B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) and hairy cell leukemia. This report focuses

  20. Phase II study of ACNU in non-small-cell lung cancer: EORTC study 08872

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.S.Th. Planting (André); A. Ardizzoni (A.); J. Estapé (J.); G. Giaccone (Giuseppe); G.V. Scagliotti (Giorgio); T.A.W. Splinter (Ted); A. Kirkpatrick (A.); O. Dalesio (O.); J.G. Mcvie (John Gordon)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractA total of 62 patients with metastatic or locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer were entered in a phase II study of ACNU. Initially, the drug was given i. v. at a dose of 100 mg/m2 every 6 weeks, but due to observed haematological side effects in chemotherapy-pretreated patients,

  1. Deconjugation Kinetics of Glucuronidated Phase II Flavonoid Metabolites by B-glucuronidase from Neutrophils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartholomé, R.; Haenen, G.; Hollman, P.C.H.; Bast, A.; Dagnelie, P.C.; Roos, D.; Keijer, J.; Kroon, P.A.; Needs, P.W.; Arts, I.C.W.

    2010-01-01

    Flavonoids are inactivated by phase II metabolism and occur in the body as glucuronides. Mammalian ß-glucuronidase released from neutrophils at inflammatory sites may be able to deconjugate and thus activate flavonoid glucuronides. We have studied deconjugation kinetics and pH optimum for four sourc

  2. A phase II trial of chimeric monoclonal antibody G250 for advanced renal cell carcinoma patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleumer, I.; Knuth, A.; Oosterwijk, E.; Hofmann, R.; Varga, Z.; Lamers, C.B.H.W.; Kruit, W.; Melchior, S.; Mala, C.; Ullrich, S.; Mulder, P.; Mulders, P.F.A.; Beck, J.L.M.

    2004-01-01

    Chimeric monoclonal antibody G250 (WX-G250) binds to a cell surface antigen found on >90% of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). A multicentre phase II study was performed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of WX-G250 in metastatic RCC (mRCC) patients. In all, 36 patients with mRCC were included. WX-G250 w

  3. Treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma with carboplatin, liposomized doxorubicin, and gemcitabine: a phase II study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillerdal, G.; Sundstrom, S.; Riska, H.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Malignant pleural mesothelioma has a poor prognosis and there is limited effect of treatment. The Nordic Mesothelioma groups decided in the year 2000 to investigate a combination of liposomized doxorubicin, carboplatin, and gemcitabine for this disease in a phase II study. METHODS: From...

  4. 76 FR 55947 - Industrial Relations Promotion Project, Phase II in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-09

    ... of the Secretary Industrial Relations Promotion Project, Phase II in Vietnam AGENCY: Bureau of... funded.. DAI, through its Industrial Relations Promotion Project (IRRP), is the only organization that... disputes and sound industrial relations by developing approaches in cooperation with trade unions/worker...

  5. Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 1998.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanton, S.L.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Neitzel, D.A.

    1999-12-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 19 Phase II screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year study for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. The sites were examined to determine if they were being effectively operated and maintained to provide fish a safe, efficient return to the Yakima River.

  6. Recombinant human interleukin 6 in metastatic renal cell cancer : A phase II trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stouthard, JML; Goey, H; deVries, EGE; deMulder, PH; Groenewegen, A; Stoter, G; Sauerwein, HP; Bakker, PJM; Veenhof, CHN

    A phase II trial investigating the anti-tumour effects of recombinant human interleukin 6 (rhlL-6) in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer was carried out. RhIL-6 (150 mu g) was administered as a daily subcutaneous injection for 42 consecutive days on an outpatient basis. Forty-nine patients

  7. Enzalutamide monotherapy: Phase II study results in patients with hormone-naive prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tombal, Bertrand; Borre, Michael; Rathenborg, Per Zier;

    2013-01-01

    al, N Engl J Med 2012;367:1187). Compared with bicalutamide in nonclinical studies, enzalutamide had higher androgen receptor– binding affinity, prevented nuclear translocation, showed no DNA binding, and induced apoptosis (Tran et al, Science 2009;324:787). In contrast to previous phase II and III...

  8. Mechanisms of toxic action of the flavonoid quercetin and its phase II metabolites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woude, van der H.

    2006-01-01

    During and after absorption in the intestine, quercetin is extensively metabolised by the phase II biotransformation system. Because the biological activity of flavonoids is dependent on the number and position of free hydroxyl groups, a first objective of this thesis was to investigate the conseque

  9. Phase II study of E7070 in patients with metastatic melanoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smyth, J.F.; Aamdal, S.; Awada, A.; Dittrich, C.; Caponigro, F.; Schoffski, P.; Gore, M.; Lesimple, T.; Djurasinovic, N.; Baron, B.; Ravic, M.; Fumoleau, P.; Punt, C.J.A.

    2005-01-01

    E7070 is a synthetic chloro-indolyl sulphonamide that is being developed as an anti cancer agent. In this phase II study, 28 patients with metastatic melanoma received 700 mg/m(2) of E7070 as a 60-min infusion repeated every 3 weeks. Although therapy was well tolerated, with one patient receiving 14

  10. Regulation of phase II enzymes by genistein and daidzein in male and female Swiss Webster mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froyen, Erik B; Reeves, Jaime L Rudolf; Mitchell, Alyson E; Steinberg, Francene M

    2009-12-01

    The consumption of soy and soy isoflavones has been associated with a decreased risk of certain cancers. A factor contributing to this dietary chemoprevention is the activity of phase I and II biotransformation enzymes. This study evaluated the hypothesis that dietary soy isoflavones will increase hepatic and extrahepatic quinone reductase (QR), UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT), and glutathione S-transferase (GST) phase II enzyme activities, under short-term feeding and basal (non-pharmacologic-induced) conditions. Male and female Swiss Webster mice were fed for 1, 3, 5, or 7 days of one of four treatments: control (casein AIN-93G) or control supplemented with flavone (positive control), genistein, or daidzein aglycones at 1,500 mg/kg of diet. QR activity was increased by daidzein in the liver, by both isoflavones in the kidney and small intestine, and by genistein in the heart. Genistein and daidzein slightly decreased UGT activities in some tissues. Liver GST activity was decreased by genistein in females. In contrast, genistein and daidzein increased kidney GST activity. In general, the greatest effects of isoflavones on phase II enzymes were observed in liver and kidney tissues, occurring at day 3, and peaking at day 5. Sex effects in the liver and kidney included females exhibiting higher QR activities and males exhibiting higher UGT and GST activities. In conclusion, individual soy isoflavones modulate phase II enzymes in mice under short-term feeding and basal conditions. This study provides insights into the actions of isolated isoflavones in mice.

  11. Recombinant human interleukin 6 in metastatic renal cell cancer : A phase II trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stouthard, JML; Goey, H; deVries, EGE; deMulder, PH; Groenewegen, A; Stoter, G; Sauerwein, HP; Bakker, PJM; Veenhof, CHN

    1996-01-01

    A phase II trial investigating the anti-tumour effects of recombinant human interleukin 6 (rhlL-6) in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer was carried out. RhIL-6 (150 mu g) was administered as a daily subcutaneous injection for 42 consecutive days on an outpatient basis. Forty-nine patients w

  12. Phase I and pharmacokinetic study of the topoisomerase II catalytic inhibitor fostriecin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, RS; Mulder, NH; Uges, DRA; Sleijfer, DT; Hoppener, FJP; Groen, HJM; Willemse, PHB; van der Graaf, WTA; de Vries, EGE

    We conducted a phase I and pharmacokinetic study of the topoisomerase II catalytic inhibitor fostriecin. Fostriecin was administered intravenously over 60 min on days 1-5 at 4-week intervals. Dose was escalated from 2 mg m(-2) day(-1) to 20 mg m(-2) day(-1) in 20 patients. Drug pharmacokinetics was

  13. Etoposide in malignant pleural mesothelioma : Two phase II trials of the EORTC Lung Cancer Cooperative Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sahmoud, T; Postmus, PE; van Pottelsberghe, C; Mattson, K; Tammilehto, L; Splinter, TAW; Planting, AST; Sutedja, T; van Pawel, J; van Zandwijk, N; Baas, P; Roozendaal, KJ; Schrijver, M; Kirkpatrick, A; Van Glabbeke, M; Ardizzoni, A; Giaccone, G

    1997-01-01

    Intravenous and oral etoposide (VP 16-213) were tested in two sequential phase II trials in chemotherapy-naive patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma. In the first trial, etoposide was given intravenously (i.v.) at a dose of 150 mg/m(2) on days 1, 3 and 5 every 3 weeks. The second trial invest

  14. The Phase-II ATLAS Pixel Tracker Upgrade: Layout and Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Abhishek; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    In early 2017 a new layout will be decided for the ATLAS experiment as it undergoes an upgrade of its tracking detector during the Phase-II LHC shutdown, to better take advantage of the increased luminosity of the HL-LHC. The various layouts are described and a description of the supporting structures are presented, along with results from testing of prototypes.

  15. NATO/CCMS PILOT STUDY CLEAN PRODUCTS AND PROCESSES (PHASE II) 2003 ANNUAL REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The 6th annual meeting of the NATO CCMS Pilot Study, Clean Products and Processes, was held in Cetraro, Italy, from May 11 to 15, 2003. This was also the first meeting of its Phase II study. 24 country representatives attended this meeting. This meeting was very ably run by th...

  16. TA 55 Reinvestment Project II Phase C Update Project Status May 23, 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giordano, Anthony P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-25

    The TA-55 Reinvestment Project (TRP) II Phase C is a critical infrastructure project focused on improving safety and reliability of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) TA-55 Complex. The Project recapitalizes and revitalizes aging and obsolete facility and safety systems providing a sustainable nuclear facility for National Security Missions.

  17. The Potential Economic Impact of Electricity Restructuring in the State of Oklahoma: Phase II Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadley, SW

    2001-10-30

    Because of the recent experiences of several states undergoing restructuring (e.g., higher prices, greater volatility, lower reliability), concerns have been raised in states currently considering restructuring as to whether their systems are equally vulnerable. Factors such as local generation costs, transmission constraints, market concentration, and market design can all play a role in the success or failure of the market. These factors along with the mix of generation capacity supplying the state will influence the relative prices paid by consumers. The purpose of this project is to provide a model and process to evaluate the potential price and economic impacts of restructuring the Oklahoma electric industry. The Phase I report concentrated on providing an analysis of the Oklahoma system in the near-term, using only present generation resources and customer demands. This Phase II study analyzed the Oklahoma power market in 2010, incorporating the potential of new generation resources and customer responses. Five key findings of this Phase II were made: (1) Projected expansion in generating capacity exceeds by over 3,000 MW the demands within the state plus the amount that could be exported with the current transmission system. (2) Even with reduced new plant construction, most new plants could lose money (although residential consumers would see lower rates) unless they have sufficient market power to raise their prices without losing significant market share (Figure S-1). (3) If new plants can raise prices to stay profitable, existing low-cost coal and hydro plants will have very high profits. Average prices to customers could be 5% to 25% higher than regulated rates (Figure S-1). If the coal and hydro plants are priced at cost-based rates (through long-term contracts or continued regulation) while all other plants use market-based rates then prices are lower. (4) Customer response to real-time prices can lower the peak capacity requirements by around 9

  18. Computational evaluation of unsaturated carbonitriles as neutral receptor model for beryllium(II) recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosli, Ahmad Nazmi; Ahmad, Mohd Rais; Alias, Yatimah; Zain, Sharifuddin Md; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran; Woi, Pei Meng

    2014-12-01

    Design of neutral receptor molecules (ionophores) for beryllium(II) using unsaturated carbonitrile models has been carried out via density functional theory, G3, and G4 calculations. The first part of this work focuses on gas phase binding energies between beryllium(II) and 2-cyano butadiene (2-CN BD), 3-cyano propene (3-CN P), and simpler models with two separate fragments; acrylonitrile and ethylene. Interactions between beryllium(II) and cyano nitrogen and terminal olefin in the models have been examined in terms of geometrical changes, distribution of charge over the entire π-system, and rehybridization of vinyl carbon orbitals. NMR shieldings and vibrational frequencies probed charge centers and strength of interactions. The six-membered cyclic complexes have planar structures with the rehybridized carbon slightly out of plane (16° in 2-CN BD). G3 results show that in 2-CN BD complex participation of vinyl carbon further stabilizes the cyclic adduct by 16.3 kcal mol(-1), whereas, in simpler models, interaction between beryllium(II) and acetonitrile is favorable by 46.4 kcal mol(-1) compared with that of ethylene. The terminal vinyl carbon in 2-CN BD rehybridizes to sp (3) with an increase of 7 % of s character to allow interaction with beryllium(II). G4 calculations show that the Be(II) and 2-CN BD complex is more strongly bound than those with Mg(II) and Ca(II) by 98.5 and 139.2 kcal mol(-1) (-1), respectively. QST2 method shows that the cyclic and acyclic forms of Be(II)-2-CN BD complexes are separated by 12.3 kcal mol(-1) barrier height. Overlap population analysis reveals that Ca(II) can be discriminated based on its tendency to form ionic interaction with the receptor models.

  19. Phase transitions in Thirring’s model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campa, Alessandro; Casetti, Lapo; Latella, Ivan; Pérez-Madrid, Agustín; Ruffo, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    In his pioneering work on negative specific heat, Walter Thirring introduced a model that is solvable in the microcanonical ensemble. Here, we give a complete description of the phase-diagram of this model in both the microcanonical and the canonical ensemble, highlighting the main features of ensemble inequivalence. In both ensembles, we find a line of first-order phase transitions which ends in a critical point. However, neither the line nor the point have the same location in the phase-diagram of the two ensembles. We also show that the microcanonical and canonical critical points can be analytically related to each other using a Landau expansion of entropy and free energy, respectively, in analogy with what has been done in (Cohen and Mukamel 2012 J. Stat. Mech. P12017). Examples of systems with certain symmetries restricting the Landau expansion have been considered in this reference, while no such restrictions are present in Thirring’s model. This leads to a phase diagram that can be seen as a prototype for what happens in systems of particles with kinematic degrees of freedom dominated by long-range interactions.

  20. Phase I and II feasibility study report for the 300-FF-5 operable unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    The purpose of this Phase I/II feasibility study is to assemble and screen a list of alternatives for remediation of the 300-FF-5 operable site on the Hanford Reservation. This screening is based on information gathered in the Phase I Remedial Investigation (RI) and on currently available information on remediation technologies. The alternatives remaining after screening provide a range of response actions for remediation. In addition, key data needs are identified for collection during a Phase II RI (if necessary). This Phase I/II FS represents a primary document as defined by the Tri-Party Agreement, but will be followed by a Phase III FS that will further develop the alternatives and provide a detailed evaluation of them. The following remedial action objectives were identified for the 300-FF-5 operable unit: Limit current human exposure to contaminated groundwater in the unit; Limit discharge of contaminated groundwater to the Columbia River; Reduce contaminant concentrations in groundwater below acceptable levels by the year 2018.

  1. Identification of hazards in non-nuclear power plants. Volume II. Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fell, R.W.

    1979-08-01

    This study extends the Phase I study to also include a hazards evaluation for two new emerging coal power plant technologies: coal fired atmospheric fluidized bed and pressurized fluidized bed power generating systems. The study also considers the sensitivity of the hazards ranking for all the non-nuclear power plants to the effects of population density, mode of plant operation, technical changes, location and environmental (temperature) effects. Information is provided under the following section headings: background; environmental and public health concerns associated with fluidized-bed combustion power plants; description of a conceptual atmospheric fluidized-bed power plant; pressurized fluidized-bed combustion combined cycle (PFBCC) power plant; hazard ranking and risk assessment for non-nuclear power plants; and, hazards sensitivity analysis.

  2. Phased Retrofits in Existing Homes in Florida Phase II. Shallow Plus Retrofits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, K. [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, Cocoa, FL (United States); Parker, D. [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, Cocoa, FL (United States); Martin, E. [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, Cocoa, FL (United States); Chasar, D. [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, Cocoa, FL (United States); Amos, B. [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, Cocoa, FL (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The BAPIRC team and Florida Power and Light (FPL) electric utility pursued a pilot phased energy-efficiency retrofit program in Florida by creating detailed data on the energy and economic performance of two levels of retrofit - simple and deep. For this Phased Deep Retrofit (PDR) project, a total of 56 homes spread across the utility partner's territory in east central Florida, southeast Florida, and southwest Florida were instrumented between August 2012 and January 2013, and received simple pass-through retrofit measures during the period of March 2013 - June 2013. Ten of these homes received a deeper package of retrofits during August 2013 - December 2013.

  3. Synthesis and processing of intelligent cost-effective structures phase II (SPICES II): smart materials aircraft applications evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, James P.; Jacobs, Steven W.; Baumann, Erwin W.

    1998-06-01

    The second phase of the synthesis and processing of intelligent cost effective structures (SPICES II) program sought to identify high payoff areas for both naval and aerospace military systems and to evaluate military systems and to evaluate the benefits of smart materials incorporation based on their ability to redefine the mission scenario of the candidate platforms in their respective theaters of operation. The SPICES II consortium, consisting of The Boeing Company, Electric Boat Corporation, United Technologies Research Center, and Pennsylvania State University, surveyed the state-of-the-art in smart structures and evaluated potential applications to military aircraft, marine and propulsion systems components and missions. Eleven baseline platforms comprising a wide variety of missions were chosen for evaluation. Each platform was examined in its field of operation for areas which can be improved using smart materials insertion. Over 250 smart materials applications were proposed to enhance the platforms. The applications were examined and, when possible, quantitatively analyzed for their effect on mission performance. The applications were then ranked for payoff, risk, and time frame for development and demonstration. Details of the efforts made in the SPICES II program pertaining to smart structure applications on military and transport aircraft will be presented. A brief discussion of the core technologies will be followed by presentation of the criteria used in ranking each application. Thereafter, a selection of the higher ranking proposed concepts are presented in detail.

  4. Visible and near-infrared calibrations for quality assessment of fresh phase I and II mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) compost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, H S S; Kilpatrick, M; Lyons, G; Sturgeon, S; Archer, J; Moore, S; Cheung, L; Finegan, K

    2005-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that visible and near-infrared spectra (Vis-NIR) of dry and milled compost can be used for generating partial least squares (PLS) calibrations of phase II compost parameters including ammonia, nitrogen dry matter (NDM), dry matter (DM), pH, conductivity, carbon, microbial population, and potential productivity. The objective of this study was to develop robust calibrations for some of the key parameters from the spectra of fresh phase I and II composts. Samples of substrates from six commercial production yards were obtained during winter and summer months of 2000-2004 to monitor changes in quality and were analyzed for the test factors. Vis-NIR reflectance measurements of fresh samples (740) were made over the range of 400-2500 nm. After mathematical pretreatments, PLS calibrations of the key parameters were developed using the NIR (1100-2500 nm) and visible and NIR (400-2500 nm) regions and subsequently validated using an independent sample set of 123 phase I and II samples obtained during 2004-2005. The phase I and II standard errors of laboratory measurements of ammonia, pH, conductivity, DM, NDM, and ash were lower than the standard error of predictions of the same parameters, respectively, by the best NIR or Vis-NIR models. The degree of precision for some of the calibrations, especially ammonia, NDM, and DM, is suitable for composters to monitor changes in quality parameters during production. The laboratory measurement errors for phase I samples were greater than those of the phase II samples, except for ash, due to a higher degree of heterogeneity in the substrate. The calibrations, especially for pH, conductivity, and ash, need to be improved with new sample sets. A major advantage of NIR spectroscopy is the ability to assess substrate quality for a range of target parameters simultaneously, within a few hours of receiving the samples. The main drawbacks are the expensive instrumentation, expertise, and training necessary for

  5. PARALLEL MEASUREMENT AND MODELING OF TRANSPORT IN THE DARHT II BEAMLINE ON ETA II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, F W; Raymond, B A; Falabella, S; Lee, B S; Richardson, R A; Weir, J T; Davis, H A; Schultze, M E

    2005-05-31

    To successfully tune the DARHT II transport beamline requires the close coupling of a model of the beam transport and the measurement of the beam observables as the beam conditions and magnet settings are varied. For the ETA II experiment using the DARHT II beamline components this was achieved using the SUICIDE (Simple User Interface Connecting to an Integrated Data Environment) data analysis environment and the FITS (Fully Integrated Transport Simulation) model. The SUICIDE environment has direct access to the experimental beam transport data at acquisition and the FITS predictions of the transport for immediate comparison. The FITS model is coupled into the control system where it can read magnet current settings for real time modeling. We find this integrated coupling is essential for model verification and the successful development of a tuning aid for the efficient convergence on a useable tune. We show the real time comparisons of simulation and experiment and explore the successes and limitations of this close coupled approach.

  6. Theory and modelling of nanocarbon phase stability.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, A. S.

    2006-01-01

    The transformation of nanodiamonds into carbon-onions (and vice versa) has been observed experimentally and has been modeled computationally at various levels of sophistication. Also, several analytical theories have been derived to describe the size, temperature and pressure dependence of this phase transition. However, in most cases a pure carbon-onion or nanodiamond is not the final product. More often than not an intermediary is formed, known as a bucky-diamond, with a diamond-like core encased in an onion-like shell. This has prompted a number of studies investigating the relative stability of nanodiamonds, bucky-diamonds, carbon-onions and fullerenes, in various size regimes. Presented here is a review outlining results of numerous theoretical studies examining the phase diagrams and phase stability of carbon nanoparticles, to clarify the complicated relationship between fullerenic and diamond structures at the nanoscale.

  7. CFD Modeling of Mixed-Phase Icing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lifen; Liu, Zhenxia; Zhang, Fei

    2016-12-01

    Ice crystal ingestion at high altitude has been reported to be a threat for safe operation of aero-engine in recently. Ice crystals do not accrete on external surface because of cold environment. But when they enter the core flow of aero-engine, ice crystals melt partially into droplets due to higher temperature. Air-droplets-ice crystal is the mixed-phase, which will give rise to ice accretion on static and rotating components in compressor. Subsequently, compressor surge and engine shutdowns may occur. To provide a numerical tool to analyze this in detail, a numerical method was developed in this study. The mixed phase flow was solved using Eulerian-Lagrangian method. The dispersed phase was represented by one-way coupling. A thermodynamic model that considers mass and energy balance with ice crystals and droplets was presented as well. The icing code was implemented by the user-defined function of Fluent. The method of ice accretion under mixed-phase conditions was validated by comparing the results simulated on a cylinder with experimental data derived from literature. The predicted ice shape and mass agree with these data, thereby confirming the validity of the numerical method developed in this research for mixed-phase conditions.

  8. High-performance phase-field modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Vignal, Philippe

    2015-04-27

    Many processes in engineering and sciences involve the evolution of interfaces. Among the mathematical frameworks developed to model these types of problems, the phase-field method has emerged as a possible solution. Phase-fields nonetheless lead to complex nonlinear, high-order partial differential equations, whose solution poses mathematical and computational challenges. Guaranteeing some of the physical properties of the equations has lead to the development of efficient algorithms and discretizations capable of recovering said properties by construction [2, 5]. This work builds-up on these ideas, and proposes novel discretization strategies that guarantee numerical energy dissipation for both conserved and non-conserved phase-field models. The temporal discretization is based on a novel method which relies on Taylor series and ensures strong energy stability. It is second-order accurate, and can also be rendered linear to speed-up the solution process [4]. The spatial discretization relies on Isogeometric Analysis, a finite element method that possesses the k-refinement technology and enables the generation of high-order, high-continuity basis functions. These basis functions are well suited to handle the high-order operators present in phase-field models. Two-dimensional and three dimensional results of the Allen-Cahn, Cahn-Hilliard, Swift-Hohenberg and phase-field crystal equation will be presented, which corroborate the theoretical findings, and illustrate the robustness of the method. Results related to more challenging examples, namely the Navier-Stokes Cahn-Hilliard and a diusion-reaction Cahn-Hilliard system, will also be presented. The implementation was done in PetIGA and PetIGA-MF, high-performance Isogeometric Analysis frameworks [1, 3], designed to handle non-linear, time-dependent problems.

  9. Software to compute and conduct sequential Bayesian phase I or II dose-ranging clinical trials with stopping rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohar, Sarah; Latouche, Aurelien; Taconnet, Mathieu; Chevret, Sylvie

    2003-10-01

    The aim of dose-ranging phase I (resp. phase II) clinical trials is to rapidly identify the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) (resp., minimal effective dose (MED)) of a new drug or combination. For the conduct and analysis of such trials, Bayesian approaches such as the Continual Reassessment Method (CRM) have been proposed, based on a sequential design and analysis up to a completed fixed sample size. To optimize sample sizes, Zohar and Chevret have proposed stopping rules (Stat. Med. 20 (2001) 2827), the computation of which is not provided by available softwares. We present in this paper a user-friendly software for the design and analysis of these Bayesian Phase I (resp. phase II) dose-ranging Clinical Trials (BPCT). It allows to carry out the CRM with stopping rules or not, from the planning of the trial, with choice of model parameterization based on its operating characteristics, up to the sequential conduct and analysis of the trial, with estimation at stopping of the MTD (resp. MED) of the new drug or combination.

  10. A Fire Safety Certification System for Board and Care Operators and Staff. SBIR Phase II: Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Bonnie L.

    This report describes Phase II of a project which developed a system for delivering fire safety training to board and care providers who serve adults with developmental disabilities. Phase II focused on developing and pilot testing a "train the trainers" workshop for instructors and field testing the provider's workshop. Evaluation of the 2-day…

  11. 78 FR 12006 - Wireline Competition Bureau Seeks Comment on Connect America Phase II Support for Price Cap Areas...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-21

    ... Price Cap Areas Outside of the Contiguous United States AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission... develop the record on issues relating to Connect America Phase II support for price cap carriers serving... issues relating to Connect America Phase II support for price cap carriers serving areas outside of the...

  12. 76 FR 3624 - Milford Wind Corridor Phase II, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Milford Wind Corridor Phase II, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market... supplemental notice in the above-referenced proceeding Milford Wind Corridor Phase II, LLC's application for...

  13. Characterization of topological phases in models of interacting fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motruk, Johannes

    2016-05-25

    The concept of topology in condensed matter physics has led to the discovery of rich and exotic physics in recent years. Especially when strong correlations are included, phenomenons such as fractionalization and anyonic particle statistics can arise. In this thesis, we study several systems hosting topological phases of interacting fermions. In the first part, we consider one-dimensional systems of parafermions, which are generalizations of Majorana fermions, in the presence of a Z{sub N} charge symmetry. We classify the symmetry-protected topological (SPT) phases that can occur in these systems using the projective representations of the symmetries and find a finite number of distinct phases depending on the prime factorization of N. The different phases exhibit characteristic degeneracies in their entanglement spectrum (ES). Apart from these SPT phases, we report the occurrence of parafermion condensate phases for certain values of N. When including an additional Z{sub N} symmetry, we find a non-Abelian group structure under the addition of phases. In the second part of the thesis, we focus on two-dimensional lattice models of spinless fermions. First, we demonstrate the detection of a fractional Chern insulator (FCI) phase in the Haldane honeycomb model on an infinite cylinder by means of the density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG). We report the calculation of several quantities characterizing the topological order of the state, i.e., (i) the Hall conductivity, (ii) the spectral flow and level counting in the ES, (iii) the topological entanglement entropy, and (iv) the charge and topological spin of the quasiparticles. Since we have access to sufficiently large system sizes without band projection with DMRG, we are in addition able to investigate the transition from a metal to the FCI at small interactions which we find to be of first order. In a further study, we consider a time-reversal symmetric model on the honeycomb lattice where a Chern insulator (CI

  14. Testing of a one dimensional model for Field II calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæk, David; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Willatzen, Morten

    2008-01-01

    to the calibrated Field II program for 1, 4, and 10 cycle excitations. Two parameter sets were applied for modeling, one real valued Pz27 parameter set, manufacturer supplied, and one complex valued parameter set found in literature, Alguer´o et al. [11]. The latter implicitly accounts for attenuation. Results show......Field II is a program for simulating ultrasound transducer fields. It is capable of calculating the emitted and pulse-echoed fields for both pulsed and continuous wave transducers. To make it fully calibrated a model of the transducer’s electro-mechanical impulse response must be included. We...... examine an adapted one dimensional transducer model originally proposed by Willatzen [9] to calibrate Field II. This model is modified to calculate the required impulse responses needed by Field II for a calibrated field pressure and external circuit current calculation. The testing has been performed...

  15. SEISMIC MODELING ENGINES PHASE 1 FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BRUCE P. MARION

    2006-02-09

    Seismic modeling is a core component of petroleum exploration and production today. Potential applications include modeling the influence of dip on anisotropic migration; source/receiver placement in deviated-well three-dimensional surveys for vertical seismic profiling (VSP); and the generation of realistic data sets for testing contractor-supplied migration algorithms or for interpreting AVO (amplitude variation with offset) responses. This project was designed to extend the use of a finite-difference modeling package, developed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories, to the advanced applications needed by industry. The approach included a realistic, easy-to-use 2-D modeling package for the desktop of the practicing geophysicist. The feasibility of providing a wide-ranging set of seismic modeling engines was fully demonstrated in Phase I. The technical focus was on adding variable gridding in both the horizontal and vertical directions, incorporating attenuation, improving absorbing boundary conditions and adding the optional coefficient finite difference methods.

  16. Measured Sensitivity of the First Mark II Phased Array Feed on an ASKAP Antenna

    CERN Document Server

    Chippendale, A P; Beresford, R J; Hampson, G A; Macleod, A; Shaw, R D; Brothers, M L; Cantrall, C; Forsyth, A R; Hay, S G; Leach, M

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the measured sensitivity of CSIRO's first Mk. II phased array feed (PAF) on an ASKAP antenna. The Mk. II achieves a minimum system-temperature-over-efficiency $T_\\mathrm{sys}/\\eta$ of 78 K at 1.23 GHz and is 95 K or better from 835 MHz to 1.8 GHz. This PAF was designed for the Australian SKA Pathfinder telescope to demonstrate fast astronomical surveys with a wide field of view for the Square Kilometre Array (SKA).

  17. Phase Fluctuations in the ABC Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodineau, T.; Derrida, B.

    2011-11-01

    We analyze the fluctuations of the steady state profiles in the modulated phase of the ABC model. For a system of L sites, the steady state profiles move on a microscopic time scale of order L 3. The variance of their displacement is computed in terms of the macroscopic steady state profiles by using fluctuating hydrodynamics and large deviations. Our analytical prediction for this variance is confirmed by the results of numerical simulations.

  18. Integrating Seasonal Oscillations into Basel II Behavioural Scoring Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Klepac

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The article introduces a new methodology of temporal influence measurement (seasonal oscillations, temporal patterns for behavioural scoring development purposes. The paper shows how significant temporal variables can be recognised and then integrated into the behavioural scoring models in order to improve model performance. Behavioural scoring models are integral parts of the Basel II standard on Internal Ratings-Based Approaches (IRB. The IRB approach much more precisely reflects individual risk bank profile.A solution of the problem of how to analyze and integrate macroeconomic and microeconomic factors represented in time series into behavioural scorecard models will be shown in the paper by using the REF II model.

  19. Functional design criteria for Project W-252, Phase II Liquid Effluent Treatment and Disposal: Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatch, C.E.

    1994-11-10

    This document provides the functional design criteria required for the Phase 2 Liquid Effluent Treatment and Disposal Project, Project W-252. Project W-252 shall provide new facilities and existing facility modifications required to implement Best Available Technology/All Known, Available, and Reasonable Methods of Prevention, Control, and Treatment (BAT/AKART) for the 200 East Phase II Liquid Effluent Streams. The project will also provide a 200 East Area Phase II Effluent Collection System (PTECS) for connection to a disposal system for relevant effluent streams to which BAT/AKART has been applied. Liquid wastestreams generated in the 200 East Area are currently discharged to the soil column. Included in these wastestreams are cooling water, steam condensate, raw water, and sanitary wastewaters. It is the policy of the DOE that the use of soil columns to treat and retain radionuclides and nonradioactive contaminants be discontinued at the earliest practical time in favor of wastewater treatment and waste minimization. In 1989, the DOE entered into an interagency agreement with Ecology and EPA. This agreement is referred to as the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement). Project W-252 is one of the projects required to achieve the milestones set forth in the Tri-Party Agreement. One of the milestones requires BAT/AKART implementation for Phase II streams by October 1997. This Functional Design Criteria (FDC) document provides the technical baseline required to initiate Project W-252 to meet the Tri-Party Agreement milestone for the application of BAT/AKART to the Phase II effluents.

  20. Asymmetric Gepner Models II. Heterotic Weight Lifting

    CERN Document Server

    Gato-Rivera, B

    2010-01-01

    A systematic study of "lifted" Gepner models is presented. Lifted Gepner models are obtained from standard Gepner models by replacing one of the N=2 building blocks and the $E_8$ factor by a modular isomorphic $N=0$ model on the bosonic side of the heterotic string. The main result is that after this change three family models occur abundantly, in sharp contrast to ordinary Gepner models. In particular, more than 250 new and unrelated moduli spaces of three family models are identified. We discuss the occurrence of fractionally charged particles in these spectra.

  1. Asymmetric Gepner models II. Heterotic weight lifting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gato-Rivera, B. [NIKHEF Theory Group, Kruislaan 409, 1098 SJ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 123, Madrid 28006 (Spain); Schellekens, A.N., E-mail: t58@nikhef.n [NIKHEF Theory Group, Kruislaan 409, 1098 SJ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 123, Madrid 28006 (Spain); IMAPP, Radboud Universiteit, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2011-05-21

    A systematic study of 'lifted' Gepner models is presented. Lifted Gepner models are obtained from standard Gepner models by replacing one of the N=2 building blocks and the E{sub 8} factor by a modular isomorphic N=0 model on the bosonic side of the heterotic string. The main result is that after this change three family models occur abundantly, in sharp contrast to ordinary Gepner models. In particular, more than 250 new and unrelated moduli spaces of three family models are identified. We discuss the occurrence of fractionally charged particles in these spectra.

  2. Rheumatic disease in a Philippine village. II: a WHO-ILAR-APLAR COPCORD study, phases II and III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigley, R; Manahan, L; Muirden, K D; Caragay, R; Pinfold, B; Couchman, K G; Valkenburg, H A

    1991-01-01

    Many difficulties were encountered in a population survey of rheumatic complaints in a remote village area in the Philippines affecting the reliability of estimates of population prevalence. In phase I, a simple questionnaire identified 269 adults out of 950 who had rheumatic symptoms. In Phase II, 234 or 87% of positive respondents were requestioned using a more detailed pro forma. There were 196 with peripheral joint pain, 67 with neck pain and 137 with back pain. One third attributed their symptoms to work and 127 subjects had to stop work because of their complaints. Disability, including an inability to carry loads, affected nearly 1.8% of the population. Questions designed to detect rheumatoid arthritis and gout were not satisfactorily answered. Of those with complaints, 82% indicated that they still required help for their symptoms. In phase III, 166 subjects were medically examined. Osteoarthritis of the knee was found in 25 and 17 had Heberden's nodes. There were 16 with epicondylitis; 16 had rotator cuff pain and 35 had levator scapulae insertion pain. Three of these and three others had neck or shoulder swellings related to carrying loads on poles. Definite rheumatoid arthritis was diagnosed in two subjects and gout in five. No case of ankylosing spondylitis was identified. Thus, rheumatic complaints were common in this rural community and were frequently severe enough to cause disability and loss of time from work. Health worker education is required on how to handle these problems.

  3. Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, Continuation: Phase II Results of a Floating Semisubmersible Wind System: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Musial, W.; Vorpahl, F.; Popko, W.

    2013-11-01

    Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation tools that account for the coupled dynamics of the wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity, and controls of the turbine, along with the incident waves, sea current, hydrodynamics, and foundation dynamics of the support structure. The Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration (OC3), which operated under the International Energy Agency (IEA) Wind Task 23, was established to verify the accuracy of these simulation tools [1]. This work was then extended under the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, Continuation (OC4) project under IEA Wind Task 30 [2]. Both of these projects sought to verify the accuracy of offshore wind turbine dynamics simulation tools (or codes) through code-to-code comparison of simulated responses of various offshore structures. This paper describes the latest findings from Phase II of the OC4 project, which involved the analysis of a 5-MW turbine supported by a floating semisubmersible. Twenty-two different organizations from 11 different countries submitted results using 24 different simulation tools. The variety of organizations contributing to the project brought together expertise from both the offshore structure and wind energy communities. Twenty-one different load cases were examined, encompassing varying levels of model complexity and a variety of metocean conditions. Differences in the results demonstrate the importance and accuracy of the various modeling approaches used. Significant findings include the importance of mooring dynamics to the mooring loads, the role nonlinear hydrodynamic terms play in calculating drift forces for the platform motions, and the difference between global (at the platform level) and local (at the member level) modeling of viscous drag. The results from this project will help guide development and improvement efforts for these tools to ensure that they are providing the accurate information needed to support the design and

  4. Phase effects in guided mode resonances II: measuring the angular phase of a surface plasmon polariton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theisen, M. J.; Brown, T. G.

    2015-02-01

    We show how the phase of a resonant interaction between a focused beam and a guided mode can be directly observed in a pupil imaging experiment, in which the irradiance leaving the pupil of a standard microscope is relayed to an image sensor through a combination Wollaston prism, calcite beam splitter and polarizer. We apply the method to the observation of a surface plasmon polariton resonance excited in a corrugated silver film fabricated using electron beam lithography. We discuss how this particular imaging configuration could be adapted for applications in plasmonic optical sensing.

  5. The Neutron Energy Spectrum Study from the Phase II Solid Methane Moderator at the LENS Neutron Source

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Yunchang; Snow, W. Mike; Lavelle, Christopher M.; Baxter, David V.; Tong, Xin; Yan, Haiyang; Leuschner, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Neutron energy spectrum measurements from a solid methane moderator were performed at the Low Energy Neutron Source (LENS) at Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) to verify our neutron scattering model of solid methane. The time-of-flight method was used to measure the energy spectrum of the moderator in the energy range of 0.1$meV\\sim$ 1$eV$. Neutrons were counted with a high efficiency $^{3}{He}$ detector. The solid methane moderator was operated in phase II temperature and the ener...

  6. Recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist in severe traumatic brain injury: a phase II randomized control trial

    OpenAIRE

    Helmy, Adel; Guilfoyle, Mathew R.; Carpenter, Keri LH; Pickard, John D.; Menon, David K.; Hutchinson, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the commonest cause of death and disability in those aged under 40 years. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL1ra) is an endogenous competitive antagonist at the interleukin-1 type-1 receptor (IL-1R). Antagonism at the IL-1R confers neuroprotection in several rodent models of neuronal injury (i.e., trauma, stroke and excitotoxicity). We describe a single center, phase II, open label, randomized-control study of recombinant human IL1ra (rhIL1ra, anakinra) in se...

  7. Phase transition in the ABC model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clincy, M.; Derrida, B.; Evans, M. R.

    2003-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that one-dimensional driven systems can exhibit phase separation even if the dynamics is governed by local rules. The ABC model, which comprises three particle species that diffuse asymmetrically around a ring, shows anomalous coarsening into a phase separated steady state. In the limiting case in which the dynamics is symmetric and the parameter q describing the asymmetry tends to one, no phase separation occurs and the steady state of the system is disordered. In the present work, we consider the weak asymmetry regime q=exp(-β/N), where N is the system size, and study how the disordered state is approached. In the case of equal densities, we find that the system exhibits a second-order phase transition at some nonzero βc. The value of βc=2π(3) and the optimal profiles can be obtained by writing the exact large deviation functional. For nonequal densities, we write down mean-field equations and analyze some of their predictions.

  8. Results of FY 2001 feasibility studies on commercialized fast reactor cycle system phase-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Hidetoshi; Maeda, Fumio; Sato, Kazujiro; Ieda, Yoshiaki; Funasaka, Hideyuki [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2002-09-01

    Feasibility Studies on Commercialized Fast Reactor (FR) Cycle System Phase-II were commenced on April 1, 2001, in order to select a few promising candidate concepts for commercialization from the candidate concepts of the FR system and fuel cycle system which were screened in Phase-I, and to present an outline plan for Phase-III onward. In FY 2001, which was the first year of Phase-II, the results of Phase-I and the plan for Phase-II were evaluated as appropriate by The R and D Project Evaluation Committee. With regard to the sodium-cooled medium-scale modular reactor and lead-bismuth cooled modular reactor, economical targets are expected to be achieved. In terms of the gas-cooled reactor, the helium gas-cooled reactor (coated particle fuel type and dispersion fuel type) was screened as a candidate concept. For the reprocessing system, a feasibility of the process for the crystallization method on the advanced aqueous method was confirmed. With regard to the oxide electrowinning method, the technological feasibility of MOX electrowinning co-precipitation was confirmed. In terms of the metal electrowinning method, the possibility of system rationalization was confirmed by Pu recovery testing at liquid Cd cathode. For the fuel fabrication system, in terms of the pelletizing method, the ease of remote-controlled fabrication of low-decontamination TRU fuels was confirmed, and in terms of the vibration compaction method, the packing density is expected to be satisfied as regards the design requirement. With regard to the casting method, the operation parameters of the injection casting technology, which were satisfied to slug specification requirements, were grasped by engineering-scale testing. (author)

  9. The first preparative solution phase synthesis of melanotan II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Melanotan II is a synthetic cyclic heptapeptide used to prevent a sunlight-induced skin cancer by stimulating the skin tanning process. In this paper we report the first solution phase synthesis of the title compound. The hexapeptide sequence has been assembled by [(2+2+1+1] scheme. After removing the orthogonal protection, a carbodiimide mediated lactamization, involving the ε-amino group of lysine and γ-carboxy group of aspartic acid, led to a cyclic intermediate. Appending N-acetylnorleucine concluded the assembly of melanotan II molecule. Protection of the lateral groups in arginine and tryptophan was omitted for atom and step economy reasons. The total synthesis of melanotan II was accomplished in 12 steps with 2.6% overall yield, affording >90% pure peptide without using preparative chromatography.

  10. ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF COAL-FIRED HIGH PERFORMANCE POWER SYSTEMS PHASE II AND III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-30

    This report presents work carried out under contract DE-AC22-95PC95144 "Engineering Development of Coal-Fired High Performance Systems Phase II and III." The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: à thermal efficiency (HHV) >47%; à NOx, SOx, and particulates <10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard); à coal providing >65% of heat input; à all solid wastes benign; à cost of electricity <90% of present plants. Phase I, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase I also included preliminary R&D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This phase, Phase II, involves the development and testing of plant subsystems, refinement and updating of the HIPPS commercial plant design, and the site selection and engineering design of a HIPPS prototype plant. Work reported herein is from: à Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; à Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

  11. Rigid Polyurethane Foam (RPF) Technology for Countermines (Sea) Program Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WOODFIN,RONALD L.; FAUCETT,DAVID L.; HANCE,BRADLEY G.; LATHAM,AMY E.; SCHMIDT,C.O.

    1999-10-01

    This Phase II report documents the results of one subtask initiated under the joint Department of Energy (DOE)/Department of Defense (DoD) Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for Countermine Warfare. The development of Rigid Polyurethane Foams for neutralization of mines and barriers in amphibious assault was the objective of the tasking. This phase of the program concentrated on formation of RPF in water, explosive mine simulations, and development of foam and fabric pontoons. Field experimentation was done primarily at the Energetic Materials Research and Testing Center (EMRTC) of the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM between February 1996 and September 1998.

  12. An FPGA-based trigger for the phase II of the MEG experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldini, A.; Bemporad, C.; Cei, F.; Galli, L.; Grassi, M.; Morsani, F.; Nicolò, D.; Ritt, S.; Venturini, M.

    2016-07-01

    For the phase II of MEG, we are going to develop a combined trigger and DAQ system. Here we focus on the former side, which operates an on-line reconstruction of detector signals and event selection within 450 μs from event occurrence. Trigger concentrator boards (TCB) are under development to gather data from different crates, each connected to a set of detector channels, to accomplish higher-level algorithms to issue a trigger in the case of a candidate signal event. We describe the major features of the new system, in comparison with phase I, as well as its performances in terms of selection efficiency and background rejection.

  13. Free-Piston Stirling Power Conversion Unit for Fission Power System, Phase II Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, J. Gary; Stanley, John

    2016-01-01

    In Phase II, the manufacture and testing of two 6-kW(sub e)Stirling engines was completed. The engines were delivered in an opposed 12-kW(sub e) arrangement with a common expansion space heater head. As described in the Phase I report, the engines were designed to be sealed both hermetically and with a bolted O-ring seal. The completed Phase II convertor is in the bolted configuration to allow future disassembly. By the end of Phase II, the convertor had passed all of the final testing requirements in preparation for delivery to the NASA Glenn Research Center. The electronic controller also was fabricated and tested during Phase II. The controller sets both piston amplitudes and maintains the phasing between them. It also sets the operating frequency of the machine. Details of the controller are described in the Phase I final report. Fabrication of the direct-current to direct-current (DC-DC) output stage, which would have stepped down the main controller output voltage from 700 to 120 V(sub DC), was omitted from this phase of the project for budgetary reasons. However, the main controller was successfully built, tested with the engines, and delivered. We experienced very few development issues with this high-power controller. The project extended significantly longer than originally planned because of yearly funding delays. The team also experienced several hardware difficulties along the development path. Most of these were related to the different thermal expansions of adjacent parts constructed of different materials. This issue was made worse by the large size of the machine. Thermal expansion problems also caused difficulties in the brazing of the opposed stainless steel sodium-potassium (NaK) heater head. Despite repeated attempts Sunpower was not able to successfully braze the opposed head under this project. Near the end of the project, Glenn fabricated an opposed Inconel NaK head, which was installed prior to delivery for testing at Glenn. Engine

  14. Photoinduced phase transition of the tetrafluoroborate salt of bis( N, N-diethylethylenediamine)copper(II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumov, Panče; Sakurai, Kenji

    2006-08-01

    The continuous temperature-induced change of the ligand field strain in a pseudo-Jahn-Teller thermochromic crystal bis( N, N-diethylethylenediamine)copper(II) tetrafluoroborate was studied. In situ powder photodiffraction was employed to demonstrate that at the low-temperature limit of the gradual lattice stability another structural phase transition can be triggered by photoinduction of the intramolecular ligand-to-metal charge transfer. The minute differences in the cationic structure imposed by the isomorphic ionic substitution result in increase of the temperature of the photoinduced phase transition of about 30 K relative to the perchlorate salt.

  15. Performance of the Tile PreProcessor Demonstrator for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Phase II Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Carrio Argos, Fernando; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter PreProcessor (TilePPr) demonstrator is a high performance double AMC board based on FPGA resources and QSFP modules. This board has been designed in the framework of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) Demonstrator Project for the Phase II Upgrade as the first stage of the back-end electronics. The TilePPr demonstrator has been conceived for receiving and processing the data coming from the front-end electronics of the TileCal Demonstrator module, as well as for configuring it. Moreover, the TilePPr demonstrator handles the communication with the Detector Control System to monitor and control the front-end electronics. The TilePPr demonstrator represents 1/8 of the final TilePPr that will be designed and installed into the detector for the ATLAS Phase II Upgrade.

  16. Oral high dose ascorbic acid treatment for one year in young CMT1A patients: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhamme, C.; de Haan, R.J.; Vermeulen, M.; Baas, F.; de Visser, M.; van Schaik, I.N.

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: High dose oral ascorbic acid substantially improved myelination and locomotor function in a Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A mouse model. A phase II study was warranted to investigate whether high dose ascorbic acid also has such a substantial effect on myelination in Charcot-Marie-

  17. Standard solar model. II - g-modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenther, D. B.; Demarque, P.; Pinsonneault, M. H.; Kim, Y.-C.

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents the g-mode oscillation for a set of modern solar models. Each solar model is based on a single modification or improvement to the physics of a reference solar model. Improvements were made to the nuclear reaction rates, the equation of state, the opacities, and the treatment of the atmosphere. The error in the predicted g-mode periods associated with the uncertainties in the model physics is predicted and the specific sensitivities of the g-mode periods and their period spacings to the different model structures are described. In addition, these models are compared to a sample of published observations. A remarkably good agreement is found between the 'best' solar model and the observations of Hill and Gu (1990).

  18. Global Air Mobility Advanced Technologies (GAMAT) Advanced Technology Development (ATD) Phase II Research and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-05-01

    chapter will begin with an overview of the focal topics we selected for design intervention generally, and then proceed to a discussion of how we...chapter will begin with an overview of the focal topics we selected for design intervention , then proceed to a discussion of the specific design concepts...GAMAT KA work and (b) judged relevant to our Phase II focus on flight planning. Some of these items are indicative of problems for which WCSS design

  19. Phase I-II study of isotopic immunoglobulin therapy for primary liver cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ettinger, D.S.; Order, S.E.; Wharam, M.D.; Parker, M.K.; Klein, J.L.; Leichner, P.K.

    1982-02-01

    A phase I-II study of isotopic immunoglobulin therapy was performed in 18 patients with primary liver cancer; 14 were evaluable for toxicity. The patients received a dose of 37-157 millicuries of 131I-labeled antibody. The dose-limiting factor appears to be hematologic toxicity, especially thrombocytopenia. An objective antitumor effect was seen in six of nine patients who were evaluable for response. Present results suggest that further clinical studies with isotopic immunoglobulin are indicated.

  20. Phase II NOx controls for the Marama and Nescaum regions. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    This technical report discusses Phase II NOx controls for utility boilers in the Mid-Atlantic Regional Air Management Association (MARAMA) and the Northeast States for Coordinated Air Use Management (NESCAUM) regions. The subject areas include: Utility boiler population profile in the MARAMA and NESCAUM regions; Discussion of RACT controls; Available NOx controls and their levels of performance; and Costs and cost effectiveness of NOx controls.

  1. Phase II study of bevacizumab and temsirolimus combination therapy for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Ulrik; Sorensen, Morten; Gaziel, Tine Bernhardtsen

    2013-01-01

    Bevacizumab combined with chemotherapy has recently shown promising efficacy in recurrent high-grade glioma. Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) mutation in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients causes abnormally high activity of the pathways of Phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases (PI3K), Protein...... been investigated, but with the hypothesis that temsirolimus might provide complimentary therapeutic benefit in combination with bevacizumab, we included patients with progressive GBM after bevacizumab in an open phase II study....

  2. Aqueous Solution Vessel Thermal Model Development II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechler, Cynthia Eileen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-28

    The work presented in this report is a continuation of the work described in the May 2015 report, “Aqueous Solution Vessel Thermal Model Development”. This computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model aims to predict the temperature and bubble volume fraction in an aqueous solution of uranium. These values affect the reactivity of the fissile solution, so it is important to be able to calculate them and determine their effects on the reaction. Part A of this report describes some of the parameter comparisons performed on the CFD model using Fluent. Part B describes the coupling of the Fluent model with a Monte-Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) neutron transport model. The fuel tank geometry is the same as it was in the May 2015 report, annular with a thickness-to-height ratio of 0.16. An accelerator-driven neutron source provides the excitation for the reaction, and internal and external water cooling channels remove the heat. The model used in this work incorporates the Eulerian multiphase model with lift, wall lubrication, turbulent dispersion and turbulence interaction. The buoyancy-driven flow is modeled using the Boussinesq approximation, and the flow turbulence is determined using the k-ω Shear-Stress-Transport (SST) model. The dispersed turbulence multiphase model is employed to capture the multiphase turbulence effects.

  3. Flexible roof drill for low coal. Volume 1. Phase I and Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoup, N.H.; Kendall, L.A.

    1977-08-30

    The Phase I report documents the effort expended by the Washington State University (WSU) research team towards meeting the terms of the contract and provides a working document for the research team during the later phases of this research project. The flexible shaft drill concepts for thin seam coal were based upon operational specifications prepared by the WSU research team after consultation with the Coal Mine Productivity Task Force of the US Steel Corporation. Investigations disclosed that a flexible shaft drill should be designed to withstand a torque load of 3000 in.-lb, a thrust load of 6000 lb, a mean feed rate of 3 ft/min (feed rate range should be 1 to 6 ft/min), withdrawal rate of 40 ft/min, and have the ability to drill an 8-ft deep hole within +- 10/sup 0/ of the vertical centerline. In order to maintain this alignment, a straight starter section would be used at the drill bit end of the drill. The length of this starter section varies with hole tolerance; based on drill hole measurements in soft, semi-consolidated shale a minimum starter section length of about 9 in. was chosen. After considering a number of alternative types of flexible shafts, it was concluded that the flexible shaft should be made up of short rigid segments interlocked at their interfaces with intermeshed teeth. Three interlocking clutch teeth at the interface were selected because to increasing the number of clutch teeth would increase the stress in each tooth to a prohibitively high level. Segments should have some restraining devices at the connecting interfaces preventing the segments from separating. This interfacial restraint should allow the segments to transmit tension loads across the interface. This is desirable so that the drill string can be withdrawn from the hole by applying tensile force to the segments.

  4. Phase Diagram for Ashkin-Teller Model on Bethe Lattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LE Jian-Xin; YANG Zhan-Ru

    2005-01-01

    Using the recursion method, we study the phase transitions of the Ashkin-Teller model on the Bethe lattice,restricting ourselves to the case of ferromagnetic interactions. The isotropic Ashkin-Teller model and the anisotropic one are respectively investigated, and exact expressions for the free energy and the magnetization are obtained. It can be found that each of the three varieties of phase diagrams, for the anisotropic Ashkin-Teller model, consists of four phases, I.e., the fully disordered paramagnetic phase Para, the fully ordered ferromagnetic phase Ferro, and two partially ordered ferromagnetic phases and , while the phase diagram, for the isotropic Ashkin-Teller model,contains three phases, I.e., the fully disordered paramagnetic phase Para, the fully ordered ferromagnetic phase Baxter Phase, and the partially ordered ferromagnetic phase .

  5. Flexible designs for phase II comparative clinical trials involving two response variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersimis, S; Sachlas, A; Papaioannou, T

    2015-01-30

    The aim of phase II clinical trials is to determine whether an experimental treatment is sufficiently promising and safe to justify further testing. The need for reduced sample size arises naturally in phase II clinical trials owing to both technical and ethical reasons, motivating a significant part of research in the field during recent years, while another significant part of the research effort is aimed at more complex therapeutic schemes that demand the consideration of multiple endpoints to make decisions. In this paper, our attention is restricted to phase II clinical trials in which two treatments are compared with respect to two dependent dichotomous responses proposing some flexible designs. These designs permit the researcher to terminate the clinical trial when high rates of favorable or unfavorable outcomes are observed early enough requiring in this way a small number of patients. From the mathematical point of view, the proposed designs are defined on bivariate sequences of multi-state trials, and the corresponding stopping rules are based on various distributions related to the waiting time until a certain number of events appear in these sequences. The exact distributions of interest, under a unified framework, are studied using the Markov chain embedding technique, which appears to be very useful in clinical trials for the sample size determination. Tables of expected sample size and power are presented. The numerical illustration showed a very good performance for these new designs.

  6. Evaluation of Beam Losses and Energy Depositions for a Possible Phase II Design for LHC Collimation

    CERN Document Server

    Lari, L; Bracco, C; Brugger, M; Cerutti, F; Doyle, E; Ferrari, A; Keller, L; Lundgren, S; Keller, L; Mauri, M; Redaelli, S; Sarchiapone, L; Smith, J; Vlachoudis, V; Weiler, T

    2008-01-01

    The LHC beams are designed to have high stability and to be stored for many hours. The nominal beam intensity lifetime is expected to be of the order of 20h. The Phase II collimation system has to be able to handle particle losses in stable physics conditions at 7 TeV in order to avoid beam aborts and to allow correction of parameters and restoration to nominal conditions. Monte Carlo simulations are needed in order to evaluate the behavior of metallic high-Z collimators during operation scenarios using a realistic distribution of losses, which is a mix of the three limiting halo cases. Moreover, the consequences in the IR7 insertion of the worst (case) abnormal beam loss are evaluated. The case refers to a spontaneous trigger of the horizontal extraction kicker at top energy, when Phase II collimators are used. These studies are an important input for engineering design of the collimation Phase II system and for the evaluation of their effect on adjacent components. The goal is to build collimators that can ...

  7. Phase diagram of a Schelling segregation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauvin, L.; Vannimenus, J.; Nadal, J.-P.

    2009-07-01

    The collective behavior in a variant of Schelling’s segregation model is characterized with methods borrowed from statistical physics, in a context where their relevance was not conspicuous. A measure of segregation based on cluster geometry is defined and several quantities analogous to those used to describe physical lattice models at equilibrium are introduced. This physical approach allows to distinguish quantitatively several regimes and to characterize the transitions between them, leading to the building of a phase diagram. Some of the transitions evoke empirical sudden ethnic turnovers. We also establish links with ‘spin-1’ models in physics. Our approach provides generic tools to analyze the dynamics of other socio-economic systems.

  8. NEUTRON SCATTERING AND LATTICE DYNAMICAL STUDIES OF THE HIGH-PRESSURE PHASE ICE (II)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董顺乐; 王燕

    2001-01-01

    Lattice dynamical calculations have been carried out for ice II based on the force field constructed for ice Ih. In order to fully understand ice II inelastic neutron scattering spectra, the decomposed phonon density of states was shown mode by mode. Calculated results have shown that the hydrogen bond force constant between the six-molecule rings is significantly weaker, 75eV/nm2, compared with the force constant, 220eV/nm2, within the rings. Inelastic neutron scattering spectra of clathrate hydrate H2O+He are almost the same as ice II. This means that the absorption of He atoms cannot affect the bond strengths of the ice II host lattice. Based on the force field model for ice II, the van der Waals interactions between water molecules and helium atoms are considered. The results obtained are consistent with experimental data. Lattice dynamical calculations have been carried out for ice II using seven rigid pairwise potentials.It was found that MCY makes the stretching and bending interactions in ice II too weak and makes the O-O bond length too long (~5%), thus its lattice densities are obviously lower than other potential lattices or experimental values.

  9. A MODEL FOR PREDICTING PHASE INVERSION IN OIL-WATER TWO-PHASE PIPE FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Jing; LI Qing-ping; YAO Hai-yuan; YU Da

    2006-01-01

    Experiments of phase inversion characteristics for horizontal oil-water two-phase flow in a stainless steel pipe loop (25.7 mm inner diameter,52 m long) are conducted. A new viewpoint is brought forward about the process of phase inversion in oil-water two-phase pipe flow. Using the relations between the total free energies of the pre-inversion and post-inversion dispersions, a model for predicting phase inversion in oil-water two-phase pipe flow has been developed that considers the characteristics of pipe flow. This model is compared against other models with relevant data of phase inversion in oil-water two-phase pipe flow. Results indicate that this model is better than other models in terms of calculation precision and applicability. The model is useful for guiding the design for optimal performance and safety in the operation of oil-water two-phase pipe flow in oil fields.

  10. Loetschberg low-level tunnel: thermal use of tunnel water at the south portal - Feasibility study, phase II; Waermenutzung Tunnelwasser Basistunnel Loetschberg, Suedportal. Machbarkeitsstudie Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dups, Ch.

    2004-07-01

    This report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) discusses the results obtained from phase II of a feasibility study on the thermal use of drainage water from the Loetschberg basis railway tunnel under the Swiss Alps. The potential for the use of the drainage water is discussed and the possible use of the heat in the industrial estates in Raron and Niedergesteln is looked at. The report recommends the further investigation of the use of the water as a source of heat for heat-pumps and its treatment for further use as drinking water. Other possible uses examined include the heating of greenhouses, in fish farms, as a water supply for a gravel and concrete works and for keeping local roads and motorways frost-free.

  11. National Geoscience Data Repository System, Phase II. Final report, January 30, 1995--January 28, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    The American Geological Institute (AGI) has completed Phase II of a project to establish a National Geoscience Data Repository System (NGDRS). The project`s primary objectives are to preserve geoscience data in jeopardy of being destroyed and to make that data available to those who have a need to use it in future investigations. These data are available for donation to the public as a result of the downsizing that has occurred in the major petroleum and mining companies in the United States for the past decade. In recent years, these companies have consolidated domestic operations, sold many of their domestic properties and relinquished many of their leases. The scientific data associated with those properties are no longer considered to be useful assets and are consequently in danger of being lost forever. The national repository project will make many of these data available to the geoscience community for the first time. To address this opportunity, AGI sought support from the Department of Energy (DOE) in 1994 to initiate the NGDRS Phase I feasibility study to determine the types and quantity of data that companies would be willing to donate. The petroleum and mining companies surveyed indicated that they were willing to donate approximately five million well logs, one hundred million miles of seismic reflection data, millions of linear feet of core and cuttings, and a variety of other types of scientific data. Based on the positive results of the Phase I study, AGI undertook Phase II of the program in 1995. Funded jointly by DOE and industry, Phase II encompasses the establishment of standards for indexing and cataloging of geoscience data and determination of the costs of transferring data from the private sector to public-sector data repositories. Pilot projects evaluated the feasibility of the project for transfer of different data types and creation of a Web-based metadata supercatalog and browser.

  12. Phase-field modeling of hydraulic fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Zachary A.; Landis, Chad M.

    2016-11-01

    In this work a theoretical framework implementing the phase-field approach to fracture is used to couple the physics of flow through porous media and cracks with the mechanics of fracture. The main modeling challenge addressed in this work, which is a challenge for all diffuse crack representations, is on how to allow for the flow of fluid and the action of fluid pressure on the aggregate within the diffuse damage zone of the cracks. The theory is constructed by presenting the general physical balance laws and conducting a consistent thermodynamic analysis to constrain the constitutive relationships. Constitutive equations that reproduce the desired responses at the various limits of the phase-field parameter are proposed in order to capture Darcy-type flow in the intact porous medium and Stokes-type flow within open cracks. A finite element formulation for the solution of the governing model equations is presented and discussed. Finally, the theoretical and numerical model is shown to compare favorably to several important analytical solutions. More complex and interesting calculations are also presented to illustrate some of the advantageous features of the approach.

  13. Modeling the distinct phases of skill acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenison, Caitlin; Anderson, John R

    2016-05-01

    A focus of early mathematics education is to build fluency through practice. Several models of skill acquisition have sought to explain the increase in fluency because of practice by modeling both the learning mechanisms driving this speedup and the changes in cognitive processes involved in executing the skill (such as transitioning from calculation to retrieval). In the current study, we use hidden Markov modeling to identify transitions in the learning process. This method accounts for the gradual speedup in problem solving and also uncovers abrupt changes in reaction time, which reflect changes in the cognitive processes that participants are using to solve math problems. We find that as participants practice solving math problems they transition through 3 distinct learning states. Each learning state shows some speedup with practice, but the major speedups are produced by transitions between learning states. In examining and comparing the behavioral and neurological profiles of each of these states, we find parallels with the 3 phases of skill acquisition proposed by Fitts and Posner (1967): a cognitive, an associative, and an autonomous phase. (PsycINFO Database Record

  14. Molecular Modeling of Solid Fluid Phase Behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter A. Monson

    2007-12-20

    This report gives a summary of the achievements under DOE contract No. DOE/ER/14150 during the period September 1, 1990 to December 31, 2007. This project was concerned with the molecular modeling of solid-fluid equilibrium. The focus was on understanding how solid-fluid and solid-solid phase behavior are related to molecular structure, and the research program made a seminal contribution in this area. The project led to 34 journal articles, including a comprehensive review article published in Advances in Chemical Physics. The DOE funding supported the work of 5 Ph.D. students, 2 M.S. students and 5 postdoctoral researchers.

  15. Preon model and cosmological quantum-hyperchromodynamic phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, H.; Hayashi, Y.

    1987-05-01

    From the cosmological viewpoint, we investigate whether or not recent preon models are compatible with the picture of the first-order phase transition from the preon phase to the composite quark-lepton phase. It is shown that the current models accepting the 't Hooft anomaly-matching condition together with quantum hyperchromodynamics are consistent with the cosmological first-order phase transition.

  16. Nyala and Bushbuck II: A Harvesting Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Temple H.; Greeff, Johanna C.

    1999-01-01

    Adds a cropping or harvesting term to the animal overpopulation model developed in Part I of this article. Investigates various harvesting strategies that might suggest a solution to the overpopulation problem without actually culling any animals. (ASK)

  17. Nyala and Bushbuck II: A Harvesting Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Temple H.; Greeff, Johanna C.

    1999-01-01

    Adds a cropping or harvesting term to the animal overpopulation model developed in Part I of this article. Investigates various harvesting strategies that might suggest a solution to the overpopulation problem without actually culling any animals. (ASK)

  18. Phase II Trial of Angiotensin-(1-7 for the Treatment of Patients with Metastatic Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul D. Savage

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Angiotensin-(1-7 [Ang-(1-7] is an endogenous antiangiogenic hormone with anticancer activity. In a phase I study of Ang-(1-7, two of three patients with metastatic sarcoma experienced disease stabilization. This phase II study examined clinical and biomarker outcomes for patients with metastatic sarcoma. Methods. Ang-(1-7 was administered by subcutaneous injection at a dose of 20 mg daily. If excessive toxicities occurred in the first cohort, a dose deescalation cohort was allowed. Blood samples were obtained to measure changes in biomarkers. Results. Treatment was well-tolerated and the dose deescalation cohort was not required. Plasma PlGF concentrations following treatment were not statistically significantly changed. A significant increase in plasma Ang-(1-7 was observed at 4 hours after injection. The median progression-free survival was 2.7 months (95% CI; 1.4 to 4.1 months, and the median overall survival was 10.2 months (95% CI; 5.3 to 18.3 months. Two patients with vascular sarcomas demonstrated prolonged disease stabilization of 10 months (hemangiopericytoma and 19 months (epithelioid hemangioendothelioma. Conclusions. Ang-(1-7 at a dose of 20 mg daily was well-tolerated. This prospective phase II study failed to confirm the PlGF biomarker effect identified in the prior phase I study. Prolonged disease stabilization in hemangiopericytoma and epithelioid hemangioendothelioma may warrant further investigation.

  19. Frequency modulation reveals the phasing of orbital eccentricity during Cretaceous Oceanic Anoxic Event II and the Eocene hyperthermals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurin, Jiří; Meyers, Stephen R.; Galeotti, Simone; Lanci, Luca

    2016-05-01

    Major advances in our understanding of paleoclimate change derive from a precise reconstruction of the periods, amplitudes and phases of the 'Milankovitch cycles' of precession, obliquity and eccentricity. While numerous quantitative approaches exist for the identification of these astronomical cycles in stratigraphic data, limitations in radioisotopic dating, and instability of the theoretical astronomical solutions beyond ∼50 Myr ago, can challenge identification of the phase relationships needed to constrain climate response and anchor floating astrochronologies. Here we demonstrate that interference patterns accompanying frequency modulation (FM) of short eccentricity provide a robust basis for identifying the phase of long eccentricity forcing in stratigraphic data. One- and two-dimensional models of sedimentary distortion of the astronomical signal are used to evaluate the veracity of the FM method, and indicate that pristine eccentricity FM can be readily distinguished in paleo-records. Apart from paleoclimatic implications, the FM approach provides a quantitative technique for testing and calibrating theoretical astronomical solutions, and for refining chronologies for the deep past. We present two case studies that use the FM approach to evaluate major carbon-cycle perturbations of the Eocene and Late Cretaceous. Interference patterns in the short-eccentricity band reveal that Eocene hyperthermals ETM2 ('Elmo'), H2, I1 and ETM3 (X; ∼52-54 Myr ago) were associated with maxima in the 405-kyr cycle of orbital eccentricity. The same eccentricity configuration favored regional anoxic episodes in the Mediterranean during the Middle and Late Cenomanian (∼94.5-97 Myr ago). The initial phase of the global Oceanic Anoxic Event II (OAE II; ∼93.9-94.5 Myr ago) coincides with maximum and falling 405-kyr eccentricity, and the recovery phase occurs during minimum and rising 405-kyr eccentricity. On a Myr scale, the event overlaps with a node in eccentricity

  20. Multilayer piezoelectric transducer models combined with Field II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæk, David; Willatzen, Morten; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2012-01-01

    with a polymer ring, and submerged into water. The transducer models are developed to account for any external electrical loading impedance in the driving circuit. The models are adapted to calculate the surface acceleration needed by the Field II software in predicting pressure pulses at any location in front...

  1. Hepatic phase I and phase II biotransformations in quail and trout: comparison to other species commonly used in toxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregus, Z; Watkins, J B; Thompson, T N; Harvey, M J; Rozman, K; Klaassen, C D

    1983-03-15

    The ability of quail and trout to perform a number of representative phase I and phase II biotransformations was examined. To facilitate interspecies comparisons, metabolism of the same substrates was examined simultaneously under uniform conditions for rat, mouse, rabbit, guinea pig, cat, and dog. Both nonmammalian species can metabolize four representative substrates of phase I mixed-function oxidases and one substrate of epoxide hydrolase, though activity tended to be lower than that of the mammals. Important differences in the conjugative pathways were also noted. Among these differences were the quail's relative deficiency in glutathione conjugation and the trout's low ability to conjugate sulfate compounds. Trout liver UDP-glucuronosyltransferase activity was remarkably high toward testosterone and bilirubin, while quail liver formed glucuronides of naphthol, p-nitrophenol, and digitoxigenin-monodigitoxoside. Also noteworthy was the high N-acetyltransferase activity of both quail and trout toward isoniazid, beta-naphthylamine, and 2-aminofluorene. Differences in substrate specificity for a given enzymatic pathway may be an indication that multiple forms of drug metabolizing systems also occur in these nonmammalian species. Observation of several hundred- or even thousand-fold differences between species in their enzyme activities for certain substrates under uniform conditions re-emphasizes the need for caution in extrapolation of xenobiotic metabolism from one species to another.

  2. Upper crustal structure from the Santa Monica Mountains to the Sierra Nevada, Southern California: Tomographic results from the Los Angeles Regional Seismic Experiment, Phase II (LARSE II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutter, W.J.; Fuis, G.S.; Ryberg, T.; Okaya, D.A.; Clayton, R.W.; Davis, P.M.; Prodehl, C.; Murphy, J.M.; Langenheim, V.E.; Benthien, M.L.; Godfrey, N.J.; Christensen, N.I.; Thygesen, K.; Thurber, C.H.; Simila, G.; Keller, Gordon R.

    2004-01-01

    In 1999, the U.S. Geological Survey and the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) collected refraction and low-fold reflection data along a 150-km-long corridor extending from the Santa Monica Mountains northward to the Sierra Nevada. This profile was part of the second phase of the Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment (LARSE II). Chief imaging targets included sedimentary basins beneath the San Fernando and Santa Clarita Valleys and the deep structure of major faults along the transect, including causative faults for the 1971 M 6.7 San Fernando and 1994 M 6.7 Northridge earthquakes, the San Gabriel Fault, and the San Andreas Fault. Tomographic modeling of first arrivals using the methods of Hole (1992) and Lutter et al. (1999) produces velocity models that are similar to each other and are well resolved to depths of 5-7.5 km. These models, together with oil-test well data and independent forward modeling of LARSE II refraction data, suggest that regions of relatively low velocity and high velocity gradient in the San Fernando Valley and the northern Santa Clarita Valley (north of the San Gabriel Fault) correspond to Cenozoic sedimentary basin fill and reach maximum depths along the profile of ???4.3 km and >3 km , respectively. The Antelope Valley, within the western Mojave Desert, is also underlain by low-velocity, high-gradient sedimentary fill to an interpreted maximum depth of ???2.4 km. Below depths of ???2 km, velocities of basement rocks in the Santa Monica Mountains and the central Transverse Ranges vary between 5.5 and 6.0 km/sec, but in the Mojave Desert, basement rocks vary in velocity between 5.25 and 6.25 km/sec. The San Andreas Fault separates differing velocity structures of the central Transverse Ranges and Mojave Desert. A weak low-velocity zone is centered approximately on the north-dipping aftershock zone of the 1971 San Fernando earthquake and possibly along the deep projection of the San Gabriel Fault. Modeling of gravity data, using

  3. On the polymorphism of benzocaine; a low-temperature structural phase transition for form (II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Eric J; Rae, A David; Welberry, T Richard

    2009-08-01

    A low-temperature structural phase transition has been observed for form (II) of benzocaine (BZC). Lowering the temperature doubles the b-axis repeat and changes the space group from P2(1)2(1)2(1) to P112(1) with gamma now 99.37 degrees. The structure is twinned, the twin rule corresponding to a 2(1) screw rotation parallel to a. The phase transition is associated with a sequential displacement parallel to a of zigzag bi-layers of ribbons perpendicular to b*. No similar phase transition was observed for form (I) and this was attributed to the different packing symmetries of the two room-temperature polymorphic forms.

  4. The Neutron Energy Spectrum Study from the Phase II Solid Methane Moderator at the LENS Neutron Source

    CERN Document Server

    Shin, Yunchang; Lavelle, Christopher M; Baxter, David V; Tong, Xin; Yan, Haiyang; Leuschner, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Neutron energy spectrum measurements from a solid methane moderator were performed at the Low Energy Neutron Source (LENS) at Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) to verify our neutron scattering model of solid methane. The time-of-flight method was used to measure the energy spectrum of the moderator in the energy range of 0.1$meV\\sim$ 1$eV$. Neutrons were counted with a high efficiency $^{3}{He}$ detector. The solid methane moderator was operated in phase II temperature and the energy spectra were measured at the temperatures of 20K and 4K. We have also tested our newly-developed scattering kernels for phase II solid methane by calculating the neutron spectral intensity expected from the methane moderator at the LENS neutron source using MCNP (Monte Carlo N-particle Transport Code). Within the expected accuracy of our approximate approach, our model predicts both the neutron spectral intensity and the optimal thickness of the moderator at both temperatures. The predictions are compared to the measur...

  5. Application of an analytical phase transformation model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Feng; WANG Hai-feng; YANG Chang-lin; CHEN Zheng; YANG Wei; YANG Gen-cang

    2006-01-01

    Employing isothermal and isochronal differential scanning calorimetry, an analytical phase transformation model was used to study the kinetics of crystallization of amorphous Mg82.3Cu17.7 and Pd40Cu30P20Ni10 alloys. The analytical model comprised different combinations of various nucleation and growth mechanisms for a single transformation. Applying different combinations of nucleation and growth mechanisms, the nucleation and growth modes and the corresponding kinetic and thermodynamic parameters, have been determined. The influence of isothermal pre-annealing on subsequent isochronal crystallization kinetics with the increase of pre-annealing can be analyzed. The results show that the changes of the growth exponent, n, and the effective overall activation energy Q, occurring as function of the degree of transformation, do not necessarily imply a change of nucleation and growth mechanisms, i.e. such changes can occur while the transformation is isokinetic.

  6. Microgravity two-phase flow regime modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.; Best, F.R.; Faget, N.

    1987-01-01

    A flow pattern or flow regime is the characteristics spatial distribution of the phases of fluid in a duct. Since heat transfer and pressure drop are dependent on the characteristic distribution of the phases, it is necessary to describe flow patterns in an appropriate manner so that a hydrodynamic or heat transfer theory applicable to that pattern can be chosen. The objective of the present analysis is to create a flow regime map based on physical modeling of vapor/liquid interaction phenomena in a microgravity environment. In the present work, four basic flow patterns are defined: dispersed flow, stratified flow, slug flow, and annular flow. Fluid properties, liquid and vapor flow rates, and pipe size were chosen as the principal parameters. It is assumed that a transition from one flow pattern to another will occur when there is a change in the dominant force which controls that flow pattern. The forces considered in this modeling are surface tension force, both force, inertial force, friction, and turbulent fluctuations.

  7. Dynamic Modeling of Phase Crossings in Two-Phase Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Søren; Veje, Christian; Willatzen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    of the variables and are usually very slow to evaluate. To overcome these challenges, we use an interpolation scheme with local refinement. The simulations show that the method handles crossing of the saturation lines for both liquid to two-phase and two-phase to gas regions. Furthermore, a novel result obtained...... in this work, the method is stable towards dynamic transitions of the inlet/outlet boundaries across the saturation lines. Results for these cases are presented along with a numerical demonstration of conservation of mass under dynamically varying boundary conditions. Finally we present results...

  8. REFINEMENT OF THE NEPHELINE DISCRIMINATOR: RESULTS OF A PHASE II STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K; Tommy Edwards, T

    2008-11-21

    Twenty five glass compositions were selected for a Phase II study to assess the potential for reducing the conservatism in the nepheline discriminator. The glass compositions were restricted to regions that fell within the validation ranges of the DWPF PCCS models. In addition, the liquidus temperature model was used to restrict the glass compositions so that they could all be melted at the same temperature. The nepheline discriminator was used to force the glass compositions into regions where nepheline formation was predicted to occur. The glasses were fabricated in the laboratory and characterized for crystallization and chemical durability after both quenching and slow cooling. Chemical analysis showed that the fabricated glasses met the target compositions. Nepheline was identified in one of the quenched glasses and several of the CCC glasses. There was no clear relationship between the types of crystallization that occurred in a particular glass and its location on the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Na{sub 2}O-SiO{sub 2} ternary diagram. A partitioning algorithm was used to identify trends in crystallization behavior based on glass composition. Generally, for the CCC glasses MnO influenced the crystallization of spinels and B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2} influenced the crystallization of nepheline. Measured durability responses varied from acceptable to unacceptable depending on the glass composition and type and extent of crystallization that occurred. It was not possible to identify any linear effects of composition on chemical durability performance for this set of study glasses. The results were not sufficient to recommend modification of the current nepheline discriminator at this time. It is recommended that the next series of experiments continue to focus not only on compositional regions where the PCCS models are considered applicable (i.e., the model validation ranges), but also be restricted to compositional regions where acceptable glasses are predicted to be

  9. Horns Rev II, 2-D Model Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Frigaard, Peter

    This report present the results of 2D physical model tests carried out in the shallow wave flume at Dept. of Civil Engineering, Aalborg University (AAU), on behalf of Energy E2 A/S part of DONG Energy A/S, Denmark. The objective of the tests was: to investigate the combined influence of the pile...

  10. Multidimensional chemical modelling, II. Irradiated outflow walls

    CERN Document Server

    Bruderer, Simon; Doty, Steven D; van Dishoeck, Ewine F; Bourke, Tyler L

    2009-01-01

    Observations of the high-mass star forming region AFGL 2591 reveal a large abundance of CO+, a molecule known to be enhanced by far UV (FUV) and X-ray irradiation. In chemical models assuming a spherically symmetric envelope, the volume of gas irradiated by protostellar FUV radiation is very small due to the high extinction by dust. The abundance of CO+ is thus underpredicted by orders of magnitude. In a more realistic model, FUV photons can escape through an outflow region and irradiate gas at the border to the envelope. Thus, we introduce the first 2D axi-symmetric chemical model of the envelope of a high-mass star forming region to explain the CO+ observations as a prototypical FUV tracer. The model assumes an axi-symmetric power-law density structure with a cavity due to the outflow. The local FUV flux is calculated by a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code taking scattering on dust into account. A grid of precalculated chemical abundances, introduced in the first part of this series of papers, is used to ...

  11. A two-phase model for chronic disease processes under intermittent inspection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying; Cook, Richard J

    2017-06-15

    A model is developed for chronic diseases with an indolent phase that is followed by a phase with more active disease resulting in progression and damage. The time scales for the intensity functions for the active phase are more naturally based on the time since the start of the active phase, corresponding to a semi-Markov formulation. This two-phase model enables one to fit a separate regression model for the duration of the indolent phase and intensity-based models for the more active second phase. In cohort studies for which the disease status is only known at a series of clinical assessment times, transition times are interval-censored, which means the time origin for phase II is interval-censored. Weakly parametric models with piecewise constant baseline hazard and rate functions are specified, and an expectation-maximization algorithm is described for model fitting. Simulation studies examining the performance of the proposed model show good performance under maximum likelihood and two-stage estimation. An application to data from the motivating study of disease progression in psoriatic arthritis illustrates the procedure and identifies new human leukocyte antigens associated with the duration of the indolent phase. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Toward Reanalysis of the Tight-Pitch HCLWR-PROTEUS Phase II Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perret, Grégory; Vlassopoulos, Efstathios; Hursin, Mathieu; Pautz, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    The HCLWR-Proteus Phase II experiments were conducted from 1985 to 1990 in the zero-power reactor Proteus at PSI in Switzerland. The experimental program was dedicated to the physics of high conversion light water reactors and in particular to the measurement of reactor parameters such as reaction rate traverses, spectral indices, absorber reactivity worths and void coefficients. The HCLWR experiments are especially interesting because they generated knowledge in the epithermal range of the neutron flux spectrum, for which little integral experimental data is available. In an effort to assess the interest of this experimental data to validate modern nuclear data and improve their uncertainties, a preliminary re-analysis of selected configurations was conducted with Monte-Carlo codes (MCNP6/SERPENT2) and modern nuclear data libraries (ENDF/B-VII.0, JEFF-3.1.1 and JENDL-4.0). The spectral ndices, flux spectra and sensitivity coefficients on k∞ were calculated using cell models representative of the tight-pitch measurement configurations containing 11% PuO2-UO2 fuel rods in different moderation conditions (air, water and dowtherm). Spectral index predictions using the three nuclear data libraries agreed within two standard deviations with the measured values. The only exception is the Pu-242-capture-to-Pu-239-fission ratio, which was overestimated with all libraries by more than four standard deviations, i.e. 13%, in the non-moderated configuration. In this configuration, Pu-242 captures are few since the flux spectrum in the Pu-242 capture resonance region (between 1eV and 1keV) is small making this spectral index hard to measure. Sensitivity coefficient predictions with both MCNP6 and SERPENT2 were in good agreement.

  13. Effect of breastfeeding on asthma, lung function and bronchial hyperreactivity in ISAAC Phase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, G; Büchele, G; Weinmayr, G; Björkstén, B; Chen, Y-Z; Wang, H; Nystad, W; Saraclar, Y; Bråbäck, L; Batlles-Garrido, J; Garcia-Hernandez, G; Weiland, S K

    2009-05-01

    The association between breastfeeding and wheezing, lung function and atopy was evaluated in the International Study of Asthma and Allergy in Childhood (ISAAC) Phase II. Cross-sectional studies were performed in 27 centres in 20 countries. Information on disease and exposure factors was collected by parental questionnaires. Data from 54,000 randomly selected school children (aged 8-12 yrs, 31,759 with skin prick testing) and a stratified subsample (n = 4,888) were used for testing the correlation of breastfeeding with bronchial hyperreactivity and lung function. Random effect models for meta-analysis were applied to calculate combined odds ratios (ORs). Any breastfeeding was associated with less wheeze both in affluent (adjusted OR (OR(adj)) 0.87, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.78-0.97) and nonaffluent countries (OR(adj) 0.80, 95% CI 0.68-0.94). Further analyses revealed that this was true only for nonatopic wheeze in nonaffluent countries (OR(adj) 0.69, 95% CI 0.53-0.90). Breastfeeding was not associated with atopic wheeze and objective measures of allergy in both affluent and nonaffluent countries. In contrast, breastfeeding was associated with higher predicted forced expiratory volume in one second in affluent countries only (mean ratio 1.11, 95% CI 1.02-1.20). Breastfeeding is associated with protection against nonatopic wheeze, which becomes particularly evident in nonaffluent countries. Overall, breastfeeding was not related to any measure of allergy. These findings may explain some of the controversy regarding breastfeeding, since the direction of the association with breastfeeding depends on the predominating wheeze phenotype (e.g. atopic, nonatopic).

  14. Structure and compressibility of the high-pressure molecular phase II of carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datchi, Frédéric; Mallick, Bidyut; Salamat, Ashkan; Rousse, Gwenaëlle; Ninet, Sandra; Garbarino, Gaston; Bouvier, Pierre; Mezouar, Mohamed

    2014-04-01

    The structure and equation of state of the crystalline molecular phase II of carbon dioxide have been investigated at room temperature from 15.5 to 57.5 GPa using synchrotron x-ray diffraction methods. The CO2 samples were embedded in neon pressure medium in order to provide quasihydrostatic conditions. The x-ray diffraction patterns of phase II are best described by a tetragonal structure, with space group P42/mnm and 2 molecules per unit cell, in accordance with a previous study [Yoo et al., Phys. Rev. B 65, 104103 (2002), 10.1103/PhysRevB.65.104103]. There is however a large (15%) difference in the intramolecular C=O bond length between the present study, 1.14(3) Å, and the latter work (1.329-1.366 Å). The present value is similar to that of the free molecule and is in very good agreement with predictions based on density functional theory. The compressibility of CO2-II determined here also disagrees with the previous study: our value for the zero-pressure bulk modulus, B0=8.5(3) GPa [with B0'=(∂B/∂P)0=6.29], is 15.5 times smaller. These findings oppose the view that CO2-II is an intermediate state between the low-pressure molecular phases and the high-pressure nonmolecular forms, consistent with our previous results for phase IV [Datchi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 185701 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.185701]. The x-ray diffraction patterns of CO2-II above 15 GPa indicate the presence of a large orthorhombic microstrain. Carrying out density functional theory calculations of the elastic tensor and stress-strain relation, we interpret this as due to the softness of the crystal against deviatoric stress in the [110] and symmetry-related directions. Unlike the other dioxides of the group-14 elements, there is however no mechanical or dynamical instability of the P42/mnm structure in CO2 up to 57.5 GPa at 295 K, and therefore no symmetry lowering to Pnnm.

  15. Phase I and Phase II Therapies for Acute Ischemic Stroke: An Update on Currently Studied Drugs in Clinical Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Cesar; Akyol, Onat; Ho, Wing Mann; Araujo, Camila; Huang, Lei; Applegate II, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a devastating cause of death and disability, consequences of which depend on the time from ischemia onset to treatment, the affected brain region, and its size. The main targets of ischemic stroke therapy aim to restore tissue perfusion in the ischemic penumbra in order to decrease the total infarct area by maintaining blood flow. Advances in research of pathological process and pathways during acute ischemia have resulted in improvement of new treatment strategies apart from restoring perfusion. Additionally, limiting the injury severity by manipulating the molecular mechanisms during ischemia has become a promising approach, especially in animal research. The purpose of this article is to review completed and ongoing phases I and II trials for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke, reviewing studies on antithrombotic, thrombolytic, neuroprotective, and antineuroinflammatory drugs that may translate into more effective treatments. PMID:28286764

  16. Phase I and Phase II Therapies for Acute Ischemic Stroke: An Update on Currently Studied Drugs in Clinical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Cesar; Akyol, Onat; Ho, Wing Mann; Araujo, Camila; Huang, Lei; Applegate, Richard; Zhang, John H

    2017-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a devastating cause of death and disability, consequences of which depend on the time from ischemia onset to treatment, the affected brain region, and its size. The main targets of ischemic stroke therapy aim to restore tissue perfusion in the ischemic penumbra in order to decrease the total infarct area by maintaining blood flow. Advances in research of pathological process and pathways during acute ischemia have resulted in improvement of new treatment strategies apart from restoring perfusion. Additionally, limiting the injury severity by manipulating the molecular mechanisms during ischemia has become a promising approach, especially in animal research. The purpose of this article is to review completed and ongoing phases I and II trials for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke, reviewing studies on antithrombotic, thrombolytic, neuroprotective, and antineuroinflammatory drugs that may translate into more effective treatments.

  17. Phase I and Phase II Therapies for Acute Ischemic Stroke: An Update on Currently Studied Drugs in Clinical Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Reis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute ischemic stroke is a devastating cause of death and disability, consequences of which depend on the time from ischemia onset to treatment, the affected brain region, and its size. The main targets of ischemic stroke therapy aim to restore tissue perfusion in the ischemic penumbra in order to decrease the total infarct area by maintaining blood flow. Advances in research of pathological process and pathways during acute ischemia have resulted in improvement of new treatment strategies apart from restoring perfusion. Additionally, limiting the injury severity by manipulating the molecular mechanisms during ischemia has become a promising approach, especially in animal research. The purpose of this article is to review completed and ongoing phases I and II trials for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke, reviewing studies on antithrombotic, thrombolytic, neuroprotective, and antineuroinflammatory drugs that may translate into more effective treatments.

  18. Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechler, Cynthia Eileen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-01

    This report describes the continuation of the work reported in “Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development”. The experiment was performed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in 2014. A rastered 35 MeV electron beam deposited power in a solution of uranyl sulfate, generating heat and radiolytic gas bubbles. Irradiations were performed at three beam power levels, 6, 12 and 15 kW. Solution temperatures were measured by thermocouples, and gas bubble behavior was observed. This report will describe the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model that was developed to calculate the temperatures and gas volume fractions in the solution vessel during the irradiations. The previous report described an initial analysis performed on a geometry that had not been updated to reflect the as-built solution vessel. Here, the as-built geometry is used. Monte-Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) calculations were performed on the updated geometry, and these results were used to define the power deposition profile for the CFD analyses, which were performed using Fluent, Ver. 16.2. CFD analyses were performed for the 12 and 15 kW irradiations, and further improvements to the model were incorporated, including the consideration of power deposition in nearby vessel components, gas mixture composition, and bubble size distribution. The temperature results of the CFD calculations are compared to experimental measurements.

  19. Casein Kinase 1 Coordinates Cohesin Cleavage, Gametogenesis, and Exit from M Phase in Meiosis II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüello-Miranda, Orlando; Zagoriy, Ievgeniia; Mengoli, Valentina; Rojas, Julie; Jonak, Katarzyna; Oz, Tugce; Graf, Peter; Zachariae, Wolfgang

    2017-01-09

    Meiosis consists of DNA replication followed by two consecutive nuclear divisions and gametogenesis or spore formation. While meiosis I has been studied extensively, less is known about the regulation of meiosis II. Here we show that Hrr25, the conserved casein kinase 1δ of budding yeast, links three mutually independent key processes of meiosis II. First, Hrr25 induces nuclear division by priming centromeric cohesin for cleavage by separase. Hrr25 simultaneously phosphorylates Rec8, the cleavable subunit of cohesin, and removes from centromeres the cohesin protector composed of shugoshin and the phosphatase PP2A. Second, Hrr25 initiates the sporulation program by inducing the synthesis of membranes that engulf the emerging nuclei at anaphase II. Third, Hrr25 mediates exit from meiosis II by activating pathways that trigger the destruction of M-phase-promoting kinases. Thus, Hrr25 synchronizes formation of the single-copy genome with gamete differentiation and termination of meiosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. 37 GHz methanol masers : Horsemen of the Apocalypse for the class II methanol maser phase?

    CERN Document Server

    Ellingsen, S P; Sobolev, A M; Voronkov, M A; Caswell, J L; Lo, N

    2011-01-01

    We report the results of a search for class II methanol masers at 37.7, 38.3 and 38.5 GHz towards a sample of 70 high-mass star formation regions. We primarily searched towards regions known to show emission either from the 107 GHz class II methanol maser transition, or from the 6.035 GHz excited OH transition. We detected maser emission from 13 sources in the 37.7 GHz transition, eight of these being new detections. We detected maser emission from three sources in the 38 GHz transitions, one of which is a new detection. We find that 37.7 GHz methanol masers are only associated with the most luminous 6.7 and 12.2 GHz methanol maser sources, which in turn are hypothesised to be the oldest class II methanol sources. We suggest that the 37.7 GHz methanol masers are associated with a brief evolutionary phase (of 1000-4000 years) prior to the cessation of class II methanol maser activity in the associated high-mass star formation region.

  1. Strictly isospectral Bianchi type II cosmological models

    CERN Document Server

    Rosu, H C; Obregón, O

    1996-01-01

    We show that, in the Q=0 factor ordering, the Wheeler-DeWitt equation for the Bianchi type ll model with the Ansatz \\rm \\Psi=A\\, e^{\\pm \\Phi(q^{\\mu})}, due to its one-dimensional character, may be approached by the strictly isospectral Darboux-Witten technique in standard supersymmetric quantum mechanics. One-parameter families of cosmological potentials and normalizable `wavefunctions of the universe' are exhibited. The isospectral method can be used to introduce normalizable wavefunctions in quantum cosmology.

  2. The Resurgence of Instantons: Multi-Cuts Stokes Phases and the Painleve II Equation

    CERN Document Server

    Schiappa, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Resurgent transseries have recently been shown to be a very powerful construction in order to completely describe nonperturbative phenomena in both matrix models and topological or minimal strings. These solutions encode the full nonperturbative content of a given gauge or string theory, where resurgence relates every (generalized) multi-instanton sector to each other via large-order analysis. The Stokes phase is the adequate gauge theory phase where an 't Hooft large N expansion exists and where resurgent transseries are most simply constructed. This paper addresses the nonperturbative study of Stokes phases associated to multi-cuts solutions of generic matrix models, constructing nonperturbative solutions for their free energies and exploring the asymptotic large-order behavior around distinct multi-instanton sectors. Explicit formulae are presented for the Z_2 symmetric two-cuts set-up, addressing the cases of the quartic matrix model in its two-cuts Stokes phase; the "triple" Penner potential which yields...

  3. Phase II Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 2 with ROTC 1 and 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marutzky, Sam

    2009-07-01

    This Phase II CAIP describes new work needed to potentially reduce uncertainty and achieve increased confidence in modeling results. This work includes data collection and data analysis to refine model assumptions, improve conceptual models of flow and transport in a complex hydrogeologic setting, and reduce parametric and structural uncertainty. The work was prioritized based on the potential to reduce model uncertainty and achieve an acceptable level of confidence in the model predictions for flow and transport, leading to model acceptance by NDEP and completion of the Phase II CAI stage of the UGTA strategy.

  4. Statistical design in phase II clinical trials and its application in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Francesco; Di Maio, Massimo; De Maio, Ermelinda; Maione, Paolo; Ottaiano, Alessandro; Pensabene, Matilde; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Lombardi, Alessandra Vernaglia; Signoriello, Giuseppe; Gallo, Ciro

    2003-05-01

    Several statistical designs for phase II studies have been proposed, but they are frequently misunderstood or not applied at all. In this review we describe the major characteristics of the available designs. To investigate the extent to which statistical designs were used in some recent phase II studies, and which designs were the most common, we did a survey of 145 trials involving treatment of breast cancer. Studies selected for the survey were published between 1995 and 1999 in one of seven specific oncology journals (all with impact factor consistently higher than 2). 94 of the studies (64.8%) did not have an identifiable statistical design. However, among the 51 studies with statistical design there was a notable heterogeneity in the type of design applied. We put together a list of factors associated with use of statistical design at univariate analysis. These factors included: referral to a previous phase I study, recent trial start date, private sponsorship, single-agent treatment, and multicentre organisation. Single-agent treatment (OR 2.35; 95% CI 1.01-5.51) and multicentre organisation (OR 3.24; 95% CI 1.47-7.15) were independently predictive of the presence of statistical design. Publication in journals with high impact factors and short intervals between the start of the study and publication were also correlated with statistical design.

  5. Performance characterization and ground testing of an airborne CO2 differential absorption lidar system (phase II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senft, Daniel C.; Fox, Marsha J.; Hamilton, Carla M.; Richter, Dale A.; Higdon, N. S.; Kelly, Brian T.

    1999-05-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Active Remote Sensing Branch has developed the Laser Airborne Remote Sensing (LARS) system for chemical detection using the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique. The system is based on a high-power CO2 laser which can use either the standard 12C16O2 or the 13C16O2 carbon dioxide isotopes as the lasing medium, and has output energies of up to 5 J on the stronger laser transitions. The lidar system is mounted on a flight-qualified optical breadboard designed for installation into the AFRL Argus C- 135E optical testbed aircraft. The Phase I ground tests were conducted at Kirtland AFB in 1997, prior to the LARS flight tests performed in September 1997 at Kirtland AFB and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The Phase II ground tests were conducted in 1998 to determine the optimum performance of the LARS system, after the incorporation of modification and improvements suggested by the flight test results. This paper will present some of the chemical detection and radiometric results obtained during the Phase II ground tests.

  6. Observations of the Crab Nebula with H.E.S.S. Phase II

    CERN Document Server

    Holler, M; van Eldik, C; Lenain, J -P; Marandon, V; Murach, T; de Naurois, M; Parsons, R D; Prokoph, H; Zaborov, D

    2015-01-01

    The High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) phase I instrument was an array of four $100\\,\\mathrm{m}^2$ mirror area Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) that has very successfully mapped the sky at photon energies above $\\sim 100\\,$GeV. Recently, a $600\\,\\mathrm{m}^2$ telescope was added to the centre of the existing array, which can be operated either in standalone mode or jointly with the four smaller telescopes. The large telescope lowers the energy threshold for gamma-ray observations to several tens of GeV, making the array sensitive at energies where the Fermi-LAT instrument runs out of statistics. At the same time, the new telescope makes the H.E.S.S. phase II instrument. This is the first hybrid IACT array, as it operates telescopes of different size (and hence different trigger rates) and different field of view. In this contribution we present results of H.E.S.S. phase II observations of the Crab Nebula, compare them to earlier observations, and evaluate the performance of the new ins...

  7. Turnable Semiconductor Laser Spectroscopy in Hollow Optical Waveguides, Phase II SBIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory J. Fetzer, Ph.D.

    2001-12-24

    In this study a novel optical trace gas sensor based on a perforated hollow waveguide (PHW) was proposed. The sensor has been given the acronym ESHOW for Environmental Sensor using Hollow Optical Waveguides. Realizations of the sensor have demonstrated rapid response time (<2s), low minimum detection limits (typically around 3 x 10-5 absorbance). Operation of the PHW technology has been demonstrated in the near-infrared (NIR) and mid0infrared (MIR) regions of the spectrum. Simulation of sensor performance provided in depth understanding of the signals and signal processing required to provide high sensitivity yet retain rapid response to gas changes. A dedicated sensor electronics and software foundation were developed during the course of the Phase II effort. Commercial applications of the sensor are ambient air and continuous emissions monitoring, industrial process control and hazardous waste site monitoring. There are numerous other applications for such a sensor including medical diagnosis and treatment, breath analysis for legal purposes, water quality assessment, combustion diagnostics, and chemical process control. The successful completion of Phase II resulted in additional funding of instrument development by the Nations Institute of Heath through a Phase I SBIR grant and a strategic teaming relationship with a commercial manufacture of medical instrumentation. The purpose of the NIH grant and teaming relationship is to further develop the sensor to monitor NO in exhaled breath for the purposes of asthma diagnosis.

  8. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes phase II. Topical report, January 1990--January 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    The Topical Report on Phase II of the project entitled, Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews work done between January 1, 1990 and September 30, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products which can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon transportation fuel. This Topical Report documents our efforts to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. Research on the Cooperative Agreement is divided into three Phases relating to three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate. In this report we present our work on catalysts which have oxidation-active metals in polyoxoanions (PHASE II).

  9. The Mg II index for upper atmosphere modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Thuillier

    Full Text Available The solar radio flux at 10.7 cm has been used in upper atmosphere density modelling because of its correlation with EUV radiation and its long and complete observational record. A proxy, the Mg II index, for the solar chromospheric activity has been derived by Heath and Schlesinger (1986 from Nimbus-7 data. This index allows one to describe the changes occurring in solar-activity in the UV Sun spectral irradiance. The use of this new proxy in upper atmosphere density modelling will be considered. First, this is supported by the 99.9% correlation between the solar radio flux (F10.7 and the Mg II index over a period of 19 years with, however, large differences on time scales of days to months. Secondly, correlation between EUV emissions and the Mg II index has been shown recently, suggesting that this last index may also be used to describe the EUV variations. Using the same density dataset, a model was first run with the F10.7 index as a solar forcing function and second, with the Mg II index. Comparison of their respective predictions to partial density data showed a 3–8% higher precision when the modelling uses the Mg II index rather than F10.7. An external validation, by means of orbit computation, resulted in a 20–40% smaller RMS of the tracking residuals. A density dataset spanning an entire solar cycle, together with Mg II data, is required to construct an accurate, unbiased as possible density model.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (middle atmosphere – composition and chemistry; thermosphere – composition and chemistry – History of geophysics (atmospheric sciences

  10. Phase II TPDCV protocol for pediatric low-grade hypothalamic/chiasmatic gliomas: 15-year update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Kavita K.; Squire, Sarah; Lamborn, Kathleen; Banerjee, Anuradha; Gupta, Nalin; Wara, William M.; Prados, Michael D.; Berger, Mitchel S.

    2010-01-01

    To report long-term results for children with low-grade hypothalamic/chiasmatic gliomas treated on a phase II chemotherapy protocol. Between 1984 and 1992, 33 children with hypothalamic/chiasmatic LGGs received TPDCV chemotherapy on a phase II prospective trial. Median age was 3.0 years (range 0.3–16.2). Twelve patients (36%) underwent STRs, 14 (42%) biopsy only, and seven (21%) no surgery. Twenty patients (61%) had pathologic JPAs, nine (27%) grade II gliomas, and four (12%) no surgical sampling. Median f/u for surviving patients was 15.2 years (range 5.3–20.7); 20 of the 23 surviving patients had 14 or more years of follow-up. Fifteen-year PFS and OS were 23.4 and 71.2%, respectively. Twenty-five patients progressed, of whom 13 are NED, two are AWD, and 10 have died. All children who died were diagnosed and first treated at age three or younger. Age at diagnosis was significantly associated with relapse and survival (P = 0.004 for PFS and P = 0.037 for OS). No PFS or OS benefit was seen with STR versus biopsy/no sampling (P = 0.58 for PFS, P = 0.59 for OS). For patients with JPAs and WHO grade II tumors, the 15-year PFS was 18.8 and 22.2% (P = 0.95) and 15-year OS was 73.7 and 55.6% (P = 0.17), respectively. Upfront TPDCV for children with hypothalamic/chiasmatic LGGs resulted in 15-year OS of 71.2% and 15-year PFS of 23.4%. No survival benefit is demonstrated for greater extent of resection. Age is a significant prognostic factor for progression and survival. PMID:20221671

  11. A phase II study of combination chemotherapy in early relapsed epithelial ovarian cancer using gemcitabine and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Mansoor Raza; Lund, Bente; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of epithelial ovarian cancer patients relapsing with a short treatment-free interval (TFI) after prior chemotherapy is unsatisfactory. This phase II trial evaluated the activity and feasibility of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) plus gemcitabine in this setting.......Treatment of epithelial ovarian cancer patients relapsing with a short treatment-free interval (TFI) after prior chemotherapy is unsatisfactory. This phase II trial evaluated the activity and feasibility of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) plus gemcitabine in this setting....

  12. Low Energy Threshold Analysis of the Phase I and Phase II Data Sets of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2009-01-01

    Results are reported from a joint analysis of Phase I and Phase II data from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. The effective electron kinetic energy threshold used is T_eff=3.5 MeV, the lowest analysis threshold yet achieved with water Cherenkov detector data. In units of 10^6 cm^{-2} s^{-1}, the total flux of active-flavor neutrinos from 8B decay in the Sun measured using the neutral current (NC) reaction of neutrinos on deuterons, with no constraint on the 8B neutrino energy spectrum, is found to be Phi_NC = 5.140 ^{+0.160}_{-0.158} (stat) ^{+0.132}_{-0.117} (syst). These uncertainties are more than a factor of two smaller than previously published results. Also presented are the spectra of recoil electrons from the charged current reaction of neutrinos on deuterons and the elastic scattering of electrons. A fit to the SNO data in which the free parameters directly describe the total 8B neutrino flux and the energy-dependent nu_e survival probability provides a measure of the total 8B neutrino flux Phi_8B =...

  13. The phase transition of Axelrod's model revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Reia, Sandro M

    2016-01-01

    Axelrod's model with $F=2$ cultural features, where each feature can assume $k$ states drawn from a Poisson distribution of parameter $q$, exhibits a continuous nonequilibrium phase transition in the square lattice. Here we use extensive Monte Carlo simulations and finite size scaling to study the critical behavior of the order parameter $\\rho$, which is the fraction of sites that belong to the largest domain of an absorbing configuration averaged over many runs. We find that it vanishes as $\\rho \\sim \\left (q_c^0 - q \\right)^\\beta$ with $\\beta \\approx 0.25$ at the critical point $q_c^0 \\approx 3.10$ and that the exponent that measures the width of the critical region is $\

  14. Model-based phase-shifting interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Zhang, Lei; Shi, Tu; Yang, Yongying; Chong, Shiyao; Miao, Liang; Huang, Wei; Shen, Yibing; Bai, Jian

    2015-10-01

    A model-based phase-shifting interferometer (MPI) is developed, in which a novel calculation technique is proposed instead of the traditional complicated system structure, to achieve versatile, high precision and quantitative surface tests. In the MPI, the partial null lens (PNL) is employed to implement the non-null test. With some alternative PNLs, similar as the transmission spheres in ZYGO interferometers, the MPI provides a flexible test for general spherical and aspherical surfaces. Based on modern computer modeling technique, a reverse iterative optimizing construction (ROR) method is employed for the retrace error correction of non-null test, as well as figure error reconstruction. A self-compiled ray-tracing program is set up for the accurate system modeling and reverse ray tracing. The surface figure error then can be easily extracted from the wavefront data in forms of Zernike polynomials by the ROR method. Experiments of the spherical and aspherical tests are presented to validate the flexibility and accuracy. The test results are compared with those of Zygo interferometer (null tests), which demonstrates the high accuracy of the MPI. With such accuracy and flexibility, the MPI would possess large potential in modern optical shop testing.

  15. In Vivo Exposure of Kaempferol Is Driven by Phase II Metabolic Enzymes and Efflux Transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Liang; Zhu, Lijun; Zhao, Min; Shi, Jian; Li, Yuhuan; Yu, Jia; Jiang, Huangyu; Wu, Jinjun; Tong, Yunli; Liu, Yuting; Hu, Ming; Lu, Linlin; Liu, Zhongqiu

    2016-09-01

    Kaempferol is a well-known flavonoid; however, it lacks extensive pharmacokinetic studies. Phase II metabolic enzymes and efflux transporters play an important role in the disposition of flavonoids. This study aimed to investigate the mechanism by which phase II metabolic enzymes and efflux transporters determine the in vivo exposure of kaempferol. Pharmacokinetic analysis in Sprague-Dawley rats revealed that kaempferol was mostly biotransformed to conjugates, namely, kaempferol-3-glucuronide (K-3-G), kaempferol-7-glucuronide (K-7-G), and kaempferol-7-sulfate, in plasma. K-3-G represented the major metabolite. Compared with that in wild-type mice, pharmacokinetics in knockout FVB mice demonstrated that the absence of multidrug resistance protein 2 (MRP2) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) significantly increased the area under the curve (AUC) of the conjugates. The lack of MRP1 resulted in a much lower AUC of the conjugates. Intestinal perfusion in rats revealed that the glucuronide conjugates were mainly excreted in the small intestine, but 7-sulfate was mainly excreted in the colon. In Caco-2 monolayers, K-7-G efflux toward the apical (AP) side was significantly higher than K-3-G efflux. In contrast, K-3-G efflux toward the basolateral (BL) side was significantly higher than K-7-G efflux. The BL-to-AP efflux was significantly reduced in the presence of the MRP2 inhibitor LTC4. The AP-to-BL efflux was significantly decreased in the presence of the BL-side MRPs inhibitor MK571. The BCRP inhibitor Ko143 decreased the glucuronide conjugate efflux. Therefore, kaempferol is mainly exposed as K-3-G in vivo, which is driven by phase II metabolic enzymes and efflux transporters (i.e., BCRP and MRPs).

  16. Research on radionuclide migration under subsurface geochemical conditions. JAERI/AECL Phase II Collaborative Program Year 1 (joint research)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-11-01

    A radionuclide migration experiment program for fractured rocks was performed under the JAERI/AECL Phase-II Collaborative Program on research and development in radioactive waste management. The program started in the fiscal year 1993, as a five-year program consists of Quarried block radionuclide migration program, Speciation of long-lived radionuclides in groundwater, Isotopic hydrogeology and Groundwater flow model development. During the first year of the program (Program Year 1: March 18, 1994 - September 30, 1994), a plan was developed to take out granite blocks containing part of natural water-bearing fracture from the wall of the experimental gallery at the depth of 240 m, and literature reviews were done in the area of the speciation of long-lived radionuclides in groundwater, isotopic hydrogeology and the groundwater flow model development to proceed further work for the Program Year 2. (author)

  17. Countrywide digital elevation models for the Islamic Republic of Mauritania—SRTM and ASTER (phase V, deliverable 65): Chapter F in Second projet de renforcement institutionnel du secteur minier de la République Islamique de Mauritanie (PRISM-II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gregory K.

    2015-01-01

    A digital elevation model (DEM) of the entire country of the Islamic Republic of Mauritania was produced using Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data as required for deliverable 65 of the contract. In addition, because of significant recent advancements of availability, seamlessness, and validity of Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) global elevation data, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) extended its efforts to include a higher resolution countrywide ASTER DEM as value added to the required Deliverable 63, which was limited to five areas within the country. Both SRTM and ASTER countrywide DEMs have been provided in ERDAS Imagine (.img) format that is also directly compatible with ESRI ArcMap, ArcGIS Explorer, and other GIS applications.

  18. Modelling of asymmetric nebulae. II. Line profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Morisset, C

    2006-01-01

    We present a tool, VELNEB_3D, which can be applied to the results of 3D photoionization codes to generate emission line profiles, position-velocity maps and 3D maps in any emission line by assuming an arbitrary velocity field. We give a few examples, based on our pseudo-3D photoionization code NEBU_3D (Morisset, Stasinska and Pena, 2005) which show the potentiality and usefulness of our tool. One example shows how complex line profiles can be obtained even with a simple expansion law if the nebula is bipolar and the slit slightly off-center. Another example shows different ways to produce line profiles that could be attributed to a turbulent velocity field while there is no turbulence in the model. A third example shows how, in certain circumstances, it is possible to discriminate between two very different geometrical structures -- here a face-on blister and its ``spherical impostor'' -- when using appropriate high resolution spectra. Finally, we show how our tool is able to generate 3D maps, similar to the ...

  19. Feasibility of MHD submarine propulsion. Phase II, MHD propulsion: Testing in a two Tesla test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doss, E.D. [ed.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Sikes, W.C. [ed.] [Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., VA (United States)

    1992-09-01

    This report describes the work performed during Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the collaborative research program established between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company (NNS). Phase I of the program focused on the development of computer models for Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) propulsion. Phase 2 focused on the experimental validation of the thruster performance models and the identification, through testing, of any phenomena which may impact the attractiveness of this propulsion system for shipboard applications. The report discusses in detail the work performed in Phase 2 of the program. In Phase 2, a two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented. The test matrix and its rationale are discussed. Representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to computer model predictions. In general, the results of the tests and their comparison with the predictions indicate that thephenomena affecting the performance of MHD seawater thrusters are well understood and can be accurately predicted with the developed thruster computer models.

  20. A phase II study of thalidomide in patients with brain metastases from malignant melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestermark, Lene; Larsen, Susanne; Lindeløv, Birgit;

    2008-01-01

    Introduction. Brain metastases develop in nearly half of the patients with advanced melanoma and in 15 to 20% of these patients CNS is the first site of relapse. Overall median survival is short, ranging from 2 to 4 months. Thalidomide has antiangiogenic and immunomodulatory effects. Results...... obtained in prior trials indicate that Thalidomide acts as a cytostatic agent in metastatic melanoma. We evaluated single agent antitumour activity and toxicity of Thalidomide in a phase II setting in patients with brain metastases associated with metastatic melanoma. Material and methods. Patients...

  1. A Disposable Microfluidic Device with a Screen Printed Electrode for Mimicking Phase II Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela Vasiliadou

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Human metabolism is investigated using several in vitro methods. However, the current methodologies are often expensive, tedious and complicated. Over the last decade, the combination of electrochemistry (EC with mass spectrometry (MS has a simpler and a cheaper alternative to mimic the human metabolism. This paper describes the development of a disposable microfluidic device with a screen-printed electrode (SPE for monitoring phase II GSH reactions. The proposed chip has the potential to be used as a primary screening tool, thus complementing the current in vitro methods.

  2. Nine-year change in statistical design, profile, and success rates of Phase II oncology trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Anastasia; Paul, Barry; Marchenko, Olga; Song, Guochen; Patel, Neerali; Moschos, Stergios J

    2016-01-01

    We investigated nine-year trends in statistical design and other features of Phase II oncology clinical trials published in 2005, 2010, and 2014 in five leading oncology journals: Cancer, Clinical Cancer Research, Journal of Clinical Oncology, Annals of Oncology, and Lancet Oncology. The features analyzed included cancer type, multicenter vs. single-institution, statistical design, primary endpoint, number of treatment arms, number of patients per treatment arm, whether or not statistical methods were well described, whether the drug was found effective based on rigorous statistical testing of the null hypothesis, and whether the drug was recommended for future studies.

  3. Summary of WPT FOA phase II demonstration performed on July 21, 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Perry T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Onar, Omer C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-08-01

    This summary provides details of the activities, presentations and hardware demonstrations performed at the International Transportation Innovation Center (iTiC) in Greenville, South Carolina as deliverables for the wireless power transfer (WPT) FOA #000667 phase II gateway. This report does not attempt to identify all encompassing efforts from each of the partners leading up to the demonstration, but will attempt to provide a record which briefly describes the project deliverables met and expectations from the Department of Energy (DOE) as action items agreed to during the wrap-up session on July 21, 2015.

  4. Beyond standard model report of working group II

    CERN Document Server

    Joshipura, A S; Joshipura, Anjan S; Roy, Probir

    1995-01-01

    Working group II at WHEPP3 concentrated on issues related to the supersymmetric standard model as well as SUSY GUTS and neutrino properties. The projects identified by various working groups as well as progress made in them since WHEPP3 are briefly reviewed.

  5. Fireside corrosion testing of candidate superheater tube alloys, coatings, and claddings - phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blough, J.L.; Stanko, G.J. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States)

    1996-08-01

    In Phase I a variety of developmental and commercial tubing alloys and claddings were exposed to laboratory fireside corrosion testing simulating a superheater or reheater in a coal-fired boiler. Phase II (in situ testing) has exposed samples of 347, RA-8511, HR3C, 253MA, Fe{sub 3}Al + 5Cr, 310 modified, 800HT, NF 709, 690 clad, and 671 clad for over 10,000 hours to the actual operating conditions of a 250-MW coal-fired boiler. The samples were installed on an air-cooled, retractable corrosion probe, installed in the reheater cavity, and controlled to the operating metal temperatures of an existing and advanced-cycle coal-fired boiler. Samples of each alloy will be exposed for 4000, 12,000, and 16,000 hours of operation. The results will be presented for the metallurgical examination of the corrosion probe samples after 4000 hours of exposure.

  6. Reactor physics studies in the GCFR phase-II critical assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pond, R B [ed.

    1976-09-01

    The reactor physics studies performed in the gas cooled fast reactor (GCFR) mockup on ZPR-9 are covered. This critical assembly, designated Phase II in the GCFR program, had a single zone PuO/sub 2/-UO/sub 2/ core composition and UO/sub 2/ radial and axial blankets. The assembly was built both with and without radial and axial stainless steel reflectors. The program included the following measurements: small-sample reactivity worths of reactor constituent materials (including helium); /sup 238/U Doppler effect; uranium and plutonium reaction rate distributions; thorium, uranium, and plutonium ..cap alpha.. and reactor kinetics. Analysis of the measurements used ENDF/B-IV nuclear data; anisotropic diffusion coefficients were used to account for neutron streaming effects. Comparison of measurements and calculations to GCFR Phase I are also made.

  7. Numerical simulations of the phase separation properties for the thermal aged CDSS with Phase Field Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue Fei [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Suzhou Nuclear Power Research Institute, Suzhou 215004 (China); Wang Zhaoxi, E-mail: wangzx03@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn [Suzhou Nuclear Power Research Institute, Suzhou 215004 (China); Applied Mechanics Laboratory, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhang Guodong [Suzhou Nuclear Power Research Institute, Suzhou 215004 (China); School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 210009 (China); Qu Baoping; Shi Huiji [Applied Mechanics Laboratory, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Shu Guogang [Suzhou Nuclear Power Research Institute, Suzhou 215004 (China); Liu Wei [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: > Thermal aging causes the Cr-rich phase precipitate and form clusters. > Phase field dynamic model is used for simulating the phase separation coarsening. > Damage initiated more easily in the ferrite matrix for the Cr clusters. - Abstract: Experiments and numerical simulations with Phase Field Model and Finite Element Analysis were carried out to investigate the phase separation dynamic properties and the corresponding thermal aging degradation mechanism. Experimental results from transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy show that thermal aging causes the Cr-rich phase precipitate and form clusters. A phase field dynamic model was developed with constitutive relations and empirical potential functions to investigate the phase separation dynamics in the ferrite phase. Numerical results integrated with cell dynamical system method show clearly the micro structure morphology and the phase separation coarsening with aging time. The evolution process of the phase separation was quantitatively illustrated and reproduced macroscopically. The scattering pattern becomes clearer and the corresponding radius becomes smaller along with the increasing aging time. The average characteristic length increases firstly then decreases and enters a more stable stage. With the increment of the local Cr concentration, the evolution of the phase morphology was quite different. Finite Element Analysis simulation results with the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman void model show that the damage initiated more easily in the ferrite matrix for the Cr atoms forming clusters with increasing aging time. The phenomenological simulations with Phase Field Model and Finite Element Analysis were in remarkably good agreement with experimental results and analytical considerations.

  8. Kane-Mele Hubbard model on a zigzag ribbon: Stability of the topological edge states and quantum phase transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chung-Hou; Lee, Der-Hau; Chao, Sung-Po

    2014-07-01

    We study the quantum phases and phase transitions of the Kane-Mele Hubbard (KMH) model on a zigzag ribbon of honeycomb lattice at a finite size via the weak-coupling renormalization group (RG) approach. In the noninteracting limit, the Kane-Mele (KM) model is known to support topological edge states where electrons show helical property with orientations of the spin and momentum being locked. The effective interedge hopping terms are generated due to finite-size effect. In the presence of an on-site Coulomb (Hubbard) interaction and the interedge hoppings, special focus is put on the stability of the topological edge states (TI phase) in the KMH model against (i) the charge and spin gaped (II) phase, (ii) the charge gaped but spin gapless (IC) phase, and (iii) the spin gaped but charge gapless (CI) phase depending on the number (even/odd) of the zigzag ribbons, doping level (electron filling factor) and the ratio of the Coulomb interaction to the interedge tunneling. We discuss different phase diagrams for even and odd numbers of zigzag ribbons. We find the TI-CI, II-IC, and II-CI quantum phase transitions are of the Kosterlitz-Thouless (KT) type. By computing various correlation functions, we further analyze the nature and leading instabilities of these phases. The relevance of our results for graphene is discussed.

  9. Electrodril system field test program. Phase II: Task C-1-deep drilling system demonstration. Final report for Phase II: Task C-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, P D

    1981-04-01

    The Electrodril Deep Drilling System field test demonstrations were aborted in July 1979, due to connector problems. Subsequent post test analyses concluded that the field replacable connectors were the probable cause of the problems encountered. The designs for both the male and female connectors, together with their manufacturing processes, were subsequently modified, as was the acceptance test procedures. A total of nine male and nine female connectors were manufactured and delivered during the 2nd Quarter 1980. Exhaustive testing was then conducted on each connector as a precursor to formal qualification testing conducted during the month of October 1980, at the Brown Oil Tool test facility located in Houston, Texas. With this report, requirements under Phase II, Task C-1 are satisfied. The report documents the results of the connector qualification test program which was successfully completed October 28, 1980. In general, it was concluded that connector qualification had been achieved and plans are now in progress to resume the field test demonstration program so that Electrodril System performance predictions and economic viability can be evaluated.

  10. Electrodril system field test program. Phase II: Task C-1-deep drilling system demonstration. Final report for Phase II: Task C-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, P D

    1981-04-01

    The Electrodril Deep Drilling System field test demonstrations were aborted in July 1979, due to connector problems. Subsequent post test analyses concluded that the field replacable connectors were the probable cause of the problems encountered. The designs for both the male and female connectors, together with their manufacturing processes, were subsequently modified, as was the acceptance test procedures. A total of nine male and nine female connectors were manufactured and delivered during the 2nd Quarter 1980. Exhaustive testing was then conducted on each connector as a precursor to formal qualification testing conducted during the month of October 1980, at the Brown Oil Tool test facility located in Houston, Texas. With this report, requirements under Phase II, Task C-1 are satisfied. The report documents the results of the connector qualification test program which was successfully completed October 28, 1980. In general, it was concluded that connector qualification had been achieved and plans are now in progress to resume the field test demonstration program so that Electrodril System performance predictions and economic viability can be evaluated.

  11. Oxoaporphine Metal Complexes (CoII, NiII, ZnII) with High Antitumor Activity by Inducing Mitochondria-Mediated Apoptosis and S-phase Arrest in HepG2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jiao-Lan; Shen, Wen-Ying; Chen, Zhen-Feng; Zhao, Li-Fang; Qin, Qi-Pin; Yu, Yan-Cheng; Liang, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Three new oxoaporphine Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes 1–3 have been synthesized and fully characterized. 1–3 have similar mononuclear structures with the metal and ligand ratio of 1:2. 1–3 exhibited higher cytotoxicity than the OD ligand and cisplatin against HepG2, T-24, BEL-7404, MGC80–3 and SK-OV-3/DDP cells, with IC50 value of 0.23−4.31 μM. Interestingly, 0.5 μM 1–3 significantly caused HepG2 arrest at S-phase, which was associated with the up-regulation of p53, p21, p27, Chk1 and Chk2 proteins, and decrease in cyclin A, CDK2, Cdc25A, PCNA proteins. In addition, 1–3 induced HepG2 apoptosis via a caspase-dependent mitochondrion pathway as evidenced by p53 activation, ROS production, Bax up-regulation and Bcl-2 down-regulation, mitochondrial dysfunction, cytochrome c release, caspase activation and PARP cleavage. Furthermore, 3 inhibited tumor growth in HepG2 xenograft model, and displayed more safety profile in vivo than cisplatin. PMID:28436418

  12. Spectral modeling of nebular-phase supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Jerkstrand, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Massive stars live fast and die young. They shine furiously for a few million years, during which time they synthesize most of the heavy elements in the universe in their cores. They end by blowing themselves up in a powerful explosion known as a supernova. During this process, the core collapses to a neutron star or a black hole, while the outer layers are expelled with velocities of thousands of kilometers per second. The resulting fireworks often outshine the entire host galaxy for many weeks. The explosion energy is eventually radiated away, but powering of the newborn nebula continues by radioactive isotopes synthesized in the explosion. The ejecta are now quite transparent, and we can see the material produced in the deep interiors of the star. To interpret the observations, detailed spectral modeling is needed. This thesis aims to develop and apply state-of-the-art computational tools for interpreting and modeling supernova observations in the nebular phase. This requires calculation of the physical co...

  13. Wax Precipitation Modeled with Many Mixed Solid Phases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heidemann, Robert A.; Madsen, Jesper; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2005-01-01

    The behavior of the Coutinho UNIQUAC model for solid wax phases has been examined. The model can produce as many mixed solid phases as the number of waxy components. In binary mixtures, the solid rich in the lighter component contains little of the heavier component but the second phase shows sub...

  14. Sterol structure determines the separation of phases and the curvature of the liquid-ordered phase in model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacia, Kirsten; Schwille, Petra; Kurzchalia, Teymuras

    2005-03-01

    The existence of lipid rafts in biological membranes in vivo is still debated. In contrast, the formation of domains in model systems has been well documented. In giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) prepared from ternary mixtures of dioleoyl-phosphatidylcholine/sphingomyelin/cholesterol, a clear separation of liquid-disordered and sphingomyelin-enriched, liquid-ordered phases could be observed. This phase separation can lead to the fission of the liquid-ordered phase from the vesicle. Here we show that in cholesterol-containing GUVs, the phase separation can involve dynamic redistribution of lipids from one phase into another as a result of a cross-linking perturbation. We found that the molecular structure of a sterol used for the preparation of GUVs determines (i) its ability to induce phase separation and (ii) the curvature (positive or negative) of the formed liquid-ordered phase. As a consequence, the latter can pinch off to the outside or inside of the vesicle. Remarkably, some mixtures of sterols induce liquid-ordered domains exhibiting both positive and negative curvature, which can lead to a new type of budding behavior in GUVs. Our findings could have implications for the role of sterols in various cell-biological processes such as budding of secretory vesicles, endocytosis, or formation of multivesicular bodies.

  15. Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification data base. Volume 3. The Hanna II, Phase I field test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartke, T.C.; Fischer, D.D.; King, S.B.; Boyd, R.M.; Humphrey, A.E.

    1985-08-01

    This report is part of a seven-volume series on the Hanna, Wyoming, underground coal gasification field tests. Volume 1 is a summary of the project, and each of Volumes 2 through 6 describes a particular test. Volume 7 is a compilation of all the data for the tests in Volumes 2 through 6. Hanna II, Phase I was conducted during the spring and summer of 1975, at a site about 700 feet up dip (to the southwest) of the Hanna I test. The test was conducted in two stages - Phase IA and IB. Phase IA consisted of linking and gasification operations between Wells 1 and 3 and Phase IB of linking from the 1-3 gasification zone to Well 2, followed by a short period of gasification from Well 2 to Well 3 over a broad range of air injection rates, in order to determine system turndown capabilities and response times. This report covers: (1) site selection and characteristics; (2) test objectives; (3) facilities description; (4) pre-operational testing; (5) test operations summary; and (6) post-test activity. 7 refs., 11 figs., 8 tabs.

  16. The hydrodynamical models of the cometary compact H II region

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Feng-Yao; Li, Juan; Zhang, Jiang-Shui; Wang, Jun-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a full numerical method to study the gas dynamics of cometary ultra-compact (UC) H II regions, and associated photodissociation regions (PDRs). The bow-shock and champagne-flow models with a $40.9/21.9 M_\\odot$ star are simulated. In the bow-shock models, the massive star is assumed to move through dense ($n=8000~cm^{-3}$) molecular material with a stellar velocity of $15~km~s^{-1}$. In the champagne-flow models, an exponential distribution of density with a scale height of 0.2 pc is assumed. The profiles of the [Ne II] 12.81\\mum and $H_2~S(2)$ lines from the ionized regions and PDRs are compared for two sets of models. In champagne-flow models, emission lines from the ionized gas clearly show the effect of acceleration along the direction toward the tail due to the density gradient. The kinematics of the molecular gas inside the dense shell is mainly due to the expansion of the H II region. However, in bow-shock models the ionized gas mainly moves in the same direction as the stellar motion...

  17. Thermal fluctuations and phase diagrams of the phase-field crystal model with pinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, J A P; Granato, E; Achim, C V; Ying, S C; Elder, K R; Ala-Nissila, T

    2008-09-01

    We study the influence of thermal fluctuations in the phase diagram of a recently introduced two-dimensional phase field crystal model with an external pinning potential. The model provides a continuum description of pinned lattice systems allowing for both elastic deformations and topological defects. We introduce a nonconserved version of the model and determine the ground-state phase diagram as a function of lattice mismatch and strength of the pinning potential. Monte Carlo simulations are used to determine the phase diagram as a function of temperature near commensurate phases. The results show a rich phase diagram with commensurate, incommensurate, and liquidlike phases with a topology strongly dependent on the type of ordered structure. A finite-size scaling analysis of the melting transition for the c(2x2) commensurate phase shows that the thermal correlation length exponent nu and specific heat behavior are consistent with the Ising universality class as expected from analytical arguments.

  18. A modified varying-stage adaptive phase II/III clinical trial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Gaohong; Vandemeulebroecke, Marc

    2016-07-01

    Conventionally, adaptive phase II/III clinical trials are carried out with a strict two-stage design. Recently, a varying-stage adaptive phase II/III clinical trial design has been developed. In this design, following the first stage, an intermediate stage can be adaptively added to obtain more data, so that a more informative decision can be made. Therefore, the number of further investigational stages is determined based upon data accumulated to the interim analysis. This design considers two plausible study endpoints, with one of them initially designated as the primary endpoint. Based on interim results, another endpoint can be switched as the primary endpoint. However, in many therapeutic areas, the primary study endpoint is well established. Therefore, we modify this design to consider one study endpoint only so that it may be more readily applicable in real clinical trial designs. Our simulations show that, the same as the original design, this modified design controls the Type I error rate, and the design parameters such as the threshold probability for the two-stage setting and the alpha allocation ratio in the two-stage setting versus the three-stage setting have a great impact on the design characteristics. However, this modified design requires a larger sample size for the initial stage, and the probability of futility becomes much higher when the threshold probability for the two-stage setting gets smaller. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Wheat bran feruloyl oligosaccharides modulate the phase II detoxifying/antioxidant enzymes via Nrf2 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huijuan; Wang, Jing; Liu, Yingli; Sun, Baoguo

    2015-03-01

    The antioxidant activities of wheat bran feruloyl oligosaccharides (FOs) were determined in rats by determining the activities and mRNA expression levels of phase II detoxifying/antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in rat organs. FOs was given by gavage at doses of 0.25, 0.5, and 0.75 mmol/kg body weight every day for 15 days. Compared with the control group, the activities of SOD, CAT, and GSH-Px in FOs treatment groups significantly (Plevels of SOD, CAT, and HO-1 in organs. Moreover, the immunoblot analysis revealed increased nuclear factor-E2-related factor (Nrf2) protein expression levels in organs and there were positive correlations between the mRNA expression of phase II detoxifying/antioxidant enzymes and the expressions of Nrf2 protein, which demonstrated FOs treatment could modulate the detoxifying/antioxidant enzymes via Nrf2 signaling. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. DOE Phase II SBIR: Spectrally-Assisted Vehicle Tracking - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villeneuve, Pierre V. [Space Computer Corporation

    2013-02-28

    The goal of this Phase II SBIR has been to develop a prototype software package to demonstrate spectrally-aided vehicle tracking. The primary application is to show improved target vehicle tracking performance in complex environments where traditional spatial tracker systems may show reduced performance. Examples include scenarios where the target vehicle is obscured by a large structure for an extended period of time, or where the target is engaging in extreme maneuvers amongst other civilian vehicles. The target information derived from spatial processing is unable to differentiate between the green versus the red vehicle. Spectral signature exploitation enables comparison of new candidate targets with existing track signatures. The ambiguity in this confusing scenario is resolved by folding spectral analysis results into each target nomination and association processes. The work performed over the two-year effort was divided into three general areas: algorithm refinement, software prototype development, and prototype performance demonstration. The tasks performed under this Phase II resulted in the completion of a software tool suitable for evaluation and testing of advanced tracking concepts.

  1. Phase II enzyme induction by a carotenoid, lutein, in a PC12D neuronal cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyake, Seiji [Laboratory of Retinal Cell Biology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Department of Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Wakasa Seikatsu Co., Ltd., 134 Chudoujiminami-cho, Shimogyo-ku, Kyoto 600-8813 (Japan); Kobayashi, Saori [Wakasa Seikatsu Co., Ltd., 134 Chudoujiminami-cho, Shimogyo-ku, Kyoto 600-8813 (Japan); Tsubota, Kazuo [Laboratory of Retinal Cell Biology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Ozawa, Yoko, E-mail: ozawa@a5.keio.jp [Laboratory of Retinal Cell Biology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Department of Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan)

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • Lutein reduced ROS levels in a PC12D neuronal cell line. • Lutein induced mRNAs of phase II antioxidative enzymes in PC12D neuronal cells. • Lutein increased protein levels of HO-1, SOD2, and NQO-1 in PC12D neuronal cells. • Lutein had no effect on intranuclear Nrf2 levels in PC12D neuronal cells. • Lutein did not activate potential upstream Nrf2 nuclear translocation pathways. - Abstract: The mechanism by which lutein, a carotenoid, acts as an antioxidant in retinal cells is still not fully understood. Here, lutein treatment of a neuronal cell line (PC12D) immediately resulted in reduced intracellular ROS levels, implying that it has a direct role in ROS scavenging. Significantly, lutein treatment also induced phase II antioxidative enzyme expression, probably via a nuclear factor-like 2 (Nrf2) independent pathway. This latter mechanism could explain why lutein acts diversely to protect against oxidative/cytotoxic stress, and why it is physiologically involved in the human neural tissue, such as the retina.

  2. The sROD Module for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Phase-II Upgrade Demonstrator

    CERN Document Server

    Carrio, F; Ferrer, A; Fiorini, L; Hernandez, Y; Higon, E; Mellado, B; March, L; Moreno, P; Reed, R; Solans, C; Valero, A; Valls, J A

    2014-01-01

    TileCal is the central hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The main upgrade of the LHC to increase the instantaneous luminosity is scheduled for 2022. The High Luminosity LHC, also called upgrade Phase-II, will imply a complete redesign of the read-out electronics in TileCal. In the new read-out architecture, the front-end electronics aims to transmit full digitized information to the back-end system in the counting rooms. Thus, the back-end system will provide digital calibrated information with en- hanced precision and granularity to the first level trigger to improve the trigger efficiencies. The demonstrator project is envisaged to qualify this new proposed architecture. A reduced part of the detector, 1/256 of the total, will be upgraded with the new electronics during 2014 to evaluate the proposed architecture in real conditions. The upgraded Read-Out Driver (sROD) will be the core element of the back-end electronics in Phase-II The sROD module is des...

  3. Research and Development for the ATLAS Forward Calorimetry at the Phase-II LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Cheplakov, Alexander; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    During the LHC Run-1 data taking period the ATLAS calorimeter system demonstrated an excellent performance of the electron and photon reconstruction as well as the hadronic jets and missing transverse energy measurements. These precision measurements played a major role in the discovery of the Higgs boson. Further study of the Higgs properties and SUSY searches should be performed at Phase-II LHC which will run at 5-7 times higher luminosity aiming to provide statistics of 3000fb-1 by 2037. A total irradiation doses will be more than doubled compared to the original design, taking into account a safety factor of 2 representing our confidence in radiation background simulations. Moreover, the increased instantaneous luminosity will result in a much higher detector occupancy. The ATLAS Forward Calorimeters (FCal) will be affected by these factors. A rich R&D program is ongoing to evaluate the consequences of the LHC modernization and to investigate different scenarios proposed for the Phase-II detector upgr...

  4. ICFT: An initial closed-loop flow test of the Fenton Hill Phase II HDR reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dash, Z.V. (ed.); Aguilar, R.G.; Dennis, B.R.; Dreesen, D.S.; Fehler, M.C.; Hendron, R.H.; House, L.S.; Ito, H.; Kelkar, S.M.; Malzahn, M.V.

    1989-02-01

    A 30-day closed-loop circulation test of the Phase II Hot Dry Rock reservoir at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, was conducted to determine the thermal, hydraulic, chemical, and seismic characteristics of the reservoir in preparation for a long-term energy-extraction test. The Phase II heat-extraction loop was successfully tested with the injection of 37,000 m/sup 3/ of cold water and production of 23,300 m/sup 3/ of hot water. Up to 10 MW/sub t/ was extracted when the production flow rate reached 0.0139 m/sup 3//s at 192/degree/C. By the end of the test, the water-loss rate had decreased to 26% and a significant portion of the injected water was recovered; 66% during the test and an additional 20% during subsequent venting. Analysis of thermal, hydraulic, geochemical, tracer, and seismic data suggests the fractured volume of the reservoir was growing throughout the test. 19 refs., 64 figs., 19 tabs.

  5. SDSS-II: Determination of shape and color parameter coefficients for SALT-II fit model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dojcsak, L.; Marriner, J.; /Fermilab

    2010-08-01

    In this study we look at the SALT-II model of Type IA supernova analysis, which determines the distance moduli based on the known absolute standard candle magnitude of the Type IA supernovae. We take a look at the determination of the shape and color parameter coefficients, {alpha} and {beta} respectively, in the SALT-II model with the intrinsic error that is determined from the data. Using the SNANA software package provided for the analysis of Type IA supernovae, we use a standard Monte Carlo simulation to generate data with known parameters to use as a tool for analyzing the trends in the model based on certain assumptions about the intrinsic error. In order to find the best standard candle model, we try to minimize the residuals on the Hubble diagram by calculating the correct shape and color parameter coefficients. We can estimate the magnitude of the intrinsic errors required to obtain results with {chi}{sup 2}/degree of freedom = 1. We can use the simulation to estimate the amount of color smearing as indicated by the data for our model. We find that the color smearing model works as a general estimate of the color smearing, and that we are able to use the RMS distribution in the variables as one method of estimating the correct intrinsic errors needed by the data to obtain the correct results for {alpha} and {beta}. We then apply the resultant intrinsic error matrix to the real data and show our results.

  6. 77 FR 23228 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program-Phase II...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-18

    ... Public Law 106-554, the ``Small Business Reauthorization Act of 2000, H.R. 5667'' enacted on December 21... Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program--Phase II--Grant Application Package SUMMARY: This application package invites small business concerns to submit a Phase...

  7. Shunted-Josephson-junction model. II. The nonautonomous case

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belykh, V. N.; Pedersen, Niels Falsig; Sørensen, O. H.

    1977-01-01

    The shunted-Josephson-junction model with a monochromatic ac current drive is discussed employing the qualitative methods of the theory of nonlinear oscillations. As in the preceding paper dealing with the autonomous junction, the model includes a phase-dependent conductance and a shunt capacitance...

  8. SU-E-J-35: Clinical Performance Evaluation of a Phase II Proton CT Scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandapaka, A; Ghebremedhin, A; Farley, D; Giacometti, V; Vence, N; Bashkirov, V; Patyal, B; Schulte, R [Loma Linda UniversityMedical Center, Loma Linda, CA (United States); Plautz, T; Zatserklyaniy, A; Johnson, R; Sadrozinski, H [University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop the methodology to evaluate the clinical performance of a Phase II Proton CT scanner Methods: Range errors on the order of 3%-5% constitute a major uncertainty in current charged particle treatment planning based on Hounsfield Unit (HU)-relative stopping power (RSP) calibration curves. Within our proton CT collaboration, we previously developed and built a Phase I proton CT scanner that provided a sensitive area of 9 cm (axial) × 18 cm (in-plane). This scanner served to get initial experience with this new treatment planning tool and to incorporate lessons learned into the next generation design. A Phase II scanner was recently completed and is now undergoing initial performance testing. It will increase the proton acquisition rate and provide a larger detection area of 9 cm x 36 cm. We are now designing a comprehensive evaluation program to test the image quality, imaging dose, and range uncertainty associated with this scanner. The testing will be performed along the lines of AAPM TG 66. Results: In our discussion of the evaluation protocol we identified the following priorities. The image quality of proton CT images, in particular spatial resolution and low-density contrast discrimination, will be evaluated with the Catphan600 phantom. Initial testing showed that the Catphan uniformity phantom did not provide sufficient uniformity; it was thus replaced by a cylindrical water phantom. The imaging dose will be tested with a Catphan dose module, and compared to a typical cone beam CT dose for comparable image quality. Lastly, we developed a dedicated dosimetry range phantom based on the CIRS pediatric head phantom HN715. Conclusion: A formal evaluation of proton CT as a new tool for proton treatment planning is an important task. The availability of the new Phase II proton CT scanner will allow us to perform this task. This research is supported by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering of the NIH under award number R01

  9. Phase Field Modeling of Twinning in Indentation of Transparent Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    twin boundaries . Equilibrium configurations of deformed and twinned crystals are attained via direct energy minimization. The theory is framed in the...phases: (i) the original crystal (the parent) and (ii) the twin. Interfaces between phases are twin boundaries . Order parameter η generally exhibits the...following values: η(X, •) = 0∀X ∈ parent, = 1∀X ∈ twin, ∈ (0, 1)∀X ∈ twin boundaries . (1) In linear elasticity, kinematic field variables are

  10. Synthesis, Spectral Characterization, Molecular Modeling, and Antimicrobial Studies of Cu(II, Ni(II, Co(II, Mn(II, and Zn(II Complexes of ONO Schiff Base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmaja Mendu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of Cu(II, Ni(II, Co(II, Mn(II, and Zn(II complexes have been synthesized from the schiff base ligand L. The schiff base ligand [(4-oxo-4H-chromen-3-yl methylene] benzohydrazide (L has been synthesized by the reaction between chromone-3-carbaldehyde and benzoyl hydrazine. The nature of bonding and geometry of the transition metal complexes as well as schiff base ligand L have been deduced from elemental analysis, FT-IR, UV-Vis, 1HNMR, ESR spectral studies, mass, thermal (TGA and DTA analysis, magnetic susceptibility, and molar conductance measurements. Cu(II, Ni(II, Co(II, and Mn(II metal ions are forming 1:2 (M:L complexes, Zn(II is forming 1:1 (M:L complex. Based on elemental, conductance and spectral studies, six-coordinated geometry was assigned for Cu(II, Ni(II, Co(II, Mn(II, and Zn(II complexes. The complexes are 1:2 electrolytes in DMSO except zinc complex, which is neutral in DMSO. The ligand L acts as tridentate and coordinates through nitrogen atom of azomethine group, oxygen atom of keto group of γ-pyrone ring and oxygen atom of hydrazoic group of benzoyl hydrazine. The 3D molecular modeling and energies of all the compounds are furnished. The biological activity of the ligand and its complexes have been studied on the four bacteria E. coli, Edwardella, Pseudomonas, and B. subtilis and two fungi pencillium and tricoderma by well disc and fusion method and found that the metal chelates are more active than the free schiff base ligand.

  11. Modeling Image Structure with Factorized Phase-Coupled Boltzmann Machines

    CERN Document Server

    Cadieu, Charles F

    2010-01-01

    We describe a model for capturing the statistical structure of local amplitude and local spatial phase in natural images. The model is based on a recently developed, factorized third-order Boltzmann machine that was shown to be effective at capturing higher-order structure in images by modeling dependencies among squared filter outputs (Ranzato and Hinton, 2010). Here, we extend this model to $L_p$-spherically symmetric subspaces. In order to model local amplitude and phase structure in images, we focus on the case of two dimensional subspaces, and the $L_2$-norm. When trained on natural images the model learns subspaces resembling quadrature-pair Gabor filters. We then introduce an additional set of hidden units that model the dependencies among subspace phases. These hidden units form a combinatorial mixture of phase coupling distributions, concentrated in the sum and difference of phase pairs. When adapted to natural images, these distributions capture local spatial phase structure in natural images.

  12. Final Technical Report for DOE Grant DE-FG02-02ER83371, Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Townsend, William; Wilkinson, David; Hamel, William; Zhou, Renbin; Nycz, Andrzej; Humphreys, Heather

    2006-04-14

    The purpose of this research was to develop a telerobotic master device consisting of a 7-axis backdrivable robotic arm, and a pressure-sensitive grip-controller integrated with a Compact Remote Console (CRC), thus creating a highly functional teleoperation station targeted to control a 6-axis industrial robotic arm and dexterous robotic hand to be used for demolition work in a nuclear setting. We successfully completed the development of one of the world?s smallest brushless motor controllers due partially to funding through this grant. These controllers are used to drive the motors in the master robotic arm. We also completed the development of an improved model of a highly advanced 4 degree-of-freedom arm ? this same arm is the core component in the teleoperation system. The WAM arm and a 3-axis gimbals were integrated with a commercially available CRC at our consultant?s lab at University of Tennessee. Additional support hardware and software were combined to tie the master control system to an existing industrial robot in the lab. A master controller for a dexterous hand was developed and became an integral part of the gimbals handle. Control algorithms were developed and the software was written and implemented. The entire system was then debugged and tested. Results of the prototype system are promising. The WAM Arm, gimbals, hand controller and CRC were successful integrated. Testing of the system to control the 6-axis industrial arm and prototype dexterous hand showed great potential. Relatively simple tasks were successfully performed at slow speeds. Some of the testing was hampered by problems with the slave dexterous hand. This is a prototype hand being developed by Barrett under a different Phase II program. Potential improvements and advancements to the system include improving the control code, and integration of a 2nd master controller arm in order to drive a 2nd slave arm and hand. In summary, the device is a complex system with advanced features

  13. Simulation and modeling of BEGe detectors for GERDA phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agostini, Matteo; Barnabe Heider, Marik; Budjas, Dusan; Schoenert, Stefan [Max-Plank-Institute fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Ur, Calin A. [INFN - Padova (Italy); Bellotti, Enrico; Cattadori, Carla [INFN - Milano (Italy); Di Vacri, Assunta; Pandola, Luciano [INFN - LNGS, L' Aquila (Italy); Garfagnini, Alberto [INFN - Padova (Italy); University of Padova (Italy)

    2010-07-01

    The GERDA experiment aims to search for the neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 76}Ge by using high purity germanium detectors enriched in {sup 76}Ge. The background suppression in the GERDA experiment can be achieved by analyzing the time-development of the detector signals. To investigate the pulse shape discrimination capabilities of Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors, a complete simulation of the signal formation and evolution was developed. The results of the simulations will be presented and compared with measurements. The characteristic shapes of the BEGe detector signals and their dependence of the interaction position are discussed.

  14. Solid phase extraction of Cu(II), Ni(II), Pb(II), Cd(II) and Mn(II) ions with 1-(2-thiazolylazo)-2-naphthol loaded Amberlite XAD-1180.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokalioğlu, Serife; Yilmaz, Vedat; Kartal, Senol

    2009-05-01

    A new method for separation and preconcentration of trace amounts of Cu(II), Ni(II), Pb(II), Cd(II) and Mn(II) ions in various matrices was proposed. The method is based on the adsorption and chelation of the metal ions on a column containing Amberlite XAD-1180 resin impregnated with 1-(2-thiazolylazo)-2-naphthol (TAN) reagent prior to their determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The effect of pH, type, concentration and volume of eluent, sample volume, flow rates of sample and elution solutions, and interfering ions have been investigated. The optimum pH for simultaneous retention of all the metal ions was 9. Eluent for quantitative elution was 20 ml of 2 mol l(-1) HNO(3). The optimum sample and eluent flow rates were found as 4 ml min(-1), and also sample volume was 500 ml, except for Mn (87% recovery). The sorption capacity of the resin was found to be 0.77, 0.41, 0.57, and 0.30 mg g(-1) for Cu(II), Ni(II), Cd(II), and Mn(II), respectively. The preconcentration factor of the method was 200 for Cu(II), 150 for Pb(II), 100 for Cd(II) and Ni(II), and 50 for Mn(II). The recovery values for all of the metal ions were > or = 95% and relative standard deviations (RSDs) were < or = 5.1%. The detection limit values were in the range of 0.03 and 1.19 microg l(-1). The accuracy of the method was confirmed by analysing the certified reference materials (TMDA 54.4 fortified lake water and GBW 07605 tea samples) and the recovery studies. This procedure was applied to the determination of Cu(II), Ni(II), Pb(II), Cd(II) and Mn(II) in waste water and lake water samples.

  15. Modeling and Analysis of NGC System using Ptolemy II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Sreekumar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Model based system design has been used in real time embedded systems for validating and testing during the development lifecycle. Computation models - synchronous dataflow model (SDF and Discrete Event (DE have been used and finite state machine has been integrated with SDF and Discrete Event (DE modeling domains for simulating the functionalities in the system. Here a case study of resource augmented Navigation, Guidance and Control unit of onboard computers in satellite launch vehicle has been selected as a frame work and fault tolerant algorithm has been modeled and simulated with Ptolemy II. Feasibility of the scheduling of the fault tolerant algorithm has been analyzed and dependencies existing between different components and processes in the system have been investigated. The future work consists of modeling original functionality of NGC units inside each state of FSM and can be validated for the correct performance. Non-deterministic communication and clock drifts can be accounted into the model.

  16. Phase field modeling and simulation of three-phase flow on solid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Wang, Xiao-Ping

    2016-08-01

    Phase field models are widely used to describe the two-phase system. The evolution of the phase field variables is usually driven by the gradient flow of a total free energy functional. The generalization of the approach to an N phase (N ≥ 3) system requires some extra consistency conditions on the free energy functional in order for the model to give physically relevant results. A projection approach is proposed for the derivation of a consistent free energy functional for the three-phase Cahn-Hilliard equations. The system is then coupled with the Navier-Stokes equations to describe the three-phase flow on solid surfaces with moving contact line. An energy stable scheme is developed for the three-phase flow system. The discrete energy law of the numerical scheme is proved which ensures the stability of the scheme. We also show some numerical results for the dynamics of triple junctions and four phase contact lines.

  17. Investigations about Starting Cracks in DC-Casting of 6063-Type Billets Part II: Modelling Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, E. K.; Schneider, W.

    Influence on starting crack tendency of varying a number of casting parameters has been studied by experiments, Part I (1), and by model calculations, Part II. Both studies point to starting block shape as a most important single factor in controlling starting cracks. By using the thermal model ALSIM-2 in analysing initial experimental results, the variable heat transfer towards the starting block was determined. This made possible a satisfactory model analysis of the starting phase and likewise the formulation of a useful cracking concept. Thus by using calculated and measured liquid pool depth curve in the starting phase of casting as a basis, an effective starting block shape was found. This new shape practically eliminates the starting crack problems in extrusion billets of the AA6063 type alloys.

  18. Design of Studies for Development of BPA Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Accounting Policy Phase II, Volume II, 1985-1988 Technical Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneese, Allen V.

    1988-08-01

    The incremental costs of corrective measures to lessen the environmental impacts of the hydroelectric system are expected to increase and difficult questions to arise about the costs, effectiveness, and justification of alternative measures and their systemwide implications. The BPA anticipate this situation by launching a forward-looking research program aimed at providing methodological tools and data suitable for estimating the productivity and cost implications of mitigation alternatives in a timely manner with state-of-the-art accuracy. Resources for the Future (RFF) agreed at the request of the BPA to develop a research program which would provide an analytical system designed to assist the BPA Administrator and other interested and responsible parties in evaluating the ecological and economic aspects of alternative protection, enhancement, and mitigation measures. While this progression from an ecological understanding to cost-effectiveness analyses is straightforward in concept, the complexities of the Columbia River system make the development of analytical methods far from simple in practice. The Phase 2 final report outlines the technical issues involved in developing an analytical system and proposes a program of research to address these issues. The report is presented in the Summary Report (Volume 1), and the present volume which consists of three technical reports: Part I, Modeling the Salmon and Steelhead Fisheries of the Columbia River Basin; Part II, Models for Cost-Effectiveness Analysis; and Part III, Ocean Fisheries Harvest Management.

  19. Membrane/distillation hybrid process research and development. Final report, phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazanec, T.J.

    1997-07-01

    This report covers work conducted under the grant awarded to BP by DOE in late 1991 entitled {open_quotes}Membrane/Distillation Hybrid Process Research and Development.{close_quotes} The program was directed towards development and commercialization of the BP process for separation of vapor phase olefins from non-olefins via facilitated transport using an aqueous facilitator. The program has come to a very successful conclusion, with formation of a partnership between BP and Stone and Webster Engineering Corporation (SWEC) to market and commercialize the technology. The focus of this report is the final portion of the program, during which engineering re-design, facilitator optimization, economic analysis, and marketing have been the primary activities. At the end of Phase II BP was looking to partner with an engineering firm to advance the selective olefin recovery (SOR) technology from the lab/demo stage to full commercialization. In August 1995 BP and SWEC reached an agreement to advance the technology by completing additional Phase III work with DOE and beginning marketing activities.

  20. Modeling the phase diagram of carbon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghiringhelli, L.M.; Los, J.H.; Meijer, E.J.; Fasolino, A.; Frenkel, D.

    2005-01-01

    We determined the phase diagram involving diamond, graphite, and liquid carbon using a recently developed semiempirical potential. Using accurate free-energy calculations, we computed the solid-solid and solid-liquid phase boundaries for pressures and temperatures up to 400 GPa and 12 000 K, respect

  1. A sensitivity analysis of the WIPP disposal room model: Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labreche, D.A.; Beikmann, M.A. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Osnes, J.D. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Rapid City, SD (United States); Butcher, B.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-07-01

    The WIPP Disposal Room Model (DRM) is a numerical model with three major components constitutive models of TRU waste, crushed salt backfill, and intact halite -- and several secondary components, including air gap elements, slidelines, and assumptions on symmetry and geometry. A sensitivity analysis of the Disposal Room Model was initiated on two of the three major components (waste and backfill models) and on several secondary components as a group. The immediate goal of this component sensitivity analysis (Phase I) was to sort (rank) model parameters in terms of their relative importance to model response so that a Monte Carlo analysis on a reduced set of DRM parameters could be performed under Phase II. The goal of the Phase II analysis will be to develop a probabilistic definition of a disposal room porosity surface (porosity, gas volume, time) that could be used in WIPP Performance Assessment analyses. This report documents a literature survey which quantifies the relative importance of the secondary room components to room closure, a differential analysis of the creep consolidation model and definition of a follow-up Monte Carlo analysis of the model, and an analysis and refitting of the waste component data on which a volumetric plasticity model of TRU drum waste is based. A summary, evaluation of progress, and recommendations for future work conclude the report.

  2. How to improve the clinical development paradigm and its division into phases I, II and III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamberger, Marion; Moore, Nicholas; Lechat, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    of improvement of the medical benefit (ASMR) [level II/III or IV/V]. Such requests mainly concern uncertainties regarding the transposability, the patient profile or correct usage in real life. Among the studies whose results were provided, in 15 cases the results were in line with expectations, in 6 cases they resulted in downward re-evaluations and the final 3 cases were inconclusive. The final recommendations of the round table were: Defining the medical need that is not covered by working in consultation (Industry and Health Authorities); Providing a Complementary Investigations Plan (PIC) after the MA at a very early stage to reinforce the early MA, and/or HTA (health technology assessment) preparation and monitoring (possible constraining actions); Enhanced use of modelling techniques and their transposability; "Intussusception" of phases to optimise the development of a complete dossier; Early "scientific opinions" (EMA, French Health Products Safety Agency [Afssaps], French Health Authority [HAS]); Raising the awareness of the authorities, industry, doctors and patients with regard to controlled observational studies; Developing the use of public data bases.

  3. The Orthopaedic Training Study, Phase II 1968-1972. Final Report, Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Carl J.; And Others

    Phase two of the Orthopaedic Training Study was designed to examine time, sequence, and content requirements of existing orthopaedic programs. Specifically, the proposal was designed to achieve the following objectives: (1) to provide a model of individualized graduate education in medicine in which the demonstration of individual competence marks…

  4. A new atmospheric aerosol phase equilibrium model (UHAERO: organic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. R. Amundson

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In atmospheric aerosols, water and volatile inorganic and organic species are distributed between the gas and aerosol phases in accordance with thermodynamic equilibrium. Within an atmospheric particle, liquid and solid phases can exist at equilibrium. Models exist for computation of phase equilibria for inorganic/water mixtures typical of atmospheric aerosols; when organic species are present, the phase equilibrium problem is complicated by organic/water interactions as well as the potentially large number of organic species. We present here an extension of the UHAERO inorganic thermodynamic model (Amundson et al., 2006c to organic/water systems. Phase diagrams for a number of model organic/water systems characteristic of both primary and secondary organic aerosols are computed. Also calculated are inorganic/organic/water phase diagrams that show the effect of organics on inorganic deliquescence behavior. The effect of the choice of activity coefficient model for organics on the computed phase equilibria is explored.

  5. A new atmospheric aerosol phase equilibrium model (UHAERO: organic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. R. Amundson

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In atmospheric aerosols, water and volatile inorganic and organic species are distributed between the gas and aerosol phases in accordance with thermodynamic equilibrium. Within an atmospheric particle, liquid and solid phases can exist at equilibrium. Models exist for computation of phase equilibria for inorganic/water mixtures typical of atmospheric aerosols; when organic species are present, the phase equilibrium problem is complicated by organic/water interactions as well as the potentially large number of organic species. We present here an extension of the UHAERO inorganic thermodynamic model (Amundson et al., 2006c to organic/water systems. Phase diagrams for a number of model organic/water systems characteristic of both primary and secondary organic aerosols are computed. Also calculated are inorganic/organic/water phase diagrams that show the effect of organics on inorganic deliquescence behavior. The effect of the choice of activity coefficient model for organics on the computed phase equilibria is explored.

  6. Regularity of solutions of a phase field model

    KAUST Repository

    Amler, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Phase field models are widely-used for modelling phase transition processes such as solidification, freezing or CO2 sequestration. In this paper, a phase field model proposed by G. Caginalp is considered. The existence and uniqueness of solutions are proved in the case of nonsmooth initial data. Continuity of solutions with respect to time is established. In particular, it is shown that the governing initial boundary value problem can be considered as a dynamical system. © 2013 International Press.

  7. Parametric Dose Standardization for Optimizing Two-Agent Combinations in a Phase I-II Trial with Ordinal Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thall, Peter F; Nguyen, Hoang Q; Zinner, Ralph G

    2017-01-01

    A Bayesian model and design are described for a phase I-II trial to jointly optimise the doses of a targeted agent and a chemotherapy agent for solid tumors. A challenge in designing the trial was that both the efficacy and toxicity outcomes were defined as four-level ordinal variables. To reflect possibly complex joint effects of the two doses on each of the two outcomes, for each marginal distribution a generalised continuation ratio model was assumed, with each agent's dose parametrically standardised in the linear term. A copula was assumed to obtain a bivariate distribution. Elicited outcome probabilities were used to construct a prior, with variances calibrated to obtain small prior effective sample size. Elicited numerical utilities of the 16 elementary outcomes were used to compute posterior mean utilities as criteria for selecting dose pairs, with adaptive randomisation to reduce the risk of getting stuck at a suboptimal pair. A simulation study showed that parametric dose standardisation with additive dose effects provides a robust, reliable model for dose pair optimisation in this setting, and it compares favourably with designs based on alternative models that include dose-dose interaction terms. The proposed model and method are applicable generally to other clinical trial settings with similar dose and outcome structures.

  8. Theoretical models for Type I and Type II supernova

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.A.

    1985-01-01

    Recent theoretical progress in understanding the origin and nature of Type I and Type II supernovae is discussed. New Type II presupernova models characterized by a variety of iron core masses at the time of collapse are presented and the sensitivity to the reaction rate /sup 12/C(..cap alpha..,..gamma..)/sup 16/O explained. Stars heavier than about 20 M/sub solar/ must explode by a ''delayed'' mechanism not directly related to the hydrodynamical core bounce and a subset is likely to leave black hole remnants. The isotopic nucleosynthesis expected from these massive stellar explosions is in striking agreement with the sun. Type I supernovae result when an accreting white dwarf undergoes a thermonuclear explosion. The critical role of the velocity of the deflagration front in determining the light curve, spectrum, and, especially, isotopic nucleosynthesis in these models is explored. 76 refs., 8 figs.

  9. Numerical Predictions of Wind Turbine Power and Aerodynamic Loads for the NREL Phase II and IV Combined Experiment Rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Earl P. N.; Johnson, Wayne; vanDam, C. P.; Chao, David D.; Cortes, Regina; Yee, Karen

    1999-01-01

    Accurate, reliable and robust numerical predictions of wind turbine rotor power remain a challenge to the wind energy industry. The literature reports various methods that compare predictions to experiments. The methods vary from Blade Element Momentum Theory (BEM), Vortex Lattice (VL), to variants of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RaNS). The BEM and VL methods consistently show discrepancies in predicting rotor power at higher wind speeds mainly due to inadequacies with inboard stall and stall delay models. The RaNS methodologies show promise in predicting blade stall. However, inaccurate rotor vortex wake convection, boundary layer turbulence modeling and grid resolution has limited their accuracy. In addition, the inherently unsteady stalled flow conditions become computationally expensive for even the best endowed research labs. Although numerical power predictions have been compared to experiment. The availability of good wind turbine data sufficient for code validation experimental data that has been extracted from the IEA Annex XIV download site for the NREL Combined Experiment phase II and phase IV rotor. In addition, the comparisons will show data that has been further reduced into steady wind and zero yaw conditions suitable for comparisons to "steady wind" rotor power predictions. In summary, the paper will present and discuss the capabilities and limitations of the three numerical methods and make available a database of experimental data suitable to help other numerical methods practitioners validate their own work.

  10. Phenotype prediction of nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in human phase II drug/xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes: perspectives on molecular evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) in coding regions can lead to amino acid changes that might alter the protein’s function and account for susceptibility to disease and altered drug/xenobiotic response. Many nsSNPs have been found in genes encoding human phase II metabolizing enzymes; however, there is little known about the relationship between the genotype and phenotype of nsSNPs in these enzymes. We have identified 923 validated nsSNPs in 104 human phase II enzyme genes from the Ensembl genome database and the NCBI SNP database. Using PolyPhen, Panther, and SNAP algorithms, 44%?59% of nsSNPs in phase II enzyme genes were predicted to have functional impacts on protein function. Predictions largely agree with the available experimental annotations. 68% of deleterious nsSNPs were correctly predicted as damaging. This study also identified many amino acids that are likely to be functionally critical, but have not yet been studied experimentally. There was significant concordance between the predicted results of Panther and PolyPhen, and between SNAP non-neutral predictions and PolyPhen scores. Evolutionarily non-neutral (destabilizing) amino acid substitutions are thought to be the pathogenetic basis for the alteration of phase II enzyme activity and to be associated with disease susceptibility and drug/xenobiotic toxicity. Furthermore, the molecular evolutionary patterns of phase II enzymes were characterized with regards to the predicted deleterious nsSNPs.

  11. Characterization, phase change and conductivity crossover of new luminescent ferroelectric Mn (II) organic-inorganic hybrid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mostafa, Mohga F., E-mail: Mohga40@yahoo.com; El Dean, Thana Sh., E-mail: th_sh2000@yahoo.com; Tammam, Ahmed K., E-mail: physicsoman@yahoo.com

    2016-09-01

    Synthesis and characterization of new luminescent ferroelectric [(CH{sub 3})(C{sub 6}H{sub 5}){sub 3}P]{sub 2}MnBr{sub 4} organic-inorganic hybrid (OIH) are reported. Powder x-ray diffraction showed the following phases: {sup P2/m} {sup (280 K)} Phase (IV) {sup P21} {sup (298 K)} Phase (III) {sup Pna21} {sup (350 K)} Phase (II) {sup Pnma} {sup (370 K)} Phase (I). Room temperature lattice parameters are a = 9.6233 (Å), b = 12.5653 (Å) c = 16.4503 (Å) and β = 105.6° (T = 298 K). UV-VIS and Ac magnetic susceptibility confirm tetrahedral symmetry of [MnBr{sub 4}]{sup 2−}. DSC and dielectric measurements showed four phase transitions at T{sub 4peak} = 279.1 ± 1 K (ΔS = 1.03 J/mol K), T{sub 3peak} = 300.1 ± 2 K (ΔS = 2.33 J/mol K), T{sub 2peakt} = 353.2 ± 3 K (ΔS = 2.68 J/mol K) and T{sub 1peak} = 379.1 ± 3 K (ΔS = 2.43 J/mol K). Calculated lattice potential energy values vary from 827 (kJ/mol) at 280 K to (797 kJ/mol) at 370 K. Ac conductivity measurements (220 < T(K) < 400) and (0.081 < f (kHz) < 30) are presented. It is ferroelectric with Curie temperature T{sub c} = 309 K. Hybrid is semiconductor in the temperature range 309 ± 14 K, where conductivity follows Jonscher’s universal dielectric response otherwise it is an insulator where crossover to super-linear power law prevails. Comparison to the corresponding chloride is discussed. - Graphical abstract: Plot of real part of permittivity [ln(ε′)] versus temperature (K). - Highlights: • Conductivity crossover from SlPL to UDR is confirmed. • Change from semiconductor to insulator. • Structural phase transformation.

  12. Time-dependent Effects in Photospheric-Phase Type II Supernova Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Dessart, Luc

    2007-01-01

    Spectroscopic modeling of Type II supernovae (SNe) generally assumes steady-state. Following the recent suggestion of Utrobin & Chugai, but using the 1D non-LTE line-blanketed model atmosphere code CMFGEN, we investigate the effects of including time-dependent terms that appear in the statistical and radiative equilibrium equations. We base our discussion on the ejecta properties and the spectroscopic signatures obtained from time-dependent simulations, investigating different ejecta configurations, and covering their evolution from one day to six weeks after shock breakout. Compared to equivalent steady-state models, our time-dependent models produce SN ejecta that are systematically over-ionized, affecting helium at one week after explosion, but ultimately affecting all ions after a few weeks. While the continuum remains essentially unchanged, time-dependence effects on observed spectral lines are large. At the recombination epoch, HI lines and NaID are considerably stronger and broader than in equivale...

  13. Edge-mounting locking mechanics for barrel strip staves for the ATLAS phase II upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the development of an edge-mounting mechanism for the interface between a stave and its support cylinder for the barrel strip staves of the phase II ATLAS upgrade. As a direct product of the prototyping programme undertaken, we have also developed the tooling required to precisely mount the components of the mechanism to their respective structures. The design has been conceived to be compatible with tilt angles as low as 10° for the nominal module envelope, and meet the positioning and stability requirements whilst having an acceptably small contribution to the total material in the tracker volume. In order to reach these goals, the tooling for stave insertion was designed to be completely removable and respects the clearances of pre-installed staves.

  14. Near-Term Electric Vehicle Program. Phase II: Mid-Term Summary Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-08-01

    The Near Term Electric Vehicle (NTEV) Program is a constituent elements of the overall national Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program that is being implemented by the Department of Energy in accordance with the requirements of the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1976. Phase II of the NTEV Program is focused on the detailed design and development, of complete electric integrated test vehicles that incorporate current and near-term technology, and meet specified DOE objectives. The activities described in this Mid-Term Summary Report are being carried out by two contractor teams. The prime contractors for these contractor teams are the General Electric Company and the Garrett Corporation. This report is divided into two discrete parts. Part 1 describes the progress of the General Electric team and Part 2 describes the progress of the Garrett team.

  15. The phase-II ATLAS pixel tracker upgrade: layout and mechanics.

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Abhishek; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment will upgrade its tracking detector during the Phase-II LHC shutdown, to better take advantage of the increased luminosity of the HL-LHC. The upgraded tracker will consist of silicon-strip modules surrounding a pixel detector, and will likely cover an extended eta range, perhaps as far as |eta|<4.0. A number of layout and supporting-structure options are being considered for the pixel detector, with the final choice expected to be made in early 2017. The proposed supporting structures are based on lightweight, highly-thermally-conductive carbon-based materials and are cooled by evaporative carbon dioxide. The various layouts will be described and a description of the supporting structures will be presented, along with results from testing of prototypes.

  16. Radiation Hard Silicon Particle Detectors for Phase-II LHC Trackers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oblakowska-Mucha, A.

    2017-02-01

    The major LHC upgrade is planned after ten years of accelerator operation. It is foreseen to significantly increase the luminosity of the current machine up to 1035 cm‑2s‑1 and operate as the upcoming High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) . The major detectors upgrade, called the Phase-II Upgrade, is also planned, a main reason being the aging processes caused by severe particle radiation. Within the RD50 Collaboration, a large Research and Development program has been underway to develop silicon sensors with sufficient radiation tolerance for HL-LHC trackers. In this summary, several results obtained during the testing of the devices after irradiation to HL-LHC levels are presented. Among the studied structures, one can find advanced sensors types like 3D silicon detectors, High-Voltage CMOS technologies, or sensors with intrinsic gain (LGAD). Based on these results, the RD50 Collaboration gives recommendation for the silicon detectors to be used in the detector upgrade.

  17. New fuzzy EWMA control charts for monitoring phase II fuzzy profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazale Moghadam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In many quality control applications, the quality of a process or product is explained by the relationship between response variable and one or more explanatory variables, called a profile. In this paper, a new fuzzy EWMA control chart for phase II fuzzy profile monitoring is proposed. To this end, we extend EWMA control charts to its equivalent Fuzzy type and then implement fuzzy ranking methods to determine whether the process fuzzy profile is under or out of control. The proposed method is capable of identifying small changes in process under condition of process profile explaining parameters vagueness, roughness and uncertainty. Determining the source of changes, this method provides us with the possibility of recognizing the causes of process transition from stable mode, removing these causes and restoring the process stable mode.

  18. Integrated safety analysis of rolapitant with coadministered drugs from phase II/III trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbour, S; Smit, T.; Wang, X

    2017-01-01

    for treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) and treatment-emergent serious adverse events (TESAEs) during cycle 1 were pooled across the four studies and summarized in the overall population and by concomitant use/non-use of CYP2D6 or BCRP substrate drugs. Results: In the integrated safety population, 828...... cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4, but it does inhibit CYP2D6 and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). To analyze potential drug-drug interactions between rolapitant and concomitant medications, this integrated safety analysis of four double-blind, randomized phase II or III studies of rolapitant examined...... the safety of rolapitant as part of an antiemetic triple-drug regimen in patients receiving emetogenic chemotherapy, including those administered concomitant medications that are substrates of CYP2D6 or BCRP, such as ondansetron, docetaxel, or irinotecan....

  19. Evaluation of hydrothermal resources of North Dakota. Phase II. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, K.L.; Howell, F.L.; Winczewski, L.M.; Wartman, B.L.; Umphrey, H.R.; Anderson, S.B.

    1981-06-01

    The Phase II activities dealt with three main topical areas: geothermal gradient and heat-flow studies, stratigraphic studies, and water quality studies. Efforts were concentrated on Mesozoic and Cenozoic rocks. The geothermal gradient and heat-flow studies involved running temperature logs in groundwater observation holes in areas of interest, and locating, obtaining access to, and casing holes of convenience to be used as heat-flow determination sites. The stratigraphic and water quality studies involved two main efforts: updating and expanding WELLFILE and assembling a computer library system (WELLCAT) for all water wells drilled in the state. WATERCAT combines data from the United States Geological Survey Water Resources Division's WATSTOR and GWST computer libraries; and includes physical, stratigraphic, and water quality data. Goals, methods, and results are presented.

  20. Performance of the TilePPr demonstrator for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Phase II Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Carrio Argos, Fernando; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter Pre-processor (TilePPr) demonstrator is a high performance double AMC board based on FPGA resources and QSFP modules. This board has been designed in the framework of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) Demonstrator Project for the Phase II Upgrade as the first stage of the off-detector electronics. The TilePPr demonstrator has been conceived for receiving and processing the data coming from the on-detector electronics of the TileCal Demonstrator module, as well as for configuring it. Moreover, the TilePPr demonstrator handles the communication with the Detector Control System to monitor and control the on-detector electronics.

  1. Nonisovalent Si-III-V and Si-II-VI alloys: Covalent, ionic, and mixed phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Joongoo; Park, Ji-Sang; Stradins, Pauls; Wei, Su-Huai

    2017-07-01

    Nonequilibrium growth of Si-III-V or Si-II-VI alloys is a promising approach to obtaining optically more active Si-based materials. We propose a new class of nonisovalent Si2AlP (or Si2ZnS) alloys in which the Al-P (or Zn-S) atomic chains are as densely packed as possible in the host Si matrix. As a hybrid of the lattice-matched parent phases, Si2AlP (or Si2ZnS) provides an ideal material system with tunable local chemical orders around Si atoms within the same composition and structural motif. Here, using first-principles hybrid functional calculations, we discuss how the local chemical orders affect the electronic and optical properties of the nonisovalent alloys.

  2. Conspray dynamic sleeve piston coal feeder. Phase II. Verification tests. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-26

    This report details the performance of Phase II: Verification Tests of the Conspray dynamic sleeve piston coal feeder. The machine performed for 200 hours at 700 psi backpressure, utilizing a 70% to 200 mesh Utah bituminous coal as feedstock. All test work was satisfactorily completed. A post-test inspection was performed. A report of component wear and failures incurred in testing is included as well as suggestions for machine upgrades. The overall conclusion is that the dynamic sleeve piston feeder has proven its ability to operate safely and reliably. When problems have occurred, the machine has demonstrated inherent safety by shutting down without endangering process or personnel. With the recommended improvements incorporated into the feeder, the unit will be ready for installation on a pilot scale coal gasifier. 9 figures, 11 tables.

  3. North Atlantic Simulations in Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments phase II (CORE-II): Inter-Annual to Decadal Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danabasoglu, G.; Yeager, S. G.; Kim, W. M.; Behrens, E.; Bentsen, M.; Bi, D.; Biastoch, A.; Bleck, R.; Boning, C. W.; Bozec, A.; Canuto, V.; Cassou, C.; Chassignet, E.; Coward, A.; Danilov, S.; Diansky, N.; Drange, H.; Farneti, R.; Fernandez, E.; Fogli, P. G.; Jung, T.; Forget, G.; Fujii, Y.; Griffies, S. M.; Gusev, A. A.; Heimbach, P.; Howard, A. M.; Ilicak, M.; Karspeck, A. R.; Kelley, M.; Large, W.; Leboissetier, A.; Lu, J.; Madec, G.; Marsland, S. J.; Masina, S.; Navarra, A.; Nurser, A. J. G.; Pirani, A.; Romanou, A.; Salas y Mélia, D.; Hunter Samuels, B. L.; Scheinert, M.; Sidorenko, D.; Sun, S.; Treguier, A. M.; Tsujino, H.; Uotila, P.; Valcke, S.; Voldoire, A.; Wang, Q.; Yashayaev, I.

    2016-02-01

    Simulated inter-annual to decadal variability and trends in the North Atlantic for the1958-2007 period from twenty global ocean - sea-ice coupled models are presented.These simulations are performed as contributions to the second phase of the CoordinatedOcean-ice Reference Experiments (CORE-II). A major focus of the present study is the representation of Atlanticmeridional overturning circulation (AMOC) variability in the participating models.Relationships between AMOC variability and those of some other related variables, suchas subpolar mixed layer depths, the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), and the LabradorSea upper-ocean hydrographic properties, are also investigated. In general, AMOCvariability shows three distinct stages. During the first stage that lasts until the mid-to late-1970s, AMOC is relatively steady, remaining lower than its long-term(1958-2007) mean. Thereafter, AMOC intensifies with maximum transports achieved in the mid- to late-1990s. This enhancement isthen followed by a weakening trend until the end of our integration period. Thissequence of low frequency AMOC variability is consistent with previous studies.Regarding strengthening of AMOC between about the mid-1970s and the mid-1990s, our resultssupport a previously identified variability mechanism where AMOC intensification isconnected to increased deep water formation in the subpolar North Atlantic, drivenby NAO-related surface fluxes. The simulations tend to show general agreement in theirrepresentations of, for example, AMOC, sea surface temperature (SST), and subpolar mixed layerdepth variabilities. In particular, the observed variability of the North Atlantic SSTs iscaptured well by all models. These findings indicate that simulated variability andtrends are primarily dictated by the atmospheric datasets which include the influenceof ocean dynamics from nature superimposed onto anthropogenic effects. Despite thesegeneral agreements, there are many differences among the model solutions

  4. Fitting the Two-Higgs-Doublet model of type II

    CERN Document Server

    Eberhardt, Otto

    2014-01-01

    We present the current status of the Two-Higgs-Doublet model of type II. Taking into account all available relevant information, we exclude at $95$% CL sizeable deviations of the so-called alignment limit, in which all couplings of the light CP-even Higgs boson $h$ are Standard-Model-like. While we can set a lower limit of $240$ GeV on the mass of the pseudoscalar Higgs boson at $95$% CL, the mass of the heavy CP-even Higgs boson $H$ can be even lighter than $200$ GeV. The strong constraints on the model parameters also set limits on the triple Higgs couplings: the $hhh$ coupling in the Two-Higgs-Doublet model of type II cannot be larger than in the Standard Model, while the $hhH$ coupling can maximally be $2.5$ times the size of the Standard Model $hhh$ coupling, assuming an $H$ mass below $1$ TeV. The selection of benchmark scenarios which maximize specific effects within the allowed regions for further collider studies is illustrated for the $H$ branching fraction to fermions and gauge bosons. As an exampl...

  5. Spin crossover properties of the [Fe(PM-BiA) sub 2 (NCS) sub 2] complex - phases I and II

    CERN Document Server

    Letard, J F; Nguyen, O; Marcen, S; Marchivie, M; Guionneau, P; Chasseau, D; Guetlich, P

    2003-01-01

    In the present review, we reexamine the photomagnetic properties of the [Fe (PM-BiA) sub 2 (NCS) sub 2], cis-bis(thiocyanato)-bis[(N-2'-pyridylmethylene)-4-(aminobiphenyl)] iron(II), compound which exhibits, depending on the synthetic method, an exceptionally abrupt spin transition (phase 1) with a very narrow hysteresis (T sub 1 sub / sub 2 arrow down = 168 K and T sub 1 sub / sub 2 arrow up = 173 K) or a gradual spin conversion (phase II) occurring at 190 K. In both cases, light irradiation in the tail of the sup 1 MLCT-LS absorption band, at 830 nm, results in the population of the high-spin state according to the light-induced excited spin-state trapping (LIESST) effect. The capacity of a compound to retain the light-induced HS information, estimated through the T(LIESST) experiment, is determined for both phases. Interestingly, the shape of the T(LIESST) curve is more gradual for the phase II than for the phase I and the T(LIESST) value is found considerably lower in the case of the phase II. The kinetic...

  6. A Phase II Study of RO4929097 Gamma-Secretase Inhibitor in Metastatic Melanoma: SWOG 0933

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sylvia M.; Moon, James; Redman, Bruce G.; Chidiac, Tarek; Flaherty, Lawrence E.; Zha, Yuanyuan; Othus, Megan; Ribas, Antoni; Sondak, Vernon K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Aberrant Notch activation confers a proliferative advantage onto many human tumors, including melanoma. This phase II trial assessed the antitumor activity of RO4929097, a gamma-secretase inhibitor of Notch signaling, on the progression-free and overall survival of patients with advanced melanoma. Methods Chemotherapy-naïve patients with metastatic melanoma of cutaneous or unknown origin were treated with RO4929097 at a dose of 20 mg orally daily, 3 consecutive days per week. A two-step accrual design was used, with an interim analysis on the first 32 patients, and continuation of enrollment if ≥4/32 patients responded. Results Thirty-six patients from 23 institutions were enrolled; 32 patients were evaluable. RO4929097 was well-tolerated, and most toxicities were grade 1 or 2. The most common toxicities were nausea (53%), fatigue (41%), and anemia (22%). There was 1 confirmed partial response lasting 7 months, and 8 patients with stable disease lasting at least through week 12, with one of these continuing for 31 months. The 6-month PFS was 9% (95% CI: 2–22%), and 1-year OS was 50% (95% CI: 32–66%). Peripheral blood T cell assays showed no significant inhibition of IL-2 production, a surrogate pharmacodynamic marker of Notch inhibition, suggesting that the drug levels were insufficient to achieve Notch target inhibition. Conclusions RO4929097 showed minimal clinical activity against metastatic melanoma in this phase II trial, possibly due to inadequate exposure to therapeutic drug levels. While Notch inhibition remains a compelling target in melanoma, our results do not support further investigation of RO4929097 at this dose and schedule. PMID:25250858

  7. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Naturita site, Naturita, Colorado. Phase II, Title I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-11-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has performed an engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Naturita, Colorado. The Phase II, Title I services include the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings, the performance of radiometric measurements to determine the extent of radium contamination, the evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology, and the costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the 704,000 tons of tailings at the Naturita site constitutes the most significant environmental impact although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. Ranchers Exploration and Development Company has been licensed by the State of Colorado to reprocess the tailings at a location 3 mi from the present site where they will be stabilized for long-term storage. The remedial action options include remedial action for structures in Naturita and Nucla (Option I) at an estimated cost of $270,000 and remedial action for structures and open land adjacent to the tailings site (Option II) at an estimated cost of $950,000.

  8. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Shiprock site, Shiprock, New Mexico. Phase II, Title I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-03-31

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has performed an engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Shiprock, New Mexico. The Phase II, Title I services include the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and other radium-contaminated materials, the evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the 1.7 million tons of tailings at the Shiprock site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. The 11 alternative actions presented range from completion of the present ongoing EPA site decontamination plan (Option I), to stabilizing in-place with varying depths of cover material (Options II-IV), to removal to an isolated long-term disposal site (Options V-XI). All options include remedial action costs for off-site locations where tailings have been placed. Costs estimates for the 11 options range from $540,000 to $12,500,000. Reprocessing the tailings for uranium is not economically feasible.

  9. Analysis of Early Severe Accident Initiated by LBLOCA for Qinshan Phase II Nuclear Power Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Xing-Wei

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to simulate an early Severe Accident (SA scenario more detail through transferring the thermal-hydraulic status of the plant predicted by RELAP5 computer code to SA Program (SAP. Based on the criterion of date extract time, the RELAP5 thermal-hydraulic calculation data is extracted to form a file for SAP input card at 1477K of cladding surface. Relying on the thermal-hydraulic boundary parameters calculated by RELAP5 code, analysis of early SA initiated by the Large Break Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LBLOCA without mitigation measures for Qinshan Phase II Nuclear Power Plant (QSP-II performed by SAP through finding the key events of accident sequence, estimating the amount of hydrogen generation and oxidation behavior of the cladding and evaluating the relocation order of the materials collapsed in the central region of the core. The results of this study are expected to improve the SA analysis methodology more detail through analyzing early SA scenario.

  10. Electron/gamma and alpha backgrounds in CRESST-II Phase 2

    CERN Document Server

    Strauss, R; Bento, A; Bucci, C; Canonica, L; Erb, A; Feilitzsch, F v; Iachellini, N Ferreiro; Gorla, P; Gütlein, A; Hauff, D; Jochum, J; Kiefer, M; Kluck, H; Kraus, H; Lanfranchi, J -C; Loebell, J; Münster, A; Petricca, F; Potzel, W; Pröbst, F; Reindl, F; Roth, S; Rottler, K; Sailer, C; Schäffner, K; Schieck, J; Scholl, S; Schönert, S; Seidel, W; Sivers, M v; Stodolsky, L; Strandhagen, C; Tanzke, A; Uffinger, M; Ulrich, A; Usherov, I; Wawoczny, S; Willers, M; Wüstrich, M; Zöller, A

    2014-01-01

    The experiment CRESST-II aims at the detection of dark matter with scintillating CaWO$_4$ crystals operated as cryogenic detectors. Recent results on spin-independent WIMP-nucleon scattering from the CRESST-II Phase 2 allowed to probe a new region of parameter space for WIMP masses below 3$\\,$GeV/c$^2$. This sensitivity was achieved after background levels were reduced significantly. We present extensive background studies of a CaWO$_4$ crystal, called TUM40, grown at the Technische Universit\\"at M\\"unchen. The average beta/gamma rate of 3.44/[kg$\\,$keV$\\,$day] (1-40$\\,$keV) and the total intrinsic alpha activity from natural decay chains of $3.08\\pm0.04\\,$mBq/kg are the lowest reported for CaWO$_4$ detectors. Contributions of gamma lines resulting from cosmogenic activation, external X-rays and intrinsic beta emitters are investigated in detail.

  11. Robust Type-II Weyl Semimetal Phase in Transition Metal Diphosphides X P2 (X =Mo , W)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autès, G.; Gresch, D.; Troyer, M.; Soluyanov, A. A.; Yazyev, O. V.

    2016-08-01

    The recently discovered type-II Weyl points appear at the boundary between electron and hole pockets. Type-II Weyl semimetals that host such points are predicted to exhibit a new type of chiral anomaly and possess thermodynamic properties very different from their type-I counterparts. In this Letter, we describe the prediction of a type-II Weyl semimetal phase in the transition metal diphosphides MoP2 and WP2 . These materials are characterized by relatively simple band structures with four pairs of type-II Weyl points. Neighboring Weyl points have the same chirality, which makes the predicted topological phase robust with respect to small perturbations of the crystalline lattice. In addition, this peculiar arrangement of the Weyl points results in long topological Fermi arcs, thus making them readily accessible in angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy.

  12. Low energy threshold analysis of the phase I and phase II data sets of the Sudbury neutrino observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seibert, S R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hime, A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Elliott, S R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rielage, K [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Results are reported from a joint analysis of Phase I and Phase II data from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. The effective electron kinetic energy threshold used is T{sub eff} = 3.5 MeV, the lowest analysis threshold yet achieved with water Cherenkov detector data. In units of 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2} s{sup =1}, the total flux of active-flavor neutrinos from {sup 8}B decay in the Sun measured using the neutral current (NC) reaction of neutrinos on deuterons, with no constraint on the {sup 8}B neutrino energy spectrum, is found to be {Phi}{sub NC} = 5.140{sub -0.158}{sup +0.160}(stat){sub -0.117}{sup +0.132}(syst). These uncertainties are more than a factor of two smaller than previously published results. Also presented are the spectra of recoil electrons from the charged current reaction of neutrinos on deuterons and the elastic scattering of electrons. A fit to the SNO data in which the free parameters directly describe the total {sup 8}B neutrino flux and the energy-dependent Ve survival probability provides a measure of the total {sup 8}B neutrino flux {Phi}{sub 8{sub B}} = 5.046{sub -0.152}{sup +0.159}(stat){sub -0.123}{sup +0.107}(syst). Combining these new results with results of all other solar experiments and the KamLAND reactor experiment yields best-fit values of the mixing parameters of {theta}{sub 12} = 34.06{sub -0.84}{sup +1.16} degrees and {Delta}m{sub 21}{sup 2} = 7.59{sub -0.21}{sup +0.20} x 10{sup -5} eV{sup 2}. The global value of {Phi}{sub 8{sub B}} is extracted to a precision of {sub -2.95}{sup +2.38}%. In a three-flavor analysis the best fit value of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub 13} is 2.00{sub -1.63}{sup +2.09} x 10{sup -2}. Interpreting this as a limit implies an upper bound of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub 13} < 0.057 (95% C. L.).

  13. Photon Number Conserving Models of H II Bubbles during Reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Paranjape, Aseem; Padmanabhan, Hamsa

    2015-01-01

    Traditional excursion set based models of H II bubble growth during the epoch of reionization are known to violate photon number conservation, in the sense that the mass fraction in ionized bubbles in these models does not equal the ratio of the number of ionizing photons produced by sources and the number of hydrogen atoms in the intergalactic medium. We demonstrate that this problem arises from a fundamental conceptual shortcoming of the excursion set approach (already recognised in the literature on this formalism) which only tracks average mass fractions instead of the exact, stochastic source counts. With this insight, we build an approximately photon number conserving Monte Carlo model of bubble growth based on partitioning regions of dark matter into halos. Our model, which is formally valid for white noise initial conditions (ICs), shows dramatic improvements in photon number conservation, as well as substantial differences in the bubble size distribution, as compared to traditional models. We explore...

  14. Phase Transitions in Two-Dimensional Traffic Flow Models

    CERN Document Server

    Cuesta, J A; Molera, J M; Cuesta, José A; Martinez, Froilán C; Molera, Juan M

    1993-01-01

    Abstract: We introduce two simple two-dimensional lattice models to study traffic flow in cities. We have found that a few basic elements give rise to the characteristic phase diagram of a first-order phase transition from a freely moving phase to a jammed state, with a critical point. The jammed phase presents new transitions corresponding to structural transformations of the jam. We discuss their relevance in the infinite size limit.

  15. Phase Transitions in Two-Dimensional Traffic Flow Models

    CERN Document Server

    Cuesta, José A; Molera, Juan M; Escuela, Angel Sánchez; 10.1103/PhysRevE.48.R4175

    2009-01-01

    We introduce two simple two-dimensional lattice models to study traffic flow in cities. We have found that a few basic elements give rise to the characteristic phase diagram of a first-order phase transition from a freely moving phase to a jammed state, with a critical point. The jammed phase presents new transitions corresponding to structural transformations of the jam. We discuss their relevance in the infinite size limit.

  16. An Angular Overlap Model for Cu(II) Ion in the AMOEBA Polarizable Force Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Jin Yu; Ponder, Jay W

    2014-01-01

    An extensible polarizable force field for transition metal ion was developed based on AMOEBA and the angular overlap model (AOM) with consistent treatment of electrostatics for all atoms. Parameters were obtained by fitting molecular mechanics (MM) energies to various ab initio gas-phase calculations. The results of parameterization were presented for copper (II) ion ligated to water and model fragments of amino acid residues involved in the copper binding sites of type 1 copper proteins. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed on aqueous copper (II) ion at various temperatures, as well as plastocyanin (1AG6) and azurin (1DYZ). Results demonstrated that the AMOEBA-AOM significantly improves the accuracy of classical MM in a number of test cases when compared to ab initio calculations. The Jahn-Teller distortion for hexa-aqua copper (II) complex was handled automatically without specifically designating axial and in-plane ligands. Analyses of MD trajectories resulted in a 6-coordination first solvation shell for aqueous copper (II) ion and a 1.8ns average residence time of water molecules. The ensemble average geometries of 1AG6 and 1DYZ copper binding sites were in general agreement with X-ray and previous computational studies.

  17. In vivo phase II-enzymes inducers, as potential chemopreventive agents, based on the chalcone and furoxan skeletons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Mauricio; Mastandrea, Ignacio; Otero, Gabriel; Cerecetto, Hugo; González, Mercedes

    2016-04-15

    Cancer chemoprevention involves prevention/delay/reverse of the carcinogenic process through administration of cancer chemopreventive agents (CCA). Compounds which are able to induce detoxification-enzymes, especially monofunctional phase II enzymes, have become in excellent approaches for new CCA. Herein, we report the synthesis of new furoxanyl chalcone-like hybrid compounds as CCA. In vitro studies showed that phenylfuroxanyl derivatives 6 and 9 displayed the best activities being 9 the greatest monofunctional-inducer. Additionally, compounds were non-mutagenic against TA98 Salmonella typhimurium strain (Ames test) and could be used in the prevention of the progression of pre-malignant lesions for their cytotoxic activity against tumoral cells. In vivo proof of concept showed increment on phase II-enzymes activities in liver, colon and mammary gland having derivative 9 the best induction profiles. We probed Nrf2 nuclear translocation is operative for both compounds allowing to exert protective effects via expression of downstream phase-II enzymes.

  18. Reversed-Phase Liquid Chromatographic Separation and Determination of Ni(II, Cu(II, Pd(II, and Ag(I Using 2-Pyrrolecarboxaldehyde-4-phenylsemicarbazone as a Complexing Reagent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arfana Mallah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the utilization of 2-pyrrolecarboxaldehyde-4-phenylsemicarbazone (PPS as a complexing reagent for the simultaneous determination and separation of Ni(II, Cu(II, Pd(II, and Ag(I by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detector. A good separation was achieved using Microsorb C18 column (150 × 4.6 mm i.d. with a mobile phase consisted of methanol : acetonitrile : water : sodium acetate (1 mM (68 : 6.5 : 25 : 0.5 v/v/v/v at a flow rate of 1 mL/min. The detection was performed at 280 nm. The linear calibration range was 2–10 μg/mL for all metal ions. The detection limits (S/N = 3 were 80 pg/mL for Ni(II, 0.8 ng/mL for Cu(II, 0.16 ng/mL for Pd(II, and 0.8 ng/mL for Ag(I. The applicability and the accuracy of the developed method were estimated by the analysis of Ni(II in hydrogenated oil (ghee samples and Pd(II in palladium charcoal.

  19. A model for wave propagation in a porous solid saturated by a three-phase fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Juan E; Savioli, Gabriela B

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a model to describe the propagation of waves in a poroelastic medium saturated by a three-phase viscous, compressible fluid. Two capillary relations between the three fluid phases are included in the model by introducing Lagrange multipliers in the principle of virtual complementary work. This approach generalizes that of Biot for single-phase fluids and allows to determine the strain energy density, identify the generalized strains and stresses, and derive the constitutive relations of the system. The kinetic and dissipative energy density functions are obtained assuming that the relative flow within the pore space is of laminar type and obeys Darcy's law for three-phase flow in porous media. After deriving the equations of motion, a plane wave analysis predicts the existence of four compressional waves, denoted as type I, II, III, and IV waves, and one shear wave. Numerical examples showing the behavior of all waves as function of saturation and frequency are presented.

  20. Zigzag order and phase competition in expanded Kitaev-Heisenberg model on honeycomb lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xiaoyan

    2015-07-01

    The Kitaev-Heisenberg model on the honeycomb lattice is investigated in two cases: (I) with the Kitaev interaction between the nearest neighbors, and (II) with the Kitaev interaction between the next nearest neighbors. In the full parameter range, the ground states are searched by Monte Carlo simulation and identified by evaluating the correlation functions. The energies of different phases are calculated and compared with the simulated result to show the phase competition. It is observed from both energy calculation and the density of states that the zigzag order shows a symmetric behavior to the stripy phase in the pure Kitaev-Heisenberg model. By considering more interactions in both cases, the energy of zigzag order can be reduced lower than the energies of other states. Thus the zigzag phase may be stabilized in more parameter region and even extended to the whole parameter range.

  1. TOXIC SUBSTANCES FROM COAL COMBUSTION--A COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT, PHASE II: ELEMENT MODES OF OCCURRENCE FOR THE OHIO 5/6/7, WYODAK AND NORTH DAKOTA COAL SAMPLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allan Kolker; Stanley J. Mroczkowski; Curtis A. Palmer; Kristen O. Dennen; Robert B. Finkelman; John H. Bullock Jr.

    2002-05-30

    This study reports on the second phase (Phase II) of USGS research activities in support of DOE contract DE-AC22-95PC95101 ''Toxic Substances From Coal Combustion--A Comprehensive Assessment'', funded under DOE Interagency Agreement DE-AI22-95PC95145. The purpose of the study was to provide a quantitative and semi-quantitative characterization of the modes of occurrence of trace elements in coal samples investigated under Phase II, including (1) Ohio 5/6/7, an Ohio bituminous coal sample blended from the No.5, No.6, and No.7 beds; (2) North Dakota, a lignite sample from the Falkirk Mine, Underwood, ND, and (3) Wyodak, a sub-bituminous coal sample from the Cordero Mine, Gillette, WY. Samples from these coal beds were selected for their range in rank and commercial applicability. Results of this research provide basic information on the distribution of elements in Phase II coal samples, information needed for development of a commercial predictive model for trace-element behavior during coal combustion.

  2. The performance of model-based versus rule-based phase I clinical trials in oncology : A quantitative comparison of the performance of model-based versus rule-based phase I trials with molecularly targeted anticancer drugs over the last 2 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Brummelen, E M J; Huitema, A D R; van Werkhoven, E; Beijnen, J H; Schellens, J H M

    2016-01-01

    Phase I studies with anticancer drugs are used to evaluate safety and tolerability and to choose a recommended phase II dose (RP2D). Traditionally, phase I trial designs are rule-based, but for several years there is a trend towards model-based designs. Simulations have shown that model-based design

  3. The circumstellar structure of the Be shell star φ Persei. II. Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, W.; Štefl, S.

    2001-03-01

    We model Fe Ii 5317 emission lines and phase resolved He I 6678 and 5876 emission lines of the bright B2e&sdO shell binary phi Per to find the size and shape of the excitation region inside the circumprimary disk. We find the Fe Ii 5317 emission to originate within 9 stellar radii in an axisymmetric disk around the primary. Orbital phase variations of He I 6678 are fit in terms of a disk sector with disk radius of 10 stellar radii and opening angle of =~ 120degr facing the secondary. This region can be alternatively described by an intersection of a sphere around the secondary and the circumprimary disk with a penetration depth of about 7 R_*. Similar fit values are found for He I 5876. The enigmatic orbital phase precedence of shell occurrence in the He I emission features is discussed. We favor a model in which the inner He I shell is deformed because of differential rotation in combination with a finite recombination time. Based on observations collected at the Ondřejov Observatory (of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic), the German-Spanish Astronomical Center (DSAZ) -- Calar Alto (operated by the Max-Plank-Institut für Astronomie Heidelberg jointly with the Spanish National Commission for Astronomy) and Observatoire de Haute-Provence (OHP; CNRS, France).

  4. X-ray phase-contrast CT of a pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne Tapfer

    Full Text Available To explore the potential of grating-based x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (CT for preclinical research, a genetically engineered mouse model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC was investigated. One ex-vivo mouse specimen was scanned with different grating-based phase-contrast CT imaging setups covering two different settings: i high-resolution synchrotron radiation (SR imaging and ii dose-reduced imaging using either synchrotron radiation or a conventional x-ray tube source. These experimental settings were chosen to assess the potential of phase-contrast imaging for two different types of application: i high-performance imaging for virtual microscopy applications and ii biomedical imaging with increased soft-tissue contrast for in-vivo applications. For validation and as a reference, histological slicing and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI were performed on the same mouse specimen. For each x-ray imaging setup, attenuation and phase-contrast images were compared visually with regard to contrast in general, and specifically concerning the recognizability of lesions and cancerous tissue. To quantitatively assess contrast, the contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR of selected regions of interest (ROI in the attenuation images and the phase images were analyzed and compared. It was found that both for virtual microscopy and for in-vivo applications, there is great potential for phase-contrast imaging: in the SR-based benchmarking data, fine details about tissue composition are accessible in the phase images and the visibility of solid tumor tissue under dose-reduced conditions is markedly superior in the phase images. The present study hence demonstrates improved diagnostic value with phase-contrast CT in a mouse model of a complex endogenous cancer, promoting the use and further development of grating-based phase-contrast CT for biomedical imaging applications.

  5. ART CCIM Phase II-A Off-Gas System Evaluation Test Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nick Soelberg; Jay Roach

    2009-01-01

    This test plan defines testing to be performed using the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) engineering-scale cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) test system for Phase II-A of the Advanced Remediation Technologies (ART) CCIM Project. The multi-phase ART-CCIM Project is developing a conceptual design for replacing the joule-heated melter (JHM) used to treat high level waste (HLW) in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) with a cold crucible induction melter. The INL CCIM test system includes all feed, melter off-gas control, and process control subsystems needed for fully integrated operation and testing. Testing will include operation of the melter system while feeding a non-radioactive slurry mixture prepared to simulate the same type of waste feed presently being processed in the DWPF. Process monitoring and sample collection and analysis will be used to characterize the off-gas composition and properties, and to show the fate of feed constituents, to provide data that shows how the CCIM retrofit conceptual design can operate with the existing DWPF off-gas control system.

  6. Efficacy and safety of liposomal anthracyclines in phase I/II clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, David S; Muggia, Franco M; Carmichael, James; Winer, Eric P; Jahanzeb, Mohammad; Venook, Alan P; Skubitz, Keith M; Rivera, Edgardo; Sparano, Joseph A; DiBella, Nicholas J; Stewart, Simon J; Kavanagh, John J; Gabizon, Alberto A

    2004-12-01

    Preclinical studies have established the pharmacologic advantages of liposomal anthracyclines, including pharmacokinetic profiles after bolus dosing that resemble continuous infusion of conventional anthracyclines, increased drug concentrations in tumor cells compared with the surrounding tissues, and reduced toxicity relative to conventional anthracycline treatment. Based on these studies, many phase I and phase II clinical trials were conducted to assess the safety and potential activity of liposomal anthracyclines in the management of both solid and hematologic tumors. These studies provided valuable insight into the safety of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil/Caelyx [PLD]), nonpegylated liposomal doxorubicin (Myocet [NPLD]), and liposomal daunorubicin (DaunoXome [DNX]) over a range of doses, either as single-agent therapy or in combination with other cytotoxic agents. Other liposomal anthracyclines in development may be well tolerated but their activity remains to be elucidated by clinical trials. The available data also suggest that liposomal anthracyclines have activity not only against tumor types with known sensitivity to conventional anthracyclines, but also potentially for tumors that are typically anthracycline-resistant. Despite the availability of clinical data from a wide variety of tumor types and patient populations, further studies of liposomal anthracycline therapy are needed to fully establish their safety, efficacy, and dosing in the treatment of these patients.

  7. Energy Economic Data Base (EEDB) Program: Phase I, Volume II. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    This Volume II of Phase I of the Energy Economic Data Base Program contains appendices. Appendix A-1 provides the site and environmental data, derived from Appendix A of Guide for Economic Evaluation of Nuclear Reactor Plant Designs, USAEC Report NUS-531, modified to reflect current requirements. These data form the bases of the criteria used for designing the facility and for evaluating the routine and accidental release of radioactive liquids and gases to the environment. Appendix A-2 provides the site and environmental data as derived from Appendix A of NUS-531, and modified to reflect coal-plant siting, forming the bases of the criteria used for designing the facility and for evaluating the release of liquids and gases to the environment. A description of the topography of the hypothetical city, Middletown, is given. Appendix B provides an overall summary of the conclusions of NUS' work on all NUS tasks in support of the nuclear fuel-cycle work in Phase I. Appendix C-1 introduces the concepts involved and addresses methods of calculation of fixed charges applicable to investor-owned utilities, as used in the EEDB. Appendix C-2 consists of review and revision of each plant's fuel cycle and operating and maintenance costs in accordance with the EEDB update procedures. In Appendix D, NSSS Capital Costs for a Mature LMFBR Industry, much information is provided on plant description, cost estimate, comparison and discussion, drawings, and equipment list. (MCW)

  8. Silicon Sensor Prototypes for the Phase II Upgrade of the CMS Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Bergauer, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The CMS Tracker will be completely exchanged in the so called Phase-II upgrade. To preserve and enhance its performance in the High-Luminosity LHC phase, the new tracker will need to cope with very high radiation levels, track densities and pile-ups. In addition, it needs to provide input for the level-1 trigger. In this paper we present the baseline design of the new tracker, with a special emphasis on the two detector module concepts for the outer tracker, the 2S and PS module. The CMS Tracker collaboration designed and procured sensor prototypes from several vendors. These productions are intended for evaluating the production quality of the manufacturers, for providing functional sensors for module prototypes and for concluding the survey towards a suitable silicon base material and sensor design. Here we provide first results of the PS-p macro-pixel-light sensor and of full-scale strip sensor prototypes for the 2S module concept, both on 6- and 8-inch wafers.

  9. Comparison between Normal and HeII Two-phase Flows at High Vapor Velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Van Weelderen, R; Rousset, B; Thibault, P; Wolf, P E

    2006-01-01

    We present results on helium co-current two-phase flow experiments at high vapor velocity obtained with the use of the new CEA/SBT 400 W/1.8 K refrigerator [1]. For vapor velocities larger than typically 4 m/s, a mist of droplets develops from the bulk liquid interface accompanied by an increase in heat transfer at the wall. Experiments were conducted in a 10 m long, 40 mm I.D. straight pipe, both in helium II and in helium I to compare these two situations. The respective roles of vapor density, vapor velocity and liquid level on atomization were systematically investigated. Light scattering experiments were performed to measure sizes, velocities and interfacial areas of droplets in a complete cross section. In-house-made heat transfer sensors located in the mist allowed us to deduce an upper value of the extra cooling power of the dispersed phase. The practical interest of atomized flow for cooling large cryogenic facilities is discussed by considering the balance between increase in heat transfer and press...

  10. Phase II: Field Detector Development For Undeclared/Declared Nuclear Testing For Treaty Verfiation Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kriz, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hunter, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Riley, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-02

    Radioactive xenon isotopes are a critical part of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) for the detection or confirmation of nuclear weapons tests as well as on-site treaty verification monitoring. On-site monitoring is not currently conducted because there are no commercially available small/robust field detector devices to measure the radioactive xenon isotopes. Xenon is an ideal signature to detect clandestine nuclear events since they are difficult to contain and can diffuse and migrate through soils due to their inert nature. There are four key radioxenon isotopes used in monitoring: 135Xe (9 hour half-life), 133mXe (2 day half-life), 133Xe (5 day half-life) and 131mXe (12 day half-life) that decay through beta emission and gamma emission. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is a leader in the field of gas collections and has developed highly selective molecular sieves that allow for the collection of xenon gas directly from air. Phase I assessed the development of a small, robust beta-gamma coincidence counting system, that combines collection and in situ detection methodologies. Phase II of the project began development of the custom electronics enabling 2D beta-gamma coincidence analysis in a field portable system. This will be a significant advancement for field detection/quantification of short-lived xenon isotopes that would not survive transport time for laboratory analysis.

  11. Partitioning of Nanoparticles into Organic Phases and Model Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Posner, J.D.; Westerhoff, P.; Hou, W-C.

    2011-08-25

    dissolved substances" or "more like colloids" as the division between behaviors of macromolecules versus colloids remains ill-defined. Below we detail our work on two broadly defined objectives: (i) Partitioning of ENP into octanol, lipid bilayer, and water, and (ii) disruption of lipid bilayers by ENPs. We have found that the partitioning of NP reaches pseudo-equilibrium distributions between water and organic phases. The equilibrium partitioning most strongly depends on the particle surface charge, which leads us to the conclusion that electrostatic interactions are critical to understanding the fate of NP in the environment. We also show that the kinetic rate at which particle partition is a function of their size (small particles partition faster by number) as can be predicted from simple DLVO models. We have found that particle number density is the most effective dosimetry to present our results and provide quantitative comparison across experiments and experimental platforms. Cumulatively, our work shows that lipid bilayers are a more effective organic phase than octanol because of the definable surface area and ease of interpretation of the results. Our early comparison of NP partitioning between water and lipids suggest that this measurement can be predictive of bioaccumulation in aquatic organisms. We have shown that nanoparticle disrupt lipid bilayer membranes and detail how NP-bilayer interaction leads to the malfunction of lipid bilayers in regulating the fluxes of ionic charges and molecules. Our results show that the disruption of the lipid membranes is similar to that of toxin melittin, except single particles can disrupt a bilayer. We show that only a single particle is required to disrupt a 150 nm DOPC liposome. The equilibrium leakage of membranes is a function of the particle number density and particle surface charge, consistent with results from our partitioning experiments. Our disruption experiments with varying surface functionality show that

  12. Partitioning of Nanoparticles into Organic Phases and Model Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Posner, J.D.; Westerhoff, P.; Hou, W-C.

    2011-08-25

    dissolved substances" or "more like colloids" as the division between behaviors of macromolecules versus colloids remains ill-defined. Below we detail our work on two broadly defined objectives: (i) Partitioning of ENP into octanol, lipid bilayer, and water, and (ii) disruption of lipid bilayers by ENPs. We have found that the partitioning of NP reaches pseudo-equilibrium distributions between water and organic phases. The equilibrium partitioning most strongly depends on the particle surface charge, which leads us to the conclusion that electrostatic interactions are critical to understanding the fate of NP in the environment. We also show that the kinetic rate at which particle partition is a function of their size (small particles partition faster by number) as can be predicted from simple DLVO models. We have found that particle number density is the most effective dosimetry to present our results and provide quantitative comparison across experiments and experimental platforms. Cumulatively, our work shows that lipid bilayers are a more effective organic phase than octanol because of the definable surface area and ease of interpretation of the results. Our early comparison of NP partitioning between water and lipids suggest that this measurement can be predictive of bioaccumulation in aquatic organisms. We have shown that nanoparticle disrupt lipid bilayer membranes and detail how NP-bilayer interaction leads to the malfunction of lipid bilayers in regulating the fluxes of ionic charges and molecules. Our results show that the disruption of the lipid membranes is similar to that of toxin melittin, except single particles can disrupt a bilayer. We show that only a single particle is required to disrupt a 150 nm DOPC liposome. The equilibrium leakage of membranes is a function of the particle number density and particle surface charge, consistent with results from our partitioning experiments. Our disruption experiments with varying surface functionality show that

  13. Silicon strip tracking detector development and prototyping for the Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, S.

    2016-07-01

    In about ten years from now, the Phase-II upgrade of the LHC will be carried out. Due to increased luminosity, a severe radiation dose and high particle rates will occur for the experiments. In consequence, several detector components will have to be upgraded. In the ATLAS experiment, the current inner detector will be replaced by an all-silicon tracking detector with the goal of at least delivering the present detector performance also in the harsh Phase-II LHC conditions. This report presents the current planning and results from first prototype measurements of the upgrade silicon strip tracking detector.

  14. Electrical Design and Performance of Single- and Double-Sided Silicon Modules for the ATLAS Phase II Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Gregor, IM; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    For the planned replacement of the ATLAS tracker during the Phase II Upgrade, the design and construction of a Silicon Strip Detector is currently being planned. In this note, the design plans for the readout structures (hybrids), Silicon-strip modules, readout and powering bus tapes and end-of-substructure cards for the ATLAS Silicon strip system are described. Specific tooling and adhesive requirements are detailed. This document is one of five supporting documents for the silicon strip chapter of the ATLAS Phase II Letter of Intent.

  15. Bioluminescence tomography based on the phase approximation model

    OpenAIRE

    Cong, W; Wang, G.

    2010-01-01

    A reconstruction method of bioluminescence sources is proposed based on a phase approximation model. Compared with the diffuse approximation, this phase approximation model more correctly predicts bioluminescence photon propagation in biological tissues, so that bioluminescence tomography can accurately locate and quantify the distribution of bioluminescence sources. The compressive sensing (CS) technique is applied to regularize the inverse source reconstruction to enhance numerical stabilit...

  16. Phase-I and randomized phase-II trial of panobinostat in combination with ICE (ifosfamide, carboplatin, etoposide) in relapsed or refractory classical Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bei; Younes, Anas; Westin, Jason R; Turturro, Francesco; Claret, Linda; Feng, Lei; Fowler, Nathan; Neelapu, Sattva; Romaguera, Jorge; Hagemeister, Fredrick B; Rodriguez, Maria Alma; Samaniego, Felipe; Fayad, Luis E; Copeland, Amanda R; Nastoupil, Loretta J; Nieto, Yago; Fanale, Michelle A; Oki, Yasuhiro

    2017-08-09

    This phase-I/phase-II study evaluated panobinostat in combination with ifosfamide, carboplatin, etoposide (P-ICE) in relapsed/refractory classical Hodgkin lymphoma. During phase I, panobinostat was given daily on Monday/Wednesday/Friday starting one week prior to Cycle 1 (C1) of ICE and during two weeks of C1-2 of ICE (Schedule A). No DLT was observed at 30 mg. However, frequent (84%) grade-4 thrombocytopenia during second week prompted us to omit the second week of panobinostat 30 mg (Schedule B) for phase II, where this regimen was compared to ICE. In the randomized phase-II study, CR was seen in 9/11 (82%) and 8/12 (67%) for P-ICE and ICE, respectively (p = .64). Grade-4 neutropenia (55% vs. 8%) and thrombocytopenia (100% vs. 33%) were more common in P-ICE. In summary, combination therapy using panobinostat produced high CR rate at the cost of greater bone marrow toxicity. Investigation of panobinostat with less myelosuppressive agents is of interest.

  17. Linear Sigma Models With Strongly Coupled Phases -- One Parameter Models

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, Kentaro

    2013-01-01

    We systematically construct a class of two-dimensional $(2,2)$ supersymmetric gauged linear sigma models with phases in which a continuous subgroup of the gauge group is totally unbroken. We study some of their properties by employing a recently developed technique. The focus of the present work is on models with one K\\"ahler parameter. The models include those corresponding to Calabi-Yau threefolds, extending three examples found earlier by a few more, as well as Calabi-Yau manifolds of other dimensions and non-Calabi-Yau manifolds. The construction leads to predictions of equivalences of D-brane categories, systematically extending earlier examples. There is another type of surprise. Two distinct superconformal field theories corresponding to Calabi-Yau threefolds with different Hodge numbers, $h^{2,1}=23$ versus $h^{2,1}=59$, have exactly the same quantum K\\"ahler moduli space. The strong-weak duality plays a crucial r\\^ole in confirming this, and also is useful in the actual computation of the metric on t...

  18. Spin Forming Aluminum Crew Module (CM) Metallic Aft Pressure Vessel Bulkhead (APVBH) - Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Eric K.; Domack, Marcia S.; Torres, Pablo D.; McGill, Preston B.; Tayon, Wesley A.; Bennett, Jay E.; Murphy, Joseph T.

    2015-01-01

    The principal focus of this project was to assist the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) Program in developing a spin forming fabrication process for manufacture of the Orion crew module (CM) aft pressure vessel bulkhead. The spin forming process will enable a single piece aluminum (Al) alloy 2219 aft bulkhead resulting in the elimination of the current multiple piece welded construction, simplify CM fabrication, and lead to an enhanced design. Phase I (NASA TM-2014-218163 (1)) of this assessment explored spin forming the single-piece CM forward pressure vessel bulkhead. The Orion MPCV Program and Lockheed Martin (LM) recently made two critical decisions relative to the NESC Phase I work scope: (1) LM selected the spin forming process to manufacture a single-piece aft bulkhead for the Orion CM, and (2) the aft bulkhead will be manufactured from Al 2219. Based on the Program's new emphasis related to the spin forming process, the NESC was asked to conduct a Phase II assessment to assist in the LM manufacture of the aft bulkhead and to conduct a feasibility study into spin forming the Orion CM cone. This activity was approved on June 19, 2013. Dr. Robert Piascik, NASA Technical Fellow for Materials at the Langley Research Center (LaRC), was selected to lead this assessment. The project plan was approved by the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) Review Board (NRB) on July 18, 2013. The primary stakeholders for this assessment were the NASA and LM MPCV Program offices. Additional benefactors are commercial launch providers developing CM concepts.

  19. Phase I/II trial of everolimus in combination with bortezomib and rituximab (RVR) in relapsed/refractory Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghobrial, I M; Redd, R; Armand, P; Banwait, R; Boswell, E; Chuma, S; Huynh, D; Sacco, A; Roccaro, A M; Perilla-Glen, A; Noonan, K; MacNabb, M; Leblebjian, H; Warren, D; Henrick, P; Castillo, J J; Richardson, P G; Matous, J; Weller, E; Treon, S P

    2015-12-01

    We examined the combination of the mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor everolimus with bortezomib and rituximab in patients with relapsed/refractory Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia (WM) in a phase I/II study. All patients received six cycles of the combination of everolimus/rituximab or everolimus/bortezomib/rituximab followed by maintenance with everolimus until progression. Forty-six patients were treated; 98% received prior rituximab and 57% received prior bortezomib. No dose-limiting toxicities were observed in the phase I. The most common treatment-related toxicities of all grades were fatigue (63%), anemia (54%), leucopenia (52%), neutropenia (48%) and diarrhea (43%). Thirty-six (78%) of the 46 patients received full dose therapy (FDT) of the three drugs. Of these 36, 2 (6%) had complete response (90% confidence interval (CI): 1-16). In all, 32/36 (89%) of patients experienced at least a minimal response (90% CI: 76-96%). The observed partial response or better response rate was 19/36 (53, 90 CI: 38-67%). For the 36 FDT patients, the median progression-free survival was 21 months (95% CI: 12-not estimable). In summary, this study demonstrates that the combination of everolimus, bortezomib and rituximab is well tolerated and achieved 89% response rate even in patients previously treated, making it a possible model of non-chemotherapeutic-based combination therapy in WM.

  20. Anisotropy in wavelet-based phase field models

    KAUST Repository

    Korzec, Maciek

    2016-04-01

    When describing the anisotropic evolution of microstructures in solids using phase-field models, the anisotropy of the crystalline phases is usually introduced into the interfacial energy by directional dependencies of the gradient energy coefficients. We consider an alternative approach based on a wavelet analogue of the Laplace operator that is intrinsically anisotropic and linear. The paper focuses on the classical coupled temperature/Ginzburg--Landau type phase-field model for dendritic growth. For the model based on the wavelet analogue, existence, uniqueness and continuous dependence on initial data are proved for weak solutions. Numerical studies of the wavelet based phase-field model show dendritic growth similar to the results obtained for classical phase-field models.