WorldWideScience

Sample records for modeling mutual respect

  1. Mutual Respect and Civic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Colin

    2010-01-01

    Contemporary theories of civic education frequently appeal to an ideal of mutual respect in the context of ethical, ethical and religious disagreement. This paper critically examines two recently popular criticisms of this ideal. The first, coming from a postmodern direction, charges that the ideal is hypocritical in its effort to be maximally…

  2. Creating a culture of mutual respect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Kathryn; Mestel, Pamela; Feldman, David L

    2010-04-01

    The Joint Commission mandates that hospitals seeking accreditation have a process to define and address disruptive behavior. Leaders at Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York, took the initiative to create a code of mutual respect that not only requires respectful behavior, but also encourages sensitivity and awareness to the causes of frustration that often lead to inappropriate behavior. Steps to implementing the code included selecting code advocates, setting up a system for mediating disputes, tracking and addressing operational system issues, providing training for personnel, developing a formal accountability process, and measuring the results.

  3. [Biological mutualism, concepts and models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perru, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Mutualism is a biological association for a mutual benefit between two different species. In this paper, firstly, we examine the history and signification of mutualism in relation to symbiosis. Then, we consider the link between concepts and models of mutualism. Models of mutualism depend on different concepts we use: If mutualism is situated at populations' level, it will be expressed by Lotka-Volterra models, concerning exclusively populations' size. If mutualism is considered as a resources' exchange or a biological market increasing the fitness of these organisms, it will be described at an individual level by a cost-benefit model. Our analysis will be limited to the history and epistemology of Lotka-Volterra models and we hypothesize that these models are adapted at first to translate dynamic evolutions of mutualism. They render stability or variations of size and assume that there are clear distinctions and a state of equilibrium between populations of different species. Italian mathematician Vito Volterra demonstrated that biological associations consist in a constant relation between some species. In 1931 and 1935, Volterra described the general form of antagonistic or mutualistic biological associations by the same differential equations. We recognize that these equations have been more used to model competition or prey-predator interactions, but a simple sign change allows describing mutualism. The epistemological problem is the following: Volterra's equations help us to conceptualize a global phenomenon. However, mutualistic interactions may have stronger effects away from equilibrium and these effects may be better understood at individual level. We conclude that, between 1985 and 2000, some researchers carried on working and converting Lotka-Volterra models but this description appeared as insufficient. So, other researchers adopted an economical viewpoint, considering mutualism as a biological market.

  4. Enhancing Mutual Respect among Nursing Assistants, Residents, and Residents' Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiselman, Terry; Noelker, Linda S.

    1991-01-01

    Interviewed nursing assistants (n=40) and nursing facility residents (n=37) regarding ways they experienced respect, disrespect, attachment, and distancing in their relationships with each other. As a result of finding evidence of disrespect, an inservice session on gaining respect as a nursing assistant was presented. (ABL)

  5. A mutualism-parasitism system modeling host and parasite with mutualism at low density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanshi; Deangelis, Donald L

    2012-04-01

    A mutualism-parasitism system of two species is considered, where mutualism is the dominant interaction when the predators (parasites) are at low density while parasitism is dominant when the predators are at high density. Our aim is to show that mutualism at low density promotes coexistence of the species and leads to high production of the prey (host). The mutualism-parasitism system presented here is a combination of the Lotka-Volterra cooperative model and Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model. By comparing dynamics of this system with those of the Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model, we present the mechanisms by which the mutualism improves the coexistence of the species and production of the prey. Then the parameter space is divided into six regions, which correspond to the four outcomes of mutualism, commensalism, predation/parasitism and neutralism, respectively. When the parameters are varied continuously among the six regions, it is shown that the interaction outcomes of the system transition smoothly among the four outcomes. By comparing the dynamics of the specific system with those of the Lotka-Volterra cooperative model, we show that the parasitism at high density promotes stability of the system. A novel aspect of this paper is the simplicity of the model, which allows rigorous and thorough analysis and transparency of the results.

  6. Economic contract theory tests models of mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyl, E Glen; Frederickson, Megan E; Yu, Douglas W; Pierce, Naomi E

    2010-09-01

    Although mutualisms are common in all ecological communities and have played key roles in the diversification of life, our current understanding of the evolution of cooperation applies mostly to social behavior within a species. A central question is whether mutualisms persist because hosts have evolved costly punishment of cheaters. Here, we use the economic theory of employment contracts to formulate and distinguish between two mechanisms that have been proposed to prevent cheating in host-symbiont mutualisms, partner fidelity feedback (PFF) and host sanctions (HS). Under PFF, positive feedback between host fitness and symbiont fitness is sufficient to prevent cheating; in contrast, HS posits the necessity of costly punishment to maintain mutualism. A coevolutionary model of mutualism finds that HS are unlikely to evolve de novo, and published data on legume-rhizobia and yucca-moth mutualisms are consistent with PFF and not with HS. Thus, in systems considered to be textbook cases of HS, we find poor support for the theory that hosts have evolved to punish cheating symbionts; instead, we show that even horizontally transmitted mutualisms can be stabilized via PFF. PFF theory may place previously underappreciated constraints on the evolution of mutualism and explain why punishment is far from ubiquitous in nature.

  7. Deadlocks and dihomotopy in mutual exclusion models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin

    2005-01-01

    spaces, the directed ($d$-spaces) of M.Grandis and the flows of P. Gaucher. All models invite to use or modify ideas from algebraic topology, notably homotopy. In specific semaphore models for mutual exclusion, we have developed methods and algorithms that can detect deadlocks and unsafe regions and give...

  8. Deadlocks and dihomotopy in mutual exclusion models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Parallel processes in concurrency theory can be modelled in a geometric framework. A convenient model are the Higher Dimensional Automata of V. Pratt and E. Goubault with cubical complexes as their mathematical description. More abstract models are given by (locally) partially ordered topological...... spaces, the directed ($d$-spaces) of M.Grandis and the flows of P. Gaucher. All models invite to use or modify ideas from algebraic topology, notably homotopy. In specific semaphore models for mutual exclusion, we have developed methods and algorithms that can detect deadlocks and unsafe regions and give...

  9. Mutual information in the Tangled Nature Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Dominic; Jeldtoft Jensen, Henrik; Sibani, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    We consider the concept of mutual information in ecological networks, and use this idea to analyse the Tangled Nature model of co-evolution. We show that this measure of correlation has two distinct behaviours depending on how we define the network in question: if we consider only the network...... of viable species this measure increases, whereas for the whole system it decreases. It is suggested that these are complimentary behaviours that show how ecosystems can become both more stable and better adapted....

  10. Modeling the Substrate Skin Effects in Mutual RL Characteristics.,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. de Roest

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this work was to model the influence of the substrateskin effects on the distributed mutual impedance per unit lengthparameters of multiple coupled on-chip interconnects. The proposedanalytic model is based on the frequency-dependent distribution of thecurrent in the silicon substrate and the closed form integrationapproach. It is shown that the calculated frequency-dependentdistributed mutual inductance and the associated mutual resistance arein good agreement with the results obtained from CAD-oriented circuitmodeling technique.

  11. A Unified Mutual Coupling Model for Multiple Antenna Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yu-jiang; NIE Zai-ping

    2006-01-01

    A unified mutual coupling model for multiple antenna communication systems based on moment methods is proposed. This model combines antenna coupling and RF front-end circuit coupling, thus providing a more accurate and complete analysis of the mutual coupling effect on multiple antenna systems.

  12. Mutual associations between patients' and partners' depression and quality of life with respect to relationship quality, physical complaints, and sense of coherence in couples coping with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drabe, Natalie; Klaghofer, Richard; Weidt, Steffi; Zwahlen, Diana; Büchi, Stefan; Jenewein, Josef

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this article is to examine the mutual associations between patients' and partners' depression and quality of life (QOL) in couples facing cancer with respect to potential resources (sense of coherence and relationship quality (RQ)) and stressors (physical complaints). Questionnaires rating depression, QOL, sense of coherence, RQ, and physical complaints were completed by 207 couples facing different cancer types and stages. Multiple regression models were used to assess the mutual associations between patient and partner variables. In female patients, 40.7% of the variance in depression score was explained by male partners' stressors and resources, whereas only 3.5% of the variance in male patients' depression was explained by female partners' stressors and resources. In male and female partners, respectively, the patients' stressors and resources explained 34.9% versus just 15.8% of the variance in depression. Regarding QOL in female patients, 30.1% of the variance was explained by the partners' stressors and resources, versus only 3.7% in male patients. Meanwhile, in male and female partners, respectively, the patients' stressors and resources explained 25.6% and 12.9% of the variance in QOL. These findings support a couples-centered approach to psycho-oncological counseling and treatment. Particularly in depressed couples with low RQ, couples therapy or counseling should be considered because of the mutual adverse association between depression and QOL in these couples. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. RESPECT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teyeb, Oumer; Boussif, Malek; Sørensen, Troels Bundgaard;

    2005-01-01

    The evaluation and optimization of packet service performance in wireless networks is a complex process, considering the number of heterogeneous entities and protocols that are involved. An emulation platform comes at hand for such performance investigations as it provides a means to see...... the performance from an end-2-end (E2E), user-perceived Quality Of Service (QoS) point of view. In this paper, the design and implementation of RESPECT, an easily configurable network emulator is described. RESPECT was originally geared towards Universal Mobile Communications System (UMTS) networks, but thanks...... to its modular and scalable design, it is being extended for generic heterogeneous networks. Using RESPECT, QoS studies can be carried out to study the behavior of different services in different network conditions, identify generalized service dependent performance metrics for already existing services...

  14. Mutual Interference Models for CDMA Mobile Communication Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Hrudkay, K.; Wieser, V.

    2002-01-01

    Nowadays we are witnesses of a huge development one of the most progressive communication technology - mobile networks. The main problem in these networks is an elimination of the mutual interference, which, mainly in non-orthogonal CDMA networks, is the principal obstacle for reaching high transmission rates The aim of this contribution is to give simplified view to mutual interference models for orthogonal and non-orthogonal CDMA networks. The contribution is intended mainly for PhD. studen...

  15. Modeling financial contagion using mutually exciting jump processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aït-Sahalia, Y.; Cacho-Diaz, J.; Laeven, R.J.A.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a model designed to capture the dynamics of asset returns, with periods of crises that are characterized by contagion. In the model, a jump in one region of the world increases the intensity of jumps both in the same region (self-excitation) as well as in other regions (mutual

  16. Mutual Interference Models for CDMA Mobile Communication Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hrudkay

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays we are witnesses of a huge development one of the mostprogressive communication technology - mobile networks. The mainproblem in these networks is an elimination of the mutual interference,which, mainly in non-orthogonal CDMA networks, is the principalobstacle for reaching high transmission rates The aim of thiscontribution is to give simplified view to mutual interference modelsfor orthogonal and non-orthogonal CDMA networks. The contribution isintended mainly for PhD. students to help them to obtain an orientationin such a complicated areas, as the interference models for CDMAnetworks are.

  17. Mutual information in a dilute, asymmetric neural network model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, Elliot

    We study the computational properties of a neural network consisting of binary neurons with dilute asymmetric synaptic connections. This simple model allows us to simulate large networks which can reflect more of the architecture and dynamics of real neural networks. Our main goal is to determine the dynamical behavior that maximizes the network's ability to perform computations. To this end, we apply information theory, measuring the average mutual information between pairs of pre- and post-synaptic neurons. Communication of information between neurons is an essential requirement for collective computation. Previous workers have demonstrated that neural networks with asymmetric connections undergo a transition from ordered to chaotic behavior as certain network parameters, such as the connectivity, are changed. We find that the average mutual information has a peak near the order-chaos transition, implying that the network can most efficiently communicate information between cells in this region. The mutual information peak becomes increasingly pronounced when the basic model is extended to incorporate more biologically realistic features, such as a variable threshold and nonlinear summation of inputs. We find that the peak in mutual information near the phase transition is a robust feature of the system for a wide range of assumptions about post-synaptic integration.

  18. MODELING OF DISTRIBUTED MUTUAL EXCLUSION SYSTEM USING EVENT-B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghuraj Suryavanshi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The problem of mutual exclusion arises in distributed systems whenever shared resources are concurrently accessed by several sites. For correctness, it is required that shared resource must be accessed by a single site at a time. To decide, which site execute the critical section next, each site communicate with a set of other sites. A systematic approach is essential to formulate an accurate speciation. Formal methods are mathematical techniques that provide systematic approach for building and verification of model. We have used Event-B as a formal technique for construction of our model. Event-B is event driven approach which is used to develop formal models of distributed systems .It supports generation and discharge of proof obligations arising due to consistency checking. In this paper, we outline a formal construction of model of Lamport's mutual exclusion algorithm for distributed system using Event-B. We have considered vector clock instead of using Lam-port's scalar clock for the purpose of message's time stamping.

  19. Stochastic mutualism model with Lévy jumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qun; Jiang, Daqing; Shi, Ningzhong; Hayat, Tasawar; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we consider a stochastic mutualism model with Lévy jumps. First of all, we show that the positive solution of the system is stochastically ultimate bounded. Then under a simple assumption, we establish sufficient and necessary conditions for the stochastic permanence and extinction of the system. The results show an important property of the Lévy jumps: they are unfavorable for the permanence of the species. Moreover, when there are no Lévy jumps, we show that there is a unique ergodic stationary distribution of the corresponding system under certain conditions. Some numerical simulations are introduced to validate the theoretical results.

  20. Mutual information model for link prediction in heterogeneous complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakibian, Hadi; Moghadam Charkari, Nasrollah

    2017-01-01

    Recently, a number of meta-path based similarity indices like PathSim, HeteSim, and random walk have been proposed for link prediction in heterogeneous complex networks. However, these indices suffer from two major drawbacks. Firstly, they are primarily dependent on the connectivity degrees of node pairs without considering the further information provided by the given meta-path. Secondly, most of them are required to use a single and usually symmetric meta-path in advance. Hence, employing a set of different meta-paths is not straightforward. To tackle with these problems, we propose a mutual information model for link prediction in heterogeneous complex networks. The proposed model, called as Meta-path based Mutual Information Index (MMI), introduces meta-path based link entropy to estimate the link likelihood and could be carried on a set of available meta-paths. This estimation measures the amount of information through the paths instead of measuring the amount of connectivity between the node pairs. The experimental results on a Bibliography network show that the MMI obtains high prediction accuracy compared with other popular similarity indices. PMID:28344326

  1. Modeling mutual feedback between users and recommender systems

    CERN Document Server

    Zeng, An; Medo, Matus; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Recommender systems daily influence our decisions on the Internet. While considerable attention has been given to issues such as recommendation accuracy and user privacy, the long-term mutual feedback between a recommender system and the decisions of its users has been neglected so far. We propose here a model of network evolution which allows us to study the complex dynamics induced by this feedback, including the hysteresis effect which is typical for systems with non-linear dynamics. Despite the popular belief that recommendation helps users to discover new things, we find that the long-term use of recommendation can contribute to the rise of extremely popular items and thus ultimately narrow the user choice. These results are supported by measurements of the time evolution of item popularity inequality in real systems. We show that this adverse effect of recommendation can be tamed by sacrificing part of short-term recommendation accuracy.

  2. Modeling Pluto-Charon mutual eclipse events. I. First-order models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunbar, R.S.; Tedesco, E.F.

    1986-11-01

    The present first order analytical and numerical models of light curves due to mutual events between close planetary binaries, the effects of shadowing are included. Attention is given to the case of the Pluto-Charon system. The results of the analytical and numerical approaches agree to well within the expected light curve measurement error. The model predicts that the current mutual eclipse event series will end by November 1990. 12 references.

  3. Global Attractivity of an Integrodifferential Model of Mutualism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangdong Xie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sufficient conditions are obtained for the global attractivity of the following integrodifferential model of mutualism: dN1(t/dt=r1N1(t[((K1+α1∫0∞J2(sN2(t-sds‍/(1+∫0∞J2(sN2(t-sds‍-N1(t], dN2(t/dt=r2N2(t[((K2+α2∫0∞J1(sN1(t-sds‍/(1+∫0∞J1(sN1(t-sds‍-N2(t], where ri,Ki, and αi, i=1,2, are all positive constants. Consider αi>Ki, i=1,2. Consider   Ji∈C([0,+∞,[0,+∞ and ∫0∞‍Ji(sds=1, i=1,2. Our result shows that conditions which ensure the permanence of the system are enough to ensure the global stability of the system. The result not only improves but also complements some existing ones.

  4. Mathematical Model of Linear Switched Reluctance Motor with Mutual Inductance Consideration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Grebennikov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents developing an mathematical model for linear switched reluctance motor (LSRM with account of the mutual inductance between the phases. Mutual interaction between the phases of LSRM gives the positive effect, as a rule the power of the machine is increased by 5-15%.

  5. Asymptotic behavior of stochastic Gilpin-Ayala mutualism model with jumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhong Zhang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This article concerns the study of stochastic Gilpin-Ayala mutualism models with white noise and Poisson jumps. Firstly, an explicit solution for one-dimensional Gilpin-Ayala mutualism model with jumps is obtained and the asymptotic pathwise behavior is analyzed. Then, sufficient conditions for the existence of global positive solutions, stochastically ultimate boundedness and stochastic permanence are established for the n-dimensional model. Asymptotic pathwise behavior of n-dimensional Gilpin-Ayala mutualism model with jumps is also discussed. Finally numerical examples are introduced to illustrate the results developed.

  6. Virulence as a Model for Interplanetary and Interstellar Colonisation - Parasitism or Mutualism

    CERN Document Server

    Starling, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    In the light of current scientific assessments of human-induced climate change, we investigate an experimental model to inform how resource-use strategies may influence interplanetary and interstellar colonisation by intelligent civilisations. In doing so, we seek to provide an additional aspect for refining the famed Fermi Paradox. The model described is necessarily simplistic, and the intent is to simply obtain some general insights to inform and inspire additional models. We model the relationship between an intelligent civilisation and its host planet as symbiotic, where the the relationship between the symbiont and the host species (the civilisation and the planets ecology, respectively) determines the fitness and ultimate survival of both organisms. We perform a series of Monte Carlo Realisation simulations, where civilisations pursue a variety of different relationships/strategies with their host planet, from mutualism to parasitism, and can consequently 'infect' other planets/hosts. We find that paras...

  7. Mutuality, empowerment and the health-wealth model: the Scottish context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howieson, Brian

    2013-06-01

    This paper will offer an alternative paradigm to healthcare delivery by introducing the concept of mutuality and empowerment into the existing health-wealth model. The backdrop is provided by Better Health, Better Care (Scottish Government 2007), Section 1 of which is entitled 'Towards a Mutual NHS'. In detail, the paper will: revisit what is meant by mutuality; advance the meaning of the 'public interest'; explore empowerment and community empowerment and its relationship to health; and introduce a model, which tries to link these concepts and terms together. It is hoped that this analysis will help researchers and practitioners alike further appreciate the important concept of mutuality and empowerment into the existing health-wealth model.

  8. Mutual information and the fidelity of response of gene regulatory models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabbaa, Omar P.; Jayaprakash, C.

    2014-08-01

    We investigate cellular response to extracellular signals by using information theory techniques motivated by recent experiments. We present results for the steady state of the following gene regulatory models found in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells: a linear transcription-translation model and a positive or negative auto-regulatory model. We calculate both the information capacity and the mutual information exactly for simple models and approximately for the full model. We find that (1) small changes in mutual information can lead to potentially important changes in cellular response and (2) there are diminishing returns in the fidelity of response as the mutual information increases. We calculate the information capacity using Gillespie simulations of a model for the TNF-α-NF-κ B network and find good agreement with the measured value for an experimental realization of this network. Our results provide a quantitative understanding of the differences in cellular response when comparing experimentally measured mutual information values of different gene regulatory models. Our calculations demonstrate that Gillespie simulations can be used to compute the mutual information of more complex gene regulatory models, providing a potentially useful tool in synthetic biology.

  9. Mutual information and the fidelity of response of gene regulatory models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabbaa, Omar P; Jayaprakash, C

    2014-08-01

    We investigate cellular response to extracellular signals by using information theory techniques motivated by recent experiments. We present results for the steady state of the following gene regulatory models found in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells: a linear transcription-translation model and a positive or negative auto-regulatory model. We calculate both the information capacity and the mutual information exactly for simple models and approximately for the full model. We find that (1) small changes in mutual information can lead to potentially important changes in cellular response and (2) there are diminishing returns in the fidelity of response as the mutual information increases. We calculate the information capacity using Gillespie simulations of a model for the TNF-α-NF-κB network and find good agreement with the measured value for an experimental realization of this network. Our results provide a quantitative understanding of the differences in cellular response when comparing experimentally measured mutual information values of different gene regulatory models. Our calculations demonstrate that Gillespie simulations can be used to compute the mutual information of more complex gene regulatory models, providing a potentially useful tool in synthetic biology.

  10. By-product mutualism and the ambiguous effects of harsher environments - A game-theoretic model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jaegher, Kris; Hoyer, Britta

    2016-01-01

    We construct two-player two-strategy game-theoretic models of by-product mutualism, where our focus lies on the way in which the probability of cooperation among players is affected by the degree of adversity facing the players. In our first model, cooperation consists of the production of a public

  11. Modeling financial contagion using mutually exciting jump processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aït-Sahalia, Y.; Cacho-Diaz, J.; Laeven, R.J.A.

    2015-01-01

    We propose a model to capture the dynamics of asset returns, with periods of crises that are characterized by contagion. In the model, a jump in one region of the world increases the intensity of jumps both in the same region (self-excitation) as well as in other regions (cross-excitation),

  12. Toward An Ontology of Mutual Recursion: Models, Mind and Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mat Wall-Smith

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In Parables for the Virtual Massumi describes 'The Autonomy of Affect' in our ecology of thought (Massumi 2002 : 35. The object of Stiegler's Technics and Time is 'technics apprehended as the horizon of all possibility to come and all possibility of a future' (Stiegler 1998 : ix. The ecological dynamic described by the recursion between this 'affective autonomy' and a 'technical horizon of possibility' describes a metamodel of the relation between body and world, between perception and expression. I argue that this metamodel allows for the technical architectures that enshrine media processes and models as both the manifestation and modulation of the 'industry' or vitality of mind. I argue that these technical architectures are crucial to the creation and maintenance of dynamic ecologies of living.

  13. Mathematical models for sleep-wake dynamics: comparison of the two-process model and a mutual inhibition neuronal model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne C Skeldon

    Full Text Available Sleep is essential for the maintenance of the brain and the body, yet many features of sleep are poorly understood and mathematical models are an important tool for probing proposed biological mechanisms. The most well-known mathematical model of sleep regulation, the two-process model, models the sleep-wake cycle by two oscillators: a circadian oscillator and a homeostatic oscillator. An alternative, more recent, model considers the mutual inhibition of sleep promoting neurons and the ascending arousal system regulated by homeostatic and circadian processes. Here we show there are fundamental similarities between these two models. The implications are illustrated with two important sleep-wake phenomena. Firstly, we show that in the two-process model, transitions between different numbers of daily sleep episodes can be classified as grazing bifurcations. This provides the theoretical underpinning for numerical results showing that the sleep patterns of many mammals can be explained by the mutual inhibition model. Secondly, we show that when sleep deprivation disrupts the sleep-wake cycle, ostensibly different measures of sleepiness in the two models are closely related. The demonstration of the mathematical similarities of the two models is valuable because not only does it allow some features of the two-process model to be interpreted physiologically but it also means that knowledge gained from study of the two-process model can be used to inform understanding of the behaviour of the mutual inhibition model. This is important because the mutual inhibition model and its extensions are increasingly being used as a tool to understand a diverse range of sleep-wake phenomena such as the design of optimal shift-patterns, yet the values it uses for parameters associated with the circadian and homeostatic processes are very different from those that have been experimentally measured in the context of the two-process model.

  14. Mathematical models for sleep-wake dynamics: comparison of the two-process model and a mutual inhibition neuronal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeldon, Anne C; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Derks, Gianne

    2014-01-01

    Sleep is essential for the maintenance of the brain and the body, yet many features of sleep are poorly understood and mathematical models are an important tool for probing proposed biological mechanisms. The most well-known mathematical model of sleep regulation, the two-process model, models the sleep-wake cycle by two oscillators: a circadian oscillator and a homeostatic oscillator. An alternative, more recent, model considers the mutual inhibition of sleep promoting neurons and the ascending arousal system regulated by homeostatic and circadian processes. Here we show there are fundamental similarities between these two models. The implications are illustrated with two important sleep-wake phenomena. Firstly, we show that in the two-process model, transitions between different numbers of daily sleep episodes can be classified as grazing bifurcations. This provides the theoretical underpinning for numerical results showing that the sleep patterns of many mammals can be explained by the mutual inhibition model. Secondly, we show that when sleep deprivation disrupts the sleep-wake cycle, ostensibly different measures of sleepiness in the two models are closely related. The demonstration of the mathematical similarities of the two models is valuable because not only does it allow some features of the two-process model to be interpreted physiologically but it also means that knowledge gained from study of the two-process model can be used to inform understanding of the behaviour of the mutual inhibition model. This is important because the mutual inhibition model and its extensions are increasingly being used as a tool to understand a diverse range of sleep-wake phenomena such as the design of optimal shift-patterns, yet the values it uses for parameters associated with the circadian and homeostatic processes are very different from those that have been experimentally measured in the context of the two-process model.

  15. An Evaluation of Shared Mental Models and Mutual Trust on General Medical Units: Implications for Collaboration, Teamwork, and Patient Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComb, Sara A; Lemaster, Matthew; Henneman, Elizabeth A; Hinchey, Kevin T

    2015-02-24

    This study examines nurse-physician teamwork and collaboration, a critical component in the delivery of safe patient care, on general medical units. To that end, we assess shared mental models and mutual trust, 2 coordinating mechanisms that help facilitate teamwork, among nurses and physicians working on general medical units. Data were collected from 37 nurses and 42 physicians at an urban teaching medical center in the Northeastern United States. Shared mental model questionnaire items were iteratively developed with experts' input to ensure content validity. Mutual trust items were adapted from an existing scale; items were reliable. Data were analyzed using χ and independent 2-tailed t tests. Physicians and nurses reported significant differences in their perceptions of the professional responsible for a variety of roles (e.g., advocating for the patient [P = 0.0007], identifying a near miss/error [P = 0.003]). Medication reconciliation is only role for which nurses perceive less responsibility than physicians perceive nurses have. Regarding mutual trust, both groups reported significantly more trust within their own professions; both groups reported similar levels of trust in physicians, with physicians reporting significantly less trust in their nursing colleagues than nurses perceive (P collaboration, more work is needed. To that end, we propose increasing knowledge about their respective roles, providing opportunities for nurse and physician collaboration through rounding or committee work and enhancing the preparedness and professionalism of interactions.

  16. Evolution of mutualism between species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Post, W.M.; Travis, C.C.; DeAngelis, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    Recent theoretical work on mutualism, the interaction between species populations that is mutually beneficial, is reviewed. Several ecological facts that should be addressed in the construction of dynamic models for mutualism are examined. Basic terminology is clarified. (PSB)

  17. Entanglement Entropy and Mutual Information of Circular Entangling Surfaces in 2 + 1-dimensional Quantum Lifshitz Model

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Tianci; Faulkner, Thomas; Fradkin, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the entanglement entropy (EE) of circular entangling cuts in the 2+1-dimensional quantum Lifshitz model, whose ground state wave function is a spatially conformal invariant state of the Rokhsar-Kivelson type, whose weight is the Gibbs weight of 2D Euclidean free boson. We show that the finite subleading corrections of EE to the area-law term as well as the mutual information are conformal invariants and calculate them for cylinder, disk-like and spherical manifolds with various spatial cuts. The subtlety due to the boson compactification in the replica trick is carefully addressed. We find that in the geometry of a punctured plane with many small holes, the constant piece of EE is proportional to the number of holes, indicating the ability of entanglement to detect topological information of the configuration. Finally, we compare the mutual information of two small distant disks with Cardy's relativistic CFT scaling proposal. We find that in the quantum Lifshitz model, the mutual information al...

  18. An experimental and modelling exploration of the host-sanction hypothesis in legume-rhizobia mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco, Diana E; Carbajal, Juan P; Cannas, Sergio; Pérez-Arnedo, Rebeca; Hidalgo-Perea, Angeles; Olivares, José; Ruiz-Sainz, José E; Sanjuán, Juan

    2009-08-07

    Despite the importance of mutualism as a key ecological process, its persistence in nature is difficult to explain since the existence of exploitative, "cheating" partners that could erode the interaction is common. By analogy with the proposed policing strategy stabilizing intraspecific cooperation, host sanctions against non-N(2) fixing, cheating symbionts have been proposed as a force stabilizing mutualism in legume-Rhizobium symbiosis. Following this proposal, penalizations would include decreased nodular rhizobial viability and/or early nodule senescence in nodules occupied by cheating rhizobia. In this work, we analyse the stability of Rhizobium-legume symbiosis when non-fixing, cheating strains are present, using an experimental and modelling approach. We used split-root experiments with soybean plants inoculated with two rhizobial strains, a cooperative, normal N(2) fixing strain and an isogenic non-fixing, "perfect" cheating mutant derivative that lacks nitrogenase activity but has the same nodulation abilities inoculated to split-root plants. We found no experimental evidence of functioning plant host sanctions to cheater rhizobia based on nodular rhizobia viability and nodule senescence and maturity molecular markers. Based on these experiments, we developed a population dynamic model with and without the inclusion of plant host sanctions. We show that plant populations persist in spite of the presence of cheating rhizobia without the need of incorporating any sanction against the cheater populations in the model, under the realistic assumption that plants can at least get some amount of fixed N(2) from the effectively mutualistic rhizobia occupying some nodules. Inclusion of plant sanctions leads to the unrealistic effect of ultimate extinction of cheater strains in soil. Our simulation results are in agreement with increasing experimental evidence and theoretical work showing that mutualisms can persist in presence of cheating partners.

  19. An Impulsive Three-Species Model with Square Root Functional Response and Mutual Interference of Predator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An impulsive two-prey and one-predator model with square root functional responses, mutual interference, and integrated pest management is constructed. By using techniques of impulsive perturbations, comparison theorem, and Floquet theory, the existence and global asymptotic stability of prey-eradication periodic solution are investigated. We use some methods and sufficient conditions to prove the permanence of the system which involve multiple Lyapunov functions and differential comparison theorem. Numerical simulations are given to portray the complex behaviors of this system. Finally, we analyze the biological meanings of these results and give some suggestions for feasible control strategies.

  20. Respectful Modeling: Addressing Uncertainty in Dynamic System Models for Molecular Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsigkinopoulou, Areti; Baker, Syed Murtuza; Breitling, Rainer

    2017-06-01

    Although there is still some skepticism in the biological community regarding the value and significance of quantitative computational modeling, important steps are continually being taken to enhance its accessibility and predictive power. We view these developments as essential components of an emerging 'respectful modeling' framework which has two key aims: (i) respecting the models themselves and facilitating the reproduction and update of modeling results by other scientists, and (ii) respecting the predictions of the models and rigorously quantifying the confidence associated with the modeling results. This respectful attitude will guide the design of higher-quality models and facilitate the use of models in modern applications such as engineering and manipulating microbial metabolism by synthetic biology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Mutual diffusion coefficient models for polymer-solvent systems based on the Chapman-Enskog theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Reis

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available There are numerous examples of the importance of small molecule migration in polymeric materials, such as in drying polymeric packing, controlled drug delivery, formation of films, and membrane separation, etc. The Chapman-Enskog kinetic theory of hard-sphere fluids with the Weeks-Chandler-Andersen effective hard-sphere diameter (Enskog-WCA has been the most fruitful in diffusion studies of simple fluids and mixtures. In this work, the ability of the Enskog-WCA model to describe the temperature and concentration dependence of the mutual diffusion coefficient, D, for a polystyrene-toluene system was evaluated. Using experimental diffusion data, two polymer model approaches and three mixing rules for the effective hard-sphere diameter were tested. Some procedures tested resulted in models that are capable of correlating the experimental data with the refereed system well for a solvent mass fraction greater than 0.3.

  2. Mutualism-parasitism paradigm synthesized from results of root-endophyte models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandyam, Keerthi G; Jumpponen, Ari

    2014-01-01

    Plant tissues host a variety of fungi. One important group is the dark septate endophytes (DSEs) that colonize plant roots and form characteristic intracellular structures - melanized hyphae and microsclerotia. The DSE associations are common and frequently observed in various biomes and plant taxa. Reviews suggest that the proportion of plant species colonized by DSE equal that colonized by AM and microscopic studies show that the proportion of the root system colonized by fungi DSE can equal, or even exceed, the colonization by AM fungi. Despite the high frequency and suspected ecological importance, the effects of DSE colonization on plant growth and performance have remained unclear. Here, we draw from over a decade of experimentation with the obscure DSE symbiosis and synthesize across large bodies of published and unpublished data from Arabidopsis thaliana and Allium porrum model systems as well as from experiments that use native plants to better resolve the host responses to DSE colonization. The data indicate similar distribution of host responses in model and native plant studies, validating the use of model plants for tractable dissection of DSE symbioses. The available data also permit empirical testing of the environmental modulation of host responses to DSE colonization and refining the "mutualism-parasitism-continuum" paradigm for DSE symbioses. These data highlight the context dependency of the DSE symbioses: not only plant species but also ecotypes vary in their responses to populations of conspecific DSE fungi - environmental conditions further shift the host responses similar to those predicted based on the mutualism-parasitism-continuum paradigm. The model systems provide several established avenues of inquiry that permit more detailed molecular and functional dissection of fungal endophyte symbioses, identifying thus likely mechanisms that may underlie the observed host responses to endophyte colonization.

  3. Mutualism-parasitism paradigm synthesized from results of root-endophyte models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keerthi Gomatam Mandyam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant tissues host a variety of fungi. One important group is the dark septate endophytes (DSE that colonize plant roots and form characteristic intracellular structures – melanized hyphae and microsclerotia. The DSE associations are common and frequently observed in various biomes and plant taxa. Reviews suggest that the proportion of plant species colonized by DSE equal that colonized by AM and microscopic studies show that the proportion of the root system colonized by fungi DSE can equal, or even exceed, the colonization by AM fungi. Despite the high frequency and suspected ecological importance, the effects of DSE colonization on plant growth and performance have remained unclear. Here, we draw from over a decade of experimentation with the obscure DSE symbiosis and synthesize across large bodies of published and unpublished data from Arabidopsis thaliana and Allium porrum model systems as well as from experiments that use native plants to better resolve the host responses to DSE colonization. The data indicate similar distribution of host responses in model and native plant studies, validating the use of model plants for tractable dissection of DSE symbioses. The available data also permit empirical testing of the environmental modulation of host responses to DSE colonization and refining the mutualism-parasitism-continuum paradigm for DSE symbioses. These data highlight the context dependency of the DSE symbioses: not only plant species but also ecotypes vary in their responses to populations of conspecific DSE fungi – environmental conditions further shift the host responses similar to those predicted based on the mutualism-parasitism-continuum paradigm. The model systems provide several established avenues of inquiry that permit more detailed molecular and functional dissection of fungal endophyte symbioses, identifying thus likely mechanisms that may underlie the observed host responses to endophyte colonization.

  4. Geometrical mutual information at the tricritical point of the two-dimensional Blume-Capel model

    CERN Document Server

    Mandal, Ipsita; Melko, Roger G

    2016-01-01

    The spin-1 classical Blume-Capel model on a square lattice is known to exhibit a finite-temperature phase transition described by the tricritical Ising CFT in 1+1 space-time dimensions. This phase transition can be accessed with classical Monte Carlo simulations, which, via a replica-trick calculation, can be used to study the shape-dependence of the classical R\\'enyi entropies for a torus divided into two cylinders. From the second R\\'enyi entropy, we calculate the Geometrical Mutual Information (GMI) introduced by St\\'ephan et. al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 127204 (2014)] and use it to extract a numerical estimate for the value of the central charge near the tricritical point. By comparing to the known CFT result, $c=7/10$, we demonstrate how this type of GMI calculation can be used to estimate the position of the tricritical point in the phase diagram.

  5. Large Eddy Simulations Analysis of the Energy Spectrum Without Mutual Friction in Superfluid 4 He: HVBK Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtaoui, M.; Merahi, L.

    2017-01-01

    The reliability of the filtered on the Hall-Vinen-Bekarevich-Khalatnikov (HVBK) model without mutual friction force is now investigated via some large eddy simulations of freely decaying isotropic superfluid turbulence. The filtered HVBK model is solved using a fully pseudo-spectral method, which is an extension of the classical Rogallo's method to the two-fluid model. Furthermore, in this paper, we analyze the evolution of various terms constituting the HVBK momentum equations using the balance equation for the energy-spectrum function. Our results are presented in both cases with and without mutual friction force. LES predictions have shown that this mutual friction decreases the energy dissipation of the normal part and the energy transfer is more significant when this force is taken into account.

  6. An Exergy-Based Model for Population Dynamics: Adaptation, Mutualism, Commensalism and Selective Extinction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Sciubba

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Following the critical analysis of the concept of “sustainability”, developed on the basis of exergy considerations in previous works, an analysis of possible species “behavior” is presented and discussed in this paper. Once more, we make use of one single axiom: that resource consumption (material and immaterial can be quantified solely in terms of exergy flows. This assumption leads to a model of population dynamics that is applied here to describe the general behavior of interacting populations. The resulting equations are similar to the Lotka-Volterra ones, but more strongly coupled and intrinsically non-linear: as such, their solution space is topologically richer than those of classical prey-predator models. In this paper, we address an interesting specific problem in population dynamics: if a species assumes a commensalistic behavior, does it gain an evolutionary advantage? And, what is the difference, in terms of the access to the available exergy resources, between mutualism and commensalism? The model equations can be easily rearranged to accommodate both types of behavior, and thus only a brief discussion is devoted to this facet of the problem. The solution space is explored in the simplest case of two interacting populations: the model results in population curves in phase space that can satisfactorily explain the evolutionistic advantages and drawbacks of either behavior and, more importantly, identify the presence or absence of a “sustainable” solution in which both species survive.

  7. A Model of Inter and Multi Disciplinary Domains, and their Mutual Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ophir Dan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The Melvil Dewey Decimal Classification system maps the human knowledge domains into a library classification decimal system, which means that the knowledge is discretized. The domains are countable similarly to how Cantor proved the countability of the fractions' domain. The debate about the "inter-" and "multi-" disciplinary domains may also be extended into "sub-domains" or from another point of view – into "super-domains". However, Science and Technology has rapidly developed after it was classified. If at the beginning, two decimal digits were enough to classify the world's knowledge into a knowledge domain, today we need more digits – about five. This means we are able to display about a million domains of knowledge. The decimal point indicates the sub-division in the zooming-in; the number of such decimal points is unlimited. Thus, the number of hierarchical levels in the knowledge-tree is unlimited. The maximal level is unreachable since it propagates in time. This intriguing issue raises doubts whether the tree is the most appropriate structure in the current state of the knowledge classification. However, I believe that the knowledge tree is a convenient way of expressing various connections between the knowledge domains. There are other models such as multi-level graph-networks that approximate closer to reality. These models can be further visualized by graph diagrams. The knowledge diagram is more complicated, considering the interaction between science and industry relative to each domain. The model of reality might be compared to the object-oriented programming languages approximating reality in order to construct more naturally computer programs that can model the world. The mutual correspondence of the knowledge domains is dynamic. Some examples of relatively new domains are as follows: biotechnology, bioinformatics, nanotechnology, integro-differential equations, data warehouse, data mining, requirements engineering, micro

  8. Superimposed folding and thrusting by two phases of mutually orthogonal or oblique shortening in analogue models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hongling; Koyi, Hemin A.; Nilfouroushan, Faramarz

    2016-02-01

    Orogens may suffer more than one phase shortening resulting in superposition of structures of different generations. Superimposition of orthogonal or oblique shortening is studied using sandbox and centrifuge modelling. Results of sand models show that in orthogonal superimposition, the two resulting structural trends are approximately orthogonal to each other. In oblique superimposition, structures trend obliquely to each other in the relatively thin areas of the model (foreland), and mutually orthogonal in areas where the model is thickened during the first phase of shortening (i.e. the hinterland). Thrusts formed during the first shortening phase may be reactivated during the later shortening phase. Spacing of the later phase structures is not as wide as expected, considering they across the pre-existing thickened wedge. Superposition of structures results in formation of type 1 fold interference pattern. Bedding is curved outwards both in the dome and basin structures. Folded layers are dipping and plunging outwards in a dome, while they are dipping and plunging inwards in a basin. In the areas between two adjacent domes or basins (i.e. where an anticline is superimposed by a syncline or a syncline is superimposed by an anticline), bedding is curved inwards, and the anticlines plunge inwards and the synclines outwards. The latter feature could be helpful to determine the age relationship for type 2 fold interference pattern. In tectonic regions where multiple phases of shortening have occurred, the orogenic-scale dome-and-basin and arrowhead-shaped interference patterns are commonly formed, as in the models. However, in some areas, the fold interference pattern might be modified by a later phase of thrusting. Similar to models results, superimposition of two and/or even more deformation phases may not be recorded by structures all over the tectonic area.

  9. Evaluating true BCI communication rate through mutual information and language models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speier, William; Arnold, Corey; Pouratian, Nader

    2013-01-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) systems are a promising means for restoring communication to patients suffering from "locked-in" syndrome. Research to improve system performance primarily focuses on means to overcome the low signal to noise ratio of electroencephalogric (EEG) recordings. However, the literature and methods are difficult to compare due to the array of evaluation metrics and assumptions underlying them, including that: 1) all characters are equally probable, 2) character selection is memoryless, and 3) errors occur completely at random. The standardization of evaluation metrics that more accurately reflect the amount of information contained in BCI language output is critical to make progress. We present a mutual information-based metric that incorporates prior information and a model of systematic errors. The parameters of a system used in one study were re-optimized, showing that the metric used in optimization significantly affects the parameter values chosen and the resulting system performance. The results of 11 BCI communication studies were then evaluated using different metrics, including those previously used in BCI literature and the newly advocated metric. Six studies' results varied based on the metric used for evaluation and the proposed metric produced results that differed from those originally published in two of the studies. Standardizing metrics to accurately reflect the rate of information transmission is critical to properly evaluate and compare BCI communication systems and advance the field in an unbiased manner.

  10. Combination of Alternative Models by Mutual Data Assimilation: Supermodeling With A Suite of Primitive Equation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duane, G. S.; Selten, F.

    2016-12-01

    Different models of climate and weather commonly give projections/predictions that differ widely in their details. While averaging of model outputs almost always improves results, nonlinearity implies that further improvement can be obtained from model interaction in run time, as has already been demonstrated with toy systems of ODEs and idealized quasigeostrophic models. In the supermodeling scheme, models effectively assimilate data from one another and partially synchronize with one another. Spread among models is manifest as a spread in possible inter-model connection coefficients, so that the models effectively "agree to disagree". Here, we construct a supermodel formed from variants of the SPEEDO model, a primitive-equation atmospheric model (SPEEDY) coupled to ocean and land. A suite of atmospheric models, coupled to the same ocean and land, is chosen to represent typical differences among climate models by varying model parameters. Connections are introduced between all pairs of corresponding independent variables at synoptic-scale intervals. Strengths of the inter-atmospheric connections can be considered to represent inverse inter-model observation error. Connection strengths are adapted based on an established procedure that extends the dynamical equations of a pair of synchronizing systems to synchronize parameters as well. The procedure is applied to synchronize the suite of SPEEDO models with another SPEEDO model regarded as "truth", adapting the inter-model connections along the way. The supermodel with trained connections gives marginally lower error in all fields than any weighted combination of the separate model outputs when used in "weather-prediction mode", i.e. with constant nudging to truth. Stronger results are obtained if a supermodel is used to predict the formation of coherent structures or the frequency of such. Partially synchronized SPEEDO models give a better representation of the blocked-zonal index cycle than does a weighted average

  11. Global Attractivity of a Periodic Delayed N-Species Model of Facultative Mutualism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadjan Muhammadhaji

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Two classes of periodic N-species Lotka-Volterra facultative mutualism systems with distributed delays are discussed. Based on the continuation theorem of the coincidence degree theory developed by Gaines and Mawhin and the Lyapunov function method, some new sufficient conditions on the existence and global attractivity of positive periodic solutions are established.

  12. Modeling of wettability alteration during spontaneous imbibition of mutually soluble solvents in mixed wet fractured reservoirs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chahardowli, M.; Bruining, J.

    2014-01-01

    Mutually-soluble solvents can enhance oil recovery both in mixed-wet fractured reservoirs. When a partially waterwet matrix is surrounded by an immiscible wetting phase in the fracture, spontaneous imbibition is the most important production mechanism. Initially, the solvent moves with the imbibing

  13. A delayed stage-structured Holling II predator-prey model with mutual interference and impulsive perturbations on predator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao Jianjun [School of Mathematics and Statistics, Guizhou College of Finance and Economics, Guiyang 550004 (China)], E-mail: jiaojianjun05@126.com; Chen Lansun [Department of Applied Mathematics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)], E-mail: lschen@amss.ac.cn; Cai Shaohong [Guizhou College of Finance and Economics, Guiyang 550004 (China)], E-mail: caish@mail.gzife.edu.cn

    2009-05-30

    In this work, we investigate a delayed stage-structured Holling II predator-prey model with mutual interference and impulsive perturbations on predator. Sufficient conditions of the global attractivity of prey-extinction periodic solution and the permanence of the system are obtained. We also prove that all solutions of the system are uniformly ultimately bounded. Our results provide reliable tactical basis for the practical pest management.

  14. Examining Mutual Elements of the Job Strain Model and the Effort--Reward Imbalance Model among Special Education Staff in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyman, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Two theories of occupational stress are often cited as being most supported by research: the job strain model (JSM) and the effort--reward imbalance model (ERIM). In order to investigate the applicability of mutual theoretical elements of both models to special education in the USA, a sample of 100 special education paraeducators in public and…

  15. Temperature driven quenches in the Ising model: appearance of negative Rényi mutual information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kormos, Márton; Zimborás, Zoltán

    2017-06-01

    We study the dynamics of the transverse field Ising chain after a local quench in which two independently thermalised chains are joined together and are left to evolve unitarily. In the emerging non-equilibrium steady state the Rényi mutual information with different indices are calculated between two adjacent segments of the chain, and are found to scale logarithmically in the subsystem size. Surprisingly, for Rényi indices α>2 we find cases where the prefactor of the logarithmic dependence is negative. The fact that the naively defined Rényi mutual information might be negative has been pointed out before, however, we provide the first example for this scenario in a realistic many-body setup. Our numerical and analytical results indicate that in this setup it can be negative for any index α>2 while it is always positive for α2 the calculated prefactors show some universal features: for example, the same prefactor is also shown to govern the logarithmic time dependence of the Rényi mutual information before the system relaxes locally to the steady state. In particular, it can decrease in the non-equilibrium evolution after the quench.

  16. Mutual coupling of hydrologic and hydrodynamic models - a viable approach for improved large-scale inundation estimates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, Jannis; Winsemius, Hessel; van Beek, Ludovicus; Haag, Arjen; Bierkens, Marc

    2016-04-01

    Due to their increasing occurrence rate and associated economic costs, fluvial floods are large-scale and cross-border phenomena that need to be well understood. Sound information about temporal and spatial variations of flood hazard is essential for adequate flood risk management and climate change adaption measures. While progress has been made in assessments of flood hazard and risk on the global scale, studies to date have made compromises between spatial resolution on the one hand and local detail that influences their temporal characteristics (rate of rise, duration) on the other. Moreover, global models cannot realistically model flood wave propagation due to a lack of detail in channel and floodplain geometry, and the representation of hydrologic processes influencing the surface water balance such as open water evaporation from inundated water and re-infiltration of water in river banks. To overcome these restrictions and to obtain a better understanding of flood propagation including its spatio-temporal variations at the large scale, yet at a sufficiently high resolution, the present study aims to develop a large-scale modeling tool by coupling the global hydrologic model PCR-GLOBWB and the recently developed hydrodynamic model DELFT3D-FM. The first computes surface water volumes which are routed by the latter, solving the full Saint-Venant equations. With DELFT3D FM being capable of representing the model domain as a flexible mesh, model accuracy is only improved at relevant locations (river and adjacent floodplain) and the computation time is not unnecessarily increased. This efficiency is very advantageous for large-scale modelling approaches. The model domain is thereby schematized by 2D floodplains, being derived from global data sets (HydroSHEDS and G3WBM, respectively). Since a previous study with 1way-coupling showed good model performance (J.M. Hoch et al., in prep.), this approach was extended to 2way-coupling to fully represent evaporation

  17. 开关磁阻电机考虑互感下仿真模型的建立%Simulation Model of Switched Reluctance Motors Considering Mutual Inductance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    臧小杰; 孟德军; 刘祥鹏

    2011-01-01

    At present, the set up of simulation model of switched reluctance motor, with little regard the impact of mutual inductance, however,in the actual motor current commutation process,the adjacent phases and the mutual inductance can achieve maximum self-inductance of 6.4%~7.0%. According to measured the mutual inductance flux values considering the mutual inductance of SRM, set up the model of simulation,and consider the with mutual inductance and without mutual inductance ,the simulation results were compared, results suggest that considering mutual inductance of the motor model simulation results closer to the actual situation.%目前开关磁阻电机仿真模型的建立很少考虑互感的影响,但实际电机电流换相过程中,相邻相产生的互感最大值可以达到自感的6.4%-7.0%根据所测得的互感磁链值,在Matlab下建立了考虑互感的开关磁阻电机模型,并对考虑互感和没有考虑互感的仿真结果进行比较,结果可知,考虑互感下电机模型的仿真结果更接近实际情况.

  18. Molecular mobility with respect to accessible volume in Monte Carlo lattice model for polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diani, J.; Gilormini, P.

    2017-02-01

    A three-dimensional cubic Monte Carlo lattice model is considered to test the impact of volume on the molecular mobility of amorphous polymers. Assuming classic polymer chain dynamics, the concept of locked volume limiting the accessible volume around the polymer chains is introduced. The polymer mobility is assessed by its ability to explore the entire lattice thanks to reptation motions. When recording the polymer mobility with respect to the lattice accessible volume, a sharp mobility transition is observed as witnessed during glass transition. The model ability to reproduce known actual trends in terms of glass transition with respect to material parameters, is also tested.

  19. Bootstrap rank-ordered conditional mutual information (broCMI): A nonlinear input variable selection method for water resources modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilty, John; Adamowski, Jan; Khalil, Bahaa; Rathinasamy, Maheswaran

    2016-03-01

    The input variable selection problem has recently garnered much interest in the time series modeling community, especially within water resources applications, demonstrating that information theoretic (nonlinear)-based input variable selection algorithms such as partial mutual information (PMI) selection (PMIS) provide an improved representation of the modeled process when compared to linear alternatives such as partial correlation input selection (PCIS). PMIS is a popular algorithm for water resources modeling problems considering nonlinear input variable selection; however, this method requires the specification of two nonlinear regression models, each with parametric settings that greatly influence the selected input variables. Other attempts to develop input variable selection methods using conditional mutual information (CMI) (an analog to PMI) have been formulated under different parametric pretenses such as k nearest-neighbor (KNN) statistics or kernel density estimates (KDE). In this paper, we introduce a new input variable selection method based on CMI that uses a nonparametric multivariate continuous probability estimator based on Edgeworth approximations (EA). We improve the EA method by considering the uncertainty in the input variable selection procedure by introducing a bootstrap resampling procedure that uses rank statistics to order the selected input sets; we name our proposed method bootstrap rank-ordered CMI (broCMI). We demonstrate the superior performance of broCMI when compared to CMI-based alternatives (EA, KDE, and KNN), PMIS, and PCIS input variable selection algorithms on a set of seven synthetic test problems and a real-world urban water demand (UWD) forecasting experiment in Ottawa, Canada.

  20. Admissible Estimators in the General Multivariate Linear Model with Respect to Inequality Restricted Parameter Set

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Gang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available By using the methods of linear algebra and matrix inequality theory, we obtain the characterization of admissible estimators in the general multivariate linear model with respect to inequality restricted parameter set. In the classes of homogeneous and general linear estimators, the necessary and suffcient conditions that the estimators of regression coeffcient function are admissible are established.

  1. Classification model based on mutual information%基于互信息量的分类模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张震; 胡学钢

    2011-01-01

    Concerning the relevance between the attributes and the contribution difference of attribute values to attribute weights in classification dataset, an improved classification model and the formulas for calculating the impact factor and sample forecast information were proposed based on mutual information. And the classification model predicted the unlabelled object classes with the sample forecast information. Finally, the experimental results show that the classification model based on mutual information can effectively improve forecast precision and accuracy performance of classification algorithm.%针对分类数据集中属性之间的相关性及每个属性取值对属性权值的贡献程度的差别,提出基于互信息量的分类模型以及影响因子与样本预测信息量的计算公式,并利用样本预测信息量预测分类标号.经实验证明,基于互信息量的分类模型可以有效地提高分类算法的预测精度和准确率.

  2. Explaining coexistence of nitrogen fixing and non-fixing rhizobia in legume-rhizobia mutualism using mathematical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyano, G; Marco, D; Knopoff, D; Torres, G; Turner, C

    2017-10-01

    In the mutualism established between legumes and soil bacteria known as rhizobia, bacteria from soil infect plants roots and reproduce inside root nodules where they fix atmospheric N2 for plant nutrition, receiving carbohydrates in exchange. Host-plant sanctions against non N2 fixing, cheating bacterial symbionts have been proposed to act in the legume-Rhizobium symbiosis, to preserve the mutualistic relationship. Sanctions include decreased rhizobial survival in nodules occupied by cheating rhizobia. Previously, a simple population model experimentally based showed that the coexistence of fixing and cheating rhizobia strains commonly found in field conditions is possible, and that the inclusion of sanctions leads to the extinction of cheating strains in soil. Here, we extend the previous model to include other factors that could complicate the sanction scenario, like horizontal transmission of symbiotic plasmids, turning non-nodulating strains into nodulating rhizobia, and competition between fixing and cheating strains for nodulation. In agreement with previous results, we show that plant populations persist even in the presence of cheating rhizobia without incorporating any sanction against the cheater populations in the model, under the realistic assumption that plants can at least get some amount of fixed N2 from the effectively mutualistic rhizobia occupying some nodules. Inclusion of plant sanctions leads to the unrealistic extinction of cheater strains in soil. Our results agree with increasing experimental evidence and theoretical work showing that mutualisms can persist in presence of cheating partners. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Maximum mutual information regularized classification

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2014-09-07

    In this paper, a novel pattern classification approach is proposed by regularizing the classifier learning to maximize mutual information between the classification response and the true class label. We argue that, with the learned classifier, the uncertainty of the true class label of a data sample should be reduced by knowing its classification response as much as possible. The reduced uncertainty is measured by the mutual information between the classification response and the true class label. To this end, when learning a linear classifier, we propose to maximize the mutual information between classification responses and true class labels of training samples, besides minimizing the classification error and reducing the classifier complexity. An objective function is constructed by modeling mutual information with entropy estimation, and it is optimized by a gradient descend method in an iterative algorithm. Experiments on two real world pattern classification problems show the significant improvements achieved by maximum mutual information regularization.

  4. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF MUTUALLY BENEFICIAL RELATIONS BEETWEEN RAW MATERIAL PRODUCERS AND PROCESSORS BASED ON NONLINEAR DEMAND FUNCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loyko V. I.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural producers interested in marketing of raw materials, whereas processing companies are interested in the establishment of raw material zones, providing capacity utilization; therefore, the establishment of sustainable linkages between producers and processors of raw materials is an objective necessity. In the article, with the help of mathematical methods we examine the conditions of mutually beneficial economic relations between agricultural producers and processing enterprises. Mathematical model for estimating the profits of the company is built of the following conditions: producers sell processing plants raw materials, determined by the coefficient of the interest in the partnership at an agreed purchase price, and the remaining raw materials are processed, so they can sell their products independently. Profit of the processing plant is determined by the mathematical model. To describe the nonlinear market-based sales of goods from its retail price we used a hyperbolic demand function

  5. Toward Robust Model Identification in Interactive Influence Diagrams Using Mutual Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Yifeng; Doshi, Prashant

    2008-01-01

    Modeling the perceived behaviors of other agents improves the performance of an agent in multiagent interactions. We utilize the language of interactive influence diagrams to model repeated interactions between the agents, and ascribe procedural models to other agents. Procedural models offer the...... the space. We then seek to identify models that are relevant to the observed behaviors of others and show how the agent may learn to identify these models. We evaluate the performance of our methods in two repeated games and provide experimental results in support.......Modeling the perceived behaviors of other agents improves the performance of an agent in multiagent interactions. We utilize the language of interactive influence diagrams to model repeated interactions between the agents, and ascribe procedural models to other agents. Procedural models offer...... the benefit of understanding how others arrive at their behaviors. Asmodel spaces are often bounded, the true models of others may not be present in the model space. In addition to considering the case when the true model is within the model space, we investigate the case when the true model may fall outside...

  6. Respect changes your life!

    CERN Multimedia

    Alizée Dauvergne

    2010-01-01

    CERN has recently joined the Geneva-based association "Le respect, ça change la vie" (Respect can change our lives). As its name suggests, the association promotes respect, in all its forms. This decision will enable CERN to share some of its values, those it has in common with the association, with the community at large.   The new bilingual logo of the "Le respect ça change la vie" association. "CERN has been a member of the Geneva-based association "Le respect, ça change la vie" since March," says Friedemann Eder, Head of the Relations with the Host States Service. Mutual respect, respecting the differences and the work of others, respect on the road, in the family, at school, etc. The association, which was founded in 2003 and now has a large number of members, promotes this universal value and encourages discussion on it. "CERN's history shows the importance and success o...

  7. Sensitivity of The High-resolution Wam Model With Respect To Time Step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasemets, K.; Soomere, T.

    The northern part of the Baltic Proper and its subbasins (Bothnian Sea, the Gulf of Finland, Moonsund) serve as a challenge for wave modellers. In difference from the southern and the eastern parts of the Baltic Sea, their coasts are highly irregular and contain many peculiarities with the characteristic horizontal scale of the order of a few kilometres. For example, the northern coast of the Gulf of Finland is extremely ragged and contains a huge number of small islands. Its southern coast is more or less regular but has up to 50m high cliff that is frequently covered by high forests. The area also contains numerous banks that have water depth a couple of meters and that may essentially modify wave properties near the banks owing to topographical effects. This feature suggests that a high-resolution wave model should be applied for the region in question, with a horizontal resolution of an order of 1 km or even less. According to the Courant-Friedrich-Lewy criterion, the integration time step for such models must be of the order of a few tens of seconds. A high-resolution WAM model turns out to be fairly sensitive with respect to the particular choice of the time step. In our experiments, a medium-resolution model for the whole Baltic Sea was used, with the horizontal resolution 3 miles (3' along latitudes and 6' along longitudes) and the angular resolution 12 directions. The model was run with steady wind blowing 20 m/s from different directions and with two time steps (1 and 3 minutes). For most of the wind directions, the rms. difference of significant wave heights calculated with differ- ent time steps did not exceed 10 cm and typically was of the order of a few per cents. The difference arose within a few tens of minutes and generally did not increase in further computations. However, in the case of the north wind, the difference increased nearly monotonously and reached 25-35 cm (10-15%) within three hours of integra- tion whereas mean of significant wave

  8. Danish Mutual Fund Performance - Selectivity, Market Timing and Persistence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Michael

    applying a single index model and a multi-factor model, respectively. Furthermore, we analyse the timing ability of the Danish mutual funds pursuing both the quadratic regressions of Treynor and Mazuy (1966) and the option approach suggested by Henriksson and Merton (1981). Finally, we analyse performance...

  9. Danish Mutual Fund Performance - Selectivity, Market Timing and Persistence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Michael

    applying a single index model and a multi-factor model, respectively. Furthermore, we analyse the timing ability of the Danish mutual funds pursuing both the quadratic regressions of Treynor and Mazuy (1966) and the option approach suggested by Henriksson and Merton (1981). Finally, we analyse performance...

  10. Mathematical Modeling on Obligate Mutualism: Interactions between leaf-cutter ants and their fungus garden

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Yun; Clark, Rebecca; Fewell, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    We propose a simple mathematical model by applying Michaelis-Menton equations of enzyme kinetics to study the mutualistic interaction between the leaf cutter ant and its fungus garden at the early stage of colony expansion. We derive the sufficient conditions on the extinction and coexistence of these two species. In addition, we give a region of initial condition that leads to the extinction of two species when the model has an interior attractor. Our global analysis indicates that the division of labor by workers ants and initial conditions are two important {factors} that determine whether leaf cutter ants colonies and their fungus garden survive and grow can exist or not. We validate the model by doing the comparing between model simulations and data on fungal and ant colony growth rates under laboratory conditions. We perform sensitive analysis and parameter estimation of the model based on the experimental data to gain more biological insights on the ecological interactions between leaf cutter ants and ...

  11. How does pollination mutualism affect the evolution of prior self-fertilization? A model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepers, Clotilde; Dufay, Mathilde; Billiard, Sylvain

    2014-12-01

    The mode of pollination is often neglected regarding the evolution of selfing. Yet the distribution of mating systems seems to depend on the mode of pollination, and pollinators are likely to interfere with selfing evolution, since they can cause strong selective pressures on floral traits. Most selfing species reduce their investment in reproduction, and display smaller flowers, with less nectar and scents (referred to as selfing syndrome). We model the evolution of prior selfing when it affects both the demography of plants and pollinators and the investment of plants in pollination. Including the selfing syndrome in the model allows to predict several outcomes: plants can evolve either toward complete outcrossing, complete selfing, or to a stable mixed-mating system, even when inbreeding depression is high. We predict that the evolution to high prior selfing could lead to evolutionary suicides, highlighting the importance of merging demography and evolution in models. The consequence of the selfing syndrome on plant-pollinator interactions could be a widespread mechanism driving the evolution of selfing in animal-pollinated taxa. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  12. Mutual structural effect of bilirubin and model membranes by vibrational circular dichroism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotná, Pavlína; Goncharova, Iryna; Urbanová, Marie

    2014-03-01

    In this study, vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy was employed for the first time to study the bilirubin (BR) interaction with model membranes and models for membrane proteins. An enantioselective interaction of BR with zwitterionic 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) and sphingomyelin (SPM) liposomes was observed by VCD and electronic circular dichroism (ECD) complemented by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The M-form of BR was preferentially recognized in the BR/DMPC system at concentration above 1×10(-4)M, for lower concentrations the P-form of BR was recognized by the DMPC liposomes. The VCD spectra also showed that the SPM liposomes, which represent the main component of nerve cell membrane, were significantly more disturbed by the presence of BR than the DMPC liposomes-a stable association with a strong VCD signal was observed providing the explanations for the supposed BR neurotoxicity. The effect of time and pH on the BR/DMPC or SPM liposome systems was shown to be essential while the effect of temperature in the range of 15-70°C was negligible demonstrating the surprisingly high temperature stability of BR when interacting with the studied membranes. The influence of a membrane protein was tested on a model consisting of poly-l-arginine (PLAG) bound in the α-helical form to the surface of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1'-rac-glycerol) liposomes and sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles. VCD and also ECD spectra showed that a variety of BR diastereoisomers interacted with PLAG in such systems. In a system of PLAG with micelles composed of sodium dodecyl sulfate, the M-form of bound BR was observed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Analytical Calculation of Mutual Information between Weakly Coupled Poisson-Spiking Neurons in Models of Dynamically Gated Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Mutual information is a commonly used measure of communication between neurons, but little theory exists describing the relationship between mutual information and the parameters of the underlying neuronal interaction. Such a theory could help us understand how specific physiological changes affect the capacity of neurons to synaptically communicate, and, in particular, they could help us characterize the mechanisms by which neuronal dynamics gate the flow of information in the brain. Here we study a pair of linear-nonlinear-Poisson neurons coupled by a weak synapse. We derive an analytical expression describing the mutual information between their spike trains in terms of synapse strength, neuronal activation function, the time course of postsynaptic currents, and the time course of the background input received by the two neurons. This expression allows mutual information calculations that would otherwise be computationally intractable. We use this expression to analytically explore the interaction of excitation, information transmission, and the convexity of the activation function. Then, using this expression to quantify mutual information in simulations, we illustrate the information-gating effects of neural oscillations and oscillatory coherence, which may either increase or decrease the mutual information across the synapse depending on parameters. Finally, we show analytically that our results can quantitatively describe the selection of one information pathway over another when multiple sending neurons project weakly to a single receiving neuron.

  14. Competitive integration models in the Western hemisphere: competitive leadership or mutual denial?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cintia Quiliconi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The North Atlantic space is undergoing active reconfiguration. In the Western Hemisphere this trend is marked by the presence of three distinct models of integration: intra-regional blocks such as Mercosur and the Andean Community; the FTAA and mega-regional agreements with the EU; and bilateral PTAs that have sprung up withgreater impetus since the FTAA failure. The demise of the FTAA opened up the way for a dual track approach to trade integration in the hemisphere: on one hand, with Brazil increasingly seeking to institutionalise the South American subsystem, and on the other, the US resorting to bilateral agreements with like-minded countries in that same regional subsystem. The active rivalry between these two countries through preferential agreements is a major factor affecting the regional re-distribution of power.

  15. Antagonism and Mutual Dependency. Critial Models of Performance and “Piano Interpretation Schools”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Cruz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available To polarize and, coincidently, intersect two different concepts, in terms of a distinction/analogy between “piano interpretation schools” and “critical models” is the aim of this paper. The former, with its prior connotations of both empiricism and dogmatism and not directly shaped by aesthetic criteria or interpretational ideals, depends mainly on the aural and oral tradition as well the teacher-student legacy; the latter employs ideally the generic criteria of interpretativeness, which can be measured in accordance to an aesthetic formula and can include features such as non-obviousness, inferentially, lack of consensus, concern with meaning or significance, concern with structure or design, etc. The relative autonomy of the former is a challenge to the latter, which embraces the range of perspectives available in the horizon of the history of ideas about music and interpretation. The effort of recognizing models of criticism within musical interpretation creates the vehicle for new understandings of the nature and the historical development of Western classical piano performance, promoting also the production of quality critical argument and the communication of key performance tendencies and styles.

  16. Potential role of parasitism in the evolution of mutualism in astigmatid mites: Hemisarcoptes cooremani as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holte, A E; Houck, M A; Collie, N L

    2001-01-01

    Phoresy is a symbiotic interaction that results in dispersal, benefiting the relocated organism without negatively impacting the phoretic host. It has long been considered that phoresy among astigmatid mites is somehow an intermediate precursor to the evolution of parasitism within the group. In astigmatid mites, only the heteromorphic deutonymph (hypopode) participates in phoretic dispersal, and the plesiomorphic hypopode may be the key to understanding the dynamics of the evolution of that parasitism. Hypopodes of Hemisarcoptes cooremani (Acari: Acariformes) and their phoretic beetle host Chilocorus cacti (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) have become the experimental focus for studies concerned with the potential forces that influence the transition of a free-living life style into various coevolved relationships. Previous radiolabeling studies applied to H. cooremani and C. cacti determined that hypopodes of H. cooremani acquired resources from adults of C. cacti while in transit, negating the paradigm that the heteromorphy was purely phoretic. To further probe this relationship, we tested whether materials could be passed from the mites to their hosts. We report here a study using a tritium radiolabel, which indicated that beetles also acquire resources from the hypopodes. These results have implications for understanding the complex relationship between H. cooremani and C. cacti. We propose that this relationship should now correctly be defined as mutualistic (not phoretic) and develop a general model for the potential role of parasitism in the evolution of mutualism among the Astigmata.

  17. Developing a goal programming model for ideal/mutual house price

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiddin, Nor Syuhadah; Zaibidi, Nerda Zura; Sulaiman, Nor Intan Saniah

    2015-12-01

    One cannot deny the importance of a house as a living need. Unfortunately, the unreasonable house price makes it approximately impossible to be owned, mostly for middle income group. Nowadays, the middle income house buyers have two alternatives, whether to buy it from a private developer or through PR1MA and My First Home scheme, since both parties have their own advantages. Goal programming has been employed to resolve the multi objective problem among parties. Due to the complex decision making in house price determination between the parties, this study purposely modeled the problem using interval goal programming approach. Goal programming and interval goal programming can be differ based on their goal (i.e. the aspire level) which is in the form of interval. This study employed primary data and secondary data, which primary data is acquired from semi-structured interview with private developer, while secondary data is the data obtained from literature review. Initial result shows the satisfactory house price over preferences and needs of the decision makers, which are RM454, 050.00 for the private developer, RM322, 880.00 for the government and range of RM2380.95 to RM245, 100.00 for the house buyer. This suggests the house price range that is satisfied by all parties which is about RM238, 000.95 to RM460, 000.00.The satisfaction might occurred when they are all cooperating, which the way could enlighten the impact of collaboration between the parties. This could be the limitations for this study.

  18. Cheaters in mutualism networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genini, Julieta; Morellato, L Patrícia C; Guimarães, Paulo R; Olesen, Jens M

    2010-08-23

    Mutualism-network studies assume that all interacting species are mutualistic partners and consider that all links are of one kind. However, the influence of different types of links, such as cheating links, on network organization remains unexplored. We studied two flower-visitation networks (Malpighiaceae and Bignoniaceae and their flower visitors), and divide the types of link into cheaters (i.e. robbers and thieves of flower rewards) and effective pollinators. We investigated if there were topological differences among networks with and without cheaters, especially with respect to nestedness and modularity. The Malpighiaceae network was nested, but not modular, and it was dominated by pollinators and had much fewer cheater species than Bignoniaceae network (28% versus 75%). The Bignoniaceae network was mainly a plant-cheater network, being modular because of the presence of pollen robbers and showing no nestedness. In the Malpighiaceae network, removal of cheaters had no major consequences for topology. In contrast, removal of cheaters broke down the modularity of the Bignoniaceae network. As cheaters are ubiquitous in all mutualisms, the results presented here show that they have a strong impact upon network topology.

  19. Simplified fate modelling in respect to ecotoxicological and human toxicological characterisation of emissions of chemical compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkved, Morten; Heijungs, Reinout

    2011-01-01

    of the data demand associated with characterisation of chemical emissions in LCIA and ERA.Based on a USEtox™ characterisation factor set consisting of 3,073 data records, multi-dimensional bilinear models for emission compartment specific fate characterisation of chemical emissions were derived by application...... of Partial Least Squares Regression. Two sets of meta-models were derived having 63% and 75% of the minimum data demand of the full USEtox™ characterisation model. The meta-models were derived by grouping the dependent variables, the fate factors obtained from the USEtox™ data set and then selecting...... of the range during validation. In general, the more data-demanding approach yielded the largest regression coefficients.The applied statistical approach illustrates that it is possible to derive meta-models from full fate and exposure models and that it is also possible to tailor the data demand of these meta...

  20. Parameterization Method for Compartmental Water Quality Models with Respect to River Network Structure and Parameter Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riml, J.; Wörman, A.

    2009-12-01

    Knowledge about both hydrochemical processes and watershed characteristics are key factors when trying to model transportation and retention of nutrients in a river system. The proposed parameterization method opens for the possibility to introduce independently measured parameters in lumped (compartmental) models. The analysis provides a better understanding of the model structure and aids in the calculation of optimal parameter values. The investigation uses a 1D distributed network model and parameterizes the result in a form appropriate for a compartmental model structure that has been developed for Swedish conditions during decades. The main tool for the analysis is the comparison of temporal moments between the two model structures. The parameterization gives information about the importance of river hydraulics but also about the effect of geomorphological processes such as the river network structure and parameter variability within the watershed. The methodology does also reveal information about predominating processes during distinctive hydrological conditions.

  1. Hybrid neural modelling of an anaerobic digester with respect to biological constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karama, A; Bernard, O; Gouzé, J L; Benhammou, A; Dochain, D

    2001-01-01

    A hybrid model for an anaerobic digestion process is proposed. The fermentation is assumed to be performed in two steps, acidogenesis and methanogenesis, by two bacterial populations. The model is based on mass balance equations, and the bacterial growth rates are represented by neural networks. In order to guarantee the biological meaning of the hybrid model (positivity of the concentrations, boundedness, saturation or inhibition of the growth rates) outside the training data set, a method that imposes constraints in the neural network is proposed. The method is applied to experimental data from a fixed bed reactor.

  2. Cross–Project Defect Prediction With Respect To Code Ownership Model: An Empirical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Jureczko

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an analysis of 83 versions of industrial, open-source and academic projects. We have empirically evaluated whether those project types constitute separate classes of projects with regard to defect prediction. Statistical tests proved that there exist significant differences between the models trained on the aforementioned project classes. This work makes the next step towards cross-project reusability of defect prediction models and facilitates their adoption, which has been very limited so far.

  3. Ombud's Corner: Respect @ CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Sudeshna Datta-Cockerill

    2014-01-01

    Since 2010 CERN has been a member of the Geneva-based association "Le respect, ça change la vie". Four years later and in conjunction with CERN’s celebration of its 60 years of ‘science for peace’, it is time to launch a new respectful workplace awareness campaign under the auspices of the Ombud.   Mutual respect is a basic pillar of peace. At CERN, we pride ourselves on our history, which started when a handful of Europe’s visionary scientists saw the opportunity that an international laboratory for fundamental research would present in bringing nations together. That idea has worked very well and, today, our success can be measured not only in terms of unprecedented scientific achievements but also in terms of training and education, and exemplary collaboration across borders, cultures and an extensive range of differences. In order for history to continue along these positive lines, and coming back to the awareness campai...

  4. Symmetry-respecting real-space renormalization for the quantum Ashkin-Teller model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Aroon; Bartlett, Stephen D; Doherty, Andrew C; Flammia, Steven T

    2015-10-01

    We use a simple real-space renormalization-group approach to investigate the critical behavior of the quantum Ashkin-Teller model, a one-dimensional quantum spin chain possessing a line of criticality along which critical exponents vary continuously. This approach, which is based on exploiting the on-site symmetry of the model, has been shown to be surprisingly accurate for predicting some aspects of the critical behavior of the quantum transverse-field Ising model. Our investigation explores this approach in more generality, in a model in which the critical behavior has a richer structure but which reduces to the simpler Ising case at a special point. We demonstrate that the correlation length critical exponent as predicted from this real-space renormalization-group approach is in broad agreement with the corresponding results from conformal field theory along the line of criticality. Near the Ising special point, the error in the estimated critical exponent from this simple method is comparable to that of numerically intensive simulations based on much more sophisticated methods, although the accuracy decreases away from the decoupled Ising model point.

  5. Numerical Modelling of Mutual Effect among Nearby Needles in a Multi-Needle Configuration of an Atmospheric Air Dielectric Barrier Discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxing Zhang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A numerical study has been conducted to understand the mutual effect among nearby needles in a multi-needle electrode dielectric barrier discharge. In the present paper, a fluid-hydrodynamic model is adopted. In this model, the mutual effect among nearby needles in a multi-needle configuration of an atmospheric air dielectric barrier discharge are investigated using a fluid-hydrodynamic model including the continuity equations for electrons and positive and negative ions coupled with Poisson’s equation. The electric fields at the streamer head of the middle needle (MN and the side needles (SNs in a three-needle model decreased under the influence of the mutual effects of nearby needles compared with that in the single-needle model. In addition, from the same comparison, the average propagation velocities of the streamers from MN and SNs, the electron average energy profile of MN and SNs (including those in the streamer channel, at the streamer head, and in the unbridged gap, and the electron densities at the streamer head of the MN and SNs also decreased. The results obtained in the current paper agreed well with the experimental and simulation results in the literature.

  6. Flurbiprofen–antioxidant mutual prodrugs as safer nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: synthesis, pharmacological investigation, and computational molecular modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Zaman; Alamgeer; Kanwal, Munazza; Hassan, Mubashir; Abdullah, Sahar; Waheed, Mamuna; Ahsan, Haseeb; Kim, Song Ja

    2016-01-01

    Flurbiprofen–antioxidant mutual prodrugs were synthesized to reduce the gastrointestinal (GI) effects associated with flurbiprofen. For reducing the GI toxicity, the free carboxylic group (–COOH) was temporarily masked by esterification with phenolic –OH of natural antioxidants vanillin, thymol, umbelliferone, and sesamol. The in vitro hydrolysis of synthesized prodrugs showed that they were stable in buffer solution at pH 1.2, indicating their stability in the stomach. The synthesized prodrugs undergo significant hydrolysis in 80% human plasma and thus release free flurbiprofen. The minimum reversion was observed at pH 1.2, suggesting that prodrugs are less irritating to the stomach than flurbiprofen. The anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antipyretic, and ulcerogenic activities of prodrugs were evaluated. All the synthesized prodrugs significantly (P<0.001) reduced the inflammation against carrageenan and egg albumin-induced paw edema at 4 hours of study. The reduction in the size of the inflamed paw showed that most of the compounds inhibited the later phase of inflammation. The prodrug 2-oxo-2H-chromen-7-yl-2-(2-fluorobiphenyl-4-yl)propanoate (4b) showed significant reduction in paw licking with percentage inhibition of 58%. It also exhibited higher analgesic activity, reducing the number of writhes with a percentage of 75%, whereas flurbiprofen showed 69% inhibition. Antipyretic activity was investigated using brewer’s yeast-induced pyrexia model, and significant (P<0.001) reduction in rectal temperature was shown by all prodrugs at all times of assessment. The results of ulcerogenic activity showed that all prodrugs produced less GI irritation than flurbiprofen. Molecular docking and simulation studies were carried out with cyclooxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2) proteins, and it was observed that our prodrugs have more potential to selectively bind to COX-2 than to COX-1. It is concluded that the synthesized prodrugs have promising pharmacological activities

  7. Roof Modelling Potential of Unmanned Air Vehicle Point Clouds with Respect to Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakis, Serkan; Gunes Sefercik, Umut; Atalay, Can

    2016-07-01

    In parallel with the improvement of laser scanning technologies, dense point clouds which provide the detailed description of terrain and non-terrain objects became indispensable for remotely-sensed data users. Owing to the large demand, besides laser scanning, point clouds were started to achieve using photogrammetric images. Unmanned air vehicle (UAV) images are one of the most preferred data for creating dense point clouds by the advantage of low cost, rapid and periodically gain. In this study, we tried to assess the roof modelling potential of UAV point clouds by comparing three dimensional (3D) roof models produced from UAV and terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) point clouds. In the study, very popular low cost action camera SJ4000 and Faro Laser Scanner Focus3D X 330 were used to provide point clouds and the roof of Bulent Ecevit University Civil Aviation Academy building was utilized. For the validation of horizontal and vertical geolocation accuracies, standard deviation was used as the main indicator. The visual results demonstrated that UAV roof model is almost coherent with TLS roof model after the filtering-based refinement on noisy pixels and systematic bias correction. Moreover, the horizontal geolocation accuracy is approx. |5cm| both in X and Y directions and bias corrected vertical geolocation accuracy is approx. 17cm for zero roof slope.

  8. An Economic Demand Response Model in Liberalized Electricity Markets with Respect to Flexibility of Consumers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharifi, Reza; Anvari-Moghaddam, Amjad; Fathi, S. Hamid

    2017-01-01

    . The most important solution can be demand response (DR) programs. This paper proposes an economic DR model for residential consumers in liberalized electricity markets to change their consumption pattern from times of high energy prices to other times to maximize their utility functions. This economic...

  9. Students' Mental Models with Respect to Flood Risk in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosschaart, Adwin; Kuiper, Wilmad; van der Schee, Joop

    2015-01-01

    Until now various quantitative studies have shown that adults and students in the Netherlands have low flood risk perceptions. In this study we interviewed fifty 15-year-old students in two different flood prone areas. In order to find out how they think and reason about the risk of flooding, the mental model approach was used. Flood risk turned…

  10. Model description of dibenzothiophene mass transfer in oil/water dispersions with respect to biodesulfurization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcelis, C.L.M.; Leeuwen, van M.; Polderman, H.G.; Janssen, A.J.H.; Lettinga, G.

    2003-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed in order to describe the mass transfer rate of dibenzothiophene within the oil droplet to the oil/water interface of droplets created in a stirred tank reactor. The mass transfer rate of dibenzothiophene was calculated for various complex hydrocarbon distillates an

  11. Treating personality-relationship transactions with respect: narrow facets, advanced models, and extended time frames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mund, Marcus; Neyer, Franz J

    2014-08-01

    Contrary to premises of dynamic transactionism, most studies investigating personality-relationship transaction only found personality effects on relationships but failed to find effects of relationship experiences on personality development. The current study reconsiders this issue in 3 ways. First, alongside the broad Big Five characteristics (Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness), specific personality facets were considered to make comparisons with relationships more symmetric. Second, a recent extension of latent change modeling was applied allowing for a theoretically more appropriate model that compensates for the shortcomings of traditionally used cross-lagged panel or growth curve models. Third, personality-relationship transaction was studied from young adulthood to midlife using a 15-year longitudinal study with 654 German adults. Results showed patterns of personality-relationship transaction with the romantic partner, friends, kin, and other interaction partners. Specifically, the development of Neuroticism, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness and their facets was closely interacting with partner and friend relationships, underlining the importance of these relationships for personality maturation during the adult years. We conclude that relationship effects have often been underestimated in previous studies. They are not bound to specific developmental periods, such as emerging adulthood, but their detection depends on the modeling approach and the analysis level (broad dimensions vs. facets). Relationship effects are most likely to occur in relationships that reflect self-selected life styles and circumstances.

  12. Optimizing hurricane disaster relief goods distribution: model development and application with respect to planning strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Mark W; Downs, Joni A

    2010-07-01

    Over the last few years, hurricane emergencies have been among the most pervasive major disruptions in the United States, particularly in the south-east region of the country. A key aspect of managing hurricane disasters involves logistical planning to facilitate the distribution and transportation of relief goods to populations in need. This study shows how a variant of the capacitated warehouse location model can be used to manage the flow of goods shipments to people in need. In this application, the model is used with protocols set forth in Florida's Comprehensive Emergency Plan and tested in a smaller city in north Florida. Scenarios explore the effects of alternate goods distribution strategies on the provision of disaster relief. Results show that measures describing people's accessibility to relief goods are affected by the distribution infrastructure used to provide relief, as well as assumptions made regarding the population(s) assumed to be in need of aid.

  13. REPAIRABLE SYSTEM AVAILABILITY MODEL WITH RESPECT TO LIFE DISTRIBUTION OF SPARE PARTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yueming

    2008-01-01

    The failed components of repairable systems are replaced with spare parts that may have different failure distributions from those of the components that have failed. The spare parts may be either the same as new, better than new, or worse than new. This is the reality in maintenance engineering. Repair with better spare parts is defined as "super repair". The failure distributions of the spare parts affect the availability of the components and their systems. A novel model is proposed to describe the availability of repairable systems across their operating time, at the level of their components, on the assumption that the failed components are immediately replaced. The model functions with arbitrary failure distributions of spare parts. It can be used to compute the availability of components and systems not only under perfect and imperfect repair but also under super repair.

  14. Mutual Calculations in Creating Accounting Models: A Demonstration of the Power of Matrix Mathematics in Accounting Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vysotskaya, Anna; Kolvakh, Oleg; Stoner, Greg

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the innovative teaching approach used in the Southern Federal University, Russia, to teach accounting via a form of matrix mathematics. It thereby contributes to disseminating the technique of teaching to solve accounting cases using mutual calculations to a worldwide audience. The approach taken in this course…

  15. Mutual Solubility of MEG, Water and Reservoir Fluid: Experimental Measurements and Modeling using the CPA Equation of State

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riaz, Muhammad; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2011-01-01

    . Prediction of mutual solubility of water, MEG and hydrocarbon fluids is important for the oil industry to ensure production and processing as well as to satisfy environmental regulations. The CPA equation of state has been successfully applied in the past to well defined systems containing associating...

  16. Mutual Calculations in Creating Accounting Models: A Demonstration of the Power of Matrix Mathematics in Accounting Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vysotskaya, Anna; Kolvakh, Oleg; Stoner, Greg

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the innovative teaching approach used in the Southern Federal University, Russia, to teach accounting via a form of matrix mathematics. It thereby contributes to disseminating the technique of teaching to solve accounting cases using mutual calculations to a worldwide audience. The approach taken in this course…

  17. Persistence of pollination mutualisms in the presence of ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanshi; Wang, Shikun

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers plant-pollinator-ant systems in which the plant-pollinator interaction is mutualistic but ants have both positive and negative effects on plants. The ants also interfere with pollinators by preventing them from accessing plants. While a Beddington-DeAngelis (BD) formula can describe the plant-pollinator interaction, the formula is extended in this paper to characterize the pollination mutualism under the ant interference. Then, a plant-pollinator-ant system with the extended BD functional response is discussed, and global dynamics of the model demonstrate the mechanisms by which pollination mutualism can persist in the presence of ants. When the ant interference is strong, it can result in extinction of pollinators. Moreover, if the ants depend on pollination mutualism for survival, the strong interference could drive pollinators into extinction, which consequently lead to extinction of the ants themselves. When the ant interference is weak, a cooperation between plant-ant and plant-pollinator mutualisms could occur, which promotes survival of both ants and pollinators, especially in the case that ants (respectively, pollinators) cannot survive in the absence of pollinators (respectively, ants). Even when the level of ant interference remains invariant, varying ants' negative effect on plants can result in survival/extinction of both ants and pollinators. Therefore, our results provide an explanation for the persistence of pollination mutualism when there exist ants.

  18. The Assessment of Orthophoto Quality with Respect to the Structure of Digital Elevation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modiri, M.; Enayati, H.; Ebrahimikia, M.

    2015-12-01

    Orthophoto is an image which is being corrected geometrically so each object has to be situated on the corrected place consequently. Choosing the best DEM structure with respect to the area topographic is the most challenge which has more important role when dealing with rough surfaces displacements in duration of orthophoto procedures. The Lower DEM resolution makes points density lower and makes the procedure faster but cause to decreasing the product precision in compare to choosing the other one. However if a fine resolution DEM cause to very delicate displacement corrections aside of the other benefits but it makes to appear some undesired visualized errors like as elongation error especially in an areas which are hidden with some obstacles and there are lacks of data in an imaging. For preventing of such error in DEM structure calculation and earning the most benefits, we found and execute some solutions. In other word we answered to this question that what DEM resolution is the best for orthophoto production. In the following we have done some tests. First a dense DEM of a topographic area calculated and edited accurately then its density was reduced in some steps gradually. At each stage the root mean square error (RMSE) of interpolated heights of points which were laid in the distance between the corresponding DEMs pixels has been calculated respectively. Two interpolation methods (Nearest neighbour and Bilinear interpolation) have been used in this test. Decreasing the DEMs density or increasing the pixel size made the amounts of errors high and the rate of this changing dependent on the kind of topography directly. So we divided the area into some reasonable topographic classes then calculated our results for each class separately. The result of each strategy compared with each other and presented in both numerical tables and some illustrated images. Because of the relation between horizontal precision of orthophotos which are existed in the standard

  19. Modeling of stresses at grain boundaries with respect to occurrence of stress corrosion cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozaczek, K.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Sinharoy, A.; Ruud, C.O. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); McIlree, A.R. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The distributions of elastic stresses/strains in the grain boundary regions were studied by the analytical and the finite element models. The grain boundaries represent the sites where stress concentration occurs as a result of discontinuity of elastic properties across the grain boundary and the presence of second phase particles elastically different from the surrounding matrix grains. A quantitative analysis of those stresses for steels and nickel based alloys showed that the stress concentrations in the grain boundary regions are high enough to cause a local microplastic deformation even when the material is in the macroscopic elastic regime. The stress redistribution as a result of such a plastic deformation was discussed.

  20. Respect for the complexity of human learning: a proposal for a new model of teacher training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori R. Muskat

    1998-02-01

    Full Text Available "Inclusion" is hard to implement worldwide. In the U.S.A. and Canada, one obstacle is the division between "general" and "special" education. To facilitate inclusion of exceptional students, a new model of teacher training is needed. This piece introduces the System for Understanding Individual Learning Performance (S.U.I.L.P.. Derived from neuropsychology, cross-cultural psychology, education, and sociology, the S.U.I.L.P. provides a holistic framework and common vocabulary for understanding learning performance in all learners--across development and different contexts. It also establishes avenues for collaboration and eventual merging of general and special education.

  1. Robustness with respect to disturbance model uncertainty: Theory and application to autopilot performance analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davison Daniel E.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the notion of disturbance model uncertainty. The disturbance is modeled as the output of a first-order filter which is driven by white noise and whose bandwidth and gain are uncertain. An analytical expression for the steady-state output variance as a function of the uncertain bandwidth and gain is derived, and several properties of this variance function are analyzed. Two notions, those of disturbance bandwidth margin and disturbance gain margin are also introduced. These tools are then applied to the analysis of a simple altitude-hold autopilot system in the presence of turbulence where the turbulence scale is treated as an uncertain parameter. It is shown that the autopilot, which is satisfactory for nominal turbulence scale, may be inadequate when the uncertainty is taken into account. Moreover, it is proven that, in order to obtain a design that provides robust performance in the face of turbulence scale uncertainty, it is necessary to substantially increase the controller bandwidth, even if one is willing to sacrifice the autopilot's holding ability and stability robustness.

  2. Mutual Mobile Membranes with Timers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Ciobanu

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A feature of current membrane systems is the fact that objects and membranes are persistent. However, this is not true in the real world. In fact, cells and intracellular proteins have a well-defined lifetime. Inspired from these biological facts, we define a model of systems of mobile membranes in which each membrane and each object has a timer representing their lifetime. We show that systems of mutual mobile membranes with and without timers have the same computational power. An encoding of timed safe mobile ambients into systems of mutual mobile membranes with timers offers a relationship between two formalisms used in describing biological systems.

  3. Modelling and Analysis of Distributed Energy Systems with Respect to Sustainable Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Nina

    , that it turns out to be most profitable to invest in enough wind to more than cover the electrified transport in Denmark. This holds, both when modelling Denmark as an isolated country, and when including the interactions between the Nordic countries. Furthermore, analyses show that fuel cell electric vehicles......Climate change and CO2 emissions is an important issue on the agenda of many politicians. Trying to decrease CO2 emissions, influences transportation, power production, etc. The power system is characterised by an increasing amount of renewables, with one of the most expanding renewable power...... also come from the road transport system. Counting for 24% of the CO2 emissions in Denmark in 2009, the road transport system needs to move towards, e.g. electric drive vehicles. However, the electric drive vehicles are also demanding electricity from the power system. This brings both challenges...

  4. Entanglement entropy and mutual information of circular entangling surfaces in the 2  +  1-dimensional quantum Lifshitz model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tianci; Chen, Xiao; Faulkner, Thomas; Fradkin, Eduardo

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the entanglement entropy (EE) of circular entangling cuts in the 2  +  1-dimensional quantum Lifshitz model. The ground state in this model is a spatially conformal invariant state of the Rokhsar-Kivelson type, whose amplitude is the Gibbs weight of 2D Euclidean free boson. We show that the finite subleading corrections of EE to the area-law term, as well as the mutual information, are conformal invariants and calculate them for cylinder, disk-like and spherical manifolds with various spatial cuts. The subtlety due to the boson compactification in the replica trick is carefully addressed. We find that in the geometry of a punctured plane with many small holes, the constant piece of EE is proportional to the number of holes, indicating the ability of entanglement to detect topological information of the configuration. Finally, we compare the mutual information of two small distant disks with Cardy’s relativistic CFT scaling proposal. We find that in the quantum Lifshitz model, the mutual information also scales at long distance with a power determined by the lowest scaling dimension local operator in the theory.

  5. Examples of New Models Applied in Selected Simulation Systems with Respect to Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Ignaszak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The tolerance of damage rule progressively meets the approval in the design casting parts procedures. Therefore, there were appeared thenew challenges and expectations for permanent development of process virtualization in the mechanical engineering industry.Virtualization is increasingly developed on the stage of product design and materials technologies optimization. Increasing expectations of design and process engineers regarding the practical effectiveness of applied simulation systems with new proposed up-grades modules is observed. The purpose is to obtain simulation tools allowing the most possible realistic prognosis of the casting structure, including indication, with the highest possible probability, places in the casting that are endangered with the possibility of shrinkage– and gas porosity formation. This 3D map of discontinuities and structure transformed in local mechanical characteristics are used to calculate the local stresses and safety factors. The needs of tolerance of damage and new approach to evaluate the quality of such prognosis must be defined. These problems of validation of new models/modules used to predict the shrinkage– and gas porosity including the chosen structure parameters in the example of AlSi7 alloy are discussed in the paper.

  6. Examples of New Models Applied in Selected Simulation Systems with Respect to Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignaszak Z.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The tolerance of damage rule progressively meets the approval in the design casting parts procedures. Therefore, there were appeared the new challenges and expectations for permanent development of process virtualization in the mechanical engineering industry. Virtualization is increasingly developed on the stage of product design and materials technologies optimization. Increasing expectations of design and process engineers regarding the practical effectiveness of applied simulation systems with new proposed up-grades modules is observed. The purpose is to obtain simulation tools allowing the most possible realistic prognosis of the casting structure, including indication, with the highest possible probability, places in the casting that are endangered with the possibility of shrinkage- and gas porosity formation. This 3D map of discontinuities and structure transformed in local mechanical characteristics are used to calculate the local stresses and safety factors. The needs of tolerance of damage and new approach to evaluate the quality of such prognosis must be defined. These problems of validation of new models/modules used to predict the shrinkage- and gas porosity including the chosen structure parameters in the example of AlSi7 alloy are discussed in the paper.

  7. Parasitism and mutualism in Wolbachia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordenstein, Seth R; Paraskevopoulos, Charalampos; Dunning Hotopp, Julie C;

    2009-01-01

    Ecological and evolutionary theories predict that parasitism and mutualism are not fixed endpoints of the symbiotic spectrum. Rather, parasitism and mutualism may be host or environment dependent, induced by the same genetic machinery, and shifted due to selection. These models presume the existe......Ecological and evolutionary theories predict that parasitism and mutualism are not fixed endpoints of the symbiotic spectrum. Rather, parasitism and mutualism may be host or environment dependent, induced by the same genetic machinery, and shifted due to selection. These models presume...... the existence of genetic or environmental variation that can spur incipient changes in symbiotic lifestyle. However, for obligate intracellular bacteria whose genomes are highly reduced, studies specify that discrete symbiotic associations can be evolutionarily stable for hundreds of millions of years...... in symbiotic lifestyle with a comprehensive, phylogenomic analysis. Contrary to previous claims, we show unequivocally that the transition in lifestyle cannot be reconstructed with current methods due to long-branch attraction (LBA) artifacts of the distant Anaplasma and Ehrlichia outgroups. Despite the use...

  8. Non-Rigid Medical Image Registration with Joint Histogram Estimation Based on Mutual Information

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Xuesong; ZHANG Su; SU He; CHEN Yazhu

    2007-01-01

    A mutual information-based non-rigid medical image registration algorithm is presented. An approximate function of Harming windowed sinc is used as kernel function of partial volume (PV)interpolation to estimate the joint histogram, which is the key to calculating the mutual information. And a new method is proposed to compute the gradient of mutual information with respect to themodel parameters. The transformation of object is modeled by a free-form deformation (FFD) based on B-splines. The experiments on 3D synthetic and real image data show that the algorithm can con-verge at the global optimum and restrain the emergency of local extreme.

  9. RBAC模型中角色的继承与互斥问题的研究%Research for Inheritance and Mutual Exclusion of Role in RBAC Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡金柱; 陈娟娟

    2003-01-01

    RBAC (Role-Based Access Control)maps naturally to an organization's structure and facilitates safety administration by separating logically users and permissions via roles as well as constructing role hierarchies, and therefore RBAC offers a powerful means of specifying access control decisions and is attracting increasing attention. In role hierarchies of RBAC,superroles inherit all properties and permissions of subroles. This paper classifies role inheritance into two types : generalization inheritance and supervision inheritance . Furthermore, it outlines two problems in relation to role inheritance :one is how to maintain data integrity,another is how to reduce the effect of absent roles on the normal running of the system. At last ,this paper discusses solutions to them 。RBAC is attracting increasing attention as a security mechanism .Separation of duty is an important safety requirement which is implemented by means of mutual exclusion of roles in RBAC. This paper presents a basic RBAC model,then explores some properties of mutual exclusion of roles,which helps enforcing security policies efficiently. At last ,this paper describes how mutual exclusion of roles affects role hierarchies.

  10. Harmonization versus Mutual Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jan Guldager; Schröder, Philipp

    The present paper examines trade liberalization driven by the coordination of product standards. For oligopolistic firms situated in separate markets that are initially sheltered by national standards, mutual recognition of standards implies entry and reduced profits at home paired......, harmonized standards may fail to harvest the full pro-competitive effects from trade liberalization compared to mutual recognition; moreover, the issue is most pronounced in markets featuring price competition....

  11. A linear programming model for optimizing HDR brachytherapy dose distributions with respect to mean dose in the DVH-tail

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holm, Åsa; Larsson, Torbjörn [Department of Mathematics, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Tedgren, Åsa Carlsson [Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics, Linköping University, SE 581-83 Linköping, Sweden and Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, SE-171 16 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Recent research has shown that the optimization model hitherto used in high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy corresponds weakly to the dosimetric indices used to evaluate the quality of a dose distribution. Although alternative models that explicitly include such dosimetric indices have been presented, the inclusion of the dosimetric indices explicitly yields intractable models. The purpose of this paper is to develop a model for optimizing dosimetric indices that is easier to solve than those proposed earlier.Methods: In this paper, the authors present an alternative approach for optimizing dose distributions for HDR brachytherapy where dosimetric indices are taken into account through surrogates based on the conditional value-at-risk concept. This yields a linear optimization model that is easy to solve, and has the advantage that the constraints are easy to interpret and modify to obtain satisfactory dose distributions.Results: The authors show by experimental comparisons, carried out retrospectively for a set of prostate cancer patients, that their proposed model corresponds well with constraining dosimetric indices. All modifications of the parameters in the authors' model yield the expected result. The dose distributions generated are also comparable to those generated by the standard model with respect to the dosimetric indices that are used for evaluating quality.Conclusions: The authors' new model is a viable surrogate to optimizing dosimetric indices and quickly and easily yields high quality dose distributions.

  12. The V-transform: A tool for analysis of control systems robustness with respect to disturbance model uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Davison

    1998-01-01

    , where G(s is the closed-loop transfer function from disturbance to output. Properties of V-transforms are investigated and the notions of disturbance gain margin and disturbance bandwidth margin, both measures of robustness with respect to disturbance model uncertainty, are introduced. Using these new tools, it is shown that there is a fundamental robustness performance limitation if the plant has nonminimum-phase zeros, but no such limitation in the minimum-phase case.

  13. On mutually unbiased bases

    CERN Document Server

    Durt, Thomas; Bengtsson, Ingemar; Zyczkowski, Karol \\

    2010-01-01

    Mutually unbiased bases for quantum degrees of freedom are central to all theoretical investigations and practical exploitations of complementary properties. Much is known about mutually unbiased bases, but there are also a fair number of important questions that have not been answered in full as yet. In particular, one can find maximal sets of ${N+1}$ mutually unbiased bases in Hilbert spaces of prime-power dimension ${N=p^\\m}$, with $p$ prime and $\\m$ a positive integer, and there is a continuum of mutually unbiased bases for a continuous degree of freedom, such as motion along a line. But not a single example of a maximal set is known if the dimension is another composite number ($N=6,10,12,...$). In this review, we present a unified approach in which the basis states are labeled by numbers ${0,1,2,...,N-1}$ that are both elements of a Galois field and ordinary integers. This dual nature permits a compact systematic construction of maximal sets of mutually unbiased bases when they are known to exist but th...

  14. Modelling and calibration of the mutual impedance experiments - Application to ESA's Rosetta Mission and preparation of BepiColombo and JUICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilet, Nicolas; Henri, Pierre; Wattieaux, Gaëtan; Randriamboarison, Orélien; Rauch, Jean-Louis

    2017-04-01

    The RPC-MIP experiment onboard the ESA's ROSETTA orbiter have monitored the plasma activity around the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko from Summer 2014 to the end of September 2016. In order to finalize the calibration of more than 2 years of mutual impedance spectra in the ionized environment of comet 67P/CG and to prepare the calibration of mutual impedance experiments onboard futures exploratory planetary missions (PWI/AM2P on-board BepiColombo and RPWI/MIME on-board JUICE), a modelisation of the electric potential generated by a pulsating charge is needed, that possibly takes into account the fact that space plasmas are out of local thermodynamic equilibrium, and therefore non-Maxwellian. The physical model of interest is the linearized Vlasov-Poisson coupled equations. In previous works, these coupled equations are Fourier transformed both in time and space and treated in the cold are Maxwellian plasma. This work extends these previous approaches and relaxes the constraint on the cold or Maxwellian character of electron velocity distribution function, in order to account for departures from local thermodynamic equilibrium. We consider both (i) a two-electron temperature plasma and (ii) electrons described by a Kappa distribution function. The electric potential is computed using a numerical integration over all wavenumbers. The main numerical difficulty is to take into account singularities of the dielectric function in the vicinity of the resonant modes. A method of grid refinement is therefore used. To tackle the large number of parameters to be explored (namely (i) density ratio, temperature ratio or (ii) kappa value), a parallel computation is implemented. Mutual impedance simulations are compared to RPC-MIP measurements in the ionized environment of comet 67P/CG.

  15. Danish mutual fund performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This article provides the first independent performance analysis of Danish mutual funds. We analyse selectivity and market timing abilities for 71 mutual funds that have been in operation from 2001 to 2010. The results show great fund performance diversity. Half the funds have performed neutrally......, whereas 42% of the funds have shown significantly negative performance and only 7% of the funds have over-performed their benchmark. Furthermore, 14% of the funds analysed possess market timing abilities, but for 8 out of 10 funds, their market timing ability has been unsuccessful....

  16. Elongated Quantum Dots of Ge on Si Growth Kinetics Modeling with Respect to the Additional Energy of Edges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozovoy, K. A.; Pishchagin, A. A.; Kokhanenko, A. P.; Voitsekhovskii, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper refining of mathematical model for calculation of parameters of selforganised quantum dots (QDs) of Ge on Si grown by the method of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is done. Calculations of pyramidal and wedge-like clusters formation energy were conducted with respect to contributions of surface energy, additional edge energy, elastic strain relaxation, and decrease in the atoms attraction to substrate. With the help of well-known model based on the generalization of classical nucleation theory it was shown that elongated islands emerge later than pyramidal clusters. Calculations of QDs surface density and size distribution function for wedge-like clusters with different length to width ratio were performed. The absence of special geometry of islands for which surface density and average size of islands reach points of extremum that was predicted earlier by the model not taking into account energy of edges was revealed when considering the additional contribution of edge formation energy.

  17. A predator-prey model with a holling type I functional response including a predator mutual interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, G.; DeAngelis, D.L.

    2011-01-01

    The most widely used functional response in describing predator-prey relationships is the Holling type II functional response, where per capita predation is a smooth, increasing, and saturating function of prey density. Beddington and DeAngelis modified the Holling type II response to include interference of predators that increases with predator density. Here we introduce a predator-interference term into a Holling type I functional response. We explain the ecological rationale for the response and note that the phase plane configuration of the predator and prey isoclines differs greatly from that of the Beddington-DeAngelis response; for example, in having three possible interior equilibria rather than one. In fact, this new functional response seems to be quite unique. We used analytical and numerical methods to show that the resulting system shows a much richer dynamical behavior than the Beddington-DeAngelis response, or other typically used functional responses. For example, cyclic-fold, saddle-fold, homoclinic saddle connection, and multiple crossing bifurcations can all occur. We then use a smooth approximation to the Holling type I functional response with predator mutual interference to show that these dynamical properties do not result from the lack of smoothness, but rather from subtle differences in the functional responses. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  18. A Predator-Prey Model with a Holling Type I Functional Response Including a Predator Mutual Interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Gunog; Deangelis, Donald L.

    2011-12-01

    The most widely used functional response in describing predator-prey relationships is the Holling type II functional response, where per capita predation is a smooth, increasing, and saturating function of prey density. Beddington and DeAngelis modified the Holling type II response to include interference of predators that increases with predator density. Here we introduce a predator-interference term into a Holling type I functional response. We explain the ecological rationale for the response and note that the phase plane configuration of the predator and prey isoclines differs greatly from that of the Beddington-DeAngelis response; for example, in having three possible interior equilibria rather than one. In fact, this new functional response seems to be quite unique. We used analytical and numerical methods to show that the resulting system shows a much richer dynamical behavior than the Beddington-DeAngelis response, or other typically used functional responses. For example, cyclic-fold, saddle-fold, homoclinic saddle connection, and multiple crossing bifurcations can all occur. We then use a smooth approximation to the Holling type I functional response with predator mutual interference to show that these dynamical properties do not result from the lack of smoothness, but rather from subtle differences in the functional responses.

  19. Conjunction of wavelet transform and SOM-mutual information data pre-processing approach for AI-based Multi-Station nitrate modeling of watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourani, Vahid; Andalib, Gholamreza; Dąbrowska, Dominika

    2017-05-01

    Accurate nitrate load predictions can elevate decision management of water quality of watersheds which affects to environment and drinking water. In this paper, two scenarios were considered for Multi-Station (MS) nitrate load modeling of the Little River watershed. In the first scenario, Markovian characteristics of streamflow-nitrate time series were proposed for the MS modeling. For this purpose, feature extraction criterion of Mutual Information (MI) was employed for input selection of artificial intelligence models (Feed Forward Neural Network, FFNN and least square support vector machine). In the second scenario for considering seasonality-based characteristics of the time series, wavelet transform was used to extract multi-scale features of streamflow-nitrate time series of the watershed's sub-basins to model MS nitrate loads. Self-Organizing Map (SOM) clustering technique which finds homogeneous sub-series clusters was also linked to MI for proper cluster agent choice to be imposed into the models for predicting the nitrate loads of the watershed's sub-basins. The proposed MS method not only considers the prediction of the outlet nitrate but also covers predictions of interior sub-basins nitrate load values. The results indicated that the proposed FFNN model coupled with the SOM-MI improved the performance of MS nitrate predictions compared to the Markovian-based models up to 39%. Overall, accurate selection of dominant inputs which consider seasonality-based characteristics of streamflow-nitrate process could enhance the efficiency of nitrate load predictions.

  20. A review of a method for dynamic load distribution, dynamical modeling, and explicit internal force control when two manipulators mutually lift and transport a rigid body object

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unseren, M.A.

    1997-04-20

    The paper reviews a method for modeling and controlling two serial link manipulators which mutually lift and transport a rigid body object in a three dimensional workspace. A new vector variable is introduced which parameterizes the internal contact force controlled degrees of freedom. A technique for dynamically distributing the payload between the manipulators is suggested which yields a family of solutions for the contact forces and torques the manipulators impart to the object. A set of rigid body kinematic constraints which restrict the values of the joint velocities of both manipulators is derived. A rigid body dynamical model for the closed chain system is first developed in the joint space. The model is obtained by generalizing the previous methods for deriving the model. The joint velocity and acceleration variables in the model are expressed in terms of independent pseudovariables. The pseudospace model is transformed to obtain reduced order equations of motion and a separate set of equations governing the internal components of the contact forces and torques. A theoretic control architecture is suggested which explicitly decouples the two sets of equations comprising the model. The controller enables the designer to develop independent, non-interacting control laws for the position control and internal force control of the system.

  1. Mutually unbiased bases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Chaturvedi

    2002-08-01

    After a brief review of the notion of a full set of mutually unbiased bases in an -dimensional Hilbert space, we summarize the work of Wootters and Fields (W K Wootters and B C Fields, Ann. Phys. 191, 363 (1989)) which gives an explicit construction for such bases for the case = r, where is a prime. Further, we show how, by exploiting certain freedom in the Wootters–Fields construction, the task of explicitly writing down such bases can be simplified for the case when is an odd prime. In particular, we express the results entirely in terms of the character vectors of the cyclic group of order . We also analyse the connection between mutually unbiased bases and the representations of .

  2. Testing the reference Moon model in respect of the thermal regime and chemical composition of the mantle: Thermodynamics versus seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuskov, O. L.; Kronrod, V. A.; Kronrod, E. V.

    2016-05-01

    The VPREMOON seismic reference Moon model (Garcia et al., 2011) has been tested with respect to the thermal regime and chemical composition of the mantle. Based on a self-consistent thermodynamic approach and petrological models of the lunar mantle covering a wide range of concentrations of CaO, Al2O3, and FeO, we convert the P- and S-wave velocity profiles to the temperature-depth profiles. The solution procedure relies on the method of the Gibbs free energy minimization and the equations of state for the mantle material which take into account the effects of phase transformations, anharmonicity, and anelasticity. We find that regardless of the chemical composition, the positive P- and S-wave velocity gradient in the lunar mantle leads to a negative temperature gradient, which has no physical basis. For adequate mantle temperatures, the P- and S-wave velocities should remain almost constant or slightly decrease with depth (especially V S ) as a result of the effects of the temperature, which grows faster than pressure. These findings underscore the importance of the relationship of the thermodynamics and physics of minerals with seismology.

  3. Band Control of Mutual Proportional Reinsurance

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, John; Yuan, Jiguang

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the optimization of mutual proportional reinsurance --- a mutual reserve system that is intended for the collective reinsurance needs of homogeneous mutual members, such as P&I Clubs in marine mutual insurance and reserve banks in the U.S. Federal Reserve. Compared to general (non-mutual) insurance models, which involve one-sided impulse control (i.e., either downside or upside impulse) of the underlying insurance reserve process that is required to be positive, a mutual insurance differs in allowing two-sided impulse control (i.e., both downside and upside impulse), coupled with the classical proportional control of reinsurance. We prove that a special band-type impulse control $(a,A,B,b)$ with $a=0$ and $a

  4. Mutual eclipses of J2 Europa by J1 Io observed at Yunnan Observatory in 2009

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-Liang Zhang; Zhong Liu

    2011-01-01

    Mutual events between natural satellites include mutual occultation and mutual eclipse.Mutual eclipse is another kind of mutual occultation as viewed from the center of the Sun instead of the Earth.Two mutual eclipses of J2 Europa by Jl Io (2009 Aug.28 and Sept.12) were observed at Yunnan Observatory during the PHEMU09 international campaign.We will calculate the astrometric data of these Galilean satellites by analyzing and fitting the light curves we obtained.The limb-darkening was considered during modeling the light intensity of eclipsed satellites in the penumbra zone,by taking the Lommel-Seeliger scattering law into account.Several dynamical quantities,such as the relative coordinates of the eclipsing satellite from the eclipsed one △α cos δ and △δ,impact parameter and mid-time corresponding to the impact parameter and the deviations O - C of observed △α cos δ and △δ relative to ephemerides,were obtained for each event respectively.

  5. Defense mutualisms enhance plant diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Marjorie G; Agrawal, Anurag A

    2014-11-18

    The ability of plants to form mutualistic relationships with animal defenders has long been suspected to influence their evolutionary success, both by decreasing extinction risk and by increasing opportunity for speciation through an expanded realized niche. Nonetheless, the hypothesis that defense mutualisms consistently enhance plant diversification across lineages has not been well tested due to a lack of phenotypic and phylogenetic information. Using a global analysis, we show that the >100 vascular plant families in which species have evolved extrafloral nectaries (EFNs), sugar-secreting organs that recruit arthropod mutualists, have twofold higher diversification rates than families that lack species with EFNs. Zooming in on six distantly related plant clades, trait-dependent diversification models confirmed the tendency for lineages with EFNs to display increased rates of diversification. These results were consistent across methodological approaches. Inference using reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) to model the placement and number of rate shifts revealed that high net diversification rates in EFN clades were driven by an increased number of positive rate shifts following EFN evolution compared with sister clades, suggesting that EFNs may be indirect facilitators of diversification. Our replicated analysis indicates that defense mutualisms put lineages on a path toward increased diversification rates within and between clades, and is concordant with the hypothesis that mutualistic interactions with animals can have an impact on deep macroevolutionary patterns and enhance plant diversity.

  6. Modeling and predicting the biofilm formation of Salmonella Virchow with respect to temperature and pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariafar, M Nima; Buzrul, Sencer; Akçelik, Nefise

    2016-03-01

    Biofilm formation of Salmonella Virchow was monitored with respect to time at three different temperature (20, 25 and 27.5 °C) and pH (5.2, 5.9 and 6.6) values. As the temperature increased at a constant pH level, biofilm formation decreased while as the pH level increased at a constant temperature, biofilm formation increased. Modified Gompertz equation with high adjusted determination coefficient (Radj(2)) and low mean square error (MSE) values produced reasonable fits for the biofilm formation under all conditions. Parameters of the modified Gompertz equation could be described in terms of temperature and pH by use of a second order polynomial function. In general, as temperature increased maximum biofilm quantity, maximum biofilm formation rate and time of acceleration of biofilm formation decreased; whereas, as pH increased; maximum biofilm quantity, maximum biofilm formation rate and time of acceleration of biofilm formation increased. Two temperature (23 and 26 °C) and pH (5.3 and 6.3) values were used up to 24 h to predict the biofilm formation of S. Virchow. Although the predictions did not perfectly match with the data, reasonable estimates were obtained. In principle, modeling and predicting the biofilm formation of different microorganisms on different surfaces under various conditions could be possible.

  7. Determining Possible Professionals and Respective Roles and Responsibilities for a Model Comprehensive Elder Abuse Intervention: A Delphi Consensus Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice Du Mont

    Full Text Available We have undertaken a multi-phase, multi-method program of research to develop, implement, and evaluate a comprehensive hospital-based nurse examiner elder abuse intervention that addresses the complex functional, social, forensic, and medical needs of older women and men. In this study, we determined the importance of possible participating professionals and respective roles and responsibilities within the intervention.Using a modified Delphi methodology, recommended professionals and their associated roles and responsibilities were generated from a systematic scoping review of relevant scholarly and grey literatures. These items were reviewed, new items added for review, and rated/re-rated for their importance to the intervention on a 5-point Likert scale by an expert panel during a one day in-person meeting. Items that did not achieve consensus were subsequently re-rated in an online survey.Those items that achieved a mean Likert rating of 4+ (rated important to very important, and an interquartile range<1 in the first or second round, and/or for which 80% of ratings were 4+ in the second round were retained for the model elder abuse intervention.Twenty-two of 31 recommended professionals and 192 of 229 recommended roles and responsibilities rated were retained for our model elder abuse intervention. Retained professionals were: public guardian and trustee (mean rating = 4.88, geriatrician (4.87, police officer (4.87, GEM (geriatric emergency management nurse (4.80, GEM social worker (4.78, community health worker (4.76, social worker/counsellor (4.74, family physician in community (4.71, paramedic (4.65, financial worker (4.59, lawyer (4.59, pharmacist (4.59, emergency physician (4.57, geriatric psychiatrist (4.33, occupational therapist (4.29, family physician in hospital (4.28, Crown prosecutor (4.24, neuropsychologist (4.24, bioethicist (4.18, caregiver advocate (4.18, victim support worker (4.18, and respite care worker (4.12.A large and

  8. Quantifying synergistic mutual information

    CERN Document Server

    Griffith, Virgil

    2012-01-01

    Quantifying cooperation among random variables in predicting a single target random variable is an important problem in many biological systems with 10s to 1000s of co-dependent variables. We review the prior literature of information theoretical measures of synergy and introduce a novel synergy measure, entitled *synergistic mutual information* and compare it against the three existing measures of cooperation. We apply all four measures against a suite of binary circuits to demonstrate our measure alone quantifies the intuitive concept of synergy across all examples.

  9. Commentary on the mutual interaction model of McCarley and Massaquoi for REM-NREM cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daan, Serge; Beersma, Domien G.M.

    1986-01-01

    McCarley and Massaquoi successfully simulated human REM-NREM cycle characteristics by extending the McCarley-Hobson model with two sets of assumptions, one creating limit cycle behavior, the other introducing two sources of circadian variation. We argue that the limit cycle assumptions, due to freed

  10. "Testing a Poisson counter model for visual identification of briefly presented, mutually confusable single stimuli in pure accuracy tasks": Correction to Kyllingsbæk, Markussen, and Bundesen (2012)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Carsten Søren; Kyllingsbæk, Søren; Markussen, Bo

    2015-01-01

    The article “Testing a Poisson Counter Model for Visual Identification of Briefly Presented, Mutually Confusable Single Stimuli in Pure Accuracy Tasks” by Søren Kyllingsbæk, Bo Markussen and Claus Bundesen (Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 2012, Vol. 38, No. 3...

  11. A Multilevel Design Model: the mutual relationship between product-service system development and societal change processes

    OpenAIRE

    Joore, J.P.; J.C. Brezet

    2014-01-01

    Change actors like designers play a strategic role in innovation and transition processes towards a sustainable society. They act at all levels of society and need help to find their way through increasingly interrelated innovation systems. To support their efforts, there is a need for a design supportive model that (1) can provide insight into the development of new products and product-service systems, as well as in developments that occur in society as a whole; (2) can provide insight into...

  12. Market timing and selectivity performance of mutual funds in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abubakar Musah

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The growing interest in mutual funds in Ghana has been tremendous over the last decade as evidenced by the continuous increases in number and total funds under management. However, no empirical work has been done on the selectivity and timing ability of the mutual fund managers. Using monthly returns data hand-collected from the reports of the mutual fund managers for the period January 2007-December 2012, this paper examines the market timing and selectivity ability of mutual fund managers in Ghana using the classic Treynor-Mazuy (1966 model and Henriksson- Merton (1981 model. The results suggest that, in general mutual fund managers in Ghana are not able to effectively select stocks and also are not able to predict both the magnitude and direction of future market returns. More specifically, all of the sample mutual fund managers attain significant negative selectivity coefficients and also most of them attain insignificant negative timing coefficients.

  13. Mutual evaluation of global gravity models (EGM2008 and GOCE) and terrestrial data in Amazon Basin, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomfim, E. P.; Braitenberg, C.; Molina, E. C.

    2013-11-01

    The gravity observations of the satellite GOCE have a global homogeneous coverage and precision. This data set constitutes an independent new tool to control the quality of terrestrial gravity data. Terrestrial data reach higher resolution and precision, but can be affected by errors due to factors such as different vertical geodetic datums, wrong position in latitude and longitude, geodynamic effects and gravimeter drift, which tends to accumulate over long distances. Terrestrial data recover gravity signals at shorter wavelengths compared to the GOCE satellite, but the average gravity anomaly values can be compared to the GOCE derived values which are bandlimited to lower frequencies. We consider the area of the Amazon Craton, and in particular the Solimões, Amazon and Parnaiba Basins, and part of the Tocantins and São Francisco Provinces in Brazil, to estimate the systematic errors in terrestrial gravity data. We calculate the average terrestrial gravity anomaly by spatial averages applying Gaussian, inverse distance and simple averages, which allows to compare the long- and medium-wavelength part of the terrestrial gravity anomalies with the gravity field derived from GOCE. We also consider the combined satellite-terrestrial model EGM2008 up to degree and order 250 (i.e. maximum expansion from satellite GOCE). The results show that the systematic errors range from about -28.1 to 25.2 mGal with a standard deviation value of 6.4 mGal. The mean value over the study area is about zero, obtaining 0.27 mGal difference between the Gaussian average of the terrestrial gravity data and the gravity data from the GOCE satellite-only model and is smaller than the commission error associated to the geopotential model. Also, we verified that 64.8 per cent of the study area does not present systematic errors, as their difference is within the commission error of 5.1 mGal of the GOCE model in the harmonic expansion up to degree 250. The comparison of the terrestrial data with

  14. Expanding comparative-advantage biological market models: contingency of mutualism on partners' resource requirements and acquisition trade-offs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeksema, Jason D; Schwartz, Mark W

    2003-05-01

    We expand the comparative-advantage biological market-modelling framework to show how differences between partners, both in their abilities to acquire two resources and in their requirements for those resources, can affect the net benefit of participating in interspecific resource exchange. In addition, the benefits derived from resource trading depend strongly on the nature of the trade-off between the acquisition of one resource and the acquisition of another, described here by the shape (linear, convex or concave) of the resource acquisition constraints of the individuals involved. Combined with previous results, these analyses provide a suite of predictions about whether or not resource exchange is beneficial for two heterospecific individuals relative to a strategy of non-interaction. The benefit derived from resource exchange depends on three factors: (i) relative differences between the partners in their resource acquisition abilities; (ii) relative differences between the partners in their resource requirements; and (iii) variation in the shape of resource acquisition trade-offs. We find that such an explicit consideration of resource requirements and acquisition abilities can provide useful and sometimes non-intuitive predictions about the benefits of resource exchange, and also which resources should be traded by which species.

  15. Mutual aid fund commission

    CERN Document Server

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    The composition of the Board of the Mutual Aid Fund for 2011 is as follows: President: Pascal Droux Vice-president: Connie Potter Treasurer: Louis Pereira Deputy treasurer: Barbara Brugger Secretary: Sonia Casenove Deputy secretary: Isabelle Mardirossian Members: Christopher David Thomas   Jean-Claude Vialis (GAC member)   Marie-Luce Falipou   Gunilla Santiard (Jean-Claude Vialis’s alternate) The role of the Fund is to provide financial help to members of personnel and beneficiaries of the Pension Fund who are in need of exceptional financial assistance. All requests are treated in the strictest confidence. Should you wish to apply for aid from the Fund, kindly contact any member of the Board as given above or Social Services, tel.74479 – 73867.

  16. Rating mutual funds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechmann, Ken L.; Rangvid, Jesper

    obtained an annual risk-adjusted excess return that is approximately 3-4 percentage points higher per annum than if the funds with the highest costs had been invested in. We compare the atpRating with the Morningstar Rating. We show that one reason why the atpRating and the Morningstar Rating contain...... different information is that the returns Morningstar uses as inputs when rating funds are highly volatile whereas the costs the atpRating uses as inputs when rating funds are highly persistent. In other words, a fund that has low costs one year will most likely also have low costs the following year......, whereas the return of a fund in a certain year generally contains only little information about the future return that the fund will generate. Finally, we have information on the investments in different mutual funds made by a small subgroup of investors known to have been exposed to both the atpRating...

  17. Rating mutual funds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechmann, Ken L.; Rangvid, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    obtained a risk-adjusted excess return that is approximately 3-4 percentage points higher per annum than if the funds with the highest costs had been invested in. We compare the atpRating with the Morningstar Rating. We show that one reason why the atpRating and the Morningstar Rating contain different...... information is that the returns Morningstar uses as inputs when rating funds are highly volatile whereas the costs the atpRating uses as inputs when rating funds are highly persistent. In other words, a fund that has low costs one year will most likely also have low costs the following year, whereas...... the return of a fund in a certain year generally contains only little information about the future return that the fund will generate. Finally, we have information on the investments in different mutual funds made by a small subgroup of investors known to have been exposed to both the atpRating...

  18. Starvation-free mutual exclusion with semaphores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesselink, Wim H.; IJbema, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The standard implementation of mutual exclusion by means of a semaphore allows starvation of processes. Between 1979 and 1986, three algorithms were proposed that preclude starvation. These algorithms use a special kind of semaphore. We model this so-called buffered semaphore rigorously and provide

  19. Mutual Group Hypnosis: A Social Interaction Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Shirley

    Mutual Group Hypnosis is discussed in terms of its similarity to group dynamics in general and in terms of its similarity to a social interaction program (Role Modeling) designed to foster the expression of warmth and acceptance among group members. Hypnosis also fosters a regression to prelogical thought processes in the service of the ego. Group…

  20. Mutual Group Hypnosis: A Social Interaction Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Shirley

    Mutual Group Hypnosis is discussed in terms of its similarity to group dynamics in general and in terms of its similarity to a social interaction program (Role Modeling) designed to foster the expression of warmth and acceptance among group members. Hypnosis also fosters a regression to prelogical thought processes in the service of the ego. Group…

  1. 基于互信息博弈的侧信道攻击风险评估模型%Side Channel Attack Risk Evaluation Model Based on Mutual Information Game

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚剑波; 张涛

    2012-01-01

    Mutual information game theory is introduced in the decision-making process of the cryptographic chips designers (defense party) and the attacker, a risk quantification evaluation model based on mutual information game is built. It investigates the attack and designs tactics choice to security risks, and combining with the quantitative methods of the mutual information, gives the optimization tactics selection method of the both sides of attack and designs on Nash equilibrium conditions, gives the mutual information benefits of the both sides of attack and designs on Nash equilibrium. Through the case analysis, the validity of the strategy is proved.%将互信息博弈理论引入密码芯片设计者(防御方)和攻击者的决策过程,建立一种互信息博弈的风险量化评估模型.考察攻防策略的选择对安全风险的影响,并结合互信息的量化方法,给出Nash均衡条件下攻防双方的优化策略选择方法及互信息收益.通过案例分析,验证了该策略的有效性.

  2. Verifying Mutual Exclusion and Liveness Properties with Split Preconditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Awadhesh Kumar Singh; Anup Kumar Bandyopadhyay

    2004-01-01

    This work is focused on presenting a split precondition approach for the modeling and proving the correctness of distributed algorithms. Formal specification and precise analysis of Peterson's distributed mutual exclusion algorithm for two process has been considered. The proof of properties like, mutual exclusion, liveness, and lockout-freedom have also been presented.

  3. 26 CFR 1.831-3 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, mutual...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, mutual fire insurance companies issuing perpetual policies...-3 Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies,...

  4. The Effect of Induced Antibodies with Respect to Neutralization, Clearance Rate and Functional Activity in a Rabbit/Infliximab Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Maiken Lumby; Teisner, Ane; Kjeldsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    and Methods: We addressed this issue in a rabbit model of treatment with the anti-tumor-necrosis factor alpha (TNF) antibody, infliximab (IFX). We developed an inhibition ELISA to selectively measure absolute concentrations of neutralizing antibodies and another ELISA for measuring the concentration...

  5. Soft Systems Methodology and Problem Framing: Development of an Environmental Problem Solving Model Respecting a New Emergent Reflexive Paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Benoit; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Identifies the more representative problem-solving models in environmental education. Suggests the addition of a strategy for defining a problem situation using Soft Systems Methodology to environmental education activities explicitly designed for the development of critical thinking. Contains 45 references. (JRH)

  6. Modelling the mechanical behaviour of pit membranes in bordered pits with respect to cavitation resistance in angiosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tixier, Aude; Herbette, Stephane; Jansen, Steven; Capron, Marie; Tordjeman, Philippe; Cochard, Hervé; Badel, Eric

    2014-08-01

    Various correlations have been identified between anatomical features of bordered pits in angiosperm xylem and vulnerability to cavitation, suggesting that the mechanical behaviour of the pits may play a role. Theoretical modelling of the membrane behaviour has been undertaken, but it requires input of parameters at the nanoscale level. However, to date, no experimental data have indicated clearly that pit membranes experience strain at high levels during cavitation events. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used in order to quantify the pit micromorphology of four tree species that show contrasting differences in vulnerability to cavitation, namely Sorbus aria, Carpinus betulus, Fagus sylvatica and Populus tremula. This allowed anatomical characters to be included in a mechanical model that was based on the Kirchhoff-Love thin plate theory. A mechanistic model was developed that included the geometric features of the pits that could be measured, with the purpose of evaluating the pit membrane strain that results from a pressure difference being applied across the membrane. This approach allowed an assessment to be made of the impact of the geometry of a pit on its mechanical behaviour, and provided an estimate of the impact on air-seeding resistance. The TEM observations showed evidence of residual strains on the pit membranes, thus demonstrating that this membrane may experience a large degree of strain during cavitation. The mechanical modelling revealed the interspecific variability of the strains experienced by the pit membrane, which varied according to the pit geometry and the pressure experienced. The modelling output combined with the TEM observations suggests that cavitation occurs after the pit membrane has been deflected against the pit border. Interspecific variability of the strains experienced was correlated with vulnerability to cavitation. Assuming that air-seeding occurs at a given pit membrane strain, the pressure predicted by the model

  7. Predictive modelling of habitat use by marine predators with respect to the abundance and depth distribution of pelagic prey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Charlotte; Castillo, Ramiro; Hunt, George L.; Punt, André E..; Vanblaricom, Glenn R.; Weimerskirch, Henri; Bertrand, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the ecological processes that underpin species distribution patterns is a fundamental goal in spatial ecology. However, developing predictive models of habitat use is challenging for species that forage in marine environments, as both predators and prey are often highly mobile and difficult to monitor. Consequently, few studies have developed resource selection functions for marine predators based directly on the abundance and distribution of their prey.

  8. MANAGEMENT MODEL OF UNCONFINED AQUIFER SYSTEM WITH SMALL THICKNESS WITH RESPECT TO DRAWDOWN BASED ON TWO-LEVEL RESPONSE MATRIX

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cai-Zhi SUN; Wei ZOU; Xue-Yu LIN

    2004-01-01

    In the management of unconfined aquifer systems, if the thickness of the aquifer is very small and the drawdown is relatively big, errors may arise when the superposition principle is adopted.directly. In allusion to this limitation, a new management model for the management of unconfined aquifer systems called two-level response matrix method is put forward. This method is applied in groundwater resources management in Shenyang city. The managing results show that this methodcan, in some degree, increase the efficiency of management and decrease the risk of management.

  9. Accountability and non-proliferation nuclear regime: a review of the mutual surveillance Brazilian-Argentine model for nuclear safeguards; Accountability e regime de nao proliferacao nuclear: uma avaliacao do modelo de vigilancia mutua brasileiro-argentina de salvaguardas nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xavier, Roberto Salles

    2014-08-01

    The regimes of accountability, the organizations of global governance and institutional arrangements of global governance of nuclear non-proliferation and of Mutual Vigilance Brazilian-Argentine of Nuclear Safeguards are the subject of research. The starting point is the importance of the institutional model of global governance for the effective control of non-proliferation of nuclear weapons. In this context, the research investigates how to structure the current arrangements of the international nuclear non-proliferation and what is the performance of model Mutual Vigilance Brazilian-Argentine of Nuclear Safeguards in relation to accountability regimes of global governance. For that, was searched the current literature of three theoretical dimensions: accountability, global governance and global governance organizations. In relation to the research method was used the case study and the treatment technique of data the analysis of content. The results allowed: to establish an evaluation model based on accountability mechanisms; to assess how behaves the model Mutual Vigilance Brazilian-Argentine Nuclear Safeguards front of the proposed accountability regime; and to measure the degree to which regional arrangements that work with systems of global governance can strengthen these international systems. (author)

  10. DOA estimation and mutual coupling calibration with the SAGE algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiong Kunlai; Liu Zhangmeng; Liu Zheng; Jiang Wenli

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a novel algorithm is presented for direction of arrival (DOA) estimation and array self-calibration in the presence of unknown mutual coupling. In order to highlight the relationship between the array output and mutual coupling coefficients, we present a novel model of the array output with the unknown mutual coupling coefficients. Based on this model, we use the space alternating generalized expectation-maximization (SAGE) algorithm to jointly estimate the DOA parameters and the mutual coupling coefficients. Unlike many existing counterparts, our method requires neither calibration sources nor initial calibration information. At the same time, our proposed method inherits the characteristics of good convergence and high estimation precision of the SAGE algorithm. By numerical experiments we demonstrate that our proposed method outperforms the existing method for DOA estimation and mutual coupling calibration.

  11. DOA estimation and mutual coupling calibration with the SAGE algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiong Kunlai

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel algorithm is presented for direction of arrival (DOA estimation and array self-calibration in the presence of unknown mutual coupling. In order to highlight the relationship between the array output and mutual coupling coefficients, we present a novel model of the array output with the unknown mutual coupling coefficients. Based on this model, we use the space alternating generalized expectation-maximization (SAGE algorithm to jointly estimate the DOA parameters and the mutual coupling coefficients. Unlike many existing counterparts, our method requires neither calibration sources nor initial calibration information. At the same time, our proposed method inherits the characteristics of good convergence and high estimation precision of the SAGE algorithm. By numerical experiments we demonstrate that our proposed method outperforms the existing method for DOA estimation and mutual coupling calibration.

  12. The Relationship between Substance Abuse Performance Measures and Mutual Help Group Participation after Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickler, Gail K; Reif, Sharon; Horgan, Constance M; Acevedo, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    We examined the relationship between treatment quality, using during-treatment process measures, and mutual help group (e.g., Alcoholics Anonymous) attendance after outpatient substance use disorder (SUD) treatment for 739 clients in the Alcohol and Drug Services Study. Logistic regression models estimated any and regular mutual help attendance after treatment. Clients referred to mutual help groups were significantly more likely to attend any mutual help after treatment. Results were mixed for facility offered mutual help groups; treatment engagement and retention were not significant. These findings offer treatment providers further evidence of the importance of referring clients to post-treatment mutual help groups, an effective, low-cost option.

  13. Uncertainty relation for mutual information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneeloch, James; Broadbent, Curtis J.; Howell, John C.

    2014-12-01

    We postulate the existence of a universal uncertainty relation between the quantum and classical mutual informations between pairs of quantum systems. Specifically, we propose that the sum of the classical mutual information, determined by two mutually unbiased pairs of observables, never exceeds the quantum mutual information. We call this the complementary-quantum correlation (CQC) relation and prove its validity for pure states, for states with one maximally mixed subsystem, and for all states when one measurement is minimally disturbing. We provide results of a Monte Carlo simulation suggesting that the CQC relation is generally valid. Importantly, we also show that the CQC relation represents an improvement to an entropic uncertainty principle in the presence of a quantum memory, and that it can be used to verify an achievable secret key rate in the quantum one-time pad cryptographic protocol.

  14. Strategy as Mutually Contingent Choice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Martin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Thomas Schelling’s The Strategy of Conflict carries significant behavioral implications which have been overlooked by economic readers. I argue that these implications are central to Schelling’s vision of game theory, that they fit well with recent advances in experimental psychology and behavioral economics, and provide a comprehensive framework that can inform research on strategy. In my view, Schelling develops a non-mathematical approach to strategy which anticipates on Gigerenzer and Selten’s “ecological rationality” program. This approach maps the processes involved in strategic reasoning and highlights their reliance on the particular information structure of interactive social environments. Building on this approach, I model strategy as a heuristic form of reasoning that governs the way in which individuals search for and provide cues in situations of mutually contingent choice. I conclude by examining how the reference to ecological rationality can help clarify Schelling’s contribution to game theory and outline potential avenues of research into strategic reasoning and interaction.

  15. Mutual authentication in electronic commerce transactions.

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Electronic commerce is a large and ever growing industry. Online transactions are returning ever-growing revenues to electronic merchants. The e-commerce industry is still facing a range of problems concerning the process of completion of online transactions. Such problems are connected to consumer fears dealing with the identity of online merchants, their security pre- cautions and methods for accepting online payments. This thesis develops and presents a Mutual Authentication Model (MAM), w...

  16. Evaluating and Investing in Equity Mutual Funds

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    Our framework for evaluating and investing in mutual funds combines observed returns on funds and passive assets with prior beliefs that distinguish pricing-model inaccuracy from managerial skill. A fund's alpha' is defined using passive benchmarks. We show that returns on non-benchmark passive assets help estimate that alpha more precisely for most funds. The resulting estimates generally vary less than standard estimates across alternative benchmark specifications. Optimal portfolios constr...

  17. Viscosity and mutual diffusion in strongly asymmetric binary ionic mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Bastea, S

    2005-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics simulation results for the viscosity and mutual diffusion constant of a strongly asymmetric binary ionic mixture (BIM). We compare the results with available theoretical models previously tested for much smaller asymmetries. For the case of viscosity we propose a new predictive framework based on the linear mixing rule, while for mutual diffusion we discuss some consistency problems of widely used Boltzmann equation based models.

  18. Viscosity and mutual diffusion in strongly asymmetric plasma mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastea, S

    2004-09-07

    The authors present molecular dynamics simulation results for the viscosity and mutual diffusion constant of a strongly asymmetric two-component plasma (TCP). They compare the results with available theoretical models previously tested for much smaller asymmetries. for the case of viscosity they propose a new predictive framework based on the linear mixing rule, while for mutual diffusion they point out some consistency problems of widely used Boltzmann equation based models.

  19. Computing and visually analyzing mutual information in molecular co-evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Held Stephanie

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Selective pressure in molecular evolution leads to uneven distributions of amino acids and nucleotides. In fact one observes correlations among such constituents due to a large number of biophysical mechanisms (folding properties, electrostatics, .... To quantify these correlations the mutual information -after proper normalization - has proven most effective. The challenge is to navigate the large amount of data, which in a study for a typical protein cannot simply be plotted. Results To visually analyze mutual information we developed a matrix visualization tool that allows different views on the mutual information matrix: filtering, sorting, and weighting are among them. The user can interactively navigate a huge matrix in real-time and search e.g., for patterns and unusual high or low values. A computation of the mutual information matrix for a sequence alignment in FASTA-format is possible. The respective stand-alone program computes in addition proper normalizations for a null model of neutral evolution and maps the mutual information to Z-scores with respect to the null model. Conclusions The new tool allows to compute and visually analyze sequence data for possible co-evolutionary signals. The tool has already been successfully employed in evolutionary studies on HIV1 protease and acetylcholinesterase. The functionality of the tool was defined by users using the tool in real-world research. The software can also be used for visual analysis of other matrix-like data, such as information obtained by DNA microarray experiments. The package is platform-independently implemented in Java and free for academic use under a GPL license.

  20. Experimental and modelling study of the effect of airflow orientation with respect to strip electrode on ozone production of surface dielectric barrier discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikeš, J.; Pekárek, S.; Soukup, I.

    2016-11-01

    This study examines the effect of airflow orientation with respect to the strip active electrode on concentration of ozone and nitrogen dioxide produced in a planar generator based on the surface dielectric barrier discharge. The orientation of the airflow was tested in parallel and perpendicular with respect to the strips. It was found that in the investigated range of average discharge power, the ozone concentration increases approximately by 25% when airflow was oriented in parallel with respect to the strips in comparison with perpendicular orientation of the airflow. Similarly the increase of nitrogen dioxide concentration was observed for parallel orientation of the airflow with respect to the strips in comparison with the perpendicular orientation of the airflow. Within the range of wavelengths from 250 to 1100 nm, the changes of intensities of spectral lines associated with airflow orientation have been observed. A 3D numerical model describing ion trajectories and airflow patterns have also been developed.

  1. Performance Evaluation of Investment (Mutual Funds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Povilas Vyšniauskas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of an investment fund is one of the main components in evaluating the performance of the fund. This study seeks for introducing and comparing risk and performance evaluation ratios. The paper is aimed at testing the worked out ratios and at distinguishing between the best ones for the purpose of evaluating the performance of Lithuanian mutual funds. Scientific studies show that a standard deviation, alpha, beta, Sharpe and Treynor ratios are mostly employed for identifying the performance of mutual funds that are also compared with their benchmark index to establish if these funds are outperformed and if is it worth paying management fees to investment banks for managing mutual funds. Historical data were selected for the period from 2012-01-02 to 2013-10-15 analysing the prices of monthly funds. The paper points out the areas of a practical application of the proposed model for investment fund valuation, which may not only provide valuable outcomes for practitioners but also may inspire further research on this article.

  2. Hospital mutual aid evacuation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, R

    1997-02-01

    Health care facilities need to be prepared for disasters such as floods, tornadoes and earthquakes. Rochester, NY, and its surrounding communities devised a hospital mutual aid evacuation plan in the event a disaster occurs and also to comply with the Joint Commission. This document discusses the plan's development process and also provides the end result.

  3. Expect Respect: Healthy Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pediatrician Ages & Stages Prenatal Baby Toddler Preschool Gradeschool Teen Dating & Sex Fitness Nutrition Driving Safety School Substance Abuse Young Adult Healthy Children > Ages & Stages > Teen > Dating & Sex > Expect Respect: Healthy Relationships Ages & Stages Listen Español ...

  4. Respect as an Incentive

    OpenAIRE

    Tor Eriksson; Marie Claire Villeval

    2010-01-01

    Assuming that people care not only about what others do but also on what others think, we study respect as a non-monetary source of motivation in a context where the length of the employment relationship is endogenous. In our three-stage gift-exchange experiment, the employer can express respect by giving the employee costly symbolic rewards after observing his level of effort. This experiment sheds light on the extent to which symbolic rewards are used, how they affect employees' further eff...

  5. Respect as an Incentive

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Tor; Villeval, Marie Claire

    2010-01-01

    Assuming that people care not only about what others do but also on what others think, we study respect as a non-monetary source of motivation in a context where the length of the employment relationship is endogeneous. In our three-stage gift-exchange experiment, the employer can express respect by giving the employee costly symbolic rewards after observing his level of effort. This experiment sheds light on the extent to which symbolic rewards are used, how they affect employees’ further ef...

  6. Respect as an Incentive

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Tor; Villeval, Marie Claire

    2010-01-01

    Assuming that people care not only about what others do but also on what others think, we study respect as a non-monetary source of motivation in a context where the length of the employment relationship is endogenous. In our three-stage gift-exchange experiment, the employer can express respect by giving the employee costly symbolic rewards after observing his level of effort. This experiment sheds light on the extent to which symbolic rewards are used, how they affect employees’ further eff...

  7. Respect as an incentive

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Tor; Villeval, Marie-Claire

    2010-01-01

    Assuming that people care not only about what others do but also on what others think, we study respect as a non-monetary source of motivation in a context where the length of the employment relationship is endogeneous. In our three-stage gift-exchange experiment, the employer can express respect by giving the employee costly symbolic rewards after observing his level of effort. This experiment sheds light on the extent to which symbolic rewards are used, how they affect employees' further ef...

  8. Generalized Mutual Synchronization between Two Controlled Interdependent Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper mainly focuses on the generalized mutual synchronization between two controlled interdependent networks. First, we propose the general model of controlled interdependent networks A and B with time-varying internetwork delays coupling. Then, by constructing Lyapunov functions and utilizing adaptive control technique, some sufficient conditions are established to ensure that the mutual synchronization errors between the state variables of networks A and B can asymptotically converge to zero. Finally, two numerical examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results and to explore potential application in future smart grid. The simulation results also show how interdependent topologies and internetwork coupling delays influence the mutual synchronizability, which help to design interdependent networks with optimal mutual synchronizability.

  9. Respect Is My Compass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Rosanne

    2008-01-01

    Building bonds of respect is difficult with students who present disruptive and intimidating behavior in the classroom. The author describes how RAP principles were used over a period of a school year to create positive connections with such a student. (Contains 1 note.)

  10. Spectral image analysis of mutual illumination between florescent objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, Shoji; Kato, Keiji; Hirai, Keita; Horiuchi, Takahiko

    2016-08-01

    This paper proposes a method for modeling and component estimation of the spectral images of the mutual illumination phenomenon between two fluorescent objects. First, we briefly describe the bispectral characteristics of a single fluorescent object, which are summarized as a Donaldson matrix. We suppose that two fluorescent objects with different bispectral characteristics are located close together under a uniform illumination. Second, we model the mutual illumination between two objects. It is shown that the spectral composition of the mutual illumination is summarized with four components: (1) diffuse reflection, (2) diffuse-diffuse interreflection, (3) fluorescent self-luminescence, and (4) interreflection by mutual fluorescent illumination. Third, we develop algorithms for estimating the spectral image components from the observed images influenced by the mutual illumination. When the exact Donaldson matrices caused by the mutual illumination influence are unknown, we have to solve a non-linear estimation problem to estimate both the spectral functions and the location weights. An iterative algorithm is then proposed to solve the problem based on the alternate estimation of the spectral functions and the location weights. In our experiments, the feasibility of the proposed method is shown in three cases: the known Donaldson matrices, weak interreflection, and strong interreflection.

  11. 基于卖空成本的证券投资基金投资组合选择问题%A Portfolio Selection Model for Mutual Fund Considering the Cost of Short Selling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王良; 杨乃定; 姜继娇

    2009-01-01

    We discussed the problem of portfolio selection for mutual fund when the cost of short selling is proportional to the price of stock. Furthermore, a portfolio selection model for mutual fund is presented combining with cost of short selling and investors'risk preference. The properties of existence of the optimal solution and the effective frontier of the model were discussed. Finally, an illustrative example was provided.%讨论了卖空条件下,按卖空中股价比例收取成本费用的证券投资基金投资组合选择问题,提出了有卖空成本、考虑基金管理人风险偏好的证券投资基金投资组合选择最优化模型,求出了最优解的解析表达式及其有效边界.在此基础上,结合模型的有效边界及相应的置信水平对模型最优解存在条件进行了分析并提出了相关定理.最后,进行了算法释例.

  12. Mutuality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnould, E. J.; Rose, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    The recently introduced construct of consumer sharing is represented as a nonreciprocal, pro-social distribution of resources given without expectation of reciprocity (Belk, 2010, ‘Sharing’, Journal of Consumer Research 36: 715–34). The approach adopted rests on shaky ontological and epistemologi......The recently introduced construct of consumer sharing is represented as a nonreciprocal, pro-social distribution of resources given without expectation of reciprocity (Belk, 2010, ‘Sharing’, Journal of Consumer Research 36: 715–34). The approach adopted rests on shaky ontological...

  13. Pluto-charon mutual events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binzel, R.P. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (USA))

    1989-11-01

    Since 1985, planetary astronomers have been working to take advantage of a once-per-century apparent alignment between Pluto and its satellite, Charon, which has allowed mutual occultation and transit events to be observed. There events, which will cease in 1990, have permitted the first precise determinations of their individual radii, densities, and surface compositions. In addition, information on their surface albedo distributions can be obtained.

  14. Mutual information challenges entropy bounds

    CERN Document Server

    Casini, H

    2006-01-01

    We consider some formulations of the entropy bounds at the semiclassical level. The entropy S(V) localized in a region V is divergent in quantum field theory (QFT). Instead of it we focus on the mutual information I(V,W)=S(V)+S(W)-S(V U W) between two different non-intersecting sets V and W. This is a low energy quantity, independent of the regularization scheme. In addition, the mutual information is bounded above by twice the entropy corresponding to the sets involved. Calculations of I(V,W) in QFT show that the entropy in empty space cannot be renormalized to zero, and must be actually very large. We find that this entropy due to the vacuum fluctuations violates the FMW bound in Minkowski space. The mutual information also gives a precise, cutoff independent meaning to the statement that the number of degrees of freedom increases with the volume in QFT. If the holographic bound holds, this points to the essential non locality of the physical cutoff. Violations of the Bousso bound would require conformal th...

  15. 互动式教学在“职业生涯规划”课程教学实践中的应用%Exploratory Practice of Mutual-Teaching Model on Course of Career Planning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢红梅; 林芝

    2014-01-01

    In the beginning of setting up the “career planning” course in Zhejiang University, the mutual-teaching model has been adopted as the primary teaching method. The curriculum design based on social interaction theory is well developed and has obtained commonly recognition and the approval of students. Sharing key points with instructor who played the roles as designer, organizer and mentor during interactive process can promote general curriculum’ teaching by mutual-teaching methods in colleges and provide valuable cases. 8 years’ teaching practice indicates that small interactive groups make study enjoyable and educational and play an important role in mutual encouragement and inspiration, meaningful construction of curriculum’s core idea initiate students’ continuous effort to realize their goals and the teaching objectives. The important ways to improve the teaching quality include learning while teaching, timely summary, mutual discussion and cooperation with team members.%浙江大学的“职业生涯规划”课程从2006年开设之初,就将互动式教学定位为该课程的主要教学模式。以社会互动理论为基础进行的教学设计得到了广大选课学生的普遍认可与好评。对教师作为具体教学互动环节的策划者、组织者和指导者所需要掌握的教学关键点的分享,为互动式教学模式在高校通识课教学中的广泛应用提供了可资借鉴的教学案例。8年的教学实践结果表明,寓教于乐的互动环节较好地起到了相互启发和相互激励的作用,对课程核心理念的意义建构所促成的行动力量实现了课程的教学目标。教学相长、定期总结、集思广益、团结协作是提高课程教学质量的重要途径。

  16. 互动式教学在“职业生涯规划”课程教学实践中的应用%Exploratory Practice of Mutual-Teaching Model on Course of Career Planning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢红梅; 林芝

    2014-01-01

    In the beginning of setting up the“career planning”course in Zhejiang University, the mutual-teaching model has been adopted as the primary teaching method. The curriculum design based on social interaction theory is well developed and has obtained commonly recognition and the approval of students. Sharing key points with instructor who played the roles as designer, organizer and mentor during interactive process can promote general curriculum’ teaching by mutual-teaching methods in colleges and provide valuable cases. 8 years’ teaching practice indicates that small interactive groups make study enjoyable and educational and play an important role in mutual encouragement and inspiration, meaningful construction of curriculum’s core idea initiate students’ continuous effort to realize their goals and the teaching objectives. The important ways to improve the teaching quality include learning while teaching, timely summary, mutual discussion and cooperation with team members.%浙江大学的“职业生涯规划”课程从2006年开设之初,就将互动式教学定位为该课程的主要教学模式。以社会互动理论为基础进行的教学设计得到了广大选课学生的普遍认可与好评。对教师作为具体教学互动环节的策划者、组织者和指导者所需要掌握的教学关键点的分享,为互动式教学模式在高校通识课教学中的广泛应用提供了可资借鉴的教学案例。8年的教学实践结果表明,寓教于乐的互动环节较好地起到了相互启发和相互激励的作用,对课程核心理念的意义建构所促成的行动力量实现了课程的教学目标。教学相长、定期总结、集思广益、团结协作是提高课程教学质量的重要途径。

  17. Respect as an Incentive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor Viking; Villeval, Marie-Claire

    In this paper we examine respect as a non-monetary source of motivation. Our experiment sheds light on the extent to which symbolic rewards are used, how they are valued by the employees, and how they affect employee effort, the duration of relationships, and profits of employers. We also study...... whether employers’ decisions to give symbolic rewards are driven by strategic considerations. We find that employers do make use of symbolic rewards and chiefly to express their satisfaction with the employee. Symbolic rewards are associated with higher profits and increased probability of continuing...

  18. Respect as an Incentive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor Viking; Villeval, Marie-Claire

    In this paper we examine respect as a non-monetary source of motivation. Our experiment sheds light on the extent to which symbolic rewards are used, how they are valued by the employees, and how they affect employee effort, the duration of relationships, and profits of employers. We also study...... whether employers’ decisions to give symbolic rewards are driven by strategic considerations. We find that employers do make use of symbolic rewards and chiefly to express their satisfaction with the employee. Symbolic rewards are associated with higher profits and increased probability of continuing...

  19. Toleration out of respect?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2013-01-01

    Under conditions of pluralism different cultures, interests or values can come into conflict, which raises the problem of how to secure peaceful co-existence. The idea of toleration historically emerged as an answer to this problem. Recently Rainer Forst has argued that toleration should not just...... prescription, which Forst presents as a requirement of justice. At both levels, it is argued that Forst’s respect conception is problematic since it presupposes that answers to very substantial normative questions, which are precisely what people tend to disagree on under conditions of pluralism, are already...

  20. 76 FR 36625 - Mutual Holding Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-22

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Mutual Holding Company AGENCY: Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS), Treasury... collection. Title of Proposal: Mutual Holding Company. OMB Number: 1550-0072. Form Numbers: MHC-1 (OTS Form... whether the applicant meets the statutory and regulatory criteria to form a mutual holding company...

  1. 76 FR 20458 - Mutual Holding Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-12

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Mutual Holding Company AGENCY: Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS), Treasury... collection. Title of Proposal: Mutual Holding Company. OMB Number: 1550-0072. Form Numbers: MHC-1 (OTS Form... whether the applicant meets the statutory and regulatory criteria to form a mutual holding company...

  2. A novel model-free data analysis technique based on clustering in a mutual information space: application to resting-state fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Benjaminsson

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Non-parametric data-driven analysis techniques can be used to study datasets with few assumptions about the data and underlying experiment. Variations of Independent Component Analysis (ICA have been the methods mostly used on fMRI data, e.g. in finding resting-state networks thought to reflect the connectivity of the brain. Here we present a novel data analysis technique and demonstrate it on resting-state fMRI data. It is a generic method with few underlying assumptions about the data. The results are built from the statistical relations between all input voxels, resulting in a whole-brain analysis on a voxel level. It has good scalability properties and the parallel implementation is capable of handling large datasets and databases. From the mutual information between the activities of the voxels over time, a distance matrix is created for all voxels in the input space. Multidimensional scaling is used to put the voxels in a lower-dimensional space reflecting the dependency relations based on the distance matrix. By performing clustering in this space we can find the strong statistical regularities in the data, which for the resting-state data turns out to be the resting-state networks. The decomposition is performed in the last step of the algorithm and is computationally simple. This opens up for rapid analysis and visualization of the data on different spatial levels, as well as automatically finding a suitable number of decomposition components.

  3. Respectful Youth Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, Erik K.

    2014-01-01

    Children are social beings who rely on interactions with others to survive and thrive. Since the human brain is wired to connect, cultures in schools and youth organizations must be designed so youth can bond to supportive peers and adults. Children learn through observation, modeling, and responding to people in their environments. Bronfenbrenner…

  4. Safety evaluation of sous vide-processed products with respect to nonproteolytic Clostridium botulinum by use of challenge studies and predictive microbiological models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyytiä-Trees, E; Skyttä, E; Mokkila, M; Kinnunen, A; Lindström, M; Lähteenmäki, L; Ahvenainen, R; Korkeala, H

    2000-01-01

    Sixteen different types of sous vide-processed products were evaluated for safety with respect to nonproteolytic group II Clostridium botulinum by using challenge tests with low (2. 0-log-CFU/kg) and high (5.3-log-CFU/kg) inocula and two currently available predictive microbiological models, Food MicroModel (FMM) and Pathogen Modeling Program (PMP). After thermal processing, the products were stored at 4 and 8 degrees C and examined for the presence of botulinal spores and neurotoxin on the sell-by date and 7 days after the sell-by date. Most of the thermal processes were found to be inadequate for eliminating spores, even in low-inoculum samples. Only 2 of the 16 products were found to be negative for botulinal spores and neurotoxin at both sampling times. Two products at the high inoculum level showed toxigenesis during storage at 8 degrees C, one of them at the sell-by date. The predictions generated by both the FMM thermal death model and the FMM and PMP growth models were found to be inconsistent with the observed results in a majority of the challenges. The inaccurate predictions were caused by the limited number and range of the controlling factors in the models. Based on this study, it was concluded that the safety of sous vide products needs to be carefully evaluated product by product. Time-temperature combinations used in thermal treatments should be reevaluated to increase the efficiency of processing, and the use of additional antibotulinal hurdles, such as biopreservatives, should be assessed.

  5. Rényi generalizations of the conditional quantum mutual information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berta, Mario [Institute for Quantum Information and Matter, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Seshadreesan, Kaushik P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Hearne Institute for Theoretical Physics, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Wilde, Mark M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Hearne Institute for Theoretical Physics, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Center for Computation and Technology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    The conditional quantum mutual information I(A; B|C) of a tripartite state ρ{sub ABC} is an information quantity which lies at the center of many problems in quantum information theory. Three of its main properties are that it is non-negative for any tripartite state, that it decreases under local operations applied to systems A and B, and that it obeys the duality relation I(A; B|C) = I(A; B|D) for a four-party pure state on systems ABCD. The conditional mutual information also underlies the squashed entanglement, an entanglement measure that satisfies all of the axioms desired for an entanglement measure. As such, it has been an open question to find Rényi generalizations of the conditional mutual information, that would allow for a deeper understanding of the original quantity and find applications beyond the traditional memoryless setting of quantum information theory. The present paper addresses this question, by defining different α-Rényi generalizations I{sub α}(A; B|C) of the conditional mutual information, some of which we can prove converge to the conditional mutual information in the limit α → 1. Furthermore, we prove that many of these generalizations satisfy non-negativity, duality, and monotonicity with respect to local operations on one of the systems A or B (with it being left as an open question to prove that monotonicity holds with respect to local operations on both systems). The quantities defined here should find applications in quantum information theory and perhaps even in other areas of physics, but we leave this for future work. We also state a conjecture regarding the monotonicity of the Rényi conditional mutual informations defined here with respect to the Rényi parameter α. We prove that this conjecture is true in some special cases and when α is in a neighborhood of one.

  6. Between Mere Tolerance and Robust Respect: Mutuality as a Basis for Civic Education in Pluralist Democracies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblith, Suzanne; Bindewald, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    This essay by Suzanne Rosenblith and Benjamin Bindewald is motivated by the question of how do those who value civic liberalism give the religiously orthodox a reason to engage in pluralist democratic deliberations in a manner that does not allow intolerance to undermine the foundations of liberal democracy. Introducing the idea of tolerance as…

  7. Between Mere Tolerance and Robust Respect: Mutuality as a Basis for Civic Education in Pluralist Democracies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblith, Suzanne; Bindewald, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    This essay by Suzanne Rosenblith and Benjamin Bindewald is motivated by the question of how do those who value civic liberalism give the religiously orthodox a reason to engage in pluralist democratic deliberations in a manner that does not allow intolerance to undermine the foundations of liberal democracy. Introducing the idea of tolerance as…

  8. Freedom of Expression, Deliberation, Autonomy and Respect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostbøll, Christian F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper elaborates on the deliberative democracy argument for freedom of expression in terms of its relationship to different dimensions of autonomy. It engages the objection that Enlightenment theories pose a threat to cultures that reject autonomy and argues that autonomy-based democracy...... is not only compatible with but necessary for respect for cultural diversity. On the basis of an intersubjective epistemology, it argues that people cannot know how to live on mutually respectful terms without engaging in public deliberation and develop some degree of personal autonomy. While freedom...... of expression is indispensable for deliberation and autonomy, this does not mean that people have no obligations regarding how they speak to each other. The moral insights provided by deliberation depend on the participants in the process treating one another with respect. The argument is related to the Danish...

  9. Waveguide mutually pumped phase conjugators

    OpenAIRE

    James, S. W.; Youden, K.E.; Jeffrey, P. M.; EASON, R. W.; Chandler, P.J.; Zhang, L.; Townsend, P.D.

    1993-01-01

    The operation of the Bridge Mutually Pumped Phase Conjugator is reported in a planar waveguide structure in photorefractive BaTiO3. The waveguide was fabricated by the technique of ion implantation. using 1.5 MeV H+ at a dose of 10^16 ions/cm^2. An order of magnitude decrease in response time is observed in the waveguide as compared to typical values obtained in bulk crystals, probably resulting from a combination of the optical confinement within the waveguide, and possibly modification of t...

  10. Mutual Coupling Compensation for Direction-of-Arrival Estimations Using the Receiving-Mutual-Impedance Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoi Shun Lui

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A short review of the receiving-mutual-impedance method (RMIM for mutual coupling compensation in direction finding applications using linear array is conducted. The differences between the conventional-mutual-impedance method (CMIM and RMIM, as well as the three different determination methods for receiving mutual impedance (RMI, will be discussed in details. As an example, direction finding with better accuracies is used for demonstrating the superiority of mutual coupling compensation using RMIM.

  11. Second-order capillary electrophoresis diode array detector data modeled with the Tucker3 algorithm: A novel strategy for Argentinean white wine discrimination respect to grape variety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azcarate, Silvana M; de Araújo Gomes, Adriano; Vera-Candioti, Luciana; Cesar Ugulino de Araújo, Mário; Camiña, José M; Goicoechea, Héctor C

    2016-07-01

    Data obtained by capillary electrophoresis with diode array detection (CE-DAD) were modeled with the purpose to discriminate Argentinean white wines samples produced from three grape varieties (Torrontés, Chardonnay, and Sauvignon blanc). Thirty-eight samples of commercial white wine from four wine-producing provinces of Argentina (Mendoza, San Juan, Salta, and Rio Negro) were analyzed. CE-DAD matrices with dimensions of 421 elution times (from 1.17 to 7.39 minutes) × 71 wavelengths (from 227 to 367 nm) were joined in a three way data array and decomposed by Tucker3 method under non-negativity constraint, employing 18, 18 and six factors in the modes 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Using the scores of Tucker model, it was possible to discriminate samples of Argentinean white wine by linear discriminant analysis and Kernel linear discriminant analysis. Core element analysis of the Tucker3 model allows identifying the loading profiles in spectral mode related to Argentinean white wine samples.

  12. A review of a method for dynamic load distribution, dynamic modeling, and explicit internal force control when two serial link manipulators mutually lift and transport a rigid body object

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unseren, M.A.

    1997-09-01

    The report reviews a method for modeling and controlling two serial link manipulators which mutually lift and transport a rigid body object in a three dimensional workspace. A new vector variable is introduced which parameterizes the internal contact force controlled degrees of freedom. A technique for dynamically distributing the payload between the manipulators is suggested which yields a family of solutions for the contact forces and torques the manipulators impart to the object. A set of rigid body kinematic constraints which restricts the values of the joint velocities of both manipulators is derived. A rigid body dynamical model for the closed chain system is first developed in the joint space. The model is obtained by generalizing the previous methods for deriving the model. The joint velocity and acceleration variables in the model are expressed in terms of independent pseudovariables. The pseudospace model is transformed to obtain reduced order equations of motion and a separate set of equations governing the internal components of the contact forces and torques. A theoretic control architecture is suggested which explicitly decouples the two sets of equations comprising the model. The controller enables the designer to develop independent, non-interacting control laws for the position control and internal force control of the system.

  13. Dynamic phase transition in the two-dimensional kinetic Ising model in an oscillating field: universality with respect to the stochastic dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buendía, G M; Rikvold, P A

    2008-11-01

    We study the dynamical response of a two-dimensional Ising model subject to a square-wave oscillating external field. In contrast to earlier studies, the system evolves under a so-called soft Glauber dynamic [Rikvold and Kolesik, J. Phys. A 35, L117 (2002)], for which both nucleation and interface propagation are slower and the interfaces smoother than for the standard Glauber dynamic. We choose the temperature and magnitude of the external field such that the metastable decay of the system following field reversal occurs through nucleation and growth of many droplets of the stable phase, i.e., the multidroplet regime. Using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, we find that the system undergoes a nonequilibrium phase transition, in which the symmetry-broken dynamic phase corresponds to an asymmetric stationary limit cycle for the time-dependent magnetization. The critical point is located where the half period of the external field is approximately equal to the metastable lifetime of the system. We employ finite-size scaling analysis to investigate the characteristics of this dynamical phase transition. The critical exponents and the fixed-point value of the fourth-order cumulant are found to be consistent with the universality class of the two-dimensional equilibrium Ising model. This universality class has previously been established for the same nonequilibrium model evolving under the standard Glauber dynamic, as well as in a different nonequilibrium model of CO oxidation. The results reported in the present paper support the hypothesis that this far-from-equilibrium phase transition is universal with respect to the choice of the stochastic dynamics.

  14. Spitzer Observations of Mutual Events in the Binary System (617) Patroclus-Menoetius

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller, Michael; Marchis, F.; Emery, J. P.; Berthier, J.; Hestroffer, D.; Harris, A.; Descamps, P.; Vachier, F.; Mottola, S.

    2007-01-01

    We report Spitzer observations of the binary Trojan system (617) Patroclus-Menoetius during two mutual events, when respectively one component shadowed and occulted the other. Observing the thermal response to mutual shadowing with spectral ( 8--33 µm) and temporal resolution allowed us to determine

  15. Freedom of Expression, Deliberation, Autonomy, and Respect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostbøll, Christian Fogh

    diversity. On the basis of an intersubjective epistemology, I argue that citizens cannot know how to live on mutually respectful terms without engaging in public deliberation. Moreover, to be successful deliberation must foster some degree of personal autonomy, at least the ability to distinguish what......The strongest versions of the democracy argument for freedom of expression rely on the deliberative conception of democracy. Deliberative democracy entails both an ideal of political autonomy and of autonomous preference formation. This paper elaborates the deliberative democracy argument...... for freedom of expression in terms of its relationship to different dimensions of autonomy. In response to the objection that Enlightenment theories pose a threat to cultures that reject autonomy, it is argued that autonomy-based democracy is not only compatible with but necessary for respect for cultural...

  16. Empirical study on mutual fund objective classification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金雪军; 杨晓兰

    2004-01-01

    Mutual funds are usually classified on the basis of their objectives. If the activities of mutual funds are consistent with their stated objectives, investors may look at the latter as signals of their risks and incomes. This work analyzes mutual fund objective classification in China by statistical methods of distance analysis and discriminant analysis; and examines whether the stated investment objectives of mutual funds adequately represent their attributes to investors. That is, if mutual funds adhere to their stated objectives, attributes must be heterogeneous between investment objective groups and homogeneous within them. Our conclusion is to some degree, the group of optimized exponential funds is heterogeneous to other groups. As a whole, there exist no significant differences between different objective groups; and 50% of mutual funds are not consistent with their objective groups.

  17. 向量白回归模型Granger因果图的条件互信息辨识与应用%Identification and application about Granger causality graph of vector autoregressive model using conditional mutual information

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏岳嵩; 田铮; 陈占寿

    2011-01-01

    Grangerl因果性是衡量系统变量间动态关系的重要依据.传统的两变量Grangerl因果分析法容易产生伪因果关系,且不能刻画变量间的即时因果性.本文利用图模型方法研究时间序列变量间的Grangerl因果关系,建立了时间序列Granger因果图,提出Grangerl因果图的条件互信息辨识方法,利用混沌理论中的关联积分估计条件互信息,统计量的显著性由置换检验确定.仿真结果证实了方法的有效性,并利用该方法研究了空气污染指标以及中国股市间的Grangerl因果关系.%The Granger Causality is an important basis for measuring the dynamic relationships among system vari- ables. Traditional two-variable Granger causality analysis method is prone to inducing spurious causal relationship and can not portray the immediate causal relationship. This paper explores how to use graphical models method to analyze the Granger causal relations among components of multivariate time series. Granger causality graph of time series is presented. The structural identification of Granger causality graph is investigated based on the conditional mutual information. The conditional mutual information is estimated using the correlation integral from chaos theory. The significance of the tested statistics is determined with a permutation test. The validity of the proposed method is confirmed by simulations analysis. The Granger causal relationships of the air pollution index and the China's stock market are investigated using the proposed method.

  18. Holographic Mutual Information is Monogamous

    CERN Document Server

    Hayden, Patrick; Maloney, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    We identify a special information-theoretic property of quantum field theories with holographic duals: the mutual informations among arbitrary disjoint spatial regions A,B,C obey the inequality I(A:BC) >= I(A:B)+I(A:C), provided entanglement entropies are given by the Ryu-Takayanagi formula. Inequalities of this type are known as monogamy relations and are characteristic of measures of quantum entanglement. This suggests that correlations in holographic theories arise primarily from entanglement rather than classical correlations. We also show that the Ryu-Takayanagi formula is consistent with all known general inequalities obeyed by the entanglement entropy, including an infinite set recently discovered by Cadney, Linden, and Winter; this constitutes strong evidence in favour of its validity.

  19. Holographic mutual information is monogamous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Patrick; Headrick, Matthew; Maloney, Alexander

    2013-02-01

    We identify a special information-theoretic property of quantum field theories with holographic duals: the mutual informations among arbitrary disjoint spatial regions A, B, C obey the inequality I(A∶B∪C)≥I(A∶B)+I(A∶C), provided entanglement entropies are given by the Ryu-Takayanagi formula. Inequalities of this type are known as monogamy relations and are characteristic of measures of quantum entanglement. This suggests that correlations in holographic theories arise primarily from entanglement rather than classical correlations. We also show that the Ryu-Takayanagi formula is consistent with all known general inequalities obeyed by the entanglement entropy, including an infinite set recently discovered by Cadney et al.; this constitutes strong evidence in favor of its validity.

  20. Evaluating Selection and Timing Ability of a Mutual Fund

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duguleană L.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the methodology and a case study to evaluate the performance of a mutual fund by taking a look at the timing and selection abilities of a portfolio manager. Separating the timing and selection abilities of the fund manager is taken into consideration by two major models. The data about the mutual fund chosen for study is the German blue chip fund “DWS Deutsche Aktien Typ O”, which includes most of the DAX 30 companies. The data consists of 117 monthly observations of the fund returns from January 1999 to September 2008. We used EViews to analyse the data.

  1. Mutual Information of Pauli Channels with Correlated Noise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Li-zhen; FANG Mao-Fa

    2007-01-01

    A general formula for the mutual information of the Pauli channels with memory modelled by correlated noise is derived.It is shown that the mutual information depends on the channel shrinking factor,the input state parameter and the channel memory coefficient.The analyses based on the general formula reveal that the entanglement is always a useful resource to enhance the mutual information of some.Pauli channels,such as the bit flip channel and the bit-phase flip channel.Our analyses also show that the entanglement is not advantageous to the reliable transmission of classical information for Borne Pauli channels at any time,such as the phase flip channel and the phase damping channel.

  2. Cointegration and causality analysis of dynamic linkage between stock market and equity mutual funds in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasipa Pojanavatee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The existing literature finds conflicting results on the magnitude of price linkages between equity mutual funds and the stock market. The study contends that in an optimal lagged model, the expectations of future prices using knowledge of past price behaviour in a particular equity mutual fund category will improve forecasts of prices of other equity mutual fund categories and the stock market index. The evidence shows that the long-run pricing of equity mutual funds is cointegrated with the stock market index. In the short run, the results indicate that some equity mutual fund categories possess both long-run and short-run exogeneity with the stock market. Therefore, the short-run dynamic indicates short-run Granger causal links running between different equity mutual fund categories.

  3. Quantum Mutual Information Along Unitary Orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Jevtic, Sania; Rudolph, Terry

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by thermodynamic considerations, we analyse the variation of the quantum mutual information on a unitary orbit of a bipartite system state, with and without global constraints such as energy conservation. We solve the full optimisation problem for the smallest system of two qubits, and explore thoroughly the effect of unitary operations on the space of reduced-state spectra. We then provide applications of these ideas to physical processes within closed quantum systems, such as a generalized collision model approach to thermal equilibrium and a global Maxwell demon playing tricks on local observers. For higher dimensions, the maximization of correlations is relatively straightforward, however the minimisation of correlations displays non-trivial structures. We characterise a set of separable states in which the minimally correlated state resides, and find a collection of classically correlated states admitting a particular "Young tableau" form. Furthermore, a partial order exists on this set with re...

  4. Speech Intelligibility Prediction Based on Mutual Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper; Taal, Cees H.

    2014-01-01

    to the mutual information between critical-band amplitude envelopes of the clean signal and the corresponding noisy/processed signal. The resulting intelligibility predictor turns out to be a simple function of the mean-square error (mse) that arises when estimating a clean critical-band amplitude using......This paper deals with the problem of predicting the average intelligibility of noisy and potentially processed speech signals, as observed by a group of normal hearing listeners. We propose a model which performs this prediction based on the hypothesis that intelligibility is monotonically related...... the intelligibility of speech signals contaminated by additive noise and potentially non-linearly processed using time-frequency weighting....

  5. Market timing: A decomposition of mutual fund returns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.A.P. Swinkels (Laurens); P.J. van der Sluis; M.J.C.M. Verbeek (Marno)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractWe decompose the conditional expected mutual fund return in five parts. Two parts, selectivity and expert market timing, can be attributed to manager skill, and three to variation in market exposure that can be achieved by private investors as well. The dynamic model that we use to estim

  6. Mutual Radiation Impedance of Uncollapsed CMUT Cells with Different Radii

    CERN Document Server

    Ozgurluk, Alper; Atalar, Abdullah; Koymen, Hayrettin

    2015-01-01

    A polynomial approximation is proposed for the mutual acoustic impedance between uncollapsed capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) cells with different radii in an infinite rigid baffle. The resulting approximation is employed in simulating CMUTs with a circuit model. A very good agreement is obtained with the corresponding finite element simulation (FEM) result.

  7. Evolutionary dynamics of fluctuating populations with strong mutualism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotibut, Thiparat; Nelson, David

    2013-03-01

    Evolutionary game theory with finite interacting populations is receiving increased attention, including subtle phenomena associated with number fluctuations, i.e., ``genetic drift.'' Models of cooperation and competition often utilize a simplified Moran model, with a strictly fixed total population size. We explore a more general evolutionary model with independent fluctuations in the numbers of two distinct species, in a regime characterized by ``strong mutualism.'' The model has two absorbing states, each corresponding to fixation of one of the two species, and allows exploration of the interplay between growth, competition, and mutualism. When mutualism is favored, number fluctuations eventually drive the system away from a stable fixed point, characterized by cooperation, to one of the absorbing states. Well-mixed populations will thus be taken over by a single species in a finite time, despite the bias towards cooperation. We calculate both the fixation probability and the mean fixation time as a function of the initial conditions and carrying capacities in the strong mutualism regime, using the method of matched asymptotic expansions. Our results are compared to computer simulations.

  8. Market Timing : A Decomposition of Mutual Fund Returns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinkels, L.A.P.; van der Sluis, P.J.; Verbeek, M.J.C.M.

    2003-01-01

    We decompose the conditional expected mutual fund return in ve parts.Two parts, selectivity and expert market timing, can be attributed to manager skill, and three to variation in market exposure that can be achieved by private investors as well.The dynamic model that we use to estimate the relative

  9. A new technique for dynamic load distribution when two manipulators mutually lift a rigid object. Part 2, Derivation of entire system model and control architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unseren, M.A.

    1994-04-01

    A rigid body model for the entire system which accounts for the load distribution scheme proposed in Part 1 as well as for the dynamics of the manipulators and the kinematic constraints is derived in the joint space. A technique is presented for expressing the object dynamics in terms of the joint variables of both manipulators which leads to a positive definite and symmetric inertia matrix. The model is then transformed to obtain reduced order equations of motion and a separate set of equations which govern the behavior of the internal contact forces. The control architecture is applied to the model which results in the explicit decoupling of the position and internal contact force-controlled degrees of freedom (DOF).

  10. On the Mutual Information in Hawking Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Iizuka, Norihiro

    2013-01-01

    We compute the mutual information of two Hawking particles emitted consecutively by an evaporating black hole. Following Page, we find that the mutual information is of order exp(-S) where S is the entropy of the black hole. We speculate on implications for black hole unitarity, in particular on a possible failure of locality at large distances.

  11. Mutual Influence Between Culture And Science

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周晓敏

    2016-01-01

    Science and culture are different concepts or areas, although they have different ways of development, but they have a complex relationship. Culture and science mutual influence and mutual restrict. The development of science has caused the change of culture, and promotes the development of human culture. At the same time, culture also influences the development of science in a certain extent.

  12. The Competitive Strategy of Mutual Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelner, Stephen P.; Slavin, Lois

    1998-01-01

    Defines and discusses mutual learning in organizations. Suggests that the idea of people and companies sharing knowledge is becoming a competitive strategy because mutual learning enables executives and employees to increase their capacity to work together, accelerate organizational learning, and avoid mistakes. (JOW)

  13. Bright Lights and Questions: Using Mutual Interrogation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Aishikin; Alangui, Willy; Barton, Bill

    2010-01-01

    Mutual Interrogation is a research methodology for ethnomathematics proposed by Alangui in 2006 in an attempt to avoid the potential inequality set up when a restricted cultural practice is viewed through the lens of the near-universal and highly developed research domain of mathematics. Using three significant examples of mutual interrogation in…

  14. [Maintaining solidarity: is mutuality the solution?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevers, J K M; Ploem, M C

    2013-01-01

    Solidarity is essentially the willingness to contribute to the community and its demands, which may even involve contributing more than one is expecting to receive. Another principle is mutuality: this refers to a balance between rights and obligations or between mutual obligations. In its advisory document 'The importance of mutuality......solidarity takes work!', The Dutch Council for Public Health and Health Care underlines the importance of ensuring solidarity within the Dutch health care system, e.g. by encouraging patients to take responsibility for their own health, possibly by introducing elements of mutuality. In our contribution, we comment on the Council's advice. Although we fully agree with the overall conclusion that solidarity should be maintained within the system, we do not see how the introduction of increased mutuality will contribute to this goal.

  15. Renewing the Respect for Similarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimon eEdelman

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In psychology, the concept of similarity has traditionally evoked a mixture of respect, stemmingfrom its ubiquity and intuitive appeal, and concern, due to its dependence on the framing of the problemat hand and on its context. We argue for a renewed focus on similarity as an explanatory concept, bysurveying established results and new developments in the theory and methods of similarity-preservingassociative lookup and dimensionality reduction — critical components of many cognitive functions, aswell as of intelligent data management in computer vision. We focus in particular on the growing familyof algorithms that support associative memory by performing hashing that respects local similarity, andon the uses of similarity in representing structured objects and scenes. Insofar as these similarity-basedideas and methods are useful in cognitive modeling and in AI applications, they should be included inthe core conceptual toolkit of computational neuroscience.

  16. The Hawaiian bobtail squid (Euprymna scolopes): a model to study the molecular basis of eukaryote-prokaryote mutualism and the development and evolution of morphological novelties in cephalopods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Patricia N; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J; Callaerts, Patrick; de Couet, H Gert

    2009-11-01

    The Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes, is a cephalopod whose small size, short lifespan, rapid growth, and year-round availability make it suitable as a model organism. E. scolopes is studied in three principal contexts: (1) as a model of cephalopod development; (2) as a model of animal-bacterial symbioses; and (3) as a system for studying adaptations of tissues that interact with light. E. scolopes embryos can be obtained continually and can be reared in the laboratory over an entire generation. The embryos and protective chorions are optically clear, facilitating in situ developmental observations, and can be manipulated experimentally. Many molecular protocols have been developed for studying E. scolopes development. This species is best known, however, for its symbiosis with the luminous marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri and has been used to study determinants of symbiont specificity, the influence of symbiosis on development of the squid light organ, and the mechanisms by which a stable association is achieved. Both partners can be grown independently under laboratory conditions, a feature that offers the unusual opportunity to manipulate the symbiosis experimentally. Molecular and genetic tools have been developed for V. fischeri, and a large expressed sequence tag (EST) database is available for the host symbiotic tissues. Additionally, comparisons between light organ form and function to those of the eye can be made. Both types of tissue interact with light, but have divergent embryonic development. As such, they offer an opportunity to study the molecular basis for the evolution of morphological novelties.

  17. Mutual information area laws for thermal free fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernigau, H.; Kastoryano, M. J.; Eisert, J.

    2015-02-01

    We provide a rigorous and asymptotically exact expression of the mutual information of translationally invariant free fermionic lattice systems in a Gibbs state. In order to arrive at this result, we introduce a novel framework for computing determinants of Töplitz operators with smooth symbols, and for treating Töplitz matrices with system size dependent entries. The asymptotically exact mutual information for a partition of the 1D lattice satisfies an area law, with a prefactor which we compute explicitly. As examples, we discuss the fermionic XX model in one dimension and free fermionic models on the torus in higher dimensions in detail. Special emphasis is put on the discussion of the temperature dependence of the mutual information, scaling like the logarithm of the inverse temperature, hence confirming an expression suggested by conformal field theory. We also comment on the applicability of the formalism to treat open systems driven by quantum noise. In the appendix, we derive useful bounds to the mutual information in terms of purities. Finally, we provide a detailed error analysis for finite system sizes. This analysis is valuable in its own right for the abstract theory of Töplitz determinants.

  18. Ecological genomics of mutualism decline in nitrogen-fixing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger, Christie R; Lau, Jennifer A; Heath, Katy D

    2016-03-16

    Anthropogenic changes can influence mutualism evolution; however, the genomic regions underpinning mutualism that are most affected by environmental change are generally unknown, even in well-studied model mutualisms like the interaction between legumes and their nitrogen (N)-fixing rhizobia. Such genomic information can shed light on the agents and targets of selection maintaining cooperation in nature. We recently demonstrated that N-fertilization has caused an evolutionary decline in mutualistic partner quality in the rhizobia that form symbiosis with clover. Here, population genomic analyses of N-fertilized versus control rhizobium populations indicate that evolutionary differentiation at a key symbiosis gene region on the symbiotic plasmid (pSym) contributes to partner quality decline. Moreover, patterns of genetic variation at selected loci were consistent with recent positive selection within N-fertilized environments, suggesting that N-rich environments might select for less beneficial rhizobia. By studying the molecular population genomics of a natural bacterial population within a long-term ecological field experiment, we find that: (i) the N environment is indeed a potent selective force mediating mutualism evolution in this symbiosis, (ii) natural variation in rhizobium partner quality is mediated in part by key symbiosis genes on the symbiotic plasmid, and (iii) differentiation at selected genes occurred in the context of otherwise recombining genomes, resembling eukaryotic models of adaptation.

  19. Continuous mutual improvement of macromolecular structure models in the PDB and of X-ray crystallographic software: the dual role of deposited experimental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos, NM 87507 (United States); Bricogne, Gerard, E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Global Phasing Ltd, Sheraton House, Castle Park, Cambridge CB3 0AX (United Kingdom); Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos, NM 87507 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Macromolecular structures deposited in the PDB can and should be continually reinterpreted and improved on the basis of their accompanying experimental X-ray data, exploiting the steady progress in methods and software that the deposition of such data into the PDB on a massive scale has made possible. Accurate crystal structures of macromolecules are of high importance in the biological and biomedical fields. Models of crystal structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) are in general of very high quality as deposited. However, methods for obtaining the best model of a macromolecular structure from a given set of experimental X-ray data continue to progress at a rapid pace, making it possible to improve most PDB entries after their deposition by re-analyzing the original deposited data with more recent software. This possibility represents a very significant departure from the situation that prevailed when the PDB was created, when it was envisioned as a cumulative repository of static contents. A radical paradigm shift for the PDB is therefore proposed, away from the static archive model towards a much more dynamic body of continuously improving results in symbiosis with continuously improving methods and software. These simultaneous improvements in methods and final results are made possible by the current deposition of processed crystallographic data (structure-factor amplitudes) and will be supported further by the deposition of raw data (diffraction images). It is argued that it is both desirable and feasible to carry out small-scale and large-scale efforts to make this paradigm shift a reality. Small-scale efforts would focus on optimizing structures that are of interest to specific investigators. Large-scale efforts would undertake a systematic re-optimization of all of the structures in the PDB, or alternatively the redetermination of groups of structures that are either related to or focused on specific questions. All of the resulting structures should be

  20. Burial and exhumation in a subduction wedge: Mutual constraints from thermomechanical modeling and natural P-T-t data (Schistes Lustrés, western Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamato, P.; Agard, P.; Burov, E.; Le Pourhiet, L.; Jolivet, L.; Tiberi, C.

    2007-07-01

    The dynamic processes leading to synconvergent exhumation of high-pressure low-temperature (HP-LT) rocks at oceanic accretionary margins, as well as the mechanisms maintaining nearly steady state regime in most accretion prisms, remain poorly understood. The present study aims at getting better constraints on the rheology, thermal conductivity, and chemical properties of the sediments in subduction zones. To reach that goal, oceanic subduction is modeled using a forward visco-elasto-plastic thermomechanical code (PARA(O)VOZ-FLAC algorithm), and synthetic pressure-temperature-time (P-T-t) paths, predicted from numerical experiments, are compared with natural P-T-t paths. The study is focused on the well constrained Schistes Lustrés complex (SL: western Alps) which is thought to represent the fossil accretionary wedge of the Liguro-Piemontese Ocean. For convergence rates comparable to Alpine subduction rates (˜3 cm yr-1), the best-fitting results are obtained for high-viscosity, low-density wedge sediments and/or a strong lower continental crust. After a transition period of 3-5 Ma the modeled accretionary wedges reach a steady state which lasts over 20 Ma. Over that time span a significant proportion (˜35%) of sediments entering the wedge undergoes P-T conditions typical of the SL complex (˜15-20 kbar; 350-450°C) with similar P-T loops. Computed exhumation rates (<6 mm yr-1) are in agreement with observations (1-5 mm yr-1). In presence of a serpentinite layer below the oceanic crust, exhumation of oceanic material takes place at rates approaching 3 mm yr-1. In all experiments the total pressure in the accretionary wedge never deviated by more than ±10% from the lithostatic component.

  1. Mutual Exclusion Principle for Multithreaded Web Crawlers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kartik Kumar Perisetla

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes mutual exclusion principle for multithreaded web crawlers. The existing web crawlers use data structures to hold frontier set in local address space. This space could be used to run more crawler threads for faster operation. All crawler threads fetch the URL to crawl from the centralized frontier. The mutual exclusion principle is used to provide access to frontier for each crawler thread in synchronized manner to avoid deadlock. The approach to utilize the waiting time on mutual exclusion lock in efficient manner has been discussed in detail.

  2. Ready, Set, Respect! GLSEN's Elementary School Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network (GLSEN), 2012

    2012-01-01

    "Ready, Set, Respect!" provides a set of tools to help elementary school educators ensure that all students feel safe and respected and develop respectful attitudes and behaviors. It is not a program to be followed but instead is designed to help educators prepare themselves for teaching about and modeling respect. The toolkit responds to…

  3. Gene Regulatory Network Reconstruction Using Conditional Mutual Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Wang

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The inference of gene regulatory network from expression data is an important area of research that provides insight to the inner workings of a biological system. The relevance-network-based approaches provide a simple and easily-scalable solution to the understanding of interaction between genes. Up until now, most works based on relevance network focus on the discovery of direct regulation using correlation coefficient or mutual information. However, some of the more complicated interactions such as interactive regulation and coregulation are not easily detected. In this work, we propose a relevance network model for gene regulatory network inference which employs both mutual information and conditional mutual information to determine the interactions between genes. For this purpose, we propose a conditional mutual information estimator based on adaptive partitioning which allows us to condition on both discrete and continuous random variables. We provide experimental results that demonstrate that the proposed regulatory network inference algorithm can provide better performance when the target network contains coregulated and interactively regulated genes.

  4. Professional Learning: A Fuzzy Logic-Based Modelling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravani, M. N.; Hadjileontiadou, S. J.; Nikolaidou, G. N.; Hadjileontiadis, L. J.

    2007-01-01

    Studies have suggested that professional learning is influenced by two key parameters, i.e., climate and planning, and their associated variables (mutual respect, collaboration, mutual trust, supportiveness, openness). In this paper, we applied analysis of the relationships between the proposed quantitative, fuzzy logic-based model and a series of…

  5. Inverse modelling of Köhler theory - Part 1: A response surface analysis of CCN spectra with respect to surface-active organic species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Samuel; Partridge, Daniel G.; Topping, David; Stier, Philip

    2016-09-01

    In this study a novel framework for inverse modelling of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra is developed using Köhler theory. The framework is established by using model-generated synthetic measurements as calibration data for a parametric sensitivity analysis. Assessment of the relative importance of aerosol physicochemical parameters, while accounting for bulk-surface partitioning of surface-active organic species, is carried out over a range of atmospherically relevant supersaturations. By introducing an objective function that provides a scalar metric for diagnosing the deviation of modelled CCN concentrations from synthetic observations, objective function response surfaces are presented as a function of model input parameters. Crucially, for the chosen calibration data, aerosol-CCN spectrum closure is confirmed as a well-posed inverse modelling exercise for a subset of the parameters explored herein. The response surface analysis indicates that the appointment of appropriate calibration data is particularly important. To perform an inverse aerosol-CCN closure analysis and constrain parametric uncertainties, it is shown that a high-resolution CCN spectrum definition of the calibration data is required where single-valued definitions may be expected to fail. Using Köhler theory to model CCN concentrations requires knowledge of many physicochemical parameters, some of which are difficult to measure in situ on the scale of interest and introduce a considerable amount of parametric uncertainty to model predictions. For all partitioning schemes and environments modelled, model output showed significant sensitivity to perturbations in aerosol log-normal parameters describing the accumulation mode, surface tension, organic : inorganic mass ratio, insoluble fraction, and solution ideality. Many response surfaces pertaining to these parameters contain well-defined minima and are therefore good candidates for calibration using a Monte Carlo Markov Chain (MCMC

  6. Manager-Investor Conflicts in Mutual Funds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mahoney, Paul G

    2004-01-01

    .... After providing some basic institutional details, it focuses on the cash flows from mutual fund investors to fund managers, brokers, and other third parties and the associated conflicts of interest...

  7. Mycorrhiza: A Common Form of Mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medve, Richard J.

    1978-01-01

    Mycorrhizae are among the most common examples of mutualism. This article discusses their structure, symbolic relationship, factors affecting formation and applying research. Questions are posed and answers suggested. (MA)

  8. Comparing network covers using mutual information

    CERN Document Server

    Esquivel, Alcides Viamontes

    2012-01-01

    In network science, researchers often use mutual information to understand the difference between network partitions produced by community detection methods. Here we extend the use of mutual information to covers, that is, the cases where a node can belong to more than one module. In our proposed solution, the underlying stochastic process used to compare partitions is extended to deal with covers, and the random variables of the new process are simply fed into the usual definition of mutual information. With partitions, our extended process behaves exactly as the conventional approach for partitions, and thus, the mutual information values obtained are the same. We also describe how to perform sampling and do error estimation for our extended process, as both are necessary steps for a practical application of this measure. The stochastic process that we define here is not only applicable to networks, but can also be used to compare more general set-to-set binary relations.

  9. Mycorrhiza: A Common Form of Mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medve, Richard J.

    1978-01-01

    Mycorrhizae are among the most common examples of mutualism. This article discusses their structure, symbolic relationship, factors affecting formation and applying research. Questions are posed and answers suggested. (MA)

  10. Stability of an intraguild predation system with mutual predation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanshi; DeAngelis, Donald L.

    2016-04-01

    We examine intraguild predation (IGP), in which species both compete for resources or space and prey on each other. The IGP system is modeled here by a lattice gas model of the mean-field theory. First, we consider the IGP system of one species in which individuals of the same species cannibalize each other. The dynamical behavior of the model demonstrates a mechanism by which the intraspecific predation promotes persistence of the species. Then we consider the IGP system of two species with mutual predation. Global dynamics of the model exhibit basic properties of IGP: (i) When both species' efficiencies in converting the consumptions into fitness are large, the outcome of their interaction is mutualistic in form and the IGP promotes persistence of both species. (ii) When one species' efficiency is large but the other's is small, the interaction outcomes become parasitic in nature, in which an obligate species can survive through the mutual predation with a facultative one. (iii) When both species' efficiencies are small, the interaction outcomes are competitive in nature and the IGP leads to extinction of one of the species. A novel result of this work is that varying one parameter or population density of the species can lead to transition of interaction outcomes between mutualism, parasitism and competition. On the other hand, dynamics of the models demonstrate that over-predation or under-predation will result in extinction of one/both species, while intermediate predation is favorable under certain parameter ranges.

  11. Quality assessment of atmospheric surface fields over the Baltic Sea from an ensemble of regional climate model simulations with respect to ocean dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. E. Markus Meier

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Climate model results for the Baltic Sea region from an ensemble of eight simulations using the Rossby Centre Atmosphere model version 3 (RCA3 driven with lateral boundary data from global climate models (GCMs are compared with results from a downscaled ERA40 simulation and gridded observations from 1980-2006. The results showed that data from RCA3 scenario simulations should not be used as forcing for Baltic Sea models in climate change impact studies because biases of the control climate significantly affect the simulated changes of future projections. For instance, biases of the sea ice cover in RCA3 in the present climate affect the sensitivity of the model's response to changing climate due to the ice-albedo feedback. From the large ensemble of available RCA3 scenario simulations two GCMs with good performance in downscaling experiments during the control period 1980-2006 were selected. In this study, only the quality of atmospheric surface fields over the Baltic Sea was chosen as a selection criterion. For the greenhouse gas emission scenario A1B two transient simulations for 1961-2100 driven by these two GCMs were performed using the regional, fully coupled atmosphere-ice-ocean model RCAO. It was shown that RCAO has the potential to improve the results in downscaling experiments driven by GCMs considerably, because sea surface temperatures and sea ice concentrations are calculated more realistically with RCAO than when RCA3 has been forced with surface boundary data from GCMs. For instance, the seasonal 2 m air temperature cycle is closer to observations in RCAO than in RCA3 downscaling simulations. However, the parameterizations of air-sea fluxes in RCAO need to be improved.

  12. 2D-DOA and Mutual Coupling Estimation in Vehicle Communication System via Conformal Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Many direction-of-arrival (DOA estimation algorithms have been proposed recently. However, the effect of mutual coupling among antenna elements has not been taken into consideration. In this paper, a novel DOA and mutual coupling coefficient estimation algorithm is proposed in intelligent transportation systems (ITS via conformal array. By constructing the spectial mutual coupling matrix (MCM, the effect of mutual coupling can be eliminated via instrumental element method. Then the DOA of incident signals can be estimated based on parallel factor (PARAFAC theory. The PARAFAC model is constructed in cumulant domain using covariance matrices. The mutual coupling coefficients are estimated based on the former DOA estimation and the matrix transformation between MCM and the steering vector. Finally, due to the drawback of the parameter pairing method in Wan et al., 2014, a novel method is given to improve the performance of parameter pairing. The computer simulation verifies the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  13. Numerical modelling and experimental measurements for a low-temperature district heating substation for instantaneous preparation of DHW with respect to service pipes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brand, Marek; Thorsen, Jan Eric; Svendsen, Svend

    2012-01-01

    as much as possible. This requires a review and improvement of a DH network, in-house substations, and the whole domestic hot water (DHW) supply system, with the focus on user comfort, hygiene, overall cost and energy efficiency. This paper describes some practical approaches to the implementation of low......-temperature district heating (LTDH) with an entry-to-substation temperature around 50 °C. To this end we developed a numerical model for an instantaneous LTDH substation that takes into consideration the effect of service pipes. The model has been verified and can be used for the further optimization of the whole...

  14. Comparison of three pesticide fate models with respect to the leaching of two herbicides under field conditions in an irrigated maize cropping system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-Benito, J M; Pot, V; Alletto, L; Mamy, L; Bedos, C; Barriuso, E; Benoit, P

    2014-11-15

    The ability of three models (PEARL, MACRO and PRZM) to describe the water transfer and leaching of the herbicides S-metolachlor and mesotrione as observed in an irrigated maize monoculture system in Toulouse area (France) was compared. The models were parameterized with field, laboratory and literature data, and pedotransfer functions using equivalent parameterization to better compare the results and the performance of the models. The models were evaluated and compared from soil water pressure, water content and temperature data monitored at 0.2, 0.5 and 1 m depth, together with water percolates and herbicide concentrations measured in a tension plate lysimeter at 1 m depth. Some hydraulic (n, θ(s)) parameters and mesotrione DT50 needed calibration. After calibration, the comparison of the results obtained by the three models indicated that PRZM was not able to simulate properly the water dynamic in the soil profile. On the contrary, PEARL and MACRO simulated generally quite well the observed water pressure head and volumetric water content at the three different depths during wetting periods (e.g. irrigated cropping period) while a poorest performance was obtained for drying periods (fallow period with bare soil and beginning of crop period). Similar water flow dynamics were simulated by PEARL and MACRO in the soil profile although in general, and due to a higher evapotranspiration in MACRO, PEARL simulated a wetter soil than MACRO. For the whole simulated period, the performance of all models to simulate water leaching at 1m depth was poor, with an overestimation of the total water volume measured in the lysimeter (ranging from 2.2 to 6.6 times). By contrast, soil temperature was properly reproduced by the three models. The models were able to simulate the leaching of herbicides at 1m depth in similar appearance time and order of magnitude as field observations. Cumulative observed and simulated mesotrione losses by leaching were consistently higher than the

  15. Global Stability of a Discrete Mutualism Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Yang

    2014-01-01

    difference equations, sufficient conditions which ensure the global asymptotical stability of the interior equilibrium of the system are obtained. The conditions which ensure the local stability of the positive equilibrium is enough to ensure the global attractivity are proved.

  16. Problem decomposition by mutual information and force-based clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Richard Edward

    alternative global optimizer, called MIMIC, which is unrelated to Genetic Algorithms. Advancement to the current practice demonstrates the use of MIMIC as a global method that explicitly models problem structure with mutual information, providing an alternate method for globally searching multi-modal domains. By leveraging discovered problem inter- dependencies, MIMIC may be appropriate for highly coupled problems or those with large function evaluation cost. This work introduces a useful addition to the MIMIC algorithm that enables its use on continuous input variables. By leveraging automatic decision tree generation methods from Machine Learning and a set of randomly generated test problems, decision trees for which method to apply are also created, quantifying decomposition performance over a large region of the design space.

  17. Inverse modelling of Köhler theory - Part 1: A response surface analysis of CCN spectra with respect to surface-active organic species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Samuel; Partridge, Daniel; Topping, David; Stier, Philip

    2016-04-01

    In this study an inverse modelling framework for the calculation of CCN spectra is developed to facilitate a more robust treatment of evaluation of Köhler models against observations. To achieve this, we define an objective function that provides a diagnostic metric of the deviation of modelled CCN spectra from observations as a function of input parameters. This allows for the assessment of model accuracy while simultaneously examining global parameter sensitivities and identifying parameter interactions across all atmospherically relevant supersaturations, corresponding to a broad range of cloud types and updraft velocities. The focus of this study is two-fold. Firstly, we assess the feasibility of inverse modelling as a new methodology for aerosol-CCN spectra closure. To achieve this goal, responses in the objective function to parameter perturbations in 2D cross-sections of the complete parameter space, response surfaces, are used to examine the likelihood of our chosen objective function containing enough information to constrain the model input parameters considered using automatic search algorithms. Secondly, these response surfaces are employed to conduct an extensive parametric sensitivity analysis and subsequently rank the relative importance of aerosol physiochemical parameters in determining CCN spectra. Using Köhler theory to model CCN concentrations requires knowledge of many physiochemical parameters, some of which are difficult to measure in-situ at the scale of interest. Therefore, novel methodologies, such as the one developed here, are required to probe the entire parameter space of aerosol-cloud interaction problems and provide global sensitivity analyses to constrain parametric uncertainties. Partitioning of surface-active species from the bulk to the surface phase can alter the point of CCN activation. Therefore, the analysis conducted here is carried out for a standard Köhler model as well as more complex Köhler models accounting for the

  18. Qualitative teamwork issues and strategies: coordination through mutual adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Wendy A; Long, Bonita; Bermbach, Nicole; Jordan, Sharalyn; Patterson, Kathryn

    2005-03-01

    Multidisciplinary research teams that include faculty, students, and volunteers can be challenging and enriching for all participants. Although such teams are becoming commonplace, minimal guidance is available about strategies to enhance team effectiveness. In this article, the authors highlight strategies to guide qualitative teamwork through coordination of team members and tasks based on mutual adjustment. Using a grounded theory exemplar, they focus on issues of (a) building the team, (b) developing reflexivity and theoretical sensitivity, (c) tackling analytic and methodological procedures, and (d) developing dissemination guidelines. Sharing information, articulating project goals and elements, acknowledging variation in individual goals, and engaging in reciprocity and respectful collaboration are key elements of mutual adjustment. The authors summarize conclusions about the costs and benefits of the process.

  19. An Alternative Approach to Non-Log-Linear Thermal Microbial Inactivation: Modelling the Number of Log Cycles Reduction with Respect to Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilis Panagiotis Valdramidis

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical approach incorporating the shoulder effect during the quantification of microbial heat inactivation is being developed based on »the number of log cycles of reduction « concept. Hereto, the heat resistance of Escherichia coli K12 in BHI broth has been quantitatively determined in a generic and accurate way by defining the time t for x log reductions in the microbial population, i.e. txD, as a function of the treatment temperature T. Survival data of the examined microorganism are collected in a range of temperatures between 52–60.6 °C. Shoulder length Sl and specific inactivation rate kmax are derived from a mathematical expression that describes a non-log-linear behaviour. The temperature dependencies of Sl and kmax are used for structuring the txD(T function. Estimation of the txD(T parameters through a global identification procedure permits reliable predictions of the time to achieve a pre-decided microbial reduction. One of the parameters of the txD(T function is proposed as »the reference minimum temperature for inactivation«. For the case study considered, a value of 51.80 °C (with a standard error, SE, of 3.47 was identified. Finally, the time to achieve commercial sterilization and pasteurization for the product at hand, i.e. BHI broth, was found to be 11.70 s (SE=5.22, and 5.10 min (SE=1.22, respectively. Accounting for the uncertainty (based on the 90 % confidence intervals, CI a fail-safe treatment of these two processes takes 20.36 s and 7.12 min, respectively.

  20. On the importance of body posture and skin modelling with respect to in situ electric field strengths in magnetic field exposure scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Gernot; Hirtl, Rene

    2016-06-01

    The reference levels and maximum permissible exposure values for magnetic fields that are currently used have been derived from basic restrictions under the assumption of upright standing body models in a standard posture, i.e. with arms laterally down and without contact with metallic objects. Moreover, if anatomical modelling of the body was used at all, the skin was represented as a single homogeneous tissue layer. In the present paper we addressed the possible impacts of posture and skin modelling in scenarios of exposure to a 50 Hz uniform magnetic field on the in situ electric field strength in peripheral tissues, which must be limited in order to avoid peripheral nerve stimulation. We considered different body postures including situations where body parts form large induction loops (e.g. clasped hands) with skin-to-skin and skin-to-metal contact spots and compared the results obtained with a homogeneous single-layer skin model to results obtained with a more realistic two-layer skin representation consisting of a low-conductivity stratum corneum layer on top of a combined layer for the cellular epidermis and dermis. Our results clearly indicated that postures with loops formed of body parts may lead to substantially higher maximum values of induced in situ electric field strengths than in the case of standard postures due to a highly concentrated current density and in situ electric field strength in the skin-to-skin and skin-to-metal contact regions. With a homogeneous single-layer skin, as is used for even the most recent anatomical body models in exposure assessment, the in situ electric field strength may exceed the basic restrictions in such situations, even when the reference levels and maximum permissible exposure values are not exceeded. However, when using the more realistic two-layer skin model the obtained in situ electric field strengths were substantially lower and no violations of the basic restrictions occurred, which can be explained by the

  1. Promoting respect at home and abroad

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    This week, I’d like to focus on respect, whether at home, at work or on the international scene. Last week, I had the opportunity to visit the SESAME laboratory in Jordan along with the new European Commissioner for Research, Carlos Moedas. Since taking up his post, Mr Moedas has attached great importance to the role science can play in diplomacy, and the visit was on his initiative.   Through the EU-funded CESSAMag project, CERN is coordinating the provision of magnets and power supplies for the SESAME main ring. The first are currently being tested at CERN by a team involving accelerator scientists from the SESAME members, and all are due to be delivered to SESAME in time for commissioning in the second half of 2016. SESAME, and CERN’s contribution to the project, are well documented in the pages of the Bulletin, but what really impresses when you visit the lab is the diversity of people working there and the degree of mutual respect they show to each other. SESAME will...

  2. Equation of state modeling of the phase equilibria of asymmetric CO2+n-alkane binary systems using mixing rules cubic with respect to mole fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cismondi, Martin; Mollerup, Jørgen M.; Zabaloy, Marcelo S.

    2010-01-01

    interaction parameters) in modern equations of state.In particular, the phase equilibria of binary mixtures containing CO2 and heavy n-alkanes have been studied by an important number of authors and using different types of models, achieving only partially accurate results and realizing the difficulties...... for the first time a quite successful complete description of asymmetric CO2+n-alkane binary systems, with n-alkane carbon number from 14 to 22....

  3. Calculation of mutual information for nonlinear communication channel at large signal-to-noise ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terekhov, I. S.; Reznichenko, A. V.; Turitsyn, S. K.

    2016-10-01

    Using the path-integral technique we examine the mutual information for the communication channel modeled by the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with additive Gaussian noise. The nonlinear Schrödinger equation is one of the fundamental models in nonlinear physics, and it has a broad range of applications, including fiber optical communications—the backbone of the internet. At large signal-to-noise ratio we present the mutual information through the path-integral, which is convenient for the perturbative expansion in nonlinearity. In the limit of small noise and small nonlinearity we derive analytically the first nonzero nonlinear correction to the mutual information for the channel.

  4. Influence of predator mutual interference and prey refuge on Lotka-Volterra predator-prey dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liujuan; Chen, Fengde; Wang, Yiqin

    2013-11-01

    A Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model incorporating a constant number of prey using refuges and mutual interference for predator species is presented. By applying the divergency criterion and theories on exceptional directions and normal sectors, we show that the interior equilibrium is always globally asymptotically stable and two boundary equilibria are both saddle points. Our results indicate that prey refuge has no influence on the coexistence of predator and prey species of the considered model under the effects of mutual interference for predator species, which differently from the conclusion without predator mutual interference, thus improving some known ones. Numerical simulations are performed to illustrate the validity of our results.

  5. On the determination of the mutual exclusion statistics parameter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Saptarshi Mandal

    2013-09-01

    Following the generalized definition of exclusion statistics to infinite-dimensional Hilbert space [Murthy and Shankar, Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 3629 (1994)] for a single-component anyonic system, we derive a simple relation between second mixed virial coefficient and the mutual exclusion statistics parameters using high-temperature expansion method for multicomponent anyonic system. The above result is derived without working in a specific model and is valid in any spatial dimensions.

  6. Determination of Optimal Cash Position of Mutual Fund

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈铭新; 张世英

    2003-01-01

    Cash position, held by mutual fund with purpose to satisfy investors′ redemption, will inevitably generate certain amount of cost. In this paper, the total cost caused by cash position is divided into opportunity cost and shortage cost, and a model is constructed to describe the relationship between total cost and cash position along with investors′ purchase and redemption, from which the formula of optimal cash position is deduced. Finally, the adjustment of optimal cash position in different market situations is discussed.

  7. Simulation Research in Mutualism Behavior ofAutomobile Industry Cluster

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Zhang; Guangle Yan

    2011-01-01

    This paper adopts the concept and mechanism of mathematical ecology theory, researches the revolutionary of automobile industry chain by setting up mutualism model of two species. Results of simulation show that automakers are more sensitive to the change of environmental resource. Automakers depending on suppliers excessively will increase the structural risk of the industry. Suppliers must make efficient utilization of the system resources; otherwise they inhibit the growth of automakers.

  8. Synchronization scenario of two distant mutually coupled semiconductor lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulet, Josep; Mirasso, Claudio; Heil, Tilmann;

    2004-01-01

    We present numerical and experimental investigations of the synchronization of the coupling-induced instabilities in two distant mutually coupled semiconductor lasers. In our experiments, two similar Fabry-Perot lasers are coupled via their coherent optical fields. Our theoretical framework...... is based on a rate equation model obtained under weak coupling conditions. In both experiments and simulations, we find (achronal) synchronization of subnanosecond intensity fluctuations in concurrence with asymmetric physical roles between the lasers, even under symmetric operating conditions. We explore...

  9. Evaluation of the MACC operational forecast system – potential and challenges of global near-real-time modelling with respect to reactive gases in the troposphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Wagner

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate (MACC/MACCII currently represents the European Union's Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS (http://www.copernicus.eu, which will become fully operational in the course of 2015. The global near-real-time MACC model production run for aerosol and reactive gases provides daily analyses and 5 day forecasts of atmospheric composition fields. It is the only assimilation system world-wide that is operational to produce global analyses and forecasts of reactive gases and aerosol fields. We have investigated the ability of the MACC analysis system to simulate tropospheric concentrations of reactive gases (CO, O3, and NO2 covering the period between 2009 and 2012. A validation was performed based on CO and O3 surface observations from the Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW network, O3 surface observations from the European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP and furthermore, NO2 tropospheric columns derived from the satellite sensors SCIAMACHY and GOME-2, and CO total columns derived from the satellite sensor MOPITT. The MACC system proved capable of reproducing reactive gas concentrations in consistent quality, however, with a seasonally dependent bias compared to surface and satellite observations: for northern hemispheric surface O3 mixing ratios, positive biases appear during the warm seasons and negative biases during the cold parts of the years, with monthly Modified Normalised Mean Biases (MNMBs ranging between −30 and 30% at the surface. Model biases are likely to result from difficulties in the simulation of vertical mixing at night and deficiencies in the model's dry deposition parameterization. Observed tropospheric columns of NO2 and CO could be reproduced correctly during the warm seasons, but are mostly underestimated by the model during the cold seasons, when anthropogenic emissions are at a highest, especially over the US, Europe and Asia. Monthly MNMBs of the satellite data

  10. Do Insect Populations Die at Constant Rates as They Become Older? Contrasting Demographic Failure Kinetics with Respect to Temperature According to the Weibull Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petros Damos

    Full Text Available Temperature implies contrasting biological causes of demographic aging in poikilotherms. In this work, we used the reliability theory to describe the consistency of mortality with age in moth populations and to show that differentiation in hazard rates is related to extrinsic environmental causes such as temperature. Moreover, experiments that manipulate extrinsic mortality were used to distinguish temperature-related death rates and the pertinence of the Weibull aging model. The Newton-Raphson optimization method was applied to calculate parameters for small samples of ages at death by estimating the maximum likelihoods surfaces using scored gradient vectors and the Hessian matrix. The study reveals for the first time that the Weibull function is able to describe contrasting biological causes of demographic aging for moth populations maintained at different temperature regimes. We demonstrate that at favourable conditions the insect death rate accelerates as age advances, in contrast to the extreme temperatures in which each individual drifts toward death in a linear fashion and has a constant chance of passing away. Moreover, slope of hazard rates shifts towards a constant initial rate which is a pattern demonstrated by systems which are not wearing out (e.g. non-aging since the failure, or death, is a random event independent of time. This finding may appear surprising, because, traditionally, it was mostly thought as rule that in aging population force of mortality increases exponentially until all individuals have died. Moreover, in relation to other studies, we have not observed any typical decelerating aging patterns at late life (mortality leveling-off, but rather, accelerated hazard rates at optimum temperatures and a stabilized increase at the extremes.In most cases, the increase in aging-related mortality was simulated reasonably well according to the Weibull survivorship model that is applied. Moreover, semi log- probability hazard

  11. Revisiting the concept of Redfield ratios applied to plankton stoichiometry - Addressing model uncertainties with respect to the choice of C:N:P ratios for phytoplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreus, Markus; Paetsch, Johannes; Grosse, Fabian; Lenhart, Hermann; Peck, Myron; Pohlmann, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Ongoing Ocean Acidification (OA) and climate change related trends impact on physical (temperature), chemical (CO2 buffer capacity) and biological (stoichiometric) properties of the marine environment. These threats affect the global ocean but they appear particularly pronounced in marginal and shelf seas. Marine biogeochemical models are often used to investigate the impacts of climate change and changes in OA on the marine system as well as its exchange with the atmosphere. Different studies showed that both the structural composition of the models and the elemental ratios of particulate organic matter in the surface ocean affect the key processes controlling the ocean's efficiency storing atmospheric excess carbon. Recent studies focus on the variability of the elemental ratios of phytoplankton and found that the high plasticity of C:N:P ratios enables the storage of large amounts of carbon by incorporation into carbohydrates and lipids. Our analysis focuses on the North Sea, a temperate European shelf sea, for the period 2000-2014. We performed an ensemble of model runs differing only in phytoplankton stoichiometry, representing combinations of C:P = [132.5, 106, 79.5] and N:P=[20, 16, 12] (i.e., Redfield ratio +/- 25%). We examine systematically the variations in annual averages of net primary production (NPP), net ecosystem production in the upper 30 m (NEP30), export production below 30 m depth (EXP30), and the air-sea flux of CO2 (ASF). Ensemble average fluxes (and standard deviations) resulted in NPP = 15.4 (2.8) mol C m-2 a-1, NEP30 = 5.4 (1.1) mol C m-2 a-1, EXP30 = 8.1 (1.1) mol C m-2 a-1 and ASF = 1.1 (0.5) mol C m-2 a-1. All key parameters exhibit only minor variations along the axis of constant C:N, but correlate positively with increasing C:P and decreasing N:P ratios. Concerning regional differences, lowest variations in local fluxes due to different stoichiometric ratios can be found in the shallow southern and coastal North Sea. Highest

  12. Partner choice in nitrogen-fixation mutualisms of legumes and rhizobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simms, Ellen L; Taylor, D Lee

    2002-04-01

    Mutualistic interactions are widespread and obligatory for many organisms, yet their evolutionary persistence in the face of cheating is theoretically puzzling. Nutrient-acquisition symbioses between plants and soil microbes are critically important to plant evolution and ecosystem function, yet we know almost nothing about the evolutionary dynamics and mechanisms of persistence of these ancient mutualisms. Partner-choice and partner-fidelity are mechanisms for dealing with cheaters, and can theoretically allow mutualisms to persist despite cheaters.Many models of cooperative behavior assume pairwise interactions, while most plant-microbe nutrient-acquisition symbioses involve a single plant interacting with numerous microbes. Market models, in contrast, are well suited to mutualisms in which single plants attempt to conduct mutually beneficial resource exchange with multiple individuals. Market models assume that one partner chooses to trade with a subset of individuals selected from a market of potential partners. Hence, determining whether partner-choice occurs in plant-microbe mutualisms is critical to understanding the evolutionary persistence and dynamics of these symbioses. The nitrogen-fixation/carbon-fixation mutualism between leguminous plants and rhizobial bacteria is widespread, ancient, and important for ecosystem function and human nutrition. It also involves single plants interacting simultaneously with several to many bacterial partners, including ineffective ("cheating") strains. We review the existing literature and find that this mutualism displays several elements of partner-choice, and may match the requirements of the market paradigm. We conclude by identifying profitable questions for future research.

  13. Models of cognitive functions with respect to selected parameters of functional state of the thyroid gland in post-menopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujski, Mariusz; Pinkas, Jarosław; Witczak, Mariusz; Owoc, Alfred; Bojar, Iwona

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the study was the development of models of cognitive functions in a group of post-menopausal women, according to the concentration of the selected laboratory parameters evaluating the functional state of the thyroid gland. The study was conducted during 2012-2014, and covered women aged 50-65 years, minimum two years after the last menstruation, without chronic diseases, cancerous diseases, mental disorders, addiction to drugs or alcohol, and who did not use hormone replacement therapy. At the stage of qualification, a brief MoCA test was performed; 383 women were qualified for the study. Blood was collected for the determination of such parameters as: TSH, TT4, fT4, anti-TPO, anti-Tg, and AB-TSHR. Assessment of cognitive functions was performed using the diagnostic instrument Central Nervous System - Vital Signs (CNS-VS) (Polish version). The results were statistically analysed. The mean age of the women in the study was 56.4 ± 3.4; the mean TSH was 1.91 ± 1.35 mU/L, fT4 14.76 ± 2.34 pmol/L, and TT4 99.12 ± 16.98 nmol/L. Mean values were: 64.74 IU/L for anti-TPO, 100.69 IU/L for anti-Tg, and 1.40 IU/L for AB-TSHR. The examined women obtained the neurocognitive index (NCI) on the level of 84.4 scores, on average. The lowest results were obtained in tests assessing cognitive flexibility (mean 78.64 scores), processing speed (mean 79.25 scores), and executive functions (mean 79.75 scores). In the tests evaluating complex attention, the mean values were 82.24 scores, psychomotor speed - mean 83.42 scores, and reaction time - mean 86.87 scores. The women examined obtained the best results in tests assessing memory (mean 90.15 scores), including verbal (mean 91.22 scores), and visual (mean 93.37 scores). The NCI and cognitive function models were assessed from the aspect of thyroid gland examinations in post-menopausal women. Based on the analyses performed, the following conclusions were drawn: The developed models of cognitive functions indicate a

  14. Is the mouse follicle culture a good model for the goat with respect to the development of preantral follicles in vitro?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, R M P; Alves, A M C V; Lima, L F; Duarte, A B G; Chaves, R N; Brito, I R; Costa, E C; Bernuci, M P; Rosa-e-Silva, A C J S; Xu, M; Rodrigues, A P R; Campello, C C; Figueiredo, J R

    2014-10-01

    The present study evaluated the efficiency of using 2 culture media developed for mice and for goats in the in vitro preantral follicle culture of each species. Murine and caprine secondary follicles were cultured in vitro with human recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone (murine medium) or with bovine recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone in association with growth hormone (caprine medium). The results showed that murine follicles cultured in caprine medium had lower (P 0.05). After in vitro maturation, a higher (P cultured under the same in vitro culture medium conditions respond differently; caprine oocytes grown in vitro in the presence of the murine medium show the greatest developmental competence among the tested combinations. Therefore, under the present experimental conditions, the mouse follicle culture has proved be a good model for the development of new culture media for caprine preantral follicles.

  15. An Analysis of the Temperature and Field Dependence of the RF Surface Resistance of Nitrogen-Doped Niobium SRF Cavities with Respect to Existing Theoretical Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reece, Charles E. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Palczewski, Ari D. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Xiao, Binping [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY

    2015-09-01

    Recent progress with the reduction of rf surface resistance (Rs) of niobium SRF cavities via the use of high temperature surface doping by nitrogen has opened a new regime for energy efficient accelerator applications. For particular doping conditions one observes dramatic decreases in Rs with increasing surface magnetic fields. The observed variations as a function of temperature may be analyzed in the context of recent theoretical treatments in hopes of gaining insight into the underlying beneficial mechanism of the nitrogen treatment. Systematic data sets of Q0 vs. Eacc vs. temperature acquired during the high Q0 R&D work of the past year will be compared with theoretical model predictions..

  16. Building a More Respectful Workplace Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placone, Ronald; Komisin, Lola

    2003-01-01

    Research has shown that the level of respect in the workplace directly correlates with the contentment, production and loyalty of employees. If you were asked to help foster a more respectful environment, where would you begin? What initiatives would you introduce? Carnegie Mellon University has crafted a model for fostering respect at the…

  17. Reconstruction of transcriptional network from microarray data using combined mutual information and network-assisted regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X-D; Qi, Y-X; Jiang, Z-L

    2011-03-01

    Many methods had been developed on inferring transcriptional network from gene expression. However, it is still necessary to design new method that discloses more detailed and exact network information. Using network-assisted regression, the authors combined the averaged three-way mutual information (AMI3) and non-linear ordinary differential equation (ODE) model to infer the transcriptional network, and to obtain both the topological structure and the regulatory dynamics. Synthetic and experimental data were used to evaluate the performance of the above approach. In comparison with the previous methods based on mutual information, AMI3 obtained higher precision with the same sensitivity. To describe the regulatory dynamics between transcription factors and target genes, network-assisted regression and regression without network, respectively, were applied in the steady-state and time series microarray data. The results revealed that comparing with regression without network, network-assisted regression increased the precision, but decreased the fitting goodness. Then, the authors reconstructed the transcriptional network of Escherichia coli and simulated the regulatory dynamics of genes. Furthermore, the authors' approach identified potential transcription factors regulating yeast cell cycle. In conclusion, network-assisted regression, combined AMI3 and ODE model, was a more precisely to infer the topological structure and the regulatory dynamics of transcriptional network from microarray data. [Includes supplementary material].

  18. Combination of six enzymes of a marine Novosphingobium converts the stereoisomers of β-O-4 lignin model dimers into the respective monomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Yukari; Nishi, Shinro; Hasegawa, Ryoichi; Hatada, Yuji

    2015-10-19

    Lignin, an aromatic polymer of phenylpropane units joined predominantly by β-O-4 linkages, is the second most abundant biomass component on Earth. Despite the continuous discharge of terrestrially produced lignin into marine environments, few studies have examined lignin degradation by marine microorganisms. Here, we screened marine isolates for β-O-4 cleavage activity and determined the genes responsible for this enzymatic activity in one positive isolate. Novosphingobium sp. strain MBES04 converted all four stereoisomers of guaiacylglycerol-β-guaiacyl ether (GGGE), a structural mimic of lignin, to guaiacylhydroxypropanone as an end metabolite in three steps involving six enzymes, including a newly identified Nu-class glutathione-S-transferase (GST). In silico searches of the strain MBES04 genome revealed that four GGGE-metabolizing GST genes were arranged in a cluster. Transcriptome analysis demonstrated that the lignin model compounds GGGE and (2-methoxyphenoxy)hydroxypropiovanillone (MPHPV) enhanced the expression of genes in involved in energy metabolism, including aromatic-monomer assimilation, and evoked defense responses typically expressed upon exposure to toxic compounds. The findings from this study provide insight into previously unidentified bacterial enzymatic systems and the physiological acclimation of microbes associated with the biological transformation of lignin-containing materials in marine environments.

  19. Biodiversity of parasites in a freshwater environment with respect to pollution: metazoan parasites of chub (Leuciscus cephalus L.) as a model for statistical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusek, L; Gelnar, M; Sebelová, S

    1998-10-01

    This paper represents an attempt to evaluate the environmental indicative potential of the biodiversity of monogenean parasites using hierarchically structured species-abundance data. A logical set of statistical methods integrating standard diversity indices, a novel approach to quantitative analysis of cumulative species-abundance curves and species-abundance models was applied for this purpose. Applicability of biodiversity measures was demonstrated using experimental data from a 1-year study on the ecology of metazoan parasites of chub (Leuciscus cephalus) in one polluted and one control site in the Morava river, Czech Republic. Analyses at the component community level revealed a significant decrease in the number of parasite species with a more equal distribution of their abundances in the polluted site compared with the control site. In order to reach a better understanding of the changes, diversity of Monogenea as a dominant part of the community was further examined within categories of species created according to: (1) specificity of infection (specialists and generalists), (2) monogenean genera (Dactylogyrus, Gyrodactylus and Paradiplozoon) and (3) inhabited guilds (skin + fins, gills). Assemblages of specialists in the polluted site exhibited a significantly reduced species richness and unequal distribution of abundances. The opposite pattern was observed in the case of generalists. The influence of pollution was also reflected by the distribution of species abundances within communities of Dactylogyrus and Paradiplozoon, while no significant shift was identified in the genus Gyrodactylus.

  20. Differential expression of two bc1 complexes in the strict acidophilic chemolithoautotrophic bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans suggests a model for their respective roles in iron or sulfur oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruscella, Patrice; Appia-Ayme, Corinne; Levicán, Gloria; Ratouchniak, Jeanine; Jedlicki, Eugenia; Holmes, David S; Bonnefoy, Violaine

    2007-01-01

    Three strains of the strict acidophilic chemolithoautotrophic Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, including the type strain ATCC 23270, contain a petIIABC gene cluster that encodes the three proteins, cytochrome c1, cytochrome b and a Rieske protein, that constitute a bc1 electron-transfer complex. RT-PCR and Northern blotting show that the petIIABC cluster is co-transcribed with cycA, encoding a cytochrome c belonging to the c4 family, sdrA, encoding a putative short-chain dehydrogenase, and hip, encoding a high potential iron-sulfur protein, suggesting that the six genes constitute an operon, termed the petII operon. Previous results indicated that A. ferrooxidans contains a second pet operon, termed the petI operon, which contains a gene cluster that is similarly organized except that it lacks hip. Real-time PCR and Northern blot experiments demonstrate that petI is transcribed mainly in cells grown in medium containing iron, whereas petII is transcribed in cells grown in media containing sulfur or iron. Primer extension experiments revealed possible transcription initiation sites for the petI and petII operons. A model is presented in which petI is proposed to encode the bc1 complex, functioning in the uphill flow of electrons from iron to NAD(P), whereas petII is suggested to be involved in electron transfer from sulfur (or formate) to oxygen (or ferric iron). A. ferrooxidans is the only organism, to date, to exhibit two functional bc1 complexes.

  1. [Respective analysis of dead patients with cirrhosis by Child-Pugh score and model of end-stage liver disease score].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Lu, Fanggen; Ouyang, Chunhui; Cheng, Zongyong; Wang, Xuehong; Liu, Xiaowei

    2012-10-01

    To understand the value of Child-Pugh (CP) classification and model of end-stage liver disease (MELD) score for patients with cirrhosis and their prognosis by retrospectively analyzing the two methods in hemorrhage death and non-hemorrhage death in patients with liver cirrhosis. A total of 72 patients who died of cirrhosis (the death group) were analyzed retrospectively, and the initial data in the hospital before death were collected. The initial information of the control group (88 patients) at the same time was also obtained. The death group was divided into two subgroups: esophagus varicosity burst massive hemorrhage death group and non-hemorrhage death group. MELD score and CP score of the death group (22.230±13.451, 10.264±2.028) were significantly higher than those of the control group (15.370±6.201, 9.318±1.644; PCP score for the massive bleeding death group were close to those of the control group. There was significant difference between the non-hemorrhage death group and the control group. The ratio of patients with CP grade A and MELD scoresCP grade C and MELD scores ≥ 30 in the death group was higher. ROC surve analysis found the accuracy of short-term predication of survival by MELD score and CP classification was improved after eliminating the risk factors of hemorrage. MELD and CP play a role in evaluating the state and prognosis of patients with cirrhosis. MELD score and CP classification predict the short-term survival efficiently on the premise of excluding the risk factors of esophagus and/or stomach bottom varicosity burst massive bleeding. CP and MELD scores are deficiencies, especially for low MELD score (CP level A patients. The prognostic accuracy may be improved when combining esophageal gastric fundal varices.

  2. The Analysis of Mutual Fund Performance: Evidence from U.S. Equity Mutual Funds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.P. Budiono (Diana)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractWe study the mutual fund performance for about 45 years. There are several key points that we can withdraw from this dissertation. First, to study the persistence of mutual fund performance, it is important to consider time-varying exposures because when they are ignored, the persistence

  3. Portfolio Optimization of Equity Mutual Funds—Malaysian Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adem Kılıçman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We focus on the equity mutual funds offered by three Malaysian banks, namely Public Bank Berhad, CIMB, and Malayan Banking Berhad. The equity mutual funds or equity trust is grouped into four clusters based on their characteristics and categorized as inferior, stable, good performing, and aggressive funds based on their return rates, variance and treynor index. Based on the cluster analysis, the return rates and variance of clusters are represented as triangular fuzzy numbers in order to reflect the uncertainty of financial market. To find the optimal asset allocation in each cluster we develop a hybrid model of optimization and fuzzy based on return rates, variance. This was done by maximizing the fuzzy return for a tolerable fuzzy risk and minimizing the fuzzy risk for a desirable fuzzy return separately at different confidence levels.

  4. Approximated mutual information training for speech recognition using myoelectric signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hua J; Chan, A D C

    2006-01-01

    A new training algorithm called the approximated maximum mutual information (AMMI) is proposed to improve the accuracy of myoelectric speech recognition using hidden Markov models (HMMs). Previous studies have demonstrated that automatic speech recognition can be performed using myoelectric signals from articulatory muscles of the face. Classification of facial myoelectric signals can be performed using HMMs that are trained using the maximum likelihood (ML) algorithm; however, this algorithm maximizes the likelihood of the observations in the training sequence, which is not directly associated with optimal classification accuracy. The AMMI training algorithm attempts to maximize the mutual information, thereby training the HMMs to optimize their parameters for discrimination. Our results show that AMMI training consistently reduces the error rates compared to these by the ML training, increasing the accuracy by approximately 3% on average.

  5. Complete chaotic synchronization in mutually coupled time-delay systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsman, Alexandra S; Schwartz, Ira B

    2007-02-01

    Complete chaotic synchronization of end lasers has been observed in a line of mutually coupled, time-delayed system of three lasers, with no direct communication between the end lasers. The present paper uses ideas from generalized synchronization to explain the complete synchronization in the presence of long coupling delays, applied to a model of mutually coupled semiconductor lasers in a line. These ideas significantly simplify the analysis by casting the stability in terms of the local dynamics of each laser. The variational equations near the synchronization manifold are analyzed, and used to derive the synchronization condition that is a function of parameters. The results explain and predict the dependence of synchronization on various parameters, such as time delays, strength of coupling and dissipation. The ideas can be applied to understand complete synchronization in other chaotic systems with coupling delays and no direct communication between synchronized subsystems.

  6. Series expansions for the mutual coupling in microstrip patch arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, David R.; Richards, William F.; Ali-Khan, Ajaz

    1989-03-01

    A dominant-mode mutual coupling theory is developed for an array of microstrip patches. One of the key features of the formulation is that only values for isolated self- and mutual impedance are needed in the formulation, making the method suitable for either a cavity model or spectral-domain analysis, or compatible with experimental measurements. The formulation is equivalent with Pozar's (1982) moment-method formulation. A series expansion of the solution is derived, allowing for approximate formulas accurate to any specified order. These formulas do not require matrix inversion. Formulas up to third order require less computation time than the exact solution, for single elements of the impedance, admittance, and scattering matrices. These expansions are computationally efficient for large sparse arrays.

  7. Synchronization in human musical rhythms and mutually interacting complex systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Holger

    2014-09-09

    Though the music produced by an ensemble is influenced by multiple factors, including musical genre, musician skill, and individual interpretation, rhythmic synchronization is at the foundation of musical interaction. Here, we study the statistical nature of the mutual interaction between two humans synchronizing rhythms. We find that the interbeat intervals of both laypeople and professional musicians exhibit scale-free (power law) cross-correlations. Surprisingly, the next beat to be played by one person is dependent on the entire history of the other person's interbeat intervals on timescales up to several minutes. To understand this finding, we propose a general stochastic model for mutually interacting complex systems, which suggests a physiologically motivated explanation for the occurrence of scale-free cross-correlations. We show that the observed long-term memory phenomenon in rhythmic synchronization can be imitated by fractal coupling of separately recorded or synthesized audio tracks and thus applied in electronic music. Though this study provides an understanding of fundamental characteristics of timing and synchronization at the interbrain level, the mutually interacting complex systems model may also be applied to study the dynamics of other complex systems where scale-free cross-correlations have been observed, including econophysics, physiological time series, and collective behavior of animal flocks.

  8. Universal behavior of the Shannon mutual information in nonintegrable self-dual quantum chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz, F. C.

    2016-09-01

    An existing conjecture states that the Shannon mutual information contained in the ground-state wave function of conformally invariant quantum chains, on periodic lattices, has a leading finite-size scaling behavior that, similarly as the von Neumann entanglement entropy, depends on the value of the central charge of the underlying conformal field theory describing the physical properties. This conjecture applies whenever the ground-state wave function is expressed in some special basis (conformal basis). Its formulation comes mainly from numerical evidences on exactly integrable quantum chains. In this paper, the above conjecture was tested for several general nonintegrable quantum chains. We introduce new families of self-dual Z (Q ) symmetric quantum chains (Q =2 ,3 ,... ). These quantum chains contain nearest-neighbor as well next-nearest-neighbor interactions (coupling constant p ). In the cases Q =2 and Q =3 , they are extensions of the standard quantum Ising and three-state Potts chains, respectively. For Q =4 and Q ≥5 , they are extensions of the Ashkin-Teller and Z (Q ) parafermionic quantum chains. Our studies indicate that these models are interesting on their own. They are critical, conformally invariant, and share the same universality class in a continuous critical line. Moreover, our numerical analysis for Q =2 -8 indicate that the Shannon mutual information exhibits the conjectured behavior irrespective if the conformally invariant quantum chain is exactly integrable or not. For completeness we also calculated, for these new families of quantum chains, the two existing generalizations of the Shannon mutual information, which are based on the Rényi entropy and on the Rényi divergence.

  9. Holographic Mutual Information for Singular Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Mozaffar, M Reza Mohammadi; Omidi, Farzad

    2015-01-01

    We study corner contributions to holographic mutual information for entangling regions composed of a set of disjoint sectors of a single infinite circle in three-dimensional conformal field theories. In spite of the UV divergence of holographic mutual information, it exhibits a first order phase transition. We show that tripartite information is also divergent for disjoint sectors, which is in contrast with the well-known feature of tripartite information being finite even when entangling regions share boundaries. We also verify the locality of corner effects by studying mutual information between regions separated by a sharp annular region. Possible extensions to higher dimensions and hyperscaling violating geometries is also considered for disjoint sectors.

  10. Mutual Information Rate and Bounds for It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Murilo S.; Rubinger, Rero M.; Viana, Emilson R.; Sartorelli, José C.; Parlitz, Ulrich; Grebogi, Celso

    2012-01-01

    The amount of information exchanged per unit of time between two nodes in a dynamical network or between two data sets is a powerful concept for analysing complex systems. This quantity, known as the mutual information rate (MIR), is calculated from the mutual information, which is rigorously defined only for random systems. Moreover, the definition of mutual information is based on probabilities of significant events. This work offers a simple alternative way to calculate the MIR in dynamical (deterministic) networks or between two time series (not fully deterministic), and to calculate its upper and lower bounds without having to calculate probabilities, but rather in terms of well known and well defined quantities in dynamical systems. As possible applications of our bounds, we study the relationship between synchronisation and the exchange of information in a system of two coupled maps and in experimental networks of coupled oscillators. PMID:23112809

  11. Mutual information rate and bounds for it.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murilo S Baptista

    Full Text Available The amount of information exchanged per unit of time between two nodes in a dynamical network or between two data sets is a powerful concept for analysing complex systems. This quantity, known as the mutual information rate (MIR, is calculated from the mutual information, which is rigorously defined only for random systems. Moreover, the definition of mutual information is based on probabilities of significant events. This work offers a simple alternative way to calculate the MIR in dynamical (deterministic networks or between two time series (not fully deterministic, and to calculate its upper and lower bounds without having to calculate probabilities, but rather in terms of well known and well defined quantities in dynamical systems. As possible applications of our bounds, we study the relationship between synchronisation and the exchange of information in a system of two coupled maps and in experimental networks of coupled oscillators.

  12. Mutual information rate and bounds for it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Murilo S; Rubinger, Rero M; Viana, Emilson R; Sartorelli, José C; Parlitz, Ulrich; Grebogi, Celso

    2012-01-01

    The amount of information exchanged per unit of time between two nodes in a dynamical network or between two data sets is a powerful concept for analysing complex systems. This quantity, known as the mutual information rate (MIR), is calculated from the mutual information, which is rigorously defined only for random systems. Moreover, the definition of mutual information is based on probabilities of significant events. This work offers a simple alternative way to calculate the MIR in dynamical (deterministic) networks or between two time series (not fully deterministic), and to calculate its upper and lower bounds without having to calculate probabilities, but rather in terms of well known and well defined quantities in dynamical systems. As possible applications of our bounds, we study the relationship between synchronisation and the exchange of information in a system of two coupled maps and in experimental networks of coupled oscillators.

  13. Integrating plant carbon dynamics with mutualism ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, Elizabeth G

    2016-04-01

    Plants reward microbial and animal mutualists with carbohydrates to obtain nutrients, defense, pollination, and dispersal. Under a fixed carbon budget, plants must allocate carbon to their mutualists at the expense of allocation to growth, reproduction, or storage. Such carbon trade-offs are indirectly expressed when a plant exhibits reduced growth or fecundity in the presence of its mutualist. Because carbon regulates the costs of all plant mutualisms, carbon dynamics are a common platform for integrating these costs in the face of ecological complexity and context dependence. The ecophysiology of whole-plant carbon allocation could thus elucidate the ecology and evolution of plant mutualisms. If mutualisms are costly to plants, then they must be important but frequently underestimated sinks in the terrestrial carbon cycle.

  14. Mutual Fund Flight-to-Liquidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rzeznik, Aleksandra

    of their portfolio towards more liquid assets in order to meet potential redemptions. This causal chain is consistent with Vayanos (2004), who argues that fund managers are investors with time-varying liquidity preferences due to threat of withdrawal. Aggregated over funds, the effect is substantial: a one standard......This paper examines the liquidity choices of mutual funds during times of market uncertainty. I find that when markets are uncertain, mutual funds actively increase the liquidity of their portfolio { often referred to as a `flight-to-liquidity.' In aggregate, mutual fund behaviour has implications...... for the market; the market driven flight-toliquidity places upward pressure on the liquidity premium. I examine the underlying mechanisms driving fund behaviour. I show that market volatility is associated with lower fund performance and withdrawals, which causes funds to adjust the composition...

  15. MISTIC: mutual information server to infer coevolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonetti, Franco L.; Teppa, Elin; Chernomoretz, Ariel

    2013-01-01

    MISTIC (mutual information server to infer coevolution) is a web server for graphical representation of the information contained within a MSA (multiple sequence alignment) and a complete analysis tool for Mutual Information networks in protein families. The server outputs a graphical visualization...... of several information-related quantities using a circos representation. This provides an integrated view of the MSA in terms of (i) the mutual information (MI) between residue pairs, (ii) sequence conservation and (iii) the residue cumulative and proximity MI scores. Further, an interactive interface...... containing all results can be downloaded. The server is available at http://mistic.leloir.org.ar. In summary, MISTIC allows for a comprehensive, compact, visually rich view of the information contained within an MSA in a manner unique to any other publicly available web server. In particular, the use...

  16. Elections to the Mutual Aid Fund

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Every two years, according to Article 6 of the Regulations of the Mutual Aid Fund, the Committee of the Mutual Aid Fund must renew one third of its membership. This year three members are outgoing. Of these three, two will stand again and one will not.   Candidates should be ready to give approximately two hours a month during working time to the Fund whose aim is to assist colleagues in financial difficulties. We invite applications from CERN Staff who wish to stand for election as a member of the CERN Mutual Aid Fund to send in their application before 17 June 2016, by email to the Fund’s President, Connie Potter (connie.potter@cern.ch).

  17. Quantised vortices and mutual friction in relativistic superfluids

    CERN Document Server

    Andersson, N; Vickers, J A

    2016-01-01

    We consider the detailed dynamics of an array of quantised superfluid vortices in the framework of general relativity, as required for quantitative modelling of realistic neutron star cores. Our model builds on the variational approach to relativistic (multi-) fluid dynamics, where the vorticity plays a central role. The description provides a natural extension of, and as it happens a better insight into, existing Newtonian models. In particular, we account for the mutual friction associated with scattering of a second "normal" component in the mixture off of the superfluid vortices.

  18. Indian mutual fund industry: Opportunities and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayant R. Kale

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an overview of the mutual fund industry in India and the reasons for its poor penetration, which includes lack of objective research. It benchmarks the industry globally, and raises key issues regarding the ownership and performance of mutual funds, the sensitivity of fund flows to performance, and the importance of regulation to its growth, all of which have been largely under researched in India. It then captures the views of leading practitioners on these and other issues, including the challenges posed by poor financial literacy, the equity culture in the country, and the weakly supportive regulatory environment.

  19. Ranking mutual funds using Sortino method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khosro Faghani Makrani

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the primary concerns on most business activities is to determine an efficient method for ranking mutual funds. This paper performs an empirical investigation to rank 42 mutual funds listed on Tehran Stock Exchange using Sortino method over the period 2011-2012. The results of survey have been compared with market return and the results have confirmed that there were some positive and meaningful relationships between Sortino return and market return. In addition, there were some positive and meaningful relationship between two Sortino methods.

  20. 26 CFR 1.831-1 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and mutual fire insurance companies issuing perpetual policies. (a) All insurance companies, other than life or mutual or foreign... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tax on insurance companies (other than life...

  1. 2D-DOA Estimation for Cylindrical Array with Mutual Coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Feng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Most conventional direction-of-arrival (DOA estimation algorithms are affected by the effect of mutual coupling, which make the performance of DOA estimation degrade. In this paper, a novel DOA estimation algorithm for conformal array in the presence of unknown mutual coupling is proposed. The special mutual coupling matrix (MCM is applied to eliminate the effect of mutual coupling. With suitable array design, the decoupling between polarization parameter and angle information is accomplished. The two-demission DOA (2D-DOA estimation is finally achieved based on estimation of signal parameters via rotational invariance techniques (ESPRIT. The proposed algorithm can be extended to conical conformal array as well. Two parameter pairing methods are illustrated for cylindrical and conical conformal array, respectively. The computer simulation verifies the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  2. Mutual recombination in slow Si+ + H- collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jian-Guo; Liu Chun-Lei; Janev R. K.; Yan Jun; Shi Jian-Rong

    2006-01-01

    This paper studies the process of mutual neutralization of Si+ and H- ions in slow collisions within the multichannel Landau-Zener model. All important ionic-covalent couplings in this collision system are included in the collision dynamics. The cross sections for population of specific final states of product Si atom are calculated in the CM energy range 0.05 eV/u-5 keV/u. Both singlet and triplet states are considered. At collision energies below ~10 eV/u, the most populated singlet state is Si(3p4p, 1S0), while for energies above ~150eV/u it is the Si(3p, 4p, 1P1) state. In the case of triplet states, the mixed 3p4p(3 S1 +3P0) states are the most populated in the entire collision energy range investigated. The total cross section exhibits a broad maximum around 200-300 eV/u and for ECM ≤ 10eV/u it monotonically increases with decreasing the collision energy, reaching a value of 8 × 10-13 cm2 at ECM = 0.05 eV/u. The ion-pair formation process in Si(3p2 3PJ)+H(1s) collisions has also been considered and its cross section in the considered energy range is very small (smaller than 10-20 cm2 in the energy region below 1 keV/u).

  3. [Respecting rights of hospitalized children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroczek, Bozena

    2004-01-01

    Children's rights are nowadays an important social, pedagogic, legal and moral problem. Practical respecting of resolutions included in the Convention on the Rights of the Child is far from perfect and requires changing social way of thinking. To attain this, the contents and essence of children's rights have to be disseminated and consequently enforced. The aim of my research was to answer the question: "What are the conditions for upholding children's right to respect at children wards?". The subject of my analysis was nurses' value hierarchy and individual conditions influencing respecting children rights. Research procedures were directed towards finding the answer to the following question: "What is the range of upholding children's right to respect?". I defined children's right to respect on the basis of analysis of Janusz Korczak's scientific output and the provisions of the Convention on the Rights of the Child. The rights being the subject of my research are classified either as "soft" or "hard" rights. "Soft" rights are defined in articles no. 12-16 and 31. Rights defined in articles no. 6, 7, 9 and 24 are referred to as "hard" rights. The synthesis of research results leads to the following solution of the research problem: The assumption of a strong influence of the most important values on mental life-thinking, perception, emotional-motivation processes, attitude and behavior of questioned nurses did not have proper empirical confirmation. Nurses' value hierarchy does not ensure upholding of children's right to respect in hospitals. Nurses' awareness of children rights reaches average level, while their knowledge and activity are at low level, and understanding of essence of children's rights and valuation of the rights--at average level. Average level of awareness of respecting children's rights makes children's existence in hospital imperiled by intuitive, often routine activities of nurses. The level of nurses' awareness is differentiated by age

  4. A consumer-resource approach to the density-dependent population dynamics of mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, J Nathaniel; DeAngelis, Donald L

    2010-05-01

    Like predation and competition, mutualism is now recognized as a consumer-resource (C-R) interaction, including, in particular, bi-directional (e.g., coral, plant-mycorrhizae) and uni-directional (e.g., ant-plant defense, plant-pollinator) C-R mutualisms. Here, we develop general theory for the density-dependent population dynamics of mutualism based on the C-R mechanism of interspecific interaction. To test the influence of C-R interactions on the dynamics and stability of bi- and uni-directional C-R mutualisms, we developed simple models that link consumer functional response of one mutualistic species with the resources supplied by another. Phase-plane analyses show that the ecological dynamics of C-R mutualisms are stable in general. Most transient behavior leads to an equilibrium of mutualistic coexistence, at which both species densities are greater than in the absence of interactions. However, due to the basic nature of C-R interactions, certain density-dependent conditions can lead to C-R dynamics characteristic of predator-prey interactions, in which one species overexploits and causes the other to go extinct. Consistent with empirical phenomena, these results suggest that the C-R interaction can provide a broad mechanism for understanding density-dependent population dynamics of mutualism. By unifying predation, competition, and mutualism under the common ecological framework of consumer-resource theory, we may also gain a better understanding of the universal features of interspecific interactions in general.

  5. A consumer-resource approach to the density-dependent population dynamics of mutualism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, J. Nathaniel; DeAngelis, Donald L.

    2010-01-01

    Like predation and competition, mutualism is now recognized as a consumer resource (C-R) interaction, including, in particular, bi-directional (e.g., coral, plant- mycorrhizae) and uni-directional (e.g., ant-plant defense, plant-pollinator) C-R mutualisms. Here, we develop general theory for the density-dependent population dynamics of mutualism based on the C-R mechanism of interspecific interaction. To test the influence of C-R interactions on the dynamics and stability of bi- and uni-directional C-R mutualisms, we developed simple models that link consumer functional response of one mutualistic species with the resources supplied by another. Phase-plane analyses show that the ecological dynamics of C-R mutualisms are stable in general. Most transient behavior leads to an equilibrium of mutualistic coexistence, at which both species densities are greater than in the absence of interactions. However, due to the basic nature of C-R interactions, certain density-dependent conditions can lead to C-R dynamics characteristic of predator-prey interactions, in which one species overexploits and causes the other to go extinct. Consistent with empirical phenomena, these results suggest that the C-R interaction can provide a broad mechanism for understanding density-dependent population dynamics of mutualism. By unifying predation, competition, and mutualism under the common ecological framework of consumer-resource theory, we may also gain a better understanding of the universal features of interspecific interactions in general.

  6. Complement and platelets: Mutual interference in the immune network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speth, Cornelia; Rambach, Günter; Würzner, Reinhard; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia; Kozarcanin, Huda; Hamad, Osama A; Nilsson, Bo; Ekdahl, Kristina N

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, the view of platelets has changed from mere elements of hemostasis to immunological multitaskers. They are connected in manifold ways to other cellular and humoral components of the immune network, one of which is the complement system, a potent player in soluble innate immunity. Our article reviews the crucial and complex interplay between platelets and complement, focusing on mutual regulation of these two interaction partners by their respective molecular mechanisms. Furthermore, the putative relevance of these processes to infectious diseases, inflammatory conditions, and autoimmune disorders, as well as the treatment of patients with biomaterials is highlighted.

  7. The Genogram: From Diagnostics to Mutual Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Adriana Balaguer; Levitt, Mary Michael

    2000-01-01

    Presents the need for integration of mutual client-therapist collaboration into the process of genogram construction and demonstrates through case examples how such integration enhances the therapeutic power of the genogram. Suggests possible changes in the training of marriage and family therapists in order for such integration to become more…

  8. Mutual Excitation in Eurozone Sovereign CDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aït-Sahalia, Y.; Laeven, R.J.A.; Pelizzon, L.

    2013-01-01

    We study self- and cross-excitation of shocks in the sovereign CDS market, on the basis of a large database of Eurozone sovereign CDS spreads. We adopt a multivariate setting with credit default intensities driven by mutually exciting jump processes, to capture the salient features observed in the d

  9. Management of mutual health organizations in Ghana.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baltussen, R.M.P.M.; Bruce, E.; Rhodes, G.; Narh-Bana, S.A.; Agyepong, I.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mutual Health Organizations (MHO) emerged in Ghana in the mid-1990s. The organizational structure and financial management of private and public MHO hold important lessons for the development of national health insurance in Ghana, but there is little evidence to date on their features. Th

  10. Canonical analysis based on mutual information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Vestergaard, Jacob Schack

    2015-01-01

    combinations with the information theoretical measure mutual information (MI). We term this type of analysis canonical information analysis (CIA). MI allows for the actual joint distribution of the variables involved and not just second order statistics. While CCA is ideal for Gaussian data, CIA facilitates...

  11. Management of mutual health organizations in Ghana.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baltussen, R.M.P.M.; Bruce, E.; Rhodes, G.; Narh-Bana, S.A.; Agyepong, I.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mutual Health Organizations (MHO) emerged in Ghana in the mid-1990s. The organizational structure and financial management of private and public MHO hold important lessons for the development of national health insurance in Ghana, but there is little evidence to date on their features.

  12. The ECJ and the Mutual Assistance Directive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.J.C. Hemels (Sigrid)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: In 1977 the European Council adopted the ‘Directive Concerning Mutual Assistance by the competent Authorities of the Member States in the Field of Direct Taxation’.3 The implementation deadline of this Directive was 1 January 1979. On 6 December 1979 the Council adopted an

  13. Management of mutual health organizations in Ghana.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baltussen, R.M.P.M.; Bruce, E.; Rhodes, G.; Narh-Bana, S.A.; Agyepong, I.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mutual Health Organizations (MHO) emerged in Ghana in the mid-1990s. The organizational structure and financial management of private and public MHO hold important lessons for the development of national health insurance in Ghana, but there is little evidence to date on their features. Th

  14. Mutual excitation in Eurozone sovereign CDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aït-Sahalia, Y.; Laeven, R.J.A.; Pelizzon, L.

    2014-01-01

    We study self- and cross-excitation of shocks in the Eurozone sovereign CDS market. We adopt a multivariate setting with credit default intensities driven by mutually exciting jump processes, to capture the salient features observed in the data, in particular, the clustering of high default probabil

  15. Do Mutual Children Cement Bonds in Stepfamilies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, Lawrence H.; Coleman, Marilyn

    1988-01-01

    Interviewed 105 midwestern stepfamilies, 39 of whom had reproduced together. Found no significant differences between families with mutual children and those without in terms of marital adjustment, stepparent- and parent-child relationships, and stepfamily affect. It was not possible to predict which families were most likely to reproduce together…

  16. Information Content of Mutual Fund Portfolio Disclosure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Wang (Yu)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAcademic financial economists have been keenly interested in the value of active portfolio management since the seminal paper of Jensen (1968). This book examines the information advantages that active mutual fund managers attain in financial markets through an analysis of disclosed fund

  17. The ECJ and the Mutual Assistance Directive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.J.C. Hemels (Sigrid)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: In 1977 the European Council adopted the ‘Directive Concerning Mutual Assistance by the competent Authorities of the Member States in the Field of Direct Taxation’.3 The implementation deadline of this Directive was 1 January 1979. On 6 December 1979 the Council adopted an

  18. Do Mutual Children Cement Bonds in Stepfamilies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, Lawrence H.; Coleman, Marilyn

    1988-01-01

    Interviewed 105 midwestern stepfamilies, 39 of whom had reproduced together. Found no significant differences between families with mutual children and those without in terms of marital adjustment, stepparent- and parent-child relationships, and stepfamily affect. It was not possible to predict which families were most likely to reproduce together…

  19. Stability of mutualisms in a lattice gas system of two species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanshi Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article considers mutualisms in a lattice gas system of two species. The species are mutualistic since each one can provide resources to the other. They are also competitive since they compete for empty sites on the same lattice. The mutualisms are assumed to have a saturated response, and the intraspecific competition is considered because of self-limitation. The mutualism system is characterized by differential equations, which are derived from reactions on lattice and are extension of a previous model. Global stability analysis demonstrates that (i When neither species can survive alone, they can coexist if mutualisms between them are strong and population densities are large, which exhibits the Allee effect in obligate mutualism; (ii When one species can survive alone but the other cannot, the latter one will survive if the mutualistic effect from the former is strong. Even if the effect is intermediate, the latter species can survive by strengthening its mutualistic effect on the former and enhancing its population density; (iii When either species can survive alone, a weak mutualism will lead to extinction of one species. When in coexistence, intermediate strength of mutualism is shown to be beneficial under certain parameter range, while over- or under- mutualism is not good. Furthermore, extremely strong/weak mutualism is exhibited to result in extinction of one/both species. While seven typical dynamics are displayed by numerical simulation in a previous work, they are proved in this work and the eighth one is exhibited. Numerical simul ations validate and extend our conclusions.

  20. Excess mutual catalysis is required for effective evolvability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovitch, Omer; Lancet, Doron

    2012-01-01

    It is widely accepted that autocatalysis constitutes a crucial facet of effective replication and evolution (e.g., in Eigen's hypercycle model). Other models for early evolution (e.g., by Dyson, Gánti, Varela, and Kauffman) invoke catalytic networks, where cross-catalysis is more apparent. A key question is how the balance between auto- (self-) and cross- (mutual) catalysis shapes the behavior of model evolving systems. This is investigated using the graded autocatalysis replication domain (GARD) model, previously shown to capture essential features of reproduction, mutation, and evolution in compositional molecular assemblies. We have performed numerical simulations of an ensemble of GARD networks, each with a different set of lognormally distributed catalytic values. We asked what is the influence of the catalytic content of such networks on beneficial evolution. Importantly, a clear trend was observed, wherein only networks with high mutual catalysis propensity (p(mc)) allowed for an augmented diversity of composomes, quasi-stationary compositions that exhibit high replication fidelity. We have reexamined a recent analysis that showed meager selection in a single GARD instance and for a few nonstationary target compositions. In contrast, when we focused here on compotypes (clusters of composomes) as targets for selection in populations of compositional assemblies, appreciable selection response was observed for a large portion of the networks simulated. Further, stronger selection response was seen for high p(mc) values. Our simulations thus demonstrate that GARD can help analyze important facets of evolving systems, and indicate that excess mutual catalysis over self-catalysis is likely to be important for the emergence of molecular systems capable of evolutionlike behavior.

  1. Plant invasions--the role of mutualisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, D M; Allsopp, N; D'Antonio, C M; Milton, S J; Rejmánek, M

    2000-02-01

    Many introduced plant species rely on mutualisms in their new habitats to overcome barriers to establishment and to become naturalized and, in some cases, invasive. Mutualisms involving animal-mediated pollination and seed dispersal, and symbioses between plant roots and microbiota often facilitate invasions. The spread of many alien plants, particularly woody ones, depends on pollinator mutualisms. Most alien plants are well served by generalist pollinators (insects and birds), and pollinator limitation does not appear to be a major barrier for the spread of introduced plants (special conditions relating to Ficus and orchids are described). Seeds of many of the most notorious plant invaders are dispersed by animals, mainly birds and mammals. Our review supports the view that tightly coevolved, plant-vertebrate seed dispersal systems are extremely rare. Vertebrate-dispersed plants are generally not limited reproductively by the lack of dispersers. Most mycorrhizal plants form associations with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi which, because of their low specificity, do not seem to play a major role in facilitating or hindering plant invasions (except possibly on remote islands such as the Galapagos which are poor in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi). The lack of symbionts has, however, been a major barrier for many ectomycorrhizal plants, notably for Pinus spp. in parts of the southern hemisphere. The roles of nitrogen-fixing associations between legumes and rhizobia and between actinorhizal plants and Frankia spp. in promoting or hindering invasions have been virtually ignored in the invasions literature. Symbionts required to induce nitrogen fixation in many plants are extremely widespread, but intentional introductions of symbionts have altered the invasibility of many, if not most, systems. Some of the world's worst invasive alien species only invaded after the introduction of symbionts. Mutualisms in the new environment sometimes re-unite the same species that form

  2. Selection for cheating across disparate environments in the legume-rhizobium mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Stephanie S; Simms, Ellen L

    2014-09-01

    The primary dilemma in evolutionarily stable mutualisms is that natural selection for cheating could overwhelm selection for cooperation. Cheating need not entail parasitism; selection favours cheating as a quantitative trait whenever less-cooperative partners are more fit than more-cooperative partners. Mutualisms might be stabilised by mechanisms that direct benefits to more-cooperative individuals, which counter selection for cheating; however, empirical evidence that natural selection favours cheating in mutualisms is sparse. We measured selection on cheating in single-partner pairings of wild legume and rhizobium lineages, which prevented legume choice. Across contrasting environments, selection consistently favoured cheating by rhizobia, but did not favour legumes that provided less benefit to rhizobium partners. This is the first simultaneous measurement of selection on cheating across both host and symbiont lineages from a natural population. We empirically confirm selection for cheating as a source of antagonistic coevolutionary pressure in mutualism and a biological dilemma for models of cooperation.

  3. Subdifferentials with respect to dualities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Legaz, J.E.; Singer, I.

    1994-12-31

    Let X and W be two sets. We introduce and study the subdifferential of an extended real valued function defined on X at a point, with respect to a duality from the set of functions on X into the set of functions on W (by a duality we mean a mapping transforming infima into suprema). We also consider some particular cases as, e.g., when the duality is a (Fenchel-Moreau) conjugation.

  4. Application of data envelopment analysis in measuring the efficiency of mutual fund

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nik, Marzieh Geramian; Mihanzadeh, Hooman; Izadifar, Mozhgan; Nik, Babak Geramian

    2015-05-01

    The growth of mutual fund industry during the past decades emphasizes the importance of this investment vehicle particularly in prosperity of financial markets and in turn, financial growth of each country. Therefore, evaluating the relative efficiency of mutual funds as investment tool is of importance. In this study, a combined model of DEA (data envelopment analysis), and goal programming (GoDEA) approaches contributes widely to analyze the return efficiency of Mutual Funds in an attempt to separate efficient and inefficient Funds as well as identifying the inefficiency resources. Mixed asset local funds, which are managed jointly by CIMB and Public Mutual Berhad, have been selected for the purpose of this paper. As a result, Public Small Cap Fund (P Small Cap) is regarded as the most efficient mutual fund during the period of study. The integrated model aims to first guide investors to choose the best performing fund among other mutual funds, secondly provides the realistic and appropriate benchmark in compare to other classic method, and finally confirms the utility of data envelopment analysis (DEA) as decision-making tool.

  5. Auto-Test on Motor Temperature Rising in Electric Vehicles with Mutual MRAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A new method to calculate the motor temperature rising in electric vehicle (EV) is proposed based on the stator resistance identification. The measure theory of the motor temperature rising with the stator resistance is discussed at first. An enhanced magnetism motor dynamic math model is built which is the research object. Then the resistance identification system model is built on the mutual model reference adaptive system (MRAS) theory. The simulation diagram of the mutual MRAS model is constructed and the resistance identification performance is studied in different motor states. Simulation results indicate that the stator resistance identification model with the mutual MRAS is effective. At the same time, the identification of motor temperature rising is possible with the identification of the stator resistance.

  6. Estimating Mutual Information by Local Gaussian Approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Shuyang; Galstyan, Aram

    2015-01-01

    Estimating mutual information (MI) from samples is a fundamental problem in statistics, machine learning, and data analysis. Recently it was shown that a popular class of non-parametric MI estimators perform very poorly for strongly dependent variables and have sample complexity that scales exponentially with the true MI. This undesired behavior was attributed to the reliance of those estimators on local uniformity of the underlying (and unknown) probability density function. Here we present a novel semi-parametric estimator of mutual information, where at each sample point, densities are {\\em locally} approximated by a Gaussians distribution. We demonstrate that the estimator is asymptotically unbiased. We also show that the proposed estimator has a superior performance compared to several baselines, and is able to accurately measure relationship strengths over many orders of magnitude.

  7. Partner manipulation stabilises a horizontally transmitted mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heil, Martin; Barajas-Barron, Alejandro; Orona-Tamayo, Domancar; Wielsch, Natalie; Svatos, Ales

    2014-02-01

    Mutualisms require protection from non-reciprocating exploiters. Pseudomyrmex workers that engage in an obligate defensive mutualism with Acacia hosts feed exclusively on the sucrose-free extrafloral nectar (EFN) that is secreted by their hosts, a behaviour linking ant energy supply directly to host performance and thus favouring reciprocating behaviour. We tested the hypothesis that Acacia hosts manipulate this digestive specialisation of their ant mutualists. Invertase (sucrose hydrolytic) activity in the ant midguts was inhibited by chitinase, a dominant EFN protein. The inhibition occurred quickly in cell-free gut liquids and in native gels and thus likely results from an enzyme-enzyme interaction. Once a freshly eclosed worker ingests EFN as the first diet available, her invertase becomes inhibited and she, thus, continues feeding on host-derived EFN. Partner manipulation acts at the phenotypic level and means that one partner actively controls the phenotype of the other partner to enhance its dependency on host-derived rewards.

  8. Hardware device binding and mutual authentication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamlet, Jason R; Pierson, Lyndon G

    2014-03-04

    Detection and deterrence of device tampering and subversion by substitution may be achieved by including a cryptographic unit within a computing device for binding multiple hardware devices and mutually authenticating the devices. The cryptographic unit includes a physically unclonable function ("PUF") circuit disposed in or on the hardware device, which generates a binding PUF value. The cryptographic unit uses the binding PUF value during an enrollment phase and subsequent authentication phases. During a subsequent authentication phase, the cryptographic unit uses the binding PUF values of the multiple hardware devices to generate a challenge to send to the other device, and to verify a challenge received from the other device to mutually authenticate the hardware devices.

  9. Mutual Learning in the European Employment Strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nedergaard, Peter

    in the European employment strategy have been either determined by the sender's interests or have underestimated how mutual learning between countries takes place. In stead the article develops a constructivist approach to learning and uses it to generate some concrete hypothesis about when learning in committees...... is most likely to take place. Afterwards, this constructivist approach is used to analyse the institutional framework surrounding the European employment strategy in order to evaluate whether the potential for learning is optimal. Finally, the article concludes that even though some basic premises......Mutual learning among the Member States is the primary purpose of the employment policy of the European Union. The two most important questions in this regard are how learning occurs and how much learning takes place. In this article I argue that the existing analyses of the effects of learning...

  10. Automotive radar - investigation of mutual interference mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goppelt, M.; Blöcher, H.-L.; Menzel, W.

    2010-09-01

    In the past mutual interference between automotive radar sensors has not been regarded as a major problem. With an increasing number of such systems, however, this topic is receiving more and more attention. The investigation of mutual interference and countermeasures is therefore one topic of the joint project "Radar on Chip for Cars" (RoCC) funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF). RoCC's goal is to pave the way for the development of high-performance, low-cost 79 GHz radar sensors based on Silicon-Germanium (SiGe) Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuits (MMICs). This paper will present some generic interference scenarios and report on the current status of the analysis of interference mechanisms.

  11. Paul Drude's prediction of nonreciprocal mutual inductance for Tesla transformers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart McGuyer

    Full Text Available Inductors, transmission lines, and Tesla transformers have been modeled with lumped-element equivalent circuits for over a century. In a well-known paper from 1904, Paul Drude predicts that the mutual inductance for an unloaded Tesla transformer should be nonreciprocal. This historical curiosity is mostly forgotten today, perhaps because it appears incorrect. However, Drude's prediction is shown to be correct for the conditions treated, demonstrating the importance of constraints in deriving equivalent circuits for distributed systems. The predicted nonreciprocity is not fundamental, but instead is an artifact of the misrepresentation of energy by an equivalent circuit. The application to modern equivalent circuits is discussed.

  12. Paul Drude's prediction of nonreciprocal mutual inductance for Tesla transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuyer, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Inductors, transmission lines, and Tesla transformers have been modeled with lumped-element equivalent circuits for over a century. In a well-known paper from 1904, Paul Drude predicts that the mutual inductance for an unloaded Tesla transformer should be nonreciprocal. This historical curiosity is mostly forgotten today, perhaps because it appears incorrect. However, Drude's prediction is shown to be correct for the conditions treated, demonstrating the importance of constraints in deriving equivalent circuits for distributed systems. The predicted nonreciprocity is not fundamental, but instead is an artifact of the misrepresentation of energy by an equivalent circuit. The application to modern equivalent circuits is discussed.

  13. Paul Drude's Prediction of Nonreciprocal Mutual Inductance for Tesla Transformers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuyer, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Inductors, transmission lines, and Tesla transformers have been modeled with lumped-element equivalent circuits for over a century. In a well-known paper from 1904, Paul Drude predicts that the mutual inductance for an unloaded Tesla transformer should be nonreciprocal. This historical curiosity is mostly forgotten today, perhaps because it appears incorrect. However, Drude's prediction is shown to be correct for the conditions treated, demonstrating the importance of constraints in deriving equivalent circuits for distributed systems. The predicted nonreciprocity is not fundamental, but instead is an artifact of the misrepresentation of energy by an equivalent circuit. The application to modern equivalent circuits is discussed. PMID:25542040

  14. Combating isolation: Building mutual mentoring networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Anne J.

    2015-12-01

    Women physicists can often feel isolated at work. Support from a grant through the ADVANCE program of the National Science Foundation (U.S. government funding) created mutual mentoring networks aimed at combating isolation specifically for women faculty at undergraduate-only institutions. This paper will discuss the organization of one such network, what contributed to its success, some of the outcomes, and how it might be implemented in other contexts.

  15. Tourism versus spatial order: mutual relations

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Beata

    2012-01-01

    The relation between tourism and the spatial environment is characterized by mutual interaction. The proliferation of tourism and massive tourism development intensifies its impact on the spatial environment, yet the focus is usually placed on environmental degradation and the resulting distortion of spatial order. Concurrently, the significance of the spatial environment, and spatial order in particular, as one of the determinants of tourism development is understated. On a theoretical plane...

  16. 47 CFR 90.165 - Procedures for mutually exclusive applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Applications and Authorizations Special Rules Governing Facilities Used to Provide Commercial Mobile Radio Services § 90.165 Procedures for mutually exclusive applications. Mutually exclusive commercial mobile radio service applications are processed...

  17. Lactobacilli-Host mutualism: "learning on the fly".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Renata C; Leulier, François

    2014-08-29

    Metazoans establish with microorganisms complex interactions for their mutual benefits. Drosophila, which has already proven useful host model to study several aspects of innate immunity and host-bacteria pathogenic associations has become a powerful model to dissect the mechanisms behind mutualistic host-microbe interactions. Drosophila microbiota is composed of simple and aerotolerant bacterial communities mostly composed of Lactobacillaceae and Acetobactereaceae. Drosophila mono- or poly-associated with lactobacilli strains constitutes a powerful model to dissect the complex interplay between lactobacilli and host biologic traits. Thanks to the genetic tractability of both Drosophila and lactobacilli this association model offers a great opportunity to reveal the underlying molecular mechanisms. Here, we review our current knowledge about how the Drosophila model is helping our understanding of how lactobacilli shapes host biology.

  18. Implant positioning system using mutual inductance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, You; O'Driscoll, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Surgical placement of implantable medical devices (IMDs) has limited precision and post-implantation the device can move over time. Accurate knowledge of the position of IMDs allows better interpretation of data gathered by the devices and may allow wireless power to be focused on the IMD thereby increasing power transfer efficiency. Existing positioning methods require device sizes and/or power consumptions which exceed the limits of in-vivo mm-sized IMDs applications. This paper describes a novel implant positioning system which replaces the external transmitting (TX) coil of a wireless power transfer link by an array of smaller coils, measures the mutual inductance between each coil in the TX array and the implanted receiving (RX) coil, and uses the spatial variation in those mutual inductances to estimate the location of the implanted device. This method does not increase the hardware or power consumption in the IMD. Mathematical analysis and electromagnetic simulations are presented which explain the theory underlying this scheme and show its feasibility. A particle swarm based algorithm is used to estimate the position of the RX coil from the measured mutual inductance values. MATLAB simulations show the positioning estimation accuracy on the order of 1 mm.

  19. Trading public goods stabilizes interspecific mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archetti, Marco; Scheuring, István

    2013-02-07

    The existence of cooperation between species raises a fundamental problem for evolutionary theory. Why provide costly services to another species if the feedback of this provision also happens to benefit intra-specific competitors that provide no service? Rewarding cooperators and punishing defectors can help maintain mutualism; this is not possible, however, when one can only respond to the collective action of one's partners, which is likely to be the case in many common symbioses. We show how the theory of public goods can explain the stability of mutualism when discrimination between cooperators and defectors is not possible: if two groups of individuals trade goods that are non-linear, increasing functions of the number of contributions, their mutualistic interaction is maintained by the exchange of these public goods, even when it is not possible to punish defectors, which can persist at relatively high frequencies. This provides a theoretical justification and testable predictions for the evolution of mutualism in the absence of discrimination mechanisms.

  20. Observations of Pluto-Charon mutual events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco, C.; Di Martino, M.; Ferreri, W. (Catania Universita (Italy); Osservatorio Astronomico, Turin (Italy))

    1989-07-01

    As part of the planned 'Pluto-Charon Mutual Eclipse Season Campaign', one mutual event was observed at the ESO Observatory on July 10, 1986 and seven mutual events were observed at the Serra La Nave stellar station of Catania Astrophysical Observatory from April 29 to July 21, 1987. At ESO the measurements were performed at the 61-cm Bochum telescope equipped with a photon-counting system and U, B, V, filters; at Serra La Nave the Cassegrain focus of the 91-cm reflector was equipped with a photon-counting system and B and V filters. The observed light losses and contact times do not show relevant systematic deviations from the predicted ones. An examination of the behavior of the B and V light curves gives slight indications of a different slope of the B and V light loss of the same event for a superior or an inferior event, and shows that the superior events are shallower at wavelengths longer than B. 6 refs.

  1. Dependence of Mutual Information of Big Protein Sequence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Feng; Huang Jing; Li Yuan- xiang; Zhou Huai-bei

    2003-01-01

    The mutual information function is used to describe the auto-correlation of amino acids in protein. We find two interesting phenomenon: (1) for any given big protein,the mutual information function I(k) is almost a const, wherek is the length of gap. (2) for any two sequence similar proteins, the mutual information are nearly the same. As a consequent, we may use mutual information of protein as a character for sequences comparison.

  2. Eavesdropping on cooperative communication within an ant-butterfly mutualism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgar, Mark A.; Nash, David R.; Pierce, Naomi E.

    2016-10-01

    Signalling is necessary for the maintenance of interspecific mutualisms but is vulnerable to exploitation by eavesdropping. While eavesdropping of intraspecific signals has been studied extensively, such exploitation of interspecific signals has not been widely documented. The juvenile stages of the Australian lycaenid butterfly, Jalmenus evagoras, form an obligate association with several species of attendant ants, including Iridomyrmex mayri. Ants protect the caterpillars and pupae, and in return are rewarded with nutritious secretions. Female and male adult butterflies use ants as signals for oviposition and mate searching, respectively. Our experiments reveal that two natural enemies of J. evagoras, araneid spiders and braconid parasitoid wasps, exploit ant signals as cues for increasing their foraging and oviposition success, respectively. Intriguingly, selection through eavesdropping is unlikely to modify the ant signal.

  3. MUTUAL IMAGE TRANSFORMATION ALGORITHMS FOR VISUAL INFORMATION PROCESSING AND RETRIEVAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Kukharev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research. The paper deals with methods and algorithms for mutual transformation of related pairs of images in order to enhance the capabilities of cross-modal multimedia retrieval (CMMR technologies. We have thoroughly studied the problem of mutual transformation of face images of various kinds (e.g. photos and drawn pictures. This problem is widely represented in practice. Research is this area is based on existing datasets. The algorithms we have proposed in this paper can be applied to arbitrary pairs of related images due to the unified mathematical specification. Method. We have presented three image transformation algorithms. The first one is based on principal component analysis and Karhunen-Loève transform (1DPCA/1DKLT. Unlike the existing solution, it does not use the training set during the transformation process. The second algorithm assumes generation of an image population. The third algorithm performs the transformation based on two-dimensional principal component analysis and Karhunen-Loève transform (2DPCA/2DKLT. Main Results. The experiments on image transformation and population generation have revealed the main features of each algorithm. The first algorithm allows construction of an accurate and stable model of transition between two given sets of images. The second algorithm can be used to add new images to existing bases and the third algorithm is capable of performing the transformation outside the training dataset. Practical Relevance. Taking into account the qualities of the proposed algorithms, we have provided recommendations concerning their application. Possible scenarios include construction of a transition model for related pairs of images, mutual transformation of the images inside and outside the dataset as well as population generation in order to increase representativeness of existing datasets. Thus, the proposed algorithms can be used to improve reliability of face recognition performed on images

  4. Analysis of mutual events of Galilean satellites observed from VBO during 2014-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasundhara, R.; Selvakumar, G.; Anbazhagan, P.

    2017-06-01

    Results of analysis of 23 events of the 2014-2015 mutual event series from the Vainu Bappu Observatory are presented. Our intensity distribution model for the eclipsed/occulted satellite is based on the criterion that it simulates a rotational light curve that matches the ground-based light curve. Dichotomy in the scattering characteristics of the leading and trailing sides explains the basic shape of the rotational light curves of Europa, Ganymede and Callisto. In the case of Io, the albedo map (courtesy United States Geological Survey) along with global values of scattering parameters works well. Mean values of residuals in (O - C) along and perpendicular to the track are found to be -3.3 and -3.4 mas, respectively, compared to 'L2' theory for the seven 2E1/2O1 events. The corresponding rms values are 8.7 and 7.8 mas, respectively. For the five 1E3/1O3 events, the along and perpendicular to the track mean residuals are 5.6 and 3.2 mas, respectively. The corresponding rms residuals are 6.8 and 10.5 mas, respectively. We compare the results using the chosen model (Model 1) with a uniform but limb-darkened disc (Model 2). The residuals with Model 2 of the 2E1/2O1 and 1E3/1O3 events indicate a bias along the satellite track. The extent and direction of bias are consistent with the shift of the light centre from the geometric centre. Results using Model 1, which intrinsically takes into account the intensity distribution, show no such bias.

  5. Evolutionary stability of mutualism: interspecific population regulation as an evolutionarily stable strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, J. Nathaniel; DeAngelis, Donald L.; Schultz, Stewart T.

    2004-01-01

    Interspecific mutualisms are often vulnerable to instability because low benefit : cost ratios can rapidly lead to extinction or to the conversion of mutualism to parasite–host or predator–prey interactions. We hypothesize that the evolutionary stability of mutualism can depend on how benefits and costs to one mutualist vary with the population density of its partner, and that stability can be maintained if a mutualist can influence demographic rates and regulate the population density of its partner. We test this hypothesis in a model of mutualism with key features of senita cactus (Pachycereus schottii) – senita moth (Upiga virescens) interactions, in which benefits of pollination and costs of larval seed consumption to plant fitness depend on pollinator density. We show that plants can maximize their fitness by allocating resources to the production of excess flowers at the expense of fruit. Fruit abortion resulting from excess flower production reduces pre–adult survival of the pollinating seed–consumer, and maintains its density beneath a threshold that would destabilize the mutualism. Such a strategy of excess flower production and fruit abortion is convergent and evolutionarily stable against invasion by cheater plants that produce few flowers and abort few to no fruit. This novel mechanism of achieving evolutionarily stable mutualism, namely interspecific population regulation, is qualitatively different from other mechanisms invoking partner choice or selective rewards, and may be a general process that helps to preserve mutualistic interactions in nature.

  6. 26 CFR 1.1502-42 - Mutual savings banks, etc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mutual savings banks, etc. 1.1502-42 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Special Taxes and Taxpayers § 1.1502-42 Mutual savings banks, etc. (a) In general. This section applies to mutual s avings banks and other institutions described in section 593(a)....

  7. The Spanish Version of the Mutuality Scale: evidence for the cultural equivalence of mutuality in Mexican American families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crist, Janice D; Escandón, Socorro; Stewart, Barbara J; Archbold, Patricia G

    2008-10-01

    Mutuality, the positive quality of the relationship between the family caregiver and care receiver, is an important variable in family care for frail older adults. It has been shown to be associated with lower levels of caregiver strain and higher levels of caregiving rewards. However, the concept and measure of mutuality were developed with non-Hispanic White samples. The purpose of this article is to describe the development of an instrument-the Spanish Version of the Mutuality Scale. We determined for Mexican American families: (a) the functional equivalence of mutuality, (b) a comparative descriptive framework for mutuality, and (c) the language equivalence of the Mutuality Scale and the Spanish Version of the Mutuality Scale. Evaluating mutuality levels for Mexican American older adults and caregivers, especially in view of their strong cultural norm of familism, is essential.

  8. An invasive slug exploits an ant-seed dispersal mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadley Dunphy, Shannon A; Prior, Kirsten M; Frederickson, Megan E

    2016-05-01

    Plant-animal mutualisms, such as seed dispersal, are often vulnerable to disruption by invasive species. Here, we show for the first time how a non-ant invasive species negatively affects seed dispersal by ants. We examined the effects of several animal species that co-occur in a temperate deciduous forest-including native and invasive seed-dispersing ants (Aphaenogaster rudis and Myrmica rubra, respectively), an invasive slug (Arion subfuscus), and native rodents-on a native myrmecochorous plant, Asarum canadense. We experimentally manipulated ant, slug, and rodent access to seed depots and measured seed removal. We also video-recorded depots to determine which other taxa interact with seeds. We found that A. rudis was the main disperser of seeds and that A. subfuscus consumed elaiosomes without dispersing seeds. Rodent visitation was rare, and rodent exclusion had no significant effect on seed or elaiosome removal. We then used data obtained from laboratory and field mesocosm experiments to determine how elaiosome robbing by A. subfuscus affects seed dispersal by A. rudis and M. rubra. We found that elaiosome robbing by slugs reduced seed dispersal by ants, especially in mesocosms with A. rudis, which picks up seeds more slowly than M. rubra. Taken together, our results show that elaiosome robbing by an invasive slug reduces seed dispersal by ants, suggesting that invasive slugs can have profound negative effects on seed dispersal mutualisms.

  9. Sliding of microtubules by a team of dynein motors: Understanding the effect of spatial distribution of motor tails and mutual exclusion of motor heads on microtubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Hanumant Pratap; Takshak, Anjneya; Mall, Utkarsh; Kunwar, Ambarish

    2016-06-01

    Molecular motors are natural nanomachines that use the free energy released from ATP hydrolysis to generate mechanical forces. Cytoplasmic dynein motors often work collectively as a team to drive important processes such as axonal growth, proplatelet formation and mitosis, as forces generated by single motors are insufficient. A large team of dynein motors is used to slide cytoskeletal microtubules with respect to one another during the process of proplatelet formation and axonal growth. These motors attach to a cargo microtubule via their tail domains, undergo the process of detachment and reattachment of their head domains on another track microtubule, while sliding the cargo microtubule along the track. Traditional continuum/mean-field approaches used in the past are not ideal for studying the sliding mechanism of microtubules, as they ignore spatial and temporal fluctuations due to different possible distributions of motor tails on cargo filament, as well as binding/unbinding of motors from their track. Therefore, these models cannot be used to address important questions such as how the distribution of motor tails on microtubules, or how the mutual exclusion of motor heads on microtubule tracks affects the sliding velocity of cargo microtubule. To answer these, here we use a computational stochastic model where we model each dynein motor explicitly. In our model, we use both random as well as uniform distributions of dynein motors on cargo microtubule, as well as mutual exclusion of motors on microtubule tracks. We find that sliding velocities are least affected by the distribution of motor tails on microtubules, whereas they are greatly affected by mutual exclusion of motor heads on microtubule tracks. We also find that sliding velocity depends on the length of cargo microtubule if mutual exclusion among motor heads is considered.

  10. Comparative Study of Mutual Exclusion Algorithms in Distributed Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jijnasa Patil

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Mutual Exclusion is an important phenomenon in distributed systems. In this paper, we analyze and compare various mutual exclusion algorithms in distributed systems. In permission based mutual exclusion process waits for permission from other processes to enter into a critical section. In token based mutual exclusion, a special message called token is passed over the system and process holding the token can enter into the critical section. We present a comparative study of quorum based, token ring token asking and multiple token algorithms for mutual exclusion in distributed systems.

  11. A Utility Accrual Scheduling Algorithm for Real-Time Activities With Mutual Exclusion Resource Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    TUF’s, and have mutual exclusion resource dependencies. This scheduling problem can be shown to be NP-hard. We present a heuristic algorithm for...be NP-hard in [2], and in [4], respectively. The GUS algorithm presented here is therefore a heuristic algorithm that seeks to maximize the total

  12. Dynamics of additional food provided predator-prey system with mutually interfering predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, B S R V; Banerjee, Malay; Srinivasu, P D N

    2013-11-01

    Use of additional/alternative food source to predators is one of the widely recognised practices in the field of biological control. Both theoretical and experimental works point out that quality and quantity of additional food play a vital role in the controllability of the pest. Theoretical studies carried out previously in this direction indicate that incorporating mutual interference between predators can stabilise the system. Experimental evidence also point out that mutual interference between predators can affect the outcome of the biological control programs. In this article dynamics of additional food provided predator-prey system in the presence of mutual interference between predators has been studied. The mutual interference between predators is modelled using Beddington-DeAngelis type functional response. The system analysis highlights the role of mutual interference on the success of biological control programs when predators are provided with additional food. The model results indicate the possibility of stable coexistence of predators with low prey population levels. This is in contrast to classical predator-prey models wherein this stable co-existence at low prey population levels is not possible. This study classifies the characteristics of biological control agents and additional food (of suitable quality and quantity), permitting the eco-managers to enhance the success rate of biological control programs.

  13. Longtime Behavior for Mutually Catalytic Branching with Negative Correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Doering, Leif

    2011-01-01

    In several examples, dualities for interacting diffusion and particle systems permit the study of the longtime behavior of solutions. A particularly difficult model in which many techniques collapse is a two-type model with mutually catalytic interaction introduced by Dawson/Perkins for which they proved under some assumptions a dichotomy between extinction and coexistence directly from the defining equations. In the present article we show how to prove a precise dichotomy for a related model with negatively correlated noises. The proof combines a self-duality to ensure uniform integrability via moment bounds on exit-times of correlated Brownian motions from the first quadrant and explicit second moment calculations. Since the uniform integrability bound is independent of the branching rate our proof can be extended to infinite branching rate processes.

  14. THE COOPERATIVE CREDIT MUTUAL IN BRAZIL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laércio Baptista da Silva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an analysis of the reality of credit unions in Brazil, in view of the singular importance of credit unions for the whole society as an alternative to private resources in favor of members of the community where they are located. It confirms that, in Brazil, the mutual credit unions, besides being presented as one of the viable options within the financial system, are also seen as an alternative by which some sectors of society promote the humanization of the financial system by offering credit and return on capital with fairer interest rates.

  15. DOA Estimation under Unknown Mutual Coupling and Multipath with Improved Effective Array Aperture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuexian; Trinkle, Matthew; Ng, Brian W-H

    2015-12-08

    Subspace-based high-resolution direction of arrival (DOA) estimation significantly deteriorates under array manifold perturbation and rank deficiency of the covariance matrix due to mutual coupling and multipath propagation, respectively. In this correspondence, the unknown mutual coupling can be circumvented by the proposed method without any passive or active calibration process, and the DOA of the coherent signals can be accurately estimated accordingly. With a newly constructed matrix, the deficient rank can be restored, and the effective array aperture can be extended compared with conventional spatial smoothing. The proposed method achieves a good robustness and DOA estimation accuracy with unknown mutual coupling. The simulation results demonstrate the validity and efficiency of the proposed method.

  16. Mutual Comparative Filtering for Change Detection in Videos with Unstable Illumination Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidyakin, Sergey V.; Vishnyakov, Boris V.; Vizilter, Yuri V.; Roslov, Nikolay I.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we propose a new approach for change detection and moving objects detection in videos with unstable, abrupt illumination changes. This approach is based on mutual comparative filters and background normalization. We give the definitions of mutual comparative filters and outline their strong advantage for change detection purposes. Presented approach allows us to deal with changing illumination conditions in a simple and efficient way and does not have drawbacks, which exist in models that assume different color transformation laws. The proposed procedure can be used to improve a number of background modelling methods, which are not specifically designed to work under illumination changes.

  17. A Simple and General Approach to Determination of Self and Mutual Inductances for AC machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Kaiyuan; Rasmussen, Peter Omand; Ritchie, Ewen

    2011-01-01

    Modelling of AC electrical machines plays an important role in electrical engineering education related to electrical machine design and control. One of the fundamental requirements in AC machine modelling is to derive the self and mutual inductances, which could be position dependant. Theories...... developed so far for inductance determination are often associated with complicated machine magnetic field analysis, which exhibits a difficulty for most students. This paper describes a simple and general approach to the determination of self and mutual inductances of different types of AC machines. A new...... determination are given for a 3-phase, salient-pole synchronous machine, and an induction machine....

  18. A Simple and General Approach to Determination of Self and Mutual Inductances for AC machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Kaiyuan; Rasmussen, Peter Omand; Ritchie, Ewen

    2011-01-01

    Modelling of AC electrical machines plays an important role in electrical engineering education related to electrical machine design and control. One of the fundamental requirements in AC machine modelling is to derive the self and mutual inductances, which could be position dependant. Theories...... developed so far for inductance determination are often associated with complicated machine magnetic field analysis, which exhibits a difficulty for most students. This paper describes a simple and general approach to the determination of self and mutual inductances of different types of AC machines. A new...

  19. MUTUAL COMPARATIVE FILTERING FOR CHANGE DETECTION IN VIDEOS WITH UNSTABLE ILLUMINATION CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Sidyakin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose a new approach for change detection and moving objects detection in videos with unstable, abrupt illumination changes. This approach is based on mutual comparative filters and background normalization. We give the definitions of mutual comparative filters and outline their strong advantage for change detection purposes. Presented approach allows us to deal with changing illumination conditions in a simple and efficient way and does not have drawbacks, which exist in models that assume different color transformation laws. The proposed procedure can be used to improve a number of background modelling methods, which are not specifically designed to work under illumination changes.

  20. A Distributed Mutual Exclusion Algorithm for Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orhan Dagdeviren

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We propose a distributed mutual exclusion algorithm for mobile ad hoc networks. This algorithm requires a ring of cluster coordinators as the underlying topology. The topology is built by first providing clusters of mobile nodes in the first step and then forming a backbone consisting of the cluster heads in a ring as the second step. The modified version of the Ricart-Agrawala Algorithm on top of this topologyprovides analytically and experimentally an order of decrease in message complexity with respect to the original algorithm. We analyze the algorithm, provide performance results of the implementation, discuss the fault tolerance and the other algorithmic extensions, and show that this architecture can be used for other middleware functions in mobile networks.

  1. Word Sense Disambiguation Based on Mutual Information and Syntactic Patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez-Amoros, David

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a hybrid system for WSD, presented to the English all-words and lexical-sample tasks, that relies on two different unsupervised approaches. The first one selects the senses according to mutual information proximity between a context word a variant of the sense. The second heuristic analyzes the examples of use in the glosses of the senses so that simple syntactic patterns are inferred. This patterns are matched against the disambiguation contexts. We show that the first heuristic obtains a precision and recall of .58 and .35 respectively in the all words task while the second obtains .80 and .25. The high precision obtained recommends deeper research of the techniques. Results for the lexical sample task are also provided.

  2. Water stress strengthens mutualism among ants, trees, and scale insects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth G Pringle

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Abiotic environmental variables strongly affect the outcomes of species interactions. For example, mutualistic interactions between species are often stronger when resources are limited. The effect might be indirect: water stress on plants can lead to carbon stress, which could alter carbon-mediated plant mutualisms. In mutualistic ant-plant symbioses, plants host ant colonies that defend them against herbivores. Here we show that the partners' investments in a widespread ant-plant symbiosis increase with water stress across 26 sites along a Mesoamerican precipitation gradient. At lower precipitation levels, Cordia alliodora trees invest more carbon in Azteca ants via phloem-feeding scale insects that provide the ants with sugars, and the ants provide better defense of the carbon-producing leaves. Under water stress, the trees have smaller carbon pools. A model of the carbon trade-offs for the mutualistic partners shows that the observed strategies can arise from the carbon costs of rare but extreme events of herbivory in the rainy season. Thus, water limitation, together with the risk of herbivory, increases the strength of a carbon-based mutualism.

  3. Mutual influences of pain and emotional face processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias J Wieser

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The perception of unpleasant stimuli enhances whereas the perception of pleasant stimuli decreases pain perception. In contrast, the effects of pain on the processing of emotional stimuli are much less known. Especially given the recent interest in facial expressions of pain as a special category of emotional stimuli, a main topic in this research line is the mutual influence of pain and facial expression processing. Therefore, in this mini-review we selectively summarize research on the effects of emotional stimuli on pain, but more extensively turn to the opposite direction namely how pain influences concurrent processing of affective stimuli such as facial expressions. Based on the motivational priming theory one may hypothesize that the perception of pain enhances the processing of unpleasant stimuli and decreases the processing of pleasant stimuli. This review reveals that the literature is only partly consistent with this assumption: Pain reduces the processing of pleasant pictures and happy facial expressions, but does not - or only partly - affect processing of unpleasant pictures. However, it was demonstrated that pain selectively enhances the processing of facial expressions if these are pain-related (i.e. facial expressions of pain. Extending a mere affective modulation theory, the latter results suggest pain-specific effects which may be explained by the perception-action model of empathy. Together, these results underscore the important mutual influence of pain and emotional face processing.

  4. Mutual influences of pain and emotional face processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieser, Matthias J; Gerdes, Antje B M; Reicherts, Philipp; Pauli, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The perception of unpleasant stimuli enhances whereas the perception of pleasant stimuli decreases pain perception. In contrast, the effects of pain on the processing of emotional stimuli are much less known. Especially given the recent interest in facial expressions of pain as a special category of emotional stimuli, a main topic in this research line is the mutual influence of pain and facial expression processing. Therefore, in this mini-review we selectively summarize research on the effects of emotional stimuli on pain, but more extensively turn to the opposite direction namely how pain influences concurrent processing of affective stimuli such as facial expressions. Based on the motivational priming theory one may hypothesize that the perception of pain enhances the processing of unpleasant stimuli and decreases the processing of pleasant stimuli. This review reveals that the literature is only partly consistent with this assumption: pain reduces the processing of pleasant pictures and happy facial expressions, but does not - or only partly - affect processing of unpleasant pictures. However, it was demonstrated that pain selectively enhances the processing of facial expressions if these are pain-related (i.e., facial expressions of pain). Extending a mere affective modulation theory, the latter results suggest pain-specific effects which may be explained by the perception-action model of empathy. Together, these results underscore the important mutual influence of pain and emotional face processing.

  5. Characterization of Predictive Behavior of a Retina by Mutual Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Sean Chen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Probing a bullfrog retina with spatially uniform light pulses of correlated stochastic intervals, we calculate the mutual information between the spiking output at the ganglion cells measured with multi-electrode array (MEA and the interval of the stimulus at a time shift later. The time-integrated information from the output about the future stimulus is maximized when the mean interval of the stimulus is within the dynamic range of the well-established anticipative phenomena of omitted-stimulus responses for the retina. The peak position of the mutual information as a function of the time shift is typically negative considering the processing delay of the retina. However, the peak position can become positive for long enough correlation time of the stimulus when the pulse intervals are generated by a Hidden Markovian model (HMM. This is indicative of a predictive behavior of the retina which is possible only when the hidden variable of the HMM can be recovered from the history of the stimulus for a prediction of its future. We verify that stochastic intervals of the same mean, variance, and correlation time do not result in the same predictive behavior of the retina when they are generated by an Ornstein–Uhlenbeck (OU process, which is strictly Markovian.

  6. Water stress strengthens mutualism among ants, trees, and scale insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, Elizabeth G; Akçay, Erol; Raab, Ted K; Dirzo, Rodolfo; Gordon, Deborah M

    2013-11-01

    Abiotic environmental variables strongly affect the outcomes of species interactions. For example, mutualistic interactions between species are often stronger when resources are limited. The effect might be indirect: water stress on plants can lead to carbon stress, which could alter carbon-mediated plant mutualisms. In mutualistic ant-plant symbioses, plants host ant colonies that defend them against herbivores. Here we show that the partners' investments in a widespread ant-plant symbiosis increase with water stress across 26 sites along a Mesoamerican precipitation gradient. At lower precipitation levels, Cordia alliodora trees invest more carbon in Azteca ants via phloem-feeding scale insects that provide the ants with sugars, and the ants provide better defense of the carbon-producing leaves. Under water stress, the trees have smaller carbon pools. A model of the carbon trade-offs for the mutualistic partners shows that the observed strategies can arise from the carbon costs of rare but extreme events of herbivory in the rainy season. Thus, water limitation, together with the risk of herbivory, increases the strength of a carbon-based mutualism.

  7. Differential and total cross sections of mutual neutralization in low-energy collisions of isotopes of H++H-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkambule, Sifiso M.; Elander, Nils; Larson, Åsa; Lecointre, Julien; Urbain, Xavier

    2016-03-01

    Mutual neutralization in the collisions of H+ and H- is studied both theoretically and experimentally. The quantum-mechanical ab initio model includes covalent states associated with the H (1 )+H (n ≤3 ) limits and the collision energy ranges from 1 meV to 100 eV. The reaction is theoretically studied for collisions between different isotopes of the hydrogen ions. From the partial wave scattering amplitude, the differential and total cross sections are computed. The differential cross section is analyzed in terms of forward- and backward-scattering events, showing a dominance of backward scattering which can be understood by examining the phase of the scattering amplitudes for the gerade and ungerade set of states. The isotope dependence of the total cross section is compared with the one obtained using a semiclassical multistate Landau-Zener model. The final state distribution analysis emphasizes the dominance of the n =3 channel for collisions below 10 eV, while at higher collision energies, the n =2 channel starts to become important. For collisions of ions forming a molecular system with a larger reduced mass, the n =2 channel starts to dominate at lower energies. Using a merged ion-beam apparatus, the branching ratios for mutual neutralization in H+ and H- collisions in the energy range from 11 to 185 eV are measured with position- and time-sensitive particle detectors. The measured and calculated branching ratios satisfactorily agree with respect to state contributions.

  8. A Bayesian Alternative to Mutual Information for the Hierarchical Clustering of Dependent Random Variables.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Marrelec

    Full Text Available The use of mutual information as a similarity measure in agglomerative hierarchical clustering (AHC raises an important issue: some correction needs to be applied for the dimensionality of variables. In this work, we formulate the decision of merging dependent multivariate normal variables in an AHC procedure as a Bayesian model comparison. We found that the Bayesian formulation naturally shrinks the empirical covariance matrix towards a matrix set a priori (e.g., the identity, provides an automated stopping rule, and corrects for dimensionality using a term that scales up the measure as a function of the dimensionality of the variables. Also, the resulting log Bayes factor is asymptotically proportional to the plug-in estimate of mutual information, with an additive correction for dimensionality in agreement with the Bayesian information criterion. We investigated the behavior of these Bayesian alternatives (in exact and asymptotic forms to mutual information on simulated and real data. An encouraging result was first derived on simulations: the hierarchical clustering based on the log Bayes factor outperformed off-the-shelf clustering techniques as well as raw and normalized mutual information in terms of classification accuracy. On a toy example, we found that the Bayesian approaches led to results that were similar to those of mutual information clustering techniques, with the advantage of an automated thresholding. On real functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI datasets measuring brain activity, it identified clusters consistent with the established outcome of standard procedures. On this application, normalized mutual information had a highly atypical behavior, in the sense that it systematically favored very large clusters. These initial experiments suggest that the proposed Bayesian alternatives to mutual information are a useful new tool for hierarchical clustering.

  9. A Bayesian Alternative to Mutual Information for the Hierarchical Clustering of Dependent Random Variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrelec, Guillaume; Messé, Arnaud; Bellec, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The use of mutual information as a similarity measure in agglomerative hierarchical clustering (AHC) raises an important issue: some correction needs to be applied for the dimensionality of variables. In this work, we formulate the decision of merging dependent multivariate normal variables in an AHC procedure as a Bayesian model comparison. We found that the Bayesian formulation naturally shrinks the empirical covariance matrix towards a matrix set a priori (e.g., the identity), provides an automated stopping rule, and corrects for dimensionality using a term that scales up the measure as a function of the dimensionality of the variables. Also, the resulting log Bayes factor is asymptotically proportional to the plug-in estimate of mutual information, with an additive correction for dimensionality in agreement with the Bayesian information criterion. We investigated the behavior of these Bayesian alternatives (in exact and asymptotic forms) to mutual information on simulated and real data. An encouraging result was first derived on simulations: the hierarchical clustering based on the log Bayes factor outperformed off-the-shelf clustering techniques as well as raw and normalized mutual information in terms of classification accuracy. On a toy example, we found that the Bayesian approaches led to results that were similar to those of mutual information clustering techniques, with the advantage of an automated thresholding. On real functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) datasets measuring brain activity, it identified clusters consistent with the established outcome of standard procedures. On this application, normalized mutual information had a highly atypical behavior, in the sense that it systematically favored very large clusters. These initial experiments suggest that the proposed Bayesian alternatives to mutual information are a useful new tool for hierarchical clustering.

  10. Peer pressure: enhancement of cooperation through mutual punishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Han-Xin; Wu, Zhi-Xi; Rong, Zhihai; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2015-02-01

    An open problem in evolutionary game dynamics is to understand the effect of peer pressure on cooperation in a quantitative manner. Peer pressure can be modeled by punishment, which has been proved to be an effective mechanism to sustain cooperation among selfish individuals. We investigate a symmetric punishment strategy, in which an individual will punish each neighbor if their strategies are different, and vice versa. Because of the symmetry in imposing the punishment, one might intuitively expect the strategy to have little effect on cooperation. Utilizing the prisoner's dilemma game as a prototypical model of interactions at the individual level, we find, through simulation and theoretical analysis, that proper punishment, when even symmetrically imposed on individuals, can enhance cooperation. Also, we find that the initial density of cooperators plays an important role in the evolution of cooperation driven by mutual punishment.

  11. Peer pressure: enhancement of cooperation through mutual punishment

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Han-Xin; Rong, Zhihai; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    An open problem in evolutionary game dynamics is to understand the effect of peer pressure on cooperation in a quantitative manner. Peer pressure can be modeled by punishment, which has been proved to be an effective mechanism to sustain cooperation among selfish individuals. We investigate a symmetric punishment strategy, in which an individual will punish each neighbor if their strategies are different, and vice versa. Because of the symmetry in imposing the punishment, one might expect intuitively the strategy to have little effect on cooperation. Utilizing the prisoner's dilemma game as a prototypical model of interactions at the individual level, we find, through simulation and theoretical analysis, that proper punishment, when even symmetrically imposed on individuals, can enhance cooperation. Besides, we find that the initial density of cooperators plays an important role in the evolution of cooperation driven by mutual punishment.

  12. Mutual Dynamics of Swimming Microorganisms and Their Fluid Habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, John O.; Burnett, G. David; Remick, Katherine E.

    "Organisms alter their material environment, and their environment constrains and naturally selects organisms." Lenton's [17] statement applies especially well to populations of swimming micro-organisms. The mutual dynamic of themselves and their fluid habitat orders and constrains them, generates concentration-convection patterns [12], [15], enhances transport of metabolites and, at all scales, guides many of their interactions. Our objective is to describe mathematical models sufficient for reaching insights that can further guide theory and experiment. These models necessarily include nonlinear and stochastic features. To illustrate self-organization and the type of experimental statistical inputs available, we present some rather astonishing data concerning the motile bacteria Bacillus subtilis and hydrodynamics associated with their activity. The inescapable interdependence of physics and biology emerges from the analysis.

  13. Peer pressure: Enhancement of cooperation through mutual punishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Han-Xin; Wu, Zhi-Xi; Rong, Zhihai; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2015-02-01

    An open problem in evolutionary game dynamics is to understand the effect of peer pressure on cooperation in a quantitative manner. Peer pressure can be modeled by punishment, which has been proved to be an effective mechanism to sustain cooperation among selfish individuals. We investigate a symmetric punishment strategy, in which an individual will punish each neighbor if their strategies are different, and vice versa. Because of the symmetry in imposing the punishment, one might intuitively expect the strategy to have little effect on cooperation. Utilizing the prisoner's dilemma game as a prototypical model of interactions at the individual level, we find, through simulation and theoretical analysis, that proper punishment, when even symmetrically imposed on individuals, can enhance cooperation. Also, we find that the initial density of cooperators plays an important role in the evolution of cooperation driven by mutual punishment.

  14. Evolutionary dynamics with fluctuating population sizes and strong mutualism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotibut, Thiparat; Nelson, David R.

    2015-08-01

    Game theory ideas provide a useful framework for studying evolutionary dynamics in a well-mixed environment. This approach, however, typically enforces a strictly fixed overall population size, deemphasizing natural growth processes. We study a competitive Lotka-Volterra model, with number fluctuations, that accounts for natural population growth and encompasses interaction scenarios typical of evolutionary games. We show that, in an appropriate limit, the model describes standard evolutionary games with both genetic drift and overall population size fluctuations. However, there are also regimes where a varying population size can strongly influence the evolutionary dynamics. We focus on the strong mutualism scenario and demonstrate that standard evolutionary game theory fails to describe our simulation results. We then analytically and numerically determine fixation probabilities as well as mean fixation times using matched asymptotic expansions, taking into account the population size degree of freedom. These results elucidate the interplay between population dynamics and evolutionary dynamics in well-mixed systems.

  15. High-Resolution Dynamical Downscaling of ERA-Interim Using the WRF Regional Climate Model for the Area of Poland. Part 2: Model Performance with Respect to Automatically Derived Circulation Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojrzyńska, Hanna; Kryza, Maciej; Wałaszek, Kinga; Szymanowski, Mariusz; Werner, Małgorzata; Dore, Anthony J.

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents the application of the high-resolution WRF model data for the automatic classification of the atmospheric circulation types and the evaluation of the model results for daily rainfall and air temperatures. The WRF model evaluation is performed by comparison with measurements and gridded data (E-OBS). The study is focused on the area of Poland and covers the 1981-2010 period, for which the WRF model has been run using three nested domains with spatial resolution of 45 km × 45 km, 15 km × 15 km and 5 km × 5 km. For the model evaluation, we have used the data from the innermost domain, and data from the second domain were used for circulation typology. According to the circulation type analysis, the anticyclonic types (AAD and AAW) are the most frequent. The WRF model is able to reproduce the daily air temperatures and the error statistics are better, compared with the interpolation-based gridded dataset. The high-resolution WRF model shows a higher spatial variability of both air temperature and rainfall, compared with the E-OBS dataset. For the rainfall, the WRF model, in general, overestimates the measured values. The model performance shows a seasonal pattern and is also dependent on the atmospheric circulation type, especially for daily rainfall.

  16. Mutual Information in the Air Quality Monitoring Network of Bogota - Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, O. J.; Jimenez-Pizarro, R.

    2012-12-01

    Large urban areas in the developing world are characterized by high population density and a great variety of activities responsible for emission of trace gases and particulate matter to the atmosphere. In general, these pollutants are unevenly distributed over cities according to the location of sources, meteorological variability and geographical features. Urban air quality monitoring networks are primarily designed to protect public health. The meteorological and air quality information gathered by monitoring networks can also be used to understand pollutant sources, sinks, and dispersion processes and to assess the spatial coverage of the network itself. Several statistical and numerical simulation methods allow for the identification of the domain that influences observations at each of the stations, i.e, the zone and respective population truly covered by the measurements. We focused on Bogota, Colombia, a dense city of approximately 9.6 million inhabitants in its metropolitan area. We analyzed the measurements obtained by the Bogotá Air Quality Monitoring Network (RMCAB) between the years 1997 and 2010 for TSP, PM10, CO, NOx and O3. RMCAB is composed of 16 stations, 13 of which are fixed and measure both atmospheric pollutants and meteorological variables. The method applied consisted of a statistical approach based on the mutual information that each station shares with its complement, i.e. the set formed by the other stations of the network. In order to improve our understanding and interpretation of the results, virtual data created for selected receptors along a simple modeled Gaussian plume spreading throughout Bogotá was analyzed. In this Gaussian model, we accounted for the prevailing weather conditions of this city and for different emission features under which the pollutants are emitted. The spatial location of the monitoring stations and emission sources, and the quality of the measurements are relevant factors when assessing the mutual

  17. Influence of inhomogeneities on holographic mutual information and butterfly effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Rong-Gen; Zeng, Xiao-Xiong; Zhang, Hai-Qing

    2017-07-01

    We study the effect of inhomogeneity, which is induced by the graviton mass in massive gravity, on the mutual information and the chaotic behavior of a 2+1-dimensional field theory from the gauge/gravity duality. When the system is near-homogeneous, the mutual information increases as the graviton mass grows. However, when the system is far from homogeneity, the mutual information decreases as the graviton mass increases. By adding the perturbations of energy into the system, we investigate the dynamical mutual information in the shock wave geometry. We find that the greater perturbations disrupt the mutual information more rapidly, which resembles the butterfly effect in chaos theory. Besides, the greater inhomogeneity reduces the dynamical mutual information more quickly just as in the static case.

  18. The macroecology of marine cleaning mutualisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floeter, Sergio R; Vázquez, Diego P; Grutter, Alexandra S

    2007-01-01

    1. Marine cleaning mutualisms generally involve small fish or shrimps removing ectoparasites and other material from cooperating 'client' fish. We evaluate the role of fish abundance, body size and behaviour as determinants of interactions with cleaning mutualists. 2. Data come from eight reef locations in Brazil, the Caribbean, the Mediterranean and Australia. 3. We conducted a meta-analysis of client-cleaner interactions involving 11 cleaner and 221 client species. 4. There was a strong, positive effect of client abundance on cleaning frequency, but only a weak, negative effect of client body size. These effects were modulated by client trophic group and social behaviour. 5. This study adds to a growing body of evidence suggesting a central role of species abundance in structuring species interactions.

  19. Mutual information-based facial expression recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazar, Mliki; Hammami, Mohamed; Hanêne, Ben-Abdallah

    2013-12-01

    This paper introduces a novel low-computation discriminative regions representation for expression analysis task. The proposed approach relies on interesting studies in psychology which show that most of the descriptive and responsible regions for facial expression are located around some face parts. The contributions of this work lie in the proposition of new approach which supports automatic facial expression recognition based on automatic regions selection. The regions selection step aims to select the descriptive regions responsible or facial expression and was performed using Mutual Information (MI) technique. For facial feature extraction, we have applied Local Binary Patterns Pattern (LBP) on Gradient image to encode salient micro-patterns of facial expressions. Experimental studies have shown that using discriminative regions provide better results than using the whole face regions whilst reducing features vector dimension.

  20. Mutually-antagonistic interactions in baseball networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra, Serguei; Powers, Scott; McCotter, Trent; Porter, Mason A.; Mucha, Peter J.

    2010-03-01

    We formulate the head-to-head matchups between Major League Baseball pitchers and batters from 1954 to 2008 as a bipartite network of mutually-antagonistic interactions. We consider both the full network and single-season networks, which exhibit structural changes over time. We find interesting structure in the networks and examine their sensitivity to baseball’s rule changes. We then study a biased random walk on the matchup networks as a simple and transparent way to (1) compare the performance of players who competed under different conditions and (2) include information about which particular players a given player has faced. We find that a player’s position in the network does not correlate with his placement in the random walker ranking. However, network position does have a substantial effect on the robustness of ranking placement to changes in head-to-head matchups.

  1. Pseudomyrmex nigropilosa: A Parasite of a Mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzen, D H

    1975-05-30

    Pseudomyrmex nigropilosa is a parasite ofthe ant-acacia mutualism in Central America in that it harvests the resources of swollen-thorn acacias but does not protect the acacias. In the process, it also lowers the rate of occupation by the obligate acacia-ants, species of ants that do protect swollen-thorn acacias. Tenancy ofan acacia by P. nigropilosa must be temporary, since the unoccupied plant is shortly killed by herbivores or competing plants, or is taken over by obligate acacia-ants. As expected of a species of short-lived ant, a P. nigropilosa colony produces reproductives earlier in the life of the colony and maintains fewer grams of workers per gram of brood than does a colony of the long-lived obligate acacia-ants.

  2. Document summarization using positive pointwise mutual information

    CERN Document Server

    S, Aji

    2012-01-01

    The degree of success in document summarization processes depends on the performance of the method used in identifying significant sentences in the documents. The collection of unique words characterizes the major signature of the document, and forms the basis for Term-Sentence-Matrix (TSM). The Positive Pointwise Mutual Information, which works well for measuring semantic similarity in the Term-Sentence-Matrix, is used in our method to assign weights for each entry in the Term-Sentence-Matrix. The Sentence-Rank-Matrix generated from this weighted TSM, is then used to extract a summary from the document. Our experiments show that such a method would outperform most of the existing methods in producing summaries from large documents.

  3. Mutually-Antagonistic Interactions in Baseball Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Saavedra, Serguei; McCotter, Trent; Porter, Mason A; Mucha, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    We formulate the head-to-head matchups between Major League Baseball pitchers and batters from 1954 to 2008 as a bipartite network of mutually-antagonistic interactions. We consider both the full network and single-season networks, which exhibit interesting structural changes over time. We also find that these networks exhibit a significant network structure that is sensitive to baseball's rule changes. We then study a biased random walk on the matchup networks as a simple and transparent way to compare the performance of players who competed under different conditions. We find that a player's position in the network does not correlate with his success in the random walker ranking but instead has a substantial effect on its sensitivity to changes in his own aggregate performance.

  4. Mutual Contextualization in Tripartite Graphs of Folksonomies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Ching-Man Au; Gibbins, Nicholas; Shadbolt, Nigel

    The use of tags to describe Web resources in a collaborative manner has experienced rising popularity among Web users in recent years. The product of such activity is given the name folksonomy, which can be considered as a scheme of organizing information in the users' own way. This research work attempts to analyze tripartite graphs - graphs involving users, tags and resources - of folksonomies and discuss how these elements acquire their semantics through their associations with other elements, a process we call mutual contextualization. By studying such process, we try to identify solutions to problems such as tag disambiguation, retrieving documents of similar topics and discovering communities of users. This paper describes the basis of the research work, mentions work done so far and outlines future plans.

  5. Balancing former opposites as mutual preconditions?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmström, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    structurally determined (in)sensitivity to life and nature reaches a critical mass, it provokes new ideals of balancing society’s logics on the one hand with considerations of life and nature on the other, as in the triple bottom line concept (Luhmann 1989). Third, the increasing diversity and speciali......). An intersubjective and a social systemic public relations paradigm. Journal of Com-munications Management, 2(1), 24–39. Holmström, S. (2002). Public relations reconstructed as part of society’s evolutionary learning processes. In D. Vercic, B. van Ruler, I. Jensen, D. Moss, & J. White (Eds.), The status of public......Focus of this chapter is society’s megatrends as they transform the frames for organisational legitimacy in a way which implies that decision-making paradoxically should balance as mutual preconditions what was formerly seen as opposites. Society’s turbulence strikes in organisations. As society...

  6. The importance of mutual positive expressivity in social adjustment: understanding the role of peers and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallquist, Julie; DiDonato, Matthew D; Hanish, Laura D; Martin, Carol Lynn; Fabes, Richard A

    2012-04-01

    The relations between young children's mutual (reciprocated) and overall positive emotion (PE) with same- and other-gender peers and their social adjustment were explored. Children's PE and peers' PE were observed across the preschool year during peer interactions (N = 166; 46% girls; M age = 52 months). Results revealed that girls and boys had similar frequencies of overall PE and mutual PE when interacting with same-gender peers, but girls were marginally higher compared with boys in overall and mutual PE when interacting with other-gender peers. Girls and boys did not have greater rates of either type of PE after controlling for gender segregation during same- or other-gender interactions. Using structural equation modeling, children's mutual PE, regardless of their gender, positively predicted indicators of positive adjustment (e.g., prosocial behavior, cooperation) and negatively predicted indicators of negative adjustment (e.g., hyperactivity, disruption, exclusion by peers). Children's overall PE did not predict either type of adjustment. Findings support the importance of mutual PE for children's development.

  7. Reciprocity and mutual impedance formulas within lossy cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Gronwald

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the validity of reciprocity and mutual impedance formulas within lossy cavities. Mutual impedance formulas are well-known from antenna theory and useful to describe the electromagnetic coupling between electromagnetic interference sources and victims. As an example the mutual impedance between two dipole antennas within a lossy rectangular cavity is calculated from a system of coupled Hallén's equations that efficiently is solved by the method of moments.

  8. Periodic Solutions of Multispecies Mutualism System with Infinite Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbo Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the delayed periodic mutualism system with Gilpin-Ayala effect. Some new and interesting sufficient conditions are obtained to guarantee the existence of periodic solution for the multispecies mutualism system with infinite delays. Our method is based on Mawhin's coincidence degree. To the best knowledge of the authors, there is no paper considering the existence of periodic solutions for n-species mutualism system with infinite delays.

  9. Effect of mutual inductance coupling on superconducting flux qubit decoherence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanyan Jiang; Hualan Xu; Yinghua Ji

    2009-01-01

    In the Born-Markov approximation and two-level approximation, and using the Bloch-Redfield equation, the decoherence property of superconducting quantum circuit with a flux qubit is investigated. The influence on decoherence of the mutual inductance coupling between the circuit components is complicated. The mutual inductance coupling between different loops will decrease the decoherence time. However, the mutual inductance coupling of the same loop, in a certain interval, will increase the decoherence time. Therefore, we can control the decoherence time by changing the mutual inductance parameters such as the strength and direction of coupling.

  10. Mutual couling reduction using a lumped LC circuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen, Jesper; Jakobsen, Kaj Bjarne

    2004-01-01

    A technique to reduce the mutual coupling between two Planar Inverted F Antennas (PIFA) is presented in this paper. By the use of a parallel LC circuit it is possible to reduce the mutual coupling between two antennas. This results in a 16 % improvement in the radiation efficiency.......A technique to reduce the mutual coupling between two Planar Inverted F Antennas (PIFA) is presented in this paper. By the use of a parallel LC circuit it is possible to reduce the mutual coupling between two antennas. This results in a 16 % improvement in the radiation efficiency....

  11. Value Effect in Indonesian Stock Returns: The Implications for the Equity Mutual Fund Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Kristianto Utomo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We extend the persistence and pervasiveness of the presence of value effect to Indonesian stock returns in the last two decades by utilizing data set that is relatively free of survivor bias and selection bias. Our finding shows that value portfolios have been able to outperform growth portfolios. Furthermore, the presence of the effect as an asset pricing factor, along with the size effect, can significantly explain the returns of the aggregate equity mutual funds in Indonesia and unveil that the equity mutual fund industry does not provide sufficient risk-adjusted return to cover trading costs and fund expenses. Our proposition is that the equity mutual fund valuation will be better off to apply simpler model shown in this paper to capture the value premium as opposed to the general application of traditional valuation method.

  12. The Evaluation of Mutual Fund Performance in Lithuania Considering Risk and Timing Ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma Gavrilova

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, Lithuania has witnessed a growing interest in investment promoted by the need to successfully manage available funds. Direct investments (e. g. buying and selling stocks require a specific knowledge of investment instruments. Therefore, an ordinary investor finds investment in mutual funds easier and cheaper. Usually the most important questions to the investor include measuring the results of a fund and the quality of the actions performed by the fund managers. The article evaluates the rates of mutual fund performance and identifies their shortages. The methods for evaluating investment return according to the level of risk and timing ability of the fund managers are presented using the Sharpe ratio and Treynor-Mazuy model on the basis of which mutual funds in Lithuania are analyzed.Article in Lithuanian

  13. Warming, CO2, and nitrogen deposition interactively affect a plant-pollinator mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Shelley E R; Ladley, Jenny J; Shchepetkina, Anastasia A; Tisch, Maggie; Gieseg, Steven P; Tylianakis, Jason M

    2012-03-01

    Environmental changes threaten plant-pollinator mutualisms and their critical ecosystem service. Drivers such as land use, invasions and climate change can affect pollinator diversity or species encounter rates. However, nitrogen deposition, climate warming and CO(2) enrichment could interact to disrupt this crucial mutualism by altering plant chemistry in ways that alter floral attractiveness or even nutritional rewards for pollinators. Using a pumpkin model system, we show that these drivers non-additively affect flower morphology, phenology, flower sex ratios and nectar chemistry (sugar and amino acids), thereby altering the attractiveness of nectar to bumble bee pollinators and reducing worker longevity. Alarmingly, bees were attracted to, and consumed more, nectar from a treatment that reduced their survival by 22%. Thus, three of the five major drivers of global environmental change have previously unknown interactive effects on plant-pollinator mutualisms that could not be predicted from studies of individual drivers in isolation.

  14. A novel plant-fungal mutualism associated with fire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baynes, Melissa; Newcombe, George; Dixon, Linley; Castlebury, Lisa; O'Donnell, Kerry

    2012-01-01

    Bromus tectorum, or cheatgrass, is native to Eurasia and widely invasive in western North America. By late spring, this annual plant has dispersed its seed and died; its aboveground biomass then becomes fine fuel that burns as frequently as once every 3-5 y in its invaded range. Cheatgrass has proven to be better adapted to fire there than many competing plants, but the contribution of its fungal symbionts to this adaptation had not previously been studied. In sampling cheatgrass endophytes, many fire-associated fungi were found, including Morchella in three western states (New Mexico, Idaho, and Washington). In greenhouse experiments, a New Mexico isolate of Morchella increased both the biomass and fecundity of its local cheatgrass population, thus simultaneously increasing both the probability of fire and survival of that event, via more fuel and a greater, belowground seed bank, respectively. Re-isolation efforts proved that Morchella could infect cheatgrass roots in a non-mycorrhizal manner and then grow up into aboveground tissues. The same Morchella isolate also increased survival of seed exposed to heat typical of that which develops in the seed bank during a cheatgrass fire. Phylogenetic analysis of Eurasian and North American Morchella revealed that this fire-associated mutualism was evolutionarily novel, in that cheatgrass isolates belonged to two phylogenetically distinct species, or phylotypes, designated Mel-6 and Mel-12 whose evolutionary origin appears to be within western North America. Mutualisms with fire-associated fungi may be contributing to the cheatgrass invasion of western North America. Copyright © 2011 British Mycological Society. All rights reserved.

  15. Multi-objective portfolio optimization of mutual funds under downside risk measure using fuzzy theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Amiri

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Mutual fund is one of the most popular techniques for many people to invest their funds where a professional fund manager invests people's funds based on some special predefined objectives; therefore, performance evaluation of mutual funds is an important problem. This paper proposes a multi-objective portfolio optimization to offer asset allocation. The proposed model clusters mutual funds with two methods based on six characteristics including rate of return, variance, semivariance, turnover rate, Treynor index and Sharpe index. Semivariance is used as a downside risk measure. The proposed model of this paper uses fuzzy variables for return rate and semivariance. A multi-objective fuzzy mean-semivariance portfolio optimization model is implemented and fuzzy programming technique is adopted to solve the resulted problem. The proposed model of this paper has gathered the information of mutual fund traded on Nasdaq from 2007 to 2009 and Pareto optimal solutions are obtained considering different weights for objective functions. The results of asset allocation, rate of return and risk of each cluster are also determined and they are compared with the results of two clustering methods.

  16. The Architecture of Interdependent Minds: A Motivation-Management Theory of Mutual Responsiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Sandra L.; Holmes, John G.

    2009-01-01

    A model of mutual responsiveness in adult romantic relationships is proposed. Behaving responsively in conflict-of-interest situations requires one partner to resist the temptation to be selfish and the other partner to resist the temptation to protect against exploitation. Managing risk and the attendant temptations of self-interest require the…

  17. Design and Implementation of Dual-Band MIMO Antenna with Low Mutual Coupling using EBG for Handheld Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duong Thanh Tu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A dual-band Multiple Input Multiple Output (MIMO antenna system with enhanced isolation for LTE and WLAN applications is proposed. Using a double-rectangular Defected Ground Structure (DGS, the MIMO antenna gets two resonant frequencies of 2.6 GHz and 5.7 GHz with bandwidth of 5.7% and 4.3% respectively. To reduce much more mutual coupling between dual-band MIMO antenna ports, a novel double-side Electromagnetic Band Gap (EBG structure with equivalent circuit model is proposed. Size of t gain of the antenna is getting better, especially at the low band. he EBG unit cell is 8.6x8.6 mm2 that is built on FR4 substrate with height of 1.6 mm, so it is achieved more compact size than conventional EBG structures. With 1x7 EBG structures, the mutual coupling gets -40dB in the low frequency band and -30 dB in the high one with narrow distance of 0.11 from feeding point to feeding point. Furthermore, radiation efficiency as well as gain of the antenna is getting better, especially at the low band.

  18. Solvation of polymers as mutual association. I. General theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudowicz, Jacek; Freed, Karl F.; Douglas, Jack F.

    2013-04-01

    A Flory-Huggins (FH) type lattice theory of self-assembly is generalized to describe the equilibrium solvation of long polymer chains B by small solvent molecules A. Solvation is modeled as a thermally reversible mutual association between the polymer and a relatively low molar mass solvent. The FH Helmholtz free energy F is derived for a mixture composed of the A and B species and the various possible mutual association complexes AiB, and F is then used to generate expressions for basic thermodynamic properties of solvated polymer solutions, including the size distribution of the solvated clusters, the fraction of solvent molecules contained in solvated states (an order parameter for solvation), the specific heat (which exhibits a maximum at the solvation transition), the second and the third osmotic virial coefficients, and the boundaries for phase stability of the mixture. Special attention is devoted to the analysis of the "entropic" contribution χs to the FH interaction parameter χ of polymer solutions, both with and without associative interactions. The entropic χs parameter arises from correlations associated with polymer chain connectivity and disparities in molecular structure between the components of the mixture. Our analysis provides the first explanation of the longstanding enigma of why χs for polymer solutions significantly exceeds χs for binary polymer blends. Our calculations also reveal that χs becomes temperature dependent when interactions are strong, in sharp contrast to models currently being used for fitting thermodynamic data of associating polymer-solvent mixtures, where χs is simply assumed to be an adjustable constant based on experience with solutions of homopolymers in nonassociating solvents.

  19. Mutualism exploitation: predatory drosophilid larvae sugar-trap ants and jeopardize facultative ant-plant mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Mayra C; Sendoya, Sebastian F; Oliveira, Paulo S

    2016-07-01

    An open question in the evolutionary ecology of ant-plant facultative mutualism is how other members of the associated community can affect the interaction to a point where reciprocal benefits are disrupted. While visiting Qualea grandiflora shrubs to collect sugary rewards at extrafloral nectaries, tropical savanna ants deter herbivores and reduce leaf damage. Here we show that larvae of the fly Rhinoleucophenga myrmecophaga, which develop on extrafloral nectaries, lure potentially mutualistic, nectar-feeding ants and prey on them. Foraging ants spend less time on fly-infested foliage. Field experiments showed that predation (or the threat of predation) on ants by fly larvae produces cascading effects through three trophic levels, resulting in fewer protective ants on leaves, increased numbers of chewing herbivores, and greater leaf damage. These results reveal an undocumented mode of mutualism exploitation by an opportunistic predator at a plant-provided food source, jeopardizing ant-derived protection services to the plant. Our study documents a rather unusual case of predation of adult ants by a dipteran species and demonstrates a top-down trophic cascade within a generalized ant-plant mutualism. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  20. Mutually opposing forces during locomotion can eliminate the tradeoff between maneuverability and stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Noah; Sefati, Shahin; Neveln, Izaak; Roth, Eatai; Mitchell, Terence; Snyder, James; Maciver, Malcolm; Fortune, Eric

    A surprising feature of animal locomotion is that organisms typically produce substantial forces in directions other than what is necessary to move the animal through its environment, such as perpendicular to, or counter to, the direction of travel. The effect of these forces has been difficult to observe because they are often mutually opposing and therefore cancel out. Using a combination of robotic physical modeling, computational modeling, and biological experiments, we discovered that these forces serve an important role: to simplify and enhance the control of locomotion. Specifically, we examined a well-suited model system, the glass knifefish Eigenmannia virescens, which produces mutually opposing forces during a hovering behavior. By systematically varying the locomotor parameters of our biomimetic robot, and measuring the resulting forces and kinematics, we demonstrated that the production and differential control of mutually opposing forces is a strategy that generates passive stabilization while simultaneously enhancing maneuverability. Mutually opposing forces during locomotion are widespread across animal taxa, and these results indicate that such forces can eliminate the tradeoff between stability and maneuverability, thereby simplifying robotic and neural control.

  1. The Development of Mutuality in Natural Small Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Paul Morgan

    1983-01-01

    Describes factors affecting the development of mutuality of attraction in natural small groups, and tests the hypothesis of the acquaintance process in 41 female residents of three floors of a university dormitory over the course of a year. Two floors showed definite increases in dyadic mutuality over time. (JAC)

  2. Style Analysis and Performance Evaluation of Dutch Mutual Funds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Horst, J.R.; Nijman, T.E.; de Roon, F.A.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we show how style analysis of mutual funds can be used to circumvent the problem of self-reported investment styles, and to improve relative performance evaluation. Subsequently, we relate style analysis to performance evaluation and present results on the performance of Dutch mutual f

  3. Mutually singular functions and computation of the lengths of curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dovgoshei, A A [Institute of Applied Mathematics and Mechanics of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Donetsk (Ukraine); Martio, O [Department of Mathematics, University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-08-31

    We study rectifiable curves given by mutually singular coordinate functions in finite-dimensional normed spaces. We describe these curves in terms of the behaviour of approximative tangents and find a simple formula for their lengths. We deduce from these results new necessary and sufficient conditions for the mutual singularity of finitely many functions of bounded variation.

  4. The Mutual Impact of Global Strategy and Organizational Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hotho, Jasper J.; Lyles, Marjorie A.; Easterby-Smith, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Despite the interest in issues of knowing and learning in the global strategy field, there has been limited mutual engagement and interaction between the fields of global strategy and organizational learning. The purpose of our article is to reflect on and articulate how the mutual exchange...

  5. Economic game theory for mutualism and cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archetti, Marco; Scheuring, István; Hoffman, Moshe; Frederickson, Megan E; Pierce, Naomi E; Yu, Douglas W

    2011-12-01

    We review recent work at the interface of economic game theory and evolutionary biology that provides new insights into the evolution of partner choice, host sanctions, partner fidelity feedback and public goods. (1) The theory of games with asymmetrical information shows that the right incentives allow hosts to screen-out parasites and screen-in mutualists, explaining successful partner choice in the absence of signalling. Applications range from ant-plants to microbiomes. (2) Contract theory distinguishes two longstanding but weakly differentiated explanations of host response to defectors: host sanctions and partner fidelity feedback. Host traits that selectively punish misbehaving symbionts are parsimoniously interpreted as pre-adaptations. Yucca-moth and legume-rhizobia mutualisms are argued to be examples of partner fidelity feedback. (3) The theory of public goods shows that cooperation in multi-player interactions can evolve in the absence of assortment, in one-shot social dilemmas among non-kin. Applications include alarm calls in vertebrates and exoenzymes in microbes.

  6. Partial order similarity based on mutual information

    CERN Document Server

    Tibély, Gergely; Palla, Gergely

    2016-01-01

    Comparing the ranking of candidates by different voters is an important topic in social and information science with a high relevance from the point of view of practical applications. In general, ties and pairs of incomparable candidates may occur, thus, the alternative rankings are described by partial orders. Various distance measures between partial orders have already been introduced, where zero distance is corresponding to a perfect match between a pair of partial orders, and larger values signal greater differences. Here we take a different approach and propose a similarity measure based on adjusted mutual information. In general, the similarity value of unity is corresponding to exactly matching partial orders, while a low similarity is associated to a pair of independent partial orders. The time complexity of the computation of this similarity measure is $\\mathcal{O}(\\left|{\\mathcal C}\\right|^3)$ in the worst case, and $\\mathcal{O}(\\left|{\\mathcal C}\\right|^2\\ln \\left|{\\mathcal C}\\right|)$ in the typi...

  7. Mutualism between tree shrews and pitcher plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Jonathan A; Chin, Lijin

    2010-01-01

    Three species of Nepenthes pitcher plants from Borneo engage in a mutualistic interaction with mountain tree shrews, the basis of which is the exchange of nutritional resources. The plants produce modified “toilet pitchers” that produce copious amounts of exudates, the latter serving as a food source for tree shrews. The exudates are only accessible to the tree shrews when they position their hindquarters over the pitcher orifice. Tree shrews mark valuable resources with feces and regularly defecate into the pitchers when they visit them to feed. Feces represent a valuable source of nitrogen for these Nepenthes species, but there are many facets of the mutualism that are yet to be investigated. These include, but are not limited to, seasonal variation in exudate production rates by the plants, behavioral ecology of visiting tree shrews and the mechanism by which the plants signal to tree shrews that their pitchers represent a food source. Further research into this extraordinary animal-plant interaction is required to gain a better understanding of the benefits to the participating species. PMID:20861680

  8. Reducing Deviance Through Youths' Mutual Aid Group Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Chau-kiu; Ngai, Steven Sek-yum

    2016-01-01

    The mutual aid group, as supported by the social worker, emerges to play a vital role in helping group members reduce their deviance or behavioral problem. However, how the collaboration of the group and social worker accomplishes the reduction has remained uncharted. Based on social capital theory, mutual aid and cohesion within the group and social workers' specific aid for the group are likely responsible for the reduction. The test of such hypotheses relies on a two-wave panel survey of the members of 60 mutual aid groups who had deviant behavioral problems, located in Hong Kong, China. These groups had 241 youths completing both initial and 1-year follow-up surveys. Results manifested the direct or unconditional contributions of mutual aid, group cohesion, and social workers' specific aid to reducing deviance. Hence, social workers can enhance the effectiveness of the mutual aid group in reducing youths' deviance.

  9. The modified Poynting theorem and the concept of mutual energy

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Shuang-ren; Yang, Kang; Yang, Xingang; Yang, Xintie

    2015-01-01

    The Poynting theorem is generalized to the modified Poynting theorem. In the modified Poynting theorem the electromagnetic field is superimposition of different electromagnetic fields including the field of retarded potential and advanced potential. The media epsilon (permittivity) and mu (permeability) can also be different in the different fields. The concept of mutual energy is introduced which is the difference between the total energy and self-energy. Using the modified Poynting theorem with the concept of the mutual energy the modified mutual energy theorem is derived. Applying time-offset transform and time integral to the modified mutual energy theorem, the time-correlation modified mutual energy theorem is obtained. Assume there are only two fields which are retarded potential, and there is only one media, the modified time-correlation energy theorem becomes the time-correlation energy theorem, which is also referred as the time-correlation reciprocity theorem. Assume there are two electromagnetic fi...

  10. The Tradeoff Between Mutual Fund and Direct Stock Investments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marekwica, Marcel; Steininger, Bertram I.

    2014-01-01

    We study the tradeoff between direct and indirect stock investments through equity mutual funds for a utility-maximizing investor. Whereas direct investments impose higher transaction costs on the formation of a well-diversified portfolio, mutual funds charge fees for their services. Our results...... show that the fee levels that make private investors indifferent between direct and indirect stock investments vary heavily according to risk aversion, the amounts invested, correlations between assets, transaction costs, and the length of investment horizon. In particular, our results suggest...... that for a wide range of actively managed mutual funds, the fees charged are too high for these mutual funds to appeal to a wide range of informed investors. However, accounting for search costs, such as costs for financial advice, can facilitate an understanding of the levels of management fees charged by mutual...

  11. 高校学生公寓文化建设与学生骨干培养相互促进模式研究%Research on the Mutual Promotion Model between Student Dormitory Cultural Construction and Student Leader Training in Universities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙绍然; 林丹

    2015-01-01

    With the trend that university students' thoughts are increasingly independent and active, the traditional university student dormitory management model has been challenged, so we must implement the ideological guidance, behavior regulation and quality improvement of student leaders from the perspective of student dormitory cultural construction, so as to feasibly promote dormitory cultural construction in universities. This paper makes an overall review of the interaction between student dormitory cultural construction and student leader cultivation, analyzes the mutual promotion between them, and expounds ways to construct the mutual promotion model between student dormitory cultural construction and student leader training in universities.%鉴于高校学生思想日趋独立、活跃的趋势,传统的高校学生公寓管理模式受到了挑战,必须要从构建高校学生公寓文化建设的角度,对学生骨干进行思想引导、行为规范、素质提升,从而切实促进高校公寓文化建设.本文全面回顾了学生公寓文化建设与学生骨干培养的互动性现状,分析了学生公寓文化建设与学生骨干培养之间相互促进作用,并阐述了高校学生骨干培养与公寓文化建设相互促进模式的构建途径.

  12. The "One Belt and One Road" is an Important Mutually Beneficial and Win-win Strategy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Long; Kaifeng

    2015-01-01

    The"One Belt and One Road"strategic conception carries the dream of development and prosperity of countries concerned,and gives the ancient Silk Road a brand new content of the time.In September and October 2013,President Xi Jinping proposed building the"New Silk Road Economic Belt"(One Belt)and the"Twenty-first Century Maritime Silk Road"(One Road)strategic conception respectively,emphasizing a mutual-beneficial and win-win

  13. Speaker identification based on complete feature corpus and evaluation of mutual information

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Yibiao; WANG Shuozhong

    2005-01-01

    A speaker model called complete feature corpus (CFC) and an evaluation algorithm of mutual information (MIE) are proposed for text-independent speaker identification. The CFC model represents the speech and pronunciation characteristics of speaker by a feature vector corpus which was trained from some typical speech samples. It hires multi-step mini-max search matching scheme for MIE algorithm to evaluate the similarity of speech features between input speech and the models in distance and information space. Maximum mutual information (MMI)decision criterion is used to decide the identity of speaker. Experiments on performance analysis with comparison to GMM method show that proposed model and evaluation algorithm are quite effective and presented a higher performance than ordinary GMM method.

  14. The Determinants of Cash Flows in Greek Bond Mutual Funds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos Grose

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the factors that affect inflows – outflows of capital in bond mutual funds that operated in the Greek market during the period 1997-2005. Investors in bond mutual funds do not seek for high gross returns in order to determine their investment decisions incontrast with investors in the stock market. The risk weighted returns however represent a crucial factor in investment decision making. Bond mutual funds that invest primarily in government bonds, appear to be more affected by commissions charged by mutual fundmanagers, since investors avoid mutual funds charging high commissions, while on the other hand investors that prefer corporate bonds show reduced sensitivity in the commissions charged by mutual funds. Investors in government bonds increase their investment positions when stock markets experience small or negative returns, a clue that shows they seek for safe heavens for their investments. This phenomenon is more evident when investors face a temporary period of low stock market returns and is not as strong when low returns in the stock markets are extended to a period of years. In these cases investment positions in bond mutual funds appear to be part of a more permanent investment policy where bond investments are considered to be an integral part of a diversified portfolio.

  15. Human attribute concepts: relative ubiquity across twelve mutually isolated languages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saucier, Gerard; Thalmayer, Amber Gayle; Bel-Bahar, Tarik S

    2014-07-01

    It has been unclear which human-attribute concepts are most universal across languages. To identify common-denominator concepts, we used dictionaries for 12 mutually isolated languages-Maasai, Supyire Senoufo, Khoekhoe, Afar, Mara Chin, Hmong, Wik-Mungkan, Enga, Fijian, Inuktitut, Hopi, and Kuna-representing diverse cultural characteristics and language families, from multiple continents. A composite list of every person-descriptive term in each lexicon was closely examined to determine the content (in terms of English translation) most ubiquitous across languages. Study 1 identified 28 single-word concepts used to describe persons in all 12 languages, as well as 41 additional terms found in 11 of 12. Results indicated that attribute concepts related to morality and competence appear to be as cross-culturally ubiquitous as basic-emotion concepts. Formulations of universal-attribute concepts from Osgood and Wierzbicka were well-supported. Study 2 compared lexically based personality models on the relative ubiquity of key associated terms, finding that 1- and 2-dimensional models draw on markedly more ubiquitous terms than do 5- or 6-factor models. We suggest that ubiquitous attributes reflect common cultural as well as common biological processes.

  16. Review on the Progress for Mutual Fund Performance Dynamic Evaluation Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhongqiuZhao

    2004-01-01

    The progress of performance dynamic evaluation theory for mutual fund from different points is summarized. The theories include conditional performance evaluation model, stochastic discount factors model, dynamic selecting and timing ability, portfolio change measure and so on. Meanwhile, this paper also summarized the progress of Performance Persistence and Survlvorshlp Bias. Then the analysis of the development tendency for the performance evaluation of portfolio is made.

  17. Mutual Entropy in Quantum Information and Information Genetics

    CERN Document Server

    Ohya, M

    2004-01-01

    After Shannon, entropy becomes a fundamental quantity to describe not only uncertainity or chaos of a system but also information carried by the system. Shannon's important discovery is to give a mathematical expression of the mutual entropy (information), information transmitted from an input system to an output system, by which communication processes could be analyzed on the stage of mathematical science. In this paper, first we review the quantum mutual entropy and discuss its uses in quantum information theory, and secondly we show how the classical mutual entropy can be used to analyze genomes, in particular, those of HIV.

  18. Mutually orthogonal Latin squares from the inner products of vectors in mutually unbiased bases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Joanne L; Rao, Asha [School of Mathematical and Geospatial Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne 3001 (Australia)], E-mail: joanne.hall@rmit.edu.au, E-mail: asha@rmit.edu.au

    2010-04-02

    Mutually unbiased bases (MUBs) are important in quantum information theory. While constructions of complete sets of d + 1 MUBs in C{sup d} are known when d is a prime power, it is unknown if such complete sets exist in non-prime power dimensions. It has been conjectured that complete sets of MUBs only exist in C{sup d} if a maximal set of mutually orthogonal Latin squares (MOLS) of side length d also exists. There are several constructions (Roy and Scott 2007 J. Math. Phys. 48 072110; Paterek, Dakic and Brukner 2009 Phys. Rev. A 79 012109) of complete sets of MUBs from specific types of MOLS, which use Galois fields to construct the vectors of the MUBs. In this paper, two known constructions of MUBs (Alltop 1980 IEEE Trans. Inf. Theory 26 350-354; Wootters and Fields 1989 Ann. Phys. 191 363-381), both of which use polynomials over a Galois field, are used to construct complete sets of MOLS in the odd prime case. The MOLS come from the inner products of pairs of vectors in the MUBs.

  19. Diversification and coevolution in brood pollination mutualisms: Windows into the role of biotic interactions in generating biological diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hembry, David H; Althoff, David M

    2016-10-01

    Brood pollination mutualisms-interactions in which specialized insects are both the pollinators (as adults) and seed predators (as larvae) of their host plants-have been influential study systems for coevolutionary biology. These mutualisms include those between figs and fig wasps, yuccas and yucca moths, leafflowers and leafflower moths, globeflowers and globeflower flies, Silene plants and Hadena and Perizoma moths, saxifrages and Greya moths, and senita cacti and senita moths. The high reciprocal diversity and species-specificity of some of these mutualisms have been cited as evidence that coevolution between plants and pollinators drives their mutual diversification. However, the mechanisms by which these mutualisms diversify have received less attention. In this paper, we review key hypotheses about how these mutualisms diversify and what role coevolution between plants and pollinators may play in this process. We find that most species-rich brood pollination mutualisms show significant phylogenetic congruence at high taxonomic scales, but there is limited evidence for the processes of both cospeciation and duplication, and there are no unambiguous examples known of strict-sense contemporaneous cospeciation. Allopatric speciation appears important across multiple systems, particularly in the insects. Host-shifts appear to be common, and widespread host-shifts by pollinators may displace other pollinator lineages. There is relatively little evidence for a "coevolution through cospeciation" model or that coevolution promotes speciation in these systems. Although we have made great progress in understanding the mechanisms by which brood pollination mutualisms diversify, many opportunities remain to use these intriguing symbioses to understand the role of biotic interactions in generating biological diversity. © 2016 Botanical Society of America.

  20. Butterfly effect and holographic mutual information under external field and spatial noncommutativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wung-Hong; Du, Yi-Hsien

    2017-02-01

    We apply the transformation of mixing azimuthal and internal coordinate or mixing time and internal coordinate to a stack of N black M-branes to find the Melvin spacetime of a stack of N black D-branes with magnetic or electric flux in string theory, after the Kaluza-Klein reduction. We slightly extend previous formulas to investigate the external magnetic and electric effects on the butterfly effect and holographic mutual information. It shows that the Melvin fields do not modify the scrambling time and will enhance the mutual information. In addition, we also T-dualize and twist a stack of N black D-branes to find a Melvin Universe supported by the flux of the NSNS b-field, which describes a non-comutative spacetime. It also shows that the spatial noncommutativity does not modify the scrambling time and will enhance the mutual information. We also study the corrected mutual information in the backreaction geometry due to the shock wave in our three model spacetimes.

  1. Butterfly Effect and Holographic Mutual Information under External Field and Spatial Noncommutativity

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Wung-Hong

    2016-01-01

    We apply the transformation of mixing azimuthal and internal coordinate or mixing time and internal coordinate to a stack of N black M-branes to find the Melvin spacetime of a stack of N black D-branes with magnetic or electric flux in string theory, after the Kaluza-Klein reduction. We slightly extend previous formulas to investigate the external magnetic and electric effects on the butterfly effect and holographic mutual information. It shows that the Melvin fields do not modify the scrambling time and will enhance the mutual information. In addition, we also T-dualize and twist a stack of N black D-branes to find a Melvin Universe supported by the flux of the NSNS b-field, which describes a non-comutative spacetime. It also shows that the spatial noncommutativity does not modify the scrambling time and will enhance the mutual information. We also study the corrected mutual information in the backreaction geometry due to the shock wave in our three model spacetimes.

  2. Parallel mutual information estimation for inferring gene regulatory networks on GPUs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Weiguo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutual information is a measure of similarity between two variables. It has been widely used in various application domains including computational biology, machine learning, statistics, image processing, and financial computing. Previously used simple histogram based mutual information estimators lack the precision in quality compared to kernel based methods. The recently introduced B-spline function based mutual information estimation method is competitive to the kernel based methods in terms of quality but at a lower computational complexity. Results We present a new approach to accelerate the B-spline function based mutual information estimation algorithm with commodity graphics hardware. To derive an efficient mapping onto this type of architecture, we have used the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA programming model to design and implement a new parallel algorithm. Our implementation, called CUDA-MI, can achieve speedups of up to 82 using double precision on a single GPU compared to a multi-threaded implementation on a quad-core CPU for large microarray datasets. We have used the results obtained by CUDA-MI to infer gene regulatory networks (GRNs from microarray data. The comparisons to existing methods including ARACNE and TINGe show that CUDA-MI produces GRNs of higher quality in less time. Conclusions CUDA-MI is publicly available open-source software, written in CUDA and C++ programming languages. It obtains significant speedup over sequential multi-threaded implementation by fully exploiting the compute capability of commonly used CUDA-enabled low-cost GPUs.

  3. Respect distances. Rationale and means of computation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munier, Raymond [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Hoekmark, Harald [Clay Technology, Lund (Sweden)

    2004-12-01

    Canisters with spent nuclear fuel can obviously not be located within deformation zones as this might jeopardise their long term mechanical stability and thereby constitute a potential hazard to the biosphere. Less apparent, but equally important, is the fact that earthquakes trigger reactivation, slip, of structures some distance from their hypocentres due to, among many other factors, stress redistribution. Fault slip across a deposition hole might damage the isolation capacity of the canister and thereby jeopardise the overall integrity of the barrier system. Therefore, the following question might be posed: What is the distance from a deformation zone beyond which a canister can be safely emplaced? This respect distance cannot be readily computed because, unknown future events aside, there are some complicated aspects that need to be addressed e.g. degree of conservatism, scale, our ability to model ice sheets and earthquakes, etc. In this report we discuss various aspects of the assignment of respect distances, propose a methodology for its assignment and apply the methodology to the Forsmark Site as a worked example. Our main concern, in the context discussed in this report, is the post glacial faults anticipated to occur after the next glaciations. To properly address conservativeness, analysis of risk, and its implementation in safety analysis, we provide an extensive compilation of our current knowledge on post glacial faults as an appendix.

  4. Mutual Coupling Between Meteorological Parameters and Secondary Microseisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Holub

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The basic scientific question of this study was: do other mechanisms exist for excitation of secondary microseisms aside from the widely accepted mechanism by non-linear interactions of respective ocean waves. Here we use continuous broadband data from secondary microseisms recorded at the Ostrava-Krásné Pole, Czech Republic (OKC seismic station to create a massive seismological database. Except for seismological data, various meteorological features and their mutual relations were analysed: temperature, the so called ¡§shifted¡¨ temperature, air density, changes of atmospheric pressure, and synoptic situations. These analyses prove that maximum amplitudes of microseisms were observed during winter, while minimum amplitudes occured in summer months. The annual variations of microseisms amplitudes could not be explained by annual variations of storm activity above the North Atlantic. In addition, current analyses also aim at quantitative and quantitative evaluation of synoptic situations for triggering individual microseismic anomalies. Some of the meteorological features, namely the distribution of low pressures above northern Europe and high-pressure areas in Central Europe make it easy to explain most of the microseismic extremes. Here we pay special attention to the influence of large earthquakes, which usually induce slow deformation waves. We conclude that at least three mechanisms of microseism generation are possible: (1 the function of atmospheric pressure at sea level in the North Atlantic, (2 the effects of spreading of thermoelastic waves in the rock mass and (3 deformation waves induced by large earthquakes.

  5. Mutually Unbiased Bases and Orthogonal Decompositions of Lie Algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Boykin, P O; Tiep, P H; Wocjan, P; Sitharam, Meera; Tiep, Pham Huu; Wocjan, Pawel

    2005-01-01

    We establish a connection between the problem of constructing maximal collections of mutually unbiased bases (MUBs) and an open problem in the theory of Lie algebras. More precisely, we show that a collection of m MUBs in K^n gives rise to a collection of m Cartan subalgebras of the special linear Lie algebra sl_n(K) that are pairwise orthogonal with respect to the Killing form, where K=R or K=C. In particular, a complete collection of MUBs in C^n gives rise to a so-called orthogonal decomposition (OD) of sl_n(C). The converse holds if the Cartan subalgebras in the OD are also *-closed, i.e., closed under the adjoint operation. In this case, the Cartan subalgebras have unitary bases, and the above correspondence becomes equivalent to a result relating collections of MUBs to collections of maximal commuting classes of unitary error bases, i.e., orthogonal unitary matrices. It is a longstanding conjecture that ODs of sl_n(C) can only exist if n is a prime power. This corroborates further the general belief that...

  6. An Economic Analysis Model of the Classification of Needs in Level Division

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Xiao-zheng

    2004-01-01

    Because there is a vague distinction respectively between the measurable components and mutual replacement, subjective comments and objective comments in the theories given by Maslow and Orldever, the author once offered his point on the four-level classification of needs. In order to interpret the mutual relation of the four levels, this paper mainly aims at offering an appropriate support of mathematical model and technical explanation. It offers an economic analysis and explanation of human needs qualitatively and quantitatively.

  7. Mutual coupling in MIMO antennas with transceiver separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelosi, Mauro; Knudsen, Miakel B.; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    2011-01-01

    In multiple antenna systems mutual coupling needs to be minimized. We propose an alternative novel decoupling technique, investigating several multiple antenna configurations for small handsets through measurements and numerical simulations. The influence of different novel designs on performance...

  8. Constructing an inclusive speech community from two mutually ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Constructing an inclusive speech community from two mutually excluding ones: The third ... which meaningfully includes all its speakers as members, referred to as a “speech community”. ... EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  9. Information asymmetry, mutual funds and earnings management: Evidence from China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhao Dai

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates how information asymmetry and mutual fund ownership affect listed companies’ earnings management. We show that (1 reducing information asymmetry improves firms’ earnings management behavior; (2 relative to short-term mutual funds, long-term mutual funds promote earnings quality by adopting a monitoring role; and (3 by dividing firms into high/low information asymmetry groups, we find that the information environment significantly increases the effect of long-term mutual funds on firms’ earnings management. In this paper, we provide new evidence for the role that institutional investors play in a typical emerging capital market. Our results have clear policy implications: to increase earnings quality, it is essential to improve information transparency and develop long-term institutional investors.

  10. Quantum correlation in degenerate optical parametric oscillators with mutual injections

    CERN Document Server

    Takata, Kenta

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically and numerically study the quantum dynamics of two degenerate optical parametric oscillators with mutual injections. The cavity mode in the optical coupling path between the two oscillator facets is explicitly considered. Stochastic equations for the oscillators and mutual injection path based on the positive $P$ representation are derived. The system of two gradually pumped oscillators with out-of-phase mutual injections are simulated, and their quantum states are investigated. When the incoherent loss of the oscillators other than the mutual injections is small, the squeezed quadratic amplitudes $\\hat{p}$ in the oscillators are positively correlated near the oscillation threshold. It indicates finite quantum correlation, and the entanglement between the intracavity subharmonic fields. When with a small loss of the injection path, each oscillator around the phase transition point forms macroscopic superposition for a small pump noise. It suggests that the low-loss injection path works as a sq...

  11. Spatial Information Based Medical Image Registration using Mutual Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benzheng Wei

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Image registration is a valuable technique for medical diagnosis and treatment. Due to the inferiority of image registration using maximum mutual information, a new hybrid method of multimodality medical image registration based on mutual information of spatial information is proposed. The new measure that combines mutual information, spatial information and feature characteristics, is proposed. Edge points are used as features, obtained from a morphology gradient detector. Feature characteristics like location, edge strength and orientation are taken into account to compute a joint probability distribution of corresponding edge points in two images. Mutual information based on this function is minimized to find the best alignment parameters. Finally, the translation parameters are calculated by using a modified Particle Swarm Optimization (MPSO algorithm. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed registration scheme.

  12. Information asymmetry, mutual funds and earnings management: Evidence from China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunhao; Dai; Dongmin; Kong; Li; Wang

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates how information asymmetry and mutual fund ownership affect listed companies’ earnings management. We show that(1) reducing information asymmetry improves firms’ earnings management behavior;(2)relative to short-term mutual funds, long-term mutual funds promote earnings quality by adopting a monitoring role; and(3) by dividing firms into high/low information asymmetry groups, we find that the information environment significantly increases the effect of long-term mutual funds on firms’ earnings management. In this paper, we provide new evidence for the role that institutional investors play in a typical emerging capital market. Our results have clear policy implications: to increase earnings quality, it is essential to improve information transparency and develop long-term institutional investors.

  13. Retrofitting mutual authentication to GSM using RAND hijacking

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Mohammed Shafiul Alam; MITCHELL, CHRIS J.

    2016-01-01

    As has been widely discussed, the GSM mobile telephony system only offers unilateral authentication of the mobile phone to the network; this limitation permits a range of attacks. While adding support for mutual authentication would be highly beneficial, changing the way GSM serving networks operate is not practical. This paper proposes a novel modification to the relationship between a Subscriber Identity Module (SIM) and its home network which allows mutual authentication without changing a...

  14. Liquidity risk and the performance of UK mutual funds

    OpenAIRE

    Foran, Jason; O'Sullivan, Niall

    2014-01-01

    We examine the role of liquidity risk, both as a stock characteristic as well as systematic liquidity risk, in UK mutual fund performance for the first time. Using four alternative measures of stock liquidity we extract principal components across stocks in order to construct systematic or market liquidity factors. We find that on average UK mutual funds are tilted towards liquid stocks (except for small stock funds as might be expected) but that, counter-intuitively, liquidity as a stock cha...

  15. Team Reasoning and Intentional Cooperation for Mutual Benefit

    OpenAIRE

    Sugden Robert

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a concept of intentional cooperation for mutual benefit. This concept uses a form of team reasoning in which team members aim to achieve common interests, rather than maximising a common utility function, and in which team reasoners can coordinate their behaviour by following pre-existing practices. I argue that a market transaction can express intentions for mutually beneficial cooperation even if, extensionally, participation in the transaction promotes each party’s self...

  16. Input impedance and mutual coupling of rectangular microstrip antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozar, D. M.

    1982-01-01

    A moment method solution to the problem of input impedance and mutual coupling of rectangular microstrip antenna elements is presented. The formulation uses the grounded dielectric slab Green's function to account rigorously for the presence of the substrate and surface waves. Both entire basis (EB) and piecewise sinusoidal (PWS) expansion modes are used, and their relative advantages are noted. Calculations of input impedance and mutual coupling are compared with measured data and other calculations.

  17. Portfolio Optimization of Equity Mutual Funds—Malaysian Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Adem Kılıçman; Jaisree Sivalingam

    2010-01-01

    We focus on the equity mutual funds offered by three Malaysian banks, namely Public Bank Berhad, CIMB, and Malayan Banking Berhad. The equity mutual funds or equity trust is grouped into four clusters based on their characteristics and categorized as inferior, stable, good performing, and aggressive funds based on their return rates, variance and treynor index. Based on the cluster analysis, the return rates and variance of clusters are represented as triangular fuzzy numbers in order to refl...

  18. Mutual Exclusion in a Token Ring in CC++

    OpenAIRE

    Binau, Ulla

    1992-01-01

    This report describes a first attempt at using UNITY to verify reactive Compositional C++ (CC++) programs. We propose a distributed solution to the mutual exclusion problem using partially synchronous communication channels. The solution is described as a CC++ program, from which a small set of "basic" properties is derived. Using UNITY, we proof mutual exclusion and progress of the solution based on the set of properties derived from the code.

  19. Automotive radar – investigation of mutual interference mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    In the past mutual interference between automotive radar sensors has not been regarded as a major problem. With an increasing number of such systems, however, this topic is receiving more and more attention. The investigation of mutual interference and countermeasures is therefore one topic of the joint project "Radar on Chip for Cars" (RoCC) funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF). RoCC's goal is to pave the way for the development of high-per...

  20. Ombuds’ corner: Is our respectful workplace strategy working?

    CERN Multimedia

    Vincent Vuillemin

    2012-01-01

    “I hope that the Code of Conduct will be a valuable tool in the maintenance and development of a workplace marked by mutual respect and understanding. We should familiarize ourselves with it, and incorporate it into our daily life at CERN.”*   “The Organization does not tolerate harassment, which can result in administrative and/or disciplinary action.”** Our Code of Conduct (“the Code”) sets the basic standards of ethical behaviour that we must first all set for ourselves. In addition, we are also entitled to expect our workplace colleagues to respect these standards. In biblical terms, if I may, the Code is an incentive for us to notice the beam obstructing our eyes and not focus on the speck in the eyes of our colleagues. In short, we should first look to ourselves to apply the Code. Managers, whatever their position, should be accountable for their team being aware of the Code and are acting according to its values - just as they...

  1. Non-rigid registration using higher-order mutual information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueckert, D.; Clarkson, M. J.; Hill, D. L. G.; Hawkes, D. J.

    2000-03-01

    Non-rigid registration of multi-modality images is an important tool for assessing temporal and structural changesbetween images. For rigid registration, voxel similarity measures like mutual information have been shown to alignimages from different modalities accurately and robustly. For non-rigid registration, mutual information can besensitive to local variations of intensity which in MR images may be caused by RF inhomogeneity. The reasonfor the sensitivity of mutual information towards intensity variations stems from the fact that mutual informationignores any spatial information. In this paper we propose an extension of the mutual information framework whichincorporates spatial information about higher-order image structure into the registration process and has the potentialto improve the accuracy and robustness of non-rigid registration in the presence of intensity variations. We haveapplied the non-rigid registration algorithm to a number of simulated MR brain images of a digital phantom whichhave been degraded by a simulated intensity shading and a known deformation. In addition, we have applied thealgorithm for the non-rigid registration of eight pre- and post-operative brain MR images which were acquired withan interventional MR scanner and therefore have substantial intensity shading due to RF field inhomogeneities. Inall cases the second-order estimate of mutual information leads to robust and accurate registration.

  2. Optical phase dynamics in mutually coupled diode laser systems exhibiting power synchronization

    CERN Document Server

    Pal, Vishwa; Ghosh, R

    2011-01-01

    We probe the physical mechanism behind the known phenomenon of power synchronization of two diode lasers that are mutually coupled via their delayed optical fields. In a diode laser, the amplitude and the phase of the optical field are coupled by the so-called linewidth enhancement factor, $\\alpha$. In this work, we explore the role of optical phases of the electric fields in amplitude (and hence power) synchronization through $\\alpha$ in such mutually delay-coupled diode laser systems. Our numerical results show that the synchronization of optical phases drives the powers of lasers to synchronized death regimes. We also find that as $\\alpha$ varies for different diode lasers, the system goes through a sequence of in-phase amplitude-death states. Within the windows between successive amplitude-death regions, the cross-correlation between the field amplitudes exhibits a universal power-law behaviour with respect to $\\alpha$.

  3. 2D Direction of Arrival Estimation for Cross Array in the Presence of Mutual Coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new method for cross array to estimate two-dimensional direction of arrival (2-D DOA in the presence of mutual coupling. In this method, the array elements which are affected by the same mutual coupling are chosen on x-axis and z-axis, respectively. Then a new matrix is constructed with the proper entries of cross covariance matrix of the chosen elements outputs on x-axis and z-axis. Propagation method (PM and rotational invariance techniques for uniform linear array (ULA are utilized in the constructed matrix to obtain two parameters correlated with elevations and azimuths. While calculating and pairing the two parameters, only once eigendecomposing and several division operations are required with the relationship among the matrix, its eigenvalues, and corresponding eigenvectors. Simulations are presented to validate the performance of the proposed method.

  4. Optical phase dynamics in mutually coupled diode laser systems exhibiting power synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Vishwa; Prasad, Awadhesh; Ghosh, R.

    2011-12-01

    We probe the physical mechanism behind the known phenomenon of power synchronization of two diode lasers that are mutually coupled via their delayed optical fields. In a diode laser, the amplitude and the phase of the optical field are coupled by the so-called linewidth enhancement factor, α. In this work, we explore the role of optical phases of the electric fields in amplitude (and hence power) synchronization through α in such mutually delay-coupled diode laser systems. Our numerical results show that the synchronization of optical phases drives the powers of lasers to synchronized death regimes. We also find that as α varies for different diode lasers, the system goes through a sequence of in-phase amplitude-death states. Within the windows between successive amplitude-death regions, the cross-correlation between the field amplitudes exhibits a universal power-law behaviour with respect to α.

  5. Mutually cooperative epidemics on power-law networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Peng-Bi; Colaiori, Francesca; Castellano, Claudio

    2017-08-01

    The spread of an infectious disease can, in some cases, promote the propagation of other pathogens favoring violent outbreaks, which cause a discontinuous transition to an endemic state. The topology of the contact network plays a crucial role in these cooperative dynamics. We consider a susceptible-infected-removed-type model with two mutually cooperative pathogens: An individual already infected with one disease has an increased probability of getting infected by the other. We present a heterogeneous mean-field theoretical approach to the coinfection dynamics on generic uncorrelated power-law degree-distributed networks and validate its results by means of numerical simulations. We show that, when the second moment of the degree distribution is finite, the epidemic transition is continuous for low cooperativity, while it is discontinuous when cooperativity is sufficiently high. For scale-free networks, i.e., topologies with diverging second moment, the transition is instead always continuous. In this way we clarify the effect of heterogeneity and system size on the nature of the transition, and we validate the physical interpretation about the origin of the discontinuity.

  6. MUTUAL INFLUENCE OF PAINTING, THEATRE AND EVERYDAY LIFE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. G. Suvorova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Basing on the works of Yu.M. Lotman, the author examines the process of interaction between painting and theater, and their mutual influence on the routine. The emphasis is on identifying the peculiarities of the interaction of theatre and painting in the period from the late XVIII – early XIX century. Theatre using expressive means of painting, created new forms of performing arts. The scenery becomes actors, not serving as a background for the actors. Acting technique was also being changed, the dynamics of the movements was changed into the static of dynamic postures. The identification of the scene and the picture led to the emergence of a new genre of "living paintings". Not only the art of painting influenced a theatre, creating new forms, but the theatre influenced painting too, creating a portrait typifying a model in accordance with the traditional theatrical characters. Gradually the boundary between art and commonplace had been crumbling, the theatre entered the life. It turned out that the theatricality of everyday life became the logical result of the considered process. Real life started to be considered as a performance that opened not only new possibilities in the prescribed range of permitted conduct, but also went beyond and was the legislator of individual behaviors, filled everyday reality with events, and thus, made a person free from the control of custom.

  7. Fast registration algorithm using a variational principle for mutual information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Murray E.; Summers, Randy

    2003-05-01

    A method is proposed for cross-modal image registration based on mutual information (MI) matching criteria. Both conventional and "normalized" MI are considered. MI may be expressed as a functional of a general image displacement field u. The variational principle for MI provides a field equation for u. The method employs a set of "registration points" consisting of a prescribed number of strongest edge points of the reference image, and minimizes an objective function D defined as the sum of the square residuals of the field equation for u at these points, where u is expressed as a sum over a set of basis functions (the affine model is presented here). D has a global minimum when the images are aligned, with a "basin of attraction" typically of width ~0.3 pixels. By pre-filtering with a low-pass filter, and using a multiresolution image pyramid, the basin may be significantly widened. The Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm is used to minimize D. Tests using randomly distributed misalignments of image pairs show that registration accuracy of 0.02 - 0.07 pixels is achieved, when using cubic B-splines for image representation, interpolation, and Parzen window estimation.

  8. Real estate mutual funds in Spain. Performance and persistence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Maside Sanfiz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present paper is to study the performance and persistence of the returns of the spanish real estate mutual funds universe from the beginning of their activity, late 1994 until august 2012. We adopt the Jensen's alpha model, Sharpe's ratio and Carhart's (1997 methodology. In terms of efficiency, Sharpe's ratio shows negative values in the first three years of activity of each fund and very low or even negative values in the last three or four years. Jensen's indicator shows that the overall funds have underperformed the market, which has been approximated by the housing profitability and a half of the profitability of all real estate funds. Benchmarks portfolios that reflect the behavior of the bond or equity markets, did not turn out to be significant variables. There is evidence of persistence for one, two, three and four years, for the universe of funds. The evidence obtained in our work for the real estate funds in Spain, efficiency lower than that of the market and persistence in performance, allows us to confirm the difficult situation that has gone through and which continues to suffer this type of collective investment, highlighting the need and the urgency of driving measures to boost their activity.

  9. Sex roles and mutual mate choice matter during mate sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhre, Lise Cats; de Jong, Karen; Forsgren, Elisabet; Amundsen, Trond

    2012-06-01

    The roles of females and males in mating competition and mate choice have lately proven more variable, between and within species, than previously thought. In nature, mating competition occurs during mate search and is expected to be regulated by the numbers of potential mates and same-sex competitors. Here, we present the first study to test how a temporal change in sex roles affects mating competition and mate choice during mate sampling. Our model system (the marine fish Gobiusculus flavescens) is uniquely suitable because of its change in sex roles, from conventional to reversed, over the breeding season. As predicted from sex role theory, courtship was typically initiated by males and terminated by females early in the breeding season. The opposite pattern was observed late in the season, at which time several females often simultaneously courted the same male. Mate-searching females visited more males early than late in the breeding season. Our study shows that mutual mate choice and mating competition can have profound effects on female and male behavior. Future work needs to consider the dynamic nature of mating competition and mate choice if we aim to fully understand sexual selection in the wild.

  10. AUTOMATIC REGISTRATION OF MULTI-SOURCE DATA USING MUTUAL INFORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. G. Parmehr

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Automatic image registration is a basic step in multi-sensor data integration in remote sensing and photogrammetric applications such as data fusion. The effectiveness of Mutual Information (MI as a technique for automated multi-sensor image registration has previously been demonstrated for medical and remote sensing applications. In this paper, a new General Weighted MI (GWMI approach that improves the robustness of MI to local maxima, particularly in the case of registering optical imagery and 3D point clouds, is presented. Two different methods including a Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM and Kernel Density Estimation have been used to define the weight function of joint probability, regardless of the modality of the data being registered. The Expectation Maximizing method is then used to estimate parameters of GMM, and in order to reduce the cost of computation, a multi-resolution strategy has been used. The performance of the proposed GWMI method for the registration of aerial orthotoimagery and LiDAR range and intensity information has been experimentally evaluated and the results obtained are presented.

  11. The demographic consequences of mutualism: ants increase host-plant fruit production but not population growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin Ford; Joshua H. Ness; Judith L. Bronstein; William F. Morris

    2015-01-01

    The impact of mutualists on a partner’s demography depends on how they affect the partner’s multiple vital rates and how those vital rates, in turn, affect population growth. However, mutualism studies rarely measure effects on multiple vital rates or integrate them to assess the ultimate impact on population growth. We used vital rate data, population models and...

  12. Balancing cognitive diversity and mutual understanding in multidisciplinary teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Rebecca; Boyle, Brendan; O'Brien, Rachael; Malik, Ashish; Tian, Karen; Parker, Vicki; Giles, Michelle; Joyce, Pauline; Chiang, Vico

    Interprofessional health care teams are increasingly utilized in health care organizations. Although there is support for their capacity to solve complex problems, there is also evidence that such teams are not always successful. In an effort to understand the capacity of interprofessional teams to innovate successfully, we investigate the role of cognitive diversity to establish whether and how knowledge differences lead to innovation. The aim of this study was to construct and investigate a model of team innovation predicted by cognitive diversity. In addition to investigating the direct impact of cognitive diversity in interprofessional health care teams, we develop a model incorporating mediated and moderated effects. In this study, we explore the role of debate as a mediating factor capable of explaining the impact of cognitive diversity on innovation. We further propose that the link between cognitive diversity and innovation through debate is contingent upon trans-specialist knowledge, knowledge shared by health care professionals, spanning specialist divides and enabling mutual understanding. The hypotheses were investigated using a cross-sectional, correlational design. Survey data received from 75 interprofessional teams employed in an acute care setting, representing a 36% response rate, were used to investigate our model. Analysis supports a significant relationship between cognitive diversity and debate, which is stronger when teams rate highly for trans-specialist knowledge. Results also support a positive relationship between debate and innovation and our full moderated mediated pathway. A range of strategies are indicated by our results to increase innovation in interprofessional teams. In particular, interventions such as interprofessional education and training, which have been shown to facilitate the development of shared language and meaning, are recommended by our findings.

  13. [Prediction of regional soil quality based on mutual information theory integrated with decision tree algorithm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fen-Fang; Wang, Ke; Yang, Ning; Yan, Shi-Guang; Zheng, Xin-Yu

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, some main factors such as soil type, land use pattern, lithology type, topography, road, and industry type that affect soil quality were used to precisely obtain the spatial distribution characteristics of regional soil quality, mutual information theory was adopted to select the main environmental factors, and decision tree algorithm See 5.0 was applied to predict the grade of regional soil quality. The main factors affecting regional soil quality were soil type, land use, lithology type, distance to town, distance to water area, altitude, distance to road, and distance to industrial land. The prediction accuracy of the decision tree model with the variables selected by mutual information was obviously higher than that of the model with all variables, and, for the former model, whether of decision tree or of decision rule, its prediction accuracy was all higher than 80%. Based on the continuous and categorical data, the method of mutual information theory integrated with decision tree could not only reduce the number of input parameters for decision tree algorithm, but also predict and assess regional soil quality effectively.

  14. CELF family RNA-binding protein UNC-75 regulates two sets of mutually exclusive exons of the unc-32 gene in neuron-specific manners in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidehito Kuroyanagi

    Full Text Available An enormous number of alternative pre-mRNA splicing patterns in multicellular organisms are coordinately defined by a limited number of regulatory proteins and cis elements. Mutually exclusive alternative splicing should be strictly regulated and is a challenging model for elucidating regulation mechanisms. Here we provide models of the regulation of two sets of mutually exclusive exons, 4a-4c and 7a-7b, of the Caenorhabditis elegans uncoordinated (unc-32 gene, encoding the a subunit of V0 complex of vacuolar-type H(+-ATPases. We visualize selection patterns of exon 4 and exon 7 in vivo by utilizing a trio and a pair of symmetric fluorescence splicing reporter minigenes, respectively, to demonstrate that they are regulated in tissue-specific manners. Genetic analyses reveal that RBFOX family RNA-binding proteins ASD-1 and FOX-1 and a UGCAUG stretch in intron 7b are involved in the neuron-specific selection of exon 7a. Through further forward genetic screening, we identify UNC-75, a neuron-specific CELF family RNA-binding protein of unknown function, as an essential regulator for the exon 7a selection. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays specify a short fragment in intron 7a as the recognition site for UNC-75 and demonstrate that UNC-75 specifically binds via its three RNA recognition motifs to the element including a UUGUUGUGUUGU stretch. The UUGUUGUGUUGU stretch in the reporter minigenes is actually required for the selection of exon 7a in the nervous system. We compare the amounts of partially spliced RNAs in the wild-type and unc-75 mutant backgrounds and raise a model for the mutually exclusive selection of unc-32 exon 7 by the RBFOX family and UNC-75. The neuron-specific selection of unc-32 exon 4b is also regulated by UNC-75 and the unc-75 mutation suppresses the Unc phenotype of the exon-4b-specific allele of unc-32 mutants. Taken together, UNC-75 is the neuron-specific splicing factor and regulates both sets of the mutually exclusive

  15. The Ethical and Non Ethical Mutual Funds Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Adamo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: One of the astonishing new developments in the financial community is the rise of ethical investments during the last decade. Particularly, the recent financial crisis has determined a major attention towards an ethically oriented finance based on social investments and environmental benefits that can create greater corporate crisis prevention. Because of the sheer size and importance of the ethical mutual funds, we thought to compare the ethical and non ethical mutual funds. Approach: The aim of this study was to describe the ethical and non ethical mutual funds under Italian and foreign law highlighting how some factors, such as performance, typology (equity, balanced, fixed income, geographic location, management fees, characterize these funds in different way. Results: The analysis has been carried out collecting a data set of 219 mutual funds published on www.morningstar.com. The data set is subdivided in 109 ethical mutual funds and 110 non ethical mutual funds. The study uses a multi-disciplinary approach and it is led by a Multiple Correspondence Analysis (MCA which puts in evidence the principal characteristics of the mutual funds by their projection on a factorial plane. Later the multivariate analysis carries out typologies of mutual funds clusters with particular characteristics by a Cluster Analysis. The study confirmed the existence of different characteristics with reference to the ethical and non ethical mutual funds. Particularly, it puts in evidence three groups of funds which are inside homogeneous but heterogeneous between them by the characteristics considered. The first groups, defined “negative ethical performance”, is composed of 152 funds. The second groups, named “positive non ethical performance”, is characterized by non ethical fund (50.23% of them is present in this group. The third cluster is called “young funds” and it is composed of funds born in the period 2005

  16. Mutualism Disruption Threatens Global Plant Biodiversity: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare E Aslan

    Full Text Available As global environmental change accelerates, biodiversity losses can disrupt interspecific interactions. Extinctions of mutualist partners can create "widow" species, which may face reduced ecological fitness. Hypothetically, such mutualism disruptions could have cascading effects on biodiversity by causing additional species coextinctions. However, the scope of this problem - the magnitude of biodiversity that may lose mutualist partners and the consequences of these losses - remains unknown.We conducted a systematic review and synthesis of data from a broad range of sources to estimate the threat posed by vertebrate extinctions to the global biodiversity of vertebrate-dispersed and -pollinated plants. Though enormous research gaps persist, our analysis identified Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, and global oceanic islands as geographic regions at particular risk of disruption of these mutualisms; within these regions, percentages of plant species likely affected range from 2.1-4.5%. Widowed plants are likely to experience reproductive declines of 40-58%, potentially threatening their persistence in the context of other global change stresses.Our systematic approach demonstrates that thousands of species may be impacted by disruption in one class of mutualisms, but extinctions will likely disrupt other mutualisms, as well. Although uncertainty is high, there is evidence that mutualism disruption directly threatens significant biodiversity in some geographic regions. Conservation measures with explicit focus on mutualistic functions could be necessary to bolster populations of widowed species and maintain ecosystem functions.

  17. Population dynamics and mutualism: Functional responses of benefits and costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, J. Nathaniel; DeAngelis, Donald L.; Bronstein, Judith L.

    2002-01-01

    We develop an approach for studying population dynamics resulting from mutualism by employing functional responses based on density‐dependent benefits and costs. These functional responses express how the population growth rate of a mutualist is modified by the density of its partner. We present several possible dependencies of gross benefits and costs, and hence net effects, to a mutualist as functions of the density of its partner. Net effects to mutualists are likely a monotonically saturating or unimodal function of the density of their partner. We show that fundamental differences in the growth, limitation, and dynamics of a population can occur when net effects to that population change linearly, unimodally, or in a saturating fashion. We use the mutualism between senita cactus and its pollinating seed‐eating moth as an example to show the influence of different benefit and cost functional responses on population dynamics and stability of mutualisms. We investigated two mechanisms that may alter this mutualism's functional responses: distribution of eggs among flowers and fruit abortion. Differences in how benefits and costs vary with density can alter the stability of this mutualism. In particular, fruit abortion may allow for a stable equilibrium where none could otherwise exist.

  18. Phytophagous insect-microbe mutualisms and adaptive evolutionary diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janson, Eric M; Stireman, John O; Singer, Michael S; Abbot, Patrick

    2008-05-01

    Adaptive diversification is a process intrinsically tied to species interactions. Yet, the influence of most types of interspecific interactions on adaptive evolutionary diversification remains poorly understood. In particular, the role of mutualistic interactions in shaping adaptive radiations has been largely unexplored, despite the ubiquity of mutualisms and increasing evidence of their ecological and evolutionary importance. Our aim here is to encourage empirical inquiry into the relationship between mutualism and evolutionary diversification, using herbivorous insects and their microbial mutualists as exemplars. Phytophagous insects have long been used to test theories of evolutionary diversification; moreover, the diversification of a number of phytophagous insect lineages has been linked to mutualisms with microbes. In this perspective, we examine microbial mutualist mediation of ecological opportunity and ecologically based divergent natural selection for their insect hosts. We also explore the conditions and mechanisms by which microbial mutualists may either facilitate or impede adaptive evolutionary diversification. These include effects on the availability of novel host plants or adaptive zones, modifying host-associated fitness trade-offs during host shifts, creating or reducing enemy-free space, and, overall, shaping the evolution of ecological (host plant) specialization. Although the conceptual framework presented here is built on phytophagous insect-microbe mutualisms, many of the processes and predictions are broadly applicable to other mutualisms in which host ecology is altered by mutualistic interactions.

  19. On the mutual information in conformal field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Chen, Lin; Hao, Peng-xiang; Long, Jiang

    2017-06-01

    In this work, we study the universal behaviors in the mutual information of two disjoint spheres in a conformal field theory (CFT). By using the operator product expansion of the spherical twist operator in terms of the conformal family, we show that the large distance expansion of the mutual information can be cast in terms of the conformal blocks. We develop the 1 /n prescription to compute the coefficients before the conformal blocks. For a single conformal family, the leading nonvanishing contribution to the mutual information comes from the bilinear operators. We show that the coefficients of these operators take universal forms and such universal behavior persists in the bilinear operators with derivatives as well. Consequently the first few leading order contributions to the mutual information in CFT take universal forms. To illustrate our framework, we discuss the free scalars and free fermions in various dimensions. For the free scalars, we compute the mutual information to the next-to-leading order and find good agreement with the improved numerical lattice result. For the free fermion, we compute the leading order result, which is of universal form, and find the good match with the numerical study. Our formalism could be applied to any CFT potentially.

  20. Construction of the Model of Mutual-promotion between Competition and Education for College Students’ Career Planning%大学生职业生涯规划“赛教互促”模式的构建与实践

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许金波; 杨忠; 崔顾芳

    2015-01-01

    Based on a summarization of the experiences drawn from the direction of college students’career planning competition and college career development education, this article proposes the model for college stu-dents’career planning, that is, integration of competition and education into one as well as mutual promotion, which is expected to promote college career planning education and improve the level and performance of the college career planning competition.%文章通过总结多年的大学生职业规划大赛指导与高校职业发展教育的实际工作经验,提出大学生职业生涯规划“二元一体,赛教互促”的新模式,该模式既有利于推动学校职业生涯规划教育,又可以不断提高学校职业生涯规划大赛的比赛水平和成绩。

  1. Theoretical studies of mutual diffusivities and surface properties in Cd–Ga liquid alloys

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B C Anusionwu; C A Madu; C E Orji

    2009-06-01

    The mutual diffusion coefficients, activation energy for diffusion, surface concentration and surface tension of the liquid Cd–Ga alloys have been calculated throughout the concentration range using energetics obtained from the theoretical model fits of the experimental thermodynamic data. Our calculations show that Cd–Ga liquid alloys showed immiscibility at a temperature of 723 K between 0.4 and 0.5 atomic fraction of Cd. Within this concentration region and temperature, the mutual diffusion coefficients approached zero values and the activation energy for diffusion reached high peak values of 220 J/mol. It was also observed that within the region of immscibility, the diffusion coefficients do not obey Arrhenius relation over a wide range of temperature.

  2. Quantum complexity: Quantum mutual information, complex networks, and emergent phenomena in quantum cellular automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, David L.

    Emerging quantum simulator technologies provide a new challenge to quantum many body theory. Quantifying the emergent order in and predicting the dynamics of such complex quantum systems requires a new approach. We develop such an approach based on complex network analysis of quantum mutual information. First, we establish the usefulness of quantum mutual information complex networks by reproducing the phase diagrams of transverse Ising and Bose-Hubbard models. By quantifying the complexity of quantum cellular automata we then demonstrate the applicability of complex network theory to non-equilibrium quantum dynamics. We conclude with a study of student collaboration networks, correlating a student's role in a collaboration network with their grades. This work thus initiates a quantitative theory of quantum complexity and provides a new tool for physics education research. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  3. Equality, self‐respect and voluntary separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.S. Merry

    2012-01-01

    This paper argues that self‐respect constitutes an important value, and further, an important basis for equality. It also argues that under conditions of inequality‐producing segregation, voluntary separation in schooling may be more likely to provide the resources necessary for self‐respect. A prim

  4. Masculinity and Respect in Flux: Olli's Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manninen, Sari

    2013-01-01

    This study examines change and the conditions of change in the masculinity of Olli, a working-class Finnish school boy. It explores "respect" as a status bound to masculine reputation, resources for obtaining respect in gendered identity work, and the negotiation of power in peer relations. I discuss how a "banal balancer"…

  5. Minimal projections with respect to various norms

    CERN Document Server

    Aksoy, Asuman Guven

    2010-01-01

    We will show that a theorem of Rudin \\cite{wr1}, \\cite{wr}, permits us to determine minimal projections not only with respect to the operator norm but with respect to quasi-norms in operators ideals and numerical radius in many concrete cases.

  6. Masculinity and Respect in Flux: Olli's Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manninen, Sari

    2013-01-01

    This study examines change and the conditions of change in the masculinity of Olli, a working-class Finnish school boy. It explores "respect" as a status bound to masculine reputation, resources for obtaining respect in gendered identity work, and the negotiation of power in peer relations. I discuss how a "banal balancer"…

  7. Respect, amitié et sollicitude.

    OpenAIRE

    Sosoe, Lukas K.

    2005-01-01

    Après avoir distingué deux concepts de respect dans la philosophie kantienne, un concept moral de respect exigeant la soumission à la loi morale et un concept social et politique de respect, le présent article expose les principales thèses de l’éthique de la sollicitude telle que développée par Gilligan. Critique de toute éthique rationaliste, l’éthique de la sollicitude  reproche à Kant l’insistance sur le respect au détriment de l’amitié et de l’amour. L’exigence du respect, telle est la th...

  8. Subsumption Checking between Concept Queries in Different Ontologies Based on Mutual Instances

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposes a checking method based on mutual instances and discusses three key problems in the method: how to deal with mistakes in the mutual instances and how to deal with too many or too few mutual instances. It provides the checking based on the weighted mutual instances considering fault tolerance, gives a way to partition the large-scale mutual instances, and proposes a process greatly reducing the manual annotation work to get more mutual instances. Intension annotation that improves the checking method is also discussed. The method is practical and effective to check subsumption relations between concept queries in different ontologies based on mutual instances.

  9. Last-passage Monte Carlo algorithm for mutual capacitance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Chi-Ok; Given, James A

    2006-08-01

    We develop and test the last-passage diffusion algorithm, a charge-based Monte Carlo algorithm, for the mutual capacitance of a system of conductors. The first-passage algorithm is highly efficient because it is charge based and incorporates importance sampling; it averages over the properties of Brownian paths that initiate outside the conductor and terminate on its surface. However, this algorithm does not seem to generalize to mutual capacitance problems. The last-passage algorithm, in a sense, is the time reversal of the first-passage algorithm; it involves averages over particles that initiate on an absorbing surface, leave that surface, and diffuse away to infinity. To validate this algorithm, we calculate the mutual capacitance matrix of the circular-disk parallel-plate capacitor and compare with the known numerical results. Good agreement is obtained.

  10. Solving Reality Problems by Using Mutual Information Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Ju Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cross-mutual information (CMI can calculate to time series for thousands of sampled points from corticocortical connection among different functional states of brain in Alzheimer’s disease (AD patients. The aim of this study was to use mutual information analysis in the multichannel EEG to predict the probability of AD disease. Considering the correlation between AD disease and ageing effect, the participants were 9 AD patients and 45 normal cases involving teenagers, young people and elders. This data revealed that both right frontal and temporo-parietal are differences between normal and AD participants. Besides, this study found the theta band is the main frequency to separate AD patients from all participants. Furthermore, this study suggested a higher distinguishable method by mutual information to predict the possibility AD patients.

  11. Occurrence and characteristics of mutual interference between LIDAR scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gunzung; Eom, Jeongsook; Park, Seonghyeon; Park, Yongwan

    2015-05-01

    The LIDAR scanner is at the heart of object detection of the self-driving car. Mutual interference between LIDAR scanners has not been regarded as a problem because the percentage of vehicles equipped with LIDAR scanners was very rare. With the growing number of autonomous vehicle equipped with LIDAR scanner operated close to each other at the same time, the LIDAR scanner may receive laser pulses from other LIDAR scanners. In this paper, three types of experiments and their results are shown, according to the arrangement of two LIDAR scanners. We will show the probability that any LIDAR scanner will interfere mutually by considering spatial and temporal overlaps. It will present some typical mutual interference scenario and report an analysis of the interference mechanism.

  12. Sparse Bayesian learning for DOA estimation with mutual coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jisheng; Hu, Nan; Xu, Weichao; Chang, Chunqi

    2015-10-16

    Sparse Bayesian learning (SBL) has given renewed interest to the problem of direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation. It is generally assumed that the measurement matrix in SBL is precisely known. Unfortunately, this assumption may be invalid in practice due to the imperfect manifold caused by unknown or misspecified mutual coupling. This paper describes a modified SBL method for joint estimation of DOAs and mutual coupling coefficients with uniform linear arrays (ULAs). Unlike the existing method that only uses stationary priors, our new approach utilizes a hierarchical form of the Student t prior to enforce the sparsity of the unknown signal more heavily. We also provide a distinct Bayesian inference for the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm, which can update the mutual coupling coefficients more efficiently. Another difference is that our method uses an additional singular value decomposition (SVD) to reduce the computational complexity of the signal reconstruction process and the sensitivity to the measurement noise.

  13. Thermalization of Mutual Information in Hyperscaling Violating Backgrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Tanhayi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    We study certain features of scaling behaviors of the mutual information during a process of thermalization, more precisely we extend the time scaling behavior of mutual information which has been discussed in \\cite{Alishahiha:2014jxa} to time-dependent hyperscaling violating geometries. We use the holographic description for entanglement entropy for two disjoint system consisting of two parallel strips whose widths are much larger than the separation between them. We find that in hyperscaling violating backgrounds the dynamical exponent plays a crucial rule in reading the general time scaling behavior (\\emph{e.g.,} at the pre-local-equilibration regime) of the mutual information during the thermalization process. While the scaling violating parameter appears in redefinition of the dimension of the theory.

  14. Production rate of the system-bath mutual information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sheng-Wen

    2017-07-01

    When an open system comes into contact with several thermal baths, the entropy produced by the irreversible processes (d Si=d S -∑α đQα/Tα ) keeps increasing, and this entropy production rate is always non-negative. However, when the system comes into contact with nonthermal baths containing quantum coherence or squeezing, this entropy production formula does not apply. In this paper, we study the increasing rate of mutual information between an open system and its environment. In the case of canonical thermal baths, we prove that this mutual information production rate could return exactly to the previous entropy production rate. Furthermore, we study an example of a single boson mode that comes into contact with multiple squeezed thermal baths, where the conventional entropy production rate does not apply, and we find that this mutual information production rate remains non-negative, which indicates a monotonic increase in the correlation between the system and its environment.

  15. Homosexual mutuality: variation on a theme by Erik Erikson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohier, R

    The exploratory descriptive study described here was conducted in order to produce the initial empirical evidence to support reformulation of the theoretical construct of heterosexual mutuality (Erikson, 1975). Six persons were interviewed in depth on tape in order to locate them on one of four identity statuses constructed by Marcia (1964, 1966, 1973). The tool was modified and extended to meet the purposes of the study. The questions are directed toward illumination of conflictual moments in the life cycle when the ability to make appropriate decisions engenders character growth, and supports the personality integration of adulthood. An ability to make decisions results in personality integration. The small study provides evidence that there exists a homosexual mutuality (contrary to Erikson's position) which is no less valuable than heterosexual mutuality, and forms an equal basis for adult personality integration.

  16. MUTUAL COUPLING REDUCTION BETWEEN MICROSTRIP ANTENNAS USING ELECTROMAGNETIC BANDGAP STRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.N. Gaikwad

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available When the number of antenna elements is placed in forming the arrays, mutual coupling between the antenna elements is a critical issue. This is particularly concern in phase array antennas. Mutual coupling is a potential source of performance degradation in the form of deviation of the radiation pattern from the desired one, gain reduction due to excitation of surface wave, increased side lobe levels etc. EBG (Electromagnetic Band Gap structure (also called as Photonic Bandgap Structure PBG not only enhances the performance of the patch antennas but also provides greater amount of isolation when placed between the microstrip arrays. This greatly reduces the mutual coupling between the antenna elements. The radiation efficiency, gain, antenna efficiency, VSWR, frequency, directivity etc greatly improves over the conventional patch antennas using EBG. The EBG structure and normal patch antenna is simulated using IE3D antenna simulation software.

  17. Mutual information after a local quench in conformal field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Asplund, Curtis T

    2013-01-01

    We compute the entanglement entropy and mutual information for two disjoint intervals in two-dimensional conformal field theories as a function of time after a local quench, using the replica trick and boundary conformal field theory. We obtain explicit formulae for the universal contributions, which are leading in the regimes of, for example, close or well-separated intervals of fixed length. The results are largely consistent with the quasiparticle picture, in which entanglement above that present in the ground state is carried by pairs of entangled, freely propagating excitations. We also calculate the mutual information for two disjoint intervals in a proposed holographic local quench, whose holographic energy-momentum tensor matches the conformal field theory one. We find that the holographic mutual information shows qualitative differences from the conformal field theory results and we discuss possible interpretations of this.

  18. Measuring causality by taking the directional symbolic mutual information approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Gui; Xie Lei; Chu Jian

    2013-01-01

    We propose a novel measure to assess causality through the comparison of symbolic mutual information between the future of one random quantity and the past of the other.This provides a new perspective that is different from the conventional conceptions.Based on this point of view,a new causality index is derived that uses the definition of directional symbolic mutual information.This measure presents properties that are different from the time delayed mutual information since the symbolization captures the dynamic features of the analyzed time series.In addition to characterizing the direction and the amplitude of the information flow,it can also detect coupling delays.This method has the property of robustness,conceptual simplicity,and fast computational speed.

  19. Sparse Bayesian Learning for DOA Estimation with Mutual Coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jisheng Dai

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Sparse Bayesian learning (SBL has given renewed interest to the problem of direction-of-arrival (DOA estimation. It is generally assumed that the measurement matrix in SBL is precisely known. Unfortunately, this assumption may be invalid in practice due to the imperfect manifold caused by unknown or misspecified mutual coupling. This paper describes a modified SBL method for joint estimation of DOAs and mutual coupling coefficients with uniform linear arrays (ULAs. Unlike the existing method that only uses stationary priors, our new approach utilizes a hierarchical form of the Student t prior to enforce the sparsity of the unknown signal more heavily. We also provide a distinct Bayesian inference for the expectation-maximization (EM algorithm, which can update the mutual coupling coefficients more efficiently. Another difference is that our method uses an additional singular value decomposition (SVD to reduce the computational complexity of the signal reconstruction process and the sensitivity to the measurement noise.

  20. The mutuality metaphor: understanding healthcare provision in NHS Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howieson, Brian

    2016-06-20

    Purpose - Better Health, Better Care Action Plan (Scottish Government, 2007) sets out how the Scottish Government intends to strengthen public ownership of the National Health Service in Scotland. The purpose of this paper is to advance extant knowledge by understanding how a state-led mutual health policy may be interpreted, and importantly, communicated. Design/methodology/approach - The definitional problem of mutuality will be discussed and analysed in terms of how it is (or perhaps should be) communicated? will be offered. Findings - It actually may be more instructive to think of, and communicate, mutuality as a metaphor to aid understanding of the openness and fluidity found in NHS Scotland. Research limitations/implications - The existence of paradox and ambiguity does not, however, negate the usefulness of the term "mutuality". Quite the opposite in fact: it is precisely by examining healthcare and its delivery through the lens of mutuality (rather than rejecting its complexity as a failure) that this amorphousness can be better appreciated. Practical implications - There is a need for more public, professional, and academic debate to explore and clarify its implementation, and how it is to be led. This must be provided whilst recognising the daily imperatives that NHS leaders must face. This would suggest, therefore, that a dual development path may help. Originality/value - Although Better Health, Better Care Action Plan was published in 2007, some eight years on there is still confusion and misunderstanding as to what mutuality in healthcare is, not only in policy and theory, but also in practice. It is hoped that this analysis will help address, in part, some of this confusion and misunderstanding.

  1. Use of the mutual exclusivity assumption by young word learners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markman, Ellen M.; Wasow, Judith L.; Hansen, Mikkel

    2003-01-01

    A critical question about early word learning is whether word learning constraints such as mutual exclusivity exist and foster early language acquisition. It is well established that children will map a novel label to a novel rather than a familiar object. Evidence for the role of mutual...... exclusivity in such indirect word learning has been questioned because: (1) it comes mostly from 2 and 3-year-olds and (2) the findings might be accounted for, not by children avoiding second labels, but by the novel object which creates a lexical gap children are motivated to fill. Three studies addressed...

  2. Biochemical Machines for the Interconversion of Mutual Information and Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Thomas; Jones, Nick S.; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein; Ouldridge, Thomas E.

    2017-01-01

    We propose a physically realizable information-driven device consisting of an enzyme in a chemical bath, interacting with pairs of molecules prepared in correlated states. These correlations persist without direct interaction and thus store free energy equal to the mutual information. The enzyme can harness this free energy, and that stored in the individual molecular states, to do chemical work. Alternatively, the enzyme can use the chemical driving to create mutual information. A modified system can function without external intervention, approaching biological systems more closely.

  3. Dimensionality Reduction by Mutual Information for Text Classification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Li-zhen; SONG Han-tao; LU Yu-chang

    2005-01-01

    The frame of text classification system was presented. The high dimensionality in feature space for text classification was studied. The mutual information is a widely used information theoretic measure, in a descriptive way, to measure the stochastic dependency of discrete random variables. The measure method was used as a criterion to reduce high dimensionality of feature vectors in text classification on Web. Feature selections or conversions were performed by using maximum mutual information including linear and non-linear feature conversions. Entropy was used and extended to find right features commendably in pattern recognition systems. Favorable foundation would be established for text classification mining.

  4. External Monitoring and Dynamic Behavior in Mutual Funds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the impact of external monitoring on the behavior in mutual funds. Specifically, we investigate how and why external monitoring can alleviate contracting inefficiency caused by information asymmetry between investors and the manager. It is shown that efficiency loss emerges when investors contract with the manager just relying on her investment return history. The establishment of external monitoring that provides investors more information about the manager’s ability can improve contracting efficiency, which converges to first-best as external monitoring strengthens. These results provide strong support for tightening supervision in mutual fund industry.

  5. Mutual Impact of Diabetes Mellitus and Tuberculosis in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jun; Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Yan Lin; Wang, Li Xia; Chen, Ming Ting

    2017-05-01

    China has a double burden of diabetes mellitus and tuberculosis, and many studies have been carried out on the mutual impact of these two diseases. This paper systematically reviewed studies conducted in China covering the mutual impact of epidemics of diabetes and tuberculosis, the impact of diabetes on multi-drug resistant tuberculosis and on the tuberculosis clinical manifestation and treatment outcome, the yields of bi-directional screening, and economic evaluation for tuberculosis screening among diabetes patients. Copyright © 2017 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  6. Investor Attrition and Fund Flows in Mutual Funds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Susan E. K.; Xu, Haoyu

    2017-01-01

    We explore the properties of equity mutual funds that experience a loss of assets after poor performance. We document that both inflows and outflows are less sensitive to performance, because performance-sensitive investors leave or decide not to invest after bad performance. Consistent with the ......We explore the properties of equity mutual funds that experience a loss of assets after poor performance. We document that both inflows and outflows are less sensitive to performance, because performance-sensitive investors leave or decide not to invest after bad performance. Consistent......–performance sensitivity when attrition arises after good performance or investors invest for nonperformance reasons....

  7. Mutual interdependence of splicing and transcription elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzyżek, Grzegorz; Świeżewski, Szymon

    2015-01-01

    Transcription and splicing are intrinsically linked, as splicing needs a pre-mRNA substrate to commence. The more nuanced view is that the rate of transcription contributes to splicing regulation. On the other hand there is accumulating evidence that splicing has an active role in controlling transcription elongation by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II (RNAP II). We briefly review those mechanisms and propose a unifying model where splicing controls transcription elongation to provide an optimal timing for successive rounds of splicing.

  8. Bedside Teaching and Respecting the Pediatric Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Touyz, Sarah Judith Jean

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Bedside teaching involving patients, physicians, and students is a ubiquitous technique used for medical training. Respect, valid informed consent, and transparency are key to ethical and effective teaching. Patient refusal in participating in bedside teaching must be respected. These ought to apply to patients of all ages, including children, who may not fully understand or be capable of consenting to participating in teaching.

  9. Mutual irradiation grafting on indigenous aramid fiber-3 in diethanolamine and epichlorohydrin and its effect on interfacially reinforced epoxy composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Lixin [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001,China (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Liu, Li, E-mail: liuli@hit.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001,China (China); Xie, Fei [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001,China (China); Huang, Yudong [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001,China (China); State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2016-07-01

    Highlights: • High energy gamma rays were used to decorate the surface of aramid fiber via mutual irradiation grafting process in two medium. • The effects of different grafting medium on aramid fiber surface were investigated through SEM, AFM, XPS, wettability and adsorption measurements. • Interfacial properties of aramid reinforced polymer composites were remarkable improved after mutual irradiation. - Abstract: The surface of indigenous aramid fiber-3 (IAF3) was decorated via mutual irradiation grafting process in diethanolamine (DEA) and epichlorohydrin (ECH), respectively, with the assist of high energy gamma rays. This modification method with great permeability produced the homogeneous and ameliorative AF3 surfaces, which were observed by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atom forced microscopy (AFM). Enhanced surface free energy and reduced contact angles of irradiated AF3 verified the fabulous effectiveness of mutual irradiation without seriously injured tensile strength. The composites based on epoxy resin (ER) polymer as the matrix and irradiated IAF3 grafted DEA and ECH as the reinforcement. By capitalizing on the irradiated IAF3 which has higher wettability and adsorption on resin, the irradiated IAF3-ECH/ER composites exhibit admirable interfacial mechanical performance as compared to the pristine IAF3 contained composites. The interfacial shear strength (IFSS), interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) and flexural strength of composites were remarkable improved to 86.5, 60.13 and 511 MPa respectively, from the pristine IAF3/ER composite with IFSS of 65.9 MPa, ILSS of 48.1 MPa, and flexural strength of 479 MPa.

  10. Ombud's Corner: Respect in the workplace

    CERN Multimedia

    Sudeshna Datta-Cockerill

    2014-01-01

    Launched in a previous issue of the Bulletin (see here), the 'Respect@CERN' campaign has triggered some rich and varied reactions, and contributions received from colleagues have covered a wide range of themes that extend from the basic “golden rule of treating others as you would have them treat you” to some very specific observations of respectful behaviour in the CERN context.   “To me, respect is the core of all relationships, all exchanges: we cannot work together and achieve results without it,” says one colleague, while another underlines the equally important dimension of projecting and preserving one’s own self-respect where “whether or not we sleep well at night depends on whether or not we feel that we have been true to ourselves that day”. Respect in the workplace is different from everyday respect in that it is based on an “earned privilege where each colleague has been selected for ...

  11. Mutual Impacts of Geocaching and Natural Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Schneider

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rising popularity of geocaching is linked to increased risk of negative impacts on natural environment. Based on that, this paper intends to present possible approach of how to evaluate these impacts in the Landscape protected area Moravian Karst (Czech Republic and in the Vrátna dolina valley (National park Malá Fatra, Slovak Republic. Recreation along with nature conservation has been solved in these areas in the log-run and geocaching has been steadily extending offer of recreational activities. Therefore, it seems desirable to examine how geocaching affects environment and simultaneously how topography or land cover influences availability or difficulty of caches. 57 caches (i.e. one third of the total has been analyzed in the Moravian Karst and 11 caches in the Vrátna dolina valley. To assess impacts, own classification of indicators has been suggested, such as cache attendance, environment attractiveness or visually detected impacts of geocaching on natural environment. Our study revealed the major risk lies primarily in geo-highways which – with respect to soil type, land cover and intensity of cache attendance – grow rather fast. Despite the local nature of detected impacts, an increased attention shall be devoted to environment care and specifically to regulation of attendance.

  12. Consumer Behavior in respect of milk in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G. Termorshuizen (Koos); M.T.G. Meulenberg; B. Wierenga (Berend)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper, consumer behaviour in the Netherlands in respect of milk is investigated using a model based on the EKB model, a so-called integrated model of consumer behaviour. The objectives of the study are: to gain insight into the factors that influence buying and consumption behavi

  13. Consumer behaviour in respect of milk in The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Termorshuizen, J.G.; Meulenberg, M.T.G.; Wierenga, B.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper, consumer behaviour in the Netherlands in respect of milk is investigated using a model based on the EKB model, a so-called integrated model of consumer behaviour. The objectives of the study are: to gain insight into the factors that influence buying and consumption behaviour with res

  14. Molecular insights into seed dispersal mutualisms driving plant population recruitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Cristina; Grivet, Delphine

    2011-11-01

    Most plant species require mutualistic interactions with animals to fulfil their demographic cycle. In this regard frugivory (i.e., the intake of fruits by animals) enhances natural regeneration by mobilizing a large amount of seeds from source trees to deposition sites across the landscape. By doing so, frugivores move propagules, and the genotypes they harbour creating the spatial, ecological, and genetic environment under which subsequent recruitment proceeds. Recruitment patterns can be envisioned as the result of two density- and distance-dependent processes: seed dispersal and seed/seedling survival (the Janzen-Connell model). Population genetic studies add another layer of complexity for understanding the fate of dispersed propagules: the genetic relatedness among neighbouring seeds within a seed clump, a major outcome of frugivore activity, modifies their chances of germinating and surviving. Yet, we virtually ignore how the spatial distribution of maternal progenies and recruitment patterns relate with each other in frugivore-generated seed rains. Here we focus on the critical role of frugivore-mediated seed dispersal in shaping the spatial distribution of maternal progenies in the seed rain. We first examine which genetic mechanisms underlying recruitment are influenced by the spatial distribution of maternal progenies. Next, we examine those studies depicting the spatial distribution of maternal progenies in a frugivore-generated seed rain. In doing so, we briefly review the most suitable analytical approaches applied to track the contribution of fruiting trees to the seed rain based on molecular data. Then we look more specifically at the role of distinct frugivore guilds in determining maternal genetic correlations and their expected consequences for recruitment patterns. Finally we posit some general conclusions and suggest future research directions that would provide a more comprehensive understanding of the ecological and evolutionary consequences

  15. Population dynamics and the ecological stability of obligate pollination mutualisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, J. Nathaniel; DeAngelis, Donald L.

    2001-01-01

    Mutualistic interactions almost always produce both costs and benefits for each of the interacting species. It is the difference between gross benefits and costs that determines the net benefit and the per-capita effect on each of the interacting populations. For example, the net benefit of obligate pollinators, such as yucca and senita moths, to plants is determined by the difference between the number of ovules fertilized from moth pollination and the number of ovules eaten by the pollinator's larvae. It is clear that if pollinator populations are large, then, because many eggs are laid, costs to plants are large, whereas, if pollinator populations are small, gross benefits are low due to lack of pollination. Even though the size and dynamics of the pollinator population are likely to be crucial, their importance has been neglected in the investigation of mechanisms, such as selective fruit abortion, that can limit costs and increase net benefits. Here, we suggest that both the population size and dynamics of pollinators are important in determining the net benefits to plants, and that fruit abortion can significantly affect these. We develop a model of mutualism between populations of plants and their pollinating seed-predators to explore the ecological consequences of fruit abortion on pollinator population dynamics and the net effect on plants. We demonstrate that the benefit to a plant population is unimodal as a function of pollinator abundance, relative to the abundance of flowers. Both selective abortion of fruit with eggs and random abortion of fruit, without reference to whether they have eggs or not, can limit pollinator population size. This can increase the net benefits to the plant population by limiting the number of eggs laid, if the pollination rate remains high. However, fruit abortion can possibly destabilize the pollinator population, with negative consequences for the plant population.

  16. Properties of cat mutually pumped phase conjugation and two-wave mixing gain in doped KNSBN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinguang Xu(许心光); Zongshu Shao(邵宗书); Zhengping Wang(王正平); Junhai Liu(刘均海); Guibao Xu(许贵宝); Dawei Hu(胡大伟)

    2003-01-01

    Cat mutually pumped phase conjugation configuration is discovered and investigated by using two-wavemixing in (KyNa1-y)2z(SrxBa1-x)1-zNb2O6 (KNSBN) crystal. When only one signal or pumped beamdoes not give birth to phase conjugation, the maximum reflectivity of signal and pumped beam attain140% and 30% due to two-wave mixing, respectively. The experimental results show that the two-wavemixing can reduce the threshold of incident beams power, extend the incident angle range, and shortenresponse rate in the process of self-pumped phase conjugator (SPPC) in KNSBN crystal.

  17. It Takes Two to Tango: How Parents' and Adolescents' Personalities Link to the Quality of Their Mutual Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denissen, Jaap J. A.; van Aken, Marcel A. G.; Dubas, Judith S.

    2009-01-01

    According to J. Belsky's (1984) process model of parenting, both adolescents' and parents' personality should exert a significant impact on the quality of their mutual relationship. Using multi-informant, symmetric data on the Big Five personality traits and the relationship quality of mothers, fathers, and two adolescent children, the current…

  18. Astrometry of mutual approximations between the Galilean moons observed at 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgado, Bruno Eduardo; Vieira-Martins, Roberto; Lainey, Valery

    2017-06-01

    A precise astrometry of natural satellites is very important to constrain dynamical models when taking into account week disturbances forces, such as tidal. For the Galilean moons of Jupiter, this astrometry is not an easy task, due to the brightness of Jupiter and its satellites. Usual CCD astrometry has a precision in the range of 100-120 mas. During the period of mutual phenomena, positions with a precision of a few mas can be obtained. However, mutual phenomena only happen during the equinox of the host planet, in the case of the Galilean moons every six years. This scenario motivates the development of alternatives methods to determine precise positions of these moons. One of these is the mutual approximations technique, in this method we determine the central instant in an apparent closest approach between two satellites. In this work, we determine the central instant of 50 curves observed from different observers. In total, 27 events were obtained, and 14 of those had at least two observers. All observations were made with a narrow-band filter centred at 889 nm with a width of 15 nm. The primary mirror of the telescopes ranges between 120-25 cm. The average precision obtained was 13 mas.

  19. The demographic consequences of mutualism: ants increase host-plant fruit production but not population growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Kevin R; Ness, Joshua H; Bronstein, Judith L; Morris, William F

    2015-10-01

    The impact of mutualists on a partner's demography depends on how they affect the partner's multiple vital rates and how those vital rates, in turn, affect population growth. However, mutualism studies rarely measure effects on multiple vital rates or integrate them to assess the ultimate impact on population growth. We used vital rate data, population models and simulations of long-term population dynamics to quantify the demographic impact of a guild of ant species on the plant Ferocactus wislizeni. The ants feed at the plant's extrafloral nectaries and attack herbivores attempting to consume reproductive organs. Ant-guarded plants produced significantly more fruit, but ants had no significant effect on individual growth or survival. After integrating ant effects across these vital rates, we found that projected population growth was not significantly different between unguarded and ant-guarded plants because population growth was only weakly influenced by differences in fruit production (though strongly influenced by differences in individual growth and survival). However, simulations showed that ants could positively affect long-term plant population dynamics through services provided during rare but important events (herbivore outbreaks that reduce survival or years of high seedling recruitment associated with abundant precipitation). Thus, in this seemingly clear example of mutualism, the interaction may actually yield no clear benefit to plant population growth, or if it does, may only do so through the actions of the ants during rare events. These insights demonstrate the value of taking a demographic approach to studying the consequences of mutualism.

  20. Effects of mutual shading on the regulation of photosynthesis in field-grown sorghum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Liu, Li-Na; Jiang, Chuang-Dao; Liu, Yu-Jun; Shi, Lei

    2014-08-01

    In the field, close planting inevitably causes mutual shading and depression of leaf photosynthesis. To clarify the regulative mechanisms of photosynthesis under these conditions, the effects of planting density on leaf structure, gas exchange and proteomics were carefully studied in field-grown sorghum. In the absence of mineral deficiency, (1) close planting induced a significant decrease in light intensity within populations, which further resulted in much lower stomatal density and other anatomical characteristics associated with shaded leaves; (2) sorghum grown at high planting density had a lower net photosynthetic rate and stomatal conductance than those grown at low planting density; (3) approximately 62 protein spots changed their expression levels under the high planting density conditions, and 22 proteins associated with photosynthesis were identified by mass spectrometry. Further analysis revealed the depression of photosynthesis caused by mutual shading involves the regulation of leaf structure, absorption and transportation of CO2, photosynthetic electron transport, production of assimilatory power, and levels of enzymes related to the Calvin cycle. Additionally, heat shock protein and oxygen-evolving enhancer protein play important roles in photoprotection in field-grown sorghum. A model for the regulation of photosynthesis under mutual shading was suggested based on our results.

  1. Polarization switching and synchronization of mutually coupled vertical-cavity surface-emitting semiconductor lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Wei-Li; Pan Wei; Luo Bin; Li Xiao-Feng; Zou Xi-Hua; Wang Meng-Yao

    2007-01-01

    Polarization switching (PS) dynamics and synchronization performances of two mutually coupled vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) are studied theoretically in this paper. A group of dimensionless rate equations is derived to describe our model. While analysing the PS characteristics, we focus on the effects of coupling rate and frequency detuning regarding different mutual injection types. The results indicate that the x-mode injection defers the occurrence of PS, while the y-mode injection leads the PS to occur at a lower current. Strong enough polarizationselective injection can suppress the PS. Moreover, if frequency detuning is considered, the effects of polarization-selective mutual injection will be weakened. To evaluate the synchronization performance, the correlation coefficients and output dynamics of VCSELs with both pure mode and mixed mode polarizations are given. It is found that performance of complete synchronization is sensitive to the frequency mismatch but it is little affected by mixed mode polarizations,which is opposite to the case of injection-locking synchronization.

  2. Rapid evolution of stability and productivity at the origin of a microbial mutualism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillesland, Kristina L.; Stahl, David A.

    2009-12-01

    Mutualistic interactions are taxonomically and functionally diverse. Despite their ubiquity, the basic ecological and evolutionary processes underlying their origin and maintenance are poorly understood. A major reason for this has been the lack of an experimentally tractable model system. We examine the evolution of an experimentally imposed obligate mutualism between sulfate-reducing and methanogenic microorganisms that have no known history of prior interaction. Twenty-four independent pairings (cocultures) of the bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris and the archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis were established and followed for 300 community doublings in two environments, one allowing for the development of a heterogeneous distribution of resources and the other not. Evolved cocultures grew up to 80percent faster and were up to 30percent more productive (biomass yield per mole substrate) than the ancestors. The evolutionary process was marked by periods of significant instability leading to extinction of two of the cocultures, but resulted in more stable, efficient, and productive mutualisms for most replicated pairings. Comparisons of evolved cocultures with those assembled from one evolved and one ancestral mutualist showed that evolution of both species contributed to improved productivity. Surprisingly, however, overall improvements in growth rate and yield were less than the sum of individual contributions, suggesting antagonistic interactions between mutations from the coevolved populations. Physical constraints on the transfer of metabolites in the evolution environment affected the evolution of M. maripaludis but not D. vulgaris. Together, these results show that challenges can imperil nascent obligate mutualisms and demonstrate the evolutionary responses that enable their persistence and future evolution.

  3. Assessing ecological specialization of an ant-seed dispersal mutualism through a wide geographic range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzaneda, Antonio J; Rey, Pedro J

    2009-11-01

    Specialization in species interactions is of central importance for understanding the ecological structure and evolution of plant-animal mutualisms. Most plant-animal mutualisms are facultative and strongly asymmetric. In particular, myrmecochory (seed dispersal by ants) has been regarded as a very generalized interaction. Although some recent studies have suggested that only a few ant species are really important for dispersal, no rigorous measurement of the specialization in ant-seed dispersal mutualisms has been performed. Here, we use individual plants as basic units for replication to investigate the generalization-specialization of the herb Helleborus foetidus on its ant dispersers over a considerable part of its geographical range. We define generalization in terms of diversity components (species richness and evenness) of the ant visitor that realizes dispersal by removing diaspores. We obtain truly comparable values of ant visitor diversity, distinguishing among different functional groups of visitors and identifying incidental visitors and real ant dispersers. Using null model approaches, we test the null hypothesis that ant-mediated dispersal is a generalized mutualism. At least two premises should be confirmed to validate the hypothesis: (1) diaspores are dispersed by multiple ant-visitor species, and (2) diaspore dispersal is significantly equitable. Though up to 37 ant species visited diaspores across 10 populations, only two large formicines, Camponotus cruentatus and Formica lugubris, were responsible for the vast majority of visits resulting in dispersal in most populations and years, which strongly suggests that ant seed dispersal in H. foetidus is ecologically specialized. Interestingly, specialization degree was unrelated to dispersal success across populations. Our study offers new insights into the spatiotemporal dynamics of myrmecochory. We propose the existence of an alternative scenario to extensive generalization. In this new scenario

  4. Integration of Particle-gas Systems with Stiff Mutual Drag Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao-Chin; Johansen, Anders

    2016-06-01

    Numerical simulation of numerous mm/cm-sized particles embedded in a gaseous disk has become an important tool in the study of planet formation and in understanding the dust distribution in observed protoplanetary disks. However, the mutual drag force between the gas and the particles can become so stiff—particularly because of small particles and/or strong local solid concentration—that an explicit integration of this system is computationally formidable. In this work, we consider the integration of the mutual drag force in a system of Eulerian gas and Lagrangian solid particles. Despite the entanglement between the gas and the particles under the particle-mesh construct, we are able to devise a numerical algorithm that effectively decomposes the globally coupled system of equations for the mutual drag force, and makes it possible to integrate this system on a cell-by-cell basis, which considerably reduces the computational task required. We use an analytical solution for the temporal evolution of each cell to relieve the time-step constraint posed by the mutual drag force, as well as to achieve the highest degree of accuracy. To validate our algorithm, we use an extensive suite of benchmarks with known solutions in one, two, and three dimensions, including the linear growth and the nonlinear saturation of the streaming instability. We demonstrate numerical convergence and satisfactory consistency in all cases. Our algorithm can, for example, be applied to model the evolution of the streaming instability with mm/cm-sized pebbles at high mass loading, which has important consequences for the formation scenarios of planetesimals.

  5. On the Empirical Evidence of Mutual Fund Strategic Risk Taking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goriaev, A.P.; Nijman, T.E.; Werker, B.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    We reexamine empirical evidence on strategic risk-taking behavior by mutual fund managers.Several studies suggest that fund performance in the first semester of a year influences risk-taking in the second semester.However, we show that previous empirical studies implicitly assume that idiosyncratic

  6. 12 CFR 544.5 - Federal mutual savings association bylaws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... by the association. (3) Corporate governance procedures. A Federal mutual association may elect to follow the corporate governance procedures of the laws of the state where the main office of the... corporate governance procedures, and shall file a copy of such bylaws, which are effective upon...

  7. Mutual Intercultural Relations among University Students in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Yongxia; Safdar, Saba; Berry, John

    2016-01-01

    The current study examies the views of both international and domestic students in Canada using the conceptual and empirical framework from the MIRIPS (Mutual Intercultural Relations in Plural Societies) project (http://www.victoria.ac.nz/cacr/research/mirips). Two hypotheses were examined. First is the "multiculturalism hypothesis"…

  8. Synchronization in a ring of mutually coupled electromechanical devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yolong, V Y Taffoti [Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Strada Costiera 11, 34100 Trieste (Italy); Woafo, P [Laboratory of Mechanics, Faculty of Sciences, P O Box 812, Yaounde (Cameroon)

    2006-11-15

    We study the synchronization in a ring of mutually coupled electromechanical devices. Each device consists of an electrical Duffing oscillator coupled magnetically with a linear mechanical oscillator. By varying the coupling coefficient, we find the ranges for cluster and complete synchronization, either in the regular state or in the chaotic one. Effects of this coupling parameter show various types of bifurcation sequences.

  9. Plant-carnivore mutualism through herbivore-induced carnivore attractants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takabayashi, J.; Dicke, M.

    1996-01-01

    Plants and carnivorous arthropods can interact mutualistically. A recent discovery is that such mutualisms can be mediated by volatile compounds — produced by plants in response to herbivore damage — that attract carnivores. However, after emission of these attractants, the plant has no control over

  10. Institutionalized Mutuality in Canada-China Management Education Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shuguang; Liu, Xianjun

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the Canada-China Management Education Program (CCMEP, 1983-1996) between the University of Toronto (UT) and Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST). In this paper, we create a "Three Levels/Four Parameters" analytical framework, based on the concept of mutuality from Johan Galtung (1980) and the concept…

  11. Renyi generalizations of the conditional quantum mutual information

    CERN Document Server

    Berta, Mario; Wilde, Mark M

    2014-01-01

    The conditional quantum mutual information $I(A;B|C)$ of a tripartite state $\\rho_{ABC}$ is an information quantity which lies at the center of many problems in quantum information theory. Three of its main properties are that it is non-negative for any tripartite state, that it decreases under local operations applied to systems $A$ and $B$, and that it obeys the duality relation $I(A;B|C)=I(A;B|D)$ for a four-party pure state on systems $ABCD$. It has been an open question to find Renyi generalizations of the conditional mutual information, that would allow for a deeper understanding of the original quantity and find applications beyond the traditional memoryless setting of quantum information theory. The present paper addresses this question, by defining different $\\alpha$-Renyi generalizations $I_{\\alpha}(A;B|C)$ of the conditional mutual information that all converge to the conditional mutual information in the limit $\\alpha \\to 1$. Furthermore, we prove that many of these generalizations satisfy the afo...

  12. Mutual recognition and the right to damages for criminal investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang Fuglsang Madsen Sørensen, Henning

    2015-01-01

    This article considers how the citizen who has been surrendered on an EAW in a case ending with acquittal or non-prosecution may achieve compensation for the loss of freedom and the surrender to another Member State. The analysis shows how the EAW and the principle of mutual recognition have been...

  13. On the behavior of mutual fund investors and managers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goriaev, A.P.

    2002-01-01

    This thesis investigates empirically and theoretically the behavior of mutual fund investors and managers. These two aspects are closely related to each other. Investors try to select funds that follow an optimal investment policy from their point of view, while fund managers are typically intereste

  14. Mutual Coupling Compensation Applied to a Uniform Circular Array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belfiori, F.; Stefania, M.; Rossum, W.L. van

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, two approaches for compensation of mutual coupling and phase shifts in a passive radar system based on a circular array are compared. The first method is based on the measurement of the antenna scattering parameters and of further relative phase and amplitude variations between the ch

  15. The Development Of Mutual Trust In British Workplaces Through ?Partnership?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.R. Dietz (Graham)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThis article examines the alleged links between 'partnership' forms of managing workplace relationships in Britain, and the development of intra-organisational 'trust'. The potential for mutually complementary linkages between the two are clear, in theory at least: partnership, as define

  16. The Development Of Mutual Trust In British Workplaces Through ?Partnership?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.R. Dietz (Graham)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThis article examines the alleged links between 'partnership' forms of managing workplace relationships in Britain, and the development of intra-organisational 'trust'. The potential for mutually complementary linkages between the two are clear, in theory at least: partnership, as

  17. The Development Of Mutual Trust In British Workplaces Through ?Partnership?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.R. Dietz (Graham)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThis article examines the alleged links between 'partnership' forms of managing workplace relationships in Britain, and the development of intra-organisational 'trust'. The potential for mutually complementary linkages between the two are clear, in theory at least: partnership, as define

  18. On the Empirical Evidence of Mutual Fund Strategic Risk Taking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goriaev, A.P.; Nijman, T.E.; Werker, B.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    We reexamine empirical evidence on strategic risk-taking behavior by mutual fund managers.Several studies suggest that fund performance in the first semester of a year influences risk-taking in the second semester.However, we show that previous empirical studies implicitly assume that idiosyncratic

  19. Institutionalized Mutuality in Canada-China Management Education Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shuguang; Liu, Xianjun

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the Canada-China Management Education Program (CCMEP, 1983-1996) between the University of Toronto (UT) and Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST). In this paper, we create a "Three Levels/Four Parameters" analytical framework, based on the concept of mutuality from Johan Galtung (1980) and the concept…

  20. Antagonists in Mutual Antipathies: A Person-Oriented Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guroglu, Berna; Haselager, Gerbert J. T.; van Lieshout, Cornelis F. M.; Scholte, Ron H. J.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the heterogeneity of mutual antipathy relationships. Separate cluster analyses of peer interactions of early adolescents (mean age 11 years) and adolescents (mean age of 14) yielded 3 "types of individuals" in each age group, namely Prosocial, Antisocial, and Withdrawn. Prevalence analysis of the 6 possible combinations of…