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Sample records for modeling laser damage

  1. Modeling Laser Damage Thresholds Using the Thompson-Gerstman Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    implementation has the ability to iterate the thermal solver algorithm over any number of different parameters such as corneal fluence, laser power... algorithm (green) next to the verified TempBuilder (red) thermal profile. These results show good agreement, which supports the validity of the new C...J. and G. D. Polhamus. 1984. Measurement and prediction of thermal injury in the retina of the rhesus monkey . IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. BME-31, 1471

  2. Modeling of laser-induced damage and optic usage at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Zhi M.; Nostrand, Mike; Carr, Wren; Bude, Jeff; Suratwala, Tayyab I.

    2016-07-01

    Modeling of laser-induced optics damage has been introduced to benchmark existing optic usage at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) which includes the number of optics exchanged for damage repair. NIF has pioneered an optics recycle strategy to allow it to run the laser at capacity since fully commissioned in 2009 while keeping the cost of optics usage manageable. We will show how the damage model is being used to evaluate strategies to streamline our optics loop efficiency, as we strive to increase the laser shot rate without increasing operating costs.

  3. Modeling crater formation in femtosecond-pulse laser damage from basic principles

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Robert A.; Schumacher, Douglass W.; Chowdhury, Enam A.

    2015-01-01

    We present the first fundamental simulation method for the determination of crater morphology due to femtosecond-pulse laser damage. To this end we have adapted the particle-in-cell (PIC) method commonly used in plasma physics for use in the study of laser damage, and developed the first implementation of a pair-potential for PIC codes. We find that the PIC method is a complementary approach to modeling laser damage, bridging the gap between fully ab-initio molecular dynamics approaches and e...

  4. Probabilistic Model for Laser Damage to the Human Retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    of the eye. As an infant, the eye is disproportionately small causing light rays to be directed behind the retinal plane by the cornea and lens...the Nd:YAG laser used on 4-21 the ABL platform. Additionally, future laser systems such as the ABL’s megawatt- class chemical oxygen iodine laser that

  5. An In Vitro Model for Retinal Laser Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    delivered from a large-frame Argon laser ( Innova 200, Coherent). A diode-pumped ND:YVO4 laser (Millennia Xs, Spectra Physics), with intracavity doubling, was...holder attached to x-y translational Innova stages equipped with computer-controlled Argon PM2 motors. Ambient temperatures during Cells experiments

  6. Laser-induced cartilage damage: an ex-vivo model using confocal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenz, Martin; Zueger, Benno J.; Monin, D.; Weiler, C.; Mainil-Varlet, P. M.; Weber, Heinz P.; Schaffner, Thomas

    1999-06-01

    Although there is an increasing popularity of lasers in orthopedic surgery, there is a growing concern about negative side effects of this therapy e.g. prolonged restitution time, radiation damage to adjacent cartilage or depth effects like bone necrosis. Despite case reports and experimental investigations over the last few years little is known about the extent of acute cartilage damage induced by different lasers types and energies. Histological examination offers only limited insights in cell viability and metabolism. Ho:YAG and Er:YAG lasers emitting at 2.1 micrometer and 2.94 micrometer, respectively, are ideally suited for tissue treatment because these wavelengths are strongly absorbed in water. The Purpose of the present study is to evaluate the effect of laser type and energy on chondrocyte viability in an ex vivo model. Free running Er:YAG (E equals 100 and 150 mJ) and Ho:YAG (E equals 500 and 800 mJ) lasers were used at different energy levels using a fixed pulse length of 400 microseconds. The energy was delivered at 8 Hz through optical fibers. Fresh bovine hyaline cartilage samples were mounted in a water bath at room temperature and the fiber was positioned at 30 degree and 180 degree angles relative to the tissue surface. After laser irradiation the samples were assessed by a life-dead cell viability test using a confocal microscope and by standard histology. Thermal damage was much deeper with Ho:YAG (up to 1800 micrometer) than with the Er:YAG laser (up to 70 micrometer). The cell viability test revealed a damage zone about twice the one determined by standard histology. Confocal microscopy is a powerful tool for assessing changes in tissue structure after laser treatment. In addition this technique allows to quantify these alterations without necessitating time consuming and expensive animal experiments.

  7. Development of a Process Model for CO(2) Laser Mitigation of Damage Growth in Fused Silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feit, M D; Rubenchik, A M; Boley, C; Rotter, M D

    2003-11-01

    A numerical model of CO{sub 2} laser mitigation of damage growth in fused silica has been constructed that accounts for laser energy absorption, heat conduction, radiation transport, evaporation of fused silica and thermally induced stresses. This model will be used to understand scaling issues and effects of pulse and beam shapes on material removal, temperatures reached and stresses generated. Initial calculations show good agreement of simulated and measured material removal. The model has also been applied to LG-770 glass as a prototype red blocker material.

  8. Highlighting the DNA damage response with ultrashort laser pulses in the near infrared and kinetic modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa eFerrando-May

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of the mechanisms governing the response to DNA damage in higher eucaryotes crucially depends on our ability to dissect the temporal and spatial organization of the cellular machinery responsible for maintaining genomic integrity. To achieve this goal, we need experimental tools to inflict DNA lesions with high spatial precision at pre-defined locations, and to visualize the ensuing reactions with adequate temporal resolution. Near-infrared femtosecond laser pulses focused through high-aperture objective lenses of advanced scanning microscopes offer the advantage of inducing DNA damage in a 3D-confined volume of subnuclear dimensions. This high spatial resolution results from the highly nonlinear nature of the excitation process. Here we review recent progress based on the increasing availability of widely tunable and user-friendly technology of ultrafast lasers in the near infrared. We present a critical evaluation of this approach for DNA microdamage as compared to the currently prevalent use of UV or VIS laser irradiation, the latter in combination with photosensitizers. Current and future applications in the field of DNA repair and DNA-damage dependent chromatin dynamics are outlined. Finally, we discuss the requirement for proper simulation and quantitative modeling. We focus in particular on approaches to measure the effect of DNA damage on the mobility of nuclear proteins and consider the pros and cons of frequently used analysis models for FRAP and photoactivation and their applicability to nonlinear photoperturbation experiments.

  9. Thermal Model of Laser-Induced Eye Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-10-08

    Eq. A-13 yields ’ cp’R! Cp + 1 = RI1 (A-14) Taking logarithms of both sides of Eq. A-14 yieldsI ’ log( cpRI - cp + 1) = ck’log R1 (A-15) Finally...LA 1 F A ND0 ST r)R I ,J T N ICI S A T W H ICH T F PPFRA T UR F" ~ RF P R IN T E1 103. ID2=IU2+TPE 1014. 1F (1n1 *LT * PA ) ID1IPA 108. 15 FUPMAT(1H0...1IM)ICM~ RF (Z+)Z~3 -Vo Io SAMPLE DATA FOR CORNEAL MODEL -- - --------------------------------- ------- ........... 06-IA CARD 1 ........... " .0’•5

  10. Laser Damage Inspection Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmon, J T; Brase, J M; Bliss, E S; Carrano, C J; Kegelmeyer, L M; Miller, M G; Orth, C D; Sacks, R A

    2001-02-26

    Large, high-power laser systems are often designed as reimaging multipass cavities to maximize the extraction of energy from the amplifiers. These multipass cavities often have vacuum spatial filters that suppress the growth of beam instability via B-integral effects. These spatial filters also relay images of laser damage, often nearly superimposing these images in common planes. Also, the fluence damage threshold limits the minimum size of the optics. When used as vacuum barriers in the spatial filters, these large optics present a safety hazard from the risk of implosion if the laser damage were sufficiently large. The objective of the project was to develop algorithms and methods for optical detection and characterization of laser-induced damage of optics. The system should detect small defects (about 5% of the critical size), track their growth over multiple laser shots, and characterize the defects accurately so that the optic can be replaced (at 25% of the critical size) and, hence, minimize the risk of implosion. The depth of field must be short enough to isolate the damaged vacuum barrier from other damaged optics in the beamline, and the system should also be capable of inspecting other optics in the beamline, since damage on one optic can subsequently damage subsequent optics. Laser induced damage starts as a small (<<1mm) crater and grows as material is removed on subsequent laser shots. The highly fractured rough surface of the crater scatters light from the illuminating inspection beam. This scattered light is imaged by the inspection system. Other types of defects may occur as well including inclusions in the bulk glass, tooling marks, and surface contamination. This report will discuss the detection and characterization of crater-like surface defects although the general techniques may prove useful for other types of defects. The work described here covers the development of an image processing approach and specific algorithms for defect detection

  11. Effect of inclusion matrix model on temperature and thermal stress fields of K9-glass damaged by long-pulse laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yunxiang; Wang, Bin; Shen, Zhonghua; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiaowu

    2013-04-01

    A model containing an inclusion matrix heated by a millisecond laser is proposed to calculate temperature and thermal stress fields of K9-glass using a finite element method. First, the evolution of temperature and thermal stress fields is analyzed. Results show that both the upper and lower surfaces are damaged. K9-glass is primarily damaged by the combination of radial and axial stresses. Calculated damage morphology is mainly determined by radial stress. Then damage morphology evolution with the increase of the incident laser energy is investigated, which shows that damage area spreads inward from both the front and rear surfaces. Finally, experimental results of long-pulse laser damage of K9-glass are analyzed. The comparison of numerical results with experimental observations shows a good correlation in damage morphology, which indicates that the built inclusion matrix model is applicable to long-pulse laser damage in K9-glass.

  12. Interaction of 1.319 μm laser with skin: an optical-thermal-damage model and experimental validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Luguang; Yang, Zaifu; Wang, Jiarui

    2014-09-01

    With the widespread use of high-power laser systems operating within the wavelength region of approximately 1.3 to 1.4 μm, it becomes very necessary to refine the laser safety guidelines setting the exposure limits for the eye and skin. In this paper, an optical-thermal-damage model was developed to simulate laser propagation, energy deposition, heat transfer and thermal damage in the skin for 1.319 μm laser irradiation. Meanwhile, an experiment was also conducted in vitro to measure the tempreture history of a porcine skin specimen irradiated by a 1.319 μm laser. Predictions from the model included light distribution in the skin, temperature response and thermal damge level of the tissue. It was shown that the light distribution region was much larger than that of the incident laser at the wavelength of 1.319 μm, and the maximum value of the fluence rate located on the interior region of the skin, not on the surface. By comparing the calculated temperature curve with the experimentally recorded temperautre data, good agreement was shown betweeen them, which validated the numerical model. The model also indicated that the damage integral changed little when the temperature of skin tissue was lower than about 55 °C, after that, the integral increased rapidly and denatunation of the tissue would occur. Based on this model, we can further explore the damage mechanisms and trends for the skin and eye within the wavelength region of 1.3 μm to 1.4 μm, incorporating with in vivo experimental investigations.

  13. Tissue damage by laser radiation: an in vitro comparison between Tm:YAG and Ho:YAG laser on a porcine kidney model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huusmann, Stephan; Wolters, Mathias; Kramer, Mario W; Bach, Thorsten; Teichmann, Heinrich-Otto; Eing, Andreas; Bardosi, Sebastian; Herrmann, Thomas R W

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of tissue damage by laser radiation is very important for the safety in the application of surgical lasers. The objective of this study is to evaluate cutting, vaporization and coagulation properties of the 2 µm Tm:YAG laser (LISA Laser Products OHG, GER) in comparison to the 2.1 µm Ho:YAG laser (Coherent Medical Group, USA) at different laser power settings in an in vitro model of freshly harvested porcine kidneys. Laser radiation of both laser generators was delivered by using a laser fiber with an optical core diameter of 550 µm (RigiFib, LISA Laser GER). Freshly harvested porcine kidneys were used as tissue model. Experiments were either performed in ambient air or in aqueous saline. The Tm:YAG laser was adjusted to 5 W for low and 120 W for the high power setting. The Ho:YAG laser was adjusted to 0.5 J and 10 Hz (5 W average power) for low power setting and to 2.0 J and 40 Hz (80 W average power) for high power setting, accordingly. The specimens of the cutting experiments were fixed in 4 % formalin, embedded in paraffin and stained with Toluidin blue. The laser damage zone was measured under microscope as the main evaluation criteria. Laser damage zone consists of an outer coagulation zone plus a further necrotic zone. In the ambient air experiments the laser damage zone for the low power setting was 745 ± 119 µm for the Tm:YAG and 614 ± 187 µm for the Ho:YAG laser. On the high power setting, the damage zone was 760 ± 167 µm for Tm:YAG and 715 ± 142 µm for Ho:YAG. The incision depth in ambient air on the low power setting was 346 ± 199 µm for Tm:YAG, 118 ± 119 µm for Ho:YAG. On the high power setting incision depth was 5083 ± 144 µm (Tm:YAG) and 1126 ± 383 µm (Ho:YAG) respectively. In the saline solution experiments, the laser damage zone was 550 ± 137 µm (Tm:YAG) versus 447 ± 65 µm (Ho:YAG), on the low power setting and 653 ± 137 µm (Tm:YAG) versus 677 ± 134 µm (Ho

  14. Laser ablation and optical surface damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, L. L.; Hamza, A. V.; Lee, H. W. H.

    Laser ablation usually accompanies optical surface damage to bare surfaces and coatings. Investigations of optical damage mechanisms by observation of ablation processes at laser fluences very close to the optical damage threshold are described. Several promising surface characterization methods for investigating damage mechanisms are also described. The possible role of laser ablation in initiating or promoting optical surface damage is discussed.

  15. Laser ablation mechanisms and optical surface damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, L. L.; Hamza, A. V.; Lee, H. W. H.

    1991-05-01

    Laser ablation usually accompanies optical surface damage to bare surfaces and coatings. Investigations of optical damage mechanisms by observation of ablation processes at laser fluences very close to the optical damage threshold are described. Several promising surface characterization methods for investigating damage mechanisms are also described. The possible role of laser ablation in initiating or promoting optical surface damage is discussed.

  16. Extreme nonlinear optics and laser damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldutis, Evaldas

    2010-11-01

    The study of laser induced damage threshold caused by series of identical laser pulses (LID-T-N) on gamma radiation resistant glasses and their analogs is performed applying know-how ultra stable laser radiation. The presented results and analysis of earlier received results show that nonlinear optical phenomena in extreme conditions of interaction are different from the traditional nonlinear optical processes, because they depend not only on intensity of electromagnetic field of laser radiation, but also on the pulse number in series of identical laser pulses. This range of laser intensities is not wide; it is different for each material and determines the range of Extreme Nonlinear Optics. The dependence of LID-T-N on pulse number N for different kinds of high quality transparent glasses was observed. The study of dynamics of these processes (i.e. the study of dependence on N) at different intensities in series of incident laser pulses provides new information about properties of the materials useful for studying laser damage fundamentals and their application. The expectation that gamma radiation resistant glasses could give useful information for technology of resistant optics for high power lasers has not proved. The received results well correspond with the earlier proposed model of laser damage.

  17. Predicting laser-induced bulk damage and conditioning for deuterated potassium di-hydrogen phosphate crystals using ADM (absorption distribution model)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Z M; Spaeth, M L; Manes, K; Adams, J J; Carr, C W

    2010-02-26

    We present an empirical model that describes the experimentally observed laser-induced bulk damage and conditioning behavior in deuterated Potassium dihydrogen Phosphate (DKDP) crystals in a self-consistent way. The model expands on an existing nanoabsorber precursor model and the multi-step absorption mechanism to include two populations of absorbing defects, one with linear absorption and another with nonlinear absorption. We show that this model connects previously uncorrelated small-beam damage initiation probability data to large-beam damage density measurements over a range of ns pulse widths relevant to ICF lasers such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In addition, this work predicts the damage behavior of laser-conditioned DKDP and explains the upper limit to the laser conditioning effect. The ADM model has been successfully used during the commissioning and early operation of the NIF.

  18. FEM modeling and histological analyses on thermal damage induced in facial skin resurfacing procedure with different CO2 laser pulse duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Francesca; Zingoni, Tiziano; Di Cicco, Emiliano; Manetti, Leonardo; Pini, Roberto; Fortuna, Damiano

    2011-07-01

    Laser light is nowadays routinely used in the aesthetic treatments of facial skin, such as in laser rejuvenation, scar removal etc. The induced thermal damage may be varied by setting different laser parameters, in order to obtain a particular aesthetic result. In this work, it is proposed a theoretical study on the induced thermal damage in the deep tissue, by considering different laser pulse duration. The study is based on the Finite Element Method (FEM): a bidimensional model of the facial skin is depicted in axial symmetry, considering the different skin structures and their different optical and thermal parameters; the conversion of laser light into thermal energy is modeled by the bio-heat equation. The light source is a CO2 laser, with different pulse durations. The model enabled to study the thermal damage induced into the skin, by calculating the Arrhenius integral. The post-processing results enabled to study in space and time the temperature dynamics induced in the facial skin, to study the eventual cumulative effects of subsequent laser pulses and to optimize the procedure for applications in dermatological surgery. The calculated data where then validated in an experimental measurement session, performed in a sheep animal model. Histological analyses were performed on the treated tissues, evidencing the spatial distribution and the entity of the thermal damage in the collageneous tissue. Modeling and experimental results were in good agreement, and they were used to design a new optimized laser based skin resurfacing procedure.

  19. Nanosecond laser damage of optical multimode fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Guido; Krüger, Jörg

    2016-07-01

    For pulse laser materials processing often optical step index and gradient index multimode fibers with core diameters ranging from 100 to 600 μm are used. The design of a high power fiber transmission system must take into account limitations resulting from both surface and volume damage effects. Especially, breakdown at the fiber end faces and selffocusing in the fiber volume critically influence the fiber performance. At least operation charts are desirable to select the appropriate fiber type for given laser parameters. In industry-relevant studies the influence of fiber core diameter and end face preparation on laser-induced (surface) damage thresholds (LIDT) was investigated for frequently used all-silica fiber types (manufacturer LEONI). Experiments on preform material (initial fiber material) and compact specimens (models of the cladding and coating material) accompanied the tests performed in accordance with the relevant LIDT standards ISO 21254-1 and ISO 21254-2 for 1-on-1 and S-on-1 irradiation conditions, respectively. The relation beam diameter vs. LIDT was investigated for fused silica fibers. Additionally, laser-induced (bulk) damage thresholds of fused silica preform material F300 (manufacturer Heraeus) in dependence on external mechanical stress simulating fiber bending were measured. All experiments were performed with 10-ns laser pulses at 1064 and 532 nm wavelength with a Gaussian beam profile.

  20. Laser-induced damage in optical materials

    CERN Document Server

    Ristau, Detlev

    2014-01-01

    Dedicated to users and developers of high-powered systems, Laser-Induced Damage in Optical Materials focuses on the research field of laser-induced damage and explores the significant and steady growth of applications for high-power lasers in the academic, industrial, and military arenas. Written by renowned experts in the field, this book concentrates on the major topics of laser-induced damage in optical materials and most specifically addresses research in laser damage that occurs in the bulk and on the surface or the coating of optical components. It considers key issues in the field of hi

  1. Photothermal damage prediction of laser interstitial thermotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoxia Li; Shifu Fan; Youquan Zhao

    2006-01-01

    An improved scattering optical model was developed under cylindrical coordinate to simulate the thermaleffect of diffusing applicator in laser interstitial thermotherapy (LITT). The thermal damage was calculatedby finite element method (FEM) using Pennes bio-heat transfer equation and Arrhenius injury integralformula. The numerical results showed that the scattering can considerably influence the evaluation of thelesion area, and the relationship between application powers or time and resulting tissue thermal damagewas nonlinear. Although usually applying relatively low power can avoid tissue charring, rather higherpower is recommended because it is indispensable to achieve necessary damage threshold and the therapytime can be shortened.

  2. Numerical analysis of laser ablation and damage in glass with multiple picosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingying; Eppelt, Urs; Russ, Simone; Hartmann, Claudia; Siebert, Christof; Zhu, Jianqiang; Schulz, Wolfgang

    2013-04-08

    This study presents a novel numerical model for laser ablation and laser damage in glass including beam propagation and nonlinear absorption of multiple incident ultrashort laser pulses. The laser ablation and damage in the glass cutting process with a picosecond pulsed laser was studied. The numerical results were in good agreement with our experimental observations, thereby revealing the damage mechanism induced by laser ablation. Beam propagation effects such as interference, diffraction and refraction, play a major role in the evolution of the crater structure and the damage region. There are three different damage regions, a thin layer and two different kinds of spikes. Moreover, the electronic damage mechanism was verified and distinguished from heat modification using the experimental results with different pulse spatial overlaps.

  3. Effects of low-level laser therapy (GaAs) in an animal model of muscular damage induced by trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Paulo Cesar Lock; da Silva, Luciano Acordi; Pinho, Cleber Aurino; De Souza, Priscila Soares; Ronsani, Merieli Medeiros; Scheffer, Debora da Luz; Pinho, Ricardo Aurino

    2013-02-01

    It has been demonstrated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and oxidative damage markers are increased after muscle damage. Recent studies have demonstrated that low-level laser therapy (LLLT) modulates many biochemical processes mainly those related to reduction of muscular injures, increment of mitochondrial respiration and ATP synthesis, as well as acceleration of the healing process. The objective of the present investigation was to verify the influence of LLLT in some parameters of muscular injury, oxidative damage, antioxidant activity, and synthesis of collagen after traumatic muscular injury. Adult male Wistar rats were divided randomly into three groups (n = 6), namely, sham (uninjured muscle), muscle injury without treatment, and muscle injury with LLLT (GaAs, 904 nm). Each treated point received 5 J/cm(2) or 0.5 J of energy density (12.5 s) and 2.5 J per treatment (five regions). LLLT was administered 2, 12, 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 h after muscle trauma. The serum creatine kinase activity was used as an index of skeletal muscle injury. Superoxide anion, thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) measurement, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were used as indicators of oxidative stress. In order to assess the synthesis of collagen, levels of hydroxyproline were measured. Our results have shown that the model of traumatic injury induces a significant increase in serum creatine kinase activity, hydroxyproline content, superoxide anion production, TBARS level, and activity of SOD compared to control. LLLT accelerated the muscular healing by significantly decreasing superoxide anion production, TBARS levels, the activity of SOD, and hydroxyproline content. The data strongly indicate that increased ROS production and augmented collagen synthesis are elicited by traumatic muscular injury, effects that were significantly decreased by LLLT.

  4. Laser-Induced Damage Initiation and Growth of Optical Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxia Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The lifetime of optical components is determined by the combination of laser-induced damage initiation probability and damage propagation rate during subsequent laser shots. This paper reviews both theoretical and experimental investigations on laser-induced damage initiation and growth at the surface of optics. The damage mechanism is generally considered as thermal absorption and electron avalanche, which play dominant roles for the different laser pulse durations. The typical damage morphology in the surface of components observed in experiments is also closely related to the damage mechanism. The damage crater in thermal absorption process, which can be estimated by thermal diffusion model, is typical distortion, melting, and ablation debris often with an elevated rim caused by melted material flow and resolidification. However, damage initiated by electron avalanche is often accompanied by generation of plasma, crush, and fracture, which can be explained by thermal explosion model. Damage growth at rear surface of components is extremely severe which can be explained by several models, such as fireball growth, impact crater, brittle fracture, and electric field enhancement. All the physical effects are not independent but mutually coupling. Developing theoretical models of multiphysics coupling are an important trend for future theoretical research. Meanwhile, more attention should be paid to integrated analysis both in theory and experiment.

  5. Novel device for tissue cooling during endoscopic laryngeal laser surgery: thermal damage study in an ex vivo calf model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Hae Jin; Burns, James A; Kobler, James B; Heaton, James T; Zeitels, Steven M

    2012-07-01

    Minimizing collateral thermal damage during endoscopic laryngeal laser surgery remains a priority, and tissue cooling is one way to achieve this goal. Cooling systems utilizing compressed air have been shown to reduce the extent of thermal trauma on the vocal folds, but these units are not ideal for endoscopic applications because cooling is inefficient at the low airflows needed. We examined whether a novel vortex cooling device that generates cooled air at low flow rates would provide a cooling benefit beyond that which could be obtained by using room-temperature air for cooling tissue or by using no cooling during simulated laryngeal laser surgery. A continuous-wave thulium laser was used to incise glottic tissue in 12 calf vocal folds. Cooling was achieved with a prototype vortex cooler (9 degrees C air output; flow rate, 3 L/min), and tissue temperature measurements were compared to those with room-air cooling and no cooling. Thermal damage was analyzed histologically by measuring the depth of lactate dehydrogenase inactivation surrounding the mucosal incision. The cooling conditions were tested during time-constant cuts (8 seconds) and depth-constant cuts (into the thyroarytenoid muscle). During time-constant cuts, comparison between vortex cooling and room-air cooling revealed that vortex cooling resulted in a thermal damage zone that was 14% smaller (519 versus 603 microm; p cooling created a thermal damage zone that was 32% smaller than that created with no cooling (p cooling (p cooling reduces thermal damage more effectively than room-air cooling or no cooling during both time-constant and depth-constant thulium laser cuts.

  6. Laser Damage Precursors in Fused Silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, P; Suratwala, T; Bude, J; Laurence, T A; Shen, N; Steele, W A; Feit, M; Menapace, J; Wong, L

    2009-11-11

    There is a longstanding, and largely unexplained, correlation between the laser damage susceptibility of optical components and both the surface quality of the optics, and the presence of near surface fractures in an optic. In the present work, a combination of acid leaching, acid etching, and confocal time resolved photoluminescence (CTP) microscopy has been used to study laser damage initiation at indentation sites. The combination of localized polishing and variations in indentation loads allows one to isolate and characterize the laser damage susceptibility of densified, plastically flowed and fractured fused silica. The present results suggest that: (1) laser damage initiation and growth are strongly correlated with fracture surfaces, while densified and plastically flowed material is relatively benign, and (2) fracture events result in the formation of an electronically defective rich surface layer which promotes energy transfer from the optical beam to the glass matrix.

  7. Dielectric nanostructures with high laser damage threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, C. Y.; Hong, L. Y.; Deng, J.; Khoo, E. H.; Liu, Z.; Wu, R. F.; Teng, J. H.

    2017-02-01

    Dielectric-based metamaterials are proposed to be the ideal candidates for low-loss, high-efficiency devices. However, to employ dielectric nanostructures for high-power applications, the dielectric material must have a high laser-induced damaged threshold (LIDT) value. In this work, we investigated the LIDT values of dielectric nanostructures for high-power fiber laser applications. Consequently, we found that the fabricated SiO2 nanostructured lens can withstand laser fluence exceeding 100 J/cm2.

  8. Cumulative fatigue damage models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgaw, Michael A.

    1988-01-01

    The problem of calculating expected component life under fatigue loading conditions is complicated by the fact that component loading histories contain, in many cases, cyclic loads of widely varying amplitudes. In such a case a cumulative damage model is required, in addition to a fatigue damage criterion, or life relationship, in order to compute the expected fatigue life. The traditional cumulative damage model used in design is the linear damage rule. This model, while being simple to use, can yield grossly unconservative results under certain loading conditions. Research at the NASA Lewis Research Center has led to the development of a nonlinear cumulative damage model, named the double damage curve approach (DDCA), that has greatly improved predictive capability. This model, which considers the life (or loading) level dependence of damage evolution, was applied successfully to two polycrystalline materials, 316 stainless steel and Haynes 188. The cumulative fatigue behavior of the PWA 1480 single-crystal material is currently being measured to determine the applicability of the DDCA for this material.

  9. Understanding Femtosecond-Pulse Laser Damage through Fundamental Physics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Robert A., III

    It did not take long after the invention of the laser for the field of laser damage to appear. For several decades researchers have been studying how lasers damage materials, both for the basic scientific understanding of highly nonequilibrium processes as well as for industrial applications. Femtosecond pulse lasers create little collateral damage and a readily reproducible damage pattern. They are easily tailored to desired specifications and are particularly powerful and versatile tools, contributing even more industrial interest in the field. As with most long-standing fields of research, many theoretical tools have been developed to model the laser damage process, covering a wide range of complexities and regimes of applicability. However, most of the modeling methods developed are either too limited in spatial extent to model the full morphology of the damage crater, or incorporate only a small subset of the important physics and require numerous fitting parameters and assumptions in order to match values interpolated from experimental data. Demonstrated in this work is the first simulation method capable of fundamentally modeling the full laser damage process, from the laser interaction all the way through to the resolidification of the target, on a large enough scale that can capture the full morphology of the laser damage crater so as to be compared directly to experimental measurements instead of extrapolated values, and all without any fitting parameters. The design, implementation, and testing of this simulation technique, based on a modified version of the particle-in-cell (PIC) method, is presented. For a 60 fs, 1 mum wavelength laser pulse with fluences of 0.5 J/cm 2, 1.0 J/cm2, and 2.0 J/cm2 the resulting laser damage craters in copper are shown and, using the same technique applied to experimental crater morphologies, a laser damage fluence threshold is calculated of 0.15 J/cm2, consistent with current experiments performed under conditions similar

  10. Laser induced damage studies in mercury cadmium telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Amit; Kapoor, Avinashi; Tripathi, K. N.; Bansal, S. K.

    2007-10-01

    We have investigated laser induced damage at 1.06 μm laser wavelength in diamond paste polished (mirror finish) and carborundum polished Hg0.8Cd0.2Te (MCT) samples with increasing fluence as well as number of pulses. Evolution of damage morphology in two types of samples is quite different. In case of diamond paste polished samples, evolution of damage morphological features is consistent with Hg evaporation with transport of Cd/Te globules towards the periphery of the molten region. Cd/Te globules get accumulated with successive laser pulses at the periphery indicating an accumulation effect. Real time reflectivity (RTR) measurement has been done to understand melt pool dynamics. RTR measurements along with the thermal profile of the melt pool are in good agreement with thermal melting model of laser irradiated MCT samples. In case of carborundum polished samples, laser damage threshold is significantly reduced. Damage morphological features are significantly influenced by surface microstructural condition. From comparison of the morphological features in the two cases, it can be inferred that laser processing of MCT for device applications depends significantly on surface preparation conditions.

  11. Laser-induced damage threshold of silicon under combined millisecond and nanosecond laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xueming; Pan, Yunxiang; Jia, Zhichao; Li, Zewen; Zhang, Hongchao; Ni, Xiaowu

    2017-03-01

    The laser-silicon interaction process was investigated with the superposed radiation of two pulsed Nd:YAG lasers. A pulse duration of 1 millisecond (ms) was superposed by 7 nanosecond (ns) pulses, creating a combined pulse laser (CPL). The time-resolved surface temperature of silicon was measured by an infrared radiation pyrometer. The melting thresholds of silicon were attained for a single ms laser and a CPL by infrared radiometry and time-resolved reflectance. The concept of threshold boundary was proposed, and a fitted curve of threshold boundary was obtained. An axisymmetric model was established for laser heating of silicon. The transient temperature fields were obtained for single ms laser and CPL irradiation using finite element analysis. The numerical results were validated experimentally, and an obvious decrease in melting threshold was found under CPL irradiation. That is attributed to pre-heating by the ms laser and the surface damage caused by the ns laser.

  12. Laser induced damage in optical materials: 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, H. E.; Chase, L. L.; Guenther, A. H.; Newnam, B. E.; Soileau, M. J.

    1990-10-01

    The 21st Annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers was divided into sessions concerning Materials and Measurements, Mirrors and Surfaces, Thin Films, and, finally, Fundamental Mechanisms. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for high power apparatus. The wavelength range of the prime interest included surface characterization, thin film substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. The scalling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength was discussed in detail.

  13. Laser-Induced Damage Growth on Larger-Aperture Fused Silica Optical Components at 351 nm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Wan-Qing; ZHANG Xiao-Min; HAN Wei; WANG Fang; XIANG Yong; LI Fu-Quan; FENG Bin; JING Feng; WEI Xiao-Feng; ZHENG Wan-Guo

    2009-01-01

    Laser-induced damage is a key lifetime limiter for optics in high-power laser facility. Damage initiation and growth under 351 nm high-fluence laser irradiation are observed on larger-aperture fused silica optics. The input surface of one fused silica component is damaged most severely and an explanation is presented. Obscurations and the area of a scratch on it are found to grow exponentially with the shot number. The area of damage site grows linearly. Micrographs of damage sites support the micro-explosion damage model which could be used to qualitatively explain the phenomena.

  14. Catastrophic nanosecond laser induced damage in the bulk of potassium titanyl phosphate crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Frank R., E-mail: frank.wagner@fresnel.fr; Natoli, Jean-Yves; Akhouayri, Hassan; Commandré, Mireille [Institut Fresnel, CNRS, Aix-Marseille Université, Ecole Centrale Marseille, Campus de St Jérôme, 13013 Marseille (France); Duchateau, Guillaume [CELIA, UMR 5107 Université Bordeaux 1-CNRS-CEA, 351 Cours de la Libération, 33405 Talence Cedex (France)

    2014-06-28

    Due to its high effective nonlinearity and the possibility to produce periodically poled crystals, potassium titanyl phosphate (KTiOPO{sub 4}, KTP) is still one of the economically important nonlinear optical materials. In this overview article, we present a large study on catastrophic nanosecond laser induced damage in this material and the very similar RbTiOPO{sub 4} (RTP). Several different systematic studies are included: multiple pulse laser damage, multi-wavelength laser damage in KTP, damage resistance anisotropy, and variations of the laser damage thresholds for RTP crystals of different qualities. All measurements were carried out in comparable experimental conditions using a 1064 nm Q-switched laser and some were repeated at 532 nm. After summarizing the experimental results, we detail the proposed model for laser damage in this material and discuss the experimental results in this context. According to the model, nanosecond laser damage is caused by light-induced generation of transient laser-damage precursors which subsequently provide free electrons that are heated by the same nanosecond pulse. We also present a stimulated Raman scattering measurement and confront slightly different models to the experimental data. Finally, the physical nature of the transient damage precursors is discussed and similarities and differences to laser damage in other crystals are pointed out.

  15. Investigation of stress induced by CO2 laser processing of fused silica optics for laser damage growth mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallais, Laurent; Cormont, Philippe; Rullier, Jean-Luc

    2009-12-21

    Laser damage mitigation' is a process developed to prevent the growth of nanosecond laser-initiated damage sites under successive irradiation. It consists of re-fusing the damage area with a CO2 laser. In this paper we investigate the stress field created around mitigated sites which could have an influence on the efficiency of the process. A numerical model of CO2 laser interaction with fused silica is developed. It takes into account laser energy absorption, heat transfer, thermally induced stress and birefringence. Residual stress near mitigated sites in fused silica samples is characterized with specific photoelastic methods and theoretical data are compared to experiments. The stress distribution and quantitative values of stress levels are obtained for sites treated with the CO2 laser in various conditions of energy deposition (beam size, pulse duration, incident power). The results provided evidence that the presence of birefringence/residual stress around the mitigated sites has an effect on their laser damage resistance.

  16. Damage induced by femtosecond laser in optical dielectric films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Caihua Huang; Yiyu Xue; Zhilin Xia; Yuanan Zhao; Fangfang Yang; Peitao Guo

    2009-01-01

    Both the nature of avalanche ionization (AI) and the role of multi-photon ionization (MPI) in the studies of laser-induced damage have remained controversial up to now. According to the model proposed by Stuart et al., we study the role of MPI and AI in laser-induced damage in two dielectric films, fused silica (FS) and barium aluminum borosilicate (BBS), irradiated by 780-nm laser pulse with the pulse width range of 0.01 鈥? 5 ps. The effects of MPI and initial electron density on seed electron generation are numerically analyzed. For FS, laser-induced damage is dominated by AI for the entire pulse width regime due to the wider band-gap. While for BBS, MPI becomes the leading power in damage for the pulse width r less than about 0.03 ps. MPI may result in a sharp rise of threshold fluence Fth on 蟿, and AI may lead to a mild increase or even a constant value of Fth on 蟿. MPI serves the production of seed electrons for AI when the electron density for AI is approached or exceeded before the end of MPI. This also means that the effect of initial electron can be neglected when MPI dominates the seed electron generation. The threshold fluence Fth decreases with the increasing initial electron density when the latter exceeds a certain critical value.

  17. Laser annealing heals radiation damage in avalanche photodiodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Jin Gyu [University of Waterloo, Institute for Quantum Computing, Waterloo, ON (Canada); University of Waterloo, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Anisimova, Elena; Higgins, Brendon L.; Bourgoin, Jean-Philippe [University of Waterloo, Institute for Quantum Computing, Waterloo, ON (Canada); University of Waterloo, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Jennewein, Thomas [University of Waterloo, Institute for Quantum Computing, Waterloo, ON (Canada); University of Waterloo, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, Quantum Information Science Program, Toronto, ON (Canada); Makarov, Vadim [University of Waterloo, Institute for Quantum Computing, Waterloo, ON (Canada); University of Waterloo, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Waterloo, ON (Canada); University of Waterloo, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Waterloo, ON (Canada)

    2017-12-15

    Avalanche photodiodes (APDs) are a practical option for space-based quantum communications requiring single-photon detection. However, radiation damage to APDs significantly increases their dark count rates and thus reduces their useful lifetimes in orbit. We show that high-power laser annealing of irradiated APDs of three different models (Excelitas C30902SH, Excelitas SLiK, and Laser Components SAP500S2) heals the radiation damage and several APDs are restored to typical pre-radiation dark count rates. Of nine samples we test, six APDs were thermally annealed in a previous experiment as another solution to mitigate the radiation damage. Laser annealing reduces the dark count rates further in all samples with the maximum dark count rate reduction factor varying between 5.3 and 758 when operating at -80 C. This indicates that laser annealing is a more effective method than thermal annealing. The illumination power to reach these reduction factors ranges from 0.8 to 1.6 W. Other photon detection characteristics, such as photon detection efficiency, timing jitter, and afterpulsing probability, fluctuate but the overall performance of quantum communications should be largely unaffected by these variations. These results herald a promising method to extend the lifetime of a quantum satellite equipped with APDs. (orig.)

  18. Influence of Ambient Temperature on Nanosecond and Picosecond Laser-Induced Bulk Damage of Fused Silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The nanosecond (ns and picosecond (ps pulsed laser-induced damage behaviors of fused silica under cryogenic and room temperature have been investigated. The laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT and damage probability are used to understand the damage behavior at different ambient temperatures. The results show that the LIDTs for both ns and ps slightly increased at cryogenic temperature compared to that at room temperature. Meanwhile, the damage probability has an inverse trend; that is, the damage probability at low temperature is smaller than that at room temperature. A theoretical model based on heated crystal lattice is well consistent with the experimental results.

  19. Laser Pointers Can Cause Serious Eye Damage in Kids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160743.html Laser Pointers Can Cause Serious Eye Damage in Kids ... 1, 2016 THURSDAY, Sept. 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Laser pointers may look harmless enough, but when children ...

  20. Effect of native defects and laser-induced defects on multi-shot laser-induced damage in multilayer mirrors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Wang; Yuanan Zhao; Tanda Shao; Zhengxiu Fan

    2011-01-01

    The roles of laser-induced defects and native defects in multilayer mirrors under multi-shot irradiation condition are investigated. The HfO2/SiO2 dielectric mirrors are deposited by electron beam evaporation (EBE). Laser damage testing is carried out on both the 1-on-l and S-on-1 regimes using 355-nm pulsed laser at a duration of 8 ns. It is found that the single-shot laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) is much higher than the multi-shot LIDT. In the multi-shot mode, the main factor influencing LIDT is the accumulation of irreversible laser-induced defects and native defects. The surface morphologies of the samples are observed by optical microscopy. Moreover, the number of laser-induced defects affects the damage probability of the samples. A correlative model based on critical conduction band (CB) electron density (ED) is presented to simulate the multi-shot damage behavior.%@@ The roles of laser-induced defects and native defects in multilayer mirrors under multi-shot irradiation condition are investigated.The Hf02/SiO2 dielectric mirrors are deposited by electron beam evaporation (EBE).Laser damage testing is carried out on both the 1-on-1 and S-on-1 regimes using 355-nn pulsed laser at a duration of 8 us.It is found that the single-shot laser-induced damage threshold(LIDT)is much higher than the multi-shot LIDT.In the multi-shot mode,the main factor influencing LIDT is the accumulation of irreversible laser-induced defects and native defects.The surface morphologies of the samples are observed by optical microscopy.Moreover,the number of laser-induced defects affects the damage probability of the samples.A correlative model based on critical conduction band(CB)electron density(ED)is presented to simulate the multi-shot damage behavior.

  1. Investigation of mechanisms leading to laser damage morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamaignère, L.; Chambonneau, M.; Diaz, R.; Grua, P.; Courchinoux, R.; Natoli, J.-Y.; Rullier, J. L.

    2016-12-01

    The original damage ring pattern at the exit surface of fused silica induced by highly modulated nanosecond infrared laser pulses demonstrates the time dependence of damage morphology. Such a damage structure is used to study the dynamics of the plasma issued from open cracks. This pattern originates from electron avalanche in this plasma, which simultaneously leads to an ionization front displacement in air and a silica ablation process. Experiments have shown that the propagation speed of the detonation wave reaches about 20 km/s and scales as the cube root of the laser intensity, in good agreement with theoretical hydrodynamics modeling. During this presentation, we present the different phases and the associated mechanisms leading to this peculiar morphology: • During an incubation phase, a precursor defect provides energy deposit that drives the near surface material into a plasma state. • Next the silica plasma provides free electrons in the surrounding air, under laser irradiation an electron avalanche is initiated and generates a breakdown wave. • Then this breakdown wave leads to an expansion of the air plasma. This latter is able to heat strongly the silica surface as well as generate free electrons in its conduction band. Hence, the silica becomes activated along the breakdown wave. • When the silica has become absorbent, an ablation mechanism of silica occurs, simultaneously with the air plasma expansion, resulting in the formation of the ring patterns in the case of these modulated laser pulses. These mechanisms are supported by experiments realized in vacuum environment. A model describing the expansion of the heated area by thermal conduction due to plasma free electrons is then presented. Next, the paper deals with the two damage formation phases that are distinguished. The first phase corresponds to the incubation of the laser flux by a subsurface defect until the damage occurrence: an incubation fluence corresponds to this phase. The

  2. Initiation, Growth and Mitigation of UV Laser Induced Damage in Fused Silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubenchik, A M; Feit, M D

    2001-12-21

    Laser damage of large fused silica optics initiates at imperfections. Possible initiation mechanisms are considered. We demonstrate that a model based on nanoparticle explosions is consistent with the observed initiation craters. Possible mechanisms for growth upon subsequent laser irradiation, including material modification and laser intensification, are discussed. Large aperture experiments indicate an exponential increase in damage size with number of laser shots. Physical processes associated with this growth and a qualitative explanation of self-accelerated growth is presented. Rapid growth necessitates damage growth mitigation techniques. Several possible mitigation techniques are mentioned, with special emphasis on CO{sub 2} processing. Analysis of material evaporation, crack healing, and thermally induced stress are presented.

  3. Initiation, Growth and Mitigation of UV Laser Induced Damage in Fused Silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubenchik, A M; Feit, M D

    2003-06-10

    Laser damage of large fused silica optics initiates at imperfections. Possible initiation mechanisms are considered. We demonstrate that a model based on nanoparticle explosions is consistent with the observed initiation craters. Possible mechanisms for growth upon subsequent laser irradiation, including material modification and laser intensification, are discussed. Large aperture experiments indicate an exponential increase in damage size with number of laser shots. Physical processes associated with this growth and a qualitative explanation of self-accelerated growth is presented. Rapid growth necessitates damage growth mitigation techniques. Several possible mitigation techniques are mentioned, with special emphasis on CO{sub 2} processing. Analysis of material evaporation, crack healing, and thermally induced stress are presented.

  4. Theoretical analysis for temperature dependence of laser- induced damage threshold of optical thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, K.; Motokoshi, S.; Somekawa, T.; Jitsuno, T.; Fujita, M.; Tanaka, KA; Azechi, H.

    2016-03-01

    The temperature dependence of the laser-induced damage threshold on optical coatings was studied in detail for laser pulses from 123 K to 473 K at different temperatures. The laser-induced damage threshold increased with decreasing temperatures when we tested long pulses (200 ps and 4 ns). The temperature dependence, however, was reversed for pulses shorter than a few picoseconds (100 fs testing). We propose a scaling model with a flowchart that includes three separate processes: free-electron generation, electron multiplication, and electron heating. Furthermore, we calculated the temperature dependence of laser-induced damage thresholds at different temperatures. Our calculation results agreed well with the experimental results.

  5. Laser-Induced Thermal Damage of Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-12-01

    As with the eye model, ther- mal damage is predicted using Henriques damage integral (11). This criterion involves integrating temperature- dependent...epide•: mal layers are much larger than the coefficients for the entire skin presented in Figure 5. This observation suggests there should be twd...EXPOI"’ES INVOLVJINS MUMtPLE PULSES OTOODYCIZO 010OTO OJO SI tNGLE PUL.$LSE 19(M."ft 7.13NP#R5 xxsLlimft p DO 3 ?V 36 Ep(MgiSNPRCL) *~To so 36

  6. Assessing laser-tissue damage with bioluminescent imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmink, Gerald J.; Opalenik, Susan R.; Beckham, Josh T.; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Jansen, Eric D.

    2006-07-01

    Effective medical laser procedures are achieved by selecting laser parameters that minimize undesirable tissue damage. Traditionally, human subjects, animal models, and monolayer cell cultures have been used to study wound healing, tissue damage, and cellular effects of laser radiation. Each of these models has significant limitations, and consequently, a novel skin model is needed. To this end, a highly reproducible human skin model that enables noninvasive and longitudinal studies of gene expression was sought. In this study, we present an organotypic raft model (engineered skin) used in combination with bioluminescent imaging (BLI) techniques. The efficacy of the raft model was validated and characterized by investigating the role of heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) as a sensitive marker of thermal damage. The raft model consists of human cells incorporated into an extracellular matrix. The raft cultures were transfected with an adenovirus containing a murine hsp70 promoter driving transcription of luciferase. The model enables quantitative analysis of spatiotemporal expression of proteins using BLI. Thermal stress was induced on the raft cultures by means of a constant temperature water bath or with a carbon dioxide (CO2) laser (λ=10.6 µm, 0.679 to 2.262 W/cm2, cw, unfocused Gaussian beam, ωL=4.5 mm, 1 min exposure). The bioluminescence was monitored noninvasively with an IVIS 100 Bioluminescent Imaging System. BLI indicated that peak hsp70 expression occurs 4 to 12 h after exposure to thermal stress. A minimum irradiance of 0.679 W/cm2 activated the hsp70 response, and a higher irradiance of 2.262 W/cm2 was associated with a severe reduction in hsp70 response due to tissue ablation. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that hsp70 mRNA levels increased with prolonged heating exposures. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent protein assays confirmed that luciferase was an accurate surrogate for hsp70 intracellular protein levels. Hematoxylin and

  7. Assessing laser-tissue damage with bioluminescent imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmink, Gerald J; Opalenik, Susan R; Beckham, Joshua T; Davidson, Jeffrey M; Jansen, E Duco

    2006-01-01

    Effective medical laser procedures are achieved by selecting laser parameters that minimize undesirable tissue damage. Traditionally, human subjects, animal models, and monolayer cell cultures have been used to study wound healing, tissue damage, and cellular effects of laser radiation. Each of these models has significant limitations, and consequently, a novel skin model is needed. To this end, a highly reproducible human skin model that enables noninvasive and longitudinal studies of gene expression was sought. In this study, we present an organotypic raft model (engineered skin) used in combination with bioluminescent imaging (BLI) techniques. The efficacy of the raft model was validated and characterized by investigating the role of heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) as a sensitive marker of thermal damage. The raft model consists of human cells incorporated into an extracellular matrix. The raft cultures were transfected with an adenovirus containing a murine hsp70 promoter driving transcription of luciferase. The model enables quantitative analysis of spatiotemporal expression of proteins using BLI. Thermal stress was induced on the raft cultures by means of a constant temperature water bath or with a carbon dioxide (CO2) laser (lambda=10.6 microm, 0.679 to 2.262 Wcm2, cw, unfocused Gaussian beam, omegaL=4.5 mm, 1 min exposure). The bioluminescence was monitored noninvasively with an IVIS 100 Bioluminescent Imaging System. BLI indicated that peak hsp70 expression occurs 4 to 12 h after exposure to thermal stress. A minimum irradiance of 0.679 Wcm2 activated the hsp70 response, and a higher irradiance of 2.262 Wcm2 was associated with a severe reduction in hsp70 response due to tissue ablation. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that hsp70 mRNA levels increased with prolonged heating exposures. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent protein assays confirmed that luciferase was an accurate surrogate for hsp70 intracellular protein levels. Hematoxylin

  8. Recent results on bulk laser damage threshold of optical glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedamzik, Ralf; Elsmann, Frank

    2013-02-01

    Modern pulsed laser applications cover a broad range of wavelength, power and pulse widths. Beam guiding optics in laser systems do not only have specific requirements on the imaging quality but also have to withstand high laser power. The laser damage threshold of an optical component depends on the surface (polishing, coating ...) and also on the bulk material properties. Actual values of bulk laser damage thresholds, particularly at pulse lengths less than 1 nanosecond (1 ns), of optical glasses are rarely found in literature, except for fused silica, which is known as a key optical material for components in high power laser. However, fused silica is rather expensive and limited in optical properties. That is the reason why customers often ask for laser damage threshold data of optical glasses. Therefore, SCHOTT has started a project for the characterization of the bulk laser damage threshold of optical glasses at the wavelengths 532 nm and 1064 nm with pulse lengths in the nano- and pico-second range. Bulk and surface laser damage testing has been performed by the Laser Zentrum Hannover in Germany according to the S-on-1 test of DIN EN ISO 11254-2 / DIN EN ISO 21254.

  9. Multivariate pluvial flood damage models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Ootegem, Luc [HIVA — University of Louvain (Belgium); SHERPPA — Ghent University (Belgium); Verhofstadt, Elsy [SHERPPA — Ghent University (Belgium); Van Herck, Kristine; Creten, Tom [HIVA — University of Louvain (Belgium)

    2015-09-15

    Depth–damage-functions, relating the monetary flood damage to the depth of the inundation, are commonly used in the case of fluvial floods (floods caused by a river overflowing). We construct four multivariate damage models for pluvial floods (caused by extreme rainfall) by differentiating on the one hand between ground floor floods and basement floods and on the other hand between damage to residential buildings and damage to housing contents. We do not only take into account the effect of flood-depth on damage, but also incorporate the effects of non-hazard indicators (building characteristics, behavioural indicators and socio-economic variables). By using a Tobit-estimation technique on identified victims of pluvial floods in Flanders (Belgium), we take into account the effect of cases of reported zero damage. Our results show that the flood depth is an important predictor of damage, but with a diverging impact between ground floor floods and basement floods. Also non-hazard indicators are important. For example being aware of the risk just before the water enters the building reduces content damage considerably, underlining the importance of warning systems and policy in this case of pluvial floods. - Highlights: • Prediction of damage of pluvial floods using also non-hazard information • We include ‘no damage cases’ using a Tobit model. • The damage of flood depth is stronger for ground floor than for basement floods. • Non-hazard indicators are especially important for content damage. • Potential gain of policies that increase awareness of flood risks.

  10. Raman Studies Of Laser Damaged Single- And Multi-Layer Optical Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exarhos, G. J.; Morse, P. L.

    1985-11-01

    Structural changes in dielectric optical coatings induced thermally or by high energy pulsed laser irradiation have been studied by the non-destructive technique of Raman Spectroscopy. A two laser (damage, probe) arrangement was used to characterize the damage process in crystalline and amorphous TiO2 and Zr02 coatings on silica during irradiation and at longer times following the onset of damage. Raman measurements were also undertaken to assess the effects of coating phase and microcrystalline grain orientation on laser induced damage in Ti02. Results suggest that certain phases have higher damage thresholds for comparable coating thicknesses and that thermal and electronic excitation effects are important considerations for modeling the damage process.

  11. CO2 laser modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Barry

    1992-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: (1) CO2 laser kinetics modeling; (2) gas lifetimes in pulsed CO2 lasers; (3) frequency chirp and laser pulse spectral analysis; (4) LAWS A' Design Study; and (5) discharge circuit components for LAWS. The appendices include LAWS Memos, computer modeling of pulsed CO2 lasers for lidar applications, discharge circuit considerations for pulsed CO2 lidars, and presentation made at the Code RC Review.

  12. Laser-induced damage of 1064-nm narrow-band interference filters under different laser modes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weidong Gao(高卫东); Hongbo He(贺洪波); Jianda Shao(邵建达); Zhengxiu Fan(范正修)

    2004-01-01

    The laser-induced damage behavior of narrow-band interference filters was investigated with a Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm under single-pulse mode and free-running laser mode.The absorption measurement of such coatings has been performed by surface thermal lensing(STL)technique.The relationship between damage morphology and absorption under the two different laser modes was studied in detail.The explanation was given by the standing-wave distribution theory.

  13. Nd : YAG surgical laser effects in canine prostate tissue: temperature and damage distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nimwegen, S. A.; L'Eplattenier, H. F.; Rem, A. I.; van der Lugt, J. J.; Kirpensteijn, J.

    2009-01-01

    An in vitro model was used to predict short-term, laser-induced, thermal damage in canine prostate tissue. Canine prostate tissue samples were equipped with thermocouple probes to measure tissue temperature at 3, 6, 9 and 12 mm depths. The tissue surface was irradiated with a Nd:YAG laser in contact

  14. Origins of laser damage in crystals of KDP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Yoreo, J; Demos, S; Yan, M; Staggs, M

    2000-05-16

    The ability of optical materials to withstand high power ultraviolet (UV) laser irradiation without sustaining irrevocable damage is critically important in two areas central to LLNL: laser fusion and UV lithography. In particular, the output fluence of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is limited by the 351 nm laser damage thresholds of the KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} (KDP) frequency conversion crystals. The ability to increase the laser output would maximize the odds of achieving ignition, allow target physicists to assess target performance at higher drives, and provide higher temperature-density conditions for studies of the physics of stellar interiors. Moreover, in order to meet the current design criteria for fusion laser systems, KDP crystals must be conditioned by illumination with low fluence laser irradiation to increase the damage threshold by about a factor of two. Over the past two decades, LLNL generated an extensive data base on laser damage and conditioning in KDP and DKDP crystals. While the damage thresholds have improved over time--primarily in response to better filtration of growth solutions--they are still far below what is expected from the band structure of the perfect crystal. Thus these empirical studies have shown that damage in KDP, like the other NIF optical materials, is caused by extrinsic defects. The purpose of this project was to perform the basic science needed to understand the process of damage or conditioning and identify the defects responsible for damage. In addition, we sought to develop time resolved spectroscopy and imaging tools that would be generally applicable to investigations of laser-materials interactions.

  15. Structural Modifications in Fused Silica Due to Laser Damage Induced Shock Compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubota, A; Davila, L; Caturla, M J; Stolken, J S; Sadigh, B; Quong, A; Rubenchik, A; Feit, M D

    2001-12-05

    High power laser pulses can produce damage in high quality fused silica optics that can lead to its eventual obscuration and failure. Current models suggest the initiation of a plasma detonation due to absorbing initiators and defects, leading to the formation of shock waves. Recent experiments have found a densified layer at the bottom of damage sites, as evidence of the laser-damage model. We have studied the propagation of shock waves through fused silica using molecular dynamics. These simulations show drastic modifications in the structure and topology of the network, in agreement with experimental observations.

  16. Automated system for laser damage testing of coated optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Dale C.; Streater, Alan D.

    2005-12-01

    Research Electro-Optics Inc. (REO) has recently developed a new laser damage testing facility for the purpose of optimizing process parameters for fabrication and coating of high-damage optics. It also enables full or sample qualification of optics with laser damage specifications. The fully automated laser damage testing system uses microscope photography for detection of damage and a 3 ns pulse length 1064 nm laser for irradiation of the sample. It can test and statistically analyze damage events from a large number of shots, enabling large area testing for low probability events. The system measures and maps sizes and locations of damage sites down to a few microns in diameter. The results are not subject to variations due to the human operator. For coatings deposited by ion beam sputtering, small defects (less than 20 microns) are found to be most prevalent at the fluences specified for small optics for the National Ignition Facility. The ability to measure and characterize small defects has improved REO's ability to optimize their processes for making coated optics with high damage thresholds. In addition to qualifying particular parts, the periodic testing also assures that equipment and processes remain optimized.

  17. Techniques for preventing damage to high power laser components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stowers, I.F.; Patton, H.G.; Jones, W.A.; Wentworth, D.E.

    1977-09-01

    Techniques for preventing damage to components of the LASL Shiva high power laser system were briefly presented. Optical element damage in the disk amplifier from the combined fluence of the primary laser beam and the Xenon flash lamps that pump the cavity was discussed. Assembly and cleaning techniques were described which have improved optical element life by minimizing particulate and optically absorbing film contamination on assembled amplifier structures. A Class-100 vertical flaw clean room used for assembly and inspection of laser components was also described. The life of a disk amplifier was extended from less than 50 shots to 500 shots through application of these assembly and cleaning techniques. (RME)

  18. Laser-induced damage of DKDP crystal under different wavelengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Mingxia; Wang, Zhengping; Cheng, Xiufeng; Sun, Shaotao; Liu, Baoan; Gao, Hui; Xu, Xinguang [State Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan, 250100 (China); Ji, Lailin [Shanghai Institute of Laser and Plasmas, CAEP, P. O. Box 800-229, Shanghai, 201800 (China); Zhao, Yuanan [Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Jiading, 201800 (China); Sun, Xun

    2010-07-15

    In this paper, DKDP crystals were grown from 80% deuterated solution by traditional temperature-reduction method. The crystal samples were selected to test laser damage threshold (LDT) and laser conditioning of 1{omega}, 2{omega} and 3{omega}. We found that the laser conditioning of 3{omega} has much more effect on improving the LDT. The damage site was observed by microscope and its effects on micro-structure and optical properties were also studied. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. Optics damage modeling and analysis at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Z. M.; Raymond, B.; Gaylord, J.; Fallejo, R.; Bude, J.; Wegner, P.

    2014-10-01

    Comprehensive modeling of laser-induced damage in optics for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has been performed on fused silica wedge focus lenses with a metric that compares the modeled damage performance to online inspections. The results indicate that damage models are successful in tracking the performance of the fused silica final optics when properly accounting for various optical finishes and mitigation processes. This validates the consistency of the damage models and allows us to further monitor and evaluate different system parameters that potentially can affect optics performance.

  20. Thulium fiber laser damage to Nitinol stone baskets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Christopher R.; Hardy, Luke A.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2015-02-01

    Our laboratory is studying the experimental Thulium fiber laser (TFL) as an alternative lithotripter to clinical gold standard Holmium:YAG laser. Safety studies characterizing undesirable Holmium laser-induced damage to Nitinol stone baskets have been previously reported. Similarly, this study characterizes TFL induced stone basket damage. A TFL beam with pulse energy of 35 mJ, pulse duration of 500 μs, and pulse rates of 50-500 Hz was delivered through 100-μm-core optical fibers, to a standard 1.9-Fr Nitinol stone basket wire. Stone basket damage was graded as a function of pulse rate, number of pulses, and working distance. Nitinol wire damage decreased with working distance and was non-existent at distances greater than 1.0 mm. In contact mode, 500 pulses delivered at pulse rates >= 200 Hz (Nitinol wires. The Thulium fiber laser, operated in low pulse energy and high pulse rate mode, may provide a greater safety margin than standard Holmium laser for lithotripsy, as evidenced by shorter non-contact working distances for stone basket damage than previously reported with Holmium laser.

  1. Contamination resistant coatings for enhanced laser damage thresholds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiller, Bruce H.; Fowler, Jesse D.; Villahermosa, Randy M.

    2012-11-01

    This paper describes a novel approach for the suppression of contamination enhanced laser damage to optical components by the use of fluorinated coatings that repel organic contaminates. In prior work we studied laser damage thresholds induced by ppm levels of toluene under nanosecond 1.064 μm irradiation of fused silica optics. That work showed that moderate vapor-phase concentrations (alcohols dramatically increased the laser damage threshold. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that water and alcohols interact more favorably with the hydroxylated silica surface thereby displacing toluene from the surface. In this work, preliminary results show that fluorinated self assembled monolayer coatings can be used to accomplish the same effect. Optics coated with fluorinated films have much higher survival rates compared with uncoated optics under the same conditions. In addition to enhancing survival of laser optics, these coatings have implications for protecting spacecraft imaging optics from organic contamination.

  2. BDS Thin Film UV Antireflection Laser Damage Competition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolz, C J

    2010-10-26

    UV antireflection coatings are a challenging coating for high power laser applications as exemplified by the use of uncoated Brewster's windows in laser cavities. In order to understand the current laser resistance of UV AR coatings in the industrial and university sectors, a double blind laser damage competition was performed. The coatings have a maximum reflectance of 0.5% at 355 nm at normal incidence. Damage testing will be performed using the raster scan method with a 7.5 ns pulse length on a single testing facility to facilitate direct comparisons. In addition to the laser resistance results, details of deposition processes and coating materials will also be shared.

  3. Incident laser modulation of a repaired damage site with a rim in fused silica rear subsurface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Li; Xiang Xia; Zu Xiao-Tao; Yuan Xiao-Dong; He Shao-Bo; Jiang Xiao-Dong; Zheng Wan-Guo

    2012-01-01

    Local CO2 laser treatment has proved to be an effective method to prevent the 351-nm laser-induced damage sitesin a fused silica surface from exponentially growing,which is responsible for limiting the lifetime of optics in high fluence laser systems.However,the CO2 laser induced ablation crater is often surrounded by a raised rim at the edge,which can also result in the intensification of transmitted ultraviolet light that may damage the downstream optics.In this work,the three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method is developed to simulate the distribution of electrical field intensity in the vicinity of the CO2 laser mitigated damage site located in the exit subsurface of fused silica.The simulated results show that the repaired damage sites with raised rims cause more notable modulation to the incident laser than those without rims.Specifically,we present a theoretical model of using dimpled patterning to control the rim structure around the edge of repaired damage sites to avoid damage to downstream optics.The calculated results accord well with previous experimental results and the underlying physical mechanism is analysed in detail.

  4. Mechanical impedance measurement and damage detection using noncontact laser ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeonseok; Lim, Hyeong Uk; Hong, Jung-Wuk; Sohn, Hoon

    2014-06-01

    This Letter proposes a mechanical impedance (MI) measurement technique using noncontact laser ultrasound. The ultrasound is generated by shooting a pulse laser beam onto a target structure, and its response is measured using a laser vibrometer. Once ultrasound propagation converges to structural vibration, MI is formed over the entire structure. Because noncontact lasers are utilized, this technique is applicable in harsh environments, free of electromagnetic interference, and able to perform wide-range scanning. The formation of MI and its feasibility for damage detection are verified through thermo-mechanical finite element analysis and lab-scale experiments.

  5. Influence of the contaminant size on the thermal damage of optical mirrors used in high energy laser system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kai; Song, Rui; Xu, Xiaojun; Liu, Zejin

    2016-09-01

    The laser induced damage is a troublesome issue in the application of optical mirrors, which is related to the robustness of the whole laser system. There are two types of mechanisms about the damage of optical mirrors: thermal effect and field effect, which are responsible for the high energy continuous wave (cw) laser induced damage and the high power pulsed laser induced damage, respectively. Under the irradiation of high energy laser, the contaminant on the mirror surface absorbs the laser energy and converts the laser energy to heat. With the heat accumulating, the optical mirror is likely to fuse and even be totally destroyed. The temperature of the contaminant was measured when it was irradiated by a cw high energy laser with power intensity 3.3kW/cm2. It is found that the contaminant achieves thermal equilibrium in a few seconds and then the temperature stays at 1700K. A physical model was established to describe the process of the thermal equilibrium. The influence of the contaminant size on the thermal damage of the optical mirror was studied theoretically. The results show that the contaminant size plays an important role in the thermal damage of the optical mirror. Only when the contaminant size is smaller than a critical size ( 10μm), the contaminant may reach thermal equilibrium and the optical mirror works well in the high energy laser system. If the contaminant size is quite large (mirror will damage under the irradiation of high energy laser.

  6. Low-power-laser therapy used in tendon damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strupinska, Ewa

    1996-03-01

    The following paper covers evaluation of low-power laser therapy results in chronic Achilles tendon damage and external Epicondylalia (tennis elbow). Fifty patients with Achilles damage (18 women and 32 men, age average 30, 24 plus or minus 10, 39 years) and fifty patients having external Epicondyalgiae (31 women and 19 men, age average 44, 36 plus or minus 10, 88 years) have been examined. The patients were irradiated by semiconductor infrared laser wavelength 904 nm separately or together with helium-neon laser wavelength 632.8 nm. The results of therapy have been based on the patient's interviews and examinations of patients as well as on the Laitinen pain questionnaire. The results prove analgesic effects in usage of low- power laser radiation therapy can be obtained.

  7. Brewster Angle Polarizing Beamsplitter Laser Damage Competition: P polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, Christopher J.; Runkel, Jeff

    2012-11-01

    Brewster angle plate polarizing beamsplitters play a critical role in splitting and combining beams within high power laser systems. A laser damage competition of polarizer beamsplitter coatings creates the opportunity to survey the current laser resistance these coatings within private industry, governmental institutions, and universities by a direct comparison of samples tested under identical conditions. The requirements of the coatings are a minimum transmission of 95% at "P" polarization and minimum reflection of 99% at "S" polarization at 1064 nm and 56.4 degrees angle of incidence. The choice of coating materials, design, and deposition method were left to the participant. Laser damage testing was performed according to the ISO 11254 standard utilizing a 1064 nm wavelength laser with a 10 ns pulse length operating at a repetition rate of 20 Hz. A double blind test assured sample and submitter anonymity so only a summary of the results are presented. In addition to the laser resistance results, details of cleaning methods, deposition processes, coating materials and layer count, and spectral results are also shared. Because of the large number of samples that were submitted, damage testing was conducted at "P" polarization only with "S" polarization damage testing reserved for next year on these submitted samples. Also the samples were only tested in the forward propagating direction; specifically samples were irradiated from air as the incident medium, through the thin film, and then through the substrate. In summary, a 6:1 difference existed for "P" polarization damage fluences amongst all of the competitors with the dominate variables that impacted the laser resistance being the deposition materials, deposition process, and cleaning method.

  8. Birefringence and residual stress induced by CO2 laser mitigation of damage growth in fused silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallais, L.; Cormont, P.; Rullier, J. L.

    2009-10-01

    We investigate the residual stress field created near mitigated sites and its influence on the efficiency on the CO2 laser mitigation of damage growth process. A numerical model of CO2 laser interaction with fused silica is developed that take into account laser energy absorption, heat transfer, thermally-induced stress and birefringence. Specific photoelastic methods are developed to characterize the residual stress near mitigated sites in fused silica samples. The stress distribution and quantitative values of stress levels are obtained for sites treated with the CO2 laser in various conditions of energy deposition (beam size, pulse duration, incident power). The results obtained also show that the presence of birefringence/residual stress around the mitigated sites has a critical effect on their laser damage resistance.

  9. Laser Damage Helps the Eavesdropper in Quantum Cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugge, Audun Nystad; Sauge, Sebastien; Ghazali, Aina Mardhiyah M.; Skaar, Johannes; Lydersen, Lars; Makarov, Vadim

    2014-02-01

    We propose a class of attacks on quantum key distribution (QKD) systems where an eavesdropper actively engineers new loopholes by using damaging laser illumination to permanently change properties of system components. This can turn a perfect QKD system into a completely insecure system. A proof-of-principle experiment performed on an avalanche photodiode-based detector shows that laser damage can be used to create loopholes. After ˜1 W illumination, the detectors' dark count rate reduces 2-5 times, permanently improving single-photon counting performance. After ˜1.5 W, the detectors switch permanently into the linear photodetection mode and become completely insecure for QKD applications.

  10. Tools for Predicting Optical Damage on Inertial Confinement Fusion-Class Laser Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nostrand, M C; Carr, C W; Liao, Z M; Honig, J; Spaeth, M L; Manes, K R; Johnson, M A; Adams, J J; Cross, D A; Negres, R A; Widmayer, C C; Williams, W H; Matthews, M J; Jancaitis, K S; Kegelmeyer, L M

    2010-12-20

    Operating a fusion-class laser to its full potential requires a balance of operating constraints. On the one hand, the total laser energy delivered must be high enough to give an acceptable probability for ignition success. On the other hand, the laser-induced optical damage levels must be low enough to be acceptably handled with the available infrastructure and budget for optics recycle. Our research goal was to develop the models, database structures, and algorithmic tools (which we collectively refer to as ''Loop Tools'') needed to successfully maintain this balance. Predictive models are needed to plan for and manage the impact of shot campaigns from proposal, to shot, and beyond, covering a time span of years. The cost of a proposed shot campaign must be determined from these models, and governance boards must decide, based on predictions, whether to incorporate a given campaign into the facility shot plan based upon available resources. Predictive models are often built on damage ''rules'' derived from small beam damage tests on small optics. These off-line studies vary the energy, pulse-shape and wavelength in order to understand how these variables influence the initiation of damage sites and how initiated damage sites can grow upon further exposure to UV light. It is essential to test these damage ''rules'' on full-scale optics exposed to the complex conditions of an integrated ICF-class laser system. Furthermore, monitoring damage of optics on an ICF-class laser system can help refine damage rules and aid in the development of new rules. Finally, we need to develop the algorithms and data base management tools for implementing these rules in the Loop Tools. The following highlights progress in the development of the loop tools and their implementation.

  11. Fabrication of mitigation pits for improving laser damage resistance in dielectric mirrors by femtosecond laser machining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, Justin E.; Qiu, S. Roger; Stolz, Christopher J.

    2011-03-20

    Femtosecond laser machining is used to create mitigation pits to stabilize nanosecond laser-induced damage in multilayer dielectric mirror coatings on BK7 substrates. In this paper, we characterize features and the artifacts associated with mitigation pits and further investigate the impact of pulse energy and pulse duration on pit quality and damage resistance. Our results show that these mitigation features can double the fluence-handling capability of large-aperture optical multilayer mirror coatings and further demonstrate that femtosecond laser macromachining is a promising means for fabricating mitigation geometry in multilayer coatings to increase mirror performance under high-power laser irradiation.

  12. Ultrashort Laser Retinal Damage Threshold Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-15

    Strickland and Mourou [1] introduced a technique called ‘‘chirped pulse amplification’’ to produce ultrashort laser pulses with extraordinary peak powers...photocoagula- tion of the retinal layers as had been seen in longer exposure studies. Thompson et al. [22] examined in detail the thermal response of...Gewebeveränderungen. Schlüsselwörter: Ultrakurz; Retina; Sicherheit; Femtosekunde; Melanin; Laserinduzierter Durchbruch; Ultraschnell References [1] Strickland D

  13. The effect of laser pulse width on laser-induced damage at K9 and UBK7 components surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xinda; Ba, Rongsheng; Zheng, Yinbo; Yuan, Jing; Li, Wenhong; Chen, Bo

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we investigated the effects of laser pulse width on laser-induced damage. We measured the damage threshold of K9 glass and UBK7 glass optical components at different pulse width, then analysis pulse-width dependence of damage threshold. It is shown that damage threshold at different pulse width conforms to thermal restriction mechanism, Because of cm size laser beam, defect on the optical component surface leads to laser-induced threshold decreased.

  14. Nonlinear cumulative damage model for multiaxial fatigue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHANG De-guang; SUN Guo-qin; DENG Jing; YAN Chu-liang

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of the continuum fatigue damage theory,a nonlinear uniaxial fatigue cumulative damage model is first proposed.In order to describe multiaxial fatigue damage characteristics,a nonlinear multiaxial fatigue cumulative damage model is developed based on the critical plane approach,The proposed model can consider the multiaxial fatigue limit,mean hydrostatic pressure and the unseparated characteristic for the damage variables and loading parameters.The recurrence formula of fatigue damage model was derived under multilevel loading,which is used to predict multiaxial fatigue life.The results showed that the proposed nonlinear multiaxial fatigue cumulative damage model is better than Miner's rule.

  15. A damage model for fracking

    CERN Document Server

    Norris, J Quinn; Rundle, John B

    2015-01-01

    Injections of large volumes of water into tight shale reservoirs allows the extraction of oil and gas not previously accessible. This large volume "super" fracking induces damage that allows the oil and/or gas to flow to an extraction well. The purpose of this paper is to provide a model for understanding super fracking. We assume that water is injected from a small spherical cavity into a homogeneous elastic medium. The high pressure of the injected water generates hoop stresses that reactivate natural fractures in the tight shales. These fractures migrate outward as water is added creating a spherical shell of damaged rock. The porosity associated with these fractures is equal to the water volume injected. We obtain an analytic expression for this volume. We apply our model to a typical tight shale reservoir and show that the predicted water volumes are in good agreement with the volumes used in super fracking.

  16. Laser-Induced Damage in DKDP Crystals under Simultaneous Exposure to Laser Harmonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negres, R A; DeMange, P; Radousky, H B; Demos, S G

    2005-10-28

    While KDP and DKDP crystals remain the only viable solution for frequency conversion in large aperture laser systems in the foreseeable future, our understanding of damage behavior in the presence of multiple colors is very limited. Such conditions exist during normal operation where, for third harmonic generation, 1{omega}, 2{omega} and 3{omega} components are present with different energy ratios as they propagate inside the crystal. The objective of this work is to shed light into the damage behavior of frequency conversion crystals during operational conditions as well as probe the fundamental mechanisms of damage initiation. We have performed a series of experiments to quantify the damage performance of pristine (unconditioned) DKDP material under simultaneous exposure to 2{omega} and 3{omega} laser pulses from a 3-ns Nd:YAG laser system as a function of the laser influences at each frequency. Results show that simultaneous dual wavelength exposure leads to a much larger damage density as compared to the total damage resulting from separate exposure at each wavelength. Furthermore, under such excitation conditions, the damage performance is directly related to and can be predicted from the damage behavior of the crystal at each wavelength separately while the mechanism and type of defects responsible for damage initiation are shown to be the same at both 2{omega} and 3{omega} excitation.

  17. Effect of defects on long-pulse laser-induced damage of two kinds of optical thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Qin, Yuan; Ni, Xiaowu; Shen, Zhonghua; Lu, Jian

    2010-10-10

    In order to study the effect of defects on the laser-induced damage of different optical thin films, we carried out damage experiments on two kinds of thin films with a 1 ms long-pulse laser. Surface-defect and subsurface-defect damage models were used to explain the damage morphology. The two-dimensional finite element method was applied to calculate the temperature and thermal-stress fields of these two films. The results show that damages of the two films are due to surface and subsurface defects, respectively. Furthermore, the different dominant defects for thin films of different structures are discussed.

  18. Linear and Nonlinear Damage Detection Using a Scanning Laser Vibrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Vanlanduit

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Because a Scanning Laser Vibrometer (SLV can perform vibration measurements with a high spatial resolution, it is an ideal instrument to accurately locate damage in a structure. Unfortunately, the use of linear damage detection features, as for instance FRFs or modal parameters, does not always lead to a successful identification of the damage location. Measurement noise and nonlinear distortions can make the damage detection procedure difficult. In this article, a combined linear-nonlinear strategy to detect and locate damage in a structure with the aid of a SLV, will be proposed. To minimize the effect of noise, the modal parameters will be estimated using a Maximum Likelihood Estimator (MLE. Both noise and nonlinear distortion levels are extracted using the residuals of a two-dimensional spline fit. The validation of the technique will be performed on SLV measurements of a delaminated composite plate.

  19. Mathematical modeling of laser lipolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reynaud Jean

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Objectives Liposuction continues to be one of the most popular procedures performed in cosmetic surgery. As the public's demand for body contouring continues, laser lipolysis has been proposed to improve results, minimize risk, optimize patient comfort, and reduce the recovery period. Mathematical modeling of laser lipolysis could provide a better understanding of the laser lipolysis process and could determine the optimal dosage as a function of fat volume to be removed. Study design/Materials and Methods An Optical-Thermal-Damage Model was formulated using finite-element modeling software (Femlab 3.1, Comsol Inc. The general model simulated light distribution using the diffusion approximation of the transport theory, temperature rise using the bioheat equation and laser-induced injury using the Arrhenius damage model. Biological tissue was represented by two homogenous regions (dermis and fat layer with a nonlinear air-tissue boundary condition including free convection. Video recordings were used to gain a better understanding of the back and forth movement of the cannula during laser lipolysis in order to consider them in our mathematical model. Infrared video recordings were also performed in order to compare the actual surface temperatures to our calculations. The reduction in fat volume was determined as a function of the total applied energy and subsequently compared to clinical data reported in the literature. Results In patients, when using cooled tumescent anesthesia, 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser or 980 nm diode laser: (6 W, back and forth motion: 100 mm/s give similar skin surface temperature (max: 41°C. These measurements are in accordance with those obtained by mathematical modeling performed with a 1 mm cannula inserted inside the hypodermis layer at 0.8 cm below the surface. Similarly, the fat volume reduction observed in patients at 6-month follow up can be determined by mathematical modeling. This fat reduction

  20. Radiation damage and annealing in 1310 nm InGaAsP/InP lasers for the CMS tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Gill, K; Grabit, R; Jensen, F; Vasey, F

    2000-01-01

    Radiation damage in 1310 nm InGaAsP/InP multi-quantum-well lasers caused by 0.8 MeV neutrons is compared with the damage from other radiation sources, in terms of the increase in laser threshold current. The annealing behavior is then presented both in terms of both temperature and forward-bias current dependence. The annealing can be described by a model where radiation induced defects have a uniform distribution of activation energies for annealing. This model can then be used to predict the long-term damage expected for lasers operating inside the CMS tracker. (19 refs).

  1. Analysis of damage threshold of K9 glass irradiated by 248-nm KrF excimer laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xi; Shao, Jingzhen; Li, Hua; Nie, Jinsong; Fang, Xiaodong

    2016-02-01

    The theoretical model of K9 glass irradiated by a 248-nm KrF excimer laser was established, and a numerical simulation was performed to calculate temperature and thermal stress fields in the K9 glass sample using the finite element method. The laser-induced damage thresholds were defined and calculated, and the effect of repetition frequency and the number of pulses on the damage threshold were also studied. Furthermore, the experiment research was carried out to confirm the numerical simulation. The damage threshold and damage morphology were analyzed by means of a metallurgical microscope and scanning electron microscopy. The simulation and experimental results indicated that the damage mechanism of K9 glass irradiated by a KrF excimer laser was melting damage and stress damage, and the stress damage first appeared inside the K9 glass sample. The tensile stress damage threshold, the compressive stress damage threshold, and the melting damage threshold were 0.64, 0.76, and 1.05 J/cm2, respectively. The damage threshold decreased with increasing repetition frequency and number of laser pulses. The experimental results indicated that the damage threshold of K9 glass was 2.8 J/cm2.

  2. Influence of the size and concentration of precursor on laser damage performance in KDP crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yueliang; Zhao, Yuanan; Peng, Xiaocong; Hu, Guohang; Zhu, Meiping; Shao, Jianda

    2016-12-01

    Laser-induced bulk damage in potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) and its deuterated analog (DKDP) crystals for nanosecond pulses is caused by light-absorbing precursor defects, which are formed during crystal growth. However, current chemical analysis and spectroscopy techniques fail to identify the nature of the responsible precursor defects because of their "invisible" concentration and/or size. In this study, the aim was to explore a novel method for understanding laser-matter interactions with regard to physical parameters, such as size and concentration, affecting the ability of damage precursors to initiate damage. Laser-induced damage performance at 1064 nm of KDP crystals grown using filters of different pore sizes was investigated. By reducing the pore size of filters in continuous filtration growth, laser damage resistance was improved. Furthermore, a model based on a Gaussian distribution of precursor thresholds and heat transfer was developed to obtain a concentration and/or size distribution of the precursor defects. The results revealed that smaller size and/or lower concentration of precursor defects could lead to better damage resistance.

  3. Impact of environmental contamination on laser induced damage of silica optics in Laser MegaJoule; Impact de l'environnement sur l'endommagement laser des optiques de silice du Laser MegaJoule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bien-Aime, K.

    2009-11-15

    Laser induced damage impact of molecular contamination on fused polished silica samples in a context of high power laser fusion facility, such as Laser MegaJoule (LMJ) has been studied. One of the possible causes of laser induced degradation of optical component is the adsorption of molecular or particular contamination on optical surfaces. In the peculiar case of LMJ, laser irradiation conditions are a fluence of 10 J/cm{sup 2}, a wavelength of 351 nm, a pulse duration of 3 ns for a single shot/days frequency. Critical compounds have been identified thanks to environmental measurements, analysis of material outgassing, and identification of surface contamination in the critical environments. Experiments of controlled contamination involving these compounds have been conducted in order to understand and model mechanisms of laser damage. Various hypotheses are proposed to explain the damage mechanism. (author)

  4. Theoretical research on damage mechanism of ultrafast laser ablation crystal silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Junfeng; Guo, Jin; Wang, Tingfeng

    2013-09-01

    High peak power picosecond laser ablation of silicon draws great attention in solar cell manufacture,laser optoelectric countermeasure applications, eta. This paper reports the damage process of ultrafast lasers interaction with silicon,which is based on Two-Temperature Model(TTM) and 1-on-1 damage threshold test method. Pulsed laser caused damage manifests in several ways, such as heat damage, mechanical effect and even eletrical effect. In this paper, a modified Two Temperature Model is applied in ultrashort laser interaction with silicon.The traditional Two-Temperature Model methods is proposed by Anismov in 1970s to calculate the interaction between ultrafast laser with metals, which is composed of free electrons and lattice. Beyond the carrier and lattice temperture model, an additional excited term and Auger recombination term of carriers is taken into account in this modified Two-Temperature Model model to reflect the characteristics in semicondutors. Under the same pulse-duration condition, the damage threshold is found to be 161 mJ/cm2 and a characteritic double-peak shape shows up. As the pulse energy density rises from 50mJ/cm2 to 161 mJ/cm2, the difference between carrier and lattice temperature steps down proportionally.Also,a detailed interaction process between photon-electron and electron-phonon is discussed. Electron and lattice temperature evolutes distinctly different, while the former is much higher than the latter until heat tranfer finished at 200 picoseconds. Two-peak feature of electron temperature is also identified. As the pulse duration increases from 20 picosecond to 60 picosecond, the he difference between carrier and lattice temperature steps down significantly. The calculated damage threshold does not change fundamentally, remaining approximately 0.16J/cm2. Also, the damage mechanism is found to be thermal heating with the pulse width between 20 and 60 picoseconds at threshold fluences which is identical to experiment test result

  5. Flood damage modelling: ambition and reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerl, Tina; Kreibich, Heidi; Franco, Guillermo; Marechal, David; Schröter, Kai

    2015-04-01

    Flood damage modelling is of increasing importance for reliable risk assessment and management. Research efforts have improved the understanding of damaging processes and more sophisticated flood damage models have been developed. However, research seems to focus on a limited number of sectors and regions and validation of models still receives too little attention. We present a global inventory of flood damage models which is compiled from a review of scientific papers and research reports on flood damage models. The models are catalogued according to model specifications, geographical characteristics, sectors addressed, input variables used, model validation, transferability and model functions. The inventory is evaluated to position the current state of science and technology in flood damage modelling as well as to derive requirements for benchmarking damage models.

  6. Laser damage helps the eavesdropper in quantum cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Bugge, Audun N; Ghazali, Aina M M; Skaar, Johannes; Lydersen, Lars; Makarov, Vadim

    2013-01-01

    By destructive laser illumination, an eavesdropper may turn a perfect quantum key distribution (QKD) system into a completely insecure system. We demonstrate this by illuminating avalanche photodiodes with increasingly intense radiation, and monitoring their parameters. After about 1 W illumination, the detectors' dark count rate drops by a factor of 2 to 5, permanently improving their single-photon counting performance. After about 1.5 W, the dark current rises, switching the detectors permanently into the linear photodetection mode and making them completely insecure for QKD applications. Illumination power higher than 2 W destroys all photosensitivity. This shows that an eavesdropper can engineer loopholes in QKD via laser damage.

  7. Thermal annealing of laser damage precursors on fused silica surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, N; Miller, P E; Bude, J D; Laurence, T A; Suratwala, T I; Steele, W A; Feit, M D; Wang, L L

    2012-03-19

    Previous studies have identified two significant precursors of laser damage on fused silica surfaces at fluenes below {approx} 35 J/cm{sup 2}, photoactive impurities in the polishing layer and surface fractures. In the present work, isothermal heating is studied as a means of remediating the highly absorptive, defect structure associated with surface fractures. A series of Vickers indentations were applied to silica surfaces at loads between 0.5N and 10N creating fracture networks between {approx} 10{micro}m and {approx} 50{micro}m in diameter. The indentations were characterized prior to and following thermal annealing under various times and temperature conditions using confocal time-resolved photo-luminescence (CTP) imaging, and R/1 optical damage testing with 3ns, 355nm laser pulses. Significant improvements in the damage thresholds, together with corresponding reductions in CTP intensity, were observed at temperatures well below the glass transition temperature (T{sub g}). For example, the damage threshold on 05.N indentations which typically initiates at fluences <8 J/cm{sup 2} could be improved >35 J/cm{sup 2} through the use of a {approx} 750 C thermal treatment. Larger fracture networks required longer or higher temperature treatment to achieve similar results. At an annealing temperature > 1100 C, optical microscopy indicates morphological changes in some of the fracture structure of indentations, although remnants of the original fracture and significant deformation was still observed after thermal annealing. This study demonstrates the potential of using isothermal annealing as a means of improving the laser damage resistance of fused silica optical components. Similarly, it provides a means of further understanding the physics associated with optical damage and related mitigation processes.

  8. Statistical analysis of absorptive laser damage in dielectric thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budgor, A.B.; Luria-Budgor, K.F.

    1978-09-11

    The Weibull distribution arises as an example of the theory of extreme events. It is commonly used to fit statistical data arising in the failure analysis of electrical components and in DC breakdown of materials. This distribution is employed to analyze time-to-damage and intensity-to-damage statistics obtained when irradiating thin film coated samples of SiO/sub 2/, ZrO/sub 2/, and Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ with tightly focused laser beams. The data used is furnished by Milam. The fit to the data is excellent; and least squared correlation coefficients greater than 0.9 are often obtained.

  9. Laser damage helps the eavesdropper in quantum cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugge, Audun Nystad; Sauge, Sebastien; Ghazali, Aina Mardhiyah M; Skaar, Johannes; Lydersen, Lars; Makarov, Vadim

    2014-02-21

    We propose a class of attacks on quantum key distribution (QKD) systems where an eavesdropper actively engineers new loopholes by using damaging laser illumination to permanently change properties of system components. This can turn a perfect QKD system into a completely insecure system. A proof-of-principle experiment performed on an avalanche photodiode-based detector shows that laser damage can be used to create loopholes. After ∼1  W illumination, the detectors' dark count rate reduces 2-5 times, permanently improving single-photon counting performance. After ∼1.5  W, the detectors switch permanently into the linear photodetection mode and become completely insecure for QKD applications.

  10. Analysis of thermal damage in vocal cords for the prevention of collateral laser treatment effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanjul Vélez, Félix; Luis Arce-Diego, José; del Barrio Fernández, Ángela; Borragán Torre, Alfonso

    2007-05-01

    The importance of vocal cords for the interaction with the world around is obviously known. Vocal cords disorders can be divided mainly into three categories: difficulty of movement of one or both vocal folds, lesion formation on them, and difficulty or lack of mucosal wave movement. In this last case, a laser heating treatment can be useful in order to improve tissue vibration. However, thermal damage should be considered to adjust laser parameters and so to prevent irreversible harmful effects to the patient. in this work, an analysis of thermal damage in vocal folds is proposed. Firstly thermo-optical laser-tissue interaction is studied, by means of a RTT (Radiation Transfer Theory) model solved with a Monte Carlo approach for the optical propagation of radiation, and a bio-heat equation, with a finite difference numerical method based solution, taking into account blood perfusion and boundary effects, for the thermal distribution. The spatial-temporal temperature distributions are obtained for two widely used lasers, Nd:YAG (1064 nm) and KTP (532 nm). From these data, an Arrhenius thermal damage analysis allows a prediction of possible laser treatment harmful effects on vocal cords that could cause scar formation or tissue burn. Different source powers and exposition times are considered, in such a way that an approximation of adequate wavelength, power and duration is achieved, in order to implement an efficient and safe laser treatment.

  11. Mitigation of Laser Damage Growth in Fused Silica with a Galvanometer Scanned CO2 Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, I L; Guss, G M; Hackel, R P

    2005-10-28

    At the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), mitigation of laser surface damage growth on fused silica using single and multiple CO{sub 2} laser pulses has been consistently successful for damage sites whose lateral dimensions are less than 100 {micro}m, but has not been for larger sites. Cracks would often radiate outward from the damage when a CO{sub 2} pulse was applied to the larger sites. An investigation was conducted to mitigate large surface damage sites using galvanometer scanning of a tightly focused CO{sub 2} laser spot over an area encompassing the laser damage. It was thought that by initially scanning the CO{sub 2} spot outside the damage site, radiating crack propagation would be inhibited. Scan patterns were typically inward moving spirals starting at radii somewhat larger than that of the damage site. The duration of the mitigation spiral pattern was {approx}110 ms during which a total of {approx}1.3 J of energy was delivered to the sample. The CO{sub 2} laser spot had a 1/e{sup 2}-diameter of {approx}200 {micro}m. Thus, there was general heating of a large area around the damage site while rapid evaporation occurred locally at the laser spot position in the spiral. A 30 to 40 {micro}m deep crater was typically generated by this spiral with a diameter of {approx}600 {micro}m. The spiral would be repeated until there was no evidence of the original damage in microscope images. Using this technique, damage sites as large as 300 mm in size did not display new damage after mitigation when exposed to fluences exceeding 22 J/cm{sup 2} at 355 nm, 7.5 ns. It was found necessary to use a vacuum nozzle during the mitigation process to reduce the amount of re-deposited fused silica. In addition, curing spiral patterns at lower laser powers were used to presumably ''re-melt'' any re-deposited fused silica. A compact, shearing interferometer microscope was developed to permit in situ

  12. Modeling Quantum Well Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Alexandru Anghel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In semiconductor laser modeling, a good mathematical model gives near-reality results. Three methods of modeling solutions from the rate equations are presented and analyzed. A method based on the rate equations modeled in Simulink to describe quantum well lasers was presented. For different signal types like step function, saw tooth and sinus used as input, a good response of the used equations is obtained. Circuit model resulting from one of the rate equations models is presented and simulated in SPICE. Results show a good modeling behavior. Numerical simulation in MathCad gives satisfactory results for the study of the transitory and dynamic operation at small level of the injection current. The obtained numerical results show the specific limits of each model, according to theoretical analysis. Based on these results, software can be built that integrates circuit simulation and other modeling methods for quantum well lasers to have a tool that model and analysis these devices from all points of view.

  13. Progressive damage analysis of carbon/epoxy laminates under couple laser and mechanical loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wanlei; Chang, Xinlong; Zhang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Youhong

    A multiscale model based bridge theory is proposed for the progressive damage analysis of carbon/epoxy laminates under couple laser and mechanical loading. The ablation model is adopted to calculate ablation temperature changing and ablation surface degradation. The polynomial strengthening model of matrix is used to improve bridging model for reducing parameter input. Stiffness degradation methods of bridging model are also improved in order to analyze the stress redistribution more accurately when the damage occurs. Thermal-mechanical analyses of the composite plate are performed using the ABAQUS/Explicit program with the developed model implemented in the VUMAT. The simulation results show that this model can be used to proclaim the mesoscale damage mechanism of composite laminates under coupled loading.

  14. Adapting Particle-In-Cell simulations to the study of short pulse laser damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Robert; Schumacher, Douglass; Chowdhury, Enam

    2014-10-01

    We present novel Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations of the full femtosecond-pulse laser damage process and the resulting damage spot morphology. At the heart of these simulations is the implementation, for the first time, of a Lennard-Jones pair potential model (LJPPM) for PIC codes. The use of PIC facilitates the first ab-initio treatment of realistic target sizes, retaining the strengths of PIC including self-consistent treatment of the laser-particle interaction and subsequent generation of plasma waves and electron heating, while the LJPPM allows a PIC code to treat a system of particles as a medium which can ablate, melt, and resolidify. Combining these two approaches, we model the effect of a femtosecond-pulse laser on metal targets near and above the damage threshold and compare to recent experimental results. In particular, we present the first simulations of the emergence of Laser-Induced Periodic Surface Structure (LIPSS) upon femtosecond-pulse laser irradiation.

  15. Utilization of scanning laser ophthalmoscopy in laser-induced bilateral human retinal nerve fiber layer damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwick, Harry; Gagliano, Donald A.; Ruiz, S.; Stuck, Bruce E.

    1995-05-01

    In this paper, we describe a military laser accident case where bilateral Q-switched laser exposure resulted in bilateral macular damage with immediate visual acuity loss in one eye (OS) and delayed visual acuity loss in the other exposed eye (OD), where retinal damage appeared more parafoveal. At 6 weeks post exposure, OS had recovered to 20/17 and OD had dropped to 20/100 Snellen activity. Retinal nerve fiber damage was observed in both eyes at this time. Contrast sensitivity measurements made in OS were suppressed across all spatial frequencies, even though Snellen acuity measured in the normal range. More severe high spatial frequency loss in contrast was measured in the right eye as well as low spatial frequency loss. Both OS and OD revealed a parafoveal preferred retinal locus with scanning laser ophthalmoscopy contrast sensitivity measurements, suggesting parafoveal retinal compensatory processes.

  16. Damage modeling and damage detection for structures using a perturbation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Akash

    This thesis is about using structural-dynamics based methods to address the existing challenges in the field of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM). Particularly, new structural-dynamics based methods are presented, to model areas of damage, to do damage diagnosis and to estimate and predict the sensitivity of structural vibration properties like natural frequencies to the presence of damage. Towards these objectives, a general analytical procedure, which yields nth-order expressions governing mode shapes and natural frequencies and for damaged elastic structures such as rods, beams, plates and shells of any shape is presented. Features of the procedure include the following: 1. Rather than modeling the damage as a fictitious elastic element or localized or global change in constitutive properties, it is modeled in a mathematically rigorous manner as a geometric discontinuity. 2. The inertia effect (kinetic energy), which, unlike the stiffness effect (strain energy), of the damage has been neglected by researchers, is included in it. 3. The framework is generic and is applicable to wide variety of engineering structures of different shapes with arbitrary boundary conditions which constitute self adjoint systems and also to a wide variety of damage profiles and even multiple areas of damage. To illustrate the ability of the procedure to effectively model the damage, it is applied to beams using Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko theories and to plates using Kirchhoff's theory, supported on different types of boundary conditions. Analytical results are compared with experiments using piezoelectric actuators and non-contact Laser-Doppler Vibrometer sensors. To illustrate the ability of the procedure to effectively model the damage, it is applied to beams using Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko theories and to plates using Kirchhoff's theory, supported on different types of boundary conditions. Analytical results are compared with experiments using piezoelectric actuators and

  17. Determination of ultra-short laser induced damage threshold of KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} crystal: Numerical calculation and experimental verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Jian [Center for Precision Engineering, School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, 191 W. Woodruff Ave, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Chen, Mingjun, E-mail: chenmj@hit.edu.cn, E-mail: chowdhury.24@osu.edu; Wang, Jinghe; Xiao, Yong [Center for Precision Engineering, School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Kafka, Kyle; Austin, Drake; Chowdhury, Enam, E-mail: chenmj@hit.edu.cn, E-mail: chowdhury.24@osu.edu [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, 191 W. Woodruff Ave, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Rapid growth and ultra-precision machining of large-size KDP (KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}) crystals with high laser damage resistance are tough challenges in the development of large laser systems. It is of high interest and practical significance to have theoretical models for scientists and manufacturers to determine the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) of actually prepared KDP optics. Here, we numerically and experimentally investigate the laser-induced damage on KDP crystals in ultra-short pulse laser regime. On basis of the rate equation for free electron generation, a model dedicated to predicting the LIDT is developed by considering the synergistic effect of photoionization, impact ionization and decay of electrons. Laser damage tests are performed to measure the single-pulse LIDT with several testing protocols. The testing results combined with previously reported experimental data agree well with those calculated by the model. By taking the light intensification into consideration, the model is successfully applied to quantitatively evaluate the effect of surface flaws inevitably introduced in the preparation processes on the laser damage resistance of KDP crystals. This work can not only contribute to further understanding of the laser damage mechanisms of optical materials, but also provide available models for evaluating the laser damage resistance of exquisitely prepared optical components used in high power laser systems.

  18. Laser damage properties of broadband low-dispersion mirrors in sub-nanosecond laser pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinlong; Bu, Xiaoqing; Jiao, Hongfei; Ma, Bin; Cheng, Xinbin; Wang, Zhangshan

    2017-01-09

    Broadband low dispersion (BBLD) mirrors are an essential component in femto-second (fs) pulse laser systems. We designed and produced Tasub>2sub>Osub>5sub>-HfOsub>2sub>/SiOsub>2sub> composite quarter-wave and non-quarter-wave HfOsub>2sub>/SiOsub>2sub> BBLD mirrors for the 30fs petawatt laser system. The laser damage properties of the BBLD mirrors were investigated in an uncompressed sub-nanosecond laser pulse. It showed that the Tasub>2sub>Osub>5sub>-HfOsub>2sub>/SiOsub>2sub> composite BBLD mirror possessed higher LIDT due to the low electric-field intensity (EFI) in the case of the coating without artificial nodules. Nevertheless, the LIDT of the composite mirror was significantly lower than the non-quarter-wave HfOsub>2sub>/SiOsub>2sub> mirror when the nodules exist. The EFI simulation and damage morphology of the nodules analysis demonstrated that the nodule leading to the light intensification in the middle of the boundary between the nodular and the surrounding coating, thus the outermost HfOsub>2sub>/SiOsub>2sub> layers cannot protect the Tasub>2sub>Osub>5sub>/SiOsub>2sub> layers, and resulting to the significantly low LIDT. This study shed some light on the development of high-laser-damage BBLD mirrors for pulse compression laser systems.

  19. Continued advancement of laser damage resistant optically functional microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Douglas S.; MacLeod, Bruce D.; Sabatino, Ernest

    2012-11-01

    Micro- and nano-structured optically functional surface textures continue to exhibit higher performance and longer term survivability than thin-film coatings for an increasing number of materials used within high energy laser (HEL) systems. Anti-reflection (AR) microstructures (ARMs) produce a graded refractive index yielding high transmission over wide spectral ranges along with a chemical, mechanical and laser damage resistance inherited from the bulk optic material. In this study, ARMs were fabricated in the relevant HEL materials sapphire, neodymium-doped YAG, fused silica, BK7 glass, and the magnesium aluminate known as SPINEL. Standardized pulsed laser induced damage threshold (LiDT) measurements were made using commercial testing services to directly compare the damage resistance of ARMs-treated optics to uncoated and thin-film-AR-coated (TFARC) optics at wavelengths of 532nm, 694nm, 800nm, 1064nm, and 1538nm. As found with prior work, the LiDT of ARMs etched in fused silica was typically in the range of 35 J/cm2 at a wavelength of 1064nm and a pulse width of 10ns, a level that is comparable to uncoated samples and 3.5 times greater than the level specified by six prominent TFARC providers. The Army Research Laboratory measured the pulsed LiDT at 532nm (10ns) of ARMs in fused silica to be up to 5 times the level of the ion beam sputtered TFARC previously employed in their HEL system, and 2 times higher than a low performance single layer MgF2 TFARC. This result was repeated and expanded using a commercial LiDT testing service for ARMs in two types of fused silica and for Schott N-BK7 glass. An average damage threshold of 26.5 J/cm2 was recorded for the ARMs-treated glass materials, a level 4 times higher than the commercial IBS TFARCs tested.

  20. Application of direct laser melting to restore damaged steel dies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jeong Hwan; Joo, Byeong Don; Mun, Sung Min; Sung, Min Young; Moon, Young Hoon

    2011-02-01

    Direct laser melting (DLM) technology can be applied to restore damaged steel dies. To understand the effects of DLM process parameters such as the laser power and scan rate, a series of experiments was conducted to determine the optimal operating parameters. To investigate the laser melting characteristics, the depth/height ratio, depth/width ratio and micro-hardness as a function of the laser energy density were analyzed. Fe-Cr and Fe-Ni layers were deposited on a steel die with 11.38 J/mm2 of energy input. The wear-resistance and the friction coefficient of the deposited layer were investigated by a pin-on-disk test. The penetration depth decreased as the scan rate increased as a consequence of the shorter interaction time. The depth/height ratio of the deposited layer decreased with an increase in the scan rate. The depth/width ratio increased as laser power increased and the scan rate decreased. The deposition shape of the Fe-Ni powder was relatively shallow and wide compared with that of the Fe-Cr powder. The scan rate had a substantial effect upon the deposition height, with the Fe-Cr powder melting more than the Fe-Ni powder. The micro-hardness of the layer melted from the powders is higher than that of the substrate, and the hardness of the laser-surface-melted layer without any metal powder is higher compared to that of the metal-powder-melted layer. The direct laser melting process with Fe-Ni powder represents a superior method when restoring a steel die when the bead shape and hardness of the restored surface are important outcome considerations.

  1. HF-based etching processes for improving laser damage resistance of fused silica optical surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suratwala, T I; Miller, P E; Bude, J D; Steele, R A; Shen, N; Monticelli, M V; Feit, M D; Laurence, T A; Norton, M A; Carr, C W; Wong, L L

    2010-02-23

    The effect of various HF-based etching processes on the laser damage resistance of scratched fused silica surfaces has been investigated. Conventionally polished and subsequently scratched fused silica plates were treated by submerging in various HF-based etchants (HF or NH{sub 4}F:HF at various ratios and concentrations) under different process conditions (e.g., agitation frequencies, etch times, rinse conditions, and environmental cleanliness). Subsequently, the laser damage resistance (at 351 or 355 nm) of the treated surface was measured. The laser damage resistance was found to be strongly process dependent and scaled inversely with scratch width. The etching process was optimized to remove or prevent the presence of identified precursors (chemical impurities, fracture surfaces, and silica-based redeposit) known to lead to laser damage initiation. The redeposit precursor was reduced (and hence the damage threshold was increased) by: (1) increasing the SiF{sub 6}{sup 2-} solubility through reduction in the NH4F concentration and impurity cation impurities, and (2) improving the mass transport of reaction product (SiF{sub 6}{sup 2-}) (using high frequency ultrasonic agitation and excessive spray rinsing) away from the etched surface. A 2D finite element crack-etching and rinsing mass transport model (incorporating diffusion and advection) was used to predict reaction product concentration. The predictions are consistent with the experimentally observed process trends. The laser damage thresholds also increased with etched amount (up to {approx}30 {micro}m), which has been attributed to: (1) etching through lateral cracks where there is poor acid penetration, and (2) increasing the crack opening resulting in increased mass transport rates. With the optimized etch process, laser damage resistance increased dramatically; the average threshold fluence for damage initiation for 30 {micro}m wide scratches increased from 7 to 41 J/cm{sup 2}, and the statistical

  2. PHENOMENOLOGICAL DAMAGE MODELS OF ANISOTROPIC STRUCTURAL MATERIALS

    OpenAIRE

    Bobyr, M.; Khalimon, O.; Bondarets, O.

    2015-01-01

    Damage in metals is mainly the process of the initiation and growth of voids. A formulation for anisotropic damage is established in the framework of the principle of strain equivalence, principle of increment complementary energy equivalence and principle of elastic energy equivalence. This paper presents the development of an anisotropic damage theory. This work is focused on the development of evolution anisotropic damage models which is based on a Young’s modulus/Poisson’s ratio change of...

  3. Study on damage of K9 glass under 248nm ultraviolet pulsed laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xi; Fang, Xiaodong

    2015-04-01

    The damage of K9 glass under 248nm ultraviolet pulsed laser irradiation was studied. The laser pulse energy was kept within the range of 60mJ to 160mJ, and the repetition rate was adjusted within the range of 1Hz to 40Hz. The damage morphologies of single-pulse and multi-pulse laser irradiation were characterized by optical microscope, and the damage mechanism was discussed. The experimental results indicated that the damage of K9 glass irradiated by 248nm ultraviolet laser mainly followed the thermal-mechanical coupling mechanism and the damage threshold of K9 glass was 2.8J/cm2. The intensity of damage area increased gradually with the increase of the laser pulse number. It was shown that accumulation effect of laser induced damage to K9 glass was obvious.

  4. Radiation damage of laser materials. Citations from the NTIS data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrigan, B.

    1980-05-01

    Laser beam damage to laser materials such as optical glass, glass fibers, alkali metal halides, metals, mirrors, optical coatings, dielectrics, semiconductors, and matrix materials is studied. The majority of these citations concern infrared laser damage to infrared optical materials. This updated bibliography contains 217 abstracts, 10 of which are new entries to the previous edition.

  5. Damage detection technique by measuring laser-based mechanical impedance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyeonseok; Sohn, Hoon [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (Daehak-ro 291, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701) (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-18

    This study proposes a method for measurement of mechanical impedance using noncontact laser ultrasound. The measurement of mechanical impedance has been of great interest in nondestructive testing (NDT) or structural health monitoring (SHM) since mechanical impedance is sensitive even to small-sized structural defects. Conventional impedance measurements, however, have been based on electromechanical impedance (EMI) using contact-type piezoelectric transducers, which show deteriorated performances induced by the effects of a) Curie temperature limitations, b) electromagnetic interference (EMI), c) bonding layers and etc. This study aims to tackle the limitations of conventional EMI measurement by utilizing laser-based mechanical impedance (LMI) measurement. The LMI response, which is equivalent to a steady-state ultrasound response, is generated by shooting the pulse laser beam to the target structure, and is acquired by measuring the out-of-plane velocity using a laser vibrometer. The formation of the LMI response is observed through the thermo-mechanical finite element analysis. The feasibility of applying the LMI technique for damage detection is experimentally verified using a pipe specimen under high temperature environment.

  6. Residual stress and damage-induced critical fracture on CO2 laser treated fused silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, M; Stolken, J; Vignes, R; Norton, M

    2009-11-02

    Localized damage repair and polishing of silica-based optics using mid- and far-IR CO{sub 2} lasers has been shown to be an effective method for increasing optical damage threshold in the UV. However, it is known that CO{sub 2} laser heating of silicate surfaces can lead to a level of residual stress capable of causing critical fracture either during or after laser treatment. Sufficient control of the surface temperature as a function of time and position is therefore required to limit this residual stress to an acceptable level to avoid critical fracture. In this work they present the results of 351 nm, 3 ns Gaussian damage growth experiments within regions of varying residual stress caused by prior CO{sub 2} laser exposures. Thermally stressed regions were non-destructively characterized using polarimetry and confocal Raman microscopy to measure the stress induced birefringence and fictive temperature respectively. For 1 {approx} 40s square pulse CO{sub 2} laser exposures created over 0.5-1.25 kW/cm{sup 2} with a 1-3 mm 1/e{sup 2} diameter beam (T{sub max} {approx} 1500-3000 K), the critical damage site size leading to fracture increases weakly with peak temperature, but shows a stronger dependence on cooling rate, as predicted by finite element hydrodynamics simulations. Confocal micro-Raman was used to probe structural changes to the glass over different thermal histories and indicated a maximum fictive temperature of 1900K for T{sub max} {ge} 2000 K. The effect of cooling rate on fictive temperature caused by CO{sub 2} laser heating are consistent with finite element calculations based on a Tool-Narayanaswamy relaxation model.

  7. Laser beam shaping for studying thermally induced damage

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masina, BN

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available for studying thermally induced damage Bathusile N. Masinaa, Richard Bodkinc, Bonex Mwakikungad and Andrew Forbesa,b?, aCSIR National Laser Centre, P. O. Box 395, Pretoria 0001, South Africa bSchool of Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag X... from the blackbody at each wavelength, it is possible to determine the temperature of the blackbody or of the object by fitting the blackbody spectrum to the measured light. The advantage of using the blackbody emission is that there is no physical...

  8. Towards a canonical elastoplastic damage model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taher, Salah El-Din F.; Baluch, Mohammed H.; Al-Gadhib, Ali H.

    1994-05-01

    Fundamental aspects of elastoplastic damage are outlined. Time-independent isotropic damage is considered in order to study material degradation. By splitting the total strain tensor into its components of elastic damage and plastic damage and using recoverable energy equivalence, three distinct modes of behavior are particularized. For each mode of behavior, a suitable damage variable is culled. An in-depth analysis of this formulation reveals a certain incongruity in the assumptions postulated in some of the previously proposed models. The suggested generalized concepts are supported by experimental evidence.

  9. Damage morphology and mechanism in ablation cutting of thin glass sheets with picosecond pulsed lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingying; Eppelt, Urs; Hartmann, Claudia; Schulz, Wolfgang; Zhu, Jianqiang; Lin, Zunqi

    2016-06-01

    We experimentally investigated the morphology and mechanism of laser-induced damage in the ablation cutting of thin glass sheets with picosecond pulsed lasers and we compared the experimental results to our models. After several passes of laser ablation, we observed two different kinds of damage morphologies on the cross-section of the cut channel. They are distinguished to be the damage region caused by high-density free-electrons and the heat-affected zone due to the heat accumulation, respectively. Furthermore, micro-cracks can be observed on the top surface of the workpiece near the cut edge. The nano-cracks could be generated by high energy free-electrons but opened and developed to be visible micro-cracks by thermal stress generated in the heat-affected zone. The crack length was proportional to the volume of heat-affected zone. Heat-affected-zone and visible-cracks free conditions of glass cutting were achieved by controlling the repetition rate and spatial overlap of laser pulses.

  10. Laser-Induced Thermal-Mechanical Damage Characteristics of Cleartran Multispectral Zinc Sulfide with Temperature-Dependent Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yajing; Jiang, Yanxue; Yang, Yanqiang

    2015-01-01

    Laser-induced thermal-mechanical damage characteristics of window materials are the focus problems in laser weapon and anti-radiation reinforcement technology. Thermal-mechanical effects and damage characteristics are investigated for cleartran multispectral zinc sulfide (ZnS) thin film window materials irradiated by continuous laser using three-dimensional (3D) thermal-mechanical model. Some temperature-dependent parameters are introduced into the model. The temporal-spatial distributions of temperature and thermal stress are exhibited. The damage mechanism is analyzed. The influences of temperature effect of material parameters and laser intensity on the development of thermal stress and the damage characteristics are examined. The results show, the von Mises equivalent stress along the thickness direction is fluctuant, which originates from the transformation of principal stresses from compressive stress to tensile stress with the increase of depth from irradiated surface. The damage originates from the thermal stress but not the melting. The thermal stress is increased and the damage is accelerated by introducing the temperature effect of parameters or the increasing laser intensity.

  11. Analysis on the damage threshold of MgO:LiNbO3 crystals under multiple femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhuolin; Meng, Qinglong; Zhang, Bin

    2016-10-01

    An improved theoretical model of the interaction between multiple femtosecond laser pulses and MgO:LiNbO3 crystals with different doping concentrations has been established based on the classical two-temperature model. The evolutions of electron and lattice temperature with the duration, the repetition frequency and the numbers of multiple femtosecond laser pulses in MgO:LiNbO3 crystals have been simulated numerically by the Crank-Nicholson implicit finite-difference method. Furthermore, the variations of the damage threshold of MgO:LiNbO3 crystals with the parameters of multiple femtosecond laser pulses at different doping concentrations, as well as the influence of doping concentration on damage threshold have also been analyzed. The results show that, the damage threshold of MgO:LiNbO3 crystals increases with the increasing of the duration of the femtosecond laser pulse. The damage threshold of MgO:LiNbO3 crystals first decreases with the increasing of the numbers and the pulse repetition frequency of the laser pulses and then tends to be a constant. The damage threshold of a small amount of MgO-doped LiNbO3 crystals is higher than that of undoped LiNbO3 crystals. Consequently, the resist damage capability of LiNbO3 crystals can be enhanced by doping appropriate MgO in many practical applications.

  12. Laser annealing of plasma-damaged silicon surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sameshima, T., E-mail: tsamesim@cc.tuat.ac.jp [Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo, 184-8588 (Japan); Hasumi, M. [Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo, 184-8588 (Japan); Mizuno, T. [Kanagawa University, Kanagawa, 259-1293 (Japan)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • Ar plasma irradiation caused serious damage at SiO{sub 2}/Si interfaces. • The light induced minority carrier effective lifetime (τ{sub eff}) was decreased to 1.7 × 10{sup −5} s by Ar plasma irradiation. • The density of charge injection type interface traps at 9.1 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −2} eV{sup −1} was formed. • 940-nm laser irradiation at 3.7 × 10{sup 4} W/cm{sup 2} for 4 × 10{sup −3} s cured the interface. • It increased τ{sub eff} to 1.7 × 10{sup −3} s and decreased D{sub it} to 2.1 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −2} eV{sup −1}. - Abstract: 13.56 MHz capacitance coupled Ar plasma irradiation at 50 W for 120 s caused serious damage at SiO{sub 2}/Si interfaces for n-type 500-μm-thick silicon substrates. The 635-nm-light induced minority carrier effective lifetime (τ{sub eff}) was decreased from 1.7 × 10{sup −3} (initial) to 1.0 × 10{sup −5} s by Ar plasma irradiation. Moreover, the capacitance response at 1 MHz alternative voltage as a function of the bias voltage (C–V) was changed to hysteresis characteristic associated with the density of charge injection type interface traps at the mid gap (D{sub it}) at 9.1 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −2} eV{sup −1}. Subsequent 940-nm laser annealing at 3.7 × 10{sup 4} W/cm{sup 2} for 4.0 × 10{sup −3} s markedly increased τ{sub eff} to 1.7 × 10{sup −3} s and decreased D{sub it} to 2.1 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −2} eV{sup −1}. The hysteresis phenomenon was reduced in C–V characteristics. Laser annealing effectively decreased the density of plasma induced carrier recombination and trap states. However, laser annealing with a high power intensity of 4.0 × 10{sup 4} W/cm{sup 2} seriously caused a thermal damage associated with a low τ{sub eff} and a high D{sub it} with no hysteresis characteristic.

  13. CO2 laser microprocessing for laser damage growth mitigation of fused silica optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doualle, Thomas; Gallais, Laurent; Monneret, Serge; Bouillet, Stephane; Bourgeade, Antoine; Ameil, Christel; Lamaignère, Laurent; Cormont, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    We report on the development of a mitigation process to prevent the growth of UV nanosecond laser-initiated damage sites under successive irradiations of fused silica components. The developed process is based on fast microablation of silica as it has been proposed by Bass et al. [Bass et al., Proc. SPIE 7842, 784220 (2010)]. This is accomplished by the displacement of the CO2 laser spot with a fast galvanometer beam scanner to form a crater with a typical conical shape to mitigate large (millimetric) and deep (few hundred microns) damage sites. We present the developed experimental system and process for this application. Particularly, we detail and evaluate a method based on quantitative phase imaging to obtain fast and accurate three-dimensional topographies of the craters. The morphologies obtained through different processes are then studied. Mitigation of submillimetric nanosecond damage sites is demonstrated through different examples. Experimental and numerical studies of the downstream intensifications, resulting in cone formation on the surface, are presented to evaluate and minimize the downstream intensifications. Eventually, the laser damage test resistance of the mitigated sites is evaluated at 355, 2.5 ns, and we discuss on the efficiency of the process for our application.

  14. Interlaminar damage of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite laminate under continuous wave laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan-Chi; Wu, Chen-Wu; Huang, Yi-Hui; Song, Hong-Wei; Huang, Chen-Guang

    2017-01-01

    The interlaminar damages were investigated on the carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite laminate under laser irradiation. Firstly, the laminated T700/BA9916 composites were exposed to continuous wave laser irradiation. Then, the interface cracking patterns of such composite laminates were examined by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Finally, the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) was performed to compute the interface stress of the laminates under laser irradiation. And the effects of the laser parameters on the interlaminar damage were discussed.

  15. Effect of Vacuum on the Laser-Induced Damage of Anti-Reflection Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LING Xiu-Lan; ZHAO Yuan-An; LI Da-Wei; ZHOU Ming; SHAO Jian-Da; FAN Zheng-Xiu

    2009-01-01

    In the comparison of damage modifications, absorption measurement and energy dispersive x-ray analysis, the effect of vacuum on the laser-induced damage of anti-reflection coatings is analyzed. It is found that vacuum decreases the laser-induced damage threshold of the films. The low laser-induced damage threshold in vacuum environments as opposed to air environments is attributed to water absorption and the formation of the O/Si,O/Zr sub-stoichiometry in the course of laser irradiation.

  16. Damage modeling in Small Punch Test specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martínez Pañeda, Emilio; Cuesta, I.I.; Peñuelas, I.

    2016-01-01

    Ductile damage modeling within the Small Punch Test (SPT) is extensively investigated. The capabilities ofthe SPT to reliably estimate fracture and damage properties are thoroughly discussed and emphasis isplaced on the use of notched specimens. First, different notch profiles are analyzed...... and constraint conditionsquantified. The role of the notch shape is comprehensively examined from both triaxiality and notchfabrication perspectives. Afterwards, a methodology is presented to extract the micromechanical-basedductile damage parameters from the load-displacement curve of notched SPT samples...

  17. Full Aperture CO2 Laser Process to Improve Laser Damage Resistance of Fused Silica Optical Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An improved method is presented to scan the full-aperture optical surface rapidly by using galvanometer steering mirrors. In contrast to the previous studies, the scanning velocity is faster by several orders of magnitude. The velocity is chosen to allow little thermodeposition thus providing small and uniform residual stress. An appropriate power density is set to obtain a lower processing temperature. The proper parameters can help to prevent optical surface from fracturing during operation at high laser flux. S-on-1 damage test results show that the damage threshold of scanned area is approximately 40% higher than that of untreated area.

  18. Structural damage detection using higher-order finite elements and a scanning laser vibrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Si

    In contrast to conventional non-destructive evaluation methods, dynamics-based damage detection methods are capable of rapid integrity evaluation of large structures and have received considerable attention from aerospace, mechanical, and civil engineering communities in recent years. However, the identifiable damage size using dynamics-based methods is determined by the number of sensors used, level of measurement noise, accuracy of structural models, and signal processing techniques. In this thesis we study dynamics of structures with damage and then derive and experimentally verify new model-independent structural damage detection methods that can locate small damage to structures. To find sensitive damage detection parameters we develop a higher-order beam element that enforces the continuity of displacements, slopes, bending moments, and shear forces at all nodes, and a higher-order rectangular plate element that enforces the continuity of displacements, slopes, and bending and twisting moments at all nodes. These two elements are used to study the dynamics of beams and plates. Results show that high-order spatial derivatives of high-frequency modes are important sensitive parameters that can locate small structural damage. Unfortunately the most powerful and popular structural modeling technique, the finite element method, is not accurate in predicting high-frequency responses. Hence, a model-independent method using dynamic responses obtained from high density measurements is concluded to be the best approach. To increase measurement density and reduce noise a Polytec PI PSV-200 scanning laser vibrometer is used to provide non-contact, dense, and accurate measurements of structural vibration velocities. To avoid the use of structural models and to extract sensitive detection parameters from experimental data, a brand-new structural damage detection method named BED (Boundary-Effect Detection) is developed for pinpointing damage locations using Operational

  19. The Space Laser Business Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Creating long-duration, high-powered lasers, for satellites, that can withstand the type of optical misalignment and damage dished out by the unforgiving environment of space, is work that is unique to NASA. It is complicated, specific work, where each step forward is into uncharted territory. In the 1990s, as this technology was first being created, NASA gave free reign to a group of "laser jocks" to develop their own business model and supply the Space Agency with the technology it needed. It was still to be a part of NASA as a division of Goddard Space Flight Center, but would operate independently out of a remote office. The idea for this satellite laboratory was based on the Skunk Works concept at Lockheed Martin Corporation. Formerly known as the Lockheed Corporation, in 1943, the aerospace firm, realizing that the type of advanced research it needed done could not be performed within the confines of a larger company, allowed a group of researchers and engineers to essentially run their own microbusiness without the corporate oversight. The Skunk Works project, in Burbank, California, produced America s first jet fighter, the world s most successful spy plane (U-2), the first 3-times-the-speed-of-sound surveillance aircraft, and the F-117A Nighthawk Stealth Fighter. Boeing followed suit with its Phantom Works, an advanced research and development branch of the company that operates independent of the larger unit and is responsible for a great deal of its most cutting-edge research. NASA s version of this advanced business model was the Space Lidar Technology Center (SLTC), just south of Goddard, in College Park, Maryland. Established in 1998 under a Cooperative Agreement between Goddard and the University of Maryland s A. James Clark School of Engineering, it was a high-tech laser shop where a small group of specialists, never more than 20 employees, worked all hours of the day and night to create the cutting- edge technology the Agency required of them. Drs

  20. Advanced Mitigation Process (AMP) for Improving Laser Damage Threshold of Fused Silica Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xin; Huang, Jin; Liu, Hongjie; Geng, Feng; Sun, Laixi; Jiang, Xiaodong; Wu, Weidong; Qiao, Liang; Zu, Xiaotao; Zheng, Wanguo

    2016-08-01

    The laser damage precursors in subsurface of fused silica (e.g. photosensitive impurities, scratches and redeposited silica compounds) were mitigated by mineral acid leaching and HF etching with multi-frequency ultrasonic agitation, respectively. The comparison of scratches morphology after static etching and high-frequency ultrasonic agitation etching was devoted in our case. And comparison of laser induce damage resistance of scratched and non-scratched fused silica surfaces after HF etching with high-frequency ultrasonic agitation were also investigated in this study. The global laser induce damage resistance was increased significantly after the laser damage precursors were mitigated in this case. The redeposition of reaction produce was avoided by involving multi-frequency ultrasonic and chemical leaching process. These methods made the increase of laser damage threshold more stable. In addition, there is no scratch related damage initiations found on the samples which were treated by Advanced Mitigation Process.

  1. A prediction model for ocular damage - Experimental validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heussner, Nico; Vagos, Márcia; Spitzer, Martin S; Stork, Wilhelm

    2015-08-01

    With the increasing number of laser applications in medicine and technology, accidental as well as intentional exposure of the human eye to laser sources has become a major concern. Therefore, a prediction model for ocular damage (PMOD) is presented within this work and validated for long-term exposure. This model is a combination of a raytracing model with a thermodynamical model of the human and an application which determines the thermal damage by the implementation of the Arrhenius integral. The model is based on our earlier work and is here validated against temperature measurements taken with porcine eye samples. For this validation, three different powers were used: 50mW, 100mW and 200mW with a spot size of 1.9mm. Also, the measurements were taken with two different sensing systems, an infrared camera and a fibre optic probe placed within the tissue. The temperatures were measured up to 60s and then compared against simulations. The measured temperatures were found to be in good agreement with the values predicted by the PMOD-model. To our best knowledge, this is the first model which is validated for both short-term and long-term irradiations in terms of temperature and thus demonstrates that temperatures can be accurately predicted within the thermal damage regime. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Damage analysis of CMOS electro-optical imaging system by a continuous wave laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sunghee; Jhang, Kyung-Young; Shin, Wan-Soon

    2016-08-01

    EOIS (electro-optical imaging system) is vulnerable to laser beam because EOIS focuses the incident laser beam onto the image sensor via lens module. Accordingly, the laser-induced damage of EOIS is necessary to be identified for the counter-measure against the laser attack. In this study, the damage of CMOS EOIS and image sensor induced by CW (continuous wave) NIR (near infrared) laser was experimentally investigated. When the laser was emitted to CMOS EOIS, a temporary damage was occurred first such as flickering or dazzling and then a permanent damage was followed as the increase of laser irradiance and irradiation time. If the EIOS is composed of the optical equipment made of heatresistant material, laser beam can penetrate the lens module of EOIS without melting the lens and lens guide. Thus, it is necessary to investigate the damage of CMOS image sensor by the CW laser and we performed experimentally investigation of damage on the CMOS image sensor similar with case of CMOS EOIS. And we analyzed the experiment results by using OM (optical microscopy) and check the image quality through tomography. As the increase of laser irradiance and irradiation time, the permanent damage such as discoloration and breakdown were sequentially appeared.

  3. Pharmacological protection of the retina against damaging laser exposures: a feasibility study. Final report, January-December 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cartledge, R.M.; Glickman, R.D.; Elliott, W.R.

    1988-09-01

    Light damage to ocular tissues may occur through at least three mechanisms -- thermal, photochemical, or mechanical (photoacoustic) stress. These stress mechanisms may act singly, or in combination, depending on the intensity, wavelength, and temporal parameters of the damaging light exposure. Because some of these mechanisms involve biochemical intermediates, the possibility exists that appropriate pharmacological therapy might limit the extent of retinal light damage. This investigation determined the degree to which pharmacological pretreatments could protect a model retina against laser light damage. Five agents were examined for protective activity: an anti-inflammatory steroid hormone (dexamethasone); three antioxidants (3-aminotyrosine, vitamins C AND E); and a chelating agent (EGTA).

  4. Endoscopic laser therapy of erosive-ulcerous and inflammatory damages of patients in oncological hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efimov, Oleg N.; Kuvshinov, Yu. P.; Poddubny, Boris K.; Kartasheva, E. O.; Ungiadze, G. V.; Ponomarev, Igor V.; Mazurov, S. T.

    1996-01-01

    The results of laser therapy present in 374 patients with erosive-ulcerous and inflammatory damages of respiratory organs and of gastro-intestinal tract after oncological operations. Two types of laser namely endoscopic laser on the basis of He-Ne and Cu laser were used as sources of radiation. It was shown high therapeutic effectiveness of laser therapy. This method may be recommended for the above-mentioned category of the patients.

  5. Comparison of laser-based mitigation of fused silica surface damage using mid- versus far-infrared lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, S T; Matthews, M J; Elhadj, S; Cooke, D; Guss, G M; Draggoo, V G; Wegner, P J

    2009-12-16

    Laser induced growth of optical damage can limit component lifetime and therefore operating costs of large-aperture fusion-class laser systems. While far-infrared (IR) lasers have been used previously to treat laser damage on fused silica optics and render it benign, little is known about the effectiveness of less-absorbing mid-IR lasers for this purpose. In this study, they quantitatively compare the effectiveness and efficiency of mid-IR (4.6 {micro}m) versus far-IR (10.6 {micro}m) lasers in mitigating damage growth on fused silica surfaces. The non-linear volumetric heating due to mid-IR laser absorption is analyzed by solving the heat equation numerically, taking into account the temperature-dependent absorption coefficient {alpha}(T) at {lambda} = 4.6 {micro}m, while far-IR laser heating is well-described by a linear analytic approximation to the laser-driven temperature rise. In both cases, the predicted results agree well with surface temperature measurements based on infrared radiometry, as well as sub-surface fictive temperature measurements based on confocal Raman microscopy. Damage mitigation efficiency is assessed using a figure of merit (FOM) relating the crack healing depth to laser power required, under minimally-ablative conditions. Based on their FOM, they show that for cracks up to at least 500 {micro}m in depth, mitigation with a 4.6 {micro}m mid-IR laser is more efficient than mitigation with a 10.6 {micro}m far-IR laser. This conclusion is corroborated by direct application of each laser system to the mitigation of pulsed laser-induced damage possessing fractures up to 225 {micro}m in depth.

  6. Modeling Propagation of Gas Path Damage

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This paper describes how damage propagation can be tracked and modeled for a range of fault modes in some modules of commercial high bypass aircraft engines. To that...

  7. Harmonic scalpel versus flexible CO2 laser for tongue resection: A histopathological analysis of thermal damage in human cadavers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf Tamir

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Monopolar cautery is the most commonly used surgical cutting and hemostatic tool for head and neck surgery. There are newer technologies that are being utilized with the goal of precise cutting, decreasing blood loss, reducing thermal damage, and allowing faster wound healing. Our study compares thermal damage caused by Harmonic scalpel and CO2 laser to cadaveric tongue. Methods Two fresh human cadaver heads were enrolled for the study. Oral tongue was exposed and incisions were made in the tongue akin to a tongue tumor resection using the harmonic scalpel and flexible C02 laser fiber at various settings recommended for surgery. The margins of resection were sampled, labeled, and sent for pathological analysis to assess depth of thermal damage calculated in millimeters. The pathologist was blinded to the surgical tool used. Control tongue tissue was also sent for comparison as a baseline for comparison. Results Three tongue samples were studied to assess depth of thermal damage by harmonic scalpel. The mean depth of thermal damage was 0.69 (range, 0.51 - 0.82. Five tongue samples were studied to assess depth of thermal damage by CO2 laser. The mean depth of thermal damage was 0.3 (range, 0.22 to 0.43. As expected, control samples showed 0 mm of thermal damage. There was a statistically significant difference between the depth of thermal injury to tongue resection margins by harmonic scalpel as compared to CO2 laser, (p = 0.003. Conclusion In a cadaveric model, flexible CO2 laser fiber causes less depth of thermal damage when compared with harmonic scalpel at settings utilized in our study. However, the relevance of this information in terms of wound healing, hemostasis, safety, cost-effectiveness, and surgical outcomes needs to be further studied in clinical settings.

  8. Laser shocks: A tool for experimental simulation of damage into materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boustie, M.; Cuq Lelandais, J. P.; Berthe, L.; Ecault, R. [Institut PPRIME, Departement Physique et Mecanique des Materiaux, CNRS-ENSMA-Universite de Poitiers, 1 av Clement Ader, 86961 FUTUROSCOPE Cedex (France); CEA-DAM Valduc, 21120 Is-sur-Tille (France); Laboratoire Procedes et Ingenierie en Mecanique et Materiaux (CNRS), Arts et Metiers ParisTech, 151 bd de l' Hopital, 75013 PARIS (France); Institut PPRIME, Departement Physique et Mecanique des Materiaux, CNRS-ENSMA-Universite de Poitiers, 1 av Clement Ader, 86961 FUTUROSCOPE Cedex (France)

    2012-07-30

    High power laser irradiation of solids results in a strong shock wave propagation, driving very high amplitude pressure loadings with very short durations. These particular characteristics offer the possibility to study the behaviour of matter under extreme dynamic conditions in continuity with what is possible with the conventional generators of shock (launchers of projectiles, explosives). An advantage of laser shocks is a possible recovery of the shocked samples presenting the metallurgical effects of the shock in most cases. We introduce the principle of the laser shock generation, the characterization of these shocks, the principal mechanisms and effects associated with their propagation in the solids. We show how laser shocks can be a laboratory tool for simulating shock effects at ultra high strain rate, providing a high in information experimental layout for validation of damage modelling on an extended strain rate range compared to conventional shock generators. New data have been obtained with ultra short femtosecond range irradiation. Experimental data gathered through post mortem observation, time resolved velocity measurement are shown along with numerical associated simulations, showing the possibility to predict the damage behaviour of metallic targets under extreme strain rate up to 10{sup 8} s{sup -1}.

  9. Analysis of temperature and thermal stress fields of K9 glass damaged by 1064nm nanosecond pulse laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yunxiang; Shen, Zhonghua; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiaowu

    2013-02-01

    There are residual scratches, inclusions and other forms of defects at surfaces of optical materials after the processes of grinding and polishing, which could either enhance the local electric field or increase the absorption rate of the material. As a result, the laser-induced damage threshold at the surface of the material is reduced greatly. In order to study underlying mechanisms and process of short pulsed laser-induced damage to K9 glass, a spatial axisymmetric model where the K9 glass was irradiated by a laser whose wavelength and pulse width are respectively 1064nm and 10ns was established. Taking into account the fact that the surface of the K9 glass is more likely to be damaged, 2μm-thick layers whose absorption coefficients are larger than bulk were set at both the input and output surfaces in the model. In addition, the model assumed that once the calculated tensile/compressive stress was greater than the tensile/compressive strength of K9 glass, the local absorption coefficient increased. The finite element method(FEM) was applied to calculate the temperature and thermal stress fields in the K9 glass. Results show that only the temperature of a small part of interacted region exceeds the melting point, while most of the damage pit is generated by thermal stress. The simulated damage morphology and the size of the damage region are consistent with those reported in literatures, which indicates that the model built in our work is reasonable.

  10. Laser-induced damage thresholds of gold, silver and their alloys in air and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starinskiy, Sergey V.; Shukhov, Yuri G.; Bulgakov, Alexander V.

    2017-02-01

    The nanosecond-laser-induced damage thresholds of gold, silver and gold-silver alloys of various compositions in air and water have been measured for single-shot irradiation conditions. The experimental results are analyzed theoretically by solving the heat flow equation for the samples irradiated in air and in water taking into account vapor nucleation at the solid-water interface. The damage thresholds of Au-Ag alloys are systematically lower than those for pure metals, both in air and water that is explained by lower thermal conductivities of the alloys. The thresholds measured in air agree well with the calculated melting thresholds for all samples. The damage thresholds in water are found to be considerably higher, by a factor of ∼1.5, than the corresponding thresholds in air. This cannot be explained, in the framework of the used model, neither by the conductive heat transfer to water nor by the vapor pressure effect. Possible reasons for the high damage thresholds in water such as scattering of the incident laser light by the vapor-liquid interface and the critical opalescence in the superheated water are suggested. Optical pump-probe measurements have been performed to study the reflectance dynamics of the surface irradiated in air and water. Comparison of the transient reflectance signal with the calculated nucleation dynamics provides evidence that the both suggested scattering mechanisms are likely to occur during metal ablation in water.

  11. Localized CO2 laser treatment and post-heating process to reduce the growth coefficient of fused silica surface damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shizhen Xu; Xiaotao Zu; Xiaodong Yuan

    2011-01-01

    The lifetime of optical components in high-fluence ultraviolet (UV) laser applications is typically limited by laser-initiated damage and its subsequent growth. Using 10.6-μm CO2 laser pulses, we successfully mitigate 355-nm laser induced damage sites on fused silica surface with dimensions less than 200 μm.The damage threshold increases and the damage growth mitigates. However, the growth coefficients of new damage on the CO2 laser processed area are higher than those of the original sample. The damage grows with crack propagation for residual stress after CO2 laser irradiation. Furthermore, post-heating is beneficial to the release of residual stress and slows down the damage growth.%@@ The lifetime of optical components in high-fluence ultraviolet (UV) laser applications is typically limited by laser-initiated damage and its subsequent growth.Using 10.6-μm CO2 laser pulses, we successfully mitigate 355-nm laser induced damage sites on fused silica surface with dimensions less than 200 μm.The damage threshold increases and the damage growth mitigates.However, the growth coefficients of new damage on the CO2 laser processed area are higher than those of the original sample.The damage grows with crack propagation for residual stress after CO2 laser irradiation.Furthermore, post-heating is beneficial to the release of residual stress and slows down the damage growth.

  12. Studies on transmitted beam modulation effect from laser induced damage on fused silica optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yi; Ma, Ping; Li, Haibo; Liu, Zhichao; Chen, Songlin

    2013-07-15

    UV laser induced damage (LID) on exit surface of fused silica could cause modulation effect to transmitted beam and further influence downstream propagation properties. This paper presents our experimental and analytical studies on this topic. In experiment, a series of measurement instruments are applied, including beam profiler, interferometer, microscope, and optical coherent tomography (OCT). Creating and characterizing of LID on fused silica sample have been implemented. Morphological features are studied based on their particular modulation effects on transmitted beam. In theoretical investigation, analytical modeling and numerical simulation are performed. Modulation effects from amplitude, phase, and size factors are analyzed respectively. Furthermore, we have novelly designed a simplified polygon model to simulate actual damage site with multiform modulation features, and the simulation results demonstrate that the modeling is usable and representative.

  13. A continuum damage model for piezoelectric materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yiming Fu; Xianqiao Wang

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a constitutive model is proposed for piezoelectric material solids containing distributed cracks.The model is formulated in a framework of continuum damage mechanics using second rank tensors as internal variables. The Helmhotlz free energy of piezoelectric mate-rials with damage is then expressed as a polynomial including the transformed strains, the electric field vector and the ten-sorial damage variables by using the integrity bases restricted by the initial orthotropic symmetry of the material. By using the Talreja's tensor valued internal state damage variables as well as the Helmhotlz free energy of the piezoelectric mate-rial, the constitutive relations of piezoelectric materials with damage are derived. The model is applied to a special case of piezoelectric plate with transverse matrix cracks. With theKirchhoff hypothesis of plate, the free vibration equationsof the piezoelectric rectangular plate considering damage isestablished. By using Galerkin method, the equations are sol-ved. Numerical results show the effect of the damage on the free vibration of the piezoelectric plate under the close-circuit condition, and the present results are compared with those of the three-dimensional theory.

  14. Laser Induced Damage Studies in Borosilicate Glass Using nanosecond and sub nanosecond pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Rastogi, Vinay; Munda, D S

    2016-01-01

    The damage mechanism induced by laser pulse of different duration in borosilicate glass widely used for making confinement geometry targets which are important for laser driven shock multiplication and elongation of pressure pulse, is studied. We measured the front and rear surface damage threshold of borosilicate glass and their dependency on laser parameters. In this paper, we also study the thermal effects on the damage diameters, generated at the time of plasma formation. These induced damage width, geometries and microstructure changes are measured and analyzed with optical microscope, scanning electron microscope and Raman spectroscopy. The results show that at low energies symmetrical damages are found and these damage width increases nonlinearly with laser intensity. The emitted optical spectrum during the process of breakdown is also investigated and is used for the characterization of emitted plasma such as plasma temperature and free electron density. Optical emission lines from Si I at 500 nm, Si ...

  15. Laser-induced surface ablation as a probe of optical surface damage mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, L. L.

    1990-02-01

    The phenomenon of laser surface damage is briefly reviewed, with an emphasis on the fundamental physical mechanisms of the interaction of laser light with the surface. Recent measurements of laser ablation of charged and neutral surface constituents and impurities are described, and it is shown that these experiments can he used to investigate optical damage mechanisms. Crystalline ZnS is used as the primary example of this work.

  16. Foam-on-Tile Damage Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koharchik, Michael; Murphy, Lindsay; Parker, Paul

    2012-01-01

    An impact model was developed to predict how three specific foam types would damage the Space Shuttle Orbiter insulating tiles. The inputs needed for the model are the foam type, the foam mass, the foam impact velocity, the foam impact incident angle, the type being impacted, and whether the tile is new or aged (has flown at least one mission). The model will determine if the foam impact will cause damage to the tile. If it can cause damage, the model will output the damage cavity dimensions (length, depth, entry angle, exit angle, and sidewall angles). It makes the calculations as soon as the inputs are entered (less than 1 second). The model allows for the rapid calculation of numerous scenarios in a short time. The model was developed from engineering principles coupled with significant impact testing (over 800 foam impact tests). This model is applicable to masses ranging from 0.0002 up to 0.4 pound (0.09 up to 181 g). A prior tool performed a similar function, but was limited to the assessment of a small range of masses and did not have the large test database for verification. In addition, the prior model did not provide outputs of the cavity damage length, entry angle, exit angle, or sidewall angles.

  17. Mitigation of Laser Damage Growth in Fused Silica NIF Optics with a Galvanometer Scanned Carbon Dioxide Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, I L; Draggoo, V; Guss, G M; Hackel, R P; Norton, M A

    2006-04-06

    Economic operation of the National Ignition Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory depends on controlling growth of laser damage in the large, high cost optics exposed to UV light at 351 nm. Mitigation of the growth of damage sites on fused silica surfaces greater than several hundred microns in diameter has been previously reported by us using galvanometer scanning of a tightly focused 10.6 {micro}m CO{sub 2} laser spot over an area encompassing the laser damage. Further investigation revealed that fused silica vapor re-deposited on the surface as ''debris'' led to laser damage at unexpectedly low fluences when exposed to multiple laser shots at 351 nm. Additionally, laser power and spatial mode fluctuations in the mitigation laser led to poor repeatability of the process. We also found that the shape of the mitigation pit could produce downstream intensification that could damage other NIF optics. Modifications were made to both the laser system and the mitigation process in order to address these issues. Debris was completely eliminated by these changes, but repeatability and downstream intensification issues still persist.

  18. Laser-induced damage tests based on a marker-based watershed algorithm with gray control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yajing; Guo; Shunxing; Tang; Xiuqing; Jiang; Yujie; Peng; Baoqiang; Zhu; Zunqi; Lin

    2014-01-01

    An effective damage test method based on a marker-based watershed algorithm with gray control(MWGC) is proposed to study the properties of damage induced by near-field laser irradiation for large-aperture laser facilities.Damage tests were performed on fused silica samples and information on the size of damage sites was obtained by this new algorithm,which can effectively suppress the issue of over-segmentation of images resulting from non-uniform illumination in darkfield imaging.Experimental analysis and results show that the lateral damage growth on the exit surface is exponential,and the number of damage sites decreases sharply with damage site size in the damage site distribution statistics.The average damage growth coefficients fitted according to the experimental results for Corning-7980 and Heraeus-Suprasil312 samples at 351 nm are 1.10 ± 0.31 and 0.60 ± 0.09,respectively.

  19. Damage modelling in plasma facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, E. [Universite Bordeaux 1, UMR 5801 (CNRS-SPS-CEA-UB1), Laboratoire des Composites Thermostructuraux, F-33600 Pessac (France)], E-mail: martin@lcts.u-bordeaux1.fr; Camus, G. [Universite Bordeaux 1, UMR 5801 (CNRS-SPS-CEA-UB1), Laboratoire des Composites Thermostructuraux, F-33600 Pessac (France); Schlosser, J.; Chevet, G. [Association Euratom-CEA, DSM/DRFC, CEA Cadarache, St. Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2009-04-30

    The plasma facing components of controlled fusion devices are submitted to high heat fluxes in operating conditions (from 10 to 20 MW/m{sup 2}). These components are made of a carbon/carbon composite tile bonded to a copper alloy heat sink. Due to the thermal expansion mismatch between the composite and the copper alloy, significant stresses may develop during fabrication and under heat load inducing damage in the composite material as well as at the copper/composite interface. The present study describes a modelling approach aimed at predicting damage development in plasma facing components. For this purpose, damage laws related to the non-linear behaviour of both the composite material and the copper/composite joint have been identified. These constitutive laws were then introduced in a numerical model representative of a plasma facing component. Results show the development of damage within the assembly submitted to a heat load.

  20. DNA damage in wounded, hypoxic and acidotic human skin fibroblast cell cultures after low laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins Evans, D.; Mbene, A.; Zungu, I.; Houreld, N.; Abrahamse, H.

    2009-02-01

    Phototherapy has become more popular and widely used in the treatment of a variety of medical conditions. To ensure sound results as evidence of its effectiveness, well designed experiments must be conducted when determining the effect of phototherapy. Cell culture models such as hypoxic, acidotic and wounded cell cultures simulating different disease conditions including ischemic heart disease, diabetes and wound healing were used to determine the effect of laser irradiation on the genetic integrity of the cell. Even though phototherapy has been found to be beneficial in a wide spectrum of conditions, it has been shown to induce DNA damage. However, this damage appears to be repairable. The risk lies in the fact that phototherapy may help the medical condition initially but damage DNA at the same time leaving undetected damage that may result in late onset, more severe, induced medical conditions including cancer. Human skin fibroblasts were cultured and used to induce a wound (by the central scratch model), hypoxic (by incubation in an anaerobic jar, 95% N2 and 5% O2) and acidotic (reducing the pH of the media to 6.7) conditions. Different models were irradiated using a Helium-Neon (632.8 nm) laser with a power density of 2.07 mW/cm2 and a fluence of 5 J/cm2 or 16 J/cm2. The effect of the irradiation was determined using the Comet assay 1 and 24 h after irradiation. In addition, the Comet assay was performed with the addition of formamidopyrimidine glycosylase (FPG) obviating strand brakes in oxidized bases at a high fluence of 16 J/cm2. A significant increase in DNA damage was seen in all three injured models at both 1 and 24 h post-irradiation when compared to the normal un-injured cells. However, when compared to non-irradiated controls the acidotic model showed a significant decrease in DNA damage 24 h after irradiation indicating the possible induction of cellular DNA repair mechanisms. When wounded cells were irradiated with higher fluences of 16 J/cm2

  1. Effect of the repaired damage morphology of fused silica on the modulation of incident laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, X.; Jiang, Y.; Qiu, R.; Zhou, Q.; Zuo, R.; Zhou, G. R.; Yao, K.

    2017-02-01

    Local CO2 laser treatment has proved to be the most promising method to extend the life-time of fused silica. However, previous experimental data show that some raised rims are observed around the mitigated sites left from the mitigation process, which will result in hazardous light modulation to the downstream optics. In this work, the morphology features of mitigated sites on the surface of fused silica optics were analyzed in detail. According to measured morphology features, a 3D analytical model for simulating the modulation value induced by mitigated site has been developed based on the scalar diffraction theory. The diffraction patterns at a discrete distance downstream from each mitigated site are measured. The influences of geometry, laser wavelength and refractive index of substrates on the modulation by repaired damage morphology at different distances are discussed, respectively. The analytical model is usable and representative to evaluate the hazardous modulation induced by repaired damage morphology to downstream optics. Results on this research suggest that the downstream intensification can be suppressed by controlling the morphology features of mitigated sites, which provides a direction for the development and improvement of the mitigated techniques of damage optics.

  2. Dynamic modeling of photothermal interactions for laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy: parameter sensitivity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, S C; Zhang, X X

    2005-12-01

    A two-dimensional model was developed to model the effects of dynamic changes in the physical properties on tissue temperature and damage to simulate laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy (LITT) treatment procedures with temperature monitoring. A modified Monte Carlo method was used to simulate photon transport in the tissue in the non-uniform optical property field with the finite volume method used to solve the Pennes bioheat equation to calculate the temperature distribution and the Arrhenius equation used to predict the thermal damage extent. The laser light transport and the heat transfer as well as the damage accumulation were calculated iteratively at each time step. The influences of different laser sources, different applicator sizes, and different irradiation modes on the final damage volume were analyzed to optimize the LITT treatment. The numerical results showed that damage volume was the smallest for the 1,064-nm laser, with much larger, similar damage volumes for the 980- and 850-nm lasers at normal blood perfusion rates. The damage volume was the largest for the 1,064-nm laser with significantly smaller, similar damage volumes for the 980- and 850-nm lasers with temporally interrupted blood perfusion. The numerical results also showed that the variations in applicator sizes, laser powers, heating durations and temperature monitoring ranges significantly affected the shapes and sizes of the thermal damage zones. The shapes and sizes of the thermal damage zones can be optimized by selecting different applicator sizes, laser powers, heating duration times, temperature monitoring ranges, etc.

  3. Terrestrial Laser Scanner for Monitoring the Deformations and the Damages of Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacca, G.; Mistretta, F.; Stochino, F.; Dessi, A.

    2016-06-01

    scanner provides the ability to detect the geometric 3D model of a building without any physical contact with the structure. Knowledge of the 3D model will give the opportunity to study the deformation and quantify the damages. Three case studies are presented relating to damaged and/or unsafe buildings: Sivillier Castle (Villasor - Sardinia- Italy), the Bell Tower of Mores (Sardinia-Italy) and industrial building (Cagliari - Italy). The first two cases concern buildings of historical and architectural importance that present a state of compromised conservation; the last, an industrial building compromised by fire. In all cases, a laser scanner survey was carried out that not only provided valuable information but also highlighted structural metric deformation and degradation.

  4. Ultrashort-pulse laser excitation and damage of dielectric materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr-Lillevang, Lasse; Balling, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Ultrashort-pulse laser excitation of dielectrics is an intricate problem due to the strong coupling between the rapidly changing material properties and the light. In the present paper, details of a model based on a multiple-rate-equation description of the conduction band are provided. The model...... is verified by comparison with recent experimental measurements of the transient optical properties in combination with ablation-depth determinations. The excitation process from the first creation of conduction-band electrons at low intensities to the formation of a highly-excited plasma and associated...... material fragmentation is explained by the model. For quartz samples, the optical properties are strongly influenced by self-trapped excitons, and the associated additions to the model are described....

  5. Geometric identification and damage detection of structural elements by terrestrial laser scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Tsung-Chin; Liu, Yu-Wei; Su, Yu-Min

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, three-dimensional (3D) terrestrial laser scanning technologies with higher precision and higher capability are developing rapidly. The growing maturity of laser scanning has gradually approached the required precision as those have been provided by traditional structural monitoring technologies. Together with widely available fast computation for massive point cloud data processing, 3D laser scanning can serve as an efficient structural monitoring alternative for civil engineering communities. Currently most research efforts have focused on integrating/calculating the measured multi-station point cloud data, as well as modeling/establishing the 3D meshes of the scanned objects. Very little attention has been spent on extracting the information related to health conditions and mechanical states of structures. In this study, an automated numerical approach that integrates various existing algorithms for geometric identification and damage detection of structural elements were established. Specifically, adaptive meshes were employed for classifying the point cloud data of the structural elements, and detecting the associated damages from the calculated eigenvalues in each area of the structural element. Furthermore, kd-tree was used to enhance the searching efficiency of plane fitting which were later used for identifying the boundaries of structural elements. The results of geometric identification were compared with M3C2 algorithm provided by CloudCompare, as well as validated by LVDT measurements of full-scale reinforced concrete beams tested in laboratory. It shows that 3D laser scanning, through the established processing approaches of the point cloud data, can offer a rapid, nondestructive, remote, and accurate solution for geometric identification and damage detection of structural elements.

  6. Implementation of an anisotropic damage material model using general second order damage tensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niazi, Muhammad; Wisselink, Harm; Meinders, Timo; Horn, ten Carel; Mori, K.; Pietrzyk, M.; Kusiak, J.; Majta, J.; Hartley, P.; Lin, J.

    2010-01-01

    Damage in metals is mainly the process of the initiation and growth of voids. With the growing complexity in materials and forming proc-esses, it becomes inevitable to include anisotropy in damage (tensorial damage variable). Most of the anisotropic damage models define the damage tensor in the prin

  7. High-Resolution In Vivo Imaging of Regimes of Laser Damage to the Primate Retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ginger M. Pocock

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate fundamental mechanisms of regimes of laser induced damage to the retina and the morphological changes associated with the damage response. Methods. Varying grades of photothermal, photochemical, and photomechanical retinal laser damage were produced in eyes of eight cynomolgus monkeys. An adaptive optics confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope and spectral domain optical coherence tomographer were combined to simultaneously collect complementary in vivo images of retinal laser damage during and following exposure. Baseline color fundus photography was performed to complement high-resolution imaging. Monkeys were perfused with 10% buffered formalin and eyes were enucleated for histological analysis. Results. Laser energies for visible retinal damage in this study were consistent with previously reported damage thresholds. Lesions were identified in OCT images that were not visible in direct ophthalmoscopic examination or fundus photos. Unique diagnostic characteristics, specific to each damage regime, were identified and associated with shape and localization of lesions to specific retinal layers. Previously undocumented retinal healing response to blue continuous wave laser exposure was recorded through a novel experimental methodology. Conclusion. This study revealed increased sensitivity of lesion detection and improved specificity to the laser of origin utilizing high-resolution imaging when compared to traditional ophthalmic imaging techniques in the retina.

  8. Development of a laser damage growth mitigation process, based on CO2 laser micro processing, for the Laser MegaJoule fused silica optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doualle, Thomas; Gallais, Laurent; Monneret, Serge; Bouillet, Stephane; Bourgeade, Antoine; Ameil, Christel; Lamaignère, Laurent; Cormont, Philippe

    2016-12-01

    In the context of high power laser systems, the laser damage resistance of fused silica surfaces at 351 nm in the nanosecond regime is a major concern. Under successive nanosecond laser irradiations, an initiated damage can grow which can make the component unsuitable. The localized CO2 laser processing has demonstrated its ability to mitigate (stopping) laser damage growth. In order to mitigate large damage sites (millimetric), a method based on fast microablation of silica has been proposed by Bass et al. [Bass et al., Proc. SPIE 7842, 784220 (2010)]. This is accomplished by scanning of the CO2 laser spot with a fast galvanometer beam scanner to form a crater with a typical conical shape. The objective of the present work is to develop a similar fast micro-ablation process for application to the Laser MegaJoule optical components. We present in this paper the developed experimental system and process. We describe also the characterization tools used in this study for shape measurements which are critical for the application. Experimental and numerical studies of the downstream intensifications, resulting of cone formation on the fused silica surface, are presented. The experimental results are compared to numerical simulations for different crater shape in order to find optimal process conditions to minimize the intensifications in the LMJ configuration. We show the laser damage test experimental conditions and procedures to evaluate the laser damage resistance of the mitigated sites and discuss the efficiency of the process for our application.

  9. Effect of focus position of ns pulse laser on damage characteristics of K9 glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yunxiang; Zhang, Hongchao; Li, Mengmeng; Shen, Zhonghua; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiaowu

    2015-05-01

    Laser-induced damage of optical glasses has been investigated for more than fifty years. Due to the residual scratches, inclusions and other forms of defects at surfaces of optical glasses after the processes of grinding and polishing, it is well known that the sample surface can be damaged more easily than bulk. In order to get the relationship between the damage threshold and the location of the laser spot, we carried out damage experiments on K9 glasses with a 7ns pulse laser. Since ns pulse laser-induced damage of optical glasses always accompanies with the generation of the plasma, a optical microscope connected with a CCD camera was used to observe the plasma flash, which can provide a real time detection of damage sites. The laser pulse was first focused into the bulk, then the spot was moved toward the direction of incident laser beam step by step until the beam was completely focused in ambient air. Damage threshold curves were measured for each focus position, and low thresholds and high thresholds were extracted from those curves. Finally, the relationship between damage thresholds and focus position was analyzed.

  10. Investigation of laser-surface interactions and optical damage mechanisms using excitation by pairs of picosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, L. L.; Lee, H. W. H.; Hughes, Robert S.

    1990-07-01

    It is demonstrated that laser-surface interactions that cause optical surface damage of nominally transparent materials can be investigated by observing the effects of excitation by pairs of picosecond pulses separated by a variable time delay. Laser-induced emission of neutrals is used as the detection mechanism in the present experiments.

  11. Particle damage sources for fused silica optics and their mitigation on high energy laser systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bude, J; Carr, C W; Miller, P E; Parham, T; Whitman, P; Monticelli, M; Raman, R; Cross, D; Welday, B; Ravizza, F; Suratwala, T; Davis, J; Fischer, M; Hawley, R; Lee, H; Matthews, M; Norton, M; Nostrand, M; VanBlarcom, D; Sommer, S

    2017-05-15

    High energy laser systems are ultimately limited by laser-induced damage to their critical components. This is especially true of damage to critical fused silica optics, which grows rapidly upon exposure to additional laser pulses. Much progress has been made in eliminating damage precursors in as-processed fused silica optics (the advanced mitigation process, AMP3), and very high damage resistance has been demonstrated in laboratory studies. However, the full potential of these improvements has not yet been realized in actual laser systems. In this work, we explore the importance of additional damage sources-in particular, particle contamination-for fused silica optics fielded in a high-performance laser environment, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser system. We demonstrate that the most dangerous sources of particle contamination in a system-level environment are laser-driven particle sources. In the specific case of the NIF laser, we have identified the two important particle sources which account for nearly all the damage observed on AMP3 optics during full laser operation and present mitigations for these particle sources. Finally, with the elimination of these laser-driven particle sources, we demonstrate essentially damage free operation of AMP3 fused silica for ten large optics (a total of 12,000 cm(2) of beam area) for shots from 8.6 J/cm(2) to 9.5 J/cm(2) of 351 nm light (3 ns Gaussian pulse shapes). Potentially many other pulsed high energy laser systems have similar particle sources, and given the insight provided by this study, their identification and elimination should be possible. The mitigations demonstrated here are currently being employed for all large UV silica optics on the National Ignition Facility.

  12. Anisotropy of hardness and laser damage threshold of unidirectional organic NLO crystal in relation to the internal structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natarajan, V. [Department of Physics, Aditanar College of Arts and Science, Tiruchendur, Tamil Nadu (India); Arivanandhan, M., E-mail: arivu_cz@yahoo.co.in [Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8011 (Japan); Sankaranarayanan, K. [Department of Physics, Alagappa University, Karaikudi 630 003, Tamil Nadu (India); Hayakawa, Y. [Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8011 (Japan)

    2011-10-17

    Highlights: {center_dot} Growth rate of the unidirectional organic crystals were measured and the variation in the growth rate was explained based on the attachment energy model. {center_dot} Anisotropic behaviors of hardness and laser damage threshold of the unidirectional materials were analyzed. {center_dot} The obtained results were explained based on the crystal structure of the material. - Abstract: Unidirectional benzophenone crystals were grown along <1 1 0>, <0 1 0> and <0 0 1> directions by uniaxially solution crystallization method at ambient temperature. The growth rate of the grown crystals was varied with orientation. The optical absorption coefficients of benzophenone were measured as a function of wavelength. The optical absorption study reveals that the benzophenone crystal has very low absorption in the wavelength range of interest. Moreover, the laser damage threshold and micro hardness for <1 1 0>, <0 1 0> and <0 0 1> oriented unidirectional benzophenone crystals were measured using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm radiation and Vicker's micro hardness tester, respectively. The laser damage threshold is larger for the <1 1 0> and <0 1 0> oriented crystals compared to <0 0 1> oriented crystal at 1064 nm wavelength. The result is consistent with the hardness variation observed for the three different crystallographic directions of benzophenone crystal. The relation between the laser damage profile and mechanical hardness anisotropy is discussed based on the crystal structure of benzophenone.

  13. Laser-induced damage in biological tissue: Role of complex and dynamic optical properties of the medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Elharith M.

    Since its invention in the early 1960's, the laser has been used as a tool for surgical, therapeutic, and diagnostic purposes. To achieve maximum effectiveness with the greatest margin of safety it is important to understand the mechanisms of light propagation through tissue and how that light affects living cells. Lasers with novel output characteristics for medical and military applications are too often implemented prior to proper evaluation with respect to tissue optical properties and human safety. Therefore, advances in computational models that describe light propagation and the cellular responses to laser exposure, without the use of animal models, are of considerable interest. Here, a physics-based laser-tissue interaction model was developed to predict the spatial and temporal temperature and pressure rise during laser exposure to biological tissues. Our new model also takes into account the dynamic nature of tissue optical properties and their impact on the induced temperature and pressure profiles. The laser-induced retinal damage is attributed to the formation of microbubbles formed around melanosomes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and the damage mechanism is assumed to be photo-thermal. Selective absorption by melanin creates these bubbles that expand and collapse around melanosomes, destroying cell membranes and killing cells. The Finite Element (FE) approach taken provides suitable ground for modeling localized pigment absorption which leads to a non-uniform temperature distribution within pigmented cells following laser pulse exposure. These hot-spots are sources for localized thermo-elastic stresses which lead to rapid localized expansions that manifest themselves as microbubbles and lead to microcavitations. Model predictions for the interaction of lasers at wavelengths of 193, 694, 532, 590, 1314, 1540, 2000, and 2940 nm with biological tissues were generated and comparisons were made with available experimental data for the retina

  14. Some Experiences in 3D Laser Scanning for Assisting Restoration and Evaluating Damage in Cultural Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, L. M.; Finat, Javier; Fernández-Martin, J. J.; Martínez, J.; SanJose, J. I.

    The recent incorporation of laser devices provides advanced tools for assisting the conservation and restoration of Cultural Heritage. It is necessary to have as complete as possible understanding of the object state before evaluating or defining the reach of the restoration process. Thus, a special effort is devoted to surveying, measuring and generating a high-resolution 3D model prior to restoration planning. This work presents results of several experiments performed on damaged pieces for evaluation purposes in Cultural Heritage. Some software tools are applied for carving-work analysis, conservation-state monitoring, and simulation of weathering processes for evaluating temporal changes. In all cases considered, a high resolution information capture has been performed with a laser scanner, the Minolta 910. Our approach is flexible enough to be adapted to other kinds of pieces or Cultural Heritage artefacts, in order to provide an assessment for intervention planning in conservation and restoration tasks.

  15. Dual wavelength laser damage mechanisms in the ultra-short pulse regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyamfi, Mark; Costella, Marion; Willemsen, Thomas; Jürgens, Peter; Mende, Mathias; Jensen, Lars; Ristau, Detlev

    2016-12-01

    New ultrashort pulse laser systems exhibit an ever increasing performance which includes shorter pulses and higher pulse energies. Optical components used in these systems are facing increasing requirements regarding their durability, and therefore understanding of the damage mechanism is crucial. In the ultra-short pulse regime electron ionization processes control the damage mechanisms. For the single wavelength, single pulse regime the Keldysh [1] and the Drude model [2] allow a quantitative description of these ionization processes. However, in this model, the electrical field is restricted to a single wavelength, and therefore it cannot be applied in the case of irradiation with two pulses at different wavelengths. As frequency conversion is becoming more common in ultra-short pulse applications, further research is needed in this field to predict the damage resistance of optical components. We investigate the damage behavior of high reflective mirrors made of different metal oxide materials under simultaneous exposure to ultra-short pulses at the wavelengths 387.5 nm and 775 nm, respectively.

  16. Damage Resistant Optical Glasses for High Power Lasers: A Continuing Glass Science and Technology Challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J H

    2002-08-28

    A major challenge in the development of optical glasses for high-power lasers is reducing or eliminating laser-induced damage to the interior (bulk) and the polished surface of the glass. Bulk laser damage in glass generally originates from inclusions. With the development of novel glass melting and forming processes it is now possible to make both fused silica and a suit of meta-phosphate laser glasses in large sizes ({approx}>0.5-lm diameter), free of inclusions and with high optical homogeneity ({approx} 10{sup -6}). Considerable attention also has been focused on improving the laser damage resistance to polished optical glass surfaces. Studies have shown that laser-induced damage to surfaces grows exponentially with the number of shots when illuminated with nano-second pulses at 351-nm above a given fluence threshold. A new approach for reducing and eliminating laser-induced surface damage relies on a series of post-polishing treatment steps. This damage improvement method is briefly reviewed.

  17. Progressive Damage Modeling of Notched Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitharaju, Venkat; Aashat, Satvir; Kia, Hamid; Satyanarayana, Arunkumar; Bogert, Philip

    2016-01-01

    There is an increased interest in using non-crimp fabric reinforced composites for primary and secondary structural weight savings in high performance automobile applications. However, one of the main challenges in implementing these composites is the lack of understanding of damage progression under a wide variety of loading conditions for general configurations. Towards that end, researchers at GM and NASA are developing new damage models to predict accurately the progressive failure of these composites. In this investigation, the developed progressive failure analysis model was applied to study damage progression in center-notched and open-hole tension specimens for various laminate schemes. The results of a detailed study with respect to the effect of element size on the analysis outcome are presented.

  18. Focal Laser Ablation of Prostate Cancer: Numerical Simulation of Temperature and Damage Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevoux Pierre

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of minimally invasive ablative techniques in the management of patients with low grade and localized prostate tumours could represent a treatment option between active surveillance and radical therapy. Focal laser ablation (FLA could be one of these treatment modalities. Dosimetry planning and conformation of the treated area to the tumor remain major issues, especially when, several fibers are required. An effective method to perform pre-treatment planning of this therapy is computer simulation. In this study we present an in vivo validation of a mathematical model. Methods The simulation model is based on finite elements method (FEM to solve the bio-heat and the thermal damage equations. Laser irradiation was performed with a 980 nm laser diode system (5 W, 75 s. Light was transmitted using a cylindrical diffusing fiber inserted inside a preclinical animal prostate cancer model induced in Copenhagen rats. Non-enhanced T2-weighted and dynamic gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted MR imaging examinations were performed at baseline and 48 hours after the procedure. The model was validated by comparing the simulated necrosis volume to the results obtained in vivo on (MRI and by histological analysis. 3 iso-damage temperatures were considered 43° C, 45° C and 50° C. Results The mean volume of the tissue necrosis, estimated from the histological analyses was 0.974 ± 0.059 cc and 0.98 ± 0.052 cc on the 48 h MR images. For the simulation model, volumes were: 1.38 cc when T = 43° C, 1.1 cc for T = 45°C and 0.99 cc when T = 50 C°. Conclusions In this study, a clear correlation was established between simulation and in vivo experiments of FLA for prostate cancer. Simulation is a promising planning technique for this therapy. It needs further more evaluation to allow to FLA to become a widely applied surgical method.

  19. Growth of laser damage in fused silica: diameter to depth ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norton, M A; Adams, J J; Carr, C W; Donohue, E E; Feit, M D; Hackel, R P; Hollingsworth, W G; Jarboe, J A; Matthews, M; Rubenchik, A M; Spaeth, M L

    2007-10-29

    Growth of laser initiated damage plays a major role in determining optics lifetime in high power laser systems. Previous measurements have established that the lateral diameter grows exponentially. Knowledge of the growth of the site in the propagation direction is also important, especially so when considering techniques designed to mitigate damage growth, where it is required to reach all the subsurface damage. In this work, we present data on both the diameter and the depth of a growing exit surface damage sites in fused silica. Measured growth rates with both 351 nm illumination and with combined 351 nm and 1054 nm illumination are discussed.

  20. Laser damage studies of ZnS via neutral Zn particle emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlinghaus, H. F.; Calaway, W. F.; Young, C. E.; Pellin, M. J.; Gruen, D. M.; Chase, L. L.

    1989-10-01

    Emission of neutral atoms from ZnS surfaces due to laser irradiation has been observed at power densities two orders of magnitude below the single pulse damage threshold of the material. We have measured the velocity distribution and absolute yield of neutral Zn atoms generated by exposure of ZnS single crystals to XeCl excimer laser irradiation (308 nm) using time-of-flight and high-resolution two-photon laser-induced fluorescence spectroscpy. The distributions are in agreement with Maxwell-Boltzmann distributions. The characteristic temperature increases from 2000 to 9000 K as the fluences are raised from 17 to 80 mJ/cm2, respectively. The absolute Zn yield also increased from 108 to 1012 atoms per laser pulse as the laser fluence is increased. The insults suggest formation of a plasma that interacts with the surface and leads to catastrophic failure. For consecutive laser shots at constant lasers fluences, a nearly exponential increase in the Zn particle density is observed, yet visible damage did not occur until 150,000 laser shots. Our results show that neutral particle emission is of considerable importance in the identification of fundamental damage mechanisms and that microscopic damage occurs far below the single-pulse damage threshold.

  1. An Elastoplastic Damage Constitutive Model for Concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jun; LIN Gao; ZHONG Hong

    2013-01-01

    An elastoplastic damage constitutive model to simulate nonlinear behavior of concrete is presented.Similar to traditional plastic theory,the irreversible deformation is modeled in effective stress space.In order to better describe different stiffness degradation mechanisms of concrete under tensile and compressive loading conditions,two damage variables,i.e.,tension and compression are introduced,to quantitatively evaluate the degree of deterioration of concrete structure.The rate dependent behavior is taken into account,and this model is derived firmly in the framework of irreversible thermodynamics.Fully implicit backward-Euler algorithm is suggested to perform constitutive integration.Numerical results of the model accord well with the test results for specimens under uniaxial tension and compression,biaxial loading and triaxial loading.Failure processes of double-edge-notched (DEN) specimen are also simulated to further validate the proposed model.

  2. An elastoplastic damage constitutive model for concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Lin, Gao; Zhong, Hong

    2013-04-01

    An elastoplastic damage constitutive model to simulate nonlinear behavior of concrete is presented. Similar to traditional plastic theory, the irreversible deformation is modeled in effective stress space. In order to better describe different stiffness degradation mechanisms of concrete under tensile and compressive loading conditions, two damage variables, i.e., tension and compression are introduced, to quantitatively evaluate the degree of deterioration of concrete structure. The rate dependent behavior is taken into account, and this model is derived firmly in the framework of irreversible thermodynamics. Fully implicit backward-Euler algorithm is suggested to perform constitutive integration. Numerical results of the model accord well with the test results for specimens under uniaxial tension and compression, biaxial loading and triaxial loading. Failure processes of double-edge-notched (DEN) specimen are also simulated to further validate the proposed model.

  3. Plasto-damage modelling for semi-brittle geomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Alizadeh Ali; Gatmiri Behrouz

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an elastoplastic damage model for constitutive modelling of semi-brittle geomaterials showing two irreversible mechanisms. On one hand, the model deals with the plastic behaviour of a porous medium by a new variant of Barcelona Basic Model. On the other hand, the model combines the micromechanical definition of damage and phenomenological concepts in the framework of Continuum Damage Mechanics (CDM) for damage modelling. A second order tensorial damage variable is adopted ...

  4. Modelling of settlement induced building damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giardina, G.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the modelling of settlement induced damage to masonry buildings. In densely populated areas, the need for new space is nowadays producing a rapid increment of underground excavations. Due to the construction of new metro lines, tunnelling activity in urban areas is growing.

  5. Investigation of bulk laser damage in transparent YAG ceramics controlled with microstructural refinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamimura, T.; Kawaguchi, Y.; Arii, T.; Shirai, W.; Mikami, T.; Okamoto, T.; Aung, Yan Lin; Ikesue, A.

    2008-10-01

    We have investigated a relationship among the bulk laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) and YAG ceramics with various structural defects. The correlation of scattering defect density and laser damage resistance was clearly observed. A high-quality YAG ceramic having a low-scattering density showed a higher LIDT than that of a low-quality YAG ceramic. Laser damage threshold (LIDT) of high-quality YAG ceramic was almost the same as that of a single crystal. In addition, the high-quality Nd:YAG ceramics with low-defect density showed an excellent oscillation efficiency which was comparable to that of a single crystal. Thus, high-quality YAG ceramic with low-defect density is more reliable as a material which is highly resistant to laser damage.

  6. Shock induced damage and damage threshold of optical K9 glass investigated by laser-driven shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yunfei; Yu, Guoyang; Jiang, Lilin; Zheng, Xianxu; Liu, Yuqiang; Yang, Yanqiang

    2011-04-01

    The shock wave driven by short laser pulse is used to study the damage of brittle material K9 glass. The damage morphology of K9 glass surface indicates that the material has experienced different loading modes, respectively, at the central area and the surrounding area of the shock wave. At the central area of shock wave, the wavefront is plane and has a uniform pressure distribution, the material mainly suffers a longitudinal shock pressure; but on the edge the shock wave, the wavefront is approximately spherical, besides longitudinal pressure, transverse tensile stress will emerge inside the material. In the latter case, the damage threshold of the material is much smaller than that in the case of compressing by longitudinal pressure only. According to the relationship between damage area and shock pressure, an experimental method is proposed to measure the damage threshold of materials under shock loading. The damage threshold of K9 glass under spherical shock wave is measured to be about 1.12 GPa; and the damage threshold under plane shock wave is estimated to be between 1.82 and 1.98 GPa. They are much bigger than the damage threshold under static pressure. This method could also be used to measure the damage threshold of other materials when loaded by dynamic pressure.

  7. Pump and probe damage testing for investigation of transient material modifications associated with laser damage in optical materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negres, R A; Feit, M D; DeMange, P; Bude, J D; Demos, S G

    2007-10-18

    Laser-induced breakdown in the bulk of transparent dielectric materials is associated with the generation of extreme localized conditions of temperatures and pressures. In this work, we perform pump and probe damage testing experiments to investigate the evolution of transient absorption by the host material arising from modifications following confined laser energy deposition in fused silica and DKDP materials. Specifically, we measure the size of the damage sites observed in the region of spatial overlap between the pump and probe pulses versus probe time delay and energy. Results of this proof-of-principle experimental work confirm that material modifications under extreme conditions created during a damage event include transient optical absorption. In addition, we found that the relaxation times of the induced absorption are very distinct for DKDP and SiO{sub 2} even under identical excitation conditions, on the order of 100 ns and 100 {micro}s, respectively.

  8. An improved damaging model for structured clays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜岩; 雷华阳; 郑刚; 徐舜华

    2008-01-01

    An improved damaging model formulated within the framework of bounding surface for structured clays was proposed. The model was intended to describe the effects of structure degradation due to geotechnical loading. The predictive capability of the model was compared with those of triaxial compression test on Tianjin soft clays. The results show that, by incorporating a new damage function into the model, the reduction of elastic bulk and shear modulus with elastic deformations and the reduction of plastic bulk modulus and shear modulus with plastic deformations are able to be appreciable. Before the axial strain reaches 15%, the axial strain computed from the model is smaller than that from the test under the drained condition. Under the undrained condition, after the axial strain reaches 1%, the axial strain increases quickly because of the complete loss of structure and stiffness; and the result computed from the model is nearly equal to that from the model without the incorporation of the damage function due to less plastic strain under undrained condition test.

  9. Laser shaft alignment measurement model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Chang-tao; Chen, Changzheng; Hou, Xiang-lin; Zhang, Guoyu

    2007-12-01

    Laser beam's track which is on photosensitive surface of the a receiver will be closed curve, when driving shaft and the driven shaft rotate with same angular velocity and rotation direction. The coordinate of arbitrary point which is on the curve is decided by the relative position of two shafts. Basing on the viewpoint, a mathematic model of laser alignment is set up. By using a data acquisition system and a data processing model of laser alignment meter with single laser beam and a detector, and basing on the installation parameter of computer, the state parameter between two shafts can be obtained by more complicated calculation and correction. The correcting data of the four under chassis of the adjusted apparatus moving on the level and the vertical plane can be calculated. This will instruct us to move the apparatus to align the shafts.

  10. A CONTINUUM DAMAGE MODEL OF AGING CONCRETE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Zhenyang; Xie Huicai; Xu Tao; Yu Jie; Cai Changan

    2001-01-01

    There is up to now no constitutive model in the current theories of CDM that could give a description for the degradation of aging concrete. The two internal state variables β and ω are introduced in this paper. β is called cohesion variable as an additional kinematic parameter, reflecting the cohesion state among material particles. ω is called damage factor for micro-defects such as voids.Then a damage model and a series of constitutive equations are developed on Continuum Mechanics.The model proposed could give a valid description for the whole-course-degradation of aging concrete due tochemical and mechanical actions. Finally, the validity of the model is evaluated by an example and experimental results.

  11. Generation of Scratches and Their Effects on Laser Damage Performance of Silica Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaguo; Ye, Hui; Yuan, Zhigang; Liu, Zhichao; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Zhe; Zhao, Shijie; Wang, Jian; Xu, Qiao

    2016-01-01

    Scratches are deleterious to precision optics because they can obscure and modulate incident laser light, which will increase the probability of damage to optical components. We here imitated the generation of brittle and ductile scratches during polishing process and endeavored to find out the possible influence of scratches on laser induced damage. Brittle scratches can be induced by spiking large sized abrasives and small abrasives may only generate ductile scratches. Both surface roughness and transmittivity are degraded due to the appearance of brittle scratches while ductile scratches make little difference to surface roughness and transmittance. However, ductile and brittle scratches greatly increase the density of damage about one order of magnitude relative to unscratched surface. In particular, ductile scratches also play an unignorable role in laser induced damage, which is different from previous knowledge. Furthermore, ZrO2 and Al2O3 polished surfaces appear to perform best in terms of damage density. PMID:27703218

  12. On Elastoplastic Damage Modelling in Unsaturated Geomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Le Pense, Solenn; Gatmiri, Behrouz; Pouya, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    International audience; In the context of nuclearwaste disposal, the modelling of the behaviour of host rocks and soils still needs improvement.Unsaturated porous geomaterials exhibit particular behaviourwhen exposed to suction. Their non-linear behaviour may result fromtwo different processes, plasticity which induces irreversible strains and damage which causes a deterioration of their elastic properties. Many elasto-plastic models are now available for unsaturated soils, most of them based...

  13. Multiphoton absorption is probably not the primary threshold damage mechanism for femtosecond laser pulse exposures in the retinal pigment epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glickman, Randolph D.; Johnson, Thomas E.

    2004-07-01

    Laser induced breakdown has the lowest energy threshold in the femtosecond domain, and is responsible for production of threshold ocular lesions. It has been proposed that multiphoton absorption may also contribute to ultrashort-pulse tissue damage, based on the observation that 33 fs, 810 nm pulse laser exposures caused more DNA breakage in cultured, primary RPE cells, compared to CW laser exposures delivering the same average power. Subsequent studies, demonstrating two-photon excitation of fluorescence in isolated RPE melanosomes, appeared to support the role of multiphoton absorption, but mainly at suprathreshold irradiance. Additional experiments have not found a consistent difference in the DNA strand breakage produced by ultrashort and CW threshold exposures. DNA damage appears to be dependent on the amount of melanin pigmentation in the cells, rather than the pulsewidth of the laser; current studies have found that, at threshold, CW and ultrashort pulse laser exposures produce almost identical amounts of DNA breakage. A theoretical analysis suggest that the number of photons delivered to the RPE melanosome during a single 33-fsec pulse at the ED50 irradiance is insufficient to produce multiphoton excitation. This result appears to exclude the melanosome as a locus for two- or three-photon excitation; however, a structure with a larger effective absorption cross-section than the melanosome may interact with the laser pulses. One possibility is that the nuclear chromatin acts as a unit absorber of photons resulting in DNA damage, but this does not explain the near equivalence of ultrashort and CW exposures in the comet assay model. This equivalence indicated that multiphoton absorption is not a major contributor to the ultrashort pulse laser damage threshold in the near infrared.

  14. Nanosecond laser damage resistance of differently prepared semi-finished parts of optical multimode fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Guido; Vogel, Jens; Preuß, Rüdiger; Vaziri, Pouya; Zoheidi, Mohammadali; Eberstein, Markus; Krüger, Jörg

    2007-12-01

    Optical multimode fibers are applied in materials processing (e.g. automotive industry), defense, aviation technology, medicine and biotechnology. One challenging task concerning the production of multimode fibers is the enhancement of laser-induced damage thresholds. A higher damage threshold enables a higher transmitted average power at a given fiber diameter or the same power inside a thinner fiber to obtain smaller focus spots. In principle, different material parameters affect the damage threshold. Besides the quality of the preform bulk material itself, the drawing process during the production of the fiber and the preparation of the fiber end surfaces influence the resistance. Therefore, the change of the laser-induced damage threshold of preform materials was investigated in dependence on a varying thermal treatment and preparation procedure. Single and multi-pulse laser-induced damage thresholds of preforms (F300, Heraeus) were measured using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm wavelength emitting pulses with a duration of 15 ns, a pulse energy of 12 mJ and a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The temporal and spatial shape of the laser pulses were controlled accurately. Laser-induced damage thresholds in a range from 150 J cm -2 to 350 J cm -2 were determined depending on the number of pulses applied to the same spot, the thermal history and the polishing quality of the samples, respectively.

  15. Damage in fused-silica spatial-filter lenses on the OMEGA laser system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigatti, Amy L.; Smith, Douglas J.; Schmid, Ansgar W.; Papernov, Semyon; Kelly, John H.

    1999-04-01

    Vacuum surface damage to fused-silica, spatial-filter lenses is the most prevalent laser-damage problem occurring on the OMEGA laser system. Approximately one-half of the stage C- input and output, D-input, E-input, and F-input spatial- filter lenses are currently damaged with millimeter-scale fracture sites. With the establishment of safe operational damage criteria, laser operation has not been impeded. These sol-gel-coated lenses see an average fluence of 2 to 4 J/cm2 at 1053 nm/1 ns. Sol-gel coatings on fused-silica glass have small-spot damage thresholds at least a factor of 2 higher than this peak operational fluence. It is now known that the vacuum surface of OMEGA's spatial-filter lenses are contaminated with vacuum pump oils and machine oils used in the manufacture of the tubes; however, development-phase damage tests were conducted on uncontaminated witness samples. Possible explanations for the damage include absorbing defects originating form ablated pinhole materials, contamination nucleated at surface defects on the coating, or subsurface defects from the polishing process. The damage does not correlate with hot spots in the beam, and the possibility of damage from ghost reflections has been eliminated. Experiments have been initiated to investigate the long-term benefits of ion etching to remove subsurface damage and to replace sol-gel layers by dielectric oxide coatings, which do not degrade with oil contamination.

  16. Entry and exit facet laser damage of optical windows with random antireflective surface structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapkota, Gopal; Case, Jason R.; Potter, Matthew G.; Busse, Lynda E.; Shaw, L. Brandon; Sanghera, Jasbinder S.; Aggarwal, Ishwar D.; Poutous, Menelaos K.

    2016-12-01

    Nanosecond duration, high intensity and high average power laser pulses induce damage on uncoated optics, due to localized field enhancement at the exit surface of the components. Anti-reflection (AR) coated optics, due to their (multiple) thin film boundaries, have similar field enhancement regions, which lead to laser damage on both entry and exit sides. Nano-scale structured optical interfaces with AR performance (ARSS) have been widely demonstrated, and found to have higher laser damage resistance than conventional AR coatings. Comprehensive tests of optical entry and exit structured-surface laser damage using nanosecond pulses for ARSS are not widely available. We measured the laser damage of random anti-reflective surface structures (rARSS), on planar, optical quality, fused silica substrates, using single 6-8ns duration pulses at 1064 nm wavelength. The single-sided rARSS substrates were optimized for Fresnel reflectance suppression at 1064 nm, and the measured transmittance at normal incidence was increased by 3.2%, with a possible theoretical maximum of 3.5%. The high energy laser beam was focused to increase the incident intensity, in order to probe values above and below the damage thresholds reported in the literature. The source laser Q-switch durations were used to directly control incident fluence. Multiple locations were tested for each Q-switch setting, to build a statistical relationship between the fluence and damaging events. Single-sided, AR random surface structured substrates were tested, using entry and exit side orientations, to determine any effects the random structures may have in the damage induced by the field enhancement on the exit side. We found that the AR randomly structured surfaces have a higher resistance, to the onset of laser damage, when they are located at the entry (structured) side of the substrates. In comparison, when the same AR random structures are in the beam exit side of the substrates, the onset of laser damage

  17. Physical limits of semiconductor laser operation: A time-resolved analysis of catastrophic optical damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziegler, Mathias; Hempel, Martin; Larsen, Henning Engelbrecht

    2010-01-01

    The early stages of catastrophic optical damage (COD) in 808 nm emitting diode lasers are mapped by simultaneously monitoring the optical emission with a 1 ns time resolution and deriving the device temperature from thermal images. COD occurs in highly localized damage regions on a 30 to 400 ns...

  18. Surface Contaminant Control Technologies to Improve Laser Damage Resistance of Optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The large high-power solid lasers, such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF of America and the Shenguang-III (SG-III laser facility of China, can output over 2.1 MJ laser pulse for the inertial confinement fusion (ICF experiments. Because of the enhancement of operating flux and the expansion of laser driver scale, the problem of contamination seriously influences their construction period and operation life. During irradiation by intense laser beams, the contaminants on the metallic surface of beam tubes can be transmitted to the optical surfaces and lead to damage of optical components. For the high-power solid-state laser facilities, contamination control focuses on the slab amplifiers, spatial filters, and final-optical assemblies. In this paper, an effective solution to control contaminations including the whole process of the laser driver is put forward to provide the safe operation of laser facilities, and the detailed technical methods of contamination control such as washing, cleanliness metrology, and cleanliness protecting are also introduced to reduce the probability of laser-induced damage of optics. The experimental results show that the cleanliness level of SG-III laser facility is much better to ensure that the laser facility can safely operate at high energy flux.

  19. Numerical Modelling and Damage Assessment of Rotary Wing Aircraft Cabin Door Using Continuum Damage Mechanics Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyina, Gangadhara Rao T.; Rayavarapu, Vijaya Kumar; V. V., Subba Rao

    2017-02-01

    The prediction of ultimate strength remains the main challenge in the simulation of the mechanical response of composite structures. This paper examines continuum damage model to predict the strength and size effects for deformation and failure response of polymer composite laminates when subjected to complex state of stress. The paper also considers how the overall results of the exercise can be applied in design applications. The continuum damage model is described and the resulting prediction of size effects are compared against the standard benchmark solutions. The stress analysis for strength prediction of rotary wing aircraft cabin door is carried out. The goal of this study is to extend the proposed continuum damage model such that it can be accurately predict the failure around stress concentration regions. The finite element-based continuum damage mechanics model can be applied to the structures and components of arbitrary configurations where analytical solutions could not be developed.

  20. Damage modelling in Plasma Facing Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, E.; Camus, G. [Bordeaux-1 Univ. des Sciences et Technologies-3, LCTS, Lab. des Composites Thermostructuraux, CNRS-UMR 5801, 33 - Pessac, (France); Schlosser, J. [Association Euratom-CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The plasma facing components (PFC) of controlled fusion devices are submitted to high heat fluxes in operating conditions (10 MW/m2 for Tore Supra and up to 20 MW/m{sup 2} for ITER, Cadarache, France). Active cooling is required to maintain a reasonable surface temperature and to avoid critical heat flux and melting of the components. The PFC developed for Tore Supra are made of a carbon/carbon (C/C) composite flat tile bonded to a copper alloy heat sink. Under operating conditions, because of the thermal expansion mismatch existing between the C/C composite and the copper alloy, these components withstand significant stresses which induce damage in the C/C material as well as at the copper/composite interface. Design tools are thus required in order to analyse the initiation and the propagation of damage in thermally loaded PFC. The present study describes a modelling approach aimed at predicting damage in actively cooled PFC. For this purpose, dedicated experimental procedures have been developed and sound constitutive laws taking into account the damage related non linear behaviour of both the C/C material and the Cu-C/C joint have been established. Various tests have first been performed on C/C samples in tension and compression, within the fibre axis and off-axis, as well as in shear using a Iosipescu type device, in order to carefully analyse the non-linear mechanical behaviour of this material. A constitutive law able to handle complex multiaxial loadings, established within a classical thermodynamical framework and using scalar damage variables, was then identified. Tensile and shear tests were also performed on C/C-Cu samples in order to identify a cohesive zone model representative of the damageable behaviour of the joint. These constitutive laws were then introduced in a numerical model representative of a PFC. Obtained results have evidenced the progressive development of damage which takes place in the assembly when

  1. Effect of low-level laser therapy (λ780 nm) on the mechanically damaged dentin-pulp complex in a model of extrusive luxation in rat incisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Santana, Dandara Andrade; Fonseca, Gabriela Ferraz; Ramalho, Luciana Maria Pedreira; Rodriguez, Tânia Tavares; Aguiar, Marcio Cajazeira

    2017-08-19

    In order to regenerate the dental pulp, many strategies have been developed as phototherapy. In the pulp repair, we do not know if gallium-aluminum-arsenide (GaAlAs) laser preserves the primary odontoblasts or stimulates the formation of more dentin matrix when dental pulp is damaged. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of laser phototherapy (λ780 nm) on vascularization, inflammation, density of the primary odontoblast layer, and formation of reactionary and reparative dentin in the dental pulp by provoking extrusion of the rat incisor. The upper incisors were extruded 3 mm and then repositioned into their original sockets followed by a laser irradiation of the palatal mucosa (λ = 780 nm; p = 70 mW; CW; 4.2 J/cm(2); 60 s) every 48 h. Non-traumatized and/or non-irradiated incisors were used as the controls. At 8 and 30 days after surgery, incisors were processed for histological and histomorphometric analysis. Morphological analysis revealed no differences in vascularization between groups, but showed discrete inflammation in some non-irradiated and injured specimens, which correlated with a more irregular reparative dentin. The density of primary odontoblasts in the groups treated with lasers was higher when compared to non-irradiated groups, but no statistically significant difference between groups (p > 0.05). The thickness of the tertiary dentin was increased in both traumatized groups with no statistically significant difference between non-irradiated and irradiated groups (p > 0.05).The present findings revealed that the GaAlAs laser induced small changes on dentin-pulp complex, with more regular dentin matrix in the irradiated dental pulps.

  2. Mechanisms of Retinal Damage from Chronic Laser Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    W.K.: The effects of the pineal gland on light-induced retinal photoreceptor damage. Exp. Eye Res. 28:37-44, 1979. 17. Hollyfield, Joe G., Rayborn...co-iI workers in 196612. Noell reported that irreversible retinal damage occurs in normal laboratory rats exposed continuously to an illuminated...light than with either red or blue light. In fact, the action spectrum of the damage paralleled the action spectrum of the ERG. The iris of pigmented rats

  3. DNA damage in blood cells exposed to low-level lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergio, Luiz Philippe da Silva; Silva, Ana Paula Almeida da; Amorim, Philipi Freitas; Campos, Vera Maria Araújo; Magalhães, Luis Alexandre Gonçalves; de Paoli, Flavia; de Souza da Fonseca, Adenilson

    2015-04-01

    In regenerative medicine, there are increasing applications of low-level lasers in therapeutic protocols for treatment of diseases in soft and in bone tissues. However, there are doubts about effects on DNA, and an adequate dosimetry could improve the safety of clinical applications of these lasers. This work aimed to evaluate DNA damage in peripheral blood cells of Wistar rats induced by low-level red and infrared lasers at different fluences, powers, and emission modes according to therapeutic protocols. Peripheral blood samples were exposed to lasers and DNA damage was accessed by comet assay. In other experiments, DNA damage was accessed in blood cells by modified comet assay using formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg) and endonuclease III enzymes. Data show that exposure to low-level red and infrared lasers induce DNA damage depending on fluence, power and emission mode, which are targeted by Fpg and endonuclease III. Oxidative DNA damage should be considered for therapeutic efficacy and patient safety in clinical applications based on low-level red and infrared lasers. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Damage detection in membrane structures using non-contact laser excitation and wavelet transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huda, Feblil; Kajiwara, Itsuro; Hosoya, Naoki

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, a vibration testing and health monitoring system based on an impulse response excited by laser is proposed to detect damage in membrane structures. A high power Nd: YAG pulse laser is used to supply an ideal impulse to a membrane structure by generating shock waves via laser-induced breakdown in air. A health monitoring apparatus is developed with this vibration testing system and a damage detecting algorithm which only requires the vibration mode shape of the damaged membrane. Artificial damage is induced in membrane structure by cutting and tearing the membrane. The vibration mode shapes of the membrane structure extracted from vibration testing by using the laser-induced breakdown and laser Doppler vibrometer are then analyzed by 2-D continuous wavelet transformation. The location of damage is determined by the dominant peak of the wavelet coefficient which can be seen clearly by applying a boundary treatment and the concept of an iso-surface to the 2-D wavelet coefficient. The applicability of the present approach is verified by finite element analysis and experimental results, demonstrating the ability of the method to detect and identify the positions of damage induced on the membrane structure.

  5. Baseline-free damage visualization using noncontact laser nonlinear ultrasonics and state space geometrical changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peipei; Sohn, Hoon; Park, Byeongjin

    2015-06-01

    Damage often causes a structural system to exhibit severe nonlinear behaviors, and the resulting nonlinear features are often much more sensitive to the damage than their linear counterparts. This study develops a laser nonlinear wave modulation spectroscopy (LNWMS) so that certain types of damage can be detected without any sensor placement. The proposed LNWMS utilizes a pulse laser to generate ultrasonic waves and a laser vibrometer for ultrasonic measurement. Under the broadband excitation of the pulse laser, a nonlinear source generates modulations at various frequency values due to interactions among various input frequency components. State space attractors are reconstructed from the ultrasonic responses measured by LNWMS, and a damage feature called Bhattacharyya distance (BD) is computed from the state space attractors to quantify the degree of damage-induced nonlinearity. By computing the BD values over the entire target surface using laser scanning, damage can be localized and visualized without relying on the baseline data obtained from the pristine condition of a target structure. The proposed technique has been successfully used for visualizing fatigue crack in an aluminum plate and delamination and debonding in a glass fiber reinforced polymer wind turbine blade.

  6. Ultraviolet laser-induced damage on fused silica substrate and its sol-gel coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoguang; Gross, Mark; Green, Katie; Oreb, Bob; Shen, Jun

    2012-06-15

    A comparative study of the laser-induced damage thresholds (LIDTs) of fused silica substrates and their sol-gel silica coatings was carried out with 355 nm laser irradiation. Chemical etching and superpolishing were employed in different ways to improve the substrate. The laser damage tests showed that the coated substrate was no more susceptible to laser damage than the bare substrate, showing that the substrate quality was the dominant factor limiting the LIDT for UV irradiation. In addition, it was found that high value of substrate microroughness was more harmful to the LIDT of the coated than the bare substrate, and that a proper combination of etching and superpolishing can optimize the LIDT.

  7. Picosecond laser damage performance assessment of multilayer dielectric gratings in vacuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessi, David A; Carr, C Wren; Hackel, Richard P; Negres, Raluca A; Stanion, Kenneth; Fair, James E; Cross, David A; Nissen, James; Luthi, Ronald; Guss, Gabe; Britten, Jerald A; Gourdin, William H; Haefner, Constantin

    2015-06-15

    Precise assessment of the high fluence performance of pulse compressor gratings is necessary to determine the safe operational limits of short-pulse high energy lasers. We have measured the picosecond laser damage behavior of multilayer dielectric (MLD) diffraction gratings used in the compression of chirped pulses on the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) kilojoule petawatt laser system at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). We present optical damage density measurements of MLD gratings using the raster scan method in order to estimate operational performance. We also report results of R-on-1 tests performed with varying pulse duration (1-30 ps) in air, and clean vacuum. Measurements were also performed in vacuum with controlled exposure to organic contamination to simulate the grating use environment. Results show sparse defects with lower damage resistance which were not detected by small-area damage test methods.

  8. Mathematical modeling of endovenous laser treatment (ELT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wassmer Benjamin

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives Endovenous laser treatment (ELT has been recently proposed as an alternative in the treatment of reflux of the Great Saphenous Vein (GSV and Small Saphenous Vein (SSV. Successful ELT depends on the selection of optimal parameters required to achieve an optimal vein damage while avoiding side effects. Mathematical modeling of ELT could provide a better understanding of the ELT process and could determine the optimal dosage as a function of vein diameter. Study design/materials and methods The model is based on calculations describing the light distribution using the diffusion approximation of the transport theory, the temperature rise using the bioheat equation and the laser-induced injury using the Arrhenius damage model. The geometry to simulate ELT was based on a 2D model consisting of a cylindrically symmetric blood vessel including a vessel wall and surrounded by an infinite homogenous tissue. The mathematical model was implemented using the Macsyma-Pdease2D software (Macsyma Inc., Arlington, MA, USA. Damage to the vein wall for CW and single shot energy was calculated for 3 and 5 mm vein diameters. In pulsed mode, the pullback distance (3, 5 and 7 mm was considered. For CW mode simulation, the pullback speed (1, 2, 3 mm/s was the variable. The total dose was expressed as joules per centimeter in order to perform comparison to results already reported in clinical studies. Results In pulsed mode, for a 3 mm vein diameter, irrespective of the pullback distance (2, 5 or 7 mm, a minimum fluence of 15 J/cm is required to obtain a permanent damage of the intima. For a 5 mm vein diameter, 50 J/cm (15W-2s is required. In continuous mode, for a 3 mm and 5 mm vein diameter, respectively 65 J/cm and 100 J/cm are required to obtain a permanent damage of the vessel wall. Finally, the use of different wavelengths (810 nm or 980 nm played only a minor influence on these results. Discussion and conclusion The parameters

  9. Laser energetics and propagation modelling for the NIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacks, R A; Elliott, A B; Goderre, G P; Haynam, C A; Henesian, M A; House, R K; Manes, K R; Mehta, N C; Shaw, M J; Widmayer, C C; Williams, W H [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA, 94550 (United States)], E-mail: sacks1@llnl.gov

    2008-05-15

    Design, activation, and operation of modern high-energy, fusion-class lasers rely heavily on accurate simulation of laser performance. Setup, equipment protection, and data interpretation of the National Ignition Facility[1] (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) are being controlled by a Laser Performance Operations Model (LPOM) [2], which, at its core, utilizes a Virtual Beam Line (VBL) simulation code to predict laser energetics, wavefront, near- and far-field beam profiles, and damage risk prior to each shot. This same simulation tool is being used widely to understand such diverse phenomena as regenerative-amplifier saturation, damage inspection system performance, fratricide risk from small-scale flaws in large optics, converter performance, and conjugate image formation.

  10. Survey of four damage models for concrete.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leelavanichkul, Seubpong (University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT); Brannon, Rebecca Moss (University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT)

    2009-08-01

    Four conventional damage plasticity models for concrete, the Karagozian and Case model (K&C), the Riedel-Hiermaier-Thoma model (RHT), the Brannon-Fossum model (BF1), and the Continuous Surface Cap Model (CSCM) are compared. The K&C and RHT models have been used in commercial finite element programs many years, whereas the BF1 and CSCM models are relatively new. All four models are essentially isotropic plasticity models for which 'plasticity' is regarded as any form of inelasticity. All of the models support nonlinear elasticity, but with different formulations. All four models employ three shear strength surfaces. The 'yield surface' bounds an evolving set of elastically obtainable stress states. The 'limit surface' bounds stress states that can be reached by any means (elastic or plastic). To model softening, it is recognized that some stress states might be reached once, but, because of irreversible damage, might not be achievable again. In other words, softening is the process of collapse of the limit surface, ultimately down to a final 'residual surface' for fully failed material. The four models being compared differ in their softening evolution equations, as well as in their equations used to degrade the elastic stiffness. For all four models, the strength surfaces are cast in stress space. For all four models, it is recognized that scale effects are important for softening, but the models differ significantly in their approaches. The K&C documentation, for example, mentions that a particular material parameter affecting the damage evolution rate must be set by the user according to the mesh size to preserve energy to failure. Similarly, the BF1 model presumes that all material parameters are set to values appropriate to the scale of the element, and automated assignment of scale-appropriate values is available only through an enhanced implementation of BF1 (called BFS) that regards scale effects to be coupled to

  11. Damage induced by pulsed IR laser radiation at transitions between different tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenz, Martin; Greber, Charlotte M.; Romano, Valerio; Forrer, Martin; Weber, Heinz P.

    1991-06-01

    Due to their strong absorption in water IR-lasers are excellent sources for precision cutting with minimal thermal damage in various fields of medicine. To understand the laser tissue interaction process one has to take into account the liquefaction of target material at the region of radiation impact. The dynamics of the created liquid may cause unexpected and undesirable effects for surgical laser applications. We studied the thermal damage along the walls of incision craters in terms of the elastic material properties and the dynamics of the drilling process. We show that the extension of thermally altered tissue is strongly influenced by the amount of hot liquefied tissue material remaining in the crater. When drilling into mechanically homogeneous materials this amount is essentially determined by the laser intensity used. However, when drilling through a composite structure consisting of various tissue types with different material properties, this is no longer the case. Even at low intensities, the damage zone varies substantially between the different layers. In our investigations we compared histologically and ultrastructurally the instantaneously created damage in the connective tissue and the subjacent skeletal muscle of skin after laser cutting, with long-time heating injuries. This comparison allows a differentiation between thermal and mechanical damage and an estimation of the minimum temperature created in the crater during the laser impact. The light microscopical examinations shows that the thermal damage in the connective tissue is about three times smaller than in the subjacent muscle layer. Comparative studies made with a composite structure consisting of the tissue substitutes gelatin and agar reveal that the unexpectedly large damage in the skeletal muscle layer is a result of the abrupt change of the elastic properties at the material transition. This discontinuity changes the ejection dynamics leading to a confinement of hot liquefied

  12. Coherent polarization locking: an approach to mitigating optical damage in a pulsed Ho:YAG laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, L H; Chua, C F; Phua, P B

    2013-04-01

    Intracavity optical damage is mitigated in a pulsed Ho:YAG laser cavity using the coherent polarization locking (CPL) technique. By splitting the available pump power into two individual Ho:YAG laser rods, we passively coherently locked two orthogonal polarization lasers with 9.13 mJ output pulse energies and 14 ns pulsewidths, and operating at 800 Hz repetition rate. A conventional Ho:YAG laser cavity with the same pump and cavity configuration results in severe optical damage when operating at <2 kHz repetition rate, thus limiting the output pulse energies to <5 mJ. We also demonstrated, to the best of our knowledge, the first pulsed operation within the entire CPL Ho:YAG laser cavity by Q-switching in one of the polarization arms, producing nanosecond pulses with no sign of pulse instability.

  13. Study of relation between crystal structure and laser damage of calcium flouride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azumi, Minako; Nakahata, Eiichiro

    2010-11-01

    The artificially grown calcium fluoride is one of key materials for microlithography and used for excimer laser optics etc. Such calcium fluoride is required high laser durability and laser induced bulk damage threshold (LIDT). However, the artificially grown calcium fluoride is not a complete crystal, and there are a lot of sub-grain boundaries inside the crystal that have the possibility of causing degradation of laser durability and LIDT. Moreover, mechanical properties of calcium fluoride are different according to the crystal axis, therefore there is a possibility that mechanical properties influences LIDT. In this study, we examined the relation between crystal structure and LIDT. First, we examined the relation between the crystal axis and LITD of single crystal calcium fruoride. The relation between the crystallographic axis and LIDT that the laser enters was examined. The ArF excimer laser and the fifth high harmonic of the Nd:YAG laser at 213nm were used for the irradiation source of light. We prepared samples that optical axes were , and from the same crystal. From the result of this examination, when the laser irradiated in axis, LIDT was the highest. Next, we observed the damage with polarizing microscope and optical microscope. The result of this observation suggested that the laser damage of calcium fluoride was related to the crystal orientation. Finally, we investigated the damage mechanism of calcium fluoride. It is thought that the laser irradiation induced stress is relaxed most easily when the optical axis is . Therefore, LIDT of calcium fluoride is supposed to be highest when the optical axis is .

  14. Mitigation of wear damage by laser surface alloying technique

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Adebiyi, ID

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available replacement costs, and all downtime costs related to such replacement. Consequently, companies will increasingly need to look to wear reduction as a direct, immediate avenue for maintaining output quotas and for cutting production costs. Laser coating...

  15. Aircrew exposure to handheld laser pointers: the potential for retinal damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Stephen

    2011-09-01

    Aviation authorities around the world continue to report substantial growth in the incidence of laser devices being aimed at aircraft in flight. Despite government restrictions, affordable handheld laser devices, with a power of up to several thousand mW, are now easily obtainable via the Internet. Lasers of this power output and wavelength have a nominal ocular hazard distance of around 1000 ft (304.8 m). Aviation medical specialists should be aware these lasers have the potential to cause retinal damage when aircrew operating at low altitudes are exposed.

  16. A theoretical investigation of the laser damage threshold of metal multi-dielectric mirrors for high power ultrashort applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Gallais, Laurent

    2013-06-17

    An approach for the theoretical evaluation of the damage threshold in optical interference coatings that combine metal and dielectric films is presented. The model that is used combines a matrix formalism to describe the film system with the two temperatures model that describes the energy transfer and the temperatures of electrons and lattice in a solid submitted to a laser irradiation at the femtosecond time scale. With this approach the thermal consequences due to the ultrafast absorption of the metal film can be evaluated in the multilayer stack for single or multiple pulses. Some applications are presented for the case of broadband mirrors for ultrashort pulses with low dispersion. Particularly we study the impact of the metal film (metal element, thickness) and the design on the Laser Induced Damage Threshold in the sub picosecond regime.

  17. Damage Detection on Thin-walled Structures Utilizing Laser Scanning and Standing Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Se Hyeok; Jeon, Jun Young; Kim, Du Hwan; Park, Gyuhae [Chonnam Nat’l Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kang, To; Han, Soon Woo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    This paper describes wavenumber filtering for damage detection using single-frequency standing wave excitation and laser scanning sensing. An embedded piezoelectric sensor generates ultrasonic standing waves, and the responses are measured using a laser Doppler vibrometer and mirror tilting device. After scanning, newly developed damage detection techniques based on wavenumber filtering are applied to the full standing wave field. To demonstrate the performance of the proposed techniques, several experiments were performed on composite plates with delamination and aluminum plates with corrosion damage. The results demonstrated that the developed techniques could be applied to various structures to localize the damage, with the potential to improve the damage detection capability at a high interrogation speed.

  18. Flood damage modeling based on expert knowledge: Insights from French damage model for agricultural sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grelot, Frédéric; Agenais, Anne-Laurence; Brémond, Pauline

    2015-04-01

    In France, since 2011, it is mandatory for local communities to conduct cost-benefit analysis (CBA) of their flood management projects, to make them eligible for financial support from the State. Meanwhile, as a support, the French Ministry in charge of Environment proposed a methodology to fulfill CBA. Like for many other countries, this methodology is based on the estimation of flood damage. However, existing models to estimate flood damage were judged not convenient for a national-wide use. As a consequence, the French Ministry in charge of Environment launched studies to develop damage models for different sectors, such as: residential sector, public infrastructures, agricultural sector, and commercial and industrial sector. In this presentation, we aim at presenting and discussing methodological choices of those damage models. They all share the same principle: no sufficient data from past events were available to build damage models on a statistical analysis, so modeling was based on expert knowledge. We will focus on the model built for agricultural activities and more precisely for agricultural lands. This model was based on feedback from 30 agricultural experts who experienced floods in their geographical areas. They were selected to have a representative experience of crops and flood conditions in France. The model is composed of: (i) damaging functions, which reveal physiological vulnerability of crops, (ii) action functions, which correspond to farmers' decision rules for carrying on crops after a flood, and (iii) economic agricultural data, which correspond to featured characteristics of crops in the geographical area where the flood management project studied takes place. The two first components are generic and the third one is specific to the area studied. It is, thus, possible to produce flood damage functions adapted to different agronomic and geographical contexts. In the end, the model was applied to obtain a pool of damage functions giving

  19. Determination of laser damage initiation probability and growth on fused silica scratches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norton, M A; Carr, C W; Cross, D A; Negres, R A; Bude, J D; Steele, W A; Monticelli, M V; Suratwala, T I

    2010-10-26

    Current methods for the manufacture of optical components inevitably leaves a variety of sub-surface imperfections including scratches of varying lengths and widths on even the finest finishes. It has recently been determined that these finishing imperfections are responsible for the majority of laser-induced damage for fluences typically used in ICF class lasers. We have developed methods of engineering subscale parts with a distribution of scratches mimicking those found on full scale fused silica parts. This much higher density of scratches provides a platform to measure low damage initiation probabilities sufficient to describe damage on large scale optics. In this work, damage probability per unit scratch length was characterized as a function of initial scratch width and post fabrication processing including acid-based etch mitigation processes. The susceptibility of damage initiation density along scratches was found to be strongly affected by the post etching material removal and initial scratch width. We have developed an automated processing procedure to document the damage initiations per width and per length of theses scratches. We show here how these tools can be employed to provide predictions of the performance of full size optics in laser systems operating at 351 nm. In addition we use these tools to measure the growth rate of a damage site initiated along a scratch and compare this to the growth measured on an isolated damage site.

  20. Investigating a Hypothetical Semiconductor Laser Bar with a Damaged Single Emitter Using a Laser Diode Simulation/Emulation Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.K. Amuzuvi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study demonstrates the use of Barlase, a semiconductor laser diode emulation tool, to emulate the by-emitter degradation of high power semiconductor laser diodes.Barlase is software that uses a LabView control interface. In this study, a hypothetical laser diode bar (multiple emitters was used to investigate a damaged single emitter randomly located in the bar and its behavior analyzed within the bar. It should however, be noted that, this scenario is valid for devices at the start of the aging process only. When all other relevant effects that affect the performance of laser diodes bars are allowed to interact over time, high levels of defects can also play important role in the degradation process. The results of this simulation scenario show the successful implementation of Barlase in the by-emitter analysis of laser diodes.

  1. Pulsed-CO2-laser-induced damage mechanisms in semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefranc, Sebastian; Autric, Michel L.

    1998-09-01

    Laser irradiation induced damage to several materials of interest for use as 10.6 micrometer laser system windows and lenses is investigated in this paper. The irradiation source in these single shot experiments was a pulsed TEA CO2 laser (lambda equals 10.6 micrometer, (tau) pulse equals 3.5 microsecond, I equals 1 - 100 MW/cm2 onto the sample). A time resolved study of the damage process in semiconductors (Ge, ZnSe, ZnS) has been carried out during the interaction by measuring the variation of the transmitted and reflected intensity of a CO2 cw laser through the samples. An analysis of the pulse shape dependence on the damage parameters has been investigated. Results show that damages are initiated by the high power peak of the laser pulse on both surfaces and in the bulk of the materials. The damaged materials have been characterized for various incident fluences by means of optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy in terms of morphology.

  2. Analysis of the Damage Mechanism Related to CO2 Laser Cochleostomy on Guinea Pig Cochlea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Different types of lasers have been used in inner ear surgery. Therefore, it is of the utmost importance to avoid damage to the inner ear (e.g., hyperthermia and acoustic effects caused by the use of such lasers. The aim of this study was to use a high powered fibre-enabled CO2 laser (10 W, 606 J/cm2 to perform cochleostomies on guinea pig cochlea and to investigate the possible laser-induced damage mechanisms. The temperature changes in the round window membrane, auditory evoked brainstem response, and morphological of the hair cells were measured and recorded before and after laser application. All of the outcomes differed in comparison with the control group. A rise in temperature and subsequent increased hearing loss were observed in animals that underwent surgery with a 10 W CO2 laser. These findings correlated with increased injury to the cochlear ultrastructure and a higher positive expression of E-cadherin and β-catenin in the damaged organ of Corti. We assume that enhanced cell-cell adhesion and the activated β-catenin-related canonical Wnt-signalling pathway may play a role in the protection of the cochlea to prevent further damage.

  3. Refurbishment of damaged tools using the combination of GTAW and laser beam welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tušek

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the use of two welding processes for the refurbishment of damaged industrial tools. In the first part the problem is presented followed by the comparison of GTAW and laser welding in terms of repair welding of damaged tools. The macrosections of the welds show the difference between both welding processes in repairing of damaged tools. At the conclusion the main findings are presented. In many cases it is useful to use both welding processes in order to achieve better weld quality and to make welding more economical. The order of the technology used depends on the tool material, the use of the tool and the tool damage.

  4. Accelerated damage visualization using binary search with fixed pitch-catch distance laser ultrasonic scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byeongjin; Sohn, Hoon

    2017-07-01

    Laser ultrasonic scanning, especially full-field wave propagation imaging, is attractive for damage visualization thanks to its noncontact nature, sensitivity to local damage, and high spatial resolution. However, its practicality is limited because scanning at a high spatial resolution demands a prohibitively long scanning time. Inspired by binary search, an accelerated damage visualization technique is developed to visualize damage with a reduced scanning time. The pitch-catch distance between the excitation point and the sensing point is also fixed during scanning to maintain a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of measured ultrasonic responses. The approximate damage boundary is identified by examining the interactions between ultrasonic waves and damage observed at the scanning points that are sparsely selected by a binary search algorithm. Here, a time-domain laser ultrasonic response is transformed into a spatial ultrasonic domain response using a basis pursuit approach so that the interactions between ultrasonic waves and damage, such as reflections and transmissions, can be better identified in the spatial ultrasonic domain. Then, the area inside the identified damage boundary is visualized as damage. The performance of the proposed damage visualization technique is validated excusing a numerical simulation performed on an aluminum plate with a notch and experiments performed on an aluminum plate with a crack and a wind turbine blade with delamination. The proposed damage visualization technique accelerates the damage visualization process in three aspects: (1) the number of measurements that is necessary for damage visualization is dramatically reduced by a binary search algorithm; (2) the number of averaging that is necessary to achieve a high SNR is reduced by maintaining the wave propagation distance short; and (3) with the proposed technique, the same damage can be identified with a lower spatial resolution than the spatial resolution required by full

  5. The improvement of laser induced damage resistance of optical workpiece surface by hydrodynamic effect polishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wenqiang; Guan, Chaoliang; Li, Shengyi; Wang, Zhuo

    2016-10-01

    Surface and subsurface damage in optical element will greatly decrease the laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) in the intense laser optical system. Processing damage on the workpiece surface can be inevitably caused when the material is removed in brittle or plastic mode. As a non-contact polishing technology, hydrodynamic effect polishing (HEP) shows very good performance on generating an ultra-smooth surface without damage. The material is removed by chemisorption between nanoparticle and workpiece surface in the elastic mode in HEP. The subsurface damage and surface scratches can be effectively removed after the polishing process. Meanwhile ultra-smooth surface with atomic level surface roughness can be achieved. To investigate the improvement of LIDT of optical workpiece, polishing experiment was conducted on a magnetorheological finishing (MRF) silica glass sample. AFM measurement results show that all the MRF directional plastic marks have been removed clearly and the root-mean-square (rms) surface roughness has decreased from 0.673nm to 0.177nm after HEP process. Laser induced damage experiment was conducted with laser pulse of 1064nm wavelength and 10ns time width. Compared with the original state, the LEDT of the silica glass sample polished by HEP has increased from 29.78J/cm2 to 45.47J/cm2. It demonstrates that LIDT of optical element treated by HEP can be greatly improved for ultra low surface roughness and nearly defect-free surface/subsurface.

  6. Interacting damage models mapped onto ising and percolation models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toussaint, Renaud; Pride, Steven R.

    2004-03-23

    The authors introduce a class of damage models on regular lattices with isotropic interactions between the broken cells of the lattice. Quasistatic fiber bundles are an example. The interactions are assumed to be weak, in the sense that the stress perturbation from a broken cell is much smaller than the mean stress in the system. The system starts intact with a surface-energy threshold required to break any cell sampled from an uncorrelated quenched-disorder distribution. The evolution of this heterogeneous system is ruled by Griffith's principle which states that a cell breaks when the release in potential (elastic) energy in the system exceeds the surface-energy barrier necessary to break the cell. By direct integration over all possible realizations of the quenched disorder, they obtain the probability distribution of each damage configuration at any level of the imposed external deformation. They demonstrate an isomorphism between the distributions so obtained and standard generalized Ising models, in which the coupling constants and effective temperature in the Ising model are functions of the nature of the quenched-disorder distribution and the extent of accumulated damage. In particular, they show that damage models with global load sharing are isomorphic to standard percolation theory, that damage models with local load sharing rule are isomorphic to the standard ising model, and draw consequences thereof for the universality class and behavior of the autocorrelation length of the breakdown transitions corresponding to these models. they also treat damage models having more general power-law interactions, and classify the breakdown process as a function of the power-law interaction exponent. Last, they also show that the probability distribution over configurations is a maximum of Shannon's entropy under some specific constraints related to the energetic balance of the fracture process, which firmly relates this type of quenched-disorder based

  7. Nanosecond multi-pulse laser-induced damage mechanisms in pure and mixed oxide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Frank R., E-mail: frank.wagner@fresnel.fr; Gouldieff, Céline, E-mail: celine.gouldieff@univ-rennes1.fr; Natoli, Jean-Yves, E-mail: jean-yves.natoli@fresnel.fr; Commandré, Mireille, E-mail: mireille.commandre@fresnel.fr

    2015-10-01

    We report on nanosecond laser-induced damage of pure and mixed oxide thin films deposited by ion beam sputtering. Silica, hafnia and alumina as well as their binary mixtures have been tested in S-on-1 mode at 355 nm and 266 nm using a multiscale approach. The results were analyzed qualitatively to discuss the different fatigue behaviors observed. The absence of a multi-photon absorption step in the 1-on-1 damage thresholds as a function of the band gap indicates defect-mediated damage mechanisms. During the multi-pulse experiments we observed laser-induced defects that cause fatigue effects and preexisting low-density defects, which are insensitive to multiple pulse irradiation. Depending on material and beam size both types of defects (preexisting and light-induced) may contribute equally to the observed damage probability. Comparing the fatigue behavior of the mixtures to their constituting pure oxides, we found that, in general, the fatigue behavior of binary mixtures cannot be interpolated from the behaviors of the pure oxides. - Highlights: • Multi-pulse laser damage can be analyzed plotting damaging shot number vs. fluence. • A fatigue effect was only observed for small laser beams, avoiding worse precursors. • The fatigue behavior of a mixture cannot be interpolated from the pure oxides. • SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} damage at 266 nm is due to deterministic material modifications. • Hafnia multi-pulse laser damage with small beams is stochastic even at 266 nm.

  8. Damage Model of Brittle Coal-Rock and Damage Energy Index of Rock Burst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹光志; 张东明; 魏作安; 李东伟

    2003-01-01

    Based on the mechanical experiment of brittle coal-rock and the damage mechanical theory, a damage model was established. Coal-Rock damage mechanical characteristic was researched. Furthermore, interior energy transformation mechanism of rock was analyzed from the point of view of damage mechanics and damage energy release rate of brittle coal rock was derived. By analyzing the energy transformation of rock burst, a new conception, damage energy index of rock burst, was put forward. The condition of rock burst was also established.

  9. Direct holographic imaging of ultrafast laser damage process in thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siaulys, Nerijus; Gallais, Laurent; Melninkaitis, Andrius

    2014-04-01

    Dynamic process of femtosecond laser-induced damage formation in dielectric thin films is reconstructed from a series of time-resolved images. Ta2O5 single-layer coatings of four different thicknesses have been investigated in transmission mode by means of time-resolved off-axis digital holography. Different processes overlapped in time were found to occur; namely, the Kerr effect, free-electron generation, ultrafast lattice heating, and shockwave generation. The trends in contribution of these effects are qualitatively reproduced by numerical models based on electron-rate equations and Drude theory, which take into account transient changes in the films and interference effects of the pump and probe pulses.

  10. Automated laser-based barely visible impact damage detection in honeycomb sandwich composite structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girolamo, D., E-mail: dgirola@ncsu.edu; Yuan, F. G. [National Institute of Aerospace, Integrated Structural Health Management Laboratory, Hampton, VA 23666 and North Carolina State University, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Girolamo, L. [North Carolina State University, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)

    2015-03-31

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) for detection and quantification of damage in composite materials is fundamental in the assessment of the overall structural integrity of modern aerospace systems. Conventional NDE systems have been extensively used to detect the location and size of damages by propagating ultrasonic waves normal to the surface. However they usually require physical contact with the structure and are time consuming and labor intensive. An automated, contactless laser ultrasonic imaging system for barely visible impact damage (BVID) detection in advanced composite structures has been developed to overcome these limitations. Lamb waves are generated by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, raster scanned by a set of galvano-mirrors over the damaged area. The out-of-plane vibrations are measured through a laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) that is stationary at a point on the corner of the grid. The ultrasonic wave field of the scanned area is reconstructed in polar coordinates and analyzed for high resolution characterization of impact damage in the composite honeycomb panel. Two methodologies are used for ultrasonic wave-field analysis: scattered wave field analysis (SWA) and standing wave energy analysis (SWEA) in the frequency domain. The SWA is employed for processing the wave field and estimate spatially dependent wavenumber values, related to discontinuities in the structural domain. The SWEA algorithm extracts standing waves trapped within damaged areas and, by studying the spectrum of the standing wave field, returns high fidelity damage imaging. While the SWA can be used to locate the impact damage in the honeycomb panel, the SWEA produces damage images in good agreement with X-ray computed tomographic (X-ray CT) scans. The results obtained prove that the laser-based nondestructive system is an effective alternative to overcome limitations of conventional NDI technologies.

  11. Effect of electric field distribution on the morphologies of laser-induced damage in hafnia-silica multilayer polarizers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genin, F.Y.; Stolz, C.J.; Reitter, T.; Kozlowski, M.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Bevis, R.P.; vonGunten, M.K. [Spectra-Physics Lasers, Inc., Mountain View, CA (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Hafnia-silica multilayer polarizers were deposited by e-beam evaporation onto BK7 glass substrates. The polarizers were designed to operate at 1064 nm at Brewster`s angle (56{degree}). They were tested with a 3-ns laser pulse at 45, 56, and 65{degree} incidence angle in order to vary the electric field distribution in the multilayer, study their effects on damage morphology, and investigate possible advantages of off-use angle laser conditioning. Morphology of the laser-induced damage was characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Four distinct damage morphologies (pit, flat bottom pit, scald, outer layer delamination) were observed; they depend strongly on incident angle of the laser beam. Massive delamination observed at 45 and 56{degree} incidence, did not occur at 65{degree}; instead, large and deep pits were found at 65{degree}. Electric field distribution, temperature rise, and change in stress in the multilayer were calculated to attempt to better understand the relation between damage morphology, electric field peak locations, and maximum thermal stress gradients. The calculations showed a twofold increase in stress change in the hafnia top layers depending on incident angle. Stress gradient in the first hafnia-silica interface was found to be highest for 45, 56, and 65{degree}, respectively. Finally, the maximum stress was deeper in the multilayer at 65{degree}. Although the limitations of such simple thermal mechanical model are obvious, the results can explain that outer layer delamination is more likely at 45 and 56{degree} than 65{degree} and that damage sites are expected to be deeper at 65{degree}.

  12. Modeling of Corrosion-induced Concrete Damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thybo, Anna Emilie A.; Michel, Alexander; Stang, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper a finite element model is introduced to simulate corrosion-induced damage in concrete. The model takes into account the penetration of corrosion products into the concrete as well as non-uniform formation of corrosion products around the reinforcement. To ac-count for the non......-uniform formation of corrosion products at the concrete/reinforcement interface, a deterministic approach is used. The model gives good estimates of both deformations in the con-crete/reinforcement interface and crack width when compared to experimental data. Further, it is shown that non-uniform deposition...... of corrosion products affects both the time-to cover cracking and the crack width at the concrete surface....

  13. Investigation of Laser-Induced Damage on Multi-Layer Dielectric Gratings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KONG Wei-Jin; SHEN Zi-Cai; SHEN Jian; SHAO Jian-Da; FAN Zheng-Xiu

    2005-01-01

    @@ We investigate mechanisms of laser induced damage thresholds (LIDTs) of multi-layer dielectric gratings (MDGs).It is found that the laser damage thresholds of MDGs and unstructured dielectric multi-layer coatings (the substrate of MDG) are 3.15J/cm2 and 9.32J/cm2, respectively, at 1064nm (12ns) with the Littrow angle 51.2°and the TEM00 mode. The laser-induced damage mechanism of multi-layer dielectric is presented with the analysis of the following factors: The dominant factor is the pollution on the corrugated surface, which is induced by the complex manufacture process of multi-layer dielectric gratings; another is the electric field distribution along the corrugated surface. The third reason is due to the reduction in stoichiometry of oxide films, resulting from the manufacture process of etching.

  14. The energy coupling efficiency of multi-wavelength laser pulses to damage initiating defects in DKDP nonlinear crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeMange, P; Negres, R A; Rubenchik, A M; Radousky, H B; Feit, M D; Demos, S G

    2007-09-25

    The bulk damage performance of potassium dihydrogen phosphate crystals under simultaneous exposure to 1064-, 532-, and 355-nm nanosecond-laser pulses is investigated in order to probe the laser-induced defect reactions leading to damage initiation during frequency conversion. The results provide insight into the mechanisms governing the behavior of the damage initiating defects under exposure to high power laser light. In addition, it is suggested that the damage performance can be directly related to and predicted from the damage behavior of the crystal at each wavelength separately.

  15. Laser surface processing and model studies

    CERN Document Server

    Yilbas, Bekir Sami

    2013-01-01

    This book introduces model studies associated with laser surface processing such as conduction limited heating, surface re-melting, Marangoni flow and its effects on the temperature field, re-melting of multi-layered surfaces, laser shock processing, and practical applications. The book provides insight into the physical processes involved with laser surface heating and phase change in laser irradiated region. It is written for engineers and researchers working on laser surface engineering.

  16. Laser Damage Growth in Fused Silica with Simultaneous 351 nm and 1053 nm irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norton, M A; Carr, A V; Carr, C W; Donohue, E E; Feit, M D; Hollingsworth, W G; Liao, Z; Negres, R A; Rubenchik, A M; Wegner, P J

    2008-10-24

    Laser-induced growth of optical damage often determines the useful lifetime of an optic in a high power laser system. We have extended our previous work on growth of laser damage in fused silica with simultaneous 351 nm and 1053 nm laser irradiation by measuring the threshold for growth with various ratios of 351 nm and 1053 nm fluence. Previously we reported that when growth occurs, the growth rate is determined by the total fluence. We now find that the threshold for growth is dependent on both the magnitude of the 351 nm fluence as well as the ratio of the 351 nm fluence to the 1053 nm fluence. Furthermore, the data suggests that under certain conditions the 1053 nm fluence does not contribute to the growth.

  17. Mitigation of organic laser damage precursors from chemical processing of fused silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxamusa, S; Miller, P E; Wong, L; Steele, R; Shen, N; Bude, J

    2014-12-01

    Increases in the laser damage threshold of fused silica have been driven by the successive elimination of near-surface damage precursors such as polishing residue, fractures, and inorganic salts. In this work, we show that trace impurities in ultrapure water used to process fused silica optics may be responsible for the formation of carbonaceous deposits. We use surrogate materials to show that organic compounds precipitated onto fused silica surfaces form discrete damage precursors. Following a standard etching process, solvent-free oxidative decomposition using oxygen plasma or high-temperature thermal treatments in air reduced the total density of damage precursors to as low as inorganic compounds are more likely to cause damage when they are tightly adhered to a surface, which may explain why high-temperature thermal treatments have been historically unsuccessful at removing extrinsic damage precursors from fused silica.

  18. Laser induced surface emission of neutral species and its relationship to optical surface damage processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, L. L.; Smith, L. K.

    1988-03-01

    The laser-induced emission of neutral constituents and impurities from surfaces of several optical materials is shown to be correlated with optical surface damage thresholds. The characteristics of the emission can be utilized to investigate physical processes involved in the absorption of laser energy at the surface. Examples are given of neutral emission correlated with catastrophic surface heating, changes in surface stoichiometry, and thermally-induced cracking.

  19. Optoacoustic monitoring of cutting efficiency and thermal damage during laser ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bay, Erwin; Douplik, Alexandre; Razansky, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    Successful laser surgery is characterized by a precise cut and effective hemostasis with minimal collateral thermal damage to the adjacent tissues. Consequently, the surgeon needs to control several parameters, such as power, pulse repetition rate, and velocity of movements. In this study we propose utilizing optoacoustics for providing the necessary real-time feedback of cutting efficiency and collateral thermal damage. Laser ablation was performed on a bovine meat slab using a Q-switched Nd-YAG laser (532 nm, 4 kHz, 18 W). Due to the short pulse duration of 7.6 ns, the same laser has also been used for generation of optoacoustic signals. Both the shockwaves, generated due to tissue removal, as well as the normal optoacoustic responses from the surrounding tissue were detected using a single broadband piezoelectric transducer. It has been observed that the rapid reduction in the shockwave amplitude occurs as more material is being removed, indicating decrease in cutting efficiency, whereas gradual decrease in the optoacoustic signal likely corresponds to coagulation around the ablation crater. Further heating of the surrounding tissue leads to carbonization accompanied by a significant shift in the optoacoustic spectra. Our results hold promise for real-time monitoring of cutting efficiency and collateral thermal damage during laser surgery. In practice, this could eventually facilitate development of automatic cut-off mechanisms that will guarantee an optimal tradeoff between cutting and heating while avoiding severe thermal damage to the surrounding tissues.

  20. Modeling the damage of welded steel, using the GTN model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Ahmar Kadi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our work is the modeling of the damage in the weld metal according to the finite element method and the concepts of fracture mechanics based on local approaches using the code ABAQUS calculates. The use of the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman model axisymmetric specimens AE type to three different zones (Base metal, molten metal and heat affected Zone with four levels of triaxiality (AE2, AE4, AE10 and AE80, we have used to model the behavior of damage to welded steel, which is described as being due to the growth and coalescence of cavities with high rates of triaxiality

  1. Comparative investigation of damage performance on K9 and SiO2 under 1064-nm nanosecond laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongjie; Wang, Fengrui; Zhang, Zhen; Huang, Jin; Zhou, Xinda; Jiang, Xiaodong; Wu, Weidong; Zheng, Wanguo

    2012-01-01

    Laser damage performance of K9 glass and fused silica glass were tested respectively at same experimental condition with 1064 nm nanosecond laser. The initial damage threshold (IDT), the damage growth threshold (DGT) and the damage growth laws of the two optics glass were investigated comparatively. The results show that the damage growth behavior of the two glasses are quite different, for example, the lower damage growth threshold and the higher damage growth coefficient for K9 glass, which can attribute to the difference of the material's damage morphology, optical absorption, residual stress near damage site between the two optics glass. The research is very important to choose transparent optical material applied in high power laser.

  2. Exploring the potential of multivariate depth-damage and rainfall-damage models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Ootegem, Luc; van Herck, K.; Creten, T.

    2017-01-01

    In Europe, floods are among the natural catastrophes that cause the largest economic damage. This article explores the potential of two distinct types of multivariate flood damage models: ‘depth-damage’ models and ‘rainfall-damage’ models. We use survey data of 346 Flemish households that were vi...

  3. Embankment deformation analyzed by elastoplastic damage model coupling consolidation theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong SUN; Xihong ZHAO

    2006-01-01

    The deformation of embankment has serious influences on neighboring structure and infrastructure. A trial embankment is reanalyzed by elastoplastic damage model coupling Biot's consolidation theory. With the increase in time of loading, the damage accumulation becomes larger. Under the centre and toe of embankment, damage becomes serious. Under the centre of embankment, vertical damage values are bigger than horizontal ones. Under the toe of embankment, horizontal damage values are bigger than vertical ones.

  4. Plasto-damage modelling for semi-brittle geomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alizadeh Ali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an elastoplastic damage model for constitutive modelling of semi-brittle geomaterials showing two irreversible mechanisms. On one hand, the model deals with the plastic behaviour of a porous medium by a new variant of Barcelona Basic Model. On the other hand, the model combines the micromechanical definition of damage and phenomenological concepts in the framework of Continuum Damage Mechanics (CDM for damage modelling. A second order tensorial damage variable is adopted for the model. Damaged effective stress variables are employed for formulation of elastoplastic behaviour laws and the plastic yield surface is a damage dependent one. The model has been validated by comparing the numerical results with experimental results of argillites.

  5. Optical coatings: Laser radiation damage. (Latest citations from the INSPEC: Information Services for the Physics and Engineering Communities database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning theoretical aspects and experimental investigations of laser induced damage to optical coatings. The citations examine damage thresholds of metal, dielectric, and metal-dielectric coating materials used in high power lasers. Topics also include the effects of laser damage on coating processes and materials, and substrate materials which influence the origin and morphology of laser damage. Laser sources are also considered. (Contains a minimum of 100 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  6. An Improved Method of Mitigating Laser Induced Surface Damage Growth in Fused Silica Using a Rastered, Pulsed CO2 Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, I L; Guss, G M; Nostrand, M J; Wegner, P L

    2010-10-21

    A new method of mitigating (arresting) the growth of large (>200 m diameter and depth) laser induced surface damage on fused silica has been developed that successfully addresses several issues encountered with our previously-reported large site mitigation technique. As in the previous work, a tightly-focused 10.6 {micro}m CO{sub 2} laser spot is scanned over the damage site by galvanometer steering mirrors. In contrast to the previous work, the laser is pulsed instead of CW, with the pulse length and repetition frequency chosen to allow substantial cooling between pulses. This cooling has the important effect of reducing the heat-affected zone capable of supporting thermo-capillary flow from scale lengths on the order of the overall scan pattern to scale lengths on the order of the focused laser spot, thus preventing the formation of a raised rim around the final mitigation site and its consequent down-stream intensification. Other advantages of the new method include lower residual stresses, and improved damage threshold associated with reduced amounts of redeposited material. The raster patterns can be designed to produce specific shapes of the mitigation pit including cones and pyramids. Details of the new technique and its comparison with the previous technique will be presented.

  7. Development of high damage threshold multilayer thin film beam combiner for laser application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nand, Mangla; Babita, Jena, S.; Tokas, R. B.; Rajput, P.; Mukharjee, C.; Thakur, S.; Jha, S. N.; Sahoo, N. K.

    2016-05-01

    A polarized wavelength multiplexer with high laser induced damage threshold has been developed to combine two laser beam of high peak power in the visible region. The present wavelength multiplexer is a multilayer thin film device deposited by reactive electron beam evaporation. The developed device is capable of combining two p-polarized laser beams of peak power density of 1.7 GW/cm2 at an angle of incidence of 45°. High transmission (T> 90%) in high pass region and high reflection (R> 99%) in stop band region have been achieved.

  8. Dynamic Damage Model of Brittle Rock and Its Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高文学; 刘运通; 杨军; 黄风雷

    2003-01-01

    On the basis of shock-induced experiments and the ultrasonic tests of the damaged rocks, the damage evolution relation between the attenuation coefficient of sound wave and the damage dissipated energy is described. Based on the TCK and RDA models, a damage model which connects the shock compression and tensile damage is established. And then the damage model is implemented in LS-DYNA3D dynamic nonlinear program. Numerical simulation of deep-hole blasting of groove is studied by use of the damage model proposed. The rock damage evolution process and the distributing rules of stress field under the explosion load are described well fairly, which provides the theory basis for the engineering blasting design.

  9. Luminescence Investigation of SiO2 Surfaces Damaged by 0.35 mm Laser Illumination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlowski, M.; Battersby, C.L.; Demos, S.G.

    1999-12-15

    Following initiation at absorbing surface flaws, UV laser-induced damage to polished fused-silica surfaces continues to grow upon subsequent illumination. In this study photoluminescence spectroscopy was used to detect the formation of a modified, absorbing layer of silica that could be responsible for the continued growth of the damage site. For damage sites created with pulsed 355 nm illumination, three characteristic photoluminescence peaks are detected within the damage sites when excited with a 351 nm CW beam. Two of the peaks are likely due to the well-known E' and NBOHC defects associated with oxygen vacancies and broken Si-0 bonds, respectively. The third, and dominant, peak at 560 nm has not been clearly identified, but is likely associated with a change in stoichiometry of the silica. The relative intensities of the peaks are non-uniform across individual damage sites. The photoluminescence data is being combined with insights from various optical and electron microscopies to develop an understanding of laser-induced damage sites. The objective is to develop strategies to slow or stop the growth of the damage sites.

  10. Investigation of laser induced damage threshold measurement with single-shot on thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhichao, E-mail: zcliu44@163.com; Zheng, Yi; Pan, Feng; Lin, Qi; Ma, Ping; Wang, Jian

    2016-09-30

    Highlights: • Developed a rapid-testing method of the laser induced damage threshold for thin film surface within only one shot. • Comparison of single shot test and the ISO standard test has been performed on several types of reflectors. • Factors that impacted the measurement accuracy were discussed, and the optimization process was mentioned in this paper as well. - Abstract: A method for rapid determination of laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) of optical coatings is proposed and investigated in this paper. By use of this method, the LIDT of thin film can be rapidly obtained by only one shot. The modulation of laser beam profile, which is considered as a negative factor in conventional LIDT test, is utilized in this method. Basing on image processing technique, the damage information could be extracted from the comparison between the damage pattern and beam intensity distribution in the test region. The applicability and repeatability of this testing method has been verified on three type reflectors, HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2}, HfO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiO{sub 2}. In addition, the experimental results showed that appropriate beam size, laser energy and image compression ratio are the key factors to ensure a high accuracy of LIDT.

  11. Few-cycle pulse laser induced damage threshold determination of ultra-broadband optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafka, Kyle R P; Talisa, Noah; Tempea, Gabriel; Austin, Drake R; Neacsu, Catalin; Chowdhury, Enam A

    2016-12-12

    A systematic study of few-cycle pulse laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) determination was performed for commercially-available ultra-broadband optics, (i.e. chirped mirrors, silver mirrors, beamsplitters, etc.) in vacuum and in air, for single and multi-pulse regime (S-on-1). Multi-pulse damage morphology at fluences below the single-pulse LIDT was studied in order to investigate the mechanisms leading to the onset of damage. Stark morphological contrast was observed between multi-pulse damage sites formed in air versus those in vacuum. One effect of vacuum testing compared to air included suppression of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) formation, possibly influenced by a reduced presence of damage debris. Another effect of vacuum was occasional lowering of LIDT, which appears to be due to the stress-strain performance of the coating design during laser irradiation and under the external stress of vacuum ambience. A fused silica substrate is also examined, and a non-LIPSS nanostructuring is observed on the surface. Possible mechanisms are discussed.

  12. Calculation of error bars for laser damage observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenberg, Jonathan W.

    2008-10-01

    The use of the error bar is a critical means of communicating the quality of individual data points and a processed result. Understanding the error bar for a processed measurement depends on the measurement technique being used and is the subject of many recent works, as such, the paper will confine its scope to the determination of the error bar on a single data point. Many investigators either ignore the error bar altogether or use a "one size error fits all" method, both of these approaches are poor procedure and misleading. It is the goal of this work to lift the veil of mysticism surrounding error bars for damage observations and make their description, calculation and use, easy and commonplace. This paper will rigorously derive the error bar size as a function of the experimental parameters and observed data and will concentrate on the dependent variable, the cumulative probability of damage. The paper will begin with a discussion of the error bar as a measure of data quality or reliability. The expression for the variance in the parameters is derived via standard methods and converted to a standard deviation. The concept of the coverage factor is introduced to scale the error bar to the desired confidence level, completing the derivation

  13. Time-resolved microscopy studies of laser damage dynamics at 0.5-1ps, 1030nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallais, L.; Ollé, A.; Sozet, M.; Berthelot, J.; Monneret, S.; Néauport, J.; Lamaignère, L.

    2016-12-01

    Based on an experimental system that can be used for simultaneous laser damage testing and time-resolved acquisition of intensity and phase images, we describe different experiments related to the study of laser damage process in the sub-picosecond regime. We report firstly on quantitative measurement of the Kerr effect in a fused silica substrate at fluences closed to the Laser Induced Damage Threshold. Then we study the damage initiation process in optical coatings, linked to intrinsic properties of the materials, and the dynamics of free electron generation and relaxation. At last, damage growth sequences are analyzed with time-resolved microscopy in order to understand laser damage growth in the case of High Reflective mirrors.

  14. Femtosecond laser surface ablation of transparent solids: understanding the bulk filamentation damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryashov, Sergey I.; Joglekar, A.; Mourou, G.; Ionin, A. A.; Zvorykin, V. D.; Hunt, A. J.

    2007-06-01

    Direct SEM examination reveals a complex nanoscale structure of deep narrow central channels within shallow wide external craters produced by single-shot high-intensity femtosecond laser radiation on Corning 0211 glass and sapphire surfaces. These internal narrow channels are not expected from ordinary surface melt spallation and expulsion processes characteristic of the external surface nanocraters, but exhibit nearly the same appearance threshold. Surprisingly, the nanochannel radiuses rapidly saturate versus incident laser intensity indicating bulk rather than surface character of laser energy deposition, in contrast to the external craters extending versus laser intensity in a regular manner. These facts may be explained by channeling of electromagnetic radiation by near-surface ablative filamentary propagation of intense femtosecond laser pulses in the highly electronically excited dielectrics, by spherical aberrations in the surface layer, or deep drilling of the samples by short-wavelength Bremsstrahlung radiation of relatively hot surface electron-hole or electron-ion plasma. The double structure of ablated surface nano-features is consistent with similar structures observed for bulk damage features fabricated by femtosecond laser pulses at supercritical laser powers, but much lower laser intensities.

  15. INTERACTION OF FEMTOSECOND LASER RADIATION WITH SKIN: MATHEMATICAL MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Yu. Rogov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The features of human skin response to the impact of femtosecond laser radiation were researched. The Monte–Carlo method was used for estimation of the radiation penetration depth into the skin cover. We used prevalent wavelength equal to 800 nm (for Ti: sapphire laser femtosecond systems. A mathematical model of heat transfer process was introduced based on the analytical solution of the system of equations describing the dynamics of the electron and phonon subsystems. An experiment was carried out to determine the threshold energy of biological tissue injury (chicken skin was used as a test object. The value of electronic subsystem relaxation time was determined from the experiment and is in keeping with literature data. The results of this work can be used to assess the maximum permissible exposure of laser radiation of different lengths that cause the damage of biological tissues, as well as for the formation of safe operation standards for femtosecond laser systems.

  16. Extending the Nanbu Collision Algorithm to Non-Spitzerian Systems and Application to Laser Heating and Damage

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, Alex M

    2016-01-01

    We have generalized the Nanbu collision algorithm to accommodate arbitrary collision rates, enabling accurate kinetic modeling of short range particle interactions in non-Spitzerian systems. With this extension, we explore the effect of different collision models on the simulation of how ultra-intense lasers first begin to heat a target. The effect of collisions on plasma evolution is crucial for treating particle slowing, energy transport, and thermalization. The widely used Nanbu collision algorithm provides a fast and computationally efficient method to include the effects of collisions between charged particles in kinetic simulations without requiring that the particles already be in local thermal equilibrium. However, it is "hardwired" to use Spitzer collision rates appropriate for hot, relatively dilute plasmas. This restriction prevents the Nanbu collision algorithm from accurately describing the initial heating of a cold target, a key problem for the study of laser damage or the generation of the warm...

  17. Micromechanical modeling of strength and damage of fiber reinforced composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishnaevsky, L. Jr.; Broendsted, P.

    2007-03-15

    The report for the first year of the EU UpWind project includes three parts: overview of concepts and methods of modelling of mechanical behavior, deformation and damage of unidirectional fiber reinforced composites, development of computational tools for the automatic generation of 3D micromechanical models of fiber reinforced composites, and micromechanical modelling of damage in FRC, and phenomenological analysis of the effect of frequency of cyclic loading on the lifetime and damage evolution in materials. (au)

  18. Modeling the material properties at the onset of damage initiation in bulk potassium dihydrogen phosphate crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demos, Stavros G.; Feit, Michael D.; Duchateau, Guillaume

    2014-10-01

    A model simulating transient optical properties during laser damage in the bulk of KDP/DKDP crystals is presented. The model was developed and tested using as a benchmark its ability to reproduce the well-documented damage initiation behaviors but most importantly, the salient behavior of the wavelength dependence of the damage threshold. The model involves two phases. During phase I, the model assumes a moderate localized initial absorption that is strongly enhanced during the laser pulse via excited state absorption and thermally driven generation of additional point defects in the surrounding material. The model suggests that during a fraction of the pulse duration, the host material around the defect cluster is transformed into a strong absorber that leads to significant increase of the local temperature. During phase II, the model suggests that the excitation pathway consists mainly of one photon absorption events within a quasicontinuum of short-lived vibronic defect states spanning the band gap that was generated after the initial localized heating of the material due to thermal quenching of the excited state lifetimes. The width of the transition (steps) between different number of photons is governed by the instantaneous temperature, which was estimated using the experimental data. The model also suggests that the critical physical parameter prior to initiation of breakdown is the conduction band electron density. This model, employing very few free parameters, for the first time is able to quantitatively reproduce the wavelength dependence of the damage initiation threshold, and thus provides important insight into the physical processes involved.

  19. Hydro-oleophobic silica antireflective films with high laser-damage threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lianghong; Lv, Haibing; Wang, Chengcheng; Yuan, Xiaodong

    2011-02-01

    A simple method of preparing hydro-oleophobic anitreflective films with high laser-damage threshold is reported in this article. By adding fluoroalkylsilanes (FAS) into reactant mixture as a co-precursor, FAS modified SiO 2 was obtained under base catalyzed hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethoxysilane. The dip-coating films were deposited on two sides of fused silica substrates. The experimental results on the effect of adding fluoroalkylsilanes (FAS) as a co-precursor on the hydro-oleophobicity and optical properties of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) based silica AR films, are reported. The hydro-oleophobicity of the films was tested by the contact angle measurements and the highest water contact angle of 136° and oil (peanut) contact angle of 93° were obtained. The surface chemical modification of the hydro-oleophobic films was confirmed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). For the films based on FAS and TEOS, additional absorption bands at 1100 cm -1 corresponding to C-F bond presented, clearly indicating the organic modification of the films. The highest optical transmittance of the hydro-oleophobic films was found to be 99.5%. By a Nd:YAG lasers the laser-damage threshold of as-deposited films was measured at 351 nm wavelength (1 ns). The laser-damage threshold was as high as 22.6 J/cm 2.

  20. Modeling of Laser Material Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Barbara

    2009-03-01

    Irradiation of a substrate by laser light initiates the complex chemical and physical process of ablation where large amounts of material are removed. Ablation has been successfully used in techniques such as nanolithography and LASIK surgery, however a fundamental understanding of the process is necessary in order to further optimize and develop applications. To accurately describe the ablation phenomenon, a model must take into account the multitude of events which occur when a laser irradiates a target including electronic excitation, bond cleavage, desorption of small molecules, ongoing chemical reactions, propagation of stress waves, and bulk ejection of material. A coarse grained molecular dynamics (MD) protocol with an embedded Monte Carlo (MC) scheme has been developed which effectively addresses each of these events during the simulation. Using the simulation technique, thermal and chemical excitation channels are separately studied with a model polymethyl methacrylate system. The effects of the irradiation parameters and reaction pathways on the process dynamics are investigated. The mechanism of ablation for thermal processes is governed by a critical number of bond breaks following the deposition of energy. For the case where an absorbed photon directly causes a bond scission, ablation occurs following the rapid chemical decomposition of material. The study provides insight into the influence of thermal and chemical processes in polymethyl methacrylate and facilitates greater understanding of the complex nature of polymer ablation.

  1. Mechanical, thermal and laser damage threshold analyses of II group metal complexes of thiourea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhanuskodi, S., E-mail: dhanus2k3@yahoo.com [School of Physics, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620 024, Tamil Nadu (India); Sabari Girisun, T.C. [School of Physics, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620 024, Tamil Nadu (India); Department of Physics, Bishop Heber College, Tiruchirappalli 620 017, Tamil Nadu (India); Bhagavannarayana, G. [Material Characterization Division, National Physical laboratory, New Delhi 110 012 (India); Uma, S.; Phillip, J. [Sophisticated Test and Instrumentation Center, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin 682 022 (India)

    2011-04-15

    Research highlights: {yields} The role of the Group II metal ions in improving the stability is discussed. {yields} BTCC has a higher heat capacity than BTZC. {yields} Elastic stiffness is found to be higher for BTCC than BTZC. {yields} Microscopy studies confirm the damage is due to thermo-chemical ablation. {yields} BTCC has a higher laser damage threshold than BTZC. - Abstract: Single crystals of thiourea metal complexes with selected Group II metal ions, Zinc and Cadmium, have been grown by solvent evaporation technique. The crystals grown are bisthiourea zinc chloride (BTZC) and bisthiourea cadmium chloride (BTCC). Following an improved photopyroelectric technique, the thermal transport properties have been determined. It is found that BTCC has a higher heat capacity (304.09 J kg{sup -1} K{sup -1}) than BTZC (255.24 J kg{sup -1} K{sup -1}), and hence BTCC has better thermal stability. Vicker's microhardness measurements reveal that these materials have reverse indentation size effect and belong to the category of soft materials. Elastic stiffness is found to be higher for BTCC (1.57 GPa) than BTZC (0.76 GPa). The roles of the Group II metal ions in improving the mechanical and thermal stability of the metal complexes are discussed. Multi-shot laser damage studies on these materials reveal that BTCC has a higher laser damage threshold (15 GW cm{sup -2}) than BTZC (6 GW cm{sup -2}).

  2. Characterization of 1064nm laser-induced damage on antireflection coatings grown by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhichao; Wei, Yaowei; Chen, Songlin; Luo, Jin; Ma, Ping

    2011-12-01

    Damage tests were carried out to measure the laser resistance of Al2O3/TiO2 and Al2O3/HfO2 antireflection coatings at 1064nm grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The S-on-1 and R-on-1 damage results are given. It's interesting to find that ALD coatings damage performance seems closed to those grown by conventional e-beam evaporation process. For Al2O3/TiO2 coatings, the grown temperature will impact the damage resistance of thin films. Crystallization of TiO2 layer at higher temperature could play an importance role as absorption defects that reduced the LIDT of coatings. In addition, it is found that using inorganic compound instead of organic compound as precursors for ALD process can effective prevent residual carbon in films and will increase the LIDT of coatings.

  3. Effect of mechanical tissue properties on thermal damage in skin after IR-laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenz, M.; Mischler, Ch.; Romano, V.; Forrer, M.; Müller, O. M.; Weber, H. P.

    1991-04-01

    The damage created instantaneously in dorsal skin and in the subjacent skeletal muscle layer after CO2 and Er3+ laser incisions is histologically and ultrastructurally investigated. Light microscopical examinations show an up to three times larger damage zone in the subcutaneous layer of skeletal muscle than in the connective tissue above. The extent of thermally altered muscle tissue is classified by different zones and characterized by comparison to long time heating injuries. The unexpectedly large damage is a result of the change of elastic properties occurring abruptly at the transition between different materials. This leads to a discontinuity of the cutting dynamics that reduces the ejection of tissue material. We show that the degree of thermal damage originates from the amount of hot material that is not ejected out of the crater acting as a secondary heat source.

  4. Experimental Damage Identification of a Model Reticulated Shell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Xu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The damage identification of a reticulated shell is a challenging task, facing various difficulties, such as the large number of degrees of freedom (DOFs, the phenomenon of modal localization and transition, and low modeling accuracy. Based on structural vibration responses, the damage identification of a reticulated shell was studied. At first, the auto-regressive (AR time series model was established based on the acceleration responses of the reticulated shell. According to the changes in the coefficients of the AR model between the damaged conditions and the undamaged condition, the damage of the reticulated shell can be detected. In addition, the damage sensitive factors were determined based on the coefficients of the AR model. With the damage sensitive factors as the inputs and the damage positions as the outputs, back-propagation neural networks (BPNNs were then established and were trained using the Levenberg–Marquardt algorithm (L–M algorithm. The locations of the damages can be predicted by the back-propagation neural networks. At last, according to the experimental scheme of single-point excitation and multi-point responses, the impact experiments on a K6 shell model with a scale of 1/10 were conducted. The experimental results verified the efficiency of the proposed damage identification method based on the AR time series model and back-propagation neural networks. The proposed damage identification method can ensure the safety of the practical engineering to some extent.

  5. Laser induced periodic surface structure formation in germanium above laser damage fluence by mid IR femtosecond laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafka, Kyle; Austin, Drake; Cheng, Jian; Trendafilov, Simeon; Shvets, Gennady; Li, Hui; Yi, Allen; Blaga, Cosmin I.; DiMauro, L. F.; Chowdhury, Enam

    2014-11-01

    Laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) were generated via interaction of multiple 90 femtosecond 1900 - 3600 nm mid IR laser pulses (3 -10,000) on single crystal Ge targets. For specific laser parameters, both low and high frequency LIPSS are found together, which are oriented perpendicular to each other. Study of polarization dependence of LIPSS revealed that orientation and symmetry of interaction could be controlled by rotating polarization of laser pulses. Low frequency LIPSS formation was consistent with surface plasmon coupling of laser pulses with excited Ge.

  6. Experimental evaluation of a new system for laser tissue welding applied on damaged lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavon, Marco; Marulli, Giuseppe; Zuin, Andrea; Lunardi, Francesca; Villoresi, Paolo; Bonora, Stefano; Calabrese, Fiorella; Rea, Federico

    2013-05-01

    Alveolar air leaks represent a challenging problem in thoracic surgery, leading to increased patient morbidity and prolonged hospitalization. Several methods have been used, but no ideal technique exists yet. We investigated the lung-sealing capacity of an experimental kit for laser tissue welding. The kit is composed of a semiconductor laser system applied on a protein substrate associated with a chromophore that increases absorption. In vitro tests on porcine lung tissue were done to define ideal laser parameters (power 100 Å, frequency 50 Hz, pulse duration 400 µs) and protein substrate dilution (50%). For in vivo tests, through a left thoracotomy, 14 pigs received two different lung damages: a linear incision and a circular incision. Protein substrate applied on damaged areas was treated with laser to obtain a layer that reconstituted the integrity of the visceral pleura. Air leaks were intraoperatively evaluated by water submersion test with an airway pressure of 20 cmH2O. Animals were sacrificed at postoperative days 0 and 7 to study early and late pathological features. After applying laser treatment, no air leaks were seen in all proofs except in 2 cases in which a second application was required. At time 0, pathological damage mostly consisted of superficial alveolar necrotic tissue covered by protein membrane. At time 7, a complete recovery of lung lesions by fibrous scar with slight inflammatory reaction of adjacent lung tissue was seen. This experimental study demonstrated the effectiveness of laser tissue welding applied to seal air leaks after lung surgery. Further studies are needed to verify acceptability for human application.

  7. Experimental evaluation of a new system for laser tissue welding applied on damaged lungs†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavon, Marco; Marulli, Giuseppe; Zuin, Andrea; Lunardi, Francesca; Villoresi, Paolo; Bonora, Stefano; Calabrese, Fiorella; Rea, Federico

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Alveolar air leaks represent a challenging problem in thoracic surgery, leading to increased patient morbidity and prolonged hospitalization. Several methods have been used, but no ideal technique exists yet. We investigated the lung-sealing capacity of an experimental kit for laser tissue welding. METHODS The kit is composed of a semiconductor laser system applied on a protein substrate associated with a chromophore that increases absorption. In vitro tests on porcine lung tissue were done to define ideal laser parameters (power 100 Å, frequency 50 Hz, pulse duration 400 µs) and protein substrate dilution (50%). For in vivo tests, through a left thoracotomy, 14 pigs received two different lung damages: a linear incision and a circular incision. Protein substrate applied on damaged areas was treated with laser to obtain a layer that reconstituted the integrity of the visceral pleura. Air leaks were intraoperatively evaluated by water submersion test with an airway pressure of 20 cmH2O. Animals were sacrificed at postoperative days 0 and 7 to study early and late pathological features. RESULTS After applying laser treatment, no air leaks were seen in all proofs except in 2 cases in which a second application was required. At time 0, pathological damage mostly consisted of superficial alveolar necrotic tissue covered by protein membrane. At time 7, a complete recovery of lung lesions by fibrous scar with slight inflammatory reaction of adjacent lung tissue was seen. CONCLUSIONS This experimental study demonstrated the effectiveness of laser tissue welding applied to seal air leaks after lung surgery. Further studies are needed to verify acceptability for human application. PMID:23396621

  8. Characterization of laser-induced damage in silicon solar cells during selective ablation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulain, G. [Université de Lyon, Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon INL-UMR5270, CNRS, INSA de Lyon, Bâtiment Blaise pascal, Villeurbanne, F-69621 (France); Agence de l’environnement et de la Maîtrise de l’Energie, 20, avenue du Grésillé, BP 90406 49004 Angers Cedex 01 (France); Blanc, D., E-mail: daniele.blanc@insa-lyon.fr [Université de Lyon, Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon INL-UMR5270, CNRS, INSA de Lyon, Bâtiment Blaise pascal, Villeurbanne, F-69621 (France); Focsa, A.; De Vita, M.; Fraser, K. [Université de Lyon, Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon INL-UMR5270, CNRS, INSA de Lyon, Bâtiment Blaise pascal, Villeurbanne, F-69621 (France); Sayad, Y. [Institut de Sciences et Technologies, Centre Universitaire de Souk Ahras, Route de Annaba, Souk Ahras (Algeria); Lemiti, M. [Université de Lyon, Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon INL-UMR5270, CNRS, INSA de Lyon, Bâtiment Blaise pascal, Villeurbanne, F-69621 (France)

    2013-05-15

    Selective laser ablation of silicon nitride layers on crystalline silicon wafers was investigated for solar cell fabrication. Laser processing was performed with a nanosecond UV laser at various energy densities ranging from 0.2 to 1.5 J cm{sup −2}. Optical microscopy was used as a simple mean to assess the ablation threshold that was correlated to the temperature at the interface between the silicon nitride coating and the silicon substrate. Minority carrier lifetime measurements were performed using a microwave photo-conductance decay technique. Band to band photoluminescence spectroscopy proved to be a sensitive technique to qualify the laser-induced damage to the silicon substrate. The crystalline structure of silicon seemed to be maintained after silicon nitride ablation as shown by UV reflectivity measurements. Laser parameters corresponding to fluences of around 0.4 J cm{sup −2} were found to achieve selective ablation of SiN{sub x} without causing detrimental damage to the surrounding material.

  9. Pulsed-laser-induced damage in semiconductors Ge, ZnS, and ZnSe at 10.6um

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefranc, Sebastian; Kudriavtsev, Eugene M.; Autric, Michel L.

    1998-04-01

    Laser irradiation induced damage to several materials of interest for use as 10.6 micrometers laser system windows is investigated in this paper. The irradiation source in these single shot experiments was a pulsed TEA CO2 laser. Damage initiation in semiconductors has been studied during the interaction by measuring the variation of the transmitted intensity of a He- Ne and a CO2 cw lasers through the samples. Results show that damages appear at the beginning of the laser-matter interaction process on both surfaces and in the bulk of the materials. The damaged materials have been characterized for various incident fluences by means of optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy in terms of topography and morphology. The modified surface chemical analysis and the structural analysis have been carried out using energy dispersive x-ray and Raman spectroscopy.

  10. A two-scale damage model with material length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dascalu, Cristian

    2009-09-01

    The Note presents the formulation of a class of two-scale damage models involving a micro-structural length. A homogenization method based on asymptotic developments is employed to deduce the macroscopic damage equations. The damage model completely results from energy-based micro-crack propagation laws, without supplementary phenomenological assumptions. We show that the resulting two-scale model has the property of capturing micro-structural lengths. When damage evolves, the micro-structural length is given by the ratio of the surface density of energy dissipated during the micro-crack growth and the macroscopic damage energy release rate per unit volume of the material. The use of fracture criteria based on resistance curves or power laws for sub-critical growth of micro-cracks leads to quasi-brittle and, respectively, time-dependent damage models. To cite this article: C. Dascalu, C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  11. Experimental studies and modeling of X-Rays multilayer mirrors damages under high X-Ray flux generated by a laser-plasma experiment; Etude experimentale et modelisation de l`endommagement des miroirs multicouches X soumis a de hauts flux de rayonnement X dans le cadre de l`experience plasma-laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Guern, F

    1996-05-24

    We have been able with this work to point out characterize X-Rays multilayers mirrors damages. We have designed two experimental set-up which have been installed in the HELIOTROPE experimental chamber of the OCTAL facility located at the CEA in Limeil-Valenton. We have demonstrated that X-Rays multilayer mirrors properties were drastically modified by X-Rays emitted by a golden laser plasma. We have, more precisely, introduced the damage speed concept to quantify the expansion of the multilayer mirror period. We have been able to classify different multilayer mirrors in function of their resistance to damage and we have demonstrated that a silicate layer deposited on a mirror allowed to increase his resistance to damage. In a second part we have developed a simulation tool in order to simulate the X-Rays multilayer mirrors optical properties modifications. We have therefore coupled a thermo-mechanic code with an optical program. The results of the simulations are in a rather good agreement with the experiments and can be used to predict, before experiments, the multilayer mirror behavior under X-Rays irradiation. (author) 55 refs.

  12. Histologic evaluation of laser lipolysis comparing continuous wave vs pulsed lasers in an in vivo pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Jessica R; Veerappan, Anna; Chen, Bo; Mirkov, Mirko; Sierra, Ray; Spiegel, Jeffrey H

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate acute and delayed laser effects of subdermal lipolysis and collagen deposition using an in vivo pig model and to compare histologic findings in fatty tissue after continuous wave diode (CW) vs pulsed laser treatment. Three CW lasers (980, 1370, and 1470 nm) and 3 pulsed lasers (1064, 1320, and 1440 nm) were used to treat 4 Göttingen minipigs. Following administration of Klein tumescent solution, a laser cannula was inserted at the top of a 10 × 2.5-cm rectangle and was passed subdermally to create separate laser "tunnels." Temperatures at the surface and at intervals of 4-mm to 20-mm depths were recorded immediately after exposure and were correlated with skin injury. Full-thickness cutaneous biopsy specimens were obtained at 1 day, 1 week, and 1 month after exposure and were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and trichrome stain. Qualitative and semiquantitative histopathologic evaluations were performed with attention to vascular damage, lipolysis, and collagen deposition. Skin surface damage occurred at temperatures exceeding 46°C. Histologic examination at 1 day after exposure showed hemorrhage, fibrous collagen fiber coagulation, and adipocyte damage. Adipocytes surrounded by histiocytes, a marker of lipolysis, were present at 1 week and 1 month after exposure. Collagen deposition in subdermal fatty tissue and in reticular dermis of some specimens was noted at 1 week and had increased at 1 month. Tissue treated with CW laser at 1470 nm demonstrated greater hemorrhage and more histiocytes at damage sites than tissue treated with pulsed laser at 1440 nm. There was a trend toward more collagen deposition with pulsed lasers than with CW lasers, but this was not statistically significant. Histopathologic comparison between results of CW laser at 980 nm vs pulsed laser at 1064 nm showed the same trend. Hemorrhage differences may result from pulse duration variations. A theoretical calculation estimating temperature rise in vessels supported this

  13. A new anisotropic damage model for brittle solids based on the effective damage concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazdani, S. [North Dakota State Univ., Fargo, ND (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The presence of microdefects within the structure of a brittle solid plays a dominant role on the manner in which the material responds to externally applied stresses. When a loading state involves a confining pressure of a sufficient magnitude such that nucleation of new microdefects and the propagation of existing ones are inhibited, brittle solids display a ductile response. However, when the same materials are stressed in a low pressure regime, responses become very brittle with little or no ductility. During the process of damage, material bonds are severed, leading to the alteration of elastic properties. It is, therefore, plausible to employ the changes in compliance or stiffness as measures of damage as they relate directly to the physics of the problem. The paper starts with a review of the fundamental concepts based on the laws of thermodynamics, considers anisotropic damage formulation, including both elastic and inelastic damage processes, and proposes new damage response tensors to allow for the rotation of principal stress axis. Damage is recorded in the material compliance tensor involving an effective damage parameter whose increment is obtained from the consistency condition of a damage potential known as {open_quotes}damage surface.{close_quotes} Finally, the paper illustrates the model for a cementitious material in different loading paths.

  14. Comparison of defects responsible for nanosecond laser-induced damage and ablation in common high index optical coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yejia; Abdulameer, Mohammed R.; Emmert, Luke A.; Day, Travis; Patel, Dinesh; Menoni, Carmen S.; Rudolph, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Spatiotemporally resolved optical laser-induced damage is an experimental technique used to study nanosecond laser damage and initiation of ablation in dielectric metal-oxide films used for optical coatings. It measures the fluence (intensity) at the initiation of damage during a single laser pulse. The technique was applied to coatings of HfO2, Sc2O3, and Ta2O5, which were prepared by ion-beam sputtering, and HfO2 which was prepared by electron-beam evaporation. Using the data obtained, we were able to retrieve the defect density distributions of these films without a priori assumptions about their functional form.

  15. In vivo and in vitro evaluation of corneal damage induced by 1573 nm laser radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courant, D.; Chapel, C. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses (DSV/DRR/SRBF), 92 (France). Dept. de Radiobiologie et de Radiopathologie; Pothier, C. [DGA-DCE/CTA/LOT, 94 - Arcueil (France); Sales, N. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses (DSV/DRM/SNV), 92 (France)

    2006-07-01

    Recent developments in laser technology have originated a variety of infrared laser sources between 1500-1700 nm called as 'eye-safe' which are gaining widespread use in industry, medicine and military applications. This spectral region has been called 'eye safe' because the cornea and aqueous humor absorb sufficient radiation to prevent nearly all potentially damaging radiation from reaching the retina whereas the lens does not absorb this spectral range and remains undamaged. However, in providing protection for the deeper layers of the eye, the cornea itself is susceptible to thermal damage. Previous studies, performed at 1540 nm with exposures less than 1 s, are inconsistent in the quantity of energy required to cause corneal damage. The purpose of this study was first, to determine the threshold damage exposure (E.D.{sub 50}) on rabbit cornea induced by a 3 ns single pulse emitted at 1573 nm, using clinical observations and histology and to compare the results to the limit values recommended by I.C.N.I.R.P. guidelines or international standards. Secondly, it was suggested to investigate the cellular effects of infrared radiation with biochemical techniques on cell cultures in order to specify a cellular damage threshold and a better understanding of the laser - tissue interaction and the corneal injury. The minimal damage criterion was defined by a shallow, very small depression of the epithelial surface with a mild fluorescein staining. The E.D.{sub 50} obtained with corneal beam diameter of 400 mm is 26.6 J.cm{sup -2}. The corresponding radiant exposure, calculated with the 1 mm aperture diameter recommended by I.C.N.I.R.P. guidelines or standards, is 4.3 J.cm{sup -2}. In vitro experiments have been carried out on primary keratocytes and H.T. 1080 epithelial cell line, using an expanded beam of 3.5 mm diameter on plates or Lab Tek holders. Cells were irradiated with 10 Hz pulse ratio frequency during 1, 2 or 3 s. The S A

  16. Understanding the Femtosecond Laser-Solid Interaction Near and Beyond the Material Damage Threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-23

    Presentation efforts: Journal articles: 1. Jian Cheng, Mingjun Chen, Kyle Kafka, Drake Austin, Jinghe Wang, Yong Xiao and Enam Chowdhury, Determination of...ultra-short laser induced damage threshold of KH2PO4 crystal: Numerical calculation and experimental verification, AIP Advances 6, 035221 (2016). 2...maximum file size for the Report Document is 50MB. Archival Publications (published) during reporting period: Journal Articles 1. Jian Cheng, Mingjun

  17. Laser abrasion for cosmetic and medical treatment of facial actinic damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, L.M.; Lask, G.P.; Glassberg, E.; Jacoby, R.; Abergel, R.P.

    1989-06-01

    Previous studies have shown the carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/) laser to be effective in the treatment of actinic cheilitis. After CO/sub 2/ laser abrasion, normal skin and marked cosmetic improvement of the lip were noted. In our study, twenty-three patients were treated with CO/sub 2/ laser abrasions for cosmetic improvement of facial lines and actinic changes. Pre- and postoperative histopathologic examinations were made on two patients. Preoperative examination of specimens from actinically damaged skin showed atypical keratinocytes in the basal layer of the epidermis, with overlying dense compact orthokeratosis and parakeratosis. Abundant solar elastosis was seen in the papillary dermis. Postoperative histologic specimens showed a normal-appearing epidermis with fibrosis in the papillary dermis and minimal solar elastosis (about four weeks after laser treatment). At present, various modalities are available for the regeneration of the aged skin, including chemical peels and dermabrasion. Significantly fewer complications were noted with CO/sub 2/ laser abrasion than with these methods. Thus, CO/sub 2/ laser abrasion can be useful in the cosmetic and medical treatment of the aged skin. Marked clinical and histologic improvement has been demonstrated.

  18. Damage to microvessels during pused laser treatment of port-wine stains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svaasand, Lars O.; Fiskerstrand, Elisanne J.; Norvang Nilsen, Lill T.; Stopps, E. K. S.; Nelson, J. Stuart; Berns, Michael W.

    1996-01-01

    Selective photothermolysis with pulsed lasers is presumably the most successful therapy for port wine stain birthmarks (flammeus nevi). Selectivity is obtained by using an optical wavelength corresponding to high absorption in blood together with small absorption in tissue. Further on, the pulse length is selected to be long enough to allow heat to diffuse into the vessel wall, but simultaneously short enough to prevent thermal damage to perivascular tissues. The optimal wavelength and pulse length are therefore dependent on vessel diameter, vessel wall thickness and depth in dermis. The present work, that is based on analytical mathematical modeling, demonstrates that in the case of a 0.45 ms long pulse at 585 nm wavelength vessels of diameter in the range of 40 - 60 micrometers require minimum optical fluence. Smaller vessels require higher fluence because the amount of heat needed to heat the wall then becomes a substantial fraction of the absorbed optical energy, and larger vessels require higher dose because the attenuation of light is blood prevents the blood in central part of the lumen to participate in the heating process. Further on, it is shown that the commonly used dose in the range of 6 - 7 J/cm2 is expected to inflict vessel rupture rather than thermolysis is superficially located vessels. The present analysis might serve to draw guide lines for a protocol where the optical energy, wavelength and pulse length are optimized with respect to vessel diameter and depth.

  19. Hydrodynamic modeling of ns-laser ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Autrique

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Laser ablation is a versatile and widespread technique, applied in an increasing number of medical, industrial and analytical applications. A hydrodynamic multiphase model describing nanosecond-laser ablation (ns-LA is outlined. The model accounts for target heating and mass removal mechanisms as well as plume expansion and plasma formation. A copper target is placed in an ambient environment consisting of helium and irradiated by a nanosecond-laser pulse. The effect of variable laser settings on the ablation process is explored in 1-D numerical simulations.

  20. Effect of standing-wave field distribution on femosecond laser-induced damage of HfO2/SiO2 mirror coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shunli Chen; Yuan'an Zhao; Hongbo He; Manda Shao

    2011-01-01

    Single-pulse and multi-pulse damage behaviors of "standard" (with A/4 stack structure) and "modified" (with reduced standing-wave field) HfO2/SiO2 mirror coatings are investigated using a commercial 50-fs, 800-nm Tksapphire laser system. Precise morphologies of damaged sites display strikingly different features when the samples are subjected to various number of incident pulses, which are explained reasonably by the standing-wave field distribution within the coatings. Meanwhile, the single-pulse laser-induced damage threshold of the "standard" mirror is improved by about 14% while suppressing the normalized electric field intensity at the outmost interface of the HfO2 and SiO2 layers by 37%. To discuss the damage mechanism, a theoretical model based on photoionization, avalanche ionization, and decays of electrons is adopted to simulate the evolution curves of the conduction-band electron density during pulse duration.%@@ Single-pulse and multi-pulse damage behaviors of "standard"(with λ/4 stack structure) and "modified"(with reduced standing-wave field) HfO2/SiO2 mirror coatings are investigated using a commercial 50-fs,800-nm Thsapphire laser system.以Precise morphologies of damaged sites display strikingly different features when the samples are subjected to various number of incident pulses, which are explained reasonably by the standing-wave field distribution within the coatings .

  1. Comparison of multiaxial fatigue damage models under variable amplitude loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hong; Shang, De Guang; Tian, Yu Jie [Beijing Univ. of Technology, Beijing (China); Liu, Jian Zhong [Beijing Institute of Aeronautical Materials, Beijing (China)

    2012-11-15

    Based on the cycle counting method of Wang and Brown and on the linear accumulation damage rule of Miner, four multiaxial fatigue damage models without any weight factors proposed by Pan et al., Varvani Farahani, Shang and Wang, and Shang et al. are used to compute fatigue damage. The procedure is evaluated using the low cycle fatigue experimental data of 7050 T7451 aluminum alloy and En15R steel under tension/torsion variable amplitude loading. The results reveal that the procedure is convenient for engineering design and application, and that the four multiaxial fatigue damage models provide good life estimates.

  2. Stochastic modeling of p53-regulated apoptosis upon radiation damage

    CERN Document Server

    Bhatt, Divesh; Bahar, Ivet

    2011-01-01

    We develop and study the evolution of a model of radiation induced apoptosis in cells using stochastic simulations, and identified key protein targets for effective mitigation of radiation damage. We identified several key proteins associated with cellular apoptosis using an extensive literature survey. In particular, we focus on the p53 transcription dependent and p53 transcription independent pathways for mitochondrial apoptosis. Our model reproduces known p53 oscillations following radiation damage. The key, experimentally testable hypotheses that we generate are - inhibition of PUMA is an effective strategy for mitigation of radiation damage if the treatment is administered immediately, at later stages following radiation damage, inhibition of tBid is more effective.

  3. ARX model-based damage sensitive features for structural damage localization using output-only measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Koushik; Bhattacharya, Bishakh; Ray-Chaudhuri, Samit

    2015-08-01

    The study proposes a set of four ARX model (autoregressive model with exogenous input) based damage sensitive features (DSFs) for structural damage detection and localization using the dynamic responses of structures, where the information regarding the input excitation may not be available. In the proposed framework, one of the output responses of a multi-degree-of-freedom system is assumed as the input and the rest are considered as the output. The features are based on ARX model coefficients, Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) test statistical distance, and the model residual error. At first, a mathematical formulation is provided to establish the relation between the change in ARX model coefficients and the normalized stiffness of a structure. KS test parameters are then described to show the sensitivity of statistical distance of ARX model residual error with the damage location. The efficiency of the proposed set of DSFs is evaluated by conducting numerical studies involving a shear building and a steel moment-resisting frame. To simulate the damage scenarios in these structures, stiffness degradation of different elements is considered. It is observed from this study that the proposed set of DSFs is good indicator for damage location even in the presence of damping, multiple damages, noise, and parametric uncertainties. The performance of these DSFs is compared with mode shape curvature-based approach for damage localization. An experimental study has also been conducted on a three-dimensional six-storey steel moment frame to understand the performance of these DSFs under real measurement conditions. It has been observed that the proposed set of DSFs can satisfactorily localize damage in the structure.

  4. LIFE DISTRIBUTION OF SERIES UNDER THE SUCCESSIVE DAMAGE MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Dongqian; C. D. Lai; LI Guoying

    2003-01-01

    We analyse further the reliability behaviour of series and parallel systems in the successive damage model initiated by Downton. The results are compared with those obtained for other models with different bivariate distributions.

  5. Integrated geomechanical modelling for deep subsurface damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wees, J.D. van; Orlic, B.; Zijl, W.; Jongerius, P.; Schreppers, G.J.; Hendriks, M.

    2001-01-01

    Government, E&P and mining industry increasingly demand fundamental insight and accurate predictions on subsurface and surface deformation and damage due to exploitation of subsurface natural resources, and subsurface storage of energy residues (e.g. CO2). At this moment deformation is difficult to

  6. Laser damage in optical components: metrology, statistical and photo-induced analysis of precursor centres; Endommagement laser dans les composants optiques: metrologie, analyse statistique et photo-induite des sites initiateurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallais, L

    2002-11-15

    This thesis deals with laser damage phenomena for nanosecond pulses, in optical components such as glasses, dielectric and metallic thin films. Firstly, a work is done on the laser damage metrology, in order to obtain accurate and reliable measurement of laser-induced damage probabilities, with a rigorous control of test parameters. Then, with the use of a specific model, we find densities of laser damage precursors in the case of bulk glasses (few tens by (100{mu}m){sup 3}) and in the case of glass surfaces (one precursor by {mu}m{sup 3}). Our analysis is associated to morphology studies by Atomic Force Microscope to discuss about precursor nature and damage process. Influence of wavelength (from 355 to 1064 nm) and cumulated shots is also studied. Simulations are performed to study initiation mechanisms on these inclusions. This work gives an estimation of complex index and size of the precursor, which permits to discuss about possible detection by non-destructive tools. (author)

  7. Anisotropic damage coupled modeling of saturated porous rock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    It is widely acknowledged that the natural rock mass is anisotropic and its failing type is also non-isotropic. An orthotropic elastic damaged model has been proposed in which the elastic deformation,the damaged deformation and irreversible deformation can be identified respectively. A second rank damage tensor is employed to characterize the induced damage and damage evolution related to the propagation conditions of microcracks. A specific form of the Gibbs free energy function is used to obtain the effective elastic stiffness and the limited scopes of damage parameters are suggested. The model’s parameter determination is proposed by virtue of conventional tri-axial test. Then,the proposed model is developed to simulate the coupled hydraulic mechanical responses and traction behaviors in different loading paths of porous media.

  8. Laser induced damage of multi-layer dielectric used in pulse compressor gratings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weijin Kong; Yuanan Zhao; Tao Wang; Jianda Shao; Zhengxiu Fan

    2005-01-01

    Laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) of multi-layer dielectric used in pulse compressor gratings (PCG) was investigated. The sample was prepared by e-beam evaporation (EBE). LIDT was detected following ISO standard 11254-1.2. It was found that LIDTs of normal and 51.2°incidence (transverse electric (TE) mode) were 14.14 and 9.31 J/cm2, respectively. A Nomarski microscope was employed to map the damage morphology, and it was found that the damage behavior was pit-concave-plat structure for normal incidence, while it was pit structure for 51.2°incidence with TE mode. The electric field distribution was calculated to illuminate the difference of LIDT between the two incident cases.

  9. Coupled elasto-plasticity damage constitutive models for concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang XU; Jian-yun CHEN; Jing LI; Gang XU

    2013-01-01

    The paper is to design and construct a coupled elasto-plasticity damage constitutive model for concrete.Based on the energy dissipation principle,the Hsieh-Ting-Chen four-parameter yield function is used.The model can reflect different strength characteristics of concrete in tension and compression,and reduce the limitation and lacuna of the traditional damage constitutive models for concrete.Furthermore,numerical test for concrete stress-strain relation under uniaxial tension and compression is given.Moreover,the damage process of concrete gravity dam is calculated and analyzed in seismic load.Compared with other damage constitutive models,the proposed model contains only one unknown parameter and the other parameters can be found in the Hsieh-Ting-Chen four-parameter yield function.The same damage evolution law,which is used for tension and compression,is good for determining stress-strain constitutive and damage characteristics in complex stress state.This coupled damage constitutive models can be applied in analyzing damage of concrete gravity dam and arch dam.

  10. Short pulse laser-induced optical damage and fracto-emission of amorphous, diamond-like carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SOKOLOWSKI-TINTEN,K.; VON DER LINDE,D.; SIEGAL,MICHAEL P.; OVERMYER,DONALD L.

    2000-02-07

    Short pulse laser damage and ablation of amorphous, diamond-like carbon films is investigated. Material removal is due to fracture of the film and ejection of large fragments, which exhibit a broadband emission of microsecond duration.

  11. Laser-induced damage of TiO2/SiO2 high reflector at 1064 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jianke; Ma, Jianyong; Xiu, Cheng; Fan, Zhengxiu; Jin, Yunxia; Zhao, Yuanan; He, Hongbo; Shao, Jianda; Huang, Huolin; Zhang, Feng; Wu, Zhengyun

    2008-04-01

    A high laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) TiO2/SiO2 high reflector (HR) at 1064nm is deposited by e-beam evaporation. The HR is characterized by optical properties, surface, and cross section structure. LIDT is tested at 1064nm with a 12ns laser pulse in the one-on-one mode. Raman technique and scanning electron Microscope are used to analyze the laser-induced modification of HR. The possible damage mechanism is discussed. It is found that the LIDT of HR is influenced by the nanometer precursor in the surface, the intrinsic absorption of film material, the compactness of the cross section and surface structure, and the homogeneity of TiO2 layer. Three typical damage morphologies such as flat-bottom pit, delamination, and plasma scald determine well the nanometer defect initiation mechanism. The laser-induced crystallization consists well with the thermal damage nature of HR.

  12. Probabilistic Modeling of Fatigue Damage Accumulation for Reliability Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Rathod

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A methodology for probabilistic modeling of fatigue damage accumulation for single stress level and multistress level loading is proposed in this paper. The methodology uses linear damage accumulation model of Palmgren-Miner, a probabilistic S-N curve, and an approach for a one-to-one transformation of probability density functions to achieve the objective. The damage accumulation is modeled as a nonstationary process as both the expected damage accumulation and its variability change with time. The proposed methodology is then used for reliability prediction under single stress level and multistress level loading, utilizing dynamic statistical model of cumulative fatigue damage. The reliability prediction under both types of loading is demonstrated with examples.

  13. Computer Modeling of Direct Metal Laser Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    A computational approach to modeling direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) additive manufacturing process is presented. The primary application of the model is for determining the temperature history of parts fabricated using DMLS to evaluate residual stresses found in finished pieces and to assess manufacturing process strategies to reduce part slumping. The model utilizes MSC SINDA as a heat transfer solver with imbedded FORTRAN computer code to direct laser motion, apply laser heating as a boundary condition, and simulate the addition of metal powder layers during part fabrication. Model results are compared to available data collected during in situ DMLS part manufacture.

  14. Study on absorbance and laser damage threshold of HfO2 films prepared by ion-assisted reaction deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dawei Zhang(张大伟); Shuhai Fan(范树海); Weidong Gao(高卫东); Hongbo He(贺洪波); Yingjian Wang(王英剑); Jianda Shao(邵建达); Zhengxiu Fan(范正修); Haojie Sun(孙浩杰)

    2004-01-01

    Using a new kind of EH1000 ion source, hafnium dioxide (HfO2) films are deposited with different deposition techniques and different conditions. The absorbance and the laser damage threshold of these films have been measured and studied. By comparing these characteristics, one can conclude that under right conditions, such as high partial pressure of oxygen and right kind of ion source, the ion-assisted reaction deposition can prepare HfO2 films with higher laser induced damage threshold.

  15. Comparison of Damage and Ultrasonic Signals, Induced by Laser at Different Wavelengths, for Aluminum and Alumina Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perchenok, Y.; Hurvits, G.; Azoulay, A.

    2005-04-01

    A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser was focused at a narrow line on Al and Alumina samples to induce ultrasonic waves. The stimulated surface acoustic wave was measured by a Fabry-Perot interferometer, while the depth of the damage created in the sample was quantified by a profilometer. Similar samples of Al and Alumina were used to measure ultrasonic signals at different laser powers and wavelengths. A profilometer was then used to quantify and measure damage depths.

  16. Gamma-ray-induced damage and recovery behavior in an erbium-doped fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussjager, Rebecca J.; Hayduk, Michael J.; Johns, Steven T.; Taylor, Linda R.; Taylor, Edward W.

    2002-01-01

    Erbium-doped fiber lasers (EDFLs) may soon find applications in space as high bit rate optical communication systems and photonic analog-to-digital converters (ADCs). The rapid advancement in digital signal processing systems has led to an increased interest in the direct digitization of high- frequency analog signals. The potential high bandwidth, reduced weight, and reduced power requirements makes photonics an attractive technology for wide-band signal conversion as well as for use in space-based platforms. It is anticipated that photonic ADCs will be able to operate at sampling rates and resolutions far greater than current electronic ADCs. The high repetition rates and narrow pulse widths produced by EDFLs allow for high-speed impulse sampling of analog signals thus making it a vital component of a photonic ADC. In this paper we report on the in situ gamma-ray irradiation of an actively mode-locked EDFL operating at 1530 nm. The onset, growth and extent of ionization induced damage under time-resolved operational conditions is presented. The laser consisted of approximately 3 meters of erbium-doped fiber pumped by a laser diode operating at 980 nm. The picosecond pulses produced by the laser were initiated and controlled by a Mach-Zehnder lithium niobate electro-optic modulator. The active mode-locking element allowed for the precise timing control of the laser repetition rate which is critical in high-speed optical networking systems as well as in photonic ADCs.

  17. Modelling of elastoplastic damage in concrete due to desiccation shrinkage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, F.; Burlion, N.; Shao, J. F.

    2002-07-01

    We present a numerical modelling of elastoplastic damage due to drying shrinkage of concrete in the framework of mechanics of partially saturated porous media. An elastoplastic model coupled with isotropic damage is first formulated. Two plastic flow mechanisms are involved, controlled by applied stress and suction, respectively. A general concept of net effective stress is used in take into account effects of capillary pressure and material damage on stress-controlled plastic deformation. Damage evolution depends both on elastic and plastic strains. The model's parameters are determined or chosen from relevant experimental data. Comparisons between numerical simulations and experimental data are presented to show the capacity of model to reproduce mains features of concrete behaviour under mechanical loading and during drying shrinkage of concrete. An example of application concerning drying of a concrete wall is finally presented. The results obtained allow to show potential capacity of proposed model for numerical modelling of complex coupling processes in concrete structures.

  18. A theoretical model of multielectrode DBR lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pan, Xing; Olesen, Henning; Tromborg, Bjarne

    1988-01-01

    A theoretical model for two- and three-section tunable distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) lasers is presented. The static tuning properties are studied in terms of threshold current, linewidth, oscillation frequency, and output power. Regions of continuous tuning for three-section DBR lasers...

  19. A Comparison of Laser Shearography and C-Scan for Assessing a Glass/Epoxy Laminate Impact Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadlec, Martin; Růžek, Roman

    2012-06-01

    Impact damage is a serious damage mechanism in composite materials, which limits their performance and reliability. Impact damage can occur during in-service applications or as a result of handling during manufacturing. Methods used currently for damage detection are based on different principles, and for that reason, they give a range of results no matter what the real damage is. Therefore, a comparison of the internal real damage with the flaw indications of a glass fibre-reinforced polymer (GFRP) laminate made with two non-destructive technique (NDT) methods has been investigated. Laser shearography measurements and C-scan ultrasonic detection were compared. Metallographic examination and surface indentation measurements provided information about the character of the real damage. Such a comparison has not yet been published because laser shearography is considered a qualitative technique. Each NDT method was able to visualise a different type of damage. The knowledge of the applicability of these methods is the key to taking advantage of both methods by combining their respective strengths. In terms of the reliability, simplicity and rapidity of all of the mentioned techniques, laser shearography turned out to be the most suitable method for the detection of barely visible flaws. The C-scan was more appropriate for precisely defining the inner damage. The tested material was a laminate typically used for ultralight aircraft. Information about the extent of damage is very important for airplane certification and maintenance.

  20. Improved laser damage threshold performance of calcium fluoride optical surfaces via Accelerated Neutral Atom Beam (ANAB) processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, S.; Walsh, M.; Svrluga, R.; Thomas, M.

    2015-11-01

    Optics are not keeping up with the pace of laser advancements. The laser industry is rapidly increasing its power capabilities and reducing wavelengths which have exposed the optics as a weak link in lifetime failures for these advanced systems. Nanometer sized surface defects (scratches, pits, bumps and residual particles) on the surface of optics are a significant limiting factor to high end performance. Angstrom level smoothing of materials such as calcium fluoride, spinel, magnesium fluoride, zinc sulfide, LBO and others presents a unique challenge for traditional polishing techniques. Exogenesis Corporation, using its new and proprietary Accelerated Neutral Atom Beam (ANAB) technology, is able to remove nano-scale surface damage and particle contamination leaving many material surfaces with roughness typically around one Angstrom. This surface defect mitigation via ANAB processing can be shown to increase performance properties of high intensity optical materials. This paper describes the ANAB technology and summarizes smoothing results for calcium fluoride laser windows. It further correlates laser damage threshold improvements with the smoothing produced by ANAB surface treatment. All ANAB processing was performed at Exogenesis Corporation using an nAccel100TM Accelerated Particle Beam processing tool. All surface measurement data for the paper was produced via AFM analysis on a Park Model XE70 AFM, and all laser damage testing was performed at Spica Technologies, Inc. Exogenesis Corporation's ANAB processing technology is a new and unique surface modification technique that has demonstrated to be highly effective at correcting nano-scale surface defects. ANAB is a non-contact vacuum process comprised of an intense beam of accelerated, electrically neutral gas atoms with average energies of a few tens of electron volts. The ANAB process does not apply mechanical forces associated with traditional polishing techniques. ANAB efficiently removes surface

  1. Chemically induced intestinal damage models in zebrafish larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehlers, Stefan H; Flores, Maria Vega; Hall, Christopher J; Okuda, Kazuhide S; Sison, John Oliver; Crosier, Kathryn E; Crosier, Philip S

    2013-06-01

    Several intestinal damage models have been developed using zebrafish, with the aim of recapitulating aspects of human inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). These experimentally induced inflammation models have utilized immersion exposure to an array of colitogenic agents (including live bacteria, bacterial products, and chemicals) to induce varying severity of inflammation. This technical report describes methods used to generate two chemically induced intestinal damage models using either dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) or trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). Methods to monitor intestinal damage and inflammatory processes, and chemical-genetic methods to manipulate the host response to injury are also described.

  2. Three-dimensional environment models from airborne laser radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderman, Ulf; Ahlberg, Simon; Elmqvist, Magnus; Persson, Asa

    2004-09-01

    Detailed 3D environment models for visualization and computer based analyses are important in many defence and homeland security applications, e.g. crisis management, mission planning and rehearsal, damage assessment, etc. The high resolution data from airborne laser radar systems for 3D sensing provide an excellent source of data for obtaining the information needed for many of these models. To utilise the 3D data provided by the laser radar systems however, efficient methods for data processing and environment model construction needs to be developed. In this paper we will present some results on the development of laser data processing methods, including methods for data classification, bare earth extraction, 3D-reconstruction of buildings, and identification of single trees and estimation of their position, height, canopy size and species. We will also show how the results can be used for the construction of detailed 3D environment models for military modelling and simulation applications. The methods use data from discrete return airborne laser radar systems and digital cameras.

  3. Threshold determinations for selective retinal pigment epithelium damage with repetitive pulsed microsecond laser systems in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Framme, Carsten; Schuele, Georg; Roider, Johann; Kracht, Dietmar; Birngruber, Reginald; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2002-01-01

    In both clinical and animal studies, it has been shown that repetitive short laser pulses can cause selective retinal pigment epithelium damage (RPE) with sparing of photoreceptors. Our purpose was to determine the ophthalmoscopic and angiographic damage thresholds as a function of pulse durations by using different pulsed laser systems to optimize treatment modalities. Chinchilla-breed rabbits were narcotized and placed in a special holding system. Laser lesions were applied using a commercial laser slit lamp, contact lens, and irradiation with a frequency-doubled Nd:YLF laser (wave-length: 527 nm; repetition rate: 500 Hz; number of pulses: 100; pulse duration: 5 micros, 1.7 micros, 200 ns) and an argon-ion laser (514 nm, 500 Hz, 100 pulses, 5 micros and 200 ms). In all eyes, spots with different energies were placed into the regio macularis with a diameter of 102 microm (tophat profile). After treatment, fundus photography and fluorescein angiography were performed and radiant exposure for ED50 damage determined. Speckle measurements at the fiber tips were performed to determine intensity peaks in the beam profile. Using the Nd:YLF laser system, the ophthalmoscopic ED50 threshold energies were 25.4 microJ (5 micros), 32 microJ (1.7 micros), and 30 microJ (200 ns). The angiographic ED50 thresholds were 13.4 microJ (5 micros), 9.2 microJ (1.7 micros), and 6.7 microJ (200 ns). With the argon laser, the angiographic threshold for 5 micros pulses was 5.5 microJ. The ophthalmoscopic threshold could not be determined because of a lack of power; however, it was > 12 microJ. For 200 ms, the ED50 radiant exposures were 20.4 mW ophthalmoscopically and 19.2 mW angiographically. Speckle factors were found to be 1.225 for the Nd:YLF and 3.180 for the argon laser. Thus, the maximal ED50 -threshold radiant exposures for the Nd:YLF were calculated to be 362 mJ/cM2 (5 micros), 478 mJ/cm2 (1.7 micros), and 438 mJ/cm2 (200 ns) ophthalmoscopically. Angiographically, the thresholds

  4. In Situ Mitigation of Subsurface and Peripheral Focused Ion Beam Damage via Simultaneous Pulsed Laser Heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Michael G; Lewis, Brett B; Iberi, Vighter; Fowlkes, Jason D; Tan, Shida; Livengood, Rick; Rack, Philip D

    2016-04-01

    Focused helium and neon ion (He(+)/Ne(+)) beam processing has recently been used to push resolution limits of direct-write nanoscale synthesis. The ubiquitous insertion of focused He(+)/Ne(+) beams as the next-generation nanofabrication tool-of-choice is currently limited by deleterious subsurface and peripheral damage induced by the energetic ions in the underlying substrate. The in situ mitigation of subsurface damage induced by He(+)/Ne(+) ion exposures in silicon via a synchronized infrared pulsed laser-assisted process is demonstrated. The pulsed laser assist provides highly localized in situ photothermal energy which reduces the implantation and defect concentration by greater than 90%. The laser-assisted exposure process is also shown to reduce peripheral defects in He(+) patterned graphene, which makes this process an attractive candidate for direct-write patterning of 2D materials. These results offer a necessary solution for the applicability of high-resolution direct-write nanoscale material processing via focused ion beams.

  5. Is flow velocity a significant parameter in flood damage modelling?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kreibich

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Flow velocity is generally presumed to influence flood damage. However, this influence is hardly quantified and virtually no damage models take it into account. Therefore, the influences of flow velocity, water depth and combinations of these two impact parameters on various types of flood damage were investigated in five communities affected by the Elbe catchment flood in Germany in 2002. 2-D hydraulic models with high to medium spatial resolutions were used to calculate the impact parameters at the sites in which damage occurred. A significant influence of flow velocity on structural damage, particularly on roads, could be shown in contrast to a minor influence on monetary losses and business interruption. Forecasts of structural damage to road infrastructure should be based on flow velocity alone. The energy head is suggested as a suitable flood impact parameter for reliable forecasting of structural damage to residential buildings above a critical impact level of 2 m of energy head or water depth. However, general consideration of flow velocity in flood damage modelling, particularly for estimating monetary loss, cannot be recommended.

  6. Comparing the use of 4.6 um lasers versus 10.6 um lasers for mitigating damage site growth on fused silica surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, S T; Matthews, M J; Elhadj, S; Cooke, D; Guss, G M; Draggoo, V G; Wegner, P J

    2010-10-21

    The advantage of using mid-infrared (IR) 4.6 {micro}m lasers, versus far-infrared 10.6 {micro}m lasers, for mitigating damage growth on fused silica is investigated. In contrast to fused silica's high absorption at 10.6 {micro}m, silica absorption at 4.6 {micro}m is two orders of magnitude less. The much reduced absorption at 4.6 {micro}m enables deep heat penetration into fused silica when it is heated using the mid-IR laser, which in turn leads to more effective mitigation of damage sites with deep cracks. The advantage of using mid-IR versus far-IR laser for damage growth mitigation under non-evaporative condition is quantified by defining a figure of merit (FOM) that relates the crack healing depth to laser power required. Based on our FOM, we show that for damage cracks up to at least 500 {micro}m in depth, mitigation using a 4.6 {micro}m mid-IR laser is more efficient than mitigation using a 10.6 {micro}m far-IR laser.

  7. Damage Identification by Using a Self-Synchronizing Multipoint Laser Doppler Vibrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The vibration-based damage identification method extracts the damage location and severity information from the change of modal properties, such as natural frequency and mode shape. Its performance and accuracy depends on the measurement precision. Laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV provides a noncontact vibration measurement of high quality, but usually it can only do sampling on a single point. Scanning LDV is normally used to obtain the mode shape with a longer scanning time. In this paper, a damage detection technique is proposed using a self-synchronizing multipoint LDV. Multiple laser beams with various frequency shifts are projected on different points of the object, reflected and interfered with a common reference beam. The interference signal containing synchronized temporal vibration information of multiple spatial points is captured by a single photodetector and can be retrieved in a very short period. Experiments are conducted to measure the natural frequencies and mode shapes of pre- and postcrack cantilever beams. Mode shape curvature is calculated by numerical interpolation and windowed Fourier analysis. The results show that the artificial crack can be identified precisely from the change of natural frequencies and the difference of mode shape curvature squares.

  8. Optical damage threshold of Au nanowires in strong femtosecond laser fields

    CERN Document Server

    Summers, A M; Paneru, Govind; Kling, M F; Flanders, B N; Trallero-Herrero, C A

    2013-01-01

    Ultrashort, intense light pulses permit the study of nanomaterials in the optical non-linear regime, potentially leading to optoelectronics that operate in the petahertz domain. These non-linear regimes are often present just below the damage threshold thus requiring the careful tuning of laser parameters to avoid the melting and disintegration of the materials. Detailed studies of the damage threshold of nanoscale materials are therefore needed. We present results on the damage threshold of Au nanowires when illuminated by intense femtosecond pulses. These nanowires were synthesized with the directed electrochemical nanowire assembly (DENA) process in two configurations: (1) free-standing Au nanowires on W electrodes and (2) Au nanowires attached to fused silica slides. In both cases the wires have a single-crystalline structure. For laser pulses with durations of 108 fs and 32 fs at 790 nm at a repetition rate of 2 kHz, we find that the free-standing nanowires melt at intensities close to 3 TW/cm$^2$ and 7....

  9. Statistical detection of structural damage based on model reduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao YIN; Heung-fai LAM; Hong-ping ZHU

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes a statistical method for damage detection based on the finite element (FE) model reduction technique that utilizes measured modal data with a limited number of sensors.A deterministic damage detection process is formulated based on the model reduction technique.The probabilistic process is integrated into the deterministic damage detection process using a perturbation technique,resulting in a statistical structural damage detection method.This is achieved by deriving the firstand second-order partial derivatives of uncertain parameters,such as elasticity of the damaged member,with respect to the measurement noise,which allows expectation and covariance matrix of the uncertain parameters to be calculated.Besides the theoretical development,this paper reports numerical verification of the proposed method using a portal frame example and Monte Carlo simulation.

  10. Laser damage thresholds of ITER mirror materials and first results on in situ laser cleaning of stainless steel mirrors

    CERN Document Server

    Wisse, M; Eren, B; Steiner, R; Mathys, D; Meyer, E

    2012-01-01

    A laser ablation system has been constructed and used to determine the damage threshold of stainless steel, rhodium and single-, poly- and nanocrystalline molybdenum in vacuum, at a number of wavelengths between 220 and 1064 nm using 5 ns pulses. All materials show an increase of the damage threshold with decreasing wavelength below 400 nm. Tests in a nitrogen atmosphere showed a decrease of the damage threshold by a factor of two to three. Cleaning tests have been performed in vacuum on stainless steel samples after applying mixed Al/W/C/D coatings using magnetron sputtering. In situ XPS analysis during the cleaning process as well ex situ reflectivity measurements demonstrate near complete removal of the coating and a substantial recovery of the reflectivity. The first results also show that the reflectivity obtained through cleaning at 532 nm may be further increased by additional exposure to UV light, in this case 230 nm, an effect which is attributed to the removal of tungsten dust from the surface.

  11. A Plastic Damage Mechanics Model for Engineered Cementitious Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick-Nielsen, Lars; Stang, Henrik; Poulsen, Peter Noe

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses the establishment of a plasticity-based damage mechanics model for Engineered Cementitious Composites (ECC). The present model differs from existing models by combining a matrix and fiber description in order to describe the behavior of the ECC material. The model provides in...

  12. Kinetic model for the pathogenesis of radiation lung damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collis, C.H. (Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (UK). Surrey Branch)

    1982-09-01

    The development of radiation-induced lung damage can be explained by a kinetic model, based on the assumption that this damage becomes manifest only when a critical proportion (K) of essential cells have ceased to function, and that the rate of loss of these cells following irradiation is linear and dose-dependent. The kinetic model relates the surviving fraction to the time to manifestation of radiation-induced lung damage and to constants, K and the cell cycle time, T. Predictions made from the model about the nature of the response to irradiation are, for the most part, fulfilled. The model can also be used to interpret the response to combined treatment with irradiation and cytotoxic drugs, including the much earlier manifestation of lung damage sometimes seen with such treatment.

  13. Contamination process and laser-induced damage of HfO2/SiO2 coatings in vacuum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Ma; Feng Pan; Songlin Chen; Zhen Wang; Jianping Hu; Qinghua Zhang; Jianda Shao

    2009-01-01

    The performances of HfO2/SiO2 single- and multi-layer coatings in vacuum influenced by contamination are studied. The surface morphology, the transmittance spectrum, and the laser-induced damage threshold are investigated. The results show that the contamination in vacuum mainly comes from the vacuum system and the contamination process is different for the HfO2 and SiO2 films. The laser-induced damage experiments at 1064 nm in vacuum show that the damage resistance of the coatings will decrease largely due to the organic contamination.

  14. Results of applying a non-evaporative mitigation technique to laser-initiated surface damage on fused-silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, J J; Bolourchi, M; Bude, J D; Guss, G M; Matthews, M J; Nostrand, M C

    2010-10-26

    We present results from a study to determine an acceptable CO{sub 2} laser-based non-evaporative mitigation protocol for use on surface damage sites in fused-silica optics. A promising protocol is identified and evaluated on a set of surface damage sites created under ICF-type laser conditions. Mitigation protocol acceptability criteria for damage re-initiation and growth, downstream intensification, and residual stress are discussed. In previous work, we found that a power ramp at the end of the protocol effectively minimizes the residual stress (<25 MPa) left in the substrate. However, the biggest difficulty in determining an acceptable protocol was balancing between low re-initiation and problematic downstream intensification. Typical growing surface damage sites mitigated with a candidate CO{sub 2} laser-based mitigation protocol all survived 351 nm, 5 ns damage testing to fluences >12.5 J/cm{sup 2}. The downstream intensification arising from the mitigated sites is evaluated, and all but one of the sites has 100% passing downstream damage expectation values. We demonstrate, for the first time, a successful non-evaporative 10.6 {micro}m CO{sub 2} laser mitigation protocol applicable to fused-silica optics used on fusion-class lasers like the National Ignition Facility (NIF).

  15. Combined Advanced Finishing and UV-Laser Conditioning for Producing UV-Damage-Resistant Fused Silica Optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menapace, J A; Penetrante, B; Golini, D; Slomba, A; Miller, P E; Parham, T; Nichols, M; Peterson, J

    2001-11-01

    Laser induced damage initiation on fused silica optics can limit the lifetime of the components when used in high power UV laser environments. Foe example in inertial confinement fusion research applications, the optics can be exposed to temporal laser pulses of about 3-nsec with average fluences of 8 J/cm{sup 2} and peak fluences between 12 and 15 J/cm{sup 2}. During the past year, we have focused on optimizing the damage performance at a wavelength of 355-nm (3{omega}), 3-nsec pulse length, for optics in this category by examining a variety of finishing technologies with a challenge to improve the laser damage initiation density by at least two orders of magnitude. In this paper, we describe recent advances in improving the 3{omega} damage initiation performance of laboratory-scale zirconium oxide and cerium oxide conventionally finished fused silica optics via application of processes incorporating magnetorheological finishing (MRF), wet chemical etching, and UV laser conditioning. Details of the advanced finishing procedures are described and comparisons are made between the procedures based upon large area 3{omega} damage performance, polishing layer contamination, and optical subsurface damage.

  16. Laser-induced damage characteristics in fused silica surface due to mechanical and chemical defects during manufacturing processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaguo; Yuan, Zhigang; Wang, Jian; Xu, Qiao

    2017-06-01

    Mechanical and chemical defects incurred by grinding and polishing as well as post-processing have been recognized as the most influential culprits that hamper the elevation of laser power/energy in high peak power/energy laser systems. In order to find out the causes for limiting the operational power of laser systems, the effects of these defects on laser damage and removal and mitigation of the defects were investigated in detail in the article. Cracks and scratches were created, annealed, etched and damaged so as to reveal the likely effects of mechanical defects on damage and potential techniques to reduce their influence. The results show that HF-based etching can open and smooth cracks/scratches, improving laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) at scratches by up to >250%. Thermal annealing did heal, to some extent, cracks but the LIDT is little improved. Both HF-etching and leaching proves to be effective in removing metallic contamination during polishing process and handling of optics, which can "contribute" to damage/damage density in fused silica. However, HF-based etching may degrade surface roughness, from 20 nm under some conditions when >20 μm material was etched away while the surface roughness was perceptibly altered by leaching (30 J/cm2 (355 nm @3 ns, beam diameter 400 μm @1/e2), a significant progress.

  17. Bulk damage and absorption in fused silica due to high-power laser applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nürnberg, F.; Kühn, B.; Langner, A.; Altwein, M.; Schötz, G.; Takke, R.; Thomas, S.; Vydra, J.

    2015-11-01

    Laser fusion projects are heading for IR optics with high broadband transmission, high shock and temperature resistance, long laser durability, and best purity. For this application, fused silica is an excellent choice. The energy density threshold on IR laser optics is mainly influenced by the purity and homogeneity of the fused silica. The absorption behavior regarding the hydroxyl content was studied for various synthetic fused silica grades. The main absorption influenced by OH vibrational excitation leads to different IR attenuations for OH-rich and low-OH fused silica. Industrial laser systems aim for the maximum energy extraction possible. Heraeus Quarzglas developed an Yb-doped fused silica fiber to support this growing market. But the performance of laser welding and cutting systems is fundamentally limited by beam quality and stability of focus. Since absorption in the optical components of optical systems has a detrimental effect on the laser focus shift, the beam energy loss and the resulting heating has to be minimized both in the bulk materials and at the coated surfaces. In collaboration with a laser research institute, an optical finisher and end users, photo thermal absorption measurements on coated samples of different fused silica grades were performed to investigate the influence of basic material properties on the absorption level. High purity, synthetic fused silica is as well the material of choice for optical components designed for DUV applications (wavelength range 160 nm - 260 nm). For higher light intensities, e.g. provided by Excimer lasers, UV photons may generate defect centers that effect the optical properties during usage, resulting in an aging of the optical components (UV radiation damage). Powerful Excimer lasers require optical materials that can withstand photon energy close to the band gap and the high intensity of the short pulse length. The UV transmission loss is restricted to the DUV wavelength range below 300 nm and

  18. Influence of cleaning process on the laser-induced damage threshold of substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhengxiang; Ding, Tao; Ye, Xiaowen; Wang, Xiaodong; Ma, Bin; Cheng, Xinbin; Liu, Huasong; Ji, Yiqin; Wang, Zhanshan

    2011-03-20

    The cleaning process of optical substrates plays an important role during the manufacture of high-power laser coatings. Two kinds of substrates, fused silica and BK7 glass, and two cleaning processes, called process 1 and process 2 having different surfactant solutions and different ultrasonic cleaning parameters, are adopted to compare the influence of the ultrasonic cleaning technique on the substrates. The evaluation standards of the cleaning results include contaminant-removal efficiency, weak absorption, and laser-induced damage threshold of the substrates. For both fused silica and BK7, process 2 is more efficient than process 1. Because acid and alkaline solutions can increase the roughness of BK7, process 2 is unsuitable for BK7 glass cleaning. The parameters of the cleaning protocol should be changed depending on the material of the optical components and the type of contamination.

  19. Influence of coating material on laser damage threshold of TiO2 films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianke Yao; Zhengxiu Fan; Hongbo He; Jianda Shao

    2007-01-01

    @@ The optical property, structure, surface properties (roughness and defect density) and laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) of TiO2 films deposited by electronic beam (EB) evaporation of TiO2 (rutile), TiO2 (anatase) and TiO2 + Ta2O5 composite materials are comparatively studied. All films show the polycrystalline anatase TiO2 structure. The loose sintering state and phase transformation during evaporating TiO2 anatase slice lead to the high surface defect density, roughness and extinction coefficient, and low LIDT of films. The TiO2 + Ta2O5 composite films have the lowest extinction coefficient and the highest LIDT among all samples investigated. Guidance of selecting materials for high LIDT laser mirrors is given.OCIS codes: 310.3840, 140.3330.

  20. Laser treatment of female stress urinary incontinence: optical, thermal, and tissue damage simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Luke A.; Chang, Chun-Hung; Myers, Erinn M.; Kennelly, Michael J.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2016-02-01

    Treatment of female stress urinary incontinence (SUI) by laser thermal remodeling of subsurface tissues is studied. Light transport, heat transfer, and thermal damage simulations were performed for transvaginal and transurethral methods. Monte Carlo (MC) provided absorbed photon distributions in tissue layers (vaginal wall, endopelvic fascia, urethral wall). Optical properties (n,μa,μs,g) were assigned to each tissue at λ=1064 nm. A 5-mm-diameter laser beam and power of 5 W for 15 s was used, based on previous experiments. MC output was converted into absorbed energy, serving as input for ANSYS finite element heat transfer simulations of tissue temperatures over time. Convective heat transfer was simulated with contact cooling probe set at 0 °C. Thermal properties (κ,c,ρ) were assigned to each tissue layer. MATLAB code was used for Arrhenius integral thermal damage calculations. A temperature matrix was constructed from ANSYS output, and finite sum was incorporated to approximate Arrhenius integral calculations. Tissue damage properties (Ea,A) were used to compute Arrhenius sums. For the transvaginal approach, 37% of energy was absorbed in endopelvic fascia layer with 0.8% deposited beyond it. Peak temperature was 71°C, treatment zone was 0.8-mm-diameter, and almost all of 2.7-mm-thick vaginal wall was preserved. For transurethral approach, 18% energy was absorbed in endopelvic fascia with 0.3% deposited beyond it. Peak temperature was 80°C, treatment zone was 2.0-mm-diameter, and only 0.6 mm of 2.4-mm-thick urethral wall was preserved. A transvaginal approach is more feasible than transurethral approach for laser treatment of SUI.

  1. Single- and multi-shot laser-induced damages of Ta2O5/SiO2 dielectric mirrors at 1064 nm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Wang; Hongbo He; Yuan'an Zhao; Yongguang Shan; Dawei Li; Chaoyang Wei

    2011-01-01

    Ta205/SiO2 dielectric mirrors deposited by ion beam sputtering (IBS) are studied. The multi-shot laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) and its dependence on the number of shots are investigated, after which we find that the multi-shot LIDT is lower than that of single-shot. The accumulation effects of defects play an important role in the multi-shot laser damage. A simple model, which includes the conduction band electron production vsa multiphoton and impact ionizations, is presented to explain the experimental phenomena.%@@ Ta2O5/SiO2 dielectric mirrors deposited by ion beam sputtering (IBS) are studied. The multi-shot laserinduced damage threshold (LIDT) and its dependence on the number of shots are investigated, after which we find that the multi-shot LIDT is lower than that of single-shot. The accumulation effects of defects play an important role in the multi-shot laser damage. A simple model, which includes the conduction band electron production vsa multiphoton and impact ionizations, is presented to explain the experimental phenomena.

  2. Collateral damage-free debridement using 193nm ArF laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne, James J.; Felsenstein, Jerome M.; Trzcinski, Robert; Zupanski-Nielsen, Donna; Connors, Daniel P.

    2011-03-01

    Burn eschar and other necrotic areas of the skin and soft tissue are anhydrous compared to the underlying viable tissue. A 193 nm ArF excimer laser, emitting electromagnetic radiation at 6.4 eV at fluence exceeding the ablation threshold, will debride such necrotic areas. Because such radiation is strongly absorbed by aqueous chloride ions through the nonthermal process of electron photodetachment, debridement will cease when hydrated (with chloride ions) viable tissue is exposed, avoiding collateral damage to this tissue. Such tissue will be sterile and ready for further treatment, such as a wound dressing and/or a skin graft.

  3. Laser docking sensor engineering model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekome, Kent; Barr, Joseph M.

    NASA JSC has been involved in the development of Laser sensors for the past ten years in order to support future rendezvous and docking missions, both manned and unmanned. Although many candidate technologies have been breadboarded and evaluated, no sensor hardware designed specifically for rendezvous and docking applications has been demonstrated on-orbit. It has become apparent that representative sensors need to be flown and demonstrated as soon as possible, with minimal cost, to provide the capability of the technology in meeting NASA's future AR&C applications. Technology and commercial component reliability have progressed to where it is now feasible to fly hardware as a detailed test objective minimizing the overall cost and development time. This presentation will discuss the ongoing effort to convert an existing in-house developed breadboard to an engineering model configuration suitable for flight. The modifications include improving the ranger resolution and stability with an in-house design, replacing the rack mounted galvanometric scanner drivers with STD-bus cards, replacing the system controlling personal computer with a microcontroller, and repackaging the subsystems as appropriate. The sensor will use the performance parameters defined in previous JSC requirements working groups as design goals and be built to withstand the space environment where fiscally feasible. Testing of the in-house ranger design is expected to be completed in October. The results will be included in the presentation. Preliminary testing of the ranging circuitry indicates a range resolution of 4mm is possible. The sensor will be mounted in the payload bay on a shelf bracket and have command, control, and display capabilities using the payload general support computer via an RS422 data line.

  4. Dynamic brittle material response based on a continuum damage model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, E.P.

    1994-12-31

    The response of brittle materials to dynamic loads was studied in this investigation based on a continuum damage model. Damage mechanism was selected to be interaction and growth of subscale cracks. Briefly, the cracks are activated by bulk tension and the density of activated cracks are described by a Weibull statistical distribution. The moduli of a cracked solid derived by Budiansky and O`Connell are then used to represent the global material degradation due to subscale cracking. This continuum damage model was originally developed to study rock fragmentation and was modified in the present study to improve on the post-limit structural response. The model was implemented into a transient dynamic explicit finite element code PRONTO 2D and then used for a numerical study involving the sudden stretching of a plate with a centrally located hole. Numerical results characterizing the dynamic responses of the material were presented. The effect of damage on dynamic material behavior was discussed.

  5. Energetic laser cleaning of metallic particles and surface damage on silica optics: investigation of the underlying mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Nan; Demos, Stavros G.; Negres, Raluca A.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Harris, Candace D.; Matthews, Manyalibo J.

    2015-11-01

    Surface particulate contamination on optics can lead to laser-induced damage hence limit the performance of high power laser system. In this work we focus on understanding the fundamental mechanisms that lead to damage initiation by metal contaminants. Using time resolved microscopy and plasma spectroscopy, we studied the dynamic process of ejecting ~30 μm stainless steel particles from the exit surface of fused silica substrate irradiated with 1064 nm, 10 ns and 355 nm, 8 ns laser pulses. Time-resolved plasma emission spectroscopy was used to characterize the energy coupling and temperature rise associated with single, 10-ns pulsed laser ablation of metallic particles bound to transparent substrates. Plasma associated with Fe(I) emission lines originating from steel microspheres was observe to cool from laser energy.

  6. Flood damage: a model for consistent, complete and multipurpose scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menoni, Scira; Molinari, Daniela; Ballio, Francesco; Minucci, Guido; Mejri, Ouejdane; Atun, Funda; Berni, Nicola; Pandolfo, Claudia

    2016-12-01

    Effective flood risk mitigation requires the impacts of flood events to be much better and more reliably known than is currently the case. Available post-flood damage assessments usually supply only a partial vision of the consequences of the floods as they typically respond to the specific needs of a particular stakeholder. Consequently, they generally focus (i) on particular items at risk, (ii) on a certain time window after the occurrence of the flood, (iii) on a specific scale of analysis or (iv) on the analysis of damage only, without an investigation of damage mechanisms and root causes. This paper responds to the necessity of a more integrated interpretation of flood events as the base to address the variety of needs arising after a disaster. In particular, a model is supplied to develop multipurpose complete event scenarios. The model organizes available information after the event according to five logical axes. This way post-flood damage assessments can be developed that (i) are multisectoral, (ii) consider physical as well as functional and systemic damage, (iii) address the spatial scales that are relevant for the event at stake depending on the type of damage that has to be analyzed, i.e., direct, functional and systemic, (iv) consider the temporal evolution of damage and finally (v) allow damage mechanisms and root causes to be understood. All the above features are key for the multi-usability of resulting flood scenarios. The model allows, on the one hand, the rationalization of efforts currently implemented in ex post damage assessments, also with the objective of better programming financial resources that will be needed for these types of events in the future. On the other hand, integrated interpretations of flood events are fundamental to adapting and optimizing flood mitigation strategies on the basis of thorough forensic investigation of each event, as corroborated by the implementation of the model in a case study.

  7. Engineering model for ultrafast laser microprocessing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audouard, E.; Mottay, E.

    2016-03-01

    Ultrafast laser micro-machining relies on complex laser-matter interaction processes, leading to a virtually athermal laser ablation. The development of industrial ultrafast laser applications benefits from a better understanding of these processes. To this end, a number of sophisticated scientific models have been developed, providing valuable insights in the physics of the interaction. Yet, from an engineering point of view, they are often difficult to use, and require a number of adjustable parameters. We present a simple engineering model for ultrafast laser processing, applied in various real life applications: percussion drilling, line engraving, and non normal incidence trepanning. The model requires only two global parameters. Analytical results are derived for single pulse percussion drilling or simple pass engraving. Simple assumptions allow to predict the effect of non normal incident beams to obtain key parameters for trepanning drilling. The model is compared to experimental data on stainless steel with a wide range of laser characteristics (time duration, repetition rate, pulse energy) and machining conditions (sample or beam speed). Ablation depth and volume ablation rate are modeled for pulse durations from 100 fs to 1 ps. Trepanning time of 5.4 s with a conicity of 0.15° is obtained for a hole of 900 μm depth and 100 μm diameter.

  8. Modelling of creep damage development in ferritic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstroem, R. [Swedish Institute for Metals Research, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1998-12-31

    The physical creep damage, which is observed in fossil-fired power plants, is mainly due to the formation of cavities and their interaction. It has previously been demonstrated that both the nucleation and growth of creep cavities can be described by power functions in strain for low alloy and 12 % CrMoV creep resistant steels. It possible to show that the physical creep damage is proportional to the product of the number of cavities and their area. Hence, the physical creep damage can also be expressed in terms of the creep strain. In the presentation this physical creep damage is connected to the empirical creep damage classes (1-5). A creep strain-time function, which is known to be applicable to low alloy and 12 % CrMoV creep resistant steels, is used to describe tertiary creep. With this creep strain - time model the residual lifetime can be predicted from the observed damage. For a given damage class the remaining life is directly proportional to the service time. An expression for the time to the next inspection is proposed. This expression is a function of fraction of the total allowed damage, which is consumed till the next inspection. (orig.) 10 refs.

  9. Comparison of simultaneous on-line optical and acoustic laser damage detection methods in the nanosecond pulse duration domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somoskoi, T.; Vass, Cs; Mero, M.; Mingesz, R.; Bozoki, Z.; Osvay, K.

    2015-05-01

    We carried out single-shot laser-induced damage threshold measurements on dielectric high reflectors guided by the corresponding ISO standard. Four simultaneous on-line detection techniques were tested and compared using 532 nm, 9 ns and 266 nm, 6 ns laser pulses. Two methods, microscope aided visual inspection and detection of scattered light off the damaged surface, were based on optical signals. The other two techniques exploited the acoustic waves accompanying a damage event in ambient air and in the substrate by a microphone and a piezoelectric sensor, respectively. A unified criterion based on the statistical analysis of the detector signals was applied to assign an objective and unambiguous damage threshold value for all of our diverse detection methods. Microscope aided visual inspection showed the lowest damage thresholds for both wavelengths. However, the sensitivity of the other three techniques proved to be only slightly lower.

  10. Damage investigation on tungsten and diamond diffractive optics at a hard x-ray free-electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlén, Fredrik; Nilsson, Daniel; Holmberg, Anders; Hertz, Hans M; Schroer, Christian G; Seiboth, Frank; Patommel, Jens; Meier, Vivienne; Hoppe, Robert; Schropp, Andreas; Lee, Hae Ja; Nagler, Bob; Galtier, Eric; Krzywinski, Jacek; Sinn, Harald; Vogt, Ulrich

    2013-04-08

    Focusing hard x-ray free-electron laser radiation with extremely high fluence sets stringent demands on the x-ray optics. Any material placed in an intense x-ray beam is at risk of being damaged. Therefore, it is crucial to find the damage thresholds for focusing optics. In this paper we report experimental results of exposing tungsten and diamond diffractive optics to a prefocused 8.2 keV free-electron laser beam in order to find damage threshold fluence levels. Tungsten nanostructures were damaged at fluence levels above 500 mJ/cm(2). The damage was of mechanical character, caused by thermal stress variations. Diamond nanostructures were affected at a fluence of 59 000 mJ/cm(2). For fluence levels above this, a significant graphitization process was initiated. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and µ-Raman analysis were used to analyze exposed nanostructures.

  11. Laser damage initiation and growth of antireflection coated S-FAP crystal surfaces prepared by pitch lap and magnetorheological finishing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolz, C J; Menapace, J A; Schaffers, K I; Bibeau, C; Thomas, M D; Griffin, A J

    2005-10-31

    Antireflection (AR) coatings typically damage at the interface between the substrate and coating. Therefore the substrate finishing technology can have an impact on the laser resistance of the coating. For this study, AR coatings were deposited on Yb:S-FAP [Yb{sup 3+}:Sr{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}F] crystals that received a final polish by both conventional pitch lap finishing as well as magnetorheological finishing (MRF). SEM images of the damage morphology reveals laser damage originates at scratches and at substrate coating interfacial absorbing defects. Previous damage stability tests on multilayer mirror coatings and bare surfaces revealed damage growth can occur at fluences below the initiation fluence. The results from this study suggest the opposite trend for AR coatings. Investigation of unstable HR and uncoated surface damage morphologies reveals significant radial cracking that is not apparent with AR damage due to AR delamination from the coated surface with few apparent cracks at the damage boundary. Damage stability tests show that coated Yb:S-FAP crystals can operate at 1057 nm at fluences around 20 J/cm{sup 2} at 10 ns; almost twice the initiation damage threshold.

  12. Modeling tsunami damage in Aceh: a reply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis R. Iverson; Anantha M. Prasad

    2008-01-01

    In reply to the critique of Baird and Kerr, we emphasize that our model is a generalized vulnerability model, built from easily acquired data from anywhere in the world, to identify areas with probable susceptibility to large tsunamis--and discuss their other criticisms in detail. We also show that a rejection of the role of trees in helping protect vulnerable areas is...

  13. Modelling end-pumped solid state lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernhardi, E.H.; Bollig, C.; Forbes, A.; Esser, M.J.D.; Wörhoff, K.; Agazzi, L.; Ismail, N.; Leijtens, X.

    2008-01-01

    The operation dynamics of end-pumped solid-state lasers are investigated by means of a spatially resolved numerical rate-equation model and a time-dependent analytical thermal model. The rate-equation model allows the optimization of parameters such as the output coupler transmission and gain medium

  14. Statistical mechanics models for multimode lasers and random lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Antenucci, F; Berganza, M Ibáñez; Marruzzo, A; Leuzzi, L

    2015-01-01

    We review recent statistical mechanical approaches to multimode laser theory. The theory has proved very effective to describe standard lasers. We refer of the mean field theory for passive mode locking and developments based on Monte Carlo simulations and cavity method to study the role of the frequency matching condition. The status for a complete theory of multimode lasing in open and disordered cavities is discussed and the derivation of the general statistical models in this framework is presented. When light is propagating in a disordered medium, the system can be analyzed via the replica method. For high degrees of disorder and nonlinearity, a glassy behavior is expected at the lasing threshold, providing a suggestive link between glasses and photonics. We describe in details the results for the general Hamiltonian model in mean field approximation and mention an available test for replica symmetry breaking from intensity spectra measurements. Finally, we summary some perspectives still opened for such...

  15. Damage progression from impact in layered glass modeled with peridynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobaru, Florin; Ha, Youn; Hu, Wenke

    2012-12-01

    Dynamic fracture in brittle materials has been difficult to model and predict. Interfaces, such as those present in multi-layered glass systems, further complicate this problem. In this paper we use a simplified peridynamic model of a multi-layer glass system to simulate damage evolution under impact with a high-velocity projectile. The simulation results are compared with results from recently published experiments. Many of the damage morphologies reported in the experiments are captured by the peridynamic results. Some finer details seen in experiments and not replicated by the computational model due to limitations in available computational resources that limited the spatial resolution of the model, and to the simple contact conditions between the layers instead of the polyurethane bonding used in the experiments. The peridynamic model uncovers a fascinating time-evolution of damage and the dynamic interaction between the stress waves, propagating cracks, interfaces, and bending deformations, in three-dimensions.

  16. Systematic analysis of DNA damage induction and DNA repair pathway activation by continuous wave visible light laser micro-irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britta Muster

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Laser micro-irradiation can be used to induce DNA damage with high spatial and temporal resolution, representing a powerful tool to analyze DNA repair in vivo in the context of chromatin. However, most lasers induce a mixture of DNA damage leading to the activation of multiple DNA repair pathways and making it impossible to study individual repair processes. Hence, we aimed to establish and validate micro-irradiation conditions together with inhibition of several key proteins to discriminate different types of DNA damage and repair pathways using lasers commonly available in confocal microscopes. Using time-lapse analysis of cells expressing fluorescently tagged repair proteins and also validation of the DNA damage generated by micro-irradiation using several key damage markers, we show that irradiation with a 405 nm continuous wave laser lead to the activation of all repair pathways even in the absence of exogenous sensitization. In contrast, we found that irradiation with 488 nm laser lead to the selective activation of non-processive short-patch base excision and single strand break repair, which were further validated by PARP inhibition and metoxyamine treatment. We conclude that these low energy conditions discriminated against processive long-patch base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair as well as double strand break repair pathways.

  17. Comparative flood damage model assessment: towards a European approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Jongman

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a wide variety of flood damage models in use internationally, differing substantially in their approaches and economic estimates. Since these models are being used more and more as a basis for investment and planning decisions on an increasingly large scale, there is a need to reduce the uncertainties involved and develop a harmonised European approach, in particular with respect to the EU Flood Risks Directive. In this paper we present a qualitative and quantitative assessment of seven flood damage models, using two case studies of past flood events in Germany and the United Kingdom. The qualitative analysis shows that modelling approaches vary strongly, and that current methodologies for estimating infrastructural damage are not as well developed as methodologies for the estimation of damage to buildings. The quantitative results show that the model outcomes are very sensitive to uncertainty in both vulnerability (i.e. depth–damage functions and exposure (i.e. asset values, whereby the first has a larger effect than the latter. We conclude that care needs to be taken when using aggregated land use data for flood risk assessment, and that it is essential to adjust asset values to the regional economic situation and property characteristics. We call for the development of a flexible but consistent European framework that applies best practice from existing models while providing room for including necessary regional adjustments.

  18. Post-processing of fused silica and its effects on damage resistance to nanosecond pulsed UV lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hui; Li, Yaguo; Zhang, Qinghua; Wang, Wei; Yuan, Zhigang; Wang, Jian; Xu, Qiao

    2016-04-10

    HF-based (hydrofluoric acid) chemical etching has been a widely accepted technique to improve the laser damage performance of fused silica optics and ensure high-power UV laser systems at designed fluence. Etching processes such as acid concentration, composition, material removal amount, and etching state (etching with additional acoustic power or not) may have a great impact on the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) of treated sample surfaces. In order to find out the effects of these factors, we utilized the Taguchi method to determine the etching conditions that are helpful in raising the LIDT. Our results show that the most influential factors are concentration of etchants and the material etched away from the viewpoint of damage performance of fused silica optics. In addition, the additional acoustic power (∼0.6  W·cm-2) may not benefit the etching rate and damage performance of fused silica. Moreover, the post-cleaning procedure of etched samples is also important in damage performances of fused silica optics. Different post-cleaning procedures were, thus, experiments on samples treated under the same etching conditions. It is found that the "spraying + rinsing + spraying" cleaning process is favorable to the removal of etching-induced deposits. Residuals on the etched surface are harmful to surface roughness and optical transmission as well as laser damage performance.

  19. Laser-induced surface ablation and optical damage of ZnS crystals caused by single- and multiple-pulse laser-irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlinghaus, H. F.; Calaway, W. F.; Gruen, D. M.; Chase, L. L.

    Velocity distributions and yields of neutral Zn atoms emitted from laser-irradiated ZnS crystals at power densities far below the single-pulse damage threshold have been analyzed by high-resolution two-photon laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy and also by electron impact ionization mass spectrometry. Large differences in the measured kinetic temperatures have been found between the single- and multiple-pulse laser irradiation experiments. The high-kinetic temperatures, obtained in multiple-pulse experiments, may be caused by cumulative surface modification, such as thermally-induced cracking, leading to a reduction of the thermal conductivity compared to the bulk value. Optical damage was related to the interaction of a plasma formed at a critical combination of particle density and laser intensity, with the surface.

  20. A coupled elasto-plastic-damage mechanical model for marble

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    A profound understanding of the mechanical behaviors of marble is very important for the design and construction of deep diversion tunnels in Jinping II hydropower station.In this paper,a coupled elasto-plastic-damage mechanical model is presented for Jinping marble.Firstly,the experimental investigations on Jinping marble are summarized.Then,based on the framework of continuum damage and plastic theories,a general mechanical model is proposed to predict the mechanical responses of Jinping marble.The proposed model is used to simulate the triaxial compressive tests,and there is a general good agreement between experimental data and numerical predictions in a qualitative manner.The proposed model is able to capture the main features of Jinping marble observed in experiments,such as progressive yielding process,damage induced by plastic distortion,dilation,elastic degradation and stress sensitivity.

  1. Accelerated aging tests of radiation damaged lasers and photodiodes for the CMS tracker optical links

    CERN Document Server

    Gill, K; Batten, J; Cervelli, G; Grabit, R; Jensen, F; Troska, Jan K; Vasey, F

    1999-01-01

    The combined effects of radiation damage and accelerated ageing in COTS lasers and p-i-n photodiodes are presented. Large numbers of these devices are employed in future High Energy Physics experiments and it is vital that these devices are confirmed to be sufficiently robust in terms of both radiation resistance and reliability. Forty 1310 nm InGaAsP edge-emitting lasers (20 irradiated) and 30 InGaAs p- i-n photodiodes (19 irradiated) were aged for 4000 hours at 80 degrees C with periodic measurements made of laser threshold and efficiency, in addition to p-i-n leakage current and photocurrent. There were no sudden failures and there was very little wearout- related degradation in either unirradiated or irradiated sample groups. The results suggest that the tested devices have a sufficiently long lifetime to operate for at least 10 years inside the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment despite being exposed to a harsh radiation environment. (13 refs).

  2. Calculation Model and Simulation of Warship Damage Probability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TENG Zhao-xin; ZHANG Xu; YANG Shi-xing; ZHU Xiao-ping

    2008-01-01

    The combat efficiency of mine obstacle is the focus of the present research. Based on the main effects that mine obstacle has on the target warship damage probability such as: features of mines with maneuverability, the success rate of mine-laying, the hit probability, mine reliability and action probability, a calculation model of target warship mine-encounter probability is put forward under the condition that the route selection of target warships accords with even distribution and the course of target warships accords with normal distribution. And a damage probability model of mines with maneuverability to target warships is set up, a simulation way proved the model to be a high practicality.

  3. Simulation of concrete perforation based on a continuum damage model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, E.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Solid and Structural Mechanics Dept.

    1994-10-01

    Numerical simulation of dynamic fracture of concrete slabs, impacted by steel projectiles, was carried out in this study. The concrete response was described by a continuum damage model. This continuum damage model was originally developed to study rock fragmentation and was modified in the present study with an emphasis on the post-limit structural response. The model was implemented into a transient dynamic explicit finite element code LS-DYNA2D and the code was then used for the numerical simulations. The specific impact configuration of this study follows the experiment series conducted by Hanchak et al. Comparisons between calculated results and measured data were made. Good agreements were found.

  4. Electromagnetomechanical elastodynamic model for Lamb wave damage quantification in composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Luke; Chattopadhyay, Aditi

    2014-03-01

    Physics-based wave propagation computational models play a key role in structural health monitoring (SHM) and the development of improved damage quantification methodologies. Guided waves (GWs), such as Lamb waves, provide the capability to monitor large plate-like aerospace structures with limited actuators and sensors and are sensitive to small scale damage; however due to the complex nature of GWs, accurate and efficient computation tools are necessary to investigate the mechanisms responsible for dispersion, coupling, and interaction with damage. In this paper, the local interaction simulation approach (LISA) coupled with the sharp interface model (SIM) solution methodology is used to solve the fully coupled electro-magneto-mechanical elastodynamic equations for the piezoelectric and piezomagnetic actuation and sensing of GWs in fiber reinforced composite material systems. The final framework provides the full three-dimensional displacement as well as electrical and magnetic potential fields for arbitrary plate and transducer geometries and excitation waveform and frequency. The model is validated experimentally and proven computationally efficient for a laminated composite plate. Studies are performed with surface bonded piezoelectric and embedded piezomagnetic sensors to gain insight into the physics of experimental techniques used for SHM. The symmetric collocation of piezoelectric actuators is modeled to demonstrate mode suppression in laminated composites for the purpose of damage detection. The effect of delamination and damage (i.e., matrix cracking) on the GW propagation is demonstrated and quantified. The developed model provides a valuable tool for the improvement of SHM techniques due to its proven accuracy and computational efficiency.

  5. Damage on HfO2/SiO2 high-reflecting coatings under single and multiple Nd:YAG laser pulse irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weidong Gao; Tao Wang; Yuanan Zhao; Jianda Shao

    2005-01-01

    The single- and multi-shot damage behaviors of HfO2/SiO2 high-reflecting (HR) coatings under Nd:YAG laser exposure were investigated. Fundamental aspects of multi-shot laser damage, such as the instability due to pulse-to-pulse accumulation of absorption defect and structural defect effect, and the mechanism of laser induced defect generation, are considered. It was found in multi-shot damage, the main factors influencing laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) are accumulation of irreversible changes of structural defects and thermal stress that induced by thermal density fluctuations.

  6. The Transmittance, Transmittance Wavefront, and Laser Induced Damage Properties of Thin Fluoride Polymer Films May Be Used as Short Pulse Laser Debris Shields

    OpenAIRE

    Shufan Chen; Chuanqun Huang; Xiaodong Jiang; Xuan Luo; Yu Fang; Weidong Wu

    2016-01-01

    Debris mitigation which pollutes and even damages the optical elements is a major challenge for all high-peak-power lasers system. In order to solve the problem, we employed some preliminary research. In this work, first, the film optical properties of fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP), perfluoroalkoxy copolymer (PFA), and ethane-tetrafluoroethylene copolymer (ETFE) were investigated with respect to their possible application as laser debris shields. The results indicate that three of the ...

  7. Long-range pulselength scaling of 351nm laser damage thresholds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foltyn, S. R.; Jolin, L. J.

    1986-12-01

    In a series of experiments incorporating 351nm pulselength of 9, 26, 54, and 625ns, it was found that laser damage thresholds increased as (pulselength)/sup x/, and that the exponent averaged 0.36 and ranged, for different samples, from 0.23 to 0.48. Similar results were obtained when only catastrophic damage was considered. Samples included Al2O3/SiO2 in both AR and HR multilayers, HR's of Sc2O3/SiO2 and HfO2/SiO2, and Al-on-pyrex mirror; 9ns thresholds were between 0.2 to 5.6 J/sq cm. When these data were compared with a wide range of other results - for wavelengths from 0.25 to 10.6 microns and pulselengths down to 4ps - a remarkably consistent picture emerged. Damage thresholds, on average, increase approximately as the cube-root of pulselength from picoseconds to nearly a microsecond, and do so regardless of wavelength or material under test.

  8. Low-damage surface smoothing of laser crystallized polycrystalline silicon using gas cluster ion beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokioka, H.; Yamarin, H.; Fujino, T.; Inoue, M.; Seki, T.; Matsuo, J.

    2007-04-01

    Surface smoothing of laser crystallized polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) films using gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) technology has been studied. It is found that both SF6-GCIB and O2-GCIB decrease the height of hillocks and reduce the surface roughness of the irradiated films. The mean surface roughness value of poly-Si films was reduced from 10.8 nm to 2.8 nm by SF6-GCIB irradiation at 80°. Ultraviolet reflectance measurement reveals that GCIB irradiation causes damage near-surface of the poly-Si films. Formation of the damage, however, can be suppressed by using GCIB irradiation at high incident angle. Effect of GCIB irradiation in a metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) capacitor has also been investigated. The capacitance-voltage curves of MIS capacitor with SF6-GCIB irradiation are distorted. On the contrary, the distortion is reduced by O2-GCIB irradiation at 80, which suggests that electrical-activated damage of the films can be decreased by using O2-GCIB irradiation.

  9. Numerical modelling of damage evolution in ingot forging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter; Martins, Paulo A.F.; Bay, Niels Oluf;

    2015-01-01

    The ingot forging process is numerically simulated applying both the Shima-Oyane porous plasticity model as a coupled damage model and the uncoupled normalized Cockcroft & Latham criterion. Four different cases including two different lower die angles (120º and 180º) and two different sizes of fe...

  10. Flight dynamics and control modelling of damaged asymmetric aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunwa, T. T.; Abdullah, E. J.

    2016-10-01

    This research investigates the use of a Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) controller to assist commercial Boeing 747-200 aircraft regains its stability in the event of damage. Damages cause an aircraft to become asymmetric and in the case of damage to a fraction (33%) of its left wing or complete loss of its vertical stabilizer, the loss of stability may lead to a fatal crash. In this study, aircraft models for the two damage scenarios previously mentioned are constructed using stability derivatives. LQR controller is used as a direct adaptive control design technique for the observable and controllable system. Dynamic stability analysis is conducted in the time domain for all systems in this study.

  11. Mathematical Modelling of Laser/Material Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-25

    translated to the model input. Even an experimental mode print can also be digitalised for the model. In trying to describe high order modes matliematically...4. Mazumder J. Steen W.M. "Welding of Ti 6al - 4V by continuous wave CO2 laser". Metal construction Sept. 1980 pp423 - 427. 5. Kogelnik H, Li.T Proc

  12. System and method for laser-based, non-evaporative repair of damage sites in the surfaces of fused silica optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, John J.; Bolourchi, Masoud; Bude, Jeffrey D.; Guss, Gabriel M.; Jarboe, Jeffery A.; Matthews, Manyalibo J.; Nostrand, Michael C; Wegner, Paul J.

    2016-09-06

    A method for repairing a damage site on a surface of an optical material is disclosed. The method may involve focusing an Infrared (IR) laser beam having a predetermined wavelength, with a predetermined beam power, to a predetermined full width ("F/W") 1/e.sup.2 diameter spot on the damage site. The focused IR laser beam is maintained on the damage site for a predetermined exposure period corresponding to a predetermined acceptable level of downstream intensification. The focused IR laser beam heats the damage site to a predetermined peak temperature, which melts and reflows material at the damage site of the optical material to create a mitigated site.

  13. Continuum damage modeling and simulation of hierarchical dental enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Songyun; Scheider, Ingo; Bargmann, Swantje

    2016-05-01

    Dental enamel exhibits high fracture toughness and stiffness due to a complex hierarchical and graded microstructure, optimally organized from nano- to macro-scale. In this study, a 3D representative volume element (RVE) model is adopted to study the deformation and damage behavior of the fibrous microstructure. A continuum damage mechanics model coupled to hyperelasticity is developed for modeling the initiation and evolution of damage in the mineral fibers as well as protein matrix. Moreover, debonding of the interface between mineral fiber and protein is captured by employing a cohesive zone model. The dependence of the failure mechanism on the aspect ratio of the mineral fibers is investigated. In addition, the effect of the interface strength on the damage behavior is studied with respect to geometric features of enamel. Further, the effect of an initial flaw on the overall mechanical properties is analyzed to understand the superior damage tolerance of dental enamel. The simulation results are validated by comparison to experimental data from micro-cantilever beam testing at two hierarchical levels. The transition of the failure mechanism at different hierarchical levels is also well reproduced in the simulations.

  14. Formability prediction for AHSS materials using damage models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, R.; Santos, Abel D.; José, César de Sá; Miranda, Sara

    2017-05-01

    Advanced high strength steels (AHSS) are seeing an increased use, mostly due to lightweight design in automobile industry and strict regulations on safety and greenhouse gases emissions. However, the use of these materials, characterized by a high strength to weight ratio, stiffness and high work hardening at early stages of plastic deformation, have imposed many challenges in sheet metal industry, mainly their low formability and different behaviour, when compared to traditional steels, which may represent a defying task, both to obtain a successful component and also when using numerical simulation to predict material behaviour and its fracture limits. Although numerical prediction of critical strains in sheet metal forming processes is still very often based on the classic forming limit diagrams, alternative approaches can use damage models, which are based on stress states to predict failure during the forming process and they can be classified as empirical, physics based and phenomenological models. In the present paper a comparative analysis of different ductile damage models is carried out, in order numerically evaluate two isotropic coupled damage models proposed by Johnson-Cook and Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN), each of them corresponding to the first two previous group classification. Finite element analysis is used considering these damage mechanics approaches and the obtained results are compared with experimental Nakajima tests, thus being possible to evaluate and validate the ability to predict damage and formability limits for previous defined approaches.

  15. Laser damage resistant anti-reflection microstructures for mid-infrared metal-ion doped ZnSe gain media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Douglas S.; MacLeod, Bruce D.; Sabatino, Ernest; Mirov, Sergey B.; Martyshkin, Dmitri V.

    2012-11-01

    Power scaling of mid-infrared laser systems based on chromium and iron doped zinc selenide (ZnSe) and zinc sulfide (ZnS) crystals is being advanced through the integration of surface relief anti-reflection microstructures (ARMs) etched directly in the facets of the laser gain media. In this study, a new ARMs texture fabrication process is demonstrated for polycrystalline ZnSe and ZnS material that results in a significant increase in pulsed laser damage resistance combined with an average reflection loss of less than 0.5% over the wavelength range of 1.9-3.0μm. The process was utilized to fabricate ARMs in chromium-doped zinc selenide (Cr2+:ZnSe) materials supplied by IPG Photonics and standardized pulsed laser induced damage threshold (LiDT) measurements at a wavelength of 2.09μm were made using the commercial testing services of Spica Technologies. It was found that the pulsed LiDT of ARMs etched in ZnSe and Cr2+:ZnSe can match or even exceed the level of a well-polished surface, a survivability that is many times higher than an equivalent performance broad-band thin-film AR coating. The results also indicate that the ARMs plasma etch process may find use as a post-polish damage mitigation technique similar to the chemical immersion used to double the damage resistance of fused silica optics. ARMs etched in Cr2+:ZnSe were also evaluated by IPG Photonics for survivability under continuous wave (CW) laser operation at a pump laser wavelength of 1.94μm. Catastrophic damage occurred between power levels of 400-500 kilowatt per square centimeter for both as polished and ARMs textured samples indicating no reduction in CW damage resistance attributable to surface effects.

  16. Evaluating Damage Potential in Security Risk Scoring Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli Weintraub

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A Continuous Monitoring System (CMS model is presented, having new improved capabilities. The system is based on the actual real-time configuration of the system. Existing risk scoring models assume damage potential is estimated by systems' owner, thus rejecting the information relying in the technological configuration. The assumption underlying this research is based on users' ability to estimate business impacts relating to systems' external interfaces which they use regularly in their business activities, but are unable to assess business impacts relating to internal technological components. According to the proposed model systems' damage potential is calculated using technical information on systems' components using a directed graph. The graph is incorporated into the Common Vulnerability Scoring Systems' (CVSS algorithm to produce risk scoring measures. Framework presentation includes system design, damage potential scoring algorithm design and an illustration of scoring computations.

  17. Temperature field modeling in laser-heated metals for laser cleaning of surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oane, Mihai; Apostol, Ileana; Timcu, Adrian

    2003-10-01

    Laser induced surface cleaning is the adequate method in a large variety of industrial domains as microelectronics, optics, photonics. By comparison to chemical and/or mechanical cleaning, laser cleaning has the advantage of a very good selectivity on the surface and in depth of the material, no surface contamination, without stress in the material volume and environmental safe. It seems that laser cleaning can be developed in a method to be currently used in microelectronic industry. For an efficient laser cleaning of metallic thin films without damage of the silicon wafer, a careful optimization of the incident laser energy, fluence, intensity and number of laser pulses is needed. We have developed an analytical procedure to study the temperature fields in pulsed laser heated solids, for a deeper knowledge of the laser-thin film substrate interaction.

  18. Dynamic rupture in a damage-breakage rheology model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyakhovsky, Vladimir; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Ilchev, Assen; Mendecki, Aleksander

    2016-08-01

    We present a thermodynamically based formulation for modelling dynamic rupture processes in the brittle crust using a continuum damage-breakage rheology. The model combines aspects of a continuum viscoelastic damage framework for brittle solids with a continuum breakage mechanics for granular flow within dynamically generated slip zones. The formulation accounts for the density of distributed cracking and other internal flaws in damaged rocks with a scalar damage parameter, and addresses the grain size distribution of a granular phase in the slip zone with a breakage parameter. A dynamic brittle instability is associated with a critical level of damage in the solid, leading to loss of convexity of the solid strain energy, localization and transition to a granular phase associated with lower energy level. The continuum damage-breakage rheology model treats the localization to a slip zone at the onset of dynamic rupture and post-failure recovery process as phase transitions between solid and granular states. The model generates sub- and supershear rupture velocities and pulse-type ruptures seen also in frictional models, and additional important features such as strong dynamic changes of volumetric strain near the rupture front and diversity of nucleation mechanisms. The propagation of rupture front and slip accumulation at a point are correlated with sharp dynamic dilation followed by a gradual decay to a level associated with the final volumetric change associated with the granular phase transition in the slipping zone. The local brittle failure process associated with the solid-granular transition is expected to produce isotropic radiation in addition to the deviatoric terms. The framework significantly extends the ability to model brittle processes in complex geometrical structures and allows analysing the roles of gouge thickness and other parameters on nucleation, rupture and radiation characteristics.

  19. Improving the laser damage resistance of oxide thin films and multilayers via tailoring ion beam sputtering parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cosar, M.B. [Aselsan Inc. Microelectronics, Guidance and Electro-Optics Division, Cankırı Yolu 7. Km, 06750 Akyurt, Ankara (Turkey); Middle East Technical University, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, Universiteler Mah. Dumlupınar Blv. No: 1, 06800 Cankaya, Ankara (Turkey); Ozhan, A.E.S. [Aselsan Inc. Microelectronics, Guidance and Electro-Optics Division, Cankırı Yolu 7. Km, 06750 Akyurt, Ankara (Turkey); Atılım University, Graduate School of Natural & Applied Sciences, Kızılcasar Mah., 06836 Incek, 06836 Golbası, Ankara (Turkey); Aydogdu, G.H., E-mail: gkuru@aselsan.com.tr [Aselsan Inc. Microelectronics, Guidance and Electro-Optics Division, Cankırı Yolu 7. Km, 06750 Akyurt, Ankara (Turkey)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • Increasing the oxygen amount during deposition supports to laser performance. • Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} films prepared without 12-cm ion source results in lower damage resistance. • We report 15.9 J/cm{sup 2} LIDT value of multilayer application. • This paper presents a novel approach to prepare oxide films without post treatment by tailoring only ion beam deposition parameters that directly influence their laser damage resistance performance. - Abstract: Ion beam sputtering is one of the widely used methods for manufacturing laser optical components due to its advantages such as uniformity, reproducibility, suitability for multilayer coatings and growth of dielectric materials with high packing densities. In this study, single Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} layers and Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiO{sub 2} heterostructures were deposited on optical quality glass substrates by dual ion beam sputtering. We focused on the effect of deposition conditions like substrate cleaning, assistance by 12 cm diameter ion beam source and oxygen partial pressure on the laser-induced damage threshold of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} single layers. Afterwards, the obtained information is employed to a sample design and produces a Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiO{sub 2} multilayer structure demonstrating low laser-induced damage without a post treatment procedure.

  20. Thickness effect on laser-induced-damage threshold of indium-tin oxide films at 1064 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Haifeng; Huang Zhimeng; Zhang Dayong; Luo Fei; Huang Lixian; Li Yanglong; Luo Yongquan; Wang Weiping; Zhao Xiangjie [Institute of Fluid Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2011-12-01

    Laser-induced-damage characteristics of commercial indium-tin oxide (ITO) films deposited by DC magnetron sputtering deposition on K9 glass substrates as a function of the film thickness have been studied at 1064 nm with a 10 ns laser pulse in the 1-on-1 mode, and the various mechanisms for thickness effect on laser-induced-damage threshold (LIDT) of the film have been discussed in detail. It is observed that laser-damage-resistance of ITO film shows dramatic thickness effect with the LIDT of the 50-nm ITO film 7.6 times as large as the value of 300 nm film, and the effect of depressed carrier density by decreasing the film thickness is demonstrated to be the primary reason. Our experiment findings indicate that searching transparent conductive oxide (TCO) film with low carrier density and high carrier mobility is an efficient technique to improve the laser-damage-resistance of TCO films based on maintaining their well electric conductivity.

  1. Study on absorbance and laser damage threshold of HfO2 films prepared by ion-assisted reaction deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张大伟; 范树海; 高卫东; 贺洪波; 王英剑; 邵建达; 范正修; 孙浩杰

    2004-01-01

    Using a new kind of EH1000 ion source, hafnium dioxide (HfO2) films are deposited with different depo sition techniques and different conditions. The absorbance and the laser damage threshold of these films have been measured and studied. By comparing these characteristics, one can conclude that under right conditions, such as high partial pressure of oxygen and right kind of ion source, the ion-assisted reaction deposition can prepare HfO2 films with higher laser induced damage threshold.

  2. Modeling elastic tensile fractures in snow using nonlocal damage mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borstad, C. P.; McClung, D. M.

    2011-12-01

    The initiation and propagation of tensile fractures in snow and ice are fundamental to numerous important physical processes in the cryosphere, from iceberg calving to ice shelf rift propagation to slab avalanche release. The heterogeneous nature of snow and ice, their proximity to the melting temperature, and the varied governing timescales typically lead to nonlinear fracture behavior which does not follow the predictions of Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM). Furthermore, traditional fracture mechanics is formally inapplicable for predicting crack initiation in the absence of a pre-existing flaw or stress concentration. An alternative to fracture mechanics is continuum damage mechanics, which accounts for the material degradation associated with cracking in a numerically efficient framework. However, damage models which are formulated locally (e.g. stress and strain are defined as point properties) suffer from mesh-sensitive crack trajectories, spurious localization of damage and improper fracture energy dissipation with mesh refinement. Nonlocal formulations of damage, which smear the effects of the material heterogeneity over an intrinsic length scale related to the material microstructure, overcome these difficulties and lead to numerically efficient and mesh-objective simulations of the tensile failure of heterogeneous materials. We present the results of numerical simulations of tensile fracture initiation and propagation in cohesive snow using a nonlocal damage model. Seventeen beam bending experiments, both notched and unnotched, were conducted using blocks of cohesive dry snow extracted from an alpine snowpack. Material properties and fracture parameters were calculated from the experimental data using beam theory and quasi-brittle fracture mechanics. Using these parameters, a nonlocal isotropic damage model was applied to two-dimensional finite element meshes of the same scale as the experiments. The model was capable of simulating the propagation

  3. Analysis of shape memory alloy sensory particles for damage detection via substructure and continuum damage modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielefeldt, Brent R.; Benzerga, A. Amine; Hartl, Darren J.

    2016-04-01

    The ability to monitor and predict the structural health of an aircraft is of growing importance to the aerospace industry. Currently, structural inspections and maintenance are based upon experiences with similar aircraft operating in similar conditions. While effective, these methods are time-intensive and unnecessary if the aircraft is not in danger of structural failure. It is imagined that future aircraft will utilize non-destructive evaluation methods, allowing for the near real-time monitoring of structural health. A particularly interesting method involves utilizing the unique transformation response of shape memory alloy (SMA) particles embedded in an aircraft structure. By detecting changes in the mechanical and/or electromagnetic responses of embedded particles, operators could detect the formation or propagation of fatigue cracks in the vicinity of these particles. This work focuses on a finite element model of SMA particles embedded in an aircraft wing using a substructure modeling approach in which degrees of freedom are retained only at specified points of connection to other parts or the application of boundary conditions, greatly reducing computational cost. Previous work evaluated isolated particle response to a static crack to numerically demonstrate and validate this damage detection method. This paper presents the implementation of a damage model to account for crack propagation and examine for the first time the effect of particle configuration and/or relative placement with respect to the ability to detect damage.

  4. Damage Mechanics in the Community Ice Sheet Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitcomb, R.; Cathles, L. M. M., IV; Bassis, J. N.; Lipscomb, W. H.; Price, S. F.

    2016-12-01

    Half of the mass that floating ice shelves lose to the ocean comes from iceberg calving, which is a difficult process to simulate accurately. This is especially true in the large-scale ice dynamics models that couple changes in the cryosphere to climate projections. Damage mechanics provide a powerful technique with the potential to overcome this obstacle by describing how fractures in ice evolve over time. Here, we demonstrate the application of a damage model to ice shelves that predicts realistic geometries. We incorporated this solver into the Community Ice Sheet Model, a three dimensional ice sheet model developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The damage mechanics formulation that we use comes from a first principles-based evolution law for the depth of basal and surface crevasses and depends on the large scale strain rate, stress state, and basal melt. We show that under idealized conditions it produces ice tongue lengths that match well with observations for a selection of natural ice tongues, including Erebus, Drygalski, and Pine Island in Antarctica, as well as Petermann in Greenland. We also apply the model to more generalized ideal ice shelf geometries and show that it produces realistic calving front positions. Although our results are preliminary, the damage mechanics model that we developed provides a promising first principles method for predicting ice shelf extent and how the calving margins of ice shelves respond to climate change.

  5. Kinetic modelling of krypton fluoride laser systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jancaitis, K.S.

    1983-11-01

    A kinetic model has been developed for the KrF* rare gas halide laser system, specifically for electron-beam pumped mixtures of krypton, fluorine, and either helium or argon. The excitation produced in the laser gas by the e-beam was calculated numerically using an algorithm checked by comparing the predicted ionization yields in the pure rare gases with their experimental values. The excitation of the laser media by multi-kilovolt x-rays was also modeled and shown to be similar to that produced by high energy electrons. A system of equations describing the transfer of the initial gas excitation into the laser upper level was assembled using reaction rate constants from both experiment and theory. A one-dimensional treatment of the interaction of the laser radiation with the gas was formulated which considered spontaneous and stimulated emission and absorption. The predictions of this model were in good agreement with the fluorescence signals and gain and absorption measured experimentally.

  6. Percolation modeling of self-damaging of composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domanskyi, Sergii; Privman, Vladimir

    2014-07-01

    We propose the concept of autonomous self-damaging in “smart” composite materials, controlled by activation of added nanosize “damaging” capsules. Percolation-type modeling approach earlier applied to the related concept of self-healing materials, is used to investigate the behavior of the initial material's fatigue. We aim at achieving a relatively sharp drop in the material's integrity after some initial limited fatigue develops in the course of the sample's usage. Our theoretical study considers a two-dimensional lattice model and involves Monte Carlo simulations of the connectivity and conductance in the high-connectivity regime of percolation. We give several examples of local capsule-lattice and capsule-capsule activation rules and show that the desired self-damaging property can only be obtained with rather sophisticated “smart” material's response involving not just damaging but also healing capsules.

  7. A historical perspective on fifteen years of laser damage thresholds at LLNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rainer, F.; De Marco, F.P.; Staggs, M.C.; Kozlowski, M.R.; Atherton, L.J.; Sheehan, L.M.

    1993-12-21

    We have completed a fifteen year, referenced and documented compilation of more than 15,000 measurements of laser-induced damage thresholds (LIDT) conducted at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). These measurements cover the spectrum from 248 to 1064 nm with pulse durations ranging from < 1 ns to 65 ns and at pulse-repetition frequencies (PRF) from single shots to 6.3 kHz. We emphasize the changes in LIDTs during the past two years since we last summarized our database. We relate these results to earlier data concentrating on improvements in processing methods, materials, and conditioning techniques. In particular, we highlight the current status of anti-reflective (AR) coatings, high reflectors (HR), polarizers, and frequency-conversion crystals used primarily at 355 nm and 1064 nm.

  8. Enhanced laser induced damage threshold of dielectric antireflection coatings by the introduction of one interfacial layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Congjuan Wang; Zhaoxia Han; Yunxia Jin; Jianda Shao; Zhengxiu Fan

    2008-01-01

    @@ A new method for increasing laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) of dielectric antireflection (AR) coating is proposed. Compared with AR film stack of H2.5L (H:HfO2, L:SiO2) on BK7 substrate, SiO2 interfacial layer with four quarter wavelength optical thickness (QWOT) is deposited on the substrate before the preparation of H2.5L film. It is found that the introduction of SiO2 interfacial layer with a certain thickness is effective and flexible to increase the LIDT of dielectric AR coatings. The measured LIDT is enhanced by about 50%, while remaining the low reflectivity with less than 0.09% at the center wavelength of 1064 nm. Detailed mechanisms of the LIDT enhancement are discussed.

  9. Laser interaction with biological material mathematical modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Kulikov, Kirill

    2014-01-01

    This book covers the principles of laser interaction with biological cells and tissues of varying degrees of organization. The problems of biomedical diagnostics are considered. Scattering of laser irradiation of blood cells is modeled for biological structures (dermis, epidermis, vascular plexus). An analytic theory is provided which is based on solving the wave equation for the electromagnetic field. It allows the accurate analysis of interference effects arising from the partial superposition of scattered waves. Treated topics of mathematical modeling are: optical characterization of biological tissue with large-scale and small-scale inhomogeneities in the layers, heating blood vessel under laser irradiation incident on the outer surface of the skin and thermo-chemical denaturation of biological structures at the example of human skin.

  10. Histological aspects of retinal damage following exposure to pulsed Nd:YAG laser radiation in rabbits: indication for mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadar, T.; Peri, D.; Turetz, J.; Fishbine, E.; Sahar, R.; Egoz, I.; Sapiens, N.; Brandeis, R.

    2007-02-01

    The severity and characteristics of retinal injury following laser radiation derived from laser and tissue related factors. We have previously shown that retinal damage following Nd:YAG Q-switched laser radiation in rabbits was related to physical parameters, i.e. energy levels and number of pulses. Yet, an extremely large variability in the severity of the damage was found under similar exposure paradigms, even within the same retina. This emphasizes the role of the biological variables in the pathological mechanism of laser-induced retinal damage. The aim of the present study was to further study histological parameters of the injury in relation to retinal site and to elucidate their role in the initiation and characteristics of the damage, following various energy levels (10-50 μJ) and number of pulses (1-4). Pigmented rabbits were exposed to Nd:YAG laser radiation (532nm, pulse duration: 20ns). Exposures were conducted in retina tissue, adjacent to the optic nerve, with a total of 20 exposures per retina. Animals were sacrificed 15 min or 24 hours post exposure, eyes enucleated and processed for paraffin embedding. 4μm thick serial sections, stained with hematoxylin and eosin, were examined under light microscopy. Two major types of retinal damage were observed: focal edema confined to the pigmented epithelium and the photoreceptor cells, and hemorrhages, associated with destruction of retinal tissue. While focal edema associated with slight elevation of the photoreceptor layer seems to depend on the pigmented epithelium, hemorrhages were related also to the choroid vasculature at the site of radiation. It is suggested that a thermo-mechanical mechanism is involved in laser induced retinal hemorrhages at energies above 10-30μJ (2-1 pulses, respectively).

  11. Low-fluence CO2 laser irradiation: selective epidermal damage to human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, B R; Tang, S V; Arndt, K A; Stern, R S; Noe, J M; Rosen, S

    1985-09-01

    The interaction of normal human skin with low-fluence CO2 laser irradiation was studied using a three-phase approach. In phase one, freshly excised skin was observed immediately after impact. In phase two, skin irradiated 2 h prior to excision was studied. In phase three, human volunteers were irradiated and biopsied at time zero, 24 h and 48 h. Seventy-five sites were exposed and 60 biopsies were performed. The earliest histologic changes were observed in the 6-10 J/cm2 fluence (radiant exposure) range and these changes included spindle and vacuolar changes in the basal layer of the epidermis. Papillary dermal coagulation was present to a maximum of 0.03 mm. At fluences of 10-25 J/cm2, superficial dermal necrosis (0.06-0.08 mm) was observed. At fluences above 25 J/cm2, transepidermal necrosis was present with increasing papillary dermal necrosis that was in proportion to the energy density delivered. At 2h, basal vacuolar changes were accompanied by diffuse keratinocytic cell death where contact was maintained between the epidermis and dermis, while where separation occurred limited keratinocytic death was observed. The earliest changes occurred at lower threshold fluences (4-6 J/cm2). After 24 h, these doses resulted in extensive epidermal necrosis with focal acute inflammatory infiltrates. At 48 h, the degree of epidermal "slough" was proportional to the energy density delivered and was maximal with a fluence of 5.7 J/cm2 delivered whereas with a fluence of 3.8 J/cm2 thin slough (0.02 mm) was observed. These findings suggest that low-dose CO2 laser irradiation may provide a new approach to selectively damage the epidermis with minimal dermal damage.

  12. Synthesis and stabilization of oxide-based colloidal suspensions in organic media: application in the preparation of hybrids organic-inorganic materials for very high laser damage threshold coatings; Synthese et stabilisation de suspensions colloidales d'oxydes en milieu organique: application a la preparation de materiaux hybrides organiques-inorganiques pour des revetements a tres haute tenue au flux laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchet, N.

    2008-02-15

    Multilayer coatings are widely used in optic and particular in the field of high power laser on the components of laser chains. The development of a highly reflective coating with a laser damage resistance requires the fine-tuning of a multilayer stack constituted by a succession alternated by materials with low and high refractive index. In order to limit the number of layers in the stack, refractive indexes must be optimized. To do it, an original approach consists in synthesizing new organic-inorganic hybrid materials satisfying the criteria of laser damage resistance and optimized refractive index. These hybrid materials are constituted by nano-particles of metal oxides synthesized by sol-gel process and dispersed in an organic polymer with high laser damage threshold. Nevertheless, this composite system requires returning both compatible phases between them by chemical grafting of alc-oxy-silanes or carboxylic acids. We showed that it was so possible to disperse in a homogeneous way these functionalized nano-particles in non-polar, aprotic solvent containing solubilized organic polymers, to obtain time-stable nano-composite solutions. From these organic-inorganic hybrid solutions, thin films with optical quality and high laser damage threshold were obtained. These promising results have permitted to realize highly reflective stacks, constituted by 7 pairs with optical properties in agreement with the theoretical models and high laser damage threshold. (author)

  13. MODEL OF LASER INTERACTION WITH LIQUID DROPLET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. N. Volkov,

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research. A mathematical model of optical breakdown in the dielectric liquid droplets when exposed to pulsed laser radiation was developed. The process is considered in several stages: heating, evaporation of the particle, forming a steam halo, ionization of the steam halo. Numerical study was carried out on the basis of the mathematical model to determine the threshold characteristics of the laser pulse. Main Results.Distributions of pressure, density and temperature of the particle steam halo were obtained by means of a calculation. The temperature field around the liquid droplet was determined. It has been found that at high energies in the gas bubble, the conditions are provided for thermal gas ionization and start of the electron avalanche, leading to plasma formation. Due to the volumetric heat generation, the droplet is overheated and is in a metastable state. The plasma cloud is almost opaque to radiation that causes an abrupt increase of temperature. As a result, an explosion occurs inside the droplet with the formation of a shock wave that is propagating outward. Practical Relevance.The results can be used to assess the performance of high-power laser scanning (LIDAR under the presence of liquid droplets in the atmosphere and other suspensions. Lasers can be used in fire and explosion aerospace systems. Obtained findings can be applied also in the systems of laser ignition and detonation initiation.

  14. Homogenization of intergranular fracture towards a transient gradient damage model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, G.; Poh, L. H.

    2016-10-01

    This paper focuses on the intergranular fracture of polycrystalline materials, where a detailed model at the meso-scale is translated onto the macro-level through a proposed homogenization theory. The bottom-up strategy involves the introduction of an additional macro-kinematic field to characterize the average displacement jump within the unit cell. Together with the standard macro-strain field, the underlying processes are propagated onto the macro-scale by imposing the equivalence of power and energy at the two scales. The set of macro-governing equations and constitutive relations are next extracted naturally as per standard thermodynamics procedure. The resulting homogenized microforce balance recovers the so-called 'implicit' gradient expression with a transient nonlocal interaction. The homogenized gradient damage model is shown to fully regularize the softening behavior, i.e. the structural response is made mesh-independent, with the damage strain correctly localizing into a macroscopic crack, hence resolving the spurious damage growth observed in many conventional gradient damage models. Furthermore, the predictive capability of the homogenized model is demonstrated by benchmarking its solutions against reference meso-solutions, where a good match is obtained with minimal calibrations, for two different grain sizes.

  15. Verification of flood damage modelling using insurance data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Qianqian; Petersen, Toke E. P.; Thorsen, Bo J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an analysis using insurance data for damage description and risk model verification, based on data from a Danish case. The results show that simple, local statistics of rainfall are not able to describe the variation in individual cost per claim, but are, howeve...

  16. Verification of flood damage modelling using insurance data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Qianqian; Panduro, T. E.; Thorsen, B. J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an analysis using insurance data for damage description and risk model verification, based on data from a Danish case. The results show that simple, local statistics of rainfall are not able to describe the variation in individual cost per claim, but are, howeve...

  17. Uncertainty in urban flood damage assessment due to urban drainage modelling and depth-damage curve estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freni, G; La Loggia, G; Notaro, V

    2010-01-01

    Due to the increased occurrence of flooding events in urban areas, many procedures for flood damage quantification have been defined in recent decades. The lack of large databases in most cases is overcome by combining the output of urban drainage models and damage curves linking flooding to expected damage. The application of advanced hydraulic models as diagnostic, design and decision-making support tools has become a standard practice in hydraulic research and application. Flooding damage functions are usually evaluated by a priori estimation of potential damage (based on the value of exposed goods) or by interpolating real damage data (recorded during historical flooding events). Hydraulic models have undergone continuous advancements, pushed forward by increasing computer capacity. The details of the flooding propagation process on the surface and the details of the interconnections between underground and surface drainage systems have been studied extensively in recent years, resulting in progressively more reliable models. The same level of was advancement has not been reached with regard to damage curves, for which improvements are highly connected to data availability; this remains the main bottleneck in the expected flooding damage estimation. Such functions are usually affected by significant uncertainty intrinsically related to the collected data and to the simplified structure of the adopted functional relationships. The present paper aimed to evaluate this uncertainty by comparing the intrinsic uncertainty connected to the construction of the damage-depth function to the hydraulic model uncertainty. In this way, the paper sought to evaluate the role of hydraulic model detail level in the wider context of flood damage estimation. This paper demonstrated that the use of detailed hydraulic models might not be justified because of the higher computational cost and the significant uncertainty in damage estimation curves. This uncertainty occurs mainly

  18. Bayesian probabilistic modeling for damage assessment in a bolted frame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Colin; Todd, Michael

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents the development of a Bayesian framework for optimizing the design of a structural health monitoring (SHM) system. Statistical damage detection techniques are applied to a geometrically-complex, three-story structure with bolted joints. A sparse network of PZT sensor-actuators is bonded to the structure, using ultrasonic guided waves in both pulse-echo and pitch-catch modes to inspect the structure. Receiver operating characteristics are used to quantify the performance of multiple features (or detectors). The detection rate of the system is compared across different types and levels of damage. A Bayesian cost model is implemented to determine the best performing network.

  19. A damage-mechanics model for fracture nucleation and propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Yakovlev, G; Turcotte, D L; Rundle, J B; Klein, W; 10.1016/j.tafmec.2010.06.002.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper a composite model for earthquake rupture initiation and propagation is proposed. The model includes aspects of damage mechanics, fiber-bundle models, and slider-block models. An array of elements is introduced in analogy to the fibers of a fiber bundle. Time to failure for each element is specified from a Poisson distribution. The hazard rate is assumed to have a power-law dependence on stress. When an element fails it is removed, the stress on a failed element is redistributed uniformly to a specified number of neighboring elements in a given range of interaction. Damage is defined to be the fraction of elements that have failed. Time to failure and modes of rupture propagation are determined as a function of the hazard-rate exponent and the range of interaction.

  20. Comparison of GTN Damage Models for Sheet Metal Forming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhi-ying; DONG Xiang-huai

    2008-01-01

    The Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) damage model was developed basing on anisotropic yield criterion to predict the damage evolution for anisotropic voided ductile materials.Hill's quadratic anisotropic yield criterion (1948) and Barlat's 3-component anisotropic yield criterion (1989) were used to describe the anisotropy of the matrix.User defined subroutines were developed using the above models.Taking the benchmark of NUMISHEET'93 square cup deep drawing as an example,the effect of matrix plastic anisotropy on a ductile material was studied.The predicted result by Barlat'89-GTN model has a better agreement with the experimental data than that by Hill'48-GTN and the original GTN model.

  1. A Visualization Method for Corrosion Damage on Aluminum Plates Using an Nd:YAG Pulsed Laser Scanning System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inbok Lee

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a non-contact nondestructive evaluation (NDE technique that uses laser-induced ultrasonic waves to visualize corrosion damage in aluminum alloy plate structures. The non-contact, pulsed-laser ultrasonic measurement system generates ultrasonic waves using a galvanometer-based Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and measures the ultrasonic waves using a piezoelectric (PZT sensor. During scanning, a wavefield can be acquired by changing the excitation location of the laser point and measuring waves using the PZT sensor. The corrosion damage can be detected in the wavefield snapshots using the scattering characteristics of the waves that encounter corrosion. The structural damage is visualized by calculating the logarithmic values of the root mean square (RMS, with a weighting parameter to compensate for the attenuation caused by geometrical spreading and dispersion of the waves. An intact specimen is used to conduct a comparison with corrosion at different depths and sizes in other specimens. Both sides of the plate are scanned with the same scanning area to observe the effect of the location where corrosion has formed. The results show that the damage can be successfully visualized for almost all cases using the RMS-based functions, whether it formed on the front or back side. Also, the system is confirmed to have distinguished corroded areas at different depths.

  2. A Visualization Method for Corrosion Damage on Aluminum Plates Using an Nd:YAG Pulsed Laser Scanning System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Inbok; Zhang, Aoqi; Lee, Changgil; Park, Seunghee

    2016-12-16

    This paper proposes a non-contact nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technique that uses laser-induced ultrasonic waves to visualize corrosion damage in aluminum alloy plate structures. The non-contact, pulsed-laser ultrasonic measurement system generates ultrasonic waves using a galvanometer-based Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and measures the ultrasonic waves using a piezoelectric (PZT) sensor. During scanning, a wavefield can be acquired by changing the excitation location of the laser point and measuring waves using the PZT sensor. The corrosion damage can be detected in the wavefield snapshots using the scattering characteristics of the waves that encounter corrosion. The structural damage is visualized by calculating the logarithmic values of the root mean square (RMS), with a weighting parameter to compensate for the attenuation caused by geometrical spreading and dispersion of the waves. An intact specimen is used to conduct a comparison with corrosion at different depths and sizes in other specimens. Both sides of the plate are scanned with the same scanning area to observe the effect of the location where corrosion has formed. The results show that the damage can be successfully visualized for almost all cases using the RMS-based functions, whether it formed on the front or back side. Also, the system is confirmed to have distinguished corroded areas at different depths.

  3. Simulating of marble subjected to uni-axial loading using index-parabola damage model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    温世游; 李夕兵; 骆达成

    2001-01-01

    The limitations of several existing classical rock damage models were critically appraised. Thereafter, a description of a new model to estimate the response of rock was provided. The results of an investigation lead to the development and confirmation of a new index-parabola damage model. The new model is divided into two parts, fictitious damage and real damage and bordered by the critical damage point. In fictitious damage, the damage variable follows the index distribution, while in the real damage a parabolic distribution is used. Thus, the so-called index-parabola damage model is derived. The proposed damage model is applied to simulate the damage procedure of marble under uni-axial loading. The results of the tests show that the proposed model is in excellent agreement with experimental data, in particular the nonlinear characteristic of rock deformation is adequately represented.

  4. Experimental study and simulation of fused silica damage initiation by laser pulse irradiation; Etude experimentale et modelisation de l'initiation de l'endommagement de la silice sous irradiation laser impulsionnelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonneau, F.; Combis, J.L.; Vierne, J. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, Dept. de Physique Theorique et Appliquee, 91 (France)] [and others

    2002-07-01

    In order to resolve problems concerning the understanding and the control of laser-induced damage of silica optical elements, a collaboration between the CEA (CESTA/DLP, DIF/DPTA, and Grenoble/LETI) and different university laboratories has been undertaken. Ultra-pure silica 'model' samples, seeded with gold nano-particles whose diameter does not exceed 5 nm, were made at the LASIM in Lyon. The aim in using these samples is to observe the mechanism of damage initiation that can be attributed to inclusions of nano-metric site. This report presents the different steps encountered during this study: making the samples, the laser-induced damage tests performed at the CESTA, and the 'Nomarski' and 'atomic force' microscope observations of this damage carried out at the Fresnel Institute in Marseille. These samples were also used for a series of experiments using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer at ANL near Chicago. This installation is of great interest because it enables us to combine the laser irradiation of the sample with the chemical identification of material ejected by the sample. A precise evaluation of the quantity of gold atoms emitted during irradiation can thus be obtained from the experimental results. The experimental data is then interpreted, and in particular, compared to, numerical simulations obtained with the DELPOR program. A very encouraging result is the existence of a pre-damage phase at very low fluences that is not detectable by classical optical devices. The experimental means developed for such 'model' samples should be transposable to the analysis of industrial glasses. (authors)

  5. Laser alignment measurement model with double beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Changtao; Zhang, Lili; Hou, Xianglin; Wang, Ming; Lv, Jia; Du, Xin; He, Ping

    2012-10-01

    Double LD-Double PSD schedule.employ a symmetric structure and there are a laser and a PSD receiver on each axis. The Double LD-Double PSD is used, and the rectangular coordinate system is set up by use of the relationship of arbitrary two points coordinates, and then the parameter formula is deduced by the knowledge of solid geometry. Using the data acquisition system and the data processing model of laser alignment meter with double laser beam and two detector , basing on the installation parameter of the computer, we can have the state parameter between the two shafts by more complicated calculation and correction. The correcting data of the four under chassis of the adjusted apparatus moving on the level and the vertical plane can be calculated using the computer. This will instruct us to move the apparatus to align the shafts.

  6. Laser filamentation mathematical methods and models

    CERN Document Server

    Lorin, Emmanuel; Moloney, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    This book is focused on the nonlinear theoretical and mathematical problems associated with ultrafast intense laser pulse propagation in gases and in particular, in air. With the aim of understanding the physics of filamentation in gases, solids, the atmosphere, and even biological tissue, specialists in nonlinear optics and filamentation from both physics and mathematics attempt to rigorously derive and analyze relevant non-perturbative models. Modern laser technology allows the generation of ultrafast (few cycle) laser pulses, with intensities exceeding the internal electric field in atoms and molecules (E=5x109 V/cm or intensity I = 3.5 x 1016 Watts/cm2 ). The interaction of such pulses with atoms and molecules leads to new, highly nonlinear nonperturbative regimes, where new physical phenomena, such as High Harmonic Generation (HHG), occur, and from which the shortest (attosecond - the natural time scale of the electron) pulses have been created. One of the major experimental discoveries in this nonlinear...

  7. Investigation of surface characteristics evolution and laser damage performance of fused silica during ion-beam sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mingjin; Dai, Yifan; Zhou, Lin; Shi, Feng; Wan, Wen; Xie, Xuhui; Sui, Tingting

    2016-08-01

    Surface characteristics have great influence on the optical properties especially the laser radiation resistivity of optics. In this paper, the surface characteristics evolutions of fused silica during ion-beam sputtering and their effects on the laser damage performance were investigated. The results show that roughness change is strongly removal depth dependent and a super-smooth surface (0.25 nm RMS) can be obtained by the ion-induced smoothing effect. The concentration of metal impurities (especially Ce element) in subsurface can be effectively decreased after the removal of polishing re-deposition layer. During ion-beam sputtering process, the plastic scratches can be removed while the brittle cracks can be broadened and passivated without increase in the depth direction. Laser damage threshold of fused silica improved by 36% after ion-beam sputtering treatment. Research results have a guiding significance for ion-beam sputtering process technology of fused silica optics.

  8. Improving the laser damage resistance of oxide thin films and multilayers via tailoring ion beam sputtering parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosar, M. B.; Ozhan, A. E. S.; Aydogdu, G. H.

    2015-05-01

    Ion beam sputtering is one of the widely used methods for manufacturing laser optical components due to its advantages such as uniformity, reproducibility, suitability for multilayer coatings and growth of dielectric materials with high packing densities. In this study, single Ta2O5 layers and Ta2O5/SiO2 heterostructures were deposited on optical quality glass substrates by dual ion beam sputtering. We focused on the effect of deposition conditions like substrate cleaning, assistance by 12 cm diameter ion beam source and oxygen partial pressure on the laser-induced damage threshold of Ta2O5 single layers. Afterwards, the obtained information is employed to a sample design and produces a Ta2O5/SiO2 multilayer structure demonstrating low laser-induced damage without a post treatment procedure.

  9. Damage threshold of platinum/carbon multilayers under hard X-ray free-electron laser irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jangwoo; Nagahira, Ayaka; Koyama, Takahisa; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Sano, Yasuhisa; Yabashi, Makina; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2015-11-01

    We evaluated the irradiation damage induced by hard X-ray free-electron lasers to platinum/carbon multilayers intended for use in a focusing reflective mirror. In order to determine the damage threshold, we compared X-ray reflectivities before and after irradiation at the first-order Bragg angle using a focused X-ray free-electron laser with a beam size of approximately 1 μm and a pulse energy ranging from 0.01 to 10 μJ at a photon energy of 10 keV. We confirmed that the damage threshold of the platinum/carbon multilayer with a bilayer period of 3 nm was 0.051 μJ/μm(2), which is sufficiently higher than that in practical applications.

  10. Literature study report of plasticity induced anisotropic damage modeling for forming processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niazi, M.S.

    2009-01-01

    A literature study report covering the topics; micromechanics of damage, continuum damage mechanics (gurson model and effective variable concept) and the dependence of damage on strain rate and temperature.

  11. Literature study report of plasticity induced anisotropic damage modeling for forming processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niazi, Muhammad Sohail

    2009-01-01

    A literature study report covering the topics; micromechanics of damage, continuum damage mechanics (gurson model and effective variable concept) and the dependence of damage on strain rate and temperature.

  12. Verification of flood damage modelling using insurance data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Qianqian; Petersen, Toke E. P.; Thorsen, Bo J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an analysis using insurance data for damage description and risk model verification, based on data from a Danish case. The results show that simple, local statistics of rainfall are not able to describe the variation in individual cost per claim, but are, however......, feasible for modelling the overall cost per day. The study also shows that combining the insurance and regional data it is possible to establish clear relationships between occurrences of claims and hazard maps. In particular, the results indicate that with improvements on data collection and analysis......, improved prediction of damage information will be possible, e.g. based on also socioeconomic variables. Furthermore, the paper concludes that more collaboration between scientific research and insurance agencies is necessary to improve inundation modelling and economic assessments for urban drainage...

  13. Statistical 3D damage accumulation model for ion implant simulators

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez-Mangas, J M; Enriquez, L E; Bailon, L; Barbolla, J; Jaraiz, M

    2003-01-01

    A statistical 3D damage accumulation model, based on the modified Kinchin-Pease formula, for ion implant simulation has been included in our physically based ion implantation code. It has only one fitting parameter for electronic stopping and uses 3D electron density distributions for different types of targets including compound semiconductors. Also, a statistical noise reduction mechanism based on the dose division is used. The model has been adapted to be run under parallel execution in order to speed up the calculation in 3D structures. Sequential ion implantation has been modelled including previous damage profiles. It can also simulate the implantation of molecular and cluster projectiles. Comparisons of simulated doping profiles with experimental SIMS profiles are presented. Also comparisons between simulated amorphization and experimental RBS profiles are shown. An analysis of sequential versus parallel processing is provided.

  14. Statistical 3D damage accumulation model for ion implant simulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Mangas, J.M. E-mail: jesman@ele.uva.es; Lazaro, J.; Enriquez, L.; Bailon, L.; Barbolla, J.; Jaraiz, M

    2003-04-01

    A statistical 3D damage accumulation model, based on the modified Kinchin-Pease formula, for ion implant simulation has been included in our physically based ion implantation code. It has only one fitting parameter for electronic stopping and uses 3D electron density distributions for different types of targets including compound semiconductors. Also, a statistical noise reduction mechanism based on the dose division is used. The model has been adapted to be run under parallel execution in order to speed up the calculation in 3D structures. Sequential ion implantation has been modelled including previous damage profiles. It can also simulate the implantation of molecular and cluster projectiles. Comparisons of simulated doping profiles with experimental SIMS profiles are presented. Also comparisons between simulated amorphization and experimental RBS profiles are shown. An analysis of sequential versus parallel processing is provided.

  15. Verification of flood damage modelling using insurance data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Q; Panduro, T E; Thorsen, B J; Arnbjerg-Nielsen, K

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an analysis using insurance data for damage description and risk model verification, based on data from a Danish case. The results show that simple, local statistics of rainfall are not able to describe the variation in individual cost per claim, but are, however, feasible for modelling the overall cost per day. The study also shows that in combining the insurance and regional data it is possible to establish clear relationships between occurrences of claims and hazard maps. In particular, the results indicate that with improvements to data collection and analysis, improved prediction of damage costs will be possible, for example based also on socioeconomic variables. Furthermore, the paper concludes that more collaboration between scientific research and insurance agencies is needed to improve inundation modelling and economic assessments for urban drainage designs.

  16. Modelling radiation damage to ESA's Gaia satellite CCDs

    CERN Document Server

    Seabroke, G M; Cropper, M S

    2008-01-01

    The Gaia satellite is a high-precision astrometry, photometry and spectroscopic ESA cornerstone mission, currently scheduled for launch in late 2011. Its primary science drivers are the composition, formation and evolution of the Galaxy. Gaia will achieve its scientific requirements with detailed calibration and correction for radiation damage. Microscopic models of Gaia's CCDs are being developed to simulate the charge trapping effect of radiation damage, which causes charge transfer inefficiency. The key to calculating the probability of a photoelectron being captured by a trap is the 3D electron density within each CCD pixel. However, this has not been physically modelled for Gaia CCD pixels. In this paper, the first of a series, we motivate the need for such specialised 3D device modelling and outline how its future results will fit into Gaia's overall radiation calibration strategy.

  17. The elasto-damage theory of the components assembling model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG ShouChun; LIANG NaiGang; LU HaiXing

    2009-01-01

    The potential energy in materials is well approximated by pair functional which is composed of pair potentials and embedding energy. During calculating material potential energy, the orientational com-ponent and the volumetric component are derived respectively from pair potentials and embedding energy. The sum of energy of all these two kinds of components is the material potential. No matter how microstructures change, damage or fracture, at the most level, they are all the changing and breaking atomic bonds. As an abstract of atomic bonds, these components change their stiffness during dam-aging. Material constitutive equations have been formulated by means of assembling all components' response functions. This material model is called the component assembling model. Theoretical analysis and numerical computing indicate that the proposed model has the capacity of reproducing some results satisfactorily, with the advantages of great conceptual simplicity, physical explicitness, and intrinsic induced anisotropy, etc.

  18. The elasto-damage theory of the components assembling model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The potential energy in materials is well approximated by pair functional which is composed of pair potentials and embedding energy. During calculating material potential energy, the orientational component and the volumetric component are derived respectively from pair potentials and embedding energy. The sum of energy of all these two kinds of components is the material potential. No matter how microstructures change, damage or fracture, at the most level, they are all the changing and breaking atomic bonds. As an abstract of atomic bonds, these components change their stiffness during damaging. Material constitutive equations have been formulated by means of assembling all components’ response functions. This material model is called the component assembling model. Theoretical analysis and numerical computing indicate that the proposed model has the capacity of reproducing some results satisfactorily, with the advantages of great conceptual simplicity, physical explicitness, and intrinsic induced anisotropy, etc.

  19. Bread dough rheology: Computing with a damage function model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Roger I.; Qi, Fuzhong; Dai, Shaocong

    2015-01-01

    We describe an improved damage function model for bread dough rheology. The model has relatively few parameters, all of which can easily be found from simple experiments. Small deformations in the linear region are described by a gel-like power-law memory function. A set of large non-reversing deformations - stress relaxation after a step of shear, steady shearing and elongation beginning from rest, and biaxial stretching, is used to test the model. With the introduction of a revised strain measure which includes a Mooney-Rivlin term, all of these motions can be well described by the damage function described in previous papers. For reversing step strains, larger amplitude oscillatory shearing and recoil reasonable predictions have been found. The numerical methods used are discussed and we give some examples.

  20. Modeling and Characterization of Damage Processes in Metallic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaessgen, E. H.; Saether, E.; Smith, S. W.; Hochhalter, J. D.; Yamakov, V. I.; Gupta, V.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a broad effort that is aimed at understanding the fundamental mechanisms of crack growth and using that understanding as a basis for designing materials and enabling predictions of fracture in materials and structures that have small characteristic dimensions. This area of research, herein referred to as Damage Science, emphasizes the length scale regimes of the nanoscale and the microscale for which analysis and characterization tools are being developed to predict the formation, propagation, and interaction of fundamental damage mechanisms. Examination of nanoscale processes requires atomistic and discrete dislocation plasticity simulations, while microscale processes can be examined using strain gradient plasticity, crystal plasticity and microstructure modeling methods. Concurrent and sequential multiscale modeling methods are being developed to analytically bridge between these length scales. Experimental methods for characterization and quantification of near-crack tip damage are also being developed. This paper focuses on several new methodologies in these areas and their application to understanding damage processes in polycrystalline metals. On-going and potential applications are also discussed.

  1. Influence of wavelength and pulse duration on peripheral thermal and mechanical damage to dentin and alveolar bone during IR laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C.; Ragadio, Jerome N.; Fried, Daniel

    2000-03-01

    The objective of this study was to measure the peripheral thermal damage produced during the laser ablation of alveolar bone and dentin for clinically relevant IR laser systems. Previous studies have demonstrated that a char layer produced around the laser incision site can inhibit the wound healing process. Moreover, in the case of dentin, a char layer is unsightly and is difficult to bond to with restorative materials. Thermal damage was assessed using polarized light microscopy for laser pulse widths from 500 ns to 300 microseconds at 2.94 micrometer and 9.6 micrometer. Water- cooling was not employed to alleviate thermal damage during the laser irradiation. At 9.6 micrometer, minimal thermal damage was observed for pulse widths on the order of the thermal relaxation time of the deposited laser energy in the tissue, 3 - 4 microseconds, and peripheral thermal damage increased with increasing pulse duration. At 2.94 micrometer, thermal damage was minimal for the Q-switched (500 ns) laser system. This study shows that 9.6 micrometer CO2 laser pulses with pulse widths of 5 - 10 microseconds are well suited for the efficient ablation of dentin and bone with minimal peripheral damage. This work was supported by NIH/NIDCR R29DE12091.

  2. Lasers in environmental technology. How DLR plans to detect environmental damage by means of laser sensors. Laser in der Umwelttechnik. Wie die DLR Umweltschaeden mit Laser-Sensoren aus dem Weltraum erfassen will

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehret, G. (Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere); Franz, J. (Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Nachrichtentechnik); Guenther, K.; Werner, C. (Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Optoelektronik); Klingenberg, H. (Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Stuttgart (Germany). Inst. fuer Technische Physik)

    1991-05-01

    Sure, there is no doubt about the necessity of environmental protection. Its implementation requires joint action by politicians, scientists and engineers. Protecting the environment, however, starts out from recognizing environmental hazards - in particular existing environmental damage. For the detection of environmental damages, the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR) (German Aerospace Research Establishment) has an excellent inventory of sensors and instrument carriers (aircraft) permitting the acquisition of current problems (ozone, climate, greenhouse effect, dying forests (Waldsterben), water pollution, etc.). A long-term objective is global surveillance from space. This article gives a summary of special laser sensors and their intended use in space. (orig.).

  3. A Coupled Thermal–Hydrological–Mechanical Damage Model and Its Numerical Simulations of Damage Evolution in APSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenhui Wei

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a coupled thermal–hydrological–mechanical damage (THMD model for the failure process of rock, in which coupling effects such as thermally induced rock deformation, water flow-induced thermal convection, and rock deformation-induced water flow are considered. The damage is considered to be the key factor that controls the THM coupling process and the heterogeneity of rock is characterized by the Weibull distribution. Next, numerical simulations on excavation-induced damage zones in Äspö pillar stability experiments (APSE are carried out and the impact of in situ stress conditions on damage zone distribution is analysed. Then, further numerical simulations of damage evolution at the heating stage in APSE are carried out. The impacts of in situ stress state, swelling pressure and water pressure on damage evolution at the heating stage are simulated and analysed, respectively. The simulation results indicate that (1 the v-shaped notch at the sidewall of the pillar is predominantly controlled by the in situ stress trends and magnitude; (2 at the heating stage, the existence of confining pressure can suppress the occurrence of damage, including shear damage and tensile damage; and (3 the presence of water flow and water pressure can promote the occurrence of damage, especially shear damage.

  4. Full spatially resolved laser modeling and design using GLOSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudock, Jared; Decker, Mark; Koroshetz, John

    2016-05-01

    L-3 ALST has developed a Generalized Laser and Optics Simulation Suite (GLOSS) to quickly and reliably design high performance laser transmitters. GLOSS uses state of the art wave propagation based algorithms to rigorously simulate the dynamics of laser oscillation. Laser pulse energy, pulse width, beam size, beam shape, and divergence are among the many key performances parameters GLOSS models have the capability to predict. The GLOSS modeling methodology will be discussed and examples of its powerful capability will be demonstrated. Model predictions within 10-15% of actual laser performance data from a sample of experimental lasers will also be shown.

  5. Wavelength and pulselength dependence of laser conditioning and bulk damage in doubler-cut KH2PO4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, J J; Bruere, J R; Bolourchi, M; Carr, C W; Feit, M D; Hackel, R P; Hahn, D E; Jarboe, J A; Lane, L A; Luthi, R L; McElroy, J N; Rubenchik, A M; Stanley, J R; Sell, W D; Vickers, J L; Weiland, T L; Willard, D A

    2005-10-28

    An experimental technique has been utilized to measure the variation of bulk damage scatter with damaging fluence in plates of KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} (KDP) crystals. Bulk damage in unconditioned and laser-conditioned doubler-cut KDP crystals has been studied using 527 nm (2{omega}) light at pulselengths of 0.3-10 ns. It is found that there is less scatter due to damage at fixed fluence for longer pulselengths. In particular, there is {approx}4X increase in fluence for equivalent scatter for damage at 2{omega}, 10 ns as compared to 0.30 ns in unconditioned KDP. The results for the unconditioned and conditioned KDP show that for all the pulselengths the scatter due to the bulk damage is a strong function of the damaging fluence ({phi}{sup -5}). It is determined that the 2{omega} fluence pulselength-scaling for equivalent bulk damage scatter in unconditioned KDP varies as {tau}{sup 0.30{+-}0.11} and in 3{omega}, 3ns ramp-conditioned KDP varies as {tau}{sup 0.27{+-}0.14}. The effectiveness of 2{omega} and 3{omega} laser conditioning at pulselengths in the range of 0.30-23 ns for damage induced 2{omega}, 3 ns is analyzed in terms of scatter. For the protocols tested (i.e. peak conditioning irradiance, etc.), the 3{omega}, 300 ps conditioning to a peak fluence of 3 J/cm{sup 2} had the best performance under 2{omega}, 3 ns testing. The general trend in the performance of the conditioning protocols was shorter wavelength and shorter pulselength appear to produce better conditioning for testing at 2{omega}, 3 ns.

  6. Advanced wavefront measurement and analysis of laser system modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, C.R.; Auerback, J.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    High spatial resolution measurements of the reflected or transmitted wavefronts of large aperture optical components used in high peak power laser systems is now possible. These measurements are produced by phase shifting interferometry. The wavefront data is in the form of 3-D phase maps that reconstruct the wavefront shape. The emphasis of this work is on the characterization of wavefront features in the mid-spatial wavelength range (from 0.1 to 10.0 mm) and has been accomplished for the first time. Wavefront structure from optical components with spatial wavelengths in this range are of concern because their effects in high peak power laser systems. At high peak power, this phase modulation can convert to large magnitude intensity modulation by non-linear processes. This can lead to optical damage. We have developed software to input the measured phase map data into beam propagation codes in order to model this conversion process. We are analyzing this data to: (1) Characterize the wavefront structure produced by current optical components, (2) Refine our understanding of laser system performance, (3) Develop a database from which future optical component specifications can be derived.

  7. Towards Industrial Application of Damage Models for Sheet Metal Forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doig, M.; Roll, K.

    2011-05-01

    Due to global warming and financial situation the demand to reduce the CO2-emission and the production costs leads to the permanent development of new materials. In the automotive industry the occupant safety is an additional condition. Bringing these arguments together the preferable approach for lightweight design of car components, especially for body-in-white, is the use of modern steels. Such steel grades, also called advanced high strength steels (AHSS), exhibit a high strength as well as a high formability. Not only their material behavior but also the damage behavior of AHSS is different compared to the performances of standard steels. Conventional methods for the damage prediction in the industry like the forming limit curve (FLC) are not reliable for AHSS. Physically based damage models are often used in crash and bulk forming simulations. The still open question is the industrial application of these models for sheet metal forming. This paper evaluates the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) model and the model of Lemaitre within commercial codes with a goal of industrial application.

  8. Modelling single shot damage thresholds of multilayer optics for high-intensity short-wavelength radiation sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loch, R A; Sobierajski, R; Louis, E; Bosgra, J; Bijkerk, F

    2012-12-17

    The single shot damage thresholds of multilayer optics for high-intensity short-wavelength radiation sources are theoretically investigated, using a model developed on the basis of experimental data obtained at the FLASH and LCLS free electron lasers. We compare the radiation hardness of commonly used multilayer optics and propose new material combinations selected for a high damage threshold. Our study demonstrates that the damage thresholds of multilayer optics can vary over a large range of incidence fluences and can be as high as several hundreds of mJ/cm(2). This strongly suggests that multilayer mirrors are serious candidates for damage resistant optics. Especially, multilayer optics based on Li(2)O spacers are very promising for use in current and future short-wavelength radiation sources.

  9. Damage modelling in concrete subject to sulfate attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Cefis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider the mechanical effect of the sulfate attack on concrete. The durability analysis of concrete structures in contact to external sulfate solutions requires the definition of a proper diffusion-reaction model, for the computation of the varying sulfate concentration and of the consequent ettringite formation, coupled to a mechanical model for the prediction of swelling and material degradation. In this work, we make use of a two-ions formulation of the reactive-diffusion problem and we propose a bi-phase chemo-elastic damage model aimed to simulate the mechanical response of concrete and apt to be used in structural analyses.

  10. Accumulation effect of SiO2 protective layer on multi-shot laser-induced damage in high-reflectivity HfO2 /SiO2 coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Wang; Hongbo He; Yuan'an Zhao; Yongguang Shan; Chaoyang Wei

    2011-01-01

    The accumulation effects in high-reflectivity (HR) HfO2/SiO2 coatings under laser irradiation are investigated. The HR HfO2/SiO2 coatings are prepared by electron beam evaporation at 1064 nm. The laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) are measured at 1064 nm and at a pulse duration of 12 ns, in 1-on-l and S-on-1 modes. Multi-shot LIDT is lower than single-shot LIDT. The laser-induced and native defects play an important role in the multi-shot mode. A correlative theory model based on critical conduction band electron density is constructed to elucidate the experimental phenomena.%The accumulation effects in high-reflectivity (HR) HfO2/SiO2 coatings under laser irradiation are investigated.The HR HfO2/SiO2 coatings are prepared by electron beam evaporation at 1 064 nm.The laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) are measured at 1 064 nm and at a pulse duration of 12 ns,in 1-on-1 and S-on-1 modes.Multi-shot LIDT is lower than single-shot LIDT.The laser-induced and native defects play an important role in the multi-shot mode.A correlative theory model based on critical conduction band electron density is constructed to elucidate the experimental phenomena.In recent years,many laboratories have investigated multi-shot laser-induced damage in optical materials,such as fused silica[1] and KTP crystals[2].The multishot laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) is often lower than single-shot LIDT because of the accumulation effects in most optical materials[1,3-5].As a result,investigations on multi-shot laser-induced damage in optical coatings are of high practical importance for high-power laser applications[5,6].The mechanism for single-shot laser damage includes avalanche ionization (AI)[7],multiphoton ionization (MPI) [8],impurity breakdown[9],etc.

  11. Testing relativity again, laser, laser, laser, laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Einstein, A.

    2015-01-01

    laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser,

  12. A relaxation-based approach to damage modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junker, Philipp; Schwarz, Stephan; Makowski, Jerzy; Hackl, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Material models, including softening effects due to, for example, damage and localizations, share the problem of ill-posed boundary value problems that yield mesh-dependent finite element results. It is thus necessary to apply regularization techniques that couple local behavior described, for example, by internal variables, at a spatial level. This can take account of the gradient of the internal variable to yield mesh-independent finite element results. In this paper, we present a new approach to damage modeling that does not use common field functions, inclusion of gradients or complex integration techniques: Appropriate modifications of the relaxed (condensed) energy hold the same advantage as other methods, but with much less numerical effort. We start with the theoretical derivation and then discuss the numerical treatment. Finally, we present finite element results that prove empirically how the new approach works.

  13. Non-Fourier thermal transport induced structural hierarchy and damage to collagen ultrastructure subjected to laser irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Nilamani; Narasimhan, Arunn; Dhar, Purbarun; Das, Sarit K

    2017-07-09

    Comprehending the mechanism of thermal transport through biological tissues is an important factor for optimal ablation of cancerous tissues and minimising collateral tissue damage. The present study reports detailed mapping of the rise in internal temperature within the tissue mimics due to NIR (1064 nm) laser irradiation, both for bare mimics and with gold nanostructures infused. Gold nanostructures such as mesoflowers and nanospheres have been synthesised and used as photothermal converters to enhance the temperature rise, resulting in achieving the desired degradation of malignant tissue in targeted region. Thermal history was observed experimentally and simulated considering non-Fourier dual phase lag (DPL) model incorporated Pennes bio-heat transfer equation using COMSOL Multiphysics software. The gross deviation in temperature i.e. rise from the classical Fourier model for bio-heat conduction suggests additional effects of temperature rise on the secondary structures and morphological and physico-chemical changes to the collagen ultrastructures building the tissue mass. The observed thermal denaturation in the collagen fibril morphologies have been explained based on the physico-chemical structure of collagen and its response to thermal radiation. The large shift in frequency of amides A and B is pronounced at a depth of maximum temperature rise compared with other positions in tissue phantom. Observations for change in band of amide I, amide II, and amide III are found to be responsible for damage to collagen ultra-structure. Variation in the concentration of gold nanostructures shows the potentiality of localised hyperthermia treatment subjected to NIR radiation through a proposed free radical mechanism.

  14. Optical coatings: laser radiation damage. January 1975-July 1988 (Citations from the INSPEC: Information Services for the Physics and Engineering Communities data base). Report for January 1975-July 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-07-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning theoretical aspects and experimental investigations of laser-induced damage of optical coatings. Damage thresholds of metal, dielectric, and metal-dielectric coating materials used in high-power lasers are discussed. The origin and morphology of damage, and the effects of coating processes and materials, and substrate materials on laser damage are included. Laser sources are also considered. (This updated bibliography contains 142 citations, 11 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  15. Modelling earthquake ruptures with dynamic off-fault damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Kurama; Bhat, Harsha S.; Klinger, Yann; Rougier, Esteban

    2017-04-01

    Earthquake rupture modelling has been developed for producing scenario earthquakes. This includes understanding the source mechanisms and estimating far-field ground motion with given a priori constraints like fault geometry, constitutive law of the medium and friction law operating on the fault. It is necessary to consider all of the above complexities of a fault systems to conduct realistic earthquake rupture modelling. In addition to the complexity of the fault geometry in nature, coseismic off-fault damage, which is observed by a variety of geological and seismological methods, plays a considerable role on the resultant ground motion and its spectrum compared to a model with simple planer fault surrounded by purely elastic media. Ideally all of these complexities should be considered in earthquake modelling. State of the art techniques developed so far, however, cannot treat all of them simultaneously due to a variety of computational restrictions. Therefore, we adopt the combined finite-discrete element method (FDEM), which can effectively deal with pre-existing complex fault geometry such as fault branches and kinks and can describe coseismic off-fault damage generated during the dynamic rupture. The advantage of FDEM is that it can handle a wide range of length scales, from metric to kilometric scale, corresponding to the off-fault damage and complex fault geometry respectively. We used the FDEM-based software tool called HOSSedu (Hybrid Optimization Software Suite - Educational Version) for the earthquake rupture modelling, which was developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory. We firstly conducted the cross-validation of this new methodology against other conventional numerical schemes such as the finite difference method (FDM), the spectral element method (SEM) and the boundary integral equation method (BIEM), to evaluate the accuracy with various element sizes and artificial viscous damping values. We demonstrate the capability of the FDEM tool for

  16. A Multiparameter Damage Constitutive Model for Rock Based on Separation of Tension and Shear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YanHui Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available By analysis of the microscopic damage mechanism of rock, a multiparameter elastoplastic damage constitutive model which considers damage mechanism of tension and shear is established. A revised general form of elastoplastic damage model containing damage internal variable of tensor form is derived by considering the hypothesis that damage strain is induced by the degeneration of elastic modulus. With decomposition of plastic strain introduced, the forms of tension damage variable and shear damage variable are derived, based on which effects of tension and shear damage on material’s stiffness and strength are considered simultaneously. Through the utilizing of Zienkiewicz-Pande criterion with tension limit, the specific form of the multiparameter damage model is derived. Numerical experiments show that the established model can simulate damage behavior of rock effectively.

  17. Transient absorption and luminescence spectra of K9 glass at sub-damage site by ultraviolet laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Z., E-mail: namezhangzhen@126.com [Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, Research Center of Laser Fusion (China); Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610000 (China); Huang, J.; Geng, F.; Zhou, X.Y. [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Feng, S.Q. [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610000 (China); Cheng, X.L., E-mail: chengxl@scu.edu.cn [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610000 (China); Jiang, X.D. [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Wu, W.D. [Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, Research Center of Laser Fusion (China); Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610000 (China); Zheng, W.G.; Tang, Y.J. [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Transient absorption and luminescence spectra at sub-damage site of K9 glass by laser irradiation at 355 nm are presented. • As the energy density increases to 2.54 J/cm{sup 2}, the absorption intensity reaches to about 0.2. • The mechanism of two-photon ionization mainly plays a critical role at sub-damage site. • Intensity of Raman spectra is very high at low energy density and decreased with respect to high energy density. -- Abstract: Transient absorption and luminescence spectra at sub-damage site of K9 glass by laser irradiation at 355 nm are presented. The dependence of transient absorption on laser energy and number of pulses was investigated. As the energy density increases to 2.54 and 3.18 J/cm{sup 2}, the transient absorption intensity reaches to about 0.20 range from 400 to 480 nm. With the increase of number of pulses the process of residual absorption appears, which can be used to explain the fatigue effect of K9 glass. The defects in K9 glass were investigated by fluorescence and Raman spectra. The fluorescence band centered at about 410 nm is attributed to oxygen deficiency centers. The mechanism of two-photon ionization plays a critical role at sub-damage site. Compared to the Raman spectra of pristine site, intensity of Raman spectra is very high at a lower energy density, while it decreased at a higher energy density.

  18. A damage model based on failure threshold weakening

    CERN Document Server

    Gran, Joseph D; Turcotte, Donald L; Holliday, James R; Klein, William

    2010-01-01

    A variety of studies have modeled the physics of material deformation and damage as examples of generalized phase transitions, involving either critical phenomena or spinodal nucleation. Here we study a model for frictional sliding with long range interactions and recurrent damage that is parameterized by a process of damage and partial healing during sliding. We introduce a failure threshold weakening parameter into the cellular-automaton slider-block model which allows blocks to fail at a reduced failure threshold for all subsequent failures during an event. We show that a critical point is reached beyond which the probability of a system-wide event scales with this weakening parameter. We provide a mapping to the percolation transition, and show that the values of the scaling exponents approach the values for mean-field percolation (spinodal nucleation) as lattice size $L$ is increased for fixed $R$. We also examine the effect of the weakening parameter on the frequency-magnitude scaling relationship and t...

  19. Mathematical model for light scanning system based on circular laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peiquan Xu; Shun Yao; Fenggui Lu; Xinhua Tang; Wei Zhang

    2005-01-01

    A novel light scanning system based on circular laser trajectory for welding robot is developed. With the help of image processing technique, intelligent laser welding could be realized. According to laser triangulation algorithm and Scheimpflug condition, mathematical model for circular laser vision is built.This scanning system projects circular laser onto welded seams and recovers the depth of the welded seams,escapes from shortcomings of less information, explains ambiguity and single tracking direction inherent in "spot" or "line" type laser trajectory. Three-dimensional (3D) model for welded seams could be recognized after depth recovery. The imaging error is investigated also.

  20. Influence of standing-wave electric field pattern on the laser damage resistance of HfO sub 2 thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Protopapa, M L; De Tomasi, F; Di Giulio, M; Perrone, M R; Scaglione, S

    2002-01-01

    The standing-wave electric field pattern that forms inside an optical coating as a consequence of laser irradiation is one of the factors influencing the coating laser-induced damage threshold. The influence of the standing-wave electric field profile on the damage resistance to ultraviolet radiation of hafnium dioxide (HfO sub 2) thin films was investigated in this work. To this end, HfO sub 2 thin films of different thicknesses deposited by the electron beam evaporation technique at the same deposition conditions were analyzed. Laser damage thresholds of the samples were measured at 308 nm (XeCl laser) by the photoacoustic beam deflection technique and microscopic inspections. The dependence of the laser damage threshold on the standing-wave electric field pattern was analyzed.

  1. Laser Damage and Effects Bibliography. Part 1. Journal Literature through 1982

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-15

    Electron 5 (Jul 75) 871-872 KOZLOV, B. M.; SAMOKHIN, A. A.; USPENSKII , A. B. "Numerical Analysis of Pulsating Evaporation of Condensed Matter under...34Laser-Induced Explosion of Solid Material" J. Appl. Phys. 48 (Feb 77) 618-620 F 25 -:.2 KOZLOV, B. M.; SAMOKHIN, A. A.; USPENSKII , A. B. "Metal-Insulator...34Theoretical Modeling of Rapid Surface Vaporization with Back Pressure" AIAA J. 17 (May 79) 519-523 KOROTCHENKO, A. I.; SAMOKHIN, A. A.; USPENSKII , A

  2. Investigations on growth, structure, optical properties and laser damage threshold of organic nonlinear optical crystals of Guanidinium L-Ascorbate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saripalli, Ravi K.; Kumar, Sanath; Bhat, H. L.; Elizabeth, Suja

    2015-05-01

    Single crystals of Guanidinium L-Ascorbate (GuLA) were grown and crystal structure was determined by direct methods. GuLA crystallizes in orthorhombic, non-centrosymmetric space group P212121. The UV-cutoff was determined as 325 nm. The morphology was generated and the interplanar angles estimated and compared with experimental values. Second harmonic generation conversion efficiency was measured and compared with other salts of L-Ascorbic acid. Surface laser damage threshold was calculated as 11.3GW/cm2 for a single shot of laser of 1064 nm wavelength.

  3. Thermal damage study on diamond tools at varying laser heating time and temperature by Raman spectroscopy and SEM

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masina, BN

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available damage study on diamond tools at varying laser heating time and temperature by Raman spectroscopy and SEM BN Masina1, BW Mwakikunga2, M Elayaperumal2, A Forbes1, and R Bodkin3 1CSIR National Laser Centre, PO BOX 395, Pretoria 0001, South Africa 2CSIR... Slide 11 Optical images at the surface of the PCD layer Initial 15 min 968 K 25 min 979 K 5 min 895 K Dark phase is cobalt or tungsten Grey phase is diamond Slide 12 Raman shift at the surface of the PCD layer 600 800 1000 1200 1400 1600 1800 2000 0 2000...

  4. Modeling and optimization of laser cutting operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gadallah Mohamed Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser beam cutting is one important nontraditional machining process. This paper optimizes the parameters of laser beam cutting parameters of stainless steel (316L considering the effect of input parameters such as power, oxygen pressure, frequency and cutting speed. Statistical design of experiments is carried in three different levels and process responses such as average kerf taper (Ta, surface roughness (Ra and heat affected zones are measured accordingly. A response surface model is developed as a function of the process parameters. Responses predicted by the models (as per Taguchi’s L27OA are employed to search for an optimal combination to achieve desired process yield. Response Surface Models (RSMs are developed for mean responses, S/N ratio, and standard deviation of responses. Optimization models are formulated as single objective optimization problem subject to process constraints. Models are formulated based on Analysis of Variance (ANOVA and optimized using Matlab developed environment. Optimum solutions are compared with Taguchi Methodology results. As such, practicing engineers have means to model, analyze and optimize nontraditional machining processes. Validation experiments are carried to verify the developed models with success.

  5. Impacts of SiO2 planarization on optical thin film properties and laser damage resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, T.; Wang, H.; Jankowska, E.; Reagan, B. A.; Rocca, J. J.; Stolz, C. J.; Mirkarimi, P.; Folta, J.; Roehling, J.; Markosyan, A.; Route, R. R.; Fejer, M. M.; Menoni, C. S.

    2016-12-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Colorado State University (CSU) have co-developed a planarization process to smooth nodular defects. This process consists of individually depositing then etching tens of nanometers of SiO2 with a ratio of 2:1, respectively. Previous work shows incorporating the angular dependent ion surface etching and unidirectional deposition reduces substrate defect cross-sectional area by 90%. This work investigates the micro-structural and optical modifications of planarized SiO2 films deposited by ion beam sputtering (IBS). It is shown the planarized SiO2 thin films have 3x increase in absorption and 18% reduction in thin film stress as compared to control (as deposited) SiO2. Planarized SiO2 films exhibit 13% increase in RMS surface roughness with respect to the control and super polished fused silica substrates. Laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) results indicate the planarization process has no effect on the onset fluence but alters the shape of the probability vs fluence trace.

  6. Etching, micro hardness and laser damage threshold studies of a nonlinear optical material L-valine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbuchezhiyan, M.; Ponnusamy, S.; Muthamizhchelvan, C.; Kanakam, C. C.; Singh, S. P.; Pal, P. K.; Datta, P. K.

    2012-04-01

    A nonlinear optical crystal of L-valine was grown from an aqueous solution containing a small amount of phosphoric acid by the slow evaporation method. The grown crystal was characterized by a single crystal X-ray diffraction to determine the unit cell parameters. The powder X-ray diffraction analysis also confirmed the lattice parameters to be a = 9.6687(7) Å, b = 5.2709(4) Å, c = 12.0371(10) Å and β = 90.805(4)°. The results of the Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICPOES) indicate the presence of a small amount of phosphorus in the grown crystal. The Vickers micro hardness test was performed to study the mechanical strength of the crystals. Chemical etching studies were carried out to analyze the dislocation structure. The laser damaged threshold of the grown crystal was measured to be 11.11 GW/cm2 for 10 ns pulse at 1064 nm, which is higher than that of the standard nonlinear optical crystals like KDP. Second harmonic generation of the grown crystals was also 1.44 times that of KDP.

  7. Damage spreading in a driven lattice gas model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio Puzzo, M. Leticia; Saracco, Gustavo P.; Albano, Ezequiel V.

    2013-06-01

    We studied damage spreading in a Driven Lattice Gas (DLG) model as a function of the temperature T, the magnitude of the external driving field E, and the lattice size. The DLG model undergoes an order-disorder second-order phase transition at the critical temperature Tc(E), such that the ordered phase is characterized by high-density strips running along the direction of the applied field; while in the disordered phase one has a lattice-gas-like behavior. It is found that the damage always spreads for all the investigated temperatures and reaches a saturation value D that depends only on T. D increases for TTc(E=∞) and is free of finite-size effects. This behavior can be explained as due to the existence of interfaces between the high-density strips and the lattice-gas-like phase whose roughness depends on T. Also, we investigated damage spreading for a range of finite fields as a function of T, finding a behavior similar to that of the case with E=∞.

  8. Investigation of optical damage mechanisms in hafnia and silica thin films using pairs of subnanosecond laser pulses with variable time delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, L. L.; Hamza, A. V.; Lee, H. W. H.

    1992-02-01

    Optical damage thresholds of submicron-thick, electron beam deposited HfO2 and SiO2 films on BK-7 substrates have been measured by monitoring the emission of neutral constituents during excitation with time-delayed pairs of 70-ps laser pulses at a wavelength of 1064 nm. The dependence of the optical damage threshold on time delay provides evidence of the optical damage mechanism. For SiO2, linear absorption is the mechanism for energy deposition into the films by the laser beams. The data for HfO2 are less definitive, although linear absorption is the most likely damage mechanism. The behavior of the single-layer films is compared to multilayer HfO2-SiO2 high-reflector coatings, for which a ``conditioning'' effect causes an increased optical damage threshold due to multiple pulse laser excitation at fluences below the single-pulse optical damage threshold.

  9. Damage detection test of a substructure model of the National Swimming Center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In order to detect the damage locations of complex spatial structures, a sensor region-based damage detection approach was developed based on the damage locating vectors method. A normalized damage locating index was introduced to identify the damage regions. An experiment on damage detection of a substructure model of the National Swimming Center ’Water Cube’ was carried out. Two damage patterns were involved in the experiment. The test model was excited by using hammer impacts. Acceleration responses of the undamaged and damaged structure model were measured. Modal parameters were identified from the acceleration responses by utilizing the eigensystem realization algorithm (ERA). By using the developed sensor region-based method, the damage regions of the substructure model were located. The results show that the proposed method is able to effec- tively locate the damage regions.

  10. Damage detection test of a substructure model of the National Swimming Center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN JiaRu; JI XiaoDong; ZHANG WeiJing; XU LongHe; FU XueYi; GU Lei

    2008-01-01

    In order to detect the damage locations of complex spatial structures,a sensor region-based damage detection approach was developed based on the damage locating vectors method.A normalized damage locating index was introduced to identify the damage regions.An experiment on damage detection of a substructure model of the National Swimming Center 'Water Cube' was carried out.Two damage patterns were involved in the experiment.The test model was excited by using hammer impacts.Acceleration responses of the undamaged and damaged struc-ture model were measured.Modal parameters were identified from the acceleration responses by utilizing the eigensystem realization algorithm (ERA).By using the developed sensor region-based method,the damage regions of the substructure model were located.The results show that the proposed method is able to effec-tively locate the damage regions.

  11. Indocyanine green enhanced near infrared laser treatment of SCK tumors in a mouse model pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafirstein, Gal; Bäumler, Wolfgang; Friedman, Ran; Hennings, Leah; Webber, Jessica; Suen, James; Griffin, Robert J.

    2011-03-01

    Background and Purpose. Determine the efficacy of indocyanine green (ICG) dye in enhancing near infrared (NIR) laser ablation of tumors in a mouse model. Methods. Mammary carcinoma cells of A/J mice were injected subcutaneously in the lower back of female A/J mice (n=6). Five to seven days post inoculation the tumors (7-9 mm) were treated with 755-nm laser using 70 J/cm2 radiant exposures and 3-ms pulse time. Epidermal cooling was accomplished by cryogen spray cooling. Two minutes prior to laser irradiation mice were injected, intravenously, with 4 mg/kg body weight of ICG solution. Results. Complete tumor ablation was observed in the tumor region and minor damage was seen in the healthy skin. No major skin damage was observed post treatment. Substantial damage (up to 100% coagulative necrosis) was observed in tissue collected from tumors that were treated with laser/ICG. Conclusions. Intravenous administration of 4 mg/kg ICG significantly enhanced thermal ablation of tumors during NIR laser irradiation while sparing healthy skin.

  12. Co:MgF2 laser ablation of tissue: effect of wavelength on ablation threshold and thermal damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomacker, K T; Domankevitz, Y; Flotte, T J; Deutsch, T F

    1991-01-01

    The wavelength dependence of the ablation threshold of a variety of tissues has been studied by using a tunable pulsed Co:MgF2 laser to determine how closely it tracks the optical absorption length of water. The Co:MgF2 laser was tuned between 1.81 and 2.14 microns, a wavelength region in which the absorption length varies by a decade. For soft tissues the ablation threshold tracks the optical absorption length; for bone there is little wavelength dependence, consistent with the low water content of bone. Thermal damage vs. wavelength was also studied for cornea and bone. Thermal damage to cornea has a weak wavelength dependence, while that to bone shows little wavelength dependence. Framing-camera pictures of the ablation of both cornea and liver show explosive removal of material, but differ as to the nature of the explosion.

  13. Modelling of the Self Sum-Frequency-Mixing Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xue-Yuan; LUO Zun-Du; HUANG Yi-Dong

    2001-01-01

    A theoretical model of the self sum-frequency-mixing (SFM) laser generated by a single crystal is proposed, in which spatial distribution of the pump and circulating fundamental lasers with arbitrary beam waists are taken into account. The model is then applied to two kinds of crystals of current interest, Nd:YAl3(BO3)4 and Nd:Ca4 GdO(BO3 )a. Numerical analyses of the self-SFM laser properties predict and confirm some experimental results. The model proposed is not limited to self-SFM lasers and may be applied to general analyses of the fundamental or nonlinear laser generation with Gaussian beams.

  14. Unified Creep Plasticity Damage (UCPD) Model for Rigid Polyurethane Foams.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neilsen, Michael K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lu, Wei-Yang [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Scherzinger, William M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hinnerichs, Terry D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lo, Chi S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Numerous experiments were performed to characterize the mechanical response of several different rigid polyurethane foams (FR3712, PMDI10, PMDI20, and TufFoam35) to large deformation. In these experiments, the effects of load path, loading rate, and temperature were investigated. Results from these experiments indicated that rigid polyurethane foams exhibit significant volumetric and deviatoric plasticity when they are compressed. Rigid polyurethane foams were also found to be very strain-rate and temperature dependent. These foams are also rather brittle and crack when loaded to small strains in tension or to larger strains in compression. Thus, a new Unified Creep Plasticity Damage (UCPD) model was developed and implemented into SIERRA with the name Foam Damage to describe the mechanical response of these foams to large deformation at a variety of temperatures and strain rates. This report includes a description of recent experiments and experimental findings. Next, development of a UCPD model for rigid, polyurethane foams is described. Selection of material parameters for a variety of rigid polyurethane foams is then discussed and finite element simulations with the new UCPD model are compared with experimental results to show behavior that can be captured with this model.

  15. ITER transient consequences for material damage: modelling versus experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazylev, B [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, IHM, P O Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Janeschitz, G [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Fusion, P O Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Landman, I [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, IHM, P O Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Pestchanyi, S [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, IHM, P O Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Loarte, A [EFDA Close Support Unit Garching, Boltmannstr 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Federici, G [ITER International Team, Garching Working Site, Boltmannstr 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Merola, M [ITER International Team, Garching Working Site, Boltmannstr 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Linke, J [Forschungszentrum Juelich, EURATOM-Association, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Zhitlukhin, A [SRC RF TRINITI, Troitsk, 142190, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Podkovyrov, V [SRC RF TRINITI, Troitsk, 142190, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Klimov, N [SRC RF TRINITI, Troitsk, 142190, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Safronov, V [SRC RF TRINITI, Troitsk, 142190, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2007-03-15

    Carbon-fibre composite (CFC) and tungsten macrobrush armours are foreseen as PFC for the ITER divertor. In ITER the main mechanisms of metallic armour damage remain surface melting and melt motion erosion. In the case of CFC armour, due to rather different heat conductivities of CFC fibres a noticeable erosion of the PAN bundles may occur at rather small heat loads. Experiments carried out in the plasma gun facilities QSPA-T for the ITER like edge localized mode (ELM) heat load also demonstrated significant erosion of the frontal and lateral brush edges. Numerical simulations of the CFC and tungsten (W) macrobrush target damage accounting for the heat loads at the face and lateral brush edges were carried out for QSPA-T conditions using the three-dimensional (3D) code PHEMOBRID. The modelling results of CFC damage are in a good qualitative and quantitative agreement with the experiments. Estimation of the droplet splashing caused by the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability was performed.

  16. Optical control of filamentation-induced damage to DNA by intense, ultrashort, near-infrared laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmadhikari, J. A.; Dharmadhikari, A. K.; Kasuba, K. C.; Bharambe, H.; D’Souza, J. S.; Rathod, K. D.; Mathur, D.

    2016-06-01

    We report on damage to DNA in an aqueous medium induced by ultrashort pulses of intense laser light of 800 nm wavelength. Focusing of such pulses, using lenses of various focal lengths, induces plasma formation within the aqueous medium. Such plasma can have a spatial extent that is far in excess of the Rayleigh range. In the case of water, the resulting ionization and dissociation gives rise to in situ generation of low-energy electrons and OH-radicals. Interactions of these with plasmid DNA produce nicks in the DNA backbone: single strand breaks (SSBs) are induced as are, at higher laser intensities, double strand breaks (DSBs). Under physiological conditions, the latter are not readily amenable to repair. Systematic quantification of SSBs and DSBs at different values of incident laser energy and under different external focusing conditions reveals that damage occurs in two distinct regimes. Numerical aperture is the experimental handle that delineates the two regimes, permitting simple optical control over the extent of DNA damage.

  17. Mathematical modeling of a photovoltaic-laser energy converter for iodine laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Gilbert H.; Heinbockel, John H.

    1987-01-01

    Space-based laser power systems will require converters to change laser radiation into electricity. Vertical junction photovoltaic converters are promising devices for this use. A promising laser for the laser power station is the t-C4F9I laser which emits radiation at a wavelength of 1.315 microns. This paper describes the results of mathematical modeling of a photovoltaic-laser energy converter for use with this laser. The material for this photovoltaic converter is Ga(53)In(47)As which has a bandgap energy of 0.94 eV, slightly below the energy of the laser photons (0.943 eV). Results of a study optimizing the converter parameters are presented. Calculated efficiency for a 1000 vertical junction converter is 42.5 percent at a power density of 1 x 10 to the 3d power w/sq cm.

  18. 3D constitutive model of anisotropic damage for unidirectional ply based on physical failure mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qing, Hai; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2010-01-01

    A 3D anisotropic continuum damage model is developed for the computational analysis of the elastic–brittle behaviour of fibre-reinforced composite. The damage model is based on a set of phenomenological failure criteria for fibre-reinforced composite, which can distinguish the matrix and fibre...... failure under tensile and compressive loading. The homogenized continuum theory is adopted for the anisotropic elastic damage constitutive model. The damage modes occurring in the longitudinal and transverse directions of a ply are represented by a damage vector. The elastic damage model is implemented...

  19. Mobile Laser Scanning for Indoor Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, C.; Apostolopoulos, G.; Backes, D.; Boehm, J.

    2013-10-01

    The process of capturing and modelling buildings has gained increased focus in recent years with the rise of Building Information Modelling (BIM). At the heart of BIM is a process change for the construction and facilities management industries whereby a BIM aids more collaborative working through better information exchange, and as a part of the process Geomatic/Land Surveyors are not immune from the changes. Terrestrial laser scanning has been proscribed as the preferred method for rapidly capturing buildings for BIM geometry. This is a process change from a traditional measured building survey just with a total station and is aided by the increasing acceptance of point cloud data being integrated with parametric building models in BIM tools such as Autodesk Revit or Bentley Architecture. Pilot projects carried out previously by the authors to investigate the geometry capture and modelling of BIM confirmed the view of others that the process of data capture with static laser scan setups is slow and very involved requiring at least two people for efficiency. Indoor Mobile Mapping Systems (IMMS) present a possible solution to these issues especially in time saved. Therefore this paper investigates their application as a capture device for BIM geometry creation over traditional static methods through a fit-for-purpose test.

  20. Two-dimensional isotropic damage elastoplastic model for quasi-brittle material

    OpenAIRE

    Beneš, P. (Pavel); Vavřík, D. (Daniel)

    2014-01-01

    Micro-mechanical model for isotropic damage of quasi-brittle material including frictionis presented. Damage is assumed to be isotropic and scalar damage variable is employed . Operatorsplitting method is applied. The article contains derived expressions for derivations necessary forcomputation of coefficients in two dimensions for strain and damage normality rules.

  1. Modeling Lightning Impact Thermo-Mechanical Damage on Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Raúl; Delgado, Sofía; González, Carlos; López-Romano, Bernardo; Wang, De-Yi; LLorca, Javier

    2014-02-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced polymers, used in primary structures for aircraft due to an excellent strength-to-weight ratio when compared with conventional aluminium alloy counterparts, may nowadays be considered as mature structural materials. Their use has been extended in recent decades, with several aircraft manufacturers delivering fuselages entirely manufactured with carbon composites and using advanced processing technologies. However, one of the main drawbacks of using such composites entails their poor electrical conductivity when compared with aluminium alloy competitors that leads to lightning strikes being considered a significant threat during the service life of the aircraft. Traditionally, this problem was overcome with the use of a protective copper/bronze mesh that added additional weight and reduced the effectiveness of use of the material. Moreover, this traditional sizing method is based on vast experimental campaigns carried out by subjecting composite panels to simulated lightning strike events. While this method has proven its validity, and is necessary for certification of the structure, it may be optimized with the aid provided by physically based numerical models. This paper presents a model based on the finite element method that includes the sources of damage observed in a lightning strike, such as thermal damage caused by Joule overheating and electromagnetic/acoustic pressures induced by the arc around the attachment points. The results of the model are compared with lightning strike experiments carried out in a carbon woven composite.

  2. Experimental models of perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucci, R C

    1993-01-01

    Animal research has provided important information on the pathogenesis of and neuropathologic responses to perinatal cerebral hypoxia-ischemia. In experimental animals, structural brain damage from hypoxia-ischemia has been produced in immature rats, rabbits, guinea pigs, sheep and monkeys (18, 20, 24, 25, 38). Of the several available animal models, the fetal and newborn rhesus monkey and immature rat have been studied most extensively because of their similarities to humans in respect to the physiology of reproduction and their neuroanatomy at or shortly following birth. Given the frequency of occurrence of human perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage and the multiple, often severe neurologic handicaps which ensue in infants and children, it is not surprising that the above described animal models have been developed. These models have provided the basis for investigations to clarify not only physiologic and biochemical mechanisms of tissue injury but also the efficacy of specific management strategies. Hopefully, such animal research will continue to provide important information regarding how best to prevent or minimize the devastating consequences of perinatal cerebral hypoxia-ischemia.

  3. Cavity formation and surface modeling of laser milling process under a thin-flowing water layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangwarodomnukun, Viboon

    2016-11-01

    Laser milling process normally involves a number of laser scans over a workpiece to selectively remove the material and then to form cavities with shape and dimensions required. However, this process adversely causes a heat accumulation in work material, which can in turn damage the laser-milled area and vicinity in terms of recast deposition and change of material properties. Laser milling process performing in a thin-flowing water layer is a promising method that can overcome such damage. With the use of this technique, water can flush away the cut debris and at the same time cool the workpiece during the ablation. To understand the potential of this technique for milling application, the effects of process parameters on cavity dimensions and surface roughness were experimentally examined in this study. Titanium sheet was used as a workpiece to be milled by a nanosecond pulse laser under different water flow velocities. A smooth and uniform cut feature can be obtained when the metal was ablated under the high laser pulse frequency and high water flow velocity. Furthermore, a surface model based on the energy balance was developed in this study to predict the cavity profile and surface roughness. By comparing to the experiments, the predicted profiles had a good agreement with the measured ones.

  4. Nanoscale effects on the thermal and mechanical properties of AlGaAs/GaAs quantum well laser diodes: influence on the catastrophic optical damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souto, Jorge; Pura, José Luis; Jiménez, Juan

    2017-06-01

    In this work we study the catastrophic optical damage (COD) of graded-index separate confinement heterostructure quantum well (QW) laser diodes based on AlGaAs/GaAs. The emphasis is placed on the impact that the nanoscale physical properties have on the operation and degradation of the active layers of these devices. When these laser diodes run in continuous-wave mode with high internal optical power densities, the QW and guide layers can experiment very intense local heating phenomena that lead to device failure. A thermo-mechanical model has been set up to study the mechanism of degradation. This model has been solved by applying finite element methods. A variety of physical factors related to the materials properties, which play a paramount role in the laser degradation process, have been considered. Among these, the reduced thicknesses of the QW and the guides lead to thermal conductivities smaller than the bulk figures, which are further reduced as extended defects develop in these layers. This results in a progressively deteriorating thermal management in the device. To the best of our knowledge, this model for laser diodes is the first one to have taken into account low scale mechanical effects that result in enhanced strengths in the structural layers. Moreover, the consequences of these conflicting size-dependent properties on the thermo-mechanical behaviour on the route to COD are examined. Subsequently, this approach opens the possibility of taking advantage of these properties in order to design robust diode lasers (or other types of power devices) in a controlled manner.

  5. Effect of Heat Input on the Tensile Damage Evolution in Pulsed Laser Welded Ti6Al4V Titanium Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Gao, Xiaolong; Zhang, Jianxun

    2016-11-01

    The present paper is focused on studying the effect of heat input on the tensile damage evolution of pulsed Nd:YAG laser welding of Ti6Al4V alloy under monotonic loading. To analyze the reasons that the tensile fracture site of the pulsed-laser-welded Ti6Al4V sheet joints changes with the heat input under monotonic loading, the microstructure of the sample with different nominal strain values was investigated by in situ observation. Experiment results show that the tensile ductility and fatigue life of welded joints with low heat input are higher than that of welded joints with high heat input. Under tensile loads, the critical engineering strain for crack initiation is much lower in the welded joint with high heat input than in the welded joints with low and medium heat input. And the microstructural damage accumulation is much faster in the fusion zone than in the base metal for the welded joints with high input, whereas the microstructural damage accumulation is much faster in the base metal than in the fusion zone for the welded joints with low input. Consequently, the welded joints fractured in the fusion zone for the welds with high heat input, whereas the welded joints ruptured in the base metal for the welds with low heat input. It is proved that the fine grain microstructure produced by low heat input can improve the critical nominal strain for crack initiation and the resistance ability of microstructural damage.

  6. Damage threshold of coating materials on x-ray mirror for x-ray free electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Takahisa; Yumoto, Hirokatsu; Miura, Takanori; Tono, Kensuke; Togashi, Tadashi; Inubushi, Yuichi; Katayama, Tetsuo; Kim, Jangwoo; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Yabashi, Makina; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Ohashi, Haruhiko

    2016-05-01

    We evaluated the damage threshold of coating materials such as Mo, Ru, Rh, W, and Pt on Si substrates, and that of uncoated Si substrate, for mirror optics of X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs). Focused 1 μm (full width at half maximum) XFEL pulses with the energies of 5.5 and 10 keV, generated by the SPring-8 angstrom compact free electron laser (SACLA), were irradiated under the grazing incidence condition. The damage thresholds were evaluated by in situ measurements of X-ray reflectivity degradation during irradiation by multiple pulses. The measured damage fluences below the critical angles were sufficiently high compared with the unfocused SACLA beam fluence. Rh coating was adopted for two mirror systems of SACLA. One system was a beamline transport mirror system that was partially coated with Rh for optional utilization of a pink beam in the photon energy range of more than 20 keV. The other was an improved version of the 1 μm focusing mirror system, and no damage was observed after one year of operation.

  7. Surface Contaminant Control Technologies to Improve Laser Damage Resistance of Optics

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaofeng Cheng; Xinxiang Miao; Hongbin Wang; Lang Qin; Yayun Ye; Qun He; Zhiqiang Ma; Longbiao Zhao; Shaobo He

    2014-01-01

    The large high-power solid lasers, such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF) of America and the Shenguang-III (SG-III) laser facility of China, can output over 2.1 MJ laser pulse for the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. Because of the enhancement of operating flux and the expansion of laser driver scale, the problem of contamination seriously influences their construction period and operation life. During irradiation by intense laser beams, the contaminants on the metallic su...

  8. Modeling of high power laser interaction with metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Kurt; Zahide, Demircioǧlu

    2017-02-01

    Laser matter interaction has been very popular subject from the first recognition of lasers. Laser application in industry or laboratory applications are based on definite interactions of the laser beam with the workpiece. In this paper, an effective model related with high power radiation interaction with metals is presented. In metals, Lorentz-Drude model is used calculate permeability theoretically. The plasma frequency was calculated at various temperatures and using the obtained results the refractive index of the metal (Ag) was investigated. The calculation result revealed that the effect of the temperature need to be considered at reflection and transmission of the laser beam.

  9. Fuzzy model for Laser Assisted Bending Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannini Oliviero

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, a fuzzy model was developed to predict the residual bending in a conventional metal bending process assisted by a high power diode laser. The study was focused on AA6082T6 aluminium thin sheets. In most dynamic sheet metal forming operations, the highly nonlinear deformation processes cause large amounts of elastic strain energy stored in the formed material. The novel hybrid forming process was thus aimed at inducing the local heating of the mechanically bent workpiece in order to decrease or eliminate the related springback phenomena. In particular, the influence on the extent of springback phenomena of laser process parameters such as source power, scan speed and starting elastic deformation of mechanically bent sheets, was experimentally assessed. Consistent trends in experimental response according to operational parameters were found. Accordingly, 3D process maps of the extent of the springback phenomena according to operational parameters were constructed. The effect of the inherent uncertainties on the predicted residual bending caused by the approximation in the model parameters was evaluated. In particular, a fuzzy-logic based approach was used to describe the model uncertainties and the transformation method was applied to propagate their effect on the residual bending.

  10. Growth of laser-induced damage during repetitive illumination of HfO2-SiO2 multilayer mirror and polarizer coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genin, F.Y.; Stolz, C.J.; Kozlowski, M.R.

    1997-01-01

    As peak fluence of high power lasers is increased, it becomes necessary to tolerate damage on mirrors, polarizers. To study how different types of damage morphologies initiate and grow during repetitive illumination, hafnia-silica multilayer mirror and polarizer coatings were laser damage tested. The coatings were prepared by e-beam evaporation and irradiated with a 3-ns pulse at 1064 nm. The damage morphology was recorded after each shot to determine the types of damage that cause massive unstable failure and lower the optic`s functional damage threshold. Results were summarized on damage stability maps plotting the average damage size vs number of shots for fluences ranging from 10 to 40 J/cm{sup 2}. The maps indicate that the commonly observed damage morphologies (pits, flat bottom pits, scalds, outer layer delamination) have distinct growth behaviors and influence the value of the functional damage threshold differently. While pits are stable up to fluences as high as 40 J/cm{sup 2}, flat bottom pits can grow during repetitive illumination above a critical fluence of about 35 J/cm{sup 2}. Scalds are formed in the first shot and never grow at fluences below 40 J/cm{sup 2}. Finally, delaminates are highly unstable and have the potential for damaging the coating catastrophically above 15 J/cm{sup 2}. Results show that delaminate damage should be prevented; this knowledge has allowed coatings development efforts to focus on eliminating the origin of such damage morphology.

  11. Prediction of cavitation damage on spillway using K-nearest neighbor modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadaei Kermani, E; Barani, G A; Ghaeini-Hessaroeyeh, M

    2015-01-01

    Cavitation is a common and destructive process on spillways that threatens the stability of the structure and causes damage. In this study, based on the nearest neighbor model, a method has been presented to predict cavitation damage on spillways. The model was tested using data from the Shahid Abbaspour dam spillway in Iran. The level of spillway cavitation damage was predicted for eight different flow rates, using the nearest neighbor model. Moreover, based on the cavitation index, five damage levels from no damage to major damage have been determined. Results showed that the present model predicted damage locations and levels close to observed damage during past floods. Finally, the efficiency and precision of the model was quantified by statistical coefficients. Appropriate values of the correlation coefficient, root mean square error, mean absolute error and coefficient of residual mass show the present model is suitable and efficient.

  12. Stiffness degradation-based damage model for RC members and structures using fiber-beam elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zongming; Zhang, Yaoting; Lu, Jiezhi; Fan, Jian

    2016-12-01

    To meet the demand for an accurate and highly efficient damage model with a distinct physical meaning for performance-based earthquake engineering applications, a stiffness degradation-based damage model for reinforced concrete (RC) members and structures was developed using fiber beam-column elements. In this model, damage indices for concrete and steel fibers were defined by the degradation of the initial reloading modulus and the low-cycle fatigue law. Then, section, member, story and structure damage was evaluated by the degradation of the sectional bending stiffness, rod-end bending stiffness, story lateral stiffness and structure lateral stiffness, respectively. The damage model was realized in Matlab by reading in the outputs of OpenSees. The application of the damage model to RC columns and a RC frame indicates that the damage model is capable of accurately predicting the magnitude, position, and evolutionary process of damage, and estimating story damage more precisely than inter-story drift. Additionally, the damage model establishes a close connection between damage indices at various levels without introducing weighting coefficients or force-displacement relationships. The development of the model has perfected the damage assessment function of OpenSees, laying a solid foundation for damage estimation at various levels of a large-scale structure subjected to seismic loading.

  13. Modelling elliptically polarised Free Electron Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Henderson, J R; Freund, H P; McNeil, B W J

    2016-01-01

    A model of a Free Electron Laser operating with an elliptically polarised undulator is presented. The equations describing the FEL interaction, including resonant harmonic radiation fields, are averaged over an undulator period and generate a generalised Bessel function scaling factor, similar to that of planar undulator FEL theory. Comparison between simulations of the averaged model with those of an unaveraged model show very good agreement in the linear regime. Two unexpected results were found. Firstly, an increased coupling to harmonics for elliptical rather than planar polarisarised undulators. Secondly, and thought to be unrelated to the undulator polarisation, a signficantly different evolution between the averaged and unaveraged simulations of the harmonic radiation evolution approaching FEL saturation.

  14. Modeling by regression for laser cutting of quartz crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Presents the theoretical models built by analysis of the mechanism of laser cutting of quartz crystal and re gression of test results for the laser cutting of quartz crystal, and comparative analysis of calculation errors for these models, and concludes with test results that these models comprehensively reflect the physical features of laser cutting of quartz crystal and satisfy the industrial production requirements, and they can be used to select right parameters for improvement of productivity and quality and saving of energy.

  15. Modeling radiation damage to pixel sensors in the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ducourthial, Audrey; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Silicon pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). As the closest detector component to the interaction point, these detectors will be subjected to a significant amount of radiation over their lifetime: prior to the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of $10^{15}n_{eq}/cm^2$ and the HL-HLC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. Simulating radiation damage is critical in order to make accurate predictions for current future detector performance that will enable searches for new particles and forces as well as precision measurements of Standard Model particles such as the Higgs boson. We present a digitization model that includes radiation damage effects to the ATLAS pixel sensors for the first time. In addition to thoroughly describing the setup, we present first predictions for basic pixel cluster properties alongside ...

  16. Modeling Radiation Damage to Pixel Sensors in the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ducourthial, Audrey; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Silicon pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). As the closest detector component to the interaction point, these detectors will be subjected to a significant amount of radiation over their lifetime: prior to the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of $10^{15} n_{eq}/cm^2$ and the HL-HLC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. Simulating radiation damage is critical in order to make accurate predictions for current future detector performance that will enable searches for new particles and forces as well as precision measurements of Standard Model particles such as the Higgs boson. We present a digitization model that includes radiation damage effects to the ATLAS pixel sensors for the first time. In addition to thoroughly describing the setup, we present first predictions for basic pixel cluster properties alongside...

  17. Evaluation of thermal damage in dental implants after irradiation with 980nm diode laser. An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Cafiero

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to analyze the thermal damage in dental implants after irradiations with a 980nm diode laser, normally used for the decontamination. Material and Methods: Five Titanium Plasma Sprayed dental implants were irradiated with a 980nm diode laser at different parameters. Temperature increase on implant surface was evaluated by a Mid-Wavelength Infrared thermal-camera (Merlin®, FLIR, USA. Temperature increase (ΔT was compared to environmental temperature (27°C and recorded in three points: “A” (laser spot, “B” (3mm apically to the laser spot and “C” (2mm horizontally to the laser spot. Finally, a morphological evaluation at optical stereomicroscopy was performed. Results: When 0.6W power was applied, a moderate increase of temperature in point A (5.5°C-15.0°C, a slight increase in point B (0.1°C-6.2°C and point C (0.1°C-5.7°C, were registered after 30” of irradiation. In the samples treated at 6W, in “point A” an impressive ΔT increase was immediately recorded (over 70°C. In “point B” was recorded a slight ΔT after 2 sec. irradiation (range 2.3°C-6.0°C, a moderate ΔT after 4 sec. irradiation (16.4°C and a consistent ΔT after 8-10 sec. irradiation (range 36.6°C-46.2°C. In “point C” ΔT values were very similar to those collected in “point B”. Optical stereomicroscopy examination at a magnification of 32x did not show any surface alteration or damage after whichever laser irradiation independently from irradiation time and power output . Conclusions: 980nm diode laser, used at controlled parameters, can be used in the decontamination of dental implants, without causing any thermal damage or increase.

  18. Modeling oxidation damage of continuous fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-Peng Yang; Gui-Qiong Jiao; Bo Wang

    2011-01-01

    For fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), oxidation of the constituents is a very important damage type for high temperature applications. During the oxidizing process, the pyrolytic carbon interphase gradually recesses from the crack site in the axial direction of the fiber into the interior of the material. Carbon fiber usually presents notch-like or local neck-shrink oxidation phenomenon, causing strength degradation. But, the reason for SiC fiber degradation is the flaw growth mechanism on its surface. A micromechanical model based on the above mechanisms was established to simulate the mechanical properties of CMCs after high temperature oxidation. The statistic and shearlag theory were applied and the calculation expressions for retained tensile modulus and strength were deduced, respectively. Meanwhile, the interphase recession and fiber strength degradation were considered. And then, the model was validated by application to a C/SiC composite.

  19. Modeling beam propagation and frequency conversion for the beamlet laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auerbach, J.M.

    1996-06-01

    The development of the Beamlet laser has involved extensive and detailed modeling of laser performance and beam propagation to: (1) predict the performance limits of the laser, (2) select system configurations with higher performance, (3) analyze experiments and provide guidance for subsequent laser shots, and (4) design optical components and establish component manufacturing specifications. In contrast to modeling efforts of previous laser systems such as Nova, those for Beamlet include as much measured optical characterization data as possible. This article concentrates on modeling of beam propagation in the Beamlet laser system, including the frequency converter, and compares modeling predictions with experimental results for several Beamlet shots. It briefly describes the workstation-based propagation and frequency conversion codes used to accomplish modeling of the Beamlet.

  20. Laser-induced breakdown and damage generation by nonlinear frequency conversion in ferroelectric crystals: Experiment and theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louchev, Oleg A.; Saito, Norihito; Wada, Satoshi [Center for Advanced Photonics, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Hatano, Hideki; Kitamura, Kenji [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

    2013-11-28

    Using our experimental data for ns pulsed second harmonic generation (SHG) by periodically poled stoichiometric LiTaO{sub 3} (PPSLT) crystals, we consider in detail the mechanism underlying laser-induced damage in ferroelectric crystals. This mechanism involves generation and heating of free electrons, providing an effective kinetic pathway for electric breakdown and crystal damage in ns pulsed operation via combined two-photon absorption (TPA) and induced pyroelectric field. In particular, a temperature increase in the lattice of ≈1 K induced initially by ns SHG and TPA at the rear of operating PPSLT crystal is found to induce a gradient of spontaneous polarization generating a pyroelectric field of ≈10 kV/cm, accelerating free electrons generated by TPA to an energy of ≈10 eV, followed by impact ionization and crystal damage. Under the damage threshold for ns operation, the impact ionization does not lead to the avalanche-like increase of free electron density, in contrast to the case of shorter ps and fs pulses. However, the total number of collisions by free electrons, ≈10{sup 18} cm{sup −3} (generated during the pulse and accelerated to the energy of ≈10 eV), can produce widespread structural defects, which by entrapping electrons dramatically increase linear absorption for both harmonics in subsequent pulses, creating a positive feedback for crystal lattice heating, pyroelectric field and crystal damage. Under pulse repetition, defect generation starting from the rear of the crystal can propagate towards its center and front side producing damage tracks along the laser beam and stopping SHG. Theoretical analysis leads to numerical estimates and analytical approximation for the threshold laser fluence for onset of this damage mechanism, which agree well with our (i) experiments for the input 1064 nm radiation in 6.8 kHz pulsed SHG by PPSLT crystal, (ii) pulsed low frequency 532 nm radiation transmission experiments, and also (iii) with the data

  1. Analysis of surface damage produced by pulsed laser ablation on metal Al and semiconductor Si

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ManBao-Yuan; LiuAi-Hua; 等

    1998-01-01

    The suraface morphological changesd produced by Nd:YAG pulsed laser ablation of metal Al and semiconductor Si were carefully examined and analyzed by using scanning elkectron microscope.The formation mechanism of the droplets was discussed.and the reasons for formation of the microcracks on the laser irradiated area of the target surface were analyzed by calculating the thermal stress,the vapor pressure and the shock pressure induced by the laser supported detonation.

  2. Thermal and damage data from multiple microsecond pulse trains at 532nm in an in vitro retinal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Michael L.; Tijerina, Amanda J.; Hoffman, Aaron; Clark, Clifton D.; Noojin, Gary D.; Rickman, John M.; Castellanos, Cherry C.; Shingledecker, Aurora D.; Boukhris, Sarah J.; Thomas, Robert J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.

    2014-03-01

    An artificially pigmented retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell model was used to study the damage rates for exposure to 1, 10, 100, and 1,000 230-μs laser pulses at 532 nm, at two different concentrations of melanosome particles (MPs) per cell. Multiple pulses were delivered at pulse repetition rates of 50 and 99 pulses per second. Standard fluorescence viability indicator dyes and the method of microthermography were used to assess damage and thermal responses, respectively. Although frame rate during microthermography was more than five times slower than the duration of laser pulses, thermal information was useful in refining the BTEC computational model for simulating high-resolution thermal responses by the pigmented cells. When we temporally sampled the thermal model output at a rate similar to our microthermography, the resulting thermal profiles for multiple pulses resembled the thermal experimental profiles. Complementary to the thermal simulations, our computer-generated thresholds were in good agreement with the in vitro data. Findings are examined within the context of common exposure limit definitions in the national and international laser safety standards.

  3. Using landscape analysis to assess and model tsunami damage in Aceh province, Sumatra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis R. Iverson; Anantha Prasad

    2007-01-01

    The nearly unprecedented loss of life resulting from the earthquake and tsunami of December 26,2004, was greatest in the province of Aceh, Sumatra (Indonesia). We evaluated tsunami damage and built empirical vulnerability models of damage/no damage based on elevation, distance from shore, vegetation, and exposure. We found that highly predictive models are possible and...

  4. Modelling of Damage During Hot Forging of Ingots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Bay, Niels

    2013-01-01

    the damage analysis on the Cockcroft & Latham criterion, since this with changing cut-off value does not inconsistently change the location of damage, in contradiction to the other investigated criteria, and since it is able to predict damage in processes, which are slightly compressive....

  5. Simulating the classical XY model with a laser network

    CERN Document Server

    Tamate, Shuhei; Marandi, Alireza; McMahon, Peter; Utsunomiya, Shoko

    2016-01-01

    Drawing fair samples from the Boltzmann distribution of a statistical model is a challenging task for modern digital computers. We propose a physical implementation of a Boltzmann sampler for the classical XY model by using a laser network. The XY spins are mapped onto the phases of multiple laser pulses in a fiber ring cavity and the steady-state distribution of phases naturally realizes the Boltzmann distribution of the corresponding XY model. We experimentally implement the laser network by using an actively mode-locked fiber laser with optical delay lines, and demonstrate Boltzmann sampling for a one-dimensional XY ring.

  6. Laser phototherapy triggers the production of reactive oxygen species in oral epithelial cells without inducing DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillenburg, Caroline Siviero; Almeida, Luciana Oliveira; Martins, Manoela Domingues; Squarize, Cristiane Helena; Castilho, Rogerio Moraes

    2014-04-01

    Laser phototherapy (LPT) is widely used in clinical practice to accelerate healing. Although the use of LPT has advantages, the molecular mechanisms involved in the process of accelerated healing and the safety concerns associated with LPT are still poorly understood. We investigated the physiological effects of LPT irradiation on the production and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), genomic instability, and deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) damage in human epithelial cells. In contrast to a high energy density (20  J/cm²), laser administered at a low energy density (4  J/cm²) resulted in the accumulation of ROS. Interestingly, 4  J/cm² of LPT did not induce DNA damage, genomic instability, or nuclear influx of the BRCA1 DNA damage repair protein, a known genome protective molecule that actively participates in DNA repair. Our results suggest that administration of low energy densities of LPT induces the accumulation of safe levels of ROS, which may explain the accelerated healing results observed in patients. These findings indicate that epithelial cells have an endowed molecular circuitry that responds to LPT by physiologically inducing accumulation of ROS, which triggers accelerated healing. Importantly, our results suggest that low energy densities of LPT can serve as a safe therapy to accelerate epithelial healing.

  7. Damage threshold of inorganic solids under free-electron-laser irradiation at 32.5 nm wavelength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hau-Riege, S; London, R A; Bionta, R M; McKernan, M A; Baker, S L; Krzywinski, J; Sobierajski, R; Nietubyc, R; Pelka, J B; Jurek, M; Klinger, D; Juha, L; Chalupsky, J; Cihelka, J; Hajkova, V; Koptyaev, S; Velyhan, A; Krasa, J; Kuba, J; Tiedtke, K; Toleikis, S; Tschentscher, T; Wabnitz, H; Bergh, M; Caleman, C; Sokolowski-Tinten, K; Stojanovic, N; Zastrau, U; Tronnier, A; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J

    2007-12-03

    We exposed samples of B4C, amorphous C, chemical-vapor-deposition (CVD)-diamond C, Si, and SiC to single 25 fs-long pulses of 32.5 nm free-electron-laser radiation at fluences of up to 2.2 J/cm{sup 2}. The samples were chosen as candidate materials for x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) optics. We found that the threshold for surface-damage is on the order of the fluence required for thermal melting. For larger fluences, the crater depths correspond to temperatures on the order of the critical temperature, suggesting that the craters are formed by two-phase vaporization [1]. XFELs have the promise of producing extremely high-intensity ultrashort pulses of coherent, monochromatic radiation in the 1 to 10 keV regime. The expected high output fluence and short pulse duration pose significant challenges to the optical components, including radiation damage. It has not been possible to obtain direct experimental verification of the expected damage thresholds since appropriate x-ray sources are not yet available. FLASH has allowed us to study the interaction of high-fluence short-duration photon pulses with materials at the shortest wavelength possible to date. With these experiments, we have come closer to the extreme conditions expected in XFEL-matter interaction scenarios than previously possible.

  8. Bi-variable damage model for fatigue life prediction of metal components

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miao Zhang; Qing-Chun Meng; Xing Zhang; Wei-Ping Hu

    2011-01-01

    Based on the theory of continuum damage mechanics, a bi-variable damage mechanics model is developed, which, according to thermodynamics, is accessible to derivation of damage driving force, damage evolution equation and damage evolution criteria. Furthermore, damage evolution equations of time rate are established by the generalized Drucker's postulate. The damage evolution equation of cycle rate is obtained by integrating the time damage evolution equations, and the fatigue life prediction method for smooth specimens under repeated loading with constant strain amplitude is constructed. Likewise, for notched specimens under the repeated loading with constant strain amplitude, the fatigue life prediction method is obtained on the ground of the theory of conservative integral in damage mechanics. Thus, the material parameters in the damage evolution equation can be obtained by reference to the fatigue test results of standard specimens with stress concentration factor equal to 1, 2 and 3.

  9. Low level laser therapy before eccentric exercise reduces muscle damage markers in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroni, Bruno Manfredini; Leal Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; De Marchi, Thiago; Lopes, André Luiz; Salvador, Mirian; Vaz, Marco Aurélio

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of low level laser therapy (LLLT) treatment before knee extensor eccentric exercise on indirect markers of muscle damage. Thirty-six healthy men were randomized in LLLT group (n = 18) and placebo group (n = 18). After LLLT or placebo treatment, subjects performed 75 maximal knee extensors eccentric contractions (five sets of 15 repetitions; velocity = 60° seg(-1); range of motion = 60°). Muscle soreness (visual analogue scale--VAS), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) levels were measured prior to exercise, and 24 and 48 h after exercise. Muscle function (maximal voluntary contraction--MVC) was measured before exercise, immediately after, and 24 and 48 h post-exercise. Groups had no difference on kineanthropometric characteristics and on eccentric exercise performance. They also presented similar baseline values of VAS (0.00 mm for LLLT and placebo groups), LDH (LLLT = 186 IU/l; placebo = 183 IU/l), CK (LLLT = 145 IU/l; placebo = 155 IU/l) and MVC (LLLT = 293 Nm; placebo = 284 Nm). VAS data did not show group by time interaction (P = 0.066). In the other outcomes, LLLT group presented (1) smaller increase on LDH values 48 h post-exercise (LLLT = 366 IU/l; placebo = 484 IU/l; P = 0.017); (2) smaller increase on CK values 24 h (LLLT = 272 IU/l; placebo = 498 IU/l; P = 0.020) and 48 h (LLLT = 436 IU/l; placebo = 1328 IU/l; P exercise; (3) smaller decrease on MVC immediately after exercise (LLLT = 189 Nm; placebo = 154 Nm; P = 0.011), and 24 h (LLLT = 249 Nm; placebo = 205 Nm; P = 0.004) and 48 h (LLLT = 267 Nm; placebo = 216 Nm; P = 0.001) post-exercise compared with the placebo group. In conclusion, LLLT treatment before eccentric exercise was effective in terms of attenuating the increase of muscle proteins in the blood serum and the decrease in muscle force.

  10. Model system for investigating laser-induced subcellular microeffects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huettmann, Gereon; Serbin, Jesper; Radt, Benno; Lange, Bjoern I.; Birngruber, Reginald

    2001-07-01

    Background: Laser induced protein denaturation is of fundamental interest for understanding the mechanisms of laser tissue interaction. Conjugates of nanoabsorbers coupled to proteins are presented as a model system for investigating ultrafast protein denaturation. Irradiation of the conjugates using repetitive picosecond laser pulses, which are only absorbed by the nanoabsorbers, could result in effects with a spatial confinement of less than 100 nm. Materials and Methods: Experiments were done with bovine intestinal alkaline phosphates (aP) coupled to 15 nm colloidal gold. This complex was irradiated at 527 nm wavelength and 35 ps pulse width with a varying number of pulses ranging form one up to 104. The radiant exposure per pulse was varied form 2 mJ/cm2 to 50 mJ/cm2. Denaturation was detected as a loss of protein function with the help of the fluorescence substrate 4MUP. Results and discussion: Irradiation did result in a steady decrease of the aP activity with increasing radiant exposures and increasing number of pulses. A maximal inactivation of 80% was reached with 104 pulses and 50 mJ/cm2 per pulse. The temperature in the particles and the surrounding water was calculated using Mie's formulas for the absorption of the nanometer gold particles and ana analytical solution of the equations for heat diffusion. With 50 mJ/cm2, the particles are heated above the melting point of gold. Since the temperature calculations strongly depend on changes in the state of matter of the particles and water, a very sophisticated thermal model is necessary to calculate exact temperatures. It is difficult to identify one of the possible mechanisms, thermal denaturation, photochemical denaturation or formation of micro bubbles from the dependance of the inactivation on pulse energy and number of applied pulses. Therefore, experiments are needed to further elucidate the damage mechanisms. In conclusion, denaturing proteins irreversibly via nanoabsorbers using picosecond laser

  11. The influence of water/air cooling on collateral tissue damage using a diode laser with an innovative pulse design (micropulsed mode)-an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, F; Körpert, W; Buchmair, A G; Passow, H; Meinl, A; Heimel, P; Moritz, A

    2013-05-01

    Since the diode laser is a good compromise for the daily use in dental offices, finding usage in numerous dental indications (e.g., surgery, periodontics, and endodontics), the minimization of the collateral damage in laser surgery is important to improve the therapeutical outcome. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of water/air cooling on the collateral thermal soft tissue damage of 980-nm diode laser incisions. A total of 36 mechanically executed laser cuts in pork liver were made with a 980-nm diode laser in micropulsed mode with three different settings of water/air cooling and examined by histological assessment to determine the area and size of carbonization, necrosis, and reversible tissue damage as well as incision depth and width. In our study, clearly the incision depth increased significantly under water/air cooling (270.9 versus 502.3 μm-test group 3) without significant changes of incision width. In test group 2, the total area of damage was significantly smaller than in the control group (in this group, the incision depth increases by 65 %). In test group 3, the total area of damage was significantly higher (incision depth increased by 85 %), but the bigger part of it represented a reversible tissue alteration leaving the amount of irreversible damage almost the same as in the control group. This first pilot study clearly shows that water/air cooling in vitro has an effect on collateral tissue damage. Further studies will have to verify, if the reduced collateral damage we have proved in this study can lead to accelerated wound healing. Reduction of collateral thermal damage after diode laser incisions is clinically relevant for promoted wound healing.

  12. Modeling of laser induced periodic surface structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skolski, J.Z.P.; Römer, G.R.B.E.; Huis in 't Veld, A.J.; Mitko, V.S.; Obona, J.V.; Ocelik, V.; Hosson, J.T.M. de

    2010-01-01

    In surfaces irradiated by short laser pulses, Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS) have been observed on all kind of materials for over forty years. These LIPSS, also referred to as ripples, consist of wavy surfaces with periodicity equal or smaller than the wavelength of the laser radi

  13. A Combined Mathematical-Physical Model of Laser-Induced Thermotherapy (LITT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevoldsen, Marie Sand; Skovgaard, Ove; Andersen, Peter E.

    2009-01-01

    Laser{induced thermo therapy (LITT) is an alternative, gentle therapy of cancer. In this work a new computa- tional model (3D space and time) of LITT is presented. Using an arbitrary small number (low energy laser light sources are applied internal to an arbitrary...... shaped tumor in the human liver. The power and position of each source can be chosen arbitrary. Each source is a spherical point source emitting light isotropically. The model consists of two, semi{coupled partial di®erential equations (PDEs) describing the light distribution and the heat absorption...... in the target tissue. Since water is a dominant tissue component in both the healthy liver and the malignant tumor the wavelength of the laser is chosen in the NIR area (1,064 nm). This is expected to form an absorption contrast in favor of the tumor leading to high temperature and damage of the tumor cells...

  14. Testicular Damage following Testicular Sperm Retrieval: A Ram Model Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Fedder

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible development of histological abnormalities such as fibrosis and microcalcifications after sperm retrieval in a ram model. Fourteen testicles in nine rams were exposed to open biopsy, multiple TESAs, or TESE, and the remaining four testicles were left unoperated on as controls. Three months after sperm retrieval, the testicles were removed, fixed, and cut into 1/2 cm thick slices and systematically put onto a glass plate exposing macroscopic abnormalities. Tissue from abnormal areas was cut into 3 μm sections and stained for histological evaluation. Pathological abnormalities were observed in testicles exposed to sperm retrieval (≥11 of 14 compared to 0 of 4 control testicles. Testicular damage was found independently of the kind of intervention used. Therefore, cryopreservation of excess sperm should be considered while retrieving sperm.

  15. Modeling Radiation Damage to Pixel Sensors in the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Nachman, Benjamin Philip; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Silicon Pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS detector. As the detector in closest proximity to the interaction point, these detectors will be subjected to a significant amount of radiation over their lifetime: prior to the HL-LHC, the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of $10^{15}$ 1 MeV $n_\\mathrm{eq}/\\mathrm{cm}^2$ and the HL-LHC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. This talk presents a digitization model that includes radiation damage effects to the ATLAS Pixel sensors for the first time. After a thorough description of the setup, predictions for basic Pixel cluster properties are presented alongside first validation studies with Run 2 collision data.

  16. A 3D Orthotropic Strain-Rate Dependent Elastic Damage Material Model.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    English, Shawn Allen

    2014-09-01

    A three dimensional orthotropic elastic constitutive model with continuum damage and cohesive based fracture is implemented for a general polymer matrix composite lamina. The formulation assumes the possibility of distributed (continuum) damage followed b y localized damage. The current damage activation functions are simply partially interactive quadratic strain criteria . However, the code structure allows for changes in the functions without extraordinary effort. The material model formulation, implementation, characterization and use cases are presented.

  17. A robust operational model for predicting where tropical cyclone waves damage coral reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puotinen, Marji; Maynard, Jeffrey A.; Beeden, Roger; Radford, Ben; Williams, Gareth J.

    2016-05-01

    Tropical cyclone (TC) waves can severely damage coral reefs. Models that predict where to find such damage (the ‘damage zone’) enable reef managers to: 1) target management responses after major TCs in near-real time to promote recovery at severely damaged sites; and 2) identify spatial patterns in historic TC exposure to explain habitat condition trajectories. For damage models to meet these needs, they must be valid for TCs of varying intensity, circulation size and duration. Here, we map damage zones for 46 TCs that crossed Australia’s Great Barrier Reef from 1985–2015 using three models – including one we develop which extends the capability of the others. We ground truth model performance with field data of wave damage from seven TCs of varying characteristics. The model we develop (4MW) out-performed the other models at capturing all incidences of known damage. The next best performing model (AHF) both under-predicted and over-predicted damage for TCs of various types. 4MW and AHF produce strikingly different spatial and temporal patterns of damage potential when used to reconstruct past TCs from 1985–2015. The 4MW model greatly enhances both of the main capabilities TC damage models provide to managers, and is useful wherever TCs and coral reefs co-occur.

  18. Experimental microendoscopic photoablative laser goniotomy as a surgical model for the treatment of dysgenetic glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobi, P C; Dietlein, T S; Krieglstein, G K

    1996-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of photoablative Er:YAG laser goniotomy under microendoscopic control in a surgical cloudy corneal model of primary infantile glaucoma. Pectinate ligaments of 12 freshly enucleated cadaver porcine eyes were treated by ab interno single-pulse (5 mJ, 200 microseconds) Er:YAG laser (2.94 microns) photoablation. Through a clear corneal incision near the limbus an ophthalmic microendoscope (18 and 20 gauge) was inserted into the anterior chamber. Internal structures were observed and photoablative laser goniotomy was conducted under video guidance. Following treatment all eyes were prepared for light and scanning electron microscopy. Anterior chamber angle structures and tissue photoablation were clearly visualized on the videoscreen using ophthalmic microendoscopy. Energy settings of 5 mJ per pulse proved to be sufficient for reproducible photoablation of pectinate ligaments, accompanied by the root of the iris falling back and exposing trabecular meshwork. This was confirmed histopathologically. Scatter thermal damage was less than 30 microns. This new therapeutic modality, which combines endoscopic visualization of the internal structures with photoablative laser goniotomy, can be effective in the management of dysgenetic glaucoma in the presence of a cloudy cornea. High reproducibility of contact laser photoablation enabled sufficient control of incision depth and was not accompanied by inadvertent tissue damage to adjacent intraocular structures.

  19. Facade model refinement by fusing terrestrial laser data and image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yawen; Qin, Sushun

    2015-12-01

    The building facade model is one of main landscapes of a city and basic data of city geographic information. It is widely useful in accurate path planning, real navigation through the urban environment, location-based application, etc. In this paper, a method of facade model refinement by fusing terrestrial laser data and image is presented. It uses the matching of model edge and image line combined with laser data verification and effectively refines facade geometry model that reconstructed from laser data. The laser data of geometric structures on building facade such as window, balcony and door are segmented, and used as a constraint for further selecting the optical model edges that are located at the cross-line of point data and no data. The results demonstrate the deviation of model edges caused by laser sampling interval can be removed in the proposed method.

  20. PHARAO Laser Source Flight Model: Design and Performances

    CERN Document Server

    Lévèque, Thomas; Esnault, François-Xavier; Delaroche, Christophe; Massonnet, Didier; Grosjean, Olivier; Buffe, Fabrice; Torresi, Patrizia; Bomer, Thierry; Pichon, Alexandre; Béraud, Pascal; Lelay, Jean-Pierre; Thomin, Stéphane; Laurent, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the design and the main performances of the PHARAO laser source flight model. PHARAO is a laser cooled cesium clock specially designed for operation in space and the laser source is one of the main sub-systems. The flight model presented in this work is the first remote-controlled laser system designed for spaceborne cold atom manipulation. The main challenges arise from mechanical compatibility with space constraints, which impose a high level of compactness, a low electric power consumption, a wide range of operating temperature and a vacuum environment. We describe the main functions of the laser source and give an overview of the main technologies developed for this instrument. We present some results of the qualification process. The characteristics of the laser source flight model, and their impact on the clock performances, have been verified in operational conditions.

  1. PHARAO laser source flight model: Design and performances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lévèque, T., E-mail: thomas.leveque@cnes.fr; Faure, B.; Esnault, F. X.; Delaroche, C.; Massonnet, D.; Grosjean, O.; Buffe, F.; Torresi, P. [Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales, 18 avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France); Bomer, T.; Pichon, A.; Béraud, P.; Lelay, J. P.; Thomin, S. [Sodern, 20 Avenue Descartes, 94451 Limeil-Brévannes (France); Laurent, Ph. [LNE-SYRTE, CNRS, UPMC, Observatoire de Paris, 61 avenue de l’Observatoire, 75014 Paris (France)

    2015-03-15

    In this paper, we describe the design and the main performances of the PHARAO laser source flight model. PHARAO is a laser cooled cesium clock specially designed for operation in space and the laser source is one of the main sub-systems. The flight model presented in this work is the first remote-controlled laser system designed for spaceborne cold atom manipulation. The main challenges arise from mechanical compatibility with space constraints, which impose a high level of compactness, a low electric power consumption, a wide range of operating temperature, and a vacuum environment. We describe the main functions of the laser source and give an overview of the main technologies developed for this instrument. We present some results of the qualification process. The characteristics of the laser source flight model, and their impact on the clock performances, have been verified in operational conditions.

  2. Insight to UV-induced formation of laser damage on LiB(3)O(5) optical surfaces during long-term sum-frequency generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, S; Andresen, A; Merschjann, C; Zimmermann, B; Prinz, M; Imlau, M

    2007-06-11

    Microscopic investigations of UV-induced formation of laser damage on LiB(3)O(5) optical surfaces during long-term sum-frequency generation (SFG) uncovers a significant growth of a SiO(2)-amorphous layer spatially limited to the illuminated area. The layer gives rise to a catastrophic break-down of the LiB(3)O(5)-output surface upon long-term laser operation even at intensities far below the laser-induced damage threshold. The interaction of UV laser light, LiB(3)O(5) surface and foreign atoms in the ambient atmosphere is discussed in the frame of a two-step process for surface-damage formation.

  3. Modeling of Coupled Nano-Cavity Lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgård, Troels Suhr

    Modeling of nanocavity light emitting semiconductor devices is done using the semiconductor laser rate equations with spontaneous and stimulated emission terms modified for Purcell enhanced recombination. The modified terms include details about the optical and electronic density......, coupled photonic crystal nanocavity structures are simulated. The resonance frequencies of in-phase and out-of-phase coupled quadrupole modes in rectangular photonic crystal H1 cavities are extracted and are found to vary non-trivially with the intercavity separation. A qualitative explanation is given...... in terms of the in-plane mode profiles. Fareld emission patterns for the structures are calculated based on the finite-dierence time-domain simulations. It is found that only systems with an even number of holes separating the cavities show clear signs of being coupled. This non-trivial coupling behavior...

  4. Analysis of the damage effect of femtosecond-laser irradiation on extreme ultraviolet Mo/Si multilayer coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suman, M. [National Research Council-Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, IFN-CNR, via Trasea 7, Padova, 35131 (Italy); Monaco, G., E-mail: monaco.gianni@gmail.com [National Research Council-Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, IFN-CNR, via Trasea 7, Padova, 35131 (Italy); Information Engineering Department, University of Padova, via Gradenigo 6B, Padova, 35131 (Italy); Zuppella, P. [National Research Council-Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, IFN-CNR, via Trasea 7, Padova, 35131 (Italy); Nicolosi, P.; Pelizzo, M.G. [National Research Council-Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, IFN-CNR, via Trasea 7, Padova, 35131 (Italy); Information Engineering Department, University of Padova, via Gradenigo 6B, Padova, 35131 (Italy); Ferrari, F.; Lucchini, M.; Nisoli, M. [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Physics and Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, IFN-CNR, Piazza L. da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2012-01-01

    Damage analysis of Mo/Si multilayer coatings exposed to fs infrared laser irradiation has been performed. The Mo/Si a-periodic multilayer samples were specifically designed with wide reflectivity bandwidth and suitable phase chirp in order to reflect attosecond pulses. After irradiation, the mirror surface was analyzed by using an optical microscope and a profilometer. The stoichiometry of the compounds formed at the sample surface after the irradiation was investigated using X-Ray photoemission spectroscopy. The performances of the irradiated samples with the reflected pulse characteristics have been derived via reflectivity and phase measurements.

  5. Bulk growth, structure, optical properties and laser damage threshold of organic nonlinear optical crystals of Imidazolium L-Ascorbate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saripalli, Ravi Kiran; Bhat, H. L.; Elizabeth, Suja

    2016-09-01

    Bulk, transparent organic nonlinear optical (NLO) single-crystals of imidazolium L-Ascorbate (ImLA) were grown using slow-evaporation. Crystal structure was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Preliminary linear optical measurements through UV-Visible and infrared spectroscopy revealed good optical transmittance and a low near-UV cutoff wavelength at 256 nm. Kurtz and Perry powder test revealed that ImLA is a phase-matchable NLO material with a second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency of 1.2 times larger than that of standard KH2PO4 (KDP). Laser damage thresholds were determined for ImLA.

  6. Threshold Damage of In vivo Porcine Skin at 2000 nm Laser Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    middle point between the lowest value consistent damage (P^) and largest value of no damage ( Pno ). The standard deviation of ED50 value was equal to...32% of the border width (P&- Pno ). Even though the Yucatan mini-pig skin best represents human skin, the dark pigmentation of the skin hindered the

  7. DAMAGE MODEL OF CONTROL FISSURE IN PERILOUS ROCK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Hong-kai; TANG Hong-mei; YE Si-qiao

    2006-01-01

    Hitherto, perilous rock is the weakest topic in disasters studies. Specially,damage of control fissure under loads is one key technique in study of develop mechanism of perilous rock. Damage division of end area of control fissure was defined by authors,then calculation methods of timed-Poisson's ratio and timed-Young's modulus were established in damage mechanics theory. Further, the authors set up damage constitutive equation of control fissure, which founds important basis to numerical simulation for control fissure to develop.

  8. Pulse shape control in a dual cavity laser: numerical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashkir, Yuri

    2006-04-01

    We present a numerical model of the laser system for generating a special shape of the pulse: a steep peak at the beginning followed by a long pulse tail. Laser pulses of this nature are required for various applications (laser material processing, optical breakdown spectroscopy, etc.). The laser system consists of two "overlapped" cavities with different round-trip times. The laser crystal, the Q-switching element, the back mirror, and the output coupler are shared. A shorter pulse is generated in a short cavity. A small fraction of this pulse is injected into the long cavity as a seed. It triggers generation of the longer pulse. The output emission from this hybrid laser produces a required pulse shape. Parameters of the laser pulse (ratios of durations and energies of short- and long- pulse components) can be controlled through cavity length and the output coupler reflection. Modelling of the laser system is based on a set of coupled rate equations for dynamic variables of the system: the inverse population in an active laser media and photon densities in coupled cavities. Numerical experiments were provided with typical parameters of a Nd:YAG laser to study the system behaviour for different combinations of parameters.

  9. 利用3S技术及三维激光扫描仪进行耕地损毁勘测%3 S Technology and 3 D Laser Scanner is used to Survey Cultivated Land Damaged

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林学艺

    2016-01-01

    3S technology is used to find cultivated land damaged,network RTK survey the range and area of cultivated land damaged, GIS extract the land area and grade before cultivated land damaged,and Maptek I-Site8810 3D laser scanner is used to recreate 3D model of cultivated land damaged with network RTK.%利用RS技术发现耕地损毁,网络RTK测量耕地损毁范围及面积,GIS提取耕地被损毁前的分类面积和等别,以及利用网络RTK配合Maptek I-Site8810三维激光扫描仪重构损毁耕地三维模型。

  10. Damage model of fresh concrete in sulphate environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张敬书; 张银华; 冯立平; 金德保; 汪朝成; 董庆友

    2015-01-01

    A model of damage to fresh concrete in a corrosive sulphate environment was formulated to investigate how and why the strength of corroded concrete changes over time. First, a corroded concrete block was divided into three regions:an expanded and dense region;a crack-development region;and a noncorroded region. Second, based on the thickness of the surface corrosion layer and the rate of loss of compressive strength of the corroding region, a computational model of the concrete blocks’ corrosion-resistance coefficient of compressive strength in a sulphate environment was generated. Third, experimental tests of the corrosion of concrete were conducted by immersing specimens in a corrosive medium for 270 d. A comparison of the experimental results with the computational formulae shows that the calculation results and test results are in good agreement. A parameter analysis reveals that the corrosion reaction plays a major role in the corrosion of fresh concrete containing ordinary Portland cement, but the diffusion of the corrosion medium plays a major role in the corrosion of concrete mixtures containing fly ash and sulphate-resistant cement. Fresh concrete with a high water-to-cement ratio shows high performance during the whole experiment process whereas fresh concrete with a low water-to-cement ratio shows poor performance during the late experiment period.

  11. The effects of low-level laser on muscle damage caused by Bothrops neuwiedi venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DM Dourado

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to assess the effects of low-level laser (660 nm on myonecrosis caused by the insertion of Bothrops neuwiedi venom in the gastrocnemius muscle of rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups (n = 24 each: Group S (0.9% saline solution; Group V (venom and Group VLLL (venom plus low-level laser. These categories were subdivided into four additional groups (n = 6 based on the euthanasia timing (3 hours, 24 hours, 3 days and 7 days. The groups V and VLLL were inoculated with 100 µL of concentrated venom (40 µg/mL in the gastrocnemius muscle. The muscle was irradiated using a gallium-aluminum-arsenide laser (GaAlAs at 35 mW power and 4 J/cm² energy density for 3 hours, 24 hours, 3 days or 7 days after venom inoculation. To evaluate the myotoxic activity of the venom, CK activity was measured and the muscle was histologically analyzed. The low-level laser reduced venom-induced CK activity in the groups euthanized at 3 hours, 24 hours and 3 days (p < 0.0001. Histological analysis revealed that low-level laser reduced neutrophilic inflammation as well as myofibrillar edema, hemorrhage and myonecrosis following B. neuwiedi envenomation. These results suggest that low-level laser can be useful as an adjunct therapy following B. neuwiedi envenomation.

  12. The effects of low-level laser on muscle damage caused by Bothrops neuwiedi venom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dourado, D.M.; Matias, R.; Almeida, M.F.; Paula, K.R. de; Carvalho, P.T.C. [University for the Development of the State and of the Region of Pantanal (UNIDERP), Campo Grande, MS (Brazil). Lab. of Experimental Histopathology]. E-mail: ccfi@uniderp.br; Vieira, R.P. [University of Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). School of Medicine. Dept. of Pathology and Physical Therapy; Oliveira, L.V.F. [Nove de Julho University (UNINOVE), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Masters Program in Rehabilitation Sciences

    2008-07-01

    The present study aimed to assess the effects of low-level laser (660 nm) on myonecrosis caused by the insertion of Bothrops neuwiedi venom in the gastrocnemius muscle of rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups (n = 24 each): Group S (0.9% saline solution); Group V (venom) and Group VLLL (venom plus low-level laser). These categories were subdivided into four additional groups (n = 6) based on the euthanasia timing (3 hours, 24 hours, 3 days and 7 days). The groups V and VLLL were inoculated with 100 {mu}L of concentrated venom (40 {mu}g/mL) in the gastrocnemius muscle. The muscle was irradiated using a gallium-aluminum-arsenide laser (GaAlAs) at 35 mW power and 4 J/cm{sup 2} energy density for 3 hours, 24 hours, 3 days or 7 days after venom inoculation. To evaluate the myotoxic activity of the venom, CK activity was measured and the muscle was histologically analyzed. The low-level laser reduced venom-induced CK activity in the groups euthanized at 3 hours, 24 hours and 3 days (p < 0.0001). Histological analysis revealed that low-level laser reduced neutrophilic inflammation as well as myofibrillar edema, hemorrhage and myonecrosis following B. neuwiedi envenomation. These results suggest that low-level laser can be useful as an adjunct therapy following B. neuwiedi envenomation. (author)

  13. Argon laser-induced damage in the goldfish (C. auratus) retina following whole-body hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaton, Michael A.; Lund, David J.; Schuschereba, Steven T.; Dahlberg, Ann M.; Cowan, Beth L.; Lester, Paul; Odom, Daniel G.

    1990-07-01

    The heat shock response is a phenomenon common to all cells and is characterized by an increase in the rate of synthesis of intracellular heat shock proteins (HSPs) . The response occurs following rapid transient increases in terrerature sufficient to cause stress but not cell death. HSPs appear to perform protective functions that raise the cell''s tolerance to diverse noxious stimuli. Thus we postulated that we could limit laser-induced retinal darriage through induction of the heat shock -response. Corrmon goldfish (C. auratus) made hyperthermic by immersion in 35C water for 15 minutes and radiolabeled with [355]methionine showed retinal liSPs with apparent molecular weights of 110 90 70 and 35 kilodaltons. To test the protective effects of HSPs against laser injury goldfish were made hyperthermic and 4 and 24 hr later their retinas were irradiated with argon laser light (51 4 . 5 nm spot size at the cornea 3. 0 mm irradiance 125 mW/cm2) . NonhyperLhermic animals served as controls. Following 24 hr of recovery fish were terminated and retinas fixed for histology. Fundus photographs were taken irrunediately after laser exposure . Lesion diameters were measured from fundus photographs and evaluated statistically. The mean retinal lesion diameters of fish not subjected to hyperthermJ. a laser exposed 4 hr post hyperLhermia and laser exposed 24 hr post hyperthermia were 10. 25 1. 4 SD 8. 82 2. 1 SD and 6. 78

  14. Reduction of RIE induced damage of GaInAsP/InP DQW lasers fabricated by 2-step growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumwongrot, D.; Kurokawa, M.; Okumura, T.; Nishimoto, Y.; Maruyama, T.; Nishiyama, N.; Arai, S.

    2008-02-01

    In order to realize low damage fine structuring processes for the low-dimensional quantum structures, we investigated a process for reducing the degradations of optical properties, which was induced during a reactive-ion-etching (RIE) process with CH 4/H II gas mixture in the quantum-well (QW) structures. Quantitative studies of optical degradation were carried out by photoluminescence (PL) and electroluminescence (EL) measurements. We introduced a thicker upper optical confinement layer (OCL) to protect the QWs from the RIE-plasma. In practical, for the PL measurement, twotypes of strain-compensated single-quantum-well (SC-SQW) structures were prepared for 40-nm-thick- and 80-nmthick- upper OCL wafers and covered by 20-nm-thick SiO II. After the samples were exposed to CH 4/H II-RIE for 5- minutes, a relatively stronger suppression of integral PL intensity as well as a spectral broadening was observed in the sample with 40-nm-thick OCL, while those did not change in the sample with 80-nm-thick OCL. For the EL measurements, using two types of SC-DQW structures, samples were exposed to CH 4/H II-RIE plasma for 5-minute and then re-grown for other layers to form high-mesa stripe laser structures (W s=1.5μm). As a result, the spontaneous emission efficiency of the lasers with 80-nm-thick OCL was almost 2 times higher than that of the lasers with 40-nmthick OCL. In addition, a lower threshold current as well as a higher differential quantum efficiency was obtained for the lasers with 80-nm-thick OCL , while that in lasers with 40-nm-thick OCL indicated poor efficiency and a slightly higher threshold.

  15. A Plasticity Induced Anisotropic Damage Model for Sheet Forming Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niazi, M.S.; Meinders, V.T.; Wisselink, H.H.; Horn, ten C.H.L.J.; Klaseboer, G.; Boogaard, van den A.H.

    2013-01-01

    Plastic deformation induces damage in Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS). Therefore damage development in these steels shall be studied and incorporated in the simulations for accurate failure predictions in forming processes and for determination of the product properties after forming. An effici

  16. A simple but realistic model for laser cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picasso, M.; Marsden, C.F.; Wagniere, J.D.; Frenk, A.; Rappaz, M. (Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (Switzerland))

    1994-04-01

    The steady development of high-power lasers has encouraged the industrial application of laser surface treatments. The aim of the laser-cladding process is to deposit a protective layer (from 0.1 to 1.5 mm) onto a workpiece and for the two to be joined by a fusion bond. A model which takes into account the main phenomena occurring during the laser-cladding process is proposed. For a given laser power, beam radius, powder jet geometry, and clad height, this model evaluates two other processing parameters, namely, the laser-beam velocity and the powder feed rate. It considers the interactions between the powder particles, the laser beam, and the molten pool. The laser power reaching the surface of the workpiece is estimated and, assuming this power is used to remelt the substrate with the clad having been predeposited, the melt-pool shape is computed using a three-dimensional (3-D) analytical model, which produces immediate results, even on personal computers. The predictions obtained with this numerical model are in good agreement with experimental results. Processing engineers may therefore use this model to choose the correct processing parameters and to establish cladding maps.

  17. A model based bayesian solution for characterization of complex damage scenarios in aerospace composite structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, H; Leckey, Cara A C; Dick, A; Harvey, G; Dobson, J

    2017-09-05

    Ultrasonic damage detection and characterization is commonly used in nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of aerospace composite components. In recent years there has been an increased development of guided wave based methods. In real materials and structures, these dispersive waves result in complicated behavior in the presence of complex damage scenarios. Model-based characterization methods utilize accurate three dimensional finite element models (FEMs) of guided wave interaction with realistic damage scenarios to aid in defect identification and classification. This work describes an inverse solution for realistic composite damage characterization by comparing the wavenumber-frequency spectra of experimental and simulated ultrasonic inspections. The composite laminate material properties are first verified through a Bayesian solution (Markov chain Monte Carlo), enabling uncertainty quantification surrounding the characterization. A study is undertaken to assess the efficacy of the proposed damage model and comparative metrics between the experimental and simulated output. The FEM is then parameterized with a damage model capable of describing the typical complex damage created by impact events in composites. The damage is characterized through a transdimensional Markov chain Monte Carlo solution, enabling a flexible damage model capable of adapting to the complex damage geometry investigated here. The posterior probability distributions of the individual delamination petals as well as the overall envelope of the damage site are determined. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Ductile failure analysis of high strength steel in hot forming based on micromechanical damage model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YingLiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The damage evolution of high strength steel at elevated temperature is investigated by using the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN model. A hybrid method integrated thermal tensile test and numerical technique is employed to identify the damage parameters. The analysis results show that the damage parameters are different at different temperature as the variation of tested material microstructure. Furthermore, the calibrated damage parameters are implemented to simulate a bugling forming at elevated temperature. The experimental results show the availability of GTN damage model in analyzing sheet formability in hot forming.

  19. Computational Modelling of Fracture Propagation in Rocks Using a Coupled Elastic-Plasticity-Damage Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isa Kolo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A coupled elastic-plasticity-damage constitutive model, AK Model, is applied to predict fracture propagation in rocks. The quasi-brittle material model captures anisotropic effects and the distinct behavior of rocks in tension and compression. Calibration of the constitutive model is realized using experimental data for Carrara marble. Through the Weibull distribution function, heterogeneity effect is captured by spatially varying the elastic properties of the rock. Favorable comparison between model predictions and experiments for single-flawed specimens reveal that the AK Model is reliable and accurate for modelling fracture propagation in rocks.

  20. Transient absorption and luminescence spectra of K9 glass at sub-damage site by ultraviolet laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z.; Huang, J.; Geng, F.; Zhou, X. Y.; Feng, S. Q.; Cheng, X. L.; Jiang, X. D.; Wu, W. D.; Zheng, W. G.; Tang, Y. J.

    2014-01-01

    Transient absorption and luminescence spectra at sub-damage site of K9 glass by laser irradiation at 355 nm are presented. The dependence of transient absorption on laser energy and number of pulses was investigated. As the energy density increases to 2.54 and 3.18 J/cm2, the transient absorption intensity reaches to about 0.20 range from 400 to 480 nm. With the increase of number of pulses the process of residual absorption appears, which can be used to explain the fatigue effect of K9 glass. The defects in K9 glass were investigated by fluorescence and Raman spectra. The fluorescence band centered at about 410 nm is attributed to oxygen deficiency centers. The mechanism of two-photon ionization plays a critical role at sub-damage site. Compared to the Raman spectra of pristine site, intensity of Raman spectra is very high at a lower energy density, while it decreased at a higher energy density.

  1. Cracking and damage behavior of tungsten under ELM’s like energy loads using millisecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farid, N., E-mail: nazarfarid@gmail.com; Zhao, D.; Oderji, H.Y.; Ding, H., E-mail: hding@dlut.edu.cn

    2015-08-15

    In this work, ELM-like conditions were replicated by exposing tungsten surface to the repetitive millisecond laser pulses, and the damage and surface modification were studied. At a pulse duration of 3 ms, the damage and cracking threshold was found at 0.2–0.3 MJ m{sup −2} while the melting was observed after 0.5 MJ m{sup −2} which shifted to lower energy load with increasing the number of shots. In addition, these thresholds significantly dropped to lower energy densities with reduction in pulse durations. At same energy load (0.42 MJ m{sup −2}), solid particles were ejected from irradiated surface exposed to 3 ms pulses while both solid and liquid droplets splashed from melt layer were observed from surface irradiated with 1 ms pulses. Analysis of exposed W surface and particles ejection from the treated surface indicate that there is no qualitative differences between ion beam and long pulse lasers to simulate the ELM like transient conditions at laboratories.

  2. Mathematical model of an optically pumped molecular laser

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Botha, LR

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available pumped molecular laser Dr L R Botha, Dr C Bollig, D Esser, C Jacobs, D Preussler SAIP 2009 Durban Page 2 © CSIR 2008 www.csir.co.za Structure of talk • Introduction • Overview of HBr laser • Numerical Model • Comparison... µm laser ring oscillator & pre-amplifier 1.9 µm Optically Pumped Molecular laser @ 4 µm 95:5 HBr Absorption cell Fast detector 2.064 µm ± 1 nm Feedback control box Feedback loop 1 P ie zo m o u nt Fast detector Feedback loop 2 Gas...

  3. Modelling and control of laser surface treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Römer, Gerardus Richardus Benardus Engelina

    1999-01-01

    The results of laser surface treatment may vary significantly during laser surface processing. These variations arise from the sensitivity of the process to disturbances, such as varying absorptivity and the small dimensions of the work piece. To increase the reproducibility of the process, a real-t

  4. Modelling and control of laser surface treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Römer, Gerardus Richardus, Bernardus, Engelina

    1999-01-01

    The results of laser surface treatment may vary significantly during laser surface processing. These variations arise from the sensitivity of the process to disturbances, such as varying absorptivity and the small dimensions of the work piece. To increase the reproducibility of the process, a

  5. Complex network model of the Treatise on Cold Damage Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Feng-jing; Sui, Yi; Zhou, Yong-hong; Sun, Ren-cheng

    2016-10-01

    Investigating the underlying principles of the Treatise on Cold Damage Disorder is meaningful and interesting. In this study, we investigated the symptoms, herbal formulae, herbal drugs, and their relationships in this treatise based on a multi-subnet composited complex network model (MCCN). Syndrome subnets were constructed for the symptoms and a formula subnet for herbal drugs. By subnet compounding using MCCN, a composited network was obtained that described the treatment relationships between syndromes and formulae. The results obtained by topological analysis suggested some prescription laws that could be validated in clinics. After subnet reduction using the MCCN, six channel (Tai-yang, Yang-ming, Shao-yang, Tai-yin, Shao-yin, and Jue-yin) subnets were obtained. By analyzing the strengths of the relationships among these six channel subnets, we found that the Tai-yang channel and Yang-ming channel were related most strongly with each other, and we found symptoms that implied pathogen movements and transformations among the six channels. This study could help therapists to obtain a deeper understanding of this ancient treatise.

  6. SIMPEL: Circuit model for photonic spike processing laser neurons

    CERN Document Server

    Shastri, Bhavin J; Tait, Alexander N; Wu, Ben; Prucnal, Paul R

    2014-01-01

    We propose an equivalent circuit model for photonic spike processing laser neurons with an embedded saturable absorber---a simulation model for photonic excitable lasers (SIMPEL). We show that by mapping the laser neuron rate equations into a circuit model, SPICE analysis can be used as an efficient and accurate engine for numerical calculations, capable of generalization to a variety of different laser neuron types found in literature. The development of this model parallels the Hodgkin--Huxley model of neuron biophysics, a circuit framework which brought efficiency, modularity, and generalizability to the study of neural dynamics. We employ the model to study various signal-processing effects such as excitability with excitatory and inhibitory pulses, binary all-or-nothing response, and bistable dynamics.

  7. Modelling colliding-pulse mode-locked semiconductor lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bischoff, Svend

    or to determine the optimum operation conditions. The purpose of this thesis is to elucidate some of the physics of interest in the field of semiconductor laser modelling, semiconductor optics and fiber optics. To be more specific we will investigate: The Colliding-Pulse Mode-Locked (CPM) Quantum Well (QW) laser...

  8. Statistical fluctuations in a saturation laser model with correlated noises

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Shi-Bo; Mei Dong-Cheng

    2006-01-01

    We study the effects of correlations between quantum and pump noises on fluctuations of the laser intensity in a saturation laser model. An approximative Fokker-Planck equation and analytic expressions of the steady-state probability distribution function (SPD) of the laser system are derived. Based on the SPD, the normalized mean, the normalized variance, and the normalized skewness of the steady-state laser intensity are calculated numerically. The results indicate that (i) the correlation strength λ of correlated noises always enhances the fluctuation of laser intensity;(ii) the correlation time τ of correlated noises strengthens the fluctuation of laser intensity for the below-threshold case but τ weakens it for the above-threshold case.

  9. Ageing Tests of Radiation Damaged Lasers and Photodiodes for the CMS Tracker Optical Links

    CERN Document Server

    Gill, K; Batten, J; Cervelli, G; Grabit, R; Jensen, F; Troska, Jan K; Vasey, F

    1999-01-01

    The effects of thermally accelerated ageing in irradiated and unirradiated 1310nm InGaAsP edge-emitting lasers and InGaAs p-i-n photodiodes are presented. 40 lasers ( 20 irradiated) and 30 photodiodes ( 19 irradiated) were aged for 4000 hours at 80¡C. Periodic measurements were made of laser threshold and efficiency, and p-i-n leakage current and photocurrent. There were no sudden failures and there was very little wearout related degradation in either unirradiated or irradiated sample groups. The results suggest that the tested devices have a sufficiently long lifetime to operate for at least 10 years inside the CMS Tracker despite being exposed to a harsh radiation environment.

  10. Ageing tests of radiation damaged lasers and photodiodes for the CMS experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Gill, K; Batten, J; Cervelli, G; Grabit, R; Jensen, F; Troska, Jan K; Vasey, F

    2000-01-01

    The effects of thermally accelerated ageing in irradiated and unirradiated 1310 nm InGaAsP edge-emitting lasers and InGaAs p-i-n photodiodes are presented. 40 lasers (20 irradiated) and 30 photodiodes (19 irradiated) were aged for 4000 hours at 80 degrees C. Periodic measurements were made of laser threshold and efficiency, and p-i-n leakage current and photocurrent. There were no sudden failures and there was very little wearout related degradation in either unirradiated or irradiated sample groups. The results suggest that the tested devices have a sufficiently long lifetime to operate for at least 10 years inside the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment despite being exposed to a harsh radiation environment. (19 refs).

  11. Nd:YAG Laser Cleaning of Red Stone Materials: Evaluation of the Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, C.; Martoni, E.; Realini, M.; Sansonetti, A.; Valentini, G.

    Lasers have been tested, during the recent past, as a useful cleaning method in conservation treatments: this is due to selectivity and precision of its performance. Nevertheless some colour changes have been detected using Nd:YAG laser sources, especially on white and red coloured substrates. Colour changes on white marble and other white architectural materials have already been widely surveyed. This chapter focuses on the interaction of laser radiation with two kinds of red materials: red Verona limestone and terracotta. These materials have been chosen because of their large use in northern Italian architecture and in statuary. Red Verona limestone is not homogenous in hue, owing to the presence of calcareous nodules (lighter in colour) and clay veins (dark reddish colour).

  12. Simplified method for numerical modeling of fiber lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtyrina, O V; Yarutkina, I A; Fedoruk, M P

    2014-12-29

    A simplified numerical approach to modeling of dissipative dispersion-managed fiber lasers is examined. We present a new numerical iteration algorithm for finding the periodic solutions of the system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations describing the intra-cavity dynamics of the dissipative soliton characteristics in dispersion-managed fiber lasers. We demonstrate that results obtained using simplified model are in good agreement with full numerical modeling based on the corresponding partial differential equations.

  13. Development in Laser Induced Extrinsic Absorption Damage Mechanism of Dielectric Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Zhi-Lin; DENG De-Gang; FAN Zheng-Xiu; SHAO Jian-Da

    2006-01-01

    @@ Absorption of host and the temperature-dependence of absorption coefficient have been considered in evaluating temperature distribution in films, when laser pulse irradiates on films. Absorption of dielectric materials experience three stages with the increase of temperature: multi-photon absorption; single photon absorption; metallic absorption. These different absorption mechanisms correspond to different band gap energies of materials, which will decrease when the temperature of materials increases. Evaluating results indicate that absorption of host increases rapidly when the laser pulse will be over. If absorption of host and the temperature-dependence of absorption are considered, the maximal temperatures in films will be increased by a factor of four.

  14. Modeling of dynamic effects of a low power laser beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, George N.; Scholl, Marija S.; Khatib, AL

    1988-01-01

    Methods of modeling some of the dynamic effects involved in laser beam propagation through the atmosphere are addressed with emphasis on the development of simple but accurate models which are readily implemented in a physical optics code. A space relay system with a ground based laser facility is considered as an example. The modeling of such characteristic phenomena as laser output distribution, flat and curved mirrors, diffraction propagation, atmospheric effects (aberration and wind shear), adaptive mirrors, jitter, and time integration of power on target, is discussed.

  15. Identifying damage locations under ambient vibrations utilizing vector autoregressive models and Mahalanobis distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosavi, A. A.; Dickey, D.; Seracino, R.; Rizkalla, S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a study for identifying damage locations in an idealized steel bridge girder using the ambient vibration measurements. A sensitive damage feature is proposed in the context of statistical pattern recognition to address the damage detection problem. The study utilizes an experimental program that consists of a two-span continuous steel beam subjected to ambient vibrations. The vibration responses of the beam are measured along its length under simulated ambient vibrations and different healthy/damage conditions of the beam. The ambient vibration is simulated using a hydraulic actuator, and damages are induced by cutting portions of the flange at two locations. Multivariate vector autoregressive models were fitted to the vibration response time histories measured at the multiple sensor locations. A sensitive damage feature is proposed for identifying the damage location by applying Mahalanobis distances to the coefficients of the vector autoregressive models. A linear discriminant criterion was used to evaluate the amount of variations in the damage features obtained for different sensor locations with respect to the healthy condition of the beam. The analyses indicate that the highest variations in the damage features were coincident with the sensors closely located to the damages. The presented method showed a promising sensitivity to identify the damage location even when the induced damage was very small.

  16. Influence of Vacuum Organic Contaminations on Laser-Induced Damage of 1064 nm Anti-Reflective Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Yun; LIU Shi-Jie; HE Hong-Bo; ZHAO Yuan-An; SHAO Jian-Da; FAN Zheng-Xiu

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the influence of vacuum organic contaminations on laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) of optical coatings. Anti-reflective (AR) coatings at 1064nm made by Ta2O5/SiO2 are deposited by the ion beam sputtering method. The LIDTs of AR coatings are measured in vacuum and in atmosphere, respectively. It is exhibited that contaminations in vacuum are easily to be absorbed onto optical surface because of lower pressure,and they become origins of damage, resulting in the decrease of LIDT from 24.5 J/cm2 in air to 15.7J/cm2 in vacuum. The LIDT of coatings in vacuum has is slightly changed compared with the value in atmosphere after the organic contaminations are wiped off. These results indicate that organic contaminations are the main reason of the LIDT decrease in vacuum. Additionally, damage morphologies have distinct changes from vacuum to atmosphere because of the differences between the residual stress and thermal decomposability of filmy materials.

  17. The effect of pulse duration on the growth rate of laser-induced damage sites at 351 nm on fused silica surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negres, R A; Norton, M A; Liao, Z M; Cross, D A; Bude, J D; Carr, C W

    2009-10-29

    Past work in the area of laser-induced damage growth has shown growth rates to be primarily dependent on the laser fluence and wavelength. More recent studies suggest that growth rate, similar to the damage initiation process, is affected by a number of additional parameters including pulse duration, pulse shape, site size, and internal structure. In this study, we focus on the effect of pulse duration on the growth rate of laser damage sites located on the exit surface of fused silica optics. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, a significant dependence of growth rate at 351 nm on pulse duration from 1 ns to 15 ns as {tau}{sup 0.3} for sites in the 50-100 {micro}m size range.

  18. A Continuum Damage Mechanics Model for the Static and Cyclic Fatigue of Cellular Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Otto

    2017-01-01

    The fatigue behavior of a cellular composite with an epoxy matrix and glass foam granules is analyzed and modeled by means of continuum damage mechanics. The investigated cellular composite is a particular type of composite foam, and is very similar to syntactic foams. In contrast to conventional syntactic foams constituted by hollow spherical particles (balloons), cellular glass, mineral, or metal place holders are combined with the matrix material (metal or polymer) in the case of cellular composites. A microstructural investigation of the damage behavior is performed using scanning electron microscopy. For the modeling of the fatigue behavior, the damage is separated into pure static and pure cyclic damage and described in terms of the stiffness loss of the material using damage models for cyclic and creep damage. Both models incorporate nonlinear accumulation and interaction of damage. A cycle jumping procedure is developed, which allows for a fast and accurate calculation of the damage evolution for constant load frequencies. The damage model is applied to examine the mean stress effect for cyclic fatigue and to investigate the frequency effect and the influence of the signal form in the case of static and cyclic damage interaction. The calculated lifetimes are in very good agreement with experimental results. PMID:28809806

  19. Development of a Computational Model for Predicting Damage to Tankers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Little, P.; Pippenger, D.; Simonsen, Bo Cerup

    1996-01-01

    A windows based computer program DAMAGE has been developed for analysis of ship grounding on a pinnacle shaped rock. The paper presents part of the theory and the overall ideas of the computerprogram.......A windows based computer program DAMAGE has been developed for analysis of ship grounding on a pinnacle shaped rock. The paper presents part of the theory and the overall ideas of the computerprogram....

  20. The analysis of damage threshold in the ruby laser interaction with copper and aluminium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katavić Boris T.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nondestructive methods are dominant in diagnosing the status and protection of all kinds of contemporary industrial object, as well as object of industrial heritage. Laser methods open wide possibilities of research in the field of diagnosis and metal processing. This paper presents the results of laser radiation interaction (wavelength λ = 694.3 nm, Ruby laser, Q-switch mode with metal samples covered with a deposit. The goal of the examination was to determine the maximum energy density, that can be used in diagnostics purpouses (interferometric methods, 3D scanning, i.e. and as a tool for safe removal of deposits, without interacting with the basic material. Microscopic examination performed with SEM coupled with EDX allowed the determination of the safe laser light energy density levels, which caused the removal of the deposite from the surface of the sample, without degradation of the surface. The energy density up to 20 103 J/m2 is maximum allowed for the diagnosis or deposit removal.