WorldWideScience

Sample records for modeling key findings

  1. Educational effectiveness: Key findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodorović Jelena

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews recent and advanced studies on educational effectiveness. Section on integrated school effectiveness research is followed by a section on conceptually integrated models. The subsequent two sections focus on more methodological limitations of past research: the failure to accommodate the hierarchical nature of schooling and the inability to capture teacher effects. Finally, the last section sums up all relevant facts and research strands.

  2. Modelling the exposure of wildlife to radiation: key findings and activities of IAEA working groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beresford, Nicholas A. [NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Center, Library Av., Bailrigg, Lancaster, LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); School of Environment and Life Sciences, University of Salford, Manchester, M4 4WT (United Kingdom); Vives i Batlle, Jordi; Vandenhove, Hildegarde [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Beaugelin-Seiller, Karine [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), PRP-ENV, SERIS, LM2E, Cadarache (France); Johansen, Mathew P. [ANSTO Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, New Illawarra Rd, Menai, NSW (Australia); Goulet, Richard [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Environmental Risk Assessment Division, 280 Slater, Ottawa, K1A0H3 (Canada); Wood, Michael D. [School of Environment and Life Sciences, University of Salford, Manchester, M4 4WT (United Kingdom); Ruedig, Elizabeth [Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins (United States); Stark, Karolina; Bradshaw, Clare [Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University, SE-10691 (Sweden); Andersson, Pal [Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, SE-171 16, Stockholm (Sweden); Copplestone, David [Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA (United Kingdom); Yankovich, Tamara L.; Fesenko, Sergey [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna International Centre, 1400, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-07-01

    In total, participants from 14 countries, representing 19 organisations, actively participated in the model application/inter-comparison activities of the IAEA's EMRAS II programme Biota Modelling Group. A range of models/approaches were used by participants (e.g. the ERICA Tool, RESRAD-BIOTA, the ICRP Framework). The agreed objectives of the group were: 'To improve Member State's capabilities for protection of the environment by comparing and validating models being used, or developed, for biota dose assessment (that may be used) as part of the regulatory process of licensing and compliance monitoring of authorised releases of radionuclides.' The activities of the group, the findings of which will be described, included: - An assessment of the predicted unweighted absorbed dose rates for 74 radionuclides estimated by 10 approaches for five of the ICRPs Reference Animal and Plant geometries assuming 1 Bq per unit organism or media. - Modelling the effect of heterogeneous distributions of radionuclides in sediment profiles on the estimated exposure of organisms. - Model prediction - field data comparisons for freshwater ecosystems in a uranium mining area and a number of wetland environments. - An evaluation of the application of available models to a scenario considering radioactive waste buried in shallow trenches. - Estimating the contribution of {sup 235}U to dose rates in freshwater environments. - Evaluation of the factors contributing to variation in modelling results. The work of the group continues within the framework of the IAEA's MODARIA programme, which was initiated in 2012. The work plan of the MODARIA working group has largely been defined by the findings of the previous EMRAS programme. On-going activities of the working group, which will be described, include the development of a database of dynamic parameters for wildlife dose assessment and exercises involving modelling the exposure of organisms in the marine coastal

  3. Key Findings for Interpersonal Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-04

    2005). Beyond difference and domination? Intercultural communication in legal contexts. Intercultural discourse and communication . The essential...trainable and consequential to warfighters in being good strangers. These key skills include observing and adapting to variation in communicative norms...warfighters in being good strangers. These key skills include observing and adapting to variation in communicative norms; allowing civilian

  4. Modelling efforts needed to advance herpes simplex virus (HSV) vaccine development: Key findings from the World Health Organization Consultation on HSV Vaccine Impact Modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Sami L; Giersing, Birgitte; Boily, Marie-Claude; Chesson, Harrell; Looker, Katharine J; Schiffer, Joshua; Spicknall, Ian; Hutubessy, Raymond; Broutet, Nathalie

    2017-06-21

    Development of a vaccine against herpes simplex virus (HSV) is an important goal for global sexual and reproductive health. In order to more precisely define the health and economic burden of HSV infection and the theoretical impact and cost-effectiveness of an HSV vaccine, in 2015 the World Health Organization convened an expert consultation meeting on HSV vaccine impact modelling. The experts reviewed existing model-based estimates and dynamic models of HSV infection to outline critical future modelling needs to inform development of a comprehensive business case and preferred product characteristics for an HSV vaccine. This article summarizes key findings and discussions from the meeting on modelling needs related to HSV burden, costs, and vaccine impact, essential data needs to carry out those models, and important model components and parameters. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Key findings of the national weatherization evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.A.; Berry, L.G.

    1994-10-01

    In 1990, the U.S. Department of Energy sponsored a comprehensive evaluation of its Weatherization Assistance Program, the nation`s largest residential energy conservation program. The primary goal of the evaluation was to establish whether the Program meets the objectives of its enabling legislation and fulfills its mission statement, to reduce the heating and cooling costs for low-income families-particularly the elderly, persons with disabilities, and children by improving the energy-efficiency of their homes and ensuring their health and safety. Oak Ridge National Laboratory managed a five-part study which produced a series of documents evaluating the Program. The objective of this document is to summarize the findings of the five-part National Weatherization Evaluation. The five studies were as follows: (1) Network Study-this study characterized the weatherization network`s leveraging, capabilities, procedures, staff, technologies, and innovations; (2) Resources and Population Study-this study profiled low-income weatherization resources, the weatherized population, and the population remaining to be served; (3) Multifamily Study-this study described the nature and extent of weatherization activities in larger multifamily buildings; (4) Single-family Study-this study estimated the national savings and cost- effectiveness of weatherizing single-family and small multifamily dwellings that use natural gas or electricity for space heating; (5) Fuel-Oil Study-this study estimated the savings and cost-effectiveness of weatherizing single-family homes, located in nine northeastern states, that use fuel oil for space heating. This paper provides a brief overview of each study`s purposes, research methods and most important findings.

  6. The KUSC Classical Music Dataset for Audio Key Finding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Hua Chuan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a benchmark dataset based on the KUSC classical music collection and provide baseline key-finding comparison results. Audio key finding is a basic music information retrieval task; it forms an essential component of systems for music segmentation, similarity assessment, and mood detection. Due to copyright restrictions and a labor-intensive annotation process, audio key finding algorithms have only been evaluated using small proprietary datasets to date. To create a common base for systematic comparisons, we have constructed a dataset comprising of more than 3,000 excerpts of classical music. The excerpts are made publicly accessible via commonly used acoustic features such as pitch-based spectrograms and chromagrams. We introduce a hybrid annotation scheme that combines the use of title keys with expert validation and correction of only the challenging cases. The expert musicians also provide ratings of key recognition difficulty. Other meta-data include instrumentation. As demonstration of use of the dataset, and to provide initial benchmark comparisons for evaluating new algorithms, we conduct a series of experiments reporting key determination accuracy of four state-of-the-art algorithms. We further show the importance of considering factors such as estimated tuning frequency, key strength or confidence value, and key recognition difficulty in key finding. In the future, we plan to expand the dataset to include meta-data for other music information retrieval tasks.

  7. Human Health Effects of Trichloroethylene: Key Findings and Scientific Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinot, Jennifer; Scott, Cheryl Siegel; Makris, Susan L.; Cooper, Glinda S.; Dzubow, Rebecca C.; Bale, Ambuja S.; Evans, Marina V.; Guyton, Kathryn Z.; Keshava, Nagalakshmi; Lipscomb, John C.; Barone, Stanley; Fox, John F.; Gwinn, Maureen R.; Schaum, John; Caldwell, Jane C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In support of the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) completed a toxicological review of trichloroethylene (TCE) in September 2011, which was the result of an effort spanning > 20 years. Objectives: We summarized the key findings and scientific issues regarding the human health effects of TCE in the U.S. EPA’s toxicological review. Methods: In this assessment we synthesized and characterized thousands of epidemiologic, experimental animal, and mechanistic studies, and addressed several key scientific issues through modeling of TCE toxicokinetics, meta-analyses of epidemiologic studies, and analyses of mechanistic data. Discussion: Toxicokinetic modeling aided in characterizing the toxicological role of the complex metabolism and multiple metabolites of TCE. Meta-analyses of the epidemiologic data strongly supported the conclusions that TCE causes kidney cancer in humans and that TCE may also cause liver cancer and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Mechanistic analyses support a key role for mutagenicity in TCE-induced kidney carcinogenicity. Recent evidence from studies in both humans and experimental animals point to the involvement of TCE exposure in autoimmune disease and hypersensitivity. Recent avian and in vitro mechanistic studies provided biological plausibility that TCE plays a role in developmental cardiac toxicity, the subject of substantial debate due to mixed results from epidemiologic and rodent studies. Conclusions: TCE is carcinogenic to humans by all routes of exposure and poses a potential human health hazard for noncancer toxicity to the central nervous system, kidney, liver, immune system, male reproductive system, and the developing embryo/fetus. PMID:23249866

  8. Functional Imaging of Autonomic Regulation: Methods and Key Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M Macey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system processing of autonomic function involves a network of regions throughout the brain which can be visualized and measured with neuroimaging techniques, notably functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. The development of fMRI procedures has both confirmed and extended earlier findings from animal models, and human stroke and lesion studies. Assessments with fMRI can elucidate interactions between different central sites in regulating normal autonomic patterning, and demonstrate how disturbed systems can interact to produce aberrant regulation during autonomic challenges. Understanding autonomic dysfunction in various illnesses reveals mechanisms that potentially lead to interventions in the impairments. The objectives here are to: 1 describe the fMRI neuroimaging methodology for assessment of autonomic neural control, 2 outline the widespread, lateralized distribution of function in autonomic sites in the normal brain which includes structures from the neocortex through the medulla and cerebellum, 3 illustrate the importance of the time course of neural changes when coordinating responses, and how those patterns are impacted in conditions of sleep-disordered breathing, and 4 highlight opportunities for future research studies with emerging methodologies. Methodological considerations specific to autonomic testing include timing of challenges relative to the underlying fMRI signal, spatial resolution sufficient to identify autonomic brainstem nuclei, blood pressure and blood oxygenation influences on the fMRI signal, and the sustained timing, often measured in minutes of challenge periods and recovery. Key findings include the lateralized nature of autonomic organization, which is reminiscent of asymmetric motor, sensory and language pathways. Testing brain function during autonomic challenges demonstrate closely-integrated timing of responses in connected brain areas during autonomic challenges, and the involvement with

  9. Dioxins levels in Australia. Key findings of studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivory, A.; Mobbs, C. [Australian Government Department of the Environment and Heritage (Australia)

    2004-09-15

    The Australian Government established the National Dioxins Program (NDP) in 2001 to improve knowledge about levels of dioxins in Australia. The program aims to determine levels, assess the risks to Australians and the environment, and to consider appropriate management actions. Starting in mid 2001and completed in 2004, the studies constituted the largest survey of dioxin levels ever undertaken in Australia. The findings will contribute to debate on how to deal with dioxins in Australia, as well as helping to meet obligations under the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants, which Australia ratified on 20 May 2004. These studies will also contribute to a better understanding about dioxins in the southern hemisphere. This paper provides a summary of the key findings of these studies and the risk assessments.

  10. The National Television Violence Study: Key Findings and Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young Children, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Summarizes findings of the Television Violence Study indicating that the context of much television violence is dangerous to viewers, perpetrators go unpunished in the majority of programs, negative consequences of violence are often ignored, guns feature prominently, and presentation of violence differs greatly across networks and across…

  11. The National Television Violence Study: Key Findings and Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young Children, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Summarizes findings of the Television Violence Study indicating that the context of much television violence is dangerous to viewers, perpetrators go unpunished in the majority of programs, negative consequences of violence are often ignored, guns feature prominently, and presentation of violence differs greatly across networks and across…

  12. Finding key bloggers, one post at a time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Weerkamp; K. Balog; M. de Rijke

    2008-01-01

    User generated content in general, and blogs in particular, form an interesting and relatively little explored domain for mining knowledge. We address the task of blog distillation: to find blogs that are principally devoted to a given topic, as opposed to blogs that merely happen to discuss the top

  13. A Model of Hierarchical Key Assignment Scheme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhigang; ZHAO Jing; XU Maozhi

    2006-01-01

    A model of the hierarchical key assignment scheme is approached in this paper, which can be used with any cryptography algorithm. Besides, the optimal dynamic control property of a hierarchical key assignment scheme will be defined in this paper. Also, our scheme model will meet this property.

  14. Audio Key Finding: Considerations in System Design and Case Studies on Chopin's 24 Preludes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuan, Ching-Hua; Chew, Elaine

    2006-12-01

    We systematically analyze audio key finding to determine factors important to system design, and the selection and evaluation of solutions. First, we present a basic system, fuzzy analysis spiral array center of effect generator algorithm, with three key determination policies: nearest-neighbor (NN), relative distance (RD), and average distance (AD). AD achieved a 79% accuracy rate in an evaluation on 410 classical pieces, more than 8% higher RD and NN. We show why audio key finding sometimes outperforms symbolic key finding. We next propose three extensions to the basic key finding system—the modified spiral array (mSA), fundamental frequency identification (F0), and post-weight balancing (PWB)—to improve performance, with evaluations using Chopin's Preludes (Romantic repertoire was the most challenging). F0 provided the greatest improvement in the first 8 seconds, while mSA gave the best performance after 8 seconds. Case studies examine when all systems were correct, or all incorrect.

  15. Audio Key Finding: Considerations in System Design and Case Studies on Chopin's 24 Preludes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Chew

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We systematically analyze audio key finding to determine factors important to system design, and the selection and evaluation of solutions. First, we present a basic system, fuzzy analysis spiral array center of effect generator algorithm, with three key determination policies: nearest-neighbor (NN, relative distance (RD, and average distance (AD. AD achieved a 79% accuracy rate in an evaluation on 410 classical pieces, more than 8% higher RD and NN. We show why audio key finding sometimes outperforms symbolic key finding. We next propose three extensions to the basic key finding system—the modified spiral array (mSA, fundamental frequency identification (F0, and post-weight balancing (PWB—to improve performance, with evaluations using Chopin's Preludes (Romantic repertoire was the most challenging. F0 provided the greatest improvement in the first 8 seconds, while mSA gave the best performance after 8 seconds. Case studies examine when all systems were correct, or all incorrect.

  16. U of M Civil Service Wellness Survey: Finding Out Employees' Health and Wellness Needs. A Report of Key Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matross, Ron; Roesler, Jon

    Key findings from a wellness survey conducted with University of Minnesota civil service employees are discussed. The survey was designed to provide information to guide future campus health and wellness programming. Four topics were covered: physical fitness/exercise, nutrition, self-improvement/psychological health, and general health/preventive…

  17. Soil fauna: key to new carbon models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filser, Juliane; Faber, Jack H.; Tiunov, Alexei V.; Brussaard, Lijbert; Frouz, Jan; De Deyn, Gerlinde; Uvarov, Alexei V.; Berg, Matty P.; Lavelle, Patrick; Loreau, Michel; Wall, Diana H.; Querner, Pascal; Eijsackers, Herman; José Jiménez, Juan

    2016-11-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is key to maintaining soil fertility, mitigating climate change, combatting land degradation, and conserving above- and below-ground biodiversity and associated soil processes and ecosystem services. In order to derive management options for maintaining these essential services provided by soils, policy makers depend on robust, predictive models identifying key drivers of SOM dynamics. Existing SOM models and suggested guidelines for future SOM modelling are defined mostly in terms of plant residue quality and input and microbial decomposition, overlooking the significant regulation provided by soil fauna. The fauna controls almost any aspect of organic matter turnover, foremost by regulating the activity and functional composition of soil microorganisms and their physical-chemical connectivity with soil organic matter. We demonstrate a very strong impact of soil animals on carbon turnover, increasing or decreasing it by several dozen percent, sometimes even turning C sinks into C sources or vice versa. This is demonstrated not only for earthworms and other larger invertebrates but also for smaller fauna such as Collembola. We suggest that inclusion of soil animal activities (plant residue consumption and bioturbation altering the formation, depth, hydraulic properties and physical heterogeneity of soils) can fundamentally affect the predictive outcome of SOM models. Understanding direct and indirect impacts of soil fauna on nutrient availability, carbon sequestration, greenhouse gas emissions and plant growth is key to the understanding of SOM dynamics in the context of global carbon cycling models. We argue that explicit consideration of soil fauna is essential to make realistic modelling predictions on SOM dynamics and to detect expected non-linear responses of SOM dynamics to global change. We present a decision framework, to be further developed through the activities of KEYSOM, a European COST Action, for when mechanistic SOM models

  18. Classification Models for Symmetric Key Cryptosystem Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shri Kant

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with the basic principle and theory behind prevalent classification models and their judicious application for symmetric key cryptosystem identification. These techniques have been implemented and verified on varieties of known and simulated data sets. After establishing the techniques the problems of cryptosystem identification have been addressed.Defence Science Journal, 2012, 62(1, pp.38-45, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.62.1440

  19. Alternative IT Sourcing Strategies: From the Campus to the Cloud. ECAR Key Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Philip J.

    2009-01-01

    This document presents the key findings from the 2009 ECAR (EDUCAUSE Center for Applied Research) study, "Alternative IT Sourcing Strategies: From the Campus to the Cloud," by Philip J. Goldstein. The study explores a multitude of strategies used by colleges and university information technology organizations to deliver the breadth of technologies…

  20. Language Learning at Key Stage 2: Findings from a Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cable, Carrie; Driscoll, Patricia; Mitchell, Rosamond; Sing, Sue; Cremin, Teresa; Earl, Justine; Eyres, Ian; Holmes, Bernardette; Martin, Cynthia; Heins, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses some of the findings from a 3-year longitudinal study of language learning in the upper stage of English primary schools, i.e. at Key Stage 2. This largely qualitative study (commissioned by the then Department for Children, Schools and Families) was designed to explore and document developing provision and practice in a…

  1. The ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology, 2010. Key Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Shannon D.; Caruso, Judith Borreson

    2010-01-01

    This document presents the key findings from "The ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology, 2010". Since 2004, the annual ECAR (EDUCAUSE Center for Applied Research) study of undergraduate students and information technology has sought to shed light on how information technology affects the college experience. We…

  2. Causes, consequences, and policy responses to the migration of health workers: key findings from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton-Roberts, Margaret; Runnels, Vivien; Rajan, S Irudaya; Sood, Atul; Nair, Sreelekha; Thomas, Philomina; Packer, Corinne; MacKenzie, Adrian; Tomblin Murphy, Gail; Labonté, Ronald; Bourgeault, Ivy Lynn

    2017-04-05

    This study sought to better understand the drivers of skilled health professional migration, its consequences, and the various strategies countries have employed to mitigate its negative impacts. The study was conducted in four countries-Jamaica, India, the Philippines, and South Africa-that have historically been "sources" of health workers migrating to other countries. The aim of this paper is to present the findings from the Indian portion of the study. Data were collected using surveys of Indian generalist and specialist physicians, nurses, midwives, dentists, pharmacists, dieticians, and other allied health therapists. We also conducted structured interviews with key stakeholders representing government ministries, professional associations, regional health authorities, health care facilities, and educational institutions. Quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and regression models. Qualitative data were analyzed thematically. Shortages of health workers are evident in certain parts of India and in certain specialty areas, but the degree and nature of such shortages are difficult to determine due to the lack of evidence and health information. The relationship of such shortages to international migration is not clear. Policy responses to health worker migration are also similarly embedded in wider processes aimed at health workforce management, but overall, there is no clear policy agenda to manage health worker migration. Decision-makers in India present conflicting options about the need or desirability of curtailing migration. Consequences of health work migration on the Indian health care system are not easily discernable from other compounding factors. Research suggests that shortages of skilled health workers in India must be examined in relation to domestic policies on training, recruitment, and retention rather than viewed as a direct consequence of the international migration of health workers.

  3. Simulation Modeling of Radio Direction Finding Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Pelikan

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available It is sometimes difficult to determine analytically error probabilities of direction finding results for evaluating algorithms of practical interest. Probalistic simulation models are described in this paper that can be to study error performance of new direction finding systems or to geographical modifications of existing configurations.

  4. Key User Extraction Based on Telecommunication Data (aka. Key Users in Social Network. How to find them?)

    CERN Document Server

    Bródka, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    The number of systems that collect vast amount of data about users rapidly grow during last few years. Many of these systems contain data not only about people characteristics but also about their relationships with other system users. From this kind of data it is possible to extract a social network that reflects the connections between system's users. Moreover, the analysis of such social network enables to investigate different characteristics of its members and their linkages. One of the types of examining such network is key users extraction. Key users are these who have the biggest impact on other network members as well as have big influence on network evolution. The obtained about these users knowledge enables to investigate and predict changes within the network. So this knowledge is very important for the people or companies who make a profit from the network like telecommunication company. The second important thing is the ability to extract these users as quick as possible, i.e. developed the algo...

  5. Designing Biodiversity Friendly Communities. Liveable Cities Forum: Key outcomes and findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-10-15

    The Liveable Cities Forum, held 21-22 August in Montreal Canada, created a platform to share best practices on biodiversity management and application at the local level. The Forum also highlighted the importance of partnership building and presented instruments (such as the Singapore Index on Cities' Biodiversity) that help to move the biodiversity agenda forward. A findings report on the Forum has recently been released, offering panel and workshop summaries, key outcomes, and a scope of future opportunities for local governments. Some of the key outcomes are as follows: Biodiversity protection is at its core a local issue, and in order to mitigate biodiversity loss in cities, there is an undeniable need for local governments to come together and work through solutions collectively; Urban centers influence local, regional and global biodiversity. Therefore, it is important that cities con-serve their local biodiversity through the sustainable use of resources beyond their borders; It is important for municipalities to engage and partner with local residents, academic institutions, and organizations, not only to have a finger on the pulse, but also to have local allies and secure long-term support; and Integrated policies help drive action. To effectively mainstream biodiversity at the local level, it is important to incorporate biodiversity considerations into multiple departments, plans and programs.

  6. The Probabilistic Model of Keys Generation of QKD Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Golubchikov, Dmitry

    2010-01-01

    The probabilistic model of keys generation of QKD systems is proposed. The model includes all phases of keys generation starting from photons generation to states detection taking characteristics of fiber-optics components into account. The paper describes the tree of events of QKD systems. Equations are found for estimation of the effectiveness of the process of sifted keys generation as well as for bit-error probability and for the rate of private keys generation.

  7. How the World's Best Schools Stay on Top: Study's Key Findings Pinpoint Practices That Align with Learning Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killion, Joellen

    2016-01-01

    Key findings from a new study highlight how Learning Forward's long-standing position on professional learning correlates with practices in high-performing systems in Singapore, Shanghai, Hong Kong, and British Columbia. The purpose of this article is to share key findings from the study so that educators might apply them to strengthening…

  8. Key West, Florida Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Key West, Florida Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model. MOST...

  9. Key West, Florida Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  10. Discrete Event Simulation Modeling and Analysis of Key Leader Engagements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    SIMULATION MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF KEY LEADER ENGAGEMENTS by Clifford C. Wakeman June 2012 Thesis Co-Advisors: Arnold H. Buss Susan...DATE June 2012 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Discrete Event Simulation Modeling and Analysis of Key...for public release; distribution is unlimited DISCRETE EVENT SIMULATION MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF KEY LEADER ENGAGEMENTS Clifford C. Wakeman

  11. Orthognathic model surgery with LEGO key-spacer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Alfred Chee-Ching; Lee, Alfred Siu Hong; Li, Wai Keung

    2013-12-01

    A new technique of model surgery using LEGO plates as key-spacers is described. This technique requires less time to set up compared with the conventional plaster model method. It also retains the preoperative setup with the same set of models. Movement of the segments can be measured and examined in detail with LEGO key-spacers.

  12. Key Findings from the Artist Project on Aerosol Retention in a Dry Steam Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelouahab Dehbi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A steam generator tube rupture (SGTR event with a stuck-open safety relief valve constitutes one of the most serious accident sequences in pressurized water reactors (PWRs because it may create an open path for radioactive aerosol release into the environment. The release may be mitigated by the deposition of fission product particles on a steam generator's (SG's dry tubes and structures or by scrubbing in the secondary coolant. However, the absence of empirical data, the complexity of the geometry, and the controlling processes have, until recently, made any quantification of retention difficult to justify. As a result, past risk assessment studies typically took little or no credit for aerosol retention in SGTR sequences. To provide these missing data, the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI initiated the Aerosol Trapping In Steam GeneraTor (ARTIST Project, which aimed to thoroughly investigate various aspects of aerosol removal in the secondary side of a breached steam generator. Between 2003 and 2011, the PSI has led the ARTIST Project, which involved intense collaboration between nearly 20 international partners. This summary paper presents key findings of experimental and analytical work conducted at the PSI within the ARTIST program.

  13. International Off-grid Renewable Energy Conference 2012: Key Findings and Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-06-15

    IRENA co-organised the International Off-grid Renewable Energy Conference (IOREC) along with the ECOWAS Regional Centre for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency (ECREEE) and the Alliance for Rural Electrification (ARE), in Accra, Ghana, on 1-2 November 2012. This report presents the key findings and recommendations that emerged from the roundtable discussions during IOREC. The report highlights that off-grid renewable energy systems, stand-alone and mini-grids, have the potential to play a significant role in achieving the goal of universal electricity access. In recognition of this role, their development needs to be integrated into the mainstream rural electrification strategies. While several successful deployment approaches exist, there is a need to scale up. What is required is a shift from the prevalent project-by-project approach, to one that focusses on the creation of a sustainable environment that facilitates large-scale deployment. Involvement of the private sector, and in particular of local enterprises, will be instrumental in extending electricity access in rural areas, rapidly and sustainably, and hence needs to be promoted. Off-grid renewable energy technologies produce striking synergies with sectors critical for human development, and play an important role in improving access to water supply while also extending healthcare and telecommunication services in rural areas.

  14. Finding the key to success: A visitors' perspective at a National Arts Festival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Saayman

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose and/or objectives: The purpose of this article was to segment festival visitors at the Klein Karoo National Arts Festival (KKNK based on their travel motives and their ratings of the Key Success Factors (KSFs in terms of their festival experience. Problem investigated: Previous research has indicated that the success and sustainability of an arts festival is dependent on the number of tickets sold for shows and productions during the festival. Therefore, success depends on attracting visitors who attend and buy tickets for different types of shows and productions. To achieve this festival organisers need to understand the aspects that visitors regard as satisfying their needs and which create a unique festival experience. Methodology: A survey was conducted using a questionnaire at the festival. A total of 450 questionnaires were administered and 443 completed questionnaires were included in the analysis. Factor analysis was used to identify visitors' motivation to travel to and attend the KKNK. Cluster analysis followed the factor analysis to segments visitors based their identified travel motives. ANOVAs, Chi-square tests, two-way frequency tables and Tukey's multiple comparisons were conducted to investigate and determine any significant differences between the clusters based on demographics, behavioural variables and KSFs. Analysis and interpretation of findings: The findings of this study revealed that the travel motives that are important to visitors to the arts festival are: Festival Attractiveness, Novelty and Escape and Socialisation. Furthermore, different markets have different travel motives, clustered as Escapists, Festival Junkies and Culture Seekers. These different clusters have different tastes and needs, for example the Culture Seekers are more interested in Rock shows and all three clusters enjoy Drama, Music Theatre and Cabaret and Comedy shows and productions. Different markets also focus on different KSFs that

  15. The framing of politics as strategy and game: a review of concepts, operationalizations and key findings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalberg, T.; Strömbäck, J.; de Vreese, C.H.

    2012-01-01

    A key concept in research on the media coverage of politics is the game or strategy frame. Contrasted with coverage of politics as issues, the framing of politics as a strategic game is marked by features such as winning and losing as the central concern and a focus on how candidates or parties are

  16. Criminal Victimisation in International Perspective : Key findings from the 2004-2005 ICVS and EU ICS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, J. van; Kesteren, J. van; Smit, P.

    2007-01-01

    This report presents the key results of the crime victim surveys that were carried out as part of the fifth sweep of the International Crime Victim Surveys (ICVS) conducted in 2004/2005. A large portion of the these data are derived from the European Survey on Crime and Safety (EU ICS), organised by

  17. Finding and Improving the Key-Frames of Long Video Sequences for Face Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nasrollahi, Kamal; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2010-01-01

    Face recognition systems are very sensitive to the quality and resolution of their input face images. This makes such systems unreliable when working with long surveillance video sequences without employing some selection and enhancement algorithms. On the other hand, processing all the frames...... of such video sequences by any enhancement or even face recognition algorithm is demanding. Thus, there is a need for a mechanism to summarize the input video sequence to a set of key-frames and then applying an enhancement algorithm to this subset. This paper presents a system doing exactly this. The system...... uses face quality assessment to select the key-frames and a hybrid super-resolution to enhance the face image quality. The suggested system that employs a linear associator face recognizer to evaluate the enhanced results has been tested on real surveillance video sequences and the experimental results...

  18. Finding solid ground: law enforcement, key populations and their health and rights in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibe, Andrew; Howell, Simon; Müller, Alexandra; Katumba, Munyaradzi; Langen, Bram; Artz, Lillian; Marks, Monique

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sex workers, people who use drugs, men who have sex with men, women who have sex with women and transgender people in South Africa frequently experience high levels of stigma, abuse and discrimination. Evidence suggests that such abuse is sometimes committed by police officers, meaning that those charged with protection are perpetrators. This reinforces cycles of violence, increases the risk of HIV infection, undermines HIV prevention and treatment interventions and violates the constitutional prescriptions that the police are mandated to protect. This paper explores how relationship building can create positive outcomes while taking into account the challenges associated with reforming police strategies in relation to key populations, and vice versa. Discussion We argue that relationships between law enforcement agencies and key populations need to be re-examined and reconstituted to enable appropriate responses and services. The antagonistic positioning, “othering” and blame assignment frequently seen in interactions between law enforcement officials and key populations can negatively influence both, albeit for different reasons. In addressing these concerns, we argue that mediation based on consensual dialogue is required, and can be harnessed through a process that highlights points of familiarity that are often shared, but not understood, by both parties. Rather than laying blame, we argue that substantive changes need to be owned and executed by all role-players, informed by a common language that is cognisant of differing perspectives. Conclusions Relational approaches can be used to identify programmes that align goals that are part of law enforcement, human rights and public health despite not always being seen as such. Law enforcement champions and representatives of key populations need to be identified and supported to promote interventions that are mutually reinforcing, and address perceived differences by highlighting commonality

  19. Finding solid ground: law enforcement, key populations and their health and rights in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Scheibe

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sex workers, people who use drugs, men who have sex with men, women who have sex with women and transgender people in South Africa frequently experience high levels of stigma, abuse and discrimination. Evidence suggests that such abuse is sometimes committed by police officers, meaning that those charged with protection are perpetrators. This reinforces cycles of violence, increases the risk of HIV infection, undermines HIV prevention and treatment interventions and violates the constitutional prescriptions that the police are mandated to protect. This paper explores how relationship building can create positive outcomes while taking into account the challenges associated with reforming police strategies in relation to key populations, and vice versa. Discussion: We argue that relationships between law enforcement agencies and key populations need to be re-examined and reconstituted to enable appropriate responses and services. The antagonistic positioning, “othering” and blame assignment frequently seen in interactions between law enforcement officials and key populations can negatively influence both, albeit for different reasons. In addressing these concerns, we argue that mediation based on consensual dialogue is required, and can be harnessed through a process that highlights points of familiarity that are often shared, but not understood, by both parties. Rather than laying blame, we argue that substantive changes need to be owned and executed by all role-players, informed by a common language that is cognisant of differing perspectives. Conclusions: Relational approaches can be used to identify programmes that align goals that are part of law enforcement, human rights and public health despite not always being seen as such. Law enforcement champions and representatives of key populations need to be identified and supported to promote interventions that are mutually reinforcing, and address perceived differences by

  20. Secret Key Generation for a Pairwise Independent Network Model

    CERN Document Server

    Nitinawarat, Sirin; Barg, Alexander; Narayan, Prakash; Reznik, Alex

    2010-01-01

    We consider secret key generation for a "pairwise independent network" model in which every pair of terminals observes correlated sources that are independent of sources observed by all other pairs of terminals. The terminals are then allowed to communicate publicly with all such communication being observed by all the terminals. The objective is to generate a secret key shared by a given subset of terminals at the largest rate possible, with the cooperation of any remaining terminals. Secrecy is required from an eavesdropper that has access to the public interterminal communication. A (single-letter) formula for secret key capacity brings out a natural connection between the problem of secret key generation and a combinatorial problem of maximal packing of Steiner trees in an associated multigraph. An explicit algorithm is proposed for secret key generation based on a maximal packing of Steiner trees in a multigraph; the corresponding maximum rate of Steiner tree packing is thus a lower bound for the secret ...

  1. Model of key success factors for Business Intelligence implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Mesaros

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available New progressive technologies recorded growth in every area. Information-communication technologies facilitate the exchange of information and it facilitates management of everyday activities in enterprises. Specific modules (such as Business Intelligence facilitate decision-making. Several studies have demonstrated the positive impact of Business Intelligence to decision-making. The first step is to put in place the enterprise. The implementation process is influenced by many factors. This article discusses the issue of key success factors affecting to successful implementation of Business Intelligence. The article describes the key success factors for successful implementation and use of Business Intelligence based on multiple studies. The main objective of this study is to verify the effects and dependence of selected factors and proposes a model of key success factors for successful implementation of Business Intelligence. Key success factors and the proposed model are studied in Slovak enterprises.

  2. Student Engagement and Student Outcomes: Key Findings from "CCSSE" Validation Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClenney, Kay; Marti, C. Nathan; Adkins, Courtney

    2012-01-01

    The findings from 20 years of research on undergraduate education have been unequivocal: The more actively engaged students are--with college faculty and staff, with other students, and with the subject matter they study--the more likely they are to learn, to stick with their studies, and to attain their academic goals. The existing literature,…

  3. The queueing model for quantum key distribution network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen Hao; Han Zheng-Fu; Guo Guang-Can; Hong Pei-Lin

    2009-01-01

    This paper develops a QKD (quantum key distribution)-based queueing model to investigate the data delay on QKD link and network, especially that based on trusted relays. It shows the mean packet delay performance of the QKD system. Furthermore, it proposes a key buffering policy which could effectively improve the delay performance in practice. The results will be helpful for quality of service in practical QKD systems.

  4. Invisible Wounds of War: Summary of Key Findings on Psychological and Cognitive Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-11

    costs using two separate methodologies. For PTSD and major depression, we used a microsimulation model to project two-year costs—costs incurred...we used our microsimulation model to predict two-year costs for the approximately 1.6 million troops who have deployed since 2001. 6 We

  5. The Effects of Content and Language Integrated Learning in European Education: Key Findings from the Andalusian Bilingual Sections Evaluation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Francisco; Casal, Sonia; Moore, Pat

    2010-01-01

    Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) represents an increasingly popular pedagogic approach that has evolved in response to the recognised need for plurilingual competence in Europe. In this article, we present key findings from one of the first large-scale, multidimensional CLIL evaluation projects. We begin by outlining the emergence…

  6. Time for Action! ICT Integration in Formal Education: Key Findings from a Region-Wide Follow-Up Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goeman, Katie; Elen, Jan; Pynoo, Bram; van Braak, Johan

    2015-01-01

    This paper is a report on the key findings of a region-wide monitoring study conducted in Dutch-speaking schools in Belgium. First, we elaborate on the building blocks of the instrument, which has been updated and improved since its first deployment in 2007. In particular we focus on the core indicators, along with the multi-actor approach, the…

  7. Investigating ideomotor cognition with motorvisual priming paradigms: Key findings, methodological challenges, and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland eThomaschke

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Ideomotor theory claims that perceptual representations of action effects are functionally involved in the planning of actions. Strong evidence for this claim comes from a phenomenon called motorvisual priming. Motorvisual priming refers to the finding that action planning directly affects perception, and that the effects are selective for stimuli that share features with the planned action. Motorvisual priming studies have provided detailed insights into the processing of perceptual representations in action planning. One important finding is that such representations in action planning have a categorical format, whereas metric representations are not anticipated in planning. Further essential findings regard the processing mechanisms and the time course of ideomotor cognition. Perceptual representations of action effects are first activated by action planning and then bound into a compound representation of the action plan. This compound representation is stabilized throughout the course of the action by the shielding of all involved representations from other cognitive processes. Despite a rapid growth in the number of motorvisual priming studies in the current literature, there are still many aspects of ideomotor cognition which have not yet been investigated. These aspects include the scope of ideomotor processing with regard to action types and stimulus types, as well as the exact nature of the binding and shielding mechanisms involved.

  8. Hypergeometric language models for republished article finding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsagkias, M.; de Rijke, M.; Weerkamp, W.

    2011-01-01

    Republished article finding is the task of identifying instances of articles that have been published in one source and republished more or less verbatim in another source, which is often a social media source. We address this task as an ad hoc retrieval problem, using the source article as a query.

  9. Key findings of the US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation's clinical practice benchmarking project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Michael P; Sabadosa, Kathryn A; Quinton, Hebe B; Marshall, Bruce C; Schechter, Michael S

    2014-04-01

    Benchmarking is the process of using outcome data to identify high-performing centres and determine practices associated with their outstanding performance. The US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) Patient Registry contains centre-specific outcomes data for all CFF-certified paediatric and adult cystic fibrosis (CF) care programmes in the USA. The CFF benchmarking project analysed these registry data, adjusting for differences in patient case mix known to influence outcomes, and identified the top-performing US paediatric and adult CF care programmes for pulmonary and nutritional outcomes. Separate multidisciplinary paediatric and adult benchmarking teams each visited 10 CF care programmes, five in the top quintile for pulmonary outcomes and five in the top quintile for nutritional outcomes. Key practice patterns and approaches present in both paediatric and adult programmes with outstanding clinical outcomes were identified and could be summarised as systems, attitudes, practices, patient/family empowerment and projects. These included: (1) the presence of strong leadership and a well-functioning care team working with a systematic approach to providing consistent care; (2) high expectations for outcomes among providers and families; (3) early and aggressive management of clinical declines, avoiding reliance on 'rescues'; and (4) patients/families that were engaged, empowered and well informed on disease management and its rationale. In summary, assessment of practice patterns at CF care centres with top-quintile pulmonary and nutritional outcomes provides insight into characteristic practices that may aid in optimising patient outcomes.

  10. EMSODEV and EPOS-IP: key findings for effective management of EU research infrastructure projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materia, Paola; Bozzoli, Sabrina; Beranzoli, Laura; Cocco, Massimo; Favali, Paolo; Freda, Carmela; Sangianantoni, Agata

    2017-04-01

    -2019) is a project of 47 partners, 6 associate partners and several international organizations for a total of 25 countries involved. EPOS IP is a key step in EPOS' mission of a pan-European Earth science integrated platform. It will deliver not only a suite of domain-specific and multidisciplinary data and services in one platform, but also the legal, governance and financial frameworks to ensure the infrastructure future operation and sustainability (EPOS ERIC). INGV experience over the years indicates that effective management of EU RIs projects should contain 5 basic elements: 1.Defined life cycle and milestones: Map of phases, deliverables, key milestones and sufficiency criteria for each group involved in the project using project management tools and software. 2.Shared organization, systems, roles: Defined roles for team members and responsibilities for functional managers are crucial. Similarly, a system of communication and team involvement is essential to success. Leadership and interpersonal/organizational skills are also important. 3.Quality assurance: Quality dimension should be aligned to the project objectives and specific criteria should be identified for each phase of the project. 4.Tracking and variance analysis: Regular reports and periodic meetings of the teams are crucial to identify when things are off target. Schedule slips, cost overruns, open issues, new risks and problems must be dealt with as early as possible. 5.Impact assessment by monitoring the achievement of results and socio-economic impact.

  11. Interprofessional social and emotional intelligence skills training: study findings and key lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Loma Kaye; Thomas-Squance, Ruth; Brainin-Rodriguez, Jo Ellen; Yancey, Antronette K

    2014-03-01

    Frequently changing demands in health care systems have focused attention on the need for emotional competence (EC) - social and emotional intelligence skills, to adapt efficiently, responsively and productively. This paper reports on findings from a workshop that introduced practical EC skills to nearly 1000 participants in education, medicine, mental health and substance abuse counseling. The holistic EC presentations were designed to teach concepts and principles providing each participant with the opportunity for individualized learning. Ninety percent of the participants rated these presentations as valuable and useful. Following this positive response, the approach was adapted to train health professionals serving diverse populations. This report shares our experience teaching various professionals and describes preliminarily testing of the adapted EC training program on a small group of health professionals, whose responsibilities included teamwork, program design, teaching clients and patients EC basics to support healthy practices and self-care. Their positive response supports the need for expanded study and further investigation.

  12. Modeling, Simulation and Analysis of Public Key Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan-Kwei; Tuey, Richard; Ma, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Security is an essential part of network communication. The advances in cryptography have provided solutions to many of the network security requirements. Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) is the foundation of the cryptography applications. The main objective of this research is to design a model to simulate a reliable, scalable, manageable, and high-performance public key infrastructure. We build a model to simulate the NASA public key infrastructure by using SimProcess and MatLab Software. The simulation is from top level all the way down to the computation needed for encryption, decryption, digital signature, and secure web server. The application of secure web server could be utilized in wireless communications. The results of the simulation are analyzed and confirmed by using queueing theory.

  13. From struggles to resource gains in interprofessional service networks: Key findings from a multiple case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toiviainen, Hanna; Kira, Mari

    2017-04-07

    In interprofessional service networks, employees cross professional boundaries to collaborate with colleagues and clients with expertise and values different from their own. It can be a struggle to adopt shared work practices and deal with "multivoicedness." At the same time, networks allow members to engage in meaningful service provision, gain a broader understanding of the service provided, and obtain social support. Intertwined network struggles and resource gains have received limited attention in the interprofessional care literature to date. The aim of the study was to investigate the learning potential of the co-existing struggles and resource gains. This article reports findings from two interprofessional networks. Interviews were conducted with 19 employees and thematically analysed. Three types of struggles and six types of resource gains of networking were identified. The struggles relate, first, to the assumptions of networking following similar practices to those in a home organisation; second, to the challenges of dealing with the multivoicedness of networking; and, third, to the experienced gap between the networking ideals and the reality of cooperation. At the same time, the network members experience gains in emotional resources (e.g., stronger sense of meaningfulness at work), cognitive resources (e.g., understanding the customer needs from alternative perspectives), and social resources (e.g., being able to rely on other professionals' competence). Learning potential emerged from the dynamics between coexisting struggles and resource gains.

  14. Finds in Testing Experiments for Model Evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ji; JIA Xiaoxia; LIU Chang; YANG Haiyan; LIU Chao

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the fault location and the failure prediction models, simulation-based and code-based experiments were conducted to collect the required failure data. The PIE model was applied to simulate failures in the simulation-based experiment. Based on syntax and semantic level fault injections, a hybrid fault injection model is presented. To analyze the injected faults, the difficulty to inject (DTI) and difficulty to detect (DTD) are introduced and are measured from the programs used in the code-based experiment. Three interesting results were obtained from the experiments: 1) Failures simulated by the PIE model without consideration of the program and testing features are unreliably predicted; 2) There is no obvious correlation between the DTI and DTD parameters; 3) The DTD for syntax level faults changes in a different pattern to that for semantic level faults when the DTI increases. The results show that the parameters have a strong effect on the failures simulated, and the measurement of DTD is not strict.

  15. Key Elements of Effective Teaching in the Direct Teaching Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruning, Roger H.

    Summaries and outlines are presented of key elements in effective teaching identified in research studies by Kounin (1970), Brophy (1973), Brophy and Evertson (1976), Stallings (1974; l975), Berliner (1979), and Good and Grouws (1979). These elements are synthesized in a direct teaching model that delineates the characteristics of effective…

  16. Research on Digital Product Modeling Key Technologies of Digital Manufacturing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Guoping; ZHOU Zude; HU Yefa; ZHAO Liang

    2006-01-01

    With the globalization and diversification of the market and the rapid development of Information Technology (IT) and Artificial Intelligence (AI), the digital revolution of manufacturing is coming. One of the key technologies in digital manufacturing is product digital modeling. This paper firstly analyzes the information and features of the product digital model during each stage in the product whole lifecycle, then researches on the three critical technologies of digital modeling in digital manufacturing-product modeling, standard for the exchange of product model data and digital product data management. And the potential signification of the product digital model during the process of digital manufacturing is concluded-product digital model integrates primary features of each stage during the product whole lifecycle based on graphic features, applies STEP as data exchange mechanism, and establishes PDM system to manage the large amount, complicated and dynamic product data to implement the product digital model data exchange, sharing and integration.

  17. Assessment of Climate Change in the Southwest United States: Key Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfin, G. M.

    2012-12-01

    The Assessment of Climate Change in the Southwest United States, is a technical input to the National Climate Assessment. The 121-author report summarizes knowledge about climate change and its impacts across Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah. The report looks at links between climate and natural resources, vulnerabilities to climate variability and change across the region and along the U.S.-Mexico border, and adaptation and mitigation choices for addressing future changes. The period since 1950 has been warmer than any period of comparable length in the last 600 years. Droughts of the past 2,000 years have exceeded the most severe and sustained drought during 1901-2010. In the last decade, flows in the major river basins of the Southwest have been lower than their 20th century averages; many snowmelt-fed streams in the region exhibited earlier snowmelt and earlier center of mass of annual streamflows. Climate models project continued temperature increases, with longer and hotter summer heat waves. Average precipitation is projected to decrease in the southern part of the region. Reduced streamflows are projected for the Rio Grande, Colorado, and San Joaquin rivers. More frequent and intense winter flooding is projected for the western Sierra Nevada, whereas Colorado Front Range summer flooding is projected to increase. Observed ecosystems impacts include changes in phenology, widespread forest disturbance due to the confluence of drought, increased temperatures, and changes to insect life cycles. Area burned by wildfire is projected to increase in most of the Southwest. Plant and animal species' distributions will be affected by climate change, and studies show that observed climate changes are strongly associated with observed changes in species' distributions. California coastal ecosystems will be affected by a combination of ocean warming, reduced oxygen content, sea level rise and ocean acidification. When west coast sea levels are

  18. Materials R and D for a timely DEMO: Key findings and recommendations of the EU Roadmap Materials Assessment Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stork, Derek, E-mail: derek.stork@ccfe.ac.uk [EFDA Power Plant Physics and Technology, Boltzmannstr. 2, Garching, 85748 Germany (Germany); Agostini, Pietro [ENEA, Brasimone Research Centre, 40032, Camugnano, Bologna (Italy); Boutard, Jean-Louis [CEA, cab HC, Saclay, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Buckthorpe, Derek [AMEC, Booths Park, Chelford Road, Knutsford, Cheshire, WA16 8QZ (United Kingdom); Diegele, Eberhard [Karlsruhe Institute for Technology, IMF-I, D-7602, Karlsruhe (Germany); Dudarev, Sergei L. [Euratom-CCFE Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); English, Colin [National Nuclear Laboratory, 5th Floor, Chadwick House, Warrington Road, Birchwood Park, WA3 6AE (United Kingdom); Federici, Gianfranco [EFDA Power Plant Physics and Technology, Boltzmannstr. 2, Garching, 85748 Germany (Germany); Gilbert, Mark R. [Euratom-CCFE Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Gonzalez, Sehila [EFDA Power Plant Physics and Technology, Boltzmannstr. 2, Garching, 85748 Germany (Germany); Ibarra, Angel [CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 40, Madrid (Spain); Linsmeier, Christian [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung–Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Puma, Antonella Li [CEA, DEN, Saclay, DM2S, SERMA, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Marbach, Gabriel [CEA, cab HC, Saclay, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Packer, Lee W. [Euratom-CCFE Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Raj, Baldev [Indian National Academy of Engineering, Shaheed Jeet Singh Marg, New Delhi 110016 (India); Rieth, Michael [Karlsruhe Institute for Technology, IMF-I, D-7602, Karlsruhe (Germany); Tran, Min Quang [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne—CRPP, Association Euratom-Switzerland, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); and others

    2014-10-15

    The findings of the EU Fusion Programme's ‘Materials Assessment Group’ (MAG), assessing readiness of Structural, Plasma Facing (PF) and High Heat Flux (HHF) materials for DEMO, are discussed. These are incorporated into the EU Fusion Power Roadmap [1], with a decision to construct DEMO in the early 2030s. The methodology uses project-based and systems-engineering approaches, the concept of Technology Readiness Levels, and considers lessons learned from Fission reactor material development. ‘Baseline’ materials are identified for each DEMO role, and the DEMO mission risks analysed from the known limitations, or unknown properties, associated with each baseline material. R and D programmes to address these risks are developed. The DEMO assessed has a phase I with a ‘starter blanket’: the blanket must withstand ≥2 MW yr m{sup −2} fusion neutron flux (equivalent to ∼20 dpa front-wall steel damage). The baseline materials all have significant associated risks, so development of ‘Risk Mitigation Materials’ (RMM) is recommended. The R and D programme has parallel development of the baseline and RMM, up to ‘down-selection’ points to align with decisions on the DEMO blanket and divertor engineering definition. ITER licensing experience is used to refine the issues for materials nuclear testing, and arguments are developed to optimise scope of materials tests with fusion neutron (‘14 MeV’) spectra before DEMO design finalisation. Some 14 MeV testing is still essential, and the Roadmap requires deployment of a ≥30 dpa (steels) testing capability by 2026. Programme optimisation by the pre-testing with fission neutrons on isotopically- or chemically-doped steels and with ion-beams is discussed along with the minimum 14 MeV testing programme, and the key role which fundamental and mission-oriented modelling can play in orienting the research.

  19. Key metrics for HFIR HEU and LEU models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilas, Germina [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Betzler, Benjamin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chandler, David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Renfro, David G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Davidson, Eva E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-10-25

    This report compares key metrics for two fuel design models of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The first model represents the highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel currently in use at HFIR, and the second model considers a low-enriched uranium (LEU) interim design fuel. Except for the fuel region, the two models are consistent, and both include an experiment loading that is representative of HFIR's current operation. The considered key metrics are the neutron flux at the cold source moderator vessel, the mass of 252Cf produced in the flux trap target region as function of cycle time, the fast neutron flux at locations of interest for material irradiation experiments, and the reactor cycle length. These key metrics are a small subset of the overall HFIR performance and safety metrics. They were defined as a means of capturing data essential for HFIR's primary missions, for use in optimization studies assessing the impact of HFIR's conversion from HEU fuel to different types of LEU fuel designs.

  20. From spatially variable streamflow to distributed hydrological models: Analysis of key modeling decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenicia, Fabrizio; Kavetski, Dmitri; Savenije, Hubert H. G.; Pfister, Laurent

    2016-02-01

    This paper explores the development and application of distributed hydrological models, focusing on the key decisions of how to discretize the landscape, which model structures to use in each landscape element, and how to link model parameters across multiple landscape elements. The case study considers the Attert catchment in Luxembourg—a 300 km2 mesoscale catchment with 10 nested subcatchments that exhibit clearly different streamflow dynamics. The research questions are investigated using conceptual models applied at hydrologic response unit (HRU) scales (1-4 HRUs) on 6 hourly time steps. Multiple model structures are hypothesized and implemented using the SUPERFLEX framework. Following calibration, space/time model transferability is tested using a split-sample approach, with evaluation criteria including streamflow prediction error metrics and hydrological signatures. Our results suggest that: (1) models using geology-based HRUs are more robust and capture the spatial variability of streamflow time series and signatures better than models using topography-based HRUs; this finding supports the hypothesis that, in the Attert, geology exerts a stronger control than topography on streamflow generation, (2) streamflow dynamics of different HRUs can be represented using distinct and remarkably simple model structures, which can be interpreted in terms of the perceived dominant hydrologic processes in each geology type, and (3) the same maximum root zone storage can be used across the three dominant geological units with no loss in model transferability; this finding suggests that the partitioning of water between streamflow and evaporation in the study area is largely independent of geology and can be used to improve model parsimony. The modeling methodology introduced in this study is general and can be used to advance our broader understanding and prediction of hydrological behavior, including the landscape characteristics that control hydrologic response, the

  1. Selection of key terrain attributes for SOC model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Mogens Humlekrog; Adhikari, Kabindra; Chellasamy, Menaka

    was selected, total 2,514,820 data mining models were constructed by 71 differences grid from 12m to 2304m and 22 attributes, 21 attributes derived by DTM and the original elevation. Relative importance and usage of each attributes in every model were calculated. Comprehensive impact rates of each attribute...... (standh) are the first three key terrain attributes in 5-attributes-model in all resolutions, the rest 2 of 5 attributes are Normal High (NormalH) and Valley Depth (Vall_depth) at the resolution finer than 40m, and Elevation and Channel Base (Chnl_base) coarser than 40m. The models at pixels size at 88m......As an important component of the global carbon pool, soil organic carbon (SOC) plays an important role in the global carbon cycle. SOC pool is the basic information to carry out global warming research, and needs to sustainable use of land resources. Digital terrain attributes are often use...

  2. Key management and encryption under the bounded storage model.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draelos, Timothy John; Neumann, William Douglas; Lanzone, Andrew J.; Anderson, William Erik

    2005-11-01

    There are several engineering obstacles that need to be solved before key management and encryption under the bounded storage model can be realized. One of the critical obstacles hindering its adoption is the construction of a scheme that achieves reliable communication in the event that timing synchronization errors occur. One of the main accomplishments of this project was the development of a new scheme that solves this problem. We show in general that there exist message encoding techniques under the bounded storage model that provide an arbitrarily small probability of transmission error. We compute the maximum capacity of this channel using the unsynchronized key-expansion as side-channel information at the decoder and provide tight lower bounds for a particular class of key-expansion functions that are pseudo-invariant to timing errors. Using our results in combination with Dziembowski et al. [11] encryption scheme we can construct a scheme that solves the timing synchronization error problem. In addition to this work we conducted a detailed case study of current and future storage technologies. We analyzed the cost, capacity, and storage data rate of various technologies, so that precise security parameters can be developed for bounded storage encryption schemes. This will provide an invaluable tool for developing these schemes in practice.

  3. Development of Groundwater Modeling Capacity in Mongolia: Keys to Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, M. T.; Valder, J. F.; Carter, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Ulaanbaatar, the capital city of Mongolia, is totally dependent on groundwater for its municipal and industrial water supply. Water is drawn from a network of shallow wells in an alluvial aquifer along the Tuul River. Evidence, however, suggests that current water use and especially the projected water demand from a rapidly growing urban population, is not sustainable from existing water sources. In response, the Mongolia Ministry of Environment and the Mongolian Fresh Water Institute requested technical assistance on groundwater modeling through the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Scientists from the USGS-SD Water Science Center provided a workshop to Mongolian water experts on basic principles of groundwater modeling using MODFLOW. The purpose of the workshop was to bring together representatives from the Government of Mongolia, local universities, technical experts, and other key stakeholders to build in-country capacity in hydrogeology and groundwater modeling. A preliminary steady-state groundwater flow model was developed to simulate groundwater conditions in the Tuul River Basin and for use in water use decision-making. The model consisted of 2 layers, 226 rows, and 260 columns with uniform 500 meter grid spacing. The upper model layer represented the alluvial aquifer and the lower layer represented the underlying bedrock, which includes areas characterized by permafrost. Estimated groundwater withdrawal was 180 m3/day, and estimated recharge was 114 mm/yr. The model will be modified and updated by Mongolian scientists as more data are available. Ultimately the model will be used to assist managers in developing a sustainable water supply, for current use and changing climate scenarios. A key to success was developing in-country technical capacity and partnerships with the Mongolian University of Science and Technology, Mongolian Freshwater Institute, a non-profit organization, UNESCO, and the government of Mongolia.

  4. Perceptions of key participants about Botswana adolescents' risks of unplanned pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, and HIV: Qualitative findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magowe, Mabel K M; Seloilwe, Esther; Dithole, Kefalotse; St Lawrence, Janet

    2017-07-13

    The qualitative research findings are reported on the perceptions of key participants in Botswana about adolescent sexuality problems and the feasibility (with suggestions) of an adolescent prevention intervention. Twenty adult key participants who were selected through purposive sampling from schools and youth centers responded to open-ended questions during face-to-face individual in-depth interviews that were conducted between December, 2011 and January, 2012 in Gaborone, Botswana. The data were analyzed by using an inductive content analysis. Five major themes and 12 subthemes emerged from the interviews. The key participants discussed situations that exposed adolescents to HIV, sexually transmitted infections, and pregnancy. They also discussed unsafe sexual practices, the consequences of unprotected sex, poor parent-adolescent communication on sexuality, and the need for a sexuality education program. Policy changes are needed to improve collaboration between adolescents, parents, teachers, and youth officers in order to address adolescent sexuality problems. Further research is needed to explore the ways in which to improve sexuality communication between these groups. The results of the study provide valuable information on the sexuality risks that expose adolescents to HIV, pregnancy, and sexually transmitted infections and the strategies for the prevention of these risks, thus informing targeted interventions for risk reduction for adolescents. © 2017 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  5. Exploring key factors in online shopping with a hybrid model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsiao-Ming; Wu, Chia-Huei; Tsai, Sang-Bing; Yu, Jian; Wang, Jiangtao; Zheng, Yuxiang

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the web increasingly influences retail sales. An in-depth analysis of consumer decision-making in the context of e-business has become an important issue for internet vendors. However, factors affecting e-business are complicated and intertwined. To stimulate online sales, understanding key influential factors and causal relationships among the factors is important. To gain more insights into this issue, this paper introduces a hybrid method, which combines the Decision Making Trial and Evaluation Laboratory (DEMATEL) with the analytic network process, called DANP method, to find out the driving factors that influence the online business mostly. By DEMATEL approach the causal graph showed that "online service" dimension has the highest degree of direct impact on other dimensions; thus, the internet vendor is suggested to made strong efforts on service quality throughout the online shopping process. In addition, the study adopted DANP to measure the importance of key factors, among which "transaction security" proves to be the most important criterion. Hence, transaction security should be treated with top priority to boost the online businesses. From our study with DANP approach, the comprehensive information can be visually detected so that the decision makers can spotlight on the root causes to develop effectual actions.

  6. Are animal models relevant to key aspects of human parturition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Bryan F; Taggart, Michael J

    2009-09-01

    Preterm birth remains the most serious complication of pregnancy and is associated with increased rates of infant death or permanent neurodevelopmental disability. Our understanding of the regulation of parturition remains inadequate. The scientific literature, largely derived from rodent animal models, suggests two major mechanisms regulating the timing of parturition: the withdrawal of the steroid hormone progesterone and a proinflammatory response by the immune system. However, available evidence strongly suggests that parturition in the human has significantly different regulators and mediators from those in most of the animal models. Our objectives are to critically review the data and concepts that have arisen from use of animal models for parturition and to rationalize the use of a new model. Many animal models have contributed to advances in our understanding of the regulation of parturition. However, we suggest that those animals dependent on progesterone withdrawal to initiate parturition clearly have a limitation to their translation to the human. In such models, a linear sequence of events (e.g., luteolysis, progesterone withdrawal, uterine activation, parturition) gives rise to the concept of a "trigger" mechanism. Conversely, we propose that human parturition may arise from the concomitant maturation of several systems in parallel. We have termed this novel concept "modular accumulation of physiological systems" (MAPS). We also emphasize the urgency to determine the precise role of the immune system in the process of parturition in situations other than intrauterine infection. Finally, we accentuate the need to develop a nonprimate animal model whose physiology is more relevant to human parturition. We suggest that the guinea pig displays several key physiological characteristics of gestation that more closely resemble human pregnancy than do currently favored animal models. We conclude that the application of novel concepts and new models are

  7. Secret Key and Private Key Constructions for Simple Multiterminal Source Models

    CERN Document Server

    Ye, Chunxuan

    2010-01-01

    We propose an approach for constructing secret and private keys based on the long-known Slepian-Wolf code, due to Wyner, for correlated sources connected by a virtual additive noise channel. Our work is motivated by results of Csisz\\'ar and Narayan which highlight innate connections between secrecy generation by multiple terminals that observe correlated source signals and Slepian-Wolf near-lossless data compression. Explicit procedures for such constructions and their substantiation are provided. The performance of low density parity check channel codes in devising a new class of secret keys is examined.

  8. Key performance indicators in hospital based on balanced scorecard model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Rahimi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Performance measurement is receiving increasing verification all over the world. Nowadays in a lot of organizations, irrespective of their type or size, performance evaluation is the main concern and a key issue for top administrators. The purpose of this study is to organize suitable key performance indicators (KPIs for hospitals’ performance evaluation based on the balanced scorecard (BSC. Method: This is a mixed method study. In order to identify the hospital’s performance indicators (HPI, first related literature was reviewed and then the experts’ panel and Delphi method were used. In this study, two rounds were needed for the desired level of consensus. The experts rated the importance of the indicators, on a five-point Likert scale. In the consensus calculation, the consensus percentage was calculated by classifying the values 1-3 as not important (0 and 4-5 to (1 as important. Simple additive weighting technique was used to rank the indicators and select hospital’s KPIs. The data were analyzed by Excel 2010 software. Results: About 218 indicators were obtained from a review of selected literature. Through internal expert panel, 77 indicators were selected. Finally, 22 were selected for KPIs of hospitals. Ten indicators were selected in internal process perspective and 5, 4, and 3 indicators in finance, learning and growth, and customer, respectively. Conclusion: This model can be a useful tool for evaluating and comparing the performance of hospitals. However, this model is flexible and can be adjusted according to differences in the target hospitals. This study can be beneficial for hospital administrators and it can help them to change their perspective about performance evaluation.

  9. Culture Models to Define Key Mediators of Cancer Matrix Remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Suzanne Fuller

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available High grade serous epithelial ovarian cancer (HG-SOC is one of the most devastating gynecological cancers affecting women worldwide, with a poor survival rate despite clinical treatment advances. HG-SOC commonly metastasizes within the peritoneal cavity, primarily to the mesothelial cells of the omentum which regulate an extracellular matrix (ECM rich in collagens type I, III and IV along with laminin, vitronectin and fibronectin. Cancer cells depend on their ability to penetrate and invade secondary tissue sites to spread, however a detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes remain largely unknown. Given the high metastatic potential of HG-SOC and the associated poor clinical outcome, it is extremely important to identify the pathways and the components of which that are responsible for the progression of this disease. In-vitro methods of recapitulating human disease processes are the critical first step in such investigations. In this context, establishment of an in-vitro ‘tumor-like’ microenvironment, such as 3D culture, to study early disease and metastasis of human HG-SOC is an important and highly insightful method. In recent years many such methods have been established to investigate the adhesion and invasion of human ovarian cancer cell lines. The aim of this review is to summarize recent developments in ovarian cancer culture systems and their use to investigate clinically relevant findings concerning the key players in driving human HG-SOC.

  10. The Hannover Consultation Liaison model: some empirical findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyberger, H; Künsebeck, H W; Lempa, W; Avenarius, H J; Liedtke, R; Plassman, R; Nordmeyer, J

    1985-01-01

    Starting from the definitions concerning the concepts 'Liaison medicine' and 'Consultative Psychiatry' we begin with remarks with regard to the Consultation Liaison-Situation in West Germany on the basis of the key-words 'Brief history', 'Independent university units with regard to Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics as well as the connected organization' and 'Teaching procedures'. Following it the Hannover Consultation Liaison model is presented particularly with regard to both the psychosomatic inpatient ward including the functional organization and psychotherapeutic processes as well as the so-called 'Innere Ambulanz' which includes the consultation liaison services in the clinico-medical departments outside Psychiatry and Psychosomatics. Within the 'Innere Ambulanz', which is closely connected to our psychosomatic inpatient ward, the consultation liaison activities and the resulting supportive psychotherapeutic strategies are performed by student auxiliary therapists who are interested in completing their 4-5 months internship-time in our department. We describe both the three supportive psychotherapeutic steps, which may last months to years including subsequent dynamically psychotherapeutic strategies as well as the reactions of the auxiliary therapist function on the students. Furthermore, we may state that there exists no one more optional education procedure of graduate students than the student's confrontation with his partial self-responsibility vis-à-vis a patient who is being supportive-psychotherapeutically treated by him. Specific empirical proofs concerning our patient oriented consultation liaison activities are demonstrated on the basis of previous psychotherapeutic findings in Crohn patients. Here we are able to demonstrate the effectivity of psychotherapy in the case of the supplementarily psychotherapeutically treated patients in comparison to the patients who received medical therapy only. Finally we are able to present quantitative clinico

  11. Measurement Science for Prognostics and Health Management for Smart Manufacturing Systems: Key Findings from a Roadmapping Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Brian A.; Vogl, Gregory; Helu, Moneer; Qiao, Guixiu; Pellegrino, Joan; Justiniano, Mauricio; Raghunathan, Anand

    2017-01-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) hosted the Roadmapping Workshop – Measurement Science for Prognostics and Health Management for Smart Manufacturing Systems (PHM4SMS) in Fall 2014 to discuss the needs and priorities of stakeholders in the PHM4SMS technology area. The workshop brought together over 70 members of the PHM community. The attendees included representatives from small, medium, and large manufacturers; technology developers and integrators; academic researchers; government organizations; trade associations; and standards bodies. The attendees discussed the current and anticipated measurement science challenges to advance PHM methods and techniques for smart manufacturing systems; the associated research and development needed to implement condition monitoring, diagnostic, and prognostic technologies within manufacturing environments; and the priorities to meet the needs of PHM in manufacturing. This paper will summarize the key findings of this workshop, and present some of the critical measurement science challenges and corresponding roadmaps, i.e., suggested courses of action, to advance PHM for manufacturing. Milestones and targeted capabilities will be presented for each roadmap across three areas: PHM Manufacturing Process Techniques; PHM Performance Assessment; and PHM Infrastructure – Hardware, Software, and Integration. An analysis of these roadmaps and crosscutting themes seen across the breakout sessions is also discussed. PMID:28664163

  12. A System-Level Throughput Model for Quantum Key Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-17

    quantum mechanics to generate and distribute shared secret keying material. QKD systems generate and distribute key by progressing through a number of...communicate a seed to prime random number generation to construct a very large matrix used in the calculation of Privacy Amplification. We assume that... generate a desired number of final key bits. RQ7: What are the implications of altering the amount of Alice’s memory allocated for Quantum Exchange

  13. Comparative study of human and mouse postsynaptic proteomes finds high compositional conservation and abundance differences for key synaptic proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Bayés

    Full Text Available Direct comparison of protein components from human and mouse excitatory synapses is important for determining the suitability of mice as models of human brain disease and to understand the evolution of the mammalian brain. The postsynaptic density is a highly complex set of proteins organized into molecular networks that play a central role in behavior and disease. We report the first direct comparison of the proteome of triplicate isolates of mouse and human cortical postsynaptic densities. The mouse postsynaptic density comprised 1556 proteins and the human one 1461. A large compositional overlap was observed; more than 70% of human postsynaptic density proteins were also observed in the mouse postsynaptic density. Quantitative analysis of postsynaptic density components in both species indicates a broadly similar profile of abundance but also shows that there is higher abundance variation between species than within species. Well known components of this synaptic structure are generally more abundant in the mouse postsynaptic density. Significant inter-species abundance differences exist in some families of key postsynaptic density proteins including glutamatergic neurotransmitter receptors and adaptor proteins. Furthermore, we have identified a closely interacting set of molecules enriched in the human postsynaptic density that could be involved in dendrite and spine structural plasticity. Understanding synapse proteome diversity within and between species will be important to further our understanding of brain complexity and disease.

  14. Monitor key parameters of winter wheat using Crop model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jibo, Yue; Haikuan, Feng; Xiudong, Qi

    2016-11-01

    Estimation of biomass, canopy cover and yield is very important to agricultural decision Precision Farming. During the winter wheat growing season of 2013/2014, field measurements were conducted at Yangling District, Shaanxi Province at the jointing stage, heading stage and filling stage. AquaCrop model and Particle swarm optimization algorithm was used to find the global optimal simulation when the intermediate variable was the biomass. Through the simulation for each of the experimental data, biomass, canopy coverage and soil moisture were verification by ground measurements. Based on 8 sets of data, the simulation accuracy was calculated. The RMSE, nRMSE, MAE and R2 between simulation and measured biomass were 1.06 ton/ha, 11.92%, 0.90 ton/ha and 0.92. The RMSE, nRMSE, MAE and R2 between simulation and measured canopy cover were 8.92%, 9.84%, 7.84% and 0.66, respectively. The simulation results show that the AquaCrop model can help the decision making of winter wheat field in arid areas.

  15. Statistics by Example, Finding Models, Teachers' Commentary and Solutions Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelinka, Martha; Sutherland, Michael

    The first part of the teachers' guide for "Finding Models" briefly describes the mathematical background necessary for the student, lists the substantive areas touched on by the problems in the pamphlet, suggests classroom uses for the booklet, and gives background information for the individual chapters. The second part provides complete…

  16. A user-oriented model for expert finding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smirnova, E.; Balog, K.

    2011-01-01

    Expert finding addresses the problem of retrieving a ranked list of people who are knowledgeable on a given topic. Several models have been proposed to solve this task, but so far these have focused solely on returning the most knowledgeable people as experts on a particular topic. In this paper we

  17. Language modeling approaches to blog post and feed finding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ernsting, B.J.; Weerkamp, W.; de Rijke, M.; Voorhees, E.M.; Buckland, L.P.

    2008-01-01

    We describe our participation in the TREC 2007 Blog track. In the opinion task we looked at the differences in performance between Indri and our mixture model, the influence of external expansion and document priors to improve opinion finding; results show that an out-of-the-box Indri implementation

  18. The changing model of big pharma: impact of key trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Ajay; Pan, Xiaogang

    2016-03-01

    Recent years have seen exciting breakthroughs in biomedical sciences that are producing truly novel therapeutics for unmet patient needs. However, the pharmaceutical industry is also facing significant barriers in the form of pricing and reimbursement, continued patent expirations and challenging market dynamics. In this article, we have analyzed data from the 1995-2015 period, on key aspects such as revenue distribution, research units, portfolio mix and emerging markets to identify four key trends that help to understand the change in strategic focus, realignment of R&D footprint, the shift from primary care toward specialty drugs and biologics and the growth of emerging markets as major revenue drivers for big pharma.

  19. Toward Designing a Quantum Key Distribution Network Simulation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miralem Mehic

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As research in quantum key distribution network technologies grows larger and more complex, the need for highly accurate and scalable simulation technologies becomes important to assess the practical feasibility and foresee difficulties in the practical implementation of theoretical achievements. In this paper, we described the design of simplified simulation environment of the quantum key distribution network with multiple links and nodes. In such simulation environment, we analyzed several routing protocols in terms of the number of sent routing packets, goodput and Packet Delivery Ratio of data traffic flow using NS-3 simulator.

  20. Distributed Global Function Model Finding for Wireless Sensor Network Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Deng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Function model finding has become an important tool for analysis of data collected from wireless sensor networks (WSNs. With the development of WSNs, a large number of sensors have been widely deployed so that the collected data show the characteristics of distribution and mass. For distributed and massive sensor data, traditional centralized function model finding algorithms would lead to a significant decrease in performance. To solve this problem, this paper proposes a distributed global function model finding algorithm for wireless sensor network data (DGFMF-WSND. In DGFMF-WSND, on the basis of gene expression programming (GEP, an adaptive population generation strategy based on sub-population associated evolution is applied to improve the convergence speed of GEP. Secondly, to solve the generation of global function model in distributed wireless sensor networks data, this paper provides a global model generation algorithm based on unconstrained nonlinear least squares. Four representative datasets are used to evaluate the performance of the proposed algorithm. The comparative results show that the improved GEP with adaptive population generation strategy outperforms all other algorithms on the average convergence speed, time-consumption, value of R-square, and prediction accuracy. Meanwhile, experimental results also show that DGFMF-WSND has a clear advantage in terms of time-consumption and error of fitting. Moreover, with increasing of dataset size, DGFMF-WSND also demonstrates good speed-up ratio and scale-up ratio.

  1. Key elements for implementing comprehensive health care models for persons with HIV: a stakeholder analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchior, L A; Panter, A T; Larson, T A; Meredith, K L; Richardson-Nassif, K; Huba, G J

    2000-09-01

    A semistructured interview was conducted with 69 stakeholders in three university-based health care projects that were funded to provide an integrated continuum of care for persons living with HIV/AIDS. Data from the key informant interviews yielded composite indicators of familiarity with the service model, the importance of the elements in the service model, and the perceived quality of services provided by these innovative HIV service demonstration projects. Ratings of service quality were related to ratings of the respondent's knowledge of the service demonstration project, the importance of the various elements in the service continuum, and several indicators of stakeholder characteristics using the data modeling method of Exhaustive CHAID (Chi-squared Automatic Interaction Detector). The groups of stakeholders most likely to give the highest quality or success ratings for these projects are identified. The implications of these findings for developing collaborative and comprehensive service models for persons with HIV/AIDS are discussed.

  2. YoungStar in Wisconsin: Analysis of Data as of July 2014. Executive Summary: Key Findings and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisconsin Council on Children and Families, 2014

    2014-01-01

    YoungStar is a five-star quality rating system for child care providers based on education, learning environment, business methods, and practices around child health and well-being. Through this rating system, the state is addressing several key issues in Wisconsin's child care system. The rating system will: (1) Improve the overall quality of…

  3. Model-based clustering in networks with Stochastic Community Finding

    CERN Document Server

    McDaid, Aaron F; Friel, Nial; Hurley, Neil J

    2012-01-01

    In the model-based clustering of networks, blockmodelling may be used to identify roles in the network. We identify a special case of the Stochastic Block Model (SBM) where we constrain the cluster-cluster interactions such that the density inside the clusters of nodes is expected to be greater than the density between clusters. This corresponds to the intuition behind community-finding methods, where nodes tend to clustered together if they link to each other. We call this model Stochastic Community Finding (SCF) and present an efficient MCMC algorithm which can cluster the nodes, given the network. The algorithm is evaluated on synthetic data and is applied to a social network of interactions at a karate club and at a monastery, demonstrating how the SCF finds the 'ground truth' clustering where sometimes the SBM does not. The SCF is only one possible form of constraint or specialization that may be applied to the SBM. In a more supervised context, it may be appropriate to use other specializations to guide...

  4. Revisiting Link Prediction: Evolving Models and Real Data Findings

    CERN Document Server

    Mendoza, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    The explosive growth of Web 2.0, which was characterized by the creation of online social networks, has reignited the study of factors that could help us understand the growth and dynamism of these networks. Various generative network models have been proposed, including the Barabasi-Albert and Watts-Strogatz models. In this study, we revisit the problem from a perspective that seeks to compare results obtained from these generative models with those from real networks. To this end, we consider the dating network Skout Inc. An analysis is performed on the topological characteristics of the network that could explain the creation of new network links. Afterwards, the results are contrasted with those obtained from the Barabasi-Albert and Watts-Strogatz generative models. We conclude that a key factor that could explain the creation of links originates in its cluster structure, where link recommendations are more precise in Watts-Strogatz segmented networks than in Barabasi-Albert hierarchical networks. This re...

  5. Key transmission parameters of an institutional outbreak during the 1918 influenza pandemic estimated by mathematical modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Peter

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim To estimate the key transmission parameters associated with an outbreak of pandemic influenza in an institutional setting (New Zealand 1918. Methods Historical morbidity and mortality data were obtained from the report of the medical officer for a large military camp. A susceptible-exposed-infectious-recovered epidemiological model was solved numerically to find a range of best-fit estimates for key epidemic parameters and an incidence curve. Mortality data were subsequently modelled by performing a convolution of incidence distribution with a best-fit incidence-mortality lag distribution. Results Basic reproduction number (R0 values for three possible scenarios ranged between 1.3, and 3.1, and corresponding average latent period and infectious period estimates ranged between 0.7 and 1.3 days, and 0.2 and 0.3 days respectively. The mean and median best-estimate incidence-mortality lag periods were 6.9 and 6.6 days respectively. This delay is consistent with secondary bacterial pneumonia being a relatively important cause of death in this predominantly young male population. Conclusion These R0 estimates are broadly consistent with others made for the 1918 influenza pandemic and are not particularly large relative to some other infectious diseases. This finding suggests that if a novel influenza strain of similar virulence emerged then it could potentially be controlled through the prompt use of major public health measures.

  6. Key Elements of the Tutorial Support Management Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Grace; Paasuke, Philip

    2011-01-01

    In response to an exponential growth in enrolments the "Tutorial Support Management" (TSM) model has been adopted by Open Universities Australia (OUA) after a two-year project on the provision of online tutor support in first year, online undergraduate units. The essential focus of the TSM model was the development of a systemic approach…

  7. Key Challenges and Potential Urban Modelling Opportunities in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chris Wray

    monitoring and guiding urban spatial planning and development. ... and social system functions, urban modelling has evolved from simple ... careful long-term planning aligned with the national vision and other strategic perspectives' (GPC,.

  8. Pupils' Perceptions of Foreign Language Learning in the Primary School--Findings from the Key Stage 2 Language Learning Pathfinder Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    This article presents findings on pupil attitudes towards learning foreign languages in Key Stage 2 (ages 7-11) in primary schools in England. As a consequence of the National Languages Strategy, the University of Warwick was commissioned by the then Department for Education and Skills to undertake an evaluation between 2003 and 2005 of 19…

  9. Key Findings and Recommendations from the Coös Youth Study: Research from the First Half of the Study. Regional Issue Brief Number 41

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staunton, Michael S.; Jaffee, Eleanor M.

    2014-01-01

    In this brief, authors Michael Staunton and Eleanor Jaffee review the key findings and recommendations from research conducted in the first half of the Coös Youth Study, which began in 2008 and is planned to continue through 2018. The study explores young people's decisions about their educational and job opportunities in rural northern New…

  10. Geometrical model fitting for interferometric data: GEM-FIND

    CERN Document Server

    Klotz, D; Paladini, C; Hron, J; Wachter, G

    2012-01-01

    We developed the tool GEM-FIND that allows to constrain the morphology and brightness distribution of objects. The software fits geometrical models to spectrally dispersed interferometric visibility measurements in the N-band using the Levenberg-Marquardt minimization method. Each geometrical model describes the brightness distribution of the object in the Fourier space using a set of wavelength-independent and/or wavelength-dependent parameters. In this contribution we numerically analyze the stability of our nonlinear fitting approach by applying it to sets of synthetic visibilities with statistically applied errors, answering the following questions: How stable is the parameter determination with respect to (i) the number of uv-points, (ii) the distribution of points in the uv-plane, (iii) the noise level of the observations?

  11. Value for Money analysis of the rural component of the SHEWA-B Project in Bangladesh: Key Findings

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, BE

    2015-01-01

    This brief presents summary findings from a value for money (VFM) analysis of the Sanitation, Hygiene Education and Water Supply (SHEWA-B) project in Bangladesh which was implemented by the Government of Bangladesh with support from UNICEF between 2007 and 2013. It also includes an overview of recommendations to improve the programme’s VFM, facilitate VFM analysis and strengthen future programme management. This research is part of a larger study into VFM of WASH programmes; more information ...

  12. The shell model approach: Key to hadron structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipkin, H.J. (Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovoth (Israel). Dept. of Nuclear Physics)

    1989-08-14

    A shell model approach leads to a simple constituent quark model for hadron structure in which mesons and baryons consist only of constituent quarks. Hadron masses are the sums of the constituent quark effective masses and a hyperfine interaction inversely proportional to the product of these same masses. Hadron masses and magnetic moments are related by the assumption that the same effective mass parameter appears in the additive mass term, the hyperfine interaction, and the quark magnetic moment, both in mesons and baryons. The analysis pinpoints the physical assumptions needed for each relation and gives two new mass relations. Application to weak decays and recent polarized EMC data confirms conclusions previously obtained that the current quark contribution to the spin structure of the proton vanishes, but without need for the questionable assumption of SU(3) symmetry relating hyperon decays and proton structure. SU(3) symmetry breaking is clarified. 24 refs.

  13. Scattering as a key to improved room acoustic computer modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindel, Jens Holger; Christensen, Claus Lynge

    1996-01-01

    It has been known for a long time that surface scattering plays a very important role in room acoustics. With room acoustic computer models like ODEON it is possible to study the influence of scattering coefficients, which can be assigned to the surfaces of the room. In the latest version...... of the program an additional effect has been modelled, namely the attenuation of sound due to diffraction, which is particularly pronounced for small surfaces, low frequencies and long reflecting paths. The present paper describes a parameter study of how to optimize the choice of the number of rays...... room acoustic parameters. Results from two different halls have shown that a relative low number of rays are sufficient for reliable and stable calculation results. The optimum value of the transition order is two or three. The inclusion of diffraction effect leads to clearly improved results....

  14. A model for revocation forecasting in public-key infrastructures

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández Gañan, Carlos; Mata Diaz, Jorge; Muñoz Tapia, José Luis; Esparza Martín, Óscar; Alins Delgado, Juan José

    2015-01-01

    One of the hardest tasks of a certification infrastructure is to manage revocation. This process consists in collecting and making the revocation status of certificates available to users. Research on this topic has focused on the trade-offs that different revocation mechanisms offer. Much less effort has been conducted to understand and model real-world revocation processes. For this reason, in this paper, we present a novel analysis of real-world collected revocation data and we propose a r...

  15. The Origin and Diversification of Osteichthyans and Sarcopterygians:Rare Chinese Fossil Findings Advance Research on Key Issues of Evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Xiaobo; ZHU Min; ZHAO Wenjin

    2010-01-01

    @@ Living organisms represent only 1% of all the biota that has ever existed on earth.All organisms,living or extinct,are related to each other by sharing common ancestors at different levels,like twigs and branches connected to each other at different nodes on the great tree of life.One major task for paleontologists and evolutionary biologists is to find out how the diverse groups of organisms arose and how they are related to each other,thereby reconstructing the history of life and understanding the pattern and process of evolution.

  16. The RNA world in the 21st century-a systems approach to finding non-coding keys to clinical questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Ulf; Naderi-Meshkin, Hojjat; Gupta, Shailendra K; Wolkenhauer, Olaf; Vera, Julio

    2016-05-01

    There was evidence that RNAs are a functionally rich class of molecules not only since the arrival of the next-generation sequencing technology. Non-coding RNAs (ncRNA) could be the key to accelerated diagnosis and enhanced prediction of disease and therapy outcomes as well as the design of advanced therapeutic strategies to overcome yet unsatisfactory approaches.In this review, we discuss the state of the art in RNA systems biology with focus on the application in the systems biomedicine field. We propose guidelines for analysing the role of microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs in human pathologies. We introduce RNA expression profiling and network approaches for the identification of stable and effective RNomics-based biomarkers, providing insights into the role of ncRNAs in disease regulation. Towards this, we discuss ways to model the dynamics of gene regulatory networks and signalling pathways that involve ncRNAs. We also describe data resources and computational methods for finding putative mechanisms of action of ncRNAs. Finally, we discuss avenues for the computer-aided design of novel RNA-based therapeutics.

  17. Key focal areas for bridging the fields of aging and disability: findings from the growing older with a disability conference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishaya Naidoo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Based upon research presented at the 2011 Festival of International Conferences on Caregiving, Disability, Aging and Technology (FICCDAT-and specifically the Growing Older with a Disability (GOWD conference, this paper identifies areas where bridging building between aging and disability is needed to support older adults aging into or with disabilities. Five focal areas emerged: 1 The Need to Forward Bridging Between Aging and Disability Sectors, 2 Theoretical Frameworks of Individual Aging that Facilitate Bridging, 3 Bridging through Consumer Participation and Involvement, 4 Bridging Through Knowledge Transfer and 5 Bridging Opportunities in Long-Term Supports and Services and Assistive Technologies. Discussion of themes is provided within both international and Canadian contexts, reflecting the interests of FICCDAT and GOWD organizers in discussing how to improve bridging in Canada. Findings from this report form the basis of the Toronto Declaration on Bridging Aging and Disability Policy, Practice, and Research.

  18. Modeling psychiatric disorders: from genomic findings to cellular phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, A; Heine, V M; Harwood, A J; Sullivan, P F; Peitz, M; Brüstle, O; Shen, S; Sun, Y-M; Glover, J C; Posthuma, D; Djurovic, S

    2016-01-01

    Major programs in psychiatric genetics have identified >150 risk loci for psychiatric disorders. These loci converge on a small number of functional pathways, which span conventional diagnostic criteria, suggesting a partly common biology underlying schizophrenia, autism and other psychiatric disorders. Nevertheless, the cellular phenotypes that capture the fundamental features of psychiatric disorders have not yet been determined. Recent advances in genetics and stem cell biology offer new prospects for cell-based modeling of psychiatric disorders. The advent of cell reprogramming and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) provides an opportunity to translate genetic findings into patient-specific in vitro models. iPSC technology is less than a decade old but holds great promise for bridging the gaps between patients, genetics and biology. Despite many obvious advantages, iPSC studies still present multiple challenges. In this expert review, we critically review the challenges for modeling of psychiatric disorders, potential solutions and how iPSC technology can be used to develop an analytical framework for the evaluation and therapeutic manipulation of fundamental disease processes. PMID:27240529

  19. Rock thermal conductivity as key parameter for geothermal numerical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sipio, Eloisa; Chiesa, Sergio; Destro, Elisa; Galgaro, Antonio; Giaretta, Aurelio; Gola, Gianluca; Manzella, Adele

    2013-04-01

    The geothermal energy applications are undergoing a rapid development. However, there are still several challenges in the successful exploitation of geothermal energy resources. In particular, a special effort is required to characterize the thermal properties of the ground along with the implementation of efficient thermal energy transfer technologies. This paper focuses on understanding the quantitative contribution that geosciences can receive from the characterization of rock thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivity of materials is one of the main input parameters in geothermal modeling since it directly controls the steady state temperature field. An evaluation of this thermal property is required in several fields, such as Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical multiphysics analysis of frozen soils, designing ground source heat pumps plant, modeling the deep geothermal reservoirs structure, assessing the geothermal potential of subsoil. Aim of this study is to provide original rock thermal conductivity values useful for the evaluation of both low and high enthalpy resources at regional or local scale. To overcome the existing lack of thermal conductivity data of sedimentary, igneous and metamorphic rocks, a series of laboratory measurements has been performed on several samples, collected in outcrop, representative of the main lithologies of the regions included in the VIGOR Project (southern Italy). Thermal properties tests were carried out both in dry and wet conditions, using a C-Therm TCi device, operating following the Modified Transient Plane Source method.Measurements were made at standard laboratory conditions on samples both water saturated and dehydrated with a fan-forced drying oven at 70 ° C for 24 hr, for preserving the mineral assemblage and preventing the change of effective porosity. Subsequently, the samples have been stored in an air-conditioned room while bulk density, solid volume and porosity were detected. The measured thermal conductivity

  20. Key Provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA): A Systematic Review and Presentation of Early Research Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Michael T; Homer, Jenny; Gumus, Gulcin; Hickling, Lucas

    2016-10-01

    To conduct a systematic literature review of selected major provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) pertaining to expanded health insurance coverage. We present and synthesize research findings from the last 5 years regarding both the immediate and long-term effects of the ACA. We conclude with a summary and offer a research agenda for future studies. We identified relevant articles from peer-reviewed scholarly journals by performing a comprehensive search of major electronic databases. We also identified reports in the "gray literature" disseminated by government agencies and other organizations. Overall, research shows that the ACA has substantially decreased the number of uninsured individuals through the dependent coverage provision, Medicaid expansion, health insurance exchanges, availability of subsidies, and other policy changes. Affordability of health insurance continues to be a concern for many people and disparities persist by geography, race/ethnicity, and income. Early evidence also indicates improvements in access to and affordability of health care. All of these changes are certain to ultimately impact state and federal budgets. The ACA will either directly or indirectly affect almost all Americans. As new and comprehensive data become available, more rigorous evaluations will provide further insights as to whether the ACA has been successful in achieving its goals. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  1. Identifying and preventing medical errors in patients with limited English proficiency: key findings and tools for the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Melanie; Renfrew, Megan R; Green, Alexander R; Lopez, Lenny; Tan-McGrory, Aswita; Brach, Cindy; Betancourt, Joseph R

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1999 Institute of Medicine (IOM) report To Err is Human, progress has been made in patient safety, but few efforts have focused on safety in patients with limited English proficiency (LEP). This article describes the development, content, and testing of two new evidence-based Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) tools for LEP patient safety. In the content development phase, a comprehensive mixed-methods approach was used to identify common causes of errors for LEP patients, high-risk scenarios, and evidence-based strategies to address them. Based on our findings, Improving Patient Safety Systems for Limited English Proficient Patients: A Guide for Hospitals contains recommendations to improve detection and prevention of medical errors across diverse populations, and TeamSTEPPS Enhancing Safety for Patients with Limited English Proficiency Module trains staff to improve safety through team communication and incorporating interpreters in the care process. The Hospital Guide was validated with leaders in quality and safety at diverse hospitals, and the TeamSTEPPS LEP module was field-tested in varied settings within three hospitals. Both tools were found to be implementable, acceptable to their audiences, and conducive to learning. Further research on the impact of the combined use of the guide and module would shed light on their value as a multifaceted intervention.

  2. Empirical model of the composition of the Venus ionosphere Repeatable characteristics and key features not modeled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, H. A., Jr.; Mayr, H. G.; Niemann, H. B.; Larson, J.

    1985-01-01

    In-situ measurements of positive ion composition of the ionosphere of Venus are combined in an empirical model which is a key element for the Venus International Reference Atmosphere (VIRA) model. The ion data are obtained from the Pioneer Venus Orbiter Ion Mass Spectrometer (OIMS) which obtained daily measurements beginning in December 1978 and extending to July 1980 when the uncontrolled rise of satellite periapsis height precluded further measurements in the main body of the ionosphere. For this period, measurements of 12 ion species are sorted into altitude and local time bins with altitude extending from 150 to 1000 km. The model results exhibit the appreciable nightside ionosphere found at Venus, the dominance of atomic oxygen ions in the dayside upper ionosphere and the increase in prominence of atomic oxygen and deuterium ions on the nightside. Short term variations, such as the abrupt changes observed in the ionopause, cannot be represented in the model.

  3. European Bilingual Models beyond "Lingua Franca": Key Findings from CLIL French Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, América; Lorenzo, Francisco; Pavón, Víctor

    2016-01-01

    Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) has expanded all around the continent following European Council guidelines, favored by competence studies that identified educational systems as a strong determinant for second language gains and deficits. Over the years since the turn of the century, CLIL has gained the support of language policy…

  4. European Bilingual Models beyond "Lingua Franca": Key Findings from CLIL French Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, América; Lorenzo, Francisco; Pavón, Víctor

    2016-01-01

    Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) has expanded all around the continent following European Council guidelines, favored by competence studies that identified educational systems as a strong determinant for second language gains and deficits. Over the years since the turn of the century, CLIL has gained the support of language policy…

  5. Impacts of casinos on key pathways to health: qualitative findings from American Indian gaming communities in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodish, Stephen R; Gittelsohn, Joel; Oddo, Vanessa M; Jones-Smith, Jessica C

    2016-07-22

    Three decades ago, casino gaming on sovereign American Indian lands was legalized with differential economic and social implications. While casinos have improved the incomes of tribal communities, there have been both positive and negative findings in relation to health impacts. We sought to understand the perceived pathways by which casinos impact individual and community health through voices of the community. We conducted semi-structured, interviews with tribal leaders (n =12) and tribal members (n =24) from tribal communities (n = 23) representing different regions of California. We inductively analyzed textual data drawing from Grounded Theory, first using line-by-line coding to identify analytic categories from emergent themes in consideration of the study objective. Then, focused codes were applied to identify salient themes, which we represented through exemplar quotes and an overall conceptual framework. Data were managed and coded using Dedoose software. American Indian-owned casinos are perceived to influence the health of tribal communities through three pathways: 1) improving the tribal economy 2) altering the built environment, and 3) disrupting the the social landscape. Forming these pathways are a series of interrelated health determinants. Improvement of the tribal economy, through both job creation for tribal members and improved tribal cash flow, was perceived by participants to both influence health. Specifically, improved cash flow has resulted in new wellness programs, community centers, places for recreation, and improved social services. Higher disposable incomes have led to better financial stability, increased access to healthy food, and more opportunities for physical activity. Yet, higher disposable incomes were perceived to also contribute to negative health behaviors, most notably increased drug and alcohol abuse. Casinos were also perceived to alter built environments, resulting in increased availability and access to unhealthy

  6. Convective moisture adjustment time scale as a key factor in regulating model amplitude of the Madden-Julian Oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xianan; Zhao, Ming; Maloney, Eric D.; Waliser, Duane E.

    2016-10-01

    Despite its pronounced impacts on weather extremes worldwide, the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) remains poorly represented in climate models. Here we present findings that point to some necessary ingredients to produce a strong MJO amplitude in a large set of model simulations from a recent model intercomparison project. While surface flux and radiative heating anomalies are considered important for amplifying the MJO, their strength per unit MJO precipitation anomaly is found to be negatively correlated to MJO amplitude across these multimodel simulations. However, model MJO amplitude is found to be closely tied to a model's convective moisture adjustment time scale, a measure of how rapidly precipitation must increase to remove excess column water vapor, or alternately the efficiency of surface precipitation generation per unit column water vapor anomaly. These findings provide critical insights into key model processes for the MJO and pinpoint a direction for improved model representation of the MJO.

  7. Quantifying Key Climate Parameter Uncertainties Using an Earth System Model with a Dynamic 3D Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, R.; Sriver, R. L.; Goes, M. P.; Urban, N.; Matthews, D.; Haran, M.; Keller, K.

    2011-12-01

    Climate projections hinge critically on uncertain climate model parameters such as climate sensitivity, vertical ocean diffusivity and anthropogenic sulfate aerosol forcings. Climate sensitivity is defined as the equilibrium global mean temperature response to a doubling of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Vertical ocean diffusivity parameterizes sub-grid scale ocean vertical mixing processes. These parameters are typically estimated using Intermediate Complexity Earth System Models (EMICs) that lack a full 3D representation of the oceans, thereby neglecting the effects of mixing on ocean dynamics and meridional overturning. We improve on these studies by employing an EMIC with a dynamic 3D ocean model to estimate these parameters. We carry out historical climate simulations with the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model (UVic ESCM) varying parameters that affect climate sensitivity, vertical ocean mixing, and effects of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols. We use a Bayesian approach whereby the likelihood of each parameter combination depends on how well the model simulates surface air temperature and upper ocean heat content. We use a Gaussian process emulator to interpolate the model output to an arbitrary parameter setting. We use Markov Chain Monte Carlo method to estimate the posterior probability distribution function (pdf) of these parameters. We explore the sensitivity of the results to prior assumptions about the parameters. In addition, we estimate the relative skill of different observations to constrain the parameters. We quantify the uncertainty in parameter estimates stemming from climate variability, model and observational errors. We explore the sensitivity of key decision-relevant climate projections to these parameters. We find that climate sensitivity and vertical ocean diffusivity estimates are consistent with previously published results. The climate sensitivity pdf is strongly affected by the prior assumptions, and by the scaling

  8. Formal language models for finding groups of experts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Liang; M. de Rijke

    2016-01-01

    The task of finding groups or teams has recently received increased attention, as a natural and challenging extension of search tasks aimed at retrieving individual entities. We introduce a new group finding task: given a query topic, we try to find knowledgeable groups that have expertise on that t

  9. Data publication and dissemination of interactive keys under the open access model

    Science.gov (United States)

    The concepts of publication, citation and dissemination of interactive keys and other online keys are discussed and illustrated by a sample paper published in the present issue (doi: 10.3897/zookeys.21.271). The present model is based on previous experience with several existing examples of publishi...

  10. Recent findings related to measuring and modeling forest road erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. J. Elliot; R. B. Foltz; P. R. Robichaud

    2009-01-01

    Sediment is the greatest pollutant of forest streams. In the absence of wildfire, forest road networks are usually the main source of sediment in forest watersheds. An understanding of forest road erosion processes is important to aid in predicting sediment delivery from roads to streams. The flowpath followed by runoff is the key to understanding road erosion...

  11. Rate Regions of Secret Key Sharing in a New Source Model

    CERN Document Server

    Salimi, Somayeh; Aref, Mohammad Reza

    2010-01-01

    A source model for secret key generation between terminals is considered. Two users, namely users 1 and 2, at one side communicate with another user, namely user 3, at the other side via a public channel where three users can observe i.i.d. outputs of correlated sources. Each of users 1 and 2 intends to share a secret key with user 3 where user 1 acts as a wiretapper for user 2 and vice versa. In this model, two situations are considered: communication from users 1 and 2 to user 3 (the forward key strategy) and from user 3 to users 1 and 2 (the backward key strategy). In both situations, the goal is sharing a secret key between user 1 and user 3 while leaking no effective information about that key to user 2, and simultaneously, sharing another secret key between user 2 and user 3 while leaking no effective information about the latter key to user 1. This model is motivated by wireless communications when considering user 3 as a base station and users 1 and 2 as network users. In this paper, for both the forw...

  12. iPSC-Based Models to Unravel Key Pathogenetic Processes Underlying Motor Neuron Disease Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Faravelli

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Motor neuron diseases (MNDs are neuromuscular disorders affecting rather exclusively upper motor neurons (UMNs and/or lower motor neurons (LMNs. The clinical phenotype is characterized by muscular weakness and atrophy leading to paralysis and almost invariably death due to respiratory failure. Adult MNDs include sporadic and familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (sALS-fALS, while the most common infantile MND is represented by spinal muscular atrophy (SMA. No effective treatment is ccurrently available for MNDs, as for the vast majority of neurodegenerative disorders, and cures are limited to supportive care and symptom relief. The lack of a deep understanding of MND pathogenesis accounts for the difficulties in finding a cure, together with the scarcity of reliable in vitro models. Recent progresses in stem cell field, in particular in the generation of induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs has made possible for the first time obtaining substantial amounts of human cells to recapitulate in vitro some of the key pathogenetic processes underlying MNDs. In the present review, recently published studies involving the use of iPSCs to unravel aspects of ALS and SMA pathogenesis are discussed with an overview of their implications in the process of finding a cure for these still orphan disorders.

  13. Keys to the House: Unlocking Residential Savings With Program Models for Home Energy Upgrades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grevatt, Jim [Energy Futures Group (United States); Hoffman, Ian [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hoffmeyer, Dale [US Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    2017-07-05

    After more than 40 years of effort, energy efficiency program administrators and associated contractors still find it challenging to penetrate the home retrofit market, especially at levels commensurate with state and federal goals for energy savings and emissions reductions. Residential retrofit programs further have not coalesced around a reliably successful model. They still vary in design, implementation and performance, and they remain among the more difficult and costly options for acquiring savings in the residential sector. If programs are to contribute fully to meeting resource and policy objectives, administrators need to understand what program elements are key to acquiring residential savings as cost effectively as possible. To that end, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored a comprehensive review and analysis of home energy upgrade programs with proven track records, focusing on those with robustly verified savings and constituting good examples for replication. The study team reviewed evaluations for the period 2010 to 2014 for 134 programs that are funded by customers of investor-owned utilities. All are programs that promote multi-measure retrofits or major system upgrades. We paid particular attention to useful design and implementation features, costs, and savings for nearly 30 programs with rigorous evaluations of performance. This meta-analysis describes program models and implementation strategies for (1) direct install retrofits; (2) heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) replacement and early retirement; and (3) comprehensive, whole-home retrofits. We analyze costs and impacts of these program models, in terms of both energy savings and emissions avoided. These program models can be useful guides as states consider expanding their strategies for acquiring energy savings as a resource and for emissions reductions. We also discuss the challenges of using evaluations to create program models that can be confidently applied in

  14. [Novel findings from an animal tourniquet shock model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraiwa, Kouichi

    2003-09-01

    This article is a review of our experimental results regarding the physiological statuses and roles of chemical mediators in tourniquet shock, and a novel phenomenon, modulation reflex, that is commonly observed in this shock model is discussed. In a rabbit with a tourniquet applied to a hind limb for 24 hrs, blood pressure (BP) gradually falls after release of the tourniquet, but the decline in BP stops when a tourniquet is again applied to the hind limb, indicating that shock mediators are attributed to the hind limb. The levels of dipeptides (anserine and carnosine) and lysosomes in blood samples as well as the levels of leukotrienes (LTD4 and LTE4) in blood and muscle samples from rabbits in tourniquet shock were elevated. However, injection of a large amount of a dipeptide into an ear vein of a rabbit did not reduce BP, suggesting that both peptides may not be directly related with reduction in BP of rabbits in tourniquet shock. Injection of a platelet-activating factor (PAF) antagonist into an ear vein resulted in slight elevation of BP and the elevated level was maintained for about 1 to 4 hrs during the period of decline in BP in tourniquet shock. As for interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-6-deficient mice at young ages have a significantly greater blood volume than do wild-type mice without concomitant changes in body composition. Therefore, the role for IL-6 in the regulation of peripheral circulation may be to elevate, not reduce BP. In mice in tourniquet shock, superoxide (O2-) production is observed in skeletal muscle cells and these cells correspond to mitochondria-rich cells. However, RT-PCR of muscle samples showed no significant nitric oxide synthase (NOS) mRNA expression after tourniquet release. Pretreatment with NOS inhibitors before tourniquet release reduced O2- production in the skeletal muscle. These results indicate that O2- produced in muscle subjected to ischemia/repefusion may be involved in shock. As for changes in mRNA expression patterns of pro

  15. Characteristics of evolving models of care for arthritis: A key informant study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veinot Paula

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The burden of arthritis is increasing in the face of diminishing health human resources to deliver care. In response, innovative models of care delivery are developing to facilitate access to quality care. Most models have developed in response to local needs with limited evaluation. The primary objective of this study is to a examine the range of models of care that deliver specialist services using a medical/surgical specialist and at least one other health care provider and b document the strengths and challenges of the identified models. A secondary objective is to identify key elements of best practice models of care for arthritis. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a sample of key informants with expertise in arthritis from jurisdictions with primarily publicly-funded health care systems. Qualitative data were analyzed using a constant comparative approach to identify common types of models of care, strengths and challenges of models, and key components of arthritis care. Results Seventy-four key informants were interviewed from six countries. Five main types of models of care emerged. 1 Specialized arthritis programs deliver comprehensive, multidisciplinary team care for arthritis. Two models were identified using health care providers (e.g. nurses or physiotherapists in expanded clinical roles: 2 triage of patients with musculoskeletal conditions to the appropriate services including specialists; and 3 ongoing management in collaboration with a specialist. Two models promoting rural access were 4 rural consultation support and 5 telemedicine. Key informants described important components of models of care including knowledgeable health professionals and patients. Conclusion A range of models of care for arthritis have been developed. This classification can be used as a framework for discussing care delivery. Areas for development include integration of care across the continuum, including primary

  16. Translational research challenges: finding the right animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, Sharma

    2012-12-01

    Translation of scientific discoveries into meaningful human applications, particularly novel therapies of human diseases, requires development of suitable animal models. Experimental approaches to test new drugs in preclinical phases often necessitated animal models that not only replicate human disease in etiopathogenesis and pathobiology but also biomarkers development and toxicity prediction. Whereas the transgenic and knockout techniques have revolutionized manipulation of rodents and other species to get greater insights into human disease pathogenesis, we are far from generating ideal animal models of most human disease states. The challenges in using the currently available animal models for translational research, particularly for developing potentially new drugs for human disease, coupled with the difficulties in toxicity prediction have led some researchers to develop a scoring system for translatability. These aspects and the challenges in selecting an animal model among those that are available to study human disease pathobiology and drug development are the topics covered in this detailed review.

  17. Modeling experimental findings on sorption and biodegradation of PAHs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rein, Arno; Smith, K. E. C.; Karlson, U. G.

    2011-01-01

    and kinetic data for growth and metabolism of PAH-degrading bacteria were obtained as input parameters. The model simulations were compared to existing solutions (such as the Best equation) and to experimental results. With this new model approach, a range of experimental observations available in literature...... could be simulated, encompassing various soil types and PAHs, and different bacterial strains. Own experiments are currently performed on phenantrene, fluoranthene and other PAHs and on ad/desorption as well as on biodegradation. The results shall be used to calibrate and verify the new model approach...... and biodegradation performance. The final goal is to optimize remediation options....

  18. Electronic Service Architecture Model Assessment of Conformity to Cloud Computing Key Features

    OpenAIRE

    Stipravietis, P; Žeiris, E; Ziema, M

    2013-01-01

    The research examines electronic service execution possibilities in cloud computing environment and the key features of cloud computing. It also offers a method which allows quantitatively assess the conformity of existing e-service architecture model to cloud computing key features.The method allows evaluating the amount of necessary transformations and their efficiency. The offered solution is verified using the business process administered by Motor Insurance Bureau...

  19. Finding model parameters: Genetic algorithms and the numerical modelling of quartz luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamiec, Grzegorz [Department of Radioisotopes, Institute of Physics, Silesian University of Technology, ul. Krzywoustego 2, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland)]. E-mail: grzegorz.adamiec@polsl.pl; Bluszcz, Andrzej [Department of Radioisotopes, Institute of Physics, Silesian University of Technology, ul. Krzywoustego 2, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Bailey, Richard [Department of Geography, Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, Surrey, TW20 0EX (United Kingdom); Garcia-Talavera, Marta [LIBRA, Centro I-D, Campus Miguel Delibes, 47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2006-08-15

    The paper presents an application of genetic algorithms (GAs) to the problem of finding appropriate parameter values for the numerical simulation of quartz thermoluminescence (TL). We show that with the use of GAs it is possible to achieve a very good match between simulated and experimentally measured characteristics of quartz, for example the thermal activation characteristics of fired quartz. The rate equations of charge transport in the numerical model of luminescence in quartz contain a large number of parameters (trap depths, frequency factors, populations, charge capture probabilities, optical detrapping probabilities, and recombination probabilities). Given that comprehensive models consist of over 10 traps, finding model parameters proves a very difficult task. Manual parameter changes are very time consuming and allow only a limited degree of accuracy. GAs provide a semi-automatic way of finding appropriate parameters.

  20. African wildlife and people : finding solutions where equilibrium models fail

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poshiwa, X.

    2013-01-01

    Grazing systems, covering about half of the terrestrial surface, tend to be either equilibrial or non-equilibrial in nature, largely depending on the environmental stochasticity.The equilibrium model perspective stresses the importance of biotic feedbacks between herbivores and

  1. African wildlife and people : finding solutions where equilibrium models fail

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poshiwa, X.

    2013-01-01

    Grazing systems, covering about half of the terrestrial surface, tend to be either equilibrial or non-equilibrial in nature, largely depending on the environmental stochasticity.The equilibrium model perspective stresses the importance of biotic feedbacks between herbivores and thei

  2. Finding Deadlocks of Event-B Models by Constraint Solving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallerstede, Stefan; Leuschel, Michael

    we propose a constraint-based approach to nding deadlocks employing the ProB constraint solver to nd values for the constants and variables of formal models that describe a deadlocking state. We discuss the principles of the technique implemented in ProB's Prolog kernel and present some results...

  3. African wildlife and people : finding solutions where equilibrium models fail

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poshiwa, X.

    2013-01-01

    Grazing systems, covering about half of the terrestrial surface, tend to be either equilibrial or non-equilibrial in nature, largely depending on the environmental stochasticity.The equilibrium model perspective stresses the importance of biotic feedbacks between herbivores and thei

  4. Passage Key Inlet, Florida; CMS Modeling and Borrow Site Impact Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    use of a nested Coastal Modeling System (CMS) model for Passage Key Inlet, which is one of the connections between the Gulf of Mexico and Tampa Bay...XIV-51 June 2016 2 Figure 1. Active USACE Jacksonville District (SAJ) projects in Pinellas, Manatee, and Sarasota Counties, FL. METHOD : The CMS...is a product of the Coastal Inlets Research Program (http://cirp.usace.army.mil) managed at ERDC. CMS is composed of two models, CMS-Flow (Buttolph

  5. The fiduciary relationship model for managing clinical genomic "incidental" findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lázaro-Muñoz, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines how the application of legal fiduciary principles (e.g., physicians' duty of loyalty and care, duty to inform, and duty act within the scope of authority), can serve as a framework to promote management of clinical genomic "incidental" or secondary target findings that is patient-centered and consistent with recognized patient autonomy rights. The application of fiduciary principles to the clinical genomic testing context gives rise to at least four physician fiduciary duties in conflict with recent recommendations by the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG). These recommendations have generated much debate among lawyers, clinicians, and bioethicists hence I believe this publication will be of value and interest to your readership. © 2014 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  6. Key-Aspects of Scientific Modeling Exemplified by School Science Models: Some Units for Teaching Contextualized Scientific Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Develaki, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Models and modeling are core elements of scientific methods and consequently also are of key importance for the conception and teaching of scientific methodology. The epistemology of models and its transfer and adaption to nature of science education are not, however, simple themes. We present some conceptual units in which school science models…

  7. The Sender-Excited Secret Key Agreement Model: Capacity and Error Exponents

    CERN Document Server

    Chou, Tzu-Han; Draper, Stark C

    2011-01-01

    We consider fundamental limits of the secret key generation problem when the sources are randomly excited by the sender and there is a noiseless public discussion channel. In many practical communication settings, the sources or channels may be influenced by some parties involved. Similar to recent works on probing capacity and channels with action-dependent states, our system model captures such a scenario. We derive single-letter expressions for the secret key capacity. Our coding strategy involves wiretap channel coding and a key generation scheme. We show that the secret key capacity is composed of both source- and channel-type randomness. By assuming that the eavesdropper receives a degraded version of the legitimate receiver's observation, we also obtain a capacity result that does not involve any auxiliary random variables, and thus it is amenable to numerical evaluation. By evaluating the capacity for several degraded channels, we show that there is a fundamental interplay between the portion of the s...

  8. Key Frame Extraction Using Unsupervised Clustering Based on a Statistical Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Shuping; LIN Xinggang

    2005-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel algorithm for extracting key frames to represent video shots. Regarding whether, or how well, a key frame represents a shot, different interpretations have been suggested. We develop our algorithm on the assumption that more important content may demand more attention and may last relatively more frames. Unsupervised clustering is used to divide the frames into clusters within a shot, and then a key frame is selected from each candidate cluster. To make the algorithm independent of video sequences, we employ a statistical model to calculate the clustering threshold. The proposed algorithm can capture the important yet salient content as the key frame. Its robustness and adaptability are validated by experiments with various kinds of video sequences.

  9. Data publication and dissemination of interactive keys under the open access model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyubomir Penev

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The concepts of publication, citation and dissemination of interactive keys and other online keys are discussed and illustrated by a sample paper published in the present issue (doi: 10.3897/zookeys.21.271. The present model is based on previous experience with several existing examples of publishing online keys. However, this model also suggests ways to publish, cite, preserve, disseminate and reuse the original data files to the benefit of the authors, future workers, and society in general. To be regarded as a ''formal scientific publication,'' an online key should satisfy the same criteria of peer review, registration, persistence, bibliographic description, etc., as conventional publications. Keys can be published in a form of either ''static'\\''dynamic'' publications. We define a ''static'' publication as a discrete unit of information preserved in a persistent and unchangeable way on the publisher’s Web site and/or on paper and consequently in conventional/electronic libraries and archives. This contrasts with the nature of the Internet, which allows and tends to encourage updating and improvement on a continuing basis. We call ''dynamic'' a publication of an interactive key on a Web site where its contents can be continuously updated. ''Dynamic'' publications meet some of the criteria of a ''formal scientific publication'' (identification, citation and location, while they lack other important features of it (persistence, archiving, indexing, science metric and citation metric services. Dynamic Web-based interactive keys may benefit from publishing the first version of their underlying datasets in a form of “formal scientific publication”. We define here the minimum set of data files to be published for several different platforms (Intkey, Lucid2, Lucid3, MX to ensure both (1 priority, identification, location and citation of the firstly published work and (2 future use and re-use of the keys.

  10. Password-only authenticated three-party key exchange with provable security in the standard model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Junghyun; Choo, Kim-Kwang Raymond; Kim, Junghwan; Kang, Hyun-Kyu; Kim, Jinsoo; Paik, Juryon; Won, Dongho

    2014-01-01

    Protocols for password-only authenticated key exchange (PAKE) in the three-party setting allow two clients registered with the same authentication server to derive a common secret key from their individual password shared with the server. Existing three-party PAKE protocols were proven secure under the assumption of the existence of random oracles or in a model that does not consider insider attacks. Therefore, these protocols may turn out to be insecure when the random oracle is instantiated with a particular hash function or an insider attack is mounted against the partner client. The contribution of this paper is to present the first three-party PAKE protocol whose security is proven without any idealized assumptions in a model that captures insider attacks. The proof model we use is a variant of the indistinguishability-based model of Bellare, Pointcheval, and Rogaway (2000), which is one of the most widely accepted models for security analysis of password-based key exchange protocols. We demonstrated that our protocol achieves not only the typical indistinguishability-based security of session keys but also the password security against undetectable online dictionary attacks.

  11. Password-Only Authenticated Three-Party Key Exchange with Provable Security in the Standard Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junghyun Nam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Protocols for password-only authenticated key exchange (PAKE in the three-party setting allow two clients registered with the same authentication server to derive a common secret key from their individual password shared with the server. Existing three-party PAKE protocols were proven secure under the assumption of the existence of random oracles or in a model that does not consider insider attacks. Therefore, these protocols may turn out to be insecure when the random oracle is instantiated with a particular hash function or an insider attack is mounted against the partner client. The contribution of this paper is to present the first three-party PAKE protocol whose security is proven without any idealized assumptions in a model that captures insider attacks. The proof model we use is a variant of the indistinguishability-based model of Bellare, Pointcheval, and Rogaway (2000, which is one of the most widely accepted models for security analysis of password-based key exchange protocols. We demonstrated that our protocol achieves not only the typical indistinguishability-based security of session keys but also the password security against undetectable online dictionary attacks.

  12. Valuing snorkeling visits to the Florida Keys with stated and revealed preference models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Timothy; Bowker, J M; Leeworthy, Vernon R

    2002-07-01

    Coastal coral reefs, especially in the Florida Keys, are declining at a disturbing rate. Marine ecologists and reef scientists have emphasized the importance of establishing nonmarket values of coral reefs to assess the cost effectiveness of coral reef management and remediation programs. The purpose of this paper is to develop a travel cost-contingent valuation model of demand for trips to the Florida Keys focusing on willingness to pay (WTP) to preserve the current water quality and health of the coral reefs. The stated and revealed preference models allow the marginal valuation of recreationists to adjust depending on current and planned trip commitments in valuing nonmarginal policy changes in recreational opportunities. The integrated model incorporates key factors for establishing baseline amenity values for tourist dive sites, including perceptions of reef quality and dive conditions, the role of substitute sites, and the quality and availability of tourist facilities and recreation opportunities. The travel cost and WTP model differ in identifying critical variables and provide insight into the adjustment of trip decisions across alternative destination sites and the valuation of trips. In contrast to the travel cost model, a measure of the availability of substitute sites and total recreation activities does not have a significant impact on WTP valuations reported by snorkelers. Snorkelers engage in a relatively focused set of activities, suggesting that these recreationists may not shift expenditures to other sites or other recreation activities in the Florida Keys when confronted with increased access costs for the snorkeling experience.

  13. Three findings to model a quantum-gravitational theory

    CERN Document Server

    Alfonso-Faus, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    In 1967 Zeldovich expressed the cosmological constant lambda in terms of G, m and h, the gravitational constant, the mass of a fundamental particle and Plancks constant. In 1972 Weinberg expressed m in terms of h, G, the speed of light c and the Hubble parameter H. We proved that both expressions are identical. We also found proportionality between c and H. The critical mass balancing the outward quantum mechanical spreading of the wave function, and its inward gravitational collapse, has been recently estimated. We identify this mass with Zeldovich and Weinberg mass. A semi classical gravity model is reinforced and provides an insight for the modelling of a quantum-gravitational theory. The time evolution of the peak probability density for a free particle, a wave function initially filling the whole Universe, explains the later geometrical properties of the fundamental particles. We prove that they end up acquiring a constant size given by their Compton wavelength. The size of the fundamental particles, as ...

  14. Finding all BRCA pathogenic mutation carriers: best practice models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Jongmans, Marjolijn Cj

    2016-09-01

    Identifying germline BRCA pathogenic mutations in patients with ovarian or breast cancer is a crucial component in the medical management of affected patients. Furthermore, the relatives of affected patients can be offered genetic testing. Relatives who test positive for a germline BRCA pathogenic mutation can take appropriate action to prevent cancer or have cancer diagnosed as early as possible for better treatment options. The recent discovery that BRCA pathogenic mutation status can inform treatment decisions in patients with ovarian cancer has led to an increased demand for BRCA testing, with testing taking place earlier in the patient care pathway. New approaches to genetic counselling may be required to meet this greater demand for BRCA testing. This review discusses the need for best practices for genetic counselling and BRCA testing; it examines the challenges facing current practice and looks at adapted models of genetic counselling.

  15. A new notion of soundness in bare public-key model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yunlei; ZHU Hong

    2003-01-01

    A new notion of soundness in bare public-key (BPK) model is presented. This new notion just lies in between one-time soundness and sequential soundness and its reasonableness is justified in the context of resettable zero-knowledge when resettable zero-knowledge prover is implemented by smart card.

  16. Conclusion: Special issue on genetic and alcohol use disorder research with diverse racial/ethnic groups: Key findings and potential next steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, Karen G; Hesselbrock, Michie N; Hesselbrock, Victor M

    2017-08-01

    This special issue brings together papers focusing on a wide range of topics relevant to the research and understanding of the role of race/ethnicity and genetic variation for the susceptibility of developing an alcohol use disorder (AUD). The key findings from the issue's 10 articles are reviewed and organized here around three topics: I: addictive behaviors and potential environmental influences; II: a focus on four racial/ethnic groups; and III: special methodologies. Several potential next steps in improving effective research strategies are highlighted: (1) implementing best practices for outreach and community engagement may reduce reluctance to participate; (2) recruiting adequately sized and racially/ethnically diverse samples will require new collaborations with investigators who successfully work in diverse communities; (3) identifying and assessing environmental influences that are both unique to, and common among, racial/ethnic groups may inform preventions for AUD; (4) use of standardized measures will facilitate the generation of larger samples and meta-analysis of research findings; and (5) use of better analytic approaches and experimental methods will improve replication in gene finding research and help advance new areas of research. Genetic research of AUD in diverse racial/ethnic populations is advancing. The articles in this issue examined the general theme of including diverse population groups in genetic studies and offered potential strategies for addressing some common problems. Greater inclusion of diverse racial/ethnic populations in this research is important to ensure that the benefits of new knowledge and technology are equally shared. (Am J Addict 2017;26:532-537). © 2017 American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  17. Nine key principles to guide youth mental health: development of service models in New South Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Deborah; Batchelor, Samantha; Coates, Dominiek; Cashman, Emma

    2014-05-01

    Historically, the Australian health system has failed to meet the needs of young people with mental health problems and mental illness. In 2006, New South Wales (NSW) Health allocated considerable funds to the reform agenda of mental health services in NSW to address this inadequacy. Children and Young People's Mental Health (CYPMH), a service that provides mental health care for young people aged 12-24 years, with moderate to severe mental health problems, was chosen to establish a prototype Youth Mental Health (YMH) Service Model for NSW. This paper describes nine key principles developed by CYPMH to guide the development of YMH Service Models in NSW. A literature review, numerous stakeholder consultations and consideration of clinical best practice were utilized to inform the development of the key principles. Subsequent to their development, the nine key principles were formally endorsed by the Mental Health Program Council to ensure consistency and monitor the progress of YMH services across NSW. As a result, between 2008 and 2012 YMH Services across NSW regularly reported on their activities against each of the nine key principles demonstrating how each principle was addressed within their service. The nine key principles provide mental health services a framework for how to reorient services to accommodate YMH and provide a high-quality model of care. [Corrections added on 29 November 2013, after first online publication: The last two sentences of the Results section have been replaced with "As a result, between 2008 and 2012 YMH Services across NSW regularly reported on their activities against each of the nine key principles demonstrating how each principle was addressed within their service."]. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. AIDS policy modeling for the 21st century: an overview of key issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauner, M S; Brandeau, M L

    2001-09-01

    Decisions about HIV prevention and treatment programs are based on factors such as program costs and health benefits, social and ethical issues, and political considerations. AIDS policy models--that is, models that evaluate the monetary and non-monetary consequences of decisions about HIV/AIDS interventions--can play a role in helping policy makers make better decisions. This paper provides an overview of the key issues related to developing useful AIDS policy models. We highlight issues of importance for researchers in the field of AIDS policy modeling as well as for policy makers. These include geographic area, setting, target groups, interventions, affordability and effectiveness of interventions, type and time horizon of policy model, and type of economic analysis. This paper is not intended to be an exhaustive review of the AIDS policy modeling literature, although many papers from the literature are discussed as examples; rather, we aim to convey the composition, achievements, and challenges of AIDS policy modeling.

  19. Thermodynamic modeling of Cu–Ni–Y system coupled with key experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mezbahul-Islam, Mohammad [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Concordia University, 1455 de Maisonneuve Blvd West, Montreal, Quebec, Montreal H3G 1M8 (Canada); Medraj, Mamoun, E-mail: mmedraj@encs.concordia.ca [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Concordia University, 1455 de Maisonneuve Blvd West, Montreal, Quebec, Montreal H3G 1M8 (Canada); Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Masdar Institute of Science and Technology, Masdar City, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2015-03-01

    A complete thermodynamic description of the Cu–Ni–Y ternary system has been obtained using the CALPHAD (CALculation of PHAse Diagram) approach. Ternary solubility of the third element in the binary compounds in the Cu–Ni–Y system is described using sublattice model within the compound energy formalism (CEF) to take into account the recently reported experimental solubility ranges. The modified quasi-chemical model (MQM) has been used to describe the liquid phase in order to account for the presence of short range ordering properly. To study the melting behavior of the Cu–Ni–Y alloys and to verify the consistency of the thermodynamic model with experimental results, 10 key samples were prepared and the phase transformation temperatures were measured using differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). The microstructural characterization and crystallographic analysis of the alloys were carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with WDS analysis and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Several vertical sections, liquidus projection and isothermal section at 973 K have been calculated and found to be in good agreement with the current experimental data as well as with the literature. - Highlights: • Thermodynamic modeling of the Cu–Ni–Y system has been performed. • Ternary solubilities of the binary compounds have been reproduced. • Modified quasi-chemical model is used to model the liquid phase. • DSC experiments are performed on selected key alloys. • The calculations are consistent with the experimental results.

  20. Summary of the key features of seven biomathematical models of human fatigue and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallis, Melissa M.; Mejdal, Sig; Nguyen, Tammy T.; Dinges, David F.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Biomathematical models that quantify the effects of circadian and sleep/wake processes on the regulation of alertness and performance have been developed in an effort to predict the magnitude and timing of fatigue-related responses in a variety of contexts (e.g., transmeridian travel, sustained operations, shift work). This paper summarizes key features of seven biomathematical models reviewed as part of the Fatigue and Performance Modeling Workshop held in Seattle, WA, on June 13-14, 2002. The Workshop was jointly sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, U.S. Department of Defense, U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, Office of Naval Research, Air Force Office of Scientific Research, and U.S. Department of Transportation. METHODS: An invitation was sent to developers of seven biomathematical models that were commonly cited in scientific literature and/or supported by government funding. On acceptance of the invitation to attend the Workshop, developers were asked to complete a survey of the goals, capabilities, inputs, and outputs of their biomathematical models of alertness and performance. Data from the completed surveys were summarized and juxtaposed to provide a framework for comparing features of the seven models. RESULTS: Survey responses revealed that models varied greatly relative to their reported goals and capabilities. While all modelers reported that circadian factors were key components of their capabilities, they differed markedly with regard to the roles of sleep and work times as input factors for prediction: four of the seven models had work time as their sole input variable(s), while the other three models relied on various aspects of sleep timing for model input. Models also differed relative to outputs: five sought to predict results from laboratory experiments, field, and operational data, while two models were developed without regard to predicting laboratory experimental results. All modelers

  1. The Key Variables for the Development of a Care Model for Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavrianopoulos T.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Stroke is a major cause of death, threatened and reduced health, and a patient’s dependence on support after the acute phase. The increase in knowledge of neurological recovery after a stroke has led to new treatment strategies, where the importance of the physical environment and rehabilitation is on par with the importance of the medical treatment. It is crucial that the whole stroke team is involved in assessing, planning, and evaluating the care provided. Aim The presentation of the variables that are needed for the development of a general model of care for stroke. Material and Methods Method was used is to search electronic databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL for a review of international literature to 2009 and became selection of books, articles and studies from libraries. The search was done the December of 2010. Results The key variables to develop a model of care are: the care planning, the team culture, the care culture, the professional knowledge, the quality of space, the observation and assessment, the patient participation and the inter-professional teamwork. Conclusions The model presents stroke care as a complex system, with many feedback relationships between key variables for care. The development of the model, with the contributions of existing literature, enables further tests in practice and improvements in stroke care and further refinement of variables which include the model of care.

  2. Pointing, looking at, and pressing keys: A diffusion model account of response modality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Pablo; Ratcliff, Roger; Childers, Russ

    2015-12-01

    Accumulation of evidence models of perceptual decision making have been able to account for data from a wide range of domains at an impressive level of precision. In particular, Ratcliff's (1978) diffusion model has been used across many different 2-choice tasks in which the response is executed via a key-press. In this article, we present 2 experiments in which we used a letter-discrimination task exploring 3 central aspects of a 2-choice task: the discriminability of the stimulus, the modality of the response execution (eye movement, key pressing, and pointing on a touchscreen), and the mapping of the response areas for the eye movement and the touchscreen conditions (consistent vs. inconsistent). We fitted the diffusion model to the data from these experiments and examined the behavior of the model's parameters. Fits of the model were consistent with the hypothesis that the same decision mechanism is used in the task with 3 different response methods. Drift rates are affected by the duration of the presentation of the stimulus while the response execution time changed as a function of the response modality.

  3. PrEP for key populations in combination HIV prevention in Nairobi: a mathematical modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremin, Ide; McKinnon, Lyle; Kimani, Joshua; Cherutich, Peter; Gakii, Gloria; Muriuki, Festus; Kripke, Katharine; Hecht, Robert; Kiragu, Michael; Smith, Jennifer; Hinsley, Wes; Gelmon, Lawrence; Hallett, Timothy B

    2017-05-01

    The HIV epidemic in the population of Nairobi as a whole is in decline, but a concentrated sub-epidemic persists in key populations. We aimed to identify an optimal portfolio of interventions to reduce HIV incidence for a given budget and to identify the circumstances in which pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) could be used in Nairobi, Kenya. A mathematical model was developed to represent HIV transmission in specific key populations (female sex workers, male sex workers, and men who have sex with men [MSM]) and among the wider population of Nairobi. The scale-up of existing interventions (condom promotion, antiretroviral therapy, and male circumcision) for key populations and the wider population as have occurred in Nairobi is represented. The model includes a detailed representation of a PrEP intervention and is calibrated to prevalence and incidence estimates specific to key populations and the wider population. In the context of a declining epidemic overall but with a large sub-epidemic in MSM and male sex workers, an optimal prevention portfolio for Nairobi should focus on condom promotion for male sex workers and MSM in particular, followed by improved antiretroviral therapy retention, earlier antiretroviral therapy, and male circumcision as the budget allows. PrEP for male sex workers could enter an optimal portfolio at similar levels of spending to when earlier antiretroviral therapy is included; however, PrEP for MSM and female sex workers would be included only at much higher budgets. If PrEP for male sex workers cost as much as US$500, average annual spending on the interventions modelled would need to be less than $3·27 million for PrEP for male sex workers to be excluded from an optimal portfolio. Estimated costs per infection averted when providing PrEP to all female sex workers regardless of their risk of infection, and to high-risk female sex workers only, are $65 160 (95% credible interval [CrI] $43 520-$90 250) and $10 920 (95% CrI $4700

  4. UNIVERSITY INNOVATION INFRASTRUCTURE MODEL AS A KEY PART OF A TERRITORAL CLUST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya P. Ivashchenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the recent decades there have been increasing efforts by developing countries to reduce the economic gap between developed and developing countries. Asian and Northern European countries demonstrate good progress in these areas.Sweden,Denmark,Chinashow stable high economic indicators that have been achieved by targeted government programs. These programs were aimed at creating a new type of economy based on knowledge and new technologies. Given the success of these countries, a number of developing countries, whose economies are dependent on resources, today, are looking to repeat their way; those countries areRussia,Indonesia,BrazilandChile. The modernization of the economy and the formation of innovative economy are key objectives of the state policies of these countries. The research by leading economists and scientists led to the conclusion that the regional level of national economy plays a key role in formation of knowledgebase economy, which indicates the need to differentiate the innovation policy of the state depending on the economy parameters of each region. This paper presents a model of the first stage of the formation of the entrepreneurialuniversityUniversityinnovation infrastructure model, which is a key part of a territoral cluster. The article consists of five parts. The first part covers the analysis of the two main models of regional development: clustering theory and Triple Helix. This section describes a positive result, which is achieved by using these models simultaneously. The second part of the article shows the importance and the role of the entrepreneurial university in the formation of innovative clusters. It will be explained how and under what conditions this formation is achieved. The third part of this paper will present University innovation infrastructure model. The fourth part will examine the practical first steps to create a cluster "Vorob’evi Gori" on the basis of theMoscowStateUniversity. The fifth

  5. Modeling the pairwise key distribution scheme in the presence of unreliable links

    CERN Document Server

    Yagan, Osman

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the secure connectivity of wireless sensor networks under the pairwise key distribution scheme of Chan et al.. Unlike recent work which was carried out under the assumption of full visibility, here we assume a (simplified) communication model where unreliable wireless links are represented as on/off channels. We present conditions on how to scale the model parameters so that the network i) has no secure node which is isolated and ii) is securely connected, both with high probability when the number of sensor nodes becomes large. The results are given in the form of zero-one laws, and exhibit significant differences with corresponding results in the full visibility case. Through simulations these zero-one laws are shown to be valid also under a more realistic communication model, i.e., the disk model.

  6. Modeling halotropism: a key role for root tip architecture and reflux loop remodeling in redistributing auxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Thea; Korver, Ruud A; Testerink, Christa; Ten Tusscher, Kirsten H W J

    2016-09-15

    A key characteristic of plant development is its plasticity in response to various and dynamically changing environmental conditions. Tropisms contribute to this flexibility by allowing plant organs to grow from or towards environmental cues. Halotropism is a recently described tropism in which plant roots bend away from salt. During halotropism, as in most other tropisms, directional growth is generated through an asymmetric auxin distribution that generates differences in growth rate and hence induces bending. Here, we develop a detailed model of auxin transport in the Arabidopsis root tip and combine this with experiments to investigate the processes generating auxin asymmetry during halotropism. Our model points to the key role of root tip architecture in allowing the decrease in PIN2 at the salt-exposed side of the root to result in a re-routing of auxin to the opposite side. In addition, our model demonstrates how feedback of auxin on the auxin transporter AUX1 amplifies this auxin asymmetry, while a salt-induced transient increase in PIN1 levels increases the speed at which this occurs. Using AUX1-GFP imaging and pin1 mutants, we experimentally confirmed these model predictions, thus expanding our knowledge of the cellular basis of halotropism.

  7. [A model for evaluation of key measures for control of chikungunya fever outbreak in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jin; Liu, Ruchun; Chen, Shuilian; Chen, Tianmu

    2015-11-01

    To analyze the transmission pattern of Chikungunya (CHIK) fever in community and evaluate the effectiveness of mosquito control, case isolation and other key control measures by using ordinary differential equation (ODE) model. According to natural history of CHIK, an ODE model for the epidemiological analysis of CHIK outbreak was established. The key parameters of the model were obtained by fitting the model with reported outbreak data of the first CHIK outbreak in China. Then the outbreak characteristics without intervention, the effectiveness of mosquito control and case isolation were simulated. Without intervention, an imported case would cause an outbreak in a community with population of 11 000, and cumulative case number would exceed 941 when the total attack rate was 8.55%. The results of our simulation revealed that the effectiveness of case isolation was not perfect enough when it was implemented alone. Although the number of cases could be decreased by case isolation, the duration of outbreak would not be shortened. Differently, the effectiveness of mosquito control was remarkable. In addition, the earlier the measure was implemented, the better the effectiveness would be. The effectiveness of mosquito control plus case isolation was same with mosquito control. To control a CHIK outbreak, mosquito control is the most recommended measures. However, case isolation is also necessary as the supplementation of mosquito control.

  8. Preferential Attachment Model with Degree Bound and its Application to Key Predistribution in WSN

    CERN Document Server

    Ruj, Sushmita

    2016-01-01

    Preferential attachment models have been widely studied in complex networks, because they can explain the formation of many networks like social networks, citation networks, power grids, and biological networks, to name a few. Motivated by the application of key predistribution in wireless sensor networks (WSN), we initiate the study of preferential attachment with degree bound. Our paper has two important contributions to two different areas. The first is a contribution in the study of complex networks. We propose preferential attachment model with degree bound for the first time. In the normal preferential attachment model, the degree distribution follows a power law, with many nodes of low degree and a few nodes of high degree. In our scheme, the nodes can have a maximum degree $d_{\\max}$, where $d_{\\max}$ is an integer chosen according to the application. The second is in the security of wireless sensor networks. We propose a new key predistribution scheme based on the above model. The important features ...

  9. Coupling process-based models and plant architectural models: A key issue for simulating crop production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reffye, de P.; Heuvelink, E.; Guo, Y.; Hu, B.G.; Zhang, B.G.

    2009-01-01

    Process-Based Models (PBMs) can successfully predict the impact of environmental factors (temperature, light, CO2, water and nutrients) on crop growth and yield. These models are used widely for yield prediction and optimization of water and nutrient supplies. Nevertheless, PBMs do not consider plan

  10. A modelling approach to find stable and reliable soil organic carbon values for further regionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bönecke, Eric; Franko, Uwe

    2015-04-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) and carbon (SOC) might be the most important components to describe soil fertility of agricultural used soils. It is sensitive to temporal and spatial changes due to varying weather conditions, uneven crops and soil management practices and still struggles with providing reliable delineation of spatial variability. Soil organic carbon, furthermore, is an essential initial parameter for dynamic modelling, understanding e.g. carbon and nitrogen processes. Alas it requires cost and time intensive field and laboratory work to attain and using this information. The objective of this study is to assess an approach that reduces efforts of laboratory and field analyses by using method to find stable initial soil organic carbon values for further soil process modelling and regionalization on field scale. The demand of strategies, technics and tools to improve reliable soil organic carbon high resolution maps and additionally reducing cost constraints is hence still facing an increasing attention of scientific research. Although, it is nowadays a widely used practice, combining effective sampling schemes with geophysical sensing techniques, to describe within-field variability of soil organic carbon, it is still challenging large uncertainties, even at field scale in both, science and agriculture. Therefore, an analytical and modelling approach might facilitate and improve this strategy on small and large field scale. This study will show a method, how to find reliable steady state values of soil organic carbon at particular points, using the approved soil process model CANDY (Franko et al. 1995). It is focusing on an iterative algorithm of adjusting the key driving components: soil physical properties, meteorological data and management information, for which we quantified the input and the losses of soil carbon (manure, crop residues, other organic inputs, decomposition, leaching). Furthermore, this approach can be combined with geophysical

  11. Modeling succession of key resource-harvesting traits of mixotrophic plankton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berge, Terje; Chakraborty, Subhendu; Hansen, Per Juel

    2017-01-01

    -based model for mixotrophy with three key resource-harvesting traits: photosynthesis, phagotrophy and inorganic nutrient uptake, which predicts the trophic strategy of species throughout the seasonal cycle. Assuming that simple carbohydrates from photosynthesis fuel respiration, and feeding primarily provides...... in the spring and increased phagotrophy during the summer, reflecting general seasonal succession patterns of temperate waters. Our trait-based model presents a simple and general approach for the inclusion of mixotrophy, succession and evolution in ecosystem models.The ISME Journal advance online publication......Unicellular eukaryotes make up the base of the ocean food web and exist as a continuum in trophic strategy from pure heterotrophy (phagotrophic zooplankton) to pure photoautotrophy (‘phytoplankton’), with a dominance of mixotrophic organisms combining both strategies. Here we formulate a trait...

  12. Key Technology Research on Open Architecture for The Sharing of Heterogeneous Geographic Analysis Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, S. S.; Wen, Y. N.; Lv, G. N.; Hu, D.

    2013-10-01

    In recent years, the increasing development of cloud computing technologies laid critical foundation for efficiently solving complicated geographic issues. However, it is still difficult to realize the cooperative operation of massive heterogeneous geographical models. Traditional cloud architecture is apt to provide centralized solution to end users, while all the required resources are often offered by large enterprises or special agencies. Thus, it's a closed framework from the perspective of resource utilization. Solving comprehensive geographic issues requires integrating multifarious heterogeneous geographical models and data. In this case, an open computing platform is in need, with which the model owners can package and deploy their models into cloud conveniently, while model users can search, access and utilize those models with cloud facility. Based on this concept, the open cloud service strategies for the sharing of heterogeneous geographic analysis models is studied in this article. The key technology: unified cloud interface strategy, sharing platform based on cloud service, and computing platform based on cloud service are discussed in detail, and related experiments are conducted for further verification.

  13. Key Issues in Modeling of Complex 3D Structures from Video Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengyong Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Construction of three-dimensional structures from video sequences has wide applications for intelligent video analysis. This paper summarizes the key issues of the theory and surveys the recent advances in the state of the art. Reconstruction of a scene object from video sequences often takes the basic principle of structure from motion with an uncalibrated camera. This paper lists the typical strategies and summarizes the typical solutions or algorithms for modeling of complex three-dimensional structures. Open difficult problems are also suggested for further study.

  14. Muninn: A versioning flash key-value store using an object-based storage model

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Y.; Pitchumani, R; Marlette, T; Miller, El

    2014-01-01

    While non-volatile memory (NVRAM) devices have the po-tential to alleviate the trade-off between performance, scal-ability, and energy in storage and memory subsystems, a block interface and storage subsystems designed for slow I/O devices make it difficult to efficiently exploit NVRAMs in a portable and extensible way. We propose an object-based storage model as a way of addressing the shortfalls of the current interfaces. Through the design of Muninn, an object-based versioning key-value st...

  15. Key factors regulating the mass delivery of macromolecules to model cell membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campbell, Richard A.; Watkins, Erik B.; Jagalski, Vivien

    2014-01-01

    We show that both gravity and electrostatics are key factors regulating interactions between model cell membranes and self-assembled liquid crystalline aggregates of dendrimers and phospholipids. The system is a proxy for the trafficking of reservoirs of therapeutic drugs to cell membranes for slow...... diffusion and continuous delivery. Neutron reflectometry measurements were carried out on supported lipid bilayers of varying charge and on hydrophilic silica surfaces. Translocation of the macromolecule across the membrane and adsorption of the lamellar aggregates occur only when the membrane (1...... of the aggregates to activate endocytosis pathways on specific cell types is discussed in the context of targeted drug delivery applications....

  16. Implementing the Five-A Model of Technical Refinement: Key Roles of the Sport Psychologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Howie J; Collins, Dave

    2016-10-01

    There is increasing evidence for the significant contribution provided by sport psychologists within applied coaching environments. However, this rarely considers their skills/knowledge being applied when refining athletes' already learned and well-established motor skills. Therefore, this article focuses on how a sport psychologist might assist a coach and athlete to implement long-term permanent and pressure proof refinements. It highlights key contributions at each stage of the Five-A model-designed to deliver these important outcomes-providing both psychomotor and psychosocial input to the support delivery. By employing these recommendations, sport psychologists can make multiple positive contributions to completion of this challenging task.

  17. Finding a balance between accuracy and computational effort for modeling biomineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommel, Johannes; Ebigbo, Anozie; Gerlach, Robin; Cunningham, Alfred B.; Helmig, Rainer; Class, Holger

    2016-04-01

    One of the key issues of underground gas storage is the long-term security of the storage site. Amongst the different storage mechanisms, cap-rock integrity is crucial for preventing leakage of the stored gas due to buoyancy into shallower aquifers or, ultimately, the atmosphere. This leakage would reduce the efficiency of underground gas storage and pose a threat to the environment. Ureolysis-driven, microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP) is one of the technologies in the focus of current research aiming at mitigation of potential leakage by sealing high-permeability zones in cap rocks. Previously, a numerical model, capable of simulating two-phase multi-component reactive transport, including the most important processes necessary to describe MICP, was developed and validated against experiments in Ebigbo et al. [2012]. The microbial ureolysis kinetics implemented in the model was improved based on new experimental findings and the model was recalibrated using improved experimental data in Hommel et al. [2015]. This increased the ability of the model to predict laboratory experiments while simplifying some of the reaction rates. However, the complexity of the model is still high which leads to high computation times even for relatively small domains. The high computation time prohibits the use of the model for the design of field-scale applications of MICP. Various approaches to reduce the computational time are possible, e.g. using optimized numerical schemes or simplified engineering models. Optimized numerical schemes have the advantage of conserving the detailed equations, as they save computation time by an improved solution strategy. Simplified models are more an engineering approach, since they neglect processes of minor impact and focus on the processes which have the most influence on the model results. This allows also for investigating the influence of a certain process on the overall MICP, which increases the insights into the interactions

  18. Data warehouse model for monitoring key performance indicators (KPIs) using goal oriented approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Mohammed Thajeel; Ta'a, Azman; Bakar, Muhamad Shahbani Abu

    2016-08-01

    The growth and development of universities, just as other organizations, depend on their abilities to strategically plan and implement development blueprints which are in line with their vision and mission statements. The actualizations of these statements, which are often designed into goals and sub-goals and linked to their respective actors are better measured by defining key performance indicators (KPIs) of the university. The proposes ReGADaK, which is an extended the GRAnD approach highlights the facts, dimensions, attributes, measures and KPIs of the organization. The measures from the goal analysis of this unit serve as the basis of developing the related university's KPIs. The proposed data warehouse schema is evaluated through expert review, prototyping and usability evaluation. The findings from the evaluation processes suggest that the proposed data warehouse schema is suitable for monitoring the University's KPIs.

  19. Key challenges and priorities for modelling European grasslands under climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipling, Richard P; Virkajärvi, Perttu; Breitsameter, Laura; Curnel, Yannick; De Swaef, Tom; Gustavsson, Anne-Maj; Hennart, Sylvain; Höglind, Mats; Järvenranta, Kirsi; Minet, Julien; Nendel, Claas; Persson, Tomas; Picon-Cochard, Catherine; Rolinski, Susanne; Sandars, Daniel L; Scollan, Nigel D; Sebek, Leon; Seddaiu, Giovanna; Topp, Cairistiona F E; Twardy, Stanislaw; Van Middelkoop, Jantine; Wu, Lianhai; Bellocchi, Gianni

    2016-10-01

    Grassland-based ruminant production systems are integral to sustainable food production in Europe, converting plant materials indigestible to humans into nutritious food, while providing a range of environmental and cultural benefits. Climate change poses significant challenges for such systems, their productivity and the wider benefits they supply. In this context, grassland models have an important role in predicting and understanding the impacts of climate change on grassland systems, and assessing the efficacy of potential adaptation and mitigation strategies. In order to identify the key challenges for European grassland modelling under climate change, modellers and researchers from across Europe were consulted via workshop and questionnaire. Participants identified fifteen challenges and considered the current state of modelling and priorities for future research in relation to each. A review of literature was undertaken to corroborate and enrich the information provided during the horizon scanning activities. Challenges were in four categories relating to: 1) the direct and indirect effects of climate change on the sward 2) climate change effects on grassland systems outputs 3) mediation of climate change impacts by site, system and management and 4) cross-cutting methodological issues. While research priorities differed between challenges, an underlying theme was the need for accessible, shared inventories of models, approaches and data, as a resource for stakeholders and to stimulate new research. Developing grassland models to effectively support efforts to tackle climate change impacts, while increasing productivity and enhancing ecosystem services, will require engagement with stakeholders and policy-makers, as well as modellers and experimental researchers across many disciplines. The challenges and priorities identified are intended to be a resource 1) for grassland modellers and experimental researchers, to stimulate the development of new research

  20. Initial Content Validation Results of a New Simulation Model for Flexible Ureteroscopy: The Key-Box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Luca; Şener, Tarik Emre; Somani, Bhaskar K; Cloutier, Jonathan; Butticè, Salvatore; Marson, Francesco; Doizi, Steeve; Proietti, Silvia; Traxer, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    We sought to test the content validity of a new training model for flexible ureteroscopy: the Key-Box. Sixteen medical students were randomized to undergo a 10-day training consisting of performing 10 different exercises aimed at learning specific movements with the flexible ureteroscope, and how to catch and release stones with a nitinol basket using the Key-Box (n = 8 students in the training group, n = 8 students in the nontraining control group). Subsequently, an expert endourologist (O.T.) blindly assessed skills acquired by the whole cohort of students through two exercises on ureteroscope manipulation and one exercise on stone capture selected among those used for the training. A performance scale (1-5) assessing different steps of the procedure was used to evaluate each student. Time to complete the exercises was measured. Mann-Whitney Rank Sum test was used for comparisons between the two groups. Mean scores obtained by trained students were significantly higher compared with those obtained by nontrained students (all p six (75%) nontrained students were not able to finish one out of the two exercises on ureteroscope manipulation and the exercise on stone capture, respectively. The mean time to complete the three exercises was 76.3, 69.9, and 107 and 172.5, 137.9, and 168 seconds in the trained and nontrained groups, respectively (all p Box(®) seems to be a valid easy-to-use training model for initiating novel endoscopists to flexible ureteroscopy.

  1. Determining Key Model Parameters of Rapidly Intensifying Hurricane Guillermo(1997) using the Ensemble Kalman Filter

    CERN Document Server

    Godinez, Humberto C; Fierro, Alexandre O; Guimond, Stephen R; Kao, Jim

    2011-01-01

    In this work we present the assimilation of dual-Doppler radar observations for rapidly intensifying hurricane Guillermo (1997) using the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) to determine key model parameters. A unique aspect of Guillermo was that during the period of radar observations strong convective bursts, attributable to wind shear, formed primarily within the eastern semicircle of the eyewall. To reproduce this observed structure within a hurricane model, background wind shear of some magnitude must be specified; as well as turbulence and surface parameters appropriately specified so that the impact of the shear on the simulated hurricane vortex can be realized. To first illustrate the complex nonlinear interactions induced by changes in these parameters, an ensemble of 120 simulations have been conducted in which individual members were formulated by sampling the parameters within a certain range via a Latin hypercube approach. Next, data from the 120 simulations and two distinct derived fields of observati...

  2. Development of generic key performance indicators for PMBOK® using a 3D project integration model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Langston

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Since Martin Barnes’ so-called ‘iron triangle’ circa 1969, much debate has occurred over how best to describe the fundamental constraints that underpin project success. This paper develops a 3D project integration model for PMBOK® comprising core constraints of scope, cost, time and risk as a basis to propose six generic key performance indicators (KPIs that articulate successful project delivery. These KPIs are defined as value, efficiency, speed, innovation, complexity and impact and can each be measured objectively as ratios of the core constraints. An overall KPI (denoted as s3/ctr is also derived. The aim in this paper is to set out the case for such a model and to demonstrate how it can be employed to assess the performance of project teams in delivering successful outcomes at various stages in the project life cycle. As part of the model’s development, a new PMBOK® knowledge area concerning environmental management is advanced.

  3. Simulation and Projection of Blocking Highs in Key Regions of the Eurasia by CMIP5 Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Previous studies generally hold viewpoint that CMIP5 models underestimate blocking frequency and predict decreasing trend of blockings in 21st century in North Hemisphere (NH). However, regional blocking has its own features, which is different from blockings in NH as a whole. Focusing on three key regions in Eurasia-Ural, Baikal, and Okhotsk where blockings significantly influence weather and climate of East Asia, historical simulations were analyzed to evaluate the performance of the CMIP5 models, and possible changes in the first half 21st century were then predicted using the RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 pathways. Comparison with NCEP/NCAR reanalysis (NNR) data revealed that instantaneous blocking frequencies are underestimated in the Ural and Baikal in the whole year and in Okhotsk in summer, but are overestimated in Okhotsk in winter. Overall, the CMIP5 models could largely reproduce character of instantaneous blocking frequency in the Eurasia, with a better performance in winter than in summer. Blocking episodes frequency in the Ural and Baikal is underestimated by most the 13 CMIP5 models, especially the short duration blocking episodes, and simulated superiorly in winter to in summer. However, modeled blocking episodes frequency is near to observed value in summer but overestimated in winter in Okhotsk. Model projections of instantaneous blocking frequency for the first half 21st century (2016-2065) shows that the RCP 4.5 projection yields a significant increasing frequency during January-May, decreasing frequency during June-August, and a little increasing frequency during September- December. The RCP 8.5 projection presents similar case to RCP 4.5 projection, but indicating more remarkable decreasing trend. Blocking episodes frequency of the multi-model ensemble mean obviously decreases in the Ural and Baikal (especially blocking episodes with short duration) and increase a little in Okhotsk in the first half 21st century. For blocking episodes with long duration

  4. Substance Use and Mental Health Trends among U.S. Military Active Duty Personnel: Key Findings from the 2008 DoD Health Behavior Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    stimulants other than metham- phetamine, tranquilizers or muscle relaxers, sedatives or bar- biturates, pain relievers, and anabolic steroids . "Nonmedical use...to 2008 (20%). This increase raises two key concerns: ( 1 ) heavy use and binge drinking are associated with higher rates of negative consequences

  5. Scientific information and the Tongass land management plan: key findings derived from the scientific literature, species assessments, resource analyses, workshops, and risk assessment panels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas N. Swanston; Charles G. Shaw; Winston P. Smith; Kent R. Julin; Guy A. Cellier; Fred H. Everest

    1996-01-01

    This document highlights key items of information obtained from the published literature and from specific assessments, workshops, resource analyses, and various risk assessment panels conducted as part of the Tongass land management planning process. None of this information dictates any particular decision; however, it is important to consider during decisionmaking...

  6. The giant Jiaodong gold province: The key to a unified model for orogenic gold deposits?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David I. Groves

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Although the term orogenic gold deposit has been widely accepted for all gold-only lode-gold deposits, with the exception of Carlin-type deposits and rare intrusion-related gold systems, there has been continuing debate on their genesis. Early syngenetic models and hydrothermal models dominated by meteoric fluids are now clearly unacceptable. Magmatic-hydrothermal models fail to explain the genesis of orogenic gold deposits because of the lack of consistent spatially – associated granitic intrusions and inconsistent temporal relationships. The most plausible, and widely accepted, models involve metamorphic fluids, but the source of these fluids is hotly debated. Sources within deeper segments of the supracrustal successions hosting the deposits, the underlying continental crust, and subducted oceanic lithosphere and its overlying sediment wedge all have their proponents. The orogenic gold deposits of the giant Jiaodong gold province of China, in the delaminated North China Craton, contain ca. 120 Ma gold deposits in Precambrian crust that was metamorphosed over 2000 million years prior to gold mineralization. The only realistic source of fluid and gold is a subducted oceanic slab with its overlying sulfide-rich sedimentary package, or the associated mantle wedge. This could be viewed as an exception to a general metamorphic model where orogenic gold has been derived during greenschist- to amphibolite-facies metamorphism of supracrustal rocks: basaltic rocks in the Precambrian and sedimentary rocks in the Phanerozoic. Alternatively, if a holistic view is taken, Jiaodong can be considered the key orogenic gold province for a unified model in which gold is derived from late-orogenic metamorphic devolatilization of stalled subduction slabs and oceanic sediments throughout Earth history. The latter model satisfies all geological, geochronological, isotopic and geochemical constraints but the precise mechanisms of auriferous fluid release, like many

  7. The giant Jiaodong gold province:The key to a unified model for orogenic gold deposits?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David I. Groves; M. Santosh

    2016-01-01

    Although the term orogenic gold deposit has been widely accepted for all gold-only lode-gold deposits, with the exception of Carlin-type deposits and rare intrusion-related gold systems, there has been continuing debate on their genesis. Early syngenetic models and hydrothermal models dominated by meteoric fluids are now clearly unacceptable. Magmatic-hydrothermal models fail to explain the genesis of orogenic gold deposits because of the lack of consistent spatially e associated granitic intrusions and inconsistent temporal relationships. The most plausible, and widely accepted, models involve meta-morphic fluids, but the source of these fluids is hotly debated. Sources within deeper segments of the supracrustal successions hosting the deposits, the underlying continental crust, and subducted oceanic lithosphere and its overlying sediment wedge all have their proponents. The orogenic gold deposits of the giant Jiaodong gold province of China, in the delaminated North China Craton, contain ca. 120 Ma gold deposits in Precambrian crust that was metamorphosed over 2000 million years prior to gold mineralization. The only realistic source of fluid and gold is a subducted oceanic slab with its overlying sulfide-rich sedimentary package, or the associated mantle wedge. This could be viewed as an exception to a general metamorphic model where orogenic gold has been derived during greenschist- to amphibolite-facies metamorphism of supracrustal rocks: basaltic rocks in the Precambrian and sedi-mentary rocks in the Phanerozoic. Alternatively, if a holistic view is taken, Jiaodong can be considered the key orogenic gold province for a unified model in which gold is derived from late-orogenic metamorphic devolatilization of stalled subduction slabs and oceanic sediments throughout Earth history. The latter model satisfies all geological, geochronological, isotopic and geochemical constraints but the precise mechanisms of auriferous fluid release, like many other subduction

  8. Choosing preclinical study models of diabetic retinopathy: key problems for consideration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi XS

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Xue-Song Mi,1,2 Ti-Fei Yuan,3,4 Yong Ding,1 Jing-Xiang Zhong,1 Kwok-Fai So4,5 1Department of Ophthalmology, First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Anatomy, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China; 3School of Psychology, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China; 4Department of Ophthalmology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong; 5Guangdong-Hongkong-Macau Institute of Central Nervous System, Jinan University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Diabetic retinopathy (DR is the most common complication of diabetes mellitus in the eye. Although the clinical treatment for DR has already developed to a relative high level, there are still many urgent problems that need to be investigated in clinical and basic science. Currently, many in vivo animal models and in vitro culture systems have been applied to solve these problems. Many approaches have also been used to establish different DR models. However, till now, there has not been a single study model that can clearly and exactly mimic the developmental process of the human DR. Choosing the suitable model is important, not only for achieving our research goals smoothly, but also, to better match with different experimental proposals in the study. In this review, key problems for consideration in choosing study models of DR are discussed. These problems relate to clinical relevance, different approaches for establishing models, and choice of different species of animals as well as of the specific in vitro culture systems. Attending to these considerations will deepen the understanding on current study models and optimize the experimental design for the final goal of preventing DR. Keywords: animal model, in vitro culture, ex vivo culture, neurovascular dysfunction

  9. Building a Bridge from Moments to PDF's: A New Approach to Finding PDF Mixing Models

    CERN Document Server

    Schüler, Lennart; Knabner, Peter; Attinger, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Probability density function (PDF) methods are a promising alternative to predicting the transport of solutes in groundwater under uncertainty. They make it possible to derive the evolution equations of the mean concentration and the concentration variance, used in moment methods. A mixing model, also known as a dissipation model, is essential for both methods. Finding a satisfactory mixing model is still an open question and due to the rather elaborate PDF methods, a difficult undertaking. Both the PDF equation and the concentration variance equation depend on the same mixing model. This connection is used to find and test an improved mixing model for the much easier to handle concentration variance. Subsequently, this mixing model is transferred to the PDF equation and tested. The newly proposed mixing model yields significantly improved results for both variance modelling and PDF modelling.

  10. Re-orienting a remote acute care model towards a primary health care approach: key enablers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Vicki; Reeve, Carole A; Humphreys, John S; Wakerman, John; Carter, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the key enablers of change in re-orienting a remote acute care model to comprehensive primary healthcare delivery. The setting of the study was a 12-bed hospital in Fitzroy Crossing, Western Australia. Individual key informant, in-depth interviews were completed with five of six identified senior leaders involved in the development of the Fitzroy Valley Health Partnership. Interviews were recorded and transcripts were thematically analysed by two investigators for shared views about the enabling factors strengthening primary healthcare delivery in a remote region of Australia. Participants described theestablishment of a culturally relevant primary healthcare service, using a community-driven, 'bottom up' approach characterised by extensive community participation. The formal partnership across the government and community controlled health services was essential, both to enable change to occur and to provide sustainability in the longer term. A hierarchy of major themes emerged. These included community participation, community readiness and desire for self-determination; linkages in the form of a government community controlled health service partnership; leadership; adequate infrastructure; enhanced workforce supply; supportive policy; and primary healthcare funding. The strong united leadership shown by the community and the health service enabled barriers to be overcome and it maximised the opportunities provided by government policy changes. The concurrent alignment around a common vision enabled implementation of change. The key principle learnt from this study is the importance of community and health service relationships and local leadership around a shared vision for the re-orientation of community health services.

  11. Accessing key steps of human tumor progression in vivo by using an avian embryo model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, Martin; Javerzat, Sophie; Gilges, Delphine; Meyre, Aurélie; de Lafarge, Benjamin; Eichmann, Anne; Bikfalvi, Andreas

    2005-02-01

    Experimental in vivo tumor models are essential for comprehending the dynamic process of human cancer progression, identifying therapeutic targets, and evaluating antitumor drugs. However, current rodent models are limited by high costs, long experimental duration, variability, restricted accessibility to the tumor, and major ethical concerns. To avoid these shortcomings, we investigated whether tumor growth on the chick chorio-allantoic membrane after human glioblastoma cell grafting would replicate characteristics of the human disease. Avascular tumors consistently formed within 2 days, then progressed through vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2-dependent angiogenesis, associated with hemorrhage, necrosis, and peritumoral edema. Blocking of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and platelet-derived growth factor receptor signaling pathways by using small-molecule receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors abrogated tumor development. Gene regulation during the angiogenic switch was analyzed by oligonucleotide microarrays. Defined sample selection for gene profiling permitted identification of regulated genes whose functions are associated mainly with tumor vascularization and growth. Furthermore, expression of known tumor progression genes identified in the screen (IL-6 and cysteine-rich angiogenic inducer 61) as well as potential regulators (lumican and F-box-only 6) follow similar patterns in patient glioma. The model reliably simulates key features of human glioma growth in a few days and thus could considerably increase the speed and efficacy of research on human tumor progression and preclinical drug screening. angiogenesis | animal model alternatives | glioblastoma

  12. Computational modeling identifies key gene regulatory interactions underlying phenobarbital-mediated tumor promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luisier, Raphaëlle; Unterberger, Elif B.; Goodman, Jay I.; Schwarz, Michael; Moggs, Jonathan; Terranova, Rémi; van Nimwegen, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Gene regulatory interactions underlying the early stages of non-genotoxic carcinogenesis are poorly understood. Here, we have identified key candidate regulators of phenobarbital (PB)-mediated mouse liver tumorigenesis, a well-characterized model of non-genotoxic carcinogenesis, by applying a new computational modeling approach to a comprehensive collection of in vivo gene expression studies. We have combined our previously developed motif activity response analysis (MARA), which models gene expression patterns in terms of computationally predicted transcription factor binding sites with singular value decomposition (SVD) of the inferred motif activities, to disentangle the roles that different transcriptional regulators play in specific biological pathways of tumor promotion. Furthermore, transgenic mouse models enabled us to identify which of these regulatory activities was downstream of constitutive androstane receptor and β-catenin signaling, both crucial components of PB-mediated liver tumorigenesis. We propose novel roles for E2F and ZFP161 in PB-mediated hepatocyte proliferation and suggest that PB-mediated suppression of ESR1 activity contributes to the development of a tumor-prone environment. Our study shows that combining MARA with SVD allows for automated identification of independent transcription regulatory programs within a complex in vivo tissue environment and provides novel mechanistic insights into PB-mediated hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:24464994

  13. A step towards considering the spatial heterogeneity of urban key features in urban hydrology flood modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leandro, J.; Schumann, A.; Pfister, A.

    2016-04-01

    Some of the major challenges in modelling rainfall-runoff in urbanised areas are the complex interaction between the sewer system and the overland surface, and the spatial heterogeneity of the urban key features. The former requires the sewer network and the system of surface flow paths to be solved simultaneously. The latter is still an unresolved issue because the heterogeneity of runoff formation requires high detailed information and includes a large variety of feature specific rainfall-runoff dynamics. This paper discloses a methodology for considering the variability of building types and the spatial heterogeneity of land surfaces. The former is achieved by developing a specific conceptual rainfall-runoff model and the latter by defining a fully distributed approach for infiltration processes in urban areas with limited storage capacity dependent on OpenStreetMaps (OSM). The model complexity is increased stepwise by adding components to an existing 2D overland flow model. The different steps are defined as modelling levels. The methodology is applied in a German case study. Results highlight that: (a) spatial heterogeneity of urban features has a medium to high impact on the estimated overland flood-depths, (b) the addition of multiple urban features have a higher cumulative effect due to the dynamic effects simulated by the model, (c) connecting the runoff from buildings to the sewer contributes to the non-linear effects observed on the overland flood-depths, and (d) OSM data is useful in identifying pounding areas (for which infiltration plays a decisive role) and permeable natural surface flow paths (which delay the flood propagation).

  14. Key Elements of the User-Friendly, GFDL SKYHI General Circulation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard S. Hemler

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past seven years, the portability of the GFDL SKYHI general circulation model has greatly increased. Modifications to the source code have allowed SKYHI to be run on the GFDL Cray Research PVP machines, the TMC CM-5 machine at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and more recently on the GFDL 40-processor Cray Research T3E system. At the same time, changes have been made to the model to make it more usable and flexible. Because of the reduction of the human resources available to manage and analyze scientific experiments, it is no longer acceptable to consider only the optimization of computer resources when producing a research code; one must also consider the availability and cost of the people necessary to maintain, modify and use the model as an investigative tool, and include these factors in defining the form of the model code. The new SKYHI model attempts to strike a balance between the optimization of the use of machine resources (CPU time, memory, disc and the optimal use of human resources (ability to understand code, ability to modify code, ability to perturb code to do experiments, ability to run code on different platforms. Two of the key features that make the new SKYHI code more usable and flexible are the archiving package and the user variable block. The archiving package is used to manage the writing of all archive files, which contain data for later analysis. The model-supplied user variable block allows the easy inclusion of any new variables needed for particular experiments.

  15. Education as Experimentation: A Planned Variation Model. Volume IIIA: Findings: Cohort II; Interim Findings: Cohort III. Volume IIIB: Appendices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, Linda B.; And Others

    This segment of the national evaluation study of the Follow Through Planned Variation Model reviews the background of the study, describes 13 of the Follow Through models involved, and presents an analysis of the effects of these models on students. The analysis is based on data from 4 years of Follow Through participation by Cohort II children…

  16. The undecided have the key: Interaction-driven opinion dynamics in a three state model

    CERN Document Server

    Balenzuela, Pablo; Semeshenko, Viktoriya

    2015-01-01

    The effects of interpersonal interactions on individual's agreements result in a social aggregation process which is reflected in the formation of collective states, as for instance, groups of individuals with a similar opinion about a given issue. This field, which has been a longstanding concern of sociologists and psychologists, has been extended into an area of experimental social psychology, and even has attracted the attention of physicists and mathematicians. In this article, we present a novel model of opinion formation in which agents may either have a strict preference for a choice, or be undecided. The opinion shift emerges during interpersonal communications, as a consequence of a cumulative process of conviction for one of the two extremes opinions through repeated interactions. There are two main ingredients which play key roles in determining the steady state: the initial fraction of undecided agents and the conviction's sensitivity in each interaction. As a function of these two parameters, th...

  17. Selection in spatial stochastic models of cancer: Migration as a key modulator of fitness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stupack Dwayne

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We study the selection dynamics in a heterogeneous spatial colony of cells. We use two spatial generalizations of the Moran process, which include cell divisions, death and migration. In the first model, migration is included explicitly as movement to a proximal location. In the second, migration is implicit, through the varied ability of cell types to place their offspring a distance away, in response to another cell's death. Results In both models, we find that migration has a direct positive impact on the ability of a single mutant cell to invade a pre-existing colony. Thus, a decrease in the growth potential can be compensated by an increase in cell migration. We further find that the neutral ridges (the set of all types with the invasion probability equal to that of the host cells remain invariant under the increase of system size (for large system sizes, thus making the invasion probability a universal characteristic of the cells selection status. We find that repeated instances of large scale cell-death, such as might arise during therapeutic intervention or host response, strongly select for the migratory phenotype. Conclusions These models can help explain the many examples in the biological literature, where genes involved in cell's migratory and invasive machinery are also associated with increased cellular fitness, even though there is no known direct effect of these genes on the cellular reproduction. The models can also help to explain how chemotherapy may provide a selection mechanism for highly invasive phenotypes. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Marek Kimmel and Glenn Webb.

  18. Antimicrobial Nanoplexes meet Model Bacterial Membranes: the key role of Cardiolipin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-Menéndez, Alejandro; Montis, Costanza; Díaz-Calvo, Teresa; Carta, Davide; Hatzixanthis, Kostas; Morris, Christopher J.; McArthur, Michael; Berti, Debora

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance to traditional antibiotics is a crucial challenge of medical research. Oligonucleotide therapeutics, such as antisense or Transcription Factor Decoys (TFDs), have the potential to circumvent current resistance mechanisms by acting on novel targets. However, their full translation into clinical application requires efficient delivery strategies and fundamental comprehension of their interaction with target bacterial cells. To address these points, we employed a novel cationic bolaamphiphile that binds TFDs with high affinity to form self-assembled complexes (nanoplexes). Confocal microscopy revealed that nanoplexes efficiently transfect bacterial cells, consistently with biological efficacy on animal models. To understand the factors affecting the delivery process, liposomes with varying compositions, taken as model synthetic bilayers, were challenged with nanoplexes and investigated with Scattering and Fluorescence techniques. Thanks to the combination of results on bacteria and synthetic membrane models we demonstrate for the first time that the prokaryotic-enriched anionic lipid Cardiolipin (CL) plays a key-role in the TFDs delivery to bacteria. Moreover, we can hypothesize an overall TFD delivery mechanism, where bacterial membrane reorganization with permeability increase and release of the TFD from the nanoplexes are the main factors. These results will be of great benefit to boost the development of oligonucleotides-based antimicrobials of superior efficacy.

  19. Characterization of a Field Spectroradiometer for Unattended Vegetation Monitoring. Key Sensor Models and Impacts on Reflectance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Pacheco-Labrador

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Field spectroradiometers integrated in automated systems at Eddy Covariance (EC sites are a powerful tool for monitoring and upscaling vegetation physiology and carbon and water fluxes. However, exposure to varying environmental conditions can affect the functioning of these sensors, especially if these cannot be completely insulated and stabilized. This can cause inaccuracy in the spectral measurements and hinder the comparison between data acquired at different sites. This paper describes the characterization of key sensor models in a double beam spectroradiometer necessary to calculate the Hemispherical-Conical Reflectance Factor (HCRF. Dark current, temperature dependence, non-linearity, spectral calibration and cosine receptor directional responses are modeled in the laboratory as a function of temperature, instrument settings, radiation measured or illumination angle. These models are used to correct the spectral measurements acquired continuously by the same instrument integrated outdoors in an automated system (AMSPEC-MED. Results suggest that part of the instrumental issues cancel out mutually or can be controlled by the instrument configuration, so that changes induced in HCFR reached about 0.05 at maximum. However, these corrections are necessary to ensure the inter-comparison of data with other ground or remote sensors and to discriminate instrumentally induced changes in HCRF from those related with vegetation physiology and directional effects.

  20. Simple dynamical models capturing the key features of the Central Pacific El Niño.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nan; Majda, Andrew J

    2016-10-18

    The Central Pacific El Niño (CP El Niño) has been frequently observed in recent decades. The phenomenon is characterized by an anomalous warm sea surface temperature (SST) confined to the central Pacific and has different teleconnections from the traditional El Niño. Here, simple models are developed and shown to capture the key mechanisms of the CP El Niño. The starting model involves coupled atmosphere-ocean processes that are deterministic, linear, and stable. Then, systematic strategies are developed for incorporating several major mechanisms of the CP El Niño into the coupled system. First, simple nonlinear zonal advection with no ad hoc parameterization of the background SST gradient is introduced that creates coupled nonlinear advective modes of the SST. Secondly, due to the recent multidecadal strengthening of the easterly trade wind, a stochastic parameterization of the wind bursts including a mean easterly trade wind anomaly is coupled to the simple atmosphere-ocean processes. Effective stochastic noise in the wind burst model facilitates the intermittent occurrence of the CP El Niño with realistic amplitude and duration. In addition to the anomalous warm SST in the central Pacific, other major features of the CP El Niño such as the rising branch of the anomalous Walker circulation being shifted to the central Pacific and the eastern Pacific cooling with a shallow thermocline are all captured by this simple coupled model. Importantly, the coupled model succeeds in simulating a series of CP El Niño that lasts for 5 y, which resembles the two CP El Niño episodes during 1990-1995 and 2002-2006.

  1. Finding Non-overlapping Clusters for Generalized Inference Over Graphical Models

    CERN Document Server

    Vats, Divyanshu

    2011-01-01

    Graphical models compactly capture stochastic dependencies amongst a collection of random variables using a graph. Inference over graphical models corresponds to finding marginal probability distributions given joint probability distributions. Several inference algorithms rely on iterative message passing between nodes. Although these algorithms can be generalized so that the message passing occurs between clusters of nodes, there are limited frameworks for finding such clusters. Moreover, current frameworks rely on finding clusters that are overlapping. This increases the computational complexity of finding clusters since the edges over a graph with overlapping clusters must be chosen carefully to avoid inconsistencies in the marginal distribution computations. In this paper, we propose a framework for finding clusters in a graph for generalized inference so that the clusters are \\emph{non-overlapping}. Given an undirected graph, we first derive a linear time algorithm for constructing a block-tree, a tree-s...

  2. Testing Models: A Key Aspect to Promote Teaching Activities Related to Models and Modelling in Biology Lessons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krell, Moritz; Krüger, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated biology teachers' (N = 148) understanding of models and modelling (MoMo), their model-related teaching activities and relations between the two. A framework which distinguishes five aspects of MoMo in science ("nature of models," "multiple models," "purpose of models," "testing…

  3. Testing Models: A Key Aspect to Promote Teaching Activities Related to Models and Modelling in Biology Lessons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krell, Moritz; Krüger, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated biology teachers' (N = 148) understanding of models and modelling (MoMo), their model-related teaching activities and relations between the two. A framework which distinguishes five aspects of MoMo in science ("nature of models," "multiple models," "purpose of models," "testing…

  4. Representing Microbial Dormancy in Soil Decomposition Models Improves Model Performance and Reveals Key Ecosystem Controls on Microbial Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Y.; Yang, J.; Zhuang, Q.; Wang, G.; Liu, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Climate feedbacks from soils can result from environmental change and subsequent responses of plant and microbial communities and nutrient cycling. Explicit consideration of microbial life history traits and strategy may be necessary to predict climate feedbacks due to microbial physiology and community changes and their associated effect on carbon cycling. In this study, we developed an explicit microbial-enzyme decomposition model and examined model performance with and without representation of dormancy at six temperate forest sites with observed soil efflux ranged from 4 to 10 years across different forest types. We then extrapolated the model to all temperate forests in the Northern Hemisphere (25-50°N) to investigate spatial controls on microbial and soil C dynamics. Both models captured the observed soil heterotrophic respiration (RH), yet no-dormancy model consistently exhibited large seasonal amplitude and overestimation in microbial biomass. Spatially, the total RH from temperate forests based on dormancy model amounts to 6.88PgC/yr, and 7.99PgC/yr based on no-dormancy model. However, no-dormancy model notably overestimated the ratio of microbial biomass to SOC. Spatial correlation analysis revealed key controls of soil C:N ratio on the active proportion of microbial biomass, whereas local dormancy is primarily controlled by soil moisture and temperature, indicating scale-dependent environmental and biotic controls on microbial and SOC dynamics. These developments should provide essential support to modeling future soil carbon dynamics and enhance the avenue for collaboration between empirical soil experiment and modeling in the sense that more microbial physiological measurements are needed to better constrain and evaluate the models.

  5. Paths to Work in Rural Places: Key Findings and Lessons from the Impact Evaluation of the Future Steps Rural Welfare-to-Work Program. Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meckstroth, Alicia; Burwick, Andrew; Ponza, Michael; Marsh, Shawn; Novak, Tim; Phillips, Shannon; Diaz-Tena, Nuria; Ng, Judy

    2006-01-01

    Helping low-income families in rural areas find gainful employment and achieve economic self-sufficiency is an ongoing policy concern. The Rural Welfare-to-Work Strategies demonstration is using rigorous experimental designs to build knowledge about how to help low-income families in rural areas strive toward sustained employment and…

  6. WHO Atlas on Global Resources for Persons with Intellectual Disabilities 2007: Key Findings Relevant for Low- and Middle-Income Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Celine; Saxena, Shekhar; Lecomte, Jocelin; Cumbrera, Marco Garrido; Harnois, Gaston

    2008-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) Atlas-ID project was designed to collect, compile, and disseminate information on intellectual disabilities (ID) services and resources from across the world. This paper aims at selecting findings in the Atlas-ID that can be used as a tool for advocacy, human rights awareness, development planning, and…

  7. Developmental programming: the concept, large animal models, and the key role of uteroplacental vascular development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, L P; Borowicz, P P; Caton, J S; Vonnahme, K A; Luther, J S; Hammer, C J; Maddock Carlin, K R; Grazul-Bilska, A T; Redmer, D A

    2010-04-01

    Developmental programming refers to the programming of various bodily systems and processes by a stressor of the maternal system during pregnancy or during the neonatal period. Such stressors include nutritional stress, multiple pregnancy (i.e., increased numbers of fetuses in the gravid uterus), environmental stress (e.g., high environmental temperature, high altitude, prenatal steroid exposure), gynecological immaturity, and maternal or fetal genotype. Programming refers to impaired function of numerous bodily systems or processes, leading to poor growth, altered body composition, metabolic dysfunction, and poor productivity (e.g., poor growth, reproductive dysfunction) of the offspring throughout their lifespan and even across generations. A key component of developmental programming seems to be placental dysfunction, leading to altered fetal growth and development. We discuss various large animal models of developmental programming and how they have and will continue to contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms underlying altered placental function and developmental programming, and, further, how large animal models also will be critical to the identification and application of therapeutic strategies that will alleviate the negative consequences of developmental programming to improve offspring performance in livestock production and human medicine.

  8. Key strategies for predictive exploration in mature environment: model innovation, exploration technology optimization and information integration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Liang-ming; PENG Sheng-lin

    2005-01-01

    Prediction has become more and more difficult in mineral exploration, especially in the mature exploration environment such as Tongling copper district. For enhancing predictive discovery of hidden ore deposits in such mature environment, the key strategies which should be adopted include the innovation of the exploration models, application of the advanced exploration techniques and integration of multiple sets of information. The innovation of the exploration models should incorporate the new metallogenic concepts that are based on the geodynamic anatomization. The advanced techniques applied in the mature exploration environment should aim at the speciality and complexity of the geological setting and working environments. The information synthesis is to integrate multiple sets of data for giving a more credible and visual prospectivity map by using the geographic imformation system(GIS) and several mathematical methods, such as weight of evidence and fuzzy logic, which can extract useful information from every set of data as much as possible. Guided by these strategies, a predictive exploration in Fenghuangshan ore field of Tongling copper district was implemented, and a hidden ore deposit was discovered.

  9. Modelling of sea salt concentrations over Europe: key uncertainties and comparison with observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tsyro

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Sea salt aerosol can significantly affect the air quality. Sea salt can cause enhanced concentrations of particulate matter and change particle chemical composition, in particular in coastal areas, and therefore should be accounted for in air quality modelling. We have used an EMEP Unified model to calculate sea salt concentrations and depositions over Europe, focusing on studying the effects of uncertainties in sea salt production and lifetime on calculation results. Model calculations of sea salt have been compared with EMEP observations of sodium concentrations in air and precipitation for a four year period, from 2004 to 2007, including size (fine/coarse resolved EMEP intensive measurements in 2006 and 2007. In the presented calculations, sodium air concentrations are between 8% and 46% overestimated, whereas concentrations in precipitation are systematically underestimated by 65–70% for years 2004–2007. A series of model tests have been performed to investigate the reasons for this underestimation, but further studies are needed. The model is found to reproduce the spatial distribution of Na+ in air and precipitation over Europe fairly well, and to capture most of sea salt episodes. The paper presents the main findings from a series of tests in which we compare several different sea spray source functions and also look at the effects of meteorological input and the efficiency of removal processes on calculated sea salt concentrations. Finally, sea salt calculations with the EMEP model have been compared with results from the SILAM model and observations for 2007. While the models produce quite close results for Na+ at the majority of 26 measurement sites, discrepancies in terms of bias and temporal correlation are also found. Those differences are believed to occur due to differences in the representation of source function and size distribution of sea salt aerosol, different meteorology used for model runs and the

  10. An adaptive model switching approach for phase I dose-finding trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daimon, Takashi; Zohar, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Model-based phase I dose-finding designs rely on a single model throughout the study for estimating the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Thus, one major concern is about the choice of the most suitable model to be used. This is important because the dose allocation process and the MTD estimation depend on whether or not the model is reliable, or whether or not it gives a better fit to toxicity data. The aim of our work was to propose a method that would remove the need for a model choice prior to the trial onset and then allow it sequentially at each patient's inclusion. In this paper, we described model checking approach based on the posterior predictive check and model comparison approach based on the deviance information criterion, in order to identify a more reliable or better model during the course of a trial and to support clinical decision making. Further, we presented two model switching designs for a phase I cancer trial that were based on the aforementioned approaches, and performed a comparison between designs with or without model switching, through a simulation study. The results showed that the proposed designs had the advantage of decreasing certain risks, such as those of poor dose allocation and failure to find the MTD, which could occur if the model is misspecified. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Heterogeneity in DNA multiple alignments: modeling, inference, and applications in motif finding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gong; Zhou, Qing

    2010-09-01

    Transcription factors bind sequence-specific sites in DNA to regulate gene transcription. Identifying transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) is an important step for understanding gene regulation. Although sophisticated in modeling TFBSs and their combinatorial patterns, computational methods for TFBS detection and motif finding often make oversimplified homogeneous model assumptions for background sequences. Since nucleotide base composition varies across genomic regions, it is expected to be helpful for motif finding to incorporate the heterogeneity into background modeling. When sequences from multiple species are utilized, variation in evolutionary conservation violates the common assumption of an identical conservation level in multiple alignments. To handle both types of heterogeneity, we propose a generative model in which a segmented Markov chain is used to partition a multiple alignment into regions of homogeneous nucleotide base composition and a hidden Markov model (HMM) is employed to account for different conservation levels. Bayesian inference on the model is developed via Gibbs sampling with dynamic programming recursions. Simulation studies and empirical evidence from biological data sets reveal the dramatic effect of background modeling on motif finding, and demonstrate that the proposed approach is able to achieve substantial improvements over commonly used background models.

  12. Finding simplicity in complexity: modelling post-fire hydrogeomorphic processes and risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Gary; Langhans, Christoph; Lane, Patrick; Nyman, Petter

    2017-04-01

    Post-fire runoff and erosion can shape landscapes, destroy infrastructure, and result in the loss of human life. However even within seemingly similar geographic regions post-fire hydro-geomorphic responses vary from almost no response through to catastrophic flash floods and debris flows. Why is there so much variability, and how can we predict areas at risk? This presentation describes the research journey taken by the post-fire research group at The University of Melbourne to answer this question for the se Australian uplands. Key steps along the way have included identifying the dominant erosion processes (and their forcings), and the key system properties controlling the rates of these dominant processes. The high degree of complexity in the interactions between the forcings, the system properties, and the erosion processes, necessitated the development of a simplified conceptual representation of post-fire hydrogeomorphic system that was conducive to modelling and simulation. Spatially mappable metrics (and proxies) for key system forcings and properties were then required to parameterize and drive the model. Each step in this journey has depended on new research, as well as ongoing feedback from land and water management agencies tasked with implementing these risk models and interpreting the results. These models are now imbedded within agencies and used for strategic risk assessments, for tactical response during fires, and for post-fire remediation and risk planning. Reflecting on the successes and failures along the way provides for some more general insights into the process of developing research-based models for operational use by land and water management agencies.

  13. A findings model for an ambulatory pediatric record: essential data, relational modeling, and vocabulary considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiffman, R N

    1995-01-01

    Effective, computer-based representation of clinical observations requires balancing the advantages of structured, coded descriptions against those of free text narrative. An essential data set of relevant signs and symptoms was defined by a multidisciplinary group based on management goals published in a national guideline to meet the needs of clinicians in the Spina Bifida Clinic at Yale-New Haven Hospital. These core data elements are stored in a structured format. Additional material is stored as free text. A relational schema was devised that permits storage of both coded findings and narrative. Symptoms and signs are represented as subtypes of a supertype patient finding entity; they inherit common attributes and specialize others. The IVORY vocabulary was supplemented and modified to provide terms that describe relevant clinical observations. For this application, fields were added that enable predictive data entry of findings based on patient age and gender.

  14. Modelling management process of key drivers for economic sustainability in the modern conditions of economic development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pishchulina E.S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The text is about issues concerning the management of driver for manufacturing enterprise economic sustainability and manufacturing enterprise sustainability assessment as the key aspect of the management of enterprise economic sustainability. The given issues become topical as new requirements for the methods of manufacturing enterprise management in the modern conditions of market economy occur. An economic sustainability model that is considered in the article is an integration of enterprise economic growth, economic balance of external and internal environment and economic sustainability. The method of assessment of economic sustainability of a manufacturing enterprise proposed in the study allows to reveal some weaknesses in the enterprise performance, and untapped reserves, which can be further used to improve the economic sustainability and efficiency of the enterprise. The management of manufacturing enterprise economic sustainability is one of the most important factors of business functioning and development in modern market economy. The relevance of this trend is increasing in accordance with the objective requirements of the growing volumes of production and sale, the increasing complexity of economic relations, changing external environment of an enterprise.

  15. Precision tests of the Standard Model using key observables of $CP$ violation and rare decays

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00346274; Albrecht, Johannes

    In this thesis advanced statistical methods are used for precision studies in the flavour sector of the Standard Model of particle physics. The necessary tools are developed and applied to two key measurements of the LHCb experiment: the determination of the CKM angle $\\gamma$ and the search for rare $B^{0} _{s} \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ and $B^0 \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ decays. The CKM angle $\\gamma$ is, for the first time, measured from $B^0 _s \\to D^\\mp _s K^\\pm$ decays using a dataset corresponding to $1\\,\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ of $pp$ interactions at a centre-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s} = 7\\mathrm{TeV}$. The result of $\\gamma = (115^{+27}_{-43})^{\\circ}$ is then combined with a set of $\\gamma$ measurements in ${B} \\to Dh$ decays resulting in a precision on $\\gamma$ of $<8^{\\circ}$. This result improves the legacy results from the $B$-factories by more than a factor of two. The rare decays $B^{0} _{s} \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ and $B^0 \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ are analysed on a dataset corresponding to $3\\,\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ of $pp$ interac...

  16. Imbalanced Insulin Actions in Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes: Key Mouse Models of Insulin Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Tetsuya; Kubota, Naoto; Kadowaki, Takashi

    2017-04-04

    Since the discovery of the tyrosine kinase activity of the insulin receptor (IR), researchers have been engaged in intensive efforts to resolve physiological functions of IR and its major downstream targets, insulin receptor substrate 1 (Irs1) and Irs2. Studies conducted using systemic and tissue-specific gene-knockout mice of IR, Irs1, and Irs2 have revealed the physiological roles of these molecules in each tissue and interactions among multiple tissues. In obesity and type 2 diabetes, selective downregulation of Irs2 and its downstream actions to cause reduced insulin actions was associated with increased insulin actions through Irs1 in variety tissues. Thus, we propose the novel concept of "organ- and pathway-specific imbalanced insulin action" in obesity and type 2 diabetes, which includes and extends "selective insulin resistance." This Review focuses on recent progress in understanding insulin signaling and insulin resistance using key mouse models for elucidating pathophysiology of human obesity and type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A prototype framework for models of socio-hydrology: identification of key feedback loops and parameterisation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshafei, Y.; Sivapalan, M.; Tonts, M.; Hipsey, M. R.

    2014-06-01

    It is increasingly acknowledged that, in order to sustainably manage global freshwater resources, it is critical that we better understand the nature of human-hydrology interactions at the broader catchment system scale. Yet to date, a generic conceptual framework for building models of catchment systems that include adequate representation of socioeconomic systems - and the dynamic feedbacks between human and natural systems - has remained elusive. In an attempt to work towards such a model, this paper outlines a generic framework for models of socio-hydrology applicable to agricultural catchments, made up of six key components that combine to form the coupled system dynamics: namely, catchment hydrology, population, economics, environment, socioeconomic sensitivity and collective response. The conceptual framework posits two novel constructs: (i) a composite socioeconomic driving variable, termed the Community Sensitivity state variable, which seeks to capture the perceived level of threat to a community's quality of life, and acts as a key link tying together one of the fundamental feedback loops of the coupled system, and (ii) a Behavioural Response variable as the observable feedback mechanism, which reflects land and water management decisions relevant to the hydrological context. The framework makes a further contribution through the introduction of three macro-scale parameters that enable it to normalise for differences in climate, socioeconomic and political gradients across study sites. In this way, the framework provides for both macro-scale contextual parameters, which allow for comparative studies to be undertaken, and catchment-specific conditions, by way of tailored "closure relationships", in order to ensure that site-specific and application-specific contexts of socio-hydrologic problems can be accommodated. To demonstrate how such a framework would be applied, two socio-hydrological case studies, taken from the Australian experience, are presented

  18. Modeling and analysis of PM2.5 generation for key factors identification in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Dehong; Jiang, Binfan; Xie, Yulei

    2016-06-01

    Recently, the PM2.5 pollution in China has occurred frequently and caused widely concern. In order to identify the key factors for PM2.5 generation, the formation characteristics of PM2.5 would be revealed. A property of electric neutrality of PM2.5 was proposed under the least-energy principle and verified through electricity-charge calculation in this paper. It indicated that PM2.5 is formed by the effect of electromagnetic force, including the effect of ionic bond, hydrogen bond and polarization. According to the analysis of interactive forces among different chemical components, a simulation model is developed for describing the random process of PM2.5 generation. In addition, an orthogonal test with two levels and four factors has been designed and carried out through the proposed model. From the text analysis, PM2.5 would be looser and suspend longer in atmosphere due to Organic Compound (OC) existing (OC can reduce about 67% of PM2.5 density). Considering that NH4+ is the only cation in the main chemical components of PM2.5, it would be vital for anions (such as SO42- and NO3-) to aggregate together for facilitating PM2.5 growing. Therefore, in order to relieve PM2.5 pollution, control strategies for OC and NH4+ would be enhanced by government through improving the quality of oils and solvent products, decreasing the amount of nitrogenous fertilizer utilization, or changing the fertilizing environment from dry condition to wet condition.

  19. Model of the Students' Key Competences Development through Interactive Whiteboard in the Subject of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brecka, Peter; Valentová, Monika

    2017-01-01

    The basis of the submitted study are the continuously rising demands to alter the curricula with the aim to develop students' key competences in order to increase their professional versatility. The lack of scientific research and discussions show that little investigation has been done on the issue of development of key competences. Therefore,…

  20. A Study of the Key Elements in the Jerome Model, the Horace Model and the Schleiermacher Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    都潇潇

    2016-01-01

    There are Two very popular and important translation models, namely the Jerome Model, the Horace Model , which can be thought to be the forerunner of the translation theory nowadays. They share one common concept—faithfulness. the Two models are discussed one by one to aim at pointing out the main differences and similarities, from which we can learn more and do better translation in our studies and works. Finally, the paper draws a conclusion that no single translation model is really better than another because the criteria of translation are dynamic rather than static.

  1. Underwater Noise Modeling and Direction-Finding Based on Heteroscedastic Time Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamarei Mahmoud

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new method for practical non-Gaussian and nonstationary underwater noise modeling. This model is very useful for passive sonar in shallow waters. In this application, measurement of additive noise in natural environment and exhibits shows that noise can sometimes be significantly non-Gaussian and a time-varying feature especially in the variance. Therefore, signal processing algorithms such as direction-finding that is optimized for Gaussian noise may degrade significantly in this environment. Generalized autoregressive conditional heteroscedasticity (GARCH models are suitable for heavy tailed PDFs and time-varying variances of stochastic process. We use a more realistic GARCH-based noise model in the maximum-likelihood approach for the estimation of direction-of-arrivals (DOAs of impinging sources onto a linear array, and demonstrate using measured noise that this approach is feasible for the additive noise and direction finding in an underwater environment.

  2. Understanding of a Key Aspect of Situation Awareness: A Research and Development Agenda to Refine the Model of Spatial Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-10

    USAARL Report No. 2017-14 Understanding of a Key Aspect of Situation Awareness: A Research and Development Agenda to Refine the Model of Spatial...Understanding of a Key Aspect of Situation Awareness: a Research and Development Agenda to Refine the Model of Spatial Orientation N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Lawson...supporting the initial model development for military applications by authors Newman, Lawson, and Rupert.  Small Business Innovative Research program

  3. Exploring a model for finding meaning in the changing world of work (Part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H. Burger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: This article explores the role that meaning, as logotherapy conceptualises it, can play to facilitate organisational changes.Research purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore further a model an earlier paper proposed for using employees’ experiences of meaning in work contexts to facilitate changes.Motivation for the study: The researchers could not find a comprehensive model in the literature for addressing employees’ experiences of meaning in, or at, work during organisational changes. A previous paper proposed such a model, but it addressed only one component fully. This article seeks to explore this model further to address this apparent gap in the literature.Research design, approach and method: The researchers used a literature review to conduct the study. The components of the model directed this review in order to find meaning at work.Main findings: The actions of organisations, which aim to create positive organisational contexts (through practices for improving meaning at work and transcendence and to frame changes using ‘Logo-OD’, can improve employees’ experiences of meaning during organisational changes.Practical/managerial implications: Understanding the relationship between meaning and organisational change, and applying the model this article presents, can contribute to the overall success of change initiatives.Contribution/value-add: This study’s primary contribution stems from the novel framework it presents for organisations to use the knowledge about how employees search for meaning to facilitate changes.

  4. From conceptual model to remediation: bioavailability, a key to clean up heavy metal contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruzzelli, Gianniantonio; Pedron, Francesca; Pezzarossa, Beatrice

    2013-04-01

    that aim to increase the bioavailability of pollutants are used in technologies which remove or destroy the solubilized contaminants. These procedures can increase mass transfer from the absorbed phase by means of sieving in order to decrease the diffusion processes (soil washing), by increasing the temperature (low temperature thermal desorption), or through the addition of chemical additives, such as chelating agents (Phytoextraction Elektrokinetic remediation). Concluding remarks Bioavailability should be a key component of the exposure evaluation in order to develop the conceptual model and to select the technology, in particular when: • only some chemical forms of contaminants are a source of risk for the site; • default assumptions regarding bioavailability are not suitable because of the site's specific characteristics; • the final destination of the site will not be modified at least in the near future.

  5. Finding the right balance between groundwater model complexity and experimental effort via Bayesian model selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöniger, Anneli; Illman, Walter A.; Wöhling, Thomas; Nowak, Wolfgang

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater modelers face the challenge of how to assign representative parameter values to the studied aquifer. Several approaches are available to parameterize spatial heterogeneity in aquifer parameters. They differ in their conceptualization and complexity, ranging from homogeneous models to heterogeneous random fields. While it is common practice to invest more effort into data collection for models with a finer resolution of heterogeneities, there is a lack of advice which amount of data is required to justify a certain level of model complexity. In this study, we propose to use concepts related to Bayesian model selection to identify this balance. We demonstrate our approach on the characterization of a heterogeneous aquifer via hydraulic tomography in a sandbox experiment (Illman et al., 2010). We consider four increasingly complex parameterizations of hydraulic conductivity: (1) Effective homogeneous medium, (2) geology-based zonation, (3) interpolation by pilot points, and (4) geostatistical random fields. First, we investigate the shift in justified complexity with increasing amount of available data by constructing a model confusion matrix. This matrix indicates the maximum level of complexity that can be justified given a specific experimental setup. Second, we determine which parameterization is most adequate given the observed drawdown data. Third, we test how the different parameterizations perform in a validation setup. The results of our test case indicate that aquifer characterization via hydraulic tomography does not necessarily require (or justify) a geostatistical description. Instead, a zonation-based model might be a more robust choice, but only if the zonation is geologically adequate.

  6. Finding cis-regulatory modules in Drosophila using phylogenetic hidden Markov models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Wendy S W; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2007-01-01

    of the increasing availability of comparative genomic data. RESULTS: We develop a method for finding regulatory modules in Eukaryotic species using phylogenetic data. Using computer simulations and analysis of real data, we show that the use of phylogenetic hidden Markov model can lead to an increase in accuracy...

  7. A mouse model of harlequin ichthyosis delineates a key role for Abca12 in lipid homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Smyth

    Full Text Available Harlequin Ichthyosis (HI is a severe and often lethal hyperkeratotic skin disease caused by mutations in the ABCA12 transport protein. In keratinocytes, ABCA12 is thought to regulate the transfer of lipids into small intracellular trafficking vesicles known as lamellar bodies. However, the nature and scope of this regulation remains unclear. As part of an original recessive mouse ENU mutagenesis screen, we have identified and characterised an animal model of HI and showed that it displays many of the hallmarks of the disease including hyperkeratosis, loss of barrier function, and defects in lipid homeostasis. We have used this model to follow disease progression in utero and present evidence that loss of Abca12 function leads to premature differentiation of basal keratinocytes. A comprehensive analysis of lipid levels in mutant epidermis demonstrated profound defects in lipid homeostasis, illustrating for the first time the extent to which Abca12 plays a pivotal role in maintaining lipid balance in the skin. To further investigate the scope of Abca12's activity, we have utilised cells from the mutant mouse to ascribe direct transport functions to the protein and, in doing so, we demonstrate activities independent of its role in lamellar body function. These cells have severely impaired lipid efflux leading to intracellular accumulation of neutral lipids. Furthermore, we identify Abca12 as a mediator of Abca1-regulated cellular cholesterol efflux, a finding that may have significant implications for other diseases of lipid metabolism and homeostasis, including atherosclerosis.

  8. A mouse model of harlequin ichthyosis delineates a key role for Abca12 in lipid homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Smyth

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Harlequin Ichthyosis (HI is a severe and often lethal hyperkeratotic skin disease caused by mutations in the ABCA12 transport protein. In keratinocytes, ABCA12 is thought to regulate the transfer of lipids into small intracellular trafficking vesicles known as lamellar bodies. However, the nature and scope of this regulation remains unclear. As part of an original recessive mouse ENU mutagenesis screen, we have identified and characterised an animal model of HI and showed that it displays many of the hallmarks of the disease including hyperkeratosis, loss of barrier function, and defects in lipid homeostasis. We have used this model to follow disease progression in utero and present evidence that loss of Abca12 function leads to premature differentiation of basal keratinocytes. A comprehensive analysis of lipid levels in mutant epidermis demonstrated profound defects in lipid homeostasis, illustrating for the first time the extent to which Abca12 plays a pivotal role in maintaining lipid balance in the skin. To further investigate the scope of Abca12's activity, we have utilised cells from the mutant mouse to ascribe direct transport functions to the protein and, in doing so, we demonstrate activities independent of its role in lamellar body function. These cells have severely impaired lipid efflux leading to intracellular accumulation of neutral lipids. Furthermore, we identify Abca12 as a mediator of Abca1-regulated cellular cholesterol efflux, a finding that may have significant implications for other diseases of lipid metabolism and homeostasis, including atherosclerosis.

  9. A systematic review of cost-effectiveness modeling of pharmaceutical therapies in neuropathic pain: variation in practice, key challenges, and recommendations for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critchlow, Simone; Hirst, Matthew; Akehurst, Ron; Phillips, Ceri; Philips, Zoe; Sullivan, Will; Dunlop, Will C N

    2017-02-01

    Complexities in the neuropathic-pain care pathway make the condition difficult to manage and difficult to capture in cost-effectiveness models. The aim of this study is to understand, through a systematic review of previous cost-effectiveness studies, some of the key strengths and limitations in data and modeling practices in neuropathic pain. Thus, the aim is to guide future research and practice to improve resource allocation decisions and encourage continued investment to find novel and effective treatments for patients with neuropathic pain. The search strategy was designed to identify peer-reviewed cost-effectiveness evaluations of non-surgical, pharmaceutical therapies for neuropathic pain published since January 2000, accessing five key databases. All identified publications were reviewed and screened according to pre-defined eligibility criteria. Data extraction was designed to reflect key data challenges and approaches to modeling in neuropathic pain and based on published guidelines. The search strategy identified 20 cost-effectiveness analyses meeting the inclusion criteria, of which 14 had original model structures. Cost-effectiveness modeling in neuropathic pain is established and increasing across multiple jurisdictions; however, amongst these studies, there is substantial variation in modeling approach, and there are common limitations. Capturing the effect of treatments upon health outcomes, particularly health-related quality-of-life, is challenging, and the health effects of multiple lines of ineffective treatment, common for patients with neuropathic pain, have not been consistently or robustly modeled. To improve future economic modeling in neuropathic pain, further research is suggested into the effect of multiple lines of treatment and treatment failure upon patient outcomes and subsequent treatment effectiveness; the impact of treatment-emergent adverse events upon patient outcomes; and consistent and appropriate pain measures to inform

  10. Solid images for geostructural mapping and key block modeling of rock discontinuities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assali, Pierre; Grussenmeyer, Pierre; Villemin, Thierry; Pollet, Nicolas; Viguier, Flavien

    2016-04-01

    Rock mass characterization is obviously a key element in rock fall hazard analysis. Managing risk and determining the most adapted reinforcement method require a proper understanding of the considered rock mass. Description of discontinuity sets is therefore a crucial first step in the reinforcement work design process. The on-field survey is then followed by a structural modeling in order to extrapolate the data collected at the rock surface to the inner part of the massif. Traditional compass survey and manual observations can be undoubtedly surpassed by dense 3D data such as LiDAR or photogrammetric point clouds. However, although the acquisition phase is quite fast and highly automated, managing, handling and exploiting such great amount of collected data is an arduous task and especially for non specialist users. In this study, we propose a combined approached using both 3D point clouds (from LiDAR or image matching) and 2D digital images, gathered into the concept of ''solid image''. This product is the connection between the advantages of classical true colors 2D digital images, accessibility and interpretability, and the particular strengths of dense 3D point clouds, i.e. geometrical completeness and accuracy. The solid image can be considered as the information support for carrying-out a digital survey at the surface of the outcrop without being affected by traditional deficiencies (lack of data and sampling difficulties due to inaccessible areas, safety risk in steep sectors, etc.). Computational tools presented in this paper have been implemented into one standalone software through a graphical user interface helping operators with the completion of a digital geostructural survey and analysis. 3D coordinates extraction, 3D distances and area measurement, planar best-fit for discontinuity orientation, directional roughness profiles, block size estimation, and other tools have been experimented on a calcareous quarry in the French Alps.

  11. Finding the effective parameter perturbations in atmospheric models: the LORENZ63 model as case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moolenaar, H.E.; Selten, F.M.

    2004-01-01

    Climate models contain numerous parameters for which the numeric values are uncertain. In the context of climate simulation and prediction, a relevant question is what range of climate outcomes is possible given the range of parameter uncertainties. Which parameter perturbation changes the climate i

  12. Finding low-energy conformations of lattice protein models by quantum annealing

    CERN Document Server

    Perdomo-Ortiz, Alejandro; Drew-Brook, Marshall; Rose, Geordie; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2012-01-01

    Lattice protein folding models are a cornerstone of computational biophysics. Although these models are a coarse grained representation, they provide useful insight into the energy landscape of natural proteins. Finding low-energy three-dimensional structures is an intractable problem even in the simplest model, the Hydrophobic-Polar (HP) model. Exhaustive search of all possible global minima is limited to sequences in the tens of amino acids. Description of protein-like properties are more accurately described by generalized models, such as the one proposed by Miyazawa and Jernigan (MJ), which explicitly take into account the unique interactions among all 20 amino acids. There is theoretical and experimental evidence of the advantage of solving classical optimization problems using quantum annealing over its classical analogue (simulated annealing). In this report, we present a benchmark implementation of quantum annealing for a biophysical problem (six different experiments up to 81 superconducting quantum ...

  13. Probing molecular mechanisms of the Hsp90 chaperone: biophysical modeling identifies key regulators of functional dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshuman Dixit

    Full Text Available Deciphering functional mechanisms of the Hsp90 chaperone machinery is an important objective in cancer biology aiming to facilitate discovery of targeted anti-cancer therapies. Despite significant advances in understanding structure and function of molecular chaperones, organizing molecular principles that control the relationship between conformational diversity and functional mechanisms of the Hsp90 activity lack a sufficient quantitative characterization. We combined molecular dynamics simulations, principal component analysis, the energy landscape model and structure-functional analysis of Hsp90 regulatory interactions to systematically investigate functional dynamics of the molecular chaperone. This approach has identified a network of conserved regions common to the Hsp90 chaperones that could play a universal role in coordinating functional dynamics, principal collective motions and allosteric signaling of Hsp90. We have found that these functional motifs may be utilized by the molecular chaperone machinery to act collectively as central regulators of Hsp90 dynamics and activity, including the inter-domain communications, control of ATP hydrolysis, and protein client binding. These findings have provided support to a long-standing assertion that allosteric regulation and catalysis may have emerged via common evolutionary routes. The interaction networks regulating functional motions of Hsp90 may be determined by the inherent structural architecture of the molecular chaperone. At the same time, the thermodynamics-based "conformational selection" of functional states is likely to be activated based on the nature of the binding partner. This mechanistic model of Hsp90 dynamics and function is consistent with the notion that allosteric networks orchestrating cooperative protein motions can be formed by evolutionary conserved and sparsely connected residue clusters. Hence, allosteric signaling through a small network of distantly connected

  14. The genetics of auricular development and malformation: new findings in model systems driving future directions for microtia research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Timothy C; Camci, Esra D; Vora, Siddharth; Luquetti, Daniela V; Turner, Eric E

    2014-08-01

    Microtia is a term used to describe a wide array of phenotypic presentations of the outer ear. Although the majority of the cases are isolated in nature, much of our understanding of the causes of microtia has been driven by the identification of genes underlying syndromic forms where the anomaly co-presents with various other craniofacial and extra-craniofacial structural defects. In this review we discuss recent findings in mice deficient in Hoxa2, a key regulator of branchial arch patterning, which has necessitated a revision to the canonical model of pinna morphogenesis. The revised model will likely impact current classification schemes for microtia and, as we argue in this review, the interpretation of the developmental basis for various auricular malformations. In addition, we highlight recent studies in other mammalian species that are providing the first clues as to possible causes of at least some isolated anomalies and thus should now accelerate the search for the more elusive genetic contributions to the many isolated and non-syndromic cases of microtia. These findings, together with the application of new genome-level sequencing technologies and more thorough quantitative assessment of available mutant mouse resources, promise an exciting future for genetic studies in microtia.

  15. Modeling and simulation of evacuation behavior using fuzzy logic in a goal finding application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sharad; Ogunlana, Kola; Sree, Swetha

    2016-05-01

    Modeling and simulation has been widely used as a training and educational tool for depicting different evacuation strategies and damage control decisions during evacuation. However, there are few simulation environments that can include human behavior with low to high levels of fidelity. It is well known that crowd stampede induced by panic leads to fatalities as people are crushed or trampled. Our proposed goal finding application can be used to model situations that are difficult to test in real-life due to safety considerations. It is able to include agent characteristics and behaviors. Findings of this model are very encouraging as agents are able to assume various roles to utilize fuzzy logic on the way to reaching their goals. Fuzzy logic is used to model stress, panic and the uncertainty of emotions. The fuzzy rules link these parts together while feeding into behavioral rules. The contributions of this paper lies in our approach of utilizing fuzzy logic to show learning and adaptive behavior of agents in a goal finding application. The proposed application will aid in running multiple evacuation drills for what-if scenarios by incorporating human behavioral characteristics that can scale from a room to building. Our results show that the inclusion of fuzzy attributes made the evacuation time of the agents closer to the real time drills.

  16. Multiscale models and stochastic simulation methods for computing rare but key binding events in cell biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrier, C. [Applied Mathematics and Computational Biology, IBENS, Ecole Normale Supérieure, 46 rue d' Ulm, 75005 Paris (France); Holcman, D., E-mail: david.holcman@ens.fr [Applied Mathematics and Computational Biology, IBENS, Ecole Normale Supérieure, 46 rue d' Ulm, 75005 Paris (France); Mathematical Institute, Oxford OX2 6GG, Newton Institute (United Kingdom)

    2017-07-01

    The main difficulty in simulating diffusion processes at a molecular level in cell microdomains is due to the multiple scales involving nano- to micrometers. Few to many particles have to be simulated and simultaneously tracked while there are exploring a large portion of the space for binding small targets, such as buffers or active sites. Bridging the small and large spatial scales is achieved by rare events representing Brownian particles finding small targets and characterized by long-time distribution. These rare events are the bottleneck of numerical simulations. A naive stochastic simulation requires running many Brownian particles together, which is computationally greedy and inefficient. Solving the associated partial differential equations is also difficult due to the time dependent boundary conditions, narrow passages and mixed boundary conditions at small windows. We present here two reduced modeling approaches for a fast computation of diffusing fluxes in microdomains. The first approach is based on a Markov mass-action law equations coupled to a Markov chain. The second is a Gillespie's method based on the narrow escape theory for coarse-graining the geometry of the domain into Poissonian rates. The main application concerns diffusion in cellular biology, where we compute as an example the distribution of arrival times of calcium ions to small hidden targets to trigger vesicular release.

  17. Multiscale models and stochastic simulation methods for computing rare but key binding events in cell biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrier, C.; Holcman, D.

    2017-07-01

    The main difficulty in simulating diffusion processes at a molecular level in cell microdomains is due to the multiple scales involving nano- to micrometers. Few to many particles have to be simulated and simultaneously tracked while there are exploring a large portion of the space for binding small targets, such as buffers or active sites. Bridging the small and large spatial scales is achieved by rare events representing Brownian particles finding small targets and characterized by long-time distribution. These rare events are the bottleneck of numerical simulations. A naive stochastic simulation requires running many Brownian particles together, which is computationally greedy and inefficient. Solving the associated partial differential equations is also difficult due to the time dependent boundary conditions, narrow passages and mixed boundary conditions at small windows. We present here two reduced modeling approaches for a fast computation of diffusing fluxes in microdomains. The first approach is based on a Markov mass-action law equations coupled to a Markov chain. The second is a Gillespie's method based on the narrow escape theory for coarse-graining the geometry of the domain into Poissonian rates. The main application concerns diffusion in cellular biology, where we compute as an example the distribution of arrival times of calcium ions to small hidden targets to trigger vesicular release.

  18. Analyzing key constraints to biogas production from crop residues and manure in the EU—A spatially explicit model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, U. Martin

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a spatially explicit method for making regional estimates of the potential for biogas production from crop residues and manure, accounting for key technical, biochemical, environmental and economic constraints. Methods for making such estimates are important as biofuels from agricultural residues are receiving increasing policy support from the EU and major biogas producers, such as Germany and Italy, in response to concerns over unintended negative environmental and social impacts of conventional biofuels. This analysis comprises a spatially explicit estimate of crop residue and manure production for the EU at 250 m resolution, and a biogas production model accounting for local constraints such as the sustainable removal of residues, transportation of substrates, and the substrates’ biochemical suitability for anaerobic digestion. In our base scenario, the EU biogas production potential from crop residues and manure is about 0.7 EJ/year, nearly double the current EU production of biogas from agricultural substrates, most of which does not come from residues or manure. An extensive sensitivity analysis of the model shows that the potential could easily be 50% higher or lower, depending on the stringency of economic, technical and biochemical constraints. We find that the potential is particularly sensitive to constraints on the substrate mixtures’ carbon-to-nitrogen ratio and dry matter concentration. Hence, the potential to produce biogas from crop residues and manure in the EU depends to large extent on the possibility to overcome the challenges associated with these substrates, either by complementing them with suitable co-substrates (e.g. household waste and energy crops), or through further development of biogas technology (e.g. pretreatment of substrates and recirculation of effluent). PMID:28141827

  19. Analyzing key constraints to biogas production from crop residues and manure in the EU-A spatially explicit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einarsson, Rasmus; Persson, U Martin

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a spatially explicit method for making regional estimates of the potential for biogas production from crop residues and manure, accounting for key technical, biochemical, environmental and economic constraints. Methods for making such estimates are important as biofuels from agricultural residues are receiving increasing policy support from the EU and major biogas producers, such as Germany and Italy, in response to concerns over unintended negative environmental and social impacts of conventional biofuels. This analysis comprises a spatially explicit estimate of crop residue and manure production for the EU at 250 m resolution, and a biogas production model accounting for local constraints such as the sustainable removal of residues, transportation of substrates, and the substrates' biochemical suitability for anaerobic digestion. In our base scenario, the EU biogas production potential from crop residues and manure is about 0.7 EJ/year, nearly double the current EU production of biogas from agricultural substrates, most of which does not come from residues or manure. An extensive sensitivity analysis of the model shows that the potential could easily be 50% higher or lower, depending on the stringency of economic, technical and biochemical constraints. We find that the potential is particularly sensitive to constraints on the substrate mixtures' carbon-to-nitrogen ratio and dry matter concentration. Hence, the potential to produce biogas from crop residues and manure in the EU depends to large extent on the possibility to overcome the challenges associated with these substrates, either by complementing them with suitable co-substrates (e.g. household waste and energy crops), or through further development of biogas technology (e.g. pretreatment of substrates and recirculation of effluent).

  20. Self-Organized Public-Key Management for Mobile Ad Hoc Networks Based on a Bidirectional Trust Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In traditional networks ,the authentication is performed by certificate authoritys(CA),which can't be built in distributed mobile Ad Hoc Networks however. In this paper, we propose a fully self-organized public key management based on bidirectional trust model without any centralized authority that allows users to generate their public-private key pairs, to issue certificates, and the trust relation spreads rationally according to the truly human relations. In contrast with the traditional self-organized public-key management, the average certificates paths get more short,the authentication passing rate gets more high and the most important is that the bidirectional trust based model satisfys the trust requirement of hosts better.

  1. Alternative to Ritt's pseudodivision for finding the input-output equations of multi-output models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshkat, Nicolette; Anderson, Chris; DiStefano, Joseph J

    2012-09-01

    Differential algebra approaches to structural identifiability analysis of a dynamic system model in many instances heavily depend upon Ritt's pseudodivision at an early step in analysis. The pseudodivision algorithm is used to find the characteristic set, of which a subset, the input-output equations, is used for identifiability analysis. A simpler algorithm is proposed for this step, using Gröbner Bases, along with a proof of the method that includes a reduced upper bound on derivative requirements. Efficacy of the new algorithm is illustrated with several biosystem model examples.

  2. Modeling halotropism : a key role for root tip architecture and reflux loop remodeling in redistributing auxin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Thea; Korver, Ruud A; Testerink, Christa; ten Tusscher, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    A key characteristic of plant development is its plasticity in response to various and dynamically changing environmental conditions. Tropisms contribute to this flexibility by allowing plant organs to grow from or towards environmental cues. Halotropism is a recently described tropism in which plan

  3. Modeling Key Drivers of E-Learning Satisfaction among Student Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Timothy; Wong, Su Luan

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the key drivers of student teachers' e-learning satisfaction. Three hundred and eighty-seven participants completed a survey questionnaire measuring their self-reported responses to six constructs (tutor quality, perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, course delivery, facilitating conditions, and course satisfaction).…

  4. Turnaround Arts Initiative: Summary of Key Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoelinga, Sara Ray; Silk, Yael; Reddy, Prateek; Rahman, Nadiv

    2015-01-01

    Turnaround Arts is a public-private partnership that aims to test the hypothesis that strategically implementing high-quality and integrated arts education programming in high-poverty, chronically underperforming schools adds significant value to school-wide reform. In 2014, the Turnaround Arts initiative completed an evaluation report covering…

  5. A study on the application of topic models to motif finding algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basha Gutierrez, Josep; Nakai, Kenta

    2016-12-22

    Topic models are statistical algorithms which try to discover the structure of a set of documents according to the abstract topics contained in them. Here we try to apply this approach to the discovery of the structure of the transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) contained in a set of biological sequences, which is a fundamental problem in molecular biology research for the understanding of transcriptional regulation. Here we present two methods that make use of topic models for motif finding. First, we developed an algorithm in which first a set of biological sequences are treated as text documents, and the k-mers contained in them as words, to then build a correlated topic model (CTM) and iteratively reduce its perplexity. We also used the perplexity measurement of CTMs to improve our previous algorithm based on a genetic algorithm and several statistical coefficients. The algorithms were tested with 56 data sets from four different species and compared to 14 other methods by the use of several coefficients both at nucleotide and site level. The results of our first approach showed a performance comparable to the other methods studied, especially at site level and in sensitivity scores, in which it scored better than any of the 14 existing tools. In the case of our previous algorithm, the new approach with the addition of the perplexity measurement clearly outperformed all of the other methods in sensitivity, both at nucleotide and site level, and in overall performance at site level. The statistics obtained show that the performance of a motif finding method based on the use of a CTM is satisfying enough to conclude that the application of topic models is a valid method for developing motif finding algorithms. Moreover, the addition of topic models to a previously developed method dramatically increased its performance, suggesting that this combined algorithm can be a useful tool to successfully predict motifs in different kinds of sets of DNA sequences.

  6. On finding galaxy clusters with PLANCK and the spherical collapse model in different dark energy cosmologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waizmann, Jean-Claude

    2010-11-24

    One of the main objectives of the PLANCK mission is to perform a full-sky cluster survey based on the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect, which leads to the question of how such a survey would be affected by cosmological models with a different history of structure formation than LCDM. To answer this question, I developed a fast semi-analytic approach for simulating full-sky maps of the Compton-y parameter, ready to be fed into a realistic simulation pipeline. I also implemented a filter and detection pipeline based on spherical multi-frequency matched filters, that was used to study the expected SZ cluster sample of PLANCK. It turned out that realistic samples will comprise 1000 clusters at low rate of contamination, significantly lower than originally anticipated. Driven by wrong estimates of the impact of early dark energy models on structure formation, we studied the spherical collapse model in dark energy model, finding that models with varying equation-of-state have a negligible impact on the structure formation. Yet, the different expansion history for the different models can be detected via volume effects, when counting objects in a known volume. Furthermore, it turned out that the different expansion history strongly affects the angular SZ power spectra for the various models, making them an interesting tool to distinguish and constrain alternative cosmologies. (orig.)

  7. Finding the right fit: A comparison of process assumptions underlying popular drift-diffusion models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, Nathaniel J S; Jekel, Marc; Dickert, Stephan; Glöckner, Andreas

    2016-12-01

    Recent research makes increasing use of eye-tracking methodologies to generate and test process models. Overall, such research suggests that attention, generally indexed by fixations (gaze duration), plays a critical role in the construction of preference, although the methods used to support this supposition differ substantially. In 2 studies we empirically test prototypical versions of prominent processing assumptions against 1 another and several base models. We find that general evidence accumulation processes provide a good fit to the data. An accumulation process that assumes leakage and temporal variability in evidence weighting (i.e., a primacy effect) fits the aggregate data, both in terms of choices and decision times, and does so across varying types of choices (e.g., charitable giving and hedonic consumption) and numbers of options well. However, when comparing models on the level of the individual, for a majority of participants simpler models capture choice data better. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record

  8. A Detailed Data-Driven Network Model of Prefrontal Cortex Reproduces Key Features of In Vivo Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hass, Joachim; Hertäg, Loreen; Durstewitz, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    The prefrontal cortex is centrally involved in a wide range of cognitive functions and their impairment in psychiatric disorders. Yet, the computational principles that govern the dynamics of prefrontal neural networks, and link their physiological, biochemical and anatomical properties to cognitive functions, are not well understood. Computational models can help to bridge the gap between these different levels of description, provided they are sufficiently constrained by experimental data and capable of predicting key properties of the intact cortex. Here, we present a detailed network model of the prefrontal cortex, based on a simple computationally efficient single neuron model (simpAdEx), with all parameters derived from in vitro electrophysiological and anatomical data. Without additional tuning, this model could be shown to quantitatively reproduce a wide range of measures from in vivo electrophysiological recordings, to a degree where simulated and experimentally observed activities were statistically indistinguishable. These measures include spike train statistics, membrane potential fluctuations, local field potentials, and the transmission of transient stimulus information across layers. We further demonstrate that model predictions are robust against moderate changes in key parameters, and that synaptic heterogeneity is a crucial ingredient to the quantitative reproduction of in vivo-like electrophysiological behavior. Thus, we have produced a physiologically highly valid, in a quantitative sense, yet computationally efficient PFC network model, which helped to identify key properties underlying spike time dynamics as observed in vivo, and can be harvested for in-depth investigation of the links between physiology and cognition.

  9. Analysis regarding the transport network models. Case study on finding the optimal transport route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stîngă, V.-G.

    2017-08-01

    Transport networks are studied most of the time from a graph theory perspective, mostly studied in a static way, in order to emphasize their characteristics like: topology, morphology, costs, traffic flows etc. There are many methods used to describe these characteristics at local and global level. Usually when analysing the transport network models, the aim is to achieve minimum capacity transit or minimum cost of operating or investment. Throughout this paper we will get an insight into the many models of the transport network that were presented over the years and we will try to make a short analysis regarding the most important ones. We will make a case study on finding the optimal route by using one of the models presented within this paper.

  10. Finding Bayesian Optimal Designs for Nonlinear Models: A Semidefinite Programming-Based Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Belmiro P M; Wong, Weng Kee

    2015-08-01

    This paper uses semidefinite programming (SDP) to construct Bayesian optimal design for nonlinear regression models. The setup here extends the formulation of the optimal designs problem as an SDP problem from linear to nonlinear models. Gaussian quadrature formulas (GQF) are used to compute the expectation in the Bayesian design criterion, such as D-, A- or E-optimality. As an illustrative example, we demonstrate the approach using the power-logistic model and compare results in the literature. Additionally, we investigate how the optimal design is impacted by different discretising schemes for the design space, different amounts of uncertainty in the parameter values, different choices of GQF and different prior distributions for the vector of model parameters, including normal priors with and without correlated components. Further applications to find Bayesian D-optimal designs with two regressors for a logistic model and a two-variable generalised linear model with a gamma distributed response are discussed, and some limitations of our approach are noted.

  11. Global biogenic volatile organic compound emissions in the ORCHIDEE and MEGAN models and sensitivity to key parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Palmira; Lathière, Juliette; Sindelarova, Katerina; Vuichard, Nicolas; Granier, Claire; Ghattas, Josefine; Cozic, Anne; Hauglustaine, Didier A.

    2016-11-01

    A new version of the biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) emission scheme has been developed in the global vegetation model ORCHIDEE (Organizing Carbon and Hydrology in Dynamic EcosystEm), which includes an extended list of biogenic emitted compounds, updated emission factors (EFs), a dependency on light for almost all compounds and a multi-layer radiation scheme. Over the 2000-2009 period, using this model, we estimate mean global emissions of 465 Tg C yr-1 for isoprene, 107.5 Tg C yr-1 for monoterpenes, 38 Tg C yr-1 for methanol, 25 Tg C yr-1 for acetone and 24 Tg C yr-1 for sesquiterpenes. The model results are compared to state-of-the-art emission budgets, showing that the ORCHIDEE emissions are within the range of published estimates. ORCHIDEE BVOC emissions are compared to the estimates of the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN), which is largely used throughout the biogenic emissions and atmospheric chemistry community. Our results show that global emission budgets of the two models are, in general, in good agreement. ORCHIDEE emissions are 8 % higher for isoprene, 8 % lower for methanol, 17 % higher for acetone, 18 % higher for monoterpenes and 39 % higher for sesquiterpenes, compared to the MEGAN estimates. At the regional scale, the largest differences between ORCHIDEE and MEGAN are highlighted for isoprene in northern temperate regions, where ORCHIDEE emissions are higher by 21 Tg C yr-1, and for monoterpenes, where they are higher by 4.4 and 10.2 Tg C yr-1 in northern and southern tropical regions compared to MEGAN. The geographical differences between the two models are mainly associated with different EF and plant functional type (PFT) distributions, while differences in the seasonal cycle are mostly driven by differences in the leaf area index (LAI). Sensitivity tests are carried out for both models to explore the response to key variables or parameters such as LAI and light-dependent fraction (LDF). The ORCHIDEE and

  12. Application of the Sea-Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM 6) to Cedar Keys NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Sea Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM) report presents a model for projecting the effects of sea-level rise on coastal marshes and related habitats on Cedar...

  13. A study of key features of the RAE atmospheric turbulence model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewell, W. F.; Heffley, R. K.

    1978-01-01

    A complex atmospheric turbulence model for use in aircraft simulation is analyzed in terms of its temporal, spectral, and statistical characteristics. First, a direct comparison was made between cases of the RAE model and the more conventional Dryden turbulence model. Next the control parameters of the RAE model were systematically varied and the effects noted. The RAE model was found to possess a high degree of flexibility in its characteristics, but the individual control parameters are cross-coupled in terms of their effect on various measures of intensity, bandwidth, and probability distribution.

  14. An overview of mice models: a key for understanding subtypes of mania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Mauricio Cuartas Arias

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Animal models have been broadly used in the study of pathophysiology and molecular and neurochemical pathways in neuropsychiatric diseases. Different approaches have used both consanguineous and non-consanguineous mice models to model behavioral patterns associated with the maniac spectrum. However, the disadvantages of validating clinical and experimental protocols have hindered the replication of these studies. In this article, the advantages and disadvantages of using consanguineous lines and non-consanguineous stocks in mice animal models for the study of mania and its subtypes are discussed. Additionally, new experimental alternatives to advance the pathogenesis and pharmacogenetics of mania using animal models are proposed and analyzed.

  15. A Modeling methodology for NoSQL Key-Value databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo ROSSEL

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in the field of non-relational databases. However, far too little attention has been paid to design methodology. Key-value data stores are an important component of a class of non-relational technologies that are grouped under the name of NoSQL databases. The aim of this paper is to propose a design methodology for this type of database that allows overcoming the limitations of the traditional techniques. The proposed methodology leads to a clean design that also allows for better data management and consistency.

  16. Capricious Cables: Understanding the Key Concepts in Transmission Expansion Planning and Its Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donohoo, P.; Milligan, M.

    2014-06-01

    The extra-high-voltage transmission network is the bulk transport network of the electric power system. To understand how the future power system may react to planning decisions today, wide-area transmission models are increasingly used to aid decision makers and stakeholders. The goal of this work is to illuminate these models for a broader audience that may include policy makers or relative newcomers to the field of transmission planning. This paper explains the basic transmission expansion planning model formulation. It highlights six of the major simplifications made in transmission expansion planning models and the resulting need to contextualize model results using knowledge from other models and knowledge not captured in the modeling process.

  17. Kondo decoherence : finding the right spin model for iron impurities in gold and silver.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costi, T. A.; Bergqvist, L.; Weichselbaum, A.; von Delft, J.; Micklitz, T.; Rosch, A.; Mavropoulos, P.; Dederichs, P. H.; Mallet, F.; Saminadayar, L.; Bauerle, C. (Materials Science Division); (Forschungszentrum Julich); (Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Munchen); (Univ. of Cologne); (CNRS); (Univ. Joseph Fourier); (Inst. Univ. de France)

    2009-02-01

    We exploit the decoherence of electrons due to magnetic impurities, studied via weak localization, to resolve a long-standing question concerning the classic Kondo systems of Fe impurities in the noble metals gold and silver: which Kondo-type model yields a realistic description of the relevant multiple bands, spin, and orbital degrees of freedom? Previous studies suggest a fully screened spin S Kondo model, but the value of S remained ambiguous. We perform density functional theory calculations that suggest S=3/2. We also compare previous and new measurements of both the resistivity and decoherence rate in quasi-one-dimensional wires to numerical renormalization group predictions for S=1/2, 1, and 3/2, finding excellent agreement for S=3/2.

  18. Cowichan Valley energy mapping and modelling. Report 6 - Findings and recommendations. Final report. [Vancouver Island, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-06-15

    This report is the final report in a series of six reports detailing the findings from the Cowichan Valley Energy Mapping and Modelling project that was carried out from April of 2011 to March of 2012 by Ea Energy Analyses in conjunction with Geographic Resource Analysis and Science (GRAS). The driving force behind the Integrated Energy Mapping and Analysis project was the identification and analysis of a suite of pathways that the Cowichan Valley Regional District (CVRD) can utilise to increase its energy resilience, as well as reduce energy consumption and GHG emissions, with a primary focus on the residential sector. Mapping and analysis undertaken will support provincial energy and GHG reduction targets, and the suite of pathways outlined will address a CVRD internal target that calls for 75% of the region's energy within the residential sector to come from locally sourced renewables by 2050. The target has been developed as a mechanism to meet resilience and climate action target. The maps and findings produced are to be integrated as part of a regional policy framework currently under development. The present report is the final report and presents a summary of the findings of project tasks 1-5 and provides a set of recommendations to the CVRD based on the work done and with an eye towards the next steps in the energy planning process of the CVRD. (LN)

  19. Characteristics of evolving models of care for arthritis: A key informant study

    OpenAIRE

    Veinot Paula; MacKay Crystal; Badley Elizabeth M

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The burden of arthritis is increasing in the face of diminishing health human resources to deliver care. In response, innovative models of care delivery are developing to facilitate access to quality care. Most models have developed in response to local needs with limited evaluation. The primary objective of this study is to a) examine the range of models of care that deliver specialist services using a medical/surgical specialist and at least one other health care provide...

  20. Three fuzzy reasoning models as a decision suport aid, to find an electrical energy tariff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela GHINITA

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available This contribution is a laboratory-work developed as an example of approximate (fuzzy reasoning for students, possible to be used as a decision – support to estimate an electrical energy (EE price for consumers. The three fuzzy tariff estimation models that are developed, integrate not only the S.C Electrica S.A.-single-supplier rate position, but and some (social constraints/ compulsions of National Authority of Settlements from Energy (NASE beginning with 1999, in this transition period from Romania. Although is possible, the paper not refer to a partial-price concrete case (internal tariff used in certain year, production price, transport price, distribution price, spot price, or an external price to be sold electrical energy, etc. This “laboratory-work-paper” shows how, by changing the parameters of S.C Electrica S.A. and NASE, it is possible to can perform sensitivity tests on the tariff function model, until can obtain an acceptable and true price. In this aim, the three fuzzy models use different rules for pricing: conservative, aggressive, and different order of words concerning the rules respectively, finally doing a comparation among prices and models. The paper not finished all fuzzy possibilities (rules which can influences the expected value of a some EE tariff but, with certitude, can create a discussion base, about the way of approximate/ fuzzy reasoning, as a modality to find and to refine an EE price.

  1. The hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) as an experimental model of toxocariasis: histopathological, immunohistochemical, and immunoelectron microscopic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Ana Maria Gonçalves; Chieffi, Pedro Paulo; da Silva, Wellington Luiz Ferreira; Kanashiro, Edite Hatsumi Yamashiro; Rubinsky-Elefant, Guita; Cunha-Neto, Edécio; Mairena, Eliane Conti; De Brito, Thales

    2015-03-01

    Toxocariasis is a globally distributed parasitic infection caused by the larval stage of Toxocara spp. The typical natural hosts of the parasite are dogs and cats, but humans can be infected by the larval stage of the parasite after ingesting embryonated eggs in soil or from contaminated hands or fomites. The migrating larvae are not adapted to complete their life cycle within accidental or paratenic hosts like humans and laboratory animals, respectively, but they are capable of invading viscera or other tissues where they may survive and induce disease. In order to characterize hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) as a model for Toxocara canis infection, histopathological and immunohistochemistry procedures were used to detect pathological lesions and the distribution of toxocaral antigens in the liver, lungs, and kidneys of experimentally infected animals. We also attempted to characterize the immunological parameters of the inflammatory response and correlate them with the histopathological findings. In the kidney, a correlation between glomerular changes and antigen deposits was evaluated using immunoelectron microscopy. The hamster is an adequate model of experimental toxocariasis for short-term investigations and has a good immunological and pathological response to the infection. Lung and liver manifestations of toxocariasis in hamsters approximated those in humans and other experimental animal models. A mixed Th2 immunological response to T. canis infection was predominant. The hamster model displayed a progressive rise of anti-toxocaral antibodies with the formation of immune complexes. Circulating antigens, immunoglobulin, and complement deposits were detected in the kidney without the development of a definite immune complex nephropathy.

  2. Theory and procedures for finding a correct kinetic model for the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendler, R W; Shrager, R; Bose, S

    2001-04-26

    In this paper, we present the implementation and results of new methodology based on linear algebra. The theory behind these methods is covered in detail in the Supporting Information, available electronically (Shragerand Hendler). In brief, the methods presented search through all possible forward sequential submodels in order to find candidates that can be used to construct a complete model for the BR-photocycle. The methodology is limited only to forward sequential models. If no such models are compatible with the experimental data,none will be found. The procedures apply objective tests and filters to eliminate possibilities that cannot be correct, thus cutting the total number of candidate sequences to be considered. In the current application,which uses six exponentials, the total sequences were cut from 1950 to 49. The remaining sequences were further screened using known experimental criteria. The approach led to a solution which consists of a pair of sequences, one with 5 exponentials showing BR* f L(f) M(f) N O BR and the other with three exponentials showing BR* L(s) M(s) BR. The deduced complete kinetic model for the BR photocycle is thus either a single photocycle branched at the L intermediate or a pair of two parallel photocycles. Reasons for preferring the parallel photocycles are presented. Synthetic data constructed on the basis of the parallel photocycles were indistinguishable from the experimental data in a number of analytical tests that were applied.

  3. KEY TECHNIQUES OF MULTI-BODY MODELING OF OCCUPANT RESTRAINT SYSTEM OF VEHICLE SIDE IMPACT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Junyuan; ZHANG Min; DING Rufang; QIU Shaobo; ZHANG Yu; LI Hongjian

    2006-01-01

    Based on multi-body dynamics, the simulation models of auto-side structures and occupant's dynamic responses are set up, using the occupant injury simulation software MADYMO3D. These models include auto-body structure, impact barrier, seat and dummy. Definitions of multi-body and joints and dynamics properties of joints based on FE combination models, of model setup are introduced. Kelvin element of MADYMO is introduced to show the force action between non-adjoining rigid bodies, too. Then all examples of the methods mentioned are given. By the comparison of simulation and real test, the contract curves between simulation and real test for main structures and biology mechanics properties of dummy are obtained. The result shows the accuracy and validity of the models.

  4. Neurobiological model of obsessive-compulsive disorder: evidence from recent neuropsychological and neuroimaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Tomohiro; Okada, Kayo; Kanba, Shigenobu

    2014-08-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) was previously considered refractory to most types of therapeutic intervention. There is now, however, ample evidence that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and behavior therapy are highly effective methods for treatment of OCD. Furthermore, recent neurobiological studies of OCD have found a close correlation between clinical symptoms, cognitive function, and brain function. A large number of previous neuroimaging studies using positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography or functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have identified abnormally high activities throughout the frontal cortex and subcortical structures in patients with OCD. Most studies reported excessive activation of these areas during symptom provocation. Furthermore, these hyperactivities were decreased after successful treatment using either selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or behavioral therapy. Based on these findings, an orbitofronto-striatal model has been postulated as an abnormal neural circuit that mediates symptomatic expression of OCD. On the other hand, previous neuropsychological studies of OCD have reported cognitive dysfunction in executive function, attention, nonverbal memory, and visuospatial skills. Moreover, recent fMRI studies have revealed a correlation between neuropsychological dysfunction and clinical symptoms in OCD by using neuropsychological tasks during fMRI. The evidence from fMRI studies suggests that broader regions, including dorsolateral prefrontal and posterior regions, might be involved in the pathophysiology of OCD. Further, we should consider that OCD is heterogeneous and might have several different neural systems related to clinical factors, such as symptom dimensions. This review outlines recent neuropsychological and neuroimaging studies of OCD. We will also describe several neurobiological models that have been developed recently. Advanced findings in these fields will update the

  5. Modelling succession of key resource harvesting traits of mixotrophic plankton populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berge, Terje; Chakraborty, Subhendu; Hansen, Per Juel;

    2016-01-01

    Unicellular eukaryotes make up the base of the ocean food web and exist as a continuum in trophic strategy from pure heterotrophy (phagotrophic zooplankton) to pure photoautotrophy (‘phytoplankton’), with a dominance of mixotrophic organisms combining both strategies. Here we formulate a trait...... in the spring and increased phagotrophy during the summer, reflecting general seasonal succession patterns of temperate waters. Our trait-based model presents a simple and general approach for the inclusion of mixotrophy, succession and evolution in ecosystem models....

  6. Key Parameters for the Inconsistencies of the Incoming Solar Radiation Boundary Condition in Global Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsushima, Yoko; Raschke, Ehrhard; Kinne, Stefan; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Bakan, Stefan; Emori, Seita; Giorgetta, Marco; Kopp, Greg; Saito, Fuyuki; Timm, Oliver; Wild, Martin

    2009-03-01

    By a comparison of the insolation, computed by 19 different climate models for the International Panel on Climate Change Fourth Assessment Report (IPCC-AR4) test period from 1980 to 1999, it is shown that those models used different values for the solar constant and for its solar cycle variations. Meridional profiles for the monthly incoming radiation displayed diversities of up to ±10 Wm-2, especially during the transient seasons. Sensitivity studies with minima and maxima for the assumed orbital parameters of the Earth show almost no change. However, the different temporal partitioning for onset and length of individual months based on different calendars (e.g. simplifications such as 30 days for each month) results in the difference in the insolation, which is strongly resemble in amount and in zonal pattern the observed diversity of the insolation in IPCC models. Contributing error sources are also different assumptions for cut-off angles at low sun-elevations and differences in increment-difference during spatial and temporal integrations. Possible impacts of these contributing errors in climate modeling are investigated within a coupled ocean-atmosphere model. It is found that monthly radiative fluxes, humidity, and temperature have a difference between the two vernal equinox experiments. Although it remained within the magnitude of the inter-model difference, the difference is systematic.

  7. Key Characteristics of Combined Accident including TLOFW accident for PSA Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bo Gyung; Kang, Hyun Gook [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Ho Joon [Khalifa University of Science, Technology and Research, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2015-05-15

    The conventional PSA techniques cannot adequately evaluate all events. The conventional PSA models usually focus on single internal events such as DBAs, the external hazards such as fire, seismic. However, the Fukushima accident of Japan in 2011 reveals that very rare event is necessary to be considered in the PSA model to prevent the radioactive release to environment caused by poor treatment based on lack of the information, and to improve the emergency operation procedure. Especially, the results from PSA can be used to decision making for regulators. Moreover, designers can consider the weakness of plant safety based on the quantified results and understand accident sequence based on human actions and system availability. This study is for PSA modeling of combined accidents including total loss of feedwater (TLOFW) accident. The TLOFW accident is a representative accident involving the failure of cooling through secondary side. If the amount of heat transfer is not enough due to the failure of secondary side, the heat will be accumulated to the primary side by continuous core decay heat. Transients with loss of feedwater include total loss of feedwater accident, loss of condenser vacuum accident, and closure of all MSIVs. When residual heat removal by the secondary side is terminated, the safety injection into the RCS with direct primary depressurization would provide alternative heat removal. This operation is called feed and bleed (F and B) operation. Combined accidents including TLOFW accident are very rare event and partially considered in conventional PSA model. Since the necessity of F and B operation is related to plant conditions, the PSA modeling for combined accidents including TLOFW accident is necessary to identify the design and operational vulnerabilities.The PSA is significant to assess the risk of NPPs, and to identify the design and operational vulnerabilities. Even though the combined accident is very rare event, the consequence of combined

  8. The Ultrasonographic Findings of Trigger Points of Myofascial Pain Syndrome in a Rabbit Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Kyung Mi; Park, Seog Hee [Catholic University of Korea, Kangnam St. Mary' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Heon; Kim, Joo Hyun; Kim, Han Kyum [Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-03-15

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is a common cause of musculoskeletal pain. Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) have been repeatedly described by numerous authors. However, there have been few studies in which their existence and behavior was supported and their location confirmed. The purpose of this study was to determine whether diagnostic ultrasonography is an objective diagnostic tool which is able to significantly identify or detect the soft tissue changes in the region of clinically identified active MTrPs by using a rabbit experimental model. Ten MPS model rabbits were used in this study. We made an MPS animal model by causing the rabbits to overuse one leg for 3 weeks by cutting the contralateral L4 spinal nerve root. We compared the ultrasonographic findings of the taut band at pre-OP with those at post-OP during the consecutive three week period. To find the taut bands of the muscle, after skin exposure, the muscles were gently rubbed or pinched with the thumb and index finger on the two opposing surfaces of the muscle across the direction of the fibers. Then, the muscle was held in the same way, but with a 5-8 MHz stick probe being used in place of the thumb. After the palpation of various muscles, we selected the hardest and largest myofascial trigger nodule, in order to observe the ultrasonographic and power Doppler findings of the MPS. The size, shape, echogenecity and vascularity of the MTrPs were observed. The analysis of the results of the ultrasonography revealed that all MTrPs have a hyperechoic area. The mean thickness of the hyperechoic lesion in the biceps was 0.96{+-}0.14 cm in the MPS site (at pre-OP?), and 0.49{+-}0.12 cm at post-OP 3weeks (p < 0.01). The hyperechoic lesions in all of the studied biceps femoris of the rabbits were observed by high resolution ultrasonography. No definitively decreased vascularity was observed within the hyperechoic area by power Doppler imaging. Until now, there has been no objective method for the diagnosis of

  9. Strategic marketing planning for heritage tourism: A conceptual model and empirical findings from two emerging heritage regions

    OpenAIRE

    McCamley, Claire; Gilmore, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the process of strategic marketing planning for heritage tourism; an inherently complex and fragmented system, requiring a coordinated approach among a range of stakeholders. A conceptual model, detailing key stakeholders and specific strategic functions, as well as a prescribed method of coordination, is presented. Two regions were investigated using a qualitative methodology, which examined five strategic documents and consisted of depth interviews with 11 key informants...

  10. Histopathological, biomechanical, and behavioral pain findings of Achilles tendinopathy using an animal model of overuse injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Leila; Vachon, Pascal; Beaudry, Francis; Langelier, Eve

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Animal models of forced running are used to study overuse tendinopathy, a common health problem for which clear evidence for effective and accessible treatments is still lacking. In these models, pain evaluation is necessary to better understand the disease, help design and evaluate therapies, and ensure humane treatment of the animals. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to evaluate pain and pathologic findings in an animal model of moderate Achilles tendinopathy induced by treadmill running. Air puffs, instead of electrical shocks, were used to stimulate running so that pain associated with stimulation would be avoided. Pressure pain sensitivity was evaluated in vivo using a new instrumented plier, whereas spinal cord peptides were analyzed ex vivo with high‐performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Tendon histologic slides were semiquantitatively evaluated, using the Bonar score technique and biomechanical properties, using the traction test. After 8 weeks of treadmill running (2 weeks for adaptation and 6 weeks for the lesion protocol), the protocol was stopped because the air puffs became ineffective to stimulate running. We, nevertheless, observed some histologic changes characteristic of overuse tendinopathy as well as decreased mechanical properties, increased Substance P and dynorphin A peptides but without pressure pain sensitivity. These results suggest that air‐puffs stimulation is sufficient to induce an early stage tendinopathy to study new therapeutic drugs without inducing unnecessary pain. They also indicate that pain‐associated peptides could be related with movement evoked pain and with the sharp breakdown of the running performance. PMID:25602018

  11. Animal models of diabetic macrovascular complications: key players in the development of new therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinonen, Suvi E; Genové, Guillem; Bengtsson, Eva; Hübschle, Thomas; Åkesson, Lina; Hiss, Katrin; Benardeau, Agnes; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Jönsson-Rylander, Ann-Cathrine; Gomez, Maria F

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a lifelong, incapacitating metabolic disease associated with chronic macrovascular complications (coronary heart disease, stroke, and peripheral vascular disease) and microvascular disorders leading to damage of the kidneys (nephropathy) and eyes (retinopathy). Based on the current trends, the rising prevalence of diabetes worldwide will lead to increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Therefore, novel means to prevent and treat these complications are needed. Under the auspices of the IMI (Innovative Medicines Initiative), the SUMMIT (SUrrogate markers for Micro- and Macrovascular hard end points for Innovative diabetes Tools) consortium is working on the development of novel animal models that better replicate vascular complications of diabetes and on the characterization of the available models. In the past years, with the high level of genomic information available and more advanced molecular tools, a very large number of models has been created. Selecting the right model for a specific study is not a trivial task and will have an impact on the study results and their interpretation. This review gathers information on the available experimental animal models of diabetic macrovascular complications and evaluates their pros and cons for research purposes as well as for drug development.

  12. Animal Models of Diabetic Macrovascular Complications: Key Players in the Development of New Therapeutic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvi E. Heinonen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a lifelong, incapacitating metabolic disease associated with chronic macrovascular complications (coronary heart disease, stroke, and peripheral vascular disease and microvascular disorders leading to damage of the kidneys (nephropathy and eyes (retinopathy. Based on the current trends, the rising prevalence of diabetes worldwide will lead to increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Therefore, novel means to prevent and treat these complications are needed. Under the auspices of the IMI (Innovative Medicines Initiative, the SUMMIT (SUrrogate markers for Micro- and Macrovascular hard end points for Innovative diabetes Tools consortium is working on the development of novel animal models that better replicate vascular complications of diabetes and on the characterization of the available models. In the past years, with the high level of genomic information available and more advanced molecular tools, a very large number of models has been created. Selecting the right model for a specific study is not a trivial task and will have an impact on the study results and their interpretation. This review gathers information on the available experimental animal models of diabetic macrovascular complications and evaluates their pros and cons for research purposes as well as for drug development.

  13. Evaluating the single seizure clinic model: Findings from a Canadian Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Syed; Hernandez-Ronquillo, Lizbeth; Moien-Afshari, Farzad; Hunter, Gary; Waterhouse, Karen; Dash, Dianne; Téllez-Zenteno, José F

    2016-08-15

    The effect of the single seizure clinic (SSC) model on patient diagnose, work-up, wait-times, and clinical care is poorly characterized and its efficacy unclear. The present study assesses patient characteristics and evaluates the impact of a single seizure clinic (SSC) model on wait-times and access to care. A prospective study of all patients (n=200) referred to our SSC for first seizure evaluation. Demographic, clinical, and paraclinicial variables were systematically collected and analyzed against a historical cohort. Binary logistic regression analysis was performed to predict impact of dichotomized variables on diagnosis of epilepsy. Diagnostic concordance between SSC nurses and epileptologists was also assessed. Predominant referral sources were emergency department physicians and general practitioners. Mean wait-time for first assessment was significantly reduced by 70.5% employing the SSC model versus historical usual care. A diagnosis was established at first-contact in 80.5% of cases while 16.0% of patients required a second visit. Eighty-two patients (41.0%) were diagnosed with epilepsy. An abnormal EEG was found in 93.9% of patients diagnosed with epilepsy. Sixty-three patients were started on anti-epileptic drugs (63.5% lamotrigine, 7.0% levetiracetam, 5.0% phenytoin, and 5.0% topiramate). In 18% of cases driving restrictions were initiated by the SSC. The most common non-seizure diagnosis was syncope (24.0%). The SSC reduced wait-times for assessment and investigations, clarified diagnoses, affected management decisions with respect to further workup, pharmacotherapy, and driving. There was moderate correlation between SSC nurses and physicians (kappa=0.54; pepilepsy. Key factors identified as predictors of epilepsy were: presence of abnormalities on electroencephalography and imaging studies, patients stratified as high or medium-risk for seizure recurrence, semiological characteristics such as amnesia and limb stiffening, and presence of tongue

  14. A study of key features of random atmospheric disturbance models for the approach flight phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffley, R. K.

    1977-01-01

    An analysis and brief simulator experiment were performed to identify and classify important features of random turbulence for the landing approach flight phase. The analysis of various wind models was carried out within the context of the longitudinal closed-loop pilot/vehicle system. The analysis demonstrated the relative importance of atmospheric disturbance scale lengths, horizontal versus vertical gust components, decreasing altitude, and spectral forms of disturbances versus the pilot/vehicle system. Among certain competing wind models, the analysis predicted no significant difference in pilot performance. This was confirmed by a moving base simulator experiment which evaluated the two most extreme models. A number of conclusions were reached: attitude constrained equations do provide a simple but effective approach to describing the closed-loop pilot/vehicle. At low altitudes the horizontal gust component dominates pilot/vehicle performance.

  15. Illustrating Electric Conductivity Using the Particle-in-a-Box Model: Quantum Superposition is the Key

    CERN Document Server

    Sivanesan, Umaseh; Izmaylov, Artur F

    2016-01-01

    Most of the textbooks explaining electric conductivity in the context of quantum mechanics provide either incomplete or semi-classical explanations that are not connected with the elementary concepts of quantum mechanics. We illustrate the conduction phenomena using the simplest model system in quantum dynamics, a particle in a box (PIB). To induce the particle dynamics, a linear potential tilting the bottom of the box is introduced, which is equivalent to imposing a constant electric field for a charged particle. Although the PIB model represents a closed system that cannot have a flow of electrons through the system, we consider the oscillatory dynamics of the particle probability density as the analogue of the electric current. Relating the amplitude and other parameters of the particle oscillatory dynamics with the gap between the ground and excited states of the PIB model allows us to demonstrate one of the most basic dependencies of electric conductivity on the valence-conduction band gap of the materia...

  16. Physiologically-based toxicokinetic models help identifying the key factors affecting contaminant uptake during flood events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkmann, Markus; Eichbaum, Kathrin [Department of Ecosystem Analysis, Institute for Environmental Research,ABBt – Aachen Biology and Biotechnology, RWTH Aachen University, Worringerweg 1, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Kammann, Ulrike [Thünen-Institute of Fisheries Ecology, Palmaille 9, 22767 Hamburg (Germany); Hudjetz, Sebastian [Department of Ecosystem Analysis, Institute for Environmental Research,ABBt – Aachen Biology and Biotechnology, RWTH Aachen University, Worringerweg 1, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Institute of Hydraulic Engineering and Water Resources Management, RWTH Aachen University, Mies-van-der-Rohe-Straße 1, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Cofalla, Catrina [Institute of Hydraulic Engineering and Water Resources Management, RWTH Aachen University, Mies-van-der-Rohe-Straße 1, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Buchinger, Sebastian; Reifferscheid, Georg [Federal Institute of Hydrology (BFG), Department G3: Biochemistry, Ecotoxicology, Am Mainzer Tor 1, 56068 Koblenz (Germany); Schüttrumpf, Holger [Institute of Hydraulic Engineering and Water Resources Management, RWTH Aachen University, Mies-van-der-Rohe-Straße 1, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Preuss, Thomas [Department of Environmental Biology and Chemodynamics, Institute for Environmental Research,ABBt- Aachen Biology and Biotechnology, RWTH Aachen University, Worringerweg 1, 52074 Aachen (Germany); and others

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • A PBTK model for trout was coupled with a sediment equilibrium partitioning model. • The influence of physical exercise on pollutant uptake was studies using the model. • Physical exercise during flood events can increase the level of biliary metabolites. • Cardiac output and effective respiratory volume were identified as relevant factors. • These confounding factors need to be considered also for bioconcentration studies. - Abstract: As a consequence of global climate change, we will be likely facing an increasing frequency and intensity of flood events. Thus, the ecotoxicological relevance of sediment re-suspension is of growing concern. It is vital to understand contaminant uptake from suspended sediments and relate it to effects in aquatic biota. Here we report on a computational study that utilizes a physiologically based toxicokinetic model to predict uptake, metabolism and excretion of sediment-borne pyrene in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). To this end, data from two experimental studies were compared with the model predictions: (a) batch re-suspension experiments with constant concentration of suspended particulate matter at two different temperatures (12 and 24 °C), and (b) simulated flood events in an annular flume. The model predicted both the final concentrations and the kinetics of 1-hydroxypyrene secretion into the gall bladder of exposed rainbow trout well. We were able to show that exhaustive exercise during exposure in simulated flood events can lead to increased levels of biliary metabolites and identified cardiac output and effective respiratory volume as the two most important factors for contaminant uptake. The results of our study clearly demonstrate the relevance and the necessity to investigate uptake of contaminants from suspended sediments under realistic exposure scenarios.

  17. Transgenic mouse models resistant to diet-induced metabolic disease: is energy balance the key?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliam, Laura A A; Neufer, P Darrell

    2012-09-01

    The prevalence and economic burden of obesity and type 2 diabetes is a driving force for the discovery of molecular targets to improve insulin sensitivity and glycemic control. Here, we review several transgenic mouse models that identify promising targets, ranging from proteins involved in the insulin signaling pathway, alterations of genes affecting energy metabolism, and transcriptional metabolic regulators. Despite the diverse endpoints in each model, a common thread that emerges is the necessity for maintenance of energy balance, suggesting pharmacotherapy must target the development of drugs that decrease energy intake, accelerate energy expenditure in a well controlled manner, or augment natural compensatory responses to positive energy balance.

  18. Breast cancer screening behaviors among Korean American immigrant women: findings from the Health Belief Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Yun; Stange, Mia Ju; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S

    2015-11-01

    This study examined the utilization of clinical breast examinations (CBEs) and mammograms among Korean American immigrant women and investigated how the six constructs of Health Belief Model (HBM) are associated with the receipt of breast cancer screening. Using a quota sampling strategy, 202 Korean American immigrant women were recruited in metropolitan areas in the northeastern United States. Approximately 64% of the participants reported having had at least one CBE in their lifetime, and about 81% of the sample had undergone at least one mammogram in their lifetime. Women who perceived themselves to be susceptible to breast cancer were more likely to have undergone a CBE, and women who had lower barriers to screening or demonstrated a higher level of confidence were more likely than their counterparts to undergo a mammogram. Findings suggest that HBM constructs such as susceptibility, barriers, and confidence should be considered when designing interventions aimed at promoting breast cancer screening.

  19. PumpKin: A tool to find principal pathways in plasma chemical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markosyan, A. H.; Luque, A.; Gordillo-Vázquez, F. J.; Ebert, U.

    2014-10-01

    PumpKin is a software package to find all principal pathways, i.e. the dominant reaction sequences, in chemical reaction systems. Although many tools are available to integrate numerically arbitrarily complex chemical reaction systems, few tools exist in order to analyze the results and interpret them in relatively simple terms. In particular, due to the large disparity in the lifetimes of the interacting components, it is often useful to group reactions into pathways that recycle the fastest species. This allows a researcher to focus on the slow chemical dynamics, eliminating the shortest timescales. Based on the algorithm described by Lehmann (2004), PumpKin automates the process of finding such pathways, allowing the user to analyze complex kinetics and to understand the consumption and production of a certain species of interest. We designed PumpKin with an emphasis on plasma chemical systems but it can also be applied to atmospheric modeling and to industrial applications such as plasma medicine and plasma-assisted combustion.

  20. A generic model of pattern formation in Mississippi Valley-Type deposits based on analytical findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelka, Ulrich; Veveakis, Manolis; Beaudoin, Nicolas; Poulet, Thomas; Koehn, Daniel; Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus; Chung, Peter; Berndt, Jasper

    2016-04-01

    Rhythmically banded dolomites (zebra dolomite) are found worldwide, and are frequently associated with mineralization of the Mississippi Valley-Type (MVT). These rocks consist of dark fine grained and impurity-rich layers alternating with light coarse grained and virtually impurity-free layers. The texture of the light layers is similar to the one of tectonic syntaxial veins where crystals grow towards a median line. We present petrographic and chemical analysis of zebra dolomite samples from the San Vicente mine, Central Peru. The applied methods are petrographic microscopy, SEM, EBSD, EMP and LA-ICP-MS. The findings influence the development of a generic model of pattern formation. We found the density and the distribution of second-phase material to be one striking feature. The impurities are accumulated in the dark layers, which show an even higher density of second-phase material than the surrounding impurity-rich dolomite. With CL, it was possible to detect a luminescent structure in the center of the light bands which seems to be present independent of the thickness and spacing of the respective layers. This structure was analysed in more detail with EMP. We further found that the dolomite crystals in the dark and light layers are chemically similar but show a variation in some trace elements. Based on the analytical findings, we put forward a mathematical model of zebra dolomite formation based on Cnoidal waves. We believe that the light coarse grained layers represent hydromechanical instabilities arising during the diagenetic compaction of a fluid saturated, impurity-rich dolomite. Our approach is based on the extension of the classical compaction bands theory to a viscose, non-linear rheology. In the model, the spacing between two light coarse grained layers is linked to the compaction length during the pattern formation. With the formulation of a 1D steady-state solution we can relate the genesis of the structure to physical parameter, such as

  1. An Innovative Mathematical Model: A Key to the Riddle of HbA1c

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Kahrom

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available HbA1c is a standard clinical assessment of glycemia and the basis of most data relating glycemic control to complications. While daily blood glucose testing gives a picture of day-to-day fluctuations, the HbA1c test offers an overview of how well glucose has been controlled over the past 4 months. I devised an innovative mathematical model to describe novel equations governing HbA1c which enables analysis of HbA1c behavior and provides emerging new concepts in assessment of diabetes management. Linear relationship of HbA1c and mean plasma glucose along with the kinetic analysis of HbA1c formation has been used as the basic suppositions to construct this model. The main application of this devised model is prediction of mean plasma glucose at any desired point in time after a change in therapy and with great certainty. This model also appraises the pattern of HbA1c changes over time and provides a unique opportunity to address common mistakes and misconceptions in routine application of HbA1c that could have potentially important implications on diabetes control.

  2. Key features of the IPSL ocean atmosphere model and its sensitivity to atmospheric resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marti, Olivier; Braconnot, P.; Bellier, J.; Brockmann, P.; Caubel, A.; Noblet, N. de; Friedlingstein, P.; Idelkadi, A.; Kageyama, M. [Unite Mixte CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, IPSL/LSCE, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Dufresne, J.L.; Bony, S.; Codron, F.; Fairhead, L.; Grandpeix, J.Y.; Hourdin, F.; Musat, I. [Unite Mixte CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique-ENS-UPCM, IPSL/LMD, Paris Cedex 05 (France); Benshila, R.; Guilyardi, E.; Levy, C.; Madec, G.; Mignot, J.; Talandier, C. [unite mixte CNRS-IRD-UPMC, IPLS/LOCEAN, Paris Cedex 05 (France); Cadule, P.; Denvil, S.; Foujols, M.A. [Institut Pierre Simon Laplace des Sciences de l' Environnement (IPSL), Paris Cedex 05 (France); Fichefet, T.; Goosse, H. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Institut d' Astronomie et de Geophysique Georges Lemaitre, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Krinner, G. [Unite mixte CNRS-UJF Grenoble, LGGE, BP96, Saint-Martin-d' Heres (France); Swingedouw, D. [CNRS/CERFACS, Toulouse (France)

    2010-01-15

    This paper presents the major characteristics of the Institut Pierre Simon Laplace (IPSL) coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model. The model components and the coupling methodology are described, as well as the main characteristics of the climatology and interannual variability. The model results of the standard version used for IPCC climate projections, and for intercomparison projects like the Paleoclimate Modeling Intercomparison Project (PMIP 2) are compared to those with a higher resolution in the atmosphere. A focus on the North Atlantic and on the tropics is used to address the impact of the atmosphere resolution on processes and feedbacks. In the North Atlantic, the resolution change leads to an improved representation of the storm-tracks and the North Atlantic oscillation. The better representation of the wind structure increases the northward salt transports, the deep-water formation and the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. In the tropics, the ocean-atmosphere dynamical coupling, or Bjerknes feedback, improves with the resolution. The amplitude of ENSO (El Nino-Southern oscillation) consequently increases, as the damping processes are left unchanged. (orig.)

  3. The Progressive BSSG Rat Model of Parkinson's: Recapitulating Multiple Key Features of the Human Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Kampen, Jackalina M; Baranowski, David C; Robertson, Harold A; Shaw, Christopher A; Kay, Denis G

    2015-01-01

    The development of effective neuroprotective therapies for Parkinson's disease (PD) has been severely hindered by the notable lack of an appropriate animal model for preclinical screening. Indeed, most models currently available are either acute in nature or fail to recapitulate all characteristic features of the disease. Here, we present a novel progressive model of PD, with behavioural and cellular features that closely approximate those observed in patients. Chronic exposure to dietary phytosterol glucosides has been found to be neurotoxic. When fed to rats, β-sitosterol β-d-glucoside (BSSG) triggers the progressive development of parkinsonism, with clinical signs and histopathology beginning to appear following cessation of exposure to the neurotoxic insult and continuing to develop over several months. Here, we characterize the progressive nature of this model, its non-motor features, the anatomical spread of synucleinopathy, and response to levodopa administration. In Sprague Dawley rats, chronic BSSG feeding for 4 months triggered the progressive development of a parkinsonian phenotype and pathological events that evolved slowly over time, with neuronal loss beginning only after toxin exposure was terminated. At approximately 3 months following initiation of BSSG exposure, animals displayed the early emergence of an olfactory deficit, in the absence of significant dopaminergic nigral cell loss or locomotor deficits. Locomotor deficits developed gradually over time, initially appearing as locomotor asymmetry and developing into akinesia/bradykinesia, which was reversed by levodopa treatment. Late-stage cognitive impairment was observed in the form of spatial working memory deficits, as assessed by the radial arm maze. In addition to the progressive loss of TH+ cells in the substantia nigra, the appearance of proteinase K-resistant intracellular α-synuclein aggregates was also observed to develop progressively, appearing first in the olfactory bulb, then

  4. Novel personalized pathway-based metabolomics models reveal key metabolic pathways for breast cancer diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Sijia; Chong, Nicole; Lewis, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    . Methods: We propose that higher-order functional representation of metabolomics data, such as pathway-based metabolomic features, can be used as robust biomarkers for breast cancer. Towards this, we have developed a new computational method that uses personalized pathway dysregulation scores for disease...... the Curve, a receiver operating characteristic curve) of 0.968 and 0.934, sensitivities of 0.946 and 0.954, and specificities of 0.934 and 0.918. These two metabolomics-based pathway models are further validated by RNA-Seq-based TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas) breast cancer data, with AUCs of 0.995 and 0.......993. Moreover, important metabolic pathways, such as taurine and hypotaurine metabolism and the alanine, aspartate, and glutamate pathway, are revealed as critical biological pathways for early diagnosis of breast cancer. Conclusions: We have successfully developed a new type of pathway-based model to study...

  5. Scenario-Led Habitat Modelling of Land Use Change Impacts on Key Species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Geary

    Full Text Available Accurate predictions of the impacts of future land use change on species of conservation concern can help to inform policy-makers and improve conservation measures. If predictions are spatially explicit, predicted consequences of likely land use changes could be accessible to land managers at a scale relevant to their working landscape. We introduce a method, based on open source software, which integrates habitat suitability modelling with scenario-building, and illustrate its use by investigating the effects of alternative land use change scenarios on landscape suitability for black grouse Tetrao tetrix. Expert opinion was used to construct five near-future (twenty years scenarios for the 800 km2 study site in upland Scotland. For each scenario, the cover of different land use types was altered by 5-30% from 20 random starting locations and changes in habitat suitability assessed by projecting a MaxEnt suitability model onto each simulated landscape. A scenario converting grazed land to moorland and open forestry was the most beneficial for black grouse, and 'increased grazing' (the opposite conversion the most detrimental. Positioning of new landscape blocks was shown to be important in some situations. Increasing the area of open-canopy forestry caused a proportional decrease in suitability, but suitability gains for the 'reduced grazing' scenario were nonlinear. 'Scenario-led' landscape simulation models can be applied in assessments of the impacts of land use change both on individual species and also on diversity and community measures, or ecosystem services. A next step would be to include landscape configuration more explicitly in the simulation models, both to make them more realistic, and to examine the effects of habitat placement more thoroughly. In this example, the recommended policy would be incentives on grazing reduction to benefit black grouse.

  6. Scenario-Led Habitat Modelling of Land Use Change Impacts on Key Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geary, Matthew; Fielding, Alan H; McGowan, Philip J K; Marsden, Stuart J

    2015-01-01

    Accurate predictions of the impacts of future land use change on species of conservation concern can help to inform policy-makers and improve conservation measures. If predictions are spatially explicit, predicted consequences of likely land use changes could be accessible to land managers at a scale relevant to their working landscape. We introduce a method, based on open source software, which integrates habitat suitability modelling with scenario-building, and illustrate its use by investigating the effects of alternative land use change scenarios on landscape suitability for black grouse Tetrao tetrix. Expert opinion was used to construct five near-future (twenty years) scenarios for the 800 km2 study site in upland Scotland. For each scenario, the cover of different land use types was altered by 5-30% from 20 random starting locations and changes in habitat suitability assessed by projecting a MaxEnt suitability model onto each simulated landscape. A scenario converting grazed land to moorland and open forestry was the most beneficial for black grouse, and 'increased grazing' (the opposite conversion) the most detrimental. Positioning of new landscape blocks was shown to be important in some situations. Increasing the area of open-canopy forestry caused a proportional decrease in suitability, but suitability gains for the 'reduced grazing' scenario were nonlinear. 'Scenario-led' landscape simulation models can be applied in assessments of the impacts of land use change both on individual species and also on diversity and community measures, or ecosystem services. A next step would be to include landscape configuration more explicitly in the simulation models, both to make them more realistic, and to examine the effects of habitat placement more thoroughly. In this example, the recommended policy would be incentives on grazing reduction to benefit black grouse.

  7. Improving Control of Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea by Integrating Research Agendas Across Disciplines: Key Questions Arising From Mathematical Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grad, Yonatan H; Goldstein, Edward; Lipsitch, Marc; White, Peter J

    2016-03-15

    The rise in gonococcal antibiotic resistance and the threat of untreatable infection are focusing attention on strategies to limit the spread of drug-resistant gonorrhea. Mathematical models provide a framework to link the natural history of infection and patient behavior to epidemiological outcomes and can be used to guide research and enhance the public health impact of interventions. While limited knowledge of key disease parameters and networks of spread has impeded development of operational models of gonococcal transmission, new tools in gonococcal surveillance may provide useful data to aid tracking and modeling. Here, we highlight critical questions in the management of gonorrhea that can be addressed by mathematical models and identify key data needs. Our overarching aim is to articulate a shared agenda across gonococcus-related fields from microbiology to epidemiology that will catalyze a comprehensive evidence-based clinical and public health strategy for management of gonococcal infections and antimicrobial resistance. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Epidemiological Implications of Host Biodiversity and Vector Biology: Key Insights from Simple Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Andrew D M; Auld, Stuart K J R

    2016-04-01

    Models used to investigate the relationship between biodiversity change and vector-borne disease risk often do not explicitly include the vector; they instead rely on a frequency-dependent transmission function to represent vector dynamics. However, differences between classes of vector (e.g., ticks and insects) can cause discrepancies in epidemiological responses to environmental change. Using a pair of disease models (mosquito- and tick-borne), we simulated substitutive and additive biodiversity change (where noncompetent hosts replaced or were added to competent hosts, respectively), while considering different relationships between vector and host densities. We found important differences between classes of vector, including an increased likelihood of amplified disease risk under additive biodiversity change in mosquito models, driven by higher vector biting rates. We also draw attention to more general phenomena, such as a negative relationship between initial infection prevalence in vectors and likelihood of dilution, and the potential for a rise in density of infected vectors to occur simultaneously with a decline in proportion of infected hosts. This has important implications; the density of infected vectors is the most valid metric for primarily zoonotic infections, while the proportion of infected hosts is more relevant for infections where humans are a primary host.

  9. The meta-volition model: organizational leadership is the key ingredient in getting society moving, literally!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yancey, Antronette K

    2009-10-01

    This paper argues that substantive and sustainable population-wide improvements in physical activity can be achieved only through the large scale adoption and implementation of policies and practices that make being active the default choice and remaining inactive difficult. Meta-volition refers to the volition and collective agency of early adopter leaders who implement such changes in their own organizations to drive productivity and health improvements. Leaders, themselves, are motivated by strong incentives to accomplish their organizational missions. The meta-volition model (MVM) specifies a cascade of changes that may be sparked by structural integration of brief activity bouts into organizational routine across sectors and types of organizations. MVM builds upon inter-disciplinary social ecological change models and frameworks such as diffusion of innovations, social learning and social marketing. MVM is dynamic rather than static, integrating biological influences with psychological factors, and socio-cultural influences with organizational processes. The model proposes six levels of dissemination triggered by organizational marketing to early adopter leaders carried out by "sparkplugs," boisterous leaders in population physical activity promotion: initiating (leader-leader), catalyzing (organizational-individual), viral marketing (individual-organizational), accelerating (organizational-organizational), anchoring (organizational-community) and institutionalizing (community-individual). MVM embodies public-private partnership principles, a collective investment in the high cost of achieving and maintaining active lifestyles.

  10. A Hybrid Network Model to Extract Key Criteria and Its Application for Brand Equity Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Yi Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Making a decision implies that there are alternative choices to be considered, and a major challenge of decision-making is to identify the adequate criteria for program planning or problem evaluation. The decision-makers’ criteria consists of the characteristics or requirements each alternative must possess and the alternatives are rated on how well they possess each criterion. We often use criteria developed and used by different researchers and institutions, and these criteria have similar means and can be substituted for one another. Choosing from existing criteria offers a practical method to engineers hoping to derive a set of criteria for evaluating objects or programs. We have developed a hybrid model for extracting evaluation criteria which considers substitutions between the criteria. The model is developed based on Social Network Analysis and Maximum Mean De-Entropy algorithms. In this paper, the introduced methodology will also be applied to analyze the criteria for assessing brand equity as an application example. The proposed model demonstrates that it is useful in planning feasibility criteria and has applications in other evaluation-planning purposes.

  11. Nuclear inputs of key iron isotopes for core-collapse modeling and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Nabi, Jameel-Un

    2014-01-01

    From the modeling and simulation results of presupernova evolution of massive stars, it was found that isotopes of iron, $^{54,55,56}$Fe, play a significant role inside the stellar cores, primarily decreasing the electron-to-baryon ratio ($Y_{e}$) mainly via electron capture processes thereby reducing the pressure support. The neutrinos produced, as a result of these capture processes, are transparent to the stellar matter and assist in cooling the core thereby reducing the entropy. The structure of the presupernova star is altered both by the changes in $Y_{e}$ and the entropy of the core material. Here we present the microscopic calculation of Gamow-Teller strength distributions for isotopes of iron. The calculation is also compared with other theoretical models and experimental data. Presented also are stellar electron capture rates and associated neutrino cooling rates, due to isotopes of iron, in a form suitable for simulation and modeling codes. It is hoped that the nuclear inputs presented here should ...

  12. Research on the effect of noise at different times of day: Models, methods and findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    Social surveys of residents' responses to noise at different times of day are reviewed. Some of the discrepancies in published reports about the importance of noise at different times of day are reduced when the research findings are classified according to the type of time of day reaction model, the type of time of day weight calculated and the method which is used to estimate the weight. When the estimates of nighttime weights from 12 studies are normalized, it is found that they still disagree, but do not support stronger nighttime weights than those used in existing noise indices. Challenges to common assumptions in nighttime response models are evaluated. Two of these challenges receive enough support to warrant further investigation: the impact of changes in numbers of noise events may be less at night than in the day and nighttime annoyance may be affected by noise levels in other periods. All existing social survey results in which averages of nighttime responses were plotted by nighttime noise levels are reproduced.

  13. Cadmium leaching from micro-lysimeters planted with the hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens: experimental findings and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingwersen, Joachim; Bücherl, Barbara; Neumann, Günter; Streck, Thilo

    2006-01-01

    The use of heavy metal hyperaccumulating plants has the potential to become a promising new technique to remediate contaminated sites. We investigated the role of metal mobilization in the Cd hyperaccumulation of Thlaspi caerulescens (J. & C. Presl, 'Ganges'). In a micro-lysimeter experiment we investigated the dynamics of Cd concentration of leachate as well as Cd removal by plant uptake in four treatments: (i) Control (bare soil), (ii) T. caerulescens, (iii) nonhyperaccumulator Brassica juncea (L.) Czern. ('PI 426308'), and (iv) co-cropping of the hyperaccumulator and nonhyperaccumulator. The experimental findings were analyzed using one- and two-site rate-limited desorption models. Co-cropping of T. caerulescens and B. juncea did not enhance metal uptake by B. juncea. Although Cd uptake of T. caerulescens was 10 times higher than that of B. juncea, the Cd concentration of leachate of the T. caerulescens treatment did not decrease below that of the B. juncea treatment. The Cd depletion in leachate was well reproduced by the two-site rate-limited desorption model. The optimized desorption coefficient was three orders of magnitude higher in the rhizosphere than in the bulk soil. Our results indicate that T. caerulescens accelerates the resupply of Cd from soil pointing to an important role of kinetic desorption in the hyperaccumulation by T. caerulescens.

  14. The Progressive BSSG Rat Model of Parkinson's: Recapitulating Multiple Key Features of the Human Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackalina M Van Kampen

    Full Text Available The development of effective neuroprotective therapies for Parkinson's disease (PD has been severely hindered by the notable lack of an appropriate animal model for preclinical screening. Indeed, most models currently available are either acute in nature or fail to recapitulate all characteristic features of the disease. Here, we present a novel progressive model of PD, with behavioural and cellular features that closely approximate those observed in patients. Chronic exposure to dietary phytosterol glucosides has been found to be neurotoxic. When fed to rats, β-sitosterol β-d-glucoside (BSSG triggers the progressive development of parkinsonism, with clinical signs and histopathology beginning to appear following cessation of exposure to the neurotoxic insult and continuing to develop over several months. Here, we characterize the progressive nature of this model, its non-motor features, the anatomical spread of synucleinopathy, and response to levodopa administration. In Sprague Dawley rats, chronic BSSG feeding for 4 months triggered the progressive development of a parkinsonian phenotype and pathological events that evolved slowly over time, with neuronal loss beginning only after toxin exposure was terminated. At approximately 3 months following initiation of BSSG exposure, animals displayed the early emergence of an olfactory deficit, in the absence of significant dopaminergic nigral cell loss or locomotor deficits. Locomotor deficits developed gradually over time, initially appearing as locomotor asymmetry and developing into akinesia/bradykinesia, which was reversed by levodopa treatment. Late-stage cognitive impairment was observed in the form of spatial working memory deficits, as assessed by the radial arm maze. In addition to the progressive loss of TH+ cells in the substantia nigra, the appearance of proteinase K-resistant intracellular α-synuclein aggregates was also observed to develop progressively, appearing first in the

  15. A Multi-Compartment Hybrid Computational Model Predicts Key Roles for Dendritic Cells in Tuberculosis Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simeone Marino

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is a world-wide health problem with approximately 2 billion people infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, the causative bacterium of TB. The pathologic hallmark of Mtb infection in humans and Non-Human Primates (NHPs is the formation of spherical structures, primarily in lungs, called granulomas. Infection occurs after inhalation of bacteria into lungs, where resident antigen-presenting cells (APCs, take up bacteria and initiate the immune response to Mtb infection. APCs traffic from the site of infection (lung to lung-draining lymph nodes (LNs where they prime T cells to recognize Mtb. These T cells, circulating back through blood, migrate back to lungs to perform their immune effector functions. We have previously developed a hybrid agent-based model (ABM, labeled GranSim describing in silico immune cell, bacterial (Mtb and molecular behaviors during tuberculosis infection and recently linked that model to operate across three physiological compartments: lung (infection site where granulomas form, lung draining lymph node (LN, site of generation of adaptive immunity and blood (a measurable compartment. Granuloma formation and function is captured by a spatio-temporal model (i.e., ABM, while LN and blood compartments represent temporal dynamics of the whole body in response to infection and are captured with ordinary differential equations (ODEs. In order to have a more mechanistic representation of APC trafficking from the lung to the lymph node, and to better capture antigen presentation in a draining LN, this current study incorporates the role of dendritic cells (DCs in a computational fashion into GranSim. Results: The model was calibrated using experimental data from the lungs and blood of NHPs. The addition of DCs allowed us to investigate in greater detail mechanisms of recruitment, trafficking and antigen presentation and their role in tuberculosis infection. Conclusion: The main conclusion of this study is

  16. The Laser Scan Data as a Key Element in the Hydraulic Flood Modelling in Urban Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sole, A.; Giosa, L.; Albano, R.; Cantisani, A.

    2013-05-01

    This paper is intended to highlight the need to use data at high spatial resolution, such as those obtained through the use of Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) techniques, to support hydraulic models for the assessment of flood hazards in urban territory. In fact, the significant structural features (houses, walls, roads, etc.) in the city are important in relation to both the volume of the floodplain that can be occupied by the flow and the direction that the flow takes across the floodplain. ALS data can range up to several terabytes in size and is a function of the geographic scale of the mission. Also, this data is typically irregular with uneven point density. Therefore, a quick method is described to ride out the difficulties to handle the large datasets with uneven point densities and to improve the extracting of feature information for further use in Geographic Information System (GIS) analysis. Finally, a comparison is made between the maximum inundated area obtained from ALS data and that one calculated using a traditional topographic map. The results show that the high-resolution data obtained from airborne remote sensing can increase the opportunities for representation of small-scale structural elements in complex systems using two-dimensional models of flood inundation.

  17. Modelling Glacial Lake Outburst Floods: Key Considerations and Challenges Posed By Climatic Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westoby, M.

    2014-12-01

    The number and size of moraine-dammed supraglacial and proglacial lakes is increasing as a result of contemporary climatic change. Moraine-dammed lakes are capable of impounding volumes of water in excess of 107 m3, and often represent a very real threat to downstream communities and infrastructure, should the bounding moraine fail and produce a catastrophic Glacial Lake Outburst Flood (GLOF). Modelling the individual components of a GLOF, including a triggering event, the complex dam-breaching process and downstream propagation of the flood is incredibly challenging, not least because direct observation and instrumentation of such high-magnitude flows is virtually impossible. We briefly review the current state-of-the-art in numerical GLOF modelling, with a focus on the theoretical and computational challenges associated with reconstructing or predicting GLOF dynamics in the face of rates of cryospheric change that have no historical precedent, as well as various implications for researchers and professionals tasked with the production of hazard maps and disaster mitigation strategies.

  18. Assessing the performance of community-available global MHD models using key system parameters and empirical relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordeev, E.; Sergeev, V.; Honkonen, I.; Kuznetsova, M.; Rastätter, L.; Palmroth, M.; Janhunen, P.; Tóth, G.; Lyon, J.; Wiltberger, M.

    2015-12-01

    Global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modeling is a powerful tool in space weather research and predictions. There are several advanced and still developing global MHD (GMHD) models that are publicly available via Community Coordinated Modeling Center's (CCMC) Run on Request system, which allows the users to simulate the magnetospheric response to different solar wind conditions including extraordinary events, like geomagnetic storms. Systematic validation of GMHD models against observations still continues to be a challenge, as well as comparative benchmarking of different models against each other. In this paper we describe and test a new approach in which (i) a set of critical large-scale system parameters is explored/tested, which are produced by (ii) specially designed set of computer runs to simulate realistic statistical distributions of critical solar wind parameters and are compared to (iii) observation-based empirical relationships for these parameters. Being tested in approximately similar conditions (similar inputs, comparable grid resolution, etc.), the four models publicly available at the CCMC predict rather well the absolute values and variations of those key parameters (magnetospheric size, magnetic field, and pressure) which are directly related to the large-scale magnetospheric equilibrium in the outer magnetosphere, for which the MHD is supposed to be a valid approach. At the same time, the models have systematic differences in other parameters, being especially different in predicting the global convection rate, total field-aligned current, and magnetic flux loading into the magnetotail after the north-south interplanetary magnetic field turning. According to validation results, none of the models emerges as an absolute leader. The new approach suggested for the evaluation of the models performance against reality may be used by model users while planning their investigations, as well as by model developers and those interesting to quantitatively

  19. Development of personnel motivation models as a key component of innovative activity management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.O. Krykunenko

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article. The aim of the article is to examine the algorithm, approaches and methods of development the model of staff motivation at high technology enterprises, to strengthen the creative-directed processes of developing new products, as well as analysis of additional factors that have contributed to the effective creative work of the staff. The results of the analysis. The problem of improving the efficiency of different economic systems in the situation of limited amount of resources and fierce competition among enterprises is highlighted in the article. The author found that the performance of the considered task can be achieved through the active use of creative abilities of employees. Entities of innovative business must address the development of management concepts creativity of staff motivation model of creative work, the development and application of a wide range of methods and instruments for the control creativity. In this case, the algorithm of motivation improvement involves defining the objective model of motivation, diagnosis of the existing system of staff incentives, building a creative ranking of employees, development of effective methods of creative work motivation. Scientific novelty of the present study is in organizing of staff creativity management, which involves the intensification and revitalization innovations of the company, the aim of which is in development and implementation of innovative products. An important phase of model motivation is to create additional motivators manifestation of the creative energy of employees, which will increase the cost-effectiveness of high-tech enterprises, to reduce the turnaround time for the development of innovative products. Thus, the development, implementation and operation of the motivation model to incorporate the creative abilities of the staff of the enterprise should be based on an integrated, generalized, systemic and integrated approach, taking into

  20. Statistical key variable analysis and model-based control for improvement performance in a deep reactive ion etching process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Shan; Pan Tianhong; Li Zhengming; Jang Shi-Shang

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes to develop a data-driven via's depth estimator of the deep reactive ion etching process based on statistical identification of key variables.Several feature extraction algorithms are presented to reduce the high-dimensional data and effectively undertake the subsequent virtual metrology (VM) model building process.With the available on-line VM model,the model-based controller is hence readily applicable to improve the quality ofa via's depth.Real operational data taken from a industrial manufacturing process are used to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.The results demonstrate that the proposed method can decrease the MSE from 2.2 × 10-2 to 9 × 10-4 and has great potential in improving the existing DRIE process.

  1. Evaluation of the use of laser scanning to create key models for 3D printing separate from and augmenting visible light sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Jeremy; Kerlin, Scott

    2016-05-01

    The illicit creation of 3D printed keys is problematic as it can allow intruders nearly undetectable access to secure facilities. Prior work has discussed how keys can be created using visible light sensing. This paper builds on this work by evaluating the utility of keys produced with laser scanning. The quality of the model produced using a structured laser scanning approach is compared to the quality of a model produced using a similarly robust visible light sensing approach.

  2. Prefrontal Control and Internet Addiction: A Theoretical Model and Review of Neuropsychological and Neuroimaging Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Matthias; Young, Kimberly S.; Laier, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Most people use the Internet as a functional tool to perform their personal goals in everyday-life such as making airline or hotel reservations. However, some individuals suffer from a loss of control over their Internet use resulting in personal distress, symptoms of psychological dependence, and diverse negative consequences. This phenomenon is often referred to as Internet addiction. Only Internet Gaming Disorder has been included in the appendix of the DSM-5, but it has already been argued that Internet addiction could also comprise problematic use of other applications with cybersex, online relations, shopping, and information search being Internet facets at risk for developing an addictive behavior. Neuropsychological investigations have pointed out that certain prefrontal functions in particular executive control functions are related to symptoms of Internet addiction, which is in line with recent theoretical models on the development and maintenance of the addictive use of the Internet. Control processes are particularly reduced when individuals with Internet addiction are confronted with Internet-related cues representing their first choice use. For example, processing Internet-related cues interferes with working memory performance and decision making. Consistent with this, results from functional neuroimaging and other neuropsychological studies demonstrate that cue-reactivity, craving, and decision making are important concepts for understanding Internet addiction. The findings on reductions in executive control are consistent with other behavioral addictions, such as pathological gambling. They also emphasize the classification of the phenomenon as an addiction, because there are also several similarities with findings in substance dependency. The neuropsychological and neuroimaging results have important clinical impact, as one therapy goal should enhance control over the Internet use by modifying specific cognitions and Internet use expectancies

  3. Prefrontal control and Internet addiction: A theoretical model and review of neuropsychological and neuroimaging findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias eBrand

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Most people use the Internet as a functional tool to perform their personal goals in everyday-life such as making airline or hotel reservations. However, some individuals suffer from a loss of control over their Internet use resulting in personal distress, symptoms of psychological dependence, and diverse negative consequences. This phenomenon is often referred to as Internet addiction. Only Internet Gaming Disorder has been included in the appendix of the DSM-5, but it has already been argued that Internet addiction could also comprise problematic use of other applications with cybersex, online relations, shopping, and information search being Internet facets at risk for developing an addictive behavior. Neuropsychological investigations have pointed out that certain prefrontal functions in particular executive control functions are related to symptoms of Internet addiction, which is in line with recent theoretical models on the development and maintenance of the addictive use of the Internet. Control processes are particularly reduced when individuals with Internet addiction are confronted with Internet-related cues representing their first choice use. For example, processing Internet-related cues interferes with working memory performance and decision making. Consistent with this, results from functional neuroimaging and other neuropsychological studies demonstrate that cue-reactivity, craving, and decision making are important concepts for understanding Internet addiction. The findings on reductions in executive control are consistent with other behavioral addictions, such as pathological gambling. They also emphasize the classification of the phenomenon as an addiction, because there are also several similarities with findings in substance dependency. The neuropsychological and neuroimaging results have important clinical impact, as one therapy goal should be to enhance control over the Internet use by modifying specific cognitions and

  4. Prefrontal control and internet addiction: a theoretical model and review of neuropsychological and neuroimaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Matthias; Young, Kimberly S; Laier, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Most people use the Internet as a functional tool to perform their personal goals in everyday-life such as making airline or hotel reservations. However, some individuals suffer from a loss of control over their Internet use resulting in personal distress, symptoms of psychological dependence, and diverse negative consequences. This phenomenon is often referred to as Internet addiction. Only Internet Gaming Disorder has been included in the appendix of the DSM-5, but it has already been argued that Internet addiction could also comprise problematic use of other applications with cybersex, online relations, shopping, and information search being Internet facets at risk for developing an addictive behavior. Neuropsychological investigations have pointed out that certain prefrontal functions in particular executive control functions are related to symptoms of Internet addiction, which is in line with recent theoretical models on the development and maintenance of the addictive use of the Internet. Control processes are particularly reduced when individuals with Internet addiction are confronted with Internet-related cues representing their first choice use. For example, processing Internet-related cues interferes with working memory performance and decision making. Consistent with this, results from functional neuroimaging and other neuropsychological studies demonstrate that cue-reactivity, craving, and decision making are important concepts for understanding Internet addiction. The findings on reductions in executive control are consistent with other behavioral addictions, such as pathological gambling. They also emphasize the classification of the phenomenon as an addiction, because there are also several similarities with findings in substance dependency. The neuropsychological and neuroimaging results have important clinical impact, as one therapy goal should enhance control over the Internet use by modifying specific cognitions and Internet use expectancies.

  5. Recasting Janis's Groupthink Model: The Key Role of Collective Efficacy in Decision Fiascoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte

    1998-02-01

    This paper advances an explanation for decision fiascoes that reflects recent theoretical trends and was developed in response to a growing body of research that has failed to substantiate the groupthink model (Janis, 1982). In this new framework, the lack of vigilance and preference for risk that characterizes groups contaminated by groupthink are attributed in large part to perceptions of collective efficacy that unduly exceed capability. High collective efficacy may also contribute to the negative framing of decisions and to certain administrative and structural organizational faults. In the making of critical decisions, these factors induce a preference for risk and a powerful concurrence seeking tendency that, facilitated by group polarization, crystallize around a decision option that is likely to fail. Implications for research and some evidence in support of this approach to the groupthink phenomenon are also discussed. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  6. The Electric Vehicles Ecosystem Model: Construct, Analysis and Identification of Key Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulkarnain

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper builds a conceptual model of electric vehicles’ (EV ecosystem and value chain build-up. Based on the literature, the research distinguishes the most critical challenges that are on the way of mobility systems’ electrification. Consumers still have some questions that call for answers before they are ready to adopt evs.With regard to technical aspects, some challenges are coming from vehicles, charging infrastructure, battery technology, and standardization. The use of battery in EVs will bring in additional environmental challenges, coming from the battery life cycle for used battery, the manufacturing, and from some materials used and treated in the manufacturing process. The policy aspects include mostly taxation strategies. For most part, established market conditions are still lacking and there are a number of unresolved challenges on both supply and demand side of the EV market.

  7. Building Analysis for Urban Energy Planning Using Key Indicators on Virtual 3d City Models - the Energy Atlas of Berlin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, A.; Kolbe, T. H.

    2012-07-01

    In the context of increasing greenhouse gas emission and global demographic change with the simultaneous trend to urbanization, it is a big challenge for cities around the world to perform modifications in energy supply chain and building characteristics resulting in reduced energy consumption and carbon dioxide mitigation. Sound knowledge of energy resource demand and supply including its spatial distribution within urban areas is of great importance for planning strategies addressing greater energy efficiency. The understanding of the city as a complex energy system affects several areas of the urban living, e.g. energy supply, urban texture, human lifestyle, and climate protection. With the growing availability of 3D city models around the world based on the standard language and format CityGML, energy system modelling, analysis and simulation can be incorporated into these models. Both domains will profit from that interaction by bringing together official and accurate building models including building geometries, semantics and locations forming a realistic image of the urban structure with systemic energy simulation models. A holistic view on the impacts of energy planning scenarios can be modelled and analyzed including side effects on urban texture and human lifestyle. This paper focuses on the identification, classification, and integration of energy-related key indicators of buildings and neighbourhoods within 3D building models. Consequent application of 3D city models conforming to CityGML serves the purpose of deriving indicators for this topic. These will be set into the context of urban energy planning within the Energy Atlas Berlin. The generation of indicator objects covering the indicator values and related processing information will be presented on the sample scenario estimation of heating energy consumption in buildings and neighbourhoods. In their entirety the key indicators will form an adequate image of the local energy situation for

  8. Diurnal Cycle of the North American Monsoon in a Mesoscale Model Simulation: Evolution of Key Parameters in Relation to Precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weizhong Zheng

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The diurnal cycle of the North American monsoon is analyzed based on the output from a mesoscale model simulation. Statistically significant diurnal cycle in precipitation is identified, with heavy precipitation—essentially convective—dominating in local afternoons. Temporal evolution of key parameters in relation to precipitation is investigated, based on which a sequence of the dynamic/thermodynamic processes underlying precipitation development is proposed. Particularly, the afternoon peak in precipitation is found preceded by enhanced static instability and low-level convergence.

  9. Object Oriented Modelling of Idea using GA based efficient key generation for e-governance security (OOMIG)

    CERN Document Server

    Sarkar, Arindam; Mandal, J K; 10.5121/ijdps.2012.3215

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays different state and central government in India as well as abroad are taking initiative to deliver different kind of services electronically specially using Information and Communication Technology (ICT). Intruders or hackers can steal or modify the information communicated between Government and consumer through internet. To implement privacy and confidentiality of the information we must use suitable encryption technique. In this paper an Object Oriented Modelling of International Data Encryption Algorithm (IDEA) using GA based efficient key generation technique has been proposed to incorporate privacy and confidentiality of information which would be communicated between government and consumer.

  10. Object Oriented Modelling Of IDEA Using GA Based Efficient Key Generation For E-Governance Security (OOMIG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arindam Sarkar

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays different state and central government in India as well as abroad are taking initiative to deliver different kind of services electronically specially using Information and Communication Technology (ICT. Intruders or hackers can steal or modify the information communicated between Government and consumer through internet. To implement privacy and confidentiality of the information we must use suitable encryption technique. In this paper an Object Oriented Modelling of InternationalData Encryption Algorithm (IDEA using GA based efficient key generation technique has been proposed to incorporate privacy and confidentiality of information which would be communicated between government and consumer.

  11. HIGHLY QUALIFIED WORKING FORCE – KEY ELEMENT OF INNOVATIVE DEVELOPMENT MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Avksientiev

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Highly qualified working force is a central element of intensive development model in modern society. The article surveys the experience of countries that managed to transform their economy to the innovative one. Ukrainian economy cannot stand aside processes that dominate the world economy trends, thus we are to use this experience to succeed in future. Today any government of the world is facing challenges that occur due to transformation of the economy into informational one. This type of economy causes its transformation form extensive to intensive one. The main reasons under that is limitation of nature resources, material factors of production. Thus this approach depends much on the quality of working force. Unfortunately in Ukraine there is a misbalance in specialist preparation. This puts additional pressure on the educational sphere also. In order to avoid this pressure we are to conduct reforms in education sphere. Nowadays, in the world views and concepts of governmental role in the social development are changing. This why, even at times of economic recession educational costs are not reduced under the new economical doctrine in the EU. Highly qualified specialists, while creating new products and services play role of engineers in XXI century. They are to lead their industries to world leading positions. From economic point of view, highly qualified specialists benefit society with higher income rates, taxation and thus, increasing the living standards in society. Thus, the majority if modern scientists prove the importance of highly trained working force for more effective economic development.

  12. Integrated hydrologic modeling as a key for sustainable urban water resources planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshtawi, Tamer; Evers, Mariele; Tischbein, Bernhard; Diekkrüger, Bernd

    2016-09-15

    In this study, a coupling of surface water (SWAT), groundwater (MODFLOW) and solute transport (MT3DMS) models was performed to quantify surface-groundwater and quantity-quality interactions under urban area expansion. The responses of groundwater level, nitrate concentrations (related to human activities) and chloride concentrations (related to seawater intrusion) to urban area expansion and corresponding changes in the urban water budget were examined on a macro-scale level. The potentials of non-conventional water resources scenarios, namely desalination, stormwater harvesting and treated wastewater (TWW) reuse were investigated. In a novel analysis, groundwater improvement and deterioration under each scenario were defined in spatial-temporal approach. The quality deterioration cycle index was estimated as the ratio between the amounts of low and high quality recharge components within the Gaza Strip boundary predicted for year 2030. The improvement index for groundwater level (IIL) and the improvement index for groundwater quality (IIQ) were developed for the scenarios as measures of the effectiveness toward sustainable groundwater planning. Even though the desalination and TWW reuse scenarios reflect a noticeable improvement in the groundwater level, the desalination scenario shows a stronger tendency toward sustainable groundwater quality. The stormwater harvesting scenario shows a slight improvement in both groundwater quality and quantity. This study provides a 'corridor of options', which could facilitate future studies focusing on developing a micro-level assessment of the above scenarios.

  13. Investigating feedback mechanisms between stress and grain-size: preliminary findings from finite-element modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, A. J.; Prior, D. J.; Ellis, S. M.

    2012-12-01

    It is widely accepted that changes in stress and grain size can induce a switch between grain-size insensitive (GSI) and sensitive (GSS) creep mechanisms. Under steady-state conditions, grains evolve to an equilibrium size in the boundary region between GSS and GSI, described by the paleopiezometer for a given material. Under these conditions, significant rheological weakening is not expected, as grain size reduction processes are balanced by grain growth processes. However, it has been shown that the stress field surrounding faults varies through the seismic cycle, with both rapid loading and unloading of stress possible in the co- and post-seismic stages. We propose that these changes in stress in the region of the brittle-ductile transition zone may be sufficient to force a deviation from the GSI-GSS boundary and thereby cause a change in grain size and creep mechanism prior to system re-equilibration. Here we present preliminary findings from numerical modelling of stress and grain size changes in response to loading of mechanical inhomogeneities. Our results are attained using a grain-size evolution (GSE) subroutine incorporated into the SULEC finite-element code developed by Susan Ellis and Susanne Buiter, which utilises an iterative approach of solving for spatial and temporal changes in differential stress, grain size and active creep mechanism. Preliminary models demonstrate that stress changes in response to the opening of a fracture in a flowing medium can be significant enough to cause a switch from GSI to GSS creep. These results are significant in the context of understanding spatial variations and feedback between stress, grain size and deformation mechanisms through the seismic cycle.

  14. Model of human aging: Recent findings on Werner’s and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shian-ling Ding

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Shian-ling Ding1, Chen-Yang Shen2,3,41Department of Nursing, Kang-Ning Junior College of Medical Care and Management, Taipei, Taiwan; 2Institute of Biomedical Sciences, and 3Life Science Library, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Graduate Institute of Environmental Science, China Medical University, Taichong, TaiwanAbstract: The molecular mechanisms involved in human aging are complicated. Two progeria syndromes, Werner’s syndrome (WS and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, characterized by clinical features mimicking physiological aging at an early age, provide insights into the mechanisms of natural aging. Based on recent findings on WS and HGPS, we suggest a model of human aging. Human aging can be triggered by two main mechanisms, telomere shortening and DNA damage. In telomere-dependent aging, telomere shortening and dysfunction may lead to DNA damage responses which induce cellular senescence. In DNA damage-initiated aging, DNA damage accumulates, along with DNA repair deficiencies, resulting in genomic instability and accelerated cellular senescence. In addition, aging due to both mechanisms (DNA damage and telomere shortening is strongly dependent on p53 status. These two mechanisms can also act cooperatively to increase the overall level of genomic instability, triggering the onset of human aging phenotypes.Keywords: human aging, Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome, Werner syndrome

  15. Correlation between protein accumulation profiles and conventional toxicological findings using a model antiandrogenic compound, flutamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friry-Santini, Claire; Rouquié, David; Kennel, Philippe; Tinwell, Helen; Benahmed, Mohamed; Bars, Rémi

    2007-05-01

    In conventional rodent toxicity studies the characterization of the adverse effects of a chemical relies primarily on gravimetric, and histopathological data. The aim of this study was to evaluate if the use of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis could generate protein accumulation profiles, which were in accordance with conventional toxicological findings by investigating a model antiandrogen, flutamide (FM), whose toxic effects, as measured using standard approaches, are well characterized. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were orally exposed to FM (0, 6, 30, and 150 mg/kg/day) for 28 days. The expected inhibition of androgen-dependent tissue stimulation, increased luteinizing hormone and testosterone plasma levels, and Leydig cell hyperplasia were observed. Changes in testicular protein accumulation profiles were evaluated in rats exposed to 150 mg/kg/day FM. Several proteins involved in steroidogenesis (e.g., StAR, ApoE, Hmgcs1, Idi1), cell cycle, and cancer (e.g., Ddx1, Hspd1) were modulated by FM, and these data provided molecular evidence for the hormonal and testicular histopathology changes recorded. Changes in proteins associated with spermatogenesis were also recorded, and these are discussed within the context of the testicular phenotype observed following FM treatment (i.e., normal spermatogenesis but Leydig cell hyperplasia). Overall, our data indicate that the combination of conventional toxicology measurements with omic observations has the potential to improve our global understanding of the toxicity of a compound.

  16. FINDING POTENTIALLY UNSAFE NUTRITIONAL SUPPLEMENTS FROM USER REVIEWS WITH TOPIC MODELING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Ryan; Sarker, Abeed; O'Connor, Karen; Goodin, Amanda; Karlsrud, Mark; Gonzalez, Graciela

    2016-01-01

    Although dietary supplements are widely used and generally are considered safe, some supplements have been identified as causative agents for adverse reactions, some of which may even be fatal. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is responsible for monitoring supplements and ensuring that supplements are safe. However, current surveillance protocols are not always effective. Leveraging user-generated textual data, in the form of Amazon.com reviews for nutritional supplements, we use natural language processing techniques to develop a system for the monitoring of dietary supplements. We use topic modeling techniques, specifically a variation of Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA), and background knowledge in the form of an adverse reaction dictionary to score products based on their potential danger to the public. Our approach generates topics that semantically capture adverse reactions from a document set consisting of reviews posted by users of specific products, and based on these topics, we propose a scoring mechanism to categorize products as "high potential danger", "average potential danger" and "low potential danger." We evaluate our system by comparing the system categorization with human annotators, and we find that the our system agrees with the annotators 69.4% of the time. With these results, we demonstrate that our methods show promise and that our system represents a proof of concept as a viable low-cost, active approach for dietary supplement monitoring.

  17. Early neonatal echocardiographic findings in an experimental rabbit model of congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.H. Manso

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to demonstrate that congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH results in vascular abnormalities that are directly associated with the severity of pulmonary hypoplasia and hypertension. These events increase right ventricle (RV afterload and may adversely affect disease management and patient survival. Our objective was to investigate cardiac function, specifically right ventricular changes, immediately after birth and relate them to myocardial histological findings in a CDH model. Pregnant New Zealand rabbits underwent the surgical procedure at 25 days of gestation (n=14. CDH was created in one fetus per horn (n=16, and the other fetuses were used as controls (n=20. At term (30 days, fetuses were removed, immediately dried and weighed before undergoing four-parameter echocardiography. The lungs and the heart were removed, weighed, and histologically analyzed. CDH animals had smaller total lung weight (P<0.005, left lung weight (P<0.005, and lung-to-body ratio (P<0.005. Echocardiography revealed a smaller left-to-right ventricle ratio (LV/RV, P<0.005 and larger diastolic right ventricle size (DRVS, P<0.007. Histologic analysis revealed a larger number of myocytes undergoing mitotic division (186 vs 132, P<0.05 in CDH hearts. Immediate RV dilation of CDH hearts is related to myocyte mitosis increase. This information may aid the design of future strategies to address pulmonary hypertension in CDH.

  18. Estimation of key parameters in adaptive neuron model according to firing patterns based on improved particle swarm optimization algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Chunhua; Wang, Jiang; Yi, Guosheng

    2017-03-01

    Estimation of ion channel parameters is crucial to spike initiation of neurons. The biophysical neuron models have numerous ion channel parameters, but only a few of them play key roles in the firing patterns of the models. So we choose three parameters featuring the adaptation in the Ermentrout neuron model to be estimated. However, the traditional particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is still easy to fall into local optimum and has the premature convergence phenomenon in the study of some problems. In this paper, we propose an improved method that uses a concave function and dynamic logistic chaotic mapping mixed to adjust the inertia weights of the fitness value, effectively improve the global convergence ability of the algorithm. The perfect predicting firing trajectories of the rebuilt model using the estimated parameters prove that only estimating a few important ion channel parameters can establish the model well and the proposed algorithm is effective. Estimations using two classic PSO algorithms are also compared to the improved PSO to verify that the algorithm proposed in this paper can avoid local optimum and quickly converge to the optimal value. The results provide important theoretical foundations for building biologically realistic neuron models.

  19. Photochemistry in Saturn's Ring-Shadowed Atmosphere: Modeling of Key Molecules and Observations of Dust Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgington, S. G.; Atreya, S. K.; Wilson, E. H.; West, R. A.; Fletcher, L. N.; Baines, K. H.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Momary, T.

    2014-12-01

    -generated molecules and haze. [1] Edgington, S.G., et al., 2012. Photochemistry in Saturn's Ring Shadowed Atmosphere: Modeling, Observations, and Preliminary Analysis. Bull. American. Astron. Soc., 38, 499 (#11.23).

  20. Stable isotopes of fossil teeth corroborate key general circulation model predictions for the Last Glacial Maximum in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Matthew J.; McKay, Moriah

    2010-11-01

    Oxygen isotope data provide a key test of general circulation models (GCMs) for the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in North America, which have otherwise proved difficult to validate. High δ18O pedogenic carbonates in central Wyoming have been interpreted to indicate increased summer precipitation sourced from the Gulf of Mexico. Here we show that tooth enamel δ18O of large mammals, which is strongly correlated with local water and precipitation δ18O, is lower during the LGM in Wyoming, not higher. Similar data from Texas, California, Florida and Arizona indicate higher δ18O values than in the Holocene, which is also predicted by GCMs. Tooth enamel data closely validate some recent models of atmospheric circulation and precipitation δ18O, including an increase in the proportion of winter precipitation for central North America, and summer precipitation in the southern US, but suggest aridity can bias pedogenic carbonate δ18O values significantly.

  1. Manufacturers’ Benefits from Their Cooperation with Key Retailers in the Context of Business Models: A Cluster Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzanna Witek-Hajduk

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to examine if, among consumer durable goods’ manufacturers operating in Poland, clusters could be distinguished in terms of the strength of benefits obtained from their cooperation with the key retailer. Also, this article aims to verify if these clusters could be differentiated according to the business models employed by the two parties. With the CATI method data was collected from 613 respondents that were clustered into 5 groups. The established clusters proved to differ statistically in terms of the manufacturer’s business model. From the perspective of the manufacturer, however, these differences proved to be poor predictors of the overall level of the obtained benefits.

  2. Key issues for the development and application of the species sensitivity distribution (SSD) model for ecological risk assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Fu-Liu; Li, Yi-Long; Wang, Yin

    2015-01-01

    The species sensitivity distribution (SSD) model is one of the most commonly used methods for ecological risk assessment based on the potentially affected fraction (PAF) of and the combined PAF (msPAF) as quantitative indicators. There are usually four steps for the development of SSD models...... fractions (msPAFs) for the joint ecological risk assessment of multiple pollutants. Among the above mentioned four steps, the first two steps are paramount. In the present study, the following six key issues are discussed: (1) how to select the appropriate species, (2) how to preprocess the toxicity data...... collected from the ecotoxicity database, (3) how to transform the acute toxicity data into chronic data, (4) how to best fit the toxicity data, (5) how to calculate the msPAF of multiple pollutants, and (6) how to determine the uncertainty of the SSD model”. In response to these questions, several...

  3. Operational Details of the Five Domains Model and Its Key Applications to the Assessment and Management of Animal Welfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellor, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Simple Summary The Five Domains Model is a focusing device to facilitate systematic, structured, comprehensive and coherent assessment of animal welfare; it is not a definition of animal welfare, nor is it intended to be an accurate representation of body structure and function. The purpose of each of the five domains is to draw attention to areas that are relevant to both animal welfare assessment and management. This paper begins by briefly describing the major features of the Model and the operational interactions between the five domains, and then it details seven interacting applications of the Model. These underlie its utility and increasing application to welfare assessment and management in diverse animal use sectors. Abstract In accord with contemporary animal welfare science understanding, the Five Domains Model has a significant focus on subjective experiences, known as affects, which collectively contribute to an animal’s overall welfare state. Operationally, the focus of the Model is on the presence or absence of various internal physical/functional states and external circumstances that give rise to welfare-relevant negative and/or positive mental experiences, i.e., affects. The internal states and external circumstances of animals are evaluated systematically by referring to each of the first four domains of the Model, designated “Nutrition”, “Environment”, “Health” and “Behaviour”. Then affects, considered carefully and cautiously to be generated by factors in these domains, are accumulated into the fifth domain, designated “Mental State”. The scientific foundations of this operational procedure, published in detail elsewhere, are described briefly here, and then seven key ways the Model may be applied to the assessment and management of animal welfare are considered. These applications have the following beneficial objectives—they (1) specify key general foci for animal welfare management; (2) highlight the foundations of

  4. Conceptual modeling of postmortem evaluation findings to describe dairy cow deaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnel, C S; Garry, F B; Hill, A E; Lombard, J E; Gould, D H

    2010-01-01

    Dairy cow mortality levels in the United States are excessive and increasing over time. To better define cause and effect and combat rising mortality, clearer definitions of the reasons that cows die need to be acquired through thorough necropsy-based postmortem evaluations. The current study focused on organizing information generated from postmortem evaluations into a monitoring system that is based on the fundamentals of conceptual modeling and that will potentially be translatable into on-farm relational databases. This observational study was conducted on 3 high-producing, commercial dairies in northern Colorado. Throughout the study period a thorough postmortem evaluation was performed by veterinarians on cows that died on each dairy. Postmortem data included necropsy findings, life-history features (e.g., birth date, lactation number, lactational and reproductive status), clinical history and treatments, and pertinent aspects of operational management that were subject to change and considered integral to the poor outcome. During this study, 174 postmortem evaluations were performed. Postmortem evaluation results were conceptually modeled to view each death within the context of the web of factors influencing the dairy and the cow. Categories were formulated describing mortality in terms of functional characteristics potentially amenable to easy performance evaluation, management oversight, and research. In total, 21 death categories with 7 category themes were created. Themes included specific disease processes with variable etiologies, failure of disease recognition or treatment, traumatic events, multifactorial failures linked to transition or negative energy balance issues, problems with feed management, miscellaneous events not amenable to prevention or treatment, and undetermined causes. Although postmortem evaluations provide the relevant information necessary for framing a cow's death, a restructuring of on-farm databases is needed to integrate this

  5. Finding Dense Locations in Symbolic Indoor Tracking Data: Modeling, Indexing, and Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Tanvir; Pedersen, Torben Bach; Lu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Finding the dense locations in large indoor spaces is very useful for many applications such as overloaded area detection, security control, crowd management, indoor navigation, and so on. Indoor tracking data can be enormous and are not immediately ready for finding dense locations. This paper...

  6. Midwifery-led antenatal care models: mapping a systematic review to an evidence-based quality framework to identify key components and characteristics of care

    OpenAIRE

    Symon, A; J. Pringle; Cheyne, H.; Downe, S.; Hundley, Vanora; Lee, E; Lynn, F; McFadden, A.; McNeill, J.; Renfrew, M. J.; Ross-Davie, M.; Van Teijlingen, Edwin; Whitford, H.; Alderdice, F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Implementing effective antenatal care models is a key global policy goal. However, the mechanisms of action of these multi-faceted models that would allow widespread implementation are seldom examined and poorly understood. In existing care model analyses there is little distinction between what is done, how it is done, and who does it. A new evidence-informed quality maternal and newborn care (QMNC) framework identifies key characteristics of quality care. This offers the opportu...

  7. From hydrodynamic to hydrological modelling: Investigating long-term hydrological regimes of key wetlands in the Macquarie Marshes, a semi-arid lowland floodplain in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Li; Macdonald, Rohan; Morrison, Tim; Hameed, Tahir; Saintilan, Neil; Ling, Joanne

    2013-09-01

    The Macquarie Marshes is an intermittently flooded wetland complex covering nearly 200,000 ha. It is one of the largest semi-permanent wetland systems in the Murray-Darling Basin, Australia, and portions of the Marshes are listed as internationally important under the Ramsar Convention. Previous studies indicate that the Marshes have undergone accelerated ecological degradation since the 1980s. The ecological degradation is documented in declining biodiversity, encroaching of terrestrial species, colonisation of exotic species, and deterioration of floodplain forests. There is strong evidence that reduction in river flows is the principal cause of the decrease in ecological values. Although the streams are relatively well gauged and modelled, the lack of hydrological records within the Marshes hampers any attempts to quantitatively investigate the relationship between hydrological variation and ecosystem integrity. To enable a better understanding of the long-term hydrological variations within the key wetland systems, and in particular, to investigate the impacts of the different water management policies (e.g. environmental water) on wetlands, a river system model including the main wetland systems was needed. The morphological complex nature of the Marshes means that the approximation of hydrological regimes within wetlands using stream hydrographs would have been difficult and inaccurate. In this study, we built a coupled 1D/2D MIKE FLOOD floodplain hydrodynamic model based on a 1 m DEM derived from a LiDAR survey. Hydrological characteristics of key constituent wetlands such as the correlation between water level and inundation area, relationships between stream and wetlands and among wetlands were estimated using time series extracted from hydrodynamic simulations. These relationships were then introduced into the existing river hydrological model (IQQM) to represent the wetlands. The model was used in this study to simulate the daily behaviours of inflow

  8. Key role of local regulation in chemosensing revealed by a new molecular interaction-based modeling method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Meier-Schellersheim

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The signaling network underlying eukaryotic chemosensing is a complex combination of receptor-mediated transmembrane signals, lipid modifications, protein translocations, and differential activation/deactivation of membrane-bound and cytosolic components. As such, it provides particularly interesting challenges for a combined computational and experimental analysis. We developed a novel detailed molecular signaling model that, when used to simulate the response to the attractant cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP, made nontrivial predictions about Dictyostelium chemosensing. These predictions, including the unexpected existence of spatially asymmetrical, multiphasic, cyclic adenosine monophosphate-induced PTEN translocation and phosphatidylinositol-(3,4,5P3 generation, were experimentally verified by quantitative single-cell microscopy leading us to propose significant modifications to the current standard model for chemoattractant-induced biochemical polarization in this organism. Key to this successful modeling effort was the use of "Simmune," a new software package that supports the facile development and testing of detailed computational representations of cellular behavior. An intuitive interface allows user definition of complex signaling networks based on the definition of specific molecular binding site interactions and the subcellular localization of molecules. It automatically translates such inputs into spatially resolved simulations and dynamic graphical representations of the resulting signaling network that can be explored in a manner that closely parallels wet lab experimental procedures. These features of Simmune were critical to the model development and analysis presented here and are likely to be useful in the computational investigation of many aspects of cell biology.

  9. Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM): An Introduction to Key Concepts within Cross-Sectional and Growth Modeling Frameworks. Technical Report #1308

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    This manuscript provides an overview of hierarchical linear modeling (HLM), as part of a series of papers covering topics relevant to consumers of educational research. HLM is tremendously flexible, allowing researchers to specify relations across multiple "levels" of the educational system (e.g., students, classrooms, schools, etc.).…

  10. Can key vegetation parameters be retrieved at the large-scale using LAI satellite products and a generic modelling approach ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewaele, Helene; Calvet, Jean-Christophe; Carrer, Dominique; Laanaia, Nabil

    2016-04-01

    wintertime minimum value of LAI on the start of the growing season is highlighted. This parameter is oversimplified in the model (LAImin=0.3 for low vegetation) and adjustments based on LAI observations significantly improve the results. For croplands, more contrasted results are obtained in relation to the difficulty to represent crop rotation in the model. Several other configurations of the model are investigated (including multi-layer diffusion (DIF) soil profile scheme) in order to ensure the robustness of this approach. Finally this optimization method should permit to map several key vegetation parameters unobservable at the large-scale (as those listed above) over the Euro-Mediterranean area.

  11. Finding of Correction Factor and Dimensional Error in Bio-AM Model by FDM Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manmadhachary, Aiamunoori; Ravi Kumar, Yennam; Krishnanand, Lanka

    2016-06-01

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) is the swift manufacturing process, in which input data can be provided from various sources like 3-Dimensional (3D) Computer Aided Design (CAD), Computed Tomography (CT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and 3D scanner data. From the CT/MRI data can be manufacture Biomedical Additive Manufacturing (Bio-AM) models. The Bio-AM model gives a better lead on preplanning of oral and maxillofacial surgery. However manufacturing of the accurate Bio-AM model is one of the unsolved problems. The current paper demonstrates error between the Standard Triangle Language (STL) model to Bio-AM model of dry mandible and found correction factor in Bio-AM model with Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM) technique. In the present work dry mandible CT images are acquired by CT scanner and supplied into a 3D CAD model in the form of STL model. Further the data is sent to FDM machine for fabrication of Bio-AM model. The difference between Bio-AM to STL model dimensions is considered as dimensional error and the ratio of STL to Bio-AM model dimensions considered as a correction factor. This correction factor helps to fabricate the AM model with accurate dimensions of the patient anatomy. These true dimensional Bio-AM models increasing the safety and accuracy in pre-planning of oral and maxillofacial surgery. The correction factor for Dimension SST 768 FDM AM machine is 1.003 and dimensional error is limited to 0.3 %.

  12. Using Range-Wide Abundance Modeling to Identify Key Conservation Areas for the Micro-Endemic Bolson Tortoise (Gopherus flavomarginatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinthya A Ureña-Aranda

    Full Text Available A widespread biogeographic pattern in nature is that population abundance is not uniform across the geographic range of species: most occurrence sites have relatively low numbers, whereas a few places contain orders of magnitude more individuals. The Bolson tortoise Gopherus flavomarginatus is endemic to a small region of the Chihuahuan Desert in Mexico, where habitat deterioration threatens this species with extinction. In this study we combined field burrows counts and the approach for modeling species abundance based on calculating the distance to the niche centroid to obtain range-wide abundance estimates. For the Bolson tortoise, we found a robust, negative relationship between observed burrows abundance and distance to the niche centroid, with a predictive capacity of 71%. Based on these results we identified four priority areas for the conservation of this microendemic and threatened tortoise. We conclude that this approach may be a useful approximation for identifying key areas for sampling and conservation efforts in elusive and rare species.

  13. Impaired expression of key molecules of ammoniagenesis underlies renal acidosis in a rat model of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürki, Remy; Mohebbi, Nilufar; Bettoni, Carla; Wang, Xueqi; Serra, Andreas L; Wagner, Carsten A

    2015-05-01

    Advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with the development of renal metabolic acidosis. Metabolic acidosis per se may represent a trigger for progression of CKD. Renal acidosis of CKD is characterized by low urinary ammonium excretion with preserved urinary acidification indicating a defect in renal ammoniagenesis, ammonia excretion or both. The underlying molecular mechanisms, however, have not been addressed to date. We examined the Han:SPRD rat model and used a combination of metabolic studies, mRNA and protein analysis of renal molecules involved in acid-base handling. We demonstrate that rats with reduced kidney function as evident from lower creatinine clearance, lower haematocrit, higher plasma blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, phosphate and potassium had metabolic acidosis that could be aggravated by HCl acid loading. Urinary ammonium excretion was highly reduced whereas urinary pH was more acidic in CKD compared with control animals. The abundance of key enzymes and transporters of proximal tubular ammoniagenesis (phosphate-dependent glutaminase, PEPCK and SNAT3) and bicarbonate transport (NBCe1) was reduced in CKD compared with control animals. In the collecting duct, normal expression of the B1 H(+)-ATPase subunit is in agreement with low urinary pH. In contrast, the RhCG ammonia transporter, critical for the final secretion of ammonia into urine was strongly down-regulated in CKD animals. In the Han:SPRD rat model for CKD, key molecules required for renal ammoniagenesis and ammonia excretion are highly down-regulated providing a possible molecular explanation for the development and maintenance of renal acidosis in CKD patients. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  14. Capability Maturity Model and Key Process Area%软件成熟度模型及其要点

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴昆; 余成

    2005-01-01

    This paper studies five levels of Capability Maturity Model and its corresponding Key Process Area. New insights have been given as to common themes, benefits and tools used for organizitions that determined to comply with the model. Those software engineering practices that consistent with the model are proved to be effective, and are conducive to software organizations that need to make right decisions on how to develop software and regulate their software development practice. By adopting these practices, software development organization will have best practice for their deliverables and customers will have assured high quality product they expected.%研究软件成熟度模型的五个级别,及其相关要点.详细阐述了其共性及特点.该模型经验证可有效提高软件工程质量,对大型软件项目的管理起到良好的指导作用,并被世界大型软件公司认可、接受和执行.

  15. MOLECULAR MODELLING OF HUMAN ALDEHYDE OXIDASE AND IDENTIFICATION OF THE KEY INTERACTIONS IN THE ENZYME-SUBSTRATE COMPLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siavoush Dastmalchi

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Aldehyde oxidase (EC 1.2.3.1, a cytosolic enzyme containing FAD, molybdenum and iron-sulphur cluster, is a member of non-cytochrome P-450 enzymes called molybdenum hydroxylases which is involved in the metabolism of a wide range of endogenous compounds and many drug substances. Drug metabolism is one of the important characteristics which influences many aspects of a therapeutic agent such as routes of administration, drug interaction and toxicity and therefore, characterisation of the key interactions between enzymes and substrates is very important from drug development point of view. The aim of this study was to generate a three-dimensional model of human aldehyde oxidase (AO in order to assist us to identify the mode of interaction between enzyme and a set of phethalazine/quinazoline derivatives. Both sequence-based (BLAST and inverse protein fold recognition methods (THREADER were used to identify the crystal structure of bovine xanthine dehydrogenase (pdb code of 1FO4 as the suitable template for comparative modelling of human AO. Model structure was generated by aligning and then threading the sequence of human AO onto the template structure, incorporating the associated cofactors, and molecular dynamics simulations and energy minimization using GROMACS program. Different criteria which were measured by the PROCHECK, QPACK, VERIFY-3D were indicative of a proper fold for the predicted structural model of human AO. For example, 97.9 percentages of phi and psi angles were in the favoured and most favoured regions in the ramachandran plot, and all residues in the model are assigned environmentally positive compatibility scores. Further evaluation on the model quality was performed by investigation of AO-mediated oxidation of a set of phthalazine/quinazoline derivatives to develop QSAR model capable of describing the extent of the oxidation. Substrates were aligned by docking onto the active site of the enzyme using GOLD technology and then

  16. The CASPAR finding aids

    OpenAIRE

    Meghini, Carlo; Avancini, Henry; Versienti, Loredana

    2011-01-01

    One of the CASPAR key components is the FIND Components, which is implementing the Finding Aids of OAIS. According to OAIS, FIND manages Description Information that is associated to Information Packages in order to support the discovery of those Packages. FIND allows defining, creating, persisting, querying, browsing, and accessing both Description Information and the association between Information Packages and Description Information

  17. Gene finding with a hidden Markov model of genome structure and evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Hein, Jotun

    2003-01-01

    annotation. The modelling of evolution by the existing comparative gene finders leaves room for improvement. Results: A probabilistic model of both genome structure and evolution is designed. This type of model is called an Evolutionary Hidden Markov Model (EHMM), being composed of an HMM and a set of region......Motivation: A growing number of genomes are sequenced. The differences in evolutionary pattern between functional regions can thus be observed genome-wide in a whole set of organisms. The diverse evolutionary pattern of different functional regions can be exploited in the process of genomic...

  18. Incorporation of water vapor transfer in the JULES land surface model: Implications for key soil variables and land surface fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Gonzalez, Raquel; Verhoef, Anne; Luigi Vidale, Pier; Braud, Isabelle

    2012-05-01

    This study focuses on the mechanisms underlying water and heat transfer in upper soil layers, and their effects on soil physical prognostic variables and the individual components of the energy balance. The skill of the JULES (Joint UK Environment Simulator) land surface model (LSM) to simulate key soil variables, such as soil moisture content and surface temperature, and fluxes such as evaporation, is investigated. The Richards equation for soil water transfer, as used in most LSMs, was updated by incorporating isothermal and thermal water vapor transfer. The model was tested for three sites representative of semiarid and temperate arid climates: the Jornada site (New Mexico, USA), Griffith site (Australia), and Audubon site (Arizona, USA). Water vapor flux was found to contribute significantly to the water and heat transfer in the upper soil layers. This was mainly due to isothermal vapor diffusion; thermal vapor flux also played a role at the Jornada site just after rainfall events. Inclusion of water vapor flux had an effect on the diurnal evolution of evaporation, soil moisture content, and surface temperature. The incorporation of additional processes, such as water vapor flux among others, into LSMs may improve the coupling between the upper soil layers and the atmosphere, which in turn could increase the reliability of weather and climate predictions.

  19. Modelling on c-Si/a-Si:H wire solar cells: some key parameters to optimize the photovoltaic performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvarez J.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Solar cells based on silicon nano- or micro-wires have attracted much attention as a promising path for low cost photovoltaic technology. The key point of this structure is the decoupling of the light absorption from the carriers collection. In order to predict and optimize the performance potential of p- (or n- doped c-Si/ n-(or p- doped a-Si:H nanowire-based solar cells, we have used the Silvaco-Atlas software to model a single-wire device. In particular, we have noticed a drastic decrease of the open-circuit voltage (Voc when increasing the doping density of the silicon core beyond an optimum value. We present here a detailed study of the parameters that can alter the Voc of c-Si(p/a-Si:H (n wires according to the doping density in c-Si. A comparison with simulation results obtained on planar c-Si/a-Si:H heterojunctions shows that the drop in Voc, linked to an increase of the dark current in both structures, is more pronounced for radial junctions due to geometric criteria. These numerical modelling results have lead to a better understanding of transport phenomena within the wire.

  20. Cadmium-induced immune abnormality is a key pathogenic event in human and rat models of preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiong; Huang, Yinping; Zhang, Keke; Huang, Yanjun; Yan, Yan; Wang, Fan; Wu, Jie; Wang, Xiao; Xu, Zhangye; Chen, Yongtao; Cheng, Xue; Li, Yong; Jiao, Jinyu; Ye, Duyun

    2016-11-01

    With increased industrial development, cadmium is an increasingly important environmental pollutant. Studies have identified various adverse effects of cadmium on human beings. However, the relationships between cadmium pollution and the pathogenesis of preeclampsia remain elusive. The objective of this study is to explore the effects of cadmium on immune system among preeclamptic patients and rats. The results showed that the cadmium levels in the peripheral blood of preeclamptic patients were significantly higher than those observed in normal pregnancy. Based on it, a novel rat model of preeclampsia was established by the intraperitoneal administration of cadmium chloride (CdCl2) (0.125 mg of Cd/kg body weight) on gestational days 9-14. Key features of preeclampsia, including hypertension, proteinuria, placental abnormalities and small foetal size, appeared in pregnant rats after the administration of low-dose of CdCl2. Cadmium increased immunoglobulin production, mainly angiotensin II type 1-receptor-agonistic autoantibodies (AT1-AA), by increasing the expression of activation-induced cytosine deaminase (AID) in B cells. AID is critical for the maturation of antibody and autoantibody responses. In addition, angiotensin II type 1-receptor-agonistic autoantibody, which emerged recently as a potential pathogenic contributor to PE, was responsible for the deposition of complement component 5 (C5) in kidneys of pregnant rats via angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) activation. C5a is a fragment of C5 that is released during C5 activation. Selectively interfering with C5a signalling by a complement C5a receptor-specific antagonist significantly attenuated hypertension and proteinuria in Cd-injected pregnant rats. Our results suggest that cadmium induces immune abnormalities that may be a key pathogenic contributor to preeclampsia and provide new insights into treatment strategies of preeclampsia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Quantitative Assessment of Synovial Vascularity Using Contrast-Enhanced Power Doppler Ultrasonography: Correlation with Histologic Findings and MR Imaging Findings in Arthritic Rabbit Knee Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Shin, Myung Jin; Kim, Seong Moon; Kim, Namkug; Suh, Sang Hyun [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Jin Suck [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-02-15

    To validate contrast-enhanced power Doppler ultrasonography (PD US) for the evaluation of synovial vascularity in an arthritic rabbit knee model in correlation with MR and histological findings. Power Doppler ultrasonography was performed for carrageenin-induced arthritic left knee and control right knee of 13 rabbits, first without and then with sonic contrast agent enhancement (Levovist, Schering, Berlin Germany), followed by gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging. Synovial vascularity was quantitatively assessed by calculating the color pixel area in power Doppler sonography using a computer-aided image analysis program and by grading the enhancement on MR images: grade 1, enhancement of knee joint is less than one-third of the area; grade 2, one-third to two-thirds enhancement; and grade 3, more than two-thirds enhancement. Microvessel density (MVD) was measured on slides stained immunohistochemically for CD31 antigen for histological assessment. The mean area of color pixels in PD US changed from 4.37 to 16.42 mm{sup 2} in the arthritic knee after enhancement (p < 0.05), whereas it changed from 0.77 to 2.31 mm{sup 2} in the control knee (p < 0.05). Arthritic knees had greater power Doppler signal than control knees both before and after contrast administration (p < 0.05). The average MVD was 88 in arthritic knees and 46 in control knees. MVDs correlated with color pixel areas of contrast-enhanced power Doppler imaging in arthritic knees. In MR grading of arthritic knees, five were grade 2 and eight were grade 3. MVD and PD US revealed no significant difference between grade 2 and 3 arthritic knees (p > 0.05). Sonic contrast-enhanced PD US improves the visualization of synovial vascularity and allows quantitative measurement in experimentally induced rabbit arthritic knees.

  2. Animal models for diabetes: Understanding the pathogenesis and finding new treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Aileen; Bowe, James

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a lifelong, metabolic disease that is characterised by an inability to maintain normal glucose homeostasis. There are several different forms of diabetes, however the two most common are Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is caused by the autoimmune destruction of pancreatic beta cells and a subsequent lack of insulin production, whilst Type 2 diabetes is due to a combination of both insulin resistance and an inability of the beta cells to compensate adequately with increased insulin release. Animal models are increasingly being used to elucidate the mechanisms underlying both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes as well as to identify and refine novel treatments. However, a wide range of different animal models are currently in use. The majority of these models are suited to addressing certain specific aspects of diabetes research, but may be of little use in other studies. All have pros and cons, and selecting an appropriate model for addressing a specific question is not always a trivial task and will influence the study results and their interpretation. Thus, as the number of available animal models increases it is important to consider the potential roles of these models in the many different aspects of diabetes research. This review gathers information on the currently used experimental animal models of both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes and evaluates their advantages and disadvantages for research purposes and details the factors that should be taken into account in their use.

  3. Towards a new structural model of the sense of humor: preliminary findings

    OpenAIRE

    N.D.van

    2012-01-01

    In this article some formal, content-related and procedural considerations towards the sense of humor are articulated and the analysis of both everyday humor behavior and of comic styles leads to the initial proposal of a four factor- model of humor (4FMH). This model is tested in a new dataset and it is also examined whether two forms of comic styles (benevolent humor and moral mockery) do fit in. The model seems to be robust but further studies on the structure of the sense of humor as a pe...

  4. Mathematical Modeling Analysis and Optimization of Key Design Parameters of Proton-Conductive Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A proton-conductive solid oxide fuel cell (H-SOFC has the advantage of operating at higher temperatures than a PEM fuel cell, but at lower temperatures than a SOFC. This study proposes a mathematical model for an H-SOFC in order to simulate the performance and optimize the flow channel designs. The model analyzes the average mass transfer and species’ concentrations in flow channels, which allows the determination of an average concentration polarization in anode and cathode gas channels, the proton conductivity of electrolyte membranes, as well as the activation polarization. An electrical circuit for the current and proton conduction is applied to analyze the ohmic losses from an anode current collector to a cathode current collector. The model uses relatively less amount of computational time to find the V-I curve of the fuel cell, and thus it can be applied to compute a large amount of cases with different flow channel dimensions and operating parameters for optimization. The modeling simulation results agreed satisfactorily with the experimental results from literature. Simulation results showed that a relatively small total width of flow channel and rib, together with a small ratio of the rib’s width versus the total width, are preferable for obtaining high power densities and thus high efficiency.

  5. The South Atlantic Anticyclone as a key player for the representation of the tropical Atlantic climate in coupled climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabos, William; Sein, Dmitry V.; Pinto, Joaquim G.; Fink, Andreas H.; Koldunov, Nikolay V.; Alvarez, Francisco; Izquierdo, Alfredo; Keenlyside, Noel; Jacob, Daniela

    2016-08-01

    The key role of the South Atlantic Anticyclone (SAA) on the seasonal cycle of the tropical Atlantic is investigated with a regionally coupled atmosphere-ocean model for two different coupled domains. Both domains include the equatorial Atlantic and a large portion of the northern tropical Atlantic, but one extends southward, and the other northwestward. The SAA is simulated as internal model variability in the former, and is prescribed as external forcing in the latter. In the first case, the model shows significant warm biases in sea surface temperature (SST) in the Angola-Benguela front zone. If the SAA is externally prescribed, these biases are substantially reduced. The biases are both of oceanic and atmospheric origin, and are influenced by ocean-atmosphere interactions in coupled runs. The strong SST austral summer biases are associated with a weaker SAA, which weakens the winds over the southeastern tropical Atlantic, deepens the thermocline and prevents the local coastal upwelling of colder water. The biases in the basins interior in this season could be related to the advection and eddy transport of the coastal warm anomalies. In winter, the deeper thermocline and atmospheric fluxes are probably the main biases sources. Biases in incoming solar radiation and thus cloudiness seem to be a secondary effect only observed in austral winter. We conclude that the external prescription of the SAA south of 20°S improves the simulation of the seasonal cycle over the tropical Atlantic, revealing the fundamental role of this anticyclone in shaping the climate over this region.

  6. The application of models to find the relevance of residence time in lake and reservoir management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven E. JØRGENSEN

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The residence time is among the most important factors that determine the water quality of lakes and reservoirs. Models are useful tools to reveal the relationship between the residence time and the water quality. Three case studies are presented to illustrate the application of models to determine the importance of the residence time for the water quality. It was found that manipulation of the residence time, i.e. ecohydrology, may be a very useful environmental management tool.

  7. Conceptual modeling in systems biology fosters empirical findings: the mRNA lifecycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dov Dori

    Full Text Available One of the main obstacles to understanding complex biological systems is the extent and rapid evolution of information, way beyond the capacity individuals to manage and comprehend. Current modeling approaches and tools lack adequate capacity to model concurrently structure and behavior of biological systems. Here we propose Object-Process Methodology (OPM, a holistic conceptual modeling paradigm, as a means to model both diagrammatically and textually biological systems formally and intuitively at any desired number of levels of detail. OPM combines objects, e.g., proteins, and processes, e.g., transcription, in a way that is simple and easily comprehensible to researchers and scholars. As a case in point, we modeled the yeast mRNA lifecycle. The mRNA lifecycle involves mRNA synthesis in the nucleus, mRNA transport to the cytoplasm, and its subsequent translation and degradation therein. Recent studies have identified specific cytoplasmic foci, termed processing bodies that contain large complexes of mRNAs and decay factors. Our OPM model of this cellular subsystem, presented here, led to the discovery of a new constituent of these complexes, the translation termination factor eRF3. Association of eRF3 with processing bodies is observed after a long-term starvation period. We suggest that OPM can eventually serve as a comprehensive evolvable model of the entire living cell system. The model would serve as a research and communication platform, highlighting unknown and uncertain aspects that can be addressed empirically and updated consequently while maintaining consistency.

  8. Defining Soil Materials for 3-D Models of the Near Surface: Preliminary Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    geologic models that were consistent with geologic architecture. A transi- tion-probability geostatistics package – TPROGS for GMS – was used to...with transition probability geostatistics . University of California at Davis. Ann Arbor: UMI Dissertation Services. ERDC/GSL TR-12-9 44 Appendix...modeling geologic features in three dimensions for sensor simulation. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Geostatistics GEOTACS GMS Shallow subsurface Soil

  9. Key process issues in Cognitive Behavioral Analysis System of Psychotherapy (CBASP): translation of an evidence-based model into clinical practice and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivian, Dina; Salwen, Jessica

    2013-09-01

    Our "desired outcome" in writing this article was to present not only key process issues stemming from the Cognitive Behavioral Analysis System of Psychotherapy (CBASP; McCullough, 2000), but to highlight those therapy maneuvers that we, a "seasoned" clinician/supervisor and a clinical trainee, find most useful in delivering treatment and in conducting supervision. We strongly believe that it is only through the translation of evidence-based therapeutic models, such as CBASP, into effective training that a true integration of science and practice can be obtained. Thus, the congruence of trainer's and trainee's views on what constitute top process issues in therapy is important in evaluating the reliability of a therapy model; with this in mind, we focus on three process issues, as follows: (1) problems are anchored to the "here and now" and to specific situational outcomes; (2) patients are encouraged to identify the role they play in affecting their distressing outcomes and to take responsibility for "fixing" them; and (3) the therapist planfully engages in the process of change via disciplined personal involvement. Research and theory supporting these maneuvers are presented, in conjunction with clinical examples. 2013 APA, all rights reserved

  10. Urban Form Energy Use and Emissions in China: Preliminary Findings and Model Proof of Concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aden, Nathaniel; Qin, Yining; Fridley, David

    2010-12-15

    Urbanization is reshaping China's economy, society, and energy system. Between 1990 and 2008 China added more than 300 million new urban residents, bringing the total urbanization rate to 46%. The ongoing population shift is spurring energy demand for new construction, as well as additional residential use with the replacement of rural biomass by urban commercial energy services. This project developed a modeling tool to quantify the full energy consequences of a particular form of urban residential development in order to identify energy- and carbon-efficient modes of neighborhood-level development and help mitigate resource and environmental implications of swelling cities. LBNL developed an integrated modeling tool that combines process-based lifecycle assessment with agent-based building operational energy use, personal transport, and consumption modeling. The lifecycle assessment approach was used to quantify energy and carbon emissions embodied in building materials production, construction, maintenance, and demolition. To provide more comprehensive analysis, LBNL developed an agent-based model as described below. The model was applied to LuJing, a residential development in Jinan, Shandong Province, to provide a case study and model proof of concept. This study produced results data that are unique by virtue of their scale, scope and type. Whereas most existing literature focuses on building-, city-, or national-level analysis, this study covers multi-building neighborhood-scale development. Likewise, while most existing studies focus exclusively on building operational energy use, this study also includes embodied energy related to personal consumption and buildings. Within the boundaries of this analysis, food is the single largest category of the building energy footprint, accounting for 23% of the total. On a policy level, the LCA approach can be useful for quantifying the energy and environmental benefits of longer average building lifespans. In

  11. Data Assimilation Tools for CO2 Reservoir Model Development – A Review of Key Data Types, Analyses, and Selected Software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rockhold, Mark L.; Sullivan, E. C.; Murray, Christopher J.; Last, George V.; Black, Gary D.

    2009-09-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has embarked on an initiative to develop world-class capabilities for performing experimental and computational analyses associated with geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide. The ultimate goal of this initiative is to provide science-based solutions for helping to mitigate the adverse effects of greenhouse gas emissions. This Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) initiative currently has two primary focus areas—advanced experimental methods and computational analysis. The experimental methods focus area involves the development of new experimental capabilities, supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory (EMSL) housed at PNNL, for quantifying mineral reaction kinetics with CO2 under high temperature and pressure (supercritical) conditions. The computational analysis focus area involves numerical simulation of coupled, multi-scale processes associated with CO2 sequestration in geologic media, and the development of software to facilitate building and parameterizing conceptual and numerical models of subsurface reservoirs that represent geologic repositories for injected CO2. This report describes work in support of the computational analysis focus area. The computational analysis focus area currently consists of several collaborative research projects. These are all geared towards the development and application of conceptual and numerical models for geologic sequestration of CO2. The software being developed for this focus area is referred to as the Geologic Sequestration Software Suite or GS3. A wiki-based software framework is being developed to support GS3. This report summarizes work performed in FY09 on one of the LDRD projects in the computational analysis focus area. The title of this project is Data Assimilation Tools for CO2 Reservoir Model Development. Some key objectives of this project in FY09 were to assess the current state

  12. Finding identifiable parameter combinations in nonlinear ODE models and the rational reparameterization of their input-output equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshkat, Nicolette; Anderson, Chris; Distefano, Joseph J

    2011-09-01

    When examining the structural identifiability properties of dynamic system models, some parameters can take on an infinite number of values and yet yield identical input-output data. These parameters and the model are then said to be unidentifiable. Finding identifiable combinations of parameters with which to reparameterize the model provides a means for quantitatively analyzing the model and computing solutions in terms of the combinations. In this paper, we revisit and explore the properties of an algorithm for finding identifiable parameter combinations using Gröbner Bases and prove useful theoretical properties of these parameter combinations. We prove a set of M algebraically independent identifiable parameter combinations can be found using this algorithm and that there exists a unique rational reparameterization of the input-output equations over these parameter combinations. We also demonstrate application of the procedure to a nonlinear biomodel.

  13. Finding and proving the exact ground state of a generalized Ising model by convex optimization and MAX-SAT

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Wenxuan; Dacek, Stephen; Rong, Ziqin; Urban, Alexander; Cao, Shan; Luo, Chuan; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2016-01-01

    Lattice models, also known as generalized Ising models or cluster expansions, are widely used in many areas of science and are routinely applied to alloy thermodynamics, solid-solid phase transitions, magnetic and thermal properties of solids, and fluid mechanics, among others. However, the problem of finding the true global ground state of a lattice model, which is essential for all of the aforementioned applications, has remained unresolved, with only a limited number of results for highly simplified systems known. In this article, we present the first general algorithm to find the exact ground states of complex lattice models and to prove their global optimality, resolving this fundamental problem in condensed matter and materials theory. We transform the infinite-discrete-optimization problem into a pair of combinatorial optimization (MAX-SAT) and non-smooth convex optimization (MAX-MIN) problems, which provide upper and lower bounds on the ground state energy respectively. By systematically converging th...

  14. Successful micronucleus testing with the EPI/001 3D reconstructed epidermis model: preliminary findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, E; Molinari, J; Remoué, N; Sá-Rocha, V M; Barrichello, C; Hurtado, S P

    2012-03-18

    Currently, the cosmetics industry relies on the results of in vitro genotoxicity tests to assess the safety of chemicals. Although the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) test for the detection of cells that have divided once is routinely used and currently accepted by regulatory agencies, it has some limitations. Reconstituted human epidermis (RHE) is widely used in safety assessments because its physiological properties resemble those of the skin, and because it allows testing of substances such as hydrophobic compounds. Thus, the micronucleus test is being adapted for application in RHE-reconstructed tissues. Here we investigated whether two different reconstructed epidermis models (EPI/001 from Straticell, and RHE/S/17 from Skinethic) are suitable for application of the micronucleus test. We found that acetone does not modify micronucleus frequency, cell viability, and model structure, compared with non-treated RHE. Treatment of the EPI/001 model with mitomycin C and vinblastine resulted in a dose-dependent increase of micronucleus frequency as well as a decrease of tissue viability and of binucleated cell rate, while no changes of the epidermal structure were observed. The number of binucleated cells obtained with the RHE/S/17 model was too small to permit micronucleus testing. These results indicate that the proliferative rate of the tissue used is a critical parameter in performing the micronucleus test on a 3D model.

  15. How Relevant Are Imaging Findings in Animal Models of Movement Disorders to Human Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannon, Darryl; Landau, Anne M; Doudet, Doris J

    2015-08-01

    The combination of novel imaging techniques with the use of small animal models of disease is often used in attempt to understand disease mechanisms, design potential clinical biomarkers and therapeutic interventions, and develop novel methods with translatability to human clinical conditions. However, it is clear that most animal models are deficient when compared to the complexity of human diseases: they cannot sufficiently replicate all the features of multisystem disorders. Furthermore, some practical differences may affect the use or interpretation of animal imaging to model human conditions such as the use of anesthesia, various species differences, and limitations of methodological tools. Nevertheless, imaging animal models allows us to dissect, in interpretable bits, the effects of one system upon another, the consequences of variable neuronal losses or overactive systems, the results of experimental treatments, and we can develop and validate new methods. In this review, we focus on imaging modalities that are easily used in both human subjects and animal models such as positron emission and magnetic resonance imaging and discuss aging and Parkinson's disease as prototypical examples of preclinical imaging studies.

  16. Is the stokeslet model sufficient for finding nutrient uptake of microscopic suspension feeders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutton, Alexander T.; Pepper, Rachel E.

    2016-11-01

    Microscopic sessile suspension feeders are part of many aquatic ecosystems. They are single-celled, vary in size from a few to about 100 microns in length, live attached to substrates, and serve important ecological roles as both food for larger organisms and consumers of bacteria and other small particles. These organisms create currents in order to bring food toward them. Understanding these currents may allow us not only deeper insight into the ecology of aquatic ecosystems, but also may enable innovation in water treatment. Simulations of the feeding currents of these organisms typically use a simple model that places a stokeslet above an infinite plane boundary representing the surface of attachment. This model produces a useful approximation for the flow field of the organism, but may be of limited accuracy when the organism is near the boundary. We create a different model composed of a stokeslet and a potential dipole, which form a sphere. This sphere has a sin(θ) tangential velocity boundary condition, accounting for the cell body. Using nutrient flux to the organism as our metric, we investigate the discrepancy between the spherical and stokeslet models in order to determine the efficacy of the stokeslet model as an approximation of single-celled suspension feeders.

  17. Mathematical models and a constructive heuristic for finding minimum fundamental cycle bases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liberti Leo

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of finding a fundamental cycle basis with minimum total cost in a graph arises in many application fields. In this paper we present some integer linear programming formulations and we compare their performances, in terms of instance size, CPU time required for the solution, and quality of the associated lower bound derived by solving the corresponding continuous relaxations. Since only very small instances can be solved to optimality with these formulations and very large instances occur in a number of applications, we present a new constructive heuristic and compare it with alternative heuristics.

  18. Depth keying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvili, Ronen; Kaplan, Amir; Ofek, Eyal; Yahav, Giora

    2003-05-01

    We present a new solution to the known problem of video keying in a natural environment. We segment foreground objects from background objects using their relative distance from the camera, which makes it possible to do away with the use of color for keying. To do so, we developed and built a novel depth video camera, capable of producing RGB and D signals, where D stands for the distance to each pixel. The new RGBD camera enables the creation of a whole new gallery of effects and applications such as multi-layer background substitutions. This new modality makes the production of real time mixed reality video possible, as well as post-production manipulation of recorded video. We address the problem of color spill -- in which the color of the foreground object is mixed, along its boundary, with the background color. This problem prevents an accurate separation of the foreground object from its background, and it is most visible when compositing the foreground objects to a new background. Most existing techniques are limited to the use of a constant background color. We offer a novel general approach to the problem with enabling the use of the natural background, based upon the D channel generated by the camera.

  19. Noncommunicating syringomyelia following occlusion of central canal in rats. Experimental model and histological findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milhorat, T H; Nobandegani, F; Miller, J I; Rao, C

    1993-02-01

    This report describes a new and reliable technique for producing experimental noncommunicating syringomyelia. In 30 rats, 1.2 to 1.6 microliters of kaolin was microinjected into the dorsal columns and central gray matter of the spinal cord at C-6. The inoculations caused transient neurological deficits in four animals and no deficits in 26 animals. Within 24 hours, kaolin and polymorphonuclear leukocytes entered the central canal and drained rostrally. The clearance of inflammatory products induced a proliferation of ependymal cells and periependymal fibrous astrocytes, which formed synechiae and obstructed the canal at the level of injection and at one or more levels up to C-1. In 22 animals followed for 48 hours or longer, the upper end of the central canal became acutely dilated and formed an ependyma-lined syrinx that enlarged to massive dimensions within 6 weeks. The rostral syrinxes did not communicate with the fourth ventricle and were not associated with hydrocephalus. The histological findings in acute noncommunicating syringomyelia were characterized by progressive stretching and thinning of the ependyma, elongation of intracanalicular septae, and the formation of periependymal edema. After 3 weeks, there was progressive compression of the periependymal tissues associated with stretching of axons, fragmentation of myelin sheaths, and the formation of myelin droplets. These findings and the sequence in which they evolved were identical in most respects to those occurring in acute and subacute noncommunicating hydrocephalus.

  20. A real-time recording model of key indicators for energy consumption and carbon emissions of sustainable buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weiwei; Yang, Huanjia; Chew, David; Hou, Yanhong; Li, Qiming

    2014-05-14

    Buildings' sustainability is one of the crucial parts for achieving urban sustainability. Applied to buildings, life-cycle assessment encompasses the analysis and assessment of the environmental effects of building materials, components and assemblies throughout the entire life of the building construction, use and demolition. Estimate of carbon emissions is essential and crucial for an accurate and reasonable life-cycle assessment. Addressing the need for more research into integrating analysis of real-time and automatic recording of key indicators for a more accurate calculation and comparison, this paper aims to design a real-time recording model of these crucial indicators concerning the calculation and estimation of energy use and carbon emissions of buildings based on a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID)-based system. The architecture of the RFID-based carbon emission recording/tracking system, which contains four functional layers including data record layer, data collection/update layer, data aggregation layer and data sharing/backup layer, is presented. Each of these layers is formed by RFID or network devices and sub-systems that operate at a specific level. In the end, a proof-of-concept system is developed to illustrate the implementation of the proposed architecture and demonstrate the feasibility of the design. This study would provide the technical solution for real-time recording system of building carbon emissions and thus is of great significance and importance to improve urban sustainability.

  1. Key signaling pathways in the muscle-invasive bladder carcinoma: Clinical markers for disease modeling and optimized treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselyov, Alex; Bunimovich-Mendrazitsky, Svetlana; Startsev, Vladimir

    2016-06-01

    In this review, we evaluate key molecular pathways and markers of muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). Overexpression and activation of EGFR, p63, and EMT genes are suggestive of basal MIBC subtype generally responsive to chemotherapy. Alterations in PPARγ, ERBB2/3, and FGFR3 gene products and their signaling along with deregulated p53, cytokeratins KRT5/6/14 in combination with the cellular proliferation (Ki-67), and cell cycle markers (p16) indicate the need for more radical treatment protocols. Similarly, the "bell-shape" dynamics of Shh expression levels may suggest aggressive MIBC. A panel of diverse biological markers may be suitable for simulation studies of MIBC and development of an optimized treatment protocol. We conducted a critical evaluation of PubMed/Medline and SciFinder databases related to MIBC covering the period 2009-2015. The free-text search was extended by adding the following keywords and phrases: bladder cancer, metastatic, muscle-invasive, basal, luminal, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, cancer stem cell, mutations, immune response, signaling, biological markers, molecular markers, mathematical models, simulation, epigenetics, transmembrane, transcription factor, kinase, predictor, prognosis. The resulting selection of ca 500 abstracts was further analyzed in order to select the latest publications relevant to MIBC molecular markers of immediate clinical significance. © 2015 UICC.

  2. Neural Tuning Size in a Model of Primate Visual Processing Accounts for Three Key Markers of Holistic Face Processing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheston Tan

    Full Text Available Faces are an important and unique class of visual stimuli, and have been of interest to neuroscientists for many years. Faces are known to elicit certain characteristic behavioral markers, collectively labeled "holistic processing", while non-face objects are not processed holistically. However, little is known about the underlying neural mechanisms. The main aim of this computational simulation work is to investigate the neural mechanisms that make face processing holistic. Using a model of primate visual processing, we show that a single key factor, "neural tuning size", is able to account for three important markers of holistic face processing: the Composite Face Effect (CFE, Face Inversion Effect (FIE and Whole-Part Effect (WPE. Our proof-of-principle specifies the precise neurophysiological property that corresponds to the poorly-understood notion of holism, and shows that this one neural property controls three classic behavioral markers of holism. Our work is consistent with neurophysiological evidence, and makes further testable predictions. Overall, we provide a parsimonious account of holistic face processing, connecting computation, behavior and neurophysiology.

  3. Analyzing Multilevel Data: Comparing Findings from Hierarchical Linear Modeling and Ordinary Least Squares Regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocconi, Louis M.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the differing conclusions one may come to depending upon the type of analysis chosen, hierarchical linear modeling or ordinary least squares (OLS) regression. To illustrate this point, this study examined the influences of seniors' self-reported critical thinking abilities three ways: (1) an OLS regression with the student…

  4. Temperature dependent fracture properties of shape memory alloys: novel findings and a comprehensive model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maletta, Carmine; Sgambitterra, Emanuele; Niccoli, Fabrizio

    2016-12-21

    Temperature dependent fracture properties of NiTi-based Shape Memory Alloys (SMAs), within the pseudoelastic regime, were analyzed. In particular, the effective Stress Intensity Factor (SIF) was estimated, at different values of the testing temperature, by a fitting of the William's expansion series, based on Digital Image Correlation (DIC) measurements. It was found that temperature plays an important role on SIF and on critical fast fracture conditions. As a consequence, Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM) approaches are not suitable to predict fracture properties of SMAs, as they do not consider the effects of temperature. On the contrary, good agreements between DIC results and the predictions of an ad-hoc analytical model were observed. In fact, the model takes into account the whole thermo mechanical loading condition, including both mechanical load and temperature. Results revealed that crack tip stress-induced transformations do not represent a toughening effect and this is a completely novel result within the SMA community. Furthremore, it was demonstrated that the analytical model can be actually used to define a temperature independent fracture toughness parameter. Therefore, a new approach is proposed, based on the analytical model, where both mechanical load and temperature are considered as loading parameters in SIF computation.

  5. Identifying key processes in the hydrochemistry of a basin through the combined use of factor and regression models

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sandow Mark Yidana; Bruce Banoeng-Yakubo; Patrick Asamoah Sakyi

    2012-04-01

    An innovative technique of measuring the intensities of major sources of variation in the hydrochemistry of (ground) water in a basin has been developed. This technique, which is based on the combination of R-mode factor and multiple regression analyses, can be used to measure the degrees of influence of the major sources of variation in the hydrochemistry without measuring the concentrations of the entire set of physico-chemical parameters which are often used to characterize water systems. R-mode factor analysis was applied to the data of 13 physico-chemical parameters and 50 samples in order to determine the major sources of variation in the hydrochemistry of some aquifers in the western region of Ghana. In this study, three sources of variation in the hydrochemistry were distinguished: the dissolution of chlorides and sulfates of the major cations, carbonate mineral dissolution, and silicate mineral weathering. Two key parameters were identified with each of the processes and multiple regression models were developed for each process. These models were tested and found to predict these processes quite accurately, and can be applied anywhere within the terrain. This technique can be reliably applied in areas where logistical constraints limit water sampling for whole basin hydrochemical characterization. Q-mode hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) applied to the data revealed three major groundwater associations distinguished on the basis of the major causes of variation in the hydrochemistry. The three groundwater types represent Na–HCO3, Ca–HCO3, and Na–Cl groundwater types. Silicate stability diagrams suggest that all these groundwater types are mainly stable in the kaolinite and montmorillonite fields suggesting moderately restricted flow conditions.

  6. A data-driven model for spectra: Finding double redshifts in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Tsalmantza, P

    2012-01-01

    We present a data-driven method - heteroscedastic matrix factorization, a kind of probabilistic factor analysis - for modeling or performing dimensionality reduction on observed spectra or other high-dimensional data with known but non-uniform observational uncertainties. The method uses an iterative inverse-variance-weighted least-squares minimization procedure to generate a best set of basis functions. The method is similar to principal components analysis, but with the substantial advantage that it uses measurement uncertainties in a responsible way and accounts naturally for poorly measured and missing data; it models the variance in the noise-deconvolved data space. A regularization can be applied, in the form of a smoothness prior (inspired by Gaussian processes) or a non-negative constraint, without making the method prohibitively slow. Because the method optimizes a justified scalar (related to the likelihood), the basis provides a better fit to the data in a probabilistic sense than any PCA basis. We...

  7. Transport Aspects of Local and Regional Energy Autonomy Findings from a Modelling Study of Liechtenstein

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    A growing number of regional and local communities in Europe aim towards “energy autonomy”. These communities try to cover their energy demand for electricity, heating and cooling to 100 % by renewable energies from local and regional sources. Is this approach also useful and viable for transport? Should the European institutions support such strategies? In this paper we will present and discuss modelling results for Liechtenstein as well as provide an overview of ongoing research project foc...

  8. Toward Finding Driving Communications Factors in the System of Systems Survivability Simulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    of the investigation (Xing Wan, Zhu, Sanchez, & Kaymal, 2013). The Lasso method is a type of least squares regression analysis in which a penalty is...various real-world models. Another reason for the experiment is to be able to compare results of the stepwise linear regression with the Lasso method in...Design, Factor Screening, Survivability Lethality and Vulnerability Assessment, Supersaturated Design, Stepwise Regression 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 77

  9. Weight Gain, Schizophrenia and Antipsychotics: New Findings from Animal Model and Pharmacogenomic Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Panariello

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Excess body weight is one of the most common physical health problems among patients with schizophrenia that increases the risk for many medical problems, including type 2 diabetes mellitus, coronary heart disease, osteoarthritis, and hypertension, and accounts in part for 20% shorter life expectancy than in general population. Among patients with severe mental illness, obesity can be attributed to an unhealthy lifestyle, personal genetic profile, as well as the effects of psychotropic medications, above all antipsychotic drugs. Novel “atypical” antipsychotic drugs represent a substantial improvement on older “typical” drugs. However, clinical experience has shown that some, but not all, of these drugs can induce substantial weight gain. Animal models of antipsychotic-related weight gain and animal transgenic models of knockout or overexpressed genes of antipsychotic receptors have been largely evaluated by scientific community for changes in obesity-related gene expression or phenotypes. Moreover, pharmacogenomic approaches have allowed to detect more than 300 possible candidate genes for antipsychotics-induced body weight gain. In this paper, we summarize current thinking on: (1 the role of polymorphisms in several candidate genes, (2 the possible roles of various neurotransmitters and neuropeptides in this adverse drug reaction, and (3 the state of development of animal models in this matter. We also outline major areas for future research.

  10. Functional piglet model for the clinical syndrome and postmortem findings induced by staphylococcal enterotoxin B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gessel, Yvonne A; Mani, Sachin; Bi, Shuguang; Hammamieh, Rasha; Shupp, Jeffrey W; Das, Rina; Coleman, Gary D; Jett, Marti

    2004-11-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin (SE) B causes serious gastrointestinal illness, and intoxication with this exotoxin can lead to lethal toxic shock syndrome. In order to overcome significant shortcomings of current rodent and nonhuman primate models, we developed a piglet model of lethal SEB intoxication. Fourteen-day-old Yorkshire piglets were given intravenous SEB, observed clinically, and sacrificed at 4, 6, 24, 48, 72, or 96 hrs posttreatment. Clinical signs were biphasic with pyrexia, vomiting, and diarrhea within 4 hrs, followed by terminal hypotension and shock by 96 hrs. Mild lymphoid lesions were identified as early as 24 hrs, with severe lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, and prominent Peyer's patches found by 72 hrs. Widespread edema-most prominent in the mesentery, between loops of spiral colon, and in retroperitoneal connective tissue-was found in animals at 72 hrs. Additional histologic changes included perivascular aggregates of large lymphocytes variably present in the lung and brain, circulating lymphoblasts, and lymphocytic portal hepatitis. Preliminary molecular investigation using gene array has uncovered several gene profile changes that may have implications in the pathophysiology leading to irreversible shock. Five genes were selected for further study, and all showed increased mRNA levels subsequent to SEB exposure. The use of this piglet model will continue to elucidate the pathogenesis of SEB intoxication and facilitate the testing of new therapeutic regimens that may better correlate with human lesions.

  11. SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT – KEY FACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Daniela DINU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper exposes Supply Chain Management by its key factors. Briefly, where the Supply Chain Management is treated as strategic part of a company then maintaining both control and influence throughout the entire supply chain are key factors and critical to success. On the other hand, finding the right partner to manage the non-strategic Supply Chains would be another key factor too. To define the most important key factors within Supply Chain Management means a deeply understanding of both Supply Chain’ s components, procedures, workflow, processes and the importance of Supply Chain Management into maximizing company's value. SCORE model able to provide solid information about measuring performance and identifying priorities within Supply Chain Management will help us to understand the key factors by analyzing its elements: Plan, Source, Make, Deliver,Return, Enable. These elements covers all the challenging areas from first to third tier of Supply Chain Management.

  12. ISUPPOSEW -A Computer Program That Finds Regions in the Plan Model of a Visual Scene

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-03-01

    points is created in such a manner that the function GENSYM names the line, the paired points are put into the property list of the new line...new elements of CDLNS and their created crossing points, if any, are named by the function GENSYM but at this stage no internal format for them is...name of the region is given by GENSYM and put into the property list of MODEL identified by REGIONS. Each created region has the property list of all

  13. How to Find Exculpatory and Inculpatory Evidence Using a Circular Digital Forensics Process Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatir, Marjan; Hejazi, Seyed Mahmood

    With raising the number of cyber crimes, the need of having a proper digital forensic process also increases. Although digital forensics is practiced in recent years, there is still a big gap between previously suggested digital forensics processes and what is really needed to be done in real cases. Some problems with current processes are lack of flexible transition between phases, not having a clear method or a complete scenario for addressing reliable evidence, and not paying enough attention to management aspects and team roles. This paper provides a process model by paying special attention to the team roles and management aspects as well as both exculpatory and inculpatory evidence.

  14. Finding all multiple stable fixpoints of n-species Lotka-Volterra competition models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lischke, Heike; Löffler, Thomas J

    2017-06-01

    One way to explore assembly of extant and novel communities from species pools, and by that biodiversity and species ranges, is to study the equilibrium behavior of dynamic competition models such as the Lotka-Volterra competition (LVC) model. We present a novel method (COMMUSTIX) to determine all stable fixpoints of the general LVC model with abundances x from a given pool of n species. To that purpose, we split the species in potentially surviving species (xi>0) and in others going extinct (xi=0). We derived criteria for the stability of xi=0 and for the equilibrium of xi>0 to determine possible combinations of extinct and surviving species by iteratively applying a mixed binary linear optimization algorithm. We tested this new method against (a) the numerical solution at equilibrium of the LVC ordinary differential equations (ODEs) and (b) the fixpoints of all combinations of surviving and extinct species (possible only for small n), tested for stability and non-negativity. The tests revealed that COMMUSTIX is reliable, it detects all multiple stable fixpoints (SFPs), which is not guaranteed by solving the ODEs, and more efficient than the combinations method. With COMMUSTIX, we studied the dependence of the fixpoint behavior on the competition strengths relative to the intra-specific competition. If inter-specific competition was considerably lower than intra-specific competition, only globally SFPs occurred. In contrast, if all inter-specific was higher than intra-specific competition, multiple SFPs consisting of only one species occurred. If competition strengths in the species pool ranged from below to above the intra-specific competition, either global or multiple SFPs strongly differing in species composition occurred. The species richness over all SFPs was high for pools of species with similar, either weak or strong competition, and lower for species with dissimilar or close to intra-specific competition strengths. The new approach is a reliable and

  15. Finding the 'lost years' in green turtles: insights from ocean circulation models and genetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putman, Nathan F; Naro-Maciel, Eugenia

    2013-10-07

    Organismal movement is an essential component of ecological processes and connectivity among ecosystems. However, estimating connectivity and identifying corridors of movement are challenging in oceanic organisms such as young turtles that disperse into the open sea and remain largely unobserved during a period known as 'the lost years'. Using predictions of transport within an ocean circulation model and data from published genetic analysis, we present to our knowledge, the first basin-scale hypothesis of distribution and connectivity among major rookeries and foraging grounds (FGs) of green turtles (Chelonia mydas) during their 'lost years'. Simulations indicate that transatlantic dispersal is likely to be common and that recurrent connectivity between the southwestern Indian Ocean and the South Atlantic is possible. The predicted distribution of pelagic juvenile turtles suggests that many 'lost years hotspots' are presently unstudied and located outside protected areas. These models, therefore, provide new information on possible dispersal pathways that link nesting beaches with FGs. These pathways may be of exceptional conservation concern owing to their importance for sea turtles during a critical developmental period.

  16. Epistemic uncertainty in the ranking and categorization of probabilistic safety assessment model elements: issues and findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgonovo, Emanuele

    2008-08-01

    In this work, we study the effect of epistemic uncertainty in the ranking and categorization of elements of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) models. We show that, while in a deterministic setting a PSA element belongs to a given category univocally, in the presence of epistemic uncertainty, a PSA element belongs to a given category only with a certain probability. We propose an approach to estimate these probabilities, showing that their knowledge allows to appreciate "the sensitivity of component categorizations to uncertainties in the parameter values" (U.S. NRC Regulatory Guide 1.174). We investigate the meaning and utilization of an assignment method based on the expected value of importance measures. We discuss the problem of evaluating changes in quality assurance, maintenance activities prioritization, etc. in the presence of epistemic uncertainty. We show that the inclusion of epistemic uncertainly in the evaluation makes it necessary to evaluate changes through their effect on PSA model parameters. We propose a categorization of parameters based on the Fussell-Vesely and differential importance (DIM) measures. In addition, issues in the calculation of the expected value of the joint importance measure are present when evaluating changes affecting groups of components. We illustrate that the problem can be solved using DIM. A numerical application to a case study concludes the work.

  17. Validation Of Key Relationships In An Extended Service-Profit Chain Model In The South Africa Retail Industry Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton M. Verwey

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to evaluate an extended conceptual model depicting hypothesised relationships between employee climate, customer value and financial performance. Questionnaires assessing employee experienced climate and customer-experienced value were completed by all the employees (more than 1200 and more than 2000 customers of a single retail company operating almost 100 stores in Southern Africa. The major findings were that some of the components of employee-experienced climate are positively related to customer experienced value in terms of both product and relationship quality. There was no significant relationship between customer-experienced value and the financial performance of the organisation. OpsommingDie doel van hierdie studie was om ‘n uitgebreide konseptuele model te toets wat gehipotetiseerde verwantskappe voorstel tussen werknemer-ervaarde klimaat, kliënt-ervaarde waarde en finansiële prestasie. Vraelyste wat werknemer-ervaarde klimaat en kliënt-ervaarde waarde meet is voltooi deur meer as 1200 werknemers en meer as 2000 kliënte van ‘n enkele kleinhandelaar wat landwyd byna 100 winkels regoor Suid-Afrika bedryf. Die hoofbevindinge is dat sommige komponente van werknemer-ervaarde klimaat positief verwant is aan kliënt-ervaarde waarde in terme van beide produk en verhoudingsgehalte. Daar was egter geen beduidende verband tussen kliëntervaarde waarde en die finansiële prestasie van die organisasie nie.

  18. Thromboelastometry (TEM) findings in disseminated intravascular coagulation in a pig model of endotoxinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöchl, Herbert; Solomon, Cristina; Schulz, Arthur; Voelckel, Wolfgang; Hanke, Alexander; Van Griensven, Martijn; Redl, Heinz; Bahrami, Soheyl

    2011-01-01

    Standard coagulation tests have a low specificity and sensitivity for diagnosing disseminated intravascular coagulation. The aim of this study was to determine whether whole blood thromboelastometry (TEM) detects lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced changes in coagulation. Blood samples from 10 pigs were drawn at baseline, before and at the end of LPS infusion and 2, 3, 4 and 5 h after the start of endotoxinemia. Simultaneous to TEM, standard coagulation tests and extended coagulation analysis including tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) were performed. Endotoxinemia resulted in a significant acceleration of the nonactivated TEM (NATEM) clotting time 2 h after the end of LPS infusion; in contrast, the changes in international normalized ratio and activated partial thromboplastin time suggested delayed initiation of coagulation. NATEM maximum clot firmness (MCF) and fibrin-based thromboelastometry test (FIBTEM)-MCF decreased significantly from baseline until the last time point (from 64.6 ± 7.8 and 35.1 ± 12.8 mm to 52.8 ± 4.6 and 21.4 ± 11.8 mm, respectively; P = 0.01 for both parameters). A sharp, transient increase of t-PA had no effect on maximum lysis in the NATEM test. PAI-1 increased significantly 3 h after the start of LPS infusion, paralleled by a decrease in maximum lysis. In conclusion, TEM was superior to standard coagulation tests in reflecting initial activation of coagulation during endotoxinemia. TEM further suggested consumption of coagulation substrate; at the same time, inhibition of plasminogen activation was accompanied by improved clot stability. Further investigations are necessary to establish the clinical relevance of these findings.

  19. Brain mechanisms of Change in Addictions Treatment: Models, Methods, and Emerging Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Tammy; Noronha, Antonio; Carroll, Kathleen M; Potenza, Marc N; Hutchison, Kent; Calhoun, Vince D; Gabrieli, John D E; Morgenstern, Jon; Nixon, Sara Jo; Wexler, Bruce E; Brewer, Judson; Ray, Lara; Filbey, Francesca; Strauman, Timothy J; Kober, Hedy; Feldstein Ewing, Sarah W

    2016-09-01

    Increased understanding of "how" and "for whom" treatment works at the level of the brain has potential to transform addictions treatment through the development of innovative neuroscience-informed interventions. The 2015 Science of Change meeting bridged the fields of neuroscience and psychotherapy research to identify brain mechanisms of behavior change that are "common" across therapies, and "specific" to distinct behavioral interventions. Conceptual models of brain mechanisms underlying effects of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, mindfulness interventions, and Motivational Interviewing were discussed. Presentations covered methods for integrating neuroimaging into psychotherapy research, and novel analytic approaches. Effects of heavy substance use on the brain, and recovery of brain functioning with sustained abstinence, which may be facilitated by cognitive training, were reviewed. Neuroimaging provides powerful tools for determining brain mechanisms underlying psychotherapy and medication effects, predicting and monitoring outcomes, developing novel interventions that target specific brain circuits, and identifying for whom an intervention will be effective.

  20. Learning Together 1: an educational model for training GPs, paediatricians: initial findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaulay, Chloe; Spicer, John; Riches, Wendy; Lakhanpaul, Monica

    2017-01-01

    Learning Together is primarily an educational intervention, where paediatric registrars [SpRs] and General Practice (GP) registrars [GPSTs] see children together in a primary care setting. Over a six month period in 2013/2014, 44 learning pairs were set up mainly in North East and Central London. Proof of concept for the model at scale was achieved. Reported learning demonstrated: clinical learning themes of new knowledge, skill and communication skills; and collaborative themes of ongoing collaboration, satisfaction with team working and change in attitudes. These themes were identified in both sets of trainees. The self-reported learning is backed up by the results of a retrospective notes review of four common conditions based on NICE guidelines; constipation, asthma, feverish illness and eczema (CAFE). Guidance adherence improved from 57% before the intervention in solo GP training consultations to 72% during the joint clinic intervention (p Learning Together in its South London extension.

  1. Epithelial cells as active player in fibrosis: findings from an in vitro model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solange Moll

    Full Text Available Kidney fibrosis, a scarring of the tubulo-interstitial space, is due to activation of interstitial myofibroblasts recruited locally or systemically with consecutive extracellular matrix deposition. Newly published clinical studies correlating acute kidney injury (AKI to chronic kidney disease (CKD challenge this pathological concept putting tubular epithelial cells into the spotlight. In this work we investigated the role of epithelial cells in fibrosis using a simple controlled in vitro system. An epithelial/mesenchymal 3D cell culture model composed of human proximal renal tubular cells and fibroblasts was challenged with toxic doses of Cisplatin, thus injuring epithelial cells. RT-PCR for classical fibrotic markers was performed on fibroblasts to assess their modulation toward an activated myofibroblast phenotype in presence or absence of that stimulus. Epithelial cell lesion triggered a phenotypical modulation of fibroblasts toward activated myofibroblasts as assessed by main fibrotic marker analysis. Uninjured 3D cell culture as well as fibroblasts alone treated with toxic stimulus in the absence of epithelial cells were used as control. Our results, with the caveats due to the limited, but highly controllable and reproducible in vitro approach, suggest that epithelial cells can control and regulate fibroblast phenotype. Therefore they emerge as relevant target cells for the development of new preventive anti-fibrotic therapeutic approaches.

  2. Glucosamine sulfate effect on the degenerated patellar cartilage: preliminary findings by pharmacokinetic magnetic resonance modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marti-Bonmati, Luis [Dr Peset University Hospital, Radiology Department, Valencia (Spain); Hospital Quiron Valencia, Radiology Department, Valencia (Spain); Sanz-Requena, Roberto; Alberich-Bayarri, Angel [Hospital Quiron Valencia, Radiology Department, Valencia (Spain); Rodrigo, Jose Luis [Dr Peset University Hospital, Traumatology and Orthopedics Surgery Department, Valencia (Spain); Carot, Jose Miguel [Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, EIO Department, Valencia (Spain)

    2009-06-15

    Normal and degenerated cartilages have different magnetic resonance (MR) capillary permeability (K{sup trans}) and interstitial interchangeable volume (v{sub e}). Our hypothesis was that glucosamine sulfate treatment modifies these neovascularity abnormalities in osteoarthritis. Sixteen patients with patella degeneration, randomly distributed into glucosamine or control groups, underwent two 1.5-Tesla dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging studies (treatment initiation and after 6 months). The pain visual analog scale (VAS) and American Knee Society (AKS) score were used. A two-compartment pharmacokinetic model was used. Percentages of variations (postreatment-pretreatment/pretreatment) were compared (t-test for independent data). In the glucosamine group, pain and functional outcomes statistically improved (VAS: 7.3 {+-} 1.1 to 3.6 {+-} 1.3, p < 0.001; AKS: 18.6 {+-} 6.9 to 42.9 {+-} 2.7, p < 0.01). Glucosamine significantly increased K{sup trans} at 6 months (-54.4 {+-} 21.2% vs 126.7 {+-} 56.9%, p < 0.001, control vs glucosamine). In conclusion, glucosamine sulfate decreases pain while improving functional outcome in patients with cartilage degeneration. Glucosamine sulfate increases K{sup trans}, allowing its proposal as a surrogate imaging biomarker after 6 months of treatment. (orig.)

  3. Developmental neurotoxicity of the organophosphorus insecticide chlorpyrifos: from clinical findings to preclinical models and potential mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Richard D; Todd, Spencer W; Lumsden, Eric; Mullins, Roger J; Mamczarz, Jacek; Fawcett, William P; Gullapalli, Rao P; Randall, William R; Pereira, Edna F R; Albuquerque, Edson X

    2017-08-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) insecticides are pest-control agents heavily used worldwide. Unfortunately, they are also well known for the toxic effects that they can trigger in humans. Clinical manifestations of an acute exposure of humans to OP insecticides include a well-defined cholinergic crisis that develops as a result of the irreversible inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), the enzyme that hydrolyzes the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh). Prolonged exposures to levels of OP insecticides that are insufficient to trigger signs of acute intoxication, which are hereafter referred to as subacute exposures, have also been associated with neurological deficits. In particular, epidemiological studies have reported statistically significant correlations between prenatal subacute exposures to OP insecticides, including chlorpyrifos, and neurological deficits that range from cognitive impairments to tremors in childhood. The primary objectives of this article are: (i) to address the short- and long-term neurological issues that have been associated with acute and subacute exposures of humans to OP insecticides, especially early in life (ii) to discuss the translational relevance of animal models of developmental exposure to OP insecticides, and (iii) to review mechanisms that are likely to contribute to the developmental neurotoxicity of OP insecticides. Most of the discussion will be focused on chlorpyrifos, the top-selling OP insecticide in the United States and throughout the world. These points are critical for the identification and development of safe and effective interventions to counter and/or prevent the neurotoxic effects of these chemicals in the developing brain. This is an article for the special issue XVth International Symposium on Cholinergic Mechanisms. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  4. The HIV Modes of Transmission model: a systematic review of its findings and adherence to guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zara Shubber

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The HIV Modes of Transmission (MOT model estimates the annual fraction of new HIV infections (FNI acquired by different risk groups. It was designed to guide country-specific HIV prevention policies. To determine if the MOT produced context-specific recommendations, we analyzed MOT results by region and epidemic type, and explored the factors (e.g. data used to estimate parameter inputs, adherence to guidelines influencing the differences. Methods: We systematically searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and UNAIDS reports, and contacted UNAIDS country directors for published MOT results from MOT inception (2003 to 25 September 2012. Results: We retrieved four journal articles and 20 UNAIDS reports covering 29 countries. In 13 countries, the largest FNI (range 26 to 63% was acquired by the low-risk group and increased with low-risk population size. The FNI among female sex workers (FSWs remained low (median 1.3%, range 0.04 to 14.4%, with little variability by region and epidemic type despite variability in sexual behaviour. In India and Thailand, where FSWs play an important role in transmission, the FNI among FSWs was 2 and 4%, respectively. In contrast, the FNI among men who have sex with men (MSM varied across regions (range 0.1 to 89% and increased with MSM population size. The FNI among people who inject drugs (PWID, range 0 to 82% was largest in early-phase epidemics with low overall HIV prevalence. Most MOT studies were conducted and reported as per guidelines but data quality remains an issue. Conclusions: Although countries are generally performing the MOT as per guidelines, there is little variation in the FNI (except among MSM and PWID by region and epidemic type. Homogeneity in MOT FNI for FSWs, clients and low-risk groups may limit the utility of MOT for guiding country-specific interventions in heterosexual HIV epidemics.

  5. Pseudoxanthoma elasticum: cardiac findings in patients and Abcc6-deficient mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice Prunier

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE, caused by mutations in the ABCC6 gene, is a rare multiorgan disease characterized by the mineralization and fragmentation of elastic fibers in connective tissue. Cardiac complications reportedly associated with PXE are mainly based on case reports. METHODS: A cohort of 67 PXE patients was prospectively assessed. Patients underwent physical examination, electrocardiogram, transthoracic echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR, treadmill testing, and perfusion myocardial scintigraphy (SPECT. Additionally, the hearts of a PXE mouse models (Abcc6(-/- and wild-type controls (WT were analyzed. RESULTS: Three patients had a history of proven coronary artery disease. In total, 40 patients underwent exercise treadmill tests, and 28 SPECT. The treadmill tests were all negative. SPECT showed mild perfusion abnormalities in two patients. Mean left ventricular (LV dimension and function values were within the normal range. LV hypertrophy was found in 7 (10.4% patients, though the hypertrophy etiology was unknown for 3 of those patients. Echocardiography revealed frequent but insignificant mitral and tricuspid valvulopathies. Mitral valve prolapse was present in 3 patients (4.5%. Two patients exhibited significant aortic stenosis (3.0%. While none of the functional and histological parameters diverged significantly between the Abcc6(-/- and WT mice groups at age of 6 and 12 months, the 24-month-old Abcc6(-/- mice developed cardiac hypertrophy without contractile dysfunction. CONCLUSIONS: Despite sporadic cases, PXE does not appear to be associated with frequent cardiac complications. However, the development of cardiac hypertrophy in the 24-month-old Abcc6(-/- mice suggests that old PXE patients might be prone to developing late cardiopathy.

  6. Patient Decisions to Receive Secondary Pharmacogenomic Findings and Development of a Multidisciplinary Practice Model to Integrate Results Into Patient Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, J Kevin; Shealy, Amy; Schreiber, Allison; Coleridge, Marissa; Noss, Ryan; Natowicz, Marvin; Moran, Rocio; Moss, Timothy; Erwin, Angelika; Eng, Charis

    2017-07-27

    Whole exome sequencing (WES) has the potential of identifying secondary findings that are predictive of poor pharmacotherapy outcomes. The purpose of this study was to investigate patients' wishes regarding the reporting of secondary pharmacogenomic findings. WES results (n = 106 patients) were retrospectively reviewed to determine the number of patients electing to receive secondary pharmacogenomic results. Phenotypes were assigned based on Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) guidelines. The percent of patients with a predicted phenotype associated with a gene-based CPIC dosing recommendation was determined. Ninety-nine patients (93.4%) elected to receive secondary pharmacogenomic findings. For each gene-drug pair analyzed, the number of patients with an actionable phenotype ranged from two (2%) to 43 patients (43.4%). Combining all gene-drug pairs, 84 unique patients (84.8%) had an actionable phenotype. A prospective multidisciplinary practice model was developed for integrating secondary pharmacogenomic findings into clinical practice. Our model highlights a unique collaboration between physician-geneticists, pharmacists, and genetic counselors. © 2017 The Authors. Clinical and Translational Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  7. Characterizing and sourcing ambient PM2.5 over key emission regions in China II: Organic molecular markers and CMB modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiabin; Xiong, Ying; Xing, Zhenyu; Deng, Junjun; Du, Ke

    2017-08-01

    From November 2012 to July 2013, a sampling campaign was completed for comprehensive characterization of PM2.5 over four key emission regions in China: Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (BTH), Yangzi River Delta (YRD), Pearl River Delta (PRD), and Sichuan Basin (SB). A multi-method approach, adopting different analytical and receptor modeling methods, was employed to determine the relative abundances of region-specific air pollution constituents and contributions of emission sources. This paper is focused on organic molecular marker based source apportionment using chemical mass balance (CMB) receptor modeling. Analyses of the organic molecular markers revealed that vehicle emission, coal combustion, biomass burning, meat cooking and natural gas combustion were the major contributors to organic carbon (OC) in PM2.5. The vehicle emission dominated the sources contributing to OC in spring at four sampling sites. During wintertime, the coal combustion had highest contribution to OC at BTH site, while the major source contributing to OC at YRD and PRD sites was vehicle emission. In addition, the relative contributions of different emission sources to PM2.5 mass at a specific location site and in a specific season revealed seasonal and spatial variations across all four sampling locations. The largest contributor to PM2.5 mass was secondary sulfate (14-17%) in winter at the four sites. The vehicle emission was found to be the major source (14-21%) for PM2.5 mass at PRD site. The secondary ammonium has minor variation (4-5%) across the sites, confirming the influences of regional emission sources on these sites. The distinct patterns of seasonal and spatial variations of source apportionment observed in this study were consistent with the findings in our previous paper based upon water-soluble ions and carbonaceous fractions. This makes it essential for the local government to make season- and region-specific mitigation strategies for abating PM2.5 pollution in China.

  8. Finding and proving the exact ground state of a generalized Ising model by convex optimization and MAX-SAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wenxuan; Kitchaev, Daniil A.; Dacek, Stephen T.; Rong, Ziqin; Urban, Alexander; Cao, Shan; Luo, Chuan; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2016-10-01

    Lattice models, also known as generalized Ising models or cluster expansions, are widely used in many areas of science and are routinely applied to the study of alloy thermodynamics, solid-solid phase transitions, magnetic and thermal properties of solids, fluid mechanics, and others. However, the problem of finding and proving the global ground state of a lattice model, which is essential for all of the aforementioned applications, has remained unresolved for relatively complex practical systems, with only a limited number of results for highly simplified systems known. In this paper, we present a practical and general algorithm that provides a provable periodically constrained ground state of a complex lattice model up to a given unit cell size and in many cases is able to prove global optimality over all other choices of unit cell. We transform the infinite-discrete-optimization problem into a pair of combinatorial optimization (MAX-SAT) and nonsmooth convex optimization (MAX-MIN) problems, which provide upper and lower bounds on the ground state energy, respectively. By systematically converging these bounds to each other, we may find and prove the exact ground state of realistic Hamiltonians whose exact solutions are difficult, if not impossible, to obtain via traditional methods. Considering that currently such practical Hamiltonians are solved using simulated annealing and genetic algorithms that are often unable to find the true global energy minimum and inherently cannot prove the optimality of their result, our paper opens the door to resolving longstanding uncertainties in lattice models of physical phenomena. An implementation of the algorithm is available at https://github.com/dkitch/maxsat-ising.

  9. Modeling the Shell of Cassiopeia A to find the TeV Gamma-ray Emission Region

    CERN Document Server

    Ergin, T; Majumdar, P; Bozkurt, M; Ercan, E N

    2013-01-01

    We will present the multi-wavelength modeling of the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A's shell based on radio, X-rays, and GeV-TeV gamma rays. Our aim is to estimate the location of TeV gamma rays with the help of spectral analysis of X-rays from different regions of the shell, because Chandra X-ray observations have a far better angular resolution than the gamma-ray measurements. Our analysis shows X-ray flux levels from various regions of the remnant to be different. We find that leptonic model is unable to explain the GeV and TeV data, simultaneously. So, we invoke a hadronic model as an additional component to explain the GeV and TeV data.

  10. Finding Role Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JANET ROBERTS

    2011-01-01

    As a university educator,I employ literature as a guide for young women to navigate the field of choices.The educational gap by sex in China was wide in the late 1980s but has disappeared or moved in favor of women in recent years,said a UNESCO report.One of the country's educational goals is to eliminate gender disparities at all levels by 2015.

  11. Identification of key uric acid synthesis pathway in a unique mutant silkworm Bombyx mori model of Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Tabunoki

    Full Text Available Plasma uric acid (UA levels decrease following clinical progression and stage development of Parkinson's disease (PD. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying decreases in plasma UA levels remain unclear, and the potential to apply mutagenesis to a PD model has not previously been discovered. We identified a unique mutant of the silkworm Bombyx mori (B.mori op. Initially, we investigated the causality of the phenotypic "op" by microarray analysis using our constructed KAIKO functional annotation pipeline. Consequently, we found a novel UA synthesis-modulating pathway, from DJ-1 to xanthine oxidase, and established methods for large-scale analysis of gene expression in B. mori. We found that the mRNA levels of genes in this pathway were significantly lower in B. mori op mutants, indicating that downstream events in the signal transduction cascade might be prevented. Additionally, levels of B.mori tyrosine hydroxylase (TH and DJ-1 mRNA were significantly lower in the brain of B. mori op mutants. UA content was significantly lower in the B. mori op mutant tissues and hemolymph. The possibility that the B. mori op mutant might be due to loss of DJ-1 function was supported by the observed vulnerability to oxidative stress. These results suggest that UA synthesis, transport, elimination and accumulation are decreased by environmental oxidative stress in the B. mori op mutant. In the case of B. mori op mutants, the relatively low availability of UA appears to be due both to the oxidation of DJ-1 and to its expenditure to mitigate the effects of environmental oxidative stress. Our findings are expected to provide information needed to elucidate the molecular mechanism of decreased plasma UA levels in the clinical stage progression of PD.

  12. A New Continuous Rotation IMU Alignment Algorithm Based on Stochastic Modeling for Cost Effective North-Finding Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Li

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on stochastic modeling of Coriolis vibration gyros by the Allan variance technique, this paper discusses Angle Random Walk (ARW, Rate Random Walk (RRW and Markov process gyroscope noises which have significant impacts on the North-finding accuracy. A new continuous rotation alignment algorithm for a Coriolis vibration gyroscope Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU is proposed in this paper, in which the extended observation equations are used for the Kalman filter to enhance the estimation of gyro drift errors, thus improving the north-finding accuracy. Theoretical and numerical comparisons between the proposed algorithm and the traditional ones are presented. The experimental results show that the new continuous rotation alignment algorithm using the extended observation equations in the Kalman filter is more efficient than the traditional two-position alignment method. Using Coriolis vibration gyros with bias instability of 0.1°/h, a north-finding accuracy of 0.1° (1σ is achieved by the new continuous rotation alignment algorithm, compared with 0.6° (1σ north-finding accuracy for the two-position alignment and 1° (1σ for the fixed-position alignment.

  13. A New Continuous Rotation IMU Alignment Algorithm Based on Stochastic Modeling for Cost Effective North-Finding Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun; Wu, Wenqi; Jiang, Qingan; Wang, Jinling

    2016-01-01

    Based on stochastic modeling of Coriolis vibration gyros by the Allan variance technique, this paper discusses Angle Random Walk (ARW), Rate Random Walk (RRW) and Markov process gyroscope noises which have significant impacts on the North-finding accuracy. A new continuous rotation alignment algorithm for a Coriolis vibration gyroscope Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) is proposed in this paper, in which the extended observation equations are used for the Kalman filter to enhance the estimation of gyro drift errors, thus improving the north-finding accuracy. Theoretical and numerical comparisons between the proposed algorithm and the traditional ones are presented. The experimental results show that the new continuous rotation alignment algorithm using the extended observation equations in the Kalman filter is more efficient than the traditional two-position alignment method. Using Coriolis vibration gyros with bias instability of 0.1°/h, a north-finding accuracy of 0.1° (1σ) is achieved by the new continuous rotation alignment algorithm, compared with 0.6° (1σ) north-finding accuracy for the two-position alignment and 1° (1σ) for the fixed-position alignment. PMID:27983585

  14. Modeling ERBB receptor-regulated G1/S transition to find novel targets for de novo trastuzumab resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thieffry Denis

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In breast cancer, overexpression of the transmembrane tyrosine kinase ERBB2 is an adverse prognostic marker, and occurs in almost 30% of the patients. For therapeutic intervention, ERBB2 is targeted by monoclonal antibody trastuzumab in adjuvant settings; however, de novo resistance to this antibody is still a serious issue, requiring the identification of additional targets to overcome resistance. In this study, we have combined computational simulations, experimental testing of simulation results, and finally reverse engineering of a protein interaction network to define potential therapeutic strategies for de novo trastuzumab resistant breast cancer. Results First, we employed Boolean logic to model regulatory interactions and simulated single and multiple protein loss-of-functions. Then, our simulation results were tested experimentally by producing single and double knockdowns of the network components and measuring their effects on G1/S transition during cell cycle progression. Combinatorial targeting of ERBB2 and EGFR did not affect the response to trastuzumab in de novo resistant cells, which might be due to decoupling of receptor activation and cell cycle progression. Furthermore, examination of c-MYC in resistant as well as in sensitive cell lines, using a specific chemical inhibitor of c-MYC (alone or in combination with trastuzumab, demonstrated that both trastuzumab sensitive and resistant cells responded to c-MYC perturbation. Conclusion In this study, we connected ERBB signaling with G1/S transition of the cell cycle via two major cell signaling pathways and two key transcription factors, to model an interaction network that allows for the identification of novel targets in the treatment of trastuzumab resistant breast cancer. Applying this new strategy, we found that, in contrast to trastuzumab sensitive breast cancer cells, combinatorial targeting of ERBB receptors or of key signaling intermediates does not

  15. Multi-Innovation Stochastic Gradient Identification Algorithm for Hammerstein Controlled Autoregressive Autoregressive Systems Based on the Key Term Separation Principle and on the Model Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiyi Hu

    2013-01-01

    speed of the stochastic gradient algorithm. The key term separation principle can simplify the identification model of the input nonlinear system, and the decomposition technique can enhance computational efficiencies of identification algorithms. The simulation results show that the proposed algorithm is effective for estimating the parameters of IN-CARAR systems.

  16. The Wheel of Writing: A Model of the Writing Domain for the Teaching and Assessing of Writing as a Key Competency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, Kjell Lars; Evensen, Lars Sigfred; Thygesen, Ragnar

    2016-01-01

    The model presented in this article aspires to represent a theoretically valid and coherent definition and description of writing, as a basis for teaching and assessing writing as a key competency in school. It represents a critique as well as an extension of previous alternatives in that it views writing as a culturally and individually…

  17. On finding and using identifiable parameter combinations in nonlinear dynamic systems biology models and COMBOS: a novel web implementation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolette Meshkat

    Full Text Available Parameter identifiability problems can plague biomodelers when they reach the quantification stage of development, even for relatively simple models. Structural identifiability (SI is the primary question, usually understood as knowing which of P unknown biomodel parameters p1,…, pi,…, pP are-and which are not-quantifiable in principle from particular input-output (I-O biodata. It is not widely appreciated that the same database also can provide quantitative information about the structurally unidentifiable (not quantifiable subset, in the form of explicit algebraic relationships among unidentifiable pi. Importantly, this is a first step toward finding what else is needed to quantify particular unidentifiable parameters of interest from new I-O experiments. We further develop, implement and exemplify novel algorithms that address and solve the SI problem for a practical class of ordinary differential equation (ODE systems biology models, as a user-friendly and universally-accessible web application (app-COMBOS. Users provide the structural ODE and output measurement models in one of two standard forms to a remote server via their web browser. COMBOS provides a list of uniquely and non-uniquely SI model parameters, and-importantly-the combinations of parameters not individually SI. If non-uniquely SI, it also provides the maximum number of different solutions, with important practical implications. The behind-the-scenes symbolic differential algebra algorithms are based on computing Gröbner bases of model attributes established after some algebraic transformations, using the computer-algebra system Maxima. COMBOS was developed for facile instructional and research use as well as modeling. We use it in the classroom to illustrate SI analysis; and have simplified complex models of tumor suppressor p53 and hormone regulation, based on explicit computation of parameter combinations. It's illustrated and validated here for models of moderate

  18. On finding and using identifiable parameter combinations in nonlinear dynamic systems biology models and COMBOS: a novel web implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshkat, Nicolette; Kuo, Christine Er-zhen; DiStefano, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Parameter identifiability problems can plague biomodelers when they reach the quantification stage of development, even for relatively simple models. Structural identifiability (SI) is the primary question, usually understood as knowing which of P unknown biomodel parameters p1,…, pi,…, pP are-and which are not-quantifiable in principle from particular input-output (I-O) biodata. It is not widely appreciated that the same database also can provide quantitative information about the structurally unidentifiable (not quantifiable) subset, in the form of explicit algebraic relationships among unidentifiable pi. Importantly, this is a first step toward finding what else is needed to quantify particular unidentifiable parameters of interest from new I-O experiments. We further develop, implement and exemplify novel algorithms that address and solve the SI problem for a practical class of ordinary differential equation (ODE) systems biology models, as a user-friendly and universally-accessible web application (app)-COMBOS. Users provide the structural ODE and output measurement models in one of two standard forms to a remote server via their web browser. COMBOS provides a list of uniquely and non-uniquely SI model parameters, and-importantly-the combinations of parameters not individually SI. If non-uniquely SI, it also provides the maximum number of different solutions, with important practical implications. The behind-the-scenes symbolic differential algebra algorithms are based on computing Gröbner bases of model attributes established after some algebraic transformations, using the computer-algebra system Maxima. COMBOS was developed for facile instructional and research use as well as modeling. We use it in the classroom to illustrate SI analysis; and have simplified complex models of tumor suppressor p53 and hormone regulation, based on explicit computation of parameter combinations. It's illustrated and validated here for models of moderate complexity, with

  19. Key factors in developing the trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced post-inflammatory irritable bowel syndrome model in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Yan Qin; Hai-Tao Xiao; Justin CY Wu; Brian M Berman; Joseph JY Sung; Zhao-Xiang Bian

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the key factors in developing the trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced postinflammatory irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS) model in rats.METHODS:TNBS was administered to rats at the following conditions:(1) with different doses (20,10,5mg/0.8 mL per rat); (2) with same dose in different concentrations (20 mg/rat,25,50 mg/mL); (3) in different ethanol percentage (25%,50%); and (4) at depth either 4 cm or 8 cm from anus.At 5 d and 4 wk after TNBS administration,inflammation severity and inflammation resolution were evaluated.At 4 and 8 wk after TNBS application,visceral hyperalgesia and enterochromaffin (EC) cell hyperplasia were assayed by abdominal withdrawal reflex test,silver staining and capillary electrophoresis.RESULTS:Our results showed that:(1) TNBS induced dose-dependent acute inflammation and inflammation resolution.At 5 d post TNBS,the pathological score and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in all TNBS treated rats were significantly elevated compared to that of the control (9.48 ± 1.86,8.18 ± 0.67,5.78 ±0.77 vs 0,and 3.55 ± 1.11,1.80 ± 0.82,0.97 ± 0.08unit/mg vs 0.14 ± 0.01 unit/mg,P < 0.05).At 4 wk post TNBS,the pathological score in high and median dose TNBS-treated rats were still significantly higher than that of the control (1.52 ± 0.38 and 0.80 ± 0.35vs 0,P < 0.05); (2) Intracolonic TNBS administration position affected the persistence of visceral hyperalgesia.At 4 wk post TNBS,abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) threshold pressure in all TNBS-treated groups were decreased compared to that of the control (21.52± 1.73 and 27.10 ± 1.94 mmHg vs 34.44 ± 1.89mmHg,P < 0.05).At 8 wk post TNBS,AWR threshold pressure in 8 cm administration group was still significantly decreased (23.33 ± 1.33 mmHg vs 36.79 ± 2.29mmHg,P < 0.05); (3) Ethanol percentage affected the TNBS-induced inflammation severity and visceral hyperalgesia.In TNBS-25% ethanol-treated group,the pathological score and MPO activity were

  20. Intervening to alleviate word-finding difficulties in children: case series data and a computational modelling foundation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, W; Fedor, A; Hughes, L; Kapikian, A; Masterson, J; Roncoli, S; Fern-Pollak, L; Thomas, M S C

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated a simple computational model of productive vocabulary acquisition, applied to simulating two case studies of 7-year-old children with developmental word-finding difficulties across four core behavioural tasks. Developmental models were created, which captured the deficits of each child. In order to predict the effects of intervention, we exposed the computational models to simulated behavioural interventions of two types, targeting the improvement of either phonological or semantic knowledge. The model was then evaluated by testing the predictions from the simulations against the actual results from an intervention study carried out with the two children. For one child it was predicted that the phonological intervention would be effective, and the semantic intervention would not. This was borne out in the behavioural study. For the second child, the predictions were less clear and depended on the nature of simulated damage to the model. The behavioural study found an effect of semantic but not phonological intervention. Through an explicit computational simulation, we therefore employed intervention data to evaluate our theoretical understanding of the processes underlying acquisition of lexical items for production and how they may vary in children with developmental language difficulties.

  1. Molecular genetic key for the identification of 17 Ixodes species of the United States (Acari:Ixodidae): a methods model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poucher, K L; Hutcheson, H J; Keirans, J E; Durden, L A; Black, W C

    1999-08-01

    A taxonomic key, based on restriction enzyme analysis of the second internal-transcribed spacer (ITS-2) in the nuclear ribosomal DNA gene, was developed for identification of 17 Ixodes tick species in the United States. This key includes: Ixodes affinis Neumann, Ixodes angustus Neumann, Ixodes baergi Cooley and Kohls, Ixodes brunneus Koch, Ixodes cookei Packard, Ixodes dentatus Marx, Ixodes jellisoni Cooley and Kohls, Ixodes kingi Bishopp, Ixodes minor Neumann, Ixodes muris Bishopp and Smith, Ixodes pacificus Cooley and Kohls, Ixodes scapularis Say, Ixodes sculpularis Neumann, I. spinipalpis Hadwen and Nuttall, Ixodes texanus Banks, Ixodes uriae White, and Ixodes woodi Bishopp. A 900-bp fragment of the ITS-2 was amplified using the polymerase chain reaction. This fragment was then digested with the restriction enzymes MspI and CfoI, and the digested fragments were size fractionated on a 2.5% high-resolution agarose gel. A dichotomous key was developed based on digested fragment sizes relative to a standard set of size markers. Little intraspecific variation in restriction fragment banding patterns was detected.

  2. Advances and visions in large-scale hydrological modelling: findings from the 11th Workshop on Large-Scale Hydrological Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Döll

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale hydrological modelling has become increasingly wide-spread during the last decade. An annual workshop series on large-scale hydrological modelling has provided, since 1997, a forum to the German-speaking community for discussing recent developments and achievements in this research area. In this paper we present the findings from the 2007 workshop which focused on advances and visions in large-scale hydrological modelling. We identify the state of the art, difficulties and research perspectives with respect to the themes "sensitivity of model results", "integrated modelling" and "coupling of processes in hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere". Some achievements in large-scale hydrological modelling during the last ten years are presented together with a selection of remaining challenges for the future.

  3. Continuum Plate Theory and Atomistic Modeling to Find the Flexural Rigidity of a Graphene Sheet Interacting with a Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. W. Roberts

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a combination of continuum modeling, atomistic simulations, and numerical optimization, we estimate the flexural rigidity of a graphene sheet. We consider a rectangular sheet that is initially parallel to a rigid substrate. The sheet interacts with the substrate by van der Waals forces and deflects in response to loading on a pair of opposite edges. To estimate the flexural rigidity, we model the graphene sheet as a continuum and numerically solve an appropriate differential equation for the transverse deflection. This solution depends on the flexural rigidity. We then use an optimization procedure to find the value of the flexural rigidity that minimizes the difference between the numerical solutions and the deflections predicted by atomistic simulations. This procedure predicts a flexural rigidity of 0.26 nN nm=1.62 eV.

  4. Application of the Sea-Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM 6) to Cedar Keys NWR : Revised report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Sea-Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM) report presents a model for projecting the effects of sea-level rise on coastal marshes and related habitats on Cedar...

  5. Application of the Sea-Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM 5.0) to Shell Keys National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Sea-Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM) report presents a model for projecting the effects of sea-level rise on coastal marshes and related habitats on Shell...

  6. WaterWorld, a spatial hydrological model applied at scales from local to global: key challenges to local application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Sophia; Mulligan, Mark

    2017-04-01

    WaterWorld is a widely used spatial hydrological policy support system. The last user census indicates regular use by 1029 institutions across 141 countries. A key feature of WaterWorld since 2001 is that it comes pre-loaded with all of the required data for simulation anywhere in the world at a 1km or 1 ha resolution. This means that it can be easily used, without specialist technical ability, to examine baseline hydrology and the impacts of scenarios for change or management interventions to support policy formulation, hence its labelling as a policy support system. WaterWorld is parameterised by an extensive global gridded database of more than 600 variables, developed from many sources, since 1998, the so-called simTerra database. All of these data are available globally at 1km resolution and some variables (terrain, land cover, urban areas, water bodies) are available globally at 1ha resolution. If users have access to better data than is pre-loaded, they can upload their own data. WaterWorld is generally applied at the national or basin scale at 1km resolution, or locally (for areas of project we have used WFDEI (WATCH Forcing Data methodology applied to ERA-Interim data) at 1km resolution to provide an alternative input to WaterWorld's preloaded climate data. Here we examine the impacts of that on key hydrological outputs: water balance, water quality and outline the remaining challenges of using datasets like these for local scale application.

  7. Molecular profiling of gene copy number abnormalities in key regulatory genes in high-risk B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia: frequency and their association with clinicopathological findings in Indian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Prerana; Ahmad, Firoz; Das, Bibhu Ranjan

    2017-05-01

    Genes related to key cellular pathways are frequently altered in B cell ALL and are associated with poor survival especially in high-risk (HR) subgroups. We examined gene copy number abnormalities (CNA) in 101 Indian HR B cell ALL patients and their correlation with clinicopathological features by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. Overall, CNA were detected in 59 (59%) cases, with 26, 10 and 23% of cases harboring 1, 2 or +3 CNA. CNA were more prevalent in BCR-ABL1 (60%), pediatric (64%) and high WCC (WBC count) (63%) patients. Frequent genes deletions included CDNK2A/B (26%), IKZF1 (25%), PAX5 (14%), JAK2 (7%), BTG1 (6%), RB1 (5%), EBF1 (4%), ETV6 (4%), while PAR1 region genes were predominantly duplicated (20%). EBF1 deletions selectively associated with adults, IKZF1 deletions occurred frequently in high WCC and BCR-ABL1 cases, while PAR1 region gains significantly associated with MLL-AF4 cases. IKZF1 haploinsufficiency group was predominant, especially in adults (65%), high WCC (60%) patients and BCR-ABL1-negative (78%) patients. Most cases harbored multiple concurrent CNA, with IKZF1 concomitantly occurring with CDNK2A/B, PAX5 and BTG1, while JAK2 occurred with CDNK2A/B and PAX5. Mutually exclusive CNA included ETV6 and IKZF1/RB1, and EBF1 and JAK2. Our results corroborate with global reports, aggregating molecular markers in Indian HR B-ALL cases. Integration of CNA data from rapid methods like MLPA, onto background of existing gold-standard methods detecting significant chromosomal abnormalities, provides a comprehensive genetic profile in B-ALL.

  8. Mississippi Waters Reaching South Florida Reefs Under No Flood Conditions: Synthesis of Observing and Modeling System Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Henaff, M.; Kourafalou, V.

    2016-02-01

    In August 2014, in situ measurements revealed an intense salinity drop impacting South Florida coral reefs. Satellite observations showed that this drop in salinity was due to a southeastward export of Mississippi waters from the Northern Gulf of Mexico. Unlike previous events of long-distance Mississippi water export, this episode is not marked by Mississippi flooding conditions, which makes it a unique study case.We have developed a high-resolution ( 2 km) numerical model of the Gulf of Mexico to study the conditions that controlled the 2014 Mississippi water export episode. It is based on the HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM), which has a detailed representation of coastal physics (especially river plume dynamics) and employs high frequency river discharge and atmospheric forcing. In addition, it assimilates remotely sensed altimetry and sea surface temperature observations. The simulation reveals a unique pathway that brought Mississippi waters along the Northern Gulf continental shelf, before reaching the deep Gulf. In the Florida Straits, Mississippi waters were advected from the deep ocean to the continental shelf under the influence of both deep sea (frontal dynamics of the local western boundary current) and shelf flows (wind-induced Ekman transport). The combined use of a regional, data-assimilative nested simulation and available observations followed best practices recommended under the Coastal Ocean and Shelf Seas Task Team of the GODAE (Global Data Assimilation Experiment) OceanView initiative. It allowed identifying key processes and features that characterize the unique episode of Mississippi River waters export of 2014, and helped analyze the wide range of processes affecting the connectivity at both the local and basin scale in the Gulf of Mexico.

  9. Transcriptional profiling of human brain endothelial cells reveals key properties crucial for predictive in vitro blood-brain barrier models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Urich

    Full Text Available Brain microvascular endothelial cells (BEC constitute the blood-brain barrier (BBB which forms a dynamic interface between the blood and the central nervous system (CNS. This highly specialized interface restricts paracellular diffusion of fluids and solutes including chemicals, toxins and drugs from entering the brain. In this study we compared the transcriptome profiles of the human immortalized brain endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3 and human primary BEC. We identified transcriptional differences in immune response genes which are directly related to the immortalization procedure of the hCMEC/D3 cells. Interestingly, astrocytic co-culturing reduced cell adhesion and migration molecules in both BECs, which possibly could be related to regulation of immune surveillance of the CNS controlled by astrocytic cells within the neurovascular unit. By matching the transcriptome data from these two cell lines with published transcriptional data from freshly isolated mouse BECs, we discovered striking differences that could explain some of the limitations of using cultured BECs to study BBB properties. Key protein classes such as tight junction proteins, transporters and cell surface receptors show differing expression profiles. For example, the claudin-5, occludin and JAM2 expression is dramatically reduced in the two human BEC lines, which likely explains their low transcellular electric resistance and paracellular leakiness. In addition, the human BEC lines express low levels of unique brain endothelial transporters such as Glut1 and Pgp. Cell surface receptors such as LRP1, RAGE and the insulin receptor that are involved in receptor-mediated transport are also expressed at very low levels. Taken together, these data illustrate that BECs lose their unique protein expression pattern outside of their native environment and display a more generic endothelial cell phenotype. A collection of key genes that seems to be highly regulated by the local

  10. MODEL BASED ON KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS FOR ASSESSING THE MARKET POSITION OF A COMPANY. CASE STUDY IN A CAR RENTAL COMPANY

    OpenAIRE

    URSACESCU Minodora; Mihai CIOC

    2012-01-01

    The present paper is the result of a research approach realized on the Romanian car rental services` market. Beginning from the characteristics of this economic sector and from the activity`s specificities of the car rental companies, the present study intends to develop an evaluation model of the position on the competitive market of a Romanian company in the car rental industry, based on Key Performance Indicators and Balanced Scorecard. The research`s objectives reside in defining an indic...

  11. Finding a pareto-optimal solution for multi-region models subject to capital trade and spillover externalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leimbach, Marian [Potsdam-Institut fuer Klimafolgenforschung e.V., Potsdam (Germany); Eisenack, Klaus [Oldenburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Economics and Statistics

    2008-11-15

    In this paper we present an algorithm that deals with trade interactions within a multi-region model. In contrast to traditional approaches this algorithm is able to handle spillover externalities. Technological spillovers are expected to foster the diffusion of new technologies, which helps to lower the cost of climate change mitigation. We focus on technological spillovers which are due to capital trade. The algorithm of finding a pareto-optimal solution in an intertemporal framework is embedded in a decomposed optimization process. The paper analyzes convergence and equilibrium properties of this algorithm. In the final part of the paper, we apply the algorithm to investigate possible impacts of technological spillovers. While benefits of technological spillovers are significant for the capital-importing region, benefits for the capital-exporting region depend on the type of regional disparities and the resulting specialization and terms-of-trade effects. (orig.)

  12. Analysis of Interactions of Key Stakeholders on B2C e-Markets - Agent Based Modelling and Simulation Approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aleksandar Marković; Sava Čavoški; Andrej Novović

    2016-01-01

    Background/purpose: This paper discusses the application of ABMS - agent-based modelling and simulation in the analysis of customer behaviour on B2C e-commerce websites as well as in the analysis of various business...

  13. Mathematical Modeling Analysis and Optimization of Key Design Parameters of Proton-Conductive Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Hong; Akhtar, Zoheb; Li, Peiwen; Wang, Kai

    2014-01-01

    A proton-conductive solid oxide fuel cell (H-SOFC) has the advantage of operating at higher temperatures than a PEM fuel cell, but at lower temperatures than a SOFC. This study proposes a mathematical model for an H-SOFC in order to simulate the performance and optimize the flow channel designs. The model analyzes the average mass transfer and species’ concentrations in flow channels, which allows the determination of an average concentration polarization in anode and cathode gas channels, th...

  14. Mathematical Modeling Analysis and Optimization of Key Design Parameters of Proton-Conductive Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hong Liu; Zoheb Akhtar; Peiwen Li; Kai Wang

    2014-01-01

    A proton-conductive solid oxide fuel cell (H-SOFC) has the advantage of operating at higher temperatures than a PEM fuel cell, but at lower temperatures than a SOFC. This study proposes a mathematical model for an H-SOFC in order to simulate the performance and optimize the flow channel designs. The model analyzes the average mass transfer and species’ concentrations in flow channels, which allows the determination of an average concentration polarization in anode and cathode gas channels, t...

  15. Rock Finding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommel-Esham, Katie; Constable, Susan D.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss a literature-based activity that helps students discover the importance of making detailed observations. In an inspiring children's classic book, "Everybody Needs a Rock" by Byrd Baylor (1974), the author invites readers to go "rock finding," laying out 10 rules for finding a "perfect" rock. In this way, the…

  16. Finding Family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU YUNYUN

    2010-01-01

    @@ It took 14 years--and just two min-utes-for an adopted Chinese girl to find her biological family. July 21 this year marked the first anniversary of Haley Butler's finding of her biological parents in Maanshan in east China's Anhui Province.

  17. Microsoft Access Small Business Solutions State-of-the-Art Database Models for Sales, Marketing, Customer Management, and More Key Business Activities

    CERN Document Server

    Hennig, Teresa; Linson, Larry; Purvis, Leigh; Spaulding, Brent

    2010-01-01

    Database models developed by a team of leading Microsoft Access MVPs that provide ready-to-use solutions for sales, marketing, customer management and other key business activities for most small businesses. As the most popular relational database in the world, Microsoft Access is widely used by small business owners. This book responds to the growing need for resources that help business managers and end users design and build effective Access database solutions for specific business functions. Coverage includes::; Elements of a Microsoft Access Database; Relational Data Model; Dealing with C

  18. Physician Appraisals: Key Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klich Jacek

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the article is to identify key criteria being used for physician appraisals and to find how communication skills of physicians are valued in those appraisals. ScienceDirect and EBSCOhost databases were used for this search. The results show that a physician appraisal is underestimated both theoretically and empirically. The particular gap exists with respect to the communication skills of physicians, which are rarely present in medical training syllabi and physician assessments. The article contributes to the theoretical discourse on physician appraisals and points out at the inconsistency between the high status of physicians as a key hospital resource on the one hand and, on the other hand, at inadequate and poorly researched assessment of their performance with a special emphasis on communication skills. The article may inspire health managers to develop and implement up-to-date assessment forms for physicians and good managerial practices in this respect in hospitals and other health care units.

  19. Priming Silicic Giant Magma Bodies: Finding Evidence for Internal Forcing Versus External Triggering of Supereruptions by Phase Equilibria Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramontano, S.; Gualda, G. A. R.; Ghiorso, M. S.; Kennedy, B.

    2015-12-01

    It is important to understand what triggers silicic eruptions because of the implications for modern-day systems. The goal of this project is to use phase equilibria modeling (i.e. rhyolite-MELTS) to determine to what extent magmas within the crust are induced to erupt due to external triggers (e.g. earthquakes; new magma injection; neighboring eruptions) and to what extent they naturally evolve to a point where eruption is inevitable (e.g. by fluid exsolution and decrease in magma strength and density). Whole-rock compositions from four rhyolite tuffs across the globe associated with large or supereruptions (Mamaku Tuff, New Zealand; Peach Spring Tuff, SW USA; early and late-erupted Bishop Tuff, California; and Toba Tuff, Indonesia) are studied using rhyolite-MELTS modeling. Key physical properties of magma are strongly affected by the initial volatile content due to fluid exsolution. By running simulations with varying water contents, we can track the evolution of fluid exsolution during crystallization. Isobaric (constrained temperature change at constant pressure) and isochoric (constrained temperature change at constant volume) models were run for the four compositions. In constrained-pressure scenarios, fluid is free to exsolve as crystallization proceeds, and the total system volume can increase or decrease accordingly; this would require deformation of the surrounding crust to accommodate the magma volume change. In constrained-volume scenarios, bubble exsolution is limited to the volume change due to crystallization; in this case, pressure can decrease or increase (if bubbles are absent or present). For fixed-pressure scenarios, fluid exsolution is more extensive and leads to internal triggering, at least for fluid-saturated conditions; external triggering is more likely in fluid-undersaturated conditions. For fixed-volume scenarios, none of the systems cross a fragmentation threshold for the crystal contents typically observed in natural pumice. If

  20. Key knowledge and data gaps in modelling the influence of CO2 concentration on the terrestrial carbon sink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, T A M; Müller, C; Arneth, A; Haverd, V; Smith, B

    2016-09-20

    Primary productivity of terrestrial vegetation is expected to increase under the influence of increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations ([CO2]). Depending on the fate of such additionally fixed carbon, this could lead to an increase in terrestrial carbon storage, and thus a net terrestrial sink of atmospheric carbon. Such a mechanism is generally believed to be the primary global driver behind the observed large net uptake of anthropogenic CO2 emissions by the biosphere. Mechanisms driving CO2 uptake in the Terrestrial Biosphere Models (TBMs) used to attribute and project terrestrial carbon sinks, including that from increased [CO2], remain in large parts unchanged since those models were conceived two decades ago. However, there exists a large body of new data and understanding providing an opportunity to update these models, and directing towards important topics for further research. In this review we highlight recent developments in understanding of the effects of elevated [CO2] on photosynthesis, and in particular on the fate of additionally fixed carbon within the plant with its implications for carbon turnover rates, on the regulation of photosynthesis in response to environmental limitations on in-plant carbon sinks, and on emergent ecosystem responses. We recommend possible avenues for model improvement and identify requirements for better data on core processes relevant to the understanding and modelling of the effect of increasing [CO2] on the global terrestrial carbon sink. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  1. Systematic Selection of Key Logistic Regression Variables for Risk Prediction Analyses: A Five-Factor Maximum Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewett, Timothy E; Webster, Kate E; Hurd, Wendy J

    2017-08-16

    The evolution of clinical practice and medical technology has yielded an increasing number of clinical measures and tests to assess a patient's progression and return to sport readiness after injury. The plethora of available tests may be burdensome to clinicians in the absence of evidence that demonstrates the utility of a given measurement. Thus, there is a critical need to identify a discrete number of metrics to capture during clinical assessment to effectively and concisely guide patient care. The data sources included Pubmed and PMC Pubmed Central articles on the topic. Therefore, we present a systematic approach to injury risk analyses and how this concept may be used in algorithms for risk analyses for primary anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in healthy athletes and patients after ACL reconstruction. In this article, we present the five-factor maximum model, which states that in any predictive model, a maximum of 5 variables will contribute in a meaningful manner to any risk factor analysis. We demonstrate how this model already exists for prevention of primary ACL injury, how this model may guide development of the second ACL injury risk analysis, and how the five-factor maximum model may be applied across the injury spectrum for development of the injury risk analysis.

  2. Automation of SimSphere Land Surface Model Use as a Standalone Application and Integration With EO Data for Deriving Key Land Surface Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropoulos, George P.; Konstas, Ioannis; Carlson, Toby N.

    2013-04-01

    Use of simulation process models has played a key role in extending our abilities to study Earth system processes and enhancing our understanding on how different components of it interplay. Use of such models combined with Earth Observation (EO) data provides a promising direction towards deriving accurately spatiotemporal estimates of key parameters characterising land surface interactions, by combining the horizontal coverage and spectral resolution of remote sensing data with the vertical coverage and fine temporal continuity of those models. SimSphere is such a software toolkit written in Java for simulating the interactions of soil, vegetation and atmosphere layers of the Earth's land surface. Its use is at present continually expanding worldwide both as an educational and as a research tool for scientific investigations. It is being used either as a stand-alone application or synergistically with EO data. Herein we present recent advancements introduced to SimSphere in different aspects of the model aiming to make its use more robust when used both as a standalone application and synergistically with EO data. We have extensively tested and updated the model code, as well as enhanced it with new functionalities. These included for example taking into account the thermal inertia variation in soil moisture, simulating additional parameters characterising land surface interactions, automating the model use when integrating it with EO data via the "triangle" method and developing batch processing operations. Use of these recently introduced to the model functionalities are illustrated herein using a variety of examples. Our work is significant to the users' community of the model and very timely, given the potential use of SimSphere in an EO-based method being under development for deriving operationally regional estimates of energy fluxes and soil moisture from EO data provided by non-commercial vendors. KEYWORDS: land surface interactions, land surface process

  3. Utilizing the ECHO Model in the Veterans Health Affairs System: Guidelines for Setup, Operations and Preliminary Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herschel Knapp

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 2011, the Veterans Health Administration (VHA consulted with the Project ECHO (Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes team at the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, to reproduce their successful model within the VHA. Methods: The VHA launched SCAN-ECHO (Specialty Care Access Network-Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes, a multisite videoconferencing system to conduct live clinical consultations between specialists at a VHA Medical Center (hospital and primary care providers stationed at satellite VHA CBOCs (Community-Based Outpatient Clinic. Results: Analysis of the first three years rendered a mean attendee satisfaction of 89.53% and a consultation satisfaction score of 88.10%. About half of the SCAN-ECHO consultations resulted in patients receiving their treatment from their local primary care providers; the remaining half were referred to the VHA Medical Center when the treatment involved equipment or services not available at the CBOCs (e.g., MRI, surgery. Conclusion: This paper details the setup, operation logistics and preliminary findings, suggesting that SCAN-ECHO is a viable model for providing quality specialty clinical consultation service, prompter access to care, reduced commutes and continuing education. Additionally, the use of a secured Internet-based videoconferencing system that supports connectivity to multiple (mobile devices could expand the utilization of this service.

  4. FASTSUBS: An Efficient Admissible Algorithm for Finding the Most Likely Lexical Substitutes Using a Statistical Language Model

    CERN Document Server

    Yuret, Deniz

    2012-01-01

    Lexical substitutes have found use in the context of word sense disambiguation, unsupervised part-of-speech induction, paraphrasing, machine translation, and text simplification. Using a statistical language model to find the most likely substitutes in a given context is a successful approach, but the cost of a naive algorithm is proportional to the vocabulary size. This paper presents the Fastsubs algorithm which can efficiently and correctly identify the most likely lexical substitutes for a given context based on a statistical language model without going through most of the vocabulary. The efficiency of Fastsubs makes large scale experiments based on lexical substitutes feasible. For example, it is possible to compute the top 10 substitutes for each one of the 1,173,766 tokens in Penn Treebank in about 6 hours on a typical workstation. The same task would take about 6 days with the naive algorithm. An implementation of the algorithm and a dataset with the top 100 substitutes of each token in the WSJ secti...

  5. A rehabilitation model as key to comprehensive care in the era of HIV as a chronic disease in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetty, Verusia; Hanass-Hancock, Jill

    2016-01-01

    In the era of widespread access to antiretroviral therapy, people living with HIV survive; however, this comes with new experiences of comorbidities and HIV-related disability posing new challenges to rehabilitation professionals and an already fragile health system in Southern Africa. Public health approaches to HIV need to include not only prevention, treatment and support but also rehabilitation. While some well-resourced countries have developed rehabilitation approaches for HIV, resource-poor settings of Southern Africa lack a model of care that includes rehabilitation approaches providing accessible and comprehensive care for people living with HIV. In this study, a learning in action approach was used to conceptualize a comprehensive model of care that addresses HIV-related disability and a feasible rehabilitation framework for resource-poor settings. The study used qualitative methods in the form of a focus group discussion with thirty participants including people living with HIV, the multidisciplinary healthcare team and community outreach partners at a semi-rural health facility in South Africa. The discussion focused on barriers and enablers of access to rehabilitation. Participants identified barriers at various levels, including transport, physical access, financial constraints and poor multi-stakeholder team interaction. The results of the group discussions informed the design of an inclusive model of HIV care. This model was further informed by established integrated rehabilitation models. Participants emphasized that objectives need to respond to policy, improve access to patient-centered care and maintain a multidisciplinary team approach. They proposed that guiding principles should include efficient communication, collaboration of all stakeholders and leadership in teams to enable staff to implement the model. Training of professional staff and lay personnel within task-shifting approaches was seen as an essential enabler to implementation. The

  6. Using a Functional Simulation of Crisis Management to Test the C2 Agility Model Parameters on Key Performance Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Isabelle Turcotte (Université Laval) Sébastien Tremblay (Université Laval) Philip Farrell (DRDC Toronto) Marie-Eve Jobidon (DRDC Toronto...Using a Functional Simulation of Crisis Management to test the C2 Agility Model Isabelle Turcotte – Université Laval Sébastien Tremblay – Université

  7. Modeling the Spatial Distribution and Fruiting Pattern of a Key Tree Species in a Neotropical Forest : Methodology and Potential Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caillaud, Damien; Crofoot, Margaret C.; Scarpino, Samuel V.; Jansen, Patrick A.; Garzon-Lopez, Carol X.; Winkelhagen, Annemarie J. S.; Bohlman, Stephanie A.; Walsh, Peter D.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The movement patterns of wild animals depend crucially on the spatial and temporal availability of resources in their habitat. To date, most attempts to model this relationship were forced to rely on simplified assumptions about the spatiotemporal distribution of food resources. Here we

  8. Predicting the Mineral Composition of Dust Aerosols. Part 2; Model Evaluation and Identification of Key Processes with Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlwitz, J. P.; Garcia-Pando, C. Perez; Miller, R. L.

    2015-01-01

    A global compilation of nearly sixty measurement studies is used to evaluate two methods of simulating the mineral composition of dust aerosols in an Earth system model. Both methods are based upon a Mean Mineralogical Table (MMT) that relates the soil mineral fractions to a global atlas of arid soil type. The Soil Mineral Fraction (SMF) method assumes that the aerosol mineral fractions match the fractions of the soil. The MMT is based upon soil measurements after wet sieving, a process that destroys aggregates of soil particles that would have been emitted from the original, undisturbed soil. The second method approximately reconstructs the emitted aggregates. This model is referred to as the Aerosol Mineral Fraction (AMF) method because the mineral fractions of the aerosols differ from those of the wet-sieved parent soil, partly due to reaggregation. The AMF method remedies some of the deficiencies of the SMF method in comparison to observations. Only the AMF method exhibits phyllosilicate mass at silt sizes, where they are abundant according to observations. In addition, the AMF quartz fraction of silt particles is in better agreement with measured values, in contrast to the overestimated SMF fraction. Measurements at distinct clay and silt particle sizes are shown to be more useful for evaluation of the models, in contrast to the sum over all particles sizes that is susceptible to compensating errors, as illustrated by the SMF experiment. Model errors suggest that allocation of the emitted silt fraction of each mineral into the corresponding transported size categories is an important remaining source of uncertainty. Evaluation of both models and the MMT is hindered by the limited number of size-resolved measurements of mineral content that sparsely sample aerosols from the major dust sources. The importance of climate processes dependent upon aerosol mineral composition shows the need for global and routine mineral measurements.

  9. Local inflammation, dissemination and coalescence of lesions are key for the progression towards active tuberculosis: the bubble model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara ePrats

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of a tuberculosis (TB infection towards active disease is driven by a combination of factors mostly related to the host response. The equilibrium between control of the bacillary load and the pathology generated is crucial as regards preventing the growth and proliferation of TB lesions. In addition, some experimental evidence suggests an important role of both local endogenous reinfection and the coalescence of neighboring lesions.Herein we propose a mathematical model that captures the essence of these factors by defining three hypotheses: (i lesions grow logistically due to the inflammatory reaction; (ii new lesions can appear as a result of extracellular bacilli or infected macrophages that escape from older lesions; and (iii lesions can merge when they are close enough. This model was implemented in Matlab to simulate the dynamics of several lesions in a 3D space. It was also fitted to available microscopy data from infected C3HeB/FeJ mice, an animal model of active TB that reacts against Mycobacterium tuberculosis with an exaggerated inflammatory response.The results of the simulations show the dynamics observed experimentally, namely an initial increase in the number of lesions followed by oscillations, and an exponential increase in the mean area of the lesions. In addition, further analysis of experimental and simulation results show a strong coincidence of the area distributions of lesions at day 21, thereby highlighting the consistency of the model. Three simulation series removing each one of the hypothesis corroborate their essential role in the dynamics observed.These results demonstrate that three local factors, namely an exaggerated inflammatory response, an endogenous reinfection and a coalescence of lesions, are needed in order to progress towards active TB. The failure of one of these factors stops induction of the disease. This mathematical model may be used as a basis for developing strategies to stop the

  10. Research to practice in addiction treatment: key terms and a field-driven model of technology transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    The transfer of new technologies (e.g., evidence-based practices) into substance abuse treatment organizations often occurs long after they have been developed and shown to be effective. Transfer is slowed, in part, due to a lack of clear understanding about all that is needed to achieve full implementation of these technologies. Such misunderstanding is exacerbated by inconsistent terminology and overlapping models of an innovation, including its development and validation, dissemination to the public, and implementation or use in the field. For this reason, a workgroup of the Addiction Technology Transfer Center (ATTC) Network developed a field-driven conceptual model of the innovation process that more precisely defines relevant terms and concepts and integrates them into a comprehensive taxonomy. The proposed definitions and conceptual framework will allow for improved understanding and consensus regarding the distinct meaning and conceptual relationships between dimensions of the technology transfer process and accelerate the use of evidence-based practices.

  11. Key regulatory role of dermal fibroblasts in pigmentation as demonstrated using a reconstructed skin model: impact of photo-aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Duval

    Full Text Available To study cutaneous pigmentation in a physiological context, we have previously developed a functional pigmented reconstructed skin model composed of a melanocyte-containing epidermis grown on a dermal equivalent comprising living fibroblasts. The present studies, using the same model, aimed to demonstrate that dermal fibroblasts influence skin pigmentation up to the macroscopic level. The proof of principle was performed with pigmented skins differing only in the fibroblast component. First, the in vitro system was reconstructed with or without fibroblasts in order to test the global influence of the presence of this cell type. We then assessed the impact of the origin of the fibroblast strain on the degree of pigmentation using fetal versus adult fibroblasts. In both experiments, impressive variation in skin pigmentation at the macroscopic level was observed and confirmed by quantitative parameters related to skin color, melanin content and melanocyte numbers. These data confirmed the responsiveness of the model and demonstrated that dermal fibroblasts do indeed impact the degree of skin pigmentation. We then hypothesized that a physiological state associated with pigmentary alterations such as photo-aging could be linked to dermal fibroblasts modifications that accumulate over time. Pigmentation of skin reconstructed using young unexposed fibroblasts (n = 3 was compared to that of tissues containing natural photo-aged fibroblasts (n = 3 which express a senescent phenotype. A stimulation of pigmentation in the presence of the natural photo-aged fibroblasts was revealed by a significant increase in the skin color (decrease in Luminance and an increase in both epidermal melanin content and melanogenic gene expression, thus confirming our hypothesis. Altogether, these data demonstrate that the level of pigmentation of the skin model is influenced by dermal fibroblasts and that natural photo-aged fibroblasts can contribute to the

  12. Thermodynamic modeling of the Co–Hf system supported by key experiments and first-principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xingxu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Liu, Shuhong, E-mail: shhliu@csu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Sino-German Cooperation Group “Microstructure in Al alloys”, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Cheng, Kaiming; Tang, Ying [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Ou, Pengfei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Nash, Philip [Thermal Processing Technology Center, Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), 10 West 32nd Street, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Sundman, Bo [INSTN, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Du, Yong [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Sino-German Cooperation Group “Microstructure in Al alloys”, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Zheng, Feng [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China)

    2015-05-20

    Highlights: • Heat contents of Co{sub 2}Hf and CoHf{sub 2} were measured by drop calorimetry. • Enthalpy of formation for Co{sub 23}Hf{sub 6} was computed via first-principles calculations. • Co–Hf system was assessed by means of CALPHAD approach. • Order–disorder model is used to describe B2 (CoHf) and A2 (βHf). • Glass forming range of the Co–Hf amorphous alloys was predicted. - Abstract: Phase equilibria and thermodynamic properties of the Co–Hf system were investigated via calorimetric measurements, first-principles calculations and thermodynamic modeling. Heat contents of Co{sub 2}Hf and CoHf{sub 2} were measured by drop calorimetry from 300 to 1200 °C. The enthalpy of formation for Co{sub 23}Hf{sub 6} at 0 K was computed via first-principles calculations. Based on the experimental measurements and first-principles calculations from the present work and the literature, the Co–Hf system was assessed by means of CALPHAD (CALculation of PHAse Diagram) approach. The excess Gibbs energy of solution phases was modeled with Redlich–Kister polynomial. Sublattice models were employed to describe the homogeneity ranges of Co{sub 2}Hf, CoHf and CoHf{sub 2}. The order–disorder transition between B2 (CoHf) and A2 (βHf) phases was taken into account in the current optimization. Using the optimized parameters, glass forming range (GFR) of the Co–Hf amorphous alloys was predicted to be 15–75 at.% Hf, which is in satisfactory agreement with the experimental observation.

  13. Combining physiological threshold knowledge to species distribution models is key to improving forecasts of the future niche for macroalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Brezo; Arenas, Francisco; Trilla, Alba; Viejo, Rosa M; Carreño, Francisco

    2015-04-01

    Species distribution models (SDM) are a useful tool for predicting species range shifts in response to global warming. However, they do not explore the mechanisms underlying biological processes, making it difficult to predict shifts outside the environmental gradient where the model was trained. In this study, we combine correlative SDMs and knowledge on physiological limits to provide more robust predictions. The thermal thresholds obtained in growth and survival experiments were used as proxies of the fundamental niches of two foundational marine macrophytes. The geographic projections of these species' distributions obtained using these thresholds and existing SDMs were similar in areas where the species are either absent-rare or frequent and where their potential and realized niches match, reaching consensus predictions. The cold-temperate foundational seaweed Himanthalia elongata was predicted to become extinct at its southern limit in northern Spain in response to global warming, whereas the occupancy of southern-lusitanic Bifurcaria bifurcata was expected to increase. Combined approaches such as this one may also highlight geographic areas where models disagree potentially due to biotic factors. Physiological thresholds alone tended to over-predict species prevalence, as they cannot identify absences in climatic conditions within the species' range of physiological tolerance or at the optima. Although SDMs tended to have higher sensitivity than threshold models, they may include regressions that do not reflect causal mechanisms, constraining their predictive power. We present a simple example of how combining correlative and mechanistic knowledge provides a rapid way to gain insight into a species' niche resulting in consistent predictions and highlighting potential sources of uncertainty in forecasted responses to climate change. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. A systems toxicology approach identifies Lyn as a key signaling phosphoprotein modulated by mercury in a B lymphocyte cell model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caruso, Joseph A.; Stemmer, Paul M. [Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States); Dombkowski, Alan [Department of Pediatrics, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States); Caruthers, Nicholas J. [Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States); Gill, Randall [Department of Immunology and Microbiology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States); Rosenspire, Allen J., E-mail: arosenspire@wayne.edu [Department of Immunology and Microbiology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Network and protein–protein interaction analyses of proteins undergoing Hg{sup 2+}-induced phosphorylation and dephosphorylation in Hg{sup 2+}-intoxicated mouse WEHI-231 B cells identified Lyn as the most interconnected node. Lyn is a Src family protein tyrosine kinase known to be intimately involved in the B cell receptor (BCR) signaling pathway. Under normal signaling conditions the tyrosine kinase activity of Lyn is controlled by phosphorylation, primarily of two well known canonical regulatory tyrosine sites, Y-397 and Y-508. However, Lyn has several tyrosine residues that have not yet been determined to play a major role under normal signaling conditions, but are potentially important sites for phosphorylation following mercury exposure. In order to determine how Hg{sup 2+} exposure modulates the phosphorylation of additional residues in Lyn, a targeted MS assay was developed. Initial mass spectrometric surveys of purified Lyn identified 7 phosphorylated tyrosine residues. A quantitative assay was developed from these results using the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) strategy. WEHI-231 cells were treated with Hg{sup 2+}, pervanadate (a phosphatase inhibitor), or anti-Ig antibody (to stimulate the BCR). Results from these studies showed that the phosphoproteomic profile of Lyn after exposure of the WEHI-231 cells to a low concentration of Hg{sup 2+} closely resembled that of anti-Ig antibody stimulation, whereas exposure to higher concentrations of Hg{sup 2+} led to increases in the phosphorylation of Y-193/Y-194, Y-501 and Y-508 residues. These data indicate that mercury can disrupt a key regulatory signal transduction pathway in B cells and point to phospho-Lyn as a potential biomarker for mercury exposure. - Highlights: • Inorganic mercury (Hg{sup 2+}) induces changes in the WEHI-231 B cell phosphoproteome. • The B cell receptor (BCR) signaling pathway was the pathway most affected by Hg{sup 2+}. • The Src family phosphoprotein kinase Lyn was the

  15. A highly spatially resolved GIS-based model to assess the isoprenoid emissions from key Italian ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Claudia Kemper; Fares, Silvano; Ciccioli, Paolo

    2014-10-01

    The amount of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (BVOC) emitted from terrestrial vegetation is of great importance in atmospheric reactivity, particularly for ozone-forming reactions and as condensation nuclei in aerosol formation and growth. This work presents a detailed inventory of isoprenoid emissions from vegetation in Italy using an original approach which combines state of the art models to estimate the species-specific isoprenoid emissions and a Geographic Information System (GIS) where emissions are spatially represented. Isoprenoid species and basal emission factors were obtained by combining results from laboratory experiments with those published in literature. For the first time, our investigation was not only restricted to isoprene and total monoterpenes, but our goal was to provide maps of isoprene and individual monoterpenes at a high-spatial (˜1 km2) and temporal resolution (daily runs, monthly trends in emissions are discussed in the text). Another novelty in our research was the inclusion of the effects of phenology on plant emissions. Our results show that: a) isoprene, a-pinene, sabinene and b-pinene are the most important compounds emitted from vegetation in Italy; b) annual biogenic isoprene and monoterpene fluxes for the year 2006 were ˜31.30 Gg and ˜37.70 Gg, respectively; and c) Quercus pubescens + Quercus petrea + Quercus robur, Quercus ilex, Quercus suber and Fagus sylvatica are the principal isoprenoid emitting species in the country. The high spatial and temporal resolution, combined with the species-specific emission output, makes the model particularly suitable for assessing local budgets, and for modeling photochemical pollution in Italy.

  16. Modelling the re-intensification of tropical storm Erin (2007 over Oklahoma: understanding the key role of downdraft formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folmer Krikken

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on the inland re-intensification of tropical storm (TS Erin (2007. In this research, the physical processes that resulted in the re-intensification of TS Erin over Oklahoma, USA, on 19 August 2007 was determined and a sensitivity study on microphysics, planetary boundary layer and convective parameterisation schemes was performed in the mesoscale modelling system, MM5. Also, we diagnosed and explained the remarkable difference between model behaviour of the original Kain–Fritsch 1 (KF1 scheme and its revised counterpart (KF2. The numerical results showed only modest sensitivity to the selected microphysics schemes – the relatively simple ‘Simple Ice’ and the advanced Reisner-Graupel. We found a relatively high sensitivity to the selected boundary layer parameterisation. Enhanced mixing in the medium range forecast (MRF scheme leads to a relatively small convective available potential energy (CAPE, a deeper boundary layer and a lower dew point temperature, thus to a relatively stable environment. Therefore, MRF forecasts less precipitation (up to 150 mm than the local mixing scheme, ETA. Model results appeared most sensitive to the selected convection schemes, that is, Grell, KF1 and KF2. With Grell and KF1, Erin intensifies and produces intense precipitation, but its structure remains close to a mesoscale convective system (MCS or squall line rather than of the observed tropical cyclone. Both schemes also simulate the most intense precipitation too far south (100 km compared to observations. On the contrary, KF2 underestimates precipitation, but the track of the convection, the precipitation and the pressure distribution are relatively close to radar and field observations. A sensitivity study reveals that the downdraft formulation is critical to modelling TS Erin's dynamics. Within tropical cyclogenesis, the mid-level relative humidity (RH is generally very high, resulting in very small downdrafts. KF2 generates

  17. Modeling the complex impacts of timber harvests to find optimal management regimes for Amazon tidal floodplain forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortini, Lucas; Cropper, Wendell P.; Zarin, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    At the Amazon estuary, the oldest logging frontier in the Amazon, no studies have comprehensively explored the potential long-term population and yield consequences of multiple timber harvests over time. Matrix population modeling is one way to simulate long-term impacts of tree harvests, but this approach has often ignored common impacts of tree harvests including incidental damage, changes in post-harvest demography, shifts in the distribution of merchantable trees, and shifts in stand composition. We designed a matrix-based forest management model that incorporates these harvest-related impacts so resulting simulations reflect forest stand dynamics under repeated timber harvests as well as the realities of local smallholder timber management systems. Using a wide range of values for management criteria (e.g., length of cutting cycle, minimum cut diameter), we projected the long-term population dynamics and yields of hundreds of timber management regimes in the Amazon estuary, where small-scale, unmechanized logging is an important economic activity. These results were then compared to find optimal stand-level and species-specific sustainable timber management (STM) regimes using a set of timber yield and population growth indicators. Prospects for STM in Amazonian tidal floodplain forests are better than for many other tropical forests. However, generally high stock recovery rates between harvests are due to the comparatively high projected mean annualized yields from fast-growing species that effectively counterbalance the projected yield declines from other species. For Amazonian tidal floodplain forests, national management guidelines provide neither the highest yields nor the highest sustained population growth for species under management. Our research shows that management guidelines specific to a region’s ecological settings can be further refined to consider differences in species demographic responses to repeated harvests. In principle, such fine

  18. Possible Therapeutic Doses of Cannabinoid Type 1 Receptor Antagonist Reverses Key Alterations in Fragile X Syndrome Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomis-González, Maria; Busquets-Garcia, Arnau; Matute, Carlos; Maldonado, Rafael; Mato, Susana; Ozaita, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common monogenetic cause of intellectual disability. The cognitive deficits in the mouse model for this disorder, the Fragile X Mental Retardation 1 (Fmr1) knockout (KO) mouse, have been restored by different pharmacological approaches, among those the blockade of cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor. In this regard, our previous study showed that the CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist rimonabant normalized a number of core features in the Fmr1 knockout mouse. Rimonabant was commercialized at high doses for its anti-obesity properties, and withdrawn from the market on the bases of mood-related adverse effects. In this study we show, by using electrophysiological approaches, that low dosages of rimonabant (0.1 mg/kg) manage to normalize metabotropic glutamate receptor dependent long-term depression (mGluR-LTD). In addition, low doses of rimonabant (from 0.01 mg/kg) equally normalized the cognitive deficit in the mouse model of FXS. These doses of rimonabant were from 30 to 300 times lower than those required to reduce body weight in rodents and to presumably produce adverse effects in humans. Furthermore, NESS0327, a CB1 receptor neutral antagonist, was also effective in preventing the novel object-recognition memory deficit in Fmr1 KO mice. These data further support targeting CB1 receptors as a relevant therapy for FXS. PMID:27589806

  19. Tight glycaemic control is a key factor in wound healing enhancement strategies in an experimental diabetes mellitus model.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, J B

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Diabetes mellitus is a leading cause of impaired wound healing. The aim of this study was to establish a glucose-controlled diabetic wound healing model. METHOD: Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: Control group (C), Diabetic Non-glucose Controlled group (DNC) and Diabetic glucose Controlled group (DC). RESULTS: Glucose control was achieved using Insulman Rapid (average daily glucose level <10 mmol\\/L). 18 Sprague-Dawley rats underwent a dorsal skin wound incision and 10 days later were killed. Fresh and fixed wound tensile strength, hydroxyproline and transforming growth factor beta-1 levels were improved in the DC group when compared to the DNC group. The quantity of fibroblasts present was similar in each group. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates the impact that diabetes has on acute wound healing and suggests that wound modulating agents must be tested in both the tightly glucose-controlled as well as the poorly glucose-controlled diabetic animal models prior to proceeding with translational clinical studies.

  20. Elucidating the key role of the fungal mycelium on the biodegradation of n-pentane as a model hydrophobic VOC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara-Fernández, Alberto; Scott, Felipe; Moreno-Casas, Patricio; Díaz-Robles, Luis; Muñoz, Raúl

    2016-08-01

    The role of the aerial mycelium of the fungus Fusarium solani in the biodegradation of n-pentane was evaluated in a continuous fungal bioreactor (FB) to determine the contribution of the aerial (hyphae) and non-aerial (monolayer) fungal biomass. The experimental results showed that although the aerial biomass fraction represented only 25.9(±3)% on a dry weight basis, it was responsible for 71.6(±4)% of n-pentane removal. The FB attained a maximum elimination capacity (ECmax) of 680(±30) g m(-3) h(-1) in the presence of fungal hyphae (which supported an interfacial area of 5.5(±1.5) × 10(6) m(2) m(-3)). In addition, a mathematical model capable of describing n-pentane biodegradation by the filamentous fungus was also developed and validated against the experimental data. This model successfully predicted the influence of the aerial biomass fraction and its partition coefficient on the n-pentane removal, with EC decreasing from 680(±30) g m(-3) h(-1) to values of 200(±14) g m(-3) h(-1) when the dimensionless partition coefficient increased from 0.21(±0.09) with aerial biomass to 0.88(±0.06) without aerial biomass. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Possible Therapeutic Doses of Cannabinoid Type 1 Receptor Antagonist Reverses Key Alterations in Fragile X Syndrome Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Gomis-González

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X syndrome (FXS is the most common monogenetic cause of intellectual disability. The cognitive deficits in the mouse model for this disorder, the Fragile X Mental Retardation 1 (Fmr1 knockout (KO mouse, have been restored by different pharmacological approaches, among those the blockade of cannabinoid type 1 (CB1 receptor. In this regard, our previous study showed that the CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist rimonabant normalized a number of core features in the Fmr1 knockout mouse. Rimonabant was commercialized at high doses for its anti-obesity properties, and withdrawn from the market on the bases of mood-related adverse effects. In this study we show, by using electrophysiological approaches, that low dosages of rimonabant (0.1 mg/kg manage to normalize metabotropic glutamate receptor dependent long-term depression (mGluR-LTD. In addition, low doses of rimonabant (from 0.01 mg/kg equally normalized the cognitive deficit in the mouse model of FXS. These doses of rimonabant were from 30 to 300 times lower than those required to reduce body weight in rodents and to presumably produce adverse effects in humans. Furthermore, NESS0327, a CB1 receptor neutral antagonist, was also effective in preventing the novel object-recognition memory deficit in Fmr1 KO mice. These data further support targeting CB1 receptors as a relevant therapy for FXS.

  2. Domain Motions and Functionally-Key Residues of l-Alanine Dehydrogenase Revealed by an Elastic Network Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing-Yuan Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis l-alanine dehydrogenase (l-MtAlaDH plays an important role in catalyzing l-alanine to ammonia and pyruvate, which has been considered to be a potential target for tuberculosis treatment. In the present work, the functional domain motions encoded in the structure of l-MtAlaDH were investigated by using the Gaussian network model (GNM and the anisotropy network model (ANM. The slowest modes for the open-apo and closed-holo structures of the enzyme show that the domain motions have a common hinge axis centered in residues Met133 and Met301. Accompanying the conformational transition, both the 1,4-dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD-binding domain (NBD and the substrate-binding domain (SBD move in a highly coupled way. The first three slowest modes of ANM exhibit the open-closed, rotation and twist motions of l-MtAlaDH, respectively. The calculation of the fast modes reveals the residues responsible for the stability of the protein, and some of them are involved in the interaction with the ligand. Then, the functionally-important residues relevant to the binding of the ligand were identified by using a thermodynamic method. Our computational results are consistent with the experimental data, which will help us to understand the physical mechanism for the function of l-MtAlaDH.

  3. Hierarchical linear and logistic modeling of outcomes of antihypertensive treatment in elderly patients: findings from the PREVIEW study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Ivo; Demosthenes, Lynnette; MacDonald, Karen; Lee, Christopher S; Reel, Sally; Brié, Heidi; Hermans, Christine; Vancayzeele, Stefaan; Van der Niepen, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Achieving guideline-recommended blood pressure targets is difficult in older adults with hypertension. We completed a subgroup analysis of patients 65 years of age or older enrolled in PREVIEW, a prospective, multicenter, pharmacoepidemiological study of the determinants and outcomes of second-line antihypertensive treatment with valsartan in Belgium. Multilevel modeling was used to identify physician- and patient-level determinants of blood pressure values and practice guideline-derived definitions of blood pressure control. Data on 1560 patients and 504 physicians were used in this analysis. Blood pressure control rates for patients age 65 and over were lower for systolic (34.2% vs. 38.6%) and combined systolic/diastolic blood pressure (31.2% vs. 34.4%) compared to the entire PREVIEW sample. Twenty-seven percent of the variability in systolic, and 32% in diastolic pressure after 90 days of treatment were attributable to such variables as physicians' knowledge and adherence to evidence-based guidelines, practice patterns, and experience; with the remaining variance attributable to various demographic, behavioral, and clinical patient-related factors. Several independent predictors of uncontrolled blood pressure after 90 days of treatment were identified, largely confirming factors identified as determinants of blood pressure values. Recommendations for managing hypertension in the elderly are made in view of these findings. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A global off-line model of size-resolved aerosol microphysics: II. Identification of key uncertainties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Spracklen

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We use the new GLOMAP model of global aerosol microphysics to investigate the sensitivity of modelled sulfate and sea salt aerosol properties to uncertainties in the driving microphysical processes and compare these uncertainties with those associated with aerosol and precursor gas emissions. Overall, we conclude that uncertainties in microphysical processes have a larger effect on global sulfate and sea salt derived condensation nuclei (CN and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN concentrations than uncertainties in present-day sulfur emissions. Our simulations suggest that uncertainties in predicted sulfate and sea salt CCN abundances due to poorly constrained microphysical processes are likely to be of a similar magnitude to long-term changes in sulfate and sea salt CCN due to changes in anthropogenic emissions. A microphysical treatment of the global sulfate aerosol allows the uncertainty in climate-relevant aerosol properties to be attributed to specific processes in a way that has not been possible with simpler aerosol schemes. In particular we conclude that: (1 changes in the binary H2SO4-H2O nucleation rate and condensation rate of gaseous H2SO4 cause a shift in the vertical location of the upper tropospheric CN layer by as much as 3 km, while the shape of the CN profile is essentially pre-served (2 uncertainties in the binary H2SO4-H2O nucleation rate have a relatively insignificant effect on marine boundary layer (MBL aerosol properties; (3 emitting a fraction of anthropogenic SO2 as particulates (to represent production of sulfate particles in power plant plumes below the scale of the model grid (which is of the order of 300 km has the potential to change the global mean MBL sulfate-derived CN concentrations by up to 72%, and changes of up to a factor 20 can occur in polluted continental regions; (4 predicted global mean MBL sulfate and sea salt CCN concentrations change by 10 to 60% when several microphysical processes are changed within

  5. Transfer studies of polystyrene nanoparticles in the ex vivo human placenta perfusion model: key sources of artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grafmueller, Stefanie; Manser, Pius; Diener, Liliane; Maurizi, Lionel; Diener, Pierre-André; Hofmann, Heinrich; Jochum, Wolfram; Krug, Harald F.; Buerki-Thurnherr, Tina; von Mandach, Ursula; Wick, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Nanotechnology is a rapidly expanding and highly promising new technology with many different fields of application. Consequently, the investigation of engineered nanoparticles in biological systems is steadily increasing. Questions about the safety of such engineered nanoparticles are very important and the most critical subject with regard to the penetration of biological barriers allowing particle distribution throughout the human body. Such translocation studies are technically challenging and many issues have to be considered to obtain meaningful and comparable results. Here we report on the transfer of polystyrene nanoparticles across the human placenta using an ex vivo human placenta perfusion model. We provide an overview of several challenges that can potentially occur in any translocation study in relation to particle size distribution, functionalization and stability of labels. In conclusion, a careful assessment of nanoparticle properties in a physiologically relevant milieu is as challenging and important as the actual study of nanoparticle-cell interactions itself.

  6. Transfer studies of polystyrene nanoparticles in the ex vivo human placenta perfusion model: key sources of artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grafmueller, Stefanie; Manser, Pius; Diener, Liliane; Maurizi, Lionel; Diener, Pierre-André; Hofmann, Heinrich; Jochum, Wolfram; Krug, Harald F.; Buerki-Thurnherr, Tina; von Mandach, Ursula; Wick, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a rapidly expanding and highly promising new technology with many different fields of application. Consequently, the investigation of engineered nanoparticles in biological systems is steadily increasing. Questions about the safety of such engineered nanoparticles are very important and the most critical subject with regard to the penetration of biological barriers allowing particle distribution throughout the human body. Such translocation studies are technically challenging and many issues have to be considered to obtain meaningful and comparable results. Here we report on the transfer of polystyrene nanoparticles across the human placenta using an ex vivo human placenta perfusion model. We provide an overview of several challenges that can potentially occur in any translocation study in relation to particle size distribution, functionalization and stability of labels. In conclusion, a careful assessment of nanoparticle properties in a physiologically relevant milieu is as challenging and important as the actual study of nanoparticle–cell interactions itself. PMID:27877820

  7. Transfer studies of polystyrene nanoparticles in the ex vivo human placenta perfusion model: key sources of artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grafmueller, Stefanie; Manser, Pius; Diener, Liliane; Maurizi, Lionel; Diener, Pierre-André; Hofmann, Heinrich; Jochum, Wolfram; Krug, Harald F; Buerki-Thurnherr, Tina; von Mandach, Ursula; Wick, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Nanotechnology is a rapidly expanding and highly promising new technology with many different fields of application. Consequently, the investigation of engineered nanoparticles in biological systems is steadily increasing. Questions about the safety of such engineered nanoparticles are very important and the most critical subject with regard to the penetration of biological barriers allowing particle distribution throughout the human body. Such translocation studies are technically challenging and many issues have to be considered to obtain meaningful and comparable results. Here we report on the transfer of polystyrene nanoparticles across the human placenta using an ex vivo human placenta perfusion model. We provide an overview of several challenges that can potentially occur in any translocation study in relation to particle size distribution, functionalization and stability of labels. In conclusion, a careful assessment of nanoparticle properties in a physiologically relevant milieu is as challenging and important as the actual study of nanoparticle-cell interactions itself.

  8. Quantitative assessment of key parameters in qualitative vulnerability methods applied in karst systems based on an integrated numerical modelling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doummar, Joanna; Kassem, Assaad

    2017-04-01

    In the framework of a three-year PEER (USAID/NSF) funded project, flow in a Karst system in Lebanon (Assal) dominated by snow and semi arid conditions was simulated and successfully calibrated using an integrated numerical model (MIKE-She 2016) based on high resolution input data and detailed catchment characterization. Point source infiltration and fast flow pathways were simulated by a bypass function and a high conductive lens respectively. The approach consisted of identifying all the factors used in qualitative vulnerability methods (COP, EPIK, PI, DRASTIC, GOD) applied in karst systems and to assess their influence on recharge signals in the different hydrological karst compartments (Atmosphere, Unsaturated zone and Saturated zone) based on the integrated numerical model. These parameters are usually attributed different weights according to their estimated impact on Groundwater vulnerability. The aim of this work is to quantify the importance of each of these parameters and outline parameters that are not accounted for in standard methods, but that might play a role in the vulnerability of a system. The spatial distribution of the detailed evapotranspiration, infiltration, and recharge signals from atmosphere to unsaturated zone to saturated zone was compared and contrasted among different surface settings and under varying flow conditions (e.g., in varying slopes, land cover, precipitation intensity, and soil properties as well point source infiltration). Furthermore a sensitivity analysis of individual or coupled major parameters allows quantifying their impact on recharge and indirectly on vulnerability. The preliminary analysis yields a new methodology that accounts for most of the factors influencing vulnerability while refining the weights attributed to each one of them, based on a quantitative approach.

  9. Finding Family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Discovering her birth parents was an exciting adventure for a 15-year-old girl It took 14 years-and just two minutes-for an adopted Chinese girl to find her biological family.July 21 this year marked the first

  10. Simple and robust determination of the activity signature of key carbohydrate metabolism enzymes for physiological phenotyping in model and crop plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jammer, Alexandra; Gasperl, Anna; Luschin-Ebengreuth, Nora;

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of physiological parameters is important to understand the link between plant phenotypes and their genetic bases, and therefore is needed as an important element in the analysis of model and crop plants. The activities of enzymes involved in primary carbohydrate metabolism have been...... shown to be strongly associated with growth performance, crop yield, and quality, as well as stress responses. A simple, fast, and cost-effective method to determine activities for 13 key enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism has been established, mainly based on coupled spectrophotometric kinetic...

  11. Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor stimulation reverses key deficits in distinct rodent models of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kingsbury Ann E

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has recently become apparent that neuroinflammation may play a significant role in Parkinson's disease (PD. This is also the case in animal paradigms of the disease. The potential neuroprotective action of the glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP-1R agonist exendin-4 (EX-4, which is protective against cytokine mediated apoptosis and may stimulate neurogenesis, was investigated In paradigms of PD. Methods Two rodent 'models' of PD, 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA and lipopolysaccaride (LPS, were used to test the effects of EX-4. Rats were then investigated in vivo and ex vivo with a wide range of behavioural, neurochemical and histological tests to measure integrity of the nigrostriatal system. Results EX-4 (0.1 and 0.5 μg/kg was given seven days after intracerebral toxin injection. Seven days later circling behaviour was measured following apomorphine challenge. Circling was significantly lower in rats given EX-4 at both doses compared to animals given 6-OHDA/LPS and vehicle. Consistent with these observations, striatal tissue DA concentrations were markedly higher in 6-OHDA/LPS + EX-4 treated rats versus 6-OHDA/LPS + vehicle groups, whilst assay of L-DOPA production by tyrosine hydroxylase was greatly reduced in the striata of 6-OHDA/LPS + vehicle rats, but this was not the case in rats co-administered EX-4. Furthermore nigral TH staining recorded in 6-OHDA/LPS + vehicle treated animals was markedly lower than in sham-operated or EX-4 treated rats. Finally, EX-4 clearly reversed the loss of extracellular DA in the striata of toxin lesioned freely moving rats. Conclusion The apparent ability of EX-4 to arrest progression of, or even reverse nigral lesions once established, suggests that pharmacological manipulation of the GLP-1 receptor system could have substantial therapeutic utility in PD. Critically, in contrast to other peptide agents that have been demonstrated to possess neuroprotective properties in pre-clinical models

  12. Vitamin D depletion does not affect key aspects of the preeclamptic phenotype in a transgenic rodent model for preeclampsia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Louise Bjørkholt; Golic, Michaela; Przybyl, Lukasz

    2016-01-01

    samples were collected in metabolic cages at days 6 and 18 of gestation. Rats were sacrificed at day 21 of gestation. Depleted dams (VDd) had negligible serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D2+3 levels (mean ± SEM; 2.95 ± 0.45 nmol/l vs. VDh 26.20 ± 2.88 nmol/l, P = .01), but in both groups, levels of 1,25(OH)2D3......Maternal vitamin D deficiency is proposed as a risk factor for preeclampsia in humans. We tested the hypothesis that vitamin D depletion aggravates and high supplementation ameliorates the preeclampsia phenotype in an established transgenic rat model of human renin-angiotensin system......-mediated preeclampsia. Adult rat dams, transgenic for human angiotensinogen (hAGT) and mated with male rats transgenic for human renin (hREN), were fed either vitamin D-depleted chow (VDd) or enriched chow (VDh) 2 weeks before mating and during pregnancy. Mean blood pressure was recorded by tail-cuff, and 24-hour urine...

  13. Model Youth Programs: A Key Strategy for Developing Community-University Partnerships Using a Community Youth Development Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Anyon

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Universities across the nation face the charge of enhancing their intellectual capital as a learning institution while also contributing to the greater social good. While there is great potential for university-community partnerships to generate lessons for youth workers and policy makers, create powerful new knowledge for the academic field, and provide transformative experiences for community members, partnerships often fail to produce such meaningful results. In the San Francisco Bay Area, community residents who have been involved in such unsuccessful initiatives frequently perceived that university partners spent insufficient time learning about the community context, prioritized research objectives over community needs and did not make long-term commitments. Despite these challenges, community-university partnerships can be useful strategies for advancing the field of youth development by strengthening research and practice in local contexts. This paper presents how the design and implementation of model youth programs served as an effective strategy in developing a partnership between a university-based center and two local communities over a 5-year period. It also describes essential lessons that other communities, research institutions or universities may use to launch, implement, expand and sustain their own successful partnerships to build local capacity to implement youth development practices, promote positive outcomes for young people, and generate knowledge about the impact of youth development approaches.

  14. Nanotechnology in Mexico: Key Findings Based on OECD Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foladori, Guillermo; Arteaga Figueroa, Edgar; Záyago Lau, Edgar; Appelbaum, Richard; Robles-Belmont, Eduardo; Villa, Liliana; Parker, Rachel; Leos, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    This analysis of Mexico's nanotechnology policies utilizes indicators developed by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, which in 2008 conducted a pilot survey comparing the nanotechnology policies of 24 countries. In this paper, we apply the same questionnaire to the Mexican case, adding business information derived from the…

  15. Nanotechnology in Mexico: Key Findings Based on OECD Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foladori, Guillermo; Arteaga Figueroa, Edgar; Záyago Lau, Edgar; Appelbaum, Richard; Robles-Belmont, Eduardo; Villa, Liliana; Parker, Rachel; Leos, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    This analysis of Mexico's nanotechnology policies utilizes indicators developed by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, which in 2008 conducted a pilot survey comparing the nanotechnology policies of 24 countries. In this paper, we apply the same questionnaire to the Mexican case, adding business information derived from the…

  16. Preschool Inclusion: Key Findings from Research and Implications for Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Sharmila; Smith, Sheila; Banerjee, Rashida

    2016-01-01

    A recent policy statement issued by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and U.S. Department of Education (DOE) on early childhood inclusion presents extensive recommendations for state and local actions that could improve young children's access to high quality inclusive early childhood programs (HHS/DOE, 2015). This brief…

  17. Using RASCAL to Find Key Villages in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-18

    Publique , vol. 16, no. 1, 2005, pp. 69–82. Kempe, D., Kleinberg, J., and Tardos, E. “Maximizing the spread of influence through a social network,” in...Influentials, networks, and public opinion formation,” Journal of Consumer Research, vol. 34, no. 4, pp. 441–458, 2007. APPENDIX: FURTHER DETAIL ON

  18. Gut Microbiota and Autism: Key Concepts and Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Helen T.; Taur, Ying; Walkup, John T.

    2017-01-01

    There is an emerging body of evidence linking the intestinal microbiota with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Studies have demonstrated differences in the composition of gut bacteria between children with ASD and controls. Certain intestinal bacteria have been observed in abundance and may be involved in the pathogenesis of ASD; including members…

  19. Finding the key - cell biology and science education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kenneth R

    2010-12-01

    No international research community, cell biology included, can exist without an educational community to renew and replenish it. Unfortunately, cell biology researchers frequently regard their work as independent of the process of education and see little reason to reach out to science teachers. For cell biology to continue to prosper, I argue that researchers must support education in at least three ways. First, we must view education and research as part of a single scientific community. Second, we should take advantage of new technologies to connect the research laboratory to the classroom. Finally, we must take the initiative in defending the integrity of science teaching, particularly when education is under attack for political or religious reasons.

  20. Gut Microbiota and Autism: Key Concepts and Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Helen T.; Taur, Ying; Walkup, John T.

    2017-01-01

    There is an emerging body of evidence linking the intestinal microbiota with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Studies have demonstrated differences in the composition of gut bacteria between children with ASD and controls. Certain intestinal bacteria have been observed in abundance and may be involved in the pathogenesis of ASD; including members…

  1. Key Findings for the Fiscal Year 2006 Core Data Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Brian L.; Rudy, Julia A.

    2008-01-01

    In 2003, EDUCAUSE launched a program called the EDUCAUSE Core Data Service (CDS), which consist of: (1) an annual survey that collects data about IT environments and practices on (primarily) member campuses; (2) a Web-based, interactive database service available to all who complete the survey through which they can access data contributed by…

  2. Does School Improve Equity? Some Key Findings from Portuguese Data

    OpenAIRE

    Chagas Lopes, Margarida; Medeiros, João; PINTO, AQUILES

    2005-01-01

    Does School Improve Equity? ABSTRACT Most school inequality research usually emphasize the role played by pupils' family social, cultural and economic condition, their parents' educational achievement, previous own school story and gender, among other factors. Despite also considering these same determinants, our main purpose in this paper had to do with assessing the specific role played both directly and indirectly by the "school effect" upon pupils' scholar trajectories; and thereby ...

  3. Modelling the relationship between obesity and mental health in children and adolescents: findings from the Health Survey for England 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Summerbell Carolyn D

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A number of studies have reported significant associations between obesity and poor psychological wellbeing in children but findings have been inconsistent. Methods: This study utilised data from 3,898 children aged 5-16 years obtained from the Health Survey for England 2007. Information was available on Body Mass Index (BMI, parental ratings of child emotional and behavioural health (Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, self-reported physical activity levels and sociodemographic variables. A multilevel modelling approach was used to allow for the clustering of children within households. Results: Curvilinear relationships between both internalising (emotional and externalising (behavioural symptoms and adjusted BMI were observed. After adjusting for potential confounders the relationships between obesity and psychological adjustment (reported externalising and internalising symptoms remained statistically significant. Being overweight, rather than obese, had no impact on overall reported mental health. 17% of children with obesity were above the suggested screening threshold for emotional problems, compared to 9% of non-obese children. Allowing for clustering and potential confounding variables children classified as obese had an odds ratio (OR of 2.13 (95% CI 1.39 to 3.26 for being above the screening threshold for an emotional disorder compared to non-obese young people. No cross-level interactions between household income and the relationships between obesity and internalising or externalising symptoms were observed. Conclusions: In this large, representative, UK-based community sample a curvilinear association with emotional wellbeing was observed for adjusted BMI suggesting the possibility of a threshold effect. Further research could focus on exploring causal relationships and developing targeted interventions.

  4. Genetic interaction motif finding by expectation maximization – a novel statistical model for inferring gene modules from synthetic lethality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Ping

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synthetic lethality experiments identify pairs of genes with complementary function. More direct functional associations (for example greater probability of membership in a single protein complex may be inferred between genes that share synthetic lethal interaction partners than genes that are directly synthetic lethal. Probabilistic algorithms that identify gene modules based on motif discovery are highly appropriate for the analysis of synthetic lethal genetic interaction data and have great potential in integrative analysis of heterogeneous datasets. Results We have developed Genetic Interaction Motif Finding (GIMF, an algorithm for unsupervised motif discovery from synthetic lethal interaction data. Interaction motifs are characterized by position weight matrices and optimized through expectation maximization. Given a seed gene, GIMF performs a nonlinear transform on the input genetic interaction data and automatically assigns genes to the motif or non-motif category. We demonstrate the capacity to extract known and novel pathways for Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast. Annotations suggested for several uncharacterized genes are supported by recent experimental evidence. GIMF is efficient in computation, requires no training and automatically down-weights promiscuous genes with high degrees. Conclusion GIMF effectively identifies pathways from synthetic lethality data with several unique features. It is mostly suitable for building gene modules around seed genes. Optimal choice of one single model parameter allows construction of gene networks with different levels of confidence. The impact of hub genes the generic probabilistic framework of GIMF may be used to group other types of biological entities such as proteins based on stochastic motifs. Analysis of the strongest motifs discovered by the algorithm indicates that synthetic lethal interactions are depleted between genes within a motif, suggesting that synthetic

  5. Multi-Modal Homing in Sea Turtles: Modeling Dual Use of Geomagnetic and Chemical Cues in Island-Finding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endres, Courtney S; Putman, Nathan F; Ernst, David A; Kurth, Jessica A; Lohmann, Catherine M F; Lohmann, Kenneth J

    2016-01-01

    Sea turtles are capable of navigating across large expanses of ocean to arrive at remote islands for nesting, but how they do so has remained enigmatic. An interesting example involves green turtles (Chelonia mydas) that nest on Ascension Island, a tiny land mass located approximately 2000 km from the turtles' foraging grounds along the coast of Brazil. Sensory cues that turtles are known to detect, and which might hypothetically be used to help locate Ascension Island, include the geomagnetic field, airborne odorants, and waterborne odorants. One possibility is that turtles use magnetic cues to arrive in the vicinity of the island, then use chemical cues to pinpoint its location. As a first step toward investigating this hypothesis, we used oceanic, atmospheric, and geomagnetic models to assess whether magnetic and chemical cues might plausibly be used by turtles to locate Ascension Island. Results suggest that waterborne and airborne odorants alone are insufficient to guide turtles from Brazil to Ascension, but might permit localization of the island once turtles arrive in its vicinity. By contrast, magnetic cues might lead turtles into the vicinity of the island, but would not typically permit its localization because the field shifts gradually over time. Simulations reveal, however, that the sequential use of magnetic and chemical cues can potentially provide a robust navigational strategy for locating Ascension Island. Specifically, one strategy that appears viable is following a magnetic isoline into the vicinity of Ascension Island until an odor plume emanating from the island is encountered, after which turtles might either: (1) initiate a search strategy; or (2) follow the plume to its island source. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that sea turtles, and perhaps other marine animals, use a multi-modal navigational strategy for locating remote islands.

  6. Multi-modal homing in sea turtles: modeling dual use of geomagnetic and chemical cues in island-finding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney S Endres

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Sea turtles are capable of navigating across large expanses of ocean to arrive at remote islands for nesting, but how they do so has remained enigmatic. An interesting example involves green turtles (Chelonia mydas that nest on Ascension Island, a tiny land mass located approximately 2000 km from the turtles' foraging grounds along the coast of Brazil. Sensory cues that turtles are known to detect, and which might hypothetically be used to help locate Ascension Island, include the geomagnetic field, airborne odorants, and waterborne odorants. One possibility is that turtles use magnetic cues to arrive in the vicinity of the island, then use chemical cues to pinpoint its location. As a first step toward investigating this hypothesis, we used oceanic, atmospheric, and geomagnetic models to assess whether magnetic and chemical cues might plausibly be used by turtles to locate Ascension Island. Results suggest that waterborne and airborne odorants alone are insufficient to guide turtles from Brazil to Ascension, but might permit localization of the island once turtles arrive in its vicinity. By contrast, magnetic cues might lead turtles into the vicinity of the island, but would not typically permit its localization because the field shifts gradually over time. Simulations reveal, however, that the sequential use of magnetic and chemical cues can potentially provide a robust navigational strategy for locating Ascension Island. Specifically, one strategy that appears viable is following a magnetic isoline into the vicinity of Ascension Island until an odor plume emanating from the island is encountered, after which turtles might either: (1 initiate a search strategy; or (2 follow the plume to its island source. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that sea turtles, and perhaps other marine animals, use a multi-modal navigational strategy for locating remote islands.

  7. Photochemistry in Saturn’s Ring-Shadowed Atmosphere: Modeling of Key Molecules and Observations of Dust Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgington, Scott G.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Wilson, Eric H.; West, Robert A.; Baines, Kevin H.; Bjoraker, Gordon L.; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Momary, Tom

    2014-11-01

    -generated molecules and haze. [1] Edgington, S.G., et al., 2012. Photochemistry in Saturn’s Ring Shadowed Atmosphere: Modeling, Observations, and Preliminary Analysis. Bull. American. Astron. Soc., 38, 499 (#11.23).

  8. Resolving key drivers of variability through an important circulation choke point in the western Mediterranean Sea; using gliders, models & satellite remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heslop, Emma; Aguiar, Eva; Mourre, Baptiste; Juza, Mélanie; Escudier, Romain; Tintoré, Joaquín

    2017-04-01

    The Ibiza Channel plays an important role in the circulation of the Western Mediterranean Sea, it governs the north/south exchange of different water masses that are known to affect regional ecosystems and is influenced by variability in the different drivers that affect sub-basins to the north (N) and south (S). A complex system. In this study we use a multi-platform approach to resolve the key drivers of this variability, and gain insight into the inter-connection between the N and S of the Western Mediterranean Sea through this choke point. The 6-year glider time series from the quasi-continuous glider endurance line monitoring of the Ibiza Channel, undertaken by SOCIB (Balearic Coastal Ocean observing and Forecasting System), is used as the base from which to identify key sub-seasonal to inter-annual patterns and shifts in water mass properties and transport volumes. The glider data indicates the following key components in the variability of the N/S flow of different water mass through the channel; regional winter mode water production, change in intermediate water mass properties, northward flows of a fresher water mass and the basin-scale circulation. To resolve the drivers of these components of variability, the strength of combining datasets from different sources, glider, modeling, altimetry and moorings, is harnessed. To the north atmospheric forcing in the Gulf of Lions is a dominant driver, while to the south the mesoscale circulation patterns of the Atlantic Jet and Alboran gyres dominate the variability but do not appear to influence the fresher inflows. Evidence of a connection between the northern and southern sub-basins is however indicated. The study highlights importance of sub-seasonal variability and the scale of rapid change possible in the Mediterranean, as well as the benefits of leveraging high resolution glider datasets within a multi-platform and modelling study.

  9. Provable secure authenticated key exchange protocol under standard model%标准模型下可证安全的认证密钥协商协议

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓帆; 邓少锋; 李益发

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an identity-based authenticated key exchange protocol in the standard model.Protocol design is inspired by bilinear pairings.Strand space knowledge and Game method in provable security are comprehensively used.The correctness of the protocol is analysed and a strict proof is given.The protocol has good forward security and session key non-hosting.At the same time,through the explicit anthentication,it improves the efficiency of the implementation of the protocol.Compared with the protocol in the random oracle model, the protocol has the same computational and communication efficiencies.%提出了一个标准模型下的基于身份认证的密钥协商协议.协议的设计采用了双线性配对的思想,协议的安全性分析,则综合运用了串空间知识以及可证安全中Game证明的方法,给出了严格的证明.协议具有良好的前向安全性和会话密钥无托管性,通过利用显式的身份认证,提高了协议的执行效率.与随机预言模型中的协议相比,在计算和通信效率方面相当.

  10. Concept design theory and model for multi-use space facilities: Analysis of key system design parameters through variance of mission requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynerson, Charles Martin

    This research has been performed to create concept design and economic feasibility data for space business parks. A space business park is a commercially run multi-use space station facility designed for use by a wide variety of customers. Both space hardware and crew are considered as revenue producing payloads. Examples of commercial markets may include biological and materials research, processing, and production, space tourism habitats, and satellite maintenance and resupply depots. This research develops a design methodology and an analytical tool to create feasible preliminary design information for space business parks. The design tool is validated against a number of real facility designs. Appropriate model variables are adjusted to ensure that statistical approximations are valid for subsequent analyses. The tool is used to analyze the effect of various payload requirements on the size, weight and power of the facility. The approach for the analytical tool was to input potential payloads as simple requirements, such as volume, weight, power, crew size, and endurance. In creating the theory, basic principles are used and combined with parametric estimation of data when necessary. Key system parameters are identified for overall system design. Typical ranges for these key parameters are identified based on real human spaceflight systems. To connect the economics to design, a life-cycle cost model is created based upon facility mass. This rough cost model estimates potential return on investments, initial investment requirements and number of years to return on the initial investment. Example cases are analyzed for both performance and cost driven requirements for space hotels, microgravity processing facilities, and multi-use facilities. In combining both engineering and economic models, a design-to-cost methodology is created for more accurately estimating the commercial viability for multiple space business park markets.

  11. Replication and extension of a hierarchical model of social anxiety and depression: fear of positive evaluation as a key unique factor in social anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Justin W

    2015-01-01

    Wang, Hsu, Chiu, and Liang (2012, Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 26, 215-224) recently proposed a hierarchical model of social interaction anxiety and depression to account for both the commonalities and distinctions between these conditions. In the present paper, this model was extended to more broadly encompass the symptoms of social anxiety disorder, and replicated in a large unselected, undergraduate sample (n = 585). Structural equation modeling (SEM) and hierarchical regression analyses were employed. Negative affect and positive affect were conceptualized as general factors shared by social anxiety and depression; fear of negative evaluation (FNE) and disqualification of positive social outcomes were operationalized as specific factors, and fear of positive evaluation (FPE) was operationalized as a factor unique to social anxiety. This extended hierarchical model explicates structural relationships among these factors, in which the higher-level, general factors (i.e., high negative affect and low positive affect) represent vulnerability markers of both social anxiety and depression, and the lower-level factors (i.e., FNE, disqualification of positive social outcomes, and FPE) are the dimensions of specific cognitive features. Results from SEM and hierarchical regression analyses converged in support of the extended model. FPE is further supported as a key symptom that differentiates social anxiety from depression.

  12. Critical Issues and Key Points from the Survey to the Creation of the Historical Building Information Model: the Case of Santo Stefano Basilica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagnetti, C.; Dubbini, M.; Ricci, P. C.; Rivola, R.; Giannini, M.; Capra, A.

    2017-05-01

    The new era of designing in architecture and civil engineering applications lies in the Building Information Modeling (BIM) approach, based on a 3D geometric model including a 3D database. This is easier for new constructions whereas, when dealing with existing buildings, the creation of the BIM is based on the accurate knowledge of the as-built construction. Such a condition is allowed by a 3D survey, often carried out with laser scanning technology or modern photogrammetry, which are able to guarantee an adequate points cloud in terms of resolution and completeness by balancing both time consuming and costs with respect to the request of final accuracy. The BIM approach for existing buildings and even more for historical buildings is not yet a well known and deeply discussed process. There are still several choices to be addressed in the process from the survey to the model and critical issues to be discussed in the modeling step, particularly when dealing with unconventional elements such as deformed geometries or historical elements. The paper describes a comprehensive workflow that goes through the survey and the modeling, allowing to focus on critical issues and key points to obtain a reliable BIM of an existing monument. The case study employed to illustrate the workflow is the Basilica of St. Stefano in Bologna (Italy), a large monumental complex with great religious, historical and architectural assets.

  13. Improving calibration of two key parameters in Hydrologic Engineering Center hydrologic modelling system, and analysing the influence of initial loss on flood peak flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Musheng; Chen, Xingwei; Chen, Ying; Yao, Huaxia

    2013-01-01

    Parameter calibration is a key and difficult issue for a hydrological model. Taking the Jinjiang Xixi watershed of south-east China as the study area, we proposed methods to improve the calibration of two very sensitive parameters, Muskingum K and initial loss, in the Hydrologic Engineering Center hydrologic modelling system (HEC-HMS) model. Twenty-three rainstorm flood events occurring from 1972 to 1977 were used to calibrate the model using a trial-and-error approach, and a relationship between initial loss and initial discharge for these flood events was established; seven rainstorm events occurring from 1978 to 1979 were used to validate the two parameters. The influence of initial loss change on different return-period floods was evaluated. A fixed Muskingum K value, which was calibrated by assuming a flow wave velocity at 3 m/s, could be used to simulate a flood hydrograph, and the empirical power-function relationship between initial loss and initial discharge made the model more applicable for flood forecasting. The influence of initial loss on peak floods was significant but not identical for different flood levels, and the change rate of peak floods caused by the same initial loss change was more remarkable when the return period increased.

  14. Threshold Key Sharing Model in Wireless Sensor Networks%无线传感器网络门限密钥共享模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柳亚男; 王箭; 杜贺

    2011-01-01

    针对现有传感器网络密钥管理方案存在的网络连通度低、抗俘获性差、节点能耗高等问题,该文提出一种基于(q,l)门限秘密共享的密钥共享模型,采用“虚拟簇头共享密钥,物理簇头重构密钥”的方式完成簇头与簇成员的密钥协商.该模型实现了簇成员能耗最低、抗俘获性最优的目标,同时门限参数l和q能够调节簇头的抗俘获性、容错性和高效性.理论分析与实验证明,与传统的概率型方案相比,该模型有效地提高了节点抗俘获性和网络连通度,并降低了节点能耗.%Most traditional probabilistic key management schemes of wireless sensor networks have disadvantages of low connectivity, poor resiliency against node capture, and high energy-consumption. A key sharing model is proposed based on (q , l )-threshold secret sharing. In this model, a key is divided into shadows to be shared by "virtual cluster heads" and re-constructed by the "physical cluster head". For tiny cluster member nodes, this model is optimized in improving their resilience against node capture attacks and saving the energy consumption. At the same time, the cluster head nodes' properties of security, tolerance and efficiency can be adjusted by controlling the parameters of q and l. Both theoretic analysis and the experimental results prove that, this model improves effectively the resilience against nodes capture attack and the network connectivity, and decreases the nodes' overheads.

  15. Parameter Estimations of Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB Model over the Life History of a Key Antarctic Species: The Antarctic Sea Star Odontaster validus Koehler, 1906.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Agüera

    Full Text Available Marine organisms in Antarctica are adapted to an extreme ecosystem including extremely stable temperatures and strong seasonality due to changes in day length. It is now largely accepted that Southern Ocean organisms are particularly vulnerable to global warming with some regions already being challenged by a rapid increase of temperature. Climate change affects both the physical and biotic components of marine ecosystems and will have an impact on the distribution and population dynamics of Antarctic marine organisms. To predict and assess the effect of climate change on marine ecosystems a more comprehensive knowledge of the life history and physiology of key species is urgently needed. In this study we estimate the Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB model parameters for key benthic Antarctic species the sea star Odontaster validus using available information from literature and experiments. The DEB theory is unique in capturing the metabolic processes of an organism through its entire life cycle as a function of temperature and food availability. The DEB model allows for the inclusion of the different life history stages, and thus, becomes a tool that can be used to model lifetime feeding, growth, reproduction, and their responses to changes in biotic and abiotic conditions. The DEB model presented here includes the estimation of reproduction handling rules for the development of simultaneous oocyte cohorts within the gonad. Additionally it links the DEB model reserves to the pyloric caeca an organ whose function has long been ascribed to energy storage. Model parameters described a slowed down metabolism of long living animals that mature slowly. O. validus has a large reserve that-matching low maintenance costs- allow withstanding long periods of starvation. Gonad development is continuous and individual cohorts developed within the gonads grow in biomass following a power function of the age of the cohort. The DEB model developed here for O

  16. Parameter Estimations of Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) Model over the Life History of a Key Antarctic Species: The Antarctic Sea Star Odontaster validus Koehler, 1906.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agüera, Antonio; Collard, Marie; Jossart, Quentin; Moreau, Camille; Danis, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Marine organisms in Antarctica are adapted to an extreme ecosystem including extremely stable temperatures and strong seasonality due to changes in day length. It is now largely accepted that Southern Ocean organisms are particularly vulnerable to global warming with some regions already being challenged by a rapid increase of temperature. Climate change affects both the physical and biotic components of marine ecosystems and will have an impact on the distribution and population dynamics of Antarctic marine organisms. To predict and assess the effect of climate change on marine ecosystems a more comprehensive knowledge of the life history and physiology of key species is urgently needed. In this study we estimate the Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) model parameters for key benthic Antarctic species the sea star Odontaster validus using available information from literature and experiments. The DEB theory is unique in capturing the metabolic processes of an organism through its entire life cycle as a function of temperature and food availability. The DEB model allows for the inclusion of the different life history stages, and thus, becomes a tool that can be used to model lifetime feeding, growth, reproduction, and their responses to changes in biotic and abiotic conditions. The DEB model presented here includes the estimation of reproduction handling rules for the development of simultaneous oocyte cohorts within the gonad. Additionally it links the DEB model reserves to the pyloric caeca an organ whose function has long been ascribed to energy storage. Model parameters described a slowed down metabolism of long living animals that mature slowly. O. validus has a large reserve that-matching low maintenance costs- allow withstanding long periods of starvation. Gonad development is continuous and individual cohorts developed within the gonads grow in biomass following a power function of the age of the cohort. The DEB model developed here for O. validus allowed us to

  17. Key factors for successful export performance for small firms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouthers, L.E.; Nakos, G.; Hadjimarcou, J.; Brouthers, K.D.

    2009-01-01

    What key factors result in superior export performance for small firms from small countries? Drawing on the internationalization process model and organizational learning theory, the authors hypothesize and find that (1) emphasizing international sales while (2) restricting exports to a few foreign

  18. Security bootstrapping model of key pre-sharing in MANET%MANET环境下的密钥预共享安全引导模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴畏; 彭茜; 冯力; 张剑

    2011-01-01

    Key pre-sharing model based on one-way hash function and (t,n) threshold schema of La- grange polynomial group was proposed to implement the security bootstrapping in mobile Ad hoc net- works (MANET) environment. This model involved following two phases, including the pre-sharing keys based on one way hash function and'I Lagrange interpolation polynomial group, and recovering the secure key based on the digital signature of threshold schema. The one way hash approach can effec- tively prevent the splitted key pieces in a key pool from being exposed. The digital signature of threshold schema also has advantages to detect and block the DoS attack and other malicious fraudu- lent behaviors during the processes of key reconstruction and recovery. The experiments of simulated environment were performed to validate the approach on the performance of successful establishing se- cure link, computation complexity, the security of bootstrapping process, the capability of network recovery from compromised nodes, and the network scale etc. The simulated experimental results show that this approach can harden the security of MANET environment with better performance.%提出了一种移动自组织网络(MANET)环境下基于单向哈希函数和拉格朗日插值多项式组的(t,n)门限方案的随机密钥预共享安全引导模型,该安全引导过程分为基于单向哈希函数和拉格朗日插值多项式组的密钥预共享安全引导过程以及基于门限数字签名的密钥安全恢复协议2个部分.引导模型采用了单向哈希函数,使得每个密钥分片的子密钥难以被暴露,同时将门限数字签名机制引入到了密钥恢复协议的安全引导过程中,有效检测和防止了在密钥恢复或重组过程中的欺骗行为以及DoS攻击.实验验证从安全引导成功的性能、模型计算复杂度、节点被俘后的网络恢复能力、引导过程安全性、网络对各种路由攻击的抵抗力以及

  19. Key-Based Data Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-16

    prgresive repetition. It is used, principally , to train small units to pefom tasks requiring a high degree of teamwork, such as fire and maneuver actions in...an adminitative structure that has a mission. An established need based on a valid deficiency in an administrative structure with a mission. Person A

  20. A prototype framework for models of socio-hydrology: identification of key feedback loops with application to two Australian case-studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Elshafei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is increasingly acknowledged that, in order to sustainably manage global freshwater resources, it is critical that we better understand the nature of human-hydrology interactions at the broader catchment system-scale. Yet to date, a generic conceptual framework for building models of catchment systems that include adequate representation of socioeconomic systems – and the dynamic feedbacks between human and natural systems – has remained elusive. In an attempt to work towards such a model, this paper outlines a generic framework for a model of socio-hydrology that posits a novel construct, a composite Community Sensitivity state variable, as a key link to elucidate the drivers of behavioural response in a hydrological context. The framework provides for both macro-scale contextual parameters, which allow it to be applied across climate, socioeconomic and political gradients, and catchment-specific conditions, by way of tailored "closure relationships", in order to ensure that site-specific and application-specific contexts of socio-hydrologic problems can be accommodated. To demonstrate how such a framework would be applied, two different socio-hydrological case studies, taken from the Australian experience, are presented and discussed. It is envisioned that the application of this framework across study sites and gradients will aid in developing our understanding of the fundamental interactions and feedbacks in such complex human-hydrology systems, and allow hydrologists to participate in the growing field of social-ecological systems modelling.

  1. Finding Groups Using Model-Based Cluster Analysis: Heterogeneous Emotional Self-Regulatory Processes and Heavy Alcohol Use Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Eun Young; von Eye, Alexander; Bates, Marsha E.; Vaschillo, Evgeny G.

    2008-01-01

    Model-based cluster analysis is a new clustering procedure to investigate population heterogeneity utilizing finite mixture multivariate normal densities. It is an inferentially based, statistically principled procedure that allows comparison of nonnested models using the Bayesian information criterion to compare multiple models and identify the…

  2. Finding Groups Using Model-Based Cluster Analysis: Heterogeneous Emotional Self-Regulatory Processes and Heavy Alcohol Use Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Eun Young; von Eye, Alexander; Bates, Marsha E.; Vaschillo, Evgeny G.

    2008-01-01

    Model-based cluster analysis is a new clustering procedure to investigate population heterogeneity utilizing finite mixture multivariate normal densities. It is an inferentially based, statistically principled procedure that allows comparison of nonnested models using the Bayesian information criterion to compare multiple models and identify the…

  3. Hybrid robust model based on an improved functional link neural network integrating with partial least square (IFLNN-PLS) and its application to predicting key process variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yan-Lin; Xu, Yuan; Geng, Zhi-Qiang; Zhu, Qun-Xiong

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a hybrid robust model based on an improved functional link neural network integrating with partial least square (IFLNN-PLS) is proposed. Firstly, an improved functional link neural network with small norm of expanded weights and high input-output correlation (SNEWHIOC-FLNN) was proposed for enhancing the generalization performance of FLNN. Unlike the traditional FLNN, the expanded variables of the original inputs are not directly used as the inputs in the proposed SNEWHIOC-FLNN model. The original inputs are attached to some small norm of expanded weights. As a result, the correlation coefficient between some of the expanded variables and the outputs is enhanced. The larger the correlation coefficient is, the more relevant the expanded variables tend to be. In the end, the expanded variables with larger correlation coefficient are selected as the inputs to improve the performance of the traditional FLNN. In order to test the proposed SNEWHIOC-FLNN model, three UCI (University of California, Irvine) regression datasets named Housing, Concrete Compressive Strength (CCS), and Yacht Hydro Dynamics (YHD) are selected. Then a hybrid model based on the improved FLNN integrating with partial least square (IFLNN-PLS) was built. In IFLNN-PLS model, the connection weights are calculated using the partial least square method but not the error back propagation algorithm. Lastly, IFLNN-PLS was developed as an intelligent measurement model for accurately predicting the key variables in the Purified Terephthalic Acid (PTA) process and the High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) process. Simulation results illustrated that the IFLNN-PLS could significant improve the prediction performance.

  4. Experimental findings on God as an attachment figure: normative processes and moderating effects of internal working models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granqvist, Pehr; Mikulincer, Mario; Gewirtz, Vered; Shaver, Phillip R

    2012-11-01

    Four studies examined implications of attachment theory for psychological aspects of religion among Israeli Jews. Study 1 replicated previous correlational findings indicating correspondence among interpersonal attachment orientations, attachment to God, and image of God. Studies 2-4 were subliminal priming experiments, which documented both normative and individual-difference effects. Regarding normative effects, findings indicated that threat priming heightened cognitive access to God-related concepts in a lexical decision task (Study 2); priming with "God" heightened cognitive access to positive, secure base-related concepts in the same task (Study 3); and priming with a religious symbol caused neutral material to be better liked (Study 4). Regarding individual differences, interpersonal attachment-related avoidance reduced the normative effects (i.e., avoidant participants had lower implicit access to God as a safe haven and secure base). Findings were mostly independent of level of religiousness. The present experiments considerably extend the psychological literature on connections between attachment constructs and aspects of religion.

  5. Quantifying Uncertainty in the Predictions of the SimSphere Land Biosphere Model in Simulating Key Parameters Characterising Earth's Energy Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Matthew; Petropoulos, George

    2014-05-01

    correspondence of the model structure to real conditions for which it had been parameterised, evidencing its ability to reproduce reasonably satisfactory the examined parameters, particularly so over flat terrain sites and specific land cover types. Given the very small number of SimSphere validation studies, our work contributes decisively towards obtaining a better understanding of the model structure and correspondence to a real world system. The latter, not only provides very important information to future model users but also is of potential key value to efforts ongoing at present by different Space Agencies examining the use of SimSphere synergistically with Earth Observation data in developing operational products at a global scale. KEYWORDS: SimSphere, Latent Heat flux, Sensible Heat fulx, Net Radiation, SVAT; Land Surface Interactions, CarboEurope.

  6. A proof-of-concept model for the identification of the key events in the infection process with specific reference to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in corneal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilias Soumpasis

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is a common medical practice to characterise an infection based on the causative agent and to adopt therapeutic and prevention strategies targeting the agent itself. However, from an epidemiological perspective, exposure to a microbe can be harmless to a host as a result of low-level exposure or due to host immune response, with opportunistic infection only occurring as a result of changes in the host, pathogen, or surrounding environment. Methods: We have attempted to review systematically the key host, pathogen, and environmental factors that may significantly impact clinical outcomes of exposure to a pathogen, using Pseudomonas aeruginosa eye infection as a case study. Results and discussion: Extended contact lens wearing and compromised hygiene may predispose users to microbial keratitis, which can be a severe and vision-threatening infection. P. aeruginosa has a wide array of virulence-associated genes and sensing systems to initiate and maintain cell populations at the corneal surface and beyond. We have adapted the well-known concept of the epidemiological triangle in combination with the classic risk assessment framework (hazard identification, characterisation, and exposure to develop a conceptual pathway-based model that demonstrates the overlapping relationships between the host, the pathogen, and the environment; and to illustrate the key events in P. aeruginosa eye infection. Conclusion: This strategy differs from traditional approaches that consider potential risk factors in isolation, and hopefully will aid the identification of data and models to inform preventive and therapeutic measures in addition to risk assessment. Furthermore, this may facilitate the identification of knowledge gaps to direct research in areas of greatest impact to avert or mitigate adverse outcomes of infection.

  7. 美国老年医学理念与实践%American geriatrics: key principles and novel care models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冷晓

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces key principles and novel care models of American geriatrics. Key geriatrics principles include ( 1 ) patient-centered healthcare with comprehensive management of not only acute and chronic diseases, but also social, environmental, psychological, psychiatric and behavioral issues tailored to the need of individual older persons; (2) continuity of care; (3) multidisciplinary collaboration and interdisciplinary team approach; (4)recovery and maintenance of functional independence and quality of life. Contemporary geriatric care models include acute care for the elderly (ACE) unit, geriatric hip fracture service, geriatric subacute care and transitional care, program of all-inclusive care for the elderly (PACE), and continuing care retirement communities (CCRC).%文章扼要介绍美国老年医学的新理念与医疗模式,前者包括从传统的亚专科以疾病为中心的单病诊疗转向以患者为中心的个体化医疗保健服务,强调整体性、系统性和连续性、多学科协作,以及功能评估与康复.后者包括老年病房、髋部骨折专诊、亚急性和过渡性医疗、全面的老年人服务项目以及退休养老社区连续性医疗保健服务.最后提及美国霍普金斯医院和北京协和医院的合作.

  8. A proof-of-concept model for the identification of the key events in the infection process with specific reference to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in corneal infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soumpasis, Ilias; Knapp, Laura; Pitt, Tyrone

    2015-01-01

    Background It is a common medical practice to characterise an infection based on the causative agent and to adopt therapeutic and prevention strategies targeting the agent itself. However, from an epidemiological perspective, exposure to a microbe can be harmless to a host as a result of low-level exposure or due to host immune response, with opportunistic infection only occurring as a result of changes in the host, pathogen, or surrounding environment. Methods We have attempted to review systematically the key host, pathogen, and environmental factors that may significantly impact clinical outcomes of exposure to a pathogen, using Pseudomonas aeruginosa eye infection as a case study. Results and discussion Extended contact lens wearing and compromised hygiene may predispose users to microbial keratitis, which can be a severe and vision-threatening infection. P. aeruginosa has a wide array of virulence-associated genes and sensing systems to initiate and maintain cell populations at the corneal surface and beyond. We have adapted the well-known concept of the epidemiological triangle in combination with the classic risk assessment framework (hazard identification, characterisation, and exposure) to develop a conceptual pathway-based model that demonstrates the overlapping relationships between the host, the pathogen, and the environment; and to illustrate the key events in P. aeruginosa eye infection. Conclusion This strategy differs from traditional approaches that consider potential risk factors in isolation, and hopefully will aid the identification of data and models to inform preventive and therapeutic measures in addition to risk assessment. Furthermore, this may facilitate the identification of knowledge gaps to direct research in areas of greatest impact to avert or mitigate adverse outcomes of infection. PMID:26546946

  9. Mast cells play a key role in Th2 cytokine-dependent asthma model through production of adhesion molecules by liberation of TNF-α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Ok Hee; Han, Eui-Hyeog; Lee, Hern-Ku; Song, Chang Ho

    2011-01-31

    Mast cells are well recognized as key cells in allergic reactions, such as asthma and allergic airway diseases. However, the effects of mast cells and TNF-α on T-helper type 2 (Th2) cytokine-dependent asthma are not clearly understood. Therefore, an aim of this study was to investigate the role of mast cells on Th2 cytokine-dependent airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation. We used genetically mast cell-deficient WBB6F1/J-Kitw/Kitw-v (W/Wv), congenic normal WBB6F1/J-Kit+/Kit+ (+/+), and mast cell-reconstituted W/Wv mouse models of allergic asthma to investigate the role of mast cells in Th2 cytokine-dependent asthma induced by ovalbumin (OVA). And we investigated whether the intratracheal injection of TNF-α directly induce the expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in W/Wv mice. This study, with OVA-sensitized and OVA-challenged mice, revealed the following typical histopathologic features of allergic diseases: increased inflammatory cells of the airway, airway hyperresponsiveness, and increased levels of TNF-α, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, and vascular cellular adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1. However, the histopathologic features and levels of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 proteins in W/Wv mice after OVA challenges were significantly inhibited. Moreover, mast cell-reconstituted W/Wv mice showed restoration of histopathologic features and recovery of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 protein levels that were similar to those found in +/+ mice. Intratracheal administration of TNF-α resulted in increased ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 protein levels in W/Wv mice. These results suggest that mast cells play a key role in a Th2 cytokine-dependent asthma model through production of adhesion molecules, including ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, by liberation of TNF-α.

  10. The Success for All Model of School Reform: Interim Findings from the Investing in Innovation (i3) Scale-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quint, Janet C.; Balu, Rekha; DeLaurentis, Micah; Rappaport, Shelley; Smith, Thomas J.; Zhu, Pei

    2014-01-01

    This is the second of three reports from MDRC's evaluation of the Success for All (SFA) scale-up demonstration, funded under the U.S. Department of Education's Investing in Innovation (i3) competition. The report presents updated findings on SFA's implementation and impacts in the scale-up sites participating in the evaluation. The i3 evaluation…

  11. Key Challenges and Opportunities Associated with the Use of In Vitro Models to Detect Human DILI: Integrated Risk Assessment and Mitigation Plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franck A. Atienzar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced liver injury (DILI is a major cause of late-stage clinical drug attrition, market withdrawal, black-box warnings, and acute liver failure. Consequently, it has been an area of focus for toxicologists and clinicians for several decades. In spite of considerable efforts, limited improvements in DILI prediction have been made and efforts to improve existing preclinical models or develop new test systems remain a high priority. While prediction of intrinsic DILI has improved, identifying compounds with a risk for idiosyncratic DILI (iDILI remains extremely challenging because of the lack of a clear mechanistic understanding and the multifactorial pathogenesis of idiosyncratic drug reactions. Well-defined clinical diagnostic criteria and risk factors are also missing. This paper summarizes key data interpretation challenges, practical considerations, model limitations, and the need for an integrated risk assessment. As demonstrated through selected initiatives to address other types of toxicities, opportunities exist however for improvement, especially through better concerted efforts at harmonization of current, emerging and novel in vitro systems or through the establishment of strategies for implementation of preclinical DILI models across the pharmaceutical industry. Perspectives on the incorporation of newer technologies and the value of precompetitive consortia to identify useful practices are also discussed.

  12. Key Challenges and Opportunities Associated with the Use of In Vitro Models to Detect Human DILI: Integrated Risk Assessment and Mitigation Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomme, Eric A.; Hewitt, Philip; Kenna, J. Gerry; Labbe, Gilles; Moulin, Frederic; Pognan, Francois; Roth, Adrian B.; Suter-Dick, Laura; Ukairo, Okechukwu; Weaver, Richard J.; Will, Yvonne; Dambach, Donna M.

    2016-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a major cause of late-stage clinical drug attrition, market withdrawal, black-box warnings, and acute liver failure. Consequently, it has been an area of focus for toxicologists and clinicians for several decades. In spite of considerable efforts, limited improvements in DILI prediction have been made and efforts to improve existing preclinical models or develop new test systems remain a high priority. While prediction of intrinsic DILI has improved, identifying compounds with a risk for idiosyncratic DILI (iDILI) remains extremely challenging because of the lack of a clear mechanistic understanding and the multifactorial pathogenesis of idiosyncratic drug reactions. Well-defined clinical diagnostic criteria and risk factors are also missing. This paper summarizes key data interpretation challenges, practical considerations, model limitations, and the need for an integrated risk assessment. As demonstrated through selected initiatives to address other types of toxicities, opportunities exist however for improvement, especially through better concerted efforts at harmonization of current, emerging and novel in vitro systems or through the establishment of strategies for implementation of preclinical DILI models across the pharmaceutical industry. Perspectives on the incorporation of newer technologies and the value of precompetitive consortia to identify useful practices are also discussed. PMID:27689095

  13. Key variables of organisation design in servitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreye, Melanie; Jensen, Per Langaa

    2014-01-01

    Manufacturing companies offering additional service with their products need to change their organisation design to accommodate for the service business. Using the star model, this paper investigates organisation design in terms of strategy, structure, processes, rewards and people as a response...... to external environment to ensure performance. We present a case in the European renewable energy sector. The findings show three key variables: (i) processes need to enable information flow between business departments; (ii) servitization strategy needs to be translated into service-centred activities......, and (iii) the parts of organisation design need to be aligned to prevent inconsistencies in service provision....

  14. Analysing ZigBee Key Establishment Protocols

    CERN Document Server

    Yüksel, Ender

    2012-01-01

    In this report, we present our approach for protocol analysis together with a real example where we find an important flow in a contemporary wireless sensor network security protocol. We start by modelling protocols using a specific process algebraic formalism called LySa process calculus. We then apply an analysis based on a special program analysis technique called control flow analysis. We apply this technique to the ZigBee-2007 End-to-End Application Key Establishment Protocol and with the help of the analysis discover an unknown flaw. Finally we suggest a fix for the protocol, and verify that the fix works by using the same technique.

  15. Overview, conclusions, and key recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loeber, R.; Farrington, D.P.; Howell, J.C.; Hoeve, M.; Loeber, R.; Farrington, D.P.

    2012-01-01

    Section I of this chapter summarizes the most important points of Chapters 2 to 5 and relevant portions of Chapter 10 (which concerns European issues) by addressing key findings that are relevant for juveniles’ transition of offending from adolescence (up to age 18) into adulthood. Section I focuses

  16. An Interactive Activation Model of Context Effects in Letter Perception: Part 1. An Account of Basic Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, James L.; Rumelhart, David E.

    1981-01-01

    A model of context effects in perception is applied to perception of letters. Perception results from excitatory and inhibitory interactions of detectors for visual features, letters, and words. The model produces facilitation for letters in pronounceable pseudowords as well as words and accounts for rule-governed performance without any rules.…

  17. Predicting Grade Point Average from the Hybrid Model of Learning in Personality: Consistent Findings from Ugandan and Australian Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Chris; Baguma, Peter; Furnham, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    Jackson developed a hybrid model of learning in personality, known as the Learning Styles Profiler (LSP), which seeks to explain personality in terms of biological, socio-cognitive and experiential processes. The hybrid model argues that functional learning outcomes can be understood in terms of how cognitions and experiences re-express sensation…

  18. An Interactive Activation Model of Context Effects in Letter Perception: Part 1. An Account of Basic Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, James L.; Rumelhart, David E.

    1981-01-01

    A model of context effects in perception is applied to perception of letters. Perception results from excitatory and inhibitory interactions of detectors for visual features, letters, and words. The model produces facilitation for letters in pronounceable pseudowords as well as words and accounts for rule-governed performance without any rules.…

  19. Modeling individual movement decisions of brown hare (Lepus europaeus) as a key concept for realistic spatial behavior and exposure: A population model for landscape-level risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinmann, Joachim U; Wang, Magnus

    2017-09-01

    Spatial behavior is of crucial importance for the risk assessment of pesticides and for the assessment of effects of agricultural practice or multiple stressors, because it determines field use, exposition, and recovery. Recently, population models have increasingly been used to understand the mechanisms driving risk and recovery or to conduct landscape-level risk assessments. To include spatial behavior appropriately in population models for use in risk assessments, a new method, "probabilistic walk," was developed, which simulates the detailed daily movement of individuals by taking into account food resources, vegetation cover, and the presence of conspecifics. At each movement step, animals decide where to move next based on probabilities being determined from this information. The model was parameterized to simulate populations of brown hares (Lepus europaeus). A detailed validation of the model demonstrated that it can realistically reproduce various natural patterns of brown hare ecology and behavior. Simulated proportions of time animals spent in fields (PT values) were also comparable to field observations. It is shown that these important parameters for the risk assessment may, however, vary in different landscapes. The results demonstrate the value of using population models to reduce uncertainties in risk assessment and to better understand which factors determine risk in a landscape context. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:2299-2307. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  20. Quantum key management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Richard John; Thrasher, James Thomas; Nordholt, Jane Elizabeth

    2016-11-29

    Innovations for quantum key management harness quantum communications to form a cryptography system within a public key infrastructure framework. In example implementations, the quantum key management innovations combine quantum key distribution and a quantum identification protocol with a Merkle signature scheme (using Winternitz one-time digital signatures or other one-time digital signatures, and Merkle hash trees) to constitute a cryptography system. More generally, the quantum key management innovations combine quantum key distribution and a quantum identification protocol with a hash-based signature scheme. This provides a secure way to identify, authenticate, verify, and exchange secret cryptographic keys. Features of the quantum key management innovations further include secure enrollment of users with a registration authority, as well as credential checking and revocation with a certificate authority, where the registration authority and/or certificate authority can be part of the same system as a trusted authority for quantum key distribution.

  1. Quantum key management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Richard John; Thrasher, James Thomas; Nordholt, Jane Elizabeth

    2016-11-29

    Innovations for quantum key management harness quantum communications to form a cryptography system within a public key infrastructure framework. In example implementations, the quantum key management innovations combine quantum key distribution and a quantum identification protocol with a Merkle signature scheme (using Winternitz one-time digital signatures or other one-time digital signatures, and Merkle hash trees) to constitute a cryptography system. More generally, the quantum key management innovations combine quantum key distribution and a quantum identification protocol with a hash-based signature scheme. This provides a secure way to identify, authenticate, verify, and exchange secret cryptographic keys. Features of the quantum key management innovations further include secure enrollment of users with a registration authority, as well as credential checking and revocation with a certificate authority, where the registration authority and/or certificate authority can be part of the same system as a trusted authority for quantum key distribution.

  2. Validation and Use of a Predictive Modeling Tool: Employing Scientific Findings to Improve Responsible Conduct of Research Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulhearn, Tyler J; Watts, Logan L; Todd, E Michelle; Medeiros, Kelsey E; Connelly, Shane; Mumford, Michael D

    2017-01-01

    Although recent evidence suggests ethics education can be effective, the nature of specific training programs, and their effectiveness, varies considerably. Building on a recent path modeling effort, the present study developed and validated a predictive modeling tool for responsible conduct of research education. The predictive modeling tool allows users to enter ratings in relation to a given ethics training program and receive instantaneous evaluative information for course refinement. Validation work suggests the tool's predicted outcomes correlate strongly (r = 0.46) with objective course outcomes. Implications for training program development and refinement are discussed.

  3. Grouted Connections with Shear Keys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ronnie; Jørgensen, M. B.; Damkilde, Lars

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a finite element model in the software package ABAQUS in which a reliable analysis of grouted pile-to-sleeve connections with shear keys is the particular purpose. The model is calibrated to experimental results and a consistent set of input parameters is estimated so...

  4. Group key management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunigan, T.; Cao, C.

    1997-08-01

    This report describes an architecture and implementation for doing group key management over a data communications network. The architecture describes a protocol for establishing a shared encryption key among an authenticated and authorized collection of network entities. Group access requires one or more authorization certificates. The implementation includes a simple public key and certificate infrastructure. Multicast is used for some of the key management messages. An application programming interface multiplexes key management and user application messages. An implementation using the new IP security protocols is postulated. The architecture is compared with other group key management proposals, and the performance and the limitations of the implementation are described.

  5. SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT – KEY FACTORS

    OpenAIRE

    Magdalena Daniela DINU

    2014-01-01

    This paper exposes Supply Chain Management by its key factors. Briefly, where the Supply Chain Management is treated as strategic part of a company then maintaining both control and influence throughout the entire supply chain are key factors and critical to success. On the other hand, finding the right partner to manage the non-strategic Supply Chains would be another key factor too. To define the most important key factors within Supply Chain Management means a deeply understanding of bot...

  6. Characterization of Behavioral, Neuropathological, Brain Metabolic and Key Molecular Changes in zQ175 Knock-In Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Peng

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is caused by an expansion of the trinucleotide poly (CAG tract located in exon 1 of the huntingtin (Htt gene leading to progressive neurodegeneration in selected brain regions, and associated functional impairments in motor, cognitive, and psychiatric domains. Since the discovery of the gene mutation that causes the disease, mouse models have been developed by different strategies. Recently, a new model, the zQ175 knock-in (KI line, was developed in an attempt to have the Htt gene in a context and causing a phenotype that more closely mimics HD in humans. The behavioral phenotype was characterized across the independent laboratories and important features reminiscent of human HD are observed in zQ175 mice. In the current study, we characterized the zQ175 model housed in an academic laboratory under reversed dark-light cycle, including motor function, in vivo longitudinal structural MRI imaging for brain volume, MRS for striatal metabolites, neuropathology, as well as a panel of key disease marker proteins in the striatum at different ages. Our results suggest that homozygous zQ175 mice exhibited significant brain atrophy before the motor deficits and brain metabolite changes. Altered striatal medium spiny neuronal marker, postsynaptic marker protein and complement component C1qC also characterized zQ175 mice. Our results confirmed that the zQ175 KI model is valuable in understanding of HD-like pathophysiology and evaluation of potential therapeutics. Our data also provide suggestions to select appropriate outcome measurements in preclinical studies using the zQ175 mice.

  7. Generalized Linear Models to Identify Key Hydromorphological and Chemical Variables Determining the Occurrence of Macroinvertebrates in the Guayas River Basin (Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minar Naomi Damanik-Ambarita

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The biotic integrity of the Guayas River basin in Ecuador is at environmental risk due to extensive anthropogenic activities. We investigated the potential impacts of hydromorphological and chemical variables on biotic integrity using macroinvertebrate-based bioassessments. The bioassessment methods utilized included the Biological Monitoring Working Party adapted for Colombia (BMWP-Col and the average score per taxon (ASPT, via an extensive sampling campaign that was completed throughout the river basin at 120 sampling sites. The BMWP-Col classification ranged from very bad to good, and from probable severe pollution to clean water based on the ASPT scores. Generalized linear models (GLMs and sensitivity analysis were used to relate the bioassessment index to hydromorphological and chemical variables. It was found that elevation, nitrate-N, sediment angularity, logs, presence of macrophytes, flow velocity, turbidity, bank shape, land use and chlorophyll were the key environmental variables affecting the BMWP-Col. From the analyses, it was observed that the rivers at the upstream higher elevations of the river basin were in better condition compared to lowland systems and that a higher flow velocity was linked to a better BMWP-Col score. The nitrate concentrations were very low in the entire river basin and did not relate to a negative impact on the macroinvertebrate communities. Although the results of the models provided insights into the ecosystem, cross fold model development and validation also showed that there was a level of uncertainty in the outcomes. However, the results of the models and sensitivity analysis can support water management actions to determine and focus on alterable variables, such as the land use at different elevations, monitoring of nitrate and chlorophyll concentrations, macrophyte presence, sediment transport and bank stability.

  8. Paediatric pharmacokinetics: key considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelor, Hannah Katharine; Marriott, John Francis

    2015-01-01

    A number of anatomical and physiological factors determine the pharmacokinetic profile of a drug. Differences in physiology in paediatric populations compared with adults can influence the concentration of drug within the plasma or tissue. Healthcare professionals need to be aware of anatomical and physiological changes that affect pharmacokinetic profiles of drugs to understand consequences of dose adjustments in infants and children. Pharmacokinetic clinical trials in children are complicated owing to the limitations on blood sample volumes and perception of pain in children resulting from blood sampling. There are alternative sampling techniques that can minimize the invasive nature of such trials. Population based models can also limit the sampling required from each individual by increasing the overall sample size to generate robust pharmacokinetic data. This review details key considerations in the design and development of paediatric pharmacokinetic clinical trials. PMID:25855821

  9. Sense making and benefit finding in couples who have a child with Asperger syndrome: an application of the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samios, Christina; Pakenham, Kenneth I; Sofronoff, Kate

    2012-05-01

    Parents of children with Asperger syndrome face many challenges that may lead them to search for meaning by developing explanations for (sense making) and finding benefits (benefit finding) in having a child with special needs. Although family theorists have proposed that finding meaning occurs interpersonally, there is a dearth of empirical research that has examined finding meaning at the couple level. This study examined sense making and benefit finding in 84 couples who have a child with Asperger syndrome by using the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model (Kenny et al., 2006) to examine actor effects (i.e. the extent to which an individual's score on the predictor variable impacts his or her own level of adjustment) and partner effects (i.e. the extent to which an individual's score on the predictor variable has an impact on his or her partner's level of adjustment) of sense making and benefit finding on parental adjustment. Results demonstrated that parents' benefit finding related to greater anxiety and parents' sense making related to not only their own adjustment but also their partner's adjustment. Results highlight the importance of adopting an interpersonal perspective on finding meaning and adjustment. Limitations, future research and clinical implications are also discussed.

  10. SLAR image interpretation keys for geographic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coiner, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    A means for side-looking airborne radar (SLAR) imagery to become a more widely used data source in geoscience and agriculture is suggested by providing interpretation keys as an easily implemented interpretation model. Interpretation problems faced by the researcher wishing to employ SLAR are specifically described, and the use of various types of image interpretation keys to overcome these problems is suggested. With examples drawn from agriculture and vegetation mapping, direct and associate dichotomous image interpretation keys are discussed and methods of constructing keys are outlined. Initial testing of the keys, key-based automated decision rules, and the role of the keys in an information system for agriculture are developed.

  11. Modeling the effect in of criticality from changes in key parameters for small High Temperature Nuclear Reactor (U-BatteryTM) using MCNP4C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauzi, A. M.

    2013-06-01

    The neutron transport code, Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) which was wellkown as the gold standard in predicting nuclear reaction was used to model the small nuclear reactor core called "U-batteryTM", which was develop by the University of Manchester and Delft Institute of Technology. The paper introduces on the concept of modeling the small reactor core, a high temperature reactor (HTR) type with small coated TRISO fuel particle in graphite matrix using the MCNPv4C software. The criticality of the core were calculated using the software and analysed by changing key parameters such coolant type, fuel type and enrichment levels, cladding materials, and control rod type. The criticality results from the simulation were validated using the SCALE 5.1 software by [1] M Ding and J L Kloosterman, 2010. The data produced from these analyses would be used as part of the process of proposing initial core layout and a provisional list of materials for newly design reactor core. In the future, the criticality study would be continued with different core configurations and geometries.

  12. A preclinical orthotopic model for glioblastoma recapitulates key features of human tumors and demonstrates sensitivity to a combination of MEK and PI3K pathway inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Meskini, Rajaa; Iacovelli, Anthony J; Kulaga, Alan; Gumprecht, Michelle; Martin, Philip L; Baran, Maureen; Householder, Deborah B; Van Dyke, Terry; Weaver Ohler, Zoë

    2015-01-01

    Current therapies for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the highest grade malignant brain tumor, are mostly ineffective, and better preclinical model systems are needed to increase the successful translation of drug discovery efforts into the clinic. Previous work describes a genetically engineered mouse (GEM) model that contains perturbations in the most frequently dysregulated networks in GBM (driven by RB, KRAS and/or PI3K signaling and PTEN) that induce development of Grade IV astrocytoma with properties of the human disease. Here, we developed and characterized an orthotopic mouse model derived from the GEM that retains the features of the GEM model in an immunocompetent background; however, this model is also tractable and efficient for preclinical evaluation of candidate therapeutic regimens. Orthotopic brain tumors are highly proliferative, invasive and vascular, and express histology markers characteristic of human GBM. Primary tumor cells were examined for sensitivity to chemotherapeutics and targeted drugs. PI3K and MAPK pathway inhibitors, when used as single agents, inhibited cell proliferation but did not result in significant apoptosis. However, in combination, these inhibitors resulted in a substantial increase in cell death. Moreover, these findings translated into the in vivo orthotopic model: PI3K or MAPK inhibitor treatment regimens resulted in incomplete pathway suppression and feedback loops, whereas dual treatment delayed tumor growth through increased apoptosis and decreased tumor cell proliferation. Analysis of downstream pathway components revealed a cooperative effect on target downregulation. These concordant results, together with the morphologic similarities to the human GBM disease characteristics of the model, validate it as a new platform for the evaluation of GBM treatment.

  13. Quantum Key Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshu, Ch.

    Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) uses Quantum Mechanics to guarantee secure communication. It enables two parties to produce a shared random bit string known only to them, which can be used as a key to encrypt and decrypt messages.

  14. Public Key Cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapson, Frank

    1996-01-01

    Describes public key cryptography, also known as RSA, which is a system using two keys, one used to put a message into cipher and another used to decipher the message. Presents examples using small prime numbers. (MKR)

  15. Key Management Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides a secure environment to research and develop advanced electronic key management and networked key distribution technologies for the Navy and DoD....

  16. Modelling and modifying young heterosexuals' HIV-preventive behaviour; a review of theories, findings and educational implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, C; Sheeran, P

    1994-07-01

    Studies applying social cognitive frameworks such as the health belief model and the theory of reasoned action to HIV-prevention are reviewed. These models suggest that appropriate beliefs, attitudes, social norms, intentions and perceived self-efficacy are sufficient psychological conditions for safer sexual behaviour. Limitations inherent in these accounts are identified and additional factors which need to be incorporated in psychological models and health education programmes are highlighted. These include, the motivational complexity of sexual behaviour, the emotional and arousal states in which it is enacted, the difficulties of planning what is regarded as spontaneous interaction and contextual factors which can undermine HIV-preventive intentions. Health education interventions aimed at individual, group and community levels are examined in light of this theoretical review and action-focused, empowering interventions grounded in youth culture are recommended.

  17. Quantum dense key distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Degiovanni, I P; Castelletto, S; Rastello, M L; Bovino, F A; Colla, A M; Castagnoli, G C

    2004-01-01

    This paper proposes a new protocol for quantum dense key distribution. This protocol embeds the benefits of a quantum dense coding and a quantum key distribution and is able to generate shared secret keys four times more efficiently than BB84 one. We hereinafter prove the security of this scheme against individual eavesdropping attacks, and we present preliminary experimental results, showing its feasibility.

  18. Finding regional models of the Alzheimer disease by fusing information from neuropsychological tests and structural MR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo, Diana L.; García-Arteaga, Juan D.; Romero, Eduardo

    2016-03-01

    Initial diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is based on the patient's clinical history and a battery of neuropsy-chological tests. This work presents an automatic strategy that uses Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to learn brain models for different stages of the disease using information from clinical assessments. Then, a comparison of the discriminant power of the models in different anatomical areas is made by using the brain region of the models as a reference frame for the classification problem, by using the projection into the AD model a Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve is constructed. Validation was performed using a leave- one-out scheme with 86 subjects (20 AD and 60 NC) from the Open Access Series of Imaging Studies (OASIS) database. The region with the best classification performance was the left amygdala where it is possible to achieve a sensibility and specificity of 85% at the same time. The regions with the best performance, in terms of the AUC, are in strong agreement with those described as important for the diagnosis of AD in clinical practice.

  19. Near-source air quality in rail yard environments – an overview of recent EPA measurement and modeling findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation will providing a summary of field measurements conducted in areas surrounding two major rail yards as well as modeling simulations of rail yard emissions dispersion. The Cicero Rail Yard Study (CIRYS) was recently released to the public and includes mobile and ...

  20. The Success for All Model of School Reform: Early Findings from the Investing in Innovation (i3) Scale-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quint, Janet C.; Balu, Rekha; DeLaurentis, Micah; Rappaport, Shelley; Smith, Thomas J.; Zhu, Pei

    2013-01-01

    First implemented in 1987, Success for All (SFA) is one of the best-known and most thoroughly evaluated school reform models. It combines three basic elements: (1) Reading instruction that emphasizes phonics for beginning readers and comprehension for students at all levels, and that is characterized by a highly structured curriculum, an emphasis…