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Sample records for modeling inverse problems

  1. Multiscale Modelling and Inverse Problems

    CERN Document Server

    Nolen, J; Stuart, A M

    2010-01-01

    The need to blend observational data and mathematical models arises in many applications and leads naturally to inverse problems. Parameters appearing in the model, such as constitutive tensors, initial conditions, boundary conditions, and forcing can be estimated on the basis of observed data. The resulting inverse problems are often ill-posed and some form of regularization is required. These notes discuss parameter estimation in situations where the unknown parameters vary across multiple scales. We illustrate the main ideas using a simple model for groundwater flow. We will highlight various approaches to regularization for inverse problems, including Tikhonov and Bayesian methods. We illustrate three ideas that arise when considering inverse problems in the multiscale context. The first idea is that the choice of space or set in which to seek the solution to the inverse problem is intimately related to whether a homogenized or full multiscale solution is required. This is a choice of regularization. The ...

  2. Inverse problems in spin models

    CERN Document Server

    Sessak, Vitor

    2010-01-01

    Several recent experiments in biology study systems composed of several interacting elements, for example neuron networks. Normally, measurements describe only the collective behavior of the system, even if in most cases we would like to characterize how its different parts interact. The goal of this thesis is to extract information about the microscopic interactions as a function of their collective behavior for two different cases. First, we will study a system described by a generalized Ising model. We find explicit formulas for the couplings as a function of the correlations and magnetizations. In the following, we will study a system described by a Hopfield model. In this case, we find not only explicit formula for inferring the patterns, but also an analytical result that allows one to estimate how much data is necessary for a good inference.

  3. Voltammetry: mathematical modelling and Inverse Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Koshev, N A; Kuzina, V V

    2016-01-01

    We propose the fast semi-analytical method of modelling the polarization curves in the voltammetric experiment. The method is based on usage of the special func- tions and shows a big calculation speed and a high accuracy and stability. Low computational needs of the proposed algorithm allow us to state the set of Inverse Problems of voltammetry for the reconstruction of metal ions concentrations or the other parameters of the electrolyte under investigation.

  4. Stochastic inverse problems: Models and metrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabbagh, Elias H.; Sabbagh, Harold A.; Murphy, R. Kim [Victor Technologies, LLC, Bloomington, IN 47407-7706 (United States); Aldrin, John C. [Computational Tools, Gurnee, IL 60031 (United States); Annis, Charles [Statistical Engineering, Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33418 (United States); Knopp, Jeremy S. [Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/RXCA), Wright Patterson AFB, OH 45433-7817 (United States)

    2015-03-31

    In past work, we introduced model-based inverse methods, and applied them to problems in which the anomaly could be reasonably modeled by simple canonical shapes, such as rectangular solids. In these cases the parameters to be inverted would be length, width and height, as well as the occasional probe lift-off or rotation. We are now developing a formulation that allows more flexibility in modeling complex flaws. The idea consists of expanding the flaw in a sequence of basis functions, and then solving for the expansion coefficients of this sequence, which are modeled as independent random variables, uniformly distributed over their range of values. There are a number of applications of such modeling: 1. Connected cracks and multiple half-moons, which we have noted in a POD set. Ideally we would like to distinguish connected cracks from one long shallow crack. 2. Cracks of irregular profile and shape which have appeared in cold work holes during bolt-hole eddy-current inspection. One side of such cracks is much deeper than other. 3. L or C shaped crack profiles at the surface, examples of which have been seen in bolt-hole cracks. By formulating problems in a stochastic sense, we are able to leverage the stochastic global optimization algorithms in NLSE, which is resident in VIC-3D®, to answer questions of global minimization and to compute confidence bounds using the sensitivity coefficient that we get from NLSE. We will also address the issue of surrogate functions which are used during the inversion process, and how they contribute to the quality of the estimation of the bounds.

  5. The inverse gravimetric problem in gravity modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanso, F.; Tscherning, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    One of the main purposes of geodesy is to determine the gravity field of the Earth in the space outside its physical surface. This purpose can be pursued without any particular knowledge of the internal density even if the exact shape of the physical surface of the Earth is not known, though this seems to entangle the two domains, as it was in the old Stoke's theory before the appearance of Molodensky's approach. Nevertheless, even when large, dense and homogeneous data sets are available, it was always recognized that subtracting from the gravity field the effect of the outer layer of the masses (topographic effect) yields a much smoother field. This is obviously more important when a sparse data set is bad so that any smoothing of the gravity field helps in interpolating between the data without raising the modeling error, this approach is generally followed because it has become very cheap in terms of computing time since the appearance of spectral techniques. The mathematical description of the Inverse Gravimetric Problem (IGP) is dominated mainly by two principles, which in loose terms can be formulated as follows: the knowledge of the external gravity field determines mainly the lateral variations of the density; and the deeper the density anomaly giving rise to a gravity anomaly, the more improperly posed is the problem of recovering the former from the latter. The statistical relation between rho and n (and its inverse) is also investigated in its general form, proving that degree cross-covariances have to be introduced to describe the behavior of rho. The problem of the simultaneous estimate of a spherical anomalous potential and of the external, topographic masses is addressed criticizing the choice of the mixed collection approach.

  6. Inverse Modelling Problems in Linear Algebra Undergraduate Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Luaces, Victor E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper will offer an analysis from a theoretical point of view of mathematical modelling, applications and inverse problems of both causation and specification types. Inverse modelling problems give the opportunity to establish connections between theory and practice and to show this fact, a simple linear algebra example in two different…

  7. Inverse Modelling Problems in Linear Algebra Undergraduate Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Luaces, Victor E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper will offer an analysis from a theoretical point of view of mathematical modelling, applications and inverse problems of both causation and specification types. Inverse modelling problems give the opportunity to establish connections between theory and practice and to show this fact, a simple linear algebra example in two different…

  8. Modeling and inverse problems in the presence of uncertainty

    CERN Document Server

    Banks, H T; Thompson, W Clayton

    2014-01-01

    Modeling and Inverse Problems in the Presence of Uncertainty collects recent research-including the authors' own substantial projects-on uncertainty propagation and quantification. It covers two sources of uncertainty: where uncertainty is present primarily due to measurement errors and where uncertainty is present due to the modeling formulation itself. After a useful review of relevant probability and statistical concepts, the book summarizes mathematical and statistical aspects of inverse problem methodology, including ordinary, weighted, and generalized least-squares formulations. It then

  9. Data-Driven Model Order Reduction for Bayesian Inverse Problems

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Tiangang

    2014-01-06

    One of the major challenges in using MCMC for the solution of inverse problems is the repeated evaluation of computationally expensive numerical models. We develop a data-driven projection- based model order reduction technique to reduce the computational cost of numerical PDE evaluations in this context.

  10. THE INVERSE PROBLEM OF A REPRODUCTION MODEL OF NATIONAL INCOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laipanova Z. M.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In practice, there were developed and tested some mathematical models of balance relationships (balance model, economic growth, expanding economy, labour market, theories of consumption, production, competitive equilibrium models of the economy in conditions of imperfect competition and others. The basis of these models were based on linear algebra, mathematical analysis, mathematical programming, differential equations, optimization methods, optimal control theory, probability theory, stochastic processes, operations research, game theory, statistical analysis. The inverse problem in various models of mathematical Economics was considered quite rare. These tasks were sufficiently investigated in the study of physical processes. As shown by the analysis of the theoretical and applied studies of economic processes, they represent considerable interest for practice. Therefore, the considered in the study inverse problems of the mathematical model, as it is shown by the already introduced results of other mathematical models, are of considerable interest in applied and theoretical research. In this article, the authors have formulated and investigated an inverse problem for a model of economic growth. For its solution the authors propose to build a system of algebraic equations, using a reproduction model of national income; then, using methods of quadratic programming, to find the best average quadratic estimates of the model parameter

  11. Stochastic reduced order models for inverse problems under uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, James E; Aquino, Wilkins; Grigoriu, Mircea D

    2015-03-01

    This work presents a novel methodology for solving inverse problems under uncertainty using stochastic reduced order models (SROMs). Given statistical information about an observed state variable in a system, unknown parameters are estimated probabilistically through the solution of a model-constrained, stochastic optimization problem. The point of departure and crux of the proposed framework is the representation of a random quantity using a SROM - a low dimensional, discrete approximation to a continuous random element that permits e cient and non-intrusive stochastic computations. Characterizing the uncertainties with SROMs transforms the stochastic optimization problem into a deterministic one. The non-intrusive nature of SROMs facilitates e cient gradient computations for random vector unknowns and relies entirely on calls to existing deterministic solvers. Furthermore, the method is naturally extended to handle multiple sources of uncertainty in cases where state variable data, system parameters, and boundary conditions are all considered random. The new and widely-applicable SROM framework is formulated for a general stochastic optimization problem in terms of an abstract objective function and constraining model. For demonstration purposes, however, we study its performance in the specific case of inverse identification of random material parameters in elastodynamics. We demonstrate the ability to efficiently recover random shear moduli given material displacement statistics as input data. We also show that the approach remains effective for the case where the loading in the problem is random as well.

  12. An inverse problem for a mathematical model of aquaponic agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobak, Carly; Kunze, Herb

    2017-01-01

    Aquaponic agriculture is a sustainable ecosystem that relies on a symbiotic relationship between fish and macrophytes. While the practice has been growing in popularity, relatively little mathematical models exist which aim to study the system processes. In this paper, we present a system of ODEs which aims to mathematically model the population and concetrations dynamics present in an aquaponic environment. Values of the parameters in the system are estimated from the literature so that simulated results can be presented to illustrate the nature of the solutions to the system. As well, a brief sensitivity analysis is performed in order to identify redundant parameters and highlight those which may need more reliable estimates. Specifically, an inverse problem with manufactured data for fish and plants is presented to demonstrate the ability of the collage theorem to recover parameter estimates.

  13. An inverse problem approach to modelling coastal effluent plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, D. C. L.; Murthy, C. R.; Miners, K. C.

    Formulated as an inverse problem, the diffusion parameters associated with length-scale dependent eddy diffusivities can be viewed as the unknowns in the mass conservation equation for coastal zone transport problems. The values of the diffusion parameters can be optimized according to an error function incorporated with observed concentration data. Examples are given for the Fickian, shear diffusion and inertial subrange diffusion models. Based on a new set of dyeplume data collected in the coastal zone off Bronte, Lake Ontario, it is shown that the predictions of turbulence closure models can be evaluated for different flow conditions. The choice of computational schemes for this diagnostic approach is based on tests with analytic solutions and observed data. It is found that the optimized shear diffusion model produced a better agreement with observations for both high and low advective flows than, e.g., the unoptimized semi-empirical model, Ky=0.075 σy1.2, described by Murthy and Kenney.

  14. Forward- vs. Inverse Problems in Modeling Seismic Attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, I. B.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic attenuation is an important property of wave propagation used in numerous applications. However, the attenuation is also a complex phenomenon, and it is important to differentiate between its two typical uses: 1) in forward problems, to model the amplitudes and spectral contents of waves required for hazard assessment and geotechnical engineering, and 2) in inverse problems, to determine the physical properties of the subsurface. In the forward-problem sense, the attenuation is successfully characterized in terms of empirical parameters of geometric spreading, radiation patterns, scattering amplitudes, t-star, alpha, kappa, or Q. Arguably, the predicted energy losses can be correct even if the underlying attenuation model is phenomenological and not sufficiently based on physics. An example of such phenomenological model is the viscoelasticity based on the correspondence principle and the Q-factor assigned to the material. By contrast, when used to invert for in situ material properties, models addressing the specific physics are required. In many studies (including in this session), a Q-factor is interpreted as a property of a point within the subsurface; however this property is only phenomenological and may be physically insufficient or inconsistent. For example, the bulk or shear Q at the same point can be different when evaluated from different wave modes. The cases of frequency-dependent Q are particularly prone of ambiguities such as trade-off with the assumed background geometric spreading. To rigorously characterize the in situ material properties responsible for seismic-wave attenuation, it is insufficient to only focus on the seismic energy loss. Mechanical models of the material need to be considered. Such models can be constructed by using Lagrangian mechanics. These models should likely contain no Q but will be based on parameters of microstructure such as heterogeneity, fractures, or fluids. I illustrate several such models based on viscosity

  15. Inverse modeling for heat conduction problem in human abdominal phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ming; Chen, Wenxi

    2011-01-01

    Noninvasive methods for deep body temperature measurement are based on the principle of heat equilibrium between the thermal sensor and the target location theoretically. However, the measurement position is not able to be definitely determined. In this study, a 2-dimensional mathematical model was built based upon some assumptions for the physiological condition of the human abdomen phantom. We evaluated the feasibility in estimating the internal organs temperature distribution from the readings of the temperature sensors arranged on the skin surface. It is a typical inverse heat conduction problem (IHCP), and is usually mathematically ill-posed. In this study, by integrating some physical and physiological a-priori information, we invoked the quasi-linear (QL) method to reconstruct the internal temperature distribution. The solutions of this method were improved by increasing the accuracy of the sensors and adjusting their arrangement on the outer surface, and eventually reached the state of converging at the best state accurately. This study suggests that QL method is able to reconstruct the internal temperature distribution in this phantom and might be worthy of a further study in an anatomical based model.

  16. Accounting for imperfect forward modeling in geophysical inverse problems — Exemplified for crosshole tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Mejer; Cordua, Knud Skou; Holm Jacobsen, Bo

    2014-01-01

    forward models, can be more than an order of magnitude larger than the measurement uncertainty. We also found that the modeling error is strongly linked to the spatial variability of the assumed velocity field, i.e., the a priori velocity model.We discovered some general tools by which the modeling error...... synthetic ground-penetrating radar crosshole tomographic inverse problems. Ignoring the modeling error can lead to severe artifacts, which erroneously appear to be well resolved in the solution of the inverse problem. Accounting for the modeling error leads to a solution of the inverse problem consistent...

  17. Dynamical inverse problems

    CERN Document Server

    Gladwell, Graham ML

    2011-01-01

    The papers in this volume present an overview of the general aspects and practical applications of dynamic inverse methods, through the interaction of several topics, ranging from classical and advanced inverse problems in vibration, isospectral systems, dynamic methods for structural identification, active vibration control and damage detection, imaging shear stiffness in biological tissues, wave propagation, to computational and experimental aspects relevant for engineering problems.

  18. Generalized emissivity inverse problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, DengMing; Wen, Tao; Dai, XianXi; Dai, JiXin; Evenson, William E

    2002-04-01

    Inverse problems have recently drawn considerable attention from the physics community due to of potential widespread applications [K. Chadan and P. C. Sabatier, Inverse Problems in Quantum Scattering Theory, 2nd ed. (Springer Verlag, Berlin, 1989)]. An inverse emissivity problem that determines the emissivity g(nu) from measurements of only the total radiated power J(T) has recently been studied [Tao Wen, DengMing Ming, Xianxi Dai, Jixin Dai, and William E. Evenson, Phys. Rev. E 63, 045601(R) (2001)]. In this paper, a new type of generalized emissivity and transmissivity inverse (GETI) problem is proposed. The present problem differs from our previous work on inverse problems by allowing the unknown (emissivity) function g(nu) to be temperature dependent as well as frequency dependent. Based on published experimental information, we have developed an exact solution formula for this GETI problem. A universal function set suggested for numerical calculation is shown to be robust, making this inversion method practical and convenient for realistic calculations.

  19. Effective Parameter Dimension via Bayesian Model Selection in the Inverse Acoustic Scattering Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abel Palafox

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We address a prototype inverse scattering problem in the interface of applied mathematics, statistics, and scientific computing. We pose the acoustic inverse scattering problem in a Bayesian inference perspective and simulate from the posterior distribution using MCMC. The PDE forward map is implemented using high performance computing methods. We implement a standard Bayesian model selection method to estimate an effective number of Fourier coefficients that may be retrieved from noisy data within a standard formulation.

  20. Inverse problems in geographical economics: parameter identification in the spatial Solow model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engbers, Ralf; Burger, Martin; Capasso, Vincenzo

    2014-11-13

    The identification of production functions from data is an important task in the modelling of economic growth. In this paper, we consider a non-parametric approach to this identification problem in the context of the spatial Solow model which allows for rather general production functions, in particular convex-concave ones that have recently been proposed as reasonable shapes. We formulate the inverse problem and apply Tikhonov regularization. The inverse problem is discretized by finite elements and solved iteratively via a preconditioned gradient descent approach. Numerical results for the reconstruction of the production function are given and analysed at the end of this paper.

  1. Effects of geometric head model perturbations on the EEG forward and inverse problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Ellenrieder, Nicolás; Muravchik, Carlos H; Nehorai, Arye

    2006-03-01

    We study the effect of geometric head model perturbations on the electroencephalography (EEG) forward and inverse problems. Small magnitude perturbations of the shape of the head could represent uncertainties in the head model due to errors on images or techniques used to construct the model. They could also represent small scale details of the shape of the surfaces not described in a deterministic model, such as the sulci and fissures of the cortical layer. We perform a first-order perturbation analysis, using a meshless method for computing the sensitivity of the solution of the forward problem to the geometry of the head model. The effect on the forward problem solution is treated as noise in the EEG measurements and the Cramér-Rao bound is computed to quantify the effect on the inverse problem performance. Our results show that, for a dipolar source, the effect of the perturbations on the inverse problem performance is under the level of the uncertainties due to the spontaneous brain activity. Thus, the results suggest that an extremely detailed model of the head may be unnecessary when solving the EEG inverse problem.

  2. Inverse problem theory methods for data fitting and model parameter estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Tarantola, A

    2002-01-01

    Inverse Problem Theory is written for physicists, geophysicists and all scientists facing the problem of quantitative interpretation of experimental data. Although it contains a lot of mathematics, it is not intended as a mathematical book, but rather tries to explain how a method of acquisition of information can be applied to the actual world.The book provides a comprehensive, up-to-date description of the methods to be used for fitting experimental data, or to estimate model parameters, and to unify these methods into the Inverse Problem Theory. The first part of the book deals wi

  3. Advanced model of eddy-current NDE inverse problem with sparse grid algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Liming; Sabbagh, Harold A.; Sabbagh, Elias H.; Murphy, R. Kim; Bernacchi, William

    2017-02-01

    In model-based inverse problem, some unknown parameters need to be estimated. These parameters are used not only to characterize the physical properties of cracks, but also to describe the position of the probes (such as lift off and angles) in the calibration. After considering the effect of the position of the probes in the inverse problem, the accuracy of the inverse result will be improved. With increasing the number of the parameters in the inverse problems, the burden of calculations will increase exponentially in the traditional full grid method. The sparse grid algorithm, which was introduced by Sergey A. Smolyak, was used in our work. With this algorithm, we obtain a powerful interpolation method that requires significantly fewer support nodes than conventional interpolation on a full grid. In this work, we combined sparse grid toolbox TASMANIAN, which is produced by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and professional eddy-current NDE software, VIC-3D R◯, to solve a specific inverse problem. An advanced model based on our previous one is used to estimate length and depth of the crack, lift off and two angles of the position of probes. Considering the calibration process, pseudorandom noise is considered in the model and statistical behavior is discussed.

  4. Open forward and inverse problems in theoretical modeling of bone tissue adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadpoor, Amir Abbas

    2013-11-01

    Theoretical modeling of bone tissue adaptation started several decades ago. Many important problems have been addressed in this area of research during the last decades. However, many important questions remain unanswered. In this paper, an overview of open problems in theoretical modeling of bone tissue adaptation is presented. First, the principal elements of bone tissue adaptation models are defined and briefly reviewed. Based on these principal elements, four categories of open problems are identified. Two of these categories primarily include forward problems, while two others include inverse problems. In every one of the identified categories, important open problems are highlighted and their importance is discussed. It is shown that most of previous studies on the theoretical modeling of bone tissue adaptation have been focused on the problems of the first category and not much is done in three other categories. The paper tries to highlight these potentially important problems that have been so far largely overlooked and to inspire new avenues of research.

  5. Fast and accurate analytical model to solve inverse problem in SHM using Lamb wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poddar, Banibrata; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2016-04-01

    Lamb wave propagation is at the center of attention of researchers for structural health monitoring of thin walled structures. This is due to the fact that Lamb wave modes are natural modes of wave propagation in these structures with long travel distances and without much attenuation. This brings the prospect of monitoring large structure with few sensors/actuators. However the problem of damage detection and identification is an "inverse problem" where we do not have the luxury to know the exact mathematical model of the system. On top of that the problem is more challenging due to the confounding factors of statistical variation of the material and geometric properties. Typically this problem may also be ill posed. Due to all these complexities the direct solution of the problem of damage detection and identification in SHM is impossible. Therefore an indirect method using the solution of the "forward problem" is popular for solving the "inverse problem". This requires a fast forward problem solver. Due to the complexities involved with the forward problem of scattering of Lamb waves from damages researchers rely primarily on numerical techniques such as FEM, BEM, etc. But these methods are slow and practically impossible to be used in structural health monitoring. We have developed a fast and accurate analytical forward problem solver for this purpose. This solver, CMEP (complex modes expansion and vector projection), can simulate scattering of Lamb waves from all types of damages in thin walled structures fast and accurately to assist the inverse problem solver.

  6. Optimization and geophysical inverse problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barhen, J.; Berryman, J.G.; Borcea, L.; Dennis, J.; de Groot-Hedlin, C.; Gilbert, F.; Gill, P.; Heinkenschloss, M.; Johnson, L.; McEvilly, T.; More, J.; Newman, G.; Oldenburg, D.; Parker, P.; Porto, B.; Sen, M.; Torczon, V.; Vasco, D.; Woodward, N.B.

    2000-10-01

    A fundamental part of geophysics is to make inferences about the interior of the earth on the basis of data collected at or near the surface of the earth. In almost all cases these measured data are only indirectly related to the properties of the earth that are of interest, so an inverse problem must be solved in order to obtain estimates of the physical properties within the earth. In February of 1999 the U.S. Department of Energy sponsored a workshop that was intended to examine the methods currently being used to solve geophysical inverse problems and to consider what new approaches should be explored in the future. The interdisciplinary area between inverse problems in geophysics and optimization methods in mathematics was specifically targeted as one where an interchange of ideas was likely to be fruitful. Thus about half of the participants were actively involved in solving geophysical inverse problems and about half were actively involved in research on general optimization methods. This report presents some of the topics that were explored at the workshop and the conclusions that were reached. In general, the objective of a geophysical inverse problem is to find an earth model, described by a set of physical parameters, that is consistent with the observational data. It is usually assumed that the forward problem, that of calculating simulated data for an earth model, is well enough understood so that reasonably accurate synthetic data can be generated for an arbitrary model. The inverse problem is then posed as an optimization problem, where the function to be optimized is variously called the objective function, misfit function, or fitness function. The objective function is typically some measure of the difference between observational data and synthetic data calculated for a trial model. However, because of incomplete and inaccurate data, the objective function often incorporates some additional form of regularization, such as a measure of smoothness

  7. The Fukushima Inverse Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez-Camara, Marta; Dokmanic, Ivan; Ranieri, Juri; Scheibler, Robin; Vetterli, Martin; STOHL Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Knowing what amount of radioactive material was released from Fukushima in March 2011 and at what time instants is crucial to assess the risk, the pollution, and to understand the scope of the consequences. Moreover, it could be used in forward simulations to obtain accurate maps of deposition. But these data are often not publicly available. We propose to estimate the emission waveforms by solving an inverse problem. Previous approaches have relied on a detailed expert guess of how the relea...

  8. The inverse problem of refraction travel times, part II: Quantifying refraction nonuniqueness using a three-layer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, J.; Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.; Steeples, D.

    2005-01-01

    This paper is the second of a set of two papers in which we study the inverse refraction problem. The first paper, "Types of Geophysical Nonuniqueness through Minimization," studies and classifies the types of nonuniqueness that exist when solving inverse problems depending on the participation of a priori information required to obtain reliable solutions of inverse geophysical problems. In view of the classification developed, in this paper we study the type of nonuniqueness associated with the inverse refraction problem. An approach for obtaining a realistic solution to the inverse refraction problem is offered in a third paper that is in preparation. The nonuniqueness of the inverse refraction problem is examined by using a simple three-layer model. Like many other inverse geophysical problems, the inverse refraction problem does not have a unique solution. Conventionally, nonuniqueness is considered to be a result of insufficient data and/or error in the data, for any fixed number of model parameters. This study illustrates that even for overdetermined and error free data, nonlinear inverse refraction problems exhibit exact-data nonuniqueness, which further complicates the problem of nonuniqueness. By evaluating the nonuniqueness of the inverse refraction problem, this paper targets the improvement of refraction inversion algorithms, and as a result, the achievement of more realistic solutions. The nonuniqueness of the inverse refraction problem is examined initially by using a simple three-layer model. The observations and conclusions of the three-layer model nonuniqueness study are used to evaluate the nonuniqueness of more complicated n-layer models and multi-parameter cell models such as in refraction tomography. For any fixed number of model parameters, the inverse refraction problem exhibits continuous ranges of exact-data nonuniqueness. Such an unfavorable type of nonuniqueness can be uniquely solved only by providing abundant a priori information

  9. A numerical study of the inverse problem of breast infrared thermography modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li; Zhan, Wang; Loew, Murray H.

    2010-03-01

    Infrared thermography has been shown to be a useful adjunctive tool for breast cancer detection. Previous thermography modeling techniques generally dealt with the "forward problem", i.e., to estimate the breast thermogram from known properties of breast tissues. The present study aims to deal with the so-called "inverse problem", namely to estimate the thermal properties of the breast tissues from the observed surface temperature distribution. By comparison, the inverse problem is a more direct way of interpreting a breast thermogram for specific physiological and/or pathological information. In tumor detection, for example, it is particularly important to estimate the tumor-induced thermal contrast, even though the corresponding non-tumor thermal background usually is unknown due to the difficulty of measuring the individual thermal properties. Inverse problem solving is technically challenging due to its ill-posed nature, which is evident primarily by its sensitivity to imaging noise. Taking advantage of our previously developed forward-problemsolving techniques with comprehensive thermal-elastic modeling, we examine here the feasibility of solving the inverse problem of the breast thermography. The approach is based on a presumed spatial constraint applied to three major thermal properties, i.e., thermal conductivity, blood perfusion, and metabolic heat generation, for each breast tissue type. Our results indicate that the proposed inverse-problem-solving scheme can be numerically stable under imaging noise of SNR ranging 32 ~ 40 dB, and that the proposed techniques can be effectively used to improve the estimation to the tumor-induced thermal contrast, especially for smaller and deeper tumors.

  10. A rainbow inverse problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calvez V.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We consider the radiative transfer equation (RTE with reflection in a three-dimensional domain, infinite in two dimensions, and prove an existence result. Then, we study the inverse problem of retrieving the optical parameters from boundary measurements, with help of existing results by Choulli and Stefanov. This theoretical analysis is the framework of an attempt to model the color of the skin. For this purpose, a code has been developed to solve the RTE and to study the sensitivity of the measurements made by biophysicists with respect to the physiological parameters responsible for the optical properties of this complex, multi-layered material. On étudie l’équation du transfert radiatif (ETR dans un domaine tridimensionnel infini dans deux directions, et on prouve un résultat d’existence. On s’intéresse ensuite à la reconstruction des paramètres optiques à partir de mesures faites au bord, en s’appuyant sur des résultats de Choulli et Stefanov. Cette analyse sert de cadre théorique à un travail de modélisation de la couleur de la peau. Dans cette perspective, un code à été développé pour résoudre l’ETR et étudier la sensibilité des mesures effectuées par les biophysiciens par rapport aux paramètres physiologiques tenus pour responsables des propriétés optiques de ce complexe matériau multicouche.

  11. Inverse problem in hydrogeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, Jesús; Alcolea, Andrés; Medina, Agustín; Hidalgo, Juan; Slooten, Luit J.

    2005-03-01

    The state of the groundwater inverse problem is synthesized. Emphasis is placed on aquifer characterization, where modelers have to deal with conceptual model uncertainty (notably spatial and temporal variability), scale dependence, many types of unknown parameters (transmissivity, recharge, boundary conditions, etc.), nonlinearity, and often low sensitivity of state variables (typically heads and concentrations) to aquifer properties. Because of these difficulties, calibration cannot be separated from the modeling process, as it is sometimes done in other fields. Instead, it should be viewed as one step in the process of understanding aquifer behavior. In fact, it is shown that actual parameter estimation methods do not differ from each other in the essence, though they may differ in the computational details. It is argued that there is ample room for improvement in groundwater inversion: development of user-friendly codes, accommodation of variability through geostatistics, incorporation of geological information and different types of data (temperature, occurrence and concentration of isotopes, age, etc.), proper accounting of uncertainty, etc. Despite this, even with existing codes, automatic calibration facilitates enormously the task of modeling. Therefore, it is contended that its use should become standard practice. L'état du problème inverse des eaux souterraines est synthétisé. L'accent est placé sur la caractérisation de l'aquifère, où les modélisateurs doivent jouer avec l'incertitude des modèles conceptuels (notamment la variabilité spatiale et temporelle), les facteurs d'échelle, plusieurs inconnues sur différents paramètres (transmissivité, recharge, conditions aux limites, etc.), la non linéarité, et souvent la sensibilité de plusieurs variables d'état (charges hydrauliques, concentrations) des propriétés de l'aquifère. A cause de ces difficultés, le calibrage ne peut êtreséparé du processus de modélisation, comme c'est le

  12. Restart Operator Meta-heuristics for a Problem-Oriented Evolutionary Strategies Algorithm in Inverse Mathematical MISO Modelling Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhikov, I. S.; Semenkin, E. S.

    2017-02-01

    This study is focused on solving an inverse mathematical modelling problem for dynamical systems based on observation data and control inputs. The mathematical model is being searched in the form of a linear differential equation, which determines the system with multiple inputs and a single output, and a vector of the initial point coordinates. The described problem is complex and multimodal and for this reason the proposed evolutionary-based optimization technique, which is oriented on a dynamical system identification problem, was applied. To improve its performance an algorithm restart operator was implemented.

  13. The Uniqueness of Single Data Function, Multiple Model Functions, Inverse Problems Including the Rayleigh Wave Dispersion Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, William

    2017-02-01

    We prove that the problem of inverting Rayleigh wave phase velocity functions c( k ) , where k is wavenumber, for density ρ ( z ) , rigidity μ ( z ) and Lamé parameter λ ( z ) , where z is depth, is fully non-unique, at least in the highly-idealized case where the base Earth model is an isotropic half space. The model functions completely trade off. This is one special case of a common inversion scenario in which one seeks to determine several model functions from a single data function. We explore the circumstances under which this broad class of problems is unique, starting with very simple scenarios, building up to the somewhat more complicated (and common) case where data and model functions are related by convolutions, and then finally, to scale-independent problems (which include the Rayleigh wave problem). The idealized cases that we examine analytically provide insight into the kinds of nonuniqueness that are inherent in the much more complicated problems encountered in modern geophysical imaging (though they do not necessarily provide methods for solving those problems). We also define what is meant by a Backus and Gilbert resolution kernel in this kind of inversion and show under what circumstances a unique localized average of a single model function can be constructed.

  14. The Uniqueness of Single Data Function, Multiple Model Functions, Inverse Problems Including the Rayleigh Wave Dispersion Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, William

    2017-04-01

    We prove that the problem of inverting Rayleigh wave phase velocity functions c( k ), where k is wavenumber, for density ρ ( z ), rigidity μ ( z ) and Lamé parameter λ ( z ), where z is depth, is fully non-unique, at least in the highly-idealized case where the base Earth model is an isotropic half space. The model functions completely trade off. This is one special case of a common inversion scenario in which one seeks to determine several model functions from a single data function. We explore the circumstances under which this broad class of problems is unique, starting with very simple scenarios, building up to the somewhat more complicated (and common) case where data and model functions are related by convolutions, and then finally, to scale-independent problems (which include the Rayleigh wave problem). The idealized cases that we examine analytically provide insight into the kinds of nonuniqueness that are inherent in the much more complicated problems encountered in modern geophysical imaging (though they do not necessarily provide methods for solving those problems). We also define what is meant by a Backus and Gilbert resolution kernel in this kind of inversion and show under what circumstances a unique localized average of a single model function can be constructed.

  15. Iterative methods for solving coefficient inverse problems of wave tomography in models with attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharsky, Alexander V.; Romanov, Sergey Y.

    2017-02-01

    We develop efficient iterative methods for solving inverse problems of wave tomography in models incorporating both diffraction effects and attenuation. In the inverse problem the aim is to reconstruct the velocity structure and the function that characterizes the distribution of attenuation properties in the object studied. We prove mathematically and rigorously the differentiability of the residual functional in normed spaces, and derive the corresponding formula for the Fréchet derivative. The computation of the Fréchet derivative includes solving both the direct problem with the Neumann boundary condition and the reversed-time conjugate problem. We develop efficient methods for numerical computations where the approximate solution is found using the detector measurements of the wave field and its normal derivative. The wave field derivative values at detector locations are found by solving the exterior boundary value problem with the Dirichlet boundary conditions. We illustrate the efficiency of this approach by applying it to model problems. The algorithms developed are highly parallelizable and designed to be run on supercomputers. Among the most promising medical applications of our results is the development of ultrasonic tomographs for differential diagnosis of breast cancer.

  16. NUMERICAL MODELING FOR POSITIVE AND INVERSE PROBLEMS OF 3-D SEEPAGE IN DOUBLE FRACTURED MEDIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Zhi-fang; GUO Geng-xin

    2005-01-01

    Three-dimensional seepage in double fractured media was modeled in this paper.The determination of hydraulic conductivity tensor of rock mass is a vital problem for the sea water intrusion or sea water encroachment and seepage of fissured medium.According to the geological and hydrogeological conditions for the 2nd-stage construction of the Three Gorges Project (TGP), the physical and mathematical models for the groundwater movement through the 3D double fractured media of rock mass during construction were established in this paper.Based on discontinuity-control inverse theory, some related parameters of double fractured media were inversed with flux being the known quantity and calibration of water table the objective function.Synchronously, the seepage field of the construction region was systematically analyzed and simulated, the results of which exhibit that the double fractured media model of fracture water can comprehensively and correctly describe the geological and hydrogeological conditions in the construction region.

  17. A linear model approach for ultrasonic inverse problems with attenuation and dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcreff, Ewen; Bourguignon, Sébastien; Idier, Jérôme; Simon, Laurent

    2014-07-01

    Ultrasonic inverse problems such as spike train deconvolution, synthetic aperture focusing, or tomography attempt to reconstruct spatial properties of an object (discontinuities, delaminations, flaws, etc.) from noisy and incomplete measurements. They require an accurate description of the data acquisition process. Dealing with frequency-dependent attenuation and dispersion is therefore crucial because both phenomena modify the wave shape as the travel distance increases. In an inversion context, this paper proposes to exploit a linear model of ultrasonic data taking into account attenuation and dispersion. The propagation distance is discretized to build a finite set of radiation impulse responses. Attenuation is modeled with a frequency power law and then dispersion is computed to yield physically consistent responses. Using experimental data acquired from attenuative materials, this model outperforms the standard attenuation-free model and other models of the literature. Because of model linearity, robust estimation methods can be implemented. When matched filtering is employed for single echo detection, the model that we propose yields precise estimation of the attenuation coefficient and of the sound velocity. A thickness estimation problem is also addressed through spike deconvolution, for which the proposed model also achieves accurate results.

  18. Model-based elastography: a survey of approaches to the inverse elasticity problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyley, M M

    2012-01-01

    Elastography is emerging as an imaging modality that can distinguish normal versus diseased tissues via their biomechanical properties. This article reviews current approaches to elastography in three areas — quasi-static, harmonic, and transient — and describes inversion schemes for each elastographic imaging approach. Approaches include: first-order approximation methods; direct and iterative inversion schemes for linear elastic; isotropic materials; and advanced reconstruction methods for recovering parameters that characterize complex mechanical behavior. The paper’s objective is to document efforts to develop elastography within the framework of solving an inverse problem, so that elastography may provide reliable estimates of shear modulus and other mechanical parameters. We discuss issues that must be addressed if model-based elastography is to become the prevailing approach to quasi-static, harmonic, and transient elastography: (1) developing practical techniques to transform the ill-posed problem with a well-posed one; (2) devising better forward models to capture the transient behavior of soft tissue; and (3) developing better test procedures to evaluate the performance of modulus elastograms. PMID:22222839

  19. Inverse problems in stochastic computational dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Capiez-Lernout, Evangéline; Soize, Christian

    2008-01-01

    International audience; This paper deals with robust updating of dynamical systems using stochastic computational models for which model and parameter uncertainties are taken into account by the nonparametric probabilistic approach. Such a problem is formulated as an inverse problem consisting in identifying the parameters of the mean computational model and the parameters of the probabilistic model of uncertainties. This inverse problem leads us to solve an optimization problem for which the...

  20. Nonlinear Inverse Problem for an Ion-Exchange Filter Model: Numerical Recovery of Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balgaisha Mukanova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the problem of identifying unknown parameters for a mathematical model of an ion-exchange filter via measurement at the outlet of the filter. The proposed mathematical model consists of a material balance equation, an equation describing the kinetics of ion-exchange for the nonequilibrium case, and an equation for the ion-exchange isotherm. The material balance equation includes a nonlinear term that depends on the kinetics of ion-exchange and several parameters. First, a numerical solution of the direct problem, the calculation of the impurities concentration at the outlet of the filter, is provided. Then, the inverse problem, finding the parameters of the ion-exchange process in nonequilibrium conditions, is formulated. A method for determining the approximate values of these parameters from the impurities concentration measured at the outlet of the filter is proposed.

  1. Forward and inverse problems of electrocardiography: modeling and recovery of epicardial potentials in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahidi, A V; Savard, P; Nadeau, R

    1994-03-01

    To assess the accuracy of solutions to the inverse problem of electrocardiography in man, epicardial potentials computed from thoracic potential distributions were compared to potentials measured directly over the surface of the heart during arrhythmia surgery. Three-dimensional finite element models of the thorax with different mesh resolutions and conductivity inhomogeneities were constructed from serial computerized tomography scans of a patient. These torso models were used to compute transfer matrices relating the epicardial potentials to the thoracic potentials. Potential distributions over the torso and the ventricles were measured with 63 leads in the same patient whose anatomical data was used to construct the torso models. To solve the inverse problem, different methods based on Tykhonov regularization or regularization- truncation were applied. The recovered epicardial potential distributions closely resembled the epicardial potential distributions measured early during ventricular preexcitation, but not the more complex distributions measured later during the QRS complex. Several problems encountered as the validation process is applied in man are also discussed.

  2. Solving inverse problem for Markov chain model of customer lifetime value using flower pollination algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ma'shumah, Fathimah; Permana, Dony; Sidarto, Kuntjoro Adji

    2015-12-01

    Customer Lifetime Value is an important and useful concept in marketing. One of its benefits is to help a company for budgeting marketing expenditure for customer acquisition and customer retention. Many mathematical models have been introduced to calculate CLV considering the customer retention/migration classification scheme. A fairly new class of these models which will be described in this paper uses Markov Chain Models (MCM). This class of models has the major advantage for its flexibility to be modified to several different cases/classification schemes. In this model, the probabilities of customer retention and acquisition play an important role. From Pfeifer and Carraway, 2000, the final formula of CLV obtained from MCM usually contains nonlinear form of the transition probability matrix. This nonlinearity makes the inverse problem of CLV difficult to solve. This paper aims to solve this inverse problem, yielding the approximate transition probabilities for the customers, by applying metaheuristic optimization algorithm developed by Yang, 2013, Flower Pollination Algorithm. The major interpretation of obtaining the transition probabilities are to set goals for marketing teams in keeping the relative frequencies of customer acquisition and customer retention.

  3. Taking into account topography rapid variations in forward modelling and inverse problems in seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capdeville, Y.; Jean-Jacques, M.

    2011-12-01

    The modeling of seismic elastic wave full waveform in a limited frequency band is now well established with a set of efficient numerical methods like the spectral element, the discontinuous Galerking or the finite difference methods. The constant increase of computing power with time has now allowed the use of seismic elastic wave full waveforms in a limited frequency band to image the elastic properties of the earth. Nevertheless, inhomogeneities of scale much smaller the minimum wavelength of the wavefield associated to the maximum frequency of the limited frequency band, are still a challenge for both forward and inverse problems. In this work, we tackle the problem of a topography varying much faster than the minimum wavelength. Using a non periodic homogenization theory and a matching asymptotic technique, we show how to remove the fast variation of the topography and replace it by a smooth Dirichlet to Neumann operator at the surface. After showing some 2D forward modeling numerical examples, we will discuss the implications of such a development for both forward and inverse problems.

  4. A model for the inverse 1-median problem on trees under uncertain costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kien Trung Nguyen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the problem of justifying vertex weights of a tree under uncertain costs so that a prespecified vertex become optimal and the total cost should be optimal in the uncertainty scenario. We propose a model which delivers the information about the optimal cost which respect to each confidence level \\(\\alpha \\in [0,1]\\. To obtain this goal, we first define an uncertain variable with respect to the minimum cost in each confidence level. If all costs are independently linear distributed, we present the inverse distribution function of this uncertain variable in \\(O(n^{2}\\log n\\ time, where \\(n\\ is the number of vertices in the tree.

  5. Inverse Problems in Geosciences: Modelling the Rock Properties of an Oil Reservoir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Katrine

    the probability that a model adhere to prior knowledge by having specific multiple-point statistics, for instance, learned from a training image. Existing methods efficiently sample an a priori probability density function to create a set of acceptable models; but they cannot evaluate the probability of a model......Even the most optimistic forecasts predict that Danish oil production will decrease by 80% in the period between 2006 and 2040, and only a strong innovative technological effort can change that. Due to the geological structures of the subsurface in the Danish part of the North Sea, Denmark...... of the subsurface of the reservoirs. Hence the focus of this work has been on acquiring models of spatial parameters describing rock properties of the subsurface using geostatistical a priori knowledge and available geophysical data. Such models are solutions to often severely under-determined, inverse problems...

  6. Multimodal, high-dimensional, model-based, Bayesian inverse problems with applications in biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, I. M.; Koutsourelakis, P. S.

    2017-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the numerical solution of model-based, Bayesian inverse problems. We are particularly interested in cases where the cost of each likelihood evaluation (forward-model call) is expensive and the number of unknown (latent) variables is high. This is the setting in many problems in computational physics where forward models with nonlinear PDEs are used and the parameters to be calibrated involve spatio-temporarily varying coefficients, which upon discretization give rise to a high-dimensional vector of unknowns. One of the consequences of the well-documented ill-posedness of inverse problems is the possibility of multiple solutions. While such information is contained in the posterior density in Bayesian formulations, the discovery of a single mode, let alone multiple, poses a formidable computational task. The goal of the present paper is two-fold. On one hand, we propose approximate, adaptive inference strategies using mixture densities to capture multi-modal posteriors. On the other, we extend our work in [1] with regard to effective dimensionality reduction techniques that reveal low-dimensional subspaces where the posterior variance is mostly concentrated. We validate the proposed model by employing Importance Sampling which confirms that the bias introduced is small and can be efficiently corrected if the analyst wishes to do so. We demonstrate the performance of the proposed strategy in nonlinear elastography where the identification of the mechanical properties of biological materials can inform non-invasive, medical diagnosis. The discovery of multiple modes (solutions) in such problems is critical in achieving the diagnostic objectives.

  7. Hybrid modeling of spatial continuity for application to numerical inverse problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedel, Michael J.; Iwashita, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    A novel two-step modeling approach is presented to obtain optimal starting values and geostatistical constraints for numerical inverse problems otherwise characterized by spatially-limited field data. First, a type of unsupervised neural network, called the self-organizing map (SOM), is trained to recognize nonlinear relations among environmental variables (covariates) occurring at various scales. The values of these variables are then estimated at random locations across the model domain by iterative minimization of SOM topographic error vectors. Cross-validation is used to ensure unbiasedness and compute prediction uncertainty for select subsets of the data. Second, analytical functions are fit to experimental variograms derived from original plus resampled SOM estimates producing model variograms. Sequential Gaussian simulation is used to evaluate spatial uncertainty associated with the analytical functions and probable range for constraining variables. The hybrid modeling of spatial continuity is demonstrated using spatially-limited hydrologic measurements at different scales in Brazil: (1) physical soil properties (sand, silt, clay, hydraulic conductivity) in the 42 km2 Vargem de Caldas basin; (2) well yield and electrical conductivity of groundwater in the 132 km2 fractured crystalline aquifer; and (3) specific capacity, hydraulic head, and major ions in a 100,000 km2 transboundary fractured-basalt aquifer. These results illustrate the benefits of exploiting nonlinear relations among sparse and disparate data sets for modeling spatial continuity, but the actual application of these spatial data to improve numerical inverse modeling requires testing.

  8. Inverse problems for Maxwell's equations

    CERN Document Server

    Romanov, V G

    1994-01-01

    The Inverse and Ill-Posed Problems Series is a series of monographs publishing postgraduate level information on inverse and ill-posed problems for an international readership of professional scientists and researchers. The series aims to publish works which involve both theory and applications in, e.g., physics, medicine, geophysics, acoustics, electrodynamics, tomography, and ecology.

  9. Mature red blood cells: from optical model to inverse light-scattering problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilev, Konstantin V; Yurkin, Maxim A; Chernyshova, Ekaterina S; Strokotov, Dmitry I; Chernyshev, Andrei V; Maltsev, Valeri P

    2016-04-01

    We propose a method for characterization of mature red blood cells (RBCs) morphology, based on measurement of light-scattering patterns (LSPs) of individual RBCs with the scanning flow cytometer and on solution of the inverse light-scattering (ILS) problem for each LSP. We considered a RBC shape model, corresponding to the minimal bending energy of the membrane with isotropic elasticity, and constructed an analytical approximation, which allows rapid simulation of the shape, given the diameter and minimal and maximal thicknesses. The ILS problem was solved by the nearest-neighbor interpolation using a preliminary calculated database of 250,000 theoretical LSPs. For each RBC in blood sample we determined three abovementioned shape characteristics and refractive index, which also allows us to calculate volume, surface area, sphericity index, spontaneous curvature, hemoglobin concentration and content.

  10. Bayesian Approach to Inverse Problems

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    Many scientific, medical or engineering problems raise the issue of recovering some physical quantities from indirect measurements; for instance, detecting or quantifying flaws or cracks within a material from acoustic or electromagnetic measurements at its surface is an essential problem of non-destructive evaluation. The concept of inverse problems precisely originates from the idea of inverting the laws of physics to recover a quantity of interest from measurable data.Unfortunately, most inverse problems are ill-posed, which means that precise and stable solutions are not easy to devise. Regularization is the key concept to solve inverse problems.The goal of this book is to deal with inverse problems and regularized solutions using the Bayesian statistical tools, with a particular view to signal and image estimation

  11. Solving Inverse Radiation Transport Problems with Multi-Sensor Data in the Presence of Correlated Measurement and Modeling Errors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Edward V. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stork, Christopher L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mattingly, John K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Inverse radiation transport focuses on identifying the configuration of an unknown radiation source given its observed radiation signatures. The inverse problem is traditionally solved by finding the set of transport model parameter values that minimizes a weighted sum of the squared differences by channel between the observed signature and the signature pre dicted by the hypothesized model parameters. The weights are inversely proportional to the sum of the variances of the measurement and model errors at a given channel. The traditional implicit (often inaccurate) assumption is that the errors (differences between the modeled and observed radiation signatures) are independent across channels. Here, an alternative method that accounts for correlated errors between channels is described and illustrated using an inverse problem based on the combination of gam ma and neutron multiplicity counting measurements.

  12. Parameter estimation and inverse problems

    CERN Document Server

    Aster, Richard C; Thurber, Clifford H

    2005-01-01

    Parameter Estimation and Inverse Problems primarily serves as a textbook for advanced undergraduate and introductory graduate courses. Class notes have been developed and reside on the World Wide Web for faciliting use and feedback by teaching colleagues. The authors'' treatment promotes an understanding of fundamental and practical issus associated with parameter fitting and inverse problems including basic theory of inverse problems, statistical issues, computational issues, and an understanding of how to analyze the success and limitations of solutions to these probles. The text is also a practical resource for general students and professional researchers, where techniques and concepts can be readily picked up on a chapter-by-chapter basis.Parameter Estimation and Inverse Problems is structured around a course at New Mexico Tech and is designed to be accessible to typical graduate students in the physical sciences who may not have an extensive mathematical background. It is accompanied by a Web site that...

  13. Statistical perspectives on inverse problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kim Emil

    of the interior of an object from electrical boundary measurements. One part of this thesis concerns statistical approaches for solving, possibly non-linear, inverse problems. Thus inverse problems are recasted in a form suitable for statistical inference. In particular, a Bayesian approach for regularisation...... is obtained by assuming that the a priori beliefs about the solution before having observed any data can be described by a prior distribution. The solution to the statistical inverse problem is then given by the posterior distribution obtained by Bayes' formula. Hence the solution of an ill-posed inverse...... problem is given in terms of probability distributions. Posterior inference is obtained by Markov chain Monte Carlo methods and new, powerful simulation techniques based on e.g. coupled Markov chains and simulated tempering is developed to improve the computational efficiency of the overall simulation...

  14. An inverse problem of mathematical modeling of the extraction process of polydisperse porous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orazov, Isabek; Makhatova, Anar

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we consider one family of problems simulating the determination of target components and density of sources from given values of the initial and final states. The mathematical statement of these problems leads to the inverse problem for the diffusion equation, where it is required to find not only a solution of the problem, but also its right-hand side that depends only on a spatial variable. A specific feature of the considered problems is that the system of eigenfunctions of the multiple differentiation operator subject to boundary conditions of the initial problem does not have the basis property. We prove the unique existence of a generalized solution of the problem.

  15. Model calibration for ice sheets and glaciers dynamics: a general theory of inverse problems in glaciology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Giudici

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Numerical modelling of the dynamic evolution of ice sheets and glaciers requires the solution of discrete equations which are based on physical principles (e.g. conservation of mass, linear momentum and energy and phenomenological constitutive laws (e.g. Glen's and Fourier's laws. These equations must be accompanied by information on the forcing term and by initial and boundary conditions (IBCs on ice velocity, stress and temperature; on the other hand the constitutive laws involve many physical parameters, some of which depend on the ice thermodynamical state. The proper forecast of the dynamics of ice sheets and glaciers requires a precise knowledge of several quantities which appear in the IBCs, in the forcing terms and in the phenomenological laws. As these quantities cannot be easily measured at the study scale in the field, they are often obtained through model calibration by solving an inverse problem (IP. The objective of this paper is to provide a thorough and rigorous conceptual framework for IPs in cryospheric studies and in particular: to clarify the role of experimental and monitoring data to determine the calibration targets and the values of the parameters that can be considered to be fixed; to define and characterise identifiability, a property related to the solution to the forward problem; to study well-posedness in a correct way, without confusing instability with ill-conditioning or with the properties of the method applied to compute a solution; to cast sensitivity analysis in a general framework and to differentiate between the computation of local sensitivity indicators with a one-at-a-time approach and first-order sensitivity indicators that consider the whole possible variability of the model parameters. The conceptual framework and the relevant properties are illustrated by means of a simple numerical example of isothermal ice flow, based on the shallow-ice approximation.

  16. Analysis of nonlinear channel friction inverse problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Weiping; LIU Guohua

    2007-01-01

    Based on the Backus-Gilbert inverse theory, the singular value decomposition (SVD) for general inverse matrices and the optimization algorithm are used to solve the channel friction inverse problem. The resolution and covari- ance friction inverse model in matrix form is developed to examine the reliability of solutions. Theoretical analyses demonstrate that the convergence rate of the general Newton optimization algorithm is in the second-order. The Wiggins method is also incorporated into the algorithm. Using the method, noise can be suppressed effectively, and the results are close to accurate solutions with proper control parameters. Also, the numerical stability can be improved.

  17. Aneesur Rahman Prize: The Inverse Ising Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swendsen, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Many methods are available for carrying out computer simulations of a model Hamiltonian to obtain thermodynamic information by generating a set of configurations. The inverse problem consists of recreating the parameters of the Hamiltonian, given a set of configurations. The problem arises in a variety of contexts, and there has been much interest recently in the inverse Ising problem, in which the configurations consist of Ising spins. I will discuss an efficient method for solving the problem and what it can tell us about the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model.

  18. Size Estimates in Inverse Problems

    KAUST Repository

    Di Cristo, Michele

    2014-01-06

    Detection of inclusions or obstacles inside a body by boundary measurements is an inverse problems very useful in practical applications. When only finite numbers of measurements are available, we try to detect some information on the embedded object such as its size. In this talk we review some recent results on several inverse problems. The idea is to provide constructive upper and lower estimates of the area/volume of the unknown defect in terms of a quantity related to the work that can be expressed with the available boundary data.

  19. Formulation and study some inverse problems in modeling of hydrophysical fields in water areas with "liquid" boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agoshkov, Valery

    2017-04-01

    There are different approaches for modeling boundary conditions describing hydrophysical fields in water areas with "liquid" boundaries. Variational data assimilation may also be considered as one of such approaches. Development of computer equipment, together with an increase in the quantity and quality of data from the satellites and other monitoring tools proves that the development of this particular approach is perspective. The range of connected the problems is wide - different recording forms of boundary conditions, observational data assimilation procedures and used models of hydrodynamics are possible. In this work some inverse problems and corresponding variational data assimilation ones, connected with mathematical modeling of hydrophysical fields in water areas (seas and oceans) with "liquid" ("open") boundaries, are formulated and studied. Note that the surface of water area (which can also be considered as a "liquid" boundary) is not included in the set of "liquid" boundaries, in this case "liquid" boundaries are borders between the areas "water-water". In the work, mathematical model of hydrothermodynamics in the water areas with "liquid" ("open") part of the boundary, a generalized statement of the problem and the splitting method for time approximation are formulated. Also the problem of variational data assimilation and iterative algorithm for solving inverse problems mentioned above are formulated. The work is based on [1]. The work was partly supported by the Russian Science Foundation (project 14-11-00609, the general formulation of the inverse problems) and by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (project 16-01-00548, the formulation of the problem and its study). [1] V.I. Agoshkov, Methods for solving inverse problems and variational data assimilation problems of observations in the problems of the large-scale dynamics of the oceans and seas, Institute of Numerical Mathematics, RAS, Moscow, 2016 (in Russian).

  20. Modeling Dynamic Programming Problems over Sequences and Trees with Inverse Coupled Rewrite Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Giegerich

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic programming is a classical algorithmic paradigm, which often allows the evaluation of a search space of exponential size in polynomial time. Recursive problem decomposition, tabulation of intermediate results for re-use, and Bellman’s Principle of Optimality are its well-understood ingredients. However, algorithms often lack abstraction and are difficult to implement, tedious to debug, and delicate to modify. The present article proposes a generic framework for specifying dynamic programming problems. This framework can handle all kinds of sequential inputs, as well as tree-structured data. Biosequence analysis, document processing, molecular structure analysis, comparison of objects assembled in a hierarchic fashion, and generally, all domains come under consideration where strings and ordered, rooted trees serve as natural data representations. The new approach introduces inverse coupled rewrite systems. They describe the solutions of combinatorial optimization problems as the inverse image of a term rewrite relation that reduces problem solutions to problem inputs. This specification leads to concise yet translucent specifications of dynamic programming algorithms. Their actual implementation may be challenging, but eventually, as we hope, it can be produced automatically. The present article demonstrates the scope of this new approach by describing a diverse set of dynamic programming problems which arise in the domain of computational biology, with examples in biosequence and molecular structure analysis.

  1. Inverse problems and uncertainty quantification

    KAUST Repository

    Litvinenko, Alexander

    2013-12-18

    In a Bayesian setting, inverse problems and uncertainty quantification (UQ)— the propagation of uncertainty through a computational (forward) model—are strongly connected. In the form of conditional expectation the Bayesian update becomes computationally attractive. This is especially the case as together with a functional or spectral approach for the forward UQ there is no need for time- consuming and slowly convergent Monte Carlo sampling. The developed sampling- free non-linear Bayesian update is derived from the variational problem associated with conditional expectation. This formulation in general calls for further discretisa- tion to make the computation possible, and we choose a polynomial approximation. After giving details on the actual computation in the framework of functional or spectral approximations, we demonstrate the workings of the algorithm on a number of examples of increasing complexity. At last, we compare the linear and quadratic Bayesian update on the small but taxing example of the chaotic Lorenz 84 model, where we experiment with the influence of different observation or measurement operators on the update.

  2. Inverse Problems and Uncertainty Quantification

    KAUST Repository

    Litvinenko, Alexander

    2014-01-06

    In a Bayesian setting, inverse problems and uncertainty quantification (UQ) - the propagation of uncertainty through a computational (forward) modelare strongly connected. In the form of conditional expectation the Bayesian update becomes computationally attractive. This is especially the case as together with a functional or spectral approach for the forward UQ there is no need for time- consuming and slowly convergent Monte Carlo sampling. The developed sampling- free non-linear Bayesian update is derived from the variational problem associated with conditional expectation. This formulation in general calls for further discretisa- tion to make the computation possible, and we choose a polynomial approximation. After giving details on the actual computation in the framework of functional or spectral approximations, we demonstrate the workings of the algorithm on a number of examples of increasing complexity. At last, we compare the linear and quadratic Bayesian update on the small but taxing example of the chaotic Lorenz 84 model, where we experiment with the influence of different observation or measurement operators on the update.

  3. Inverse problem for biomedical applications: use of prior information on target and forward model parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Fabrizio; Del Bianco, Samuele; Zaccanti, Giovanni

    2011-02-01

    We propose the use of a retrieval operator for biomedical applications in near-infrared spectroscopy. The proposed retrieval operator is based on the "Optimal Estimation" method. The main characteristic of this method relates to the possibility to include prior information both on target and on forward model parameters of the inversion procedure. The possibility of the retrieval operator to elaborate a-priori information can in principle be a benefit for the whole retrieval procedure. This means that a larger number of target parameters can be retrieved, or that a better accuracy can be achieved in retrieving the target parameters. The final goal of this inversion procedure is to have an improved estimate of the target parameters. The procedure has been tested on time-resolved simulated experiments obtained with a Monte Carlo code. The results obtained show that an improved performance of the inversion procedure is achieved when prior information on target and forward model parameters is available. With the use of a priori information on target parameters we have in average a lower difference between the retrieved values of the parameters and their true values, and the error bars determined by the inversion procedure on the retrieved parameters are significantly lower. At the same time a good estimate of the errors on the forward model parameters can significantly improve the retrieval of the target parameters.

  4. Linear inverse problem of the reactor dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, N. P.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work is the study transient processes in nuclear reactors. The mathematical model of the reactor dynamics excluding reverse thermal coupling is investigated. This model is described by a system of integral-differential equations, consisting of a non-stationary anisotropic multispeed kinetic transport equation and a delayed neutron balance equation. An inverse problem was formulated to determine the stationary part of the function source along with the solution of the direct problem. The author obtained sufficient conditions for the existence and uniqueness of a generalized solution of this inverse problem.

  5. The role of nonlinearity in inverse problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snieder, Roel

    1998-06-01

    In many practical inverse problems, one aims to retrieve a model that has infinitely many degrees of freedom from a finite amount of data. It follows from a simple variable count that this cannot be done in a unique way. Therefore, inversion entails more than estimating a model: any inversion is not complete without a description of the class of models that is consistent with the data; this is called the appraisal problem. Nonlinearity makes the appraisal problem particularly difficult. The first reason for this is that nonlinear error propagation is a difficult problem. The second reason is that for some nonlinear problems the model parameters affect the way in which the model is being interrogated by the data. Two examples are given of this, and it is shown how the nonlinearity may make the problem more ill-posed. Finally, three attempts are shown to carry out the model appraisal for nonlinear inverse problems that are based on an analytical approach, a numerical approach and a common sense approach.

  6. Optical tomography: forward and inverse problems

    CERN Document Server

    Arridge, Simon

    2009-01-01

    This paper is a review of recent mathematical and computational advances in optical tomography. We discuss the physical foundations of forward models for light propagation on microscopic, mesoscopic and macroscopic scales. We also consider direct and numerical approaches to the inverse problems that arise at each of these scales. Finally, we outline future directions and open problems in the field.

  7. Impact of numerical artifact of the forward model in the inverse solution of density-dependent flow problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, Mohamed K.; Ginn, Timothy R.

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the effect of computational error on the inversion of a density-dependent flow and transport model, using SEAWAT and UCODE-2005 in an inverse identification of hydraulic conductivity and dispersivity using head and concentration data from a 2-D laboratory experiment. We investigated inversions using three different solution schemes including variation of number of particles and time step length, in terms of the three aspects: the shape and smoothness of the objective function surface, the consequent impacts to the optimization, and the resulting Pareto analyses. This study demonstrates that the inversion is very sensitive to the choice of the forward model solution scheme. In particular, standard finite difference methods provide the smoothest objective function surface; however, this is obtained at the cost of numerical artifacts that can lead to erroneous warping of the objective function surface. Total variation diminishing (TVD) schemes limit these impacts at the cost of more computation time, while the hybrid method of characteristics (HMOC) approach with increased particle numbers and/or reduced time step gives both smoothed and accurate objective function surface. Use of the most accurate methods (TVD and HMOC) did lead to successful inversion of the two parameters; however, with distinct results for Pareto analyses. These results illuminate the sensitivity of the inversion to a number of aspects of the forward solution of the density-driven flow problem and reveal that parameter values may result that are erroneous but that counteract numerical errors in the solution.

  8. Theoretical analyses and numerical experiments of variational assimilation for one-dimensional ocean temperature model with techniques in inverse problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG; Sixun; HAN; Wei; WU; Rongsheng

    2004-01-01

    In the present work, the data assimilation problem in meteorology and physical oceanography is re-examined using the variational optimal control approaches in combination with regularization techniques in inverse problem. Here the estimations of the initial condition,boundary condition and model parameters are performed simultaneously in the framework of variational data assimilation. To overcome the difficulty of ill-posedness, especially for the model parameters distributed in space and time, an additional term is added into the cost functional as a stabilized functional. Numerical experiments show that even with noisy observations the initial conditions and model parameters are recovered to an acceptable degree of accuracy.

  9. Impact of the aspects of forward model solution schemes in the inverse solution of density dependent flow problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, M.; Ginn, T.

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the computational error on the solution of the inverse problem connecting with density-dependent flow problem. This effect will be addressed by evaluating the uniqueness of the inverse via monitoring objective function surface behavior in two dimensions parameter space, hydraulic conductivity and longitudinal dispersivity. In addition, the Pareto surface will be generated to evaluate the trade-offs between two calibration objectives based on head and concentration measurement errors. This is conducted by changing the aspects of forward model solution scheme, Eulerian and Lagrangian methods with associated variables. The data used for this study is based on the lab study of Nassar et al (2008). The seepage tank is essentially 2D (in an x-z vertical plane) with relatively homogenous coarse sand media with assigned flux in the upstream and constant head or assigned flux boundary condition at the downstream. The forward model solution is conducted with SEAWAT and it is utilized jointly with the inverse code UCODE-2005. This study demonstrates that the choice of the different numerical scheme with associated aspects of the forward problem is a vital step in the solution of the inverse problem in indirect manner. The method of characteristics gives good results by increasing the initial particles numbers and/ or reducing the time step. The advantage of using more particles concept over decreasing the time step is in smoothing the objective function surface that enable the gradient based search technique works in efficient way. Also, the selected points on the Pareto surface is collapsed to two points on the objective function space. Most likely they are not collapsed to a single point in objective function space with one best parameter set because the problem is advection dominating problem.

  10. Iterative optimization in inverse problems

    CERN Document Server

    Byrne, Charles L

    2014-01-01

    Iterative Optimization in Inverse Problems brings together a number of important iterative algorithms for medical imaging, optimization, and statistical estimation. It incorporates recent work that has not appeared in other books and draws on the author's considerable research in the field, including his recently developed class of SUMMA algorithms. Related to sequential unconstrained minimization methods, the SUMMA class includes a wide range of iterative algorithms well known to researchers in various areas, such as statistics and image processing. Organizing the topics from general to more

  11. Direct and inverse problems of infrared tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sizikov, Valery S.; Evseev, Vadim; Fateev, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The problems of infrared tomography-direct (the modeling of measured functions) and inverse (the reconstruction of gaseous medium parameters)-are considered with a laboratory burner flame as an example of an application. The two measurement modes are used: active (ON) with an external IR source...

  12. Introduction to inverse problems for differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Hasanov Hasanoğlu, Alemdar

    2017-01-01

    This book presents a systematic exposition of the main ideas and methods in treating inverse problems for PDEs arising in basic mathematical models, though it makes no claim to being exhaustive. Mathematical models of most physical phenomena are governed by initial and boundary value problems for PDEs, and inverse problems governed by these equations arise naturally in nearly all branches of science and engineering. The book’s content, especially in the Introduction and Part I, is self-contained and is intended to also be accessible for beginning graduate students, whose mathematical background includes only basic courses in advanced calculus, PDEs and functional analysis. Further, the book can be used as the backbone for a lecture course on inverse and ill-posed problems for partial differential equations. In turn, the second part of the book consists of six nearly-independent chapters. The choice of these chapters was motivated by the fact that the inverse coefficient and source problems considered here a...

  13. Solving inaccuracies in anatomical models for electrocardiographic inverse problem resolution by maximizing reconstruction quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, Miguel; Climent, Andreu; Liberos, Alejandro; Hernandez-Romero, Ismael; Arenal, Angel; Bermejo, Javier; Fernandez-Aviles, Francisco; Atienza, Felipe; Guillem, Maria

    2017-05-23

    Electrocardiographic Imaging (ECGI) has become an increasingly used technique for non-invasive diagnosis of cardiac arrhythmias, although the need for medical imaging technology to determine the anatomy hinders its introduction in the clinical practice. This work explores the ability of a new metric based on the inverse reconstruction quality for the location and orientation of the atrial surface inside the torso. Body surface electrical signals from 31 realistic mathematical models and four AF patients were used to estimate the optimal position of the atria inside the torso. The curvature of the L-curve from the Tikhonov method, which was found to be related to the inverse reconstruction quality, was measured after application of deviations in atrial position and orientation. Independent deviations in the atrial position were solved by finding the maximal L-curve curvature with an error of 1.7±2.4 mm in mathematical models and 9.1±11.5 mm in patients. For the case of independent angular deviations, the error in location by using the L-curve was 5.8±7.1º in mathematical models and 12.4º±13.2º in patients. The ability of the L-curve curvature was tested also under superimposed uncertainties in the 3 axis of translation and in the 3 axis of rotation and the error in location was of 2.3±3.2 mm and 6.4º±7.1º in mathematical models, and 7.9±10.7 mm and 12.1º±15.5º in patients. The curvature of L-curve is a useful marker for the atrial position and would allow emending the inaccuracies in its location.

  14. Improving multiple-point-based a priori models for inverse problems by combining Sequential Simulation with the Frequency Matching Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordua, Knud Skou; Hansen, Thomas Mejer; Lange, Katrine;

    In order to move beyond simplified covariance based a priori models, which are typically used for inverse problems, more complex multiple-point-based a priori models have to be considered. By means of marginal probability distributions ‘learned’ from a training image, sequential simulation has pr...... in order to improve the pattern reproducibility while maintaining the efficiency of the sequential Gibbs sampling strategy. We compare realizations of three types of a priori models. Finally, the results are exemplified through crosshole travel time tomography....

  15. Variational Bayesian Approximation methods for inverse problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad-Djafari, Ali

    2012-09-01

    Variational Bayesian Approximation (VBA) methods are recent tools for effective Bayesian computations. In this paper, these tools are used for inverse problems where the prior models include hidden variables and where where the estimation of the hyper parameters has also to be addressed. In particular two specific prior models (Student-t and mixture of Gaussian models) are considered and details of the algorithms are given.

  16. Evaluation of three inverse problem models to quantify skin microcirculation using diffusion-weighted MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordier, G [Ecole Catholique d' Arts et Metiers, Lyon (France); Choi, J; Raguin, L G [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1226 (United States)], E-mail: guy.raguin@mines-nancy.org

    2008-11-01

    Skin microcirculation plays an important role in diseases such as chronic venous insufficiency and diabetes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide quantitative information with a better penetration depth than other noninvasive methods, such as laser Doppler flowmetry or optical coherence tomography. Moreover, successful MRI skin studies have recently been reported. In this article, we investigate three potential inverse models to quantify skin microcirculation using diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI), also known as q-space MRI. The model parameters are estimated based on nonlinear least-squares (NLS). For each of the three models, an optimal DWI sampling scheme is proposed based on D-optimality in order to minimize the size of the confidence region of the NLS estimates and thus the effect of the experimental noise inherent to DWI. The resulting covariance matrices of the NLS estimates are predicted by asymptotic normality and compared to the ones computed by Monte-Carlo simulations. Our numerical results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed models and corresponding DWI sampling schemes as compared to conventional approaches.

  17. FELIX: advances in modeling forward and inverse ice-sheet problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunzburger, Max; Hoffman, Mattew; Leng, Wei; Perego, Mauro; Price, Stephen; Salinger, Andrew; Stadler, Georg; Ju, Lili

    2013-04-01

    Several models of different complexity and accuracy have been proposed for describing ice-sheet dynamics. We introduce a parallel, finite element framework for implementing these models, which range from the "shallow ice approximation" up through nonlinear Stokes flow. These models make up the land ice dynamical core of FELIX, which is being developed under the Community Ice Sheet Model. We present results from large-scale simulations of the Greenland ice-sheet, compare models of differing complexity and accuracy, and explore different solution methods for the resulting linear and nonlinear systems. We also address the problem of finding an optimal initial state for Greenland ice-sheet via estimating the spatially varying linear-friction coefficient at the ice-bedrock interface. The problem, which consists of minimizing the mismatch between a specified and computed surface mass balance and/or the mismatch between observed and modeled surface velocities, is solved as an optimal control problem constrained by the governing model equations.

  18. Automatic versus manual model differentiation to compute sensitivities and solve non-linear inverse problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizondo, D.; Cappelaere, B.; Faure, Ch.

    2002-04-01

    Emerging tools for automatic differentiation (AD) of computer programs should be of great benefit for the implementation of many derivative-based numerical methods such as those used for inverse modeling. The Odyssée software, one such tool for Fortran 77 codes, has been tested on a sample model that solves a 2D non-linear diffusion-type equation. Odyssée offers both the forward and the reverse differentiation modes, that produce the tangent and the cotangent models, respectively. The two modes have been implemented on the sample application. A comparison is made with a manually-produced differentiated code for this model (MD), obtained by solving the adjoint equations associated with the model's discrete state equations. Following a presentation of the methods and tools and of their relative advantages and drawbacks, the performances of the codes produced by the manual and automatic methods are compared, in terms of accuracy and of computing efficiency (CPU and memory needs). The perturbation method (finite-difference approximation of derivatives) is also used as a reference. Based on the test of Taylor, the accuracy of the two AD modes proves to be excellent and as high as machine precision permits, a good indication of Odyssée's capability to produce error-free codes. In comparison, the manually-produced derivatives (MD) sometimes appear to be slightly biased, which is likely due to the fact that a theoretical model (state equations) and a practical model (computer program) do not exactly coincide, while the accuracy of the perturbation method is very uncertain. The MD code largely outperforms all other methods in computing efficiency, a subject of current research for the improvement of AD tools. Yet these tools can already be of considerable help for the computer implementation of many numerical methods, avoiding the tedious task of hand-coding the differentiation of complex algorithms.

  19. Estimating uncertainties in complex joint inverse problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, Juan Carlos

    2016-04-01

    Sources of uncertainty affecting geophysical inversions can be classified either as reflective (i.e. the practitioner is aware of her/his ignorance) or non-reflective (i.e. the practitioner does not know that she/he does not know!). Although we should be always conscious of the latter, the former are the ones that, in principle, can be estimated either empirically (by making measurements or collecting data) or subjectively (based on the experience of the researchers). For complex parameter estimation problems in geophysics, subjective estimation of uncertainty is the most common type. In this context, probabilistic (aka Bayesian) methods are commonly claimed to offer a natural and realistic platform from which to estimate model uncertainties. This is because in the Bayesian approach, errors (whatever their nature) can be naturally included as part of the global statistical model, the solution of which represents the actual solution to the inverse problem. However, although we agree that probabilistic inversion methods are the most powerful tool for uncertainty estimation, the common claim that they produce "realistic" or "representative" uncertainties is not always justified. Typically, ALL UNCERTAINTY ESTIMATES ARE MODEL DEPENDENT, and therefore, besides a thorough characterization of experimental uncertainties, particular care must be paid to the uncertainty arising from model errors and input uncertainties. We recall here two quotes by G. Box and M. Gunzburger, respectively, of special significance for inversion practitioners and for this session: "…all models are wrong, but some are useful" and "computational results are believed by no one, except the person who wrote the code". In this presentation I will discuss and present examples of some problems associated with the estimation and quantification of uncertainties in complex multi-observable probabilistic inversions, and how to address them. Although the emphasis will be on sources of uncertainty related

  20. Influence of skull anisotropy for the forward and inverse problem in EEG: simulation studies using FEM on realistic head models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, G; Guerin, C; Baillet, S; Garnero, L; Meunier, G

    1998-01-01

    For the sake of realism in the description of conduction from primary neural currents to scalp potentials, we investigated the influence of skull anisotropy on the forward and inverse problems in brain functional imaging with EEG. At present, all methods available for cortical imaging assume a spherical geometry, or when using realistic head shapes do not consider the anisotropy of head tissues. However, to our knowledge, no study relates the implication of this simplifying hypothesis on the spatial resolution of EEG for source imaging. In this paper, a method using finite elements in a realistic head geometry is implemented and validated. The influence of erroneous conductivity values for the head tissues is presented, and results show that the conductivities of the brain and the skull in the radial orientation are the most critical ones. In the inverse problem, this influence has been evaluated with simulations using a distributed source model with a comparison of two regularization techniques, with the isotropic model working on data sets produced by a nonisotropic model. Regularization with minimum norm priors produces source images with spurious activity, meaning that the errors in the head model totally annihilate any localization ability. But nonlinear regularization allows the accurate recovery of simultaneous spots of activity, while the restoration of very close active regions is profoundly disabled by errors in the head model. We conclude that for robust cortical source imaging with EEG, a realistic head model taking anisotropy of tissues into account should be used.

  1. Inverse Problems in Classical and Quantum Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Almasy, Andrea A

    2009-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is in the area of Applied Mathematics known as Inverse Problems. Inverse problems are those where a set of measured data is analysed in order to get as much information as possible on a model which is assumed to represent a system in the real world. We study two inverse problems in the fields of classical and quantum physics: QCD condensates from tau-decay data and the inverse conductivity problem. We use a functional method which allows us to extract within rather general assumptions phenomenological parameters of QCD (the condensates) from a comparison of the time-like experimental data with asymptotic space-like results from theory. The price to be paid for the generality of assumptions is relatively large errors in the values of the extracted parameters. Although we do not claim that our method is superior to other approaches, we hope that our results lend additional confidence to the numerical results obtained with the help of methods based on QCD sum rules. In this thesis, als...

  2. Hybrid nested sampling algorithm for Bayesian model selection applied to inverse subsurface flow problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsheikh, Ahmed H., E-mail: aelsheikh@ices.utexas.edu [Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences (ICES), University of Texas at Austin, TX (United States); Institute of Petroleum Engineering, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Wheeler, Mary F. [Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences (ICES), University of Texas at Austin, TX (United States); Hoteit, Ibrahim [Department of Earth Sciences and Engineering, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-02-01

    A Hybrid Nested Sampling (HNS) algorithm is proposed for efficient Bayesian model calibration and prior model selection. The proposed algorithm combines, Nested Sampling (NS) algorithm, Hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC) sampling and gradient estimation using Stochastic Ensemble Method (SEM). NS is an efficient sampling algorithm that can be used for Bayesian calibration and estimating the Bayesian evidence for prior model selection. Nested sampling has the advantage of computational feasibility. Within the nested sampling algorithm, a constrained sampling step is performed. For this step, we utilize HMC to reduce the correlation between successive sampled states. HMC relies on the gradient of the logarithm of the posterior distribution, which we estimate using a stochastic ensemble method based on an ensemble of directional derivatives. SEM only requires forward model runs and the simulator is then used as a black box and no adjoint code is needed. The developed HNS algorithm is successfully applied for Bayesian calibration and prior model selection of several nonlinear subsurface flow problems.

  3. Taking into account small scale inhomogeneities and topography rapid variations in forward modeling and inverse problems in seismology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capdeville, Y.; Cupillard, P.; Marigo, J. J.

    2012-04-01

    The modeling of seismic elastic wave full waveform in a limited frequency band is now well established with a set of efficient numerical methods like the spectral element, the discontinuous Galerking or the finite difference methods. The constant increase of computing power with time has now allowed the use of seismic elastic wave full waveforms in a limited frequency band to image the elastic properties of the earth. Nevertheless, inhomogeneities of scale much smaller the minimum wavelength of the wavefield associated to the maximum frequency of the limited frequency band, are still a challenge for both forward and inverse problems. In this work, we tackle the problem of elastic properties and topography varying much faster than the minimum wavelength. Using a non periodic homogenization theory and a matching asymptotic technique, we show how to compute effective elastic properties, how to compute local correctors and how remove the fast variations of the topography and replace it by a smooth Dirichlet to Nemann operator at the surface. After showing some 2D and 3D forward modeling numerical examples, we will discuss the implications of such a development for both forward and inverse problems.

  4. Massively parallel approach to time-domain forward and inverse modelling of EM induction problem in spherical Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velimsky, J.

    2011-12-01

    Inversion of observatory and low-orbit satellite geomagnetic data in terms of the three-dimensional distribution of electrical conductivity in the Earth's mantle can provide an independent constraint on the physical, chemical, and mineralogical composition of the Earth's mantle. This problem has been recently approached by different numerical methods. There are several key challenges from the numerical and algorithmic point of view, in particular the accuracy and speed of the forward solver, the effective evaluation of sensitivities of data to changes of model parameters, and the dependence of results on the a-priori knowledge of the spatio-temporal structure of the primary ionospheric and magnetospheric electric currents. Here I present recent advancements of the time-domain, spherical harmonic-finite element approach. The forward solver has been adapted to distributed-memory parallel architecture using band-matrix routines from the ScaLapack library. The evaluation of gradient of data misfit in the model space using adjoint approach has been also paralellized. Finally, the inverse problem has been reformulated in a way which allows for simultaneous reconstruction of conductivity model and external field model directly from the data.

  5. Computationally efficient Bayesian inference for inverse problems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marzouk, Youssef M.; Najm, Habib N.; Rahn, Larry A.

    2007-10-01

    Bayesian statistics provides a foundation for inference from noisy and incomplete data, a natural mechanism for regularization in the form of prior information, and a quantitative assessment of uncertainty in the inferred results. Inverse problems - representing indirect estimation of model parameters, inputs, or structural components - can be fruitfully cast in this framework. Complex and computationally intensive forward models arising in physical applications, however, can render a Bayesian approach prohibitive. This difficulty is compounded by high-dimensional model spaces, as when the unknown is a spatiotemporal field. We present new algorithmic developments for Bayesian inference in this context, showing strong connections with the forward propagation of uncertainty. In particular, we introduce a stochastic spectral formulation that dramatically accelerates the Bayesian solution of inverse problems via rapid evaluation of a surrogate posterior. We also explore dimensionality reduction for the inference of spatiotemporal fields, using truncated spectral representations of Gaussian process priors. These new approaches are demonstrated on scalar transport problems arising in contaminant source inversion and in the inference of inhomogeneous material or transport properties. We also present a Bayesian framework for parameter estimation in stochastic models, where intrinsic stochasticity may be intermingled with observational noise. Evaluation of a likelihood function may not be analytically tractable in these cases, and thus several alternative Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) schemes, operating on the product space of the observations and the parameters, are introduced.

  6. TOPICAL REVIEW: Inverse problems in elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Marc; Constantinescu, Andrei

    2005-04-01

    This review is devoted to some inverse problems arising in the context of linear elasticity, namely the identification of distributions of elastic moduli, model parameters or buried objects such as cracks. These inverse problems are considered mainly for three-dimensional elastic media under equilibrium or dynamical conditions, and also for thin elastic plates. The main goal is to overview some recent results, in an effort to bridge the gap between studies of a mathematical nature and problems defined from engineering practice. Accordingly, emphasis is given to formulations and solution techniques which are well suited to general-purpose numerical methods for solving elasticity problems on complex configurations, in particular the finite element method and the boundary element method. An underlying thread of the discussion is the fact that useful tools for the formulation, analysis and solution of inverse problems arising in linear elasticity, namely the reciprocity gap and the error in constitutive equation, stem from variational and virtual work principles, i.e., fundamental principles governing the mechanics of deformable solid continua. In addition, the virtual work principle is shown to be instrumental for establishing computationally efficient formulae for parameter or geometrical sensitivity, based on the adjoint solution method. Sensitivity formulae are presented for various situations, especially in connection with contact mechanics, cavity and crack shape perturbations, thus enriching the already extensive known repertoire of such results. Finally, the concept of topological derivative and its implementation for the identification of cavities or inclusions are expounded.

  7. Differential equations inverse and direct problems

    CERN Document Server

    Favini, Angelo

    2006-01-01

    DEGENERATE FIRST ORDER IDENTIFICATION PROBLEMS IN BANACH SPACES A NONISOTHERMAL DYNAMICAL GINZBURG-LANDAU MODEL OF SUPERCONDUCTIVITY. EXISTENCE AND UNIQUENESS THEOREMSSOME GLOBAL IN TIME RESULTS FOR INTEGRODIFFERENTIAL PARABOLIC INVERSE PROBLEMSFOURTH ORDER ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL OPERATORS WITH GENERAL WENTZELL BOUNDARY CONDITIONSTUDY OF ELLIPTIC DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS IN UMD SPACESDEGENERATE INTEGRODIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS OF PARABOLIC TYPE EXPONENTIAL ATTRACTORS FOR SEMICONDUCTOR EQUATIONSCONVERGENCE TO STATIONARY STATES OF SOLUTIONS TO THE SEMILINEAR EQUATION OF VISCOELASTICITY ASYMPTOTIC BEHA

  8. A-optimal encoding weights for nonlinear inverse problems, with application to the Helmholtz inverse problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crestel, Benjamin; Alexanderian, Alen; Stadler, Georg; Ghattas, Omar

    2017-07-01

    The computational cost of solving an inverse problem governed by PDEs, using multiple experiments, increases linearly with the number of experiments. A recently proposed method to decrease this cost uses only a small number of random linear combinations of all experiments for solving the inverse problem. This approach applies to inverse problems where the PDE solution depends linearly on the right-hand side function that models the experiment. As this method is stochastic in essence, the quality of the obtained reconstructions can vary, in particular when only a small number of combinations are used. We develop a Bayesian formulation for the definition and computation of encoding weights that lead to a parameter reconstruction with the least uncertainty. We call these weights A-optimal encoding weights. Our framework applies to inverse problems where the governing PDE is nonlinear with respect to the inversion parameter field. We formulate the problem in infinite dimensions and follow the optimize-then-discretize approach, devoting special attention to the discretization and the choice of numerical methods in order to achieve a computational cost that is independent of the parameter discretization. We elaborate our method for a Helmholtz inverse problem, and derive the adjoint-based expressions for the gradient of the objective function of the optimization problem for finding the A-optimal encoding weights. The proposed method is potentially attractive for real-time monitoring applications, where one can invest the effort to compute optimal weights offline, to later solve an inverse problem repeatedly, over time, at a fraction of the initial cost.

  9. Hybrid nested sampling algorithm for Bayesian model selection applied to inverse subsurface flow problems

    KAUST Repository

    Elsheikh, Ahmed H.

    2014-02-01

    A Hybrid Nested Sampling (HNS) algorithm is proposed for efficient Bayesian model calibration and prior model selection. The proposed algorithm combines, Nested Sampling (NS) algorithm, Hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC) sampling and gradient estimation using Stochastic Ensemble Method (SEM). NS is an efficient sampling algorithm that can be used for Bayesian calibration and estimating the Bayesian evidence for prior model selection. Nested sampling has the advantage of computational feasibility. Within the nested sampling algorithm, a constrained sampling step is performed. For this step, we utilize HMC to reduce the correlation between successive sampled states. HMC relies on the gradient of the logarithm of the posterior distribution, which we estimate using a stochastic ensemble method based on an ensemble of directional derivatives. SEM only requires forward model runs and the simulator is then used as a black box and no adjoint code is needed. The developed HNS algorithm is successfully applied for Bayesian calibration and prior model selection of several nonlinear subsurface flow problems. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

  10. Homometric Point Sets and Inverse Problems

    CERN Document Server

    Grimm, Uwe

    2008-01-01

    The inverse problem of diffraction theory in essence amounts to the reconstruction of the atomic positions of a solid from its diffraction image. From a mathematical perspective, this is a notoriously difficult problem, even in the idealised situation of perfect diffraction from an infinite structure. Here, the problem is analysed via the autocorrelation measure of the underlying point set, where two point sets are called homometric when they share the same autocorrelation. For the class of mathematical quasicrystals within a given cut and project scheme, the homometry problem becomes equivalent to Matheron's covariogram problem, in the sense of determining the window from its covariogram. Although certain uniqueness results are known for convex windows, interesting examples of distinct homometric model sets already emerge in the plane. The uncertainty level increases in the presence of diffuse scattering. Already in one dimension, a mixed spectrum can be compatible with structures of different entropy. We ex...

  11. Inverse problem in Parker's dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Reshetnyak, M Yu

    2015-01-01

    The inverse solution of the 1D Parker dynamo equations is considered. The method is based on minimization of the cost-function, which characterize deviation of the model solution properties from the desired ones. The output is the latitude distribution of the magnetic field generation sources: the $\\alpha$- and $\\omega$-effects. Minimization is made using the Monte-Carlo method. The details of the method, as well as some applications, which can be interesting for the broad dynamo community, are considered: conditions when the invisible for the observer at the surface of the planet toroidal part of the magnetic field is much larger than the poloidal counterpart. It is shown that at some particular distributions of $\\alpha$ and $\\omega$ the well-known thesis that sign of the dynamo-number defines equatorial symmetry of the magnetic field to the equator plane, is violated. It is also demonstrated in what circumstances magnetic field in the both hemispheres have different properties, and simple physical explanati...

  12. An Entropic Estimator for Linear Inverse Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amos Golan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we examine an Information-Theoretic method for solving noisy linear inverse estimation problems which encompasses under a single framework a whole class of estimation methods. Under this framework, the prior information about the unknown parameters (when such information exists, and constraints on the parameters can be incorporated in the statement of the problem. The method builds on the basics of the maximum entropy principle and consists of transforming the original problem into an estimation of a probability density on an appropriate space naturally associated with the statement of the problem. This estimation method is generic in the sense that it provides a framework for analyzing non-normal models, it is easy to implement and is suitable for all types of inverse problems such as small and or ill-conditioned, noisy data. First order approximation, large sample properties and convergence in distribution are developed as well. Analytical examples, statistics for model comparisons and evaluations, that are inherent to this method, are discussed and complemented with explicit examples.

  13. Inverse problems in reduced order models of cardiovascular haemodynamics: aspects of data assimilation and heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, Sanjay; Corsini, Chiara; Baker, Catriona; Hsia, Tain-Yen; Pennati, Giancarlo; Vignon-Clementel, Irene E

    2017-01-01

    Inverse problems in cardiovascular modelling have become increasingly important to assess each patient individually. These problems entail estimation of patient-specific model parameters from uncertain measurements acquired in the clinic. In recent years, the method of data assimilation, especially the unscented Kalman filter, has gained popularity to address computational efficiency and uncertainty consideration in such problems. This work highlights and presents solutions to several challenges of this method pertinent to models of cardiovascular haemodynamics. These include methods to (i) avoid ill-conditioning of the covariance matrix, (ii) handle a variety of measurement types, (iii) include a variety of prior knowledge in the method, and (iv) incorporate measurements acquired at different heart rates, a common situation in the clinic where the patient state differs according to the clinical situation. Results are presented for two patient-specific cases of congenital heart disease. To illustrate and validate data assimilation with measurements at different heart rates, the results are presented on a synthetic dataset and on a patient-specific case with heart valve regurgitation. It is shown that the new method significantly improves the agreement between model predictions and measurements. The developed methods can be readily applied to other pathophysiologies and extended to dynamical systems which exhibit different responses under different sets of known parameters or different sets of inputs (such as forcing/excitation frequencies).

  14. Third-order harmonic expansion of the magnetoencephalography forward and inverse problems in an ellipsoidal brain model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcocer-Sosa, Mauricio; Gutiérrez, David

    2017-04-01

    We present a forward modeling solution in the form of an array response kernel for magnetoencephalography. We consider the case when the brain's anatomy is approximated by an ellipsoid and an equivalent current dipole model is used to approximate brain sources. The proposed solution includes the contributions up to the third-order ellipsoidal harmonic terms; hence, we compare this new approximation against the previously available one that only considered up to second-order harmonics. We evaluated the proposed solution when used in the inverse problem of estimating physiologically feasible visual evoked responses from magnetoencephalography data. Our results showed that the contribution of the third-order harmonic terms provides a more realistic representation of the magnetic fields (closer to those generated with a numerical approximation based on the boundary element method) and, subsecuently, the estimated equivalent current dipoles are a better fit to those observed in practice (e.g., in visual evoked potentials). Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Improving multiple-point-based a priori models for inverse problems by combining Sequential Simulation with the Frequency Matching Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordua, Knud Skou; Hansen, Thomas Mejer; Lange, Katrine;

    proven to be an efficient way of obtaining multiple realizations that honor the same multiple-point statistics as the training image. The frequency matching method provides an alternative way of formulating multiple-point-based a priori models. In this strategy the pattern frequency distributions (i.......e. marginals) of the training image and a subsurface model are matched in order to obtain a solution with the same multiple-point statistics as the training image. Sequential Gibbs sampling is a simulation strategy that provides an efficient way of applying sequential simulation based algorithms as a priori...... information in probabilistic inverse problems. Unfortunately, when this strategy is applied with the multiple-point-based simulation algorithm SNESIM the reproducibility of training image patterns is violated. In this study we suggest to combine sequential simulation with the frequency matching method...

  16. Nonlinear Least Squares for Inverse Problems

    CERN Document Server

    Chavent, Guy

    2009-01-01

    Presents an introduction into the least squares resolution of nonlinear inverse problems. This title intends to develop a geometrical theory to analyze nonlinear least square (NLS) problems with respect to their quadratic wellposedness, that is, both wellposedness and optimizability

  17. Metaheuristic optimization of acoustic inverse problems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leijen, A.V.; Rothkrantz, L.; Groen, F.

    2011-01-01

    Swift solving of geoacoustic inverse problems strongly depends on the application of a global optimization scheme. Given a particular inverse problem, this work aims to answer the questions how to select an appropriate metaheuristic search strategy, and how to configure it for optimal performance.

  18. Metaheuristic optimization of acoustic inverse problems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leijen, A.V.; Rothkrantz, L.; Groen, F.

    2011-01-01

    Swift solving of geoacoustic inverse problems strongly depends on the application of a global optimization scheme. Given a particular inverse problem, this work aims to answer the questions how to select an appropriate metaheuristic search strategy, and how to configure it for optimal performance. F

  19. Inverse problems in classical and quantum physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almasy, A.A.

    2007-06-29

    The subject of this thesis is in the area of Applied Mathematics known as Inverse Problems. Inverse problems are those where a set of measured data is analysed in order to get as much information as possible on a model which is assumed to represent a system in the real world. We study two inverse problems in the fields of classical and quantum physics: QCD condensates from tau-decay data and the inverse conductivity problem. Despite a concentrated effort by physicists extending over many years, an understanding of QCD from first principles continues to be elusive. Fortunately, data continues to appear which provide a rather direct probe of the inner workings of the strong interactions. We use a functional method which allows us to extract within rather general assumptions phenomenological parameters of QCD (the condensates) from a comparison of the time-like experimental data with asymptotic space-like results from theory. The price to be paid for the generality of assumptions is relatively large errors in the values of the extracted parameters. Although we do not claim that our method is superior to other approaches, we hope that our results lend additional confidence to the numerical results obtained with the help of methods based on QCD sum rules. EIT is a technology developed to image the electrical conductivity distribution of a conductive medium. The technique works by performing simultaneous measurements of direct or alternating electric currents and voltages on the boundary of an object. These are the data used by an image reconstruction algorithm to determine the electrical conductivity distribution within the object. In this thesis, two approaches of EIT image reconstruction are proposed. The first is based on reformulating the inverse problem in terms of integral equations. This method uses only a single set of measurements for the reconstruction. The second approach is an algorithm based on linearisation which uses more then one set of measurements. A

  20. Optimization and inverse problems in electromagnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Wiak, Sławomir

    2003-01-01

    From 12 to 14 September 2002, the Academy of Humanities and Economics (AHE) hosted the workshop "Optimization and Inverse Problems in Electromagnetism". After this bi-annual event, a large number of papers were assembled and combined in this book. During the workshop recent developments and applications in optimization and inverse methodologies for electromagnetic fields were discussed. The contributions selected for the present volume cover a wide spectrum of inverse and optimal electromagnetic methodologies, ranging from theoretical to practical applications. A number of new optimal and inverse methodologies were proposed. There are contributions related to dedicated software. Optimization and Inverse Problems in Electromagnetism consists of three thematic chapters, covering: -General papers (survey of specific aspects of optimization and inverse problems in electromagnetism), -Methodologies, -Industrial Applications. The book can be useful to students of electrical and electronics engineering, computer sci...

  1. Solutions of inverse problems for biodegradation of xenobiotic polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masaji; Kawai, Fusako

    2016-02-01

    Mathematical techniques are applied to a microbial depolymerization process. A mathematical model for the transition of the weight distribution and the microbial population is described. Inverse problems for a molecular factor and a time factor of a degradation rate are derived. Numerical techniques to solve the inverse problems are illustrated, and numerical results are presented.

  2. Data quality for the inverse lsing problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decelle, Aurélien; Ricci-Tersenghi, Federico; Zhang, Pan

    2016-09-01

    There are many methods proposed for inferring parameters of the Ising model from given data, that is a set of configurations generated according to the model itself. However little attention has been paid until now to the data, e.g. how the data is generated, whether the inference error using one set of data could be smaller than using another set of data, etc. In this paper we discuss the data quality problem in the inverse Ising problem, using as a benchmark the kinetic Ising model. We quantify the quality of data using effective rank of the correlation matrix, and show that data gathered in a out-of-equilibrium regime has a better quality than data gathered in equilibrium for coupling reconstruction. We also propose a matrix-perturbation based method for tuning the quality of given data and for removing bad-quality (i.e. redundant) configurations from data.

  3. INVERSE COEFFICIENT PROBLEMS FOR PARABOLIC HEMIVARIATIONAL INEQUALITIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Zhenhai; I.Szántó

    2011-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the class of inverse problems for a nonlinear parabolic hemivariational inequality.The unknown coefficient of the operator depends on the gradient of the solution and belongs to a set of admissible coefficients.It is proved that the convergence of solutions for the corresponding direct problems continuously depends on the coefficient convergence.Based on this result the existence of a quasisolution of the inverse problem is obtained.

  4. Solving Inverse Problems for Mechanistic Systems Biology Models with Unknown Inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-16

    frusemide in terms of diuresis and natriuresis can be modeled by indirect response model [18]. In this project, a modified version of this model was used...were derived from their measurements. The model relating the effect site excretion rate of frusemide ( ) to diuresis is given by: 64433-MA-II...time courses of frusemide infusion rate, frusemide urinary excretion rate, diuresis and natriuresis). The “true” parameter values used in the

  5. Modeling Dynamic Programming Problems over Sequences and Trees with Inverse Coupled Rewrite Systems

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Dynamic programming is a classical algorithmic paradigm, which often allows the evaluation of a search space of exponential size in polynomial time. Recursive problem decomposition, tabulation of intermediate results for re-use, and Bellman's Principle of Optimality are its well-understood ingredients. However, algorithms often lack abstraction and are difficult to implement, tedious to debug, and delicate to modify. The present article proposes a generic framework for...

  6. BOOK REVIEW: Inverse Problems. Activities for Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2003-06-01

    This book is a valuable introduction to inverse problems. In particular, from the educational point of view, the author addresses the questions of what constitutes an inverse problem and how and why we should study them. Such an approach has been eagerly awaited for a long time. Professor Groetsch, of the University of Cincinnati, is a world-renowned specialist in inverse problems, in particular the theory of regularization. Moreover, he has made a remarkable contribution to educational activities in the field of inverse problems, which was the subject of his previous book (Groetsch C W 1993 Inverse Problems in the Mathematical Sciences (Braunschweig: Vieweg)). For this reason, he is one of the most qualified to write an introductory book on inverse problems. Without question, inverse problems are important, necessary and appear in various aspects. So it is crucial to introduce students to exercises in inverse problems. However, there are not many introductory books which are directly accessible by students in the first two undergraduate years. As a consequence, students often encounter diverse concrete inverse problems before becoming aware of their general principles. The main purpose of this book is to present activities to allow first-year undergraduates to learn inverse theory. To my knowledge, this book is a rare attempt to do this and, in my opinion, a great success. The author emphasizes that it is very important to teach inverse theory in the early years. He writes; `If students consider only the direct problem, they are not looking at the problem from all sides .... The habit of always looking at problems from the direct point of view is intellectually limiting ...' (page 21). The book is very carefully organized so that teachers will be able to use it as a textbook. After an introduction in chapter 1, sucessive chapters deal with inverse problems in precalculus, calculus, differential equations and linear algebra. In order to let one gain some insight

  7. 3rd Annual Workshop on Inverse Problem

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This proceeding volume is based on papers presented on the Third Annual Workshop on Inverse Problems which was organized by the Department of Mathematical Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology and University of Gothenburg, and took place in May 2013 in Stockholm. The purpose of this workshop was to present new analytical developments and numerical techniques for solution of inverse problems for a wide range of applications in acoustics, electromagnetics, optical fibers, medical imaging, geophysics, etc. The contributions in this volume reflect these themes and will be beneficial to researchers who are working in the area of applied inverse problems.

  8. An Inverse Problem Statistical Methodology Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-12

    R. Vogel, Computational Methods for Inverse Problems, SIAM, Philadelphia, 2002. [36] D. D. Wackerly, W. Mendenhall III, and R. L. Scheaffer , Mathematical Statistics with Applications, Duxbury Thompson Learning, USA, 2002. 56

  9. Inverse feasibility problems of the inverse maximum flow problems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Adrian Deaconu; Eleonor Ciurea

    2013-04-01

    A linear time method to decide if any inverse maximum flow (denoted General Inverse Maximum Flow problems (IMFG)) problem has solution is deduced. If IMFG does not have solution, methods to transform IMFG into a feasible problem are presented. The methods consist of modifying as little as possible the restrictions to the variation of the bounds of the flow. New inverse combinatorial optimization problems are introduced and solved.

  10. Electromagnetic tomography (EMT): image reconstruction based on the inverse problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Starting from Maxwell's equations for inhomogeneous media, nonlinear integral equations of the inverse problem of the electromagnetic tomography (EMT) are derived, whose kernel is the dyadic Green's function for the EMT sensor with a homogeneous medium in the object space. Then in terms of ill-posedness of the inverse problem, a Tikhonov-type regularization model is established based on a linearization-approximation of the nonlinear inverse problem. Finally, an iterative algorithm of image reconstruction based on the inverse problem and reconstruction images of some object flows for simplified sensor are given. Initial results of the image reconstruction show that the algorithm based on the inverse problem is superior to those based on the linear back-projection in the quality of image reconstruction.

  11. An inverse problem in analytical dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Guang-Cheng; Mei-Feng-Xiang

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an inverse problem in analytical dynamics.The inverse problem is to construct the Lagrangian when the integrals of a system are given.Firstly,the differential equations are obtained by using the time derivative of the integrals.Secondly,the differential equations can be written in the Lagrange equations under certain conditions and the Lagrangian can be obtained.Finally,two examples are given to illustrate the application of the result.

  12. Skin color modeling using the radiative transfer equation solved by the auxiliary function method: inverse problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnain, Caroline; Elias, Mady; Frigerio, Jean-Marc

    2008-07-01

    In a previous article [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 24, 2196 (2007)] we have modeled skin color using the radiative transfer equation, solved by the auxiliary function method. Three main parameters have been determined as being predominant in the diversity of skin color: the concentrations of melanosomes and of red blood cells and the oxygen saturation of blood. From the reflectance spectrum measured on real Caucasian skin, these parameters are now evaluated by minimizing the standard deviation on the adjusted wavelength range between the experimental spectrum and simulated spectra gathered in a database.

  13. The inverse maximum dynamic flow problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAGHERIAN; Mehri

    2010-01-01

    We consider the inverse maximum dynamic flow (IMDF) problem.IMDF problem can be described as: how to change the capacity vector of a dynamic network as little as possible so that a given feasible dynamic flow becomes a maximum dynamic flow.After discussing some characteristics of this problem,it is converted to a constrained minimum dynamic cut problem.Then an efficient algorithm which uses two maximum dynamic flow algorithms is proposed to solve the problem.

  14. Minimax approach to inverse problems of geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balk, P. I.; Dolgal, A. S.; Balk, T. V.; Khristenko, L. A.

    2016-03-01

    A new approach is suggested for solving the inverse problems that arise in the different fields of applied geophysics (gravity, magnetic, and electrical prospecting, geothermy) and require assessing the spatial region occupied by the anomaly-generating masses in the presence of different types of a priori information. The interpretation which provides the maximum guaranteed proximity of the model field sources to the real perturbing object is treated as the best interpretation. In some fields of science (game theory, economics, operations research), the decision-making principle that lies in minimizing the probable losses which cannot be prevented if the situation develops by the worst-case scenario is referred to as minimax. The minimax criterion of choice is interesting as, instead of being confined to the indirect (and sometimes doubtful) signs of the "optimal" solution, it relies on the actual properties of the information in the results of a particular interpretation. In the hierarchy of the approaches to the solution of the inverse problems of geophysics ordered by the volume and quality of the retrieved information about the sources of the field, the minimax approach should take special place.

  15. Inverse Variational Problem for Nonstandard Lagrangians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, A.; Talukdar, B.

    2014-06-01

    In the mathematical physics literature the nonstandard Lagrangians (NSLs) were introduced in an ad hoc fashion rather than being derived from the solution of the inverse problem of variational calculus. We begin with the first integral of the equation of motion and solve the associated inverse problem to obtain some of the existing results for NSLs. In addition, we provide a number of alternative Lagrangian representations. The case studies envisaged by us include (i) the usual modified Emden-type equation, (ii) Emden-type equation with dissipative term quadratic in velocity, (iii) Lotka-Volterra model and (vi) a number of the generic equations for dissipative-like dynamical systems. Our method works for nonstandard Lagrangians corresponding to the usual action integral of mechanical systems but requires modification for those associated with the modified actions like S =∫abe L(x ,x˙ , t) dt and S =∫abL 1 - γ(x ,x˙ , t) dt because in the latter case one cannot construct expressions for the Jacobi integrals.

  16. A Parametric Empirical Bayesian framework for the EEG/MEG inverse problem: generative models for multisubject and multimodal integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard N Henson

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We review recent methodological developments within a Parametric Empirical Bayesian (PEB framework for reconstructing intracranial sources of extracranial electroencephalographic (EEG and magnetoencephalographic (MEG data under linear Gaussian assumptions. The PEB framework offers a natural way to integrate multiple constraints (spatial priors on this inverse problem, such as those derived from different modalities (e.g., from functional magnetic resonance imaging, fMRI or from multiple replications (e.g., subjects. Using variations of the same basic generative model, we illustrate the application of PEB to three cases: 1 symmetric integration (fusion of MEG and EEG; 2 asymmetric integration of MEG or EEG with fMRI, and 3 group-optimisation of spatial priors across subjects. We evaluate these applications on multimodal data acquired from 18 subjects, focusing on energy induced by face perception within a time-frequency window of 100-220ms, 8-18Hz. We show the benefits of multi-modal, multi-subject integration in terms of the model evidence and the reproducibility (over subjects of cortical responses to faces.

  17. Inverse problem of Ocean Acoustic Tomography (OAT) - A numerical experiment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murty, T.V.R.; Somayajulu, Y.K.; Mahadevan, R.; Murty, C.S.

    layers, or grids developEd. by solving the forward problem of the acoustic model enable build the generalized inverse operator (GIO) that operates on the travel time perturbation data. Resolution matrices obtained through SVD helped to examine...

  18. Numerical Methods for Bayesian Inverse Problems

    KAUST Repository

    Ernst, Oliver

    2014-01-06

    We present recent results on Bayesian inversion for a groundwater flow problem with an uncertain conductivity field. In particular, we show how direct and indirect measurements can be used to obtain a stochastic model for the unknown. The main tool here is Bayes’ theorem which merges the indirect data with the stochastic prior model for the conductivity field obtained by the direct measurements. Further, we demonstrate how the resulting posterior distribution of the quantity of interest, in this case travel times of radionuclide contaminants, can be obtained by Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulations. Moreover, we investigate new, promising MCMC methods which exploit geometrical features of the posterior and which are suited to infinite dimensions.

  19. Solving Direct and Inverse Heat Conduction Problems

    CERN Document Server

    Taler, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Presents a solution for direct and inverse heat conduction problems. This work discusses the theoretical basis for the heat transfer process in the first part. It presents selected theoretical and numerical problems in the form of exercises with their subsequent solutions in the second part

  20. Inverse Eigenvalue Problem in Structural Dynamics Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huiqing Xie; Hua Dai

    2006-01-01

    A kind of inverse eigenvalue problem in structural dynamics design is considered. The problem is formulated as an optimization problem. The properties of this problem are analyzed, and the existence of the optimum solution is proved. The directional derivative of the objective function is obtained and a necessary condition for a point to be a local minimum point is given. Then a numerical algorithm for solving the problem is presented and a plane-truss problem is discussed to show the applications of the theories and the algorithm.

  1. Prior Information in Inverse Boundary Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garde, Henrik

    This thesis gives a threefold perspective on the inverse problem of inclusion detection in electrical impedance tomography: depth dependence, monotonicitybased reconstruction, and sparsity-based reconstruction. The depth dependence is given in terms of explicit bounds on the datum norm, which shows...... be regularized against noise with a uniform regularization parameter, and that the method can be generalized to discrete electrode models. We give examples in 2D and 3D with noisy simulated data as well as real measurements, and give a comparison of reconstructions based on a non-linear and a linear formulation...... of the reconstruction. Numerical examples are given in both 2D and 3D for partial data using noisy simulated data as well as real measurements....

  2. INVERSE CENTER LOCATION PROBLEM ON A TREE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the inverse center location problem restricted on a tree with different costs and bound constraints.The authors first show that the problem can be formulated as a series of combinatorial linear programs,then an O(|V|2 log |V|)time algorithm to solve the problem is presented.For the equal cost case,the authors further give an O(|V|)time algorithm.

  3. Direct Problems and Inverse Problems in Biometric Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihailescu Marius Iulian

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The article purpose is to describe the two sides of biometrics technologies, direct problems and inverse problems. The advance that we face today in field of Information Technology makes Information Security an inseparable part. The authentication has a huge role when we deal about security. The problems that can appear in implementing and developing biometrics systems is raising many problems, and one of the goal of this article is to focus on direct and inverse problems which is a new and challenging branch in biometrics technologies.

  4. Analysis of the Gibbs Sampler for Hierarchical Inverse Problems

    OpenAIRE

    Agapiou, Sergios; Bardsley, Johnathan M.; Papaspiliopoulos, Omiros; Stuart, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    Many inverse problems arising in applications come from continuum models where the unknown parameter is a field. In practice the unknown field is discretized resulting in a problem in $\\mathbb{R}^N$, with an understanding that refining the discretization, that is increasing $N$, will often be desirable. In the context of Bayesian inversion this situation suggests the importance of two issues: (i) defining hyper-parameters in such a way that they are interpretable in the continuum limit $N \\to...

  5. The relativistic inverse stellar structure problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindblom, Lee [Theoretical Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2014-01-14

    The observable macroscopic properties of relativistic stars (whose equations of state are known) can be predicted by solving the stellar structure equations that follow from Einstein’s equation. For neutron stars, however, our knowledge of the equation of state is poor, so the direct stellar structure problem can not be solved without modeling the highest density part of the equation of state in some way. This talk will describe recent work on developing a model independent approach to determining the high-density neutron-star equation of state by solving an inverse stellar structure problem. This method uses the fact that Einstein’s equation provides a deterministic relationship between the equation of state and the macroscopic observables of the stars which are composed of that material. This talk illustrates how this method will be able to determine the high-density part of the neutron-star equation of state with few percent accuracy when high quality measurements of the masses and radii of just two or three neutron stars become available. This talk will also show that this method can be used with measurements of other macroscopic observables, like the masses and tidal deformabilities, which can (in principle) be measured by gravitational wave observations of binary neutron-star mergers.

  6. The Relativistic Inverse Stellar Structure Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Lindblom, Lee

    2014-01-01

    The observable macroscopic properties of relativistic stars (whose equations of state are known) can be predicted by solving the stellar structure equations that follow from Einstein's equation. For neutron stars, however, our knowledge of the equation of state is poor, so the direct stellar structure problem can not be solved without modeling the highest density part of the equation of state in some way. This talk will describe recent work on developing a model independent approach to determining the high-density neutron-star equation of state by solving an inverse stellar structure problem. This method uses the fact that Einstein's equation provides a deterministic relationship between the equation of state and the macroscopic observables of the stars which are composed of that material. This talk illustrates how this method will be able to determine the high-density part of the neutron-star equation of state with few percent accuracy when high quality measurements of the masses and radii of just two or thr...

  7. The physical and mathematical aspects of inverse problems in radiation detection and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussein, Esam M.A., E-mail: hussein@unb.ca [Laboratory for Threat Material Detection, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB, E3B 5A3 (Canada)

    2012-07-15

    The inverse problem is the problem of converting detectable measurements into useful quantifiable indications. It is the problem of spectrum unfolding, image reconstruction, identifying a threat material, or devising a radiotherapy plan. The solution of an inverse problem requires a forward model that relates the quantities of interest to measurements. This paper explores the physical issues associated with formulating a radiation-transport forward model best suited for inversion, and the mathematical challenges associated with the solution of the corresponding inverse problem.

  8. Riemann Zeros and the Inverse Phase Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourigny, David S.

    2013-10-01

    Finding a universal method of crystal structure solution and proving the Riemann hypothesis are two outstanding challenges in apparently unrelated fields. For centro-symmetric crystals however, a connection arises as the result of a statistical approach to the inverse phase problem. It is shown that parameters of the phase distribution are related to the non-trivial Riemann zeros by a Mellin transform.

  9. Inverse acoustic problem of N homogeneous scatterers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berntsen, Svend

    2002-01-01

    The three-dimensional inverse acoustic medium problem of N homogeneous objects with known geometry and location is considered. It is proven that one scattering experiment is sufficient for the unique determination of the complex wavenumbers of the objects. The mapping from the scattered fields...

  10. Inverse scattering problem in turbulent magnetic fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Treumann, R A; Narita, Y

    2016-01-01

    We apply a particular form of the inverse scattering theory to turbulent magnetic fluctuations in a plasma. In the present note we develop the theory, formulate the magnetic fluctuation problem in terms of its electrodynamic turbulent response function, and reduce it to the solution of a special form of the famous Gel$'$fand-Levitan-Marchenko equation of quantum mechanical scattering theory.

  11. RIEMANN ZEROS AND THE INVERSE PHASE PROBLEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    TOURIGNY, DAVID S.

    2013-01-01

    Finding a universal method of crystal structure solution and proving the Riemann hypothesis are two outstanding challenges in apparently unrelated fields. For centrosymmetric crystals however, a connection arises as the result of a statistical approach to the inverse phase problem. It is shown that parameters of the phase distribution are related to the non-trivial Riemann zeros by a Mellin transform. PMID:24293780

  12. The inverse problem of bioelectricity: an evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterom, A. van

    2012-01-01

    This invited paper presents a personal view on the current status of the solution to the inverse problem of bioelectricity. Its focus lies on applications in the field of electrocardiography. The topic discussed is also relevant in other medical domains, such as electroencephalography, electroneurog

  13. General inverse problems for regular variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damek, Ewa; Mikosch, Thomas Valentin; Rosinski, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Regular variation of distributional tails is known to be preserved by various linear transformations of some random structures. An inverse problem for regular variation aims at understanding whether the regular variation of a transformed random object is caused by regular variation of components ...

  14. On the Stewart-Lyth Inverse Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Ayón-Beato, E; Mansilla, R; Terrero-Escalante, C A; Ay\\'on-Beato, Eloy; Garc\\'{\\i}a, Alberto; Mansilla, Ricardo

    2000-01-01

    In this paper the Stewart-Lyth inverse problem is rewritten using the comoving scales as the basic parameter. It is shown that some information on the inflaton potential can be obtained from observations taking into account only the scalar power spectrum.

  15. Inverse acoustic problem of N homogeneous scatterers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berntsen, Svend

    2002-01-01

    The three-dimensional inverse acoustic medium problem of N homogeneous objects with known geometry and location is considered. It is proven that one scattering experiment is sufficient for the unique determination of the complex wavenumbers of the objects. The mapping from the scattered fields...

  16. Numerical linear algebra for reconstruction inverse problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachaoui, Abdeljalil

    2004-01-01

    Our goal in this paper is to discuss various issues we have encountered in trying to find and implement efficient solvers for a boundary integral equation (BIE) formulation of an iterative method for solving a reconstruction problem. We survey some methods from numerical linear algebra, which are relevant for the solution of this class of inverse problems. We motivate the use of our constructing algorithm, discuss its implementation and mention the use of preconditioned Krylov methods.

  17. The forward and inverse problem of cardiac magnetic fields based on concentric ellipsoid torso-heart model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Hua, Ning; Tang, Xue-Zheng; Lu, Hong; Ma, Ping; Tang, Fa-Kuan

    2010-08-01

    This paper constructs a concentric ellipsoid torso-heart model by boundary element method and investigates the impacts of model structures on the cardiac magnetic fields generated by both equivalent primary source-a current dipole and volume currents. Then by using the simulated magnetic fields based on the torso-heart model as input, the cardiac current sources-an array of current dipoles by optimal constrained linear inverse method are constructed. Next, the current dipole array reconstruction considering boundaries are compared with that in an unbounded homogeneous medium. Furthermore, the influence of random noise on reconstruction is also considered and the reconstructing effect is judged by several reconstructing parameters.

  18. PUBLISHER'S ANNOUNCEMENT: New developments for Inverse Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    2006 has proved to be a very successful year for Inverse Problems. After an increase for the fourth successive year, we achieved our highest impact factor to date, 1.541 (Source: 2005 ISI® Journal Citation Report), and the Editorial Board is keen to build on this success by continuing to improve the service we offer to our readers and authors. The Board has observed that Inverse Problems receives very few Letters to the Editor submissions, and that moreover those that we do receive rarely conform to the requirements for Letters to the Editor set out in the journal's editorial policy. The Board has therefore decided to merge the current Letters to the Editor section into our regular Papers section, which will now accommodate all research articles that meet the journal's high quality standards. Any submissions that would previously have been Letters to the Editor are still very welcome as Papers, and can be submitted by e-mail to ip@iop.org or online using our online submissions form at authors.iop.org/submit. Inverse Problems' processing times are already among the fastest in the field—on average, authors receive our decision on their paper in less than three months. Thanks to our easy-to-use online refereeing system, publishing a Paper is now just as fast as publishing a Letter to the Editor, and we are striving to ensure that the journal's high standards are applied consistently to all our Papers, maintaining Inverse Problems' position as the leading journal in the field. Our highly acclaimed Topical Review section will also continue and grow; providing timely insights into the development of all topical fields within Inverse Problems. We have many exciting Topical Reviews currently in preparation for 2007 and will continue to commission articles at the cutting edge of research. We look forward to receiving your contributions and to continuing to provide the best publication service available.

  19. The magnetic field of cortical current sources: the application of a spatial filtering model to the forward and inverse problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S; Roth, B J; Wikswo, J P

    1990-07-01

    We extend our theoretical model based on spatial filtering to determine the ability of a SQUID magnetometer to resolve 2 localized current sources in the brain. We find that in order to resolve 2 separated but coaxial cortical sources, the source-to-pickup coil distance must be comparable to the distance between the 2 sources. The size of the current sources affects the resolving power of a magnetometer, but an anisotropy of 3 in the cortical tissue does not produce a significant effect. The model also provides a solution of the inverse calculation, either to reconstruct the original current source distribution from the measured magnetic field, or to continue the field at the magnetometer inward towards the sources. Both the inverse and inward calculations are limited by the fact that the inverse filter function serves as a high-pass filter, which leads to instabilities at high spatial frequencies, particularly in the presence of noise. The instabilities can be minimized by choosing an appropriate window to attenuate the noise, but this in turn reduces the spatial resolution.

  20. Compressed word problems for inverse monoids

    CERN Document Server

    Lohrey, Markus

    2011-01-01

    The compressed word problem for a finitely generated monoid M asks whether two given compressed words over the generators of M represent the same element of M. For string compression, straight-line programs, i.e., context-free grammars that generate a single string, are used in this paper. It is shown that the compressed word problem for a free inverse monoid of finite rank at least two is complete for Pi^p_2 (second universal level of the polynomial time hierarchy). Moreover, it is shown that there exists a fixed finite idempotent presentation (i.e., a finite set of relations involving idempotents of a free inverse monoid), for which the corresponding quotient monoid has a PSPACE-complete compressed word problem. It was shown previously that the ordinary uncompressed word problem for such a quotient can be solved in logspace. Finally, a PSPACE-algorithm that checks whether a given element of a free inverse monoid belongs to a given rational subset is presented. This problem is also shown to be PSPACE-complet...

  1. TOPICAL REVIEW: Optical tomography: forward and inverse problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arridge, Simon R.; Schotland, John C.

    2009-12-01

    This is a review of recent mathematical and computational advances in optical tomography. We discuss the physical foundations of forward models for light propagation on microscopic, mesoscopic and macroscopic scales. We also consider direct and numerical approaches to the inverse problems that arise at each of these scales. Finally, we outline future directions and open problems in the field.

  2. The inverse variational problem in classical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Lopuszánski, Jan T

    1999-01-01

    This book provides a concise description of the current status of a fascinating scientific problem - the inverse variational problem in classical mechanics. The essence of this problem is as follows: one is given a set of equations of motion describing a certain classical mechanical system, and the question to be answered is: Do these equations of motion correspond to some Lagrange function as its Euler-Lagrange equations? In general, not for every system of equations of motion does a Lagrange function exist; it can, however, happen that one may modify the given equations of motion in such a w

  3. ROBUST PARTIAL INVERSE NETWORK FLOW PROBLEMS%强部分逆网络流问题

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨晓光

    2001-01-01

    In this paper,a new model for inverse network flow problems,robust partial inverse problem is presented. For a given partial solution,the robust partial inverse problem is to modify the coefficients optimally such that all full solutions containing the partial solution become optimal under new coefficients. It has been shown that the robust partial inverse spanning tree problem can be formulated as a combinatorial linear program,while the robust partial inverse minimum cut problem and the robust partial inverse assignment problem can be solved by combinatorial strongly polynomial algorithms.

  4. Inverse problems biomechanical imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberai, Assad A.

    2016-03-01

    It is now well recognized that a host of imaging modalities (a list that includes Ultrasound, MRI, Optical Coherence Tomography, and optical microscopy) can be used to "watch" tissue as it deforms in response to an internal or external excitation. The result is a detailed map of the deformation field in the interior of the tissue. This deformation field can be used in conjunction with a material mechanical response to determine the spatial distribution of material properties of the tissue by solving an inverse problem. Images of material properties thus obtained can be used to quantify the health of the tissue. Recently, they have been used to detect, diagnose and monitor cancerous lesions, detect vulnerable plaque in arteries, diagnose liver cirrhosis, and possibly detect the onset of Alzheimer's disease. In this talk I will describe the mathematical and computational aspects of solving this class of inverse problems, and their applications in biology and medicine. In particular, I will discuss the well-posedness of these problems and quantify the amount of displacement data necessary to obtain a unique property distribution. I will describe an efficient algorithm for solving the resulting inverse problem. I will also describe some recent developments based on Bayesian inference in estimating the variance in the estimates of material properties. I will conclude with the applications of these techniques in diagnosing breast cancer and in characterizing the mechanical properties of cells with sub-cellular resolution.

  5. A Frequency Matching Method: Solving Inverse Problems by Use of Geologically Realistic Prior Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Katrine; Frydendall, Jan; Cordua, Knud Skou;

    2012-01-01

    The frequency matching method defines a closed form expression for a complex prior that quantifies the higher order statistics of a proposed solution model to an inverse problem. While existing solution methods to inverse problems are capable of sampling the solution space while taking into account...... solution model to an inverse problem by using a priori information based on multiple point statistics learned from training images. We demonstrate the applicability of the suggested method on a synthetic tomographic crosshole inverse problem....

  6. Analog fault diagnosis by inverse problem technique

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Rania F.

    2011-12-01

    A novel algorithm for detecting soft faults in linear analog circuits based on the inverse problem concept is proposed. The proposed approach utilizes optimization techniques with the aid of sensitivity analysis. The main contribution of this work is to apply the inverse problem technique to estimate the actual parameter values of the tested circuit and so, to detect and diagnose single fault in analog circuits. The validation of the algorithm is illustrated through applying it to Sallen-Key second order band pass filter and the results show that the detecting percentage efficiency was 100% and also, the maximum error percentage of estimating the parameter values is 0.7%. This technique can be applied to any other linear circuit and it also can be extended to be applied to non-linear circuits. © 2011 IEEE.

  7. Inverse problem approaches for digital hologram reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Corinne; Denis, Loic; Thiebaut, Eric; Fournel, Thierry; Seifi, Mozhdeh

    2011-06-01

    Digital holography (DH) is being increasingly used for its time-resolved three-dimensional (3-D) imaging capabilities. A 3-D volume can be numerically reconstructed from a single 2-D hologram. Applications of DH range from experimental mechanics, biology, and fluid dynamics. Improvement and characterization of the 3-D reconstruction algorithms is a current issue. Over the past decade, numerous algorithms for the analysis of holograms have been proposed. They are mostly based on a common approach to hologram processing: digital reconstruction based on the simulation of hologram diffraction. They suffer from artifacts intrinsic to holography: twin-image contamination of the reconstructed images, image distortions for objects located close to the hologram borders. The analysis of the reconstructed planes is therefore limited by these defects. In contrast to this approach, the inverse problems perspective does not transform the hologram but performs object detection and location by matching a model of the hologram. Information is thus extracted from the hologram in an optimal way, leading to two essential results: an improvement of the axial accuracy and the capability to extend the reconstructed field beyond the physical limit of the sensor size (out-of-field reconstruction). These improvements come at the cost of an increase of the computational load compared to (typically non iterative) classical approaches.

  8. Dark Energy as an Inverse Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Espana-Bonet, C; Espana-Bonet, Cristina; Ruiz-Lapuente, Pilar

    2005-01-01

    A model--independent approach to dark energy is here developed by considering the determination of its equation of state as an inverse problem. The reconstruction of w(z) as a non--parametric function using the current SNe Ia data is explored. It is investigated as well how results would improve when considering other samples of cosmic distance indicators at higher redshift. This approach reveals the lack of information in the present samples to conclude on the behavior of w(z) at z > 0.6. At low level of significance a preference is found for w_{0} 0 at z ~ 0.2--0.3. The solution of w(z) along redshift never departs more than 1.95\\sigma from the cosmological constant w(z)=-1, and this only occurs when using various cosmic distance indicators. The determination of w(z) as a function is readdressed considering samples of large number of SNe Ia as those to be provided by SNAP. It is found an improvement in the resolution of w(z) when using those synthetic samples, which is favored by adding data at very high z...

  9. The Stewart-Lyth Inverse Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Ayón-Beato, E; Mansilla, R; Terrero-Escalante, C A; Ay\\'on-Beato, Eloy; Garc\\'{\\i}a, Alberto; Mansilla, Ricardo

    2000-01-01

    In this paper the Stewart-Lyth inverse problem is introduced. It consists of solving two non-linear differential equations for the first slow-roll parameter and finding the inflaton potential. The equations are derived from the Stewart-Lyth equations for the scalar and tensorial perturbations produced during the inflationary period. The geometry of the phase planes transverse to the trajectories is analyzed, and conclusions about the possible behaviour for general solutions are drawn.

  10. INVERSE SCATTERING PROBLEMS BY SINGULAR SOURCE METHODS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The inverse scattering problems are to detect the property of obstacles from the measurements outside the obstacles. One of important research areas in this topic is the recovery of boundary property for impenetrable obstacles. In this paper, we would like to give a brief review about the recently developed singular source methods. There are three different methods in this category, namely, linear sampling method, pointsource method and probe method. We also present some recent new results about the probe method.

  11. Inverse scattering problem for quantum graph vertices

    CERN Document Server

    Cheon, Taksu; Turek, Ondrej

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate how the inverse scattering problem of a quantum star graph can be solved by means of diagonalization of Hermitian unitary matrix when the vertex coupling is of the scale invariant (or F\\"ul\\H{o}p-Tsutsui) form. This enables the construction of quantum graphs with desired properties in a tailor-made fashion. The procedure is illustrated on the example of quantum vertices with equal transmission probabilities.

  12. About some inverse problems of nuclear physics

    CERN Document Server

    Belashev, B Z

    2002-01-01

    Some inverse problems of high energy physics and NMR spectroscopy are observed. The methods of the Fourier transformation and the maximum entropy technique have been applied for their solutions. The integral images of the experimental distributions are informative for determination of the space-time characteristics of the particles generation domain and for the analysis of blurring spectra. These methods have been tested in comparison with the results which have been obtained independently

  13. Determination of Diffusion Coefficients in Cement-Based Materials: An Inverse Problem for the Nernst-Planck and Poisson Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szyszkiewicz-Warzecha, Krzysztof; Jasielec, Jerzy J.; Fausek, Janusz; Filipek, Robert

    2016-08-01

    Transport properties of ions have significant impact on the possibility of rebars corrosion thus the knowledge of a diffusion coefficient is important for reinforced concrete durability. Numerous tests for the determination of diffusion coefficients have been proposed but analysis of some of these tests show that they are too simplistic or even not valid. Hence, more rigorous models to calculate the coefficients should be employed. Here we propose the Nernst-Planck and Poisson equations, which take into account the concentration and electric potential field. Based on this model a special inverse method is presented for determination of a chloride diffusion coefficient. It requires the measurement of concentration profiles or flux on the boundary and solution of the NPP model to define the goal function. Finding the global minimum is equivalent to the determination of diffusion coefficients. Typical examples of the application of the presented method are given.

  14. Hidden information in ill-posed inverse problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kahrobaei, S.; Mansoori, M.; Joosten, G.J.P.; Van den Hof, P.M.J.; Jansen, J.D.

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that parameter updating of large-scale numerical reservoir flow models (a.k.a. ‘computer assisted history matching’) is an ill-posed inverse problem. Typically the number of uncertain parameters in a reservoir flow model is very large whereas the available information for estimating

  15. Hidden information in ill-posed inverse problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kahrobaei, S.; Mansoori, M.; Joosten, G.J.P.; Van den Hof, P.M.J.; Jansen, J.D.

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that parameter updating of large-scale numerical reservoir flow models (a.k.a. ‘computer assisted history matching’) is an ill-posed inverse problem. Typically the number of uncertain parameters in a reservoir flow model is very large whereas the available information for estimating

  16. Inverse problems basics, theory and applications in geophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Richter, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    The overall goal of the book is to provide access to the regularized solution of inverse problems relevant in geophysics without requiring more mathematical knowledge than is taught in undergraduate math courses for scientists and engineers. From abstract analysis only the concept of functions as vectors is needed. Function spaces are introduced informally in the course of the text, when needed. Additionally, a more detailed, but still condensed introduction is given in Appendix B. A second goal is to elaborate the single steps to be taken when solving an inverse problem: discretization, regularization and practical solution of the regularized optimization problem. These steps are shown in detail for model problems from the fields of inverse gravimetry and seismic tomography. The intended audience is mathematicians, physicists and engineers having a good working knowledge of linear algebra and analysis at the upper undergraduate level.

  17. Forward modeling. Route to electromagnetic inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groom, R.; Walker, P. [PetRos EiKon Incorporated, Ontario (Canada)

    1996-05-01

    Inversion of electromagnetic data is a topical subject in the literature, and much time has been devoted to understanding the convergence properties of various inverse methods. The relative lack of success of electromagnetic inversion techniques is partly attributable to the difficulties in the kernel forward modeling software. These difficulties come in two broad classes: (1) Completeness and robustness, and (2) convergence, execution time and model simplicity. If such problems exist in the forward modeling kernel, it was demonstrated that inversion can fail to generate reasonable results. It was suggested that classical inversion techniques, which are based on minimizing a norm of the error between data and the simulated data, will only be successful when these difficulties in forward modeling kernels are properly dealt with. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  18. THE INVERSE PROBLEM FOR BOOLEAN EQUATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussain Mobarak Albarakati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Forward Problem (FB of Boolean equations consists of finding solutions of a system of Boolean equations, or equivalently, a single Boolean equation of the form f(X = 0 where f(X: Bn → B and B is an arbitrary Boolean algebra. By contrast, the Inverse Problem (IB of Boolean equations aims to reconstruct the equation f (X = 0 given the set of solutions and hence to verify the correctness of this set. This study derives methods that handle this inverse problem for the main types of solutions of Boolean equations. These include: (a Subsumptive general solutions, in which each of the variables is expressed as an interval by deriving successive conjunctive or disjunctive eliminants of the original function, (b Parametric general solutions, in which each of the variables is expressed via arbitrary parameters which are freely chosen elements of the underlying Boolean algebra and (c Particular solutions, each of which is an assignment from the underlying Boolean algebra to every pertinent variable that makes the Boolean equation an identity. The reconstructed function f(X in every case is set in a canonical form, such as the complete-sum form, to facilitate proving its equivalence to the original function. The methods presented herein are demonstrated with carefully-chosen illustrative examples over big Boolean algebras of various sizes. Among the methods utilized in handling the inverse problem for Boolean equations, the ones utilizing the variable-entered Karnaugh map offered pictorial insight and exhibited an efficient divide-and-conquer strategy.

  19. Deep Convolutional Neural Network for Inverse Problems in Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Kyong Hwan; McCann, Michael T.; Froustey, Emmanuel; Unser, Michael

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel deep convolutional neural network (CNN)-based algorithm for solving ill-posed inverse problems. Regularized iterative algorithms have emerged as the standard approach to ill-posed inverse problems in the past few decades. These methods produce excellent results, but can be challenging to deploy in practice due to factors including the high computational cost of the forward and adjoint operators and the difficulty of hyper parameter selection. The starting point of our work is the observation that unrolled iterative methods have the form of a CNN (filtering followed by point-wise non-linearity) when the normal operator (H*H, the adjoint of H times H) of the forward model is a convolution. Based on this observation, we propose using direct inversion followed by a CNN to solve normal-convolutional inverse problems. The direct inversion encapsulates the physical model of the system, but leads to artifacts when the problem is ill-posed; the CNN combines multiresolution decomposition and residual learning in order to learn to remove these artifacts while preserving image structure. We demonstrate the performance of the proposed network in sparse-view reconstruction (down to 50 views) on parallel beam X-ray computed tomography in synthetic phantoms as well as in real experimental sinograms. The proposed network outperforms total variation-regularized iterative reconstruction for the more realistic phantoms and requires less than a second to reconstruct a 512 x 512 image on GPU.

  20. Inverse scattering problem in turbulent magnetic fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treumann, Rudolf A.; Baumjohann, Wolfgang; Narita, Yasuhito

    2016-08-01

    We apply a particular form of the inverse scattering theory to turbulent magnetic fluctuations in a plasma. In the present note we develop the theory, formulate the magnetic fluctuation problem in terms of its electrodynamic turbulent response function, and reduce it to the solution of a special form of the famous Gelfand-Levitan-Marchenko equation of quantum mechanical scattering theory. The last of these applies to transmission and reflection in an active medium. The theory of turbulent magnetic fluctuations does not refer to such quantities. It requires a somewhat different formulation. We reduce the theory to the measurement of the low-frequency electromagnetic fluctuation spectrum, which is not the turbulent spectral energy density. The inverse theory in this form enables obtaining information about the turbulent response function of the medium. The dynamic causes of the electromagnetic fluctuations are implicit to it. Thus, it is of vital interest in low-frequency magnetic turbulence. The theory is developed until presentation of the equations in applicable form to observations of turbulent electromagnetic fluctuations as input from measurements. Solution of the final integral equation should be done by standard numerical methods based on iteration. We point to the possibility of treating power law fluctuation spectra as an example. Formulation of the problem to include observations of spectral power densities in turbulence is not attempted. This leads to severe mathematical problems and requires a reformulation of inverse scattering theory. One particular aspect of the present inverse theory of turbulent fluctuations is that its structure naturally leads to spatial information which is obtained from the temporal information that is inherent to the observation of time series. The Taylor assumption is not needed here. This is a consequence of Maxwell's equations, which couple space and time evolution. The inversion procedure takes advantage of a particular

  1. Prior Information in Inverse Boundary Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garde, Henrik

    This thesis gives a threefold perspective on the inverse problem of inclusion detection in electrical impedance tomography: depth dependence, monotonicitybased reconstruction, and sparsity-based reconstruction. The depth dependence is given in terms of explicit bounds on the datum norm, which shows...... into how much noise that can be allowed in the datum before an inclusion cannot be detected. The monotonicity method is a direct reconstruction method that utilizes a monotonicity property of the forward problem in order to characterize the inclusions. Here we rigorously prove that the method can...... of the method. Sparsity-based reconstruction is an iterative method, that through an optimization problem with a sparsity prior, approximates the inhomogeneities. Here we make use of prior information, that can cheaply be obtained from the monotonicity method, to improve both the contrast and resolution...

  2. The Inverse Problem for the Dipole Field

    CERN Document Server

    Epp, V

    2015-01-01

    The Inverse problem for an electromagnetic field produced by a dipole is solved. It is assumed that the field of an arbitrary changing dipole is known. Obtained formulae allow calculation of the position and dynamics of the dipole which produces the measured field. The derived results can be used in investigations on radiative process in solids caused by changing of the charge distribution. For example, generation of the electromagnetic field caused by oscillations of atoms or electron gas at the trace of a particle channeling in a crystal, or fields arising at solids cracking or dislocation formation -- in any case when one is interested in the details of the dipole field source.

  3. Inverse problem for multi-body interaction of nonlinear waves

    CERN Document Server

    Marruzzo, Alessia; Antenucci, Fabrizio; Pagnani, Andrea; Leuzzi, Luca

    2016-01-01

    The inverse problem is studied in multi-body systems with nonlinear dynamics representing, e.g., phase-locked wave systems, standard multimode and random lasers. Using a general model for four-body interacting complex-valued variables we test two methods based on pseudolikelihood, respectively with regularization and with decimation, to determine the coupling constants from sets of measured configurations. We test statistical inference predictions for increasing number of sampled configurations and for an externally tunable {\\em temperature}-like parameter mimicing real data noise and helping minimization procedures. Analyzed models with phasors and rotors are generalizations of problems of real-valued spherical problems (e.g., density fluctuations), discrete spins (Ising and vectorial Potts) or finite number of states (standard Potts): inference methods presented here can, then, be straightforward applied to a large class of inverse problems.

  4. Microlocal analysis of a seismic linearized inverse problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, C.C.

    2001-01-01

    The seismic inverse problem is to determine the wavespeed c x in the interior of a medium from measurements at the boundary In this paper we analyze the linearized inverse problem in general acoustic media The problem is to nd a left inverse of the linearized forward map F or equivalently to nd the

  5. Generalized Inverse Eigenvalue Problem for Centrohermitian Matrices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘仲云; 谭艳祥; 田兆录

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we first consider the existence and the general form of solution to the following generalized inverse eigenvalue problem(GIEP) : given a set of n-dimension complex vectors { xj }jm = 1 and a set of complex numbers { λj} jm = 1, find two n × n centrohermitian matrices A, B such that { xj }jm = 1 and { λj }jm= 1 are the generalized eigenvectors and generalized eigenvalues of Ax = λBx, respectively. We then discuss the optimal approximation problem for the GIEP. More concretely, given two arbitrary matrices, A-, B- ∈Cn×n , we find two matrices A* and B* such that the matrix (A* ,B* ) is closest to (A- ,B-) in the Frobenius norm, where the matrix (A*, B* ) is the solution to the GIEP. We show that the expression of the solution of the optimal approximation is unique and derive the expression for it.

  6. An inverse problem by boundary element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran-Cong, T.; Nguyen-Thien, T. [University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, QLD (Australia); Graham, A.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-02-01

    Boundary Element Methods (BEM) have been established as useful and powerful tools in a wide range of engineering applications, e.g. Brebbia et al. In this paper, we report a particular three dimensional implementation of a direct boundary integral equation (BIE) formulation and its application to numerical simulations of practical polymer processing operations. In particular, we will focus on the application of the present boundary element technology to simulate an inverse problem in plastics processing.by extrusion. The task is to design profile extrusion dies for plastics. The problem is highly non-linear due to material viscoelastic behaviours as well as unknown free surface conditions. As an example, the technique is shown to be effective in obtaining the die profiles corresponding to a square viscoelastic extrudate under different processing conditions. To further illustrate the capability of the method, examples of other non-trivial extrudate profiles and processing conditions are also given.

  7. Inverse problems for partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Isakov, Victor

    2017-01-01

    This third edition expands upon the earlier edition by adding nearly 40 pages of new material reflecting the analytical and numerical progress in inverse problems in last 10 years. As in the second edition, the emphasis is on new ideas and methods rather than technical improvements. These new ideas include use of the stationary phase method in the two-dimensional elliptic problems and of multi frequencies\\temporal data to improve stability and numerical resolution. There are also numerous corrections and improvements of the exposition throughout. This book is intended for mathematicians working with partial differential equations and their applications, physicists, geophysicists, and financial, electrical, and mechanical engineers involved with nondestructive evaluation, seismic exploration, remote sensing, and various kinds of tomography. Review of the second edition: "The first edition of this excellent book appeared in 1998 and became a standard reference for everyone interested in analysis and numerics of...

  8. Inverse minimum spanning tree problem and reverse shortest-path problem with discrete values

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Longcheng; HE Yong

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we consider two network improvement problems with given discrete values: the inverse minimum spanning tree problem and the reverse shortest-path problem, where the decrements of the weight of the edges are given discrete values. First,for the three models of the inverse minimum spanning tree problem (the sum-type, the bottleneck-type and the constrained bottlenecktype), we present their respective strongly polynomial algorithms. Then, we show that the reverse shortest-path problem is strongly NP-complete.

  9. Frechet derivatives for shallow water ocean acoustic inverse problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odom, Robert I.

    2003-04-01

    For any inverse problem, finding a model fitting the data is only half the problem. Most inverse problems of interest in ocean acoustics yield nonunique model solutions, and involve inevitable trade-offs between model and data resolution and variance. Problems of uniqueness and resolution and variance trade-offs can be addressed by examining the Frechet derivatives of the model-data functional with respect to the model variables. Tarantola [Inverse Problem Theory (Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1987), p. 613] published analytical formulas for the basic derivatives, e.g., derivatives of pressure with respect to elastic moduli and density. Other derivatives of interest, such as the derivative of transmission loss with respect to attenuation, can be easily constructed using the chain rule. For a range independent medium the analytical formulas involve only the Green's function and the vertical derivative of the Green's function for the medium. A crucial advantage of the analytical formulas for the Frechet derivatives over numerical differencing is that they can be computed with a single pass of any program which supplies the Green's function. Various derivatives of interest in shallow water ocean acoustics are presented and illustrated by an application to the sensitivity of measured pressure to shallow water sediment properties. [Work supported by ONR.

  10. A toolkit for forward/inverse problems in electrocardiography within the SCIRun problem solving environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Brett M; Tate, Jess D; Erem, Burak; Swenson, Darrell J; Wang, Dafang F; Steffen, Michael; Brooks, Dana H; van Dam, Peter M; Macleod, Rob S

    2011-01-01

    Computational modeling in electrocardiography often requires the examination of cardiac forward and inverse problems in order to non-invasively analyze physiological events that are otherwise inaccessible or unethical to explore. The study of these models can be performed in the open-source SCIRun problem solving environment developed at the Center for Integrative Biomedical Computing (CIBC). A new toolkit within SCIRun provides researchers with essential frameworks for constructing and manipulating electrocardiographic forward and inverse models in a highly efficient and interactive way. The toolkit contains sample networks, tutorials and documentation which direct users through SCIRun-specific approaches in the assembly and execution of these specific problems.

  11. Hierarchical Bayesian inference for the EEG inverse problem using realistic FE head models: depth localization and source separation for focal primary currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucka, Felix; Pursiainen, Sampsa; Burger, Martin; Wolters, Carsten H

    2012-07-16

    The estimation of the activity-related ion currents by measuring the induced electromagnetic fields at the head surface is a challenging and severely ill-posed inverse problem. This is especially true in the recovery of brain networks involving deep-lying sources by means of EEG/MEG recordings which is still a challenging task for any inverse method. Recently, hierarchical Bayesian modeling (HBM) emerged as a unifying framework for current density reconstruction (CDR) approaches comprising most established methods as well as offering promising new methods. Our work examines the performance of fully-Bayesian inference methods for HBM for source configurations consisting of few, focal sources when used with realistic, high-resolution finite element (FE) head models. The main foci of interest are the correct depth localization, a well-known source of systematic error of many CDR methods, and the separation of single sources in multiple-source scenarios. Both aspects are very important in the analysis of neurophysiological data and in clinical applications. For these tasks, HBM provides a promising framework and is able to improve upon established CDR methods such as minimum norm estimation (MNE) or sLORETA in many aspects. For challenging multiple-source scenarios where the established methods show crucial errors, promising results are attained. Additionally, we introduce Wasserstein distances as performance measures for the validation of inverse methods in complex source scenarios.

  12. Large Deviation Strategy for Inverse Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Ojima, Izumi

    2011-01-01

    Taken traditionally as a no-go theorem against the theorization of inductive processes, Duheme-Quine thesis may interfere with the essence of statistical inference. This difficulty can be resolved by \\textquotedblleft Micro-Macro duality\\textquotedblright\\ \\cite{Oj03, Oj05} which clarifies the importance of specifying the pertinent aspects and accuracy relevant to concrete contexts of scientific discussions and which ensures the matching between what to be described and what to describe in the form of the validity of duality relations. This consolidates the foundations of the inverse problem, induction method, and statistical inference crucial for the sound relations between theory and experiments. To achieve the purpose, we propose here Large Deviation Strategy (LDS for short) on the basis of Micro-Macro duality, quadrality scheme, and large deviation principle. According to the quadrality scheme emphasizing the basic roles played by the dynamics, algebra of observables together with its representations and ...

  13. The inverse problem for Schwinger pair production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hebenstreit, F., E-mail: hebenstreit@itp.unibe.ch

    2016-02-10

    The production of electron–positron pairs in time-dependent electric fields (Schwinger mechanism) depends non-linearly on the applied field profile. Accordingly, the resulting momentum spectrum is extremely sensitive to small variations of the field parameters. Owing to this non-linear dependence it is so far unpredictable how to choose a field configuration such that a predetermined momentum distribution is generated. We show that quantum kinetic theory along with optimal control theory can be used to approximately solve this inverse problem for Schwinger pair production. We exemplify this by studying the superposition of a small number of harmonic components resulting in predetermined signatures in the asymptotic momentum spectrum. In the long run, our results could facilitate the observation of this yet unobserved pair production mechanism in quantum electrodynamics by providing suggestions for tailored field configurations.

  14. An inverse problem for Schwinger pair production

    CERN Document Server

    Hebenstreit, Florian

    2016-01-01

    The production of electron-positron pairs in time-dependent electric fields (Schwinger mechanism) depends non-linearly on the applied field profile. Accordingly, the resulting momentum spectrum is extremely sensitive to small variations of the field parameters. Owing to this non-linear dependence it is so far unpredictable how to choose a field configuration such that a predetermined momentum distribution is generated. We show that quantum kinetic theory along with optimal control theory can be used to approximately solve this inverse problem for Schwinger pair production. We exemplify this by studying the superposition of a small number of harmonic components resulting in predetermined signatures in the asymptotic momentum spectrum. In the long run, our results could facilitate the observation of this yet unobserved pair production mechanism in quantum electrodynamics by providing suggestions for tailored field configurations.

  15. The inverse problem for Schwinger pair production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Hebenstreit

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The production of electron–positron pairs in time-dependent electric fields (Schwinger mechanism depends non-linearly on the applied field profile. Accordingly, the resulting momentum spectrum is extremely sensitive to small variations of the field parameters. Owing to this non-linear dependence it is so far unpredictable how to choose a field configuration such that a predetermined momentum distribution is generated. We show that quantum kinetic theory along with optimal control theory can be used to approximately solve this inverse problem for Schwinger pair production. We exemplify this by studying the superposition of a small number of harmonic components resulting in predetermined signatures in the asymptotic momentum spectrum. In the long run, our results could facilitate the observation of this yet unobserved pair production mechanism in quantum electrodynamics by providing suggestions for tailored field configurations.

  16. Forward and inverse problems of electrocardiography : clinical investigations

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The non-invasive reconstruction of cardiac activity can significantly improve the quality of cardiac diagnostics. Two major approaches are considered. The model-based method consists in the optimization of an electrophysiological cardiac model until the measured and simulated ECGs are similar. The inverse problem of electrocardiography is solved to compute the cardiac sources distributions from body surface potential maps. The results and their interpretation are shown for several patients.

  17. PREFACE: First International Congress of the International Association of Inverse Problems (IPIA): Applied Inverse Problems 2007: Theoretical and Computational Aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlmann, Gunther

    2008-07-01

    This volume represents the proceedings of the fourth Applied Inverse Problems (AIP) international conference and the first congress of the Inverse Problems International Association (IPIA) which was held in Vancouver, Canada, June 25 29, 2007. The organizing committee was formed by Uri Ascher, University of British Columbia, Richard Froese, University of British Columbia, Gary Margrave, University of Calgary, and Gunther Uhlmann, University of Washington, chair. The conference was part of the activities of the Pacific Institute of Mathematical Sciences (PIMS) Collaborative Research Group on inverse problems (http://www.pims.math.ca/scientific/collaborative-research-groups/past-crgs). This event was also supported by grants from NSF and MITACS. Inverse Problems (IP) are problems where causes for a desired or an observed effect are to be determined. They lie at the heart of scientific inquiry and technological development. The enormous increase in computing power and the development of powerful algorithms have made it possible to apply the techniques of IP to real-world problems of growing complexity. Applications include a number of medical as well as other imaging techniques, location of oil and mineral deposits in the earth's substructure, creation of astrophysical images from telescope data, finding cracks and interfaces within materials, shape optimization, model identification in growth processes and, more recently, modelling in the life sciences. The series of Applied Inverse Problems (AIP) Conferences aims to provide a primary international forum for academic and industrial researchers working on all aspects of inverse problems, such as mathematical modelling, functional analytic methods, computational approaches, numerical algorithms etc. The steering committee of the AIP conferences consists of Heinz Engl (Johannes Kepler Universität, Austria), Joyce McLaughlin (RPI, USA), William Rundell (Texas A&M, USA), Erkki Somersalo (Helsinki University of Technology

  18. Inverse problem of HIV cell dynamics using Genetic Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, J. A.; Guzmán, F. S.

    2017-01-01

    In order to describe the cell dynamics of T-cells in a patient infected with HIV, we use a flavour of Perelson's model. This is a non-linear system of Ordinary Differential Equations that describes the evolution of healthy, latently infected, infected T-cell concentrations and the free viral cells. Different parameters in the equations give different dynamics. Considering the concentration of these types of cells is known for a particular patient, the inverse problem consists in estimating the parameters in the model. We solve this inverse problem using a Genetic Algorithm (GA) that minimizes the error between the solutions of the model and the data from the patient. These errors depend on the parameters of the GA, like mutation rate and population, although a detailed analysis of this dependence will be described elsewhere.

  19. Diffuse interface methods for inverse problems: case study for an elliptic Cauchy problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Martin; Løseth Elvetun, Ole; Schlottbom, Matthias

    2015-12-01

    Many inverse problems have to deal with complex, evolving and often not exactly known geometries, e.g. as domains of forward problems modeled by partial differential equations. This makes it desirable to use methods which are robust with respect to perturbed or not well resolved domains, and which allow for efficient discretizations not resolving any fine detail of those geometries. For forward problems in partial differential equations methods based on diffuse interface representations have gained strong attention in the last years, but so far they have not been considered systematically for inverse problems. In this work we introduce a diffuse domain method as a tool for the solution of variational inverse problems. As a particular example we study ECG inversion in further detail. ECG inversion is a linear inverse source problem with boundary measurements governed by an anisotropic diffusion equation, which naturally cries for solutions under changing geometries, namely the beating heart. We formulate a regularization strategy using Tikhonov regularization and, using standard source conditions, we prove convergence rates. A special property of our approach is that not only operator perturbations are introduced by the diffuse domain method, but more important we have to deal with topologies which depend on a parameter \\varepsilon in the diffuse domain method, i.e. we have to deal with \\varepsilon -dependent forward operators and \\varepsilon -dependent norms. In particular the appropriate function spaces for the unknown and the data depend on \\varepsilon . This prevents the application of some standard convergence techniques for inverse problems, in particular interpreting the perturbations as data errors in the original problem does not yield suitable results. We consequently develop a novel approach based on saddle-point problems. The numerical solution of the problem is discussed as well and results for several computational experiments are reported. In

  20. Ensemble methods for large scale inverse problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemink, A.W.; Umer Altaf, M.; Barbu, A.L.; Verlaan, M.

    2013-01-01

    Variational data assimilation, also sometimes simply called the ‘adjoint method’, is used very often for large scale model calibration problems. Using the available data, the uncertain parameters in the model are identified by minimizing a certain cost function that measures the difference between t

  1. Inverse Problems in a Bayesian Setting

    KAUST Repository

    Matthies, Hermann G.

    2016-02-13

    In a Bayesian setting, inverse problems and uncertainty quantification (UQ)—the propagation of uncertainty through a computational (forward) model—are strongly connected. In the form of conditional expectation the Bayesian update becomes computationally attractive. We give a detailed account of this approach via conditional approximation, various approximations, and the construction of filters. Together with a functional or spectral approach for the forward UQ there is no need for time-consuming and slowly convergent Monte Carlo sampling. The developed sampling-free non-linear Bayesian update in form of a filter is derived from the variational problem associated with conditional expectation. This formulation in general calls for further discretisation to make the computation possible, and we choose a polynomial approximation. After giving details on the actual computation in the framework of functional or spectral approximations, we demonstrate the workings of the algorithm on a number of examples of increasing complexity. At last, we compare the linear and nonlinear Bayesian update in form of a filter on some examples.

  2. Mechanism and Modeling for Polymerization of Acrylamide in Inverse Microemulsions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiXiao; ZhangWeiying; YuanHuigen

    2004-01-01

    After discussion on the mechanism of polymer particle nucleation and growth in inverse microemulsion polymerization, a schematic physical model for polymerization of acrylamide in inverse microemulsions was presented. Furthermore, several key problems in mathematically modeling of inverse microemulsion polymerization were pointed out.

  3. Piecewise polynomial solutions to linear inverse problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per Christian; Mosegaard, K.

    1996-01-01

    We have presented a new algorithm PP-TSVD that computes piecewise polynomial solutions to ill-posed problems, without a priori knowledge about the positions of the break points. In particular, we can compute piecewise constant functions that describe layered models. Such solutions are useful, e.g.......g., in seismological problems, and the algorithm can also be used as a preprocessor for other methods where break points/discontinuities must be incorporated explicitly....

  4. Error handling strategies in multiphase inverse modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finsterle, S.; Zhang, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Parameter estimation by inverse modeling involves the repeated evaluation of a function of residuals. These residuals represent both errors in the model and errors in the data. In practical applications of inverse modeling of multiphase flow and transport, the error structure of the final residuals often significantly deviates from the statistical assumptions that underlie standard maximum likelihood estimation using the least-squares method. Large random or systematic errors are likely to lead to convergence problems, biased parameter estimates, misleading uncertainty measures, or poor predictive capabilities of the calibrated model. The multiphase inverse modeling code iTOUGH2 supports strategies that identify and mitigate the impact of systematic or non-normal error structures. We discuss these approaches and provide an overview of the error handling features implemented in iTOUGH2.

  5. Including geological information in the inverse problem of palaeothermal reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautner, S.; Nielsen, S. B.

    2003-04-01

    A reliable reconstruction of sediment thermal history is of central importance to the assessment of hydrocarbon potential and the understanding of basin evolution. However, only rarely do sedimentation history and borehole data in the form of present day temperatures and vitrinite reflectance constrain the past thermal evolution to a useful level of accuracy (Gallagher and Sambridge,1992; Nielsen,1998; Trautner and Nielsen,2003). This is reflected in the inverse solutions to the problem of determining heat flow history from borehole data: The recent heat flow is constrained by data while older values are governed by the chosen a prior heat flow. In this paper we reduce this problem by including geological information in the inverse problem. Through a careful analysis of geological and geophysical data the timing of the tectonic processes, which may influence heat flow, can be inferred. The heat flow history is then parameterised to allow for the temporal variations characteristic of the different tectonic events. The inversion scheme applies a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach (Nielsen and Gallagher, 1999; Ferrero and Gallagher,2002), which efficiently explores the model space and futhermore samples the posterior probability distribution of the model. The technique is demonstrated on wells in the northern North Sea with emphasis on the stretching event in Late Jurassic. The wells are characterised by maximum sediment temperature at the present day, which is the worst case for resolution of the past thermal history because vitrinite reflectance is determined mainly by the maximum temperature. Including geological information significantly improves the thermal resolution. Ferrero, C. and Gallagher,K.,2002. Stochastic thermal history modelling.1. Constraining heat flow histories and their uncertainty. Marine and Petroleum Geology, 19, 633-648. Gallagher,K. and Sambridge, M., 1992. The resolution of past heat flow in sedimentary basins from non-linear inversion

  6. HOMOTOPY SOLUTION OF THE INVERSE GENERALIZED EIGENVALUE PROBLEMS IN STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李书; 王波; 胡继忠

    2004-01-01

    The structural dynamics problems, such as structural design, parameter identification and model correction, are considered as a kind of the inverse generalized eigenvalue problems mathematically. The inverse eigenvalue problems are nonlinear. In general, they could be transformed into nonlinear equations to solve. The structural dynamics inverse problems were treated as quasi multiplicative inverse eigenalue problems which were solved by homotopy method for nonlinear equations. This method had no requirements for initial value essentially because of the homotopy path to solution. Numerical examples were presented to illustrate the homotopy method.

  7. PREFACE: International Conference on Inverse Problems 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hon, Yiu-Chung; Ling, Leevan

    2011-03-01

    Following the first International Conference on Inverse Problems - Recent Theoretical Development and Numerical Approaches held at the City University of Hong Kong in 2002, the fifth International Conference was held again at the City University during December 13-17, 2010. This fifth conference was jointly organized by Professor Yiu-Chung Hon (Co-Chair, City University of Hong Kong, HKSAR), Dr Leevan Ling (Co-Chair, Hong Kong Baptist University, HKSAR), Professor Jin Cheng (Fudan University, China), Professor June-Yub Lee (Ewha Womans University, South Korea), Professor Gui-Rong Liu (University of Cincinnati, USA), Professor Jenn-Nan Wang (National Taiwan University, Taiwan), and Professor Masahiro Yamamoto (The University of Tokyo, Japan). It was agreed to alternate holding the conference among the above places (China, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, and Hong Kong) once every two years. The next conference has been scheduled to be held at the Southeast University (Nanjing, China) in 2012. The purpose of this series of conferences is to establish a strong collaborative link among the universities of the Asian-Pacific regions and worldwide leading researchers in inverse problems. The conference addressed both theoretical (mathematics), applied (engineering) and developmental aspects of inverse problems. The conference was intended to nurture Asian-American-European collaborations in the evolving interdisciplinary areas and it was envisioned that the conference would lead to long-term commitments and collaborations among the participating countries and researchers. There was a total of more than 100 participants. A call for the submission of papers was sent out after the conference, and a total of 19 papers were finally accepted for publication in this proceedings. The papers included in the proceedings cover a wide scope, which reflects the current flourishing theoretical and numerical research into inverse problems. Finally, as the co-chairs of the Inverse Problems

  8. Large-Scale Inverse Problems and Quantification of Uncertainty

    CERN Document Server

    Biegler, Lorenz; Ghattas, Omar

    2010-01-01

    Large-scale inverse problems and associated uncertainty quantification has become an important area of research, central to a wide range of science and engineering applications. Written by leading experts in the field, Large-scale Inverse Problems and Quantification of Uncertainty focuses on the computational methods used to analyze and simulate inverse problems. The text provides PhD students, researchers, advanced undergraduate students, and engineering practitioners with the perspectives of researchers in areas of inverse problems and data assimilation, ranging from statistics and large-sca

  9. Inverse problems and inverse scattering of plane waves

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh Roy, Dilip N

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this text is to present the theory and mathematics of inverse scattering, in a simple way, to the many researchers and professionals who use it in their everyday research. While applications range across a broad spectrum of disciplines, examples in this text will focus primarly, but not exclusively, on acoustics. The text will be especially valuable for those applied workers who would like to delve more deeply into the fundamentally mathematical character of the subject matter.Practitioners in this field comprise applied physicists, engineers, and technologists, whereas the theory is almost entirely in the domain of abstract mathematics. This gulf between the two, if bridged, can only lead to improvement in the level of scholarship in this highly important discipline. This is the book''s primary focus.

  10. General bounds for electrode mislocation on the EEG inverse problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrachini, L; von Ellenrieder, N; Muravchik, C H

    2011-07-01

    We analyze the effect of electrode mislocation on the electroencephalography (EEG) inverse problem using the Cramér-Rao bound (CRB) for single dipolar source parameters. We adopt a realistic head shape model, and solve the forward problem using the Boundary Element Method; the use of the CRB allows us to obtain general results which do not depend on the algorithm used for solving the inverse problem. We consider two possible causes for the electrode mislocation, errors in the measurement of the electrode positions and an imperfect registration between the electrodes and the scalp surfaces. For 120 electrodes placed in the scalp according to the 10-20 standard, and errors on the electrode location with a standard deviation of 5mm, the lower bound on the standard deviation in the source depth estimation is approximately 1mm in the worst case. Therefore, we conclude that errors in the electrode location may be tolerated since their effect on the EEG inverse problem are negligible from a practical point of view. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A variational Bayesian method to inverse problems with impulsive noise

    KAUST Repository

    Jin, Bangti

    2012-01-01

    We propose a novel numerical method for solving inverse problems subject to impulsive noises which possibly contain a large number of outliers. The approach is of Bayesian type, and it exploits a heavy-tailed t distribution for data noise to achieve robustness with respect to outliers. A hierarchical model with all hyper-parameters automatically determined from the given data is described. An algorithm of variational type by minimizing the Kullback-Leibler divergence between the true posteriori distribution and a separable approximation is developed. The numerical method is illustrated on several one- and two-dimensional linear and nonlinear inverse problems arising from heat conduction, including estimating boundary temperature, heat flux and heat transfer coefficient. The results show its robustness to outliers and the fast and steady convergence of the algorithm. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.

  12. Bayesian Inference Applied to the Electromagnetic Inverse Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, D M; Wood, C C; Schmidt, David M.; George, John S.

    1998-01-01

    We present a new approach to the electromagnetic inverse problem that explicitly addresses the ambiguity associated with its ill-posed character. Rather than calculating a single ``best'' solution according to some criterion, our approach produces a large number of likely solutions that both fit the data and any prior information that is used. While the range of the different likely results is representative of the ambiguity in the inverse problem even with prior information present, features that are common across a large number of the different solutions can be identified and are associated with a high degree of probability. This approach is implemented and quantified within the formalism of Bayesian inference which combines prior information with that from measurement in a common framework using a single measure. To demonstrate this approach, a general neural activation model is constructed that includes a variable number of extended regions of activation and can incorporate a great deal of prior informati...

  13. Source localization in electromyography using the inverse potential problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Doel, Kees; Ascher, Uri M.; Pai, Dinesh K.

    2011-02-01

    We describe an efficient method for reconstructing the activity in human muscles from an array of voltage sensors on the skin surface. MRI is used to obtain morphometric data which are segmented into muscle tissue, fat, bone and skin, from which a finite element model for volume conduction is constructed. The inverse problem of finding the current sources in the muscles is solved using a careful regularization technique which adds a priori information, yielding physically reasonable solutions from among those that satisfy the basic potential problem. Several regularization functionals are considered and numerical experiments on a 2D test model are performed to determine which performs best. The resulting scheme leads to numerical difficulties when applied to large-scale 3D problems. We clarify the nature of these difficulties and provide a method to overcome them, which is shown to perform well in the large-scale problem setting.

  14. Pseudo almost periodic solutions to parabolic boundary value inverse problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    We first define the pseudo almost periodic functions in a more general setting.Then we show the existence,uniqueness and stability of pseudo almost periodic solutions of parabolic inverse problems for a type of boundary value problems.

  15. Investigating complex networks with inverse models

    CERN Document Server

    Wens, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroscience have motivated the study of network organization in spatially distributed dynamical systems from indirect measurements. However, the associated connectivity estimation, when combined with inverse modeling, is strongly affected by spatial leakage. We formulate this problem in a general framework and develop a new approach to model spatial leakage and limit its effects. It is analytically compared to existing regression-based methods used in electrophysiology, which are shown to yield biased estimates of amplitude and phase couplings.

  16. Perturbative methods for inverse problems on degenerate differential equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Favini

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Pertubation results for linear relations satisfying a resolvent condition of weak parabolic type are established. Such results are applied to solve some inverse problems for degenerate differential equations, supplying a new method which avoids any fixed-point argument and essentially consists in reducing the original inverse problem to an auxiliary direct one.

  17. A Forward Glimpse into Inverse Problems through a Geology Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, Brian J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a forward approach to an inverse problem related to detecting the nature of geological substrata which makes use of optimization techniques in a multivariable calculus setting. The true nature of the related inverse problem is highlighted. (Contains 2 figures.)

  18. Physics-driven Spatiotemporal Regularization for High-dimensional Predictive Modeling: A Novel Approach to Solve the Inverse ECG Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Bing; Yang, Hui

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a novel physics-driven spatiotemporal regularization (STRE) method for high-dimensional predictive modeling in complex healthcare systems. This model not only captures the physics-based interrelationship between time-varying explanatory and response variables that are distributed in the space, but also addresses the spatial and temporal regularizations to improve the prediction performance. The STRE model is implemented to predict the time-varying distribution of electric potentials on the heart surface based on the electrocardiogram (ECG) data from the distributed sensor network placed on the body surface. The model performance is evaluated and validated in both a simulated two-sphere geometry and a realistic torso-heart geometry. Experimental results show that the STRE model significantly outperforms other regularization models that are widely used in current practice such as Tikhonov zero-order, Tikhonov first-order and L1 first-order regularization methods.

  19. CUDA Parallel Algorithms for Forward and Inverse Structural Gravity Problems

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes usage of CUDA parallelization scheme for forward and inverse gravity problems for structural boundaries. Forward problem is calculated using the finite elements approach. This means that the whole calculation volume is split into parallelepipeds and then the gravity effect of each is calculated using known formula. Inverse problem solution is found using iteration local corrections method. This method requires only forward problem calculation on each iteration and does no...

  20. Inverse problem for porosity estimation during solidification of TNT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldélio Bueno Caldeira

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the porosity formed during the solidification process is estimated by an inverse problem technique based on particle swarm optimization. The effective heat capacity method is adopted to model the heat transfer problem. The transient-diffusive heat transfer equation is solved numerically by the finite volume method with an explicit scheme, employing the central difference interpolation function. The solution of the direct problem is compared to reference solutions. The model is applied to trinitrotoluene (TNT solidification process. The results show that the proposed procedure was able to estimate the porosity for different Stefan numbers. The analysis of the heat flux in the mold is indicated to predict the porosity formation during the casting process.

  1. Inverse problem for multi-body interaction of nonlinear waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marruzzo, Alessia; Tyagi, Payal; Antenucci, Fabrizio; Pagnani, Andrea; Leuzzi, Luca

    2017-06-14

    The inverse problem is studied in multi-body systems with nonlinear dynamics representing, e.g., phase-locked wave systems, standard multimode and random lasers. Using a general model for four-body interacting complex-valued variables we test two methods based on pseudolikelihood, respectively with regularization and with decimation, to determine the coupling constants from sets of measured configurations. We test statistical inference predictions for increasing number of sampled configurations and for an externally tunable temperature-like parameter mimicing real data noise and helping minimization procedures. Analyzed models with phasors and rotors are generalizations of problems of real-valued spherical problems (e.g., density fluctuations), discrete spins (Ising and vectorial Potts) or finite number of states (standard Potts): inference methods presented here can, then, be straightforward applied to a large class of inverse problems. The high versatility of the exposed techniques also concerns the number of expected interactions: results are presented for different graph topologies, ranging from sparse to dense graphs.

  2. A Frequency Matching Method: Solving Inverse Problems by Use of Geologically Realistic Prior Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Katrine; Frydendall, Jan; Cordua, Knud Skou

    2012-01-01

    The frequency matching method defines a closed form expression for a complex prior that quantifies the higher order statistics of a proposed solution model to an inverse problem. While existing solution methods to inverse problems are capable of sampling the solution space while taking into accou...

  3. Introduction to the 30th volume of Inverse Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Alfred K.

    2014-01-01

    The field of inverse problems is a fast-developing domain of research originating from the practical demands of finding the cause when a result is observed. The woodpecker, searching for insects, is probing a tree using sound waves: the information searched for is whether there is an insect or not, hence a 0-1 decision. When the result has to contain more information, ad hoc solutions are not at hand and more sophisticated methods have to be developed. Right from its first appearance, the field of inverse problems has been characterized by an interdisciplinary nature: the interpretation of measured data, reinforced by mathematical models serving the analyzing questions of observability, stability and resolution, developing efficient, stable and accurate algorithms to gain as much information as possible from the input and to feedback to the questions of optimal measurement configuration. As is typical for a new area of research, facets of it are separated and studied independently. Hence, fields such as the theory of inverse scattering, tomography in general and regularization methods have developed. However, all aspects have to be reassembled to arrive at the best possible solution to the problem at hand. This development is reflected by the first and still leading journal in the field, Inverse Problems. Founded by pioneers Roy Pike from London and Pierre Sabatier from Montpellier, who enjoyably describes the journal's nascence in his book Rêves et Combats d'un Enseignant-Chercheur, Retour Inverse [1], the journal has developed successfully over the last few decades. Neither the Editors-in-Chief, formerly called Honorary Editors, nor the board or authors could have set the path to success alone. Their fruitful interplay, complemented by the efficient and highly competent publishing team at IOP Publishing, has been fundamental. As such it is my honor and pleasure to follow my renowned colleagues Pierre Sabatier, Mario Bertero, Frank Natterer, Alberto Grünbaum and

  4. SIPPI: A Matlab toolbox for sampling the solution to inverse problems with complex prior information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Mejer; Cordua, Knud Skou; Caroline Looms, Majken

    2013-01-01

    for solving such probabilistically formulated inverse problems by sampling the a posteriori probability density function. In order to describe the a priori probability density function, we consider both simple Gaussian models and more complex (and realistic) a priori models based on higher order statistics....... These a priori models can be used with both linear and non-linear inverse problems. For linear inverse Gaussian problems we make use of least-squares and kriging-based methods to describe the a posteriori probability density function directly. For general non-linear (i.e. non-Gaussian) inverse problems, we make...... use of the extended Metropolis algorithm to sample the a posteriori probability density function. Together with the extended Metropolis algorithm, we use sequential Gibbs sampling that allow computationally efficient sampling of complex a priori models. The toolbox can be applied to any inverse...

  5. Inverse Coefficient Problems for Nonlinear Parabolic Differential Equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun Hua OU; Alemdar HASANOV; Zhen Hai LIU

    2008-01-01

    This paper is devoted to a class of inverse problems for a nonlinear parabolic differential equation.The unknown coefficient of the equation depends on the gradient of the solution and belongs to a set of admissible coefficients.It is proved that the convergence of solutions for the corresponding direct problems continuously depends on the coefficient convergence.Based on this result the existence of a quasisolution of the inverse problem is obtained in the appropriate class of admissible coefficients.

  6. Local regularization of linear inverse problems via variational filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamm, Patricia K.

    2017-08-01

    We develop local regularization methods for ill-posed linear inverse problems governed by general Fredholm integral operators. The methods are executed as filtering algorithms which are simple to implement and computationally efficient for a large class of problems. We establish a convergence theory and give convergence rates for such methods, and illustrate their computational speed in numerical tests for inverse problems in geomagnetic exploration and imaging.

  7. Bayesian inference for inverse problems occurring in uncertainty analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Shuai; Celeux, Gilles; Bousquet, Nicolas; Couplet, Mathieu

    2012-01-01

    The inverse problem considered here is to estimate the distribution of a non-observed random variable $X$ from some noisy observed data $Y$ linked to $X$ through a time-consuming physical model $H$. Bayesian inference is considered to take into account prior expert knowledge on $X$ in a small sample size setting. A Metropolis-Hastings within Gibbs algorithm is proposed to compute the posterior distribution of the parameters of $X$ through a data augmentation process. Since calls to $H$ are qu...

  8. An Efficient Pseudo-Inverse Solution to the Inverse Kinematic Problem for 6-Joint Manipulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Chiaverini

    1990-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of the pseudo-inverse Jacobian matrix makes the solution of the inverse kinematic problem well-defined even at singular configurations of the robot arm, in the neighbourhood of a singularity, however, the computed solution often results in high joint velocities which may not be feasible to the real manipulator. Furthermore, the pseudo-inverse solution is computationally expensive, thus preventing real-time applications.

  9. Index Theory-Based Algorithm for the Gradiometer Inverse Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-28

    field generated by the positive eigenvector of the gradiometer tensor to the closeness of fit of the proposed inverse solution to the mass and...line field generated by the positive eigenvector of the gradiometer tensor to the closeness of fit of the proposed inverse solution to the mass and...2015). The inverse source problem for the gradiometer tensor can be stated generally as follows: given a gradiometer tensor field, extract

  10. An Inverse Eigenvalue Problem for Jacobi Matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengsheng Wang

    2011-01-01

    eigenvectors. The solvability of the problem is discussed, and some sufficient conditions for existence of the solution of this problem are proposed. Furthermore, a numerical algorithm and two examples are presented.

  11. Cardiac electromechanics and the forward/inverse problems of electrocardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buist, M; Smith, N P; Pullan, A J

    2005-01-01

    The mechanical motion of the heart plays a role in determining the waveforms observed in an ECG. This study is designed to ascertain, from a theoretical perspective, the influence of this motion. This is achieved through an analysis of a detailed forward model including a full bidomain description and a strongly coupled model of cardiac electromechanics. Simulations were run on identical problems with and without the inclusion of mechanical deformation and the results were analyzed with a view towards the inverse problem of electrocardiology. Initial results have shown the QRS complex to be largely invariant under deformation, but significant changes in T wave morphology have been observed. Further analysis has revealed that it is the effect of the cell-level mechanics on repolarization that is primarily responsible for these changes as opposed to the tissue deformation.

  12. Comparison of optimal design methods in inverse problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, H. T.; Holm, K.; Kappel, F.

    2011-07-01

    Typical optimal design methods for inverse or parameter estimation problems are designed to choose optimal sampling distributions through minimization of a specific cost function related to the resulting error in parameter estimates. It is hoped that the inverse problem will produce parameter estimates with increased accuracy using data collected according to the optimal sampling distribution. Here we formulate the classical optimal design problem in the context of general optimization problems over distributions of sampling times. We present a new Prohorov metric-based theoretical framework that permits one to treat succinctly and rigorously any optimal design criteria based on the Fisher information matrix. A fundamental approximation theory is also included in this framework. A new optimal design, SE-optimal design (standard error optimal design), is then introduced in the context of this framework. We compare this new design criterion with the more traditional D-optimal and E-optimal designs. The optimal sampling distributions from each design are used to compute and compare standard errors; the standard errors for parameters are computed using asymptotic theory or bootstrapping and the optimal mesh. We use three examples to illustrate ideas: the Verhulst-Pearl logistic population model (Banks H T and Tran H T 2009 Mathematical and Experimental Modeling of Physical and Biological Processes (Boca Raton, FL: Chapman and Hall/CRC)), the standard harmonic oscillator model (Banks H T and Tran H T 2009) and a popular glucose regulation model (Bergman R N, Ider Y Z, Bowden C R and Cobelli C 1979 Am. J. Physiol. 236 E667-77 De Gaetano A and Arino O 2000 J. Math. Biol. 40 136-68 Toffolo G, Bergman R N, Finegood D T, Bowden C R and Cobelli C 1980 Diabetes 29 979-90).

  13. REGULARIZED D-BAR METHOD FOR THE INVERSE CONDUCTIVITY PROBLEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Kim; Lassas, Matti; Mueller, Jennifer;

    2009-01-01

    A strategy for regularizing the inversion procedure for the two-dimensional D-bar reconstruction algorithm based on the global uniqueness proof of Nachman [Ann. Math. 143 (1996)] for the ill-posed inverse conductivity problem is presented. The strategy utilizes truncation of the boundary integral...

  14. Applications of elliptic Carleman inequalities to Cauchy and inverse problems

    CERN Document Server

    Choulli, Mourad

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a unified approach to studying the stability of both elliptic Cauchy problems and selected inverse problems. Based on elementary Carleman inequalities, it establishes three-ball inequalities, which are the key to deriving logarithmic stability estimates for elliptic Cauchy problems and are also useful in proving stability estimates for certain elliptic inverse problems. The book presents three inverse problems, the first of which consists in determining the surface impedance of an obstacle from the far field pattern. The second problem investigates the detection of corrosion by electric measurement, while the third concerns the determination of an attenuation coefficient from internal data, which is motivated by a problem encountered in biomedical imaging.

  15. Inverse Coefficient Problems for Nonlinear Elliptic Variational Inequalities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Run-sheng Yang; Yun-hua Ou

    2011-01-01

    This paper is devoted to a class of inverse coefficient problems for nonlinear elliptic variational inequalities. The unknown coefficient of elliptic variational inequalities depends on the gradient of the solution and belongs to a set of admissible coefficients. It is shown that the nonlinear elliptic variational inequalities is unique solvable for the given class of coefficients. The existence of quasisolutions of the inverse problems is obtained.

  16. THE INVERSE PROBLEM OF CENTROSYMMETRIC MATRICES WITH A SUBMATRIX CONSTRAINT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-yun Peng; Xi-yan Hu; Lei Zhang

    2004-01-01

    By using Moore-Penrose generalized inverse and the general singular value decomposition of matrices, this paper establishes the necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of and the expressions for the centrosymmetric solutions with a submatrix constraint of matrix inverse problem AX = B. In addition, in the solution set of corresponding problem, the expression of the optimal approximation solution to a given matrix is derived.

  17. Stability analysis of the inverse transmembrane potential problem in electrocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Martin; Mardal, Kent-André; Nielsen, Bjørn Fredrik

    2010-10-01

    In this paper we study some mathematical properties of an inverse problem arising in connection with electrocardiograms (ECGs). More specifically, we analyze the possibility for recovering the transmembrane potential in the heart from ECG recordings, a challenge currently investigated by a growing number of groups. Our approach is based on the bidomain model for the electrical activity in the myocardium, and leads to a parameter identification problem for elliptic partial differential equations (PDEs). It turns out that this challenge can be split into two subproblems: the task of recovering the potential at the heart surface from body surface recordings; the problem of computing the transmembrane potential inside the heart from the potential determined at the heart surface. Problem (1), which can be formulated as the Cauchy problem for an elliptic PDE, has been extensively studied and is well known to be severely ill-posed. The main purpose of this paper is to prove that problem (2) is stable and well posed if a suitable prior is available. Moreover, our theoretical findings are illuminated by a series of numerical experiments. Finally, we discuss some aspects of uniqueness related to the anisotropy in the heart.

  18. MODEL SELECTION FOR SPECTROPOLARIMETRIC INVERSIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asensio Ramos, A.; Manso Sainz, R.; Martinez Gonzalez, M. J.; Socas-Navarro, H. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38205, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Viticchie, B. [ESA/ESTEC RSSD, Keplerlaan 1, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Orozco Suarez, D., E-mail: aasensio@iac.es [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2012-04-01

    Inferring magnetic and thermodynamic information from spectropolarimetric observations relies on the assumption of a parameterized model atmosphere whose parameters are tuned by comparison with observations. Often, the choice of the underlying atmospheric model is based on subjective reasons. In other cases, complex models are chosen based on objective reasons (for instance, the necessity to explain asymmetries in the Stokes profiles) but it is not clear what degree of complexity is needed. The lack of an objective way of comparing models has, sometimes, led to opposing views of the solar magnetism because the inferred physical scenarios are essentially different. We present the first quantitative model comparison based on the computation of the Bayesian evidence ratios for spectropolarimetric observations. Our results show that there is not a single model appropriate for all profiles simultaneously. Data with moderate signal-to-noise ratios (S/Ns) favor models without gradients along the line of sight. If the observations show clear circular and linear polarization signals above the noise level, models with gradients along the line are preferred. As a general rule, observations with large S/Ns favor more complex models. We demonstrate that the evidence ratios correlate well with simple proxies. Therefore, we propose to calculate these proxies when carrying out standard least-squares inversions to allow for model comparison in the future.

  19. Iterative Reconstruction Methods for Hybrid Inverse Problems in Impedance Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Kristoffer; Knudsen, Kim

    2014-01-01

    For a general formulation of hybrid inverse problems in impedance tomography the Picard and Newton iterative schemes are adapted and four iterative reconstruction algorithms are developed. The general problem formulation includes several existing hybrid imaging modalities such as current density...... impedance imaging, magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography, and ultrasound modulated electrical impedance tomography, and the unified approach to the reconstruction problem encompasses several algorithms suggested in the literature. The four proposed algorithms are implemented numerically in two...... be based on a theoretical analysis of the underlying inverse problem....

  20. Structured Sparsity Regularization Approach to the EEG Inverse Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montoya-Martinez, Jair; Artes-Rodriguez, Antonio; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2012-01-01

    Localization of brain activity involves solving the EEG inverse problem, which is an undetermined ill-posed problem. We propose a novel approach consisting in estimating, using structured sparsity regularization techniques, the Brain Electrical Sources (BES) matrix directly in the spatio-temporal......Localization of brain activity involves solving the EEG inverse problem, which is an undetermined ill-posed problem. We propose a novel approach consisting in estimating, using structured sparsity regularization techniques, the Brain Electrical Sources (BES) matrix directly in the spatio...

  1. Inverse problems in vision and 3D tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Mohamad-Djafari, Ali

    2013-01-01

    The concept of an inverse problem is a familiar one to most scientists and engineers, particularly in the field of signal and image processing, imaging systems (medical, geophysical, industrial non-destructive testing, etc.) and computer vision. In imaging systems, the aim is not just to estimate unobserved images, but also their geometric characteristics from observed quantities that are linked to these unobserved quantities through the forward problem. This book focuses on imagery and vision problems that can be clearly written in terms of an inverse problem where an estimate for the image a

  2. Underground water quality model inversion of genetic algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Ruijie; LI Xin

    2009-01-01

    The underground water quality model with non-linear inversion problem is ill-posed, and boils down to solving the minimum of nonlinear function. Genetic algorithms are adopted in a number of individuals of groups by iterative search to find the optimal solution of the problem, the encoding strings as its operational objective, and achieving the iterative calculations by the genetic operators. It is an effective method of inverse problems of groundwater, with incomparable advantages and practical significances.

  3. Reconstruction Methods for Inverse Problems with Partial Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Kristoffer

    This thesis presents a theoretical and numerical analysis of a general mathematical formulation of hybrid inverse problems in impedance tomography. This includes problems from several existing hybrid imaging modalities such as Current Density Impedance Imaging, Magnetic Resonance Electrical...... Impedance Tomography, and Ultrasound Modulated Electrical Impedance Tomography. After giving an introduction to hybrid inverse problems in impedance tomography and the mathematical tools that facilitate the related analysis, we explain in detail the stability properties associated with the classification...... of a linearised hybrid inverse problem. This is done using pseudo-differential calculus and theory for overdetermined boundary value problem. Using microlocal analysis we then present novel results on the propagation of singularities, which give a precise description of the distinct features of solutions...

  4. Numerical methods for forward and inverse problems in optical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hao

    The main objective of this work is to develop efficient and accurate numerical algorithms for mathematical problems in optical imaging: forward modeling and inverse problems. Radiative transfer equation (RTE) can be regarded as the gold standard of modeling in vivo photon migration, however an efficient solver of RTE is extremely computationally challenging. In this work we develop a fast multigrid solver for steady-state or frequency-domain RTE on 2D and 3D structured and unstructured meshes with vacuum or reflection boundary condition. The error estimate and convergence analysis of the algorithm is given. The subsequent effort is devoted to quantitatively improve the reconstruction from ill-posed problems, such as multilevel approach with L1+TV regularization for bioluminescence tomography, multilevel regularization for diffuse optical tomography, linear complex-source method for fluorescence tomography, and Bregman method for quantitative photoacoustic tomography. Most of the developed methods are general in the sense that they are not limited to a particular reconstruction problem and can be combined in a synergetic way.

  5. Stabilizing inverse problems by internal data

    KAUST Repository

    Kuchment, Peter

    2012-07-30

    Several newly developing hybrid imaging methods (e.g., those combining electrical impedance or optical imaging with acoustics) enable one to obtain some auxiliary interior information (usually some combination of the electrical conductivity and the current) about the parameters of the tissues. This information, in turn, happens to stabilize the exponentially unstable and thus low-resolution optical and electrical impedance tomography. Various known instances of this effect have been studied individually. We show that there is a simple general technique (covering all known cases) that shows what kinds of interior data stabilize the reconstruction, and why. Namely, we show when the linearized problem becomes an elliptic pseudo-differential one, and thus stable. Stability here is meant as the problem being Fredholm, so the local uniqueness is not shown and probably does not hold in such generality. © 2012 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  6. Stabilizing Inverse Problems by Internal Data

    CERN Document Server

    Kuchment, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Several newly developing hybrid imaging methods (e.g., those combining electrical impedance or optical imaging with acoustics) enable one to obtain some auxiliary interior information (usually some combination of the electrical conductivity and the current) about the parameters of the tissues. This information, in turn, happens to stabilize the exponentially unstable and thus low resolution optical and electrical impedance tomography. Various known instances of this effect have been studied individually. We show that there is a simple general technique (covering all known cases) that shows what kind of interior data stabilizes the reconstruction, and why. Namely, we show when the linearized problem becomes elliptic pseudo-differential one, and thus stable. Stability here is meant as the problem being Fredholm, so the local uniqueness is not shown and probably does not hold in such generality.

  7. One-dimensional inverse problems of mathematical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Lavrent'ev, M M; Yakhno, V G; Schulenberger, J R

    1986-01-01

    This monograph deals with the inverse problems of determining a variable coefficient and right side for hyperbolic and parabolic equations on the basis of known solutions at fixed points of space for all times. The problems are one-dimensional in nature since the desired coefficient of the equation is a function of only one coordinate, while the desired right side is a function only of time. The authors use methods based on the spectral theory of ordinary differential operators of second order and also methods which make it possible to reduce the investigation of the inverse problems to the in

  8. Minimax theory for a class of nonlinear statistical inverse problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Kolyan; Schmidt-Hieber, Johannes

    2016-06-01

    We study a class of statistical inverse problems with nonlinear pointwise operators motivated by concrete statistical applications. A two-step procedure is proposed, where the first step smoothes the data and inverts the nonlinearity. This reduces the initial nonlinear problem to a linear inverse problem with deterministic noise, which is then solved in a second step. The noise reduction step is based on wavelet thresholding and is shown to be minimax optimal (up to logarithmic factors) in a pointwise function-dependent sense. Our analysis is based on a modified notion of Hölder smoothness scales that are natural in this setting.

  9. Inverse problems in ordinary differential equations and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Llibre, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    This book is dedicated to study the inverse problem of ordinary differential equations, that is it focuses in finding all ordinary differential equations that satisfy a given set of properties. The Nambu bracket is the central tool in developing this approach. The authors start characterizing the ordinary differential equations in R^N which have a given set of partial integrals or first integrals. The results obtained are applied first to planar polynomial differential systems with a given set of such integrals, second to solve the 16th Hilbert problem restricted to generic algebraic limit cycles, third for solving the inverse problem for constrained Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanical systems, fourth for studying the integrability of a constrained rigid body. Finally the authors conclude with an analysis on nonholonomic mechanics, a generalization of the Hamiltonian principle, and the statement an solution of the inverse problem in vakonomic mechanics.

  10. The Inverse Source Problem for Maxwell’s Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-01

    of applied biomedical engineering and also as a mathematical problem (see for example [3, 22, 15, 7, 14, 9, 6, 121 where we have emphasized...BLEISTEIN AND J. COHEN, Nonuniqueness in the inverse source problem in acoustics and electromagnetics, Journal of Mathematical Physics, 18 (1977), pp. 194

  11. Unfolding in particle physics: a window on solving inverse problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spanò Francesco

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Unfolding is the ensemble of techniques aimed at resolving inverse, ill-posed problems. A pedagogical introduction to the origin and main problems related to unfolding is presented and used as the the stepping stone towards the illustration of some of the most common techniques that are currently used in particle physics experiments.

  12. AN INVERSE MAXIMUM CAPACITY PATH PROBLEM WITH LOWER BOUND CONSTRAINTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨超; 陈学旗

    2002-01-01

    The computational complexity of inverse mimimum capacity path problem with lower bound on capacity of maximum capacity path is examined, and it is proved that solution of this problem is NP-complete. A strong polynomial algorithm for a local optimal solution is provided.

  13. On a class of inverse electrostatic and elasticity problems

    OpenAIRE

    Artemev, Andrei; Parnovski, Leonid; Polterovich, Iosif

    2012-01-01

    We study the inverse electrostatic and elasticity problems associated with Poisson and Navier equations. The uniqueness of solutions of these problems is proved for piecewise constant electric charge and internal stress distributions having a checkered structure: they are constant on rectangular blocks. Such distributions appear naturally in practical applications. We also discuss computational challenges arising in the numerical implementation of our method.

  14. Effect of head shape variations among individuals on the EEG/MEG forward and inverse problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Ellenrieder, Nicolás; Muravchik, Carlos H; Wagner, Michael; Nehorai, Arye

    2009-03-01

    We study the effect of the head shape variations on the EEG/magnetoencephalography (MEG) forward and inverse problems. We build a random head model such that each sample represents the head shape of a different individual and solve the forward problem assuming this random head model, using a polynomial chaos expansion. The random solution of the forward problem is then used to quantify the effect of the geometry when the inverse problem is solved with a standard head model. The results derived with this approach are valid for a continuous family of head models, rather than just for a set of cases. The random model consists of three random surfaces that define layers of different electric conductivity, and we built an example based on a set of 30 deterministic models from adults. Our results show that for a dipolar source model, the effect of the head shape variations on the EEG/MEG inverse problem due to the random head model is slightly larger than the effect of the electronic noise present in the sensors. The variations in the EEG inverse problem solutions are due to the variations in the shape of the volume conductor, while the variations in the MEG inverse problem solutions, larger than the EEG ones, are caused mainly by the variations of the absolute position of the sources in a coordinate system based on anatomical landmarks, in which the magnetometers have a fixed position.

  15. Adaptive regularization of noisy linear inverse problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kai; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard; Lehn-Schiøler, Tue

    2006-01-01

    In the Bayesian modeling framework there is a close relation between regularization and the prior distribution over parameters. For prior distributions in the exponential family, we show that the optimal hyper-parameter, i.e., the optimal strength of regularization, satisfies a simple relation: T...

  16. Parameter Selection Methods in Inverse Problem Formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-03

    therapy levels, with u(t) = 0 for fully off and u(t) = 1, for fully on. Although HIV treatment is nearly always administered as combination therapy...Davidian, and E.S. Rosenberg, Model fitting and predic- tion with HIV treatment interruption data, CRSC-TR05-40, NCSU, October 2005; Bull. Math

  17. Inverse problem of bottom slope design for aerator devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴建华; 樊博; 许唯临

    2013-01-01

    Air entrainment is an effective approach to protect release works from cavitation damage. The traditional method of aera-tor device designs is that, for given flow conditions, the geometries of the aerator device are designed and then the effects are experi-mentally tested for cavitation damage control. The present paper proposes an inverse problem method of determining the bottom slopes in front of and behind an aerator if the requirements of air entrainment, flow conditions and some of aerator geometric para-meters are given. An RBF neural network model is developed and the relevant bottom slopes are calculated in different conditions of flow and geometry on the basis of the data of 19 aerator devices from different discharge tunnels with safe operation. The case study shows that the methodology provides an effective way to design aerator devices under given target conditions.

  18. Detecting multi-spin interactions in the inverse Ising problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Joseph; Swendsen, Robert H.

    2017-10-01

    While the usual goal in Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of Ising models is the efficient generation of spin configurations with Boltzmann probabilities, the inverse problem is to determine the coupling constants from a given set of spin configurations. Most recent work has been limited to local magnetic fields and pair-wise interactions. We have extended solutions to multi-spin interactions, using correlation function matching (CFM). A more serious limitation of previous work has been the uncertainty of whether a chosen set of interactions is capable of faithfully representing real data. We show how our confirmation testing method uses an additional MC simulation to detect significant interactions that might be missing in the assumed representation of the data.

  19. Wake Vortex Inverse Model User's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, David; Delisi, Donald

    2008-01-01

    NorthWest Research Associates (NWRA) has developed an inverse model for inverting landing aircraft vortex data. The data used for the inversion are the time evolution of the lateral transport position and vertical position of both the port and starboard vortices. The inverse model performs iterative forward model runs using various estimates of vortex parameters, vertical crosswind profiles, and vortex circulation as a function of wake age. Forward model predictions of lateral transport and altitude are then compared with the observed data. Differences between the data and model predictions guide the choice of vortex parameter values, crosswind profile and circulation evolution in the next iteration. Iterations are performed until a user-defined criterion is satisfied. Currently, the inverse model is set to stop when the improvement in the rms deviation between the data and model predictions is less than 1 percent for two consecutive iterations. The forward model used in this inverse model is a modified version of the Shear-APA model. A detailed description of this forward model, the inverse model, and its validation are presented in a different report (Lai, Mellman, Robins, and Delisi, 2007). This document is a User's Guide for the Wake Vortex Inverse Model. Section 2 presents an overview of the inverse model program. Execution of the inverse model is described in Section 3. When executing the inverse model, a user is requested to provide the name of an input file which contains the inverse model parameters, the various datasets, and directories needed for the inversion. A detailed description of the list of parameters in the inversion input file is presented in Section 4. A user has an option to save the inversion results of each lidar track in a mat-file (a condensed data file in Matlab format). These saved mat-files can be used for post-inversion analysis. A description of the contents of the saved files is given in Section 5. An example of an inversion input

  20. The inverse problem based on a full dispersive wave equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gegentana Bao; Naranmandula Bao

    2012-01-01

    The inverse problem for harmonic waves and wave packets was studied based on a full dispersive wave equation. First, a full dispersive wave equation which describes wave propagation in nondissipative microstructured linear solids is established based on the Mindlin theory, and the dispersion characteristics are discussed. Second, based on the full dispersive wave equation, an inverse problem for determining the four unknown coefficients of wave equa- tion is posed in terms of the frequencies and corresponding wave numbers of four different harmonic waves, and the inverse problem is demonstrated with rigorous mathematical theory. Research proves that the coefficients of wave equation related to material properties can be uniquely determined in cases of normal and anomalous dispersions by measuring the frequen- cies and corresponding wave numbers of four different harmonic waves which propagate in a nondissipative microstructured linear solids.

  1. On numerical methods for direct and inverse problems in electromagnetism

    OpenAIRE

    Zemanova, Viera

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to the study of processes in the propagation of electromagnetic fields. We do not aim at one particular problem, actually very different kinds of topics are analyzed here. We deal with direct problems as well as with inverse ones, low frequency electromagnetism is discussed and consequently the wave propagation problem in high frequency domain is studied. Study of electromagnetic materials and their behavior is of a huge interest for the technological world. Its impo...

  2. Forward and inverse modelling of post-seismic deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Ophelia; Al-Attar, David; Tromp, Jeroen; Mitrovica, Jerry X.

    2016-11-01

    We consider a new approach to both the forward and inverse problems in post-seismic deformation. We present a method for forward modelling post-seismic deformation in a self-gravitating, heterogeneous and compressible earth with a variety of linear and non-linear rheologies. We further demonstrate how the adjoint method can be applied to the inverse problem both to invert for rheological structure and to calculate the sensitivity of a given surface measurement to changes in rheology or time-dependence of the source. Both the forward and inverse aspects are illustrated with several numerical examples implemented in a spherically symmetric earth model.

  3. Forward and inverse modelling of post-seismic deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Ophelia; Al-Attar, David; Tromp, Jeroen; Mitrovica, Jerry X.

    2017-02-01

    We consider a new approach to both the forward and inverse problems in post-seismic deformation. We present a method for forward modelling post-seismic deformation in a self-gravitating, heterogeneous and compressible earth with a variety of linear and nonlinear rheologies. We further demonstrate how the adjoint method can be applied to the inverse problem both to invert for rheological structure and to calculate the sensitivity of a given surface measurement to changes in rheology or time-dependence of the source. Both the forward and inverse aspects are illustrated with several numerical examples implemented in a spherically symmetric earth model.

  4. Uniqueness and local stability for the inverse scattering problem of determining the cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG; Lixin; MA; Fuming

    2005-01-01

    Considering a time-harmonic electromagnetic plane wave incident on an arbitrarily shaped open cavity embedded in infinite ground plane, the physical process is modelled by Maxwell's equations. We investigate the inverse problem of determining the shape of the open cavity from the information of the measured scattered field. Results on the uniqueness and the local stability of the inverse problem in the 2-dimensional TM (transverse magnetic) polarization are proved in this paper.

  5. Fractal-Based Methods and Inverse Problems for Differential Equations: Current State of the Art

    OpenAIRE

    Kunze, Herb E.; Davide La Torre; Franklin Mendivil; Manuel Ruiz Galán; Rachad Zaki

    2014-01-01

    We illustrate, in this short survey, the current state of the art of fractal-based techniques and their application to the solution of inverse problems for ordinary and partial differential equations. We review several methods based on the Collage Theorem and its extensions. We also discuss two innovative applications: the first one is related to a vibrating string model while the second one considers a collage-based approach for solving inverse problems for partial differential equations on ...

  6. Uncertainty quantification and weak approximation of an elliptic inverse problem

    CERN Document Server

    Dashti, Masoumeh

    2011-01-01

    We consider the inverse problem of determining the permeability from the pressure in a Darcy model of flow in a porous medium. Mathematically the problem is to find the diffusion coefficient for a linear uniformly elliptic partial differential equation in divergence form, in a bounded domain in dimension $d \\le 3$, from measurements of the solution in the interior. We adopt a Bayesian approach to the problem. We place a prior random field measure on the log permeability, specified through the Karhunen-Lo\\`eve expansion of its draws. We consider Gaussian measures constructed this way, and study the regularity of functions drawn from them. We also study the Lipschitz properties of the observation operator mapping the log permeability to the observations. Combining these regularity and continuity estimates, we show that the posterior measure is well-defined on a suitable Banach space. Furthermore the posterior measure is shown to be Lipschitz with respect to the data in the Hellinger metric, giving rise to a for...

  7. SIPPI: A Matlab toolbox for sampling the solution to inverse problems with complex prior information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Mejer; Cordua, Knud Skou; Looms, Majken Caroline

    2013-01-01

    We present an application of the SIPPI Matlab toolbox, to obtain a sample from the a posteriori probability density function for the classical tomographic inversion problem. We consider a number of different forward models, linear and non-linear, such as ray based forward models that rely...... on the high frequency approximation of the wave-equation and ‘fat’ ray based forward models relying on finite frequency theory. In order to sample the a posteriori probability density function we make use of both least squares based inversion, for linear Gaussian inverse problems, and the extended Metropolis...... sampler, for non-linear non-Gaussian inverse problems. To illustrate the applicability of the SIPPI toolbox to a tomographic field data set we use a cross-borehole traveltime data set from Arrenæs, Denmark. Both the computer code and the data are released in the public domain using open source and open...

  8. Mathematical model of MMR inversion for geophysical data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suabsagun Yooyuanyong

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present an analysis of the solution to a number of geophysical inverse problems which are generally non-unique. The mathematical inverse problem that arises is commonly ill-posed in the sense that small changes in the data lead to large changes in the solution. We conduct the inversion algorithm to explore the conductivity for the ground structure. The algorithm uses the data in the form of magnetic field measurements for magnetometric resistivity (MMR. The inversion example is performed to investigate the conductivity ground profile that best fits the observed data. The result is compared with the true model and discussed to show the efficiency of the method. The model for the inversion example with the apparent conductivity and the true conductivity are plotted to show the convergence of the algorithm.

  9. Forward and inverse problems of EEG dipole localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musha, T; Okamoto, Y

    1999-01-01

    Mathematical procedures are discussed in detail of numerical solutions for obtaining scalp potentials from the electric sources. The finite-element method for an inhomogeneous volume conductor, the boundary-element method for a compartment model, and their hybrid for more general cases are discussed. Construction of the head model and typical estimation of electric conductivity of the compartment model is described, which can reduce errors in estimated dipole location caused by incorrect head geometry. The concept of reciprocity is explained, which is applied to understanding a relation between the electrode configuration and its sensitivity for various source conditions. Typical techniques for solving the inverse problem are reviewed for discrete source models. Methods of estimating accuracy of the dipole location in the presence of noise are discussed, together with some numerical examples. The dipolarity is a goodness-of-fit of the dipole approximation, and lowering of the dipolarity is related to inhomogeneous neuronal activity in the cortex. Finally, a criterion of determining the optimal number of model parameters is given in terms of AIC (Akaike Information Criterion), which is applied to decide the most probable number of equivalent dipoles.

  10. Geometric MCMC for infinite-dimensional inverse problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beskos, Alexandros; Girolami, Mark; Lan, Shiwei; Farrell, Patrick E.; Stuart, Andrew M.

    2017-04-01

    Bayesian inverse problems often involve sampling posterior distributions on infinite-dimensional function spaces. Traditional Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithms are characterized by deteriorating mixing times upon mesh-refinement, when the finite-dimensional approximations become more accurate. Such methods are typically forced to reduce step-sizes as the discretization gets finer, and thus are expensive as a function of dimension. Recently, a new class of MCMC methods with mesh-independent convergence times has emerged. However, few of them take into account the geometry of the posterior informed by the data. At the same time, recently developed geometric MCMC algorithms have been found to be powerful in exploring complicated distributions that deviate significantly from elliptic Gaussian laws, but are in general computationally intractable for models defined in infinite dimensions. In this work, we combine geometric methods on a finite-dimensional subspace with mesh-independent infinite-dimensional approaches. Our objective is to speed up MCMC mixing times, without significantly increasing the computational cost per step (for instance, in comparison with the vanilla preconditioned Crank-Nicolson (pCN) method). This is achieved by using ideas from geometric MCMC to probe the complex structure of an intrinsic finite-dimensional subspace where most data information concentrates, while retaining robust mixing times as the dimension grows by using pCN-like methods in the complementary subspace. The resulting algorithms are demonstrated in the context of three challenging inverse problems arising in subsurface flow, heat conduction and incompressible flow control. The algorithms exhibit up to two orders of magnitude improvement in sampling efficiency when compared with the pCN method.

  11. A Survey on Inverse Problems for Applied Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Yaman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to introduce inversion-based engineering applications and to investigate some of the important ones from mathematical point of view. To do this we employ acoustic, electromagnetic, and elastic waves for presenting different types of inverse problems. More specifically, we first study location, shape, and boundary parameter reconstruction algorithms for the inaccessible targets in acoustics. The inverse problems for the time-dependent differential equations of isotropic and anisotropic elasticity are reviewed in the following section of the paper. These problems were the objects of the study by many authors in the last several decades. The physical interpretations for almost all of these problems are given, and the geophysical applications for some of them are described. In our last section, an introduction with many links into the literature is given for modern algorithms which combine techniques from classical inverse problems with stochastic tools into ensemble methods both for data assimilation as well as for forecasting.

  12. Methodes entropiques appliquees au probleme inverse en magnetoencephalographie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapalme, Ervig

    2005-07-01

    This thesis is devoted to biomagnetic source localization using magnetoencephalography. This problem is known to have an infinite number of solutions. So methods are required to take into account anatomical and functional information on the solution. The work presented in this thesis uses the maximum entropy on the mean method to constrain the solution. This method originates from statistical mechanics and information theory. This thesis is divided into two main parts containing three chapters each. The first part reviews the magnetoencephalographic inverse problem: the theory needed to understand its context and the hypotheses for simplifying the problem. In the last chapter of this first part, the maximum entropy on the mean method is presented: its origins are explained and also how it is applied to our problem. The second part is the original work of this thesis presenting three articles; one of them already published and two others submitted for publication. In the first article, a biomagnetic source model is developed and applied in a theoretical con text but still demonstrating the efficiency of the method. In the second article, we go one step further towards a realistic modelization of the cerebral activation. The main priors are estimated using the magnetoencephalographic data. This method proved to be very efficient in realistic simulations. In the third article, the previous method is extended to deal with time signals thus exploiting the excellent time resolution offered by magnetoencephalography. Compared with our previous work, the temporal method is applied to real magnetoencephalographic data coming from a somatotopy experience and results agree with previous physiological knowledge about this kind of cognitive process.

  13. A time domain sampling method for inverse acoustic scattering problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yukun; Hömberg, Dietmar; Hu, Guanghui; Li, Jingzhi; Liu, Hongyu

    2016-06-01

    This work concerns the inverse scattering problems of imaging unknown/inaccessible scatterers by transient acoustic near-field measurements. Based on the analysis of the migration method, we propose efficient and effective sampling schemes for imaging small and extended scatterers from knowledge of time-dependent scattered data due to incident impulsive point sources. Though the inverse scattering problems are known to be nonlinear and ill-posed, the proposed imaging algorithms are totally "direct" involving only integral calculations on the measurement surface. Theoretical justifications are presented and numerical experiments are conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of our methods. In particular, the proposed static imaging functionals enhance the performance of the total focusing method (TFM) and the dynamic imaging functionals show analogous behavior to the time reversal inversion but without solving time-dependent wave equations.

  14. Forward and inverse models for photon transport in soil-ice mixtures and their application to the problem of retrieving optical properties of planetary surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picca, Paolo; Furfaro, Roberto; Kargel, Jeffrey; Ganapol, Barry D.

    2008-04-01

    Remote sensing studies are often based on simplified approaches describing the photon transport in absorbing and scattering media. The main purpose of the present paper is to show the potentiality of modeling directly the transport phenomena by mean of linear Boltzmann equation. Some details about the solution method of the integro-differential equation are reported with a collection of results of relevance in planetary study domain. An inverse approach based on artificial neural network is also proposed to retrieve the optical properties of planetary surfaces and its performances are tested in various cases.

  15. A new method of solving the coefficient inverse problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the new method for solving the coefficient inverse problem in the reproducing kernel space. It is different from the previous studies. This method gives accurate results and shows that it is valid by the numerical example.

  16. Solving probabilistic inverse problems rapidly with prior samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Käufl, Paul; Valentine, Andrew P.; de Wit, Ralph W.; Trampert, Jeannot

    2016-01-01

    Owing to the increasing availability of computational resources, in recent years the probabilistic solution of non-linear, geophysical inverse problems by means of sampling methods has become increasingly feasible. Nevertheless, we still face situations in which a Monte Carlo approach is not

  17. Solving probabilistic inverse problems rapidly with prior samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Käufl, Paul; Valentine, Andrew P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/364418680; de Wit, Ralph W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/344668908; Trampert, Jeannot|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304829250

    2016-01-01

    Owing to the increasing availability of computational resources, in recent years the probabilistic solution of non-linear, geophysical inverse problems by means of sampling methods has become increasingly feasible. Nevertheless, we still face situations in which a Monte Carlo approach is not practic

  18. A comparative analysis of algorithms for the magnetoencephalography inverse problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorrentino, A [CNR-INFM LAMIA, Genova (Italy); Pascarella, A; Piana, M [Dipartimento di Informatica, Universita di Verona, Ca Vignal 2, Strada le Grazie 15, 37134, Verona (Italy); Campi, C [Dipartimento di Matematica, Universita di Genova, via Dodecaneso 35, 16146, Genova (Italy)], E-mail: sorrentino@fisica.unige.it

    2008-11-01

    We present a comparison of three methods for the solution of the magnetoencephalography inverse problem. The methods are: an eigenspace projected beamformer, an algorithm implementing multiple signal classification with recursively applied projection and a particle filter for Bayesian tracking. Synthetic data with neurophysiological significance are analyzed by the three methods to recover position and amplitude time course of the active sources.

  19. Solving the Inverse-Square Problem with Complex Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, N.

    2005-01-01

    The equation of motion for a mass that moves under the influence of a central, inverse-square force is formulated and solved as a problem in complex variables. To find the solution, the constancy of angular momentum is first established using complex variables. Next, the complex position coordinate and complex velocity of the particle are assumed…

  20. A mathematical framework for inverse wave problems in heterogeneous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blazek, K.D.; Stolk, C.; Symes, W.W.

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides a theoretical foundation for some common formulations of inverse problems in wave propagation, based on hyperbolic systems of linear integro-differential equations with bounded and measurable coefficients. The coefficients of these time-dependent partial differential equations re

  1. Dimensionality Reduction and Uncertainty Quantification for Inverse Problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Tristan

    2015-01-01

    Many inverse problems in science and engineering involve multi-experiment data and thus require a large number of forward simulations. Dimensionality reduction techniques aim at reducing the number of forward solves by (randomly) subsampling the data. In the special case of non-linear least-squares

  2. Solution of 3D inverse scattering problems by combined inverse equivalent current and finite element methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kılıç, Emre, E-mail: emre.kilic@tum.de; Eibert, Thomas F.

    2015-05-01

    An approach combining boundary integral and finite element methods is introduced for the solution of three-dimensional inverse electromagnetic medium scattering problems. Based on the equivalence principle, unknown equivalent electric and magnetic surface current densities on a closed surface are utilized to decompose the inverse medium problem into two parts: a linear radiation problem and a nonlinear cavity problem. The first problem is formulated by a boundary integral equation, the computational burden of which is reduced by employing the multilevel fast multipole method (MLFMM). Reconstructed Cauchy data on the surface allows the utilization of the Lorentz reciprocity and the Poynting's theorems. Exploiting these theorems, the noise level and an initial guess are estimated for the cavity problem. Moreover, it is possible to determine whether the material is lossy or not. In the second problem, the estimated surface currents form inhomogeneous boundary conditions of the cavity problem. The cavity problem is formulated by the finite element technique and solved iteratively by the Gauss–Newton method to reconstruct the properties of the object. Regularization for both the first and the second problems is achieved by a Krylov subspace method. The proposed method is tested against both synthetic and experimental data and promising reconstruction results are obtained.

  3. Inverse Eigenvalue Problems for Two Special Acyclic Matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debashish Sharma

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study two inverse eigenvalue problems (IEPs of constructing two special acyclic matrices. The first problem involves the reconstruction of matrices whose graph is a path, from given information on one eigenvector of the required matrix and one eigenvalue of each of its leading principal submatrices. The second problem involves reconstruction of matrices whose graph is a broom, the eigen data being the maximum and minimum eigenvalues of each of the leading principal submatrices of the required matrix. In order to solve the problems, we use the recurrence relations among leading principal minors and the property of simplicity of the extremal eigenvalues of acyclic matrices.

  4. A regularized GMRES method for inverse blackbody radiation problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Jieer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The inverse blackbody radiation problem is focused on determining temperature distribution of a blackbody from measured total radiated power spectrum. This problem consists of solving a first kind of Fredholm integral equation and many numerical methods have been proposed. In this paper, a regularized GMRES method is presented to solve the linear ill-posed problem caused by the discretization of such an integral equation. This method projects the orignal problem onto a lower dimensional subspaces by the Arnoldi process. Tikhonov regularization combined with GCV criterion is applied to stabilize the numerical iteration process. Three numerical examples indicate the effectiveness of the regularized GMRES method.

  5. An inverse Sturm–Liouville problem with a fractional derivative

    KAUST Repository

    Jin, Bangti

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, we numerically investigate an inverse problem of recovering the potential term in a fractional Sturm-Liouville problem from one spectrum. The qualitative behaviors of the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions are discussed, and numerical reconstructions of the potential with a Newton method from finite spectral data are presented. Surprisingly, it allows very satisfactory reconstructions for both smooth and discontinuous potentials, provided that the order . α∈. (1,. 2) of fractional derivative is sufficiently away from 2. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.

  6. Forward and inverse problems in fundamental and applied magnetohydrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    This Minireview summarizes the recent efforts to solve forward and inverse problems as they occur in different branches of fundamental and applied magnetohydrodynamics. As for the forward problem, the main focus is on the numerical treatment of induction processes, including self-excitation of magnetic fields in non-spherical domains and/or under the influence of non-homogeneous material parameters. As an important application of the developed numerical schemes, the functioning of the von-K\\'...

  7. IPDO-2007: Inverse Problems, Design and Optimization Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-01

    108 INVERSE APPROACHES IN IMPROVEMENT OF AIR POLUTION PLUME DISPERSION MODELS FOR REGULATORY APPLICATIONS 517 109 USING OF THE IOSO NM SOFTWARE FOR...Dulikravich, G.S., Orlande, H.R.B., Tanaka, M. and Colaco, M.J.), Miami Beach, FL, April 16-18, 2007. 5. Inverse Approaches in Improvement of Air Pollution...A. Woodbury (USA) Prof. Anatoly G. Yagola (Russia) 5.4 SPONSORS AND PROMOTERS OF IPDO-2007 AFOSR/Numerical Mathematics (United States Air Force

  8. Computational experiment on the numerical solution of some inverse problems of mathematical physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'ev, V. I.; Kardashevsky, A. M.; Sivtsev, PV

    2016-11-01

    In this article the computational experiment on the numerical solution of the most popular linear inverse problems for equations of mathematical physics are presented. The discretization of retrospective inverse problem for parabolic equation is performed using difference scheme with non-positive weight multiplier. Similar difference scheme is also used for the numerical solution of Cauchy problem for two-dimensional Laplace equation. The results of computational experiment, performed on model problems with exact solution, including ones with randomly perturbed input data are presented and discussed.

  9. The numerical solution of the boundary inverse problem for a parabolic equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'ev, V. V.; Vasilyeva, M. V.; Kardashevsky, A. M.

    2016-10-01

    Boundary inverse problems occupy an important place among the inverse problems of mathematical physics. They are connected with the problems of diagnosis, when additional measurements on one of the borders or inside the computational domain are necessary to restore the boundary regime in the other border, inaccessible to direct measurements. The boundary inverse problems belong to a class of conditionally correct problems, and therefore, their numerical solution requires the development of special computational algorithms. The paper deals with the solution of the boundary inverse problem for one-dimensional second-order parabolic equations, consisting in the restoration of boundary regime according to measurements inside the computational domain. For the numerical solution of the inverse problem it is proposed to use an analogue of a computational algorithm, proposed and developed to meet the challenges of identification of the right side of the parabolic equations in the works P.N.Vabishchevich and his students based on a special decomposition of solving the problem at each temporal layer. We present and discuss the results of a computational experiment conducted on model problems with quasi-solutions, including with random errors in the input data.

  10. Solution of inverse problems with limited forward solver evaluations: a Bayesian perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilionis, I.; Zabaras, N.

    2014-01-01

    Solving inverse problems based on computationally demanding forward models is ubiquitously difficult since one is necessarily limited to just a few observations of the response surface. The usual practice is to replace the response surface with a surrogate. However, this approach induces additional uncertainties on the posterior distributions. The main contribution of this work is the reformulation of the Bayesian solution of the inverse problem when the expensive forward model is replaced by the surrogate. We derive three approximations of the reformulated solution with increasing complexity and fidelity. We demonstrate numerically that the proposed approximations capture the uncertainty of the solution of the inverse problem induced by the fact that the forward model is replaced by a finite number of simulations. We demonstrate our approach in two different problems: locating the contamination source of a diffusive process and inferring the permeability field of an oil reservoir based on measurements of the oil-cut curves.

  11. From inverse problems in mathematical physiology to quantitative differential diagnoses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Zenker

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The improved capacity to acquire quantitative data in a clinical setting has generally failed to improve outcomes in acutely ill patients, suggesting a need for advances in computer-supported data interpretation and decision making. In particular, the application of mathematical models of experimentally elucidated physiological mechanisms could augment the interpretation of quantitative, patient-specific information and help to better target therapy. Yet, such models are typically complex and nonlinear, a reality that often precludes the identification of unique parameters and states of the model that best represent available data. Hypothesizing that this non-uniqueness can convey useful information, we implemented a simplified simulation of a common differential diagnostic process (hypotension in an acute care setting, using a combination of a mathematical model of the cardiovascular system, a stochastic measurement model, and Bayesian inference techniques to quantify parameter and state uncertainty. The output of this procedure is a probability density function on the space of model parameters and initial conditions for a particular patient, based on prior population information together with patient-specific clinical observations. We show that multimodal posterior probability density functions arise naturally, even when unimodal and uninformative priors are used. The peaks of these densities correspond to clinically relevant differential diagnoses and can, in the simplified simulation setting, be constrained to a single diagnosis by assimilating additional observations from dynamical interventions (e.g., fluid challenge. We conclude that the ill-posedness of the inverse problem in quantitative physiology is not merely a technical obstacle, but rather reflects clinical reality and, when addressed adequately in the solution process, provides a novel link between mathematically described physiological knowledge and the clinical concept of

  12. From inverse problems in mathematical physiology to quantitative differential diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenker, Sven; Rubin, Jonathan; Clermont, Gilles

    2007-11-01

    The improved capacity to acquire quantitative data in a clinical setting has generally failed to improve outcomes in acutely ill patients, suggesting a need for advances in computer-supported data interpretation and decision making. In particular, the application of mathematical models of experimentally elucidated physiological mechanisms could augment the interpretation of quantitative, patient-specific information and help to better target therapy. Yet, such models are typically complex and nonlinear, a reality that often precludes the identification of unique parameters and states of the model that best represent available data. Hypothesizing that this non-uniqueness can convey useful information, we implemented a simplified simulation of a common differential diagnostic process (hypotension in an acute care setting), using a combination of a mathematical model of the cardiovascular system, a stochastic measurement model, and Bayesian inference techniques to quantify parameter and state uncertainty. The output of this procedure is a probability density function on the space of model parameters and initial conditions for a particular patient, based on prior population information together with patient-specific clinical observations. We show that multimodal posterior probability density functions arise naturally, even when unimodal and uninformative priors are used. The peaks of these densities correspond to clinically relevant differential diagnoses and can, in the simplified simulation setting, be constrained to a single diagnosis by assimilating additional observations from dynamical interventions (e.g., fluid challenge). We conclude that the ill-posedness of the inverse problem in quantitative physiology is not merely a technical obstacle, but rather reflects clinical reality and, when addressed adequately in the solution process, provides a novel link between mathematically described physiological knowledge and the clinical concept of differential diagnoses

  13. SIAM conference on inverse problems: Geophysical applications. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This conference was the second in a series devoted to a particular area of inverse problems. The theme of this series is to discuss problems of major scientific importance in a specific area from a mathematical perspective. The theme of this symposium was geophysical applications. In putting together the program we tried to include a wide range of mathematical scientists and to interpret geophysics in as broad a sense as possible. Our speaker came from industry, government laboratories, and diverse departments in academia. We managed to attract a geographically diverse audience with participation from five continents. There were talks devoted to seismology, hydrology, determination of the earth`s interior on a global scale as well as oceanographic and atmospheric inverse problems.

  14. Iterative total variation schemes for nonlinear inverse problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmayr, Markus; Burger, Martin

    2009-10-01

    In this paper we discuss the construction, analysis and implementation of iterative schemes for the solution of inverse problems based on total variation regularization. Via different approximations of the nonlinearity we derive three different schemes resembling three well-known methods for nonlinear inverse problems in Hilbert spaces, namely iterated Tikhonov, Levenberg-Marquardt and Landweber. These methods can be set up such that all arising subproblems are convex optimization problems, analogous to those appearing in image denoising or deblurring. We provide a detailed convergence analysis and appropriate stopping rules in the presence of data noise. Moreover, we discuss the implementation of the schemes and the application to distributed parameter estimation in elliptic partial differential equations.

  15. Integral geometry and inverse problems for hyperbolic equations

    CERN Document Server

    Romanov, V G

    1974-01-01

    There are currently many practical situations in which one wishes to determine the coefficients in an ordinary or partial differential equation from known functionals of its solution. These are often called "inverse problems of mathematical physics" and may be contrasted with problems in which an equation is given and one looks for its solution under initial and boundary conditions. Although inverse problems are often ill-posed in the classical sense, their practical importance is such that they may be considered among the pressing problems of current mathematical re­ search. A. N. Tihonov showed [82], [83] that there is a broad class of inverse problems for which a particular non-classical definition of well-posed ness is appropriate. This new definition requires that a solution be unique in a class of solutions belonging to a given subset M of a function space. The existence of a solution in this set is assumed a priori for some set of data. The classical requirement of continuous dependence of the solutio...

  16. Obtaining sparse distributions in 2D inverse problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reci, A.; Sederman, A. J.; Gladden, L. F.

    2017-08-01

    The mathematics of inverse problems has relevance across numerous estimation problems in science and engineering. L1 regularization has attracted recent attention in reconstructing the system properties in the case of sparse inverse problems; i.e., when the true property sought is not adequately described by a continuous distribution, in particular in Compressed Sensing image reconstruction. In this work, we focus on the application of L1 regularization to a class of inverse problems; relaxation-relaxation, T1-T2, and diffusion-relaxation, D-T2, correlation experiments in NMR, which have found widespread applications in a number of areas including probing surface interactions in catalysis and characterizing fluid composition and pore structures in rocks. We introduce a robust algorithm for solving the L1 regularization problem and provide a guide to implementing it, including the choice of the amount of regularization used and the assignment of error estimates. We then show experimentally that L1 regularization has significant advantages over both the Non-Negative Least Squares (NNLS) algorithm and Tikhonov regularization. It is shown that the L1 regularization algorithm stably recovers a distribution at a signal to noise ratio direct spectroscopic discrimination is impossible, and hence measurement of chemical composition within porous media, such as catalysts or rocks, is possible while still being stable to high levels of noise.

  17. An inverse problem of thickness design for bilayer textile materials under low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dinghua; Cheng, Jianxin; Chen, Yuanbo; Ge, Meibao

    2011-04-01

    The human heat-moisture-comfort level is mainly determined by heat and moisture transfer characteristics in clothing. With respect to the model of steady-state heat and moisture transfer through parallel pore textiles, we propose an inverse problem of thickness design for bilayer textile material under low temperature in this paper. Adopting the idea of regularization method, we formulate the inverse problem solving into a function minimization problem. Combining the finite difference method for ordinary differential equations with direct search method of one-dimensional minimization problems, we derive three kinds of iteration algorithms of regularized solution for the inverse problem of thickness design. Numerical simulation is achieved to verify the efficiency of proposed methods.

  18. A hybrid algorithm for solving inverse problems in elasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barabasz Barbara

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper offers a new approach to handling difficult parametric inverse problems in elasticity and thermo-elasticity, formulated as global optimization ones. The proposed strategy is composed of two phases. In the first, global phase, the stochastic hp-HGS algorithm recognizes the basins of attraction of various objective minima. In the second phase, the local objective minimizers are closer approached by steepest descent processes executed singly in each basin of attraction. The proposed complex strategy is especially dedicated to ill-posed problems with multimodal objective functionals. The strategy offers comparatively low computational and memory costs resulting from a double-adaptive technique in both forward and inverse problem domains. We provide a result on the Lipschitz continuity of the objective functional composed of the elastic energy and the boundary displacement misfits with respect to the unknown constitutive parameters. It allows common scaling of the accuracy of solving forward and inverse problems, which is the core of the introduced double-adaptive technique. The capability of the proposed method of finding multiple solutions is illustrated by a computational example which consists in restoring all feasible Young modulus distributions minimizing an objective functional in a 3D domain of a photo polymer template obtained during step and flash imprint lithography.

  19. Forward and inverse problems in fundamental and applied magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesecke, Andre; Stefani, Frank; Wondrak, Thomas; Xu, Mingtian

    2013-03-01

    This minireview summarizes the recent efforts to solve forward and inverse problems as they occur in different branches of fundamental and applied magnetohydrodynamics. For the forward problem, the main focus is on the numerical treatment of induction processes, including self-excitation of magnetic fields in non-spherical domains and/or under the influence of non-homogeneous material parameters. As an important application of the developed numerical schemes, the functioning of the von-Kármán-sodium (VKS) dynamo experiment is shown to depend crucially on the presence of soft-iron impellers. As for the inverse problem, the main focus is on the mathematical background and some initial practical applications of contactless inductive flow tomography (CIFT), in which flow induced magnetic field perturbations are utilized to reconstruct the velocity field. The promises of CIFT for flow field monitoring in the continuous casting of steel are substantiated by results obtained at a test rig with a low-melting liquid metal. While CIFT is presently restricted to flows with low magnetic Reynolds numbers, some selected problems from non-linear inverse dynamo theory, with possible applications to geo- and astrophysics, are also discussed.

  20. MAP estimators and their consistency in Bayesian nonparametric inverse problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashti, M.; Law, K. J. H.; Stuart, A. M.; Voss, J.

    2013-09-01

    We consider the inverse problem of estimating an unknown function u from noisy measurements y of a known, possibly nonlinear, map {G} applied to u. We adopt a Bayesian approach to the problem and work in a setting where the prior measure is specified as a Gaussian random field μ0. We work under a natural set of conditions on the likelihood which implies the existence of a well-posed posterior measure, μy. Under these conditions, we show that the maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimator is well defined as the minimizer of an Onsager-Machlup functional defined on the Cameron-Martin space of the prior; thus, we link a problem in probability with a problem in the calculus of variations. We then consider the case where the observational noise vanishes and establish a form of Bayesian posterior consistency for the MAP estimator. We also prove a similar result for the case where the observation of {G}(u) can be repeated as many times as desired with independent identically distributed noise. The theory is illustrated with examples from an inverse problem for the Navier-Stokes equation, motivated by problems arising in weather forecasting, and from the theory of conditioned diffusions, motivated by problems arising in molecular dynamics.

  1. MAP estimators and their consistency in Bayesian nonparametric inverse problems

    KAUST Repository

    Dashti, M.

    2013-09-01

    We consider the inverse problem of estimating an unknown function u from noisy measurements y of a known, possibly nonlinear, map applied to u. We adopt a Bayesian approach to the problem and work in a setting where the prior measure is specified as a Gaussian random field μ0. We work under a natural set of conditions on the likelihood which implies the existence of a well-posed posterior measure, μy. Under these conditions, we show that the maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimator is well defined as the minimizer of an Onsager-Machlup functional defined on the Cameron-Martin space of the prior; thus, we link a problem in probability with a problem in the calculus of variations. We then consider the case where the observational noise vanishes and establish a form of Bayesian posterior consistency for the MAP estimator. We also prove a similar result for the case where the observation of can be repeated as many times as desired with independent identically distributed noise. The theory is illustrated with examples from an inverse problem for the Navier-Stokes equation, motivated by problems arising in weather forecasting, and from the theory of conditioned diffusions, motivated by problems arising in molecular dynamics. © 2013 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  2. Relevance vector machine technique for the inverse scattering problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Fang-Fang; Zhang Ye-Rong

    2012-01-01

    A novel method based on the relevance vector machine(RVM)for the inverse scattering problem is presented in this paper.The nonlinearity and the ill-posedness inherent in this problem are simultaneously considered.The nonlinearity is embodied in the relation between the scattered field and the target property,which can be obtained through the RVM training process.Besides,rather than utilizing regularization,the ill-posed nature of the inversion is naturally accounted for because the RVM can produce a probabilistic output.Simulation results reveal that the proposed RVM-based approach can provide comparative performances in terms of accuracy,convergence,robustness,generalization,and improved performance in terms of sparse property in comparison with the support vector machine(SVM)based approach.

  3. Solving Inverse Detection Problems Using Passive Radiation Signatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favorite, Jeffrey A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Armstrong, Jerawan C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vaquer, Pablo A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-15

    The ability to reconstruct an unknown radioactive object based on its passive gamma-ray and neutron signatures is very important in homeland security applications. Often in the analysis of unknown radioactive objects, for simplicity or speed or because there is no other information, they are modeled as spherically symmetric regardless of their actual geometry. In these presentation we discuss the accuracy and implications of this approximation for decay gamma rays and for neutron-induced gamma rays. We discuss an extension of spherical raytracing (for uncollided fluxes) that allows it to be used when the exterior shielding is flat or cylindrical. We revisit some early results in boundary perturbation theory, showing that the Roussopolos estimate is the correct one to use when the quantity of interest is the flux or leakage on the boundary. We apply boundary perturbation theory to problems in which spherically symmetric systems are perturbed in asymmetric nonspherical ways. We apply mesh adaptive direct search (MADS) algorithms to object reconstructions. We present a benchmark test set that may be used to quantitatively evaluate inverse detection methods.

  4. Parameter Identification Of Multilayer Thermal Insulation By Inverse Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenarokomov, Aleksey V.; Alifanov, Oleg M.; Gonzalez, Vivaldo M.

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce an iterative regularization method in the research of radiative and thermal properties of materials with further applications in the design of Thermal Control Systems (TCS) of spacecrafts. In this paper the radiative and thermal properties (heat capacity, emissivity and thermal conductance) of a multilayered thermal-insulating blanket (MLI), which is a screen-vacuum thermal insulation as a part of the (TCS) for perspective spacecrafts, are estimated. Properties of the materials under study are determined in the result of temperature and heat flux measurement data processing based on the solution of the Inverse Heat Transfer Problem (IHTP) technique. Given are physical and mathematical models of heat transfer processes in a specimen of the multilayered thermal-insulating blanket located in the experimental facility. A mathematical formulation of the IHTP, based on sensitivity function approach, is presented too. The practical testing was performed for specimen of the real MLI. This paper consists of recent researches, which developed the approach suggested at [1].

  5. Inverse Problem in the Surface EMG: A Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    the arm containing the studied muscle is modelised (figure 1). The multi- electrode recording system is composed of 16 electrodes regularly...nature of this study (feasibility of the inverse problem in SEMG), the modelisation was made with a few simplifying hypotheses in mind to facilitate the...implementation of the localisation algorithm. This modelisation is nevertheless inspired by previous works [6], and the shapes of the synthetic MUAPs

  6. Inverse Problems for Matrix Exponential in System Identification: System Aliasing

    OpenAIRE

    Yue, Zuogong; Thunberg, Johan; Goncalves, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    This note addresses identification of the $A$-matrix in continuous time linear dynamical systems on state-space form. If this matrix is partially known or known to have a sparse structure, such knowledge can be used to simplify the identification. We begin by introducing some general conditions for solvability of the inverse problems for matrix exponential. Next, we introduce "system aliasing" as an issue in the identification of slow sampled systems. Such aliasing give rise to non-unique mat...

  7. Explicit inverse distance weighting mesh motion for coupled problems

    OpenAIRE

    Witteveen, J.A.S.; Bijl, H.

    2009-01-01

    An explicit mesh motion algorithm based on inverse distance weighting interpolation is presented. The explicit formulation leads to a fast mesh motion algorithm and an easy implementation. In addition, the proposed point-by-point method is robust and flexible in case of large deformations, hanging nodes, and parallelization. Mesh quality results and CPU time comparisons are presented for triangular and hexahedral unstructured meshes in an airfoil flutter fluid-structure interaction problem.

  8. Explicit solution for an infinite dimensional generalized inverse eigenvalue problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazem Ghanbari

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We study a generalized inverse eigenvalue problem (GIEP, Ax=λBx, in which A is a semi-infinite Jacobi matrix with positive off-diagonal entries ci>0, and B= diag (b0,b1,…, where bi≠0 for i=0,1,…. We give an explicit solution by establishing an appropriate spectral function with respect to a given set of spectral data.

  9. Estimation of physical properties of laminated composites via the method of inverse vibration problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balci, Murat [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Bayburt University, Bayburt (Turkmenistan); Gundogdu, Omer [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Ataturk University, Erzurum (Turkmenistan)

    2017-01-15

    In this study, estimation of some physical properties of a laminated composite plate was conducted via the inverse vibration problem. Laminated composite plate was modelled and simulated to obtain vibration responses for different length-to-thickness ratio in ANSYS. Furthermore, a numerical finite element model was developed for the laminated composite utilizing the Kirchhoff plate theory and programmed in MATLAB for simulations. Optimizing the difference between these two vibration responses, inverse vibration problem was solved to obtain some of the physical properties of the laminated composite using genetic algorithms. The estimated parameters are compared with the theoretical results, and a very good correspondence was observed.

  10. Statistical mechanics of the inverse Ising problem and the optimal objective function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Johannes

    2017-08-01

    The inverse Ising problem seeks to reconstruct the parameters of an Ising Hamiltonian on the basis of spin configurations sampled from the Boltzmann measure. Over the last decade, many applications of the inverse Ising problem have arisen, driven by the advent of large-scale data across different scientific disciplines. Recently, strategies to solve the inverse Ising problem based on convex optimisation have proven to be very successful. These approaches maximise particular objective functions with respect to the model parameters. Examples are the pseudolikelihood method and interaction screening. In this paper, we establish a link between approaches to the inverse Ising problem based on convex optimisation and the statistical physics of disordered systems. We characterise the performance of an arbitrary objective function and calculate the objective function which optimally reconstructs the model parameters. We evaluate the optimal objective function within a replica-symmetric ansatz and compare the results of the optimal objective function with other reconstruction methods. Apart from giving a theoretical underpinning to solving the inverse Ising problem by convex optimisation, the optimal objective function outperforms state-of-the-art methods, albeit by a small margin.

  11. The Neuroelectromagnetic Inverse Problem and the Zero Dipole Localization Error

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolando Grave de Peralta

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A tomography of neural sources could be constructed from EEG/MEG recordings once the neuroelectromagnetic inverse problem (NIP is solved. Unfortunately the NIP lacks a unique solution and therefore additional constraints are needed to achieve uniqueness. Researchers are then confronted with the dilemma of choosing one solution on the basis of the advantages publicized by their authors. This study aims to help researchers to better guide their choices by clarifying what is hidden behind inverse solutions oversold by their apparently optimal properties to localize single sources. Here, we introduce an inverse solution (ANA attaining perfect localization of single sources to illustrate how spurious sources emerge and destroy the reconstruction of simultaneously active sources. Although ANA is probably the simplest and robust alternative for data generated by a single dominant source plus noise, the main contribution of this manuscript is to show that zero localization error of single sources is a trivial and largely uninformative property unable to predict the performance of an inverse solution in presence of simultaneously active sources. We recommend as the most logical strategy for solving the NIP the incorporation of sound additional a priori information about neural generators that supplements the information contained in the data.

  12. The neural network approximation method for solving multidimensional nonlinear inverse problems of geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimelevich, M. I.; Obornev, E. A.; Obornev, I. E.; Rodionov, E. A.

    2017-07-01

    The iterative approximation neural network method for solving conditionally well-posed nonlinear inverse problems of geophysics is presented. The method is based on the neural network approximation of the inverse operator. The inverse problem is solved in the class of grid (block) models of the medium on a regularized parameterization grid. The construction principle of this grid relies on using the calculated values of the continuity modulus of the inverse operator and its modifications determining the degree of ambiguity of the solutions. The method provides approximate solutions of inverse problems with the maximal degree of detail given the specified degree of ambiguity with the total number of the sought parameters n × 103 of the medium. The a priori and a posteriori estimates of the degree of ambiguity of the approximated solutions are calculated. The work of the method is illustrated by the example of the three-dimensional (3D) inversion of the synthesized 2D areal geoelectrical (audio magnetotelluric sounding, AMTS) data corresponding to the schematic model of a kimberlite pipe.

  13. Inverse problem for in vivo NMR spatial localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasenfeld, A.C.

    1985-11-01

    The basic physical problem of NMR spatial localization is considered. To study diseased sites, one must solve the problem of adequately localizing the NMR signal. We formulate this as an inverse problem. As the NMR Bloch equations determine the motion of nuclear spins in applied magnetic fields, a theoretical study is undertaken to answer the question of how to design magnetic field configurations to achieve these localized excited spin populations. Because of physical constraints in the production of the relevant radiofrequency fields, the problem factors into a temporal one and a spatial one. We formulate the temporal problem as a nonlinear transformation, called the Bloch Transform, from the rf input to the magnetization response. In trying to invert this transformation, both linear (for the Fourier Transform) and nonlinear (for the Bloch Transform) modes of radiofrequency excitation are constructed. The spatial problem is essentially a statics problem for the Maxwell equations of electromagnetism, as the wavelengths of the radiation considered are on the order of ten meters, and so propagation effects are negligible. In the general case, analytic solutions are unavailable, and so the methods of computer simulation are used to map the rf field spatial profiles. Numerical experiments are also performed to verify the theoretical analysis, and experimental confirmation of the theory is carried out on the 0.5 Tesla IBM/Oxford Imaging Spectrometer at the LBL NMR Medical Imaging Facility. While no explicit inverse is constructed to ''solve'' this problem, the combined theoretical/numerical analysis is validated experimentally, justifying the approximations made. 56 refs., 31 figs.

  14. Relative risk regression models with inverse polynomials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Yang; Woodward, Mark

    2013-08-30

    The proportional hazards model assumes that the log hazard ratio is a linear function of parameters. In the current paper, we model the log relative risk as an inverse polynomial, which is particularly suitable for modeling bounded and asymmetric functions. The parameters estimated by maximizing the partial likelihood are consistent and asymptotically normal. The advantages of the inverse polynomial model over the ordinary polynomial model and the fractional polynomial model for fitting various asymmetric log relative risk functions are shown by simulation. The utility of the method is further supported by analyzing two real data sets, addressing the specific question of the location of the minimum risk threshold.

  15. Inverse problem of pulsed eddy current field of ferromagnetic plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xing-Le; Lei, Yin-Zhao

    2015-03-01

    To determine the wall thickness, conductivity and permeability of a ferromagnetic plate, an inverse problem is established with measured values and calculated values of time-domain induced voltage in pulsed eddy current testing on the plate. From time-domain analytical expressions of the partial derivatives of induced voltage with respect to parameters, it is deduced that the partial derivatives are approximately linearly dependent. Then the constraints of these parameters are obtained by solving a partial linear differential equation. It is indicated that only the product of conductivity and wall thickness, and the product of relative permeability and wall thickness can be determined accurately through the inverse problem with time-domain induced voltage. In the practical testing, supposing the conductivity of the ferromagnetic plate under test is a fixed value, and then the relative variation of wall thickness between two testing points can be calculated via the ratio of the corresponding inversion results of the product of conductivity and wall thickness. Finally, this method for wall thickness measurement is verified by the experiment results of a carbon steel plate. Project supported by the National Defense Basic Technology Research Program of China (Grant No. Z132013T001).

  16. Multiscattering inversion for low-model wavenumbers

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2016-09-21

    A successful full-waveform inversion implementation updates the low-wavenumber model components first for a proper description of the wavefield propagation and slowly adds the high wavenumber potentially scattering parts of the model. The low-wavenumber components can be extracted from the transmission parts of the recorded wavefield emanating directly from the source or the transmission parts from the single- or double-scattered wavefield computed from a predicted scatter field acting as secondary sources.We use a combined inversion of data modeled from the source and those corresponding to single and double scattering to update the velocity model and the component of the velocity (perturbation) responsible for the single and double scattering. The combined inversion helps us access most of the potential model wavenumber information that may be embedded in the data. A scattering-angle filter is used to divide the gradient of the combined inversion, so initially the high-wavenumber (low-scattering-angle) components of the gradient are directed to the perturbation model and the low-wavenumber (highscattering- angle) components are directed to the velocity model. As our background velocity matures, the scatteringangle divide is slowly lowered to allow for more of the higher wavenumbers to contribute the velocity model. Synthetic examples including the Marmousi model are used to demonstrate the additional illumination and improved velocity inversion obtained when including multiscattered energy. © 2016 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  17. Identification of weakly coupled multiphysics problems. Application to the inverse problem of electrocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrado, Cesare; Gerbeau, Jean-Frédéric; Moireau, Philippe

    2015-02-01

    This work addresses the inverse problem of electrocardiography from a new perspective, by combining electrical and mechanical measurements. Our strategy relies on the definition of a model of the electromechanical contraction which is registered on ECG data but also on measured mechanical displacements of the heart tissue typically extracted from medical images. In this respect, we establish in this work the convergence of a sequential estimator which combines for such coupled problems various state of the art sequential data assimilation methods in a unified consistent and efficient framework. Indeed, we aggregate a Luenberger observer for the mechanical state and a Reduced-Order Unscented Kalman Filter applied on the parameters to be identified and a POD projection of the electrical state. Then using synthetic data we show the benefits of our approach for the estimation of the electrical state of the ventricles along the heart beat compared with more classical strategies which only consider an electrophysiological model with ECG measurements. Our numerical results actually show that the mechanical measurements improve the identifiability of the electrical problem allowing to reconstruct the electrical state of the coupled system more precisely. Therefore, this work is intended to be a first proof of concept, with theoretical justifications and numerical investigations, of the advantage of using available multi-modal observations for the estimation and identification of an electromechanical model of the heart.

  18. Network connections that evolve to circumvent the inverse optics problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Cherlyn; Sundararajan, Janani; Hogan, Michael; Purves, Dale

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental problem in vision science is how useful perceptions and behaviors arise in the absence of information about the physical sources of retinal stimuli (the inverse optics problem). Psychophysical studies show that human observers contend with this problem by using the frequency of occurrence of stimulus patterns in cumulative experience to generate percepts. To begin to understand the neural mechanisms underlying this strategy, we examined the connectivity of simple neural networks evolved to respond according to the cumulative rank of stimulus luminance values. Evolved similarities with the connectivity of early level visual neurons suggests that biological visual circuitry uses the same mechanisms as a means of creating useful perceptions and behaviors without information about the real world.

  19. Network connections that evolve to circumvent the inverse optics problem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherlyn Ng

    Full Text Available A fundamental problem in vision science is how useful perceptions and behaviors arise in the absence of information about the physical sources of retinal stimuli (the inverse optics problem. Psychophysical studies show that human observers contend with this problem by using the frequency of occurrence of stimulus patterns in cumulative experience to generate percepts. To begin to understand the neural mechanisms underlying this strategy, we examined the connectivity of simple neural networks evolved to respond according to the cumulative rank of stimulus luminance values. Evolved similarities with the connectivity of early level visual neurons suggests that biological visual circuitry uses the same mechanisms as a means of creating useful perceptions and behaviors without information about the real world.

  20. Methane combustion kinetic rate constants determination: an ill-posed inverse problem analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara D. L. Ferreira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Methane combustion was studied by the Westbrook and Dryer model. This well-established simplified mechanism is very useful in combustion science, for computational effort can be notably reduced. In the inversion procedure to be studied, rate constants are obtained from [CO] concentration data. However, when inherent experimental errors in chemical concentrations are considered, an ill-conditioned inverse problem must be solved for which appropriate mathematical algorithms are needed. A recurrent neural network was chosen due to its numerical stability and robustness. The proposed methodology was compared against Simplex and Levenberg-Marquardt, the most used methods for optimization problems.

  1. The Bayesian Formulation and Well-Posedness of Fractional Elliptic Inverse Problems

    CERN Document Server

    Trillos, Nicolas Garcia

    2016-01-01

    We study the inverse problem of recovering the order and the diffusion coefficient of an elliptic fractional partial differential equation from a finite number of noisy observations of the solution. We work in a Bayesian framework and show conditions under which the posterior distribution is given by a change of measure from the prior. Moreover, we show well-posedness of the inverse problem, in the sense that small perturbations of the observed solution lead to small Hellinger perturbations of the associated posterior measures. We thus provide a mathematical foundation to the Bayesian learning of the order ---and other inputs--- of fractional models.

  2. Solving the structural inverse gravity problem by the modified gradient methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyshko, P. S.; Akimova, E. N.; Misilov, V. E.

    2016-09-01

    New methods for solving the three-dimensional inverse gravity problem in the class of contact surfaces are described. Based on the approach previously suggested by the authors, new algorithms are developed. Application of these algorithms significantly reduces the number of the iterations and computing time compared to the previous ones. The algorithms have been numerically implemented on the multicore processor. The example of solving the structural inverse gravity problem for a model of four-layer medium (with the use of gravity field measurements) is constructed.

  3. Forward and inverse problems in fundamental and applied magnetohydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Giesecke, Andre; Wondrak, Thomas; Xu, Mingtian

    2012-01-01

    This Minireview summarizes the recent efforts to solve forward and inverse problems as they occur in different branches of fundamental and applied magnetohydrodynamics. As for the forward problem, the main focus is on the numerical treatment of induction processes, including self-excitation of magnetic fields in non-spherical domains and/or under the influence of non-homogeneous material parameters. As an important application of the developed numerical schemes, the functioning of the von-K\\'{a}rm\\'{a}n-sodium (VKS) dynamo experiment is shown to depend crucially on the presence of soft-iron impellers. As for the inverse problem, the main focus is on the mathematical background and some first practical applications of the Contactless Inductive Flow Tomography (CIFT), in which flow induced magnetic field perturbations are utilized for the reconstruction of the velocity field. The promises of CIFT for flow field monitoring in the continuous casting of steel are substantiated by results obtained at a test rig wit...

  4. From Bayes to Tarantola: New insights to understand uncertainty in inverse problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Martínez, J. L.; Fernández-Muñiz, Z.; Pallero, J. L. G.; Pedruelo-González, L. M.

    2013-11-01

    Anyone working on inverse problems is aware of their ill-posed character. In the case of inverse problems, this concept (ill-posed) proposed by J. Hadamard in 1902, admits revision since it is somehow related to their ill-conditioning and the use of local optimization methods to find their solution. A more general and interesting approach regarding risk analysis and epistemological decision making would consist in analyzing the existence of families of equivalent model parameters that are compatible with the prior information and predict the observed data within the same error bounds. Otherwise said, the ill-posed character of discrete inverse problems (ill-conditioning) originates that their solution is uncertain. Traditionally nonlinear inverse problems in discrete form have been solved via local optimization methods with regularization, but linear analysis techniques failed to account for the uncertainty in the solution that it is adopted. As a result of this fact uncertainty analysis in nonlinear inverse problems has been approached in a probabilistic framework (Bayesian approach), but these methods are hindered by the curse of dimensionality and by the high computational cost needed to solve the corresponding forward problems. Global optimization techniques are very attractive, but most of the times are heuristic and have the same limitations than Monte Carlo methods. New research is needed to provide uncertainty estimates, especially in the case of high dimensional nonlinear inverse problems with very costly forward problems. After the discredit of deterministic methods and some initial years of Bayesian fever, now the pendulum seems to return back, because practitioners are aware that the uncertainty analysis in high dimensional nonlinear inverse problems cannot (and should not be) solved via random sampling methodologies. The main reason is that the uncertainty “space” of nonlinear inverse problems has a mathematical structure that is embedded in the

  5. The forward and inverse problems in time-distance helioseismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackiewicz, Jason; Gizon, Laurent; Birch, Aaron C.

    2008-10-01

    Time-distance helioseismology is a set of tools for peering into the solar interior. In this paper we discuss and provide examples of the steps that go into current high-resolution time-distance helioseismic analyses. These steps include observations (cross covariances, travel times), modeling of the seismic wavefield for a weakly inhomogeneous solar model, and inversion of the travel times. The discussion is framed in the context of studying quiet-Sun flows, although the extension to other solar perturbations is straightforward and analogous. The two-plus-one-dimensional (2+1D) inversion procedure implemented here produces maps of vector flows in the near-surface layers of the photosphere. We examine the flows obtained by compromising, or 'trading off', between different observation times, spatial resolutions, and noise levels. Also studied is the correlation of the flows at different depths and over different time intervals.

  6. The forward and inverse problems in time-distance helioseismology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackiewicz, Jason; Gizon, Laurent [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, 37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany); Birch, Aaron C [Colorado Research Associates, NWRA, 3380 Mitchell Lane, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)], E-mail: jackiewicz@mps.mpg.de

    2008-10-15

    Time-distance helioseismology is a set of tools for peering into the solar interior. In this paper we discuss and provide examples of the steps that go into current high-resolution time-distance helioseismic analyses. These steps include observations (cross covariances, travel times), modeling of the seismic wavefield for a weakly inhomogeneous solar model, and inversion of the travel times. The discussion is framed in the context of studying quiet-Sun flows, although the extension to other solar perturbations is straightforward and analogous. The two-plus-one-dimensional (2+1D) inversion procedure implemented here produces maps of vector flows in the near-surface layers of the photosphere. We examine the flows obtained by compromising, or 'trading off', between different observation times, spatial resolutions, and noise levels. Also studied is the correlation of the flows at different depths and over different time intervals.

  7. Inverse Problem Solution in Landmines Detection Based on Active Thermography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Szymanik

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Landmines still affect numerous territories in the whole world and pose a serious threat, mostly to civilians. Widely used non-metallic landmines are undetectable using metal detector. Therefore, there is an urging need to improve methods of detecting such objects. In the present study we introduce relatively new method of landmines' detection: active infrared thermography with microwave excitation. In this paper we present the optimization based method of solving inverse problem for microwave heating. This technique will be used in the reconstruction of detected landmines geometric and material properties.

  8. THE INVERSE PROBLEM OF OPTIMAL REGULATORS AND ITS AP PLICATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a new solution to the inverse problem of linear optimal regulators to minimize a cost function and meet the requirements of relative stability in the presence of a constant but unknown disturbance. A state feedback matrix is developed using Lyapunov's second method. Moreover, the relationships between the state feedback matrix and the cost function are obtained, and a formula to solve the weighting matrices is suggest ed. The developed method is applied successfully to design the horizontal loops in the inertial navigation system.

  9. Solution of inverse localization problem associated to multistatic radar system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boutkhil M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the problem of inverse localization by a target with the aim to retrieve the position of the target, given the intensity and phase of the electromagnetic waves scattered by this object. Assuming the surface cross section to be known as well as the intensity and phase of the scattered waves, the target position was reconstructed through the echo signals scattered of each bistatic. We develop in the same time a multistatic ambiguity function trough bistatic ambiguity function to investigate several fundamental aspects that determine multistatic radar performance. We used a multistatic radar constructed of two bistatic radars, two transmitters and one receiver.

  10. Combined approach to the inverse protein folding problem. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruben A. Abagyan

    2000-06-01

    The main scientific contribution of the project ''Combined approach to the inverse protein folding problem'' submitted in 1996 and funded by the Department of Energy in 1997 is the formulation and development of the idea of the multilink recognition method for identification of functional and structural homologues of newly discovered genes. This idea became very popular after they first announced it and used it in prediction of the threading targets for the CASP2 competition (Critical Assessment of Structure Prediction).

  11. A direct sampling method to an inverse medium scattering problem

    KAUST Repository

    Ito, Kazufumi

    2012-01-10

    In this work we present a novel sampling method for time harmonic inverse medium scattering problems. It provides a simple tool to directly estimate the shape of the unknown scatterers (inhomogeneous media), and it is applicable even when the measured data are only available for one or two incident directions. A mathematical derivation is provided for its validation. Two- and three-dimensional numerical simulations are presented, which show that the method is accurate even with a few sets of scattered field data, computationally efficient, and very robust with respect to noises in the data. © 2012 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  12. Stability of charge inversion, Thomson problem, and application to electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Michael; Patriarca, Marco; Karttunen, Mikko

    2003-03-01

    We analyze charge inversion in colloidal systems at zero temperature using stability concepts, and connect this to the classical Thomson problem of arranging electrons on sphere. We show that for a finite microion charge, the globally stable, lowest-energy state of the complex formed by the colloid and the oppositely charged microions is always overcharged. This effect disappears in the continuous limit. Additionally, a layer of at least twice as many microions as required for charge neutrality is always locally stable. In an applied external electric field the stability of the microion cloud is reduced. Finally, this approach is applied to a system of two colloids at low but finite temperature.

  13. On Inverse Topology Problem for Laplace Operators on Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. Yu. Ershova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Laplacian operators on finite compact metric graphs are considered under the assumption that matching conditions at graph vertices are of $\\delta$ type. Under one additional assumption, the inverse topology problem is treated. Using the apparatus of boundary triples, we generalize and extend existing results on necessary conditions of isospectrality of two Laplacians defined on different graphs. A result is also given covering the case of Schrodinger operators.

  14. On a dense minimizer of empirical risk in inverse problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Podlewski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Properties of estimators of a functional parameter in an inverse problem setup are studied. We focus on estimators obtained through dense minimization (as opposed to minimization over \\(\\delta\\-nets of suitably defined empirical risk. At the cost of imposition of a sort of local finite-dimensionality assumption, we fill some gaps in the proofs of results published by Klemelä and Mammen [Ann. Statist. 38 (2010, 482-511]. We also give examples of functional classes that satisfy the modified assumptions.

  15. A New Inexact Inverse Subspace Iteration for Generalized Eigenvalue Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Mohammad

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper‎, ‎we represent an inexact inverse‎ ‎subspace iteration method for computing a few eigenpairs of the‎ ‎generalized eigenvalue problem $Ax = \\lambda Bx$[Q.~Ye and P.~Zhang‎, ‎Inexact inverse subspace iteration for generalized eigenvalue‎ ‎problems‎, ‎Linear Algebra and its Application‎, ‎434 (2011 1697-1715‎‎]‎. ‎In particular‎, ‎the linear convergence property of the inverse‎ ‎subspace iteration is preserved‎.

  16. An inverse problem for a semilinear parabolic equation arising from cardiac electrophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beretta, Elena; Cavaterra, Cecilia; Cerutti, M. Cristina; Manzoni, Andrea; Ratti, Luca

    2017-10-01

    In this paper we develop theoretical analysis and numerical reconstruction techniques for the solution of an inverse boundary value problem dealing with the nonlinear, time-dependent monodomain equation, which models the evolution of the electric potential in the myocardial tissue. The goal is the detection of an inhomogeneity \

  17. Inverse problems with non-trivial priors: efficient solution through sequential Gibbs sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Mejer; Cordua, Knud Skou; Mosegaard, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Markov chain Monte Carlo methods such as the Gibbs sampler and the Metropolis algorithm can be used to sample solutions to non-linear inverse problems. In principle, these methods allow incorporation of prior information of arbitrary complexity. If an analytical closed form description of the pri...... also reduce the computation time for the inversion dramatically. The method works for any statistical model for which sequential simulation can be used to generate realizations. This applies to most algorithms developed in the geostatistical community.......Markov chain Monte Carlo methods such as the Gibbs sampler and the Metropolis algorithm can be used to sample solutions to non-linear inverse problems. In principle, these methods allow incorporation of prior information of arbitrary complexity. If an analytical closed form description of the prior...... for applying the sequential Gibbs sampler and illustrate how it works. Through two case studies, we demonstrate the application of the method to a linear image restoration problem and to a non-linear cross-borehole inversion problem. We demonstrate how prior information can reduce the complexity of an inverse...

  18. An Inverse Robust Optimisation Approach for a Class of Vehicle Routing Problems under Uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Sun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a trade-off between the total penalty paid to customers (TPC and the total transportation cost (TTC in depot for vehicle routing problems under uncertainty (VRPU. The trade-off refers to the fact that the TTC in depot inevitably increases when the TPC decreases and vice versa. With respect to this issue, the vehicle routing problem (VRP with uncertain customer demand and travel time was studied to optimise the TPC and the TTC in depot. In addition, an inverse robust optimisation approach was proposed to solve this kind of VRPU by combining the ideas of inverse optimisation and robust optimisation so as to improve both the TPC and the TTC in depot. The method aimed to improve the corresponding TTC of the robust optimisation solution under the minimum TPC through minimising the adjustment of benchmark road transportation cost. According to the characteristics of the inverse robust optimisation model, a genetic algorithm (GA and column generation algorithm are combined to solve the problem. Moreover, 39 test problems are solved by using an inverse robust optimisation approach: the results show that both the TPC and TTC obtained by using the inverse robust optimisation approach are less than those calculated using a robust optimisation approach.

  19. Review on solving the inverse problem in EEG source analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabri Simon G

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this primer, we give a review of the inverse problem for EEG source localization. This is intended for the researchers new in the field to get insight in the state-of-the-art techniques used to find approximate solutions of the brain sources giving rise to a scalp potential recording. Furthermore, a review of the performance results of the different techniques is provided to compare these different inverse solutions. The authors also include the results of a Monte-Carlo analysis which they performed to compare four non parametric algorithms and hence contribute to what is presently recorded in the literature. An extensive list of references to the work of other researchers is also provided. This paper starts off with a mathematical description of the inverse problem and proceeds to discuss the two main categories of methods which were developed to solve the EEG inverse problem, mainly the non parametric and parametric methods. The main difference between the two is to whether a fixed number of dipoles is assumed a priori or not. Various techniques falling within these categories are described including minimum norm estimates and their generalizations, LORETA, sLORETA, VARETA, S-MAP, ST-MAP, Backus-Gilbert, LAURA, Shrinking LORETA FOCUSS (SLF, SSLOFO and ALF for non parametric methods and beamforming techniques, BESA, subspace techniques such as MUSIC and methods derived from it, FINES, simulated annealing and computational intelligence algorithms for parametric methods. From a review of the performance of these techniques as documented in the literature, one could conclude that in most cases the LORETA solution gives satisfactory results. In situations involving clusters of dipoles, higher resolution algorithms such as MUSIC or FINES are however preferred. Imposing reliable biophysical and psychological constraints, as done by LAURA has given superior results. The Monte-Carlo analysis performed, comparing WMN, LORETA, sLORETA and SLF

  20. PRECISE INTEGRAL ALGORITHM BASED SOLUTION FOR TRANSIENT INVERSE HEAT CONDUCTION PROBLEMS WITH MULTI-VARIABLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yi-bo; YANG Hai-tian; WU Rui-feng

    2005-01-01

    By modeling direct transient heat conduction problems via finite element method (FEM) and precise integral algorithm, a new approach is presented to solve transient inverse heat conduction problems with multi-variables. Firstly, the spatial space and temporal domain are discretized by FEM and precise integral algorithm respectively. Then, the high accuracy semi-analytical solution of direct problem can be got. Finally, based on the solution, the computing model of inverse problem and expression of sensitivity analysis are established. Single variable and variables combined identifications including thermal parameters, boundary conditions and source-related terms etc. are given to validate the approach proposed in 1-D and 2-D cases. The effects of noise data and initial guess on the results are investigated. The numerical examples show the effectiveness of this approach.

  1. Galerkin approximation for inverse problems for nonautonomous nonlinear distributed systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, H. T.; Reich, Simeon; Rosen, I. G.

    1988-01-01

    An abstract framework and convergence theory is developed for Galerkin approximation for inverse problems involving the identification of nonautonomous nonlinear distributed parameter systems. A set of relatively easily verified conditions is provided which are sufficient to guarantee the existence of optimal solutions and their approximation by a sequence of solutions to a sequence of approximating finite dimensional identification problems. The approach is based on the theory of monotone operators in Banach spaces and is applicable to a reasonably broad class of nonlinear distributed systems. Operator theoretic and variational techniques are used to establish a fundamental convergence result. An example involving evolution systems with dynamics described by nonstationary quasilinear elliptic operators along with some applications are presented and discussed.

  2. Parameterization of geophysical inversion model using particle clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Dikun

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new method of constructing physical models in a geophysical inverse problem, when there are only a few possible physical property values in the model and they are reasonably known but the geometry of the target is sought. The model consists of a fixed background and many small "particles" as building blocks that float around in the background to resemble the target by clustering. This approach contrasts the conventional geometric inversions requiring the target to be regularly shaped bodies, since here the geometry of the target can be arbitrary and does not need to be known beforehand. Because of the lack of resolution in the data, the particles may not necessarily cluster when recovering compact targets. A model norm, called distribution norm, is introduced to quantify the spread of particles and incorporated into the objective function to encourage further clustering of the particles. As proof of concept, 1D magnetotelluric inversion is used as example. My experiments reveal that the ...

  3. Auditory model inversion and its application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Heming; WANG Yongqi; CHEN Xueqin

    2005-01-01

    Auditory model has been applied to several aspects of speech signal processing field, and appears to be effective in performance. This paper presents the inverse transform of each stage of one widely used auditory model. First of all it is necessary to invert correlogram and reconstruct phase information by repetitious iterations in order to get auditory-nerve firing rate. The next step is to obtain the negative parts of the signal via the reverse process of the HWR (Half Wave Rectification). Finally the functions of inner hair cell/synapse model and Gammatone filters have to be inverted. Thus the whole auditory model inversion has been achieved. An application of noisy speech enhancement based on auditory model inversion algorithm is proposed. Many experiments show that this method is effective in reducing noise.Especially when SNR of noisy speech is low it is more effective than other methods. Thus this auditory model inversion method given in this paper is applicable to speech enhancement field.

  4. Solution of the nonlinear inverse scattering problem by T -matrix completion. II. Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinson, Howard W.; Markel, Vadim A.

    2016-10-01

    This is Part II of the paper series on data-compatible T -matrix completion (DCTMC), which is a method for solving nonlinear inverse problems. Part I of the series [H. W. Levinson and V. A. Markel, Phys. Rev. E 94, 043317 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevE.94.043317] contains theory and here we present simulations for inverse scattering of scalar waves. The underlying mathematical model is the scalar wave equation and the object function that is reconstructed is the medium susceptibility. The simulations are relevant to ultrasound tomographic imaging and seismic tomography. It is shown that DCTMC is a viable method for solving strongly nonlinear inverse problems with large data sets. It provides not only the overall shape of the object, but the quantitative contrast, which can correspond, for instance, to the variable speed of sound in the imaged medium.

  5. Basis set expansion for inverse problems in plasma diagnostic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B.; Ruiz, C. L.

    2013-07-01

    A basis set expansion method [V. Dribinski, A. Ossadtchi, V. A. Mandelshtam, and H. Reisler, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 2634 (2002)], 10.1063/1.1482156 is applied to recover physical information about plasma radiation sources from instrument data, which has been forward transformed due to the nature of the measurement technique. This method provides a general approach for inverse problems, and we discuss two specific examples relevant to diagnosing fast z pinches on the 20-25 MA Z machine [M. E. Savage, L. F. Bennett, D. E. Bliss, W. T. Clark, R. S. Coats, J. M. Elizondo, K. R. LeChien, H. C. Harjes, J. M. Lehr, J. E. Maenchen, D. H. McDaniel, M. F. Pasik, T. D. Pointon, A. C. Owen, D. B. Seidel, D. L. Smith, B. S. Stoltzfus, K. W. Struve, W. A. Stygar, L. K. Warne, J. R. Woodworth, C. W. Mendel, K. R. Prestwich, R. W. Shoup, D. L. Johnson, J. P. Corley, K. C. Hodge, T. C. Wagoner, and P. E. Wakeland, in Proceedings of the Pulsed Power Plasma Sciences Conference (IEEE, 2007), p. 979]. First, Abel inversion of time-gated, self-emission x-ray images from a wire array implosion is studied. Second, we present an approach for unfolding neutron time-of-flight measurements from a deuterium gas puff z pinch to recover information about emission time history and energy distribution. Through these examples, we discuss how noise in the measured data limits the practical resolution of the inversion, and how the method handles discontinuities in the source function and artifacts in the projected image. We add to the method a propagation of errors calculation for estimating uncertainties in the inverted solution.

  6. Basis set expansion for inverse problems in plasma diagnostic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, B.; Ruiz, C. L. [Sandia National Laboratories, PO Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    A basis set expansion method [V. Dribinski, A. Ossadtchi, V. A. Mandelshtam, and H. Reisler, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 2634 (2002)] is applied to recover physical information about plasma radiation sources from instrument data, which has been forward transformed due to the nature of the measurement technique. This method provides a general approach for inverse problems, and we discuss two specific examples relevant to diagnosing fast z pinches on the 20–25 MA Z machine [M. E. Savage, L. F. Bennett, D. E. Bliss, W. T. Clark, R. S. Coats, J. M. Elizondo, K. R. LeChien, H. C. Harjes, J. M. Lehr, J. E. Maenchen, D. H. McDaniel, M. F. Pasik, T. D. Pointon, A. C. Owen, D. B. Seidel, D. L. Smith, B. S. Stoltzfus, K. W. Struve, W. A. Stygar, L. K. Warne, J. R. Woodworth, C. W. Mendel, K. R. Prestwich, R. W. Shoup, D. L. Johnson, J. P. Corley, K. C. Hodge, T. C. Wagoner, and P. E. Wakeland, in Proceedings of the Pulsed Power Plasma Sciences Conference (IEEE, 2007), p. 979]. First, Abel inversion of time-gated, self-emission x-ray images from a wire array implosion is studied. Second, we present an approach for unfolding neutron time-of-flight measurements from a deuterium gas puff z pinch to recover information about emission time history and energy distribution. Through these examples, we discuss how noise in the measured data limits the practical resolution of the inversion, and how the method handles discontinuities in the source function and artifacts in the projected image. We add to the method a propagation of errors calculation for estimating uncertainties in the inverted solution.

  7. On the new approach to solving the inverse problem of gravimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsanukaev, Z. Z.

    2017-01-01

    The results of the studies within the new approach to solving the inverse problem of gravimetry are considered. This approach consists in direct (analytical) continuation of the anomalous gravitational field specified on the Earth's surface into the lower half-space with the use of the method of discrete approximations. The solution of the problem of analytical continuation is demonstrated by the model example. In the solution of the problem of analytical continuation, the developed algorithms and computer programs were implemented in two program packages which are used both in the model computations and in practice.

  8. Well-posedness of inverse problems for systems with time dependent parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banks, H. T.; Pedersen, Michael

    2009-01-01

    H is identified with its dual and denotes the associated duality product. We show under reasonable assumptions on the time-dependent sesquilinear forms a (t;.,.) : V x V -> C and d (t;.,.) : V-D x V-D -> C that this model allows a unique solution and that the solution depends continuously...... on the data of the problem. We also consider well-posedness as well as finite element type approximations in associated inverse problems. The problem above is a weak formulation that includes models in abstract differential operator form that include plate, beam and shell equations with several important...

  9. Active Subspace Methods for Data-Intensive Inverse Problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qiqi [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2017-04-27

    The project has developed theory and computational tools to exploit active subspaces to reduce the dimension in statistical calibration problems. This dimension reduction enables MCMC methods to calibrate otherwise intractable models. The same theoretical and computational tools can also reduce the measurement dimension for calibration problems that use large stores of data.

  10. Inverse modeling for Large-Eddy simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, Bernardus J.

    1998-01-01

    Approximate higher order polynomial inversion of the top-hat filter is developed with which the turbulent stress tensor in Large-Eddy Simulation can be consistently represented using the filtered field. Generalized (mixed) similarity models are proposed which improved the agreement with the kinetic

  11. The inverse problem of estimating the gravitational time dilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gusev, A. V., E-mail: avg@sai.msu.ru; Litvinov, D. A.; Rudenko, V. N. [Moscow State University, Sternberg Astronomical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    Precise testing of the gravitational time dilation effect suggests comparing the clocks at points with different gravitational potentials. Such a configuration arises when radio frequency standards are installed at orbital and ground stations. The ground-based standard is accessible directly, while the spaceborne one is accessible only via the electromagnetic signal exchange. Reconstructing the current frequency of the spaceborne standard is an ill-posed inverse problem whose solution depends significantly on the characteristics of the stochastic electromagnetic background. The solution for Gaussian noise is known, but the nature of the standards themselves is associated with nonstationary fluctuations of a wide class of distributions. A solution is proposed for a background of flicker fluctuations with a spectrum (1/f){sup γ}, where 1 < γ < 3, and stationary increments. The results include formulas for the error in reconstructing the frequency of the spaceborne standard and numerical estimates for the accuracy of measuring the relativistic redshift effect.

  12. Canonically Transformed Detectors Applied to the Classical Inverse Scattering Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Jung, C; Torres, J M

    2005-01-01

    The concept of measurement in classical scattering is interpreted as an overlap of a particle packet with some area in phase space that describes the detector. Considering that usually we record the passage of particles at some point in space, a common detector is described e.g. for one-dimensional systems as a narrow strip in phase space. We generalize this concept allowing this strip to be transformed by some, possibly non-linear, canonical transformation, introducing thus a canonically transformed detector. We show such detectors to be useful in the context of the inverse scattering problem in situations where recently discovered scattering echoes could not be seen without their help. More relevant applications in quantum systems are suggested.

  13. Canonically Transformed Detectors Applied to the Classical Inverse Scattering Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, C.; Seligman, T. H.; Torres, J. M.

    The concept of measurement in classical scattering is interpreted as an overlap of a particle packet with some area in phase space that describes the detector. Considering that usually we record the passage of particles at some point in space, a common detector is described e.g. for one-dimensional systems as a narrow strip in phase space. We generalize this concept allowing this strip to be transformed by some, possibly non-linear, canonical transformation, introducing thus a canonically transformed detector. We show such detectors to be useful in the context of the inverse scattering problem in situations where recently discovered scattering echoes could not be seen without their help. More relevant applications in quantum systems are suggested.

  14. Analysis of forward and inverse problems in chemical dynamics and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabitz, H. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The overall scope of this research concerns the development and application of forward and inverse analysis tools for problems in chemical dynamics and chemical kinetics. The chemical dynamics work is specifically associated with relating features in potential surfaces and resultant dynamical behavior. The analogous inverse research aims to provide stable algorithms for extracting potential surfaces from laboratory data. In the case of chemical kinetics, the focus is on the development of systematic means to reduce the complexity of chemical kinetic models. Recent progress in these directions is summarized below.

  15. Variational approach to direct and inverse problems of atmospheric pollution studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penenko, Vladimir; Tsvetova, Elena; Penenko, Alexey

    2016-04-01

    We present the development of a variational approach for solving interrelated problems of atmospheric hydrodynamics and chemistry concerning air pollution transport and transformations. The proposed approach allows us to carry out complex studies of different-scale physical and chemical processes using the methods of direct and inverse modeling [1-3]. We formulate the problems of risk/vulnerability and uncertainty assessment, sensitivity studies, variational data assimilation procedures [4], etc. A computational technology of constructing consistent mathematical models and methods of their numerical implementation is based on the variational principle in the weak constraint formulation specifically designed to account for uncertainties in models and observations. Algorithms for direct and inverse modeling are designed with the use of global and local adjoint problems. Implementing the idea of adjoint integrating factors provides unconditionally monotone and stable discrete-analytic approximations for convection-diffusion-reaction problems [5,6]. The general framework is applied to the direct and inverse problems for the models of transport and transformation of pollutants in Siberian and Arctic regions. The work has been partially supported by the RFBR grant 14-01-00125 and RAS Presidium Program I.33P. References: 1. V. Penenko, A.Baklanov, E. Tsvetova and A. Mahura . Direct and inverse problems in a variational concept of environmental modeling //Pure and Applied Geoph.(2012) v.169: 447-465. 2. V. V. Penenko, E. A. Tsvetova, and A. V. Penenko Development of variational approach for direct and inverse problems of atmospheric hydrodynamics and chemistry, Izvestiya, Atmospheric and Oceanic Physics, 2015, Vol. 51, No. 3, p. 311-319, DOI: 10.1134/S0001433815030093. 3. V.V. Penenko, E.A. Tsvetova, A.V. Penenko. Methods based on the joint use of models and observational data in the framework of variational approach to forecasting weather and atmospheric composition

  16. Material model calibration through indentation test and stochastic inverse analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Buljak, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Indentation test is used with growing popularity for the characterization of various materials on different scales. Developed methods are combining the test with computer simulation and inverse analyses to assess material parameters entering into constitutive models. The outputs of such procedures are expressed as evaluation of sought parameters in deterministic sense, while for engineering practice it is desirable to assess also the uncertainty which affects the final estimates resulting from various sources of errors within the identification procedure. In this paper an experimental-numerical method is presented centered on inverse analysis build upon data collected from the indentation test in the form of force-penetration relationship (so-called indentation curve). Recursive simulations are made computationally economical by an a priori model reduction procedure. Resulting inverse problem is solved in a stochastic context using Monte Carlo simulations and non-sequential Extended Kalman filter. Obtained re...

  17. Inversion identities for inhomogeneous face models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frahm, Holger; Karaiskos, Nikos

    2014-10-01

    We derive exact inversion identities satisfied by the transfer matrix of inhomogeneous interaction-round-a-face (IRF) models with arbitrary boundary conditions using the underlying integrable structure and crossing properties of the local Boltzmann weights. For the critical restricted solid-on-solid (RSOS) models these identities together with some information on the analytical properties of the transfer matrix determine the spectrum completely and allow to derive the Bethe equations for both periodic and general open boundary conditions.

  18. Inversion identities for inhomogeneous face models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger Frahm

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We derive exact inversion identities satisfied by the transfer matrix of inhomogeneous interaction-round-a-face (IRF models with arbitrary boundary conditions using the underlying integrable structure and crossing properties of the local Boltzmann weights. For the critical restricted solid-on-solid (RSOS models these identities together with some information on the analytical properties of the transfer matrix determine the spectrum completely and allow to derive the Bethe equations for both periodic and general open boundary conditions.

  19. Inversion identities for inhomogeneous face models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frahm, Holger; Karaiskos, Nikos

    2014-10-15

    We derive exact inversion identities satisfied by the transfer matrix of inhomogeneous interaction-round-a-face (IRF) models with arbitrary boundary conditions using the underlying integrable structure and crossing properties of the local Boltzmann weights. For the critical restricted solid-on-solid (RSOS) models these identities together with some information on the analytical properties of the transfer matrix determine the spectrum completely and allow to derive the Bethe equations for both periodic and general open boundary conditions.

  20. FOREWORD: 2nd International Workshop on New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems (NCMIP 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc-Féraud, Laure; Joubert, Pierre-Yves

    2012-09-01

    Conference logo This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to the scientific contributions presented during the 2nd International Workshop on New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems, (NCMIP 2012). This workshop took place at Ecole Normale Supérieure de Cachan, in Cachan, France, on 15 May 2012, at the initiative of Institut Farman. The first edition of NCMIP also took place in Cachan, France, within the scope of the ValueTools Conference, in May 2011 (http://www.ncmip.org/2011/). The NCMIP Workshop focused on recent advances in the resolution of inverse problems. Indeed inverse problems appear in numerous scientific areas such as geophysics, biological and medical imaging, material and structure characterization, electrical, mechanical and civil engineering, and finance. The resolution of inverse problems consists of estimating the parameters of the observed system or structure from data collected by an instrumental sensing or imaging device. Its success firstly requires the collection of relevant observation data. It also requires accurate models describing the physical interactions between the instrumental device and the observed system, as well as the intrinsic properties of the solution itself. Finally, it requires the design of robust, accurate and efficient inversion algorithms. Advanced sensor arrays and imaging devices provide high rate and high volume data; in this context, the efficient resolution of the inverse problem requires the joint development of new models and inversion methods, taking computational and implementation aspects into account. During this one-day workshop, researchers had the opportunity to bring to light and share new techniques and results in the field of inverse problems. The topics of the workshop were: algorithms and computational aspects of inversion, Bayesian estimation, kernel methods, learning methods, convex optimization, free discontinuity problems, metamodels, proper orthogonal decomposition

  1. FOREWORD: 3rd International Workshop on New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems (NCMIP 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc-Féraud, Laure; Joubert, Pierre-Yves

    2013-10-01

    Conference logo This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to the scientific contributions presented during the 3rd International Workshop on New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems, NCMIP 2013 (http://www.farman.ens-cachan.fr/NCMIP_2013.html). This workshop took place at Ecole Normale Supérieure de Cachan, in Cachan, France, on 22 May 2013, at the initiative of Institut Farman. The prior editions of NCMIP also took place in Cachan, France, firstly within the scope of the ValueTools Conference, in May 2011 (http://www.ncmip.org/2011/), and secondly at the initiative of Institut Farman, in May 2012 (http://www.farman.ens-cachan.fr/NCMIP_2012.html). The NCMIP Workshop focused on recent advances in the resolution of inverse problems. Indeed inverse problems appear in numerous scientific areas such as geophysics, biological and medical imaging, material and structure characterization, electrical, mechanical and civil engineering, and finances. The resolution of inverse problems consists of estimating the parameters of the observed system or structure from data collected by an instrumental sensing or imaging device. Its success firstly requires the collection of relevant observation data. It also requires accurate models describing the physical interactions between the instrumental device and the observed system, as well as the intrinsic properties of the solution itself. Finally, it requires the design of robust, accurate and efficient inversion algorithms. Advanced sensor arrays and imaging devices provide high rate and high volume data; in this context, the efficient resolution of the inverse problem requires the joint development of new models and inversion methods, taking computational and implementation aspects into account. During this one-day workshop, researchers had the opportunity to bring to light and share new techniques and results in the field of inverse problems. The topics of the workshop were: algorithms and computational

  2. Multiscale-combined inversion problem based on convolution model%基于褶积模型的多尺度联合反演问题

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马坚伟; 朱亚平; 杨慧珠

    2001-01-01

    本文基于褶积模型推导出多尺度约束最小二乘解,提出小波域多尺度联合反演方法(MCIM,Multiscale-Combined Inversion Method).利用多尺度问的内在联系,采用尺度序列分解,以粗尺度下的反演解作为待优化的当前尺度反演的约束,提高反演效率与稳定性.多组测试数据显示,对于薄层检测与去噪,该方法具有良好的效果.

  3. Direct and inverse source problems for a space fractional advection dispersion equation

    KAUST Repository

    Aldoghaither, Abeer

    2016-05-15

    In this paper, direct and inverse problems for a space fractional advection dispersion equation on a finite domain are studied. The inverse problem consists in determining the source term from final observations. We first derive the analytic solution to the direct problem which we use to prove the uniqueness and the unstability of the inverse source problem using final measurements. Finally, we illustrate the results with a numerical example.

  4. The inverse problem of constructing a gravimetric geoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlotnicki, V.; Parsons, B.; Wunsch, C.

    1982-01-01

    Computation of a single geoidal height from gravity acceleration data formally requires that the latter be known everywhere on the earth. A computational procedure based on linear inverse theory for estimating geoidal heights from incomplete sets of data is presented. The same scheme can be used to estimate gravity accelerations from altimetry-derived geoids. The systematic error owing to lack of data and the choice of a particular inverse operator is described by using resolution functions and their spherical harmonic expansions. An rms value of this error is also estimated by assuming a spectrum for the unknown geoid. The influence of the size of the data region, the spacing between data, the filtering applied to the data, and the model weighting function chosen are all quantified in a spherical geometry. The examples presented show that when low degree spherical harmonic coefficients are available - from satellite orbit analysis - a band-passed version of the geoid can be constructed from local gravity data, even with a relatively restricted data set.

  5. The inverse problem of constructing a gravimetric geoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlotnicki, V.; Parsons, B.; Wunsch, C.

    1982-01-01

    Computation of a single geoidal height from gravity acceleration data formally requires that the latter be known everywhere on the earth. A computational procedure based on linear inverse theory for estimating geoidal heights from incomplete sets of data is presented. The same scheme can be used to estimate gravity accelerations from altimetry-derived geoids. The systematic error owing to lack of data and the choice of a particular inverse operator is described by using resolution functions and their spherical harmonic expansions. An rms value of this error is also estimated by assuming a spectrum for the unknown geoid. The influence of the size of the data region, the spacing between data, the filtering applied to the data, and the model weighting function chosen are all quantified in a spherical geometry. The examples presented show that when low degree spherical harmonic coefficients are available - from satellite orbit analysis - a band-passed version of the geoid can be constructed from local gravity data, even with a relatively restricted data set.

  6. Electrostatic Point Charge Fitting as an Inverse Problem: Revealing the Underlying Ill-Conditioning

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, Maxim V; Timerghazin, Qadir K

    2015-01-01

    Atom-centered point charge model of the molecular electrostatics---a major workhorse of the atomistic biomolecular simulations---is usually parameterized by least-squares (LS) fitting of the point charge values to a reference electrostatic potential, a procedure that suffers from numerical instabilities due to the ill-conditioned nature of the LS problem. Here, to reveal the origins of this ill-conditioning, we start with a general treatment of the point charge fitting problem as an inverse problem, and construct an analytically soluble model with the point charges spherically arranged according to Lebedev quadrature naturally suited for the inverse electrostatic problem. This analytical model is contrasted to the atom-centered point-charge model that can be viewed as an irregular quadrature poorly suited for the problem. This analysis shows that the numerical problems of the point charge fitting are due to the decay of the curvatures corresponding to the eigenvectors of LS sum Hessian matrix. In part, this i...

  7. The Use of Reciprocity in Atmospheric Source Inversion Problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitao, J J

    2004-10-13

    The goal of the Event Reconstruction Project is to find the location and strength of atmospheric release points, both stationary and moving. Source inversion relies on observational data as input. The methodology is sufficiently general to allow various forms of data. In this report, the authors will focus primarily on concentration measurements obtained at point monitoring locations at various times. The algorithms being investigated in the Project are the MCMC (Markov Chain Monte Carlo), SMC (Sequential Monte Carlo) Methods, classical inversion methods, and hybrids of these. They refer the reader to the report by Johannesson et al. (2004) for explanations of these methods. These methods require computing the concentrations at all monitoring locations for a given ''proposed'' source characteristic (locations and strength history). It is anticipated that the largest portion of the CPU time will take place performing this computation. MCMC and SMC will require this computation to be done at least tens of thousands of times. Therefore, an efficient means of computing forward model predictions is important to making the inversion practical. In this report they show how Green's functions and reciprocal Green's functions can significantly accelerate forward model computations. First, instead of computing a plume for each possible source strength history, they can compute plumes from unit impulse sources only. By using linear superposition, they can obtain the response for any strength history. This response is given by the forward Green's function. Second, they may use the law of reciprocity. Suppose that they require the concentration at a single monitoring point x{sub m} due to a potential (unit impulse) source that is located at x{sub s}. instead of computing a plume with source location x{sub s}, they compute a ''reciprocal plume'' whose (unit impulse) source is at the monitoring locations x{sub m}. The

  8. Methods and Algorithms for Solving Inverse Problems for Fractional Advection-Dispersion Equations

    KAUST Repository

    Aldoghaither, Abeer

    2015-11-12

    Fractional calculus has been introduced as an e cient tool for modeling physical phenomena, thanks to its memory and hereditary properties. For example, fractional models have been successfully used to describe anomalous di↵usion processes such as contaminant transport in soil, oil flow in porous media, and groundwater flow. These models capture important features of particle transport such as particles with velocity variations and long-rest periods. Mathematical modeling of physical phenomena requires the identification of pa- rameters and variables from available measurements. This is referred to as an inverse problem. In this work, we are interested in studying theoretically and numerically inverse problems for space Fractional Advection-Dispersion Equation (FADE), which is used to model solute transport in porous media. Identifying parameters for such an equa- tion is important to understand how chemical or biological contaminants are trans- ported throughout surface aquifer systems. For instance, an estimate of the di↵eren- tiation order in groundwater contaminant transport model can provide information about soil properties, such as the heterogeneity of the medium. Our main contribution is to propose a novel e cient algorithm based on modulat-ing functions to estimate the coe cients and the di↵erentiation order for space FADE, which can be extended to general fractional Partial Di↵erential Equation (PDE). We also show how the method can be applied to the source inverse problem. This work is divided into two parts: In part I, the proposed method is described and studied through an extensive numerical analysis. The local convergence of the proposed two-stage algorithm is proven for 1D space FADE. The properties of this method are studied along with its limitations. Then, the algorithm is generalized to the 2D FADE. In part II, we analyze direct and inverse source problems for a space FADE. The problem consists of recovering the source term using final

  9. Inverse problem of life cycle assessment (LCA: its application in designing for environment (DfE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rybaczewska-Błażejowska Magdalena

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The inverse problem of life cycle assessment, used in designing for environment, is about determining the optimal values of environmental inputs that provide the required environmental impacts. The notion of the inverse problem of life cycle assessment is explained here using a case study of a coffee machine (abstract model SimaPro, based on models Sima and Pro described in SimaPro 8.1 software. The dependencies between input and output signals were defined by nonlinear functions of several variables. Next, linearization was used and coefficient aki was calculated. On the basis of 3 hypothetical experiments, recommendations have been made on the reduction of the value of the factors that are the most detrimental for the environment: the consumption of aluminium, electricity, and paper for coffee filters, for the analysed product. The results prove the high applicability and usefulness of the proposed approach during environmental evaluation and enhancement of products over the full product life cycle.

  10. Final Technical Report for "Applied Mathematics Research: Simulation Based Optimization and Application to Electromagnetic Inverse Problems"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haber, Eldad

    2014-03-17

    The focus of research was: Developing adaptive mesh for the solution of Maxwell's equations; Developing a parallel framework for time dependent inverse Maxwell's equations; Developing multilevel methods for optimization problems with inequal- ity constraints; A new inversion code for inverse Maxwell's equations in the 0th frequency (DC resistivity); A new inversion code for inverse Maxwell's equations in low frequency regime. Although the research concentrated on electromagnetic forward and in- verse problems the results of the research was applied to the problem of image registration.

  11. On computational experiments in some inverse problems of heat and mass transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilchenko, G. G.; Bilchenko, N. G.

    2016-11-01

    The results of mathematical modeling of effective heat and mass transfer on hypersonic aircraft permeable surfaces are considered. The physic-chemical processes (the dissociation and the ionization) in laminar boundary layer of compressible gas are appreciated. Some algorithms of control restoration are suggested for the interpolation and approximation statements of heat and mass transfer inverse problems. The differences between the methods applied for the problem solutions search for these statements are discussed. Both the algorithms are realized as programs. Many computational experiments were accomplished with the use of these programs. The parameters of boundary layer obtained by means of the A.A.Dorodnicyn's generalized integral relations method from solving the direct problems have been used to obtain the inverse problems solutions. Two types of blowing laws restoration for the inverse problem in interpolation statement are presented as the examples. The influence of the temperature factor on the blowing restoration is investigated. The different character of sensitivity of controllable parameters (the local heat flow and local tangent friction) respectively to step (discrete) changing of control (the blowing) and the switching point position is studied.

  12. Escript: Open Source Environment For Solving Large-Scale Geophysical Joint Inversion Problems in Python

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Lutz; Altinay, Cihan; Fenwick, Joel; Smith, Troy

    2014-05-01

    The program package escript has been designed for solving mathematical modeling problems using python, see Gross et al. (2013). Its development and maintenance has been funded by the Australian Commonwealth to provide open source software infrastructure for the Australian Earth Science community (recent funding by the Australian Geophysical Observing System EIF (AGOS) and the AuScope Collaborative Research Infrastructure Scheme (CRIS)). The key concepts of escript are based on the terminology of spatial functions and partial differential equations (PDEs) - an approach providing abstraction from the underlying spatial discretization method (i.e. the finite element method (FEM)). This feature presents a programming environment to the user which is easy to use even for complex models. Due to the fact that implementations are independent from data structures simulations are easily portable across desktop computers and scalable compute clusters without modifications to the program code. escript has been successfully applied in a variety of applications including modeling mantel convection, melting processes, volcanic flow, earthquakes, faulting, multi-phase flow, block caving and mineralization (see Poulet et al. 2013). The recent escript release (see Gross et al. (2013)) provides an open framework for solving joint inversion problems for geophysical data sets (potential field, seismic and electro-magnetic). The strategy bases on the idea to formulate the inversion problem as an optimization problem with PDE constraints where the cost function is defined by the data defect and the regularization term for the rock properties, see Gross & Kemp (2013). This approach of first-optimize-then-discretize avoids the assemblage of the - in general- dense sensitivity matrix as used in conventional approaches where discrete programming techniques are applied to the discretized problem (first-discretize-then-optimize). In this paper we will discuss the mathematical framework for

  13. GARCH modelling of covariance in dynamical estimation of inverse solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galka, Andreas [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, University of Kiel, 24098 Kiel (Germany) and Institute of Statistical Mathematics (ISM), Minami-Azabu 4-6-7, Tokyo 106-8569 (Japan)]. E-mail: galka@physik.uni-kiel.de; Yamashita, Okito [ATR Computational Neuroscience Laboratories, Hikaridai 2-2-2, Kyoto 619-0288 (Japan); Ozaki, Tohru [Institute of Statistical Mathematics (ISM), Minami-Azabu 4-6-7, Tokyo 106-8569 (Japan)

    2004-12-06

    The problem of estimating unobserved states of spatially extended dynamical systems poses an inverse problem, which can be solved approximately by a recently developed variant of Kalman filtering; in order to provide the model of the dynamics with more flexibility with respect to space and time, we suggest to combine the concept of GARCH modelling of covariance, well known in econometrics, with Kalman filtering. We formulate this algorithm for spatiotemporal systems governed by stochastic diffusion equations and demonstrate its feasibility by presenting a numerical simulation designed to imitate the situation of the generation of electroencephalographic recordings by the human cortex.

  14. Reduced conductivity dependence method for increase of dipole localization accuracy in the EEG inverse problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yitembe, Bertrand Russel; Crevecoeur, Guillaume; Van Keer, Roger; Dupre, Luc

    2011-05-01

    The EEG is a neurological diagnostic tool with high temporal resolution. However, when solving the EEG inverse problem, its localization accuracy is limited because of noise in measurements and available uncertainties of the conductivity value in the forward model evaluations. This paper proposes the reduced conductivity dependence (RCD) method for decreasing the localization error in EEG source analysis by limiting the propagation of the uncertain conductivity values to the solutions of the inverse problem. We redefine the traditional EEG cost function, and in contrast to previous approaches, we introduce a selection procedure of the EEG potentials. The selected potentials are, as low as possible, affected by the uncertainties of the conductivity when solving the inverse problem. We validate the methodology on the widely used three-shell spherical head model with a single electrical dipole and multiple dipoles as source model. The proposed RCD method enhances the source localization accuracy with a factor ranging between 2 and 4, dependent on the dipole location and the noise in measurements. © 2011 IEEE

  15. FOREWORD: Tackling inverse problems in a Banach space environment: from theory to applications Tackling inverse problems in a Banach space environment: from theory to applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Thomas; Hofmann, Bernd; Kaltenbacher, Barbara

    2012-10-01

    Inverse problems can usually be modelled as operator equations in infinite-dimensional spaces with a forward operator acting between Hilbert or Banach spaces—a formulation which quite often also serves as the basis for defining and analyzing solution methods. The additional amount of structure and geometric interpretability provided by the concept of an inner product has rendered these methods amenable to a convergence analysis, a fact which has led to a rigorous and comprehensive study of regularization methods in Hilbert spaces over the last three decades. However, for numerous problems such as x-ray diffractometry, certain inverse scattering problems and a number of parameter identification problems in PDEs, the reasons for using a Hilbert space setting seem to be based on conventions rather than an appropriate and realistic model choice, so often a Banach space setting would be closer to reality. Furthermore, non-Hilbertian regularization and data fidelity terms incorporating a priori information on solution and noise, such as general Lp-norms, TV-type norms, or the Kullback-Leibler divergence, have recently become very popular. These facts have motivated intensive investigations on regularization methods in Banach spaces, a topic which has emerged as a highly active research field within the area of inverse problems. Meanwhile some of the most well-known regularization approaches, such as Tikhonov-type methods requiring the solution of extremal problems, and iterative ones like the Landweber method, the Gauss-Newton method, as well as the approximate inverse method, have been investigated for linear and nonlinear operator equations in Banach spaces. Convergence with rates has been proven and conditions on the solution smoothness and on the structure of nonlinearity have been formulated. Still, beyond the existing results a large number of challenging open questions have arisen, due to the more involved handling of general Banach spaces and the larger variety

  16. Inverse heat conduction problem in a phase change memory device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Jean-Luc; De, Indrayush; Sousa, Véronique

    2017-01-01

    An invers heat conduction problem is solved considering the thermal investigation of a phase change memory device using the scanning thermal microscopy. The heat transfer model rests on system identification for the probe thermal impedance and on a finite element method for the device thermal impedance. Unknown parameters in the model are then identified using a nonlinear least square algorithm that minimizes the quadratic gap between the measured probe temperature and the simulated one.

  17. A hierarchical Bayesian-MAP approach to inverse problems in imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Raghu G.

    2016-07-01

    We present a novel approach to inverse problems in imaging based on a hierarchical Bayesian-MAP (HB-MAP) formulation. In this paper we specifically focus on the difficult and basic inverse problem of multi-sensor (tomographic) imaging wherein the source object of interest is viewed from multiple directions by independent sensors. Given the measurements recorded by these sensors, the problem is to reconstruct the image (of the object) with a high degree of fidelity. We employ a probabilistic graphical modeling extension of the compound Gaussian distribution as a global image prior into a hierarchical Bayesian inference procedure. Since the prior employed by our HB-MAP algorithm is general enough to subsume a wide class of priors including those typically employed in compressive sensing (CS) algorithms, HB-MAP algorithm offers a vehicle to extend the capabilities of current CS algorithms to include truly global priors. After rigorously deriving the regression algorithm for solving our inverse problem from first principles, we demonstrate the performance of the HB-MAP algorithm on Monte Carlo trials and on real empirical data (natural scenes). In all cases we find that our algorithm outperforms previous approaches in the literature including filtered back-projection and a variety of state-of-the-art CS algorithms. We conclude with directions of future research emanating from this work.

  18. Children's strategies to solving additive inverse problems: a preliminary analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Meixia; Auxter, Abbey E.

    2017-03-01

    Prior studies show that elementary school children generally "lack" formal understanding of inverse relations. This study goes beyond lack to explore what children might "have" in their existing conception. A total of 281 students, kindergarten to third grade, were recruited to respond to a questionnaire that involved both contextual and non-contextual tasks on inverse relations, requiring both computational and explanatory skills. Results showed that children demonstrated better performance in computation than explanation. However, many students' explanations indicated that they did not necessarily utilize inverse relations for computation. Rather, they appeared to possess partial understanding, as evidenced by their use of part-whole structure, which is a key to understanding inverse relations. A close inspection of children's solution strategies further revealed that the sophistication of children's conception of part-whole structure varied in representation use and unknown quantity recognition, which suggests rich opportunities to develop students' understanding of inverse relations in lower elementary classrooms.

  19. Children's strategies to solving additive inverse problems: a preliminary analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Meixia; Auxter, Abbey E.

    2017-01-01

    Prior studies show that elementary school children generally "lack" formal understanding of inverse relations. This study goes beyond lack to explore what children might "have" in their existing conception. A total of 281 students, kindergarten to third grade, were recruited to respond to a questionnaire that involved both contextual and non-contextual tasks on inverse relations, requiring both computational and explanatory skills. Results showed that children demonstrated better performance in computation than explanation. However, many students' explanations indicated that they did not necessarily utilize inverse relations for computation. Rather, they appeared to possess partial understanding, as evidenced by their use of part-whole structure, which is a key to understanding inverse relations. A close inspection of children's solution strategies further revealed that the sophistication of children's conception of part-whole structure varied in representation use and unknown quantity recognition, which suggests rich opportunities to develop students' understanding of inverse relations in lower elementary classrooms.

  20. Electrostatic point charge fitting as an inverse problem: Revealing the underlying ill-conditioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Maxim V.; Talipov, Marat R.; Timerghazin, Qadir K., E-mail: qadir.timerghazin@marquette.edu [Department of Chemistry, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201-1881 (United States)

    2015-10-07

    Atom-centered point charge (PC) model of the molecular electrostatics—a major workhorse of the atomistic biomolecular simulations—is usually parameterized by least-squares (LS) fitting of the point charge values to a reference electrostatic potential, a procedure that suffers from numerical instabilities due to the ill-conditioned nature of the LS problem. To reveal the origins of this ill-conditioning, we start with a general treatment of the point charge fitting problem as an inverse problem and construct an analytical model with the point charges spherically arranged according to Lebedev quadrature which is naturally suited for the inverse electrostatic problem. This analytical model is contrasted to the atom-centered point-charge model that can be viewed as an irregular quadrature poorly suited for the problem. This analysis shows that the numerical problems of the point charge fitting are due to the decay of the curvatures corresponding to the eigenvectors of LS sum Hessian matrix. In part, this ill-conditioning is intrinsic to the problem and is related to decreasing electrostatic contribution of the higher multipole moments, that are, in the case of Lebedev grid model, directly associated with the Hessian eigenvectors. For the atom-centered model, this association breaks down beyond the first few eigenvectors related to the high-curvature monopole and dipole terms; this leads to even wider spread-out of the Hessian curvature values. Using these insights, it is possible to alleviate the ill-conditioning of the LS point-charge fitting without introducing external restraints and/or constraints. Also, as the analytical Lebedev grid PC model proposed here can reproduce multipole moments up to a given rank, it may provide a promising alternative to including explicit multipole terms in a force field.

  1. Inverse acoustic scattering problem in half-space with anisotropic random impedance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helin, Tapio; Lassas, Matti; Päivärinta, Lassi

    2017-02-01

    We study an inverse acoustic scattering problem in half-space with a probabilistic impedance boundary value condition. The Robin coefficient (surface impedance) is assumed to be a Gaussian random function with a pseudodifferential operator describing the covariance. We measure the amplitude of the backscattered field averaged over the frequency band and assume that the data is generated by a single realization of λ. Our main result is to show that under certain conditions the principal symbol of the covariance operator of λ is uniquely determined. Most importantly, no approximations are needed and we can solve the full non-linear inverse problem. We concentrate on anisotropic models for the principal symbol, which leads to the analysis of a novel anisotropic spherical Radon transform and its invertibility.

  2. Manipulation with heterogeneity within a species population formulated as an inverse problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, D.; Brutovsky, B.; Kočišová, J.; Šprinc, S.

    2010-11-01

    Dependence of the evolutionary dynamics on the population’s heterogeneity has been reliably recognized and studied within the frame of evolutionary optimization theory. As the causal relation between the heterogeneity and dynamics of environment has been revealed, the possibility to influence convergence rate of evolutionary processes by purposeful manipulation with environment emerges. For the above purposes we formulate the task as the inverse problem meaning that desired population heterogeneity, quantified by Tsallis information entropy, represents the model’s input and dynamics of environment leading to desired population heterogeneity is looked for. Here the presented abstract model of evolutionary motion within the inverse model of replicating species is case-independent and it is relevant for the broad range of phenomena observed at cellular, ecological, economic and social scales. We envision relevance of the model for anticancer therapy, in which the effort is to circumvent heterogeneity as it typically correlates with the therapy efficiency.

  3. Inverse problems using artificial neural networks in long range atmospheric dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, P.K.; Gera, B.; Ghosh, A.K. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India). Reactor Safety Div.

    2011-05-15

    Scalar dispersion in the atmosphere is an important area wherein different approaches are followed in development of good analytical models. The analyses based on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes offer an opportunity of model development based on first principles of physics and hence such models have an edge over the existing models. Both forward and backward calculation methods are being developed for atmospheric dispersion around NPPs at BARC. Forward modeling methods, which describe the atmospheric transport from sources to receptors, use forward-running transport and dispersion models or computational fluid dynamics models which are run many times, and the resulting dispersion field is compared to observations from multiple sensors. Backward or inverse modeling methods use only one model run in the reverse direction from the receptors to estimate the upwind sources. Inverse modeling methods include adjoint and tangent linear models, Kalman filters, and variational data assimilation, and neural network. The present paper is aimed at developing a new approach where the identified specific signatures at receptor points form the basis for source estimation or inversions. This approach is expected to reduce the large transient data sets to reduced and meaningful data sets. In fact this reduces the inherently transient data set into a time independent mean data set. Forward computations were carried out with CFD code for various cases to generate a large set of data to train the Artificial Neural Network (ANN). Specific signature analysis was carried out to find the parameters of interest for ANN training like peak concentration, time to reach peak concentration and time to fall. The ANN was trained with data and source strength and locations were predicted from ANN. The inverse problem was performed using the ANN approach in long range atmospheric dispersion. An illustration of application of CFD code for atmospheric dispersion studies for a hypothetical

  4. On rational approximation methods for inverse source problems

    KAUST Repository

    Rundell, William

    2011-02-01

    The basis of most imaging methods is to detect hidden obstacles or inclusions within a body when one can only make measurements on an exterior surface. Such is the ubiquity of these problems, the underlying model can lead to a partial differential equation of any of the major types, but here we focus on the case of steady-state electrostatic or thermal imaging and consider boundary value problems for Laplace\\'s equation. Our inclusions are interior forces with compact support and our data consists of a single measurement of (say) voltage/current or temperature/heat flux on the external boundary. We propose an algorithm that under certain assumptions allows for the determination of the support set of these forces by solving a simpler "equivalent point source" problem, and which uses a Newton scheme to improve the corresponding initial approximation. © 2011 American Institute of Mathematical Sciences.

  5. Dynamic inverse models in human-cyber-physical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Ryan M.; Scobee, Dexter R. R.; Burden, Samuel A.; Sastry, S. Shankar

    2016-05-01

    Human interaction with the physical world is increasingly mediated by automation. This interaction is characterized by dynamic coupling between robotic (i.e. cyber) and neuromechanical (i.e. human) decision-making agents. Guaranteeing performance of such human-cyber-physical systems will require predictive mathematical models of this dynamic coupling. Toward this end, we propose a rapprochement between robotics and neuromechanics premised on the existence of internal forward and inverse models in the human agent. We hypothesize that, in tele-robotic applications of interest, a human operator learns to invert automation dynamics, directly translating from desired task to required control input. By formulating the model inversion problem in the context of a tracking task for a nonlinear control system in control-a_ne form, we derive criteria for exponential tracking and show that the resulting dynamic inverse model generally renders a portion of the physical system state (i.e., the internal dynamics) unobservable from the human operator's perspective. Under stability conditions, we show that the human can achieve exponential tracking without formulating an estimate of the system's state so long as they possess an accurate model of the system's dynamics. These theoretical results are illustrated using a planar quadrotor example. We then demonstrate that the automation can intervene to improve performance of the tracking task by solving an optimal control problem. Performance is guaranteed to improve under the assumption that the human learns and inverts the dynamic model of the altered system. We conclude with a discussion of practical limitations that may hinder exact dynamic model inversion.

  6. Parabolic inverse convection-diffusion-reaction problem solved using an adaptive parametrization

    CERN Document Server

    Deolmi, Giulia

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the solution of a parabolic inverse problem based upon the convection-diffusion-reaction equation, which can be used to estimate both water and air pollution. We will consider both known and unknown source location: while in the first case the problem is solved using a projected damped Gauss-Newton, in the second one it is ill-posed and an adaptive parametrization with time localization will be adopted to regularize it. To solve the optimization loop a model reduction technique (Proper Orthogonal Decomposition) is used.

  7. The Application of Levenberg-Marquartb Algorithm in EEG Inverse Problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Ling; MA Zheng-hua

    2005-01-01

    EEG inverse problem has great significance and importance for both clinical and research applications. It discusses EEG dipole source localization problems solved by nonlinear local optimization methods, such as Levenberg-Marquartb. This paper presents the relation between location errors and noise level on condition that the source number is known; if the source number is not known, the selected number in model may not equal to the actual one, and a computation is carried out and a corresponding discrimination criteria is proposed. Computer simulation demonstrates that Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm is better than global methods if the source number is small.

  8. A Direct inverse model to determine permeability fields from pressure and flow rate measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, G.K.; Fokker, P.A.; Wilschut, F.; Zijl, W.

    2008-01-01

    The determination of the permeability field from pressure and flow rate measurements in wells is a key problem in reservoir engineering. This paper presents a Double Constraint method for inverse modeling that is an example of direct inverse modeling. The method is used with a standard block-centere

  9. A regularizing iterative ensemble Kalman method for PDE-constrained inverse problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, Marco A.

    2016-02-01

    We introduce a derivative-free computational framework for approximating solutions to nonlinear PDE-constrained inverse problems. The general aim is to merge ideas from iterative regularization with ensemble Kalman methods from Bayesian inference to develop a derivative-free stable method easy to implement in applications where the PDE (forward) model is only accessible as a black box (e.g. with commercial software). The proposed regularizing ensemble Kalman method can be derived as an approximation of the regularizing Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) scheme (Hanke 1997 Inverse Problems 13 79-95) in which the derivative of the forward operator and its adjoint are replaced with empirical covariances from an ensemble of elements from the admissible space of solutions. The resulting ensemble method consists of an update formula that is applied to each ensemble member and that has a regularization parameter selected in a similar fashion to the one in the LM scheme. Moreover, an early termination of the scheme is proposed according to a discrepancy principle-type of criterion. The proposed method can be also viewed as a regularizing version of standard Kalman approaches which are often unstable unless ad hoc fixes, such as covariance localization, are implemented. The aim of this paper is to provide a detailed numerical investigation of the regularizing and convergence properties of the proposed regularizing ensemble Kalman scheme; the proof of these properties is an open problem. By means of numerical experiments, we investigate the conditions under which the proposed method inherits the regularizing properties of the LM scheme of (Hanke 1997 Inverse Problems 13 79-95) and is thus stable and suitable for its application in problems where the computation of the Fréchet derivative is not computationally feasible. More concretely, we study the effect of ensemble size, number of measurements, selection of initial ensemble and tunable parameters on the performance of the method

  10. Approximate Bayesian computation for machine learning, inverse problems and big data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad-Djafari, Ali

    2017-06-01

    This paper summarizes my tutorial talk in MaxEnt 2016 workshop. Starting from the basics of the Bayesian approach and simple example of low dimensional parameter estimation where almost all the computations can be done easily, we go very fast to high dimensional case. In those real world cases, even for the sample case of linear model with Gaussian prior, where the posterior law is also Gaussian, the cost of the computation of the posterior covariance becomes important and needs approximate and fast algorithms. Different approximation methods for model comparison and model selection in machine learning problems are presented in summary. Among the existing methods, we mention Laplace approximation, Akaike Information Criterion (AIC), Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) and Variational Bayesian Approximation (VBA) Methods. Finally, through two examples of inverse problems in imaging systems: X ray and Diffraction wave Computed Tomography (CT), we show how to handle the real great dimensional problems.

  11. Inverse transient heat conduction problems and identification of thermal parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchonouglo, K.; Banna, M.; Vallée, C.; Dupré, J.-C.

    2008-04-01

    This work deals with the estimation of polymers properties. An inverse analysis based on finite element method is applied to identify simultaneously the constants thermal conductivity and heat capacity per unit volume. The inverse method algorithm constructed is validated from simulated transient temperature recording taken at several locations on the surface of the solid. Transient temperature measures taped with infrared camera on polymers were used for identifying the thermal properties. The results show an excellent agreement between manufacturer and identified values.

  12. [Models and computation methods of EEG forward problem].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yinghcun; Zou, Ling; Zhu, Shanan

    2004-04-01

    The research of EEG is of grat significance and clinical importance in studying the cognitive function and neural activity of the brain. There are two key problems in the field of EEG, EEG forward problem and EEG inverse problem. EEG forward problem which aims to get the distribution of the scalp potential due to the known current distribution in the brain is the basis of the EEG inverse problem. Generally, EEG inverse problem depends on the accuracy and efficiency of the computational method of EEG forward problem. This paper gives a review of the head model and corresponding computational method about EEG forward problem studied in recent years.

  13. Forward and inverse problem for cardiac magnetic field and electric potential using two boundary element methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fa-Kuan; Wang, Qian; Hua, Ning; Tang, Xue-Zheng; Lu, Hong; Ma, Ping

    2010-12-01

    This paper discusses the forward and inverse problem for cardiac magnetic fields and electric potentials. A torso-heart model established by boundary element method (BEM) is used for studying the distributions of cardiac magnetic fields and electric potentials. Because node-to-node and triangle-to-triangle BEM can lead to discrepant field distributions, their properties and influences are compared. Then based on constructed torso-heart model and supposed current source functional model—current dipole array, the magnetic and electric imaging by optimal constrained linear inverse method are applied at the same time. Through figure and reconstructing parameter comparison, though the magnetic current dipole array imaging possesses better reconstructing effect, however node-to-node BEM and triangle-to-triangle BEM make little difference to magnetic and electric imaging.

  14. A MATLAB based 3D modeling and inversion code for MT data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Arun; Dehiya, Rahul; Gupta, Pravin K.; Israil, M.

    2017-07-01

    The development of a MATLAB based computer code, AP3DMT, for modeling and inversion of 3D Magnetotelluric (MT) data is presented. The code comprises two independent components: grid generator code and modeling/inversion code. The grid generator code performs model discretization and acts as an interface by generating various I/O files. The inversion code performs core computations in modular form - forward modeling, data functionals, sensitivity computations and regularization. These modules can be readily extended to other similar inverse problems like Controlled-Source EM (CSEM). The modular structure of the code provides a framework useful for implementation of new applications and inversion algorithms. The use of MATLAB and its libraries makes it more compact and user friendly. The code has been validated on several published models. To demonstrate its versatility and capabilities the results of inversion for two complex models are presented.

  15. Two-dimensional probabilistic inversion of plane-wave electromagnetic data: Methodology, model constraints and joint inversion with electrical resistivity data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosas-Carbajal, M.; Linde, N.; Kalscheuer, T.; Vrugt, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Probabilistic inversion methods based on Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation are well suited to quantify parameter and model uncertainty of nonlinear inverse problems. Yet, application of such methods to CPU-intensive forward models can be a daunting task, particularly if the parameter space

  16. Uniqueness and stability in an inverse problem for a Poisson’s equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Consider the Poisson’s equation(?)″(x)=-ev-(?)+e(?)-v-N(x)with the Diriehlet boundary data,and we mainly investigate the inverse problem of determining the unknown function N(x)from a parameter function family.Some uniqueness and stability results in the inverse problem are obtained.

  17. Solving inverse problems of mathematical physics by means of the PHOENICS software package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsevity, Y.; Lushpenko, S. [Institute for Problems in Machinery, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine Pozharskogo, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    1997-12-31

    Several approaches on organizing solution of inverse problems by means of PHOENICS on the basis of the technique of automated fitting are proposing. A version of a `nondestructive` method of using PHOENICS in the inverse problem solution regime and the ways of altering the program in the case of introducing optimization facilities in it are under consideration. (author) 12 refs.

  18. Inverse limits and statistical properties for chaotic implicitly defined economic models

    CERN Document Server

    Mihailescu, Eugen

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we study the dynamics and ergodic theory of certain economic models which are implicitly defined. We consider 1-dimensional and 2-dimensional overlapping generations models, a cash-in-advance model, heterogeneous markets and a cobweb model with adaptive adjustment. We consider the inverse limit spaces of certain chaotic invariant fractal sets and their metric, ergodic and stability properties. The inverse limits give the set of intertemporal perfect foresight equilibria for the economic problem considered. First we show that the inverse limits of these models are stable under perturbations. We prove that the inverse limits are expansive and have specification property. We then employ utility functions on inverse limits in our case. We give two ways to rank such utility functions. First, when perturbing certain dynamical systems, we rank utility functions in terms of their \\textit{average values} with respect to invariant probability measures on inverse limits, especially with respect to measures...

  19. A PDE-Constrained Optimization Approach to Uncertainty Quantification in Inverse Problems, with Applications to Inverse Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-28

    illuminations. Inverse medium problems are encountered in acoustic, elastic, and electromagnetic wave propagation. We use a Lippmann- Schwinger formulation...Na. (5) This is a Born-approximation Lippmann- Schwinger scattering equation, where G(-, •;u) is the Green’s function (in the reference medium

  20. Modified Landweber Algorithm for Solving the Inverse Problem in EIT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGChao; WANGHuaxiang

    2005-01-01

    This paper analyses the Landweber iteration method and demonstrates that Landweber method is a modified of the generalized inverse constructed using the iteration solution. The phenomenon is explained that the image reconstructed using Landweber iteration algorithm through a large numbers of iteration steps is similar tothe minimum norm solution of the generalized inverse. A new reconstruction algorithm called the modified Landweber method is proposed, which divides the image reconstruction process into two steps, off-line pre-iteration and on-line one-step reconstruction. The reconstruction speed is markedly improved.

  1. Inverse Eigenvalue Problems for a Structure with Linear Parameters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Liang-sheng; YANG Jia-hua; WEI Yuan-qian; MEN Hao; YANG Qing-kun; LIU Zhen-yu

    2005-01-01

    The inverse design method of a dynamic system with linear parameters has been studied. For some specified eigenvalues and eigenvectors, the design parameter vector which is often composed of whole or part of coefficients of spring and mass of the system can be obtained and the rigidity and mass matrices of an initially designed structure can be reconstructed through solving linear algebra equations. By using implicit function theorem, the conditions of existence and uniqueness of the solution are also deduced. The theory and method can be used for inverse vibration design of complex structure system.

  2. Quantitative optical coherence elastography as an inverse elasticity problem (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Li; Wijesinghe, Philip; Dantuono, James T.; Sampson, David D.; Munro, Peter R. T.; Kennedy, Brendan F.; Oberai, Assad A.

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative elasticity imaging, which retrieves elastic modulus maps from tissue, is preferred to qualitative strain imaging for acquiring system- and operator-independent images and longitudinal and multi-site diagnoses. Quantitative elasticity imaging has already been demonstrated in optical elastography by relating surface-acoustic and shear wave speed to Young's modulus via a simple algebraic relationship. Such approaches assume largely homogeneous samples and neglect the effect of boundary conditions. We present a general approach to quantitative elasticity imaging based upon the solution of the inverse elasticity problem using an iterative technique and apply it to compression optical coherence elastography. The inverse problem is one of finding the distribution of Young's modulus within a sample, that in response to an applied load, and a given displacement and traction boundary conditions, can produce a displacement field matching one measured in experiment. Key to our solution of the inverse elasticity problem is the use of the adjoint equations that allow the very efficient evaluation of the gradient of the objective function to be minimized with respect to the unknown values of Young's modulus within the sample. Although we present the approach for the case of linear elastic, isotropic, incompressible solids, this method can be employed for arbitrarily complex mechanical models. We present the details of the method and quantitative elastograms of phantoms and tissues. We demonstrate that by using the inverse approach, we can decouple the artefacts produced by mechanical tissue heterogeneity from the true distribution of Young's modulus, which are often evident in techniques that employ first-order algebraic relationships.

  3. A Hybrid Optimization Method for Solving Bayesian Inverse Problems under Uncertainty.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Zhang

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate the application of a new method, the Finite Difference and Stochastic Gradient (Hybrid method, for history matching in reservoir models. History matching is one of the processes of solving an inverse problem by calibrating reservoir models to dynamic behaviour of the reservoir in which an objective function is formulated based on a Bayesian approach for optimization. The goal of history matching is to identify the minimum value of an objective function that expresses the misfit between the predicted and measured data of a reservoir. To address the optimization problem, we present a novel application using a combination of the stochastic gradient and finite difference methods for solving inverse problems. The optimization is constrained by a linear equation that contains the reservoir parameters. We reformulate the reservoir model's parameters and dynamic data by operating the objective function, the approximate gradient of which can guarantee convergence. At each iteration step, we obtain the relatively 'important' elements of the gradient, which are subsequently substituted by the values from the Finite Difference method through comparing the magnitude of the components of the stochastic gradient, which forms a new gradient, and we subsequently iterate with the new gradient. Through the application of the Hybrid method, we efficiently and accurately optimize the objective function. We present a number numerical simulations in this paper that show that the method is accurate and computationally efficient.

  4. A Hybrid Optimization Method for Solving Bayesian Inverse Problems under Uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Wang, Zengfei; Zhang, Liming; Yao, Jun; Yan, Xia

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the application of a new method, the Finite Difference and Stochastic Gradient (Hybrid method), for history matching in reservoir models. History matching is one of the processes of solving an inverse problem by calibrating reservoir models to dynamic behaviour of the reservoir in which an objective function is formulated based on a Bayesian approach for optimization. The goal of history matching is to identify the minimum value of an objective function that expresses the misfit between the predicted and measured data of a reservoir. To address the optimization problem, we present a novel application using a combination of the stochastic gradient and finite difference methods for solving inverse problems. The optimization is constrained by a linear equation that contains the reservoir parameters. We reformulate the reservoir model's parameters and dynamic data by operating the objective function, the approximate gradient of which can guarantee convergence. At each iteration step, we obtain the relatively 'important' elements of the gradient, which are subsequently substituted by the values from the Finite Difference method through comparing the magnitude of the components of the stochastic gradient, which forms a new gradient, and we subsequently iterate with the new gradient. Through the application of the Hybrid method, we efficiently and accurately optimize the objective function. We present a number numerical simulations in this paper that show that the method is accurate and computationally efficient.

  5. An iterative method for 2D inverse scattering problems by alternating reconstruction of medium properties and wavefields: theory and application to the inversion of elastic waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzuti, G.; Gisolf, A.

    2017-03-01

    We study a reconstruction algorithm for the general inverse scattering problem based on the estimate of not only medium properties, as in more conventional approaches, but also wavefields propagating inside the computational domain. This extended set of unknowns is justified as a way to prevent local minimum stagnation, which is a common issue for standard methods. At each iteration of the algorithm, (i) the model parameters are obtained by solution of a convex problem, formulated from a special bilinear relationship of the data with respect to properties and wavefields (where the wavefield is kept fixed), and (ii) a better estimate of the wavefield is calculated, based on the previously reconstructed properties. The resulting scheme is computationally convenient since step (i) can greatly benefit from parallelization and the wavefield update (ii) requires modeling only in the known background model, which can be sped up considerably by factorization-based direct methods. The inversion method is successfully tested on synthetic elastic datasets.

  6. Spectral inverse problem for q-deformed harmonic oscillator

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Bera; J Datta

    2006-12-01

    The supersymmetric quantization condition is used to study the wave functions of SWKB equivalent -deformed harmonic oscillator which are obtained by using only the knowledge of bound-state spectra of -deformed harmonic oscillator. We have also studied the nonuniqueness of the obtained interactions by this spectral inverse method.

  7. Explicit inverse distance weighting mesh motion for coupled problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witteveen, J.A.S.; Bijl, H.

    2009-01-01

    An explicit mesh motion algorithm based on inverse distance weighting interpolation is presented. The explicit formulation leads to a fast mesh motion algorithm and an easy implementation. In addition, the proposed point-by-point method is robust and flexible in case of large deformations, hanging n

  8. A limited memory BFGS method for a nonlinear inverse problem in digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, G.; Loli Piccolomini, E.; Nagy, J. G.

    2017-09-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is an imaging technique that allows the reconstruction of a pseudo three-dimensional image of the breast from a finite number of low-dose two-dimensional projections obtained by different x-ray tube angles. An issue that is often ignored in DBT is the fact that an x-ray beam is polyenergetic, i.e. it is composed of photons with different levels of energy. The polyenergetic model requires solving a large-scale, nonlinear inverse problem, which is more expensive than the typically used simplified, linear monoenergetic model. However, the polyenergetic model is much less susceptible to beam hardening artifacts, which show up as dark streaks and cupping (i.e. background nonuniformities) in the reconstructed image. In addition, it has been shown that the polyenergetic model can be exploited to obtain additional quantitative information about the material of the object being imaged. In this paper we consider the multimaterial polyenergetic DBT model, and solve the nonlinear inverse problem with a limited memory BFGS quasi-Newton method. Regularization is enforced at each iteration using a diagonally modified approximation of the Hessian matrix, and by truncating the iterations.

  9. A 2D inverse problem of predicting boiling heat transfer in a long fin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orzechowski, Tadeusz

    2016-10-01

    A method for the determination of local values of the heat transfer coefficient on non-isothermal surfaces was analyzed on the example of a long smooth-surfaced fin made of aluminium. On the basis of the experimental data, two cases were taken into consideration: one-dimensional model for Bi two-dimensional model for thicker elements. In the case when the drop in temperature over the thickness could be omitted, the rejected local values of heat fluxes were calculated from the integral of the equation describing temperature distribution on the fin. The corresponding boiling curve was plotted on the basis of temperature gradient distribution as a function of superheat. For thicker specimens, where Bi > 0.1, the problem was modelled using a 2-D heat conduction equation, for which the boundary conditions were posed on the surface observed with a thermovision camera. The ill-conditioned inverse problem was solved using a method of heat polynomials, which required validation.

  10. Method of Minimax Optimization in the Coefficient Inverse Heat-Conduction Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diligenskaya, A. N.; Rapoport, É. Ya.

    2016-07-01

    Consideration has been given to the inverse problem on identification of a temperature-dependent thermal-conductivity coefficient. The problem was formulated in an extremum statement as a problem of search for a quantity considered as the optimum control of an object with distributed parameters, which is described by a nonlinear homogeneous spatially one-dimensional Fourier partial equation with boundary conditions of the second kind. As the optimality criterion, the authors used the error (minimized on the time interval of observation) of uniform approximation of the temperature computed on the object's model at an assigned point of the segment of variation in the spatial variable to its directly measured value. Pre-parametrization of the sought control action, which a priori records its description accurate to assigning parameters of representation in the class of polynomial temperature functions, ensured the reduction of the problem under study to a problem of parametric optimization. To solve the formulated problem, the authors used an analytical minimax-optimization method taking account of the alternance properties of the sought optimum solutions based on which the algorithm of computation of the optimum values of the sought parameters is reduced to a system (closed for these unknowns) of equations fixing minimax deviations of the calculated values of temperature from those observed on the time interval of identification. The obtained results confirm the efficiency of the proposed method for solution of a certain range of applied problems. The authors have studied the influence of the coordinate of a point of temperature measurement on the exactness of solution of the inverse problem.

  11. Higher order Nevanlinna functions and the inverse three spectra problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Boyko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The three spectra problem of recovering the Sturm-Liouville equation by the spectrum of the Dirichlet-Dirichlet boundary value problem on \\([0,a]\\, the Dirichlet-Dirichlet problem on \\([0,a/2]\\ and the Neumann-Dirichlet problem on \\([a/2,a]\\ is considered. Sufficient conditions of solvability and of uniqueness of the solution to such a problem are found.

  12. Inverse problem for multivariate time series using dynamical latent variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamparo, M.; Stramaglia, S.; Banavar, J. R.; Maritan, A.

    2012-06-01

    Factor analysis is a well known statistical method to describe the variability among observed variables in terms of a smaller number of unobserved latent variables called factors. While dealing with multivariate time series, the temporal correlation structure of data may be modeled by including correlations in latent factors, but a crucial choice is the covariance function to be implemented. We show that analyzing multivariate time series in terms of latent Gaussian processes, which are mutually independent but with each of them being characterized by exponentially decaying temporal correlations, leads to an efficient implementation of the expectation-maximization algorithm for the maximum likelihood estimation of parameters, due to the properties of block-tridiagonal matrices. The proposed approach solves an ambiguity known as the identifiability problem, which renders the solution of factor analysis determined only up to an orthogonal transformation. Samples with just two temporal points are sufficient for the parameter estimation: hence the proposed approach may be applied even in the absence of prior information about the correlation structure of latent variables by fitting the model to pairs of points with varying time delay. Our modeling allows one to make predictions of the future values of time series and we illustrate our method by applying it to an analysis of published gene expression data from cell culture HeLa.

  13. Riemann–Hilbert problem approach for two-dimensional flow inverse scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agaltsov, A. D., E-mail: agalets@gmail.com [Faculty of Computational Mathematics and Cybernetics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Novikov, R. G., E-mail: novikov@cmap.polytechnique.fr [CNRS (UMR 7641), Centre de Mathématiques Appliquées, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); IEPT RAS, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation)

    2014-10-15

    We consider inverse scattering for the time-harmonic wave equation with first-order perturbation in two dimensions. This problem arises in particular in the acoustic tomography of moving fluid. We consider linearized and nonlinearized reconstruction algorithms for this problem of inverse scattering. Our nonlinearized reconstruction algorithm is based on the non-local Riemann–Hilbert problem approach. Comparisons with preceding results are given.

  14. On t-local solvability of inverse scattering problems in two-dimensional layered media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baev, A. V.

    2015-06-01

    The solvability of two-dimensional inverse scattering problems for the Klein-Gordon equation and the Dirac system in a time-local formulation is analyzed in the framework of the Galerkin method. A necessary and sufficient condition for the unique solvability of these problems is obtained in the form of an energy conservation law. It is shown that the inverse problems are solvable only in the class of potentials for which the stationary Navier-Stokes equation is solvable.

  15. Lipschitz stability in an inverse problem for the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation

    CERN Document Server

    Baudouin, Lucie; Crépeau, Emmanuelle; Mercado, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an inverse problem for the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky (K-S) equation. The problem of retrieving the anti-diusion coefficient from a measurement of the solution is discussed. This measurement consists of the solution at some positive time and partial boundary data. Uniqueness and Lipschitz stability for this inverse problem are proven with the Bukhgeim-Klibanov method. The proof is based on a global Carleman inequality for the linearized K-S equation.

  16. Solution of an inverse scattering problem for the acoustic wave equation in three-dimensional media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baev, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    A three-dimensional inverse scattering problem for the acoustic wave equation is studied. The task is to determine the density and acoustic impedance of a medium. A necessary and sufficient condition for the unique solvability of this problem is established in the form of an energy conservation law. The interpretation of the solution to the inverse problem and the construction of medium images are discussed.

  17. New progress in the inverse problem in the calculus of variations

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    We present a new class of solutions for the inverse problem in the calculus of variations in arbitrary dimension $n$. This is the problem of determining the existence and uniqueness of Lagrangians for systems of $n$ second order ordinary differential equations. We also provide a number of new theorems concerning the inverse problem using exterior differential systems theory (EDS). Concentrating on the differential step of the EDS process, our new results provide a significant advance in the u...

  18. Generalized Uncertainty Quantification for Linear Inverse Problems in X-ray Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, Michael James [Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY (United States)

    2014-04-25

    In industrial and engineering applications, X-ray radiography has attained wide use as a data collection protocol for the assessment of material properties in cases where direct observation is not possible. The direct measurement of nuclear materials, particularly when they are under explosive or implosive loading, is not feasible, and radiography can serve as a useful tool for obtaining indirect measurements. In such experiments, high energy X-rays are pulsed through a scene containing material of interest, and a detector records a radiograph by measuring the radiation that is not attenuated in the scene. One approach to the analysis of these radiographs is to model the imaging system as an operator that acts upon the object being imaged to produce a radiograph. In this model, the goal is to solve an inverse problem to reconstruct the values of interest in the object, which are typically material properties such as density or areal density. The primary objective in this work is to provide quantitative solutions with uncertainty estimates for three separate applications in X-ray radiography: deconvolution, Abel inversion, and radiation spot shape reconstruction. For each problem, we introduce a new hierarchical Bayesian model for determining a posterior distribution on the unknowns and develop efficient Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods for sampling from the posterior. A Poisson likelihood, based on a noise model for photon counts at the detector, is combined with a prior tailored to each application: an edge-localizing prior for deconvolution; a smoothing prior with non-negativity constraints for spot reconstruction; and a full covariance sampling prior based on a Wishart hyperprior for Abel inversion. After developing our methods in a general setting, we demonstrate each model on both synthetically generated datasets, including those from a well known radiation transport code, and real high energy radiographs taken at two U. S. Department of Energy

  19. Solving inverse problems through a smooth formulation of multiple-point geostatistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melnikova, Yulia

    have proposed a smooth formulation of training-image based priors, which was inspired by the Frequency Matching method developed by our group earlier. The proposed smooth generalization, that integrates data and multiple-point statistics in a probabilistic framework, allows us to find solution by use......In oil and gas sector accurate reservoir description play a crucial role in problems associated with recovery of hydrocarbons, risk estimation and predicting reservoir performance. Knowledge on reservoir properties can be inferred from measurements typically made at the surface by solving...... be inferred, for instance, from a conceptual geological model termed a training image.The main motivation for this study was the challenge posed by history matching, an inverse problem aimed at estimating rock properties from production data. We addressed two main difficulties of the history matching problem...

  20. Trefftz method for the solution of three-dimensional forward and inverse problems of geoelectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yegorov, I. V.

    2011-02-01

    The Trefftz method is applied to the numerical solution of the three-dimensional (3D) forward problem for an electromagnetic field harmonically oscillating with time in a 3D environment, which ensures the possibility to solve a 3D inverse problem. Here, the known idea of simultaneous joint interpretation of the tangential components of electric and magnetic fields measured on the Earth's surface, which was suggested by A.N. Tikhonov for the development of the electromagnetic sounding method, is employed in the context of the numerical-analytical representation of the forward problem solution in accordance with the Trefftz method. Application of this method allows enables one to generalize the basic plane-stratified vertically 1D model of the medium by allowing for lateral variations in electric conductivity.

  1. Multi-frequency image reconstruction for radio interferometry. A regularized inverse problem approach

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrari, André; Ferrari, Chiara; Mary, David; Schutz, Antony; Smirnov, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    We describe a "spatio-spectral" deconvolution algorithm for wide-band imaging in radio interferometry. In contrast with the existing multi-frequency reconstruction algorithms, the proposed method does not rely on a model of the sky-brightness spectral distribution. This non-parametric approach can be of particular interest for the new generation of low frequency radiotelescopes. The proposed solution formalizes the reconstruction problem as a convex optimization problem with spatial and spectral regularizations. The efficiency of this approach has been already proven for narrow-band image reconstruction and the present contribution can be considered as its extension to the multi-frequency case. Because the number of frequency bands multiplies the size of the inverse problem, particular attention is devoted to the derivation of an iterative large scale optimization algorithm. It is shown that the main computational bottleneck of the approach, which lies in the resolution of a linear system, can be efficiently ...

  2. Inverse-problem approach for particle digital holography: accurate location based on local optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulez, Ferréol; Denis, Loïc; Fournier, Corinne; Thiébaut, Eric; Goepfert, Charles

    2007-04-01

    We propose a microparticle localization scheme in digital holography. Most conventional digital holography methods are based on Fresnel transform and present several problems such as twin-image noise, border effects, and other effects. To avoid these difficulties, we propose an inverse-problem approach, which yields the optimal particle set that best models the observed hologram image. We resolve this global optimization problem by conventional particle detection followed by a local refinement for each particle. Results for both simulated and real digital holograms show strong improvement in the localization of the particles, particularly along the depth dimension. In our simulations, the position precision is > or =1 microm rms. Our results also show that the localization precision does not deteriorate for particles near the edge of the field of view.

  3. ON THE INVERSE MINIMUM SPANNING TREE PROBLEM WITH MINIMUM NUMBER OF PERTURBED EDGES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bangyi LI; Zhaohan SHENG

    2003-01-01

    Let G= be a network with the vertex set V, the edge set E and the length vector L, andlet T* be a prior determined spanning tree of G. The inverse minimum spanning tree problem withminimum number of perturbed edges is to perturb the length vector L to L+ δ, such that T* is one ofminimum spanning trees under the length vector L+ δ and the number of perturbed edges is minimum.This paper establishes a mathematical model for this problem and transforms it into a minimumvertex covering problem in a bipartite graph Go, a path-graph. Thus a strongly polynomial algorithmwith time complexity O(mn2) can be designed by using Hungarian method.

  4. A 2D forward and inverse code for streaming potential problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soueid Ahmed, A.; Jardani, A.; Revil, A.

    2013-12-01

    The self-potential method corresponds to the passive measurement of the electrical field in response to the occurrence of natural sources of current in the ground. One of these sources corresponds to the streaming current associated with the flow of the groundwater. We can therefore apply the self- potential method to recover non-intrusively some information regarding the groundwater flow. We first solve the forward problem starting with the solution of the groundwater flow problem, then computing the source current density, and finally solving a Poisson equation for the electrical potential. We use the finite-element method to solve the relevant partial differential equations. In order to reduce the number of (petrophysical) model parameters required to solve the forward problem, we introduced an effective charge density tensor of the pore water, which can be determined directly from the permeability tensor for neutral pore waters. The second aspect of our work concerns the inversion of the self-potential data using Tikhonov regularization with smoothness and weighting depth constraints. This approach accounts for the distribution of the electrical resistivity, which can be independently and approximately determined from electrical resistivity tomography. A numerical code, SP2DINV, has been implemented in Matlab to perform both the forward and inverse modeling. Three synthetic case studies are discussed.

  5. SP2DINV: A 2D forward and inverse code for streaming potential problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soueid Ahmed, A.; Jardani, A.; Revil, A.; Dupont, J. P.

    2013-09-01

    The self-potential method corresponds to the passive measurement of the electrical field in response to the occurrence of natural sources of current in the ground. One of these sources corresponds to the streaming current associated with the flow of the ground water. We can therefore apply the self-potential method to recover non-intrusively some information regarding the ground water flow. We first solve the forward problem starting with the solution of the ground water flow problem, then computing the source current density, and finally solving a Poisson equation for the electrical potential. We use the finite-element method to solve the relevant partial differential equations. In order to reduce the number of (petrophysical) model parameters required to solve the forward problem, we introduced an effective charge density tensor of the pore water, which can be determined directly from the permeability tensor for neutral pore waters. The second aspect of our work concerns the inversion of the self-potential data using Tikhonov regularization with smoothness and weighting depth constraints. This approach accounts for the distribution of the electrical resistivity, which can be independently and approximately determined from electrical resistivity tomography. A numerical code, SP2DINV, has been implemented in Matlab to perform both the forward and inverse modeling. Three synthetic case studies are discussed.

  6. Calculation of transport coefficient profiles in modulation experiments as an inverse problem

    CERN Document Server

    Escande, D F

    2011-01-01

    The calculation of transport profiles from experimental measurements belongs in the category of inverse problems which are known to come with issues of ill-conditioning or singularity. A reformulation of the calculation, the matricial approach, is proposed for periodically modulated experiments, within the context of the standard advection-diffusion model where these issues are related to the vanishing of the determinant of a 2x2 matrix. This sheds light on the accuracy of calculations with transport codes, and provides a path for a more precise assessment of the profiles and of the related uncertainty.

  7. Electromagnetic forward and inverse problems of non-rotating magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Liu, Guoqiang; Tao, Chunjing; Wang, Hao; He, Wenjing

    2009-01-01

    The analysis of electromagnetic forward and inverse problems is very important in the process of image reconstruction for magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI). A new analysis method was introduced in this paper. It breaks through some illogical supposes that the existing methods applied and can improve the spatial resolution of the image availably. Besides it can avoid rotating the static magnetic field which is very difficult to come true in application, therefore the development of MAT-MI technique can be promoted greatly. To test the validity of the new method, two test models were analyzed, and the availability of the method was demonstrated.

  8. Analytical techniques for addressing forward and inverse problems of light scattering by irregularly shaped particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xu; Chen, Zhigang; Gong, Jianmin; Taflove, Allen; Backman, Vadim

    2004-06-01

    Understanding light scattering by nonspherical particles is crucial in modeling the transport of light in realistic structures such as biological tissues. We report the application of novel analytical approaches based on modified Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin and equiphase-sphere methods that facilitate accurate characterization of light scattering by a wide range of irregularly shaped dielectric particles. We also demonstrate that these approaches have the potential to address the inverse-scattering problem by means of a spectral analysis of the total scattering cross section of arbitrarily shaped particles.

  9. New prospects in direct, inverse and control problems for evolution equations

    CERN Document Server

    Fragnelli, Genni; Mininni, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    This book, based on a selection of talks given at a dedicated meeting in Cortona, Italy, in June 2013, shows the high degree of interaction between a number of fields related to applied sciences. Applied sciences consider situations in which the evolution of a given system over time is observed, and the related models can be formulated in terms of evolution equations (EEs). These equations have been studied intensively in theoretical research and are the source of an enormous number of applications. In this volume, particular attention is given to direct, inverse and control problems for EEs. The book provides an updated overview of the field, revealing its richness and vitality.

  10. Updated Results for the Wake Vortex Inverse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, Robert E.; Lai, David Y.; Delisi, Donald P.; Mellman, George R.

    2008-01-01

    NorthWest Research Associates (NWRA) has developed an Inverse Model for inverting aircraft wake vortex data. The objective of the inverse modeling is to obtain estimates of the vortex circulation decay and crosswind vertical profiles, using time history measurements of the lateral and vertical position of aircraft vortices. The Inverse Model performs iterative forward model runs using estimates of vortex parameters, vertical crosswind profiles, and vortex circulation as a function of wake age. Iterations are performed until a user-defined criterion is satisfied. Outputs from an Inverse Model run are the best estimates of the time history of the vortex circulation derived from the observed data, the vertical crosswind profile, and several vortex parameters. The forward model, named SHRAPA, used in this inverse modeling is a modified version of the Shear-APA model, and it is described in Section 2 of this document. Details of the Inverse Model are presented in Section 3. The Inverse Model was applied to lidar-observed vortex data at three airports: FAA acquired data from San Francisco International Airport (SFO) and Denver International Airport (DEN), and NASA acquired data from Memphis International Airport (MEM). The results are compared with observed data. This Inverse Model validation is documented in Section 4. A summary is given in Section 5. A user's guide for the inverse wake vortex model is presented in a separate NorthWest Research Associates technical report (Lai and Delisi, 2007a).

  11. Inverse problem of elastica of a variable-arc-length beam subjected to a concentrated load

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaowei Zhang; Jialing Yang; Keren Wang

    2005-01-01

    An inverse problem of elastica of a variable-arclength beam subjected to a concentrated load is investigated.The beam is fixed at one end, and can slide freely over a hinge support at the other end. The inverse problem is to determine the value of the load when the deflection of the action point of the load is given. Based on the elasitca equations and the elliptic integrals, a set of nonlinear equations for the inverse problem are derived, and an analytical solution by means of iterations and Quasi-Newton method is presented. From the results, the relationship between the loads and deflections of the loading point is obtained.

  12. Physics-based Inverse Problem to Deduce Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-07

    please find the Final Technical Report with SF 298 for Dr. Erin E. Hackett’s ONR grant entitled Physics -based Inverse Problem to Deduce Marine...From- To) 07/03/2017 Final Technica l Dec 2012- Dec 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Physics -based Inverse Problem to Deduce Marine...19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code) 843-349-4087 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Physics -Based Inverse Problem To

  13. A unified approach to the helioseismic forward and inverse problems of differential rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritzwoller, M.H.; Lavely, E.M. (Colorado Univ., Boulder (USA) MIT, Cambridge, MA (USA))

    1991-03-01

    A general, degenerate perturbation theoretic treatment of the helioseismic forward and inverse problem for solar differential rotation is presented. For the forward problem, differential rotation is represented as the axisymmetric component of a general toroidal flow field using velocity spherical harmonics. This approach allows each degree of differential rotation to be estimated independently from all other degrees. In the inverse problem, the splitting caused by differential rotation is expressed as an expansion in a set of orthonormal polynomials that are intimately related to the solution of the forward problem. The combined use of vector spherical harmonics as basis functions for differential ratio and the Clebsch-Gordon coefficients to represent splitting provides a unified approach to the forward and inverse problems of differential rotation which greatly simplify inversion. 43 refs.

  14. Joint Hydrogeophysical Inversion: State Estimation for Seawater Intrusion Models in 3D

    CERN Document Server

    Steklova, K

    2016-01-01

    Seawater intrusion (SWI) is a complex process, where 3D modeling is often necessary in order to monitor and manage the affected aquifers. Here, we present a synthetic study to test a joint hydrogeophysical inversion approach aimed at solving the inverse problem of estimating initial and current saltwater distribution. First, we use a 3D groundwater model for variable density flow based on discretized flow and solute mass balance equations. In addition to the groundwater model, a 3D geophysical model was developed for direct current resistivity imaging and inversion. The objective function of the coupled problem consists of data misfit and regularization terms as well as a coupling term that relates groundwater and geophysical states. We present a novel approach to solve the inverse problem using an Alternating Direction Method of Multipliers (ADMM) to minimize this coupled objective function. The sensitivities are derived analytically for the discretized system of equations, which allows us to efficiently com...

  15. The Quantum Inverse Scattering Method for Hubbard-like Models

    CERN Document Server

    Martins, M J

    1997-01-01

    This work is concerned with various aspects of the formulation of the quantum inverse scattering method for the one-dimensional Hubbard model. We first establish the essential tools to solve the eigenvalue problem for the transfer matrix of the classical ``covering'' Hubbard model within the algebraic Bethe Ansatz framework. The fundamental commutation rules exhibit a hidden 6-vertex symmetry which plays a crucial role in the whole algebraic construction. Next we apply this formalism to study the SU(2) highest weights properties of the eigenvectors and the solution of a related coupled spin model with twisted boundary conditions. The machinery developed in this paper is applicable to many other models, and as an example we present the algebraic solution of the Bariev XY coupled model.

  16. An inverse problem for a one-dimensional time-fractional diffusion problem

    KAUST Repository

    Jin, Bangti

    2012-06-26

    We study an inverse problem of recovering a spatially varying potential term in a one-dimensional time-fractional diffusion equation from the flux measurements taken at a single fixed time corresponding to a given set of input sources. The unique identifiability of the potential is shown for two cases, i.e. the flux at one end and the net flux, provided that the set of input sources forms a complete basis in L 2(0, 1). An algorithm of the quasi-Newton type is proposed for the efficient and accurate reconstruction of the coefficient from finite data, and the injectivity of the Jacobian is discussed. Numerical results for both exact and noisy data are presented. © 2012 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  17. Eddy current imaging. Limits of the born approximation and advantages of an exact solution to the inverse problem; Imagerie par courants de Foucault. Limites de l`approximation de Born et interet d`une resolution exacte du probleme inverse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamman, E.; Zorgati, R.

    1995-12-31

    Eddy current non-destructive testing is used by EDF to detect flaws affecting conductive objects such as steam generator tubes. With a view to obtaining ever more accurate information on equipment integrity, thereby facilitating diagnosis, studies aimed at using measurements to reconstruct an image of the flaw have been proceeding now for about ten years. In this context, our approach to eddy current imaging is based on inverse problem formalism. The direct problem, involving a mathematical model linking measurements provided by a probe with variables characterizing the defect, is dealt with elsewhere. Using the model results, we study the possibility of inverting it, i.e. of reconstructing an image of the flaw from the measurements. We first give an overview of the different inversion techniques, representative of the state of the art and all based on linearization of the inverse problem by means of the Born approximation. The model error resulting from an excessive Born approximation nevertheless severely limits the quantity of the images which can be obtained. In order to counteract this often critical error and extend the eddy current imaging application field, we have to del with the non-linear inverse problem. A method derived from recent research is proposed and implemented to ensure consistency with the exact model. Based on an `optimization` type approach and provided with a convergence theorem, the method is highly efficient. (authors). 17 refs., 7 figs., 1 append.

  18. Considerations about the solution space of a VTI marine CSEM Inversion problem using vertical antennas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunziker, J.W.; Thorbecke, J.W.; Slob, E.C.

    2015-01-01

    We exploit the randomness of a genetic inversion algorithm to map the global minimum of the solution space of Controlled-Source Electromagnetic inversion problems. In this study, we focus on the information content that vertical electric or magnetic receivers could add to solve for anisotropic condu

  19. Voxel inversion of airborne electromagnetic data for improved model integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiandaca, Gianluca; Auken, Esben; Kirkegaard, Casper; Vest Christiansen, Anders

    2014-05-01

    Inversion of electromagnetic data has migrated from single site interpretations to inversions including entire surveys using spatial constraints to obtain geologically reasonable results. Though, the model space is usually linked to the actual observation points. For airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys the spatial discretization of the model space reflects the flight lines. On the contrary, geological and groundwater models most often refer to a regular voxel grid, not correlated to the geophysical model space, and the geophysical information has to be relocated for integration in (hydro)geological models. We have developed a new geophysical inversion algorithm working directly in a voxel grid disconnected from the actual measuring points, which then allows for informing directly geological/hydrogeological models. The new voxel model space defines the soil properties (like resistivity) on a set of nodes, and the distribution of the soil properties is computed everywhere by means of an interpolation function (e.g. inverse distance or kriging). Given this definition of the voxel model space, the 1D forward responses of the AEM data are computed as follows: 1) a 1D model subdivision, in terms of model thicknesses, is defined for each 1D data set, creating "virtual" layers. 2) the "virtual" 1D models at the sounding positions are finalized by interpolating the soil properties (the resistivity) in the center of the "virtual" layers. 3) the forward response is computed in 1D for each "virtual" model. We tested the new inversion scheme on an AEM survey carried out with the SkyTEM system close to Odder, in Denmark. The survey comprises 106054 dual mode AEM soundings, and covers an area of approximately 13 km X 16 km. The voxel inversion was carried out on a structured grid of 260 X 325 X 29 xyz nodes (50 m xy spacing), for a total of 2450500 inversion parameters. A classical spatially constrained inversion (SCI) was carried out on the same data set, using 106054

  20. A Bayesian setting for an inverse problem in heat transfer

    KAUST Repository

    Ruggeri, Fabrizio

    2014-01-06

    In this work a Bayesian setting is developed to infer the thermal conductivity, an unknown parameter that appears into heat equation. Temperature data are available on the basis of cooling experiments. The realistic assumption that the boundary data are noisy is introduced, for a given prescribed initial condition. We show how to derive the global likelihood function for the forward boundary-initial condition problem, given the values of the temperature field plus Gaussian noise. We assume that the thermal conductivity parameter can be modelled a priori through a lognormal distributed random variable or by means of a space-dependent stationary lognormal random field. In both cases, given Gaussian priors for the time-dependent Dirichlet boundary values, we marginalize out analytically the joint posterior distribution of and the random boundary conditions, TL and TR, using the linearity of the heat equation. Synthetic data are used to carry out the inference. We exploit the concentration of the posterior distribution of , using the Laplace approximation and therefore avoiding costly MCMC computations.

  1. A Direct Solution Approach to the Inverse Shallow-Water Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alelign Gessese

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of open channel flow modelling often requires an accurate representation of the channel bed topography to accurately predict the flow hydrodynamics. Experimental techniques are the most widely used approaches to measure the bed topographic elevation of open channels. However, they are usually cost and time consuming. Free surface measurement is, on the other hand, relatively easy to obtain using airborne photographic techniques. We present in this work an easy to implement and fast to solve numerical technique to identify the underlying bedrock topography from given free surface elevation data in shallow open channel flows. The main underlying idea is to derive explicit partial differential equations which govern this inverse reconstruction problem. The technique described here is a “one-shot technique” in the sense that the solution of the partial differential equation provides the solution to the inverse problem directly. The idea is tested on a set of artificial data obtained by first solving the forward problem governed by the shallow-water equations. Numerical results show that the channel bed topographic elevation can be reconstructed with a level of accuracy less than 3%. The method is also shown to be robust when noise is present in the input data.

  2. Sequential Monte Carlo samplers for semi-linear inverse problems and application to magnetoencephalography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommariva, Sara; Sorrentino, Alberto

    2014-11-01

    We discuss the use of a recent class of sequential Monte Carlo methods for solving inverse problems characterized by a semi-linear structure, i.e. where the data depend linearly on a subset of variables and nonlinearly on the remaining ones. In this type of problems, under proper Gaussian assumptions one can marginalize the linear variables. This means that the Monte Carlo procedure needs only to be applied to the nonlinear variables, while the linear ones can be treated analytically; as a result, the Monte Carlo variance and/or the computational cost decrease. We use this approach to solve the inverse problem of magnetoencephalography, with a multi-dipole model for the sources. Here, data depend nonlinearly on the number of sources and their locations, and depend linearly on their current vectors. The semi-analytic approach enables us to estimate the number of dipoles and their location from a whole time-series, rather than a single time point, while keeping a low computational cost.

  3. THE INVERSE PROBLEM FOR PART SYMMETRIC MATRICES ON A SUBSPACE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-yun Peng; Xi-yan Hu; Lei Zhang

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the following two problems are considered:Problem I. Given S ∈ Rn×p, X, B ∈ Rn×m, find A ∈ SRs,n such that AX = B, where SRs,n = {A ∈ Rn×n|xT(A - AT) = 0, for all x ∈ R(S)}.Problem Ⅱ. Given A* ∈ Rn×n, find A ∈ SE such that ‖A^-A*‖ = minA∈sE‖A-A*‖,where SE is the solution set of Problem Ⅰ.The necessary and sufficient conditions for the solvability of and the general form of the solutions of problem Ⅰ are given. For problem Ⅱ, the expression for the solution, a numerical algorithm and a numerical example are provided.

  4. PREFACE: The Second International Conference on Inverse Problems: Recent Theoretical Developments and Numerical Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jin; Hon, Yiu-Chung; Seo, Jin Keun; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2005-01-01

    The Second International Conference on Inverse Problems: Recent Theoretical Developments and Numerical Approaches was held at Fudan University, Shanghai from 16-21 June 2004. The first conference in this series was held at the City University of Hong Kong in January 2002 and it was agreed to hold the conference once every two years in a Pan-Pacific Asian country. The next conference is scheduled to be held at Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan in July 2006. The purpose of this series of biennial conferences is to establish and develop constant international collaboration, especially among the Pan-Pacific Asian countries. In recent decades, interest in inverse problems has been flourishing all over the globe because of both the theoretical interest and practical requirements. In particular, in Asian countries, one is witnessing remarkable new trends of research in inverse problems as well as the participation of many young talents. Considering these trends, the second conference was organized with the chairperson Professor Li Tat-tsien (Fudan University), in order to provide forums for developing research cooperation and to promote activities in the field of inverse problems. Because solutions to inverse problems are needed in various applied fields, we entertained a total of 92 participants at the second conference and arranged various talks which ranged from mathematical analyses to solutions of concrete inverse problems in the real world. This volume contains 18 selected papers, all of which have undergone peer review. The 18 papers are classified as follows: Surveys: four papers give reviews of specific inverse problems. Theoretical aspects: six papers investigate the uniqueness, stability, and reconstruction schemes. Numerical methods: four papers devise new numerical methods and their applications to inverse problems. Solutions to applied inverse problems: four papers discuss concrete inverse problems such as scattering problems and inverse problems in

  5. Variational principles and optimal solutions of the inverse problems of creep bending of plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormotin, K. S.; Oleinikov, A. I.

    2012-09-01

    It is shown that inverse problems of steady-state creep bending of plates in both the geometrically linear and nonlinear formulations can be represented in a variational formulation. Steady-state values of the obtained functionals corresponding to the solutions of the problems of inelastic deformation and elastic unloading are determined by applying a finite element procedure to the functionals. Optimal laws of creep deformation are formulated using the criterion of minimizing damage in the functionals of the inverse problems. The formulated problems are reduced to the problems solved by the finite element method using MSC.Marc software.

  6. An Inverse Eigenvalue Problem for Damped Gyroscopic Second-Order Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongxin Yuan

    2009-01-01

    analytical mass and stiffness matrices, so that ( has a prescribed subset of eigenvalues and eigenvectors, is considered. Necessary and sufficient conditions under which this quadratic inverse eigenvalue problem is solvable are specified.

  7. Error Analysis in the Joint Event Location/Seismic Calibration Inverse Problem

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rodi, William L

    2006-01-01

    ...: The analysis is being done in the context of the multiple-event inverse problem, in which the locations of multiple events are inferred jointly with travel-time corrections for the event-station paths...

  8. A computationally efficient parallel Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm for highly parameterized inverse model analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Youzuo; O'Malley, Daniel; Vesselinov, Velimir V.

    2016-09-01

    Inverse modeling seeks model parameters given a set of observations. However, for practical problems because the number of measurements is often large and the model parameters are also numerous, conventional methods for inverse modeling can be computationally expensive. We have developed a new, computationally efficient parallel Levenberg-Marquardt method for solving inverse modeling problems with a highly parameterized model space. Levenberg-Marquardt methods require the solution of a linear system of equations which can be prohibitively expensive to compute for moderate to large-scale problems. Our novel method projects the original linear problem down to a Krylov subspace such that the dimensionality of the problem can be significantly reduced. Furthermore, we store the Krylov subspace computed when using the first damping parameter and recycle the subspace for the subsequent damping parameters. The efficiency of our new inverse modeling algorithm is significantly improved using these computational techniques. We apply this new inverse modeling method to invert for random transmissivity fields in 2-D and a random hydraulic conductivity field in 3-D. Our algorithm is fast enough to solve for the distributed model parameters (transmissivity) in the model domain. The algorithm is coded in Julia and implemented in the MADS computational framework (http://mads.lanl.gov). By comparing with Levenberg-Marquardt methods using standard linear inversion techniques such as QR or SVD methods, our Levenberg-Marquardt method yields a speed-up ratio on the order of ˜101 to ˜102 in a multicore computational environment. Therefore, our new inverse modeling method is a powerful tool for characterizing subsurface heterogeneity for moderate to large-scale problems.

  9. Sparse deconvolution for the large-scale ill-posed inverse problem of impact force reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Baijie; Zhang, Xingwu; Gao, Jiawei; Liu, Ruonan; Chen, Xuefeng

    2017-01-01

    Most previous regularization methods for solving the inverse problem of force reconstruction are to minimize the l2-norm of the desired force. However, these traditional regularization methods such as Tikhonov regularization and truncated singular value decomposition, commonly fail to solve the large-scale ill-posed inverse problem in moderate computational cost. In this paper, taking into account the sparse characteristic of impact force, the idea of sparse deconvolution is first introduced to the field of impact force reconstruction and a general sparse deconvolution model of impact force is constructed. Second, a novel impact force reconstruction method based on the primal-dual interior point method (PDIPM) is proposed to solve such a large-scale sparse deconvolution model, where minimizing the l2-norm is replaced by minimizing the l1-norm. Meanwhile, the preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm is used to compute the search direction of PDIPM with high computational efficiency. Finally, two experiments including the small-scale or medium-scale single impact force reconstruction and the relatively large-scale consecutive impact force reconstruction are conducted on a composite wind turbine blade and a shell structure to illustrate the advantage of PDIPM. Compared with Tikhonov regularization, PDIPM is more efficient, accurate and robust whether in the single impact force reconstruction or in the consecutive impact force reconstruction.

  10. Humanoid Walking Robot: Modeling, Inverse Dynamics, and Gain Scheduling Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvedin Kljuno

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents reference-model-based control design for a 10 degree-of-freedom bipedal walking robot, using nonlinear gain scheduling. The main goal is to show concentrated mass models can be used for prediction of the required joint torques for a bipedal walking robot. Relatively complicated architecture, high DOF, and balancing requirements make the control task of these robots difficult. Although linear control techniques can be used to control bipedal robots, nonlinear control is necessary for better performance. The emphasis of this work is to show that the reference model can be a bipedal walking model with concentrated mass at the center of gravity, which removes the problems related to design of a pseudo-inverse system. Another significance of this approach is the reduced calculation requirements due to the simplified procedure of nominal joint torques calculation. Kinematic and dynamic analysis is discussed including results for joint torques and ground force necessary to implement a prescribed walking motion. This analysis is accompanied by a comparison with experimental data. An inverse plant and a tracking error linearization-based controller design approach is described. We propose a novel combination of a nonlinear gain scheduling with a concentrated mass model for the MIMO bipedal robot system.

  11. A nonlinear inversion for the velocity background and perturbation models

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Zedong

    2015-08-19

    Reflected waveform inversion (RWI) provides a method to reduce the nonlinearity of the standard full waveform inversion (FWI) by inverting for the single scattered wavefield obtained using an image. However, current RWI methods usually neglect diving waves, which is an important source of information for extracting the long wavelength components of the velocity model. Thus, we propose a new optimization problem through breaking the velocity model into the background and the perturbation in the wave equation directly. In this case, the perturbed model is no longer the single scattering model, but includes all scattering. We optimize both components simultaneously, and thus, the objective function is nonlinear with respect to both the background and perturbation. The new introduced w can absorb the non-smooth update of background naturally. Application to the Marmousi model with frequencies that start at 5 Hz shows that this method can converge to the accurate velocity starting from a linearly increasing initial velocity. Application to the SEG2014 demonstrates the versatility of the approach.

  12. Genetic algorithms and smoothing filters in solving the geophysical inversion problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šešum Vesna

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The combination of genetic algorithms, smoothing filters and geophysical tomography is used in solving the geophysical inversion problem. This hybrid technique is developed to improve the results obtained by using genetic algorithm sonly. The application of smoothing filters can improve the performance of GA implementation for solving the geophysical inversion problem. Some test-examples and the obtained comparative results are presented.

  13. Uniqueness and Nonuniqueness in Inverse Problems for Elliptic Partial Differential Equations and Related Medical Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiwoon Kwon

    2015-01-01

    measured data for the inverse problem. For anisotropic coefficient with anomaly with or without jumps from known or unknown background, nonuniqueness of the inverse problems is discussed and the relation to cloaking or illusion of the anomaly is explained. The uniqueness and nonuniqueness issues are discussed firstly for EIT and secondly for ISP in similar arguments. Arguing the relation between source-to-detector map and Dirichlet-to-Neumann map in DOT and the uniqueness and nonuniqueness of DOT are also explained.

  14. Some Inverse Problems in Periodic Homogenization of Hamilton-Jacobi Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Songting; Tran, Hung V.; Yu, Yifeng

    2016-09-01

    We look at the effective Hamiltonian {overline{H}} associated with the Hamiltonian {H(p,x)=H(p)+V(x)} in the periodic homogenization theory. Our central goal is to understand the relation between {V} and {overline{H}}. We formulate some inverse problems concerning this relation. Such types of inverse problems are, in general, very challenging. In this paper, we discuss several special cases in both convex and nonconvex settings.

  15. Uniqueness of Inversion Problems Described by First-Kind Integral Equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐铁峰

    2002-01-01

    We propose a general method to prove the uniqueness of the inversion problems described by first-kind integral equations. The method depends on the analytical properties of the Fourier transform of the integral kernel and the finiteness of the total states (or probability, if normalized), the integration of the "local" density of states, which is a rather moderate condition and satisfied by many inversion problems arising from physics and engineering.

  16. Review of the inverse scattering problem at fixed energy in quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatier, P. C.

    1972-01-01

    Methods of solution of the inverse scattering problem at fixed energy in quantum mechanics are presented. Scattering experiments of a beam of particles at a nonrelativisitic energy by a target made up of particles are analyzed. The Schroedinger equation is used to develop the quantum mechanical description of the system and one of several functions depending on the relative distance of the particles. The inverse problem is the construction of the potentials from experimental measurements.

  17. Moving Least Squares Method for a One-Dimensional Parabolic Inverse Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baiyu Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the numerical solution of a class of one-dimensional inverse parabolic problems using the moving least squares approximation; the inverse problem is the determination of an unknown source term depending on time. The collocation method is used for solving the equation; some numerical experiments are presented and discussed to illustrate the stability and high efficiency of the method.

  18. Calculation Error of Numerical Solution for a Boundary—Value Inverse Heat Conduction Problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiXijing; HeQun; 等

    1996-01-01

    A one-dimensional linear inverse heat conduction problem is studied in this paper,This ill-posed problem is replaced by the perturbed problem with a non-localized boundary condition.After the derivation of its closed-from analytical solution,the calculation error can be determinde by the comparison between the numerical and exact solutions.

  19. A Study of Inverse Problems Based on Two Kinds of Special Matrix Equations in Euclidean Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Two special classes of symmetric coefficient matrices were defined based on characteristics matrix; meanwhile, the expressions of the solution to inverse problems are given and the conditions for the solvability of these problems are studied relying on researching. Finally, the optimal approximation solution of these problems is provided.

  20. SQUIDs and inverse problem techniques in nondestructive evaluation of metals

    CERN Document Server

    Bruno, A C

    2001-01-01

    Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices coupled to gradiometers were used to defect flaws in metals. We detected flaws in aluminium samples carrying current, measuring fields at lift-off distances up to one order of magnitude larger than the size of the flaw. Configured as a susceptometer we detected surface-braking flaws in steel samples, measuring the distortion on the applied magnetic field. We also used spatial filtering techniques to enhance the visualization of the magnetic field due to the flaws. In order to assess its severity, we used the generalized inverse method and singular value decomposition to reconstruct small spherical inclusions in steel. In addition, finite elements and optimization techniques were used to image complex shaped flaws.

  1. Inverse scattering problem for Sturm-Liouville operator on non-compact A-graph. Uniqueness result.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Ignatyev

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We consider a connected metric graph with the following property: each two cycles can have at most one common point. Such graphs are called A-graphs. On noncompact A-graph we consider a scattering problem for Sturm--Liouville differential operator with standard matching conditions in the internal vertices. Transport, spectral and scattering problems for differential operators on graphs appear frequently in mathematics, natural sciences and engineering. In particular, direct and inverse problems for such operators are used to construct and study models in mechanics, nano-electronics, quantum computing and waveguides. The most complete results on (both direct and inverse spectral problems were achieved in the case of Sturm--Liouville operators on compact graphs, in the noncompact case there are no similar general results. In this paper, we establish some properties of the spectral characteristics and investigate the inverse problem of recovering the operator from the scattering data. A uniqueness theorem for such inverse problem is proved.

  2. Variational Bayesian approximation with scale mixture prior for inverse problems: A numerical comparison between three algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharsalli, Leila; Mohammad-Djafari, Ali; Fraysse, Aurélia; Rodet, Thomas

    2013-08-01

    Our aim is to solve a linear inverse problem using various methods based on the Variational Bayesian Approximation (VBA). We choose to take sparsity into account via a scale mixture prior, more precisely a student-t model. The joint posterior of the unknown and hidden variable of the mixtures is approximated via the VBA. To do this approximation, classically the alternate algorithm is used. But this method is not the most efficient. Recently other optimization algorithms have been proposed; indeed classical iterative algorithms of optimization such as the steepest descent method and the conjugate gradient have been studied in the space of the probability densities involved in the Bayesian methodology to treat this problem. The main object of this work is to present these three algorithms and a numerical comparison of their performances.

  3. Linearized Functional Minimization for Inverse Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohlberg, Brendt [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tartakovsky, Daniel M. [University of California, San Diego; Dentz, Marco [Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research, Barcelona, Spain

    2012-06-21

    Heterogeneous aquifers typically consist of multiple lithofacies, whose spatial arrangement significantly affects flow and transport. The estimation of these lithofacies is complicated by the scarcity of data and by the lack of a clear correlation between identifiable geologic indicators and attributes. We introduce a new inverse-modeling approach to estimate both the spatial extent of hydrofacies and their properties from sparse measurements of hydraulic conductivity and hydraulic head. Our approach is to minimize a functional defined on the vectors of values of hydraulic conductivity and hydraulic head fields defined on regular grids at a user-determined resolution. This functional is constructed to (i) enforce the relationship between conductivity and heads provided by the groundwater flow equation, (ii) penalize deviations of the reconstructed fields from measurements where they are available, and (iii) penalize reconstructed fields that are not piece-wise smooth. We develop an iterative solver for this functional that exploits a local linearization of the mapping from conductivity to head. This approach provides a computationally efficient algorithm that rapidly converges to a solution. A series of numerical experiments demonstrates the robustness of our approach.

  4. Soft leptogenesis in the inverse seesaw model

    CERN Document Server

    Garayoa, J; Rius, N

    2007-01-01

    We consider leptogenesis induced by soft supersymmetry breaking terms ("soft leptogenesis"), in the context of the inverse seesaw mechanism. In this model there are lepton number (L) conserving and L-violating soft supersymmetry-breaking B-terms involving the singlet sneutrinos which, together with the -- generically small-- L-violating parameter responsible of the neutrino mass, give a small mass splitting between the four singlet sneutrino states of a single generation. In combination with the trilinear soft supersymmetry breaking terms they also provide new CP violating phases needed to generate a lepton asymmetry in the singlet sneutrino decays. We obtain that in this scenario the lepton asymmetry is proportional to the L-conserving soft supersymmetry-breaking B-term, and it is not suppressed by the L-violating parameters. Consequently we find that, as in the standard see-saw case, this mechanism can lead to sucessful leptogenesis only for relatively small value of the relevant soft bilinear coupling. The...

  5. Improving landscape inference by integrating heterogeneous data in the inverse Ising problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrat-Charlaix, Pierre; Figliuzzi, Matteo; Weigt, Martin

    2016-11-01

    The inverse Ising problem and its generalizations to Potts and continuous spin models have recently attracted much attention thanks to their successful applications in the statistical modeling of biological data. In the standard setting, the parameters of an Ising model (couplings and fields) are inferred using a sample of equilibrium configurations drawn from the Boltzmann distribution. However, in the context of biological applications, quantitative information for a limited number of microscopic spins configurations has recently become available. In this paper, we extend the usual setting of the inverse Ising model by developing an integrative approach combining the equilibrium sample with (possibly noisy) measurements of the energy performed for a number of arbitrary configurations. Using simulated data, we show that our integrative approach outperforms standard inference based only on the equilibrium sample or the energy measurements, including error correction of noisy energy measurements. As a biological proof-of-concept application, we show that mutational fitness landscapes in proteins can be better described when combining evolutionary sequence data with complementary structural information about mutant sequences.

  6. Mixed-norm estimates for the M/EEG inverse problem using accelerated gradient methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramfort, Alexandre; Kowalski, Matthieu; Hämäläinen, Matti

    2012-04-07

    Magneto- and electroencephalography (M/EEG) measure the electromagnetic fields produced by the neural electrical currents. Given a conductor model for the head, and the distribution of source currents in the brain, Maxwell's equations allow one to compute the ensuing M/EEG signals. Given the actual M/EEG measurements and the solution of this forward problem, one can localize, in space and in time, the brain regions that have produced the recorded data. However, due to the physics of the problem, the limited number of sensors compared to the number of possible source locations, and measurement noise, this inverse problem is ill-posed. Consequently, additional constraints are needed. Classical inverse solvers, often called minimum norm estimates (MNE), promote source estimates with a small ℓ₂ norm. Here, we consider a more general class of priors based on mixed norms. Such norms have the ability to structure the prior in order to incorporate some additional assumptions about the sources. We refer to such solvers as mixed-norm estimates (MxNE). In the context of M/EEG, MxNE can promote spatially focal sources with smooth temporal estimates with a two-level ℓ₁/ℓ₂ mixed-norm, while a three-level mixed-norm can be used to promote spatially non-overlapping sources between different experimental conditions. In order to efficiently solve the optimization problems of MxNE, we introduce fast first-order iterative schemes that for the ℓ₁/ℓ₂ norm give solutions in a few seconds making such a prior as convenient as the simple MNE. Furthermore, thanks to the convexity of the optimization problem, we can provide optimality conditions that guarantee global convergence. The utility of the methods is demonstrated both with simulations and experimental MEG data.

  7. Ellipsoidal head model for fetal magnetoencephalography: forward and inverse solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, David [Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, 851 S. Morgan St (M/C 063), Chicago, IL 60607-7053 (United States); Nehorai, Arye [Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, 851 S. Morgan St (M/C 063), Chicago, IL 60607-7053 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, 851 S. Morgan St, 1120 SEO (M/C 154), Chicago, IL 60607-7053 (United States); Preissl, Hubert [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); MEG-Center, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen, 72206 (Germany)

    2005-05-07

    Fetal magnetoencephalography (fMEG) is a non-invasive technique where measurements of the magnetic field outside the maternal abdomen are used to infer the source location and signals of the fetus' neural activity. There are a number of aspects related to fMEG modelling that must be addressed, such as the conductor volume, fetal position and orientation, gestation period, etc. We propose a solution to the forward problem of fMEG based on an ellipsoidal head geometry. This model has the advantage of highlighting special characteristics of the field that are inherent to the anisotropy of the human head, such as the spread and orientation of the field in relationship with the localization and position of the fetal head. Our forward solution is presented in the form of a kernel matrix that facilitates the solution of the inverse problem through decoupling of the dipole localization parameters from the source signals. Then, we use this model and the maximum likelihood technique to solve the inverse problem assuming the availability of measurements from multiple trials. The applicability and performance of our methods are illustrated through numerical examples based on a real 151-channel SQUID fMEG measurement system (SARA). SARA is an MEG system especially designed for fetal assessment and is currently used for heart and brain studies. Finally, since our model requires knowledge of the best-fitting ellipsoid's centre location and semiaxes lengths, we propose a method for estimating these parameters through a least-squares fit on anatomical information obtained from three-dimensional ultrasound images.

  8. Forecasting wind-driven wildfires using an inverse modelling approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Rios

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A technology able to rapidly forecast wildlfire dynamics would lead to a paradigm shift in the response to emergencies, providing the Fire Service with essential information about the on-going fire. The article at hand presents and explores a novel methodology to forecast wildfire dynamics in wind-driven conditions, using real time data assimilation and inverse modelling. The forecasting algorithm combines Rothermel's rate of spread theory with a perimeter expansion model based on Huygens principle and solves the optimisation problem with a tangent linear approach and a forward automatic differentiation. Its potential is investigated using synthetic data and evaluated in different wildfire scenarios. The results show the high capacity of the method to quickly predict the location of the fire front with a positive lead time (ahead of the event. This work opens the door to further advances framework and more sophisticated models while keeping the computational time suitable for operativeness.

  9. The algebraic method of the scattering inverse problem solution under untraditional statements

    CERN Document Server

    Popushnoj, M N

    2001-01-01

    The algebraic method of the scattering inverse problem solution under untraditional statements is proposed consistently in this review, in the framework of which some quantum theory od scattering charged particles problem were researched afterwards. The inverse problem of scattering theory of charged particles on the complex plane of the Coulomb coupling constant (CCC) is considered. A procedure of interaction potential restoration is established for the case when the energy, orbital moment quadrate and CCC are linearly dependent. The relation between one-parametric problems of the potential scattering of charged particles is investigated

  10. Applying neural networks to the solution of forward and inverse heat conduction problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, S.; Hwang, Y. [Department of Weapon System Engineering, Chung Cheng Institute of Technology, National Defense University, No. 190, Sanyuan 1st St., Dashi Jen, Taoyuan 33509, Taiwan (Taiwan)

    2006-12-15

    This paper employs the continuous-time analogue Hopfield neural network to compute the temperature distribution in forward heat conduction problems and solves inverse heat conduction problems by using a back propagation neural (BPN) network to identify the unknown boundary conditions. The weak generalization capacity of BPN networks is improved by employing the Bayesian regularization algorithm. The feasibility of the proposed method is examined in a series of numerical simulations. The results show that the proposed neural network analysis method successfully solves forward heat conduction problems and is capable of predicting the unknown parameters in inverse problems with an acceptable error. (author)

  11. The inverse maximum flow problem with lower and upper bounds for the flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deaconu Adrian

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The general inverse maximum flow problem (denoted GIMF is considered, where lower and upper bounds for the flow are changed so that a given feasible flow becomes a maximum flow and the distance (considering l1 norm between the initial vector of bounds and the modified vector is minimum. Strongly and weakly polynomial algorithms for solving this problem are proposed. In the paper it is also proved that the inverse maximum flow problem where only the upper bound for the flow is changed (IMF is a particular case of the GIMF problem.

  12. Fast Inverse Nonlinear Fourier Transforms for Fiber Bragg Grating Design and Related Problems

    CERN Document Server

    Wahls, Sander

    2016-01-01

    The problem of constructing a fiber Bragg grating profile numerically such that the reflection coefficient of the grating matches a given specification is considered. The well-known analytic solution to this problem is given by a suitable inverse nonlinear Fourier transform (also known as inverse scattering transform) of the specificed reflection coefficient. Many different algorithms have been proposed to compute this inverse nonlinear Fourier transform numerically. The most efficient ones require $\\mathcal{O}(D^{2})$ floating point operations (flops) to generate $D$ samples of the grating profile. In this paper, two new fast inverse nonlinear Fourier transform algorithms that require only $\\mathcal{O}(D\\log^{2}D)$ flops are proposed. The merits of our algorithms are demonstrated in numerical examples, in which they are compared to a conventional layer peeling method, the Toeplitz inner bordering method and integral layer peeling. One of our two algorithms also extends to the design problem for fiber-assiste...

  13. Adaptive eigenspace method for inverse scattering problems in the frequency domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grote, Marcus J.; Kray, Marie; Nahum, Uri

    2017-02-01

    A nonlinear optimization method is proposed for the solution of inverse scattering problems in the frequency domain, when the scattered field is governed by the Helmholtz equation. The time-harmonic inverse medium problem is formulated as a PDE-constrained optimization problem and solved by an inexact truncated Newton-type iteration. Instead of a grid-based discrete representation, the unknown wave speed is projected to a particular finite-dimensional basis of eigenfunctions, which is iteratively adapted during the optimization. Truncating the adaptive eigenspace (AE) basis at a (small and slowly increasing) finite number of eigenfunctions effectively introduces regularization into the inversion and thus avoids the need for standard Tikhonov-type regularization. Both analytical and numerical evidence underpins the accuracy of the AE representation. Numerical experiments demonstrate the efficiency and robustness to missing or noisy data of the resulting adaptive eigenspace inversion method.

  14. The Prediction Properties of Inverse and Reverse Regression for the Simple Linear Calibration Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Peter A.; Geoffrey, Vining G.; Wilson, Sara R.; Szarka, John L., III; Johnson, Nels G.

    2010-01-01

    The calibration of measurement systems is a fundamental but under-studied problem within industrial statistics. The origins of this problem go back to basic chemical analysis based on NIST standards. In today's world these issues extend to mechanical, electrical, and materials engineering. Often, these new scenarios do not provide "gold standards" such as the standard weights provided by NIST. This paper considers the classic "forward regression followed by inverse regression" approach. In this approach the initial experiment treats the "standards" as the regressor and the observed values as the response to calibrate the instrument. The analyst then must invert the resulting regression model in order to use the instrument to make actual measurements in practice. This paper compares this classical approach to "reverse regression," which treats the standards as the response and the observed measurements as the regressor in the calibration experiment. Such an approach is intuitively appealing because it avoids the need for the inverse regression. However, it also violates some of the basic regression assumptions.

  15. A hybrid algorithm for solving the EEG inverse problem from spatio-temporal EEG data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crevecoeur, Guillaume; Hallez, Hans; Van Hese, Peter; D'Asseler, Yves; Dupré, Luc; Van de Walle, Rik

    2008-08-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder caused by intense electrical activity in the brain. The electrical activity, which can be modelled through the superposition of several electrical dipoles, can be determined in a non-invasive way by analysing the electro-encephalogram. This source localization requires the solution of an inverse problem. Locally convergent optimization algorithms may be trapped in local solutions and when using global optimization techniques, the computational effort can become expensive. Fast recovery of the electrical sources becomes difficult that way. Therefore, there is a need to solve the inverse problem in an accurate and fast way. This paper performs the localization of multiple dipoles using a global-local hybrid algorithm. Global convergence is guaranteed by using space mapping techniques and independent component analysis in a computationally efficient way. The accuracy is locally obtained by using the Recursively Applied and Projected-MUltiple Signal Classification (RAP-MUSIC) algorithm. When using this hybrid algorithm, a four times faster solution is obtained.

  16. Inverse problem analysis for identification of reaction kinetics constants in microreactors for biodiesel synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, P. C.; Naveira-Cotta, C. P.

    2016-09-01

    The theoretical analysis for the design of microreactors in biodiesel production is a complicated task due to the complex liquid-liquid flow and mass transfer processes, and the transesterification reaction that takes place within these microsystems. Thus, computational simulation is an important tool that aids in understanding the physical-chemical phenomenon and, consequently, in determining the suitable conditions that maximize the conversion of triglycerides during the biodiesel synthesis. A diffusive-convective-reactive coupled nonlinear mathematical model, that governs the mass transfer process during the transesterification reaction in parallel plates microreactors, under isothermal conditions, is here described. A hybrid numerical-analytical solution via the Generalized Integral Transform Technique (GITT) for this partial differential system is developed and the eigenfunction expansions convergence rates are extensively analyzed and illustrated. The heuristic method of Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) is applied in the inverse analysis of the proposed direct problem, to estimate the reaction kinetics constants, which is a critical step in the design of such microsystems. The results present a good agreement with the limited experimental data in the literature, but indicate that the GITT methodology combined with the PSO approach provide a reliable computational algorithm for direct-inverse analysis in such reactive mass transfer problems.

  17. An Inverse Eigenvalue Problem for a Vibrating String with Two Dirichlet Spectra

    KAUST Repository

    Rundell, William

    2013-04-23

    A classical inverse problem is "can you hear the density of a string clamped at both ends?" The mathematical model gives rise to an inverse Sturm-Liouville problem for the unknown density ñ, and it is well known that the answer is negative: the Dirichlet spectrum from the clamped end-point conditions is insufficient. There are many known ways to add additional information to gain a positive answer, and these include changing one of the boundary conditions and recomputing the spectrum or giving the energy in each eigenmode-the so-called norming constants. We make the assumption that neither of these changes are possible. Instead we will add known mass-densities to the string in a way we can prescribe and remeasure the Dirichlet spectrum. We will not be able to answer the uniqueness question in its most general form, but will give some insight to what "added masses" should be chosen and how this can lead to a reconstruction of the original string density. © 2013 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  18. CICAAR - Convolutive ICA with an Auto-Regressive Inverse Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrholm, Mads; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2004-01-01

    We invoke an auto-regressive IIR inverse model for convolutive ICA and derive expressions for the likelihood and its gradient. We argue that optimization will give a stable inverse. When there are more sensors than sources the mixing model parameters are estimated in a second step by least squares...

  19. The Inverse 1-Median Problem on Tree Networks with Variable Real Edge Lengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longshu Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Location problems exist in the real world and they mainly deal with finding optimal locations for facilities in a network, such as net servers, hospitals, and shopping centers. The inverse location problem is also often met in practice and has been intensively investigated in the literature. As a typical inverse location problem, the inverse 1-median problem on tree networks with variable real edge lengths is discussed in this paper, which is to modify the edge lengths at minimum total cost such that a given vertex becomes a 1-median of the tree network with respect to the new edge lengths. First, this problem is shown to be solvable in linear time with variable nonnegative edge lengths. For the case when negative edge lengths are allowable, the NP-hardness is proved under Hamming distance, and strongly polynomial time algorithms are presented under l1 and l∞ norms, respectively.

  20. On the possibility of control restoration in some inverse problems of heat and mass transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilchenko, G. G.; Bilchenko, N. G.

    2016-11-01

    The hypersonic aircraft permeable surfaces effective heat protection problems are considered. The physic-chemical processes (the dissociation and the ionization) in laminar boundary layer of compressible gas are appreciated in mathematical model. The statements of direct problems of heat and mass transfer are given: according to preset given controls it is necessary to compute the boundary layer mathematical model parameters and determinate the local and total heat flows and friction forces and the power of blowing system. The A.A.Dorodnicyn's generalized integral relations method has been used as calculation basis. The optimal control - the blowing into boundary layer (for continuous functions) was constructed as the solution of direct problem in extreme statement with the use of this approach. The statement of inverse problems are given: the control laws ensuring the preset given local heat flow and local tangent friction are restored. The differences between the interpolation and the approximation statements are discussed. The possibility of unique control restoration is established and proved (in the stagnation point). The computational experiments results are presented.

  1. INVERSE EIGENVALUE PROBLEM OF HERMITIAN GENERALIZED ANTI-HAMILTONIAN MATRICES%HGAH矩阵的逆特征值问题

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张忠志; Liu Changrong

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the inverse eigenvalue problem of Hermitian generalized anti-Hamiltonian matrices and relevant optimal approximate problem are considered. The necessary and sufficient conditions of the solvability for inverse eigenvalue problem and an expression of the general solution of the problem are derived. The solution of the relevant optimal approximate problem is given.

  2. Seeing the Forest Through the Trees: Investigating Signal to Noise Problems in Regional Atmospheric Inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuh, A. E.; Denning, A. S.; Corbin, K. D.; Uliasz, M.; Zupanski, D.; Parazoo, N. C.

    2007-12-01

    Estimation of regional carbon fluxes from sparse atmospheric data by transport inversion is complicated by high- frequency variations in surface fluxes in both space and time. We assume that a forward coupled model of the vegetated land surface and atmosphere adequately captures most of the high-frequency variations (SiB-RAMS) as a `preprocessor` of input data from remote sensing and large-scale weather. We then use continuous CO2 observations and backward-in-time Lagrangian particle modeling to estimate persistent multiplicative biases in photosynthesis and ecosystem respiration, constraining the temporal pattern of these fluxes with the forward model. With a sparse network of continuous observing sites in North America, the inverse problem is still badly underconstrained for flux biases on the model grid scale. Previous studies have reduced the dimensionality of this problem by using large `regions` such as biomes or ecoregions, or by seeking a smooth solution in space. This could introduce substantial bias in the solution because the actual flux biases are likely to be quite heterogeneous. We have evaluated the degree to which carbon flux over large regions (500 to 1500 km) can be recovered when the true spatial pattern is not smooth. We performed ensembles of inversions for a 4-month case study in May- August, 2004 over North America with synthetic mid-day CO2 observations from a network of 8 towers. A smooth regional field of model biases was superposed with ensembles of various degrees of grid-scale `noise,` and these were then used to create synthetic concentration data. The pseudodata were then inverted to estimate gridded values of the biases, which were then combined with time-varying model fluxes to create regional maps of sources and sinks. We found that the degree to which corrections in regional fluxes are possible will depend on the relative amount of variance in the regional vs grid scales, but that the system is quite successful in estimating

  3. A constructive approach for discovering new drug leads: Using a kernel methodology for the inverse-QSAR problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong William WL

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The inverse-QSAR problem seeks to find a new molecular descriptor from which one can recover the structure of a molecule that possess a desired activity or property. Surprisingly, there are very few papers providing solutions to this problem. It is a difficult problem because the molecular descriptors involved with the inverse-QSAR algorithm must adequately address the forward QSAR problem for a given biological activity if the subsequent recovery phase is to be meaningful. In addition, one should be able to construct a feasible molecule from such a descriptor. The difficulty of recovering the molecule from its descriptor is the major limitation of most inverse-QSAR methods. Results In this paper, we describe the reversibility of our previously reported descriptor, the vector space model molecular descriptor (VSMMD based on a vector space model that is suitable for kernel studies in QSAR modeling. Our inverse-QSAR approach can be described using five steps: (1 generate the VSMMD for the compounds in the training set; (2 map the VSMMD in the input space to the kernel feature space using an appropriate kernel function; (3 design or generate a new point in the kernel feature space using a kernel feature space algorithm; (4 map the feature space point back to the input space of descriptors using a pre-image approximation algorithm; (5 build the molecular structure template using our VSMMD molecule recovery algorithm. Conclusion The empirical results reported in this paper show that our strategy of using kernel methodology for an inverse-Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship is sufficiently powerful to find a meaningful solution for practical problems.

  4. A trade-off solution between model resolution and covariance in surface-wave inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, J.; Xu, Y.; Miller, R.D.; Zeng, C.

    2010-01-01

    Regularization is necessary for inversion of ill-posed geophysical problems. Appraisal of inverse models is essential for meaningful interpretation of these models. Because uncertainties are associated with regularization parameters, extra conditions are usually required to determine proper parameters for assessing inverse models. Commonly used techniques for assessment of a geophysical inverse model derived (generally iteratively) from a linear system are based on calculating the model resolution and the model covariance matrices. Because the model resolution and the model covariance matrices of the regularized solutions are controlled by the regularization parameter, direct assessment of inverse models using only the covariance matrix may provide incorrect results. To assess an inverted model, we use the concept of a trade-off between model resolution and covariance to find a proper regularization parameter with singular values calculated in the last iteration. We plot the singular values from large to small to form a singular value plot. A proper regularization parameter is normally the first singular value that approaches zero in the plot. With this regularization parameter, we obtain a trade-off solution between model resolution and model covariance in the vicinity of a regularized solution. The unit covariance matrix can then be used to calculate error bars of the inverse model at a resolution level determined by the regularization parameter. We demonstrate this approach with both synthetic and real surface-wave data. ?? 2010 Birkh??user / Springer Basel AG.

  5. Problems in Cybersemiotic Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brier, Søren

    2014-01-01

    the Peircean theory of the observer as the phaneroscopic foundation. 4. Cobley points out that both models, as they are combined in Cybersemiotics lacks to integrate a theory of interest and power. They are too consensual in their view on communication. This is a general problem in both theories. Still Luhmann......Going from an empirical to an informational paradigm of cognition and communication, does not really help us to analyze, how the living systems manage to make a meaningful interpretation of environment that is useful for their survival and procreation. Other models are needed. 1. There is von...... Uexküll’s cybernetic-behavioral model, which has the problem of being placed in a Platonic, static worldview. The Umwelt of an animal is a construction limited of its functional realism of survival. It is connected to the species. 2. Ture von Uexküll and Søren Brier both realized that Maturana and Varela...

  6. Method and software to solution of inverse and inverse design fluid flow and heat transfer problems is compatible with CFD-software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krukovsky, P.G. [Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kiev (Ukraine)

    1997-12-31

    The description of method and software FRIEND which provide a possibility of solution of inverse and inverse design problems on the basis of existing (base) CFD-software for solution of direct problems (in particular, heat-transfer and fluid-flow problems using software PHOENICS) are presented. FRIEND is an independent additional module that widens the operational capacities of the base software unified with this module. This unifying does not require any change or addition to the base software. Interfacing of FRIEND and the base software takes place through input and output files of the base software. A brief description of the computational technique applied for the inverse problem solution, same detailed information on the interfacing of FRIEND and CFD-software and solution results for testing inverse and inverse design problems, obtained using the tandem CFD-software PHOENICS and FRIEND, are presented. (author) 9 refs.

  7. Reducing complexity of inverse problems using geostatistical priors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Mejer; Mosegaard, Klaus; Cordua, Knud Skou

    a posterior sample, can be reduced significantly using informed priors based on geostatistical models. We discuss two approaches to include such geostatistically based prior information. One is based on a parametric description of the prior likelihood that applies to 2-point based statistical models...

  8. A Riemann-Hilbert approach to the inverse problem for the Stark operator on the line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Its, A.; Sukhanov, V.

    2016-05-01

    The paper is concerned with the inverse scattering problem for the Stark operator on the line with a potential from the Schwartz class. In our study of the inverse problem, we use the Riemann-Hilbert formalism. This allows us to overcome the principal technical difficulties which arise in the more traditional approaches based on the Gel’fand-Levitan-Marchenko equations, and indeed solve the problem. We also produce a complete description of the relevant scattering data (which have not been obtained in the previous works on the Stark operator) and establish the bijection between the Schwartz class potentials and the scattering data.

  9. Two numerical methods for an inverse problem for the 2-D Helmholtz equation

    CERN Document Server

    Gryazin, Y A; Lucas, T R

    2003-01-01

    Two solution methods for the inverse problem for the 2-D Helmholtz equation are developed, tested, and compared. The proposed approaches are based on a marching finite-difference scheme which requires the solution of an overdetermined system at each step. The preconditioned conjugate gradient method is used for rapid solutions of these systems and an efficient preconditioner has been developed for this class of problems. Underlying target applications include the imaging of land mines, unexploded ordinance, and pollutant plumes in environmental cleanup sites, each formulated as an inverse problem for a 2-D Helmholtz equation. The images represent the electromagnetic properties of the respective underground regions. Extensive numerical results are presented.

  10. Material parameter identification and inverse problems in soft tissue biomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Sam

    2017-01-01

    The articles in this book review hybrid experimental-computational methods applied to soft tissues which have been developed by worldwide specialists in the field. People developing computational models of soft tissues and organs will find solutions for calibrating the material parameters of their models; people performing tests on soft tissues will learn what to extract from the data and how to use these data for their models and people worried about the complexity of the biomechanical behavior of soft tissues will find relevant approaches to address this complexity.

  11. An inverse problem of determining a nonlinear term in an ordinary differential equation

    OpenAIRE

    Kamimura, Yutaka

    1998-01-01

    An inverse problem for a nonlinear ordinary differential equation is discussed. We prove an existence theorem of a nonlinear term with which a boundary value problem admits a solution. This is an improvement of earlier work by A. Lorenzi. We also prove a uniqueness theorem of the nonlinear term.

  12. Inverse Problems for a Parabolic Integrodifferential Equation in a Convolutional Weak Form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kairi Kasemets

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We deduce formulas for the Fréchet derivatives of cost functionals of several inverse problems for a parabolic integrodifferential equation in a weak formulation. The method consists in the application of an integrated convolutional form of the weak problem and all computations are implemented in regular Sobolev spaces.

  13. On the inverse problem of blade design for centrifugal pumps and fans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruyt, Nicolaas P.; Westra, R.W.

    2014-01-01

    The inverse problem of blade design for centrifugal pumps and fans has been studied. The solution to this problem provides the geometry of rotor blades that realize specified performance characteristics, together with the corresponding flow field. Here a three-dimensional solution method is

  14. A smoothing Newton method for a type of inverse semi-definite quadratic programming problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiantao; Zhang, Liwei; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2009-01-01

    We consider an inverse problem arising from the semi-definite quadratic programming (SDQP) problem. We represent this problem as a cone-constrained minimization problem and its dual (denoted ISDQD) is a semismoothly differentiable (SC1) convex programming problem with fewer variables than the original one. The Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions of the dual problem (ISDQD) can be formulated as a system of semismooth equations which involves the projection onto the cone of positive semi-definite matrices. A smoothing Newton method is given for getting a Karush-Kuhn-Tucker point of ISDQD. The proposed method needs to compute the directional derivative of the smoothing projector at the corresponding point and to solve one linear system per iteration. The quadratic convergence of the smoothing Newton method is proved under a suitable condition. Numerical experiments are reported to show that the smoothing Newton method is very effective for solving this type of inverse quadratic programming problems.

  15. A solution to the inverse problem in ocean acoustics

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murty, T.V.R.; Somayajulu, Y.K.; Mahadevan, R.; Murty, C.S.; Sastry, J.S.

    The methodology and software developed to reconstruct a vertical sound speed profile as a part of studies on the marine acoustic modelling, using the ray path lengths and the travel time perturbations in tomographic layers are outlined. For a...

  16. The Hierarchy Solution to the LHC Inverse Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Gainer, James S; Park, Myeonghun

    2015-01-01

    Supersymmetric (SUSY) models, even those described by relatively few parameters, generically allow many possible SUSY particle (sparticle) mass hierarchies. As the sparticle mass hierarchy determines, to a great extent, the collider phenomenology of a model, the enumeration of these hierarchies is of the utmost importance. We therefore provide a readily generalizable procedure for determining the number of sparticle mass hierarchies in a given SUSY model. As an application, we analyze the gravity-mediated SUSY breaking scenario with various combinations of GUT-scale boundary conditions involving different levels of universality among the gaugino and scalar masses. For each of the eight considered models, we provide the complete list of forbidden hierarchies in a compact form. Our main result is that the complete (typically rather large) set of forbidden hierarchies among the eight sparticles considered in this analysis can be fully specified by just a few forbidden relations involving much smaller subsets of ...

  17. The hierarchy solution to the LHC inverse problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainer, James S.; Matchev, Konstantin T.; Park, Myeonghun

    2015-06-01

    Supersymmetric (SUSY) models, even those described by relatively few parameters, generically allow many possible SUSY particle (sparticle) mass hierarchies. As the sparticle mass hierarchy determines, to a great extent, the collider phenomenology of a model, the enumeration of these hierarchies is of the utmost importance. We therefore provide a readily generalizable procedure for determining the number of sparticle mass hierarchies in a given SUSY model. As an application, we analyze the gravity-mediated SUSY breaking scenario with various combinations of GUT-scale boundary conditions involving different levels of universality among the gaugino and scalar masses. For each of the eight considered models, we provide the complete list of forbidden hierarchies in a compact form. Our main result is that the complete (typically rather large) set of forbidden hierarchies among the eight sparticles considered in this analysis can be fully specified by just a few forbidden relations involving much smaller subsets of sparticles.

  18. Inverse problems: Fuzzy representation of uncertainty generates a regularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreinovich, V.; Chang, Ching-Chuang; Reznik, L.; Solopchenko, G. N.

    1992-01-01

    In many applied problems (geophysics, medicine, and astronomy) we cannot directly measure the values x(t) of the desired physical quantity x in different moments of time, so we measure some related quantity y(t), and then we try to reconstruct the desired values x(t). This problem is often ill-posed in the sense that two essentially different functions x(t) are consistent with the same measurement results. So, in order to get a reasonable reconstruction, we must have some additional prior information about the desired function x(t). Methods that use this information to choose x(t) from the set of all possible solutions are called regularization methods. In some cases, we know the statistical characteristics both of x(t) and of the measurement errors, so we can apply statistical filtering methods (well-developed since the invention of a Wiener filter). In some situations, we know the properties of the desired process, e.g., we know that the derivative of x(t) is limited by some number delta, etc. In this case, we can apply standard regularization techniques (e.g., Tikhonov's regularization). In many cases, however, we have only uncertain knowledge about the values of x(t), about the rate with which the values of x(t) can change, and about the measurement errors. In these cases, usually one of the existing regularization methods is applied. There exist several heuristics that choose such a method. The problem with these heuristics is that they often lead to choosing different methods, and these methods lead to different functions x(t). Therefore, the results x(t) of applying these heuristic methods are often unreliable. We show that if we use fuzzy logic to describe this uncertainty, then we automatically arrive at a unique regularization method, whose parameters are uniquely determined by the experts knowledge. Although we start with the fuzzy description, but the resulting regularization turns out to be quite crisp.

  19. An inverse-source problem for maximization of pore-fluid oscillation within poroelastic formations

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, C.

    2016-07-04

    This paper discusses a mathematical and numerical modeling approach for identification of an unknown optimal loading time signal of a wave source, atop the ground surface, that can maximize the relative wave motion of a single-phase pore fluid within fluid-saturated porous permeable (poroelastic) rock formations, surrounded by non-permeable semi-infinite elastic solid rock formations, in a one-dimensional setting. The motivation stems from a set of field observations, following seismic events and vibrational tests, suggesting that shaking an oil reservoir is likely to improve oil production rates. This maximization problem is cast into an inverse-source problem, seeking an optimal loading signal that minimizes an objective functional – the reciprocal of kinetic energy in terms of relative pore-fluid wave motion within target poroelastic layers. We use the finite element method to obtain the solution of the governing wave physics of a multi-layered system, where the wave equations for the target poroelastic layers and the elastic wave equation for the surrounding non-permeable layers are coupled with each other. We use a partial-differential-equation-constrained-optimization framework (a state-adjoint-control problem approach) to tackle the minimization problem. The numerical results show that the numerical optimizer recovers optimal loading signals, whose dominant frequencies correspond to amplification frequencies, which can also be obtained by a frequency sweep, leading to larger amplitudes of relative pore-fluid wave motion within the target hydrocarbon formation than other signals.

  20. Solving large-scale PDE-constrained Bayesian inverse problems with Riemann manifold Hamiltonian Monte Carlo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui-Thanh, T.; Girolami, M.

    2014-11-01

    We consider the Riemann manifold Hamiltonian Monte Carlo (RMHMC) method for solving statistical inverse problems governed by partial differential equations (PDEs). The Bayesian framework is employed to cast the inverse problem into the task of statistical inference whose solution is the posterior distribution in infinite dimensional parameter space conditional upon observation data and Gaussian prior measure. We discretize both the likelihood and the prior using the H1-conforming finite element method together with a matrix transfer technique. The power of the RMHMC method is that it exploits the geometric structure induced by the PDE constraints of the underlying inverse problem. Consequently, each RMHMC posterior sample is almost uncorrelated/independent from the others providing statistically efficient Markov chain simulation. However this statistical efficiency comes at a computational cost. This motivates us to consider computationally more efficient strategies for RMHMC. At the heart of our construction is the fact that for Gaussian error structures the Fisher information matrix coincides with the Gauss-Newton Hessian. We exploit this fact in considering a computationally simplified RMHMC method combining state-of-the-art adjoint techniques and the superiority of the RMHMC method. Specifically, we first form the Gauss-Newton Hessian at the maximum a posteriori point and then use it as a fixed constant metric tensor throughout RMHMC simulation. This eliminates the need for the computationally costly differential geometric Christoffel symbols, which in turn greatly reduces computational effort at a corresponding loss of sampling efficiency. We further reduce the cost of forming the Fisher information matrix by using a low rank approximation via a randomized singular value decomposition technique. This is efficient since a small number of Hessian-vector products are required. The Hessian-vector product in turn requires only two extra PDE solves using the adjoint

  1. Basic Problems in Design and Inverse Engineering Solution for Outer Characteristic of Vehicle Suspension Shock Absorbers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞德孚; 陈庆东; 李文君

    2003-01-01

    Based on the theory and the practical experiences of linearity design of feasible design area and inverse solution of non-linear outer characteristic of suspension shock absorber, in accordance with non-linearity outer characteristic formed by open-up damping coefficient, full-open damping coefficient and smoothness to safety ratio of suspension shock absorber, a method and a research conclusion of the feasible design and inverse solution for the basic problems of designing and inverse solution of non-linear outer characteristic of suspension damping components are provided.

  2. Numerical Solution of Inverse Radiative-Conductive Transient Heat Transfer Problem in a Grey Participating Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmywaczyk, J.; Koniorczyk, P.

    2009-08-01

    The problem of simultaneous identification of the thermal conductivity Λ(T) and the asymmetry parameter g of the Henyey-Greenstein scattering phase function is under consideration. A one-dimensional configuration in a grey participating medium with respect to silica fibers for which the thermophysical and optical properties are known from the literature is accepted. To find the unknown parameters, it is assumed that the thermal conductivity Λ(T) may be represented in a base of functions {1, T, T 2, . . .,T K } so the inverse problem can be applied to determine a set of coefficients {Λ0, Λ1, . . ., Λ K ; g}. The solution of the inverse problem is based on minimization of the ordinary squared differences between the measured and model temperatures. The measured temperatures are considered known. Temperature responses measured or theoretically generated at several different distances from the heat source along an x axis of the specimen set are known as a result of the numerical solution of the transient coupled heat transfer in a grey participating medium. An implicit finite volume method (FVM) is used for handling the energy equation, while a finite difference method (FDM) is applied to find the sensitivity coefficients with respect to the unknown set of coefficients. There are free parameters in a model, so these parameters are changed during an iteration process used by the fitting procedure. The Levenberg- Marquardt fitting procedure is iteratively searching for best fit of these parameters. The source term in the governing conservation-of-energy equation taking into account absorption, emission, and scattering of radiation is calculated by means of a discrete ordinate method together with an FDM while the scattering phase function approximated by the Henyey-Greenstein function is expanded in a series of Legendre polynomials with coefficients {c l } = (2l + 1)g l . The numerical procedure proposed here also allows consideration of some cases of coupled heat

  3. Reification of galaxies: cognitive astrophysics and the multiwavelength inverse problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madore, Barry F.

    2012-08-01

    Lessons learned in the history and philosophy of science have generally had little immediate impact on how we as individual astronomers conduct our research. And yet we do share many common views on how we undertake basic research, and how we translate observations and theory into communicable knowledge. In this introductory talk I will illustrate how we as extragalactic astronomers have already violated some of the basic tenets of what constitutes ``science'' as seen from a philosophical point of view, and I will predict what the future of astronomy as a science may soon look like. Simple examples of how we are already ``cognitively closed'' to many immediate and tangible aspects of the Universe will be given and some solutions to this dilemma will be proposed. We may be at a point in time where more data is not necessarily the best solution to our problems. Discovering that familiar concepts and even certain objects may not exist in the traditional sense of the word could provide a motivation for broadening our way of conceptualizing the extragalactic Universe, more as a continuum of processes and phase transitions rather than an assembly of discrete objects. Once again the Universe may be ``forcing us to think''.

  4. Inverse heat transfer problem in digital temperature control in plate fin and tube heat exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taler, Dawid; Sury, Adam

    2011-12-01

    The aim of the paper is a steady-state inverse heat transfer problem for plate-fin and tube heat exchangers. The objective of the process control is to adjust the number of fan revolutions per minute so that the water temperature at the heat exchanger outlet is equal to a preset value. Two control techniques were developed. The first is based on the presented mathematical model of the heat exchanger while the second is a digital proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control. The first procedure is very stable. The digital PID controller becomes unstable if the water volumetric flow rate changes significantly. The developed techniques were implemented in digital control system of the water exit temperature in a plate fin and tube heat exchanger. The measured exit temperature of the water was very close to the set value of the temperature if the first method was used. The experiments showed that the PID controller works also well but becomes frequently unstable.

  5. An Inverse Problem of Temperature Optimization in Hyperthermia by Controlling the Overall Heat Transfer Coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ali Aghayan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel scheme to obtain the optimum tissue heating condition during hyperthermia treatment is proposed. To do this, the effect of the controllable overall heat transfer coefficient of the cooling system is investigated. An inverse problem by a conjugated gradient with adjoint equation is used in our model. We apply the finite difference time domain method to numerically solve the tissue temperature distribution using Pennes bioheat transfer equation. In order to provide a quantitative measurement of errors, convergence history of the method and root mean square of errors are also calculated. The effects of heat convection coefficient of water and thermal conductivity of casing layer on the control parameter are also discussed separately.

  6. Solving the LHC Inverse Problem with Dark Matter Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Altunkaynak, Baris; Nelson, Brent D

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the utility of cosmological and astrophysical observations for distinguishing between supersymmetric theories. In particular we consider 276 pairs of models that give rise to nearly identical patterns of observables at hadron colliders. Despite inherent uncertainties in such things as the local halo density model, or background rates from astrophysical sources, we find observations associated with stable relic neutralinos can be a surprisingly effective discriminant between candidate theories. We focus attention on neutralino scattering experiments (direct detection of relic neutralinos) and observations of gamma-rays from relic neutralino annihilation (indirect detection experiments). With extremely conservative physics assumptions and background estimates we find 101 of the 276 degenerate pairs can be distinguished. Using slightly more optimistic assumptions about background rates increases this number to 186 of the 276 pairs. We discuss the sensitivity of these results to additional assumpti...

  7. Modelling of radiative transfer by the Monte Carlo method and solving the inverse problem based on a genetic algorithm according to experimental results of aerosol sensing on short paths using a femtosecond laser source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matvienko, G G; Oshlakov, V K; Sukhanov, A Ya [V.E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Stepanov, A N [Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhnii Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2015-02-28

    We consider the algorithms that implement a broadband ('multiwave') radiative transfer with allowance for multiple (aerosol) scattering and absorption by main atmospheric gases. In the spectral range of 0.6 – 1 μm, a closed numerical simulation of modifications of the supercontinuum component of a probing femtosecond pulse is performed. In the framework of the algorithms for solving the inverse atmospheric-optics problems with the help of a genetic algorithm, we give an interpretation of the experimental backscattered spectrum of the supercontinuum. An adequate reconstruction of the distribution mode for the particles of artificial aerosol with the narrow-modal distributions in a size range of 0.5 – 2 mm and a step of 0.5 mm is obtained. (light scattering)

  8. SOLVING A CLASS OF INVERSE QP PROBLEMS BY A SMOOTHING NEWTON METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiantao Xiao; Liwei Zhang

    2009-01-01

    We consider an inverse quadratic programming (IQP) problem in which the parameters in the objective function of a given quadratic programming (QP) problem are adjusted as little as possible so that a known feasible solution becomes the optimal one. This problem can be formulated as a minimization problem with a positive semidefinite cone constraint and its dual (denoted IQD(A, b)) is a semismoothly differentiable (SC~1) convex program-ming problem with fewer variables than the original one. In this paper a smoothing New-ton method is used for getting a Karush-Kuhn-Tucker point of IQD(A, b). The proposed method needs to solve only one linear system per iteration and achieves quadratic conver-gence. Numerical experiments are reported to show that the smoothing Newton method is effective for solving this class of inverse quadratic programming problems.

  9. Numerical Methods for Forward and Inverse Problems in Discontinuous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chartier, Timothy P.

    2011-03-08

    The research emphasis under this grant's funding is in the area of algebraic multigrid methods. The research has two main branches: 1) exploring interdisciplinary applications in which algebraic multigrid can make an impact and 2) extending the scope of algebraic multigrid methods with algorithmic improvements that are based in strong analysis.The work in interdisciplinary applications falls primarily in the field of biomedical imaging. Work under this grant demonstrated the effectiveness and robustness of multigrid for solving linear systems that result from highly heterogeneous finite element method models of the human head. The results in this work also give promise to medical advances possible with software that may be developed. Research to extend the scope of algebraic multigrid has been focused in several areas. In collaboration with researchers at the University of Colorado, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory, the PI developed an adaptive multigrid with subcycling via complementary grids. This method has very cheap computing costs per iterate and is showing promise as a preconditioner for conjugate gradient. Recent work with Los Alamos National Laboratory concentrates on developing algorithms that take advantage of the recent advances in adaptive multigrid research. The results of the various efforts in this research could ultimately have direct use and impact to researchers for a wide variety of applications, including, astrophysics, neuroscience, contaminant transport in porous media, bi-domain heart modeling, modeling of tumor growth, and flow in heterogeneous porous media. This work has already led to basic advances in computational mathematics and numerical linear algebra and will continue to do so into the future.

  10. Scalable posterior approximations for large-scale Bayesian inverse problems via likelihood-informed parameter and state reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Tiangang; Marzouk, Youssef; Willcox, Karen

    2016-06-01

    Two major bottlenecks to the solution of large-scale Bayesian inverse problems are the scaling of posterior sampling algorithms to high-dimensional parameter spaces and the computational cost of forward model evaluations. Yet incomplete or noisy data, the state variation and parameter dependence of the forward model, and correlations in the prior collectively provide useful structure that can be exploited for dimension reduction in this setting-both in the parameter space of the inverse problem and in the state space of the forward model. To this end, we show how to jointly construct low-dimensional subspaces of the parameter space and the state space in order to accelerate the Bayesian solution of the inverse problem. As a byproduct of state dimension reduction, we also show how to identify low-dimensional subspaces of the data in problems with high-dimensional observations. These subspaces enable approximation of the posterior as a product of two factors: (i) a projection of the posterior onto a low-dimensional parameter subspace, wherein the original likelihood is replaced by an approximation involving a reduced model; and (ii) the marginal prior distribution on the high-dimensional complement of the parameter subspace. We present and compare several strategies for constructing these subspaces using only a limited number of forward and adjoint model simulations. The resulting posterior approximations can rapidly be characterized using standard sampling techniques, e.g., Markov chain Monte Carlo. Two numerical examples demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of our approach: inversion of an integral equation in atmospheric remote sensing, where the data dimension is very high; and the inference of a heterogeneous transmissivity field in a groundwater system, which involves a partial differential equation forward model with high dimensional state and parameters.

  11. Solving Large-Scale Inverse Magnetostatic Problems using the Adjoint Method

    CERN Document Server

    Bruckner, Florian; Wautischer, Gregor; Huber, Christian; Vogler, Christoph; Hinze, Michael; Suess, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    An efficient algorithm for the reconstruction of the magnetization state within magnetic components is presented. The occurring inverse magnetostatic problem is solved by means of an adjoint approach, based on the Fredkin-Koehler method for the solution of the forward problem. Due to the use of hybrid FEM-BEM coupling combined with matrix compression techniques the resulting algorithm is well suited for large-scale problems. Furthermore the reconstruction of the magnetization state within a permanent magnet is demonstrated.

  12. Uncertainty Visualization in Forward and Inverse Cardiac Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Brett M; Erem, Burak; Potter, Kristin; Rosen, Paul; Johnson, Chris R; Brooks, Dana H; Macleod, Rob S

    2013-01-01

    Quantification and visualization of uncertainty in cardiac forward and inverse problems with complex geometries is subject to various challenges. Specific to visualization is the observation that occlusion and clutter obscure important regions of interest, making visual assessment difficult. In order to overcome these limitations in uncertainty visualization, we have developed and implemented a collection of novel approaches. To highlight the utility of these techniques, we evaluated the uncertainty associated with two examples of modeling myocardial activity. In one case we studied cardiac potentials during the repolarization phase as a function of variability in tissue conductivities of the ischemic heart (forward case). In a second case, we evaluated uncertainty in reconstructed activation times on the epicardium resulting from variation in the control parameter of Tikhonov regularization (inverse case). To overcome difficulties associated with uncertainty visualization, we implemented linked-view windows and interactive animation to the two respective cases. Through dimensionality reduction and superimposed mean and standard deviation measures over time, we were able to display key features in large ensembles of data and highlight regions of interest where larger uncertainties exist.

  13. Optimal Experimental Design for Large-Scale Bayesian Inverse Problems

    KAUST Repository

    Ghattas, Omar

    2014-01-06

    We develop a Bayesian framework for the optimal experimental design of the shock tube experiments which are being carried out at the KAUST Clean Combustion Research Center. The unknown parameters are the pre-exponential parameters and the activation energies in the reaction rate expressions. The control parameters are the initial mixture composition and the temperature. The approach is based on first building a polynomial based surrogate model for the observables relevant to the shock tube experiments. Based on these surrogates, a novel MAP based approach is used to estimate the expected information gain in the proposed experiments, and to select the best experimental set-ups yielding the optimal expected information gains. The validity of the approach is tested using synthetic data generated by sampling the PC surrogate. We finally outline a methodology for validation using actual laboratory experiments, and extending experimental design methodology to the cases where the control parameters are noisy.

  14. Sensitivity Functions and Their Uses in Inverse Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-21

    Σ0 is used in formu- lating the standard errors for our estimates θ̂n; these are given by SEk = √ (Σ0)kk, k = 1, 2, ..., p. (5) Because θ0 in (4) is...standard formula SEk = √ σ̂2(χT χ)−1kk , k = 1, 2, ..., p, (7) with χ(θ) an n× p sensitivity matrix for our model given by χjk(θ) = ∂f(tj, θ) ∂θk . (8) 5 For...Note that since θ = (K, r, x0), the standard error for K is indicated as the first entry in each of the ordered sets in each table, i.e., SEK = SEθ1

  15. Inverse boundary value problem for anisotropic heat operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoungsun; Nakamura, Gen

    2011-04-01

    As a mathematical model of thermography, a reconstruction scheme called the dynamical probe method is given for identifying unknown separated inclusions inside a known anisotropic heat conductor. The heat conductivities of inclusions can be also anisotropic. The measured data is the so called Neumann to Dirichlet map which is a mathematical idealization of many measurements consisting of injecting heat flux and measuring the corresponding heat distribution on the part of the boundary of the known heat conductor by infrared camera for any fixed time interval. This idealization becomes relevant if we have for instance the cooling boundary condition on the other part of the boundary. This is due to the exponential decay of temperature in time which enables to conduct many measurements in a short time.

  16. Inverse modeling methods for indoor airborne pollutant tracking: literature review and fundamentals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X; Zhai, Z

    2007-12-01

    Reduction in indoor environment quality calls for effective control and improvement measures. Accurate and prompt identification of contaminant sources ensures that they can be quickly removed and contaminated spaces isolated and cleaned. This paper discusses the use of inverse modeling to identify potential indoor pollutant sources with limited pollutant sensor data. The study reviews various inverse modeling methods for advection-dispersion problems and summarizes the methods into three major categories: forward, backward, and probability inverse modeling methods. The adjoint probability inverse modeling method is indicated as an appropriate model for indoor air pollutant tracking because it can quickly find source location, strength and release time without prior information. The paper introduces the principles of the adjoint probability method and establishes the corresponding adjoint equations for both multi-zone airflow models and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models. The study proposes a two-stage inverse modeling approach integrating both multi-zone and CFD models, which can provide a rapid estimate of indoor pollution status and history for a whole building. Preliminary case study results indicate that the adjoint probability method is feasible for indoor pollutant inverse modeling. The proposed method can help identify contaminant source characteristics (location and release time) with limited sensor outputs. This will ensure an effective and prompt execution of building management strategies and thus achieve a healthy and safe indoor environment. The method can also help design optimal sensor networks.

  17. A statistical physics approach to learning curves for the inverse Ising problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachschmid-Romano, Ludovica; Opper, Manfred

    2017-06-01

    Using methods of statistical physics, we analyse the error of learning couplings in large Ising models from independent data (the inverse Ising problem). We concentrate on learning based on local cost functions, such as the pseudo-likelihood method for which the couplings are inferred independently for each spin. Assuming that the data are generated from a true Ising model, we compute the reconstruction error of the couplings using a combination of the replica method with the cavity approach for densely connected systems. We show that an explicit estimator based on a quadratic cost function achieves minimal reconstruction error, but requires the length of the true coupling vector as prior knowledge. A simple mean field estimator of the couplings which does not need such knowledge is asymptotically optimal, i.e. when the number of observations is much larger than the number of spins. Comparison of the theory with numerical simulations shows excellent agreement for data generated from two models with random couplings in the high temperature region: a model with independent couplings (Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model), and a model where the matrix of couplings has a Wishart distribution.

  18. Preliminary Study of the Feasibility of Inverse Problem Algorithms Used for Arc Magnetic Measurement Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Li, Xingwen; Song, Haoyong; Rong, Mingzhe

    2010-04-01

    Non-contact magnetic measurement method is an effective way to study the air arc behavior experimentally One of the crucial techniques is to solve an inverse problem for the electromagnetic field. This study is devoted to investigating different algorithms for this kind of inverse problem preliminarily, including the preconditioned conjugate gradient method, penalty function method and genetic algorithm. The feasibility of each algorithm is analyzed. It is shown that the preconditioned conjugate gradient method is valid only for few arc segments, the estimation accuracy of the penalty function method is dependent on the initial conditions, and the convergence of genetic algorithm should be studied further for more segments in an arc current.

  19. Solution of inverse heat conduction problem using the Tikhonov regularization method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, Piotr

    2017-02-01

    It is hard to solve ill-posed problems, as calculated temperatures are very sensitive to errors made while calculating "measured" temperatures or performing real-time measurements. The errors can create temperature oscillation, which can be the cause of an unstable solution. In order to overcome such difficulties, a variety of techniques have been proposed in literature, including regularization, future time steps and smoothing digital filters. In this paper, the Tikhonov regularization is applied to stabilize the solution of the inverse heat conduction problem. The impact on the inverse solution stability and accuracy is demonstrated.

  20. Entropy description of measured information in mathematical and physical inverse problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    There are two types of inverse problems: Optimization designation and parameter identification. Before the parameter identification of mathematical and physical inverse problems, it is necessary to determine the number and position of measurement points in analysis and evaluation of a large number of measured data. In this paper, a mathematical methodology is proposed to describe the influence of the number and position of measurement points on the reconstruction precision. Information entropy and Bayesian theory are used in the description. Finally, a numerical experiment shows that the methodology is effective.