WorldWideScience

Sample records for modeling intense beams

  1. The WARP Code: Modeling High Intensity Ion Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grote, David P.; Friedman, Alex; Vay, Jean-Luc; Haber, Irving

    2005-03-01

    The Warp code, developed for heavy-ion driven inertial fusion energy studies, is used to model high intensity ion (and electron) beams. Significant capability has been incorporated in Warp, allowing nearly all sections of an accelerator to be modeled, beginning with the source. Warp has as its core an explicit, three-dimensional, particle-in-cell model. Alongside this is a rich set of tools for describing the applied fields of the accelerator lattice, and embedded conducting surfaces (which are captured at sub-grid resolution). Also incorporated are models with reduced dimensionality: an axisymmetric model and a transverse "slice" model. The code takes advantage of modern programming techniques, including object orientation, parallelism, and scripting (via Python). It is at the forefront in the use of the computational technique of adaptive mesh refinement, which has been particularly successful in the area of diode and injector modeling, both steady-state and time-dependent. In the presentation, some of the major aspects of Warp will be overviewed, especially those that could be useful in modeling ECR sources. Warp has been benchmarked against both theory and experiment. Recent results will be presented showing good agreement of Warp with experimental results from the STS500 injector test stand. Additional information can be found on the web page http://hif.lbl.gov/theory/WARP_summary.html.

  2. The WARP Code: Modeling High Intensity Ion Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grote, David P.; Friedman, Alex; Vay, Jean-Luc; Haber, Irving

    2005-01-01

    The Warp code, developed for heavy-ion driven inertial fusion energy studies, is used to model high intensity ion (and electron) beams. Significant capability has been incorporated in Warp, allowing nearly all sections of an accelerator to be modeled, beginning with the source. Warp has as its core an explicit, three-dimensional, particle-in-cell model. Alongside this is a rich set of tools for describing the applied fields of the accelerator lattice, and embedded conducting surfaces (which are captured at sub-grid resolution). Also incorporated are models with reduced dimensionality: an axisymmetric model and a transverse ''slice'' model. The code takes advantage of modern programming techniques, including object orientation, parallelism, and scripting (via Python). It is at the forefront in the use of the computational technique of adaptive mesh refinement, which has been particularly successful in the area of diode and injector modeling, both steady-state and time-dependent. In the presentation, some of the major aspects of Warp will be overviewed, especially those that could be useful in modeling ECR sources. Warp has been benchmarked against both theory and experiment. Recent results will be presented showing good agreement of Warp with experimental results from the STS500 injector test stand

  3. Intense beams of light ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camarcat, Noel

    1985-01-01

    Results of experiments performed in order to accelerate intense beams of light and heavier ions are presented. The accelerating diodes are driven by existing pulsed power generators. Optimization of the generator structure is described in chapter I. Nuclear diagnostics of the accelerated light ion beams are presented in chapter II. Chapter III deals with the physics of intense charged particle beams. The models developed are applied to the calculation of the performances of the ion diodes described in the previous chapters. Chapter IV reports preliminary results on a multiply ionized carbon source driven by a 0.1 TW pulsed power generator. (author) [fr

  4. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagenhart, W.K.

    1984-05-29

    The neutral beam intensity controller is based on selected magnetic defocusing of the ion beam prior to neutralization. The defocused portion of the beam is dumped onto a beam dump disposed perpendicular to the beam axis. Selective defocusing is accomplished by means of a magnetic field generator disposed about the neutralizer so that the field is transverse to the beam axis. The magnetic field intensity is varied to provide the selected partial beam defocusing of the ions prior to neutralization. The desired focused neutral beam portion passes along the beam path through a defining aperture in the beam dump, thereby controlling the desired fraction of neutral particles transmitted to a utilization device without altering the kinetic energy level of the desired neutral particle fraction. By proper selection of the magnetic field intensity, virtually zero through 100% intensity control of the neutral beam is achieved.

  5. Beam halo in high-intensity beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wangler, T.P.

    1993-01-01

    In space-charge dominated beams the nonlinear space-charge forces produce a filamentation pattern, which in projection to the 2-D phase spaces results in a 2-component beam consisting of an inner core and a diffuse outer halo. The beam-halo is of concern for a next generation of cw, high-power proton linacs that could be applied to intense neutron generators for nuclear materials processing. The author describes what has been learned about beam halo and the evolution of space-charge dominated beams using numerical simulations of initial laminar beams in uniform linear focusing channels. Initial results are presented from a study of beam entropy for an intense space-charge dominated beam

  6. Beam dynamics in high intensity cyclotrons including neighboring bunch effects: Model, implementation, and application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Yang (杨建俊

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Space-charge effects, being one of the most significant collective effects, play an important role in high intensity cyclotrons. However, for cyclotrons with small turn separation, other existing effects are of equal importance. Interactions of radially neighboring bunches are also present, but their combined effects have not yet been investigated in any great detail. In this paper, a new particle in the cell-based self-consistent numerical simulation model is presented for the first time. The model covers neighboring bunch effects and is implemented in the three-dimensional object-oriented parallel code OPAL-cycl, a flavor of the OPAL framework. We discuss this model together with its implementation and validation. Simulation results are presented from the PSI 590 MeV ring cyclotron in the context of the ongoing high intensity upgrade program, which aims to provide a beam power of 1.8 MW (CW at the target destination.

  7. Envelope model for passive magnetic focusing of an intense proton or ion beam propagating through thin foils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M. Lund

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Ion beams (including protons with low emittance and high space-charge intensity can be propagated with normal incidence through a sequence of thin metallic foils separated by vacuum gaps of order the characteristic transverse beam extent to transport/collimate the beam or to focus it to a small transverse spot. Energetic ions have sufficient range to pass through a significant number of thin foils with little energy loss or scattering. The foils reduce the (defocusing radial electric self-field of the beam while not altering the (focusing azimuthal magnetic self-field of the beam, thereby allowing passive self-beam focusing if the magnetic field is sufficiently strong relative to the residual electric field. Here we present an envelope model developed to predict the strength of this passive (beam generated focusing effect under a number of simplifying assumptions including relatively long pulse duration. The envelope model provides a simple criterion for the necessary foil spacing for net focusing and clearly illustrates system focusing properties for either beam collimation (such as injecting a laser-produced proton beam into an accelerator or for magnetic pinch focusing to a small transverse spot (for beam driven heating of materials. An illustrative example is worked for an idealization of a recently performed laser-produced proton-beam experiment to provide guidance on possible beam focusing and collimation systems. It is found that foils spaced on the order of the characteristic transverse beam size desired can be employed and that envelope divergence of the initial beam entering the foil lens must be suppressed to limit the total number of foils required to practical values for pinch focusing. Relatively modest proton-beam current at 10 MeV kinetic energy can clearly demonstrate strong magnetic pinch focusing achieving a transverse rms extent similar to the foil spacing (20–50  μm gaps in beam propagation distances of tens of mm

  8. Absolute intensities of supersonic beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beijerinck, H.C.W.; Habets, A.H.M.; Verster, N.F.

    1977-01-01

    In a molecular beam experiment the center-line intensity I(0) (particles s -1 sterad -1 ) and the flow rate dN/dt (particles s -1 ) of a beam source are important features. To compare the performance of different types of beam sources the peaking factor, kappa, is defined as the ratio kappa=π(I(0)/dN/dt). The factor π is added to normalize to kappa=1 for an effusive source. The ideal peaking factor for the supersonic flow from a nozzle follows from continuum theory. Numerical values of kappa are available. Experimental values of kappa for an argon expansion are presented in this paper, confirming these calculations. The actual center-line intensity of a supersonic beam source with a skimmer is reduced in comparison to this ideal intensity if the skimmer shields part of the virtual source from the detector. Experimental data on the virtual source radius are given enabling one to predict this shielding quantitatively. (Auth.)

  9. Intense nonrelativistic cesium ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampel, M.C.

    1984-01-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion group at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has constructed the One Ampere Cesium injector as a proof of principle source to supply an induction linac with a high charge density and high brightness ion beam. This is studied here. An electron beam probe was developed as the major diagnostic tool for characterizing ion beam space charge. Electron beam probe data inversion is accomplished with the EBEAM code and a parametrically adjusted model radial charge distribution. The longitudinal charge distribution was not derived, although it is possible to do so. The radial charge distribution that is derived reveals an unexpected halo of trapped electrons surrounding the ion beam. A charge fluid theory of the effect of finite electron temperature on the focusing of neutralized ion beams (Nucl Fus. 21, 529(1981)) is applied to the problem of the cesium beam final focus at the end of the injector. It is shown that the theory's predictions and assumptions are consistent with the experimental data, and that it accounts for the observed ion beam radius of approx.5 cm and the electron halo, including the determination of an electron Debye length of approx.10 cm

  10. Modelling properties of hard x-rays generated by the interaction between relativistic electrons and very intense laser beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popa, Alexandru

    2009-01-01

    In a previous paper we presented a calculation model for high harmonic generation by relativistic Thomson scattering of the electromagnetic radiation by free electrons. In this paper we present a similar model for the calculation of the energies of hard x-rays (20- 200 keV) resulted from the interaction between relativistic electrons (20-100 MeV) and very intense laser beams. Starting from the relativistic equations of motion of an electron in the electromagnetic field we show that the Lienard-Wiechert equation leads to electromagnetic waves whose frequencies are in the domain of hard x-rays. When the relativistic parameter of the laser beam is greater than unity, the model predicts the existence of harmonics of the above frequencies. Our theoretical values are in good agreement with experimental values of the x-ray energies from the literature and predict accurately their angular distribution.

  11. Edge imaging in intense beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bernal

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The appearance of rings of charge observed near the edge of beams from high-perveance guns is described with a simple ray tracing technique inspired by the particle-core model. We illustrate the technique, which has no analog in light optics, with examples from experiments employing solenoid focusing of an electron beam. The rings of charge result from the combined effects of external focusing and space-charge forces acting on paraxial fringe particles with relatively large initial transverse velocities. The model is independent of the physical mechanisms responsible for the fringe particles. Furthermore, the focal length for edge imaging in a uniform focusing channel is derived using a linearized trajectory equation for the motion of fringe particles. Counterintuitively, the focal length decreases as the beam current increases.

  12. Funnel cone for focusing intense ion beams on a target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Ni, P.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a funnel cone for concentrating an ion beam on a target. The cone utilizes the reflection characteristic of ion beams on solid walls to focus the incident beam andincrease beam intensity on target. The cone has been modeled with the TRIM code. A prototype has been tested and installed for use in the 350-keV K+ NDCX target chamber.

  13. Fan-beam intensity modulated proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, Patrick; Westerly, David; Mackie, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This paper presents a concept for a proton therapy system capable of delivering intensity modulated proton therapy using a fan beam of protons. This system would allow present and future gantry-based facilities to deliver state-of-the-art proton therapy with the greater normal tissue sparing made possible by intensity modulation techniques.Methods: A method for producing a divergent fan beam of protons using a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles is described and particle transport through the quadrupole doublet is simulated using a commercially available software package. To manipulate the fan beam of protons, a modulation device is developed. This modulator inserts or retracts acrylic leaves of varying thickness from subsections of the fan beam. Each subsection, or beam channel, creates what effectively becomes a beam spot within the fan area. Each channel is able to provide 0–255 mm of range shift for its associated beam spot, or stop the beam and act as an intensity modulator. Results of particle transport simulations through the quadrupole system are incorporated into the MCNPX Monte Carlo transport code along with a model of the range and intensity modulation device. Several design parameters were investigated and optimized, culminating in the ability to create topotherapy treatment plans using distal-edge tracking on both phantom and patient datasets.Results: Beam transport calculations show that a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles can be used to create a divergent fan beam of 200 MeV protons over a distance of 2.1 m. The quadrupole lengths were 30 and 48 cm, respectively, with transverse field gradients less than 20 T/m, which is within the range of water-cooled magnets for the quadrupole radii used. MCNPX simulations of topotherapy treatment plans suggest that, when using the distal edge tracking delivery method, many delivery angles are more important than insisting on narrow beam channel widths in order to obtain conformal target coverage

  14. Fan-beam intensity modulated proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Patrick; Westerly, David; Mackie, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a concept for a proton therapy system capable of delivering intensity modulated proton therapy using a fan beam of protons. This system would allow present and future gantry-based facilities to deliver state-of-the-art proton therapy with the greater normal tissue sparing made possible by intensity modulation techniques. A method for producing a divergent fan beam of protons using a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles is described and particle transport through the quadrupole doublet is simulated using a commercially available software package. To manipulate the fan beam of protons, a modulation device is developed. This modulator inserts or retracts acrylic leaves of varying thickness from subsections of the fan beam. Each subsection, or beam channel, creates what effectively becomes a beam spot within the fan area. Each channel is able to provide 0-255 mm of range shift for its associated beam spot, or stop the beam and act as an intensity modulator. Results of particle transport simulations through the quadrupole system are incorporated into the MCNPX Monte Carlo transport code along with a model of the range and intensity modulation device. Several design parameters were investigated and optimized, culminating in the ability to create topotherapy treatment plans using distal-edge tracking on both phantom and patient datasets. Beam transport calculations show that a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles can be used to create a divergent fan beam of 200 MeV protons over a distance of 2.1 m. The quadrupole lengths were 30 and 48 cm, respectively, with transverse field gradients less than 20 T/m, which is within the range of water-cooled magnets for the quadrupole radii used. MCNPX simulations of topotherapy treatment plans suggest that, when using the distal edge tracking delivery method, many delivery angles are more important than insisting on narrow beam channel widths in order to obtain conformal target coverage. Overall, the sharp distal

  15. Intense beam dynamics in a magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saenz, G.A.

    1984-01-01

    The analysis of the trajectory of an intense charged-particle beam in a magnetic field presents many challenges. A major problem of the analysis is that the magnetic fields induced by the intense beam currents can significantly modify the pre-existing magnetic fields. A model is presented which suggests that single-particle analysis can be used to predict the self-consistent trajectory of an intense particle beam in a magnetized plasma when the particle velocity is much greater than the Alfven velocity. A relativistic Lagrangian formalism is used to calculate single-particle trajectories in magnetic fields. An experiment was constructed which investigated a region of parameter space where the theory was valid. A 1-MeV, 50-kA, 50-ns rotating electron beam was used to compare the theory with experiment. A technique is described which determines magnetic field magnitudes necessary for single particle trajectories to produce toroidal and poloidal currents. These are the required currents for producing compact-torus magnetic-confinement geometries. The trapping of relativistic-beam electrons in a plasma is reported

  16. Recent developments for beam intensity increase operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andre, T.; Anger, P.; Baelde, J.L.; Baumgarten, R.; Doutressoulles, C.; Ducoudret, B.; Etaix, G.; Jamet, C.; Mariette, C.; Petit, E.; Tichoux, G.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the beam intensity increase operation (THI project) is to multiply the present intensities for lightest ions by a factor of fifteen in order to reach maximum power of six kilowatts. The main objective is the production of large amounts of rare isotopes, either with SISSI (device intended for producing radioactive beams), or with SPIRAL (production and acceleration of radioactive ion beams). As part of this THI project, new developments have been required such as spiral scanners, for beam profile measurements, and safety system to protect equipments against beam loses. Other developments are being carried on to improve the high intensity beam operation. (authors)

  17. Theoretical modeling of the divergence of a flat-topped beam from a two-stage beam shaper into a conical intensity profile after propagation in free space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighatzadeh, A.; Saadat, Sh.

    2014-02-01

    In this article, a two-stage beam shaping device based on a plastic fiber-bundle prism duct coupled waveguide is theoretically and experimentally described. ZEMAX software is used to simulate and investigate the divergence phenomenon on the beam shape outputted and the radiance profiles in both position and angle space. The effect of prism's geometrical structure on the beam divergence is also investigated and the optimum geometric conditions are reported. According to the theoretical results, due to an asymmetrical divergence effect the beam's cross section is increased with distance by a variable aspect ratio. The results also show that propagation in free space transformed a square beam with a flat-top intensity distribution into a rectangular beam with a conical intensity distribution. For experimental study, an imaging technique is applied to investigate the beam's output images and intensity profiles. A source light is used to illuminate the optical beam shaping elements of the reported design. Digital photographs of the beam's output for different axial distances are taken by a camera and the image data is converted into a response curve for comparison with the simulated image profiles. The obtained experimental results are strongly in agreement with the theoretical ones.

  18. Cyclotrons for high-intensity beams

    CERN Document Server

    Seidel, Mike

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the important physical and technological aspects of cyclotrons for the acceleration of high-intensity beams. Special emphasis is given to the discussion of beam loss mechanisms and extraction schemes.

  19. R & D of a Gas-Filled RF Beam Profile Monitor for Intense Neutrino Beam Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yonehara, K. [Fermilab; Backfish, M. [Fermilab; Moretti, A. [Fermilab; Tollestrup, A. V. [Fermilab; Watts, A. [Fermilab; Zwaska, R. M. [Fermilab; Abrams, R. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Cummings, M. A.; Dudas, A. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Johnson, R. P. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Kazakevich, G. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Neubauer, M. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Liu, Q. [Case Western Reserve U.

    2017-05-01

    We report the R&D of a novel radiation-robust hadron beam profile monitor based on a gas-filled RF cavity for intense neutrino beam experiments. An equivalent RF circuit model was made and simulated to optimize the RF parameter in a wide beam intensity range. As a result, the maximum acceptable beam intensity in the monitor is significantly increased by using a low-quality factor RF cavity. The plan for the demonstration test is set up to prepare for future neutrino beam experiments.

  20. Consistency checks in beam emission modeling for neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Punyapu, Bharathi; Vattipalle, Prahlad; Sharma, Sanjeev Kumar; Baruah, Ujjwal Kumar; Crowley, Brendan

    2015-01-01

    In positive neutral beam systems, the beam parameters such as ion species fractions, power fractions and beam divergence are routinely measured using Doppler shifted beam emission spectrum. The accuracy with which these parameters are estimated depend on the accuracy of the atomic modeling involved in these estimations. In this work, an effective procedure to check the consistency of the beam emission modeling in neutral beam injectors is proposed. As a first consistency check, at a constant beam voltage and current, the intensity of the beam emission spectrum is measured by varying the pressure in the neutralizer. Then, the scaling of measured intensity of un-shifted (target) and Doppler shifted intensities (projectile) of the beam emission spectrum at these pressure values are studied. If the un-shifted component scales with pressure, then the intensity of this component will be used as a second consistency check on the beam emission modeling. As a further check, the modeled beam fractions and emission cross sections of projectile and target are used to predict the intensity of the un-shifted component and then compared with the value of measured target intensity. An agreement between the predicted and measured target intensities provide the degree of discrepancy in the beam emission modeling. In order to test this methodology, a systematic analysis of Doppler shift spectroscopy data obtained on the JET neutral beam test stand data was carried out

  1. Beam monitoring system for intense neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tron, A.M.

    2001-01-01

    Monitoring system realizing novel principle of operation and allowing to register a two-dimensional beam current distribution within entire aperture (100...200 mm) of ion pipe for a time in nanosecond range has been designed and accomplished for beam control of the INR intense neutron source, for preventing thermo-mechanical damage of its first wall. Key unit of the system is monitor of two-dimensional beam current distribution, elements of which are high resistant to heating by the beam and to radiation off the source. The description of the system and monitor are presented. Implementation of the system for the future sources with more high intensities are discussed. (author)

  2. BEAM HALO FORMATION IN HIGH-INTENSITY BEAMS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FEDOTOV, A.V.

    2005-03-18

    Studies of beam halo became unavoidable feature of high-intensity machines where uncontrolled beam loss should be kept to extremely small level. For a well controlled stable beam such a loss is typically associated with the low density halo surrounding beam core. In order to minimize uncontrolled beam loss or improve performance of an accelerator, it is very important to understand what are the sources of halo formation in a specific machine of interest. The dominant mechanisms are, in fact, different in linear accelerators, circular machines or Energy Recovering Linacs (ERL). In this paper, we summarize basic mechanisms of halo formation in high-intensity beams and discuss their application to various types of accelerators of interest, such as linacs, rings and ERL.

  3. Beam Diagnostics for Low-Intensity Radioactive Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Cosentino, L

    2001-01-01

    In order to perform imaging, profiling and identification of low intensity (Ibeam5 pps) Radioactive Ion Beams (RIB), we have developed a series of diagnostics devices, operating in a range of beam energy from 50 keV up to 8 MeV/A. These characteristics do them especially suitable for ISOL RIB facilities.

  4. Frontiers of particle beams: Intensity limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dienes, M.; Month, M.; Turner, S.

    1992-01-01

    The present volume is the proceedings of the latest of these joint schools, held on Hilton Head Island, South Carolina, in 1990. This course dealt with intensity limitations and was centered on a series of lectures which could be divided into the following main categories: Self and environmental fields, Coherent instabilities and their simulation, Beam-beam interaction, Other multiparticle effects, Beam source limitations, Engineering limitations. (orig.)

  5. Low intensity beam target unit

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1976-01-01

    This is a wheel fitted with many targets around its periphery (each with three longitudinally arranged thin rods) of which one is placed into the beam via a rotation of the wheel. Upstream of each target is placed a luminescent screen, aligbed on each target axis and viewed with a TV camera, to make sure that one is hitting the target. This target unit was probably used to study target's behaviour (like beam heating). Gualtiero Del Torre stands on the left, Pierre Gerdil on the right.

  6. Small scale photon beams measurement and modeling for Intensity-modulated radiotherapy and radio-surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Hadi, Talal

    2017-01-01

    The advanced techniques of radiotherapy use very small fields in case small tumors such as in the brain to irradiate precisely the lesion. This work concerns the measurement absorbed dose in small field of 0.5 x 0.5 cm 2 to 3 x 3 cm 2 . However, the measurement dose in small fields is characterized by high gradient dose and a leak of lateral electronic equilibrium. That requires use a detector having an adapted sensitive volume and adapted spatial resolution. The detectors marketed are not perfectly compatible with these conditions. Actually, there is no international methodological consensus, nor a metrological reference for measurement dose in small fields. The IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) protocol 398 used to calculate the absorbed dose at 10 cm x 10 cm is not suitable for small fields. In absence a referenced detector, the dosimetric data measurement is verified using a Gafchromic films due to its excellent spatial resolution. We measure using conventional detectors (ionization chambers and/or Gafchromic films) the leakage dose at a point outside of irradiated field. The dosimetric data such as output factor (OF), percentage depth dose (PDD) and off-axis ratio (OAR) were also carried out by the diode. The correlation between the on-axis dose and off-axis dose is the subject of our study. This study proposes an experimental method to calculate the on-axis dose in small field for stereotactic radiotherapy. The method is based on the out of field leakage measurement. This model can be used to validate dose and output factor measurement. The experimental validation of the present method was performed for square and rectangular fields with sizes ranging from 0.5 cm x 0.5 cm to 10 cm x 10 cm. (author) [fr

  7. Simulations of multistage intense ion beam acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slutz, S.A.; Poukey, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    An analytic theory for magnetically insulated, multistage acceleration of high intensity ion beams, where the diamagnetic effect due to electron flow is important, has been presented by Slutz and Desjarlais. The theory predicts the existence of two limiting voltages called V 1 (W) and V 2 (W), which are both functions of the injection energy qW of ions entering the accelerating gap. As the voltage approaches V 1 (W), unlimited beam-current density can penetrate the gap without the formation of a virtual anode because the dynamic gap goes to zero. Unlimited beam current density can penetrate an accelerating gap above V 2 (W), although a virtual anode is formed. It was found that the behavior of these limiting voltages is strongly dependent on the electron density profile. The authors have investigated the behavior of these limiting voltages numerically using the 2-D particle-in-cell (PIC) code MAGIC. Results of these simulations are consistent with the superinsulated analytic results. This is not surprising, since the ignored coordinate eliminates instabilities known to be important from studies of single stage magnetically insulated ion diodes. To investigate the effect of these instabilities the authors have simulated the problem with the 3-D PIC code QUICKSILVER, which indicates behavior that is consistent with the saturated model

  8. Intense pulsed ion beams for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphries, S. Jr.

    1980-04-01

    The subject of this review paper is the field of intense pulsed ion beam generation and the potential application of the beams to fusion research. Considerable progress has been made over the past six years. The ion injectors discussed utilize the introduction of electrons into vacuum acceleration gaps in conjunction with high voltage pulsed power technology to achieve high output current. Power levels from injectors exceeding 1000 MW/cm 2 have been obtained for pulse lengths on the order of 10 -7 sec. The first part of the paper treats the physics and technology of intense ion beams. The second part is devoted to applications of intense ion beams in fusion research. A number of potential uses in magnetic confinement systems have been proposed

  9. Fan beam intensity modulated proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Patrick M.

    A fan beam proton therapy is developed which delivers intensity modulated proton therapy using distal edge tracking. The system may be retrofit onto existing proton therapy gantries without alterations to infrastructure in order to improve treatments through intensity modulation. A novel range and intensity modulation system is designed using acrylic leaves that are inserted or retracted from subsections of the fan beam. Leaf thicknesses are chosen in a base-2 system and motivated in a binary manner. Dose spots from individual beam channels range between 1 and 5 cm. Integrated collimators attempting to limit crosstalk among beam channels are investigated, but found to be inferior to uncollimated beam channel modulators. A treatment planning system performing data manipulation in MATLAB and dose calculation in MCNPX is developed. Beamlet dose is calculated on patient CT data and a fan beam source is manually defined to produce accurate results. An energy deposition tally follows the CT grid, allowing straightforward registration of dose and image data. Simulations of beam channels assume that a beam channel either delivers dose to a distal edge spot or is intensity modulated. A final calculation is performed separately to determine the deliverable dose accounting for all sources of scatter. Treatment plans investigate the effects that varying system parameters have on dose distributions. Beam channel apertures may be as large as 20 mm because the sharp distal falloff characteristic of proton dose provides sufficient intensity modulation to meet dose objectives, even in the presence of coarse lateral resolution. Dose conformity suffers only when treatments are delivered from less than 10 angles. Jaw widths of 1--2 cm produce comparable dose distributions, but a jaw width of 4 cm produces unacceptable target coverage when maintaining critical structure avoidance. Treatment time for a prostate delivery is estimated to be on the order of 10 minutes. Neutron production

  10. Intense ion beams for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehlhorn, T.A.

    1997-01-01

    Intense beams of light of heavy ions are being studied as inertial confinement fusion (ICF) drivers for high yield and energy. Heavy and light ions have common interests in beam transport, targets, and alternative accelerators. Self-pinched transport is being jointly studied. This article reviews the development of intense ion beams for ICF. Light-ion drivers are highlighted because they are compact, modular, efficient and low cost. Issues facing light ions are: (1) decreasing beam divergence; (2) increasing beam brightness; and (3) demonstrating self-pinched transport. Applied-B ion diodes are favored because of efficiency, beam brightness, perceived scalability, achievable focal intensity, and multistage capability. A light-ion concept addressing these issues uses: (1) an injector divergence of ≤ 24 mrad at 9 MeV; (2) two-stage acceleration to reduce divergence to ≤ 12 mrad at 35 MeV; and (3) self-pinched transport accepting divergences up to 12 mrad. Substantial progress in ion-driven target physics and repetitive ion diode technology is also presented. Z-pinch drivers are being pursued as the shortest pulsed power path to target physics experiments and high-yield fusion. However, light ions remain the pulsed power ICF driver of choice for high-yield fusion energy applications that require driver standoff and repetitive operation. 100 refs

  11. Stability of Periodically Focused Intense Particle Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pakter, R.; Rizzato, F. B.

    2001-01-01

    A stability analysis of periodically focused intense particle beams based on the beam envelope equation is performed. We show that (i) the scenario, as the focusing field increases, is not the existence of a single threshold above which stable matched (equilibrium) solutions are absent, as generally believed, but the existence of successive regions of stability interrupted by gaps of instability; (ii) the beam can be focused to tighter radii using new stable matched solutions found for focusing field strengths greater than the previous threshold. Self-consistent simulations validate the findings

  12. Intense particle beam and multiple applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, M.; Machida, M.

    1988-01-01

    The Multiple Application Intense Particle Beam project is an experiment in which an injector of high energy neutral or ionized particles will be used to diagnose high density and high temperature plasmas. The acceleration of the particles will be carried out feeding a diode with a high voltage pulse produced by a Marx generator. Other apllications of intense particle beam generated by this injector that could be explored in the future include: heating and stabilization of compact toroids, treatment of metallic surfaces and ion implantation. (author) [pt

  13. Linac design for intense hadron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chuan

    2009-12-14

    Based on the RFQ and H-type DTL structures, this dissertation is dedicated to study the beam dynamics in the presence of significantly strong space-charge effects while accelerating intense hadron beams in the low- and medium-{beta} region. Besides the 5 mA/30 mA, 17 MeV proton injector (RFQ+DTL) and the 125 mA, 40 MeV deuteron DTL of the EUROTRANS and IFMIF facilities, a 200 mA, 700 keV proton RFQ has been also intensively studied for a small-scale but ultra-intense neutron source FRANZ planned at Frankfurt University. The most remarkable properties of the FRANZ RFQ and the IFMIF DTL are the design beam intensities, 200 mA and 125 mA. A new design approach, which can provide a balanced and accelerated beam bunching at low energy, has been developed for intense beams. To design the IFMIF DTL and the injector DTL part of the EUROTRANS driver linac, which have been foreseen as the first real applications of the novel superconducting CH-DTL structure, intensive attempts have been made to fulfill the design goals under the new conditions. For the IFMIF DTL, the preliminary IAP design has been considerably improved with respect to the linac layout as well as the beam dynamics. By reserving sufficient drift spaces for the cryosystem, diagnostic devices, tuner and steerer, introducing SC solenoid lenses and adjusting the accelerating gradients and accordingly other configurations of the cavities, a more realistic, reliable and efficient linac system has been designed. On the other hand, the specifications and positions of the transverse focusing elements as well as the phase- and energy-differences between the bunch-center particle and the synchronous particle at the beginning of the {phi}{sub s}=0 sections have been totally redesigned. For the EUROTRANS injector DTL, in addition to the above-mentioned procedures, extra optimization concepts to coordinate the beam dynamics between two intensities have been applied. In the beam transport simulations for both DTL designs

  14. Damping of coherent oscillations in intense ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpov, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Transverse decoherence of a displaced ion bunch is an important phenomenon in synchrotrons and storage rings. An offset can be caused by an injection error after the bunch-to-bucket transfer between synchrotrons or by an externally generated kick. Decoherence results in a transverse emittance blowup, which can cause particle losses and a beam quality degradation. To prevent the beam blowup, a transverse feedback system (TFS) can be used. The damping time should be shorter than the characteristic decoherence time, which can be strongly affected by the interplay of different intensity effects (e.g., space charge and impedances). This thesis describes the development of the analytical models that explain decoherence and emittance growth with chromaticity, space charge, and image charges within the first synchrotron period. The pulsed response function including intensity effects was derived from the model for beam transfer functions. For a coasting beam, the two- dimensional model shows that space charge slows down and above intensity threshold suppresses decoherence. These predictions were confirmed by particle tracking simulations with self-consistent space charge fields. Additionally, halo buildup and losses during decoherence were observed in simulations. These effects were successfully interpreted using a non self-consistent particle-core model. The two-dimensional model was extended to the bunched beams. The simulation results reproduce the analytical predictions. The intensity threshold of decoherence suppression is higher in comparison to a coasting beam, image charges can restore decoherence. In the present work dedicated experiments were performed in the SIS18 synchrotron at GSI Darmstadt and the results were compared with simulations and analytical predictions. The contribution of nonlinearities and image charges is negligible while chromaticity and space charge dominate decoherence. To study the damping efficiency of TFS, a comprehensive TFS module was

  15. Intense non-relativistic cesium ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampel, M.C.

    1984-02-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion group at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has constructed the One Ampere Cesium Injector as a proof of principle source to supply an induction linac with a high charge density and high brightness ion beam. This is studied here. An electron beam probe was developed as the major diagnostic tool for characterizing ion beam space charge. Electron beam probe data inversion is accomplished with the EBEAM code and a parametrically adjusted model radial charge distribution. The longitudinal charge distribution was not derived, although it is possible to do so. The radial charge distribution that is derived reveals an unexpected halo of trapped electrons surrounding the ion beam. A charge fluid theory of the effect of finite electron temperature on the focusing of neutralized ion beams (Nucl. Fus. 21, 529 (1981)) is applied to the problem of the Cesium beam final focus at the end of the injector. It is shown that the theory's predictions and assumptions are consistent with the experimental data, and that it accounts for the observed ion beam radius of approx. 5 cm, and the electron halo, including the determination of an electron Debye length of approx. 10 cm

  16. Intensive Ion Beam In Storage Rings With Electron Cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Korotaev, Yu V; Kamerdjiev, V; Maier, R; Meshkov, I; Noda, K; Prasuhn, D; Sibuya, S; Sidorin, A; Stein, H J; Stockhorst, H; Syresin, E M; Uesugi, T

    2004-01-01

    Results of experimental studies of the electron cooling of a proton beam at COSY (Juelich, Germany) and an ion beam at HIMAC (Chiba, Japan) are presented. Intensity of the ion beam is limited by two general effects: particle loss directly after the injection and development of instability in a deep cooled ion beam. Methods of the instability suppression, which allow increasing the cooled beam intensity, are described.

  17. High repetition rate intense ion beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, D.A.; Glidden, S.C.; Noonan, B.

    1992-01-01

    This final report describes a ≤ 150kV, 40kA, 100ns high repetition rate pulsed power system and intense ion beam source which is now in operation at Cornell University. Operation of the Magnetically-controlled Anode Plasma (MAP) ion diode at > 100Hz (burst mode for up to 10 pulse bursts) provides an initial look at repetition rate limitations of both the ion diode and beam diagnostics. The pulsed power systems are capable of ≥ 1kHz operation (up to 10 pulse bursts), but ion diode operation was limited to ∼100Hz because of diagnostic limitations. By varying MAP diode operating parameters, ion beams can be extracted at a few 10s of keV or at up to 150keV, the corresponding accelerating gap impedance ranging from about 1Ω to about 10Ω. The ability to make hundreds of test pulses per day at an average repetition rate of about 2 pulses per minute permits statistical analysis of diode operation as a function of various parameters. Most diode components have now survived more than 10 4 pulses, and the design and construction of the various pulsed power components of the MAP diode which have enabled us to reach this point are discussed. A high speed data acquisition system and companion analysis software capable of acquiring pulse data at 1ms intervals (in bursts of up to 10 pulses) and processing it in ≤ min is described

  18. Transverse beam shape measurements of intense proton beams using optical transition radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarpine, Victor E.; /Fermilab

    2012-03-01

    A number of particle physics experiments are being proposed as part of the Department of Energy HEP Intensity Frontier. Many of these experiments will utilize megawatt level proton beams onto targets to form secondary beams of muons, kaons and neutrinos. These experiments require transverse size measurements of the incident proton beam onto target for each beam spill. Because of the high power levels, most beam intercepting profiling techniques will not work at full beam intensity. The possibility of utilizing optical transition radiation (OTR) for high intensity proton beam profiling is discussed. In addition, previous measurements of OTR beam profiles from the NuMI beamline are presented.

  19. Beam halo in high-intensity hadron linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerigk, F.

    2006-01-01

    This document aims to cover the most relevant mechanisms for the development of beam halo in high-intensity hadron linacs. The introduction outlines the various applications of high-intensity linacs and it will explain why, in the case of the CERN Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) study a linac was chosen to provide a high-power beam, rather than a different kind of accelerator. The basic equations, needed for the understanding of halo development are derived and employed to study the effects of initial and distributed mismatch on high-current beams. The basic concepts of the particle-core model, envelope modes, parametric resonances, the free-energy approach, and the idea of core-core resonances are introduced and extended to study beams in realistic linac lattices. The approach taken is to study the behavior of beams not only in simplified theoretical focusing structures but to highlight the beam dynamics in realistic accelerators. All effects which are described and derived with simplified analytic models, are tested in realistic lattices and are thus related to observable effects in linear accelerators. This approach involves the use of high-performance particle tracking codes, which are needed to simulate the behavior of the outermost particles in distributions of up to 100 million macro particles. In the end a set of design rules are established and their impact on the design of a typical high-intensity machine, the CERN SPL, is shown. The examples given in this document refer to two different design evolutions of the SPL study: the first conceptual design report (SPL I) and the second conceptual design report (SPL II). (orig.)

  20. Beam halo in high-intensity hadron linacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerigk, F.

    2006-12-21

    This document aims to cover the most relevant mechanisms for the development of beam halo in high-intensity hadron linacs. The introduction outlines the various applications of high-intensity linacs and it will explain why, in the case of the CERN Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) study a linac was chosen to provide a high-power beam, rather than a different kind of accelerator. The basic equations, needed for the understanding of halo development are derived and employed to study the effects of initial and distributed mismatch on high-current beams. The basic concepts of the particle-core model, envelope modes, parametric resonances, the free-energy approach, and the idea of core-core resonances are introduced and extended to study beams in realistic linac lattices. The approach taken is to study the behavior of beams not only in simplified theoretical focusing structures but to highlight the beam dynamics in realistic accelerators. All effects which are described and derived with simplified analytic models, are tested in realistic lattices and are thus related to observable effects in linear accelerators. This approach involves the use of high-performance particle tracking codes, which are needed to simulate the behavior of the outermost particles in distributions of up to 100 million macro particles. In the end a set of design rules are established and their impact on the design of a typical high-intensity machine, the CERN SPL, is shown. The examples given in this document refer to two different design evolutions of the SPL study: the first conceptual design report (SPL I) and the second conceptual design report (SPL II). (orig.)

  1. Improving the particle beam characteristics resulting from laser ion acceleration at ultra high intensity through target manipulation - Numerical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatomirescu, Dragos; d'Humieres, Emmanuel; Vizman, Daniel

    2017-12-01

    The necessity to produce superior quality ion and electron beams has been a hot research field due to the advances in laser science in the past decade. This work focuses on the parametric study of different target density profiles in order to determine their effect on the spatial distribution of the accelerated particle beam, the particle maximum energy, and the electromagnetic field characteristics. For the scope of this study, the laser pulse parameters were kept constant, while varying the target parameters. The study continues the work published in [1] and focuses on further studying the effects of target curvature coupled with a cone laser focusing structure. The results show increased particle beam focusing and a significant enhancement in particle maximum energy.

  2. Intense muon beams and neutrino factories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsa, Z.

    2000-01-01

    High intensity muon sources are needed in exploring neutrino factories, lepton flavor violating muon processes, and lower energy experiments as the stepping phase towards building higher energy μ + μ - colliders. We present a brief overview, sketch of a neutrino source, and an example of a muon storage ring at BNL with detector(s) at Fermilab, Sudan, etc. Physics with low energy neutrino beams based on muon storage rings (μSR) and conventional Horn Facilities are described and compared. CP violation Asymmetries and a new Statistical Figure of Merit to be used for comparison is given. Improvements in the sensitivity of low energy experiments to study Flavor changing neutral currents are also included

  3. Materials processing with intense pulsed ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rej, D.J.; Davis, H.A.; Olson, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    We review research investigating the application of intense pulsed ion beams (IPIBs) for the surface treatment and coating of materials. The short range (0.1-10 μm) and high-energy density (1-50 J/cm 2 ) of these short-pulsed (≤ 1 μs) beams (with ion currents I = 5 - 50 kA, and energies E = 100 - 1000 keV) make them ideal to flash-heat a target surface, similar to the more familiar pulsed laser processes. IPIB surface treatment induces rapid melt and solidification at up to 10 10 K/s to cause amorphous layer formation and the production of non-equilibrium microstructures. At higher energy density the target surface is vaporized, and the ablated vapor is condensed as coatings onto adjacent substrates or as nanophase powders. Progress towards the development of robust, high-repetition rate IPIB accelerators is presented along with economic estimates for the cost of ownership of this technology

  4. Longitudinal density modulation and energy conversion in intense beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, J. R.; Neumann, J. G.; Tian, K.; O'Shea, P. G.

    2007-01-01

    Density modulation of charged particle beams may occur as a consequence of deliberate action, or may occur inadvertently because of imperfections in the particle source or acceleration method. In the case of intense beams, where space charge and external focusing govern the beam dynamics, density modulation may, under some circumstances, be converted to velocity modulation, with a corresponding conversion of potential energy to kinetic energy. Whether this will occur depends on the properties of the beam and the initial modulation. This paper describes the evolution of discrete and continuous density modulations on intense beams and discusses three recent experiments related to the dynamics of density-modulated electron beams

  5. High intensity beam dump for the Tevatron beam abort system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kidd, J.; Mokhov, N.; Murphy, T.; Palmer, M.; Toohig, T.; Turkot, F.; VanGinneken, A.

    1981-01-01

    The beam abort system proposed for the Fermilab Tevatron Accelerator will extract the proton beam from the ring in a single turn (approximately 20/mu/s) and direct it to an external beam dump. It is the function of the beam dump to absorb the unwanted beam and limit the escaping radiation to levels that are acceptable to the surrounding populace and apparatus. A beam dump that is expected to meet these requirements has been designed and constructed. Detailed design of the dump, including considerations leading to the choice of materials, are given. 6 refs

  6. Development of high intensity beam handling system, 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanoi, Yutaka; Tanaka, Kazuhiro; Minakawa, Michifumi

    1992-01-01

    We have constructed the new counter experimental hall at the KEK 12 GeV Proton Synchrotron (KEK-PS) in order to handle high intensity primary proton beams of up to 1x10 3 pps (protons per second), which is one order of magnitude greater than the present beam intensity of the KEK-PS, 1x10 12 pps. New technologies for handling high-intensity beams have, then, been developed and employed in the construction of the new hall. A part of our R/D work on handling high intensity beams will be reported. (author)

  7. Beam Dynamics Studies for High-Intensity Beams in the CERN Proton Synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2082016; Benedikt, Michael

    With the discovery of the Higgs boson, the existence of the last missing piece of the Standard Model of particle physics (SM) was confirmed. However, even though very elegant, this theory is unable to explain, for example, the generation of neutrino masses, nor does it account for dark energy or dark matter. To shed light on some of these open questions, research in fundamental particle physics pursues two complimentary approaches. On the one hand, particle colliders working at the high-energy frontier, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), located in Geneva, Switzerland, are utilized to investigate the fundamental laws of nature. Alternatively, fixed target facilities require high-intensity beams to create a large flux of secondary particles to investigate, for example, rare particle decay processes, or to create neutrino beams. This thesis investigates limitations arising during the acceleration of high-intensity beams at the CERN Proton Synchrotro...

  8. Intense beams: The past, present, and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonas, G.; Sweeney, M.A.

    1998-06-01

    Nobody could have predicted the circuitous course of the last 30 years of progress in intense beams and pulsed power. There were many discoveries and twists and turns along the way, but the steady flow of understanding and technological advances has sustained the field. Pulsed power research began in the early 1960s with the development of the technology to test the reliability of nuclear weapons in a pulsed radiation environment. Because of the effort in the 1970s on an electron beam approach to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) at Sandia National Laboratories and at the Kurchatov Institute, simulation codes, diagnostics, and innovative pulsed power techniques such as self-magnetic insulation were developed. The electron approach ended in 1979, and the more promising ion approach continued. At the same time, z pinches, used since the early 1970s to evaluate the response of materials to keV X rays, were considered as an alternative to drive ICF capsules. The use of z pinches for ICF was discontinued in 1984 because of budget cuts and the belief that ions offered a route to the standoff requirement for energy applications. Now, in 1998, because of budget limitations and the 1995 discovery that the soft x-ray power achievable in a z-pinch implosion can be greatly enhanced, the ion approach has been suspended, and a new facility, X-1, proposed to achieve high yield in the laboratory with z pinches. In this paper the authors review the research paths that led to these changes, describe the present status of z pinches, and predict what the future holds. Although nobody can predict the future, the past 30 years have taught us some lessons that can be applied to the next 30 years. The paper concludes with some of these lessons learned

  9. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazerson, Samuel

    2014-04-14

    With the advent of applied 3D fi elds in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous velocity reduction, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database [1]. Benchmark calculations are presented to validate the collisionless particle orbits, neutral beam injection model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields.

  10. Delivering the world’s most intense muon beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Cook

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A new muon beam line, the muon science innovative channel, was set up at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, in Osaka, Japan, using the 392 MeV proton beam impinging on a target. The production of an intense muon beam relies on the efficient capture of pions, which subsequently decay to muons, using a novel superconducting solenoid magnet system. After the pion-capture solenoid, the first 36° of the curved muon transport line was commissioned and the muon flux was measured. In order to detect muons, a target of either copper or magnesium was placed to stop muons at the end of the muon beam line. Two stations of plastic scintillators located upstream and downstream from the muon target were used to reconstruct the decay spectrum of muons. In a complementary method to detect negatively charged muons, the x-ray spectrum yielded by muonic atoms in the target was measured in a germanium detector. Measurements, at a proton beam current of 6 pA, yielded (10.4±2.7×10^{5}  muons per watt of proton beam power (μ^{+} and μ^{-}, far in excess of other facilities. At full beam power (400 W, this implies a rate of muons of (4.2±1.1×10^{8}  muons s^{−1}, among the highest in the world. The number of μ^{-} measured was about a factor of 10 lower, again by far the most efficient muon beam produced. The setup is a prototype for future experiments requiring a high-intensity muon beam, such as a muon collider or neutrino factory, or the search for rare muon decays which would be a signature for phenomena beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. Such a muon beam can also be used in other branches of physics, nuclear and condensed matter, as well as other areas of scientific research.

  11. P-West High Intensity Secondary Beam Area Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, A.; Currier, R.; Eartly, D.; Guthke, A.; Johnson, G.; Lee, D.; Dram, R.; Villegas, E.; Rest, J.; Tilles, E.; Vander Arend, P.

    1977-03-01

    This report gives the initial design parameters of a 1000 GeV High Intensity Superconducting Secondary Beam Laboratory to be situated in the Proton Area downstream of the existing Proton West experimental station. The area will provide Fermilab with a major capability for experimentation with pion and antiproton beams of intensities and of energies available at no other laboratory and with an electron beam with excellent spot size, intensity, and purity at energies far above that available at electron machines. Detailed beam design, area layouts, and cost estimates are presented, along with the design considerations.

  12. Intense relativistic electron beam: generation and propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittal, K.C.; Mondal, J.

    2010-01-01

    A general review of relativistic electron beam extracted from explosive field emission diode has been presented here. The beam current in the diode gap taking into account cathode and anode plasma expansion velocity and excluding the self magnetic field effect is directly proportional to gap voltage V 3/2 and inversely proportional to the square of the effective diode gap (d-vt). In the limit of high current, self magnetic field focusing effect comes into play and results in a critical current at which pinching will take place. When the diode current exceeds the critical current, the electron flow is in the para-potential regime. Different diode geometries such as planner, coaxial, rod-pinched, reflex triode are discussed qualitatively. When the beam is injected into a vacuum drift tube the propagation of the beam is only possible in presence of a strong axial magnetic field which prevents the beam expansion in the radial direction. If the beam is injected in the drift tube filled with dense plasma, then the redistribution of the plasma electrons effectively neutralizes the beam space charge, resulting subsequent propagation of the beam along the drift tube. The beam propagation through neutral gas is similar to the plasma filled drift tube. In this case both the neutral gas pressure and the beam current regulate the transmission of the REB. (author)

  13. A practical method of modeling a treatment couch using cone-beam computed tomography for intensity-modulated radiation therapy and RapidArc treatment delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldosary, Ghada; Nobah, Ahmad; Al-Zorkani, Faisal; Devic, Slobodan; Moftah, Belal

    2015-01-01

    The effect of a treatment couch on dose perturbation is not always fully considered in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). In the course of inverse planning radiotherapy techniques, beam parameter optimization may change in the absence of the couch, causing errors in the calculated dose distributions. Although modern treatment planning systems (TPS) include data for the treatment couch components, they are not manufactured identically. Thus, variations in their Hounsfield unit (HU) values may exist. Moreover, a radiotherapy facility may wish to have a third-party custom tabletop installed that is not included by the TPS vendor. This study demonstrates a practical and simple method of acquiring reliable computed tomography (CT) data for the treatment couch and shows how the absorbed dose calculated with the modeled treatment couch can differ from that with the default treatment couch found in the TPS. We also experimentally verified that neglecting to incorporate the treatment couch completely in the treatment planning process might result in dose differences of up to 9.5% and 7.3% for 4-MV and 10-MV photon beams, respectively. Furthermore, 20 RapidArc and IMRT cases were used to quantify the change in calculated dose distributions caused by using either the default or modeled couch. From 2-dimensional (2D) ionization chamber array measurements, we observed large dose distribution differences between the measurements and calculations when the couch was omitted that varied according to the planning technique and anatomic site. Thus, incorporating the treatment couch in the dose calculation phase of treatment planning significantly decreases dose calculation errors.

  14. Final focus system for high intensity beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Henestroza

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The neutralized transport experiment (NTX at the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is exploring the performance of neutralized final-focus systems for high perveance heavy ion beams. The final-focus scenario in a heavy ion fusion driver consists of several large aperture quadrupole magnets followed by a drift section in which the beam space charge is neutralized by a plasma. This beam is required to hit a millimeter-sized target spot at the end of the drift section. The objective of the NTX experiments and associated theory and simulations is to study the various physical mechanisms that determine the final spot size (radius r_{s} at a given distance (f from the end of the last quadrupole. In a fusion driver, f is the standoff distance required to keep the chamber wall and superconducting magnets properly protected. The NTX final quadrupole focusing system produces a converging beam at the entrance to the neutralized drift section where it focuses to a small spot. The final spot is determined by the conditions of the beam entering the quadrupole section, the beam dynamics in the magnetic lattice, and the plasma neutralization dynamics in the drift section. The main issues are the control of emittance growth due to high order fields from magnetic multipoles and image fields. In this paper, we will describe the theoretical and experimental aspects of the beam dynamics in the quadrupole lattice, and how these physical effects influence the final beam size. In particular, we present theoretical and experimental results on the dependence of final spot size on geometric aberrations and perveance.

  15. Ion accumulation and space charge neutralization in intensive electron beams for ion sources and electron cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirkov, G.D.

    1996-01-01

    The Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS), Electron Beam Ion Traps (EBIT) and electron beams for electron cooling application have the beam parameters in the same ranges of magnitudes. EBIS and EBIT produce and accumulate ions in the beam due to electron impact ionization. The cooling electron beam accumulates positive ions from the residual gas in the accelerator chamber during the cooling cycle. The space charge neutralization of cooling beam is also used to reduce the electron energy spread and enhance the cooling ability. The advanced results of experimental investigations and theoretical models of the EBIS electron beams are applied to analyze the problem of beam neutralization in the electron cooling techniques. The report presents the analysis of the most important processes connected with ion production, accumulation and losses in the intensive electron beams of ion sources and electron cooling systems for proton and ion colliders. The inelastic and elastic collision processes of charged particles in the electron beams are considered. The inelastic processes such as ionization, charge exchange and recombination change the charge states of ions and neutral atoms in the beam. The elastic Coulomb collisions change the energy of particles and cause the energy redistribution among components in the electron-ion beams. The characteristic times and specific features of ionization, beam neutralization, ion heating and loss in the ion sources and electron cooling beams are determined. The dependence of negative potential in the beam cross section on neutralization factor is studied. 17 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  16. Ablative acceleration of thin foil targets by intense proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, S.; Ozaki, T.; Imasaki, K.; Higaki, S.; Nakai, S.

    1981-01-01

    A focused proton beam of up to 2 x 10 10 w/cm 2 was obtained using pinch-reflex ion diode connected to Reiden IV generator. Experiments of beam target interaction have been done using thin foil targets. In this power range the interaction was explained classically. The experimental dependence of ablation pressure on proton beam intensity was obtained as P sub(a) = 3 x 10 -3 I sup(0.7) bar (I in w/cm 2 ). (author)

  17. Intense e-beam interaction with matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, R.H.; Crawford, O.H.

    1984-01-01

    This document describes work done in this period on certain nonlinear processes of potential importance at high energy densities in condensed matter, and on the theory of the electron slowing-down-cascade spectrum engendered in solids by e-beams

  18. Insulating materials resistance in intense radiation beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oproiu, Constantin; Martin, Diana; Scarlat, Florin; Timus, Dan; Brasoveanu, Mirela; Nemtanu, Monica

    2002-01-01

    The paper emphasizes the main changes of the mechanical and electrical properties of some organic insulating materials exposed to accelerated electron beams. These materials are liable to be used in nuclear plants and particle accelerators. The principal mechanical and electrical properties analyzed were: tensile strength, fracture strength, tearing on fracture, dielectric strength, electrical resistivity, dielectric constant and tangent angle of dielectric losses. (authors)

  19. Faraday Cup - it is used to measure beam intensities at low energy beams.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    A Faraday Cup is used to measure beam intensities at low energy beams. An electrically isolated metallic electrode intercepts the beam and captures all its charges. These charges are integrated using an current sensitive amplifier. When the beam impinges onto the electrode surface low energy electrons are liberated. In order to prevent these electrons from escaping the cup and thus falsifying the measurement, a repeller electrode with negative potential pushes the electrons back onto the electrode.

  20. ORBIT : BEAM DYNAMICS CALCULATIONS FOR HIGH - INTENSITY RINGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HOLMES, J.A.; DANILOV, V.; GALAMBOS, J.; SHISHLO, A.; COUSINEAU, S.; CHOU, W.; MICHELOTTI, L.; OSTIGUY, F.; WEI, J.

    2002-01-01

    We are developing a computer code, ORBIT, specifically for beam dynamics calculations in high-intensity rings. Our approach allows detailed simulation of realistic accelerator problems. ORBIT is a particle-in-cell tracking code that transports bunches of interacting particles through a series of nodes representing elements, effects, or diagnostics that occur in the accelerator lattice. At present, ORBIT contains detailed models for strip-foil injection including painting and foil scattering; rf focusing and acceleration; transport through various magnetic elements; longitudinal and transverse impedances; longitudinal, transverse, and three-dimensional space charge forces; collimation and limiting apertures; and the calculation of many useful diagnostic quantities. ORBIT is an object-oriented code, written in C++ and utilizing a scripting interface for the convenience of the user. Ongoing improvements include the addition of a library of accelerator maps, BEAMLINE/MXYZPTLK the introduction of a treatment magnet errors and fringe fields; the conversion of the scripting interface to the standard scripting language, Python; and the parallelization of the computations using MPI. The ORBIT code is an open source, powerful, and convenient tool for studying beam dynamics in high-intensity rings

  1. Plasma-Immersion Formation of High-Intensity Ion Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabchikov, A. I.; Anan'in, P. S.; Dektyarev, S. V.; Sivin, D. O.; Shevelev, A. E.

    2017-12-01

    For the first time, the possibility of forming high-intensity beams of low-energy metal and gas ions is demonstrated experimentally. The use of a hybrid system for ion-beam formation including plasmaimmersion extraction and ion acceleration and their subsequent ballistic focusing in an equipotential space with neutralization of the space charge of the beam made possible the pulse-periodic formation of titanium and nitrogen ion beams with an ion-current density of more than 1 A/cm2 and a pulsed power density of 2.6 kW/cm2.

  2. A transparent vacuum window for high-intensity pulsed beams

    CERN Document Server

    Monteil, M; Veness, R

    2011-01-01

    The HiRadMat (High-Radiation to Materials) facility Ill will allow testing of accelerator components, in particular those of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, under the impact of high-intensity pulsed beams. To reach this intensity range, the beam will be focused on a focal point where the target to be tested is located. A 60 mm aperture vacuum window will separate the vacuum of the beam line which is kept under high vacuum 10(-8) mbar, from the test area which is at atmospheric pressure. This window has to resist collapse due to beam passage. The high-intensity of the beam means that typical materials used for standard vacuum windows (such as stainless steel, aluminium and titanium alloy) cannot endure the energy deposition induced by the beam passage. Therefore, a vacuum window has been designed to maintain the differential pressure whilst resisting collapse due to the beam impact on the window. In this paper, we will present calculations of the energy transfer from beam to window, the design of the ...

  3. Space-Charge Waves and Instabilities in Intense Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J. G.

    1997-11-01

    Advancced accelerator applications, such as drivers for heavy ion inertial fusion, high-intensity synchrotrons for spallation neutron sources, high energy boosters, free electron lasers, high-power microwave generators, etc., require ever-increasing beam intensity. An important beam dynamics issue in such beams is the collective behavior of charged particles due to their space charge effects. This includes the phenomena of space-charge waves and instabilities excited on beams by external perturbations. It is very crucial to fully understand these phenomena in order to develop advanced accelerators for various applications. At the University of Maryland we have been conducting experimental programs to study space-charge waves and longitudinal instabilities by employing low-energy, high-current, space-charge dominated electron beams. Localized perturbations on the beams are generated from a gridded electron gun. In a conducting transport channel focused by short solenoids, these perturbations evolve into space-charge waves propagating on the beams. The wave speed is measured and many beam parameters are determined with this technique. The reflection of space-charge waves at the shoulder of an initially rectangular beam bunch is also observed. In a resistive-wall channel focused by a uniform long solenoid, the space-charge waves suffer longitudinal instability. The properties of the instabilities are studied in detail in the long wavelength range. In this talk we review our experimental results on the waves and instabilities and compare with theory.

  4. Emittance growth due to space charge compensation and beam intensity instabilities in negative ion beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Valerio-Lizarraga

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The need to extract the maximum beam intensity with low transversal emittance often comes with the drawback of operating the ion source to limits where beam current instabilities arise, such fluctuations can change the beam properties producing a mismatch in the following sections of the machine. The space charge compensation (SCC generated by the beam particles colliding with the residual gas reaches a steady state after a build-up time. This paper shows how once in the steady state, the beam ends with a transversal emittance value bigger than the case without compensation. In addition, we study how the beam intensity variation can disturb the SCC dynamics and its impact on the beam properties. The results presented in this work come from 3-D simulations using tracking codes taking into account the secondary ions to estimate the degree of the emittance growth due to space charge and SCC.

  5. Emittance growth due to space charge compensation and beam intensity instabilities in negative ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerio-Lizarraga, C. A.

    2018-03-01

    The need to extract the maximum beam intensity with low transversal emittance often comes with the drawback of operating the ion source to limits where beam current instabilities arise, such fluctuations can change the beam properties producing a mismatch in the following sections of the machine. The space charge compensation (SCC) generated by the beam particles colliding with the residual gas reaches a steady state after a build-up time. This paper shows how once in the steady state, the beam ends with a transversal emittance value bigger than the case without compensation. In addition, we study how the beam intensity variation can disturb the SCC dynamics and its impact on the beam properties. The results presented in this work come from 3-D simulations using tracking codes taking into account the secondary ions to estimate the degree of the emittance growth due to space charge and SCC.

  6. Calculated intensity of high-energy neutron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustapha, B.; Nolen, J.A.; Back, B.B.

    2004-01-01

    The flux, energy and angular distributions of high-energy neutrons produced by in-flight spallation and fission of a 400 MeV/A 238 U beam and by the break-up of a 400 MeV/A deuteron beam are calculated. In both cases very intense secondary neutron beams are produced, peaking at zero degrees, with a relatively narrow energy spread. Such secondary neutron beams can be produced with the primary beams from the proposed rare isotope accelerator driver linac. The break-up of a 400 kW deuteron beam on a liquid-lithium target can produce a neutron flux of >10 10 neutrons/cm 2 /s at a distance of 10 m from the target

  7. The generation of high-quality, intense ion beams by ultra-intense lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Roth, M; Audebert, Patrick; Blazevic, A; Brambrink, E; Cowan, T E; Fuchs, J; Gauthier, J C; Geissel, M; Hegelich, M; Karsch, S; Meyer-Ter-Vehn, J; Ruhl, H; Schlegel, T; Stephens, R B

    2002-01-01

    Intense beams of protons and heavy ions have been observed in ultra-intense laser-solid interaction experiments. Thereby, a considerable fraction of the laser energy is transferred to collimated beams of energetic ions (e.g. up to 50 MeV protons; 100 MeV fluorine), which makes these beams highly interesting for various applications. Experimental results indicate a very short-pulse duration and an excellent beam quality, leading to beam intensities in the TW range. To characterize the beam quality and its dependence on laser parameters and target conditions we performed experiments using the 100 TW laser system at Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses at the Ecole Polytechnique, France, with focused intensities exceeding 10 sup 1 sup 9 W cm sup - sup 2. We found a strong dependence on the target rear surface conditions allowing to tailor the ion beam by an appropriate target design. We also succeeded in the generation of heavy ion beams by suppressing the proton amount at the target surface. We wi...

  8. High intensity beam profile monitors for the LAMPF primary beam lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, E.W.; Macek, R.J.; van Dyck, O.; Lee, D.; Harvey, A.; Bridge, J.; Cainet, J.

    1979-01-01

    Two types of beam profile monitors are in use at LAMPF to measure the properties of the 800 MeV, 500 μA proton beam external to the linac. Both types use secondary electron emission from a wire to produce a current signal proportional to the amount of proton beam that intercepts the wire. The wire scanner system uses a pair of orthogonal wires which are passed through the beam and the harp system uses two fixed planes of parallel wires. Most of the harps are not retractable and are exposed continuously to the primary beam. The high beam intensities available lead to a number of technical problems for instruments that intercept the beam or are close to primary beam targets. The thermal, electrical, radiation-damage, and material selection problems encountered, and some solutions which have been implemented are discussed

  9. High Intensity Beam Issues in the CERN Proton Synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    Aumon, Sandra; Rivkin, Leonid

    This PhD work is about limitations of high intensity proton beams observed in the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS) and, in particular, about issues at injection and transition energies. With its 53 years, the CERN PS would have to operate beyond the limit of its performance to match the future requirements. Beam instabilities driven by transverse impedance and aperture restrictions are important issues for the operation and for the High-Luminosity LHC upgrade which foresees an intensity increase delivered by the injectors. The main subject of the thesis concerns the study of a fast transverse instability occurring at transition energy. The proton beams crossing this energy range are particularly sensitive to wake forces because of the slow synchrotron motion. This instability can cause a strong vertical emittance blow-up and severe losses in less than a synchrotron period. Experimental observations show that the particles at the peak density of the beam longitudinal distribution oscillate in the vertical plane du...

  10. Single-electrode monitors for relativistic intense electron beam parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stratienko, V.A.; Khorenko, V.K.

    1977-01-01

    A single-electrode monitor operating in atmosphere on delta-electrons for precision measurement of high-intensity electron beams is developed. As an emitter is used a 0.2 mm aluminium foil with a hole which is a replica of the sample subjected to radiation. The electric charge from the emitter is recorded by a current integrator. The single-electrode monitor enabled to form a 225 MeV electron beam with a flux density of 5x10 15 electrons/ (cm 2 and confine the latter for 140 hours with an accuracy of +- 0.2 mm. Controlling the beam shifting by means of the single-electrode monitor described, it is possible to measure the real dimensions and density distributions of high-intensity electron beams

  11. CAS course on Intensity Limitations in Particle Beams at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Accelerator School

    2015-01-01

    The CERN Accelerator School (CAS) recently organised a specialised course on Intensity Limitations in Particle Beams, at CERN from 2 to 11 November, 2015.     Many accelerators and storage rings, whether intended for particle physics experiments, synchrotron light sources or industrial applications, require beams of high brightness and the highest possible intensities. A good understanding of the possible limitations is required to achieve the desired performance. This course covered the interaction of beams with their surroundings and with other beams, as well as further collective effects. The lectures on the effects and possible mitigations were complemented by tutorials. The course was very successful, with 66 students representing 14 nationalities attending. Most participants came from European counties, but also from Armenia, China and Russia. Feedback from the participants was positive, reflecting the standard of the lectures and teaching. In addition to the academic pro...

  12. Intense positron beam and its application to surface science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Y.; Hirose, M.; Kanazawa, I.; Sueoka, O.; Takamura, S.; Okada, S.

    1992-01-01

    Intense pulsed slow positron beam has been produced using the 100 MeV electron LINAC of JAERI · Tokai. In order to use the beam for surface studies such as positron diffraction and positron microscopy, it was transferred from the solenoid magnetic field to field free region and then was brightness-enhanced. The beam size was reduced from 10 mmφ (in the magnetic field) to 0.5 mmφ after two stages of re-moderation. Using the intense brightness-enhanced positron beam we have observed for the first time RHEPD (Reflection High-Energy Positron Diffraction) patterns. A design of re-emission positron microscopy is also described. (author)

  13. Generation of an intense ion beam by a pinched relativistic electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilad, P.; Zinamon, Z.

    1976-01-01

    The pinched electron beam of a pulsed electron accelerator is used to generate an intense beam of ions. A foil anode and vacuum drift tube are used. The space charge field of the pinched beam in the tube accelerates ions from the foil anode. Ion currents of 10 kA at a density of 5kA/cm 2 with pulse length of 50 ns are obtained using a 5 kJ, 450 kV, 3 Ω diode. (author)

  14. Proposal for an intense slow positron beam facility at PSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waeber, W.B.; Taqqu, D.; Zimmermann, U.; Solt, G.

    1990-05-01

    In the domain of condensed matter physics and materials sciences monoenergetic slow positrons in the form of highest intensity beams are demonstrated to be extreamly useful and considered to be highly needed. This conclusion has been reached and the scientific relevance of the positron probe has been highlighted at an international workshop in November 1989 at PSI, where the state of the art and the international situation on slow positron beams, the fields of application of intense beams and the technical possibilities at PSI for installing intense positron sources have been evaluated. The participants agreed that a high intensity beam as a large-scale user facility at PSI would serve fundamental and applied research. The analysis of responses given by numerous members of a widespread positron community has revealed a large research potential in the domain of solid-state physics, atomic physics and surface, thin-film and defect physics, for example. The excellent feature of slow positron beams to be a suitable probe also for lattice defects near surfaces or interfaces has attracted the interest not only of science but also of industry.In this report we propose the installation of an intense slow positron beam facility at PSI including various beam lines of different qualities and based on the Cyclotron production of β + emitting source material and on a highest efficiency moderation scheme which exceeds standard moderation efficiencies by two orders of magnitude. In its proposed form, the project is estimated to be realizable in the nineties and costs will amount to between 15 and 20 MSFr. (author) 10 figs., 6 tabs., 78 refs

  15. B-dot monitor for intense electron beam measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qin; Li Hong; Chen Nan; Gao Feng; Wang Yongwei; Wang Liping

    2009-01-01

    Azimuthal arrays of B-dot loops are often used to measure the time-resolved beam centroid position of a pulsed, intense electron beam propagating in a metallic tube. This paper describes the designing principle, parameters and calibration of the B-dot monitors. According to the beam current pulse rise time, fall time and the pulse width, the B-dot is designed to work as a differential loop, the loop inductance is about 60 nH. The B-dot monitor's sensitivity and the displacement curve are calibrated in the test stand. The sensitivity of the B-dots and the passive RC integrator is averagely 4 147 A/V, integrate constant is about 1 μs. The B-dot monitors are used to measure the Dragon-I electron beam and the experimental results show that the B-dot monitors can measure the beam current and centroid position accurately. (authors)

  16. Approach to increase beam intensity extracted from a cyclotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, M.; Hojo, S.; Katagiri, K.; Miyahara, N.; Noda, A.; Noda, K.; Sugiura, A.; Wakui, T.; Smirnov, V.; Vorozhtsov, S.; Goto, A.

    2017-09-01

    To increase the beam intensity of cyclotrons used for producing radionuclides, beam loss during extraction must be reduced. Extraction efficiency is limited by the beam parameters in front of the deflector, especially angular distribution. Computer simulation of the second harmonic mode for 18 MeV protons, which is frequently used, has been carried out to understand beam behavior in a cyclotron. The extraction efficiency is determined by the width of the angular distribution of particles in the phase space plot at the deflector. An effective method to reduce the width is to shorten the bunch at injection. The simulation shows that the bunch phase length at injection must be ⩽30° to realize a 30 μA extraction beam current and satisfy the deflector heat limit of 200 W.

  17. Application of Beam Diagnostics for Intense Heavy Ion Beams at the GSI UNILAC

    CERN Document Server

    Barth, W; Glatz, J; Groening, L; Richter, S; Yaramishev, S

    2003-01-01

    With the new High Current Injector (HSI) of the GSI UNILAC the beam pulse intensity had been increased by approximately two orders of magnitudes. The HSI was mounted and commissioned in 1999; since this time the UNILAC serves as an injector for the synchrotron SIS, especially for high uranium intensities. Considering the high beam power of up to 1250 kW and the short stopping range for the UNILAC beam energies (≤12 MeV/u), accelerator components could be destroyed, even during a single beam pulse. All diagnostic elements had to be replaced preferably by non-destructive devices. The beam current is mainly measured by beam transformers instead of Faraday cups, beam positions are measured with segmented capacitive pick-ups and secondary beam monitors instead of profile harps. The 24 installed pick-ups are also used to measure intensities, widths and phase of the bunches, as well beam energies by evaluating pick-ups at different positions. The residual gas ionization monitors allow on-line measurements ...

  18. Investigation on Beam Dynamics Design of High-Intensity RFQs

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, C

    2004-01-01

    Recently various potential uses of high-intensity beams bring new opportunities as well as challenges to RFQ accelerator research because of the new problems arising from the strong space-charge effects. Unconventional concepts of beam dynamics design, which surround the choice of basic parameters and the optimization of main dynamics parameters’ variation along the machine, are illustrated by the designing Peking University (PKU) Deuteron RFQ. An efficient tool of LANL RFQ Design Codes for beam dynamics simulation and analysis, RFQBAT, is introduced. Some quality criterions are also presented for evaluating design results.

  19. A beam intensity profile monitor based on secondary electron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berdoz, A.R.; Birchall, J.; Campbell, J.R.; Davis, C.A.; Davison, N.E.; Mosscrop, D.R.; Page, S.A.; Ramsay, W.D.; Sekulovich, A.M.; Van Oers, W.T.H.; MIschke, R.E.

    1991-03-01

    Two dual function intensity profile monitors have been designed for a measurement of parity violation in antiproton-proton scattering at about 230 MeV using longitudinally polarized protons. Each device contains a set of split secondary electron emission (SEM) foils to determine the median of the beam current distribution (in x and y). The split foils, coupled through servoamplifiers and operational amplifiers to upstream air core steering magnets, have demonstrated the ability to hold the beam position stable to within ± 3 μm after one hour of data taking with a 100 nA, 15 mm FWHM Gaussian beam. (Author) 16 refs., 10 figs., tab

  20. Investigations on transport and storage of high ion beam intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Ninad Shrikrishna

    2009-08-25

    In the framework of this thesis the intense low energy ion beam transport was investigated. Especially, the beam transport in toroidal magnetic field configurations was discussed, as it may allow the accumulation of high intensive beams in the future. One of the specific tasks is to design an injection system that can be used for the proposed low energy accumulator ring. A simulation code (TBT) was written to describe the particle motion in curved segments. Particle in Cell techniques were utilized to simulate a multi particle dynamics. A possibility of reading an external data file was made available so that a measured distribution can be used to compare simulation results with measured ones. A second order cloud in cell method was used to calculate charge density and in turn to solve Poisson's equation. Further simulations were performed to study the self field effects on beam transport. Experiments were performed to compare the simulation results and gain practical experience. The preparatory experiments consisted of building and characterization of the ion source in a first step. Along with the momentum spectrometer and emittance scanner the beam properties were studied. Low mass ion beams He{sup +} and mixed p, H{sup 2+}, H{sup 3+} beams were analyzed. In the second stage, beams were transported through a solenoid and the phase space distribution was measured as a function of the magnetic field for different beam energies. The phase-space as distributions measured in a first stage were simulated backward and then again forward transported through the solenoid. The simulated results were then compared with the measured distribution. The LINTRA transport program was used. The phase-space distribution was further simulated for transport experiments in a toroidal magnetic field. The transport program that was used to simulate the beam in the toroid was also used to design the injection system. The injection system with its special field configurations was

  1. Investigations on transport and storage of high ion beam intensities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Ninad Shrikrishna

    2009-01-01

    In the framework of this thesis the intense low energy ion beam transport was investigated. Especially, the beam transport in toroidal magnetic field configurations was discussed, as it may allow the accumulation of high intensive beams in the future. One of the specific tasks is to design an injection system that can be used for the proposed low energy accumulator ring. A simulation code (TBT) was written to describe the particle motion in curved segments. Particle in Cell techniques were utilized to simulate a multi particle dynamics. A possibility of reading an external data file was made available so that a measured distribution can be used to compare simulation results with measured ones. A second order cloud in cell method was used to calculate charge density and in turn to solve Poisson's equation. Further simulations were performed to study the self field effects on beam transport. Experiments were performed to compare the simulation results and gain practical experience. The preparatory experiments consisted of building and characterization of the ion source in a first step. Along with the momentum spectrometer and emittance scanner the beam properties were studied. Low mass ion beams He + and mixed p, H 2+ , H 3+ beams were analyzed. In the second stage, beams were transported through a solenoid and the phase space distribution was measured as a function of the magnetic field for different beam energies. The phase-space as distributions measured in a first stage were simulated backward and then again forward transported through the solenoid. The simulated results were then compared with the measured distribution. The LINTRA transport program was used. The phase-space distribution was further simulated for transport experiments in a toroidal magnetic field. The transport program that was used to simulate the beam in the toroid was also used to design the injection system. The injection system with its special field configurations was designed to perform

  2. Improving the intensity of a focused laser beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddadi, Sofiane; Fromager, Michael; Louhibi, Djelloul; Hasnaoui, Abdelkrim; Harfouche, Ali; Cagniot, Emmanuel; ńit-Ameur, Kamel

    2015-03-01

    Let us consider the family of symmetrical Laguerre-Gaus modes of zero azimuthal order which will be denoted as LGp0 . The latter is made up of central lobe surrounded by p concentric rings of light. The fundamental mode LG00 is a Gaussian beam of width W. The focusing of a LGp0 beam of power P by a converging lens of focal length f produces a focal spot keeping the LGp0 -shape and having a central intensity I0= 2PW2/(λf)2 whatever the value of the radial order p. Many applications of lasers (laser marking, laser ablation, …) seek nowadays for a focal laser spot with the highest as possible intensity. For a given power P, increasing intensity I0 can be achieved by increasing W and reducing the focal length f. However, this way of doing is in fact limited because the ratio W/f cannot increase indefinitely at the risk of introducing a huge truncation upon the edge of the lens. In fact, it is possible to produce a single-lobed focal spot with a central intensity of about p times the intensity I0. This result has been obtained by reshaping (rectification) a LGp0 beam thanks to a proper Binary Diffractive Optical Element (BDOE). In addition, forcing a laser cavity to oscillate upon a LGp0 can improve the power extract due to a mode volume increasing with the mode order p. This could allow envisaging an economy of scale in term of laser pumping power for producing a given intensity I0. In addition, we have demonstrated that a rectified LGp0 beam better stand the lens spherical aberration than the usual Gaussian beam.

  3. Nonlinear beam dynamics in a funnel for combining two intense ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whealton, J.H.; Raridon, R.J.; Rothe, K.E.; Becraft, W.R.; Owens, T.L.

    1989-01-01

    The concept of funnels was introduced over the last few years with an endeavor to increase the beam intensity by combining two beams in the following fashion: The beam is, in each case, produced by an rf accelerator and thereby composed of bunches. The beam bunches are made to occupy relatively small fractions of the longitudinal phase in these cases. The bunches form each of the two beams are made to interlace and enter and rf deflector which produced the interlacing of the beams into one beam with twice as many bunches occupying twice the phase. The funnel itself, in one embodiment called the magnetic funnel, is composed of many transport elements with strong transverse focusing produced by quadruple permanent magnetic fields. An occasional rf rebuncher is introduced to recompress the beam longitudinally so the beam occupies the appropriate small fraction of velocity space in the parallel direction. Crucial elements of the funnel are the beam dynamics in the rf rebuncher and the deflector. Beam dynamics in either case must be assessed using an analysis which is described in this paper. Several components in a magnetic funnel have been examined by dint of a full three-dimensional solution to the time-dependent Vlasov-Poisson equations with all image charges included. Specifically, the rms emittance growth of subsystems is examined in detail. 11 refs., 26 figs

  4. Resonant Self-Trapping and Absorption of Intense Bessel Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, J.; Parra, E.; Milchberg, H. M.

    2000-01-01

    We report the observation of resonant self-trapping and enhanced laser-plasma heating resulting from propagation of high intensity Bessel beams in neutral gas. The enhancement in absorption and plasma heating is directly correlated to the spatial trapping of laser radiation. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  5. Modulation instability of an intense laser beam in an unmagnetized ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The modulation instability of an intense circularly polarized laser beam propagating in an unmagnetized, cold electron–positron–ion plasma is investigated. Adopting a generalized. Karpman method, a three-dimensional nonlinear equation is shown to govern the laser field. Then the conditions for modulation ...

  6. Internal dynamics of intense twin beams and their coherence

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Peřina Jr., J.; Haderka, Ondřej; Allevi, A.; Bondani, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, Feb (2016), 1-8, č. článku 22320. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/12/0382 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : dynamics of intense * twin beams * pump-depleted parametric * down-conversion * coherence Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  7. Modulation instability of an intense laser beam in an unmagnetized ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The modulation instability of an intense circularly polarized laser beam propagating in an unmagnetized, cold electron–positron–ion plasma is investigated. Adopting a generalized Karpman method, a three-dimensional nonlinear equation is shown to govern the laser field. Then the conditions for modulation instability and ...

  8. Low and high intensity beam monitoring and tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Lietti, D.; Bolognini, D.; Colombo, J.; Hasan, S.; Mattera, A.; Mozzanica, A.; Prest, M.; Schmitt, B.; Vallazza, E.

    Several detector types have been designed and assembled in order to monitor charged particle beams in a wide range of intensities: silicon microstrip detectors for high precision tracking (spatial resolution better than 5 μm), a scintillating fiber tracker with multianode photomultiplier readout for coarse but fast monitoring, a microstrip silicon detector readout by a counting ASIC to monitor very high intensity beams. These detectors and their readout electronics have been characterized at the BTF (Beam Test Facility) of the INFN National Laboratories of Frascati and used on the H8 line at the CERN SPS as tracking media for the data taking of the H8RD22 collaboration. The paper describes the results obtained in terms of spatial resolution and maximum counting rates.

  9. LHC Beam Instrumentation: Beam Position and Intensity Measurements (1/3)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    The LHC is equipped with a full suite of sophisticated beam instrumentation which has been essential for rapid commissioning, the safe increase in total stored beam power and the understanding of machine optics and accelerator physics phenomena. These lectures will introduce these systems and comment on their contributions to the various stages of beam operation. They will include details on: the beam position system and its use for real-time global orbit feedback; the beam loss system and its role in machine protection; total and bunch by bunch intensity measurements; tune measurement and feedback; diagnostics for transverse beam size measurements, abort gap monitoring and longitudinal density measurements. Issues and problems encountered along the way will also be discussed together with the prospect for future upgrades.

  10. Hydrodynamics of layer structured targets impinged by intense ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davila, J.; Barrero, A.

    1989-01-01

    To minimize the energy loss in the corona outflow, a layer structured spherical hollow shell has been proposed to be used as target in inertial confinement fusion. For ion beam drivers, the major part of the beam energy is absorbed in the middle layer, which is called either absorber or pusher. The outer layer, called tamper, slows down the outward expansion of the absorbed low density region. The materials of the tamper and pusher are usually in the inner layer. The knowledge of the hydrodynamics of the interaction of an intense beam with a structured target is then an essential point in order to achieve break-even conditions in ion-beam fusion. (author) 2 refs., 2 figs

  11. Current density monitor for intense relativistic electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorito, R.B.; Raleigh, M.; Seltzer, S.M.

    1986-01-01

    We describe a new type of electric probe which is capable of measuring the time-resolved current density profile of a stable, reproducible, high-energy (>4-MeV) high-current (>1-kA) electron beam. The sensing element of this probe is an open-ended but capped-off 50-Ω coaxial line constructed of graphite. The graphite sensor is 4.3 mm in diameter, 6 cm long, and is range thin to the primary beam electrons. The probe produces a signal proportional to the intercepted beam current. When the sensor is scanned radially through the beam during repeated pulses, a curve of signal versus depth of insertion is produced from which the radial current density profile can be determined. Measurements are presented of the profile of the electron beam from the Experimental Test Accelerator (4.5 MeV, 10 kA) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Good agreement is shown between measurements made with this probe and the beam radius as predicted by transport codes. The advantage of the electric probe lies in its ruggedness, simplicity, inherent fast rise time, and low cost. In contrast to other systems it requires no radiation shielding, water cooling, or auxiliary support equipment to operate in an intense beam environment

  12. Dosimetric Uncertainties in Verification of Intensity Modulated Photon Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurkovic, S.

    2010-01-01

    The doctoral thesis presents method for the calculation of the compensators' shape to modulate linear accelerators' beams. Characteristic of the method is more strict calculation of the scattered radiation in beams with an inhomogeneous cross-section than it was before. Method could be applied in various clinical situations. It's dosimetric verification was made in phantoms, measuring dose distributions using ionization chambers as well as radiographic film. Therefore, ionization chambers were used for the evaluation of modulator shape and film was used for the evaluation of two-dimensional dose distributions. It is well known that dosimetry of the intensity modulated photon beams is rather complicated regarding inhomogeneity of the dose distribution. The main reason for that is the beam modulator which changes spectral distribution of the beam. Possibility of use different types of detectors for the measurements of dose distributions in modulated photon beams and their accuracy were examined. Small volume ionization chambers, different diodes and amorphus silicon detector and radigraphic film were used. Measured dose distributions were compared between each other as well as with distributions simulated using Monte Carlo particle transport algorithm. In this way the most accurate method for the verification of modulate photon beams is suggested. (author)

  13. Intense Ion Beams for Warm Dense Matter Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heimbucher, Lynn; Coleman, Joshua Eugene

    2008-01-01

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is exploring the physical limits of compression and focusing of ion beams for heating material to warm dense matter (WDM) and fusion ignition conditions. The NDCX is a beam transport experiment with several components at a scale comparable to an inertial fusion energy driver. The NDCX is an accelerator which consists of a low-emittance ion source, high-current injector, solenoid matching section, induction bunching module, beam neutralization section, and final focusing system. The principal objectives of the experiment are to control the beam envelope, demonstrate effective neutralization of the beam space-charge, control the velocity tilt on the beam, and understand defocusing effects, field imperfections, and limitations on peak intensity such as emittance and aberrations. Target heating experiments with space-charge dominated ion beams require simultaneous longitudinal bunching and transverse focusing. A four-solenoid lattice is used to tune the beam envelope to the necessary focusing conditions before entering the induction bunching module. The induction bunching module provides a head-to-tail velocity ramp necessary to achieve peak axial compression at the desired focal plane. Downstream of the induction gap a plasma column neutralizes the beam space charge so only emittance limits the focused beam intensity. We present results of beam transport through a solenoid matching section and simultaneous focusing of a singly charged K + ion bunch at an ion energy of 0.3 MeV. The results include a qualitative comparison of experimental and calculated results after the solenoid matching section, which include time resolved current density, transverse distributions, and phase-space of the beam at different diagnostic planes. Electron cloud and gas measurements in the solenoid lattice and in the vicinity of intercepting diagnostics are also presented. Finally, comparisons of

  14. Beam dynamics of mixed high intensity highly charged ion Beams in the Q/A selector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X.H., E-mail: zhangxiaohu@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Yuan, Y.J.; Yin, X.J.; Qian, C.; Sun, L.T. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Du, H.; Li, Z.S.; Qiao, J.; Wang, K.D. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhao, H.W.; Xia, J.W. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2017-06-11

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources are widely used in heavy ion accelerators for their advantages in producing high quality intense beams of highly charged ions. However, it exists challenges in the design of the Q/A selection systems for mixed high intensity ion beams to reach sufficient Q/A resolution while controlling the beam emittance growth. Moreover, as the emittance of beam from ECR ion sources is coupled, the matching of phase space to post accelerator, for a wide range of ion beam species with different intensities, should be carefully studied. In this paper, the simulation and experimental results of the Q/A selection system at the LECR4 platform are shown. The formation of hollow cross section heavy ion beam at the end of the Q/A selector is revealed. A reasonable interpretation has been proposed, a modified design of the Q/A selection system has been committed for HIRFL-SSC linac injector. The features of the new design including beam simulations and experiment results are also presented.

  15. Beam dynamics of mixed high intensity highly charged ion Beams in the Q/A selector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X. H.; Yuan, Y. J.; Yin, X. J.; Qian, C.; Sun, L. T.; Du, H.; Li, Z. S.; Qiao, J.; Wang, K. D.; Zhao, H. W.; Xia, J. W.

    2017-06-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources are widely used in heavy ion accelerators for their advantages in producing high quality intense beams of highly charged ions. However, it exists challenges in the design of the Q/A selection systems for mixed high intensity ion beams to reach sufficient Q/A resolution while controlling the beam emittance growth. Moreover, as the emittance of beam from ECR ion sources is coupled, the matching of phase space to post accelerator, for a wide range of ion beam species with different intensities, should be carefully studied. In this paper, the simulation and experimental results of the Q/A selection system at the LECR4 platform are shown. The formation of hollow cross section heavy ion beam at the end of the Q/A selector is revealed. A reasonable interpretation has been proposed, a modified design of the Q/A selection system has been committed for HIRFL-SSC linac injector. The features of the new design including beam simulations and experiment results are also presented.

  16. Pulsed hollow cathode discharge: intense electron beam and filamentary plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modreanu, Gabriel

    1998-01-01

    This work deals with a transient hollow cathode discharge optimised by a preionization one and providing intense electron beams. It exists a preionization current value for which the pulsed discharge becomes a very straight and bright filament, well collimated on the discharge tube axis for some tenths of centimeters. A remarkable feature of this discharge is that, without internal metallic electrodes very pure plasma could be produced. Using self-biasing by the beam of a Faraday cup placed only few millimeters behind the anode, we deduced the beam electron's distribution function and its temporal behavior for two radial positions, on the axis and 1 millimeter off-axis, respectively. The real advantage of this measurement technique is the transient polarization character, which allows analysis very closely from the electron beam extraction hole. On the other side, using the emission spectroscopy, we have studied the plasma produced in electron beam - gas interaction and deduced the temporal evolution of the electron temperature. The temporal behavior of the filamentary plasma diameter shows a constriction at the last moments of the beam existence, followed by diffusion controlled expansion. The ambipolar diffusion coefficient corresponding to the estimated electron temperature describes quite well this expansion and allows a quantitative interpretation of the measured temperature diminution, with taking into account the preferential fast electrons escape. The analysis of both beam and post-beam plasma phases suggests potential applications of this robust, very reproducible and not expensive discharge also susceptible to be external monitored. The beam - target interaction could be used for PVD, elementary analysis and filamentary or point-like X-ray emission. (author) [fr

  17. Experiments of an intense H{sup -} ion beam acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, A.; Takeiri, Y.; Kaneko, O.; Oka, Y.; Tsumori, K.; Asano, E.; Kawamoto, T.; Akiyama, R.; Kuroda, T.

    1995-08-01

    An intense H{sup -} beam of a single beamlet is extracted from a large multicusp plasma source operated with cesium seeding. The H{sup -} beams are accelerated up to 100keV by a single-stage or a two-stage electrode system. Spatial profiles of the beams are measured calorimetrically and a minimum beam divergence angle of 5mrad is achieved at a H{sup -} current density of 30mA/cm{sup 2} with a beam energy of 100keV. A ratio of an acceleration current to a H{sup -} current increases abruptly when a H{sup -} current saturates in the space charge limited region. This enhancement is mainly due to secondary electrons caused by the intersection of H{sup -} beams with an extraction grid. When an operating gas pressure decreases, the ratio of the acceleration current to the H{sup -} current decreases. This is related to a stripping loss of H{sup -} ions in the electrodes. A beam divergence angle becomes minimum when a ratio of V{sub acc} to V{sub ext} is set at a optimum value of 1.6 in the single-stage acceleration. This ratio is almost the same as that in the double-stage acceleration, where the optimum ratio of E{sub acc1}/E{sub ext} is 1.5. In the optimum E{sub acc1}/E{sub ext} ratio the divergence angle is not affected by V{sub acc2}. The divergence angle can be reduced by changing V{sub acc2} even if the ratio of E{sub acc1}/E{sub ext} is not optimized. The beam steering effect by permanent magnets buried in an extraction grid is observed in nine beamlets experiments. A simple calculation of a single particle trajectory gives a good approximation of the beam deflection angle. (author).

  18. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2008-08-01

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  19. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2010-03-16

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  20. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state

  1. An algorithm for fast beam angle selection in intensity modulated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaitheeswaran, R; Narayanan, V K Sathiya; Bhangle, Janhavi R; Nirhali, Amit; Kumar, Namitha; Basu, Sumit; Maiya, Vikram

    2010-12-01

    This article aims to introduce a novel algorithm for fast beam angle selection in intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The algorithm models the optimization problem as a beam angle ranking problem and chooses suitable beam angles according to their rank. A new parameter called "beam intensity profile perturbation score (BIPPS)" is used for ranking the beam angles. The BIPPS-based beam angle ranking implicitly accounts for the dose-volume effects of the involved structures. A simulated phantom case with obvious optimal beam angles is used to verify the validity of the presented technique. In addition, the efficiency of the algorithm was examined in three clinical cases (prostate, pancreas, and head and neck) in terms of DVH and dose distribution. In all cases, the judgment of the algorithm's efficiency was based on the comparison between plans with equidistant beams (equal-angle-plan) and plans with beams obtained using the algorithm (suitable-angle-plan). It is observed from the study that the beam angle ranking function over BIPPS instantly picks up a suitable set of beam angles for a specific case. It takes only about 15 min for choosing the suitable beam angles even for the most complicated cases. The DVHs and dose distributions confirm that the proposed algorithm can efficiently reduce the mean or maximum dose to OARs, while guaranteeing the target coverage and dose uniformity. On the average, about 17% reduction in the mean dose to critical organs, such as rectum, bladder, kidneys and parotids, is observed. Also, about 12% (averaged) reduction in the maximum dose to critical organs (spinal cord) is observed in the clinical cases presented in this study. This study demonstrates that the algorithm can be effectively applied to IMRT scenarios to get fast and case specific beam angle configurations.

  2. Intensity modulated tangential beam irradiation of the intact breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, L.; Hunt, M.; Chui, C.; Forster, K.; Lee, H.; Lutz, W.; Yahalom, J.; Kutcher, G.J.; McCormick, B.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential benefits of intensity modulated tangential beams in the irradiation of the intact breast. The primary goal was to develop an intensity modulated treatment which would substantially decrease the dose to coronary arteries, lung and contralateral breast while still using a standard tangential beam arrangement. Improved target dose homogeneity, within the limits imposed by opposed fields, was also desired. Since a major goal of the study was the development of a technique which was practical for use on a large population of patients, the design of 'standard' intensity profiles analogous in function to conventional wedges was also investigated. Materials and Methods: Three dimensional treatment planning was performed using both conventional and intensity modulated tangential beams. Plans were developed for both the right and left breast for a range of patient sizes and shapes. For each patient, PTV, lung, heart, origin and peripheral branches of the coronary artery, and contralateral breast were contoured. Optimum tangential beam direction and shape were designed using Beams-Eye-View display and then used for both the conventional and intensity modulated plans. For the conventional plan, the optimum wedge combination and beam weighting were chosen based on the dose distribution in a single transverse plane through the field center. Intensity modulated plans were designed using an algorithm which allows the user to specify the prescribed, maximum and minimum acceptable doses and dose volume constraints for each organ of interest. Plans were compared using multiple dose distributions and DVHs. Results: Significant improvements in the doses to critical structures were achieved using the intensity modulated plan. Coronary artery dose decreased substantially for patients treated to the left breast. Ipsilateral lung and contralateral breast doses decreased for all patients. For one patient treated to

  3. Relativistic fluid formulation and theory of intense relativistic electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siambis, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    A new general relativistic fluid formulation has been obtained for intense relativistic electron beams (IREB) with arbitrarily high relativistic mass factor γ. This theory is valid for confined IREB equilibria such as those found inside high energy accelerators as well as in the pinched and ion-focused regimes of beam propagation in plasma channels. The new relativistic fluid formulation is based on the covariant relativistic fluid formulation of Newcomb with the parameter lambda identical to 1, in order to allow for realistic confined equilibria. The resulting equilibrium constraints require that the beam has a slow rotational velocity around its direction of propagation and that the off-diagonal thermal stress element, associated with these two directions of motion, be nonzero. The effective betatron oscillation frequency of the fluid elements of the beam is modified by the radial gradient and anisotropies in the thermal stress elements of the beam fluid. The wave equation, for sausage, hose and filamentation excitations on the relativistic fluid beam, is found to be formally identical to that obtained from the Vlasov equation approach, hence phase-mixing damping is a generic and self-consistent correlate of the new relativistic fluid formulation

  4. LHC Report: 25 ns spacing yields record beam intensity

    CERN Multimedia

    The LHC team

    2012-01-01

    Over the weekend the LHC broke two records: a record number of 2,748 proton bunches were injected into the accelerator giving a record beam intensity of around 2.7 x 1014 protons in both beams. These beams have yet to face the challenge of "ramping" to high energy.   These very good results were made possible by a new beam configuration: the design value of 25 nanosecond spacing between proton bunches replaced - for the first time – the typical 50 nanosecond spacing. This test run was done at 450 GeV with no collisions. Up to now, the LHC has been running with around 1,380 bunches with 50 nanoseconds between bunches. By going to 25 nanoseconds, the LHC operations team can double the number of bunches to around 2,800. One of the main limitations for this mode of operation is the so-called electron cloud (see Bulletin 15-16/2011) that is strongly enhanced by the reduced spacing among bunches.  The electron cloud has nasty effects on the beam (beam size increase...

  5. APPLICATION OF UAL TO HIGH INTENSITY BEAM DYNAMICS STUDIES IN THE SNS ACCUMULATOR RING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MALITSKY, N.; FEDOTOV, A.V.; WEI, J.

    2002-01-01

    The SNS Ring off-line parallel simulation environment based on the Unified Accelerator Libraries (UAL) has been implemented and used for extensive full-scale beam dynamics studies arising in high-intensity rings. The paper describes the structure of this environment and its application to the development and analysis of the SNS accumulator ring beam loss model including a complex combination of several physical effects

  6. APPLICATION OF UAL TO HIGH INTENSITY BEAM DYNAMICS STUDIES IN THE SNS ACCUMULATOR RING.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MALITSKY,N.; FEDOTOV,A.V.; WEI,J.

    2002-06-03

    The SNS Ring off-line parallel simulation environment based on the Unified Accelerator Libraries (UAL) has been implemented and used for extensive full-scale beam dynamics studies arising in high-intensity rings. The paper describes the structure of this environment and its application to the development and analysis of the SNS accumulator ring beam loss model including a complex combination of several physical effects.

  7. Numerical Studies of Electromagnetic Instabilities in Intense Charged Particle Beams with Large Energy Anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Startsev, Edward; Lee, Wei-li

    2005-01-01

    In intense charged particle beams with large energy anisotropy, free energy is available to drive transverse electromagnetic Weibel-type instabilities. Such slow-wave transverse electromagnetic instabilities can be described by the so-called Darwin model, which neglects the fast-wave portion of the displacement current. The Weibel instability may also lead to an increase in the longitudinal velocity spread, which would make the focusing of the beam difficult and impose a limit on the minimum spot size achievable in heavy ion fusion experiments. This paper reports the results of recent numerical studies of the Weibel instability using the Beam Eigenmode And Spectra (bEASt) code for space-charge-dominated, low-emittance beams with large tune depression. To study the nonlinear stage of the instability, the Darwin model is being developed and incorporated into the Beam Equilibrium Stability and Transport(BEST) code.

  8. Development of Intense Beam Proton Linac in China

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, S; Ouyang Hua Fu; Zhao, S

    2004-01-01

    Study on intense beam proton linac was started about four years ago in a national program for the basic research on ADS in China. This ADS program is meant for the future development of the clean nuclear power generation. Another important application of HPPA for Chinese Spallation Neutron Source was also proposed recently in China, and it is financially supported by Chinese Academy of Sciences. In this paper, the research progress on intense beam proton linac in these two application fields will be outlined. It involves the test result of an high-current ECR proton source, construction status of a 3.5 MeV RFQ accelerator and the design of a DTL linac.

  9. Design alternatives for beam halo monitors in high intensity accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, H; Corsini, R; Lefèvre, T; Schulte, Daniel; Tecker, F A; Welsch, C P

    2005-01-01

    In future high intensity, high energy accelerators it must be ensured that particle losses are minimized as activation of the vacuum chambers or other components makes maintenance and upgrade work time consuming and costly. It is imperative to have a clear understanding of the mechanisms that can lead to halo formation and to have the possibility to test available theoretical models with an adequate experimental setup. Optical transition radiation (OTR) provides an interesting opportunity for linear real-time measurements of the transverse beam profile with a resolution which has been so far at best in the some μm range. However, the dynamic range of standard OTR systems is typically limited and needs to be improved for its application for halo measurements. In this contribution, the existing OTR system as it is installed in the CLIC test facility (CTF3) is analyzed and the contribution of each component to the final image quality discussed. Finally, possible halo measurement techniques based on OTR are pres...

  10. HIGH-INTENSITY EFFECTS IN THE LONGITUDINAL MOTION OF STORED PARTICLE BEAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sessler, Andrew M.

    1973-02-01

    A brief review is given of the various self-field phenomena associated with the longitudinal motion of particles in storage rings. Although there are some high-intensity phenomena for which the coupling of longitudinal and transverse motion is essential, such as, for example, the headtail effect; the great majority of high-intensity phenomena primarily involve either longitudinal or transverse degrees of freedom. In this review, we restrict our attention to phenomena which are essentially longitudinal in nature. It is convenient to consider separately the behavior of unbunched (coasting) and bunched (external RF system in operation) beams. Detailed experimental information on coasting beams has been obtained on the ISR, on the (old) CERN electron model CESAR, and on electron ring accelerators. All high-energy electron storage rings have bunched beams and, of course, so do synchrotrons, so that there are a large number of sources of experimental information about the longitudinal motion of bunched beams.

  11. Intensity-modulated tangential beam irradiation of the intact breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, L.; Hunt, M.; Chui, C.; Spirou, S.; Forster, K.; Lee, H.; Yahalom, J.; Kutcher, G.J.; McCormick, B.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential benefits of intensity modulated tangential beams in the irradiation of the intact breast. Methods and Materials: Three-dimensional treatment planning was performed on five left and five right breasts using standard wedged and intensity modulated (IM) tangential beams. Optimal beam parameters were chosen using beams-eye-view display. For the standard plans, the optimal wedge angles were chosen based on dose distributions in the central plane calculated without inhomogeneity corrections, according to our standard protocol. Intensity-modulated plans were generated using an inverse planning algorithm and a standard set of target and critical structure optimization criteria. Plans were compared using multiple dose distributions and dose volume histograms for the planning target volume (PTV), ipsilateral lung, coronary arteries, and contralateral breast. Results: Significant improvements in the doses to critical structures were achieved using intensity modulation. Compared with a standard-wedged plan prescribed to 46 Gy, the dose from the IM plan encompassing 20% of the coronary artery region decreased by 25% (from 36 to 27 Gy) for patients treated to the left breast; the mean dose to the contralateral breast decreased by 42% (from 1.2 to 0.7 Gy); the ipsilateral lung volume receiving more than 46 Gy decreased by 30% (from 10% to 7%); the volume of surrounding soft tissue receiving more than 46 Gy decreased by 31% (from 48% to 33%). Dose homogeneity within the target volume improved greatest in the superior and inferior regions of the breast (approximately 8%), although some decrease in the medial and lateral high-dose regions (approximately 4%) was also observed. Conclusion: Intensity modulation with a standard tangential beam arrangement significantly reduces the dose to the coronary arteries, ipsilateral lung, contralateral breast, and surrounding soft tissues. Improvements in dose homogeneity throughout the target volume can also be

  12. Electron beam based transversal profile measurements of intense ion beams; Elektronenstrahl-Diagnostik zur Bestimmung vom transversalen Profil intensiver Ionenstrahlen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Moussati, Said

    2014-11-03

    A non-invasive diagnostic method for the experimental determination of the transverse profile of an intense ion beam has been developed and investigated theoretically as well as experimentally within the framework of the present work. The method is based on the deflection of electrons when passing the electromagnetic field of an ion beam. To achieve this an electron beam is employed with a specifically prepared transversal profile. This distinguish this method from similar ones which use thin electron beams for scanning the electromagnetic field [Roy et al. 2005; Blockland10]. The diagnostic method presented in this work will be subsequently called ''Electron-Beam-Imaging'' (EBI). First of all the influence of the electromagnetic field of the ion beam on the electrons has been theoretically analyzed. It was found that the magnetic field causes only a shift of the electrons along the ion beam axis, while the electric field only causes a shift in a plane transverse to the ion beam. Moreover, in the non-relativistic case the magnetic force is significantly smaller than the Coulomb one and the electrons suffer due to the magnetic field just a shift and continue to move parallel to their initial trajectory. Under the influence of the electric field, the electrons move away from the ion beam axis, their resulting trajectory shows a specific angle compared to the original direction. This deflection angle practically depends just on the electric field of the ion beam. Thus the magnetic field has been neglected when analysing the experimental data. The theoretical model provides a relationship between the deflection angle of the electrons and the charge distribution in the cross section of the ion beam. The model however only can be applied for small deflection angles. This implies a relationship between the line-charge density of the ion beam and the initial kinetic energy of the electrons. Numerical investigations have been carried out to clarify the

  13. Physics of neutralization of intense high-energy ion beam pulses by electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaganovich, I. D.; Davidson, R. C.; Dorf, M. A.; Startsev, E. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Lee, E. P.; Friedman, A.

    2010-01-01

    Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by electrons form the basis for a wide range of applications to high energy accelerators and colliders, heavy ion fusion, and astrophysics. For example, for ballistic propagation of intense ion beam pulses, background plasma can be used to effectively neutralize the beam charge and current, so that the self-electric and self-magnetic fields do not affect the ballistic propagation of the beam. From the practical perspective of designing advanced plasma sources for beam neutralization, a robust theory should be able to predict the self-electric and self-magnetic fields during beam propagation through the background plasma. The major scaling relations for the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of intense ion charge bunches propagating through background plasma have been determined taking into account the effects of transients during beam entry into the plasma, the excitation of collective plasma waves, the effects of gas ionization, finite electron temperature, and applied solenoidal and dipole magnetic fields. Accounting for plasma production by gas ionization yields a larger self-magnetic field of the ion beam compared to the case without ionization, and a wake of current density and self-magnetic field perturbations is generated behind the beam pulse. A solenoidal magnetic field can be applied for controlling the beam propagation. Making use of theoretical models and advanced numerical simulations, it is shown that even a small applied magnetic field of about 100 G can strongly affect the beam neutralization. It has also been demonstrated that in the presence of an applied magnetic field the ion beam pulse can excite large-amplitude whistler waves, thereby producing a complex structure of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. The presence of an applied solenoidal magnetic field may also cause a strong enhancement of the radial self-electric field of the beam pulse propagating through the

  14. Physics of Neutralization of Intense High-Energy Ion Beam Pulses by Electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaganovich, I.D.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.A.; Startsev, E.A.; Sefkow, A.B.; Lee, E.P.; Friedman, A.

    2010-01-01

    Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by electrons forms the basis for a wide range of applications to high energy accelerators and colliders, heavy ion fusion, and astrophysics. For example, for ballistic propagation of intense ion beam pulses, background plasma can be used to effectively neutralize the beam charge and current, so that the self-electric and self- magnetic fields do not affect the ballistic propagation of the beam. From the practical perspective of designing advanced plasma sources for beam neutralization, a robust theory should be able to predict the self-electric and self-magnetic fields during beam propagation through the background plasma. The major scaling relations for the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of intense ion charge bunches propagating through background plasma have been determined taking into account the effects of transients during beam entry into the plasma, the excitation of collective plasma waves, the effects of gas ionization, finite electron temperature, and applied solenoidal and dipole magnetic fields. Accounting for plasma production by gas ionization yields a larger self-magnetic field of the ion beam compared to the case without ionization, and a wake of current density and self-magnetic field perturbations is generated behind the beam pulse. A solenoidal magnetic field can be applied for controlling the beam propagation. Making use of theoretical models and advanced numerical simulations, it is shown that even a small applied magnetic field of about 100G can strongly affect the beam neutralization. It has also been demonstrated that in the presence of an applied magnetic field the ion beam pulse can excite large-amplitude whistler waves, thereby producing a complex structure of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. The presence of an applied solenoidal magnetic field may also cause a strong enhancement of the radial self-electric field of the beam pulse propagating through the

  15. A cooler for intense low-energy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varentsov, V.L.; Habs, D.

    2002-01-01

    A new efficient cooling technique for intense low-energy ion beams is explored. The primary ions are directly injected through a converging-diverging nozzle into a cold expanding supersonic He carrier gas jet. There they adopt the temperature and overall velocity of the gas jet, creating an e - He + plasma in the slowing down process. In the RF-funnel that is placed on axis in the immediate vicinity of the nozzle exit plane the He + ions and electrons penetrate into the funnel walls and the He + ions have neutralized, while the desired more heavy ions are confined and focused inside the funnel. After reducing the plasma to a small level in the funnel the ion beam is further purified and compressed passing through a RFQ channel. Finally, the cooled low-emittance ion beam is extracted into high vacuum conditions through the skimmer placed behind the RFQ channel. The operation of the new ion beam cooling technique has been studied by means of numerical simulations. The results of calculations are presented

  16. A cooler for intense low-energy ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Varentsov, V L

    2002-01-01

    A new efficient cooling technique for intense low-energy ion beams is explored. The primary ions are directly injected through a converging-diverging nozzle into a cold expanding supersonic He carrier gas jet. There they adopt the temperature and overall velocity of the gas jet, creating an e sup - He sup + plasma in the slowing down process. In the RF-funnel that is placed on axis in the immediate vicinity of the nozzle exit plane the He sup + ions and electrons penetrate into the funnel walls and the He sup + ions have neutralized, while the desired more heavy ions are confined and focused inside the funnel. After reducing the plasma to a small level in the funnel the ion beam is further purified and compressed passing through a RFQ channel. Finally, the cooled low-emittance ion beam is extracted into high vacuum conditions through the skimmer placed behind the RFQ channel. The operation of the new ion beam cooling technique has been studied by means of numerical simulations. The results of calculations are...

  17. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, W. M.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Barnard, J. J.; Cohen, R. H.; Dorf, M. A.; Lund, S. M.; Perkins, L. J.; Terry, M. R.; Logan, B. G.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J. Y.; Kwan, J. W.; Lee, E. P.; Lidia, S. M.; Ni, P. A.; Reginato, L. L.; Roy, P. K.; Seidl, P. A.; Takakuwa, J. H.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W. L.; Davidson, R. C.; Gilson, E. P.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Qin, H.; Startsev, E.; Haber, I.; Kishek, R. A.; Koniges, A. E.

    2011-03-31

    Intense heavy-ion beams have long been considered a promising driver option for inertial-fusion energy production. This paper briefly compares inertial confinement fusion (ICF) to the more-familiar magnetic-confinement approach and presents some advantages of using beams of heavy ions to drive ICF instead of lasers. Key design choices in heavy-ion fusion (HIF) facilities are discussed, particularly the type of accelerator. We then review experiments carried out at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) over the past thirty years to understand various aspects of HIF driver physics. A brief review follows of present HIF research in the US and abroad, focusing on a new facility, NDCX-II, being built at LBNL to study the physics of warm dense matter heated by ions, as well as aspects of HIF target physics. Future research directions are briefly summarized.

  18. Fast damping in mismatched high intensity beam transportation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Variale

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available A very fast damping of beam envelope oscillation amplitudes was recently observed in simulations of high intensity beam transport, through periodic FODO cells, in mismatched conditions [V. Variale, Nuovo Cimento Soc. Ital. Fis. 112A, 1571–1582 (1999 and T. Clauser et al., in Proceedings of the Particle Accelerator Conference, New York, 1999 (IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, 1999, p. 1779]. A Landau damping mechanism was proposed at the origin of observed effect. In this paper, to further investigate the source of this fast damping, extensive simulations have been carried out. The results presented here support the interpretation of the mechanism at the origin of the fast damping as a Landau damping effect.

  19. Beam-front dynamics and ion acceleration in drifting intense relativistic electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, K.F.; Hintze, W.

    1976-01-01

    Collective ion acceleration at the injection of a relativistic electron beam into a low-pressure gas or a plasma is discussed and its strong dependence on the beam-front dynamics is shown. A simple one-dimensional model taking explicitly into account the motion and ionizing action of the ions in the beam-front region is developed for the calculation of the beam drift velocity. The obtained pressure dependence is in good agreement with experimental data. The energy distribution is shown of the ions accelerated in the moving potential well of the space charge region. Scaling laws for the beam-front dynamics and ion acceleration are derived. (J.U.)

  20. Self-pinched transport of intense ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ottinger, P.F.; Neri, J.M.; Stephanakis, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    Electron beams with substantial net currents have been routinely propagated in the self-pinched mode for the past two decades. However, as the physics of gas breakdown and beam neutralization is different for ion beams, previous predictions indicated insufficient net current for pinching so that ion beam self-pinched transport (SPT) was assumed impossible. Nevertheless, recent numerical simulations using the IPROP code have suggested that ion SPT is possible. These results have prompted initial experiments to investigate SPT of ion beams. A 100-kA, 1.2-MeV, 3-cm-radius proton beam, generated on the Gamble II pulsed-power accelerator at NRL, has been injected into helium in the 30- to 250-mTorr regime to study this phenomenon. Evidence of self-pinched ion beam transport was observed in the 35- to 80-mTorr SPT pressure window predicted by IPROP. Measured signals from a time- and space-resolved scattered proton diagnostic and a time-integrated Li(Cu) nuclear activation diagnostic, both of which measure protons striking a 10-cm diameter target 50 cm into the transport region, are significantly larger in this pressure window than expected for ballistic transport. These results are consistent with significant self-magnetic fields and self-pinching of the ion beam. On the other hand, time-integrated signals from these same two diagnostics are consistent with ballistic transport at pressures above and below the SPT window. Interferometric electron line-density measurements, acquired during beam injection into the helium gas, show insignificant ionization below 35 mTorr, a rapidly rising ionization fraction with pressure in the SPT window, and a plateau in ionization fraction at about 2% for pressures above 80 mTorr. These and other results are consistent with the physical picture for SPT. IPROP simulations, which closely model the Gamble II experimental conditions, produce results that are in qualitative agreement with the experimental results. The advantages of SPT for

  1. Experimental study of intensive electron beam scattering in melting channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balagura, V.S.; Kurilko, V.I.; Safronov, B.G.

    1988-01-01

    Multiple scattering of an intensive electron beam at 28 keV energy passing through a melting channel in iron targets is experimentally studied. The dependence of scattering on the melting current value is established. The material density in the channel on the basis of the binary collision method is evaluated. It is shown that these density values are of three orders less than the estimations made on the basis of the data on energy losses of electrons in the channel. 6 refs.; 4 figs

  2. A beam source model for scanned proton beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimstrand, Peter; Traneus, Erik; Ahnesjö, Anders; Grusell, Erik; Glimelius, Bengt; Tilly, Nina

    2007-06-07

    A beam source model, i.e. a model for the initial phase space of the beam, for scanned proton beams has been developed. The beam source model is based on parameterized particle sources with characteristics found by fitting towards measured data per individual beam line. A specific aim for this beam source model is to make it applicable to the majority of the various proton beam systems currently available or under development, with the overall purpose to drive dose calculations in proton beam treatment planning. The proton beam phase space is characterized by an energy spectrum, radial and angular distributions and deflections for the non-modulated elementary pencil beam. The beam propagation through the scanning magnets is modelled by applying experimentally determined focal points for each scanning dimension. The radial and angular distribution parameters are deduced from measured two-dimensional fluence distributions of the elementary beam in air. The energy spectrum is extracted from a depth dose distribution for a fixed broad beam scan pattern measured in water. The impact of a multi-slab range shifter for energy modulation is calculated with an own Monte Carlo code taking multiple scattering, energy loss and straggling, non-elastic and elastic nuclear interactions in the slab assembly into account. Measurements for characterization and verification have been performed with the scanning proton beam system at The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala. Both in-air fluence patterns and dose points located in a water phantom were used. For verification, dose-in-water was calculated with the Monte Carlo code GEANT 3.21 instead of using a clinical dose engine with approximations of its own. For a set of four individual pencil beams, both with the full energy and range shifted, 96.5% (99.8%) of the tested dose points satisfied the 1%/1 mm (2%/2 mm) gamma criterion.

  3. 4{pi} Neutron detection with low-intensity radioactive beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Zoppo, A. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S.Sofia 62, I95123 Catania (Italy)], E-mail: delzoppo@lns.infn.it; Figuera, P. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S.Sofia 62, I95123 Catania (Italy); Musumarra, A. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S.Sofia 62, I95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Metodologie Fisiche e Chimiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania, I95123 Catania (Italy); Colonna, N. [INFN-Sezione di Bari, Via Orabona 4, I70126, Bari (Italy); Alba, R.; Bonomo, C. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S.Sofia 62, I95123 Catania (Italy); Cherubini, S. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S.Sofia 62, I95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Metodologie Fisiche e Chimiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania, I95123 Catania (Italy); Cosentino, L.; Di Pietro, A. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S.Sofia 62, I95123 Catania (Italy); Gulino, M. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S.Sofia 62, I95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Metodologie Fisiche e Chimiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania, I95123 Catania (Italy); La Cognata, M. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S.Sofia 62, I95123 Catania (Italy); Lamia, L. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S.Sofia 62, I95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Metodologie Fisiche e Chimiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania, I95123 Catania (Italy); Pellegriti, M.G.; Pizzone, R.G. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S.Sofia 62, I95123 Catania (Italy); Rolfs, C. [Institut fur Physik mit Ionenstrahlen, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Bochum (Germany); Romano, S.; Spitaleri, C. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S.Sofia 62, I95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Metodologie Fisiche e Chimiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania, I95123 Catania (Italy); Tudisco, S. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S.Sofia 62, I95123 Catania (Italy)] (and others)

    2007-11-01

    The feasibility of inclusive neutron production measurements in reactions induced by low-intensity radioactive beams using a 4{pi} thermalization counter is studied. The time response of the detector is investigated experimentally by a technique that results in an enhanced sensitivity to weak components with long capture times. Complementary Monte Carlo simulations are presented. The capture time response is found to be independent on the neutron energy above 0.1 MeV. The capability of the capture time information in the unambiguous identification of neutron signals correlated to the projectile arrival on the target even in the presence of an intense background contamination is shown. As an application case, the {sup 8}Li({sup 4}He,n){sup 11}B reaction at the Big-Bang temperature is commented.

  4. 4π Neutron detection with low-intensity radioactive beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Zoppo, A.; Figuera, P.; Musumarra, A.; Colonna, N.; Alba, R.; Bonomo, C.; Cherubini, S.; Cosentino, L.; Di Pietro, A.; Gulino, M.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pellegriti, M. G.; Pizzone, R. G.; Rolfs, C.; Romano, S.; Spitaleri, C.; Tudisco, S.; Tumino, A.

    2007-11-01

    The feasibility of inclusive neutron production measurements in reactions induced by low-intensity radioactive beams using a 4π thermalization counter is studied. The time response of the detector is investigated experimentally by a technique that results in an enhanced sensitivity to weak components with long capture times. Complementary Monte Carlo simulations are presented. The capture time response is found to be independent on the neutron energy above 0.1 MeV. The capability of the capture time information in the unambiguous identification of neutron signals correlated to the projectile arrival on the target even in the presence of an intense background contamination is shown. As an application case, the 8Li( 4He,n) 11B reaction at the Big-Bang temperature is commented.

  5. 4π Neutron detection with low-intensity radioactive beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Zoppo, A.; Figuera, P.; Musumarra, A.; Colonna, N.; Alba, R.; Bonomo, C.; Cherubini, S.; Cosentino, L.; Di Pietro, A.; Gulino, M.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pellegriti, M.G.; Pizzone, R.G.; Rolfs, C.; Romano, S.; Spitaleri, C.; Tudisco, S.

    2007-01-01

    The feasibility of inclusive neutron production measurements in reactions induced by low-intensity radioactive beams using a 4π thermalization counter is studied. The time response of the detector is investigated experimentally by a technique that results in an enhanced sensitivity to weak components with long capture times. Complementary Monte Carlo simulations are presented. The capture time response is found to be independent on the neutron energy above 0.1 MeV. The capability of the capture time information in the unambiguous identification of neutron signals correlated to the projectile arrival on the target even in the presence of an intense background contamination is shown. As an application case, the 8 Li( 4 He,n) 11 B reaction at the Big-Bang temperature is commented

  6. Nonlinear plasma waves excitation by intense ion beams in background plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaganovich, Igor D.; Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2004-01-01

    Plasma neutralization of an intense ion pulse is of interest for many applications, including plasma lenses, heavy ion fusion, cosmic ray propagation, etc. An analytical electron fluid model has been developed to describe the plasma response to a propagating ion beam. The model predicts very good charge neutralization during quasi-steady-state propagation, provided the beam pulse duration τ b is much longer than the electron plasma period 2π/ω p , where ω p =(4πe 2 n p /m) 1/2 is the electron plasma frequency, and n p is the background plasma density. In the opposite limit, the beam pulse excites large-amplitude plasma waves. If the beam density is larger than the background plasma density, the plasma waves break. Theoretical predictions are compared with the results of calculations utilizing a particle-in-cell (PIC) code. The cold electron fluid results agree well with the PIC simulations for ion beam propagation through a background plasma. The reduced fluid description derived in this paper can provide an important benchmark for numerical codes and yield scaling relations for different beam and plasma parameters. The visualization of numerical simulation data shows complex collective phenomena during beam entry and exit from the plasma

  7. Plasma opening switch for long-pulse intense ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, H.A.; Mason, R.J.; Bartsch, R.R.; Greenly, J.B.; Rej, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    A Plasma Opening Switch (POS) is being developed at Los Alamos, as part of an intense ion beam experiment with special application to materials processing. The switch must conduct up to 100 kA for 400 ns, and open quicky to avoid premature gap closure in the ion beam diode load. Power multiplication is not a necessity, but prepulse suppression is. A positive central polarity is desirable, since with it an ion beam can be conveniently launched beyond the switch from the central anode toward a negatively charged target. Using traditional scaling rules, a POS was designed with a 1.25 cm radius inner anode, and a 5.0 cm radius outer cathode. This has been constructed, and subjected to circuit, and simulational analysis. The computations are being performed with the 2D ANTHEM implicit code. Preliminary results show a marked difference in switching dynamics, when the central positive polarity is used in place of the more conventional opposite choice. Opening is achieved by the fast development of a central anode magnetic layer, rather than by the more conventional slow evolution of a cathode gap. With the central anode, higher fill densities are needed to achieve desired conduction times. This has suggested switch design improvements, which are discussed

  8. Microwave generation and frequency conversion using intense relativistic electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzzi, J.M.; Doucet, H.J.; Etlicher, B.

    1977-01-01

    Some aspects of the microwave generation and frequency conversion by relativistic electron beams are studied. Using an electron synchrotron maser, the excitation of microwaves by an annular relativistic electron beam propagating through a circular wave guide immersed in a longitudinal magnetic field is analyzed. This theoretical model is somewhat more realistic than the previous one because the guiding centers are not on the wave guide axis. Microwave reflection is observed on a R.E.B. front propagating into a gas filled waveguide. The frequency conversion from the incident X-band e.m. waves and the reflected Ka band observed signal is consistent with the Doppler model for β = 0.7. This value agrees with the average beam front velocity as measured from time-of-flight using two B/sub theta/ probes. The reflection is found to occur during the current rise time. With a low impedance device (2 Ω, 400 keV) a GW X-band emission has been observed using thin anodes and a gas filled waveguide. This emission is probably due to the self-fields of the beam and could be used as a diagnostic

  9. Fracture analysis of surface exfoliation on single crystal silicon irradiated by intense pulsed ion beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jie; Shahid, Ijaz; Yu, Xiao; Zhang, Jie; Zhong, Haowen; Cui, Xiaojun; Liang, Guoying; Yu, Xiang; Huang, Wanying; Yan, Sha; Zhang, Gaolong; Zhang, Xiaofu; Le, Xiaoyun

    2017-12-01

    Surface exfoliation was observed on single crystal silicon surface irradiated by Intense Pulsed Ion Beam (IPIB). As the strong transient thermal stress impact induced by IPIB was mainly attributed to the exfoliation, a micro scale model combined with thermal conduction and linear elastic fracture mechanics was built to analyze the thermal stress distribution along the energy deposition process. After computation with finite element method, J integral parameter was applied as the criterion for crack development. It was demonstrated that the exfoliation initiation calls for specific material, crack depth and IPIB parameter. The results are potentially valuable for beam/target selection and IPIB parameter optimization.

  10. Broadband source localization using horizontal-beam acoustic intensity striations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgut, Altan; Orr, Marshall; Rouseff, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Waveguide invariant theory is applied to horizontal line array (HLA) beamformer output to localize moving broadband noise sources from measured acoustic intensity striation patterns. Acoustic signals emitted by ships of opportunity (merchant ships) were simultaneously recorded on a HLA and three hydrophones separated by 10 km during the RAGS03 (relationship between array gain and shelf-break fluid processes) experiment. Hough transforms are used to estimate both the waveguide invariant parameter "beta" and the ratio of source range at the closest point of approach to source speed from the observed striation patterns. Broadband (50-150-Hz) acoustic data-sets are used to demonstrate source localization capability as well as inversion capability of waveguide invariant parameter beta. Special attention is paid to bathymetric variability since the acoustic intensity striation patterns seem to be influenced by range-dependent bathymetry of the experimental area. The Hough transform method is also applied to the HLA beam-time record data and to the acoustic intensity data from three distant receivers to validate the estimation results from HLA beamformer output. Good agreement of the results from all three approaches suggests the feasibility of locating broadband noise sources and estimating waveguide invariant parameter beta in shallow waters.

  11. Intense ion beams from laser plasma : production and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bykovsky, Yu.A.; Kozlovsky, K.I.; Shikanov, A.E.

    1994-01-01

    The production of intense ion beams from plasma injectors using laser-induced plasma bundles are considered. Laser plasma bundles with quantity of ions about 10 sup 1 sup 5 - 10 sup 1 sup 6 imp sup -1 are created by interaction of laser irradiation ( q = 10 sup 9 - 10 sup 1 sup 3 W / cm sup 2, less than 'thermonuclear' intensities, lambda - 0.53 - 10.6 micro, E 0.1 - 10 J/ imp )with various solid targets in vacuum. By changing laser parameters and focusing conditions it is able to produce ions from very wide spectrum of chemical elements and of different charge. High density moving plasma gives the possibility to extract and to form in time up to 1 - 3 microsecond ion current equal 10-10 sup 3 A. Some types of such injector for radiation physics arrangements were elaborated. The main goals of the application of these equipment are the following : - acceleration of multiply charged ions in big accelerators; - ion implantation and material modification; - generation of intense pulse neutron fluxes; - vaporization of material and special layers creation. 4 refs., (author)

  12. The Theory of Coherent Radiation by Intense Electron Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Buts, Vyacheslav A; Kurilko, V.I

    2006-01-01

    Spurred by the development of high-current, high-energy relativistic electron beams this books delves into the foundations of a device and geometry independent theoretical treatment of a large collection of interacting and radiating electron bunches. Part I deals with the basics of the radiation emission of a single charged particle, paying particular attention to the effect of radiation reaction and dwelling on the corresponding well-known paradoxes. Part II investigates the collective behaviour of a high-density electron bunch where both discrete and continous beam modelling is explored. Part III treats the application to modern systems while still keeping the treatment as general as possible. This book will be mandatory reading for anyone working on the foundations of modern devices such as free electron lasers, plasma accelerators, synchroton sources and other modern sources of bright, coherent radiation with high spectral density.

  13. The stress intensity factor for the double cantilever beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichter, W. B.

    1983-01-01

    Fourier transforms and the Wiener-Hopf technique are used in conjunction with plane elastostatics to examine the singular crack tip stress field in the double cantilever beam (DCB) specimen. In place of the Dirac delta function, a family of functions which duplicates the important features of the concentrated forces without introducing unmanageable mathematical complexities is used as a loading function. With terms of order h-squared/a-squared retained in the series expansion, the dimensionless stress intensity factor is found to be K (h to the 1/2)/P = 12 to the 1/2 (a/h + 0.6728 + 0.0377 h-squared/a-squared), in which P is the magnitude of the concentrated forces per unit thickness, a is the distance from the crack tip to the points of load application, and h is the height of each cantilever beam. The result is similar to that obtained by Gross and Srawley by fitting a line to discrete results from their boundary collocation analysis.

  14. On intense proton beam generation and transport in hollow cones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.J. Honrubia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Proton generation, transport and interaction with hollow cone targets are investigated by means of two-dimensional PIC simulations. A scaled-down hollow cone with gold walls, a carbon tip and a curved hydrogen foil inside the cone has been considered. Proton acceleration is driven by a 1020 W·cm−2 and 1 ps laser pulse focused on the hydrogen foil. Simulations show an important surface current at the cone walls which generates a magnetic field. This magnetic field is dragged by the quasi-neutral plasma formed by fast protons and co-moving electrons when they propagate towards the cone tip. As a result, a tens of kT Bz field is set up at the cone tip, which is strong enough to deflect the protons and increase the beam divergence substantially. We propose using heavy materials at the cone tip and increasing the laser intensity in order to mitigate magnetic field generation and proton beam divergence.

  15. High energy high intensity coherent photon beam for the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannenbaum, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    What is proposed for the 20 TeV protons hitting a fixed target is to make a tertiary electron beam similar to that which is the basis of the tagged photon beam at Fermilab. Briefly, a zero degree neutral beam is formed by sweeping out the primary proton beam and any secondary charged particles. Then the photons, from the decay of π 0 in the neutral beam, are converted to e + e - pairs in a lead converter and a high quality electron beam is formed. This beam is brought to the target area where it is converted to a photon beam by Bremsstrahlung in a radiator

  16. A high intensity beam handling system at the KEK-PS new experimental hall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, K.H.; Minakawa, M.; Yamanoi, Y.

    1991-01-01

    We would like to summarize newly developed technology for handling high-intensity beams. This was practically employed in the beam-handling system of primary protons at the KEK-PS new experimental hall. (author)

  17. Research and simulation of intense pulsed beam transfer in electrostatic accelerate tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Chaolong; Shi Haiquan; Lu Jianqin

    2012-01-01

    To study intense pulsed beam transfer in electrostatic accelerate tube, the matrix method was applied to analyze the transport matrixes in electrostatic accelerate tube of non-intense pulsed beam and intense pulsed beam, and a computer code was written for the intense pulsed beam transporting in electrostatic accelerate tube. Optimization techniques were used to attain the given optical conditions and iteration procedures were adopted to compute intense pulsed beam for obtaining self-consistent solutions in this computer code. The calculations were carried out by using ACCT, TRACE-3D and TRANSPORT for different beam currents, respectively. The simulation results show that improvement of the accelerating voltage ratio can enhance focusing power of electrostatic accelerate tube, reduce beam loss and increase the transferring efficiency. (authors)

  18. Thermal analysis of injection beam dump of high-intensity rapid-cycling synchrotron in J-PARC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, J.; Saha, P. K.; Yamamoto, K.; Kinsho, M.; Nihei, T.

    2017-10-01

    The beam dump at the beam injection area in the J-PARC 3-GeV rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) accepts beams that pass through the charge exchange foil without ideal electron stripping during the multi-turn beam injection. The injection beam dump consists of the beam pipe, beam stopper, radiation shield, and cooling mechanism. The ideal beam power into the injection beam dump is 400 W in the case of design RCS extraction beam power of 1 MW with a healthy foil, which has 99.7 % charge stripping efficiency. On the other hand, as a radiation generator, the RCS is permitted to be operated with maximum average beam power of 4 kW into the injection beam dump based on the radiation shielding calculation, in consideration of lower charge stripping efficiency due to the foil deterioration. In this research, to evaluate the health of the RCS injection beam dump system from the perspective of the heat generation, a thermal analysis was performed based on the actual configuration with sufficiently large region, including the surrounding concrete and soil. The calculated temperature and heat flux density distribution showed the validity of the mesh spacing and model range. The calculation result showed that the dumped 4 kW beam causes the temperature to increase up to 330, 400, and 140 °C at the beam pipe, beam stopper, and radiation shield, respectively. Although these high temperatures induce stress in the constituent materials, the calculated stress values were lower than the ultimate tensile strength of each material. Transient temperature analysis of the beam stopper, which simulated the sudden break of the charge stripper foil, demonstrated that one bunched beam pulse with the maximum beam power does not lead to a serious rise in the temperature of the beam stopper. Furthermore, from the measured outgassing rate of stainless steel at high temperature, the rise in beam line pressure due to additive outgassing from the heated beam pipe was estimated to have a negligible

  19. Longitudinal instabilities of intense beams in a transport channel with complex wall impedances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.G.; Reiser, M.

    1992-01-01

    The longitudinal instabilities of intense beams are a very important issue in particle accelerators and other applications such as microwave devices. In recent years, the stimulation of new interests in research of longitudinal instabilities concerns induction linear accelerators which are a promising driver for Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion. In contrast with the accelerators for high energy physics, the beam current in induction linacs as drivers for heavy ion inertial fusion is as high as kiloamperes, while the beam particle velocity is only sub-relativistic. Thus, the space charge force plays an important role in the instability analysis. Another important factor is the interaction between charged particles and induction gaps which are usually modeled by discrete R, L, C circuits in the low frequency limit. Studies show that the impedances of induction gaps are a function of frequency and could change from inductive to capacitive, or verse versa, as frequencies shift. This requires different circuit model at different frequency ranges. Thus, it is desirable to have a theory which can analyze the instability in a transport channel with general complex impedances, rather than a specific circuit configuration. This paper presents a theoretical model based on the framework of Vlasov theory for the longitudinal instabilities of intense beams in a transport channel with complex wall impedances. A dispersion equation is derived to characterize the instabilities with all the relevant parameters including the space charge, the beam energy spread, the real and imaginary parts of the complex wall impedances. For the beam without energy spread, the expressions for the growth rates of the slow waves are given and the effects of different wall structures on the instabilities are discussed

  20. Simulation of the Beam Dump for a High Intensity Electron Gun

    CERN Document Server

    Doebert, S; Lefevre, T; Pepitone, K

    2014-01-01

    The CLIC Drive Beam is a high-intensity pulsed electron beam. A test facility for the Drive Beam electron gun will soon be commissioned at CERN. In this contribution we outline the design of a beam dump / Faraday cup capable of resisting the beam’s thermal load. The test facility will operate initially up to 140 keV. At such low energies, the electrons are absorbed very close to the surface of the dump, leading to a large energy deposition density in this thin layer. In order not to damage the dump, the beam must be spread over a large surface. For this reason, a small-angled cone has been chosen. Simulations using Geant4 have been performed to estimate the distribution of energy deposition in the dump. The heat transport both within the electron pulse and between pulses has been modelled using finite element methods to check the resistance of the dump at high repetition rates. In addition, the possibility of using a moveable dump to measure the beam profile and emittance is discussed.

  1. Investigation of the flat-beam model of the beam-beam interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjoern S. Schmekel

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available At the interaction point of a storage ring collider each beam is subject to perturbations due to the electromagnetic field of the counterrotating beam. For flat beams, a well-known approximation models the beam by a current sheet which is uniform in the horizontal plane, restricting the particle motion to the vertical direction. In this classical model a water-bag beam distribution has been used to find working points and beam-beam tune shift parameters which lead to a stable beam distribution. We investigate the stability of a more realistic Gaussian equilibrium distribution. A linearized Vlasov equation written in action-angle variables is used to compute the radial and angular modes of a perturbation in two-dimensional phase space to first order in the displacement from the design trajectory. We find that the radial modes, which are often neglected, can have a stabilizing effect on the beam motion.

  2. Role of beam orientation optimization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pugachev, Andrei; Li, Jonathan G.; Boyer, Arthur L.; Hancock, Steven L.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Donaldson, Sarah S.; Lei Xing

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the role of beam orientation optimization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and to examine the potential benefits of noncoplanar intensity-modulated beams. Methods and Materials: A beam orientation optimization algorithm was implemented. For this purpose, system variables were divided into two groups: beam position (gantry and table angles) and beam profile (beamlet weights). Simulated annealing was used for beam orientation optimization and the simultaneous iterative inverse treatment planning algorithm (SIITP) for beam intensity profile optimization. Three clinical cases were studied: a localized prostate cancer, a nasopharyngeal cancer, and a paraspinal tumor. Nine fields were used for all treatments. For each case, 3 types of treatment plan optimization were performed: (1) beam intensity profiles were optimized for 9 equiangular spaced coplanar beams; (2) orientations and intensity profiles were optimized for 9 coplanar beams; (3) orientations and intensity profiles were optimized for 9 noncoplanar beams. Results: For the localized prostate case, all 3 types of optimization described above resulted in dose distributions of a similar quality. For the nasopharynx case, optimized noncoplanar beams provided a significant gain in the gross tumor volume coverage. For the paraspinal case, orientation optimization using noncoplanar beams resulted in better kidney sparing and improved gross tumor volume coverage. Conclusion: The sensitivity of an IMRT treatment plan with respect to the selection of beam orientations varies from site to site. For some cases, the choice of beam orientations is important even when the number of beams is as large as 9. Noncoplanar beams provide an additional degree of freedom for IMRT treatment optimization and may allow for notable improvement in the quality of some complicated plans

  3. Finite element modelling of composite castellated beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frans Richard

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, castellated beam becomes popular in building structural as beam members. This is due to several advantages of castellated beam such as increased depth without any additional mass, passing the underfloor service ducts without changing of story elevation. However, the presence of holes can develop various local effects such as local buckling, lateral torsional buckling caused by compression force at the flange section of the steel beam. Many studies have investigated the failure mechanism of castellated beam and one technique which can prevent the beam fall into local failure is the use of reinforced concrete slab as lateral support on castellated beam, so called composite castellated beam. Besides of preventing the local failure of castellated beam, the concrete slab can increase the plasticity moment of the composite castellated beam section which can deliver into increasing the ultimate load of the beam. The aim of this numerical studies of composite castellated beam on certain loading condition (monotonic quasi-static loading. ABAQUS was used for finite element modelling purpose and compared with the experimental test for checking the reliability of the model. The result shows that the ultimate load of the composite castellated beam reached 6.24 times than the ultimate load of the solid I beam and 1.2 times compared the composite beam.

  4. Optimization of the electron beam properties from intense laser pulses interacting with structured gas jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, K. K.; Tsai, H.-E.; Barber, S. K.; Lehe, R.; Mao, H.-S.; Steinke, S.; van Tilborg, J.; Nakamura, K.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2017-05-01

    Laser plasma acceleration has been intensely investigated for its ability to produce energetic, ultrashort electron bunches in a compact distance. A high intensity laser pulse propagating through a plasma expels the electrons from the optical axis via the ponderomotive force, leaving behind a column of ions and driving a density wake. The accelerating electric fields present in the wake can reach several orders of magnitude greater than those found in radio-frequency cavities, allowing for compact systems much smaller than those using conventional accelerators. This compact source can provide electrons for various applications including stages for a high energy collider or for production of x-ray pulses from coherent undulator radiation. However, these applications require tunable, stable and high-quality electron beams. We report on a study of controlled injection along a shock-induced density downramp of laser-plasma- accelerated electrons through precision tailoring of the density profile produced from a mm-scale gas jet. Using BELLA Center's TREX Ti:Sapphire laser, the effects of the plasma density profile and the tilt of the shock front on the beam spatial profile, steering, and energy were investigated experimentally. To explain these rela- tionships, we propose simple models which agree well with experimental results. Using this technique, electron beam quality was tailored, allowing for the production of high-quality electron beams with percent-level energy spreads over a range of energies.

  5. Implosion of multilayered cylindrical targets driven by intense heavy ion beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piriz, A R; Portugues, R F; Tahir, N A; Hoffmann, D H H

    2002-11-01

    An analytical model for the implosion of a multilayered cylindrical target driven by an intense heavy ion beam has been developed. The target is composed of a cylinder of frozen hydrogen or deuterium, which is enclosed in a thick shell of solid lead. This target has been designed for future high-energy-density matter experiments to be carried out at the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt. The model describes the implosion dynamics including the motion of the incident shock and the first reflected shock and allows for calculation of the physical conditions of the hydrogen at stagnation. The model predicts that the conditions of the compressed hydrogen are not sensitive to significant variations in target and beam parameters. These predictions are confirmed by one-dimensional numerical simulations and thus allow for a robust target design.

  6. Intense relativistic electron beam injector system for tokamak current drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, V.L.; Creedon, J.M.; Ecker, B.M.; Helava, H.I.

    1983-01-01

    We report experimental and theoretical studies of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) injection system designed for tokamak current drive experiments. The injection system uses a standard high-voltage pulsed REB generator and a magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL) to drive an REB-accelerating diode in plasma. A series of preliminary experiments has been carried out to test the system by injecting REBs into a test chamber with preformed plasma and applied magnetic field. REBs were accelerated from two types of diodes: a conventional vacuum diode with foil anode, and a plasma diode, i.e., an REB cathode immersed in the plasma. REB current was in the range of 50 to 100 kA and REB particle energy ranged from 0.1 to 1.0 MeV. MITL power density exceeded 10 GW/cm 2 . Performance of the injection system and REB transport properties is documented for plasma densities from 5 x 10 12 to 2 x 10 14 cm -3 . Injection system data are compared with numerical calculations of the performance of the coupled system consisting of the generator, MITL, and diode

  7. Collective Focusing of Intense Ion Beam Pulses for High-energy Density Physics Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorf, Mikhail A.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2011-01-01

    The collective focusing concept in which a weak magnetic lens provides strong focusing of an intense ion beam pulse carrying a neutralizing electron background is investigated by making use of advanced particle-in-cell simulations and reduced analytical models. The original analysis by Robertson Phys. Rev. Lett. 48, 149 (1982) is extended to the parameter regimes of particular importance for several high-energy density physics applications. The present paper investigates (1) the effects of non-neutral collective focusing in a moderately strong magnetic field; (2) the diamagnetic effects leading to suppression of the applied magnetic field due to the presence of the beam pulse; and (3) the influence of a finite-radius conducting wall surrounding the beam cross-section on beam neutralization. In addition, it is demonstrated that the use of the collective focusing lens can significantly simplify the technical realization of the final focusing of ion beam pulses in the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-I (NDCX-I), and the conceptual designs of possible experiments on NDCX-I are investigated by making use of advanced numerical simulations.

  8. Analytical model of impedance in elliptical beam pipes

    CERN Document Server

    Pesah, Arthur Chalom

    2017-01-01

    Beam instabilities are among the main limitations in building higher intensity accelerators. Having a good impedance model for every accelerators is necessary in order to build components that minimize the probability of instabilities caused by the interaction beam-environment and to understand what piece to change in case of intensity increasing. Most of accelerator components have their impedance simulated with finite elements method (using softwares like CST Studio), but simple components such as circular or flat pipes are modeled analytically, with a decreasing computation time and an increasing precision compared to their simulated model. Elliptical beam pipes, while being a simple component present in some accelerators, still misses a good analytical model working for the hole range of velocities and frequencies. In this report, we present a general framework to study the impedance of elliptical pipes analytically. We developed a model for both longitudinal and transverse impedance, first in the case of...

  9. Progress toward a microsecond duration, repetitively pulsed, intense-ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, H.A.; Olson, J.C.; Reass, W.A.; Coates, D.M.; Hunt, J.W.; Schleinitz, H.M.; Lovberg, R.H.; Greenly, J.B.

    1996-01-01

    A number of intense ion beams applications are emerging requiring repetitive high-average-power beams. These applications include ablative deposition of thin films, rapid melt and resolidification for surface property enhancement, advanced diagnostic neutral beams for the next generation of Tokamaks, and intense pulsed-neutron sources. A 200-250 keV, 15 kA, 1 μs duration, 1-30 Hz intense ion beam accelerator is being developed to address these applications. (author). 4 figs., 7 refs

  10. High intensity proton beam transportation through fringe field of 70 MeV compact cyclotron to beam line targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Li, Ming; Wei, Sumin; Xing, Jiansheng; Hu, Yueming; Johnson, Richard R.; Piazza, Leandro; Ryjkov, Vladimir

    2016-06-01

    From the stripping points, the high intensity proton beam of a compact cyclotron travels through the fringe field area of the machine to the combination magnet. Starting from there the beams with various energy is transferred to the switching magnet for distribution to the beam line targets. In the design of the extraction and transport system for the compact proton cyclotron facilities, such as the 70 MeV in France and the 100 MeV in China, the space charge effect as the beam crosses the fringe field has not been previously considered; neither has the impact on transverse beam envelope coupled from the longitudinal direction. Those have been concerned much more with the higher beam-power because of the beam loss problem. In this paper, based on the mapping data of 70 MeV cyclotron including the fringe field by BEST Cyclotron Inc (BEST) and combination magnet field by China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE), the beam extraction and transport are investigated for the 70 MeV cyclotron used on the SPES project at Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (INFN-LNL). The study includes the space charge effect and longitudinal and transverse coupling mentioned above, as well as the matching of beam optics using the beam line for medical isotope production as an example. In addition, the designs of the ±45° switching magnets and the 60° bending magnet for the extracted beam with the energy from 35 MeV to 70 MeV have been made. Parts of the construction and field measurements of those magnets have been done as well. The current result shows that, the design considers the complexity of the compact cyclotron extraction area and fits the requirements of the extraction and transport for high intensity proton beam, especially at mA intensity levels.

  11. Application and generation of large amplitude plasma waves by beating of two intense laser beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salomaa, R.R.E.; Karttunen, S.J.

    1986-01-01

    Large amplitude plasma waves which can be created by heating two intense laser beams are applicable e.g., to particle acceleration, to induction of plasma currents, and to plasma heating. A central issue in these applications is the nonlinear behaviour of the plasmon. We present a theory model where nonlinear frequency shifts in the plasmon evolution and formation of electromagnetic cascades by inelastic plasmon-photon scattering are accounted. The analytical temporal solution can be constructed in terms of Bessel functions and elliptic integrals. Implications of the results to the applications and further needs to refine the model are discussed. A suggestion for broadening the light spectrum in laserfusion is made. (orig.)

  12. On the behavior of ion implanted silicon strip detectors in high intensity low energy heavy ion beam experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Bradfield, W; Parker, P D; Visser, D W

    2002-01-01

    In a recent investigation of the development of leakage currents in Silicon Strip Detectors used in experiments with high intensity stable beams, anomalous behavior was observed. Over a very short period of time the leakage current rose to levels that could be damaging to the detectors. A discussion of this evidence and how the problem was solved, with a viable model, will be given, leading to guidelines for use of such detectors in a stable beam environment.

  13. Analysis of the longitudinal instability of intense beams in a transport channel with complex wall impedances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.G.; Reiser, M.

    1992-01-01

    The longitudinal instability of intense beams in a transport channel with complex wall impedances is analyzed based on the framework of the Vlasov theory. The dispersion equation derived characterizes the instability with all the relevant parameters including the space charge, the beam energy spread, the real and imaginary parts of the complex wall impedances. For the beam without energy spread, the illustrative examples show the stable regions determined by the beam and wall properties. (author). 10 refs.,4 figs

  14. Cylindrical shock waves and dynamic phenomena induced in solids by intense proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertarelli, Alessandro; Carra, Federico; Dallocchio, Alessandro; Guinchard, Michael; Mariani, Nicola; Peroni, Lorenzo; Redaelli, Stefano; Scapin, Martina

    2013-06-01

    The accidental impact of hadron beams on matter can induce intense shockwaves along with complex dynamic phenomena (phase transitions, extended density changes, explosions and fragment projections). These events have been successfully modeled resorting to wave propagation codes; to produce accurate results, however, these programs require reliable material constitutive models that are often scarce and inaccurate. A complex and innovative experiment was carried out at CERN to benchmark existing material constitutive models and possibly derive new ones. The test setup, aimed at the characterization of six different materials impacted by 440 GeV intense proton pulses, allowed to generate cylindrical shockwaves on material specimens and to observe the effects induced by their propagation. This method, a combination between numerical simulations and an experimental technique, permitting to tune the intensity, location and timing of the beam-deposited energy, may allow to study the effects induced by internal, quasi-instantaneous loadings in domains well beyond particle physics (accidents in nuclear facilities, internal explosions, high pressure blasts etc.), particularly when relatively little explored cylindrical shockwaves are generated. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Commission under the FP7 Research Infrastructures project EuCARD, grant agreement no. 227579.

  15. Self-consistent Vlasov-Maxwell description of the longitudinal dynamics of intense charged particle beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald C. Davidson

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a self-consistent kinetic model for the longitudinal dynamics of a long, coasting beam propagating in straight (linear geometry in the z direction in the smooth-focusing approximation. Starting with the three-dimensional Vlasov-Maxwell equations, and integrating over the phase-space (x_{⊥},p_{⊥} transverse to beam propagation, a closed system of equations is obtained for the nonlinear evolution of the longitudinal distribution function F_{b}(z,p_{z},t and average axial electric field ⟨E_{z}^{s}⟩(z,t. The primary assumptions in the present analysis are that the dependence on axial momentum p_{z} of the distribution function f_{b}(x,p,t is factorable, and that the transverse beam dynamics remains relatively quiescent (absence of transverse instability or beam mismatch. The analysis is carried out correct to order k_{z}^{2}r_{w}^{2} assuming slow axial spatial variations with k_{z}^{2}r_{w}^{2}≪1, where k_{z}∼∂/∂z is the inverse length scale of axial variation in the line density λ_{b}(z,t=∫dp_{z}F_{b}(z,p_{z},t, and r_{w} is the radius of the conducting wall (assumed perfectly conducting. A closed expression for the average longitudinal electric field ⟨E_{z}^{s}⟩(z,t in terms of geometric factors, the line density λ_{b}, and its derivatives ∂λ_{b}/∂z,… is obtained for the class of bell-shaped density profiles n_{b}(r,z,t=(λ_{b}/πr_{b}^{2}f(r/r_{b}, where the shape function f(r/r_{b} has the form specified by f(r/r_{b}=(n+1(1-r^{2}/r_{b}^{2}^{n} for 0≤rbeam intensities (proportional to λ_{b} ranging from low-intensity, emittance-dominated beams, to very-high-intensity, low-emittance beams.

  16. Beam orientation optimization for intensity-modulated radiation therapy using mixed integer programming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Ruijie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital (Institute), Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences/Peking Union Medical College, PO Box 2258, Beijing 100021 (China); Dai Jianrong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital (Institute), Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences/Peking Union Medical College, PO Box 2258, Beijing 100021 (China); Yang Yong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15232 (United States); Hu Yimin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital (Institute), Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences/Peking Union Medical College, PO Box 2258, Beijing 100021 (China)

    2006-08-07

    The purpose of this study is to extend an algorithm proposed for beam orientation optimization in classical conformal radiotherapy to intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and to evaluate the algorithm's performance in IMRT scenarios. In addition, the effect of the candidate pool of beam orientations, in terms of beam orientation resolution and starting orientation, on the optimized beam configuration, plan quality and optimization time is also explored. The algorithm is based on the technique of mixed integer linear programming in which binary and positive float variables are employed to represent candidates for beam orientation and beamlet weights in beam intensity maps. Both beam orientations and beam intensity maps are simultaneously optimized in the algorithm with a deterministic method. Several different clinical cases were used to test the algorithm and the results show that both target coverage and critical structures sparing were significantly improved for the plans with optimized beam orientations compared to those with equi-spaced beam orientations. The calculation time was less than an hour for the cases with 36 binary variables on a PC with a Pentium IV 2.66 GHz processor. It is also found that decreasing beam orientation resolution to 10{sup 0} greatly reduced the size of the candidate pool of beam orientations without significant influence on the optimized beam configuration and plan quality, while selecting different starting orientations had large influence. Our study demonstrates that the algorithm can be applied to IMRT scenarios, and better beam orientation configurations can be obtained using this algorithm. Furthermore, the optimization efficiency can be greatly increased through proper selection of beam orientation resolution and starting beam orientation while guaranteeing the optimized beam configurations and plan quality.

  17. Modeling of active beam units with Modelica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maccarini, Alessandro; Hultmark, Göran; Vorre, Anders

    2015-01-01

    . Measurements from a full-scale experiment are used to compare the thermal behavior of the active beam with the one predicted by simulations. The simulation results show that the model corresponds closely with the actual operation. The model predicts the outlet water temperature of the active beam...... with a maximum mean absolute error of 0.18 °C. In term of maximum mean absolute percentage error, simulation results differ by 0.9%. The methodology presented is general enough to be applied for modeling other active beam units. Modeling of active beam units with Modelica. Available from: https...

  18. Experimental results of beryllium exposed to intense high energy proton beam pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Ammigan, K; Hurh, P; Zwaska, R; Butcher, M; Guinchard, M; Calviani, M; Losito, R; Roberts, S; Kuksenko, V; Atherton, A; Caretta, O; Davenne, T; Densham, C; Fitton, M; Loveridge, J; O'Dell, J

    2017-01-01

    Beryllium is extensively used in various accelerator beam lines and target facilities as a material for beam windows, and to a lesser extent, as secondary particle production targets. With increasing beam intensities of future accelerator facilities, it is critical to understand the response of beryllium under extreme conditions to reliably operate these components as well as avoid compromising particle production efficiency by limiting beam parameters. As a result, an exploratory experiment at CERN’s HiRadMat facility was carried out to take advantage of the test facility’s tunable high intensity proton beam to probe and investigate the damage mechanisms of several beryllium grades. The test matrix consisted of multiple arrays of thin discs of varying thicknesses as well as cylinders, each exposed to increasing beam intensities. This paper outlines the experimental measurements, as well as findings from Post-Irradiation-Examination (PIE) work where different imaging techniques were used to analyze and co...

  19. Examination of Beryllium Under Intense High Energy Proton Beam at CERN's HiRadMat Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Ammigan, K.; Hurh, P.; Zwaska, R.; Atherton, A.; Caretta, O.; Davenne,T.; Densham, C.; Fitton, M.; Loveridge, P.; O'Dell, J.; Roberts, S.; Kuksenko, V.; Butcher, M.; Calviani, M.; Guinchard, M.; Losito, R.

    2017-01-01

    Beryllium is extensively used in various accelerator beam lines and target facilities as material for beam win- dows, and to a lesser extent, as secondary particle produc- tion targets. With increasing beam intensities of future ac- celerator facilities, it is critical to understand the response of beryllium under extreme conditions to avoid compro- mising particle production efficiency by limiting beam pa- rameters. As a result, the planned experiment at CERN’s HiRadMat facility will take advantage of the test facility’s tunable high intensity proton beam to probe and investigate the damage mechanisms of several grades of beryllium. The test matrix will consist of multiple arrays of thin discs of varying thicknesses as well as cylinders, each exposed to increasing beam intensities. Online instrumentations will acquire real time temperature, strain, and vibration data of the cylinders, while Post-Irradiation-Examination (PIE) of the discs will exploit advanced microstructural characteri- zation and imagin...

  20. Examination of Beryllium Under Intense High Energy Proton Beam at CERN's HiRadMat Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Ammigan, K; Hurh, P; Zwaska, R; Atherton, A; Caretta, O; Davenne, t; Densham, C; Fitton, M; Loveridge, P; O'Dell, J; Roberts, S; Kuksenko, v; Butcher, M; Calviani, M; Guinchard, M; Losito, R

    2015-01-01

    Beryllium is extensively used in various accelerator beam lines and target facilities as material for beam win- dows, and to a lesser extent, as secondary particle produc- tion targets. With increasing beam intensities of future ac- celerator facilities, it is critical to understand the response of beryllium under extreme conditions to avoid compro- mising particle production efficiency by limiting beam pa- rameters. As a result, the planned experiment at CERN’s HiRadMat facility will take advantage of the test facility’s tunable high intensity proton beam to probe and investigate the damage mechanisms of several grades of beryllium. The test matrix will consist of multiple arrays of thin discs of varying thicknesses as well as cylinders, each exposed to increasing beam intensities. Online instrumentations will acquire real time temperature, strain, and vibration data of the cylinders, while Post-Irradiation-Examination (PIE) of the discs will exploit advanced microstructural characteri- zation and imagin...

  1. Determination of beam intensity and position in a particle accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Kasprowicz, G

    2011-01-01

    A subject of the thesis is conception, design, implementation, tests and deployment of new position measurement system of particle bunch in the CERN PS circular accelerator. The system is based on novel algorithms of particle position determination. The Proton Synchrotron accelerator (PS), installed at CERN, although commissioned in 1959, still plays a central role in the production of beams for the Antiproton Decelerator, Super Proton Synchrotron, various experimental areas and for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The PS produces beams of different types of particles, mainly protons, but also various species of ions. Almost all these particle beams pass through the PS. The quality of the beams delivered to the LHC has a direct impact on the effective luminosity, and therefore the performance of the instrumentation of the PS is of great importance. The old trajectory and orbit measurement system of the PS is dated back to 1988 and no longer fulfilled present day requirements. It used 40 beam position monitors...

  2. Determination of Beam Intensity and Position in a Particle Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Kasprowicz, Grzegorz; Raich, Uli

    2011-10-04

    A subject of the thesis is conception, design, implementation, tests and deployment of new position measurement system of particle bunch in the CERN PS circular accelerator. The system is based on novel algorithms of particle position determination. The Proton Synchrotron accelerator (PS), installed at CERN†, although commissioned in 1959, still plays a central role in the production of beams for the Antiproton Decelerator, Super Proton Synchrotron, various experimental areas and for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)‡. The PS produces beams of different types of particles, mainly protons, but also various species of ions. Almost all these particle beams pass through the PS. The quality of the beams delivered to the LHC has a direct impact on the effective luminosity, and therefore the performance of the instrumentation of the PS is of great importance. The old trajectory and orbit measurement system of the PS is dated back to 1988 and no longer fulfilled present day requirements. It used 40 beam posi...

  3. Time dependence of microsecond intense electron beam transport in gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucey, R.F. Jr.; Gilgenback, R.M.; Tucker, J.E.; Brake, M.L.; Enloe, C.L.; Repetti, T.E.

    1987-01-01

    The authors present results of long-pulse (0.5 μs) electron beam propagation in the ion focused regime (IFR). Electron beam parameters are 800 kV with several hundred amperes injected current. For injection into air (from 0.7 mTorr to 75 mTorr) and helium (from 14 mTorr to 227 mTorr) the authors observe a ''time-dependent propagation window'' in which efficient (up to 100%) propagation starts at a time comparable to the electron impact ionization time needed to achieve n/sub i/ -- (1/γ/sup 2/)n/sub eb/. The transport goes abruptly to zero about 50-150 ns after this initial propagation. This is followed by erratic propagation often consisting of numerous narrower pulses 10-40 ns wide. In these pulses the transported current can be 100% of the injected current, but is generally lower. As the fill pressure is increased, there are differences in the propagated beam pulse, which can be summarized as follows: 1) the temporal occurrence of the beam propagation window shifts to earlier times, 2) the propagated beam current has much faster risetimes, 3) a larger portion of the injected beam is propagated. Similar results are observed when the electron beam is propagated in helium. However, at a given pressure, the beam transport window occurs at later times and exhibits a slower risetime. These effects are consistent with electron beam-induced ionization. Experiments are being performed to determine if the observed beam instability is due to the ion hose instability or streaming instability

  4. Mean intensity of the fundamental Bessel-Gaussian beam in turbulent atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, Igor P.

    2017-11-01

    In the given article mean intensity of a fundamental Bessel-Gaussian optical beam in turbulent atmosphere is studied. The problem analysis is based on the solution of the equation for the transverse second-order mutual coherence function of a fundamental Bessel-Gaussian beam of optical radiation. Distributions of mean intensity of a fundamental Bessel- Gaussian beam optical beam in longitudinal and transverse to a direction of propagation of optical radiation are investigated in detail. Influence of atmospheric turbulence on change of radius of the central part of a Bessel optical beam is estimated. Values of parameters at which it is possible to generate in turbulent atmosphere a nondiffracting pseudo-Bessel optical beam by means of a fundamental Bessel-Gaussian optical beam are established.

  5. Progress toward a microsecond duration, repetitive, intense-ion beam for active spectroscopic measurements on ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, H.A.; Bartsch, R.R.; Barnes, C.W. [and others

    1996-06-01

    The authors describe the design of an intense, pulsed, repetitive, neutral beam based on magnetically insulated diode technology for injection into ITER for spectroscopic measurements of thermalizing alpha particle and thermal helium density profiles, ion temperature, plasma rotation, and low Z impurity concentrations in the confinement region. The beam is being developed to enhance low signal-to-noise ratios expected with conventional steady-state ion beams because of severe beam attenuation and intense bremstrahlung emission. A 5 GW (e.g., 100 keV, 50 kA) one-microsecond-duration beam would increase the signal by 10{sup 3} compared to a conventional 5 MW beam with signal-to-noise ratios comparable to those from a chopped conventional beam in one second.

  6. SU-F-T-202: An Evaluation Method of Lifetime Attributable Risk for Comparing Between Proton Beam Therapy and Intensity Modulated X-Ray Therapy for Pediatric Cancer Patients by Averaging Four Dose-Response Models for Carcinoma Induction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, M; Shirato, H [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Ito, Y [Department of Biostatistics, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Sakurai, H; Mizumoto, M; Kamizawa, S [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Murayama, S; Yamashita, H [Proton Therapy Division, Shizuoka Cancer Center Hospital, Nagaizumi, Shizuoka (Japan); Takao, S; Suzuki, R [Department of Medical Physics, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To examine how much lifetime attributable risk (LAR) as an in silico surrogate marker of radiation-induced secondary cancer would be lowered by using proton beam therapy (PBT) in place of intensity modulated x-ray therapy (IMXT) in pediatric patients. Methods: From 242 pediatric patients with cancers who were treated with PBT, 26 patients were selected by random sampling after stratification into four categories: a) brain, head, and neck, b) thoracic, c) abdominal, and d) whole craniospinal (WCNS) irradiation. IMXT was re-planned using the same computed tomography and region of interest. Using dose volume histogram (DVH) of PBT and IMXT, the LAR of Schneider et al. was calculated for the same patient. The published four dose-response models for carcinoma induction: i) full model, ii) bell-shaped model, iii) plateau model, and ix) linear model were tested for organs at risk. In the case that more than one dose-response model was available, the LAR for this patient was calculated by averaging LAR for each dose-response model. Results: Calculation of the LARs of PBT and IMXT based on DVH was feasible for all patients. The mean±standard deviation of the cumulative LAR difference between PBT and IMXT for the four categories was a) 0.77±0.44% (n=7, p=0.0037), b) 23.1±17.2%,(n=8, p=0.0067), c) 16.4±19.8% (n=8, p=0.0525), and d) 49.9±21.2% (n=3, p=0.0275, one tailed t-test), respectively. The LAR was significantly lower by PBT than IMXT for the the brain, head, and neck region, thoracic region, and whole craniospinal irradiation. Conclusion: In pediatric patients who had undergone PBT, the LAR of PBT was significantly lower than the LAR of IMXT estimated by in silico modeling. This method was suggested to be useful as an in silico surrogate marker of secondary cancer induced by different radiotherapy techniques. This research was supported by the Translational Research Network Program, JSPS KAKENHI Grant No. 15H04768 and the Global Institution for

  7. SU-F-T-202: An Evaluation Method of Lifetime Attributable Risk for Comparing Between Proton Beam Therapy and Intensity Modulated X-Ray Therapy for Pediatric Cancer Patients by Averaging Four Dose-Response Models for Carcinoma Induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, M; Shirato, H; Ito, Y; Sakurai, H; Mizumoto, M; Kamizawa, S; Murayama, S; Yamashita, H; Takao, S; Suzuki, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To examine how much lifetime attributable risk (LAR) as an in silico surrogate marker of radiation-induced secondary cancer would be lowered by using proton beam therapy (PBT) in place of intensity modulated x-ray therapy (IMXT) in pediatric patients. Methods: From 242 pediatric patients with cancers who were treated with PBT, 26 patients were selected by random sampling after stratification into four categories: a) brain, head, and neck, b) thoracic, c) abdominal, and d) whole craniospinal (WCNS) irradiation. IMXT was re-planned using the same computed tomography and region of interest. Using dose volume histogram (DVH) of PBT and IMXT, the LAR of Schneider et al. was calculated for the same patient. The published four dose-response models for carcinoma induction: i) full model, ii) bell-shaped model, iii) plateau model, and ix) linear model were tested for organs at risk. In the case that more than one dose-response model was available, the LAR for this patient was calculated by averaging LAR for each dose-response model. Results: Calculation of the LARs of PBT and IMXT based on DVH was feasible for all patients. The mean±standard deviation of the cumulative LAR difference between PBT and IMXT for the four categories was a) 0.77±0.44% (n=7, p=0.0037), b) 23.1±17.2%,(n=8, p=0.0067), c) 16.4±19.8% (n=8, p=0.0525), and d) 49.9±21.2% (n=3, p=0.0275, one tailed t-test), respectively. The LAR was significantly lower by PBT than IMXT for the the brain, head, and neck region, thoracic region, and whole craniospinal irradiation. Conclusion: In pediatric patients who had undergone PBT, the LAR of PBT was significantly lower than the LAR of IMXT estimated by in silico modeling. This method was suggested to be useful as an in silico surrogate marker of secondary cancer induced by different radiotherapy techniques. This research was supported by the Translational Research Network Program, JSPS KAKENHI Grant No. 15H04768 and the Global Institution for

  8. Anisotropy effect of crater formation on single crystal silicon surface under intense pulsed ion beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jie; Yu, Xiao; Zhang, Jie; Zhong, Haowen; Cui, Xiaojun; Liang, Guoying; Yu, Xiang; Huang, Wanying; Shahid, Ijaz; Zhang, Xiaofu; Yan, Sha; Le, Xiaoyun

    2018-04-01

    Due to the induced extremely fast thermal and dynamic process, Intense Pulsed Ion Beam (IPIB) is widely applied in material processing, which can bring enhanced material performance and surface craters as well. To investigate the craters' formation mechanism, a specific model was built with Finite Element Methods (FEM) to simulate the thermal field on irradiated single crystal silicon. The direct evidence for the existence of the simulated 6-fold rotational symmetric thermal distribution was provided by electron microscope images obtained on single crystal silicon. The correlation of the experiment and simulation is of great importance to understand the interaction between IPIB and materials.

  9. A nested partitions framework for beam angle optimization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Souza, Warren D; Nazareth, Daryl P; Zhang, Hao H; Shi Leyuan; Meyer, Robert R

    2008-01-01

    Coupling beam angle optimization with dose optimization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) increases the size and complexity of an already large-scale combinatorial optimization problem. We have developed a novel algorithm, nested partitions (NP), that is capable of finding suitable beam angle sets by guiding the dose optimization process. NP is a metaheuristic that is flexible enough to guide the search of a heuristic or deterministic dose optimization algorithm. The NP method adaptively samples from the entire feasible region, or search space, and coordinates the sampling effort with a systematic partitioning of the feasible region at successive iterations, concentrating the search in promising subsets. We used a 'warm-start' approach by initiating NP with beam angle samples derived from an integer programming (IP) model. In this study, we describe our implementation of the NP framework with a commercial optimization algorithm. We compared the NP framework with equi-spaced beam angle selection, the IP method, greedy heuristic and random sampling heuristic methods. The results of the NP approach were evaluated using two clinical cases (head and neck and whole pelvis) involving the primary tumor and nodal volumes. Our results show that NP produces better quality solutions than the alternative considered methods

  10. A nested partitions framework for beam angle optimization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Souza, Warren D; Nazareth, Daryl P [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Zhang, Hao H; Shi Leyuan [Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Meyer, Robert R [Computer Sciences Department, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)], E-mail: dsouzaw@ohsu.edu

    2008-06-21

    Coupling beam angle optimization with dose optimization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) increases the size and complexity of an already large-scale combinatorial optimization problem. We have developed a novel algorithm, nested partitions (NP), that is capable of finding suitable beam angle sets by guiding the dose optimization process. NP is a metaheuristic that is flexible enough to guide the search of a heuristic or deterministic dose optimization algorithm. The NP method adaptively samples from the entire feasible region, or search space, and coordinates the sampling effort with a systematic partitioning of the feasible region at successive iterations, concentrating the search in promising subsets. We used a 'warm-start' approach by initiating NP with beam angle samples derived from an integer programming (IP) model. In this study, we describe our implementation of the NP framework with a commercial optimization algorithm. We compared the NP framework with equi-spaced beam angle selection, the IP method, greedy heuristic and random sampling heuristic methods. The results of the NP approach were evaluated using two clinical cases (head and neck and whole pelvis) involving the primary tumor and nodal volumes. Our results show that NP produces better quality solutions than the alternative considered methods.

  11. Clinical application of intensity and energy modulated radiotherapy with photon and electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiangkui Mu

    2005-01-01

    In modern, advanced radiotherapy (e.g. intensity modulated photon radiotherapy, IMXT) the delivery time for each fraction becomes prolonged to 10-20 minutes compared with the conventional, commonly 2-5 minutes. The biological effect of this prolongation is not fully known. The large number of beam directions in IMXT commonly leads to a large integral dose in the patient. Electrons would reduce the integral dose but are not suitable for treating deep-seated tumour, due to their limited penetration in tissues. By combining electron and photon beams, the dose distributions may be improved compared with either used alone. One obstacle for using electron beams in clinical routine is that there is no available treatment planning systems that optimise electron beam treatments in a similar way as for IMXT. Protons have an even more pronounced dose fall-off, larger penetration depth and less penumbra widening than electrons and are therefore more suitable for advanced radiotherapy. However, proton facilities optimised for advanced radiotherapy are not commonly available. In some instances electron beams may be an acceptable surrogate. The first part of this study is an experimental in vitro study where the situation in a tumour during fractionated radiotherapy is simulated. The effect of the prolonged fraction time is compared with the predictions by radiobiological models. The second part is a treatment planning study to analyse the mixing of electron and photon beams for at complex target volume in comparison with IMXT. In the next step a research version of an electron beam optimiser was used for the improvement of treatment plans. The aim was to develop a method for translating crude energy and intensity matrices for optimised electrons into a deliverable treatment plan without destroying the dose distribution. In the final part, different methods of treating the spinal canal in medulloblastoma were explored in a treatment planning study that was evaluated with

  12. Analysis of test beam data of ATLAS Pixel Detector production modules with a high intensity pion beam.

    CERN Document Server

    Alimonti, G; Bazalova, M; Beccherle, R; Breugnon, P; Brüser, D; Cauz, D; Clemens, J C; Cobal-Grassman, M; Dobos, D; Einsweiler, Kevin F; Flick, T; Gagliardi, G; Gemme, C; Gerlach, P; Gorelov, I; Grosse-Knetter, J; Hügging, F G; Imhauser, M; Kersten, S; Klingenberg, R; Kuhn, M; Lari, T; Martínez, G; Mass, M; Massman, F; Matera, A; Mathes, M; Meroni, C; Morettini, P; Naumov, D; Netchaeva, P; Ragusa, F; Richardson, J; Rossi, L; Rozanov, A; Santi, L; Schiavi, C; Schultes, J; Sícho, P; Stahl, T; Ta, D B; Tieman, D; Tomasek, L; Troncon, C; Vahsen, S; Valenta, J; Virzi, J; Vrba, V; Weingarten, J

    2005-01-01

    Beam tests of ATLAS Pixel Detector production modules were performed with a high intensity pion bion at the SPS H8 test beam facility. Several of the modules had been previously irradiated to the fluence of 10**15 neq/cm2. Data were taken at different beam intensities, up to the value foreseen for the innermost pixel layer at the design LHC luminosity of 10**34/cm2/s. At each intensity, data were taken with different configurations of the front-end chip. This note describes the analysis of the high intensity run of August 2004. The particles trajectories were reconstructed using the pixel detectors under test and the detection efficiency was measured as a function of the beam intensity. With the standard ATLAS b-layer configuration and at the B-layer expected column-pair hit occupancy of 0.17 pixel hits per bunch crossing, the measured readout efficiency is 98 %, which is the same value found at low intensity. Efficiency losses are observed only when the column pair occupancy exceeds 0.24 hits per bunch cross...

  13. Focused transport of intense charged particle beams. Final technical report FY/93

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Many recent developments in accelerator technology have increased the need for a better understanding of the physics of intense-beam transport. Of particular interest to the work described here is the appearance, as beam intensities are increased, of a class of nonlinear phenomena which involve the collective interaction of the beam particles. Beam intensity, used as a measure of the importance of space-charge collective behavior, depends on the ratio of current to emittance. The nonlinear beam dynamics, and any resulting emittance growth, which are characteristic of the intense-beam regime, can therefore occur even at low currents in any accelerator system with sufficiently high intensity, especially in the low beta section. Furthermore, since emittance of a beam is difficult to reduce, the ultimate achievement of necessary beam luminosities requires the consideration of possible causes of longitudinal and transverse emittance growth at every stage of the beam lifetime. The research program described here has addressed the fundamental physics which comes into play during the transport, acceleration and focusing of intense beams. Because of the long term and ongoing nature of the research program discussed here, this report is divided into two sections. The first section constitutes a long term revue of the accomplishments which have resulted from the research effort reported, especially in pioneering the use of particle-in-cell (PIC) computer simulation techniques for simulation of the dynamics of space-charge-dominated beams in particle accelerators. The following section emphasizes, in more detail, the accomplishments of the FY 92/93 period immediately prior to the termination of this particular avenue of support. 41 refs

  14. Transportation of high intensity beam to the high resolution caves of VECC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, P.S.; Shoor, Bivas; Mallik, C.; Bhandari, R.K.

    2003-01-01

    Presently at Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata light heavy ion beams are delivered to the user's target in high intensity (HI) caves through its three beam lines which are at an angle of 0 degree (Channel 1), 15 degree (Channel 2) and 35 degree (Channel 3) with respect to zero channel. For Channel 2 or Channel 3, the extracted beam is transported through the zero channel and then bend right by energizing the switching magnet (SWM) as per requirement. The extracted beam goes straight to channel 1 when SWM is off. Channel l beam can be bent left by an analyzing magnet (AM) to transport the beam to the high-resolution (HR) beam line. Alpha beam was transported through this line to the target in HR cave 2 in dispersive mode

  15. Spill control and intensity monitoring for the Bevatron--Bevalac external particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barale, J.J.; Crebbin, K.C.

    1975-03-01

    Time-intensity modulation in beam spill can be of primary concern in some experiments. The major source of this beam structure is from main-guide field-magnet power supply ripple. If the time constants are appropriate, then final control of beam structure can be accomplished by closed loop control of the intensity of beam spill. The response characteristics of the feedback system will determine the final structure. At high beam fluxes signal to noise ratio of beam detectors, in the feedback loop, can be improved by at least four orders of magnitude by using photomultiplier tubes and a water Cherenkov counter in place of the normal secondary emission monitor. At beam fluxes below 10 10 particles per second (PPS), a plastic scintillator and photomultiplier tube are used in the feedback system. A plastic scintillator and photomultiplier are also used in the beam as intensity monitors. At intensities below about 10 7 PPS standard counting techniques are used. For intensities between 10 6 to 110 9 PPS, the photomultiplier is used as a current source driving an integrating circuit which is then calibrated to read the number of particles per pulse. (U.S.)

  16. Implications of the Electrostatic Approximation in the Beam Frame on the Nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell Equations for Intense Beam Propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, Ronald C.; Lee, W. Wei-li; Hong Qin; Startsev, Edward

    2001-01-01

    This paper develops a clear procedure for solving the nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations for a one-component intense charged particle beam or finite-length charge bunch propagating through a cylindrical conducting pipe (radius r = r(subscript)w = const.), and confined by an applied focusing force. In particular, the nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations are Lorentz-transformed to the beam frame ('primed' variables) moving with axial velocity relative to the laboratory. In the beam frame, the particle motions are nonrelativistic for the applications of practical interest, already a major simplification. Then, in the beam frame, we make the electrostatic approximation which fully incorporates beam space-charge effects, but neglects any fast electromagnetic processes with transverse polarization (e.g., light waves). The resulting Vlasov-Maxwell equations are then Lorentz-transformed back to the laboratory frame, and properties of the self-generated fields and resulting nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations in the laboratory frame are discussed

  17. Pragmatic development of a laser ion source for intense highly-charged ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibuya, Shinji; Takeuchi, Takeshi; Maruyama, Toshiyuki; Mochizuki, Tetsuro; Nakagawa, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Recently, applications of high-charge-state (including fully stripped) heavy-ion beams have been attracting interest in both physics and industry. To enhance their usefulness, more intense beams are required. Cancer therapy using carbon ions is a particularly promising heavy-ion beam application. Due to advances in laser technology, the laser ion source (LIS) has become one of the most popular sources for generating highly charged and intense heavy-ion beams. The project to develop a high-intensity LIS was started on June 2009. In our project, whose ultimate goal is to apply a heavy-ion accelerator for cancer therapy, we have almost completed designing the LIS, and manufacturing will commence soon. We intend to measure the source performance by performing plasma and beam tests up until the end of March 2011. We will report the outline and a progress of the project. (author)

  18. Stabilization of the Beam Intensity in the Linac at the CTF3 CLIC Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Dubrovskiy, A; Bathe, BN; Srivastava, S

    2013-01-01

    A new electron beam stabilization system has been introduced in CTF3 in order to open new possibilities for CLIC beam studies in ultra-stable conditions and to provide a sustainable tool to keep the beam intensity and energy at its reference values for long term operations. The stabilization system is based on a pulse-to-pulse feedback control of the electron gun to compensate intensity deviations measured at the end of the injector and at the beginning of the linac. Thereby it introduces negligible beam distortions at the end of the linac and it significantly reduces energy deviations. A self-calibration mechanism has been developed to automatically configure the feedback controller for the optimum performance. The residual intensity jitter of 0.045% of the stabilized beam was measured whereas the CLIC requirement is 0.075%.

  19. Plasma Wakefield Acceleration of an Intense Positron Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blue, B

    2004-04-21

    The Plasma Wakefield Accelerator (PWFA) is an advanced accelerator concept which possess a high acceleration gradient and a long interaction length for accelerating both electrons and positrons. Although electron beam-plasma interactions have been extensively studied in connection with the PWFA, very little work has been done with respect to positron beam-plasma interactions. This dissertation addresses three issues relating to a positron beam driven plasma wakefield accelerator. These issues are (a) the suitability of employing a positron drive bunch to excite a wake; (b) the transverse stability of the drive bunch; and (c) the acceleration of positrons by the plasma wake that is driven by a positron bunch. These three issues are explored first through computer simulations and then through experiments. First, a theory is developed on the impulse response of plasma to a short drive beam which is valid for small perturbations to the plasma density. This is followed up with several particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations which study the experimental parameter (bunch length, charge, radius, and plasma density) range. Next, the experimental setup is described with an emphasis on the equipment used to measure the longitudinal energy variations of the positron beam. Then, the transverse dynamics of a positron beam in a plasma are described. Special attention is given to the way focusing, defocusing, and a tilted beam would appear to be energy variations as viewed on our diagnostics. Finally, the energy dynamics imparted on a 730 {micro}m long, 40 {micro}m radius, 28.5 GeV positron beam with 1.2 x 10{sup 10} particles in a 1.4 meter long 0-2 x 10{sup 14} e{sup -}/cm{sup 3} plasma is described. First the energy loss was measured as a function of plasma density and the measurements are compared to theory. Then, an energy gain of 79 {+-} 15 MeV is shown. This is the first demonstration of energy gain of a positron beam in a plasma and it is in good agreement with the predictions

  20. Transverse Beam Halo Measurements at High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) using Vibrating Wire Monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, M.; Hanna, B.; Scarpine, V.; Shiltsev, V.; Steimel, J.; Artinian, S.; Arutunian, S.

    2015-02-26

    The measurement and control of beam halos will be critical for the applications of future high-intensity hadron linacs. In particular, beam profile monitors require a very high dynamic range when used for the transverse beam halo measurements. In this study, the Vibrating Wire Monitor (VWM) with aperture 60 mm was installed at the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) front-end to measure the transverse beam halo. A vibrating wire is excited at its resonance frequency with the help of a magnetic feedback loop, and the vibrating and sensitive wires are connected through a balanced arm. The sensitive wire is moved into the beam halo region by a stepper motor controlled translational stage. We study the feasibility of the vibrating wire for the transverse beam halo measurements in the low-energy front-end of the proton linac.

  1. Designing Neutralized Drift Compression for Focusing of Intense Ion Beam Pulses in a Background Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaganovich, I.D.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.; Startsev, E.A.; Barnard, J.J.; Friedman, A.; Lee, E.P.; Lidia, S.M.; Logan, B.G.; Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.A.; Welch, D.R.; Sefkow, A.B.

    2009-01-01

    Neutralized drift compression offers an effective method for particle beam focusing and current amplification. In neutralized drift compression, a linear radial and longitudinal velocity drift is applied to a beam pulse, so that the beam pulse compresses as it drifts in the drift-compression section. The beam intensity can increase more than a factor of 100 in both the radial and longitudinal directions, resulting in more than 10,000 times increase in the beam number density during this process. The self-electric and self-magnetic fields can prevent tight ballistic focusing and have to be neutralized by supplying neutralizing electrons. This paper presents a survey of the present theoretical understanding of the drift compression process and plasma neutralization of intense particle beams. The optimal configuration of focusing and neutralizing elements is discussed in this paper.

  2. A 3 GHz photoelectron gun for high beam intensity

    CERN Document Server

    Bossart, Rudolf; Dehler, M; Godot, J C

    1996-01-01

    For the Compact Linear Collider Test Facility (CTF) at CERN a new rf gun with a laser driven photocathode is under construction. The new rf gun will replace the present 11/2 cell gun and will consist of 21/2 cells accelerating the beam to a momentum of 7.0 MeV/c with an electric field strength of 100 MV/m. The strong space-charge forces at low beam energy caused by the high charge density of the electron bunches are contained by radial and longitudinal rf focusing in the gun. The rf gun under construction has been optimized by MAFIA beam simulations for an injector assembly comprising a second accelerating rf structure and an intermediate solenoid magnet correcting the beam divergence of the 21/2 cell gun. The beam loading of the rf gun, by a train of 48 bunches with 21 nC charge each, causes a strong energy decay accompanied by an increase of the flight time for the bunches with lower energy. These effects can be corrected by slightly shifting the acceleration frequency of the gun. The experimental results...

  3. Determination of Beam Intensity and Position in a Particle Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Kasprowicz, Grzegorz

    2010-01-01

    The Proton Synchrotron accelerator (PS), installed at CERN, although commissioned in 1959, still plays a central role in the production of beams for the Antiproton Decelerator, Super Proton Synchrotron, various experimental areas and for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The PS produces beams of different types of particles, mainly protons, but also various species of ions. Almost all these particle beams pass through the PS. The quality of the beams delivered to the LHC has a direct impact on the effective luminosity, and therefore the performance of the instrumentation of the PS is of great importance. The old trajec- tory and orbit measurement system of the PS dated back to 1988 and no longer fulfilled present day requirements. It used 40 beam position monitors (BPMs) and an analogue signal processing chain to acquire the trajectory of one single particle bunch out of many, over two consecutive turns at a maximum rate of once every 5ms. The BPMs were in good condition, however the electronics was aging and ...

  4. Moessbauer Effect applications using intense radioactive ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    The Moessbauer Effect is reviewed as a promising tool for a number of new solid state studies when used in combination with radioactive beam/implantation facilities. The usual Moessbauer Effect involves long-lived radioactive parents (days to years) that populate low-lying nuclear excited states that subsequently decay to the ground state. Resonant emission/absorption of recoil-free gamma rays from these states provide information on a number of properties of the host materials. Radioactive ion beams (RIB) produced on-line allow new Moessbauer nuclei to be studied where there is no suitable parent. The technique allows useful sources to be made having extremely low local concentrations. The ability to separate the beams in both Z and A should provide high specific activity ''conventional'' sources, a feature important in some applications such as Moessbauer studies in diamond anvil high pressure cells. Exotic chemistry is proposed using RIB and certain Krypton and Xenon Moessbauer isotopes

  5. Apparatus and process for active pulse intensity control of laser beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Russell B.

    1992-01-01

    An optically controlled laser pulse energy control apparatus and process is disclosed wherein variations in the energy of a portion of the laser beam are used to vary the resistance of a photodetector such as a photoresistor through which a control voltage is fed to a light intensity controlling device through which a second portion of the laser beam passes. Light attenuation means are provided to vary the intensity of the laser light used to control the resistance of the photodetector. An optical delay path is provided through which the second portion of the beam travels before reaching the light intensity controlling device. The control voltage is supplied by a variable power supply. The apparatus may be tuned to properly attenuate the laser beam passing through the intensity controlling device by adjusting the power supply, the optical delay path, or the light attenuating means.

  6. Detection of an intense polychromatic gamma beam modulated at 3000 MHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beil, H.; Veyssiere, A.; Daujat, P.

    1968-01-01

    This paper presents two methods of detection of a γ beam modulated at very high frequencies. The intense modulated beam is created by means of Bremsstrahlung in a gold-target, the latter having been placed in the emerging electron beam of the Linac at Saclay. A tentative interpretation of the physical phenomena involved in the detection processes is also given. The empirical data agree reasonably well with numerical evaluations based on well established theoretical concepts concerning these phenomena. (authors) [fr

  7. SPES: A new cyclotron-based facility for research and applications with high-intensity beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggiore, M.; Campo, D.; Antonini, P.; Lombardi, A.; Manzolaro, M.; Andrighetto, A.; Monetti, A.; Scarpa, D.; Esposito, J.; Silvestrin, L.

    2017-06-01

    In 2016, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (Italy) started the commissioning of a new accelerator facility based on a high-power cyclotron able to deliver proton beams up to 70 MeV of energy and 700 μA current. Such a machine is the core of the Selective Production of Exotic Species (SPES) project whose main goal is to provide exotics beam for nuclear and astrophysics research and to deliver high-intensity proton beams for medical applications and neutrons generator.

  8. The wondrous world of transport and acceleration of intense ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siebenlist, F.

    1987-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of the transport, bunching and acceleration of intense ion beams in periodic focusing channels is described. The aim is to show the feasibility of accelerating high current ion beams with a Multiple Electrostatic Quadrupole Array Linear ACcelerator (MEQALAC). 83 refs.; 51 figs.; 3 tabs

  9. A proton beam delivery system for conformal therapy and intensity modulated therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Qingchang

    2001-01-01

    A scattering proton beam delivery system for conformal therapy and intensity modulated therapy is described. The beam is laterally spread out by a dual-ring double scattering system and collimated by a program-controlled multileaf collimator and patient specific fixed collimators. The proton range is adjusted and modulated by a program controlled binary filter and ridge filters

  10. Selected List of Low Energy Beam Transport Facilities for Light-Ion, High-Intensity Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prost, L. R. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2016-02-17

    This paper presents a list of Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) facilities for light-ion, high-intensity accelerators. It was put together to facilitate comparisons with the PXIE LEBT design choices. A short discussion regarding the importance of the beam perveance in the choice of the transport scheme follows.

  11. Characterization of a proton beam driven by a high-intensity laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagisaka, Akito; Daido, Hiroyuki; Ogura, Koichi; Orimo, Satoshi; Hayashi, Yukio; Mori, Michiaki; Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Yogo, Akifumi; Kado, Masataka; Fukumi, Atsushi; Li, Zhong; Pirozhkov, Alexander S.; Nakamura, Shu

    2007-01-01

    High-energy protons are observed with a 3 μm thick tantalum target irradiated with a high intensity laser. The maximum proton energy is ∼900 keV. The half angle of the generated proton beam (>500 keV) is about 10deg. Characterization of the proton beam will significantly contribute to the proton applications. (author)

  12. Production of intense negative hydrogen beams with polarized nuclei by selective neutralization of cold negative ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershcovitch, A.

    1984-02-13

    A process for selectively neutralizing H/sup -/ ions in a magnetic field to produce an intense negative hydrogen ion beam with spin polarized protons. Characteristic features of the process include providing a multi-ampere beam of H/sup -/ ions that are

  13. First beam in a new compact intense 30 MeV H- cyclotron for isotope production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milton, B.F.; Dutto, G.; Helmer, R.; Keitel, R.; Kleeven, W.J.; Lanz, P.; Poirier, R.L.; Reiniger, K.; Ries, T.; Schmor, P.W.; Schneider, H.R.; Sliwinski, A.; Sura, J.; Uzat, W.; Yandon, J.; Dawson, R.; Dehnel, M.; Erdman, K.L.; Gyles, W.; Sample, J.; Walker, Q.; Watt, R.

    1990-06-01

    A new high intensity, 30 MeV H - cyclotron has been constructed for radioisotope production. It is a four-sector radial ridge design with two 45 degrees dees in opposite valleys. An external multi-cusp dc source developed at TRIUMF generates the H - beam for injection into the cyclotron. Beam extraction is by stripping to H + in thin graphite foils. Two multiple foil stripper mechanisms produce two simultaneous external beams, of intensities up to 200 μA. Adjustment of the extraction foil position permits extracted beam energy variation from 15 MeV to 30 MeV. Results of magnet field mapping, vacuum, high power RF and beam tests will be described. A 30 MeV beam of intensity in excess of 250 μA has already been extracted along one beam line. On opposite beam lines two beams, one of 140 μA the other of 164 μA, for a total in excess of 300 μA, were simultaneously produced. (Author) 7 refs., 3 figs

  14. Concept for Generation of Warm Dense Matter of Insulator due to Flyer Impact Accelerated by Electron Beam Irradiation using Intense Pulsed Power Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    TAMURA, Fumihiro; HAYASHI, Ryota; KUDO, Takahiro; WATABE, Arata; KASHINE, Kenji; TOKUCHI, Akira; KIKUCHI, Takashi; TAKAHASHI, Kazumasa; SASAKI, Toru; ASO, Tsukasa; HARADA, Nob.; JIANG, Weihua

    2016-03-01

    We have proposed a concept for generation method of warm dense matter (WDM) by using flyer impact accelerated by intense electron beams. To generate the warm dense matter by using flyer impact, the output current of electron beams generated by the intense pulsed-power generator as ETIGO-II is evaluated. The results denote that the beam current and the pulse duration are 11 kA and 50 ns, respectively. The achievable parameters of WDM by using flyer impact are estimated by the simplified model. It indicated that the sample temperature achieves the provided electron beams with lower conversion efficiency.

  15. Concept for Generation of Warm Dense Matter of Insulator due to Flyer Impact Accelerated by Electron Beam Irradiation using Intense Pulsed Power Generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TAMURA, Fumihiro; HAYASHI, Ryota; KUDO, Takahiro; WATABE, Arata; TOKUCHI, Akira; KIKUCHI, Takashi; TAKAHASHI, Kazumasa; SASAKI, Toru; ASO, Tsukasa; HARADA, Nob.; JIANG, Weihua; KASHINE, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    We have proposed a concept for generation method of warm dense matter (WDM) by using flyer impact accelerated by intense electron beams. To generate the warm dense matter by using flyer impact, the output current of electron beams generated by the intense pulsed-power generator as ETIGO-II is evaluated. The results denote that the beam current and the pulse duration are 11 kA and 50 ns, respectively. The achievable parameters of WDM by using flyer impact are estimated by the simplified model. It indicated that the sample temperature achieves the provided electron beams with lower conversion efficiency. (paper)

  16. Production and Studies of Photocathodes for High Intensity Electron Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Chevallay, E; Legros, P; Suberlucq, Guy; Trautner, H

    2000-01-01

    For short, high-intensity electron bunches, alkali-tellurides have proved to be a reliable photo-cathode material. Measurements of lifetimes in an rf gun of the CLIC Test Facility II at field strengths greater than 100 MV/m are presented. Before and after using them in this gun, the spectral response of the CS-Te and Rb-Te cathodes were determined with the help of an optical parametric oscillator. The behaviour of both materials can be described by Spicer's 3-step model. Whereas during the use the threshold for photo-emission in Cs-Te was shifted to higher proton energies, that of Rb-Te did not change. Our latest investigations on the stoichiometric ratio of the components are shown. The preparation of the photo-cathodes was monitored with 320 nm wavelength light , with the aim of improving the measurement sensitivity. The latest results on the protection of Cs-Te cathode surfaces with CsBr against pollution are summarized. New investigations on high mean current production are presented.,

  17. Proton Drivers for neutrino beams and other high intensity applications

    CERN Document Server

    Garoby, R; Koseki, T; Thomason, J

    2013-01-01

    CERN, Fermilab, J-PARC and RAL tentatively plan to have proton accelerators delivering multi-MW of beam power in view of enhancing their physics reach especially in the domain of neutrinos. These plans are described, together with their benefits for other applications.

  18. High-intensity light-ion beam research at NRL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooperstein, G.; Colombant, D.G.; Barker, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    High-brightness proton beams (.4 MA, 1 MV) have recently been extracted from 20 cm 2 axial pinch-reflex diodes (PRDs) mounted on the NRL Gamble II generator. A source power brightness of GT 10 TW/cm 2 rad 2 was achieved in these experiments. A new barrel-shaped equitorial PRD that can be coupled to PBFA-II has also been operated on Gamble II and has demonstrated 50% proton efficiency with predominately azimuthally-symmetric charged-particle flow. In other experiments the stopping power of deuterons in hot plasmas was measured using a PRD on Gamble II. Results show about 40% enhancement in stopping power over that in cold targets when the beam was focused to about .25 MA/cm 2 . Research is also being performed on transporting ion beams in large-diameter channels (>= 2.5 cm) and on a post-transport, plasma-filled, magnetic-focusing section to bring the beam to pellet dimensions. (author)

  19. High-intensity pulsed beam source with tunable operation mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashilevskiy, A. V.; Kanaev, G. G.; Ezhov, V. V.; Shamanin, V. I.

    2017-05-01

    The report presents the design of an electron and an ion pulsed accelerator. The powerful high-voltage pulse generator of the accelerator and the vacuum bushing insulator is able to change the polarity of the output voltage. The low-inductance matching transformer provides an increase in the DFL output impedance by 4 times. The generator based on a high voltage pulse transformer and a pseudo spark switch is applied for DFL charging. The high-impedance magnetically insulated focusing diode with Br magnetic field and the “passive” anode was used to realize the ion beam generation mode. The plasma is formed on the surface of the anode caused by an electrical breakdown at the voltage edge pulse; as a result, the carbon ion and proton beam is generated. This beam has the following parameters: the current density is about 400 A/cm2 (in focus): the applied voltage is up to 450 kV. The accelerator is designed for the research on the interaction of the charged particle pulsed beams with materials and for the development of technological processes of a material modification.

  20. Method of active charge and current neutralization of intense ion beams for ICF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guiragossian, Z.G.T.; Orthel, J.L.; Lemons, D.S.; Thode, L.E.

    1981-01-01

    Methods of generating the beam neutralization electrons with required properties are given in the context of a Light Ion Fusion Experiment (LIFE) designed accelerator. Recently derived envelope equations for neutralized and ballistically focused intense ion beams are applied to the LIFE geometry in which 10 MeV He + multiple beamlets coalesce and undergo 45:1 radial compression while beam pulses experience a 20:1 axial compression in the propagation range of 10 m. Both active and auto-neutralization methods are examined and found to produce initial electron temperatures consistent with the requirement of the envelope equation for both radial and axial adiabatic beam pulse compressions. The stability of neutralized beam propagation is also examined concerning the Pierce type electrostatic instability and for the case of LIFE beams it is found to have insignificant effect. A scaled experimental setup is presented which can serve to perform near term tests on the ballistically focused propagation of neutralized light ion beams

  1. Development and application of high power and high intensity ion beam sources at NPI, Tomsk, Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryabchikov, A.I.

    2007-01-01

    High - current ion beams have become a powerful tool for improving the surface properties of different materials. The prospects of wide commercial use of such beams for material treatment is not only due to the possibility of improving their properties, but, also for economic expediency. To achieve a high throughput and reduce the cost on ion beam material treatment, ion beams of high average and pulsed power are necessary. This paper gives an overview of work on generation of pulsed and repetitively pulsed beams of ion beams with currents ranging from fractions of an ampere to several tens of kA and with pulse duration from several tens of nanoseconds to several hundreds of microseconds. A number of different methods of materials surface properties modification using high power and intense ion beam and plasma are considered. (author)

  2. LEIR impedance model and coherent beam instability observations

    CERN Document Server

    Biancacci, N; Migliorati, M; Rijoff, T L

    2017-01-01

    The LEIR machine is the first synchrotron in the ion ac-celeration chain at CERN and it is responsible to deliverhigh intensity ion beams to the LHC. Following the recentprogress in the understanding of the intensity limitations,detailed studies of the machine impedance started. In thiswork we describe the present LEIR impedance model, detail-ing the contribution to the total longitudinal and transverseimpedance of several machine elements. We then comparethe machine tune shift versus intensity predictions againstmeasurements at injection energy and summarize the co-herent instability observations in the absence of transversefeedback.

  3. Non-perturbative measurement of low-intensity charged particle beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, M.; Geithner, R.; Golm, J.; Neubert, R.; Schwickert, M.; Stöhlker, T.; Tan, J.; Welsch, C. P.

    2017-01-01

    Non-perturbative measurements of low-intensity charged particle beams are particularly challenging to beam diagnostics due to the low amplitude of the induced electromagnetic fields. In the low-energy antiproton decelerator (AD) and the future extra low energy antiproton rings at CERN, an absolute measurement of the beam intensity is essential to monitor the operation efficiency. Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) based cryogenic current comparators (CCC) have been used for measuring slow charged beams in the nA range, showing a very good current resolution. But these were unable to measure fast bunched beams, due to the slew-rate limitation of SQUID devices and presented a strong susceptibility to external perturbations. Here, we present a CCC system developed for the AD machine, which was optimised in terms of its current resolution, system stability, ability to cope with short bunched beams, and immunity to mechanical vibrations. This paper presents the monitor design and the first results from measurements with a low energy antiproton beam obtained in the AD in 2015. These are the first CCC beam current measurements ever performed in a synchrotron machine with both coasting and short bunched beams. It is shown that the system is able to stably measure the AD beam throughout the entire cycle, with a current resolution of 30 {nA}.

  4. Gas-breakdown effects associated with the self-pinched transport of intense light-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ottinger, P.F.; Olson, C.L.; Welch, D.R.; Oliver, B.V.

    1997-01-01

    Self-pinched transport (SPT) of intense light-ion beams is being considered for delivering energy to a high-gain, high-yield inertial confinement fusion target. Proton beam SPT experiments are underway on the Gamble II generators at the Naval Research Laboratory. The physics of SPT in low-pressure gas is being analyzed with analytic theory and numerical simulations. A 1-D theory estimates the net current fraction necessary for stable transport as a function of gas density for a given beam profile. SPT simulations using the 3-D hybrid particle-in-cell (PIC) code IPROP determine the beam profile. Important to both theory and simulations is the inclusion of gas-breakdown physics. A comparison between the theory and the self-consistent simulations using IPROP is made. Additional SPT simulations have been carried out using the 2-D hybrid PIC code SOLENZ which assumes a pre-ionized plasma. This simulation model enables the investigation of long time scale beam propagation issues. A comparison between IPROP and SOLENZ will be presented. SOLENZ simulations with the Gamble I beam parameters demonstrate SPT but point to the need to study the injection conditions to improve beam confinement. Simulations examining beam-to-wall distance and injection conditions will be presented

  5. Intense heavy ion beam-induced effects in carbon-based stripper foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupka, Katharina

    2016-08-15

    Amorphous carbon or carbon-based stripper foils are commonly applied in accelerator technology for electron stripping of ions. At the planned facility for antiproton and ion research (FAIR) at the Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt, thin carbon stripper foils provide an option for directly delivering ions of intermediate charge states to the heavy ion synchrotron, SIS 18, in order to mitigate space charge limitations during high-intensity operation. In case of desired high end-energies in the synchrotron, a second stripping process by a thicker carbon foil provides ions of higher charge states for injection into the SIS18. High beam intensities and a pulsed beam structure as foreseen at FAIR pose new challenges to the stripper foils which experience enhanced degradation by radiation damage, thermal effects, and stress waves. In order to ensure reliable accelerator operation, radiation-hard stripper foils are required. This thesis aims to a better understanding of processes leading to degradation of carbon-based thin foils. Special focus is placed on ion-beam induced structure and physical property changes and on the influence of different beam parameters. Irradiation experiments were performed at the M3-beamline of the universal linear accelerator (UNILAC) at GSI, using swift heavy ion beams with different pulse lengths and repetition rates. Tested carbon foils were standard amorphous carbon stripper foils produced by the GSI target laboratory, as well as commercial amorphous and diamond-like carbon foils and buckypaper foils. Microstructural changes were investigated with various methods such as optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), profilometry and chromatic aberration measurements. For the investigation of structural changes X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), in-situ Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and small angle X

  6. Intense heavy ion beam-induced effects in carbon-based stripper foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupka, Katharina

    2016-08-01

    Amorphous carbon or carbon-based stripper foils are commonly applied in accelerator technology for electron stripping of ions. At the planned facility for antiproton and ion research (FAIR) at the Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt, thin carbon stripper foils provide an option for directly delivering ions of intermediate charge states to the heavy ion synchrotron, SIS 18, in order to mitigate space charge limitations during high-intensity operation. In case of desired high end-energies in the synchrotron, a second stripping process by a thicker carbon foil provides ions of higher charge states for injection into the SIS18. High beam intensities and a pulsed beam structure as foreseen at FAIR pose new challenges to the stripper foils which experience enhanced degradation by radiation damage, thermal effects, and stress waves. In order to ensure reliable accelerator operation, radiation-hard stripper foils are required. This thesis aims to a better understanding of processes leading to degradation of carbon-based thin foils. Special focus is placed on ion-beam induced structure and physical property changes and on the influence of different beam parameters. Irradiation experiments were performed at the M3-beamline of the universal linear accelerator (UNILAC) at GSI, using swift heavy ion beams with different pulse lengths and repetition rates. Tested carbon foils were standard amorphous carbon stripper foils produced by the GSI target laboratory, as well as commercial amorphous and diamond-like carbon foils and buckypaper foils. Microstructural changes were investigated with various methods such as optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), profilometry and chromatic aberration measurements. For the investigation of structural changes X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), in-situ Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and small angle X

  7. Course Notes: United States Particle Accelerator School Beam Physics with Intense Space-Charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnard, J.J.; Lund, S.M.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this course is to provide a comprehensive introduction to the physics of beams with intense space charge. This course is suitable for graduate students and researchers interested in accelerator systems that require sufficient high intensity where mutual particle interactions in the beam can no longer be neglected. This course is intended to give the student a broad overview of the dynamics of beams with strong space charge. The emphasis is on theoretical and analytical methods of describing the acceleration and transport of beams. Some aspects of numerical and experimental methods will also be covered. Students will become familiar with standard methods employed to understand the transverse and longitudinal evolution of beams with strong space charge. The material covered will provide a foundation to design practical architectures. In this course, we will introduce you to the physics of intense charged particle beams, focusing on the role of space charge. The topics include: particle equations of motion, the paraxial ray equation, and the Vlasov equation; 4-D and 2-D equilibrium distribution functions (such as the Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij, thermal equilibrium, and Neuffer distributions), reduced moment and envelope equation formulations of beam evolution; transport limits and focusing methods; the concept of emittance and the calculation of its growth from mismatches in beam envelope and from space-charge non-uniformities using system conservation constraints; the role of space-charge in producing beam halos; longitudinal space-charge effects including small amplitude and rarefaction waves; stable and unstable oscillation modes of beams (including envelope and kinetic modes); the role of space charge in the injector; and algorithms to calculate space-charge effects in particle codes. Examples of intense beams will be given primarily from the ion and proton accelerator communities with applications from, for example, heavy-ion fusion, spallation

  8. Head-On Beam-Beam Interactions in High-Energy Hadron Colliders. GPU-Powered Modelling of Nonlinear Effects

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2160109; Støvneng, Jon Andreas

    2017-08-15

    The performance of high-energy circular hadron colliders, as the Large Hadron Collider, is limited by beam-beam interactions. The strength of the beam-beam interactions will be higher after the upgrade to the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider, and also in the next generation of machines, as the Future Circular Hadron Collider. The strongly nonlinear force between the two opposing beams causes diverging Hamiltonians and drives resonances, which can lead to a reduction of the lifetime of the beams. The nonlinearity makes the effect of the force difficult to study analytically, even at first order. Numerical models are therefore needed to evaluate the overall effect of different configurations of the machines. For this thesis, a new code named CABIN (Cuda-Accelerated Beam-beam Interaction) has been developed to study the limitations caused by the impact of strong beam-beam interactions. In particular, the evolution of the beam emittance and beam intensity has been monitored to study the impact quantitatively...

  9. Device for measurement of the intensity and the time structure of the extracted beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozelov, A.V.; Lebedev, A.A.; Medved', S.A.; Mikhajlov, Yu.V.

    1994-01-01

    The module is intented for measuring the time structure and the intensity (up to 10 7 s -1 ) of an extracted beam of charged particles and synchronizing the data acquisition system with particle damp from an accelerator. 16-digit counters operating by turn are used for counting the input pulses at measuring the beam intensity during the controlled time interval (from 4 μs up 4 ms). The obtained data are recorded into the memory of 1 K x 16 capacity. It allows to analyze the time structure of a beam up to harmonics ∼ 100 kHz. 4 refs., 2 figs

  10. ORBIT: A code for collective beam dynamics in high-intensity rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, J.A.; Danilov, V.; Galambos, J.; Shishlo, A.; Cousineau, S.; Chou, W.; Michelotti, L.; Ostiguy, J.-F.; Wei, J.

    2002-01-01

    We are developing a computer code, ORBIT, specifically for beam dynamics calculations in high-intensity rings. Our approach allows detailed simulation of realistic accelerator problems. ORBIT is a particle-in-cell tracking code that transports bunches of interacting particles through a series of nodes representing elements, effects, or diagnostics that occur in the accelerator lattice. At present, ORBIT contains detailed models for strip-foil injection, including painting and foil scattering; rf focusing and acceleration; transport through various magnetic elements; longitudinal and transverse impedances; longitudinal, transverse, and three-dimensional space charge forces; collimation and limiting apertures; and the calculation of many useful diagnostic quantities. ORBIT is an object-oriented code, written in C++ and utilizing a scripting interface for the convenience of the user. Ongoing improvements include the addition of a library of accelerator maps, BEAMLINE/MXYZPTLK; the introduction of a treatment of magnet errors and fringe fields; the conversion of the scripting interface to the standard scripting language, Python; and the parallelization of the computations using MPI. The ORBIT code is an open source, powerful, and convenient tool for studying beam dynamics in high-intensity rings

  11. ORBIT: A Code for Collective Beam Dynamics in High-Intensity Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, J. A.; Danilov, V.; Galambos, J.; Shishlo, A.; Cousineau, S.; Chou, W.; Michelotti, L.; Ostiguy, J.-F.; Wei, J.

    2002-12-01

    We are developing a computer code, ORBIT, specifically for beam dynamics calculations in high-intensity rings. Our approach allows detailed simulation of realistic accelerator problems. ORBIT is a particle-in-cell tracking code that transports bunches of interacting particles through a series of nodes representing elements, effects, or diagnostics that occur in the accelerator lattice. At present, ORBIT contains detailed models for strip-foil injection, including painting and foil scattering; rf focusing and acceleration; transport through various magnetic elements; longitudinal and transverse impedances; longitudinal, transverse, and three-dimensional space charge forces; collimation and limiting apertures; and the calculation of many useful diagnostic quantities. ORBIT is an object-oriented code, written in C++ and utilizing a scripting interface for the convenience of the user. Ongoing improvements include the addition of a library of accelerator maps, BEAMLINE/MXYZPTLK; the introduction of a treatment of magnet errors and fringe fields; the conversion of the scripting interface to the standard scripting language, Python; and the parallelization of the computations using MPI. The ORBIT code is an open source, powerful, and convenient tool for studying beam dynamics in high-intensity rings.

  12. ORBIT: A CODE FOR COLLECTIVE BEAM DYNAMICS IN HIGH INTENSITY RINGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HOLMES, J.A.; DANILOV, V.; GALAMBOS, J.; SHISHLO, A.; COUSINEAU, S.; CHOU, W.; MICHELOTTI, L.; OSTIGUY, J.F.; WEI, J.

    2002-01-01

    We are developing a computer code, ORBIT, specifically for beam dynamics calculations in high-intensity rings. Our approach allows detailed simulation of realistic accelerator problems. ORBIT is a particle-in-cell tracking code that transports bunches of interacting particles through a series of nodes representing elements, effects, or diagnostics that occur in the accelerator lattice. At present, ORBIT contains detailed models for strip-foil injection, including painting and foil scattering; rf focusing and acceleration; transport through various magnetic elements; longitudinal and transverse impedances; longitudinal, transverse, and three-dimensional space charge forces; collimation and limiting apertures; and the calculation of many useful diagnostic quantities. ORBIT is an object-oriented code, written in C++ and utilizing a scripting interface for the convenience of the user. Ongoing improvements include the addition of a library of accelerator maps, BEAMLINE/MXYZPTLK, the introduction of a treatment of magnet errors and fringe fields; the conversion of the scripting interface to the standard scripting language, Python; and the parallelization of the computations using MPI. The ORBIT code is an open source, powerful, and convenient tool for studying beam dynamics in high-intensity rings

  13. Thermal sensitive paper as a diagnostic for intense relativistic electron beam dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilgenbach, R.M.; McDermott, D.B.; Marshall, T.C.

    1978-08-01

    Thermal sensitive paper has been used as a diagnostic for an intense relativistic electron beam propagating in a rippled magnetic field. The E/sub r/ x B/sub z/ rotation of the beam has been measured from the exposed pattern on the thermal paper and used to calculate the electrostatic field of the beam E/sub r/, and the corresponding values of electron density and beam current. Exposed strips of thermal paper show longitudinal modulation of the radial electron velocity with a period corresponding to that of a rippled magnetic field; modulation of the radial electron velocity at the cyclotron frequency has also been observed.

  14. Experience with High-Intensity Beam Scraping and Tail Population at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Redaelli, S; Burkart, F; Bruce, R; Mirarchi, D; Salvachua, B; Valentino, G; Wollmann, D

    2013-01-01

    The population of beam tails at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a source of concern for the operation at higher beam energies and intensities when even small fractions of the beam could represent a potential danger is case of slow or fast losses, e.g. caused by orbit transients or by collimator movements. Different studies have been performed using the technique of collimator scans to probe the beam tail population in different conditions. The experience accumulated during the operation at 3.5 TeV and 4 TeV is reviewed.

  15. Application of high power modulated intense relativistic electron beams for development of Wake Field Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, M.

    1989-01-01

    This final Progress Report addresses DOE-sponsored research on the development of future high-gradient particle accelerators. The experimental and the theoretical research, which lasted three years, investigated the Two Beam Accelerator (TBA). This high-voltage-gradient accelerator was powered by a modulated intense relativistic electron beam (MIREB) of power >10 10 watts. This research was conceived after a series of successful experiments performed at NRL generating and using MIREBs. This work showed that an RF structure could be built which was directly powered by a modulated intense relativistic electron beam. This structure was then used to accelerate a second electron beam. At the end of the three year project the proof-of-principle accelerator demonstrated the generation of a high current beam of electrons with energy >60 MeV. Scaling laws needed to design practical devices for future applications were also derived

  16. CERN Accelerator School: Intensity Limitations in Particle Beams | 2-11 November

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Registration is now open for the CERN Accelerator School’s specialised course on Intensity Limitations in Particle Beams, to be held at CERN between 2 and 11 November 2015.   This course will mainly be of interest to staff in accelerator laboratories, university departments and companies manufacturing accelerator equipment. Many accelerators and storage rings, whether intended for particle physics experiments, synchrotron light sources or industrial applications, require beams of high brightness and the highest possible intensities. A good understanding of the possible limitations is required to achieve the desired performance. The programme for this course will cover the interaction of beams with their surroundings, with other beams and further collective effects. Lectures on the effects and possible mitigations will be complemented by tutorials. Further information can be found at: http://cas.web.cern.ch/cas/Intensity-Limitations-2015/IL-advert.html   http:/...

  17. The use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy photon beams for improving the dose uniformity of electron beams shaped with MLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosalaei, Homeira; Karnas, Scott; Shah, Sheel; Van Doodewaard, Sharon; Foster, Tim; Chen, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Electrons are ideal for treating shallow tumors and sparing adjacent normal tissue. Conventionally, electron beams are collimated by cut-outs that are time-consuming to make and difficult to adapt to tumor shape throughout the course of treatment. We propose that electron cut-outs can be replaced using photon multileaf collimator (MLC). Two major problems of this approach are that the scattering of electrons causes penumbra widening because of a large air gap, and available commercial treatment planning systems (TPSs) do not support MLC-collimated electron beams. In this study, these difficulties were overcome by (1) modeling electron beams collimated by photon MLC for a commercial TPS, and (2) developing a technique to reduce electron beam penumbra by adding low-energy intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) photons (4 MV). We used blocks to simulate MLC shielding in the TPS. Inverse planning was used to optimize boost photon beams. This technique was applied to a parotid and a central nervous system (CNS) clinical case. Combined photon and electron plans were compared with conventional plans and verified using ion chamber, film, and a 2D diode array. Our studies showed that the beam penumbra for mixed beams with 90 cm source to surface distance (SSD) is comparable with electron applicators and cut-outs at 100 cm SSD. Our mixed-beam technique yielded more uniform dose to the planning target volume and lower doses to various organs at risk for both parotid and CNS clinical cases. The plans were verified with measurements, with more than 95% points passing the gamma criteria of 5% in dose difference and 5 mm for distance to agreement. In conclusion, the study has demonstrated the feasibility and potential advantage of using photon MLC to collimate electron beams with boost photon IMRT fields. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Self-Consistent simulations of High-Intensity Beams and E-Clouds with WARP POSINST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vay, J.-L.; Friendman, A.; Grote, D.P.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a new, comprehensive set of simulation tools aimed at modeling the interaction of intense ion beams and electron clouds (e-clouds). The set contains the 3-D accelerator PIC codeWARP and the 2-D ''slice'' ecloud code POSINST, as well as a merger of the two, augmented by new modules for impact ionization and neutral gas generation. The new capability runs on workstations or parallel supercomputers and contains advanced features such as mesh refinement, disparate adaptive time stepping, and a new ''drift-Lorentz'' particle mover for tracking charged particles in magnetic fields using large time steps. It is being applied to the modeling of ion beams (1 MeV, 180 mA, K+) for heavy ion inertial fusion and warm dense matter studies, as they interact with electron clouds in the High-Current Experiment (HCX). In earlier papers, we described the capabilities and presented recent simulation results with detailed comparisons against the HCX experiment, as well as their application (in a different regime) to the modeling of e-clouds in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We concentrate here on the description of the implementation of the ''quasi-static'' mode of operation, for comparison with other codes, and introduce a new consideration on the estimate of computing time between the quasi-static and the fully self-consistent modes

  19. The effects of laser beam incident angle and intensity distribution on Fabry-Perot etalon spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Fahua; Wang, Yingying; Shi, Wenjuan; Chen, Ying; Liu, Mengling; Guo, Wenxin

    2017-11-01

    Fabry-Perot(F-P) etalon has important applications in laser detection, lidar and laser communication systems. In practical applications, the spectrum of the F-P etalon is affected by various factors, such as incident angle, divergence angle, spectral width, intensity distribution of the incident beam, absorption loss, surface defects of the plate and so on. The effects of the incident angle and the beam intensity distribution on F-P etalon spectrum are mainly analyzed. For the first time, taking into account both the beam incident angle and divergence angle, the precise analytical expression of the F-P etalon transmission spectrum is derived. For the Gaussian light intensity distribution, the precise analytical expression of the F-P etalon transmission spectrum is derived. The simulation analysis is carried out and the results are as follows. When the beam divergence angle is not zero, the incident angle increases, on the one hand, the center of the etalon spectrum is moved to the high frequency, and the frequency shift is linear with the square of the incident angle. The slope decreases with the increase of the divergence angle. On the other hand, resulting in peak reduction, spectral line broadening, and with the divergence angle increases, the more obvious the phenomenon. Considering the distribution of Gaussian light intensity, the spectrum of the etalon will be improved with the increase concentration of beam energy. On the one hand, the peak value is increased, the spectral line is narrowed and with the incidence angle increases, the degree of improvement is more obvious. On the one hand, the center of the spectrum moves toward the low frequency, but the larger the incident angle, the smaller the movement amount. The error of frequency discrimination or frequency locking by using the F-P etalon spectrum increases rapidly with the increase of the beam incident angle and beam divergence angle, and the Gaussian light intensity distribution beam can effectively

  20. Object-Oriented Modelling of Flexible Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiavo, Francesco; Vigano, Luca; Ferretti, Gianni

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the problem of modelling flexible thin beams in multibody systems is tackled. The proposed model, implemented with the object-oriented modelling language Modelica, is completely modular, allowing the realization of complex systems by simple aggregation of basic components. The finite element method is employed as the basic scheme to spatially discretize the model equations. Exploiting the modular features of the language, the beam substructuring discretisation scheme (mixed finite element-finite volume) is derived as well. Selected simulation results are presented in order to validate the model with respect to both theoretical predictions and literature reference results

  1. Generation and focusing of pulsed intense ion beams. Progress report, April 1, 1979-September 30, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudan, R.N.; Hammer, D.A.

    1981-04-01

    Theoretical calculations suggest that an intense pulsed approx. 1 MeV proton beam can be used to simulate the characteristics of approx. 1 GeV heavy ion beam propagation in an inertial confinement fusion reactor chamber. Given the present availability of the former beams and the high projected cost for obtaining the latter ones, such experimental simulations appear appropriate. Work was undertaken under the cited contract to apply the technology of intense proton beams to this end. The first task was the development of a high brightness pulsed proton source which could produce a weakly convergent approx. 10 kA proton beam in a field free drift region. This was accomplished at approx. 250 keV, and preliminary beam propagation experiments were performed. It was concluded that a proper simulation experiment would require a higher voltage beam. An upgraded version of the existing generator, which would have produced a 30 kA beam at about 500 keV, and further propagation experiments were proposed as part of our unsuccessful renewal proposal dated October 15, 1979

  2. Upgrading the GANIL facilities for high-intensity heavy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, E.

    1995-01-01

    A new project, called THI, is underway at GANIL for taking advantage of the high intensities extracted from the 14 GHz ion source. The goal is to boost the present beam intensities by a factor of the order of 15 for light ion species up to Ar while coping with beam powers of several kW. The status of the numerous components of this upgrading is described, including non-interceptive beam diagnostics, beam loss detection, supervision of electric and magnetic supplies, thermal shielding, solutions for radiation and safety problems, movable stripper, etc. The status of a re-buncher to be placed between the two separated sector cyclotrons in order to ameliorate the extraction efficiency of the last cyclotron is also presented. (author)

  3. The key physics and technology issues in the intense-beam proton accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Fu Shin Ian; Guan Xia Ling

    2002-01-01

    Beam power is required to raise one order in the next generation spallation neutron source. There are still some physics and technology difficulties need to be overcome, even though no fatal obstacle exists due to the rapid development of the technology in intense-beam accelerator in recent years. Therefore, it is highly demanded to clarify the key issues and to lunch an R and D program to break through the technological barriers before start to build the expansive machine. The new technological challenge arises from the high beam current, the high accelerator power and the high demand on the reliability and stability of the accelerator operation. The will discuss these issues and the means to resolve them, as well as the state of the art in a few of major technological disciplines. Finally, the choice the framework of intense-beam accelerator is discussed

  4. The key physics and technology issues in the intense-beam proton accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Shinian; Fang Shouxian

    2002-01-01

    Beam power is required to raise one order in the next generation spallation neutron source. There are still some physics and technology difficulties need to be overcome, even though no fatal obstacle exists due to the rapid development of the technology in intense-beam accelerator in recent years. Therefore, it is highly demanded to clarify the key issues and to lunch an R and D program to break through the technological barriers before author start to build the expansive machine. The new technological challenge arises from the high beam current, the high accelerator power and the high demand on the reliability and stability of the accelerator operation. The author will discuss these issues and the means to resolve them, as well as the state of the art in a few of major technological disciplines. Finally, the choice the framework of intense-beam accelerator is discussed

  5. Stimulated Raman scattering by an intense relativistic electron beam subjected to a rippled electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekefi, G.; Shefer, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    Generation of submillimeter radiation by stimulated Raman scattering in an intense relativistic electron beam subjected to a spatially periodic transverse electric field is examined. The requisite electric field modulation can be obtained by rippling the wall of the conducting drift tube. When the electron beam is subjected to a periodic longitudinal electric field, short-wavelength plasmons, rather than photons, are generated. The growth rate and other parameters related to this instability are discussed

  6. Reduction of the beam intensity by means of a sieve for Linac4

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia Tudela, M; Lombardi, A

    2010-01-01

    Different types of beams are needed by the PSB, in particular at Linac4 [1]. Low intensity beam can be obtained using a piece called “sieve” in the Linac to PSB transfer line. The aim of this note is to study the dynamics of the protons, generated after this piece, which could activate the vacuum chamber, up to the end of the line, in order to locate the losses and their level.

  7. The beam intensity and positron monitoring system of the Daresbury Electron Synchrotron (NINA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poole, D.E.; Ring, T.; Peters, D.G.; Allen, J.

    1976-01-01

    The beam sensing system of NINA has been redesigned and rebuilt to provide comprehensive monitoring of beam intensity and position. The reasons for the change are stated, and the requirements and performance specification for the new system are listed. The report falls under the following heads: the sensing head; the head electronics unit; the line receiver unit; performance of installed monitors; display system and computer interface. The performance of the new system is summarized. (U.K.)

  8. 650 mm long liquid hydrogen target for use in a high intensity electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark, J.W.

    1983-07-01

    This paper describes a 650 mm long liquid hydrogen target constructed for use in the high intensity electron beam at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The main design problem was to construct a target that would permit the heat deposited by the electron beam to be removed rapidly without boiling the hydrogen so as to maintain constant target density for optimum data taking. Design requirements, construction details and operating experience are discussed

  9. Production and characterization of an intense hyperthermal beam of H3 molecules and of H atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garvey, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    In order to study the reaction H + H 2 in a crossed molecular beam experiment, a means of generating an intense beam of H atoms is essential. The method consists of using a high power arc discharge to create a high temperature (approx.12,000 K) plasma in which H 2 molecules can be dissociated into atoms. By using an arc source of the type developed by Kunth, a stable, intense, hyperthermal H atom beam was successfully produced. Section 2 of this thesis discusses the design and operation of the apparatus and Section 3 of the thesis discusses the characterization of the hydrogen atoms within the beam. The laboratory energy distribution function of these atoms was determined approximately, and spans the range from 0.5 eV to about 12 eV. The total intensity of this beam is of the order of approx.10 22 atoms/sterad/sec. In the course of developing this intense beam of hydrogen atoms, the source was found to also produce metastable H 3 molecules. This is the first direct, unambiguous observation of such a species in a molecular beam, and is discussed in Section 4. Translational energy analysis of this H 3 molecule indicates an energy distribution similar to that of the H atoms, suggesting that the lifetime of H 3 is of the order of 40 μsec or longer. The author also observed emission spectra from the Rydberg states of H 3 identified previously by Herzberg. This is spectroscopic evidence for the presence of this neutral molecule in the beam

  10. EBIS/T charge breeding for intense rare isotope beams at MSU

    CERN Document Server

    Schwarz, S; Marrs, R E; Kittimanapun, K; Lapierre, A; Mendez, A J; Ames, F; Beene, J R; Lindroos, M; Ahle, L E; Stracener, D W; Kester, O; Wenander, F; Lopez-Urrutia, J R Crespo; Dilling, J; Bollen, G

    2010-01-01

    Experiments with reaccelerated beams are an essential component of the science program of existing and future rare isotope beam facilities. NSCL is currently constructing ReA3, a reaccelerator for rare isotopes that have been produced by projectile fragmentation and in-flight fission and that have been thermalized in a gas stopper. The resulting low-energy beam will be brought to an Electron Beam Ion Source/Trap (EBIS/T) in order to obtain highly charged ions at an energy of 12 keV/u. This charge breeder is followed by a compact linear accelerator with a maximum beam energy of 3MeV/u for U-238 and higher energies for lighter isotopes. Next-generation rare isotope beam facilities like the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams FRIB, but also existing Isotope Separator On-line (ISOL) facilities are expected to provide rare-isotope beam rates in the order of 10(11) particles per second for reacceleration. At present the most promising scheme to efficiently start the reacceleration of these intense beams is the use of a...

  11. Intial characterization fo a commerical electron gun for profiling high intensity proton beams in Project X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurman-Keup, R.; Johnson, A.S.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Thangaraj, J.C.T.; Zhang, D.; /Fermilab; Blokland, W.; /Oak Ridge

    2011-03-01

    Measuring the profile of a high-intensity proton beam is problematic in that traditional invasive techniques such as flying wires don't survive the encounter with the beam. One alternative is the use of an electron beam as a probe of the charge distribution in the proton beam as was done at the Spallation Neutron Source at ORNL. Here we present an initial characterization of the beam from a commercial electron gun from Kimball Physics, intended for use in the Fermilab Main Injector for Project X. Despite the fact that the horizontal spot size is abnormally large in the high current measurement, the spot size at the downstream cross X2 is reasonable in the context of measuring the deflection. A thin foil OTR would help with the beam heating and should be tried. The next phase of this experiment is to simulate the proton beam with a pair of current carrying wires and to design and construct a fast deflector. Some of the remaining issues to be considered include determining the minimum beam current needed to observe the deflected beam for a given sweep time and the impact of longitudinal variations in the charge density of the bunch.

  12. Technological Aspects of Corrosion-Resistant Steels Surfacing by Intense Relativistic Electron Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belozerov, V. V.; Donets, S. E.; Klepikov, V. F.; Kivshik, V. F.; Lytvynenko, V. V.; Lonin, Yu. F.; Ponomarev, A. G.; Uvarov, V. T.

    Intense tubular relativistic electron beams are a promising tool for a number of practical applications, such as obtaining nanodispersed powder materials, surface properties modification of products, remote surfacing, etc. In current technologies for obtaining of nanopowder materials, one of the leading techniques is one based on the materials handling concentrated flows of energy. Using the various technological equipment (pulse current generators, accelerators), energy is inputted into the material in the form of intense impulse current, the plasma flows of charged particle beams. Each of the specified types of impact is characterized by a certain decomposition mechanism of processed materials to micro- and nano-sized state. Thus, the action of intense pulsed currents based on the thermal evaporation of a melt conductor with its subsequent condensation in liquid, the use of plasma flows and charged particle beams also involves evaporation and condensation of a material in a vacuum or in a special atmosphere.

  13. Polymer electrolyte fuel cell performance degradation at different synchrotron beam intensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eller, Jens; Büchi, Felix N

    2014-01-01

    The degradation of cell performance of polymer electrolyte fuel cells under monochromatic X-ray irradiation at 13.5 keV was studied in galvanostatic and potentiostatic operation modes in a through-plane imaging direction over a range of two orders of magnitude beam intensity at the TOMCAT beamline of the Swiss Light Source. The performance degradation was found to be a function of X-ray dose and independent of beam intensity, whereas the degradation rate correlates with beam intensity. The cell performance was more sensitive to X-ray irradiation at higher temperature and gas feed humidity. High-frequency resistance measurements and the analysis of product water allow conclusions to be drawn on the dominating degradation processes, namely change of hydrophobicity of the electrode and sulfate contamination of the electrocatalyst.

  14. Optical diagnosis system for intense electron beam diode plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jie; Shu Ting; Zhang Jun; Fan Yuwei; Yang Jianhua; Liu Lie; Yin Yi; Luo Ling

    2012-01-01

    A nanosecond time-resolved imaging platform for diode plasmas diagnostics has been constructed based on the pulsed electron beam accelerator and high speed framing camera (HSFC). The accelerator can provide an electrical pulse with voltages of 200-500 kV, rise-time (from 10% to 90% amplitude) of 25 ns and duration of 110 ns. The diode currents up to kA level can be extracted. The trigger signal for camera was picked up by a water-resistor voltage divider after the main switch of the accelerator, which could avoid the disadvantageous influence of the time jitter caused by the breakdown of the gas gaps. Then the sampled negative electrical pulse was converted into a transistor-transistor logic (TTL) signal (5 V) with rise time of about 1.5 ns and time jitter less than 1 ns via a processor. And this signal was taken as the synchronization time base. According to the working characteristics of the camera, the synchronization scheme relying mainly on electrical pulse delay method supplemented by light signal delay method was determined to make sure that the camera can work synchronously with the light production and transportation from the diode plasma within the time scale of nanosecond. Moreover, shielding and filtering methods were used to restrain the interference on the measurement system from the accelerator. Finally, time resolved 2-D framing images of the diode plasma were acquired. (authors)

  15. A mask for high-intensity heavy-ion beams in the MAYA active target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez-Tajes, C., E-mail: rodriguez@ganil.fr [Grand Accélérateur National d' Ions Lourds (GANIL), CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, Bvd Henri Becquerel, 14076 Caen (France); Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, E-15706 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Pancin, J.; Damoy, S.; Roger, T.; Babo, M. [Grand Accélérateur National d' Ions Lourds (GANIL), CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, Bvd Henri Becquerel, 14076 Caen (France); Caamaño, M. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, E-15706 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Farget, F.; Grinyer, G.F.; Jacquot, B.; Pérez-Loureiro, D. [Grand Accélérateur National d' Ions Lourds (GANIL), CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, Bvd Henri Becquerel, 14076 Caen (France); Ramos, D. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, E-15706 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Suzuki, D. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, Université Paris-Sud 11, CNRS/IN2P3, F-91406 Orsay (France)

    2014-12-21

    The use of high-intensity and/or heavy-ion beams in active targets and time-projection chambers is often limited by the strong ionization produced by the beam. Besides the difficulties associated with the saturation of the detector and electronics, beam-related signals may hide the physical events of interest or reduce the detector performance. In addition, space-charge effects may deteriorate the homogeneity of the electric drift field and distort the subsequent reconstruction of particle trajectories. In anticipation of future projects involving such conditions, a dedicated beam mask has been developed and tested in the MAYA active target. Experimental results with a {sup 136}Xe beam are presented.

  16. Experimental results of beryllium exposed to intense high energy proton beam pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammigan, K. [Fermilab; Hartsell, B. [Fermilab; Hurh, P. [Fermilab; Zwaska, R. [Fermilab; Butcher, M. [CERN; Guinchard, M. [CERN; Calviani, M. [CERN; Losito, R. [CERN; Roberts, S. [Culham Lab; Kuksenko, V. [Oxford U.; Atherton, A. [Rutherford; Caretta, O. [Rutherford; Davenne, T. [Rutherford; Densham, C. [Rutherford; Fitton, M. [Rutherford; Loveridge, J. [Rutherford; O' Dell, J. [Rutherford

    2017-02-10

    Beryllium is extensively used in various accelerator beam lines and target facilities as a material for beam windows, and to a lesser extent, as secondary particle production targets. With increasing beam intensities of future accelerator facilities, it is critical to understand the response of beryllium under extreme conditions to reliably operate these components as well as avoid compromising particle production efficiency by limiting beam parameters. As a result, an exploratory experiment at CERN’s HiRadMat facility was carried out to take advantage of the test facility’s tunable high intensity proton beam to probe and investigate the damage mechanisms of several beryllium grades. The test matrix consisted of multiple arrays of thin discs of varying thicknesses as well as cylinders, each exposed to increasing beam intensities. This paper outlines the experimental measurements, as well as findings from Post-Irradiation-Examination (PIE) work where different imaging techniques were used to analyze and compare surface evolution and microstructural response of the test matrix specimens.

  17. CNS active target (CAT) for missing mass spectroscopy with intense beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ota, S.; Tokieda, H.; Lee, C.S.; Watanabe, Y.N.

    2015-01-01

    A new gaseous active target based on a time projection chamber, named CAT, is introduced. The remarkable feature is a dual gain THGEM to decrease the effective gain for the beam particles while keeping a high enough effective gain for the recoil particles. The measured effective gain of low gain region was a factor of one hundred smaller than that of high gain region. This technique provides a wide dynamic range in order to detect both the beam and recoil particles at the same time even with a very high intensity beam of more than 10 5 Hz. (author)

  18. Development of a silicon micro-strip detector for tracking high intensity secondary beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiuchi, R.; Asano, H.; Hasegawa, S.; Honda, R.; Ichikawa, Y.; Imai, K.; Joo, C. W.; Nakazawa, K.; Sako, H.; Sato, S.; Shirotori, K.; Sugimura, H.; Tanida, K.; Watabe, T.

    2014-11-01

    A single-sided silicon micro-strip detector (SSD) has been developed as a tracking detector for hadron experiments at J-PARC where secondary meson beams with intensities of up to 108 Hz are available. The performance of the detector has been investigated and verified in a series of test beam experiments in the years 2009-2011. The hole mobility was deduced from the analysis of cluster events. The beam rate dependence was measured in terms of timing resolution, signal-to-noise ratio, and hit efficiency. This paper describes the detector with its read-out system, details of the test experiments, and discusses the performance achieved.

  19. Development of a silicon micro-strip detector for tracking high intensity secondary beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiuchi, R. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Asano, H. [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Hasegawa, S. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Honda, R. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Ichikawa, Y. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Imai, K. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Joo, C.W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Nakazawa, K. [Physics Department, Gifu University, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan); Sako, H.; Sato, S. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Shirotori, K. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Sugimura, H. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Tanida, K., E-mail: tanida@phya.snu.ac.kr [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Watabe, T. [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

    2014-11-01

    A single-sided silicon micro-strip detector (SSD) has been developed as a tracking detector for hadron experiments at J-PARC where secondary meson beams with intensities of up to 10{sup 8} Hz are available. The performance of the detector has been investigated and verified in a series of test beam experiments in the years 2009–2011. The hole mobility was deduced from the analysis of cluster events. The beam rate dependence was measured in terms of timing resolution, signal-to-noise ratio, and hit efficiency. This paper describes the detector with its read-out system, details of the test experiments, and discusses the performance achieved.

  20. A stable production of intense electron beam plasma with ion back stream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uramoto, Johshin.

    1975-12-01

    An intense electron beam is extracted without space charge limit from a dc plasma source along a magnetic field. The beam space charge is neutralized stably through back streaming of self-ionized ions from the beam extracting anode region where a neutral gas is fed locally. In Appendix I, a space charge free electron gun is designed under this neutralization method. In Appendix II, a dynamic discharge through a series resistance is described, where an operative mechanism of the well-known TP-D plasma is clarified. (auth.)

  1. Design for low beam loss in accelerators for intense neutron source applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jameson, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    Control of beam loss in intense ion linacs involves keeping beam spill below parts in 10 -5 --10 -8 /m by preventing total beam size from extending to the limiting apertures. Starting from good rms design practices, new analysis of the machine architecture is described in terms of the effects of the machine tune with space-charge, free-energy constraint, and halo-producing mechanisms. It is shown that halos are produced by the time- (or position-) varying nature of common linac aspects (such as misalignment, mismatching, acceleration, and construction techniques) through collective core/single-particle interaction dynamics plus resonances

  2. Electron Acceleration by Beating of Two Intense Cross-Focused Hollow Gaussian Laser Beams in Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Saleh T.; Gauniyal, Rakhi; Ahmad, Nafis; Rawat, Priyanka; Purohit, Gunjan

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents propagation of two cross-focused intense hollow Gaussian laser beams (HGBs) in collisionless plasma and its effect on the generation of electron plasma wave (EPW) and electron acceleration process, when relativistic and ponderomotive nonlinearities are simultaneously operative. Nonlinear differential equations have been set up for beamwidth of laser beams, power of generated EPW, and energy gain by electrons using WKB and paraxial approximations. Numerical simulations have been carried out to investigate the effect of typical laser-plasma parameters on the focusing of laser beams in plasmas and further its effect on power of excited EPW and acceleration of electrons. It is observed that focusing of two laser beams in plasma increases for higher order of hollow Gaussian beams, which significantly enhanced the power of generated EPW and energy gain. The amplitude of EPW and energy gain by electrons is found to enhance with an increase in the intensity of laser beams and plasma density. This study will be useful to plasma beat wave accelerator and in other applications requiring multiple laser beams. Supported by United Arab Emirates University for Financial under Grant No. UPAR (2014)-31S164

  3. A particle swarm optimization algorithm for beam angle selection in intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yongjie; Yao Dezhong; Yao, Jonathan; Chen Wufan

    2005-01-01

    Automatic beam angle selection is an important but challenging problem for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning. Though many efforts have been made, it is still not very satisfactory in clinical IMRT practice because of overextensive computation of the inverse problem. In this paper, a new technique named BASPSO (Beam Angle Selection with a Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm) is presented to improve the efficiency of the beam angle optimization problem. Originally developed as a tool for simulating social behaviour, the particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is a relatively new population-based evolutionary optimization technique first introduced by Kennedy and Eberhart in 1995. In the proposed BASPSO, the beam angles are optimized using PSO by treating each beam configuration as a particle (individual), and the beam intensity maps for each beam configuration are optimized using the conjugate gradient (CG) algorithm. These two optimization processes are implemented iteratively. The performance of each individual is evaluated by a fitness value calculated with a physical objective function. A population of these individuals is evolved by cooperation and competition among the individuals themselves through generations. The optimization results of a simulated case with known optimal beam angles and two clinical cases (a prostate case and a head-and-neck case) show that PSO is valid and efficient and can speed up the beam angle optimization process. Furthermore, the performance comparisons based on the preliminary results indicate that, as a whole, the PSO-based algorithm seems to outperform, or at least compete with, the GA-based algorithm in computation time and robustness. In conclusion, the reported work suggested that the introduced PSO algorithm could act as a new promising solution to the beam angle optimization problem and potentially other optimization problems in IMRT, though further studies need to be investigated

  4. Low energy intense electron beams with extra-low energy spread

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrov, A.V.; Calabrese, R.; Ciullo, G.; Dikansky, N.S.; Guidi, V.; Kot, N.C.; Kudelainen, V.I.; Lamanna, G.; Lebedev, V.A.; Logachov, P.V.; Tecchio, L.; Yang, B.

    1994-01-01

    Maximum achievable intensity for low energy electron beams is a feature that is not very often compatible with low energy spread. We show that a proper choice of the source and the acceleration optics allows one to match them together. In this scheme, a GaAs photocathode excited by a single-mode infrared laser and adiabatic acceleration in fully magnetised optics enables the production of a low-energy-spread electron beam with relatively high intensity. The technological problems associated with the method are discussed together with its limitations. (orig.)

  5. Non-linear beam dynamics tests in the LHC: measurement of intensity decay for probing dynamic aperture at injection

    CERN Document Server

    Cettour Cave, S; Giovannozzi, M; Ludwig, M; MacPherson, A; Redaelli, S; Roncarolo, F; Solfaroli Camillocci, M; Venturini Delsolaro, W

    2013-01-01

    For a second year in a row dynamic aperture experiments have been performed at the LHC. These studies have been carried out by two teams following alternative techniques: On Beam 1 a novel approach has been tested which heats the beam until the emittance becomes large, and derives the dynamic aperture from beam losses assuming an inverse logarithm model for the time-dependence of the intensity. On Beam 2, the traditional approach of sampling the dynamic aperture with large amplitude kicks has been pursued [1]. In 2011, considerable progress was made and impressive results have been reported. In 2012 a further Machine Development (MD) session was scheduled during which both teams have benefited from an improved availability of the beams and more optimal performance of the instrumentation. Observations and analysis are presented as two MD reports of the LHC dynamic aperture experiment MD. This note describes the observations made on Beam 1, when the strength of the spool pieces have been varied. The key quantit...

  6. Study of the many-dimensional transverse phase-space distributions of intense ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riehl, G.

    1993-12-01

    Aim of this thesis was the study of the transverse phase-space distributions of intense ion beams and especially the determination of the emittance growth and the filaments of the distributions. Developed was a facility, which determines under application of each two perpendicularly arranged slit apertures and profile grids and a multichannel current-amplifier plug-in both beam profile and beam emittance of the two transverse motion planes. After the determination of the 1- and 2-dimensional phase-space distributions was successfully realized, the facility was further developed for the measurement of the 3-dimensional phase-space distributions. The observed growth of the emittance and RMS growth on magnetic solenoids could be quantitatively determined and their different causes determined. The growth factors of an optically only slightly filamented beam emittance between 1.5 and 3.2 show that the beam quality is strongly interfered by such influences. The measurements showed beyond the causes and the connection between the filamentation of the emittance as well as the origin of the hollow beams and beam halos observed in many experiments. It could be shown that not only magnetic fields and space-charge fields but pricipally each radial-symmetric, nonlinear field couples the two transverse motion planes and by this causes in nearly all cases a growth of the beam emittance

  7. Modeling beam-front dynamics at low gas pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, R.J.; Yu, S.

    1982-01-01

    The dynamics of space charge neutralization at the front of an intense self-focused electron beam pulse exhibits important differences in different gas pressure regimes. At very low pressures, the beam front is in the so-called ion-focused regime (IFR) where all secondary electrons are expelled from the beam region by the radial electric field without causing significant additional ionization. We estimate the upper pressure boundary of this regime by considering the distance scale length for cascade (avalanche) ionization. Data from the FX-25 diode experiments indicate a critical transition pressure (P/sub c/) that agrees with this estimate and with its scaling among various gas types. Normal mobility-limited treatments (local conductivity models) of the secondary electrons at the beam front are not justified until the gas pressure is 10 to 50 times higher than P/sub c/, due to runaway of these secondary electrons in the strong space-charge electric field at the lower pressures. The main conclusion of this study is that a non-local phase space (Boltzmann) treatment of the secondary electrons is required to accurately describe these different beam front regimes and the transitions between them; such a code model is currently under development

  8. Development of apparatus for high-intensity beam lines at the KEK-PS new experimental hall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanoi, Yutaka; Tanaka, Kazuhiro; Minakawa, Michifumi

    1992-01-01

    The new counter experimental hall was constructed at the KEK 12 GeV Proton Synchrotron (the KEK-PS) in order to handle high-intensity primary proton beams of up to 1 x 10 13 pps (protons per second), which is one order of magnitude greater than the present beam intensity of the KEK-PS, 1 x 10 12 pps. New technologies for handling high-intensity beams have, then, been developed and employed in the new hall construction. A part of our R/D work on handling high intensity beam is briefly reported. (author)

  9. Experimental three-dimensional beam profiling and modeling of a terahertz beam generated from a two-color air plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pernille Klarskov; Strikwerda, Andrew; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    a sharp, conical intensity profile resembling a donut, and in the focal region the beam collapses to a central, Lorentz-shaped profile. The Lorentzian intensity profile in the focal region can be explained by considering the frequency-dependent spot size derived from measurements of the Gouy phase shift...... in the focal region, and the transition from the donut profile to a central peak is consistent with propagation of a Bessel–Gauss beam, as shown by simulations based on a recent transient photocurrent model (You et al 2012 Phys. Rev. Lett. 109 183902). We combine our measurements to the first full 3D...

  10. Intense beams from gases generated by a permanent magnet ECR ion source at PKU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, H T; Peng, S X; Lu, P N; Yan, S; Zhou, Q F; Zhao, J; Yuan, Z X; Guo, Z Y; Chen, J E

    2012-02-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source is designed for the production of high-current ion beams of various gaseous elements. At the Peking University (PKU), the primary study is focused on developing suitable permanent magnet ECR ion sources (PMECRs) for separated function radio frequency quadrupole (SFRFQ) accelerator and for Peking University Neutron Imaging Facility. Recently, other kinds of high-intensity ion beams are required for new acceleration structure demonstration, simulation of fusion reactor material irradiation, aviation bearing modification, and other applications. So we expanded the ion beam category from O(+), H(+), and D(+) to N(+), Ar(+), and He(+). Up to now, about 120 mA of H(+), 83 mA of D(+), 50 mA of O(+), 63 mA of N(+), 70 mA of Ar(+), and 65 mA of He(+) extracted at 50 kV through a φ 6 mm aperture were produced by the PMECRs at PKU. Their rms emittances are less than 0.2 π mm mrad. Tungsten samples were irradiated by H(+) or He(+) beam extracted from this ion source and H∕He holes and bubbles have been observed on the samples. A method to produce a high intensity H∕He mixed beam to study synergistic effect is developed for nuclear material irradiation. To design a He(+) beam injector for coupled radio frequency quadruple and SFRFQ cavity, He(+) beam transmission experiments were carried out on PKU low energy beam transport test bench and the transmission was less than 50%. It indicated that some electrode modifications must be done to decrease the divergence of He(+) beam.

  11. Intense beams from gases generated by a permanent magnet ECR ion source at PKU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, H. T.; Chen, J. E. [College of Physical Sciences, Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); SKLNPT, Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Peng, S. X.; Lu, P. N.; Yan, S.; Zhou, Q. F.; Zhao, J.; Yuan, Z. X.; Guo, Z. Y. [SKLNPT, Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2012-02-15

    An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source is designed for the production of high-current ion beams of various gaseous elements. At the Peking University (PKU), the primary study is focused on developing suitable permanent magnet ECR ion sources (PMECRs) for separated function radio frequency quadrupole (SFRFQ) accelerator and for Peking University Neutron Imaging Facility. Recently, other kinds of high-intensity ion beams are required for new acceleration structure demonstration, simulation of fusion reactor material irradiation, aviation bearing modification, and other applications. So we expanded the ion beam category from O{sup +}, H{sup +}, and D{sup +} to N{sup +}, Ar{sup +}, and He{sup +}. Up to now, about 120 mA of H{sup +}, 83 mA of D{sup +}, 50 mA of O{sup +}, 63 mA of N{sup +}, 70 mA of Ar{sup +}, and 65 mA of He{sup +} extracted at 50 kV through a {phi} 6 mm aperture were produced by the PMECRs at PKU. Their rms emittances are less than 0.2 {pi} mm mrad. Tungsten samples were irradiated by H{sup +} or He{sup +} beam extracted from this ion source and H/He holes and bubbles have been observed on the samples. A method to produce a high intensity H/He mixed beam to study synergistic effect is developed for nuclear material irradiation. To design a He{sup +} beam injector for coupled radio frequency quadruple and SFRFQ cavity, He{sup +} beam transmission experiments were carried out on PKU low energy beam transport test bench and the transmission was less than 50%. It indicated that some electrode modifications must be done to decrease the divergence of He{sup +} beam.

  12. SLC beam line error analysis using a model-based expert system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.; Kleban, S.

    1988-02-01

    Commissioning particle beam line is usually a very time-consuming and labor-intensive task for accelerator physicists. To aid in commissioning, we developed a model-based expert system that identifies error-free regions, as well as localizing beam line errors. This paper will give examples of the use of our system for the SLC commissioning. 8 refs., 5 figs

  13. The Intense Slow Positron Beam Facility at the NC State University PULSTAR Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawari, Ayman I.; Moxom, Jeremy; Hathaway, Alfred G.; Brown, Benjamin; Gidley, David W.; Vallery, Richard; Xu, Jun

    2009-01-01

    An intense slow positron beam is in its early stages of operation at the 1-MW open-pool PULSTAR research reactor at North Carolina State University. The positron beam line is installed in a beam port that has a 30-cmx30-cm cross sectional view of the core. The positrons are created in a tungsten converter/moderator by pair-production using gamma rays produced in the reactor core and by neutron capture reactions in cadmium cladding surrounding the tungsten. Upon moderation, slow (∼3 eV) positrons that are emitted from the moderator are electrostatically extracted, focused and magnetically guided until they exit the reactor biological shield with 1-keV energy, approximately 3-cm beam diameter and an intensity exceeding 6x10 8 positrons per second. A magnetic beam switch and transport system has been installed and tested that directs the beam into one of two spectrometers. The spectrometers are designed to implement state-of-the-art PALS and DBS techniques to perform positron and positronium annihilation studies of nanophases in matter.

  14. Spatial and spectral coherence in propagating high-intensity twin beams

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Haderka, O.; Machulka, R.; Peřina ml., Jan; Allevi, A.; Bondani, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 5, Sep (2015), s. 14365 ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/12/0382 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : spatial and spectral coherence * high-intensity twin beams Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 5.228, year: 2015

  15. Dynamics of cavitation clouds within a high-intensity focused ultrasonic beam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, Yuan; Katz, Joseph; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    In this experimental study, we generate a 500 kHz high-intensity focused ultrasonic beam, with pressure amplitude in the focal zone of up to 1.9 MPa, in initially quiescent water. The resulting pressure field and behavior of the cavitation bubbles are measured using high-speed digital in-line

  16. Higher order mode laser beam intensity fluctuations in strong oceanic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baykal, Yahya

    2017-05-01

    Intensity fluctuations of the higher order mode laser beams are evaluated when these beams propagate in a medium exhibiting strong oceanic turbulence. Our formulation involves the modified Rytov solution that extends the Rytov solution to cover strong turbulence as well, and our recently reported expression that relates the atmospheric turbulence structure constant to the oceanic turbulence parameters and oceanic wireless optical communication link parameters. The variations of the intensity fluctuations are reported against the changes of the ratio of temperature to salinity contributions to the refractive index spectrum, rate of dissipation of kinetic energy per unit mass of fluid, rate of dissipation of mean-squared temperature, viscosity and the source size of the higher order mode laser beam. Our results indicate that under any oceanic turbulence parameters, it is advantageous to employ higher order laser modes in reducing the scintillation noise in wireless optical communication links operating in a strongly turbulent ocean.

  17. Spot size, depth-of-focus, and diffraction ring intensity formulas for truncated Gaussian beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urey, Hakan

    2004-01-20

    Simple polynomial formulas to calculate the FWHM and full width at 1/e2 intensity diffraction spot size and the depth of focus at a Strehl ratio of 0.8 and 0.5 as a function of a Gaussian beam truncation ratio and a system f-number are presented. Formulas are obtained by use of the numerical integration of a Huygens-Fresnel diffraction integral and can be used to calculate the number of resolvable spots, the modulation transfer function, and the defocus tolerance of optical systems that employ laser beams. I also derived analytical formulas for the diffraction ring intensity as a function of the Gaussian beam truncation ratio and the system f-number. Such formulas can be used to estimate the diffraction-limited contrast of display and imaging systems.

  18. Intensive treatment models and coercion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohlenschlaeger, Johan; Thorup, Anne; Petersen, Lone

    2007-01-01

    Little evidence exists concerning the optimal treatment for patients with first-episode schizophrenia-spectrum disorders and the effect on traditional outcomes. The aim was to investigate whether optimal treatment models have an effect on the level of use of coercion and on traditional outcomes...... and on client satisfaction. Integrated Treatment had fewer bed-days, more patients living in non-supervised accommodation, and better score on quality of life. No differences were found as to the use of coercion. This study adds to the evidence that intensified treatment models are superior to standard...

  19. Quantum and classical correlations of intense beams of light investigated via joint photodetection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agliati, Andrea [Quanta System S.p.A., Via IV Novembre, 116-21058, Solbiate Olona (Vatican City State, Holy See,) (Italy); Bondani, Maria [INFM/CNR, Unita di Como (Italy); Andreoni, Alessandra [Dipartimento di Fisica e Matematica, Universita degli Studi dell' Insubria, Como (Italy); Cillis, Giovanni De [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Milano (Italy); Paris, Matteo G A [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Milano (Italy)

    2005-12-01

    We address joint photodetection as a method for discriminating between the classical correlations of a thermal beam divided by a beam splitter and the quantum entanglement of a twin beam obtained by parametric down-conversion. We show that for intense beams of light the detection of the difference photocurrent may be used, in principle, in order to reveal entanglement, while the simple measurement of the correlation coefficient is not sufficient. We have experimentally measured the correlation coefficient and the variance of the difference photocurrent for several classical and quantum states. Results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions taking into account the extra noise in the generated fields that is due to the pump laser fluctuations.

  20. Quantum and classical correlations of intense beams of light investigated via joint photodetection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agliati, Andrea; Bondani, Maria; Andreoni, Alessandra; Cillis, Giovanni De; Paris, Matteo G A

    2005-01-01

    We address joint photodetection as a method for discriminating between the classical correlations of a thermal beam divided by a beam splitter and the quantum entanglement of a twin beam obtained by parametric down-conversion. We show that for intense beams of light the detection of the difference photocurrent may be used, in principle, in order to reveal entanglement, while the simple measurement of the correlation coefficient is not sufficient. We have experimentally measured the correlation coefficient and the variance of the difference photocurrent for several classical and quantum states. Results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions taking into account the extra noise in the generated fields that is due to the pump laser fluctuations

  1. Theoretical and Computational Investigation of Periodically Focused Intense Charged-Particle Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chiping [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center

    2013-06-26

    The purpose of this report is to summarize results of theoretical and computational investigations of periodically focused intense charged-particle beams in parameter regimes relevant to the development of advanced high-brightness, high-power accelerators for high-energy physics research. The breakthroughs and highlights in our research in the period from April 1, 2010 to March 30, 2013 were: a) Theory and simulation of adiabatic thermal Child-Langmuir flow; b) Particle-in-cell simulations of adiabatic thermal beams in periodic solenoidal focusing field; c)Dynamics of charged particles in an adiabatic thermal beam equilibrium in a periodic solenoidal focusing field; d) Training of undergraduate researchers and graduate student in accelerator and beam physics. A brief introduction and summary is presented. Detailed descriptions of research results are provided in an appendix of publications at the end of the report.

  2. Electromagnetic Coupling Between High Intensity LHC Beams and the Synchrotron Radiation Monitor Light Extraction System

    CERN Document Server

    Andreazza, W; Bravin, E; Caspers, F; Garlasch`e, M; Gras, J; Goldblatt, A; Lefevre, T; Jones, R; Metral, E; Nosych, A; Roncarolo_, F; Salvant, B; Trad, G; Veness, R; Vollinger, C; Wendt, M

    2013-01-01

    The CERN LHC is equipped with two Synchrotron Radiation Monitor (BSRT) systems used to characterise transverse and longitudinal beam distributions. Since the end of the 2011 LHC run the light extraction system, based on a retractable mirror, has suffered deformation and mechanical failure that is correlated to the increase in beam intensity. Temperature probes have associated these observations to a strong heating of the mirror support with a dependence on the longitudinal bunch length and shape, indicating the origin as electromagnetic coupling between the beam and the structure. This paper combines all this information with the aim of characterising and improving the system in view of its upgrade during the current LHC shutdown. Beam-based observations are presented along with electromagnetic and thermomechanical simulations and complemented by laboratory measurements, including the study of the RF properties of different mirror bulk and coating materials.

  3. Computer simulations for intense continuous beam transport in electrostatic lens systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xiaosong; Lv Jianqin

    2008-01-01

    A code LEADS based on the Lie algebraic analysis for the continuous beam dynamics with space charge effect in beam transport has been developed. The program is used for the simulations of axial-symmetric and unsymmetrical intense continuous beam in the channels including drift spaces, electrostatic lenses and DC electrostatic accelerating tubes. In order to get the accuracy required, all elements are divided into many small segments, and the electric field in the segments is regarded as uniform field, and the dividing points are treated as thin lenses. Iteration procedures are adopted in the program to obtain self-consistent solutions. The code can be used in the designs of low energy beam transport systems, electrostatic accelerators and ion implantation machines. (authors)

  4. Individualized Selection of Beam Angles and Treatment Isocenter in Tangential Breast Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penninkhof, Joan, E-mail: j.penninkhof@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus M.C. Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Spadola, Sara [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus M.C. Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Alma Mater Studiorum, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Baaijens, Margreet [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus M.C. Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Lanconelli, Nico [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Alma Mater Studiorum, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Heijmen, Ben [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus M.C. Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-06-01

    Purpose and Objective: Propose a novel method for individualized selection of beam angles and treatment isocenter in tangential breast intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: For each patient, beam and isocenter selection starts with the fully automatic generation of a large database of IMRT plans (up to 847 in this study); each of these plans belongs to a unique combination of isocenter position, lateral beam angle, and medial beam angle. The imposed hard planning constraint on patient maximum dose may result in plans with unacceptable target dose delivery. Such plans are excluded from further analyses. Owing to differences in beam setup, database plans differ in mean doses to organs at risk (OARs). These mean doses are used to construct 2-dimensional graphs, showing relationships between: (1) contralateral breast dose and ipsilateral lung dose; and (2) contralateral breast dose and heart dose (analyzed only for left-sided). The graphs can be used for selection of the isocenter and beam angles with the optimal, patient-specific tradeoffs between the mean OAR doses. For 30 previously treated patients (15 left-sided and 15 right-sided tumors), graphs were generated considering only the clinically applied isocenter with 121 tangential beam angle pairs. For 20 of the 30 patients, 6 alternative isocenters were also investigated. Results: Computation time for automatic generation of 121 IMRT plans took on average 30 minutes. The generated graphs demonstrated large variations in tradeoffs between conflicting OAR objectives, depending on beam angles and patient anatomy. For patients with isocenter optimization, 847 IMRT plans were considered. Adding isocenter position optimization next to beam angle optimization had a small impact on the final plan quality. Conclusion: A method is proposed for individualized selection of beam angles in tangential breast IMRT. This may be especially important for patients with cardiac risk factors or an

  5. Intense highly charged ion beam production and operation with a superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H. W.; Sun, L. T.; Guo, J. W.; Lu, W.; Xie, D. Z.; Hitz, D.; Zhang, X. Z.; Yang, Y.

    2017-09-01

    The superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with advanced design in Lanzhou (SECRAL) is a superconducting-magnet-based electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) for the production of intense highly charged heavy ion beams. It is one of the best performing ECRISs worldwide and the first superconducting ECRIS built with an innovative magnet to generate a high strength minimum-B field for operation with heating microwaves up to 24-28 GHz. Since its commissioning in 2005, SECRAL has so far produced a good number of continuous wave intensity records of highly charged ion beams, in which recently the beam intensities of 40Ar+ and 129Xe26+ have, for the first time, exceeded 1 emA produced by an ion source. Routine operations commenced in 2007 with the Heavy Ion accelerator Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL), China. Up to June 2017, SECRAL has been providing more than 28,000 hours of highly charged heavy ion beams to the accelerator demonstrating its great capability and reliability. The great achievement of SECRAL is accumulation of numerous technical advancements, such as an innovative magnetic system and an efficient double-frequency (24 +18 GHz ) heating with improved plasma stability. This article reviews the development of SECRAL and production of intense highly charged ion beams by SECRAL focusing on its unique magnet design, source commissioning, performance studies and enhancements, beam quality and long-term operation. SECRAL development and its performance studies representatively reflect the achievements and status of the present ECR ion source, as well as the ECRIS impacts on HIRFL.

  6. Intensive treatment models and coercion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohlenschlaeger, Johan; Thorup, Anne; Petersen, Lone

    2007-01-01

    Little evidence exists concerning the optimal treatment for patients with first-episode schizophrenia-spectrum disorders and the effect on traditional outcomes. The aim was to investigate whether optimal treatment models have an effect on the level of use of coercion and on traditional outcomes. ...

  7. Improved Beam Angle Arrangement in Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Treatment Planning for Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Wenhua; Lim, Gino J.; Li, Yupeng; Zhu, X. Ronald; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigates potential gains of an improved beam angle arrangement compared to a conventional fixed gantry setup in intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment for localized prostate cancer patients based on a proof of principle study. Materials and Methods: Three patients with localized prostate cancer retrospectively selected from our institution were studied. For each patient, IMPT plans were designed using two, three and four beam angles, respectively, obtained from a beam angle optimization algorithm. Those plans were then compared with ones using two lateral parallel-opposed beams according to the conventional planning protocol for localized prostate cancer adopted at our institution. Results: IMPT plans with two optimized angles achieved significant improvements in rectum sparing and moderate improvements in bladder sparing against those with two lateral angles. Plans with three optimized angles further improved rectum sparing significantly over those two-angle plans, whereas four-angle plans found no advantage over three-angle plans. A possible three-beam class solution for localized prostate patients was suggested and demonstrated with preserved dosimetric benefits because individually optimized three-angle solutions were found sharing a very similar pattern. Conclusions: This study has demonstrated the potential of using an improved beam angle arrangement to better exploit the theoretical dosimetric benefits of proton therapy and provided insights of selecting quality beam angles for localized prostate cancer treatment

  8. Beam intensity scanner system for three dimensional dose verification of IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vahc, Young W.; Kwon, Ohyun; Park, Kwangyl; Park, Kyung R.; Yi, Byung Y.; Kim, Keun M.

    2003-01-01

    Patient dose verification is clinically one of the most important parts in the treatment delivery of radiation therapy. The three dimensional (3D) reconstruction of dose distribution delivered to target volume helps to verify patient dose and determine the physical characteristics of beams used in IMRT. Here we present beam intensity scanner (BInS) system for the pre-treatment dosimetric verification of two dimensional photon intensity. The BInS is a radiation detector with a custom-made software for dose conversion of fluorescence signals from scintillator. The scintillator is used to produce fluorescence from the irradiation of 6 MV photons on a Varian Clinac 21EX. The digitized fluoroscopic signals obtained by digital video camera-based scintillator (DVCS) will be processed by our custom made software to reproduce 3D- relative dose distribution. For the intensity modulated beam (IMB), the BInS calculates absorbed dose in absolute beam fluence which is used for the patient dose distribution. Using BInS, we performed various measurements related to IMRT and found the following: (1) The 3D-dose profiles of the IMBs measured by the BInS demonstrate good agreement with radiographic film, pin type ionization chamber and Monte Carlo simulation. (2) The delivered beam intensity is altered by the mechanical and dosimetric properties of the collimation of dynamic and/or step MLC system. This is mostly due to leaf transmission, leaf penumbra scattered photons from the round edges of leaves, and geometry of leaf. (3) The delivered dose depends on the operational detail of how to make multi leaf opening. These phenomena result in a fluence distribution that can be substantially different from the initial and calculated intensity modulation and therefore, should be taken into account by the treatment planning for accurate dose calculations delivered to the target volume in IMRT. (author)

  9. Electroweak interactions between intense neutrino beams and dense electron-positron magneto-plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Tsintsadze, N L; Stenflo, L

    2003-01-01

    The electroweak coupling between intense neutrino beams and strongly degenerate relativistic dense electron-positron magneto-plasmas is considered. The intense neutrino bursts interact with the plasma due to the weak Fermi interaction force, and their dynamics is governed by a kinetic equation. Our objective here is to develop a kinetic equation for a degenerate neutrino gas and to use that equation to derive relativistic magnetohydrodynamic equations. The latter are useful for studying numerous collective processes when intense neutrino beams nonlinearly interact with degenerate, relativistic, dense electron-positron plasmas in strong magnetic fields. If the number densities of the plasma particles are of the order of 10 sup 3 sup 3 cm sup - sup 3 , the pair plasma becomes ultra-relativistic, which strongly affects the potential energy of the weak Fermi interaction. The new system of equations allows several neutrino-driven streaming instabilities involving new types of relativistic Alfven-like waves, The re...

  10. Intense heavy ion beam-induced temperature effects in carbon-based stripper foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupka, K.; Tomut, M.; Simon, P.; Hubert, C.; Romanenko, A.; Lommel, B.; Trautmann, C.

    2015-01-01

    At the future FAIR facility, reliably working solid carbon stripper foils are desired for providing intermediate charge states to SIS18. With the expected high beam intensities, the foils experience enhanced degradation and limited lifetime due to severe radiation damage, stress waves, and thermal effects. This work presents systematic measurements of the temperature of different carbon-based stripper foils (amorphous, diamond-like, and carbon-nanotube based) exposed to 4.8 MeV/u U, Bi, and Au beams of different pulse intensities. Thermal and spectroscopic analyses were performed by means of infrared thermography and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The resulting temperature depends on the foil thickness and strongly increases with increasing pulse intensity and repetition rate. (author)

  11. Physics of intense light ion beams and production of high energy density in matter. Annual report 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluhm, H.J.

    1995-06-01

    This report presents the results obtained in 1994 within the FZK-program on 'Physics of intense ion beams and pulsed plasmas'. It describes the present status of the 6 MW, 2 TW pulsed generator KALIF-HELIA, the production and focussing of high power ion beams and numerical simulations and experiments related to the hydrodynamics of beam matter interaction. (orig.) [de

  12. Development of Beam Diagnostic Tools for Monitoring Cyclotron Beams at Production Intensities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, Mikael

    2009-01-01

    This final report for the IAEA-CRP on “Improved High Current Liquid and Gas Targets for Cyclotron Produced Radioisotopes” reports the progress made as part of the Danish participation in the above CRP. Some of the work is the result of international, multi-institutional collaboration and/or research student education, and credit is hereby given to my former students Helge Thisgaard and Jesper Jørgensen, Katie Gagnon, student of Tom Ruth at Triumf, Canada, and, last but not least, to Tom himself. The people at the Edmonton PET centre, for beam time. David Schlyer and Rick Carson of BNL for access to the Tandem accelerator calibration shots. (author)

  13. Mechanisms and control of beam halo formation in intense microwave sources and accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C.; Pakter, R.

    2000-05-01

    Halo formation and control in space-charge-dominated electron and ion beams are investigated in parameter regimes relevant to the development of high-power microwave (HPM) sources and high-intensity electron and ion linear accelerators. In particular, a mechanism for electron beam halo formation is identified in high-power periodic permanent magnet (PPM) focusing klystron amplifiers. It is found in self-consistent simulations that large-amplitude current oscillations induce mismatched beam envelope oscillations and electron beam halo formation. Qualitative agreement is found between simulations and the 50 MW 11.4 GHz PPM focusing klystron experiment at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) (D. Sprehn, G. Caryotakis, E. Jongewaard, and R. M. Phillips, "Periodic permanent magnetic development for linear collider X-band klystrons," Proceedings of the XIXth International Linac Conference, Argonne National Laboratory Report ANL-98/28, 1998, p. 689). Moreover, a new class of cold-fluid corkscrewing elliptic beam equilibria is discovered for ultrahigh-brightness, space-charge dominated electron or ion beam propagation through a linear focusing channel consisting of uniform solenoidal magnetic focusing fields, periodic solenoidal magnetic focusing fields, and/or alternating-gradient quadrupole magnetic focusing fields in an arbitrary arrangement including field tapering. As an important application of such new cold-fluid corkscrewing elliptic beam equilibria, a technique is developed and demonstrated for controlling of halo formation and beam hollowing in a rms-matched ultrahigh-brightness ion beam as it is injected from an axisymmetric Pierce diode into an alternating-gradient magnetic quadrupole focusing channel.

  14. Spes: An intense source of Neutron-Rich Radioactive Beams at Legnaro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrighetto, A.; Manzolaro, M.; Corradetti, S.; Scarpa, D.; Monetti, A.; Rossignoli, M.; Ballan, M.; Borgna, F.; D'Agostini, F.; Gramegna, F.; Prete, G.; Meneghetti, G.; Ferrari, M.; Zenoni, A.

    2018-02-01

    The Isotope Separation On-Line (ISOL) method for the production of Radioactive Ion Beams (RIB) is attracting significant interest in the worldwide nuclear physics community. Within this context the SPES (Selective Production of Exotic Species) RIB facility is now under construction at INFN LNL (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro). This technique is established as one of the main techniques for high intensity and high quality beams production. The SPES facility will produce n-rich isotopes by means of a 40 MeV proton beam, emitted by a cyclotron, impinging on a uranium carbide multi-foil fission target. The aim of this work is to describe the most important results obtained by the study of the on-line behavior of the SPES production target assembly. This target system will produce RIBs at a rate of about 1013 fissions per second, it will be able to dissipate a total power of up to 10 kW, and it is planned to work continuously for 2 week-runs of irradiation. ISOL beams of 24 different elements will be produced, therefore a target and ion source development is ongoing to ensure a great variety of produced isotopes and to improve the beam intensity and purity.

  15. Numerical simulations of self-pinched transport of intense ion beams in low-pressure gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, D.V.; Ottinger, P.F.; Welch, D.R.; Oliver, B.V.; Olson, C.L.

    1999-01-01

    The self-pinched transport of intense ion beams in low-pressure background gases is studied using numerical simulations and theoretical analysis. The simulations are carried out in a parameter regime that is similar to proton beam experiments being fielded on the Gamble II pulsed power generator [J. D. Shipman, Jr., IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. NS-18, 243 (1971)] at the Naval Research Laboratory. Simulation parameter variations provide information on scaling with background gas species, gas pressure, beam current, beam energy, injection angles, and boundaries. The simulation results compare well with simple analytic scaling arguments for the gas pressure at which the effective net current should peak and with estimates for the required confinement current. The analysis indicates that the self-pinched transport of intense proton beams produced on Gamble II (1.5 MeV, 100 kA, 3 cm radius) is expected to occur at gas pressures between 30 and 80 mTorr of He or between 3 and 10 mTorr of Ar. The significance of these results to ion-driven inertial confinement fusion is discussed. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  16. Early Beam Injection Scheme for the Fermilab Booster: A Path for Intensity Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, C. M. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-10-28

    Over the past decade, Fermilab has focused efforts on the intensity frontier physics and is committed to increase the average beam power delivered to the neutrino and muon programs substantially. Many upgrades to the existing injector accelerators, namely, the current 400 MeV LINAC and the Booster, are in progress under the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP). Proton Improvement Plan-II (PIP-II) proposes to replace the existing 400 MeV LINAC by a new 800 MeV LINAC, as an injector to the Booster which will increase Booster output power by nearly a factor of two from the PIP design value by the end of its completion. In any case, the Fermilab Booster is going to play a very significant role for nearly next two decades. In this context, I have developed and investigated a new beam injection scheme called "early injection scheme" (EIS) for the Booster with the goal to significantly increase the beam intensity output from the Booster thereby increasing the beam power to the HEP experiments even before PIP-II era. The scheme, if implemented, will also help improve the slip-stacking efficiency in the MI/RR. Here I present results from recent simulations, beam studies, current status and future plans for the new scheme.

  17. Beam profile measurement on HITU transducers using a thermal intensity sensor technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkens, V; Sonntag, S; Jenderka, K-V

    2011-01-01

    Thermal intensity sensors based on the transformation of the incident ultrasonic energy into heat inside a small cylindrical absorber have been developed at PTB in the past, in particular to determine the acoustic output of medical diagnostic ultrasound equipment. Currently, this sensor technique is being expanded to match the measurement challenges of high intensity therapeutic ultrasound (HITU) fields. At the high acoustic power levels as utilized in the clinical application of HITU transducers, beam characterization using hydrophones is critical due to the possible damage of the sensitive and expensive measurement devices. Therefore, the low-cost and robust thermal sensors developed offer a promising alternative for the determination of high intensity output beam profiles. A sensor prototype with a spatial resolution of 0.5 mm was applied to the beam characterization of an HITU transducer operated at several driving amplitude levels. Axial beam plots and lateral profiles at focus were acquired. The absolute continuous wave output power was, in addition, determined using a radiation force balance.

  18. Timoshenko beam model for chiral materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, T. Y.; Wang, Y. N.; Yuan, L.; Wang, J. S.; Qin, Q. H.

    2017-12-01

    Natural and artificial chiral materials such as deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), chromatin fibers, flagellar filaments, chiral nanotubes, and chiral lattice materials widely exist. Due to the chirality of intricately helical or twisted microstructures, such materials hold great promise for use in diverse applications in smart sensors and actuators, force probes in biomedical engineering, structural elements for absorption of microwaves and elastic waves, etc. In this paper, a Timoshenko beam model for chiral materials is developed based on noncentrosymmetric micropolar elasticity theory. The governing equations and boundary conditions for a chiral beam problem are derived using the variational method and Hamilton's principle. The static bending and free vibration problem of a chiral beam are investigated using the proposed model. It is found that chirality can significantly affect the mechanical behavior of beams, making materials more flexible compared with nonchiral counterparts, inducing coupled twisting deformation, relatively larger deflection, and lower natural frequency. This study is helpful not only for understanding the mechanical behavior of chiral materials such as DNA and chromatin fibers and characterizing their mechanical properties, but also for the design of hierarchically structured chiral materials.

  19. Novel neutralized-beam intense neutron source for fusion technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osher, J.E.; Perkins, L.J.

    1983-01-01

    We describe a neutralized-beam intense neutron source (NBINS) as a relevant application of fusion technology for the type of high-current ion sources and neutral beamlines now being developed for heating and fueling of magnetic-fusion-energy confinement systems. This near-term application would support parallel development of highly reliable steady-state higher-voltage neutral D 0 and T 0 beams and provide a relatively inexpensive source of fusion neutrons for materials testing at up to reactor-like wall conditions. Beam-target examples described incude a 50-A mixed D-T total (ions plus neutrals) space-charge-neutralized beam at 120 keV incident on a liquid Li drive-in target, or a 50-A T 0 + T + space-charge-neutralized beam incident on either a LiD or gas D 2 target with calculated 14-MeV neutron yields of 2 x 10 15 /s, 7 x 10 15 /s, or 1.6 x 10 16 /s, respectively. The severe local heat loading on the target surface is expected to limit the allowed beam focus and minimum target size to greater than or equal to 25 cm 2

  20. Using prepulsing: a useful way for increasing absorption efficiency of high intensity laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Huimin; Zhang Guoping; Sheng Jiatian

    1990-01-01

    Using prepulse to irradiate target for increasing absorption efficiency of high intensity incident laser beam is considered and some theoretical simulations have been done. 1-D non-LTE radiative hydrodynamic code is used to simulate the interactions of laser beam with matter. A gaussian laser prepulse of wavelength 1.06 μm, FWHM 600 ps and peak intensity 1.5 x 10 12 W/cm 2 was used to irradiate 20 μm thick Au plate target, after 3ns a main gaussian pulse with wavelength 1.06 μm, FWHM 600 ps and peak intensity 3.0 x 10 14 W/cm 2 irradiated the expanding Au plasma. The responces of laser-produced plasma conditions are shown. By comparing with without prepulsing, under the condition of same main incident laser pulse, the absorption efficiency is increased from 0.36 to 0.60 and the laser-x-ray conversion efficiency is increased from 0.16 to 0.25. The electron temperature of hot plasma is also higher than without prepulsing, and the x-ray spectrum which is emitted from laser-produced hot plasma is harder and more intense than without prepulsing. The responces of laser-produced plasma for Fe target with prepulsing are shown as well. The conclusion is that using prepulsing is a useful way for getting high absorption laser beam

  1. Performance of Multiplexed XY Resistive Micromegas detectors in a high intensity beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, D.; Burtsev, V.; Chumakov, A.; Cooke, D.; Depero, E.; Dermenev, A. V.; Donskov, S. V.; Dubinin, F.; Dusaev, R. R.; Emmenegger, S.; Fabich, A.; Frolov, V. N.; Gardikiotis, A.; Gninenko, S. N.; Hösgen, M.; Karneyeu, A. E.; Ketzer, B.; Kirsanov, M. M.; Konorov, I. V.; Kramarenko, V. A.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Levchenko, E.; Lyubovitskij, V. E.; Lysan, V.; Mamon, S.; Matveev, V. A.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Myalkovskiy, V. V.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peshekhonov, D. V.; Polyakov, V. A.; Radics, B.; Rubbia, A.; Samoylenko, V. D.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tlisov, D. A.; Toropin, A. N.; Vasilishin, B.; Arenas, G. Vasquez; Ulloa, P.; Crivelli, P.

    2018-02-01

    We present the performance of multiplexed XY resistive Micromegas detectors tested in the CERN SPS 100 GeV/c electron beam at intensities up to 3 . 3 × 105e- /(s ṡcm2) . So far, all studies with multiplexed Micromegas have only been reported for tests with radioactive sources and cosmic rays. The use of multiplexed modules in high intensity environments was not explored due to the effect of ambiguities in the reconstruction of the hit point caused by the multiplexing feature. For the specific mapping and beam intensities analyzed in this work with a multiplexing factor of five, more than 50% level of ambiguity is introduced due to particle pile-up as well as fake clusters due to the mapping feature. Our results prove that by using the additional information of cluster size and integrated charge from the signal clusters induced on the XY strips, the ambiguities can be reduced to a level below 2%. The tested detectors are used in the CERN NA64 experiment for tracking the incoming particles bending in a magnetic field in order to reconstruct their momentum. The average hit detection efficiency of each module was found to be ∼96% at the highest beam intensities. By using four modules a tracking resolution of 1.1% was obtained with ∼85% combined tracking efficiency.

  2. VME computer monitoring system of KEK-PS fast pulsed magnet currents and beam intensities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakubo, T.; Akiyama, A.; Kadokura, E.; Ishida, T.

    1992-01-01

    For beam transfer from the KEK-PS Linac to the Booster synchrotron ring and from the Booster to the Main ring, many pulse magnets have been installed. It is very important for the machine operation to monitor the firing time, rising time and peak value of the pulsed magnet currents. It is also very important for magnet tuning to obtain good injection efficiency of the Booster and the Main ring, and to observe the last circulating bunched beam in the Booster as well as the first circulating in the Main. These magnet currents and beam intensity signals are digitized by a digital oscilloscope with signal multiplexers, and then shown on a graphic display screen of the console via a VME computer. (author)

  3. Generation of intense ion beams and their application to controlled fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreike, P.; Ferch, R.L.; Friedman, A.

    1977-01-01

    Successful generation of pulsed multi-kA proton beams in the energy range 0.2 to 1.7 MeV using existing pulsed power technology has been achieved by three different techniques: reflex triodes, pinched electron-beam diodes and magnetically insulated diodes. Peak current densities in excess of 10 kAcm -2 have been observed on the NRL Gamble II machine and over 1.0 kAcm -2 on the Cornell Neptune machine. Peak total ion currents above 200 kA are produced by Gamble II. The potential applications of intense ion beams to magnetic confinement include (i) plasma heating and (ii) ion rings. A summary of continuous theoretical and experimental investigations on these applications is presented. (author)

  4. Upgrade of the Fast Beam Intensity Measurement System for the CERN PS Complex

    CERN Document Server

    Allica, JC; Andreazza, W; Belohrad, D; Favre, G; Favre, N; Jensen, L; Lenardon, F; Vollenberg, W

    2014-01-01

    The CERN Proton Synchrotron complex (CPS) has been operational for over 50 years. During this time the Fast Beam Current Transformers (FBCTs) have only been repaired when they ceased to function, or individually modified to cope with new requests. This strategy resulted in a large variation of designs, making their maintenance difficult and limiting the precision with which comparisons could be made between transformers for the measurement of beam intensity transmission. During the first long shutdown of the CERN LHC and its injectors (LS1) these systems have undergone a major consolidation, with detectors and acquisition electronics upgraded to provide a uniform measurement system throughout the PS complex. This paper discusses the solutions used and analyses the first beam measurement results.

  5. Non-destructive profile measurement of intensive heavy ion beams; Zerstoerungsfreie Profilmessung intensiver Schwerionenstrahlen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Frank

    2010-02-08

    Within the framework of the FAIR-project (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) at GSI (Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research), high intensity beams from protons to uranium ions with kinetic energies up to 30 AGeV are foreseen. Present GSI-accelerators like the UNILAC and the Heavy Ion Synchrotron (SIS-18) with a magnetic rigidity of 18 Tm will be used as injectors for the future synchrotron (SIS-100). Their beam current will be increased by up to two orders of magnitude. An accurate beam position and beam profile measurement is mandatory for a safe operation of transport sections, in particular in front of production targets (Fragment Separator (FRS)-target, anti p-production-target and Warm Dense Matter (WDM)-targets). Conventional intercepting profile monitors will not withstand the thermal stress of intensive ion beams, particularly for low energy applications or focused beams. For transverse profile determination a non-intercepting Beam Induced Fluorescence (BIF)-monitor was developed, working with residual gas. The BIF-monitor exploits fluorescence light emitted by residual gas molecules after atomic collisions with beam ions. Fluorescence-images were recorded with an image-intensified camera system, and beam profiles were obtained by projecting these images. Within the scope of this dissertation the following topics have been investigated: The photon yield, profile shape and background contribution were determined for different ion species (H{sup +}, S{sup 6+}, Ar{sup 18+}, K{sup +}, Ni{sup 9+}, Xe{sup 48+}, Ta{sup 24+}, Au{sup 65+}, U{sup 73+}), beam energies (7.7 AkeV-750 AMeV), gas pressures (10{sup -6}-3 mbar) and gas species (N{sub 2}, He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe). Applying an imaging spectrograph and narrowband 10 nm interference filters, the spectral response was mapped and associated with the corresponding gas transitions. Spectrally resolved beam profiles were also obtained form the spectrographic images. Major results are the light yield showing a

  6. High intensity uranium beams from the superHILAC and the bevatron: final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    The two injectors formerly used at the SuperHILAC were a 750-kV air-insulated Cockcroft-Walton (EVE) and a 2.5-MV pressurized HV multiplier (ADAM). The EVE injector can deliver adequate intensities of ions up to mass 40 (argon). The ADAM injector can accelerate ions with lower charge-to-mass ratios, and they can produce beams of heavier ions. The intensity of these beams decreases as the mass number increases, with the lowest practical intensity being achieved with lead beams. Experience with the two existing injectors provided substantial help in defining the general requirements for a new injector which would provide ample beams above mass 40. The requirements for acceptance by the first tank of the SuperHILAC are a particle velocity #betta# = 0.0154 (corresponding to an energy of 113 keV/amu) and a charge-to-mass ratio of 0.046 or larger. Present ion source performance dictates an air-insulated Cockcroft-Walton as a pre-accelerator because of its easy accessibility and its good overall reliability. The low charge state ions then receive further acceleration and, if necessary, subsequent stripping to the required charge state before injection into the SuperHILAC. A low-beta linac of the Widereoe type has been built to perform this acceleration. The injector system described consists of a Cockcroft-Walton pre-injector, injection beam lines and isotope analysis, a low-velocity linear accelerator, and SuperHILAC control center modifications

  7. High intensity uranium beams from the superHILAC and the bevatron: final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-03-01

    The two injectors formerly used at the SuperHILAC were a 750-kV air-insulated Cockcroft-Walton (EVE) and a 2.5-MV pressurized HV multiplier (ADAM). The EVE injector can deliver adequate intensities of ions up to mass 40 (argon). The ADAM injector can accelerate ions with lower charge-to-mass ratios, and they can produce beams of heavier ions. The intensity of these beams decreases as the mass number increases, with the lowest practical intensity being achieved with lead beams. Experience with the two existing injectors provided substantial help in defining the general requirements for a new injector which would provide ample beams above mass 40. The requirements for acceptance by the first tank of the SuperHILAC are a particle velocity ..beta.. = 0.0154 (corresponding to an energy of 113 keV/amu) and a charge-to-mass ratio of 0.046 or larger. Present ion source performance dictates an air-insulated Cockcroft-Walton as a pre-accelerator because of its easy accessibility and its good overall reliability. The low charge state ions then receive further acceleration and, if necessary, subsequent stripping to the required charge state before injection into the SuperHILAC. A low-beta linac of the Widereoe type has been built to perform this acceleration. The injector system described consists of a Cockcroft-Walton pre-injector, injection beam lines and isotope analysis, a low-velocity linear accelerator, and SuperHILAC control center modifications.

  8. Measurement of the intensity of the beam in the abort gap at the Tevatron utilizing synchrotron light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thurman-Keup, R.; Lorman, E.; Meyer, T.; Pordes, S.; De Santis, S.

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the implementation of abort gap beam intensity monitoring at the Tevatron collider at Fermilab. There are two somewhat independent monitors which measure the intensity of the synchrotron light emitted by particles in the abort gaps. One system uses a gated Photomultiplier Tube (PMT) to measure the light intensity, and the other system uses a single lens telescope, gated image intensifier, and Charge Injection Device (CID) camera to image the beam

  9. Interaction of an intense relativistic electron beam with full density air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, D.P.; Pechacek, R.E.; Raleigh, M.; Oliphant, W.F.; Meger, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    The authors report on a study of plasma generation by direct deposition of energy from an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) into full density air. It has been postulated that a sufficiently intense REB can fully ionize the air and produce a 2 eV plasma with Spitzer conductivity. The REB is produced from a field emission diode driven by either the Gamble I or Gamble II generator. Gamble I can produce a 0.60 MV, 300 kA, 50 ns REB and Gamble II can produce a 2.0 MV, 1.0 MA, 50 ns REB. The REB was injected into a short diagnostic cell containing full density air and up to a 14 kG solenoidal magnetic field. The diagnostics include beam and net current measurements, x-ray and visible photography and visible light spectroscopy

  10. Simulating the Long-Distance Propagation of Intense Beams in the Paul Trap Simulator Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Gilson, Erik P; Davidson, Ronald C; Efthimion, Philip; Majeski, Richard; Startsev, Edward

    2005-01-01

    The Paul Trap Simulator Experiment (PTSX) makes use of a compact Paul trap configuration with quadrupolar oscillating wall voltages to simulate the propagation of intense charged particle beams over distances of many kilometers through magnetic alternating-gradient transport systems. The simulation is possible because of the similarity between the transverse dynamics of particles in the two systems. One-component pure cesium ion plasmas have been trapped that correspond to normalized intensity parameters s < 0.8, where s is the ratio of the square of the plasma frequency to twice the square of the average transverse focusing frequency. The PTSX device confines the plasma for hundreds of milliseconds, which is equivalent to beam propagation over tens of kilometers. Results are presented for experiments in which the amplitude of the oscillating confining voltage waveform has been modified as a function of time. A comparison is made between abrupt changes in amplitude and adiabatic changes in amplitude. T...

  11. Production of intense metallic ion beams in order of isotopic separations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarrouy, J.L.

    1955-01-01

    We describe an isotope separator with magnetic sector of 60 deg that permits, with a process of neutralization of the space charge, to use efficiently intense ion beams. The sources of realized ions provide ionic debits of 10 mA. This present work deals who to obtain intense ion beams (10 to 15 mA), different processes of ion currents measurement, as well as the study of the phenomenon of space charge neutralization. The second part of this memory will be on the survey and the adaptation on the source of various type of oven permitting to spray and to ionize metals directly. By order of increasing difficulty of vaporization, we reached the chromium. (M.B.) [fr

  12. Production of intensive negative lithium beam with caesium sputter-type ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanov, Nikolai R.

    2018-01-01

    Compounds of lithium oxide, hydroxide and carbonate, mixed with silver, were prepared for use as a cathode in caesium-sputter ion source. The intention was to determine the procedure which would produce the highest intensity negative lithium beams over extended period and with maximum stability. The chemical composition and properties of the samples were analysed using mass-spectrometry, optical microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray Analyses (EDX) and Raman spectroscopy. These analyses showed that the chemical transformations with components resulted from pressing, storage and bake out were qualitatively in agreement with expectations. Intensive negative lithium ion beams >1 μA were delivered using cathodes fabricated from materials with multicomponent chemical composition when the following conditions were met: (i) use of components with moderate enthalpy of formation; (ii) low moisture content at final stage of cathode production and (iii) small concentration of water molecules in hydrate phase in the cathode mixture.

  13. Modeling space charge in beams for heavy-ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, W.M.

    1995-01-01

    A new analytic model is presented which accurately estimates the radially averaged axial component of the space-charge field of an axisymmetric heavy-ion beam in a cylindrical beam pipe. The model recovers details of the field near the beam ends that are overlooked by simpler models, and the results compare well to exact solutions of Poisson's equation. Field values are shown for several simple beam profiles and are compared with values obtained from simpler models

  14. Experimental observations and theoretical models for beam-beam phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kheifets, S.

    1981-03-01

    The beam-beam interaction in storage rings exhibits all the characteristics of nonintegrable dynamical systems. Here one finds all kinds of resonances, closed orbits, stable and unstable fixed points, stochastic layers, chaotic behavior, diffusion, etc. The storage ring itself being an expensive device nevertheless while constructed and put into operation presents a good opportunity of experimentally studying the long-time behavior of both conservative (proton machines) and nonconservative (electron machines) dynamical systems - the number of bunch-bunch interactions routinely reaches values of 10 10 -10 11 and could be increased by decreasing the beam current. At the same time the beam-beam interaction puts practical limits for the yield of the storage ring. This phenomenon not only determines the design value of main storage ring parameters (luminosity, space charge parameters, beam current), but also in fact prevents many of the existing storage rings from achieving design parameters. Hence, the problem has great practical importance along with its enormous theoretical interest. A brief overview of the problem is presented

  15. Intense electron beams from GaAs photocathodes as a tool for molecular and atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krantz, Claude

    2009-01-01

    We present cesium-coated GaAs photocathodes as reliable sources of intense, quasi-monoenergetic electron beams in atomic and molecular physics experiments. In long-time operation of the Electron Target of the ion storage ring TSR in Heidelberg, cold electron beams could be realised at steadily improving intensity and reliability. Minimisation of processes degrading the quantum efficiency allowed to increase the extractable current to more than 1mA at usable cathode lifetimes of 24 h or more. The benefits of the cold electron beam with respect to its application to electron cooling and electron-ion recombination experiments are discussed. Benchmark experiments demonstrate the superior cooling force and energy resolution of the photoelectron beam compared to its thermionic counterparts. The long period of operation allowed to study the long-time behaviour of the GaAs samples during multiple usage cycles at the Electron Target and repeated in-vacuum surface cleaning by atomic hydrogen exposure. An electron emission spectroscopy setup has been implemented at the photocathode preparation chamber of the Electron Target. Among others, this new facility opened the way to a novel application of GaAs (Cs) photocathodes as robust, ultraviolet-driven electron emitters. Based on this principle, a prototype of an electron gun, designed for implementation at the HITRAP setup at GSI, has been built and taken into operation successfully. (orig.)

  16. Description and operation of the LEDA beam-position/intensity measurement module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, C.R.; Stettler, M.W.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the specification, design and preliminary operation of the beam-position/intensity measurement module being built for the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) and Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) projects at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The module, based on the VXI footprint, is divided into three sections: first, the analog front-end which consists of logarithmic amplifiers, anti-alias filters, and digitizers; second, the digital-to-analog section for monitoring signals on the front panel; and third, the DSP, error correction, and VXI-interface section. Beam position is calculated based on the log-ratio transfer function. The module has four, 2-MHz, IF inputs suitable for two-axis position measurements. It has outputs in both digital and analog format for x- and y-position and beam intensity. Real-time error-correction is performed on the four input signals after they are digitized and before calculating the beam position to compensate for drift, offsets, gain non-linearities, and other systematic errors. This paper also describes how the on-line error-correction is implemented digitally and algorithmically

  17. Direct-aperture optimization applied to selection of beam orientations in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedford, J L; Webb, S

    2007-01-01

    Direct-aperture optimization (DAO) was applied to iterative beam-orientation selection in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), so as to ensure a realistic segmental treatment plan at each iteration. Nested optimization engines dealt separately with gantry angles, couch angles, collimator angles, segment shapes, segment weights and wedge angles. Each optimization engine performed a random search with successively narrowing step sizes. For optimization of segment shapes, the filtered backprojection (FBP) method was first used to determine desired fluence, the fluence map was segmented, and then constrained direct-aperture optimization was used thereafter. Segment shapes were fully optimized when a beam angle was perturbed, and minimally re-optimized otherwise. The algorithm was compared with a previously reported method using FBP alone at each orientation iteration. An example case consisting of a cylindrical phantom with a hemi-annular planning target volume (PTV) showed that for three-field plans, the method performed better than when using FBP alone, but for five or more fields, neither method provided much benefit over equally spaced beams. For a prostate case, improved bladder sparing was achieved through the use of the new algorithm. A plan for partial scalp treatment showed slightly improved PTV coverage and lower irradiated volume of brain with the new method compared to FBP alone. It is concluded that, although the method is computationally intensive and not suitable for searching large unconstrained regions of beam space, it can be used effectively in conjunction with prior class solutions to provide individually optimized IMRT treatment plans

  18. Intense electron beams from GaAs photocathodes as a tool for molecular and atomic physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krantz, Claude

    2009-10-28

    We present cesium-coated GaAs photocathodes as reliable sources of intense, quasi-monoenergetic electron beams in atomic and molecular physics experiments. In long-time operation of the Electron Target of the ion storage ring TSR in Heidelberg, cold electron beams could be realised at steadily improving intensity and reliability. Minimisation of processes degrading the quantum efficiency allowed to increase the extractable current to more than 1mA at usable cathode lifetimes of 24 h or more. The benefits of the cold electron beam with respect to its application to electron cooling and electron-ion recombination experiments are discussed. Benchmark experiments demonstrate the superior cooling force and energy resolution of the photoelectron beam compared to its thermionic counterparts. The long period of operation allowed to study the long-time behaviour of the GaAs samples during multiple usage cycles at the Electron Target and repeated in-vacuum surface cleaning by atomic hydrogen exposure. An electron emission spectroscopy setup has been implemented at the photocathode preparation chamber of the Electron Target. Among others, this new facility opened the way to a novel application of GaAs (Cs) photocathodes as robust, ultraviolet-driven electron emitters. Based on this principle, a prototype of an electron gun, designed for implementation at the HITRAP setup at GSI, has been built and taken into operation successfully. (orig.)

  19. Neutron beam design for low intensity neutron and gamma-ray radioscopy using small neutron sources

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, T

    2003-01-01

    Two small neutron sources of sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf and sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am-Be radioisotopes were used for design of neutron beams applicable to low intensity neutron and gamma ray radioscopy (LINGR). In the design, Monte Carlo code (MCNP) was employed to generate neutron and gamma ray beams suited to LINGR. With a view to variable neutron spectrum and neutron intensity, various arrangements were first examined, and neutron-filter, gamma-ray shield and beam collimator were verified. Monte Carlo calculations indicated that with a suitable filter-shield-collimator arrangement, thermal neutron beam of 3,900 ncm sup - sup 2 s sup - sup 1 with neutron/gamma ratio of 7x10 sup 7 , and 25 ncm sup - sup 2 s sup - sup 1 with very large neutron/gamma ratio, respectively, could be produced by using sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf(122 mu g) and a sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am-Be(37GBq)radioisotopes at the irradiation port of 35 cm from the neutron sources.

  20. Intensity and average orbital angular momentum of partially coherent flat-topped vortex beam in slant atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ya-qing; Wang, Li-guo

    2017-11-01

    On the basis of the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle and the cross-spectral density function (CSDF), the intensity and average orbital angular momentum (OAM) of the partially coherent flat-topped vortex beams in the slant atmospheric turbulence are presented. The effects of the order, topological charge, waist radius, and propagation distance of the beam on the intensity and average OAM are discussed. Results obtained show that the intensity of the partially coherent flat-topped vortex beam is changed due to the variations of the propagation distance, waist radius, topological charge and beam order, the average OAM is constant during the beam propagation in the atmospheric turbulence and related only to the waist radius and beam order. Results obtained by this paper may serve as theory bases for future applications in the atmospheric optical communication.

  1. Analysis of plasma channels in mm-scale plasmas formed by high intensity laser beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, R; Habara, H; Iwawaki, T; Uematsu, Y; Tanaka, K A; Ivancic, S; Anderson, K; Haberberger, D; Stoeckl, C; Theobald, W; Sakagami, H

    2016-01-01

    A plasma channel created by a high intensity infrared laser beam was observed in a long scale-length plasma (L ∼ 240 μm) with the angular filter refractometry technique, which indicated a stable channel formation up to the critical density. We analyzed the observed plasma channel using a rigorous ray-tracing technique, which provides a deep understanding of the evolution of the channel formation. (paper)

  2. Targets for production of high-intensity radioactive ion-beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagebo, E.; Hoff, P.; Steffensen, K.

    1991-01-01

    The recent developments of target systems for production of high intensity radioactive ion-beams at the ISOLDE mass separators is described. Methods for chemically selective production through separation of molecular ions are outlined and the effects of the addition of reactive gases has been studied. Results and further possible applications in the light element region are discussed. (author) 10 refs.; 9 figs.; 1 tab

  3. Combined centroid-envelope dynamics of intense, magnetically focused charged beams surrounded by conducting walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiuza, K.; Rizzato, F.B.; Pakter, R.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the combined envelope-centroid dynamics of magnetically focused high-intensity charged beams surrounded by conducting walls. Similar to the case where conducting walls are absent, it is shown that the envelope and centroid dynamics decouple from each other. Mismatched envelopes still decay into equilibrium with simultaneous emittance growth, but the centroid keeps oscillating with no appreciable energy loss. Some estimates are performed to analytically obtain characteristics of halo formation seen in the full simulations

  4. Resolving Tropical Cyclone Intensity in Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, C. A.

    2018-02-01

    In recent years, global weather forecast models and global climate models have begun to depict intense tropical cyclones, even up to category 5 on the Saffir-Simpson scale. In light of the limitation of horizontal resolution in such models, the author performs calculations, using the extended Best Track data for Atlantic tropical cyclones, to estimate the ability of models with differing grid spacing to represent Atlantic tropical cyclone intensity statistically. Results indicate that, under optimistic assumptions, models with horizontal grid spacing of one fourth degree or coarser should not produce a realistic number of category 4 and 5 storms unless there are errors in spatial attributes of the wind field. Furthermore, the case of Irma (2017) is used to demonstrate the importance of a realistic depiction of angular momentum and to motivate the use of angular momentum in model evaluation.

  5. Modification of solid surface by intense pulsed light-ion and metal-ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Y.; Ariyoshi, T.; Hanjo, H.; Tsutsumi, S.; Fujii, Y.; Itami, M.; Okamoto, A.; Ogawa, S.; Hamada, T.; Fukumaru, F.

    1989-03-01

    Metal surfaces of Al, stainless-steel and Ti were bombarded with focused intense pulsed proton and carbon ion beams (energy ˜ 80 keV, current density ≲ 1000 A/cm 2, pulse width ˜ 300 ns). Thin titanium carbide layers were produced by carbon-ion irradiation on the titanium surface. The observed molten surface structures and recrystallized layer (20 μm depth) indicated that the surfaces reached high temperatures as a result of the irradiation. The implantation of intense pulsed metal ion beams (Al +, ˜ 20 A/cm 2) with simultaneous deposition of anode metal vapor on Ti and Fe made a mixed layer of AlTi and AlFe of about 0.5 μm depth. Ti and B multilayered films evaporated on glass substrates were irradiated by intense pulsed proton beams of relatively lower current density (10-200 A/cm 2). Ti films containing B atoms above 10 at.% were obtained. When the current density was about 200 A/cm 2 diffraction peaks of TiB 2 appeared.

  6. Accurate Profile Measurement of the low Intensity Secondary Beams in the CERN Experimental Areas

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2084531; Tranquille, Gerard

    2018-02-23

    The CERN accelerators deliver a wide spectrum of secondary beams to the Experimental Areas. These beams are composed of hadrons, leptons, and heavy ions that can vary greatly in momentum (1 GeV/c to 400 GeV/c) and intensity (10^2 to 10^8 particles per second). The profile, position, and intensity of these beams are measured utilising particle detectors. However, the current systems show several problems that limit the quality of this kind of monitoring. The aim of this doctoral thesis is to investigate the best detector technology that could replace the existing monitors and build a first prototype of it. A review of the existing detection techniques has led to the choice of Scintillating Fibres (SciFi) read-out with Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM). This detection technology has the potential to perform better in terms of material budget, range of intensities measured, and active area size. In addition, it has particle counting capabilities, which could extend its application to momentum spectrometry or Time...

  7. An Efficient Estimation Method for Reducing the Axial Intensity Drop in Circular Cone-Beam CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Reconstruction algorithms for circular cone-beam (CB scans have been extensively studied in the literature. Since insufficient data are measured, an exact reconstruction is impossible for such a geometry. If the reconstruction algorithm assumes zeros for the missing data, such as the standard FDK algorithm, a major type of resulting CB artifacts is the intensity drop along the axial direction. Many algorithms have been proposed to improve image quality when faced with this problem of data missing; however, development of an effective and computationally efficient algorithm remains a major challenge. In this work, we propose a novel method for estimating the unmeasured data and reducing the intensity drop artifacts. Each CB projection is analyzed in the Radon space via Grangeat's first derivative. Assuming the CB projection is taken from a parallel beam geometry, we extract those data that reside in the unmeasured region of the Radon space. These data are then used as in a parallel beam geometry to calculate a correction term, which is added together with Hu’s correction term to the FDK result to form a final reconstruction. More approximations are then made on the calculation of the additional term, and the final formula is implemented very efficiently. The algorithm performance is evaluated using computer simulations on analytical phantoms. The reconstruction comparison with results using other existing algorithms shows that the proposed algorithm achieves a superior performance on the reduction of axial intensity drop artifacts with a high computation efficiency.

  8. Kinetic description of intense nonneutral beam propagation through a periodic solenoidal focusing field based on the nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, R.C. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Princeton Plasma Physics Lab.; Chen, C. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center

    1997-08-01

    A kinetic description of intense nonneutral beam propagation through a periodic solenoidal focusing field B{sup sol}({rvec x}) is developed. The analysis is carried out for a thin beam with characteristic beam radius r{sub b} {much_lt} S, and directed axial momentum {gamma}{sub b}m{beta}{sub b}c (in the z-direction) large compared with the transverse momentum and axial momentum spread of the beam particles. Making use of the nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations for general distribution function f{sub b}({rvec x},{rvec p},t) and self-consistent electrostatic field consistent with the thin-beam approximation, the kinetic model is used to investigate detailed beam equilibrium properties for a variety of distribution functions. Examples are presented both for the case of a uniform solenoidal focusing field B{sub z}(z) = B{sub 0} = const. and for the case of a periodic solenoidal focusing field B{sub z}(z + S) = B{sub z}(z). The nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations are simplified in the thin-beam approximation, and an alternative Hamiltonian formulation is developed that is particularly well-suited to intense beam propagation in periodic focusing systems. Based on the present analysis, the Vlasov-Maxwell description of intense nonneutral beam propagation through a periodic solenoidal focusing field {rvec B}{sup sol}({rvec x}) is found to be remarkably tractable and rich in physics content. The Vlasov-Maxwell formalism developed here can be extended in a straightforward manner to investigate detailed stability behavior for perturbations about specific choices of beam equilibria.

  9. Computer generation of cobalt-60 single beam dose distribution using an analytical beam model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayaraman, S.

    1981-01-01

    A beam dose calculation model based on evaluation of tissue air ratios (TAR) and scatter air ratios (SAR) for cobalt-60 beams of rectangular cross section has been developed. Off-central axis fall-off of primary radiation intensity is derived by an empirical formulation involving an arctangent function with the slope of the geometrical penumbra acting as an essential constant. Central axis TAR and SAR values are assessed by semi-empirical polynomial expressions employing the two sides of the rectangular field as the bariables. The model utilises a minimum number of parametric constants and is useful for computer generation of isodose curves. The model is capable of accounting for situations where wedge filters or split field shielding blocks, are encountered. Further it could be widely applied with minor modifications to several makes of the currently available cobalt-60 units. The paper explains the model and shows examples of the results obtained in comparison with the corresponding experimentally determined dose distributions. (orig.) [de

  10. Roman Pot Insertions in High-Intensity Beams for the CT-PPS Project at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Deile, Mario; Mereghetti, Alessio; Mirarchi, Daniele; Redaelli, Stefano; Salvachua, Belen; Salvant, Benoit; Valentino, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    The CMS-TOTEM Precision Proton Spectrometer (CT-PPS) at the LHC IP5 aims at exploring diffractive physics at high luminosity in standard LHC fills. It is based on 14 Roman Pots (RPs), designed to host tracking and time-of-flight detectors for measuring the kinematics of leading protons. To reach the physics goals, the RPs will finally have to approach the beams to distances of 15 beam σs (i.e. ~1.5 mm) or closer. After problems with showers and impedance heating in first high-luminosity RP insertions in 2012, the LS1 of LHC was used for upgrades in view of impedance minimisation and for adding new collimators to intercept RP-induced showers. In 2015 the effectiveness of these improvements was shown by successfully inserting the RPs in all LHC beam intensity steps to a first-phase distance of ~25 σs. This contribution reviews the measurements of debris showers and impedance effects, i.e. the data from Beam Loss Monitors, beam vacuum gauges and temperature sensors. The dependences of the observables on the lu...

  11. Use of Intense Ion Beams for Surface Modification and Creation of New Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Renk, T; Prasad, S V; Provencio, P P; Thompson, M

    2002-01-01

    We have conducted surface treatment and alloying experiments with Al, Fe, and Ti-based metals on the RHEPP-1 accelerator (0.8 MV, 20 W, 80 ns FHWM, up to 1 Hz repetition rate) at Sandia National Laboratories. Ions are generated by the MAP gas-breakdown active anode, which can yield a number of different beam species including H, N, and C, depending upon the injected gas. Beams of intense pulsed high-power ion beams have been used to produce surface modification by changes in microstructure caused by rapid heating and cooling of the surface. Increase of beam power leads to ablation of a target surface, and redeposition of ablated material onto a separate substrate. Experiments are described in which ion beams are used in an attempt to increase high-voltage breakdown of a treated surface. Surface alloying of coated Pt and Hf layers is also described. This mixing of a previously deposited thin-film layer into a Ti-alloy substrate leads to significantly enhanced surface wear durability, compared to either untreat...

  12. Role of Density Profiles for the Nonlinear Propagation of Intense Laser Beam through Plasma Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonu Sen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work role of density profiles for the nonlinear propagation of intense laser beam through plasma channel is analyzed. By employing the expression for the dielectric function of different density profile plasma, a differential equation for beamwidth parameter is derived under WKB and paraxial approximation. The laser induces modifications of the dielectric function through nonlinearities. It is found that density profiles play vital role in laser-plasma interaction studies. To have numerical appreciation of the results the propagation equation for plasma is solved using the fourth order Runge-Kutta method for the initial plane wave front of the beam, using boundary conditions. The spot size of the laser beam decreases as the beam penetrates into the plasma and significantly adds self-focusing in plasma. This causes the laser beam to become more focused by reduction of diffraction effect, which is an important phenomenon in inertial confinement fusion and also for the understanding of self-focusing of laser pulses. Numerical computations are presented and discussed in the form of graphs for typical parameters of laser-plasma interaction.

  13. Development of intense pulsed heavy ion beam diode using gas puff plasma gun as ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, H.; Higashiyama, M.; Takata, S.; Kitamura, I.; Masugata, K.

    2006-01-01

    A magnetically insulated ion diode with an active ion source of a gas puff plasma gun has been developed in order to generate a high-intensity pulsed heavy ion beam for the implantation process of semiconductors and the surface modification of materials. The nitrogen plasma produced by the plasma gun is injected into the acceleration gap of the diode with the external magnetic field system. The ion diode is operated at diode voltage approx. =200 kV, diode current approx. =2 kA and pulse duration approx. =150 ns. A new acceleration gap configuration for focusing ion beam has been designed in order to enhance the ion current density. The experimental results show that the ion current density is enhanced by a factor of 2 and the ion beam has the ion current density of 27 A/cm 2 . In addition, the coaxial type Marx generator with voltage 200 kV and current 15 kA has been developed and installed in the focus type ion diode. The ion beam of ion current density approx. =54 A/cm 2 is obtained. To produce metallic ion beams, an ion source by aluminum wire discharge has been developed and the aluminum plasma of ion current density ∼70 A/cm 2 is measured. (author)

  14. Formation of silver nanoparticles inside a soda-lime glass matrix in the presence of a high intensity Ar+ laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niry, M. D.; Khalesifard, H. R.; Mostafavi-Amjad, J.; Ahangary, A.; Azizian-Kalandaragh, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Formation and motion of the silver nanoparticles inside an ion-exchanged soda-lime glass in the presence of a focused high intensity continuous wave Ar + laser beam (intensity: 9.2 x 10 4 W/cm 2 ) have been studied in here. One-dimensional diffusion equation has been used to model the diffusion of the silver ions into the glass matrix, and a two-dimensional reverse diffusion model has been introduced to explain the motion of the silver clusters and their migration toward the glass surface in the presence of the laser beam. The results of the mentioned models were in agreement with our measurements on thickness of the ion-exchange layer by means of optical microscopy and recorded morphology of the glass surface around the laser beam axis by using a Mirau interferometer. SEM micrographs were used to extract the size distribution of the migrated silver particles over the glass surface.

  15. Workload modelling for data-intensive systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lassnig, Mario

    This thesis presents a comprehensive study built upon the requirements of a global data-intensive system, built for the ATLAS Experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider. First, a scalable method is described to capture distributed data management operations in a non-intrusive way. These operations are collected into a globally synchronised sequence of events, the workload. A comparative analysis of this new data-intensive workload against existing computational workloads is conducted, leading to the discovery of the importance of descriptive attributes in the operations. Existing computational workload models only consider the arrival rates of operations, however, in data-intensive systems the correlations between attributes play a central role. Furthermore, the detrimental effect of rapid correlated arrivals, so called bursts, is assessed. A model is proposed that can learn burst behaviour from captured workload, and in turn forecast potential future bursts. To help with the creation of a full representative...

  16. TOPICAL REVIEW: Nanofabrication by advanced electron microscopy using intense and focused beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo Furuya

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The nanogrowth and nanofabrication of solid substances using an intense and focused electron beam are reviewed in terms of the application of scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM and STEM to control the size, position and structure of nanomaterials. The first example discussed is the growth of freestanding nanotrees on insulator substrates by TEM. The growth process of the nanotrees was observed in situ and analyzed by high-resolution TEM (HRTEM and was mainly controlled by the intensity of the electron beam. The second example is position- and size-controlled nanofabrication by STEM using a focused electron beam. The diameters of the nanostructures grown ranged from 4 to 20 nm depending on the size of the electron beam. Magnetic nanostructures were also obtained using an iron-containing precursor gas, Fe(CO5. The freestanding iron nanoantennas were examined by electron holography. The magnetic field was observed to leak from the nanostructure body which appeared to act as a 'nanomagnet'. The third example described is the effect of a vacuum on the size and growth process of fabricated nanodots containing W in an ultrahigh-vacuum field-emission TEM (UHV-FE-TEM. The size of the dots can be controlled by changing the dose of electrons and the partial pressure of the precursor. The smallest particle size obtained was about 1.5 nm in diameter, which is the smallest size reported using this method. Finally, the importance of a smaller probe and a higher electron-beam current with atomic resolution is emphasized and an attempt to develop an ultrahigh-vacuum spherical aberration corrected STEM (Cs-corrected STEM at NIMS is reported.

  17. Some applications of particle-in-cell codes to problems of high intensity beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1986-04-01

    The technique of using the ''particle-in-cell'' method was developed in the field of plasma physics. Borrowed for problems of intense beams, it becomes an especially powerful tool because such problems frequently use single species ''plasmas'' and so pose a less severe requirement on the computer. Several problems are examined in which the PIC code method has been useful. The first is the classical Pierce gun in a transient or short pulse mode. Here the transverse beam optics are strongly affected by the time dependence of the current. The second is a study of high power klystrons searching for the source of an instability. The third is the high power rf source called the ''lasertron'' which is under development at SLAC. The interesting new development for the lasertron simulation is the introduction of a double gap output cavity for improved efficiency. The lasertron and klystron simulations are steady state solutions to rf problems with high-Q cavities. In order to limit the computation to a realistic time, these simulations use an external equivalent circuit which can communicate with the beam tunnel through ports placed at the locations of the rf cavities. Applications for electron beams generally require using a fully relativistic electromagnetic code such as MASK. In some applications, the computation can be speeded up by limiting the solution of the fields to the electrostatic conditions. This can be especially helpful if the degree of precision required demands very large numbers of macroparticles. An example of such an application is shown for a problem involving emittance growth for a high intensity beam for heavy ion fusion.

  18. Some applications of particle-in-cell codes to problems of high intensity beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1986-04-01

    The technique of using the ''particle-in-cell'' method was developed in the field of plasma physics. Borrowed for problems of intense beams, it becomes an especially powerful tool because such problems frequently use single species ''plasmas'' and so pose a less severe requirement on the computer. Several problems are examined in which the PIC code method has been useful. The first is the classical Pierce gun in a transient or short pulse mode. Here the transverse beam optics are strongly affected by the time dependence of the current. The second is a study of high power klystrons searching for the source of an instability. The third is the high power rf source called the ''lasertron'' which is under development at SLAC. The interesting new development for the lasertron simulation is the introduction of a double gap output cavity for improved efficiency. The lasertron and klystron simulations are steady state solutions to rf problems with high-Q cavities. In order to limit the computation to a realistic time, these simulations use an external equivalent circuit which can communicate with the beam tunnel through ports placed at the locations of the rf cavities. Applications for electron beams generally require using a fully relativistic electromagnetic code such as MASK. In some applications, the computation can be speeded up by limiting the solution of the fields to the electrostatic conditions. This can be especially helpful if the degree of precision required demands very large numbers of macroparticles. An example of such an application is shown for a problem involving emittance growth for a high intensity beam for heavy ion fusion

  19. High intensity production of high and medium charge state uraniumand other heavy ion beams with VENUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitner, Daniela; Galloway, Michelle L.; Loew, Timothy J.; Lyneis, Claude M.; Rodriguez, Ingrid Castro; Todd, Damon S.

    2007-11-15

    The next generation, superconducting ECR ion source VENUS(Versatile ECR ion source for NUclear Science) started operation with 28GHzmicrowave heating in 2004. Since then it has produced world recordion beam intensities. For example, 2850 e mu A of O6+, 200 e mu A of U33+or U34+, and in respect to high charge state ions, 1 e mu A of Ar18+, 270e mu A of Ar16+, 28 e mu A of Xe35+ and 4.9 e mu A of U47+ have beenproduced. A brief overview of the latest developments leading to theserecord intensities is given and the production of high intensity uraniumbeams is discussed in more detail.

  20. Studies of the Core Conditions of the Earth and Super-Earths Using Intense Ion Beams at FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahir, N. A.; Neumayer, P.; Bagnoud, V. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstraße 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Lomonosov, I. V.; Shutov, A. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Institutskii pr. 18, 142432 Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Borm, B. [Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, D-60438 Frankfurt (Germany); Piriz, A. R.; Piriz, S. A. [E.T.S.I. Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, E-13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2017-09-01

    Using detailed numerical simulations, we present the design of an experiment that will generate samples of iron under extreme conditions of density and pressure believed to exist in the interior of the Earth and interior of extrasolar Earth-like planets. In the proposed experiment design, an intense uranium beam is used to implode a multilayered cylindrical target that consists of a thin Fe cylinder enclosed in a thick massive W shell. Such intense uranium beams will be available at the heavy-ion synchrotron, SIS100, at the Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research (FAIR), at Darmstadt, which is under construction and will become operational in the next few years. It is expected that the beam intensity will increase gradually over a couple of years to its maximum design value. Therefore, in our studies, we have considered a wide range of beam parameters, from the initial beam intensity (“Day One”) to the maximum specified value. It is also worth noting that two different focal spot geometries have been used. In one case, a circular focal spot with a Gaussian transverse intensity distribution is considered, whereas in the other case, an annular focal spot is used. With these two beam geometries, one can access different parts of the Fe phase diagram. For example, heating the sample with a circular focal spot generates a hot liquid state, while an annular focal spot can produce a highly compressed liquid or a highly compressed solid phase depending on the beam intensity.

  1. Beam halo in high-intensity hadron accelerators caused by statistical gradient errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Gerigk

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The particle-core model for a continuous cylindrical beam is used to describe the motion of single particles oscillating in a uniform linear focusing channel. Using a random variation of the focusing forces, the model is deployed as proof of principle for the occurrence of large single particle radii without the presence of initial mismatch of the beam core. Multiparticle simulations of a periodic 3D transport channel are then used to qualify and quantify the effects in a realistic accelerator lattice.

  2. Design study of a radio-frequency quadrupole for high-intensity beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahng, Jungbae; Kim, Eun-San; Choi, Bong-Hyuk

    2017-07-01

    The Rare isotope Accelerator Of Newness (RAON) heavy-ion accelerator has been designed for the Rare Isotope Science Project (RISP) in Korea. The RAON will produce heavy-ion beams from 660-MeV-proton to 200-MeV/u-uranium with continuous wave (CW) power of 400 kW to support research in various scientific fields. Its system consists of an ECR ion source, LEBTs with 10 keV/u, CW RFQ accelerator with 81.25 MHz and 500 keV/u, a MEBT system, and a SC linac. In detail, the driver linac system consists of a Quarter Wave Resonator (QWR) section with 81.25 MHz and a Half Wave Resonator (HWR) section with 162.5 MHz, Linac-1, and a Spoke Cavity section with 325 MHz, Linac-2. These linacs have been designed to optimize the beam parameters to meet the required design goals. At the same time, a light-heavy ion accelerator with high-intensity beam, such as proton, deuteron, and helium beams, is required for experiments. In this paper, we present the design study of the high intensity RFQ for a deuteron beam with energies from 30 keV/u to 1.5 MeV/u and currents in the mA range. This system is composed of an Penning Ionization Gauge ion source, short LEBT with a RF deflector, and shared SC Linac. In order to increase acceleration efficiency in a short length with low cost, the 2nd harmonic of 162.5 MHz is applied as the operation frequency in the D+ RFQ design. The D+ RFQ is designed with 4.97 m, 1.52 bravery factor. Since it operates with 2nd harmonic frequency, the beam should be 50% of the duty factor while the cavity should be operated in CW mode, to protect the downstream linac system. We focus on avoiding emittance growth by the space-charge effect and optimizing the RFQ to achieve a high transmission and low emittance growth. Both the RFQ beam dynamics study and RFQ cavity design study for two and three dimensions will be discussed. Supported by Korea University Future Research Grant

  3. Beam Dynamics Studies of the ISOLDE Post-accelerator for the High Intensity and Energy Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, Matthew Alexander; Pasini, M

    2012-01-01

    The High Intensity and Energy (HIE) project represents a major upgrade of the ISOLDE (On-Line Isotope Mass Separator) nuclear facility at CERN with a mandate to significantly increase the energy, intensity and quality of the radioactive nuclear beams provided to the European nuclear physics community for research at the forefront of topics such as nuclear structure physics and nuclear astrophysics. The HIE-ISOLDE project focuses on the upgrade of the existing Radioactive ion beam EXperiment (REX) post-accelerator with the addition of a 40MVsuperconducting linac comprising 32 niobium sputter-coated copper quarter-wave cavities operating at 101.28 MHz and at an accelerating gradient close to 6 MV/m. The energy of post-accelerated radioactive nuclear beams will be increased from the present ceiling of 3 MeV/u to over 10 MeV/u, with full variability in energy, and will permit, amongst others, Coulomb interaction and few-nucleon transfer reactions to be carried out on the full inventory of radionuclides available ...

  4. Beam dynamics studies of the ISOLDE post-accelerator for the high intensity and energy upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, M A

    2012-01-01

    The High Intensity and Energy (HIE) project represents a major upgrade of the ISOLDE (On-Line Isotope Mass Separator) nuclear facility at CERN with a mandate to significantly increase the energy, intensity and quality of the radioactive nuclear beams provided to the European nuclear physics community for research at the forefront of topics such as nuclear structure physics and nuclear astrophysics. The HIE-ISOLDE project focuses on the upgrade of the existing Radioactive ion beam EXperiment (REX) post-accelerator with the addition of a 40MVsuperconducting linac comprising 32 niobium sputter-coated copper quarter-wave cavities operating at 101.28 MHz and at an accelerating gradient close to 6 MV/m. The energy of post-accelerated radioactive nuclear beams will be increased from the present ceiling of 3 MeV/u to over 10 MeV/u, with full variability in energy, and will permit, amongst others, Coulomb interaction and few-nucleon transfer reactions to be carried out on the full inventory of radionuclides available ...

  5. Investigation of Generation, Acceleration, Transport and Final Focusing of High-Intensity Heavy Ion Beams from Sources to Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiping Chen

    2006-10-26

    Under the auspices of the research grant, the Intense Beam Theoretical Research Goup at Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Plasma Science and Fusion Center made significant contributions in a number of important areas in the HIF and HEDP research, including: (a) Derivation of rms envelope equations and study of rms envelope dynamics for high-intensity heavy ion beams in a small-aperture AG focusing transport systems; (b) Identification of a new mechanism for chaotic particle motion, halo formation, and beam loss in high-intensity heavy ion beams in a small-aperture AG focusing systems; Development of elliptic beam theory; (d) Study of Physics Issues in the Neutralization Transport Experiment (NTX).

  6. Investigation of Generation, Acceleration, Transport and Final Focusing of High-Intensity Heavy Ion Beams from Sources to Targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiping Chen

    2006-01-01

    Under the auspices of the research grant, the Intense Beam Theoretical Research Group at Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Plasma Science and Fusion Center made significant contributions in a number of important areas in the HIF and HEDP research, including: (a) Derivation of rms envelope equations and study of rms envelope dynamics for high-intensity heavy ion beams in a small-aperture AG focusing transport systems; (b) Identification of a new mechanism for chaotic particle motion, halo formation, and beam loss in high-intensity heavy ion beams in a small-aperture AG focusing systems; (c) Development of elliptic beam theory; and (d) Study of Physics Issues in the Neutralization Transport Experiment (NTX)

  7. Multi-beamlet focusing of intense negative ion beams by aperture displacement technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeiri, Y.; Kaneko, O.; Oka, Y.; Tsumori, K.; Asano, E.; Akiyama, R.; Kawamoto, T.; Kuroda, T.; Ando, A.

    1995-08-01

    Multi-beamlet focusing of an intense negative ion beam has been performed using the beamlet steering by the aperture displacement. The apertures of the grounded grid were displaced as all beamlets of 270 (18 x 15) in the area of 25 cm x 26 cm would be steered to a common point (a focal point) in both the two-stage and the single-stage accelerators. The multi-beamlets were successfully focused and the e-folding half width of 10 cm was achieved 11.2 m downstream from the ion source in both the accelerators. The corresponding gross divergence angle is 9 mrad. The negative ion beamlets are deflected by the magnetic field for the electron deflection at the extraction grid and the deflection direction oppositely changes line by line, resulting in the beam split in the deflection direction. This beamlet deflection was well compensated also using the beamlet steering by the aperture displacement of the grounded grid. The beam acceleration properties related with the beam divergence and the H{sup -} ion current were nearly the same for both the two-stage and the single-stage accelerators, and were dependent on the ratio of the extraction to the acceleration electric fields. (author).

  8. Removal of NOx by pulsed, intense relativistic electron beam in distant gas chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imada, Go; Sakurai, Tomoki; Jiang Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi

    2002-01-01

    Removal of NOx has been studied using a pulsed, intense relativistic electron beam (IREB). The dependence of NOx concentration and the removal efficiency of NOx on the number of IREB shot have been investigated within a distant gas chamber spatially isolated from the electron beam source. The distant gas chamber is filled up with a dry-air-balanced NO gas mixture with the pressure of 270 kPa, and is irradiated by the IREB (2 MeV, 30 A, 35 ns) passing through a 1.6-m-long atmosphere. With the initial NO concentration of 88 ppm, ∼ 70 % of NOx is successfully removed by firing 10 shots of IREB. The NOx removal efficiency has been found to be 50-155 g/kWh

  9. Bessel-Gauss beam enhancement cavities for high-intensity applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, William P; Schimpf, Damian N; Abram, Gilberto; Kärtner, Franz X

    2012-10-22

    We introduce Bessel-Gauss beam enhancement cavities that may circumvent the major obstacles to more efficient cavity-enhanced high-field physics such as high-harmonic generation. The basic properties of Bessel-Gauss beams are reviewed and their transformation properties through simple optical systems (consisting of spherical and conical elements) are presented. A general Bessel-Gauss cavity design strategy is outlined, and a particular geometry, the confocal Bessel-Gauss cavity, is analyzed in detail. We numerically simulate the confocal Bessel-Gauss cavity and present an example cavity with 300 MHz repetition rate supporting an effective waist of 33 μm at the focus and an intensity ratio from the focus to the cavity mirror surfaces of 1.5 × 10(4).

  10. Influence of Polarization of the Incident Beam on Integrated Intensities in X-Ray Energy-Dispersive Diffractometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, J. Staun; Buras, B.; Jensen, T.

    1978-01-01

    Polarization measurements of the primary X-ray beam produced by thick copper and tungsten anodes are reported and formulas derived for integrated intensities of Bragg reflections in energy-dispersive diffractometry with the polarization of the primary beam taken into account. It was found...

  11. Proceedings of the workshop on the science of intense radioactive ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClelland, J.B.; Vieira, D.J. (comps.)

    1990-10-01

    This report contains the proceedings of a 2-1/2 day workshop on the Science of Intense Radioactive Ion Beams which was held at the Los Alamos National Laboratory on April 10--12, 1990. The workshop was attended by 105 people, representing 30 institutions from 10 countries. The thrust of the workshop was to develop the scientific opportunities which become possible with a new generation intense Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility, currently being discussed within North America. The workshop was organized around five primary topics: (1) reaction physics; (2) nuclei far from stability/nuclear structure; (3) nuclear astrophysics; (4) atomic physics, material science, and applied research; and (5) facilities. Overview talks were presented on each of these topics, followed by 1-1/2 days of intense parallel working group sessions. The final half day of the workshop was devoted to the presentation and discussion of the working group summary reports, closing remarks and a discussion of future plans for this effort.

  12. Proceedings of the workshop on the science of intense radioactive ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClelland, J.B.; Vieira, D.J.

    1990-10-01

    This report contains the proceedings of a 2-1/2 day workshop on the Science of Intense Radioactive Ion Beams which was held at the Los Alamos National Laboratory on April 10--12, 1990. The workshop was attended by 105 people, representing 30 institutions from 10 countries. The thrust of the workshop was to develop the scientific opportunities which become possible with a new generation intense Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility, currently being discussed within North America. The workshop was organized around five primary topics: (1) reaction physics; (2) nuclei far from stability/nuclear structure; (3) nuclear astrophysics; (4) atomic physics, material science, and applied research; and (5) facilities. Overview talks were presented on each of these topics, followed by 1-1/2 days of intense parallel working group sessions. The final half day of the workshop was devoted to the presentation and discussion of the working group summary reports, closing remarks and a discussion of future plans for this effort

  13. Development of a laser ion source for production of high-intensity heavy-ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwagi, H.; Yamada, K.; Kurashima, S.

    2017-09-01

    A laser ion source has been developed as a high-intensity source for the ion implanter and the single pulsed beam of the azimuthally varying field cyclotron at TIARA. Highly charged beams of C5+ and C6+ ions and low-charged beams of heavy ions such as C, Al, Ti, Cu, Au, and Pt are required for the single-pulse acceleration in the cyclotron and for the ion implanter, respectively. In the vacuum chamber of the ion source, a target holder on a three-dimensional linear-motion stage provides a fresh surface for each laser shot. A large-sized target with a maximum size of 300 mm × 135 mm is mounted on the holder for long-term operation. The ion current (ion charge flux) in the laser-produced plasma is measured by a Faraday cup and time-of-flight spectra of each charge state are measured using a 90° cylindrical electrostatic analyzer just behind the Faraday cup. Carbon-plasma-generation experiments indicate that the source produces intense high- and low-charged pulsed ion beams. At a laser energy of 483 mJ (2.3 × 1013 W/cm2), average C6+ current of 13 mA and average C5+ current of 23 mA were obtained over the required time duration for single-pulse acceleration in the cyclotron (49 ns for C6+ and 80 ns for C5+). Furthermore, at 45 mJ (2.1 × 1012 W/cm2), an average C2+ current of 1.6 mA over 0.88 μs is obtained.

  14. Free Vibration Analysis for Cracked FGM Beams by Means of a Continuous Beam Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Chuan Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and a continuous stiffness beam model, the free vibration of rectangular-section beams made of functionally graded materials (FGMs containing open edge cracks is studied. Assuming the material gradients follow exponential distribution along beam thickness direction, the conversion relation between the vibration governing equations of a FGM beam and that of an isotropic homogenous beam is deduced. A continuous function is used to characterize the bending stiffness of an edge cracked FGM beam. Thus, the cracked FGM beam is treated as an intact beam with continuously varying bending stiffness along its longitudinal direction. The characteristic equations of beams with different boundary conditions are obtained by transfer matrix method. To verify the validity of the proposed method, natural frequencies for intact and cracked FGM beams are calculated and compared with those obtained by three-dimensional finite element method (3D FEM and available data in the literature. After that, further discussions are carried out to analyze the influences of crack depth, crack location, material property, and slenderness ratio on the natural frequencies of the cracked FGM beams.

  15. Intense, brilliant micro γ-beams in nuclear physics and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habs, D.; Gasilov, S.; Lang, C.; Thirolf, P. G.; Jentschel, M.; Diehl, R.; Schroer, C.; Barty, C. P. J.; Zamfir, N. V.

    2011-06-01

    The upcoming γ facilities MEGa-Ray (Livermore) and ELI-NP (Bucharest) will have a 105 times higher γ flux F0 = 1013/s and a ~30 times smaller band width (ΔEγ/Eγ = BW ~ 10-3) than the presently best γ beam facility. They will allow to extract a small γ beam of about 30 - 100 μm radius 1 m behind the γ production point, containing the dominant γ energy band width. One can collimate the γ beam down to ΘBW = √ BW/ γe , where γe = Ee/ mec2 is a measure of the energy Ee of the electron beam, from which the γ beam is produced by Compton back-scattering. Due to the γ energy - angle correlation, the angular collimation results at the same time in a reduction of the γ beam band width without loss of "good" γ quanta, however, the primary γ flux F0is reduced to about Fcoll ~ F0 . 1.5 . ΔEγ/Eγ. For γ rays in the (0.1-100) MeV range, the negative real part δ of the index of refraction n = 1- δ + iβ from coherent Rayleigh scattering (virtual photo effect) dominates over the positive δ contributions from coherent virtual Compton scattering and coherent virtual pair creation scattering (Delbrück scattering). The very small absolute value |δ| ~ 10-6 - 10-9 of the index of refraction of matter for hard X-rays and γ-rays and its negative sign--in contrast to usual optics--results in a very different γ-ray optics, e.g. focusing lenses become concave and we use stacks of N optimized lenses. It requires very small radii of curvature of the γ lenses and thus very small γ beam radii. This leads to a technical new solution, where the primary γ beam is subdivided into M γ beamlets, which do not interfere with each other, but contribute with their independent intensities. We send the γ beamlets into a two-dimensional array of closely packed cylindrical parabolic refractive lenses, where N ~ 103 lenses with very small radius of curvature are stacked behind each other, leading to contracted beam spots in one dimension. With a second 1D lens system turned by

  16. Recent development of ECRIS for production of intense beam of highly charged heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, T.

    2007-01-01

    In the last decade, the physics of ECR plasma was gradually revealed by the great effort of the scientists and engineers in the field of ECR ion sources engineering. According to the physics of ECR plasma, it is possible to derive the technological rule which directly affects the ECR ion source performance. Based on these results, many kind of ECRISs were built with the modern technologies and successfully produced intense beam of highly charged heavy ions. This article describes the state of art on the physics of ECR plasma and performance of several ECRISs in the world. (author)

  17. Intense, pulsed, charged particle beams and associated applications to materials science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yatsui, K.; Grigoriu, C.; Masugata, K.; Jiang, W.; Sonegawa, T.; Nakagawa, Y.; Eka Prijono, A.C. [Nagaoka Univ. of Technology, Niigata (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    We have demonstrated successful preparation of thin films and nanosize powders by using the technique of intense pulsed ion beam evaporation. In this paper, we review the experimental results of thin film deposition of ZnS, YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x}, BaTiO{sub 3}, cBN, ZrO{sub 2}, ITO, and apatite, as well as the experimental results of the synthesis of nanosize powders of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. (author)

  18. System for monitoring the position, intensity, uniformity, and directivity of a beam of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boux, R.

    1976-01-01

    A monitoring device transparent to ionizing radiation, designed to measure the orientation, intensity and uniformity of an incident beam, comprises a cylindrical housing forming at least one ionization chamber with one or more ion-collecting electrodes transverse to the housing axis, each electrode being subdivided into a plurality of mutually insulated conductive elements connected to respective amplifiers. The elements of at least one electrode include one or more outer elements surrounding or bracketing one or more inner elements to measure the radiation in a central zone and a peripheral zone. The outputs of the respective amplifiers are additively and subtractively combined in an evaluation circuit

  19. Electrostatic system of background suppression under detection of low-intensive ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubrovin, M.M.; Belyaev, V.A.

    2002-01-01

    Paper describes electrostatic system to suppress background at recording of low-intensive particle fluxes with transverse cross section exceeding the area of detector inlet aperture. Electrostatic system comprises 5 electrodes ensuring such spatial distribution of electrostatic field that enables accumulation of beam all ions with 30 x 40 mm 2 cross section at inlet aperture of secondary electron multiplier (SEM) with 9 mm diameter. In this case, ion trajectories prior to enter SEM are turned by 180 deg thus essentially improving signal/background ratio [ru

  20. On the Possibility of Using Nonlinear Elements for Landau Damping in High-Intensity Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexahin, Y. [Fermilab; Gianfelice-Wendt, E. [Fermilab; Lebedev, V. [Fermilab; Valishev, A. [Fermilab

    2016-09-30

    Direct space-charge force shifts incoherent tunes downwards from the coherent ones breaking the Landau mechanism of coherent oscillations damping at high beam intensity. To restore it nonlinear elements can be employed which move back tunes of large amplitude particles. In the present report we consider the possibility of creating a “nonlinear integrable optics” insertion in the Fermilab Recycler to host either octupoles or hollow electron lens for this purpose. For comparison we also consider the classic scheme with distributed octupole families. It is shown that for the Proton Improvement Plan II (PIP II) parameters the required nonlinear tune shift can be created without destroying the dynamic aperture.

  1. Comments on frictional cooling and the zero energy options for cooling intense muon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebrun, P.

    2000-01-01

    It is shown that the proposed frictional cooling method is not directly applicable to intense (∼ 10 12 ) muon bunches, mostly due to space charge constraints. Other difficulties stem from the fact that the initial emittance must be quite small, compared to the nominal muon collider emittance. Excessive heat due to energy deposition in the foils, from the primary muon beam or from secondary electrons could also destroy the thin foils used as moderator. Other zero energy schemes are considered, separately for μ - and μ + . All of them lead the authors to the study of exotic electrons-ions-muons plasma

  2. Intensity measurements of slowly extracted heavy ion beams from the SIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heeg, P.; Peters, A.; Strehl, P.

    1994-11-01

    The paper reports about performance tests of newly designed Secondary Electron Monitors (SEM), Ionization Chambers (IC) and Multi Diode Counters (MDC). Especially the linearity of the detectors with respect to the specific energy loss will be discussed. Calibration has been performed by means of scintillation particle counters at the lower end of the intensity region. The status of the Cryogenic Current Comparator (CCC), which is provided for absolute measurements and calibration of detectors above some nA of beam current is reported, too. (orig.)

  3. Generation and acceleration of high intensity beams in the SLC injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, M.C.; Browne, M.J.; Clendenin, J.E.; Jobe, R.K.; Seeman, J.T.; Sheppard, J.C.; Stiening, R.F.

    1985-04-01

    A new gun pulser and substantially increased focusing have been added to the first 100 m of the SLAC linac in order to provide a pair of intense electron bunches to the SLC damping ring. Each bunch from this injector must have 5 x 10 10 electrons, an invariant emittance γepsilon less than or equal to 1.8 x 10 -3 m-rad and the pair must have an energy spread of less than 2%. Wakefield instabilities present in earlier versions of this injector have been controlled by reducing the transverse beam dimension by a factor of 3

  4. Modeling the interaction of high power ion or electron beams with solid target materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.M.

    1983-11-01

    Intense energy deposition on first wall materials and other components as a result of plasma disruptions in magnetic fusion devices are expected to cause melting and vaporization of these materials. The exact amount of vaporization losses and melt layer thickness are very important to fusion reactor design and lifetime. Experiments using ion or electron beams to simulate the disruption effects have different environments than the actual disruption conditions in fusion reactors. A model has been developed to accurately simulate the beam-target interactions so that the results from such experiments can be meaningful and useful to reactor design. This model includes a two dimensional solution of the heat conduction equation with moving boundaries. It is found that the vaporization and melting of the sample strongly depends on the characteristics of the beam spatial distribution, beam diameter, and on the power-time variation of the beam

  5. The High-Intensity K+ Beam for the NA62 Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Doble, N

    2011-01-01

    The NA62 experiment, approved in 2009, aims to measure the branching ratio of the very rare decay K+ → + with a precision of ±10%. This branching ratio is calculable with good precision in the Standard Model to be (8.5±0.7) 10-11. Predictions of this branching ratio are also available for various extensions of the Standard Model, including supersymmetry and a 4th generation of quarks and leptons, and show that this decay mode is very sensitive to physics beyond the Standard Model. To achieve the K+ decay rate required to collect some 100 events of this very rare process in two years, a new 75 GeV/c secondary hadron beam line has been designed, which provides a ≈ 40x higher kaon flux per incident proton than the previous K12 beam for NA48/2 and at the same time sufficiently small halo rates to allow the very high veto efficency necessary to perform this delicate measurement. The K+ content in the beam is ≈ 6%. In this note we describe in detail the design of this new beam line, which wil...

  6. Large acceptance magnetic focussing horns for production of a high intensity narrow band neutrino beam at the AGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, A.; Chimienti, L.; Leonhardt, W.

    1985-01-01

    A set of two large acceptance (20 to 140 mrad) horns have been designed and built to form a parallel beam of 3 GeV/c pions and kaons for the production of an intense, dichromatic neutrino beam. A set of beam plugs and collimators determined the momentum of the particles which pass through the horns. The cooling and maintenance of the horns and target was a particular concern since they were operated with an incident intensity of over 10 13 proton/sec. These systems were designed for simplicity, reliability, and easy replacement

  7. The model of beam-plasma discharge in the rocket environment during an electron beam injection in the ionosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishin, E.V.; Ruzhin, Yu.Ya.

    1980-01-01

    The model of beam-plasma discharge in the rocket environment during electron beam injection in the ionosphere is constructed. The discharge plasma density dependence on the neutral gas concentration and the beam parameters is found

  8. Electron beam requirements for a three-dimensional Smith-Purcell backward-wave oscillator for intense terahertz radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Je Kim

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A Smith-Purcell device can operate as a backward-wave oscillator for intense, narrow-bandwidth, continuous wave radiation at terahertz wavelengths. We determine the requirements on electron beam current and emittance for the system to oscillate based on a three-dimensional extension of our previous two-dimensional analysis. It is found that specially designed electron beams are required with a current that exceeds a certain threshold value and a flat transverse profile that allows the beam to travel very close to the grating surface. Two methods for producing electron beams with the required characteristics are discussed.

  9. Average intensity and coherence properties of a partially coherent Lorentz-Gauss beam propagating through oceanic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dajun; Wang, Guiqiu; Wang, Yaochuan

    2018-01-01

    Based on the Huygens-Fresnel integral and the relationship of Lorentz distribution and Hermite-Gauss function, the average intensity and coherence properties of a partially coherent Lorentz-Gauss beam propagating through oceanic turbulence have been investigated by using numerical examples. The influences of beam parameters and oceanic turbulence on the propagation properties are also discussed in details. It is shown that the partially coherent Lorentz-Gauss beam with smaller coherence length will spread faster in oceanic turbulence, and the stronger oceanic turbulence will accelerate the spreading of partially coherent Lorentz-Gauss beam in oceanic turbulence.

  10. Wakefield and the diffraction model due to a flat beam moving past a conducting wedge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, A.W.; Henke, H.

    1995-07-01

    A collimator is often used to clean a beam of its excessive tail particles. If the beam intensity is high enough or if the beam is brought too close to the collimator, however, the wakefields generated by the beam-collimator interaction can cause additional beam tails to grow, thus defeating, or even worsening, the beam-tail cleaning process. The wakefield generated by a sheet beam moving past a conducting wedge has been obtained in closed form by Henke using the method of conformal mapping. This result is applied in the present work to obtain the wake force and the transverse kick received by a test charge moving with the beam. For the beam to be approximated as sheet beams, it is assumed to be flat and the collimator is assumed to have an infinite extent in the flat dimention. We derive an exact expression for the transverse wake force delivered to particles in the beam bunch. Implication of emittance growth as a beam passes closely by a collimator is discussed. We consider two idealized wedge geometries: In Section 2, when the wedge has the geometry as a disrupted beam pipe, and in Section 3, when it is like a semi-infinite screen. Unfortunately, we do not have solutions for more realistic collimator geometries such as when it is tapered to minimize the wakefield effects. However, our results should still serve as pessimistic limiting cases. An interesting opportunity is offered by our exact calculation of the wakefields: it can be used to confront the diffraction model used to estimate the high-frequency impedance of a cavity structure. It is shown that the field pattern, as well as the impedance, agrees with those obtained by the diffraction model in appropriate limits

  11. Dose determination in radiotherapy for photon beams modified by static intensity modulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellanos Lopez, M.E.

    1998-01-01

    The static intensity modulators, used in radiotherapy, modify the spectral composition of the beam and lead to specific problems of the dose calculation. The aim of this work was to establish a three dimensional calculation, global and accurate, adapted to the primary-diffused separation algorithm and valid for any static modulator type. A theoretical study, experimentally verified, allowed the evaluation of the primary fluence, resulting from metallic sheets placed between photons beams of 6 to 23 MV nominal energy. It has been showed that the diffused, coming from the modulators, could be neglected for weak thickness and for the relative dose variation. In return it leads to significant variations of many % on the absolute dose and must be take into account for the bigger thicknesses. Corrective methods for the primary fluence have been proposed. From the energy spectra of the beam, the metallic modulator influence has been studied on the primary and diffused components of the dose and improvements of the calculation method have been proposed. These improvements are based on the modulator representation as a transmission matrix and on semi-empirical corrective factors. (A.L.B.)

  12. Transcript of the workshop to discuss plans for a National High Intensity Radioactive Nuclear Beam Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitschke, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Following the ''First International Conference on Radioactive Nuclear Beams'' in Berkeley, a workshop was held on October 19, 1989 at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to discuss plans for a National High Intensity Radioactive Nuclear Beam (RNB) Facility. The purpose of the workshop was -- after having discussed during the conference the physics question that can be addressed with RNBs -- to evaluate more concretely the possibilities for actually constructing such a facility in this country. It is becoming increasingly apparent that facility producing beams of radioactive nuclei with extreme neutron-to-proton ratios is of high scientific interest and technically feasible. It would allow the study of nuclear structure and astrophysical reactions very far from the line of stable nuclei, and could provide new possibilities of reaching the long-sought island of stability of superheavy nuclei. Such facilities are under advanced consideration in Japan and at CERN in Europe. This paper contains a slightly edited transcript of the tape recording that was made of the workshop

  13. Liquid-film stripper for high-intensity heavy-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leemann, B.T.; Merrill, P.; Syversrud, H.K.; Wada, R.; Yourd, R.B.

    1981-03-01

    Electron strippers are widely used in heavy ion accelerators such as tandem Van de Graaff generators and heavy ion linacs. The SuperHILAC at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, employs a fluorocarbon oil vapor stripper at 113 keV/A for its high intensity injector ABEL, while after acceleration to 1.199 MeV/A a 35 μg/cm 2 carbon foil stripper is used. At present, the lifetime of these foils is about 1 hour for an 40 Ar beam of approx. 1 μA average particle current. With higher intensity high mass (100 less than or equal to A less than or equal to 238) beams available from ABEL injector the lifetime is expected to drop drastically and might be as low as one minute. A different approach to solve the stripper foil lifetime problem uses a thin free standing oil film spun from the edge of a sharp-edged rotating disc touching the surface of an oil reservoir. Areas of about 10 cm 2 with areal densities down to 20 μg/cm 2 have been reported. The work described here is based on the same concept, and produces a constantly regenerated, stable, free standing oil film of appropriate thickness for use at the SuperHILAC

  14. A Statistical Model for Energy Intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjaneh Issapour

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A promising approach to improve scientific literacy in regards to global warming and climate change is using a simulation as part of a science education course. The simulation needs to employ scientific analysis of actual data from internationally accepted and reputable databases to demonstrate the reality of the current climate change situation. One of the most important criteria for using a simulation in a science education course is the fidelity of the model. The realism of the events and consequences modeled in the simulation is significant as well. Therefore, all underlying equations and algorithms used in the simulation must have real-world scientific basis. The "Energy Choices" simulation is one such simulation. The focus of this paper is the development of a mathematical model for "Energy Intensity" as a part of the overall system dynamics in "Energy Choices" simulation. This model will define the "Energy Intensity" as a function of other independent variables that can be manipulated by users of the simulation. The relationship discovered by this research will be applied to an algorithm in the "Energy Choices" simulation.

  15. Electromagnetic Weible Instability in Intense Charged Particle Beams with Large Energy Anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2003-01-01

    In plasmas with strongly anisotropic distribution functions, collective instabilities may develop if there is sufficient coupling between the transverse and longitudinal degrees of freedom. Our previous numerical and theoretical studies of intense charged particle beams with large temperature anisotropy [E. A. Startsev, R. C. Davidson and H. Qin, PRSTAB, 6, 084401 (2003); Phys. Plasmas 9, 3138 (2002)] demonstrated that a fast, electrostatic, Harris-like instability develops, and saturates nonlinearly, for sufficiently large temperature anisotropy (T perpendi c ular b /T parallelb >> 1). The total distribution function after saturation, however, is still far from equipartitioned. In this paper the linearized Vlasov-Maxwell equations are used to investigate detailed properties of the transverse electromagnetic Weibel-type instability for a long charge bunch propagating through a cylindrical pipe of radius r w . The kinetic stability analysis is carried out for azimuthally symmetric perturbations about a two-temperature thermal equilibrium distribution in the smooth-focusing approximation. The most unstable modes are identified, and their eigenfrequencies, radial mode structure and instability thresholds are determined. The stability analysis shows that, although there is free energy available to drive the electromagnetic Weibel instability, the finite transverse geometry of the charged particle beam introduces a large threshold value for the temperature anisotropy ((T perpendi c ularb /T parallelb ) Weibel >> (T perpendi c ularb /T parallelb ) Harris ) below which the instability is absent. Hence, unlike the case of an electrically neutral plasma, the Weibel instability is not expected to play as significant a role in the process of energy isotropization of intense unneutralized charged particle beams as the electrostatic Harris-type instability

  16. Experimental study of proton acceleration with ultra-high intensity, high contrast laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flacco, A.

    2008-07-01

    This thesis reports experimental work in the domain of laser-matter interaction to study the production of energetic proton beams. The ion beams accelerated by laser have been increasing in quality, in energy and in repeatability as laser technology keeps improving. The presence of the pedestal before the high peak laser pulse introduces many unknowns in the accelerating conditions that are created on the front and on the rear surface of the target. The first part of the experimental activities is focused to a better comprehension and the experimental validation of the interaction of a 'pedestal-like', moderate intensity, laser pulse on Aluminum targets. The developed interferometric technique proved to be reliable and produced a complete set of maps of the early stages of the plasma expansion. The reflectometry experiment stresses the importance of the quality of the metallic targets and underlines some obscure points on the behaviour of the rear surface of the illuminated foil. For instance the reflectometry measurements on the thicker targets are significantly different from what is foreseen by the simulations about the timescale of the shock break out. In the second part, the XPW laser pulse is used in ion acceleration from thin metal foils. The laser and target parameters are varied to put in evidence the dependence of the ion beam to the experimental condition. In conclusion I can say that first, during the variation of the target thickness, an optimum is put in evidence. Secondly, the correlation between the laser pulse duration and the proton cutoff energy is qualitatively different between thicker (15 μm) and thinner (1.5 μm, 3 μm) targets. For the first, an optimal pulse duration exists while for the seconds, no variation is found - in the searched space - from the monotonic decreasing of the cutoff energy with the peak intensity. The experimental results put however in evidence some points that are not completely understood. (A.C.)

  17. Analytical theory and nonlinear δf perturbative simulations of temperature anisotropy instability in intense charged particle beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward A. Startsev

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available In plasmas with strongly anisotropic distribution functions (T_{∥b}/T_{⊥b}≪1 a Harris-like collective instability may develop if there is sufficient coupling between the transverse and longitudinal degrees of freedom. Such anisotropies develop naturally in accelerators and may lead to a deterioration of beam quality. This paper extends previous numerical studies [E. A. Startsev, R. C. Davidson, and H. Qin, Phys. Plasmas 9, 3138 (2002] of the stability properties of intense non-neutral charged particle beams with large temperature anisotropy (T_{⊥b}≫T_{∥b} to allow for nonaxisymmetric perturbations with ∂/∂θ≠0. The most unstable modes are identified, and their eigenfrequencies, radial mode structure, and nonlinear dynamics are determined. The simulation results clearly show that moderately intense beams with s_{b}=ω[over ^]_{pb}^{2}/2γ_{b}^{2}ω_{β⊥}^{2}≳0.5 are linearly unstable to short-wavelength perturbations with k_{z}^{2}r_{b}^{2}≳1, provided the ratio of longitudinal and transverse temperatures is smaller than some threshold value. Here, ω[over ^]_{pb}^{2}=4πn[over ^]_{b}e_{b}^{2}/γ_{b}m_{b} is the relativistic plasma frequency squared, and ω_{β⊥} is the betatron frequency associated with the applied smooth-focusing field. A theoretical model is developed based on the Vlasov-Maxwell equations which describes the essential features of the linear stages of instability. Both the simulations and the analytical theory predict that the dipole mode (azimuthal mode number m=1 is the most unstable mode. In the nonlinear stage, tails develop in the longitudinal momentum distribution function, and the kinetic instability saturates due to resonant wave-particle interactions.

  18. Laser alignment measurement model with double beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Changtao; Zhang, Lili; Hou, Xianglin; Wang, Ming; Lv, Jia; Du, Xin; He, Ping

    2012-10-01

    Double LD-Double PSD schedule.employ a symmetric structure and there are a laser and a PSD receiver on each axis. The Double LD-Double PSD is used, and the rectangular coordinate system is set up by use of the relationship of arbitrary two points coordinates, and then the parameter formula is deduced by the knowledge of solid geometry. Using the data acquisition system and the data processing model of laser alignment meter with double laser beam and two detector , basing on the installation parameter of the computer, we can have the state parameter between the two shafts by more complicated calculation and correction. The correcting data of the four under chassis of the adjusted apparatus moving on the level and the vertical plane can be calculated using the computer. This will instruct us to move the apparatus to align the shafts.

  19. Studies and conception of a radiofrequency cooler for high intensity beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duval, Florian

    2009-01-01

    The topic of this thesis is the study and the conception of a RFQ Cooler with buffer gas for high intensity radioactive beams. This project is in the frame of the next extension of GANIL, Spiral2, and the future low-energy facility DESIR ('Decay, Excitation and Storage of Radioactive ions'). The goal is to reduce the beams emittance of Spiral2 beams to allow their purification (ideally at isobaric level) with a high resolution separator. This cooler consists on a quadrupolar structure on which ions are confined by RF potential in opposite phase at an energy of 100 eV. A light buffer-gas, typically helium, is injected in the quadrupole and, after each collision, the ion lose a part of its energy and is finally cooled. The main problem on our project concerns the space charge. The existing devices are able to cool currents of few 10 nA whereas we have to treat beam intensities around 1 μA which induce an increase of the Coulomb repulsion between ions. That needs to produce strong RF fields which induce high RF potentials (≅ 10 kV pp ) and a low inner radius (r 0 ≅ 3 a 5 mm). We have worked on a first prototype, SHIRaC-Phase1 ('Spiral2 High Intensity Radiofrequency Cooler'), with a 3 mm-inner radius, built at CSNSM-Orsay and moved at LPC-Caen at the end of 2007. The main R and D effort concerns the electronic part. A first RF system, based on a LC resonant circuit, has been developed and has provided up to 2500 V pp between 4.5 and 6.3 MHz. In these conditions, we have checked that we didn't have strong limitations from electrical breakdown between our electrodes. With this device, we have reduced the beam emittance to a value around 2 π.mm.mrad at 60 keV and the longitudinal energy spread to 146 meV. The maximum transmission of Sodium 23 Na + and Rubidium 87 Rb + is 25% with an ionization source for which the beam quality is better than Spiral2. For this reason, we have conceived a new cooler with an acceptance of 80 π.mm.mrad at 60 ke

  20. Damping beam displacements through phase mixing: an illustrative model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barletta, W.A.; Briggs, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    We develop a simple model of a beam transported in a hard wall channel (an idealized very-high-order magnetic-multipole channel). The extremely anharmonic nature of the potential leads to damping of coherent transverse displacements of the beam via phase mixing. For the case of small uniform displacements of the beam we can write down by inspection the analytical form of the motion of the beam centroid. The same technique allows us to evaluate the effects of focussing and scattering elements in the transport channel upon the damping of the transverse motion of the beam

  1. Analytical Model for Fictitious Crack Propagation in Concrete Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulfkjær, J. P.; Krenk, S.; Brincker, Rune

    An analytical model for load-displacement curves of unreinforced notched and un-notched concrete beams is presented. The load displacement-curve is obtained by combining two simple models. The fracture is modelled by a fictitious crack in an elastic layer around the mid-section of the beam. Outside...... the elastic layer the deformations are modelled by the Timoshenko beam theory. The state of stress in the elastic layer is assumed to depend bi-lineary on local elongation corresponding to a linear softening relation for the fictitious crack. For different beam size results from the analytical model...... is compared with results from a more accurate model based on numerical methods. The analytical model is shown to be in good agreement with the numerical results if the thickness of the elastic layer is taken as half the beam depth. Several general results are obtained. It is shown that the point on the load...

  2. Analytical Model for Fictitious Crack Propagation in Concrete Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulfkjær, J. P.; Krenk, Steen; Brincker, Rune

    1995-01-01

    An analytical model for load-displacement curves of concrete beams is presented. The load-displacement curve is obtained by combining two simple models. The fracture is modeled by a fictitious crack in an elastic layer around the midsection of the beam. Outside the elastic layer the deformations...... are modeled by beam theory. The state of stress in the elastic layer is assumed to depend bilinearly on local elongation corresponding to a linear softening relation for the fictitious crack. Results from the analytical model are compared with results from a more detailed model based on numerical methods...... for different beam sizes. The analytical model is shown to be in agreement with the numerical results if the thickness of the elastic layer is taken as half the beam depth. It is shown that the point on the load-displacement curve where the fictitious crack starts to develop and the point where the real crack...

  3. Beam intensity modulation for penumbra enhancement in the treatment of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dirkx, Maarten L.P.; Essers, Marion; Soernsen de Koste, John R. van; Senan, Suresh; Heijmen, Ben J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: A treatment planning study was performed for patients with lung cancer in order to investigate the extent to which doses to critical structures could be reduced by penumbra enhancement at the superior and inferior field edges, using beam intensity modulation (BIM) with a multileaf collimator. By applying two independent published models for the prediction of the incidence of normal tissue complications, the potential for dose escalation without increasing the incidence of pneumonitis was estimated. Methods and Materials: For 12 patients, the standard treatment technique was compared with the BIM technique using the Cadplan 3D planning system (Varian-Dosetek). Dose distributions in the healthy lung tissue were evaluated by considering both lungs minus the tumor as one functional unit. The following parameters were compared: (i) the average normalized total dose (NTD), (ii) the lung volume receiving an NTD of more than 20 Gy, and (iii) the calculated normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Results: Due to the applied BIM technique, the field lengths could be reduced by 1.4 cm for all patients, while achieving a minimum dose at the superior and inferior parts of the target of 95% of the isocenter dose. Compared to the standard technique, BIM reduced the patient mean of the average NTD for the healthy lung tissue from 16.5 to 15.3 Gy. The volume of healthy lung tissue receiving an NTD of 20 Gy or more was reduced by 9.7% (range 2.2 to 23.1%). The calculated NTCP reduced from 10.7% to 7.6% on average. The length of the esophagus that received a dose of 60 Gy or more could be reduced for 5 of the 6 stage III patients in this study. Based on equal lung NTCPs for the standard technique and the BIM technique, a mean dose escalation of 5.7 Gy (range 1.1 to 16.0 Gy) was possible for the 12 patients in this study. Based on equal average NTDs for the two techniques, the patient mean of the allowed dose escalation was 6.5 Gy (range 1.1 to 18.2 Gy). All dose

  4. Model-Independent Beam Dynamics Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irwin, J.; Wang, C.X.; Yan, Y.T.; Bane, K.L.; Cai, Y.; Decker, F.; Minty, M.G.; Stupakov, G.V.; Zimmermann, F.

    1999-01-01

    Using a singular value decomposition of a beam line matrix, composed of many beam position measurements for a large number of pulses, together with the measurement of pulse-by-pulse beam properties or machine attributes, the contributions of each variable to the beam centroid motion can be identified with a greatly improved resolution. The eigenvalues above the noise floor determine the number of significant physical variables. This method is applicable to storage rings, linear accelerators, and any system involving a number of sources and a larger number of sensors with unknown correlations. Applications are presented from the Stanford Linear Collider. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  5. Generation and focusing of pulsed intense ion beams. Final progress report, April 1, 1979-September 30, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudan, R.N.; Hammer, D.A.

    1981-04-01

    Theoretical calculations suggest that an intense pulsed approx. 1 MeV proton beam can be used to simulate the characteristics of approx. 1 GeV heavy ion beam propagation in an inertial confinement fusion reactor chamber. Given the present availability of the former beams and the high projected cost for obtaining the latter ones, such experimental simulations appear appropriate. Work was undertaken under the cited contract to apply the technology of intense proton beams to this end. The first task was the development of a high brightness pulsed proton source which could produce a weakly convergent approx. 10 kA proton beam in a field free drift region. This was accomplished at approx. 250 keV, and preliminary beam propagation experiments were performed. It was concluded that a proper simulation experiment would require a higher voltage beam. An upgraded version of the existing generator, which would have produced a 30 kA beam at about 500 keV, and further propagation experiments were proposed as part of our unsuccessful renewal proposal dated October 15, 1979

  6. SPIRAL2 at GANIL: Next Generation of ISOL Facility for Intense Secondary Radioactive Ion Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gales, S.

    2010-03-01

    To pursue the investigation of a new territory of nuclei with extreme N/Z called terra incognita several projects, all aiming at the increase by several orders of magnitude of the Radioactive Ion Beams (RIB) intensities are now under discussions worldwide. As selected by the ESFRI committee, the next generation of ISOL facility in Europe is represented by the SPIRAL2 Project to be built at GANIL (Caen, France). SPIRAL 2 is based on a high power, CW, superconducting driver LINAC, delivering 5 mA of deuteron beams at 40MeV (200kW) directed on a C converter+ Uranium target and producing therefore up to 5ṡ1013fissions/s. The expected radioactive beams intensities for exotic species in the mass range from A=60 to A=140, of the order of 106 to 1010pps, will surpass by two orders of magnitude any existing facilities in the world. These unstable atoms will be available at energies between few keV/n to 15 MeV/n. The same driver will accelerate high intensity (100μA to 1 mA), heavy ions up to Ar at 14 MeV/A producing also proton rich exotic nuclei. In applied areas SPIRAL2 is considered as a powerful variable energy neutron source, a must to study the impact of nuclear fission and fusion on materials. Construction of the SPIRAL2 facility is shared by ten French laboratories and a network of international partners. Under the FP7 framework program of European Union called “Preparatory Phase” for the construction of new facilities, the SPIRAL2 project has been granted a budget of about 4Meuros to build up an international consortium around this new venture. Regarding the future physics program a call for Letter of intents has been launched in Oct 2006 and 8 large International collaborations has been built up around new instruments for SPIRAL2. The status of the construction of SPIRAL2 accelerator and technical R&D programs for physics instrumentation (detectors, spectrometers) in collaboration with EU and International partners will be presented.

  7. Intensity limits for propagation of 0.527 μm laser beams through large-scale-length plasmas for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemann, C.; Divol, L.; Froula, D.H.; Gregori, G.; Jones, O.; Kirkwood, R.K.; MacKinnon, A.J.; Meezan, N.B.; Moody, J.D.; Sorce, C.; Suter, L.J.; Glenzer, S.H.; Bahr, R.; Seka, W.

    2005-01-01

    We have established the intensity limits for propagation of a frequency-doubled (2ω, 527 nm) high intensity interaction beam through an underdense large-scale-length plasma. We observe good beam transmission at laser intensities at or below 2x10 14 W/cm 2 and a strong reduction at intensities up to 10 15 W/cm 2 due to the onset of parametric scattering instabilities. We show that temporal beam smoothing by spectral dispersion allows a factor of 2 higher intensities while keeping the beam spray constant, which establishes frequency-doubled light as an option for ignition and burn in inertial confinement fusion experiments

  8. Development and characterization of micro-pattern gas detectors for intense beams of hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandenbroucke, Maxence

    2012-01-01

    This thesis work is dedicated to the design, development and characterization of Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors. The performances of a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) equipped with a triple Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) amplification structure are reported. The intrinsic ion backflow suppression of GEM foils drastically reduces the space charge produced by wire readout in traditional TPC. The GEM solution allows the operation of a TPC at much higher event rate. The second part of this thesis describes the development of a 40 x 40 cm 2 Micromegas detector with a highly segmented central area. A reduction of discharges compared to conventional Micromegas detectors is needed for stable operation in intense beams of hadrons. Spark reduction technologies have been successfully studied and results are presented.

  9. The tensile effect on crack formation in single crystal silicon irradiated by intense pulsed ion beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Guoying; Shen, Jie; Zhang, Jie; Zhong, Haowen; Cui, Xiaojun; Yan, Sha; Zhang, Xiaofu; Yu, Xiao; Le, Xiaoyun

    2017-10-01

    Improving antifatigue performance of silicon substrate is very important for the development of semiconductor industry. The cracking behavior of silicon under intense pulsed ion beam irradiation was studied by numerical simulation in order to understand the mechanism of induced surface peeling observed by experimental means. Using molecular dynamics simulation based on Stillinger Weber potential, tensile effect on crack growth and propagation in single crystal silicon was investigated. Simulation results reveal that stress-strain curves of single crystal silicon at a constant strain rate can be divided into three stages, which are not similar to metal stress-strain curves; different tensile load velocities induce difference of single silicon crack formation speed; the layered stress results in crack formation in single crystal silicon. It is concluded that the crack growth and propagation is more sensitive to strain rate, tensile load velocity, stress distribution in single crystal silicon.

  10. Development and characterization of micro-pattern gas detectors for intense beams of hadrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandenbroucke, Maxence

    2012-07-02

    This thesis work is dedicated to the design, development and characterization of Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors. The performances of a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) equipped with a triple Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) amplification structure are reported. The intrinsic ion backflow suppression of GEM foils drastically reduces the space charge produced by wire readout in traditional TPC. The GEM solution allows the operation of a TPC at much higher event rate. The second part of this thesis describes the development of a 40 x 40 cm{sup 2} Micromegas detector with a highly segmented central area. A reduction of discharges compared to conventional Micromegas detectors is needed for stable operation in intense beams of hadrons. Spark reduction technologies have been successfully studied and results are presented.

  11. UCN up-scattering as a source of highly intense monochromatic pulsed beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauch, H.; Geltenborg, P.; Zimmer, O.

    2011-01-01

    The present proposal opens new possibilities to increase the usable neutron flux by advanced neutron cooling and phase space transformation methods. Thus a new instrument should be installed where the available neutron flux is used more efficiently. The essential point is an increase of phase space density and brilliance due to a more effective production of ultra-cold neutrons and a following transformation of these neutrons to higher energies. Recently reported progresses in the production of UCN's and in the up-scattering of such neutrons make the time mature to step towards a new method to produce high intense pulsed neutron beams. The up-scattering is made by fast moving Bragg crystals

  12. Comparison of Square and Radial Geometries for High Intensity Laser Power Beaming Receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raible, Daniel E.; Fast, Brian R.; Dinca, Dragos; Nayfeh, Taysir H.; Jalics, Andrew K.

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to further advance a realizable form of wireless power transmission (WPT), high intensity laser power beaming (HILPB) has been developed for both space and terrestrial applications. Unique optical-to-electrical receivers are employed with near infrared (IR-A) continuous-wave (CW) semiconductor lasers to experimentally investigate the HILPB system. In this paper, parasitic feedback, uneven illumination and the implications of receiver array geometries are considered and experimental hardware results for HILPB are presented. The TEM00 Gaussian energy profile of the laser beam presents a challenge to the effectiveness of the receiver to perform efficient photoelectric conversion, due to the resulting non-uniform illumination of the photovoltaic cell arrays. In this investigation, the geometry of the receiver is considered as a technique to tailor the receiver design to accommodate the Gaussian beam profile, and in doing so it is demonstrated that such a methodology is successful in generating bulk receiver output power levels reaching 25 W from 7.2 sq cm of photovoltaic cells. These results are scalable, and may be realized by implementing receiver arraying and utilizing higher power source lasers to achieve a 1.0 sq m receiver capable of generating over 30 kW of electrical power. This type of system would enable long range optical "refueling" of electric platforms, such as MUAV s, airships, robotic exploration missions and provide power to spacecraft platforms which may utilize it to drive electric means of propulsion. In addition, a smaller HILPB receiver aperture size could be utilized to establish a robust optical communications link within environments containing high levels of background radiance, to achieve high signal to noise ratios.

  13. Dosimetric evaluation of an ipsilateral intensity modulated radiotherapy beam arrangement for parotid malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yirmibesoglu, Eda; Fried, David V.; Kostich, Mark; Rosenman, Julian; Shockley, William; Weissler, Mark; Zanation, Adam; Chera, Bhishamjit

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a dosimetric comparison of an ipsilateral beam arrangement for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with off-axis beams. Six patients who received post-operative radiotherapy (RT) for parotid malignancies were used in this dosimetric study. Four treatment plans were created for each CT data set (24 plans): 1) ipsilateral 4-field off-axis IMRT (4fld-OA), 2) conventional wedge pair (WP), 3) 7 field co-planar IMRT (7fld), and 4) ipsilateral co-planar 4-field quartet IMRT (4fld-CP). Dose, volume statistics for the planning target volumes (PTVs) and planning risk volumes (PRVs) were compared for the four treatment techniques. Wedge pair plans inadequately covered the deep aspect of the PTV. The 7-field IMRT plans delivered the largest low dose volumes to normal tissues. Mean dose to the contralateral parotid was highest for 7 field IMRT. Mean dose to the contralateral submandibular gland was highest for 7 field IMRT and WP. 7 field IMRT plans had the highest dose to the oral cavity. The mean doses to the brainstem, spinal cord, ipsilateral temporal lobe, cerrebellum and ipsilateral cochlea were similar among the four techniques. For postoperative treatment of the parotid bed, 4-field ipsilateral IMRT techniques provided excellent coverage while maximally sparing the contralateral parotid gland and submandibular gland

  14. Handling of high intensity proton beams at 12 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takasaki, M.; Minakawa, M.; Yamanoi, Y.; Ieiri, M.; Kato, Y.; Ishii, H.; Suzuki, Y.; Suzuki, T.; Tanaka, K.H.

    1990-01-01

    A new counter experimental hall is now being constructed at the KEK (National Laboratory for High Energy Physics, Japan) 12 GeV Proton Synchrotron (KEK-PS). This hall will be completed by the end of 1989, immediately followed by magnet installation. The present report describes the new technical achievements employed at the hall. The most important and essential feature of the equipment is that the beam-handling system is maintenance-free, though in case of need, maintenance should be carried out quickly from a distant location in order to reduce the absorbed dose during the maintenance work. This paper is divided into three parts. The first part outlines the general design concept of the hall, focusing on the handling of high-intensity beams. The second part addresses the development of a quick-disconnect system, focusing on electric power, interlock signals, cooling water, pumping port, and vacuum flange. The third part describes the development of radiation-resistant instruments, focusing on polyimide magnets and cement magnets. (N.K.)

  15. High intensity pulsed ion beams in material processing: Equipment and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piekoszewski, J.; Langner, J.

    1991-02-01

    The accelerators capable of producing short-duration high intensity pulsed ion beams (HIPIB) used so far in surface treatment experiments are outlined. The duration of the beams fall in the range from ns to μs and their current densities are in the range between 50-280 A/cm 2. In the remainder of the paper the experiments illustrating the modification of the surface properties of semiconductors, metals and ceramics are reviewed. They show that in semiconductors, HIPIB may be effective in annealing of ion implantation damage, in formation of p-n junctions in a single step doping process, in alloying the predeposited dopant, and in silicides formation. In metals, properly chosen HIPIB may induce the effects leading to an increase of their microhardness, abrasive wear resistance and corrosion resistance. Also mixing of various kind of coatings with metallic substrates is feasible. In ceramics, HIPIB can be used in polishing their surface by surface melt. It is also demonstrated that with HIPIB technique, the single step process of deposition of well adhesing metallic coatings on metallic and ceramic substrates can be accomplished.

  16. Effect on structure and mechanical property of tungsten irradiated by high intensity pulsed ion beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Xianxiu; Zhang, Xiaonan; Liu, Xiaofei; Wang, Younian

    2017-09-01

    The anti-thermal radiation performance of tungsten was investigated by high intensity pulsed ion beam technology. The ion beam was mainly composed of Cn+ (70%) and H+ (30%) at an acceleration voltage of 250 kV under different energy densities for different number of pulses. GIXRD analysis showed that no obvious phase structural changes occurred on the tungsten, and microstress generated. SEM analysis exhibited that there was no apparent irradiation damage on the surface of tungsten at the low irradiation frequency (3 times and 10 times) and at the low energy density (0.25 J/cm2 and 0.7 J/cm2). Cracks appeared on the surface of tungsten after 100-time and 300-time irradiation. Shedding phenomenon even appeared on the surface of tungsten at the energy densities of 1.4 J/cm2 and 2.0 J/cm2. The surface nano-hardness of tungsten decreased with the increase of the pulse times and the energy density. The tungsten has good anti-thermal radiation properties under certain heat load environment.

  17. Arbitrary control of the polarization and intensity profiles of diffraction-attenuation-resistant beams along their propagation direction

    OpenAIRE

    Corato-Zanarella, Mateus; Dorrah, Ahmed H.; Zamboni-Rached, Michel; Mojahedi, Mo

    2017-01-01

    We report on the theory and experimental generation of a class of diffraction-attenuation-resistant beams with state of polarization (SoP) and intensity that can be controlled on demand along the propagation direction. This is achieved by a suitable superposition of Bessel beams, whose parameters are systematically chosen based on closed-form analytic expressions provided by the Frozen Waves (FWs) method. Using an amplitude-only spatial light modulator, we experimentally demonstrate three sce...

  18. A high intensity beam line of γ-rays up to 22MeV energy based on Compton backscattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, W.; Xu, W.; Chen, J.G.; Ma, Y.G.; Cai, X.Z.; Wang, H.W.; Xu, Y.; Wang, C.B.; Lu, G.C.; Tian, W.D.; Yuan, R.Y.; Xu, J.Q.; Wei, Z.Y.; Yan, Z.; Shen, W.Q.

    2007-01-01

    Shanghai Laser Electron Gamma Source, a high intensity beam line of γ-ray, has been proposed recently. The beam line is expected to generate γ-rays up to the maximum energy of 22MeV by Compton backscattering between a CO 2 laser and electrons in the 3.5 GeV storage ring of the Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The flux of non-collimated γ-rays is estimated to be 10 9 -10 10 s -1 when a CO 2 laser of several hundred Watt power is employed. We will discuss physics issues in the design and optimization of the beam line

  19. Generation of quantum beams in large clusters irradiated by Super-Intense, high - contrast femtosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faenov, A.Ya.; Pikuz, T.A. [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kyoto (Japan); Joint Institute for High Temperatures RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Fukuda, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Bulanov, S.V.; Hayashi, Y.; Kotaki, H.; Pirozhkov, A.S.; Kawachi, T.; Kando, M. [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kyoto (Japan); Skobelev, I.Yu.; Fortov, V.E. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Chen, L.M.; Zhang, L.; Yan, W.C.; Yuan, D.W.; Mao, J.Y.; Wang, Z.H.; Ma, J.L. [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Kato, Y. [The Graduate School for the Creation of New Photonics Industries, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka (Japan)

    2013-02-15

    A short review of our experimental studies on generation of photon and particle beams in submicron clusters irradiated by intense, high-contrast ({proportional_to} 10{sup 8}-10{sup 10}) femtosecond laser pulses is presented. It is shown that highlyefficient laser-cluster interaction allows creating bright sources of X-ray, high-energy electron and ion beams. The examples of applications of femtosecond-laser-produced cluster plasmas (FLPCP) for X-ray and ion beams radiography are presented. (copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. Intense light-ion beams provide a robust, common-driver path toward ignition, gain, and commercial fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, J.J.; Cook, D.L.

    1993-01-01

    Intense light-ion beams are being developed for investigations of inertial confinement fusion (ICF). This effort has concentrated on developing the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) at Sandia as a driver for ICF target experiments, on design concepts for a high-yield, high-gain Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF), and on a comprehensive system study of a light-ion beam-driven commercial fusion reactor (LIBRA). Reports are given on the status of design concepts and research in these areas. (author)

  1. Arbitrary Control of Polarization and Intensity Profiles of Diffraction-Attenuation-Resistant Beams along the Propagation Direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corato-Zanarella, Mateus; Dorrah, Ahmed H.; Zamboni-Rached, Michel; Mojahedi, Mo

    2018-02-01

    We report on the theory and experimental generation of a class of diffraction-attenuation-resistant beams with state of polarization (SOP) and intensity that can be controlled on demand along the propagation direction. This control is achieved by a suitable superposition of Bessel beams, whose parameters are systematically chosen based on closed-form analytic expressions provided by the frozen waves method. Using an amplitude-only spatial light modulator, we experimentally demonstrate three scenarios. In the first, the SOP of a horizontally polarized beam evolves to radial polarization and is then changed to vertical polarization, with the beam intensity held constant. In the second, we simultaneously control the SOP and the longitudinal intensity profile, which is chosen such that the beam's central ring can be switched off over predefined space regions, thus generating multiple foci with different SOPs and at different intensity levels along the propagation. Finally, the ability to control the SOP while overcoming attenuation inside lossy fluids is shown experimentally. We envision our proposed method to be of great interest for many applications, such as optical tweezers, atom guiding, material processing, microscopy, and optical communications.

  2. Effect of quadrupole focusing-field fluctuation on the transverse stability of intense hadron beams in storage rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kiyokazu; Matsuba, Masanori; Okamoto, Hiromi

    2018-02-01

    A systematic experimental study is performed to clarify the parameter dependence of the noise-induced beam instability previously demonstrated by a Princeton group [M. Chung et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 145003 (2009)]. Because of the weakness of the driving force, the instability develops very slowly, which substantially limits the application of conventional experimental and numerical techniques. In the present study, a novel tabletop apparatus called "S-POD" (Simulator of Particle Orbit Dynamics) is employed to explore the long-term collective behavior of intense hadron beams. S-POD provides a many-body Coulomb system physically equivalent to a relativistic charged-particle beam and thus enables us to conduct various beam-dynamics experiments without the use of large-scale machines. It is reconfirmed that random noise on the linear beam-focusing potential can be a source of slow beam quality degradation. Experimental observations are explained well by a simple perturbation theory that predicts the existence of a series of dangerous noise frequency bands overlooked in the previous study. Those additional instability bands newly identified with S-POD are more important practically because the driving noise frequencies can be very low. The dependence of the instability on the noise level, operating tune, and beam intensity is examined and found consistent with theoretical predictions.

  3. A dosimetric comparison of fan-beam intensity modulated radiotherapy with gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery for treating intermediate intracranial lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Lijun; Xia Ping; Verhey, Lynn J.; Boyer, Arthur L.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To compare and evaluate treatment plans for the fan-beam intensity modulated radiotherapy and the Gamma Knife radiosurgery for treating medium-size intracranial lesions (range 4-25 cm 3 ). Methods and Materials: Treatment plans were developed for the Leksell Gamma Knife and a fan-beam inverse treatment planning system for intensity modulated radiotherapy. Treatment plan comparisons were carried out using dose-volume histogram (DVH), tissue-volume ratio (TVR), and maximum dose to the prescription dose (MDPD) ratio. The study was carried out for both simulated targets and clinical targets with irregular shapes and at different locations. Results: The MDPD ratio was significantly greater for the Gamma Knife plans than for the fan-beam IMRT plans. The Gamma Knife plans produced equivalent TVR values to the fan-beam IMRT plans. Based on the DVH comparison, the fan-beam IMRT delivered significantly more dose to the normal brain tissue than the Gamma Knife. The results of the comparison were found to be insensitive to the target locations. Conclusion: The Gamma Knife is better than the fan-beam IMRT in sparing normal brain tissue while producing equivalent tumor dose conformity for treating medium-size intracranial lesions. However, the target dose homogeneity is significantly better for the fan-beam IMRT than for the Gamma Knife

  4. A tesselation-based model for intensity estimation and laser plasma interactions calculations in three dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colaïtis, A.; Chapman, T.; Strozzi, D.; Divol, L.; Michel, P.

    2018-03-01

    A three-dimensional laser propagation model for computation of laser-plasma interactions is presented. It is focused on indirect drive geometries in inertial confinement fusion and formulated for use at large temporal and spatial scales. A modified tesselation-based estimator and a relaxation scheme are used to estimate the intensity distribution in plasma from geometrical optics rays. Comparisons with reference solutions show that this approach is well-suited to reproduce realistic 3D intensity field distributions of beams smoothed by phase plates. It is shown that the method requires a reduced number of rays compared to traditional rigid-scale intensity estimation. Using this field estimator, we have implemented laser refraction, inverse-bremsstrahlung absorption, and steady-state crossed-beam energy transfer with a linear kinetic model in the numerical code Vampire. Probe beam amplification and laser spot shapes are compared with experimental results and pf3d paraxial simulations. These results are promising for the efficient and accurate computation of laser intensity distributions in holhraums, which is of importance for determining the capsule implosion shape and risks of laser-plasma instabilities such as hot electron generation and backscatter in multi-beam configurations.

  5. Modeling of an Adjustable Beam Solid State Light

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal is for the development of a computational model of a prototype variable beam light source using optical modeling software, Zemax OpticStudio ®. The...

  6. A self-calibrating ionisation chamber for the precise intensity calibration of high-energy heavy-ion beam monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junghans, A.

    1996-01-01

    The intensity of a 136 Xe(600 A MeV) beam has been determined by simultaneously measuring the particle rate and the corresponding ionisation current with an ionisation chamber. The ionisation current of this self-calibrating device was compared at higher intensities with the current of a secondary-electron monitor and a calibration of the secondary-electron current was achieved with a precision of 2%. This method can be applied to all high-energy heavy-ion beams. (orig.)

  7. Polarized proton and deuteron targets for the usage in intensive proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Get'man, V.A.; Derkach, A.Ya.; Karnaukhov, I.M.; Lukhanin, A.A.; Razumnyj, A.A.; Sorokin, P.V.; Sporo, E.A.; Telegin, Yu.N.

    1982-01-01

    Polarized proton and deuteron targets are developed and tested for conducting investigations in intense photon beams. A flowsheet of polarization targets which includes: working agent of the target, superconducting magnet, cryostat of 3 He evaporation with 3 He pumping and recirculation systems, SHF system of 4 mm range for polarization pumping, measuring system of target polarization protons is presented. Working agent of the targets includes frozen balls with 1.5 mm diameter. Ethylene-glucol and 1.2-propylene-glycol were used as a working substance for proton targets. Completely deuterated ethylene-glycol was used for the deuteron target. Vertical magnetic field with 2.7 T intensity is produced by a superconducting magnetic system. Polarization pumping is exercised at 75 GHz frequency. Q-meter of direct current is used for determination of polarization. Working temperature of the cryostat is approximately 0.5 K. The lock device permits to exercise replacement of the target working agent during 30 minutes

  8. High energy density physics with intense ion and laser beams. Annual report 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weyrich, K. (comp.)

    2004-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Laser plasma physics, plasma spectroscopy, beam interaction experiments, atomic and radiation physics, pulsed power applications, beam transport and accelerator research and development, properties of dense plasma, instabilities in beam-plasma interaction, beam transport in dense plasmas, short-pulse laser-matter interaction. (HSI)

  9. Relativistic phase effect in modeling interactions between ultraintense laser beams and electrons plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, Alexandru; Stancalie, Viorica

    2017-06-01

    In a series of previous papers we proved an accurate connection between quantum and classical equations in the case of electrodynamic systems. We have used this connection to elaborate simplified models for systems composed of very intense laser beams and electrons or atoms. These models are in good agreement with numerous experimental data from literature. In this paper we develop the above approach for the new field of interactions between ultraintense laser beams, having intensities in the range 1018 - 1022 W/cm2, and electron plasmas. We show that in this case new effects take place, such as the fact that the variation of the phase of the field at the point where the electron is situated, decreases when the intensity of the field increases, due to a strong relativistic behavior. This effect leads to an aperiodic behavior of the radiations generated by above interactions, and to a possible new method for solitary waves generation.

  10. Mini biased collimated faraday cups for measurement of intense pulsed ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Xiaoping; Shi Lei; Zhang Jiasheng; Qiu Aici

    2000-01-01

    An analysis of principle of a biased Faraday cup for measuring ion beams density and the main reasons related to the measuring accuracy were presented. An array of mini biased collimated Faraday cups was manufactured for the measurement of ion beam density of a compact 200 keV high power ion beam source. In the experiments the maximum density of ion beam was in the center of the beam, and it was about 170 A/cm 2

  11. An optimal algorithm for configuring delivery options of a one-dimensional intensity-modulated beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luan Shuang; Chen, Danny Z; Zhang, Li; Wu Xiaodong; Yu, Cedric X

    2003-01-01

    The problem of generating delivery options for one-dimensional intensity-modulated beams (1D IMBs) arises in intensity-modulated radiation therapy. In this paper, we present an algorithm with the optimal running time, based on the 'rightmost-preference' method, for generating all distinct delivery options for an arbitrary 1D IMB. The previously best known method for generating delivery options for a 1D IMB with N left leaf positions and N right leaf positions is a 'brute-force' solution, which first generates all N! possible combinations of the left and right leaf positions and then removes combinations that are not physically allowed delivery options. Compared with the brute-force method, our algorithm has several advantages: (1) our algorithm runs in an optimal time that is linearly proportional to the total number of distinct delivery options that it actually produces. Note that for a 1D IMB with multiple peaks, the total number of distinct delivery options in general tends to be considerably smaller than the worst case N!. (2) Our algorithm can be adapted to generating delivery options subject to additional constraints such as the 'minimum leaf separation' constraint. (3) Our algorithm can also be used to generate random subsets of delivery options; this feature is especially useful when the 1D IMBs in question have too many delivery options for a computer to store and process. The key idea of our method is that we impose an order on how left leaf positions should be paired with right leaf positions. Experiments indicated that our rightmost-preference algorithm runs dramatically faster than the brute-force algorithm. This implies that our algorithm can handle 1D IMBs whose sizes are substantially larger than those handled by the brute-force method. Applications of our algorithm in therapeutic techniques such as intensity-modulated arc therapy and 2D modulations are also discussed

  12. Predictability of bone density at posterior mandibular implant sites using cone-beam computed tomography intensity values

    OpenAIRE

    Alkhader, Mustafa; Hudieb, Malik; Khader, Yousef

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the predictability of bone density at posterior mandibular implant sites using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) intensity values. Materials and Methods: CBCT cross-sectional images for 436 posterior mandibular implant sites were selected for the study. Using Invivo software (Anatomage, San Jose, California, USA), two observers classified the bone density into three categories: low, intermediate, and high, and CBCT intensity values were g...

  13. Beam model for non-planar orbits in synchrotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Month, M.

    1984-01-01

    A framework has been developed for a beam model in the case of synchrotron orbits not confined to a plane. An appropriate moving reference system for the analysis of beam stability has been introduced. As examples of strong perturbations to median plane symmetry, two geometries for the overpass for the Tevatron collider are considered

  14. Beam model for non-planar orbits in synchrotrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Month, M.

    1984-03-26

    A framework has been developed for a beam model in the case of synchrotron orbits not confined to a plane. An appropriate moving reference system for the analysis of beam stability has been introduced. As examples of strong perturbations to median plane symmetry, two geometries for the overpass for the Tevatron collider are considered.

  15. Artificial Neural Network Model for Low Strength RC Beam Shear ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research was to investigate how the shear strength prediction of low strength reinforced concrete beams will improve under an ANN model. An existing database of 310 reinforced concrete beams without web reinforcement was divided into three sets of training, validation and testing. A total of 224 different architectural ...

  16. Calculation of benchmarks with a shear beam model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, M.A.N.; Boer, A.; Rots, J.G.; Ferreira, D.

    2015-01-01

    Fiber models for beam and shell elements allow for relatively rapid finite element analysis of concrete structures and structural elements. This project aims at the development of the formulation of such elements and a pilot implementation. Standard nonlinear fiber beam formulations do not account

  17. Nonlinear δf particle simulations of collective excitations and energy-anisotropy instabilities in high-intensity bunched beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Qin

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Collective effects with strong coupling between the longitudinal and transverse dynamics are of fundamental importance for applications of high-intensity bunched beams. The self-consistent Vlasov-Maxwell equations are applied to high-intensity finite-length charge bunches, and a generalized δf particle simulation algorithm is developed for bunched beams with or without energy anisotropy. The nonlinear δf method exhibits minimal noise and accuracy problems in comparison with standard particle-in-cell simulations. Systematic studies are carried out under conditions corresponding to strong 3D nonlinear space-charge forces in the beam frame. For charge bunches with isotropic energy, finite bunch-length effects are clearly evident by the fact that the spectra for an infinitely long coasting beam and a nearly spherical charge bunch have strong similarities, whereas the spectra have distinctly different features when the bunch length is varied between these two limiting cases. For bunched beams with anisotropic energy, there exists no exact kinetic equilibrium because the particle dynamics do not conserve transverse energy and longitudinal energy separately. A reference state in approximate dynamic equilibrium has been constructed theoretically, and a quasi-steady state has been established in the simulations for the anisotropic case. Collective excitations relative to the reference state have been simulated using the generalized δf algorithm. In particular, the electrostatic Harris instability driven by strong energy anisotropy is investigated for a finite-length charge bunch. The observed growth rates are larger than those obtained for infinitely long coasting beams. However, the growth rate decreases for increasing bunch length to a value similar to the case of a long coasting beam. For long bunches, the instability is axially localized symmetrically relative to the beam center, and the characteristic wavelength in the longitudinal direction is

  18. Intensity-gradient induced Sisyphus cooling of a single atom in a localized hollow-beam trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Yaling; Xia, Yong; Ren, Ruimin; Du, Xiangli; Yin, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    In order to realize a convenient and efficient laser cooling of a single atom, we propose a simple and promising scheme to cool a single neutral atom in a blue-detuned localized hollow-beam trap by intensity-gradient induced Sisyphus cooling, and study the dynamic process of the intensity-gradient cooling of a single 87 Rb atom in the localized hollow-beam trap by using Monte-Carlo simulations. Our study shows that a single 87 Rb atom with a temperature of 120 μK from a magneto-optical trap (MOT) can be directly cooled to a final temperature of 4.64 μK in our proposed scheme. We also investigate the dependences of the cooling results on the laser detuning δ of the localized hollow-beam, the power RP 0 of the re-pumping laser beam, the sizes of both the localized hollow-beam and the re-pumping beam, and find that there is a pair of optimal cooling parameters (δ and RP 0 ) for an expected lowest temperature, and the cooling results strongly depend on the size of the re-pumping beam, but weakly depend on the size of the localized hollow-beam. Finally, we further study the cooling potential of our localized hollow-beam trap for the initial temperature of a single atom, and find that a single 87 Rb atom with an initial temperature of higher than 1 mK can also be cooled directly to about 6.6 μK. (paper)

  19. Experimental characterization and physical modelling of the dose distribution of scanned proton pencil beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedroni, E; Scheib, S; Boehringer, T; Coray, A; Grossmann, M; Lin, S; Lomax, A

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present the pencil beam dose model used for treatment planning at the PSI proton gantry, the only system presently applying proton therapy with a beam scanning technique. The scope of the paper is to give a general overview on the various components of the dose model, on the related measurements and on the practical parametrization of the results. The physical model estimates from first physical principles absolute dose normalized to the number of incident protons. The proton beam flux is measured in practice by plane-parallel ionization chambers (ICs) normalized to protons via Faraday-cup measurements. It is therefore possible to predict and deliver absolute dose directly from this model without other means. The dose predicted in this way agrees very well with the results obtained with ICs calibrated in a cobalt beam. Emphasis is given in this paper to the characterization of nuclear interaction effects, which play a significant role in the model and are the major source of uncertainty in the direct estimation of the absolute dose. Nuclear interactions attenuate the primary proton flux, they modify the shape of the depth-dose curve and produce a faint beam halo of secondary dose around the primary proton pencil beam in water. A very simple beam halo model has been developed and used at PSI to eliminate the systematic dependences of the dose observed as a function of the size of the target volume. We show typical results for the relative (using a CCD system) and absolute (using calibrated ICs) dosimetry, routinely applied for the verification of patient plans. With the dose model including the nuclear beam halo we can predict quite precisely the dose directly from treatment planning without renormalization measurements, independently of the dose, shape and size of the dose fields. This applies also to the complex non-homogeneous dose distributions required for the delivery of range-intensity-modulated proton therapy, a novel therapy technique

  20. Study of an intense proton beam profiler based on laser absorption; Etude d'un profileur optique de faisceaux intenses de protons par absorption laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pottin, B

    2001-10-01

    Among the challenges of high current proton accelerators, the development of new beam diagnostics is of major importance. The main difficulty for these instruments, is the beam power which deteriorates any instruments used to catch it. The chosen detectors are therefore 'non-interceptive systems. After an introduction concerning characteristics of the used accelerator (chapter I), parameters defining a beam of particles are presented (chapter II). Among these ones, the profile is an important beam characteristic for its transport. After the description of the different types of beam profilers, their problematic application to intense beams is discussed. New physical phenomena have to be used for profilers. Thus, we have prospected optical luminescence phenomena. The light produced during the interaction of protons with the residual gas and/or locally injected is a source of informations on beam characteristics. In chapters III and IV, there is an experimental and theoretical analysis of the luminescence. Chapter V is a direct application of spectroscopic measurements to estimate the output of protons with a non-interceptive technique. With the spectral analysis, the idea of a profiler based on laser absorption is developed. This presentation is both theoretical and experimental (chapters 6 and 7). The laser absorption needs the use of metastable states we define in the chapter 6. The evolution of the metastable states, with time and space, has been rigorously studied to discuss the concept of an optical profiler. Chapter VII presents all the necessary instrumentation for the use of a laser and the first measurements with the beam. At the thesis end, the first recorded profile is presented. An experimental critic is presented with a description of the different sources of errors and the proposed cures. (author)

  1. Commissioning with low-intensity beams helps prepare CMS for this year’s physics run. This event is one of the first low-intensity collisions recorded in the CMS detector, during the early hours of 23 April 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2068005

    2016-01-01

    Commissioning with low-intensity beams helps prepare CMS for this year’s physics run. This event is one of the first low-intensity collisions recorded in the CMS detector, during the early hours of 23 April 2016

  2. Modelling pencil-beam divergence with the electron pencil-beam redefinition algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Robert A.; Hogstrom, Kenneth R.; White, R. Allen; Starkschall, George

    2001-11-01

    The electron pencil-beam redefinition algorithm (PBRA), which is used to calculate electron beam dose distributions, assumes that the virtual source of each pencil beam is identical to that of the broad beam incident on the patient. In the present work, a virtual source specific for each pencil beam is modelled by including the source distance as a pencil-beam parameter to be redefined with depth. To incorporate a variable pencil-beam source distance parameter, the transport equation was reformulated to explicitly model divergence resulting in the algorithm divPBRA. Allowing the virtual source position to vary with individual pencil beams is expected to better model the effects of heterogeneities on local electron fluence divergence (or convergence). Selected experiments from a measured data set developed at The University of Texas M D Anderson Cancer Center were used to evaluate the accuracy of the dose calculated using divPBRA. Results of the calculation showed that the theory accurately predicted the virtual source position in regions of side-scatter equilibrium and predicted reasonable virtual source positions in regions lacking side-scatter equilibrium (i.e. penumbra and in the vicinity and shadow of internal heterogeneities). Results of the evaluation showed the dose accuracy of divPBRA to be marginally better to that of PBRA, except in regions of extremely sharp dose perturbations, where the divPBRA calculations were significantly greater than the measured data. Dose calculations using divPBRA took 45% longer than those using PBRA. Therefore, we concluded that divPBRA offers no significant advantage over PBRA for the purposes of clinical treatment planning. However, the results were promising and divPBRA might prove useful if further modelling were to include large-angle scattering, low-energy delta rays and brehmsstrahlung.

  3. Modelling pencil-beam divergence with the electron pencil-beam redefinition algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, Robert A.; Hogstrom, Kenneth R.; Starkschall, George [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); White, R. Allen [Department of Biomathematics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2001-11-01

    The electron pencil-beam redefinition algorithm (PBRA), which is used to calculate electron beam dose distributions, assumes that the virtual source of each pencil beam is identical to that of the broad beam incident on the patient. In the present work, a virtual source specific for each pencil beam is modelled by including the source distance as a pencil-beam parameter to be redefined with depth. To incorporate a variable pencil-beam source distance parameter, the transport equation was reformulated to explicitly model divergence resulting in the algorithm divPBRA. Allowing the virtual source position to vary with individual pencil beams is expected to better model the effects of heterogeneities on local electron fluence divergence (or convergence). Selected experiments from a measured data set developed at The University of Texas M D Anderson Cancer Center were used to evaluate the accuracy of the dose calculated using divPBRA. Results of the calculation showed that the theory accurately predicted the virtual source position in regions of side-scatter equilibrium and predicted reasonable virtual source positions in regions lacking side-scatter equilibrium (i.e. penumbra and in the vicinity and shadow of internal heterogeneities). Results of the evaluation showed the dose accuracy of divPBRA to be marginally better to that of PBRA, except in regions of extremely sharp dose perturbations, where the divPBRA calculations were significantly greater than the measured data. Dose calculations using divPBRA took 45% longer than those using PBRA. Therefore, we concluded that divPBRA offers no significant advantage over PBRA for the purposes of clinical treatment planning. However, the results were promising and divPBRA might prove useful if further modelling were to include large-angle scattering, low-energy delta rays and brehmsstrahlung. (author)

  4. Modelling pencil-beam divergence with the electron pencil-beam redefinition algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, R A; Hogstrom, K R; White, R A; Starkschall, G

    2001-11-01

    The electron pencil-beam redefinition algorithm (PBRA), which is used to calculate electron beam dose distributions, assumes that the virtual source of each pencil beam is identical to that of the broad beam incident on the patient. In the present work, a virtual source specific for each pencil beam is modelled by including the source distance as a pencil-beam parameter to be redefined with depth. To incorporate a variable pencil-beam source distance parameter, the transport equation was reformulated to explicitly model divergence resulting in the algorithm divPBRA. Allowing the virtual source position to vary with individual pencil beams is expected to better model the effects of heterogeneities on local electron fluence divergence (or convergence). Selected experiments from a measured data set developed at The University of Texas M D Anderson Cancer Center were used to evaluate the accuracy of the dose calculated using divPBRA. Results of the calculation showed that the theory accurately predicted the virtual source position in regions of side-scatter equilibrium and predicted reasonable virtual source positions in regions lacking side-scatter equilibrium (i.e. penumbra and in the vicinity and shadow of internal heterogeneities). Results of the evaluation showed the dose accuracy of divPBRA to be marginally better to that of PBRA, except in regions of extremely sharp dose perturbations, where the divPBRA calculations were significantly greater than the measured data. Dose calculations using divPBRA took 45% longer than those using PBRA. Therefore, we concluded that divPBRA offers no significant advantage over PBRA for the purposes of clinical treatment planning. However, the results were promising and divPBRA might prove useful if further modelling were to include large-angle scattering, low-energy delta rays and brehmsstrahlung.

  5. High energy-intensity atomic oxygen beam source for low earth orbit materials degradation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, J.B.; Blais, N.C.

    1988-01-01

    A high intensity (10 19 O-atoms/s-sr) high energy (5 eV) source of oxygen atoms has been developed that produces a total fluence of 10 22 O-atoms/cm 2 in less than 100 hours of continuous operation at a distance of 15 cm from the source. The source employs a CW CO 2 laser sustained discharge to form a high temperature (15,000 K) plasma in the throat of a 0.3-mm diameter nozzle using 3--8 atmospheres of rare gas/O 2 mixtures. Visible and infrared photon flux levels of 1 watt/cm 2 have been measured 15 cm downstream of the source while vacuum UV (VUV) fluxes are comparable to that measured in low earth orbit. The reactions of atomic oxygen with kapton, Teflon, silver, and various coatings have been studied. The oxidation of kapton (reaction efficiency = 3 /times/ 10/sup /minus/24/ cm /+-/ 50%) has an activation energy of 0.8 Kcal/mole over the temperature range of 25/degree/C to 100/degree/C at a beam energy of 1.5 eV and produces low molecular weight gas phase reaction products (H 2 O, NO, CO 2 ). Teflon reacts with ∼0.1--0.2 efficiency to that of kapton at 25/degree/C and both surfaces show a rug-like texture after exposure to the O-atom beam. Angular scattering distribution measurements of O-atoms show a near cosine distribution from reactive surfaces indicating complete accommodation of the translational energy with the surface while a nonreactive surface (nickel oxide) shows specular-like scattering with 50% accommodation of the translational energy with the surface. A technique for simple on orbit chemical experiments using resistance measurements of coated silver strips is described. 9 figs

  6. Treatment planning for heavy ion radiotherapy: physical beam model and dose optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, M.; Haberer, T.; Kraft, G.; Schardt, D.; Weber, U.

    2000-09-01

    We describe a novel code system, TRiP, dedicated to the planning of radiotherapy with energetic ions, in particular 12 C. The software is designed to cooperate with three-dimensional active dose shaping devices like the GSI raster scan system. This unique beam delivery system allows to select any combination from a list of 253 individual beam energies, 7 different beam spot sizes and 15 intensity levels. The software includes a beam model adapted to and verified for carbon ions. Inverse planning techniques are implemented in order to obtain a uniform target dose distribution from clinical input data, i.e. CT images and patient contours. This implies the automatic generation of intensity modulated fields of heavy ions with as many as 40000 raster points, where each point corresponds to a specific beam position, energy and particle fluence. This set of data is directly passed to the beam delivery and control system. The treatment planning code is in clinical use since the start of the GSI pilot project in December 1997. To this end 48 patients have been successfully planned and treated. (orig.)

  7. Treatment planning for heavy-ion radiotherapy: physical beam model and dose optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, M.; Jäkel, O.; Haberer, T.; Kraft, G.; Schardt, D.; Weber, U.

    2000-11-01

    We describe a novel code system, TRiP, dedicated to the planning of radiotherapy with energetic ions, in particular 12C. The software is designed to cooperate with three-dimensional active dose shaping devices like the GSI raster scan system. This unique beam delivery system allows us to select any combination from a list of 253 individual beam energies, 7 different beam spot sizes and 15 intensity levels. The software includes a beam model adapted to and verified for carbon ions. Inverse planning techniques are implemented in order to obtain a uniform target dose distribution from clinical input data, i.e. CT images and patient contours. This implies the automatic generation of intensity modulated fields of heavy ions with as many as 40 000 raster points, where each point corresponds to a specific beam position, energy and particle fluence. This set of data is directly passed to the beam delivery and control system. The treatment planning code has been in clinical use since the start of the GSI pilot project in December 1997. Forty-eight patients have been successfully planned and treated.

  8. HiRadMat at CERN/SPS - A dedicated facility providing high intensity beam pulses to material samples

    CERN Multimedia

    Charitonidis, N; Efthymiopoulos, I

    2014-01-01

    HiRadMat (High Radiation to Materials), constructed in 2011, is a facility at CERN designed to provide high‐intensity pulsed beams to an irradiation area where material samples as well as accelerator component assemblies (e.g. vacuum windows, high power beam targets, collimators…) can be tested. The facility uses a 440 GeV proton beam extracted from the CERN SPS with a pulse length of up to 7.2 us, and with a maximum pulse energy of 3.4 MJ (3xE13 proton/pulse). In addition to protons, ion beams with energy of 440 GeV/charge and total pulse energy of 21 kJ can be provided. The beam parameters can be tuned to match the needs of each experiment. HiRadMat is not an irradiation facility where large doses on equipment can be accumulated. It is rather a test area designed to perform single pulse experiments to evaluate the effect of high‐intensity pulsed beams on materials or accelerator component assemblies in a controlled environment. The fa‐ cility is designed for a maximum of 1E16 protons per year, dist...

  9. Bayesian modelling of the emission spectrum of the Joint European Torus Lithium Beam Emission Spectroscopy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Sehyun; Svensson, J; Brix, M; Ghim, Y-C

    2016-02-01

    A Bayesian model of the emission spectrum of the JET lithium beam has been developed to infer the intensity of the Li I (2p-2s) line radiation and associated uncertainties. The detected spectrum for each channel of the lithium beam emission spectroscopy system is here modelled by a single Li line modified by an instrumental function, Bremsstrahlung background, instrumental offset, and interference filter curve. Both the instrumental function and the interference filter curve are modelled with non-parametric Gaussian processes. All free parameters of the model, the intensities of the Li line, Bremsstrahlung background, and instrumental offset, are inferred using Bayesian probability theory with a Gaussian likelihood for photon statistics and electronic background noise. The prior distributions of the free parameters are chosen as Gaussians. Given these assumptions, the intensity of the Li line and corresponding uncertainties are analytically available using a Bayesian linear inversion technique. The proposed approach makes it possible to extract the intensity of Li line without doing a separate background subtraction through modulation of the Li beam.

  10. Non-coplanar beam intensity modulation allows large dose escalation in stage III lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derycke, Sylvie; Van Duyse, Bart; De Gersem, Werner; De Wagter, Carlos; De Neve, Wilfried

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of dose escalation in stage III non-small cell lung cancer, we compared standard coplanar (2D) with non-coplanar beam arrangements, without (3D) and with beam intensity modulation (3D-BIM). Materials and methods: This study was a planning effort performed on a non-selected group of 10 patients. Starting from a serial CT scan, treatment planning was performed using Sherouse's GRATIS TM 3D planning system. Two target volumes were defined; gross tumor volume (GTV) defined a high-dose target volume that had to receive a dose of at least 80 Gy and GTV plus the lymph node regions with >10% probability of invasion defined an intermediate-dose target volume (GTV+N). It was our intention to irradiate GTV+N up to 56 Gy or more. If the prescribed doses on GTV and GTV+N could not be reached with either the 2D or 3D technique, a 3D-BIM plan was performed. The 3D-BIM plan was a class solution involving identical gantry angles, segment arrangements and relative segment weights for all patients. Dose volume histograms for GTV, GTV+N, lung and spinal cord were calculated. Criteria for tolerance were met if no points inside the spinal cord exceeded 50 Gy and if at least 50% of the lung volume received less than 20 Gy. Under these constraints, maximal achievable doses to GTV and GTV+N were calculated. Results: In all 2D plans, spinal cord was the limiting factor and the prescribed doses for GTV and GTV+N could not be reached in any patient. The non-coplanar 3D plan resulted in a satisfying solution in 4 out of 10 patients under the same constraints. In comparison with 2D, the minimum dose in GTV+N was increased. Six patients had to be planned with the 3D-BIM technique. The theoretical minimum dose to GTV+N ranged between 56 and 98 Gy. The delivery of 80 Gy or more to GTV was possible in all patients. For a minimal dose of 80 Gy to GTV, the maximal dose to any point of the spinal cord varied between 27 and 46 Gy. The lung volume receiving more than

  11. Treatment planning, optimization, and beam delivery technqiues for intensity modulated proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengbusch, Evan R.

    Physical properties of proton interactions in matter give them a theoretical advantage over photons in radiation therapy for cancer treatment, but they are seldom used relative to photons. The primary barriers to wider acceptance of proton therapy are the technical feasibility, size, and price of proton therapy systems. Several aspects of the proton therapy landscape are investigated, and new techniques for treatment planning, optimization, and beam delivery are presented. The results of these investigations suggest a means by which proton therapy can be delivered more efficiently, effectively, and to a much larger proportion of eligible patients. An analysis of the existing proton therapy market was performed. Personal interviews with over 30 radiation oncology leaders were conducted with regard to the current and future use of proton therapy. In addition, global proton therapy market projections are presented. The results of these investigations serve as motivation and guidance for the subsequent development of treatment system designs and treatment planning, optimization, and beam delivery methods. A major factor impacting the size and cost of proton treatment systems is the maximum energy of the accelerator. Historically, 250 MeV has been the accepted value, but there is minimal quantitative evidence in the literature that supports this standard. A retrospective study of 100 patients is presented that quantifies the maximum proton kinetic energy requirements for cancer treatment, and the impact of those results with regard to treatment system size, cost, and neutron production is discussed. This study is subsequently expanded to include 100 cranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) patients, and the results are discussed in the context of a proposed dedicated proton SRS treatment system. Finally, novel proton therapy optimization and delivery techniques are presented. Algorithms are developed that optimize treatment plans over beam angle, spot size, spot spacing

  12. SU-F-T-209: Multicriteria Optimization Algorithm for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Using Pencil Proton Beam Scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltran, C; Kamal, H [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To provide a multicriteria optimization algorithm for intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning. Methods: Intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning requires efficient optimization algorithms to overcome the uncertainties in the Bragg peaks locations. This work is focused on optimization algorithms that are based on Monte Carlo simulation of the treatment planning and use the weights and the dose volume histogram (DVH) control points to steer toward desired plans. The proton beam treatment planning process based on single objective optimization (representing a weighted sum of multiple objectives) usually leads to time-consuming iterations involving treatment planning team members. We proved a time efficient multicriteria optimization algorithm that is developed to run on NVIDIA GPU (Graphical Processing Units) cluster. The multicriteria optimization algorithm running time benefits from up-sampling of the CT voxel size of the calculations without loss of fidelity. Results: We will present preliminary results of Multicriteria optimization for intensity modulated proton therapy based on DVH control points. The results will show optimization results of a phantom case and a brain tumor case. Conclusion: The multicriteria optimization of the intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning provides a novel tool for treatment planning. Work support by a grant from Varian Inc.

  13. SU-F-T-209: Multicriteria Optimization Algorithm for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Using Pencil Proton Beam Scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltran, C; Kamal, H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a multicriteria optimization algorithm for intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning. Methods: Intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning requires efficient optimization algorithms to overcome the uncertainties in the Bragg peaks locations. This work is focused on optimization algorithms that are based on Monte Carlo simulation of the treatment planning and use the weights and the dose volume histogram (DVH) control points to steer toward desired plans. The proton beam treatment planning process based on single objective optimization (representing a weighted sum of multiple objectives) usually leads to time-consuming iterations involving treatment planning team members. We proved a time efficient multicriteria optimization algorithm that is developed to run on NVIDIA GPU (Graphical Processing Units) cluster. The multicriteria optimization algorithm running time benefits from up-sampling of the CT voxel size of the calculations without loss of fidelity. Results: We will present preliminary results of Multicriteria optimization for intensity modulated proton therapy based on DVH control points. The results will show optimization results of a phantom case and a brain tumor case. Conclusion: The multicriteria optimization of the intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning provides a novel tool for treatment planning. Work support by a grant from Varian Inc.

  14. Effects of beamline components (undulator, monochromator, focusing device) on the beam intensity at ID18F (ESRF)

    CERN Document Server

    Somogyi, A; Vekemans, B; Vincze, L; Simionovici, A; Adams, F

    2003-01-01

    The ID18F microprobe end-station of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) is dedicated to precise and reproducible quantitative X-ray fluorescence analysis in the ppm level with =19 and micron-size spatial resolution. In order to fulfill this requirement the precise monitoring and normalization of the intensity variation of the focused micro-beam is necessary. The various effects influencing the intensity variation, hence the stability of the mu-beam, were investigated by placing different detectors (miniature ionization chamber, photodiodes) into the monochromatic beam. The theoretical statistical error of the measured signal in each detector was estimated on the basis of the absorption and e sup - -ion-pair production processes and was compared with the measured statistical errors.

  15. Beam commission of the high intensity proton source developed at INFN-LNS for the European Spallation Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, L.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Miraglia, A.; Leonardi, O.; Castro, G.; Torrisi, G.; Mascali, D.; Mazzaglia, M.; Allegra, L.; Amato, A.; Calabrese, G.; Caruso, A.; Chines, F.; Gallo, G.; Longhitano, A.; Manno, G.; Marletta, S.; Maugeri, A.; Passarello, S.; Pastore, G.; Seminara, A.; Spartà, A.; Vinciguerra, S.

    2017-07-01

    At the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (INFN-LNS) the beam commissioning of the high intensity Proton Source for the European Spallation Source (PS-ESS) started in November 2016. Beam stability at high current intensity is one of the most important parameter for the first steps of the ongoing commissioning. Promising results were obtained since the first source start with a 6 mm diameter extraction hole. The increase of the extraction hole to 8 mm allowed improving PS-ESS performances and obtaining the values required by the ESS accelerator. In this work, extracted beam current characteristics together with Doppler shift and emittance measurements are presented, as well as the description of the next phases before the installation at ESS in Lund.

  16. A mechanical model for FRP-strengthened beams in bending

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. Valvo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We analyse the problem of a simply supported beam, strengthened with a fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP strip bonded to its intrados and subjected to bending couples applied to its end sections. A mechanical model is proposed, whereby the beam and FRP strip are modelled according to classical beam theory, while the adhesive and its neighbouring layers are modelled as an interface having a piecewise linear constitutive law defined over three intervals (elastic response – softening response – debonding. The model is described by a set of differential equations with appropriate boundary conditions. An analytical solution to the problem is determined, including explicit expressions for the internal forces, displacements and interfacial stresses. The model predicts an overall non-linear mechanical response for the strengthened beam, ranging over several stages: from linearly elastic behaviour to damage, until the complete detachment of the FRP reinforcement.

  17. On beam models and their paraxial approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, W. J.; King, B.

    2018-01-01

    We derive focused laser pulse solutions to the electromagnetic wave equation in vacuum. After reproducing beam and pulse expressions for the well-known paraxial Gaussian and axicon cases, we apply the method to analyse a laser beam with Lorentzian transverse momentum distribution. Whilst a paraxial approach has some success close to the focal axis and within a Rayleigh range of the focal spot, we find that it incorrectly predicts the transverse fall-off typical of a Lorentzian. Our vector-potential approach is particularly relevant to calculation of quantum electrodynamical processes in weak laser pulse backgrounds.

  18. Dynamics of the off axis intense beam propagation in a spiral inflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goswami, A.; Sing Babu, P.; Pandit, V.S.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper the dynamics of space charge dominated beam in a spiral inflector is discussed by developing equations of motion for centroid and beam envelope for the off axis beam propagation. Evolution of the beam centroid and beam envelope is studied as a function of the beam current for various input beam parameters. The transmission of beam through the inflector is also estimated as a function of the beam current for an on axis and off axis beam by tracking a large number of particles. Simulation studies show that shift of the centroid from the axis at the inflector entrance affects the centroid location at the exit of the inflector and causes reduction in the beam transmission. The centroid shift at the entrance in the horizontal plane (h plane) is more critical as it affects the centroid shift in the vertical plane (u plane) by a large amount near the inflector exit where the available aperture is small. The beam transmission is found to reduce with increase in the centroid shift as well as with the beam current.

  19. The Intense Pulsed Ion Beam Treatment and the Titanium Nitride Coating of Hard Alloy for Cutting Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remnev, Gennady E.; Tarbokov, Vladislav A.

    The aim of this work was to investigate adhesion increasing of titanium nitride coating deposited at hard alloy tool’s surface pretreated by intense pulsed ion beam of different energy density. Two alloys were treated by high-power pulsed ion beam of 1÷3.75 J/cm2 energy density. Analyzing the data obtained from tunnel microscopy, X-ray spectrum and measurements of surface relief geometry characteristics, such as roughness and profile length, we came to the following conclusion. First, the value of energy density of ion beam plays the key role in the formation of the relief and phase structure of the surface. Second, these two characteristics are almost independent of the initial characteristics of the irradiated alloys. Also, the article touches the results of scratch-test of the titanium nitride coating. The results demonstrate changes in wearing and destruction mode of the coating deposited at the tool treated by ion beam.

  20. Intense beam production of highly charged heavy ions by the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source SECRAL (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, H. W.; Sun, L. T.; Zhang, X. Z.; Guo, X. H.; Cao, Y.; Lu, W.; Zhang, Z. M.; Yuan, P.; Song, M. T.; Zhao, H. Y.; Jin, T.; Shang, Y.; Zhan, W. L.; Wei, B. W.; Xie, D. Z.

    2008-01-01

    There has been increasing demand to provide higher beam intensity and high enough beam energy for heavy ion accelerator and some other applications, which has driven electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source to produce higher charge state ions with higher beam intensity. One of development trends for highly charged ECR ion source is to build new generation ECR sources by utilization of superconducting magnet technology. SECRAL (superconducting ECR ion source with advanced design in Lanzhou) was successfully built to produce intense beams of highly charged ion for Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). The ion source has been optimized to be operated at 28 GHz for its maximum performance. The superconducting magnet confinement configuration of the ion source consists of three axial solenoid coils and six sextupole coils with a cold iron structure as field booster and clamping. An innovative design of SECRAL is that the three axial solenoid coils are located inside of the sextupole bore in order to reduce the interaction forces between the sextupole coils and the solenoid coils. For 28 GHz operation, the magnet assembly can produce peak mirror fields on axis of 3.6 T at injection, 2.2 T at extraction, and a radial sextupole field of 2.0 T at plasma chamber wall. During the commissioning phase at 18 GHz with a stainless steel chamber, tests with various gases and some metals have been conducted with microwave power less than 3.5 kW by two 18 GHz rf generators. It demonstrates the performance is very promising. Some record ion beam intensities have been produced, for instance, 810 e μA of O 7+ , 505 e μA of Xe 20+ , 306 e μA of Xe 27+ , and so on. The effect of the magnetic field configuration on the ion source performance has been studied experimentally. SECRAL has been put into operation to provide highly charged ion beams for HIRFL facility since May 2007

  1. Intense beam production of highly charged heavy ions by the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source SECRAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H W; Sun, L T; Zhang, X Z; Guo, X H; Cao, Y; Lu, W; Zhang, Z M; Yuan, P; Song, M T; Zhao, H Y; Jin, T; Shang, Y; Zhan, W L; Wei, B W; Xie, D Z

    2008-02-01

    There has been increasing demand to provide higher beam intensity and high enough beam energy for heavy ion accelerator and some other applications, which has driven electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source to produce higher charge state ions with higher beam intensity. One of development trends for highly charged ECR ion source is to build new generation ECR sources by utilization of superconducting magnet technology. SECRAL (superconducting ECR ion source with advanced design in Lanzhou) was successfully built to produce intense beams of highly charged ion for Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). The ion source has been optimized to be operated at 28 GHz for its maximum performance. The superconducting magnet confinement configuration of the ion source consists of three axial solenoid coils and six sextupole coils with a cold iron structure as field booster and clamping. An innovative design of SECRAL is that the three axial solenoid coils are located inside of the sextupole bore in order to reduce the interaction forces between the sextupole coils and the solenoid coils. For 28 GHz operation, the magnet assembly can produce peak mirror fields on axis of 3.6 T at injection, 2.2 T at extraction, and a radial sextupole field of 2.0 T at plasma chamber wall. During the commissioning phase at 18 GHz with a stainless steel chamber, tests with various gases and some metals have been conducted with microwave power less than 3.5 kW by two 18 GHz rf generators. It demonstrates the performance is very promising. Some record ion beam intensities have been produced, for instance, 810 e microA of O(7+), 505 e microA of Xe(20+), 306 e microA of Xe(27+), and so on. The effect of the magnetic field configuration on the ion source performance has been studied experimentally. SECRAL has been put into operation to provide highly charged ion beams for HIRFL facility since May 2007.

  2. Optical Frequency Optimization of a High Intensity Laser Power Beaming System Utilizing VMJ Photovoltaic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raible, Daniel E.; Dinca, Dragos; Nayfeh, Taysir H.

    2012-01-01

    An effective form of wireless power transmission (WPT) has been developed to enable extended mission durations, increased coverage and added capabilities for both space and terrestrial applications that may benefit from optically delivered electrical energy. The high intensity laser power beaming (HILPB) system enables long range optical 'refueling" of electric platforms such as micro unmanned aerial vehicles (MUAV), airships, robotic exploration missions and spacecraft platforms. To further advance the HILPB technology, the focus of this investigation is to determine the optimal laser wavelength to be used with the HILPB receiver, which utilizes vertical multi-junction (VMJ) photovoltaic cells. Frequency optimization of the laser system is necessary in order to maximize the conversion efficiency at continuous high intensities, and thus increase the delivered power density of the HILPB system. Initial spectral characterizations of the device performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) indicate the approximate range of peak optical-to-electrical conversion efficiencies, but these data sets represent transient conditions under lower levels of illumination. Extending these results to high levels of steady state illumination, with attention given to the compatibility of available commercial off-the-shelf semiconductor laser sources and atmospheric transmission constraints is the primary focus of this paper. Experimental hardware results utilizing high power continuous wave (CW) semiconductor lasers at four different operational frequencies near the indicated band gap of the photovoltaic VMJ cells are presented and discussed. In addition, the highest receiver power density achieved to date is demonstrated using a single photovoltaic VMJ cell, which provided an exceptionally high electrical output of 13.6 W/sq cm at an optical-to-electrical conversion efficiency of 24 percent. These results are very promising and scalable, as a potential 1.0 sq m HILPB receiver of

  3. Fixed, object-specific intensity compensation for cone beam optical CT radiation dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Kurtis H.; Hazarika, Rubin; Silveira, Matheus A.; Jordan, Kevin J.

    2018-03-01

    Optical cone beam computed tomography (CT) scanning of radiochromic gel dosimeters, using a CCD camera and a low stray light convergent source, provides fast, truly 3D radiation dosimetry with high accuracy. However, a key limiting factor in radiochromic gel dosimetry at large (⩾10 cm diameter) volumes is the initial attenuation of the dosimeters. It is not unusual to observe a 5–10×  difference in signal intensity through the dosimeter center versus through the surrounding medium in pre-irradiation images. Thus, all dosimetric information in a typical experiment is measured within the lower 10%–20% of the camera sensor’s range, and re-use of gels is often not possible due to a lack of transmission. To counteract this, in this note we describe a simple method to create source compensators by printing on transparent films. This technique, which is easily implemented and inexpensive, is an optical analogue to the bowtie filter in x-ray CT. We present transmission images and solution phantom reconstructions to demonstrate that (1) placing compensators beyond the focal zone of the imaging lens prevents high spatial frequency features of the printed films from generating reconstruction artifacts, and (2) object-specific compensation considerably reduces the range of intensities measured in projection images. This will improve the measurable dose range in optical CT dosimetry, and will enable imaging of larger gel volumes (∼15 cm diameter). Additionally, it should enable re-use of dosimeters by printing a new compensator for a second experiment.

  4. Non-uniform sound intensity distributions when measuring absorption coefficients in reverberation chambers using a phased beam tracing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2010-01-01

    sound intensity distributions on absorber under measurement conditions have been simulated using a phased beam tracing, and used as correction functions for reducing discrepancies between the measured and theoretical absorption coefficients. Two reverberation rooms were investigated by assuming...... that a test specimen was attached to a vertical surface and the floor. The frequency-dependent sound intensity distributions on absorbers were found to be affected by the reverberation chamber geometry and dimensions, the absorption capability of the specimen, and the placement of the specimen. High frequency...... agreement is found between corrected and measured statistical absorption coefficients. The non-uniform sound intensity can account for the discrepancy at high frequencies....

  5. SU-E-T-353: Decoding the Beam Complexity in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, W; Cho, S; Zhang, X; Hoffman, K; Kudchadker, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Modern IMRT relies on computers to generate treatment plans of varied complexity. A highly complex treatment plan may use a large number of small and irregular beam apertures in order to achieve high dose conformity. However, excessive beam complexity can increase dosimetric uncertainty, prolong treatment time, and increase susceptibility to target or organ motion. In this study we sought to develop metrics to assess the complexity of IMRT beams and plans. Methods: Based the information of leaf positions and MU for each beam segment, we calculated the following beam complexity metrics: aperture area, shape irregularity, and beam modulation. Then these beam complexity metrics were averaged to obtain the corresponding plan complexity metrics, using the beam MUs as weighting factors. We evaluated and compared the beam and plan complexity scores for 65 IMRT plans from 3 sites (prostate, head and neck, and spine). We also studied how the plan complexity scores were affected by adjusting inverse planning parameters. Results: For prostate IMRT, the lateral beams had large MUs and smaller shape irregularity, while the anterior or posterior beams had larger modulation values. On average, the prostate IMRT plans had the smallest shape irregularity and beam modulation; the HN IMRT plans had the largest aperture area, shape irregularity, and beam modulation; and the spine stereotactic IMRT plans often had small aperture area, which may be associated with relatively large discrepancies between calculated and measures doses. The plan complexity increased as the number of optimization iterations and the number of beam segments increased and as the minimum segment area decreased. Conclusion: Complexity of IMRT beams and plans were quantified in terms of aperture area, shape irregularity and beam modulation. The complexity metrics varied among IMRT plans for different disease sites and were affected when the planning parameters were adjusted

  6. On models of layered piezoelectric beams for passive vibration control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurini, C.; dell'Isola, F.; Pouget, J.

    2004-06-01

    In this paper models of layered piezoelectric beams are discussed. The attention is focused on the analysis of the assumptions on transversal stress and strain distribution and their influence on the deduction of the beam constitutive equations from a three dimensional description. A model accounting for non trivial transversal interactions between different layers is deduced from a mixed variational formulation where non-local conditions on transversal stress are enforced by Lagrange multipliers method. The fully coupled electromechanical nature of the system is described. For a sandwich piezoelectric beam, analytical expressions of the beam constitutive coefficients are provided and comparisons to standard modelling approaches are presented. Finally, the fundamental features of the proposed model are highlighted by presenting the through-the-thickness distribution of the 3D state fields.

  7. Random and systematic beam modulator errors in dynamic intensity modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsai, Homayon; Cho, Paul S; Phillips, Mark H; Giansiracusa, Robert S; Axen, David

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports on the dosimetric effects of random and systematic modulator errors in delivery of dynamic intensity modulated beams. A sliding-widow type delivery that utilizes a combination of multileaf collimators (MLCs) and backup diaphragms was examined. Gaussian functions with standard deviations ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 mm were used to simulate random positioning errors. A clinical example involving a clival meningioma was chosen with optic chiasm and brain stem as limiting critical structures in the vicinity of the tumour. Dose calculations for different modulator fluctuations were performed, and a quantitative analysis was carried out based on cumulative and differential dose volume histograms for the gross target volume and surrounding critical structures. The study indicated that random modulator errors have a strong tendency to reduce minimum target dose and homogeneity. Furthermore, it was shown that random perturbation of both MLCs and backup diaphragms in the order of σ = 1 mm can lead to 5% errors in prescribed dose. In comparison, when MLCs or backup diaphragms alone was perturbed, the system was more robust and modulator errors of at least σ = 1.5 mm were required to cause dose discrepancies greater than 5%. For systematic perturbation, even errors in the order of ±0.5 mm were shown to result in significant dosimetric deviations

  8. Intense ${^31-35}$Ar beams produced with a nanostructured CaO target at ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Ramos, J P; Mendonça, T M; Seiffert, C; Senos, A M R; Fynbo, H O U; Tengblad, O; Briz, J A; Lund, M V; Koldste, G T; Carmona-Gallardo, M; Pesudo, V; Stora, T

    2014-01-01

    At the ISOLDE facility at CERN, thick targets are bombarded with highly energetic pulsed protons to produce radioactive ion beams (RIBs). The isotopes produced in the bulk of the material have to diffuse out of the grain and effuse throughout the porosity of the material to a transfer line which is connected to an ionizer, from which the charged isotopes are extracted and delivered for physics experiments. Calcium oxide (CaO) powder targets have been used to produce mainly neutron deficient argon and carbon RIBs over the past decades. Such targets presented unstable yields, either decaying over time or low from the beginning of operation. These problems were suspected to come from the degradation of the target microstructure (sintering due to high temperature and/or high proton intensity). In this work, a CaO microstructural study in terms of sintering was conducted on a nanostructured CaO powder synthesized from the respective carbonate. Taking the results of this study, several changes were made at ISOLDE i...

  9. Towards using a Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor for in vivo beam monitoring of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Page, R.F., E-mail: ryan.page@bristol.ac.uk [H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Abbott, N.L.; Davies, J.; Dyke, E.L.; Randles, H.J. [H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Velthuis, J.J. [H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Bristol Haematology and Oncology Centre, University Hospitals Bristol, NHS Foundation Trust (United Kingdom); Fletcher, S.; Gregory, S.D.; Hall, C.; John, A.; Lawrence, H.; Stevens, P.H. [Bristol Haematology and Oncology Centre, University Hospitals Bristol, NHS Foundation Trust (United Kingdom); Hugtenburg, R.P.; Tunbridge, V. [Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-11

    The use of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) for cancer treatments is entering wider use. These treatments involve using a complex configuration of field modifying components, known as Multileaf Collimators (MLC), to dynamically shape the beam. A treatment consists of a sequence of irregular shaped fields, which means real time monitoring and verification is essential. In the current framework the treatment plans are verified before the patient is treated, but not during. The aim of our collaboration is to monitor the treatment being given to the patient. This is achieved by placing a camera system using an ultra-thin Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (MAPS) upstream of the patient. -- Highlights: •A Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor was used to measure the shape of an IMRT field. •The sensor was positioned upstream of the patient causing only a ∼ 0.1% attenuation. •Edges of Multileaf Collimators were determined using edge reconstruction techniques. •The reconstructed edge precision was measured to be 52±4μm for a single frame. •Edge positions from the sensor and film are compared and found to be within error.

  10. Thermal field induced by intense pulsed ion beam and its possible application in thermal diffusivity measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao; Huang, Wanying; Shen, Jie; Zhang, Jie; Zhong, Haowen; Cui, Xiaojun; Liang, Guoying; Zhang, Xiaofu; Zhang, Gaolong; Yan, Sha; Remnev, Gennady Efimovich; Le, Xiaoyun

    2017-10-01

    As a type of flash heating source, intense pulsed ion beam (IPIB) can induce strong thermal effect in the near-surface region of the target. Compared with laser, the energy deposition efficiency of IPIB is significantly higher and is less dependent on the optical properties of the target. The range of ions in matter can be changed more flexibly by adjusting the accelerating voltage. This makes IPIB an ideal candidate for pulsed heating source of the flash method for the measurement of thermal diffusivity of materials. In present work, numerical verification of flash method with IPIB generated by magnetically insulated diode (MID) was carried out. By exploring the features of the induced thermal field, it is demonstrated that IPIB composed of protons and carbon ions with energy of several hundred keV and cross-sectional energy density of several J/cm2 can be used for the measurement of thermal diffusivity with flash method, and the principles of optimization in experimental parameters are discussed.

  11. Random and systematic beam modulator errors in dynamic intensity modulated radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsai, Homayon [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Box 356043, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Cho, Paul S [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Box 356043, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Phillips, Mark H [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Box 356043, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Giansiracusa, Robert S [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Box 356043, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Axen, David [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

    2003-05-07

    This paper reports on the dosimetric effects of random and systematic modulator errors in delivery of dynamic intensity modulated beams. A sliding-widow type delivery that utilizes a combination of multileaf collimators (MLCs) and backup diaphragms was examined. Gaussian functions with standard deviations ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 mm were used to simulate random positioning errors. A clinical example involving a clival meningioma was chosen with optic chiasm and brain stem as limiting critical structures in the vicinity of the tumour. Dose calculations for different modulator fluctuations were performed, and a quantitative analysis was carried out based on cumulative and differential dose volume histograms for the gross target volume and surrounding critical structures. The study indicated that random modulator errors have a strong tendency to reduce minimum target dose and homogeneity. Furthermore, it was shown that random perturbation of both MLCs and backup diaphragms in the order of {sigma} = 1 mm can lead to 5% errors in prescribed dose. In comparison, when MLCs or backup diaphragms alone was perturbed, the system was more robust and modulator errors of at least {sigma} = 1.5 mm were required to cause dose discrepancies greater than 5%. For systematic perturbation, even errors in the order of {+-}0.5 mm were shown to result in significant dosimetric deviations.

  12. Development of exploding wire ion source for intense pulsed heavy ion beam accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochiai, Y.; Murata, T.; Ito, H.; Masugata, K.

    2012-01-01

    A Novel exploding wire type ion source device is proposed as a metallic ion source of intense pulsed heavy ion beam (PHIB) accelerator. In the device multiple shot operations is realized without breaking the vacuum. The basic characteristics of the device are evaluated experimentally with an aluminum wire of diameter 0.2 mm, length 25 mm. Capacitor bank of capacitance 3 μF, charging voltage 30 kV was used and the wire was successfully exploded by a discharge current of 15 kA, rise time 5.3 μs. Plasma flux of ion current density around 70 A/cm 2 was obtained at 150 mm downstream from the device. The drift velocity of ions evaluated by a time-of-flight method was 2.7x10 4 m/sec, which corresponds to the kinetic energy of 100 eV for aluminum ions. From the measurement of ion current density distribution ion flow is found to be concentrated to the direction where ion acceleration gap is placed. From the experiment the device is found to be acceptable for applying PHIB accelerator. (author)

  13. Effect of intense pulsed ion beams irradiation on the oxidation behavior of gamma sup ' -based superalloy

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang Hong Tao; Han Bao Xi; Yan Sha; Zhao Wei Jiang; Han Ya Fan

    2002-01-01

    Intense pulsed ion beams (IPIB) with three different power densities (25, 37.5 and 50 MW/cm sup 2) are employed for the surface treatment of gamma sup ' -based superalloy IC6. The influence of IPIB irradiation on the oxidation behavior of IC6 at 1100 degree sign C for up to 100 h is investigated. It is found that the phase states of IC6 are dramatically changed after IPIB irradiation and the oxidation behavior of the irradiated coupons depends greatly on the power density of IPIB. IPIB irradiation with a power density of 25 or 37.5 MW/cm sup 2 significantly reduces the oxidation rate with respect to the unirradiated coupon. The improvement of the oxidation resistance can be attributed to a change in the oxidation products from a three-layered scale of Ni-rich oxides for the unirradiated coupon to a two-layered scale of Mo- and Al-rich oxides. In contrast, IPIB irradiation with a power density of 50 MW/cm sup 2 proves to be detrimental, causing a higher oxidation rate. The oxidation mechanism for IPIB irradiat...

  14. Modeling of direct beam extraction for a high-charge-state fusion driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, O. A.; Grant Logan, B.

    A newly proposed type of multicharged ion source offers the possibility of an economically advantageous high-charge-state fusion driver. Multiphoton absorption in an intense uniform laser focus can give multiple charge states of high purity, simplifying or eliminating the need for charge-state separation downstream. Very large currents (hundreds of amperes) can be extracted from this type of source. Several arrangements are possible. For example, the laser plasma could be tailored for storage in a magnetic bucket, with beam extracted from the bucket. A different approach, described in this report, is direct beam extraction from the expanding laser plasma. We discuss extraction and focusing for the particular case of a 4.1 MV beam of Xe 16+ ions. The maximum duration of the beam pulse is limited by the total charge in the plasma, while the practical pulse length is determined by the range of plasma radii over which good beam optics can be achieved. The extraction electrode contains a solenoid for beam focusing. Our design studies were carried out first with an envelope code and then with a self-consistent particle code. Results from our initial model showed that hundreds of amperes could be extracted, but that most of this current missed the solenoid entrance or was intercepted by the wall and that only a few amperes were able to pass through. We conclude with an improved design which increases the surviving beam to more than 70 A.

  15. Beam angle selection for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment of unresectable pancreatic cancer: are noncoplanar beam angles necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, D S; Bartlett, G K; Das, I J; Cardenes, H R

    2013-09-01

    External beam radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy (CRT) is widely used for the treatment of unresectable pancreatic cancer. Noncoplanar (NCP) 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and coplanar (CP) IMRT have been reported to lower the radiation dose to organs at risk (OARs). The purpose of this article is to examine the utility of noncoplanar beam angles in IMRT for the management of pancreatic cancer. Sixteen patients who were treated with CRT for unresectable adenocarcinoma of the pancreatic head or neck were re-planned using CP and NCP beams in 3DCRT and IMRT with the Varian Eclipse treatment planning system. Compared to CP IMRT, NCP IMRT had similar target coverage with slightly increased maximum point dose, 5,799 versus 5,775 cGy (p = 0.008). NCP IMRT resulted in lower mean kidney dose, 787 versus 1,210 cGy (p kidney dose, but did not improve other dose-volume criteria. The use of NCP beam angles is preferred only in patients with risk factors for treatment-related kidney dysfunction.

  16. Design Optimisation of a High Intensity Beam Facility and Feasibility Experiment of a Solid Fragmented Target

    CERN Document Server

    Charitonidis, Nikolaos; Rivkin, Leonid

    2014-06-13

    The present PhD thesis describes the design, execution and results of the HRMT-10 experiment performed at the HiRadMat facility of the CERN/SPS complex. The first part of the thesis covers the design optimization studies of the HiRadMat facility, focusing in particular on the radiation protection issues. A detailed Monte-Carlo model of the facility has been developed and validated through comparison with measurements. A very satisfactory agreement between the simulation and the experimental data is observed. In the second part of this thesis, a novel feasibility experiment of a fragmented solid target for a future Neutrino Factory or a Super Beam facility, able to support high beam powers ( 1 MW) is presented in detail. A solid granular target has been proposed as an interesting alternative to an open Hg jet target, presently considered as the baseline for such facilities, but posing considerable technical challenges. The HRMT-10 experiment seeks to address the lack of experimental data of the feasibility of...

  17. Evolution of High Intensity Beams in the CERN PS Booster after H⁻ Injection and Phase Space Painting

    CERN Document Server

    Cieslak-Kowalska, Magdalena; Benedetto, Elena; Bracco, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    With the LHC Injector Upgrade (LIU) project, the injection energy of PS Booster (PSB) ' first circular accelerator in the LHC injector chain ' will be raised from 50 MeV to 160 MeV and the present multiturn injection will be upgraded to H⁻ injection with transverse and longitudinal painting. In the scope of this project, it is planned to double the beam intensities, profiting from the fact that the βγ2 factor will be two times larger (0.35 at 50 MeV and 0.71 at 160 MeV), so the resulting tune spread driven by a direct space charge should remain similar. This paper describes the feasibility to double the intensity of high intensity and large emittance beams, looking into the evolution under space charge and taking into account losses constrains in the ring and in the extraction lines.

  18. Numerical and experimental characterization of a plasma induced on a solid target by an intense pulsed multi-MeV e-beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribière, M.; Maisonny, R.; d'Almeida, T.

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the interaction of an intense pulsed multi MeV electron beam with a solid target on the ASTERIX high voltage generator using a set of numerical and experimental tools. Physical mechanisms occurring at various stages are examined, from electron beam dynamics to X-ray production, including plasma generation at the solid target surface. First, the electron beam characteristics are determined using 2D axisymmetric Particle-In-Cell calculations and a good agreement is found between calculated and measured current and voltage profiles. Calculated electron beam characteristics serve as an input to a 3D Monte-Carlo code in order to simulate the dose distribution within the solid target. The plasma produced at the target surface upon interaction with the electron beam is diagnosed and quantitatively characterized through UV-visible emission spectroscopy. Plasma species are identified and spectroscopy data are analyzed based on a 1D radiative transfer model, allowing electron density and temperature profiles to be inferred. Such combined numerical and experimental investigation is promising for gaining insight into physical mechanisms occurring upon the interaction between high energy electrons and solid targets.

  19. Modeling FAMA ion beam diagnostics based on the Ptolemy II model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balvanovic, R., E-mail: broman@vinca.rs [Laboratory of Physics, Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, PO Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Belicev, P. [Laboratory of Physics, Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, PO Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Radjenovic, B. [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2012-10-21

    The previously developed model of ion beam transport control of the FAMA facility is further enhanced by equipping it with the model of ion beam diagnostics. The model of control, executing once, is adjusted so that it executes in iterative mode, where each iteration samples the input beam normally distributed over initial phase space and calculates a single trajectory through the facility beam lines. The model takes into account only the particles that manage to pass through all the beam line apertures, emulating in this way a Faraday cup and a beam profile meter. Generated are also beam phase space distributions and horizontal and vertical beam profiles at the end of the beam transport lines the FAMA facility consists of. By adding the model of ion beam diagnostics to the model of ion beam transport control, the process of determining optimal ion beam control parameters is eased and speeded up, and the understanding of influence of control parameters on the ion beam characteristics is improved.

  20. Extraction of high-intensity ion beams from a laser plasma by a pulsed spherical diode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Oguri

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available High-current Cu^{+} ion beams were extracted from a laser-produced plasma using a pulsed high-voltage multiaperture diode driven by an induction cavity. The amplitude and the duration of the extraction voltage were 130 kV and 450 ns, respectively. During the extraction, explosive beam divergence due to the strong space-charge force was suppressed by the focusing action of the gap between concentric hemispheres. Modulation of the extracted beam flux due to the plasma prefill in the gap has been eliminated by using a biased control grid put on the anode holes. By means of this extraction scheme we obtained a rectangular beam pulse with a rise time as short as ≈100  ns. The beam current behind the cathode was limited to ≈0.1   A, owing to space-charge effects, as well as to poor geometrical transmission through the cathode sphere. From the measurement of the extracted beam current density distribution along the beam axis and the beam profile measurement, we found a beam waist slightly downstream of the spherical center of the diode structure. The measured beam behavior was consistent with numerical results obtained via a 3D particle code. No serious degradation of the beam emittance was observed for the grid-controlled extraction scheme.

  1. On the possible use of the MASURCA reactor as a flexible, high-intensity, fast neutron beam facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dioni, Luca; Jacqmin, Robert; Sumini, Marco; Stout, Brian

    2017-09-01

    In recent work [1, 2], we have shown that the MASURCA research reactor could be used to deliver a fairly-intense continuous fast neutron beam to an experimental room located next to the reactor core. As a consequence of the MASURCA favorable characteristics and diverse material inventories, the neutron beam intensity and spectrum can be further tailored to meet the users' needs, which could be of interest for several applications. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed to characterize in detail the extracted neutron (and photon) beam entering the experimental room. These numerical simulations were done for two different bare cores: A uranium metallic core (˜30% 235U enriched) and a plutonium oxide core (˜25% Pu fraction, ˜78% 239Pu). The results show that the distinctive resonance energy structures of the two core leakage spectra are preserved at the channel exit. As the experimental room is large enough to house a dedicated set of neutron spectrometry instruments, we have investigated several candidate neutron spectrum measurement techniques, which could be implemented to guarantee well-defined, repeatable beam conditions to users. Our investigation also includes considerations regarding the gamma rays in the beams.

  2. Beam configuration selection for robust intensity-modulated proton therapy in cervical cancer using Pareto front comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Schoot, A J A J; Visser, J; van Kesteren, Z; Janssen, T M; Rasch, C R N; Bel, A

    2016-02-21

    The Pareto front reflects the optimal trade-offs between conflicting objectives and can be used to quantify the effect of different beam configurations on plan robustness and dose-volume histogram parameters. Therefore, our aim was to develop and implement a method to automatically approach the Pareto front in robust intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) planning. Additionally, clinically relevant Pareto fronts based on different beam configurations will be derived and compared to enable beam configuration selection in cervical cancer proton therapy. A method to iteratively approach the Pareto front by automatically generating robustly optimized IMPT plans was developed. To verify plan quality, IMPT plans were evaluated on robustness by simulating range and position errors and recalculating the dose. For five retrospectively selected cervical cancer patients, this method was applied for IMPT plans with three different beam configurations using two, three and four beams. 3D Pareto fronts were optimized on target coverage (CTV D(99%)) and OAR doses (rectum V30Gy; bladder V40Gy). Per patient, proportions of non-approved IMPT plans were determined and differences between patient-specific Pareto fronts were quantified in terms of CTV D(99%), rectum V(30Gy) and bladder V(40Gy) to perform beam configuration selection. Per patient and beam configuration, Pareto fronts were successfully sampled based on 200 IMPT plans of which on average 29% were non-approved plans. In all patients, IMPT plans based on the 2-beam set-up were completely dominated by plans with the 3-beam and 4-beam configuration. Compared to the 3-beam set-up, the 4-beam set-up increased the median CTV D(99%) on average by 0.2 Gy and decreased the median rectum V(30Gy) and median bladder V(40Gy) on average by 3.6% and 1.3%, respectively. This study demonstrates a method to automatically derive Pareto fronts in robust IMPT planning. For all patients, the defined four-beam configuration was found optimal

  3. Beam configuration selection for robust intensity-modulated proton therapy in cervical cancer using Pareto front comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van de Schoot, A J A J; Visser, J; Van Kesteren, Z; Rasch, C R N; Bel, A; Janssen, T M

    2016-01-01

    The Pareto front reflects the optimal trade-offs between conflicting objectives and can be used to quantify the effect of different beam configurations on plan robustness and dose-volume histogram parameters. Therefore, our aim was to develop and implement a method to automatically approach the Pareto front in robust intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) planning. Additionally, clinically relevant Pareto fronts based on different beam configurations will be derived and compared to enable beam configuration selection in cervical cancer proton therapy. A method to iteratively approach the Pareto front by automatically generating robustly optimized IMPT plans was developed. To verify plan quality, IMPT plans were evaluated on robustness by simulating range and position errors and recalculating the dose. For five retrospectively selected cervical cancer patients, this method was applied for IMPT plans with three different beam configurations using two, three and four beams. 3D Pareto fronts were optimized on target coverage (CTV D 99% ) and OAR doses (rectum V 30Gy ; bladder V 40Gy ). Per patient, proportions of non-approved IMPT plans were determined and differences between patient-specific Pareto fronts were quantified in terms of CTV D 99% , rectum V 30Gy and bladder V 40Gy to perform beam configuration selection. Per patient and beam configuration, Pareto fronts were successfully sampled based on 200 IMPT plans of which on average 29% were non-approved plans. In all patients, IMPT plans based on the 2-beam set-up were completely dominated by plans with the 3-beam and 4-beam configuration. Compared to the 3-beam set-up, the 4-beam set-up increased the median CTV D 99% on average by 0.2 Gy and decreased the median rectum V 30Gy and median bladder V 40Gy on average by 3.6% and 1.3%, respectively. This study demonstrates a method to automatically derive Pareto fronts in robust IMPT planning. For all patients, the defined four-beam configuration was found optimal in

  4. Generation of initial kinetic distributions for simulation of long-pulse charged particle beams with high space-charge intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M. Lund

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Self-consistent Vlasov-Poisson simulations of beams with high space-charge intensity often require specification of initial phase-space distributions that reflect properties of a beam that is well adapted to the transport channel—both in terms of low-order rms (envelope properties as well as the higher-order phase-space structure. Here, we first review broad classes of kinetic distributions commonly in use as initial Vlasov distributions in simulations of unbunched or weakly bunched beams with intense space-charge fields including the following: the Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV equilibrium, continuous-focusing equilibria with specific detailed examples, and various nonequilibrium distributions, such as the semi-Gaussian distribution and distributions formed from specified functions of linear-field Courant-Snyder invariants. Important practical details necessary to specify these distributions in terms of standard accelerator inputs are presented in a unified format. Building on this presentation, a new class of approximate initial kinetic distributions are constructed using transformations that preserve linear focusing, single-particle Courant-Snyder invariants to map initial continuous-focusing equilibrium distributions to a form more appropriate for noncontinuous focusing channels. Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations are employed to show that the approximate initial distributions generated in this manner are better adapted to the focusing channels for beams with high space-charge intensity. This improved capability enables simulations that more precisely probe intrinsic stability properties and machine performance.

  5. Generation of Initial Kinetic Distributions for Simulation of Long-Pulse Charged Particle Beams with High Space-Charge intensity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, Steven M.; Kikuchi, Takashi; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2007-04-03

    Self-consistent Vlasov-Poisson simulations of beams with high space-charge intensity often require specification of initial phase-space distributions that reflect properties of a beam that is well adapted to the transport channel--both in terms of low-order rms (envelope) properties as well as the higher-order phase-space structure. Here, we first review broad classes of kinetic distributions commonly in use as initial Vlasov distributions in simulations of unbunched or weakly bunched beams with intense space-charge fields including: the Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV) equilibrium, continuous-focusing equilibria with specific detailed examples, and various non-equilibrium distributions, such as the semi-Gaussian distribution and distributions formed from specified functions of linear-field Courant-Snyder invariants. Important practical details necessary to specify these distributions in terms of usual accelerator inputs are presented in a unified format. Building on this presentation, a new class of approximate initial kinetic distributions are constructed using transformations that preserve linear-focusing single-particle Courant-Snyder invariants to map initial continuous-focusing equilibrium distributions to a form more appropriate for non-continuous focusing channels. Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations are employed to show that the approximate initial distributions generated in this manner are better adapted to the focusing channels for beams with high space-charge intensity. This improved capability enables simulation applications that more precisely probe intrinsic stability properties and machine performance.

  6. Generation of initial Vlasov distributions for simulation of charged particle beams with high space-charge intensity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, S M; Kikuchi, T; Davidson, R C

    2007-04-12

    Self-consistent Vlasov simulations of beams with high space-charge intensity often require specification of initial phase-space distributions that reflect properties of a beam that is well adapted to the transport channel, both in terms of low-order rms (envelope) properties as well as the higher-order phase-space structure. Here, we first review broad classes of distributions commonly in use as initial Vlasov distributions in simulations of beams with intense space-charge fields including: the Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV) equilibrium, continuous-focusing equilibria with specific detailed examples, and various non-equilibrium distributions, such as the semi-Gaussian distribution and distributions formed from specified functions of linear-field Courant-Snyder invariants. Important practical details necessary to specify these distributions in terms of usual accelerator inputs are presented in a unified format. Building on this presentation, a new class of approximate initial distributions are constructed using transformations that preserve linear-focusing single-particle Courant-Snyder invariants to map initial continuous-focusing equilibrium distributions to a form more appropriate for non-continuous focusing channels. Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations are employed to show that the approximate initial distributions generated in this manner are better adapted to the focusing channels for beams with high space-charge intensity. This improved capability enables simulation applications that more precisely probe intrinsic stability properties and machine performance.

  7. Large deflection of viscoelastic beams using fractional derivative model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahranini, Seyed Masoud Sotoodeh; Eghtesad, Mohammad; Ghavanloo, Esmaeal; Farid, Mehrdad

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with large deflection of viscoelastic beams using a fractional derivative model. For this purpose, a nonlinear finite element formulation of viscoelastic beams in conjunction with the fractional derivative constitutive equations has been developed. The four-parameter fractional derivative model has been used to describe the constitutive equations. The deflected configuration for a uniform beam with different boundary conditions and loads is presented. The effect of the order of fractional derivative on the large deflection of the cantilever viscoelastic beam, is investigated after 10, 100, and 1000 hours. The main contribution of this paper is finite element implementation for nonlinear analysis of viscoelastic fractional model using the storage of both strain and stress histories. The validity of the present analysis is confirmed by comparing the results with those found in the literature.

  8. Beam dynamics studies to develop LHC luminosity model

    CERN Document Server

    Campogiani, Giovanna; Papaphilippou, Ioannis

    The thesis project aims at studying the different physical processes that are impacting luminosity, one of the key figures of merit of a collider operation. In particular the project focuses on extracting the most relevant parameters for the high-energy part of the model, which is mostly dominated by the beam-beam effect. LHC luminosity is degraded by parasitic collisions that reduce the beam lifetime and the particles stability in the collider. This instability is due to the non-linear effects of one beam electromagnetic field on another in the interaction region. Such parasitic encounters can be as many as 16 per interaction region, piling up to around 180 000 per second. Our goal is to study the evolution of charge density distribution in the beam, by tracking particles through a symplectic integrator that includes the beam-beam effect. In particular we want to obtain data on the halo particles, which are more sensible to instability, to better characterise the beam lifetime and monitor the luminosity evol...

  9. Levy-Student processes for a stochastic model of beam halos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petroni, N. Cufaro; De Martino, S.; De Siena, S.; Illuminati, F.

    2006-01-01

    We describe the transverse beam distribution in particle accelerators within the controlled, stochastic dynamical scheme of the stochastic mechanics which produces time reversal invariant diffusion processes. In this paper we analyze the consequences of introducing the generalized Student laws, namely non-Gaussian, Levy infinitely divisible (but not stable) distributions. We will analyze this idea from two different standpoints: (a) first by supposing that the stationary distribution of our (Wiener powered) stochastic model is a Student distribution; (b) by supposing that our model is based on a (non-Gaussian) Levy process whose increments are Student distributed. In the case (a) the longer tails of the power decay of the Student laws, and in the case (b) the discontinuities of the Levy-Student process can well account for the rare escape of particles from the beam core, and hence for the formation of a halo in intense beams

  10. Enhanced collective focusing of intense neutralized ion beam pulses in the presence of weak solenoidal magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorf, Mikhail A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Startsev, Edward A.

    2012-01-01

    The design of ion drivers for warm dense matter and high energy density physics applications and heavy ion fusion involves transverse focusing and longitudinal compression of intense ion beams to a small spot size on the target. To facilitate the process, the compression occurs in a long drift section filled with a dense background plasma, which neutralizes the intense beam self-fields. Typically, the ion bunch charge is better neutralized than its current, and as a result a net self-pinching (magnetic) force is produced. The self-pinching effect is of particular practical importance, and is used in various ion driver designs in order to control the transverse beam envelope. In the present work we demonstrate that this radial self-focusing force can be significantly enhanced if a weak (B ∼ 100 G) solenoidal magnetic field is applied inside the neutralized drift section, thus allowing for substantially improved transport. It is shown that in contrast to magnetic self-pinching, the enhanced collective self-focusing has a radial electric field component and occurs as a result of the overcompensation of the beam charge by plasma electrons, whereas the beam current becomes well-neutralized. As the beam leaves the neutralizing drift section, additional transverse focusing can be applied. For instance, in the neutralized drift compression experiments (NDCX) a strong (several Tesla) final focus solenoid is used for this purpose. In the present analysis we propose that the tight final focus in the NDCX experiments may possibly be achieved by using a much weaker (few hundred Gauss) magnetic lens, provided the ion beam carries an equal amount of co-moving neutralizing electrons from the preceding drift section into the lens. In this case the enhanced focusing is provided by the collective electron dynamics strongly affected by a weak applied magnetic field.

  11. Intensity Modulated Proton Beam Radiation for Brachytherapy in Patients With Cervical Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clivio, Alessandro [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Kluge, Anne [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Cozzi, Luca, E-mail: lucozzi@iosi.ch [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Köhler, Christhardt [Department of Gynecology, Charité University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Neumann, Oliver [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Vanetti, Eugenio [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Wlodarczyk, Waldemar; Marnitz, Simone [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité University Hospital, Berlin (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) in patients with cervical cancer in terms of coverage, conformity, and dose–volume histogram (DVH) parameters correlated with recommendations from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Eleven patients with histologically proven cervical cancer underwent primary chemoradiation for the pelvic lymph nodes, the uterus, the cervix, and the parametric region, with a symmetric margin of 1 cm. The prescription was for 50.4 Gy, with 1.8 Gy per fraction. The prescribed dose to the parametria was 2.12 Gy up to 59.36 Gy in 28 fractions as a simultaneous boost. For several reasons, the patients were unable to undergo brachytherapy. As an alternative, IMPT was planned with 5 fractions of 6 Gy to the cervix, including the macroscopic tumor with an MRI-guided target definition, with an isotropic margin of 5 mm for planning target volume (PTV) definition. Groupe-Europeen de Curietherapie and European society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO) criteria were used for DVH evaluation. Reference comparison plans were optimized for volumetric modulated rapid arc (VMAT) therapy with the RapidArc (RA). Results: The dose to the high-risk volume was calculated with α/β = 10 with 89.6 Gy. For IMPT, the clinical target volume showed a mean dose of 38.2 ± 5.0 Gy (35.0 ±1.8 Gy for RA). The D{sub 98%} was 31.9 ± 2.6 Gy (RA: 30.8 ± 1.0 Gy). With regard to the organs at risk, the 2Gy Equivalent Dose (EQD2) (α/β = 3) to 2 cm{sup 3} of the rectal wall, sigmoid wall, and bladder wall was 62.2 ± 6.4 Gy, 57.8 ± 6.1 Gy, and 80.6 ± 8.7 Gy (for RA: 75.3 ± 6.1 Gy, 66.9 ± 6.9 Gy, and 89.0 ± 7.2 Gy, respectively). For the IMPT boost plans in combination with external beam radiation therapy, all DVH parameters correlated with <5% risk for grades 2 to 4 late gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity. Conclusion: In patients who are not eligible for brachytherapy, IMPT as a boost

  12. Pierce-type dispersion relation for an intense relativistic electron beam interacting with a slow-wave structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.

    1994-01-01

    A Pierce-type dispersion relation is derived for the interaction of an intense relativistic electron beam with a cylindrical slow-wave structure of arbitrary corrugation depth. It is shown that near a resonance, the Pierce parameter can be expressed in terms of the vacuum dispersion function and the beam current. The dispersion relation is valid in both the low-current (Compton) regime and the high-current (Raman) regime. The dispersion characteristics of the interaction, such as the linear instability growth rate and bandwidth, are analyzed for both regimes

  13. Model Independent Analysis of Beam Centroid Dynamics in Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chun-xi

    2003-04-21

    Fundamental issues in Beam-Position-Monitor (BPM)-based beam dynamics observations are studied in this dissertation. The major topic is the Model-Independent Analysis (MIA) of beam centroid dynamics. Conventional beam dynamics analysis requires a certain machine model, which itself of ten needs to be refined by beam measurements. Instead of using any particular machine model, MIA relies on a statistical analysis of the vast amount of BPM data that often can be collected non-invasively during normal machine operation. There are two major parts in MIA. One is noise reduction and degrees-of-freedom analysis using a singular value decomposition of a BPM-data matrix, which constitutes a principal component analysis of BPM data. The other is a physical base decomposition of the BPM-data matrix based on the time structure of pulse-by-pulse beam and/or machine parameters. The combination of these two methods allows one to break the resolution limit set by individual BPMs and observe beam dynamics at more accurate levels. A physical base decomposition is particularly useful for understanding various beam dynamics issues. MIA improves observation and analysis of beam dynamics and thus leads to better understanding and control of beams in both linacs and rings. The statistical nature of MIA makes it potentially useful in other fields. Another important topic discussed in this dissertation is the measurement of a nonlinear Poincare section (one-turn) map in circular accelerators. The beam dynamics in a ring is intrinsically nonlinear. In fact, nonlinearities are a major factor that limits stability and influences the dynamics of halos. The Poincare section map plays a basic role in characterizing and analyzing such a periodic nonlinear system. Although many kinds of nonlinear beam dynamics experiments have been conducted, no direct measurement of a nonlinear map has been reported for a ring in normal operation mode. This dissertation analyzes various issues concerning map

  14. Model Independent Analysis of Beam Centroid Dynamics in Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chun-xi

    2003-01-01

    Fundamental issues in Beam-Position-Monitor (BPM)-based beam dynamics observations are studied in this dissertation. The major topic is the Model-Independent Analysis (MIA) of beam centroid dynamics. Conventional beam dynamics analysis requires a certain machine model, which itself of ten needs to be refined by beam measurements. Instead of using any particular machine model, MIA relies on a statistical analysis of the vast amount of BPM data that often can be collected non-invasively during normal machine operation. There are two major parts in MIA. One is noise reduction and degrees-of-freedom analysis using a singular value decomposition of a BPM-data matrix, which constitutes a principal component analysis of BPM data. The other is a physical base decomposition of the BPM-data matrix based on the time structure of pulse-by-pulse beam and/or machine parameters. The combination of these two methods allows one to break the resolution limit set by individual BPMs and observe beam dynamics at more accurate levels. A physical base decomposition is particularly useful for understanding various beam dynamics issues. MIA improves observation and analysis of beam dynamics and thus leads to better understanding and control of beams in both linacs and rings. The statistical nature of MIA makes it potentially useful in other fields. Another important topic discussed in this dissertation is the measurement of a nonlinear Poincare section (one-turn) map in circular accelerators. The beam dynamics in a ring is intrinsically nonlinear. In fact, nonlinearities are a major factor that limits stability and influences the dynamics of halos. The Poincare section map plays a basic role in characterizing and analyzing such a periodic nonlinear system. Although many kinds of nonlinear beam dynamics experiments have been conducted, no direct measurement of a nonlinear map has been reported for a ring in normal operation mode. This dissertation analyzes various issues concerning map

  15. Beam Dynamics Studies and the Design, Fabrication and Testing of Superconducting Radiofrequency Cavity for High Intensity Proton Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saini, Arun [Univ. of Delhi, New Delhi (India)

    2012-03-01

    The application horizon of particle accelerators has been widening significantly in recent decades. Where large accelerators have traditionally been the tools of the trade for high-energy nuclear and particle physics, applications in the last decade have grown to include large-scale accelerators like synchrotron light sources and spallation neutron sources. Applications like generation of rare isotopes, transmutation of nuclear reactor waste, sub-critical nuclear power, generation of neutrino beams etc. are next area of investigation for accelerator scientific community all over the world. Such applications require high beam power in the range of few mega-watts (MW). One such high intensity proton beam facility is proposed at Fermilab, Batavia, US, named as Project-X. Project-X facility is based on H- linear accelerator (linac), which will operate in continuous wave (CW) mode and accelerate H- ion beam with average current of 1 mA from kinetic energy of 2.5 MeV to 3 GeV to deliver 3MW beam power. One of the most challenging tasks of the Project-X facility is to have a robust design of the CW linac which can provide high quality beam to several experiments simultaneously. Hence a careful design of linac is important to achieve this objective.

  16. Ion beam enhancement in magnetically insulated ion diodes for high-intensity pulsed ion beam generation in non-relativistic mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, X. P.; Zhang, Z. C.; Pushkarev, A. I.; Lei, M. K.

    2016-01-01

    High-intensity pulsed ion beam (HIPIB) with ion current density above Child-Langmuir limit is achieved by extracting ion beam from anode plasma of ion diodes with suppressing electron flow under magnetic field insulation. It was theoretically estimated that with increasing the magnetic field, a maximal value of ion current density may reach nearly 3 times that of Child-Langmuir limit in a non-relativistic mode and close to 6 times in a highly relativistic mode. In this study, the behavior of ion beam enhancement by magnetic insulation is systematically investigated in three types of magnetically insulated ion diodes (MIDs) with passive anode, taking into account the anode plasma generation process on the anode surface. A maximal enhancement factor higher than 6 over the Child-Langmuir limit can be obtained in the non-relativistic mode with accelerating voltage of 200-300 kV. The MIDs differ in two anode plasma formation mechanisms, i.e., surface flashover of a dielectric coating on the anode and explosive emission of electrons from the anode, as well as in two insulation modes of external-magnetic field and self-magnetic field with either non-closed or closed drift of electrons in the anode-cathode (A-K) gap, respectively. Combined with ion current density measurement, energy density characterization is employed to resolve the spatial distribution of energy density before focusing for exploring the ion beam generation process. Consistent results are obtained on three types of MIDs concerning control of neutralizing electron flows for the space charge of ions where the high ion beam enhancement is determined by effective electron neutralization in the A-K gap, while the HIPIB composition of different ion species downstream from the diode may be considerably affected by the ion beam neutralization during propagation.

  17. Ion beam enhancement in magnetically insulated ion diodes for high-intensity pulsed ion beam generation in non-relativistic mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, X. P. [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion, and Electron Beams, Ministry of Education, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Surface Engineering Laboratory, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhang, Z. C.; Lei, M. K., E-mail: surfeng@dlut.edu.cn [Surface Engineering Laboratory, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Pushkarev, A. I. [Surface Engineering Laboratory, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Laboratory of Beam and Plasma Technology, High Technologies Physics Institute, Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30, Lenin Ave, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    High-intensity pulsed ion beam (HIPIB) with ion current density above Child-Langmuir limit is achieved by extracting ion beam from anode plasma of ion diodes with suppressing electron flow under magnetic field insulation. It was theoretically estimated that with increasing the magnetic field, a maximal value of ion current density may reach nearly 3 times that of Child-Langmuir limit in a non-relativistic mode and close to 6 times in a highly relativistic mode. In this study, the behavior of ion beam enhancement by magnetic insulation is systematically investigated in three types of magnetically insulated ion diodes (MIDs) with passive anode, taking into account the anode plasma generation process on the anode surface. A maximal enhancement factor higher than 6 over the Child-Langmuir limit can be obtained in the non-relativistic mode with accelerating voltage of 200–300 kV. The MIDs differ in two anode plasma formation mechanisms, i.e., surface flashover of a dielectric coating on the anode and explosive emission of electrons from the anode, as well as in two insulation modes of external-magnetic field and self-magnetic field with either non-closed or closed drift of electrons in the anode-cathode (A-K) gap, respectively. Combined with ion current density measurement, energy density characterization is employed to resolve the spatial distribution of energy density before focusing for exploring the ion beam generation process. Consistent results are obtained on three types of MIDs concerning control of neutralizing electron flows for the space charge of ions where the high ion beam enhancement is determined by effective electron neutralization in the A-K gap, while the HIPIB composition of different ion species downstream from the diode may be considerably affected by the ion beam neutralization during propagation.

  18. Formation of High Charge State Heavy Ion Beams with intense Space Charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidl, P.A.; Vay, J.-L.

    2011-01-01

    High charge-state heavy-ion beams are of interest and used for a number of accelerator applications. Some accelerators produce the beams downstream of the ion source by stripping bound electrons from the ions as they pass through a foil or gas. Heavy-ion inertial fusion (HIF) would benefit from low-emittance, high current ion beams with charge state >1. For these accelerators, the desired dimensionless perveance upon extraction from the emitter is ∼10 -3 , and the electrical current of the beam pulse is ∼1 A. For accelerator applications where high charge state and very high current are desired, space charge effects present unique challenges. For example, in a stripper, the separation of charge states creates significant nonlinear space-charge forces that impact the beam brightness. We will report on the particle-in-cell simulation of the formation of such beams for HIF, using a thin stripper at low energy.

  19. Ion beam studies. Pt. 3(a): the modelling of electrostatic mirrors for the manipulation and focussing of heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beanland, D.G.; Freeman, J.H.

    1976-06-01

    Electrostatic mirrors have been used to steer, focus and scan intense beams of heavy ions. In this paper, an account is given of the computer modelling of such mirrors. Consideration is given to aperture effects in the lens and it is shown that shaped fields can be used to control the focussing behaviour. The mirror structure incorporates an additional negatively-biased electrode to prevent the penetration of the electric field through the apertures and along the beam trajectories outside the mirror space. This factor and the compact design minimise the space-charge de-focussing effects which normally militate against the use of such electrostatic lenses with high intensity ion beams. The experimental verification of the modelling for a variety of ion-beam manipulation requirements will be described in a subsequent paper. (author)

  20. High-intensity positive beams extracted from a compact double-chamber ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huck, H.; Somacal, H.; Di Gregorio, D.E.; Fernandez Niello, J.O.; Igarzabal, M.; Di Paolo, H.; Reinoso, M.

    2005-01-01

    This work presents the design and development of a simple ion source, the associated ion extraction optics, and the beam transport of a low-energy and high-current proton accelerator. In its actual version, the ion source can deliver positive proton currents up to 100 mA. This rather high beam current is achieved by adding a small ionization chamber between the discharge chamber containing the filament and the extraction electrode of the ion source. Different parameters of the ion source and the injection beam line are evaluated by means of computer simulations to optimize the beam production and transmission

  1. Drift compression and final focus for intense heavy ion beams with nonperiodic, time-dependent lattice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Qin

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available In the currently envisioned configurations for heavy ion fusion, it is necessary to longitudinally compress the beam bunches by a large factor after the acceleration phase. Because the space-charge force increases as the beam is compressed, the beam size in the transverse direction will increase in a periodic quadrupole lattice. If an active control of the beam size is desired, a larger focusing force is needed to confine the beam in the transverse direction, and a nonperiodic quadrupole lattice along the beam path is necessary. In this paper, we describe the design of such a focusing lattice using the transverse envelope equations. A drift compression and final focus lattice should focus the entire beam pulse onto the same focal spot on the target. This is difficult with a fixed lattice, because different slices of the beam may have different perveance and emittance. Four time-dependent magnets are introduced in the upstream of drift compression to focus the entire pulse onto the same focal spot. Drift compression and final focusing schemes are developed for a typical heavy ion fusion driver and for the integrated beam experiment being designed by the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory.

  2. Conceptual design of elliptical cavities for intensity and position sensitive beam measurements in storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanjari, M S; Chen, X; Hülsmann, P; Litvinov, Yu A; Nolden, F; Piotrowski, J; Steck, M; Stöhlker, Th

    2015-01-01

    Position sensitive beam monitors are indispensable for the beam diagnostics in storage rings. Apart from their applications in the measurements of beam parameters, they can be used in non-destructive in-ring decay studies of radioactive ion beams as well as enhancing precision in the isochronous mass measurement technique. In this work, we introduce a novel approach based on cavities with elliptical cross-section, in order to compensate the limitations of known designs for the application in ion storage rings. The design is aimed primarily for future heavy ion storage rings of the FAIR project. The conceptual design is discussed together with simulation results. (paper)

  3. Alpha particle diagnostic beam line system to generate an intense Li0 beam with an ORNL SITEX source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagenhart, W.K.; Stirling, W.L.; Tsai, C.C.; Whealton, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) SITEX (Surface Ionization with Transverse Extraction) negative ion source utilizes a 100-V/20-A reflex arc discharge in a 1300-gauss magnetic field to generate Cs+ ions and H+ or D+ ions, depending on the beam required. A shaped molybdenum plate is placed directly behind the arc column. Cesium coverage on this plate is used to minimize the surface work function, which requires two-thirds of a monolayer coverage. Cesium coverage ia adjusted both by cesium flow control into the arc discharge chamber and by temperature control of the converter using gaseous-helium cooling channels in the converter plate. Normal converter operational temperatures are 300 0 to 500 0 C H - /D - beams are generated at the biased converter surface (-150 V with respect to the anode) by Cs + sputtering of absorbed hydrogen or deuterium and by the reflection-conversion mechanism of H + /D + ions which strike the converter surface at 150 eV. The negative ions are accelerated through the 150-V plasma sheath at the converter surface and are focused by the converter geometry and magnetic field so as to pass through the exit aperture with minimum angular divergence. The ion optics of the SITEX accelerator has been calculated using the ORNL 3-D optics code and results in a divergence perpendicular to the slot of theta/sub perpendicular rms/ = 0.35 0 and parallel to the slot of theta/sub parallel rms/ = 0.18 0 . This beam divergence should be adequate for injection into a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) for further acceleration

  4. Investigation of the effects of intense pulsed particle beams on the durability of metal-to-plastic interfaces.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, Somuri V.; Renk, Timothy J.; Provencio, Paula Polyak; Petersen, Donald W. (University of Alabama, Birmingham, AL); Petersen, Thomas D. (University of California, San Diego, CA); Buchheit, Thomas Edward; McNulty, Donald E. (DePuy Orthopaedic, Inc., Warsaw, IN); Engelko, Vladimir (D. V. Efremov Scientific Research Institute of the Electrophysical Apparatus, St. Petersburg, Russia)

    2005-02-01

    We have investigated the potential for intense particle beam surface modification to improve the mechanical properties of materials commonly used in the human body for contact surfaces in, for example, hip and knee implants. The materials studied include Ultra-High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE), Ti-6Al-4Al (titanium alloy), and Co-Cr-Mo alloy. Samples in flat form were exposed to both ion and electron beams (UHMWPE), and to ion beam treatment (metals). Post-analysis indicated a degradation in bulk properties of the UHMWPE, except in the case of the lightest ion fluence tested. A surface-alloyed Hf/Ti layer on the Ti-6Al-4V is found to improve surface wear durability, and have favorable biocompatibility. A promising nanolaminate ceramic coating is applied to the Co-Cr-Mo to improve surface hardness.

  5. LICORNE: A new and unique facility for producing intense, kinematically focused neutron beams at the IPN Orsay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson J.N.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available LICORNE is a new neutron source recently installed at the tandem accelerator of the Institut de Physique Nucléaire d'Orsay, where a Li7-beam is used to bombard a hydrogen-containing target to produce an intense forward-directed neutron beam. The directionality of the beam, which is the unique characteristic of LICORNE, will permit the installation of γ-ray detectors dedicated to the investigation of fission fragment de-excitation which are unimpeded by neutrons from the source. A first experimental program will focus on the measurement of prompt γ-ray emission in the neutron-induced fission of fertile and fissile isotopes at incident neutron energies relevant for the core design of Generation-IV nuclear reactors. Other potential uses of the LICORNE facility for both fundamental and applied physics research are also presented.

  6. Magnetic focusing of an intense slow positron beam for enhanced depth-resolved analysis of thin films and interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Falub, C V; Mijnarends, P E; Schut, H; Veen, A V

    2002-01-01

    The intense reactor-based slow positron beam (POSH) at the Delft research reactor has been coupled to a Two-Dimensional Angular Correlation of Annihilation Radiation (2D-ACAR) setup. The design is discussed with a new target chamber for the 2D-ACAR setup based on Monte Carlo simulations of the positron trajectories, beam energy distribution and beam transmission in an increasing magnetic field gradient. Numerical simulations and experiment show that when the slow positron beam with a FWHM of 11.6 mm travels in an increasing axial magnetic field created by a strong NdFeB permanent magnet, the intensity loss is negligible above approx 6 keV and a focusing factor of 5 in diameter is achieved. Monte Carlo simulations and Doppler broadening experiments in the target region show that in this configuration the 2D-ACAR setup can be used to perform depth sensitive studies of defects in thin films with a high resolution. The positron implantation energy can be varied from 0 to 25 keV before entering the non-uniform mag...

  7. Fast Data Acquisition in Heavy Ion CT Using Intensifying Screen—EMCCD Camera System With Beam Intensity Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraishi, Hiroshi; Abe, Shinji; Satoh, Hitoshi; Hara, Hidetake; Mogaki, Tatsuya; Hara, Satoshi; Miyake, Shoko; Watanabe, Yusuke; Koba, Yusuke

    2012-10-01

    We investigated the feasibility of fast data acquisition in heavy ion CT (IonCT) technique with an X-ray intensifying screen-charged coupled device (CCD) camera system. This technique is based on measuring the residual range distribution of heavy ions after passing through an object. We took a large number of images with a CCD camera for one projection by changing the range shifter (RS) thickness to obtain a characteristic curve similar to a Bragg curve and then to estimate the relative residual range. We used a high quality Electron Multiplying CCD (EMCCD) camera, which drastically reduced data acquisition time. We also used a parallel-plate ionization chamber upstream of an object to monitor the time variation in heavy ion beam intensity from a synchrotron accelerator and to perform beam intensity correction for all EMCCD images. Experiments were conducted using a broad beam of 12C, which was generated by spreading out the pencil beam accelerated up to 400 MeV/u by the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator, in Chiba (HIMAC) at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, with a scatterer. We demonstrated that a fast CT data acquisition, 14 min for 256 projections, is possible for an electron density phantom, consisting of six rods with a relative electron density resolution of 0.017, using the proposed technique with HIMAC.

  8. Intense γ-ray generation for a polarized positron beam in a linear collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Miyahara

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available γ-ray generation by Compton backscattering in an optical lens series with periodic focal points is considered to produce a polarized positron beam for a linear collider. The lens series is composed of 20 unit cells with a length of 210 mm. Each lens has a hole to pass an electron beam with an energy of 5.8 GeV and the generated γ rays. It is shown by diffraction analysis that laser beam loss in the series is very small, and the beam size is periodically reduced to 26 μm. Electron beam size is reduced to 34 μm in a superconducting solenoid with a field of 15 T. To get a required γ-ray yield of 7×10^{15} γ/s, only one circularly polarized CO_{2} laser source with a power of 24 kW is needed.

  9. Fast pencil beam dose calculation for proton therapy using a double-Gaussian beam model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joakim eda Silva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The highly conformal dose distributions produced by scanned proton pencil beams are more sensitive to motion and anatomical changes than those produced by conventional radiotherapy. The ability to calculate the dose in real time as it is being delivered would enable, for example, online dose monitoring, and is therefore highly desirable. We have previously described an implementation of a pencil beam algorithm running on graphics processing units (GPUs intended specifically for online dose calculation. Here we present an extension to the dose calculation engine employing a double-Gaussian beam model to better account for the low-dose halo. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first such pencil beam algorithm for proton therapy running on a GPU. We employ two different parametrizations for the halo dose, one describing the distribution of secondary particles from nuclear interactions found in the literature and one relying on directly fitting the model to Monte Carlo simulations of pencil beams in water. Despite the large width of the halo contribution, we show how in either case the second Gaussian can be included whilst prolonging the calculation of the investigated plans by no more than 16%, or the calculation of the most time-consuming energy layers by about 25%. Further, the calculation time is relatively unaffected by the parametrization used, which suggests that these results should hold also for different systems. Finally, since the implementation is based on an algorithm employed by a commercial treatment planning system, it is expected that with adequate tuning, it should be able to reproduce the halo dose from a general beam line with sufficient accuracy.

  10. Pulsar average wave forms and hollow-cone beam models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backer, D. C.

    1976-01-01

    Pulsar wave forms have been analyzed from observations conducted over a wide radio-frequency range to assess the wave-form morphologies and to measure wave-form widths. The results of the analysis compare favorably with the predictions of a model with a hollow-cone beam of fixed dimensions and with random orientation of both the observer and the cone axis with respect to the pulsar spin axis. A class of three-component wave forms is included in the model by adding a central pencil beam to the hollow-cone hypothesis. The consequences of a number of discrepancies between observations and quantitative predictions of the model are discussed.

  11. Synchronization of streak and framing camera measurements of an intense relativistic electron beam propagating through gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidman, D.J.; Murphy, D.P.; Myers, M.C.; Meger, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    The expansion of the radius of a 5 MeV, 20 kA, 40 ns electron beam from SuperIBEX during propagation through gas is being measured. The beam is generated, conditions, equilibrated, and then passed through a thin foil that produces Cherenkov light, which is recorded by a streak camera. At a second location, the beam hits another Cherenkov emitter, which is viewed by a framing camera. Measurements at these two locations can provide a time-resolved measure of the beam expansion. The two measurements, however, must be synchronized with each other, because the beam radius is not constant throughout the pulse due to variations in beam current and energy. To correlate the timing of the two diagnostics, several shots have been taken with both diagnostics viewing Cherenkov light from the same foil. Experimental measurements of the Cherenkov light from one foil viewed by both diagnostics will be presented to demonstrate the feasibility of correlating the diagnostics with each other. Streak camera data showing the optical fiducial, as well as the final correlation of the two diagnostics, will also be presented. Preliminary beam radius measurements from Cherenkov light measured at two locations will be shown

  12. Stability Properties of Azimuthally Symmetric Perturbations in an Intense Electron Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-02-03

    Y ^B/man2^ 1/2 Wcb = 0bc and pb Te nb/ Ybm ) are the beam electron cyclotron and plasma frequencies, respectively, f and f are the fractional chargee...the effective potential (r ) is defined by 1 + -2 E0(r) 2 Ybm ( b b b -b)r (5) In Eq. (5), 2 2 1/2 cb cb + W pb 2 2 f (1-f (6)b-2 4 2 Lbl -m ) -1-fe...6 where i cb = eBO/Ybmc is the beam electron cyclotron frequency and A 2 2 wpb = 4Te n/ ybm is the beam electron plasma frequency-squared. For

  13. Transport of intense proton beams in an induction linac by solenoid lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namkung, W.; Choe, J. Y.; Uhm, H. S.

    1986-01-01

    In the proposed proton induction linac at NSWC, a 100 A and 3 μs proton beam is accelerated to 5 MeV through a series of accelerating gaps. This beam can be effectively focused by solenoid lenses in this low energy regime and can be transported by adjusting the focusing strength in each period. For the transport channel design to reduce the number of independently controlled lenses, a theory of matched beams in the space-charge dominated regime has been developed. This study can be applied to cost efficient designs of induction accelerators for heavy ion fusion and free electron lasers.

  14. Particle-core model for transverse dynamics of beam halo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. P. Wangler

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available The transverse motion of beam halo particles is described by a particle-core model which uses the space-charge field of a continuous cylindrical oscillating beam core in a uniform linear focusing channel to provide the force that drives particles to large amplitudes. The model predicts a maximum amplitude for the resonantly-driven particles as a function of the initial mismatch. We have calculated these amplitude limits and have estimated the growth times for extended-halo formation as a function of both the space-charge tune-depression ratio and a mismatch parameter. We also present formulas for the scaling of the maximum amplitudes as a function of the beam parameters. The model results are compared with multiparticle simulations and we find very good agreement for a variety of initial particle distributions.

  15. A simple model of hose instabilities in rotating electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandenburg, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    A simple foilless diode with a properly designed transmission line feed can generate an intense, wellcollimated annular electron beam. As part of the AID project at Los Alamos, a 3-MeV annular beam is routinely generated with a radius of 1 cm, a thickness of about 100 μ, a current density of about 1 MA/cm 2 , and a scattering angle of about 30 mrad. The particle-in-cell code CEMIT has been used previously to investigate the properties of foilless diodes. It is found that the beam quality can vary significantly during this transition. The best quality beam is achieved by a configuration that is not foilless or foil, but a combination. Microwave generation within the diode and zero-frequency cyclotron wave growth appear to be the major source of energy spread and angular scatter on the beam. Changes in the cathode shape that do not alter the current density profile greatly can change change the energy spread significantly due to microwave generation. Simulations have typically been carried out using a short rise time on the voltage pulse and then holding the voltage constant to obtain a steady state result. When driven by a real source, however, the voltage is continually changing on a time scale that is slow compared with the transit time of the speed of light across the diode. Simulations in which the voltage changes continually have been carried out for both inner and outer conductor foilless diodes. It is found that energy spread dominates the beam at low voltage while angular scatter dominates at higher voltage. Based upon these simulations, a more complete time history of this class of diode is possible

  16. High-intensity ion sources for accelerators with emphasis on H- beam formation and transport (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper lays out the fundamental working principles of a variety of high-current ion sources for accelerators in a tutorial manner, and gives examples of specific source types such as dc discharge-driven and rf-driven multicusp sources, Penning-type, and electron cyclotron resonance-based sources while discussing those principles, pointing out general performance limits as well as the performance parameters of specific sources. Laser-based, two-chamber, and surface-ionization sources are briefly mentioned. Main aspects of this review are particle feed, ionization mechanism, beam formation, and beam transport. Issues seen with beam formation and low-energy transport of negative hydrogen-ion beams are treated in detail.

  17. Progress in the production of intense ion beams and the formation of proton layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapetanakos, C.A.; Golden, J.; Marsh, S.J.; Mahaffey, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    The results on ion sources and the application of ion beams to the formation of proton layers and rings are presented. Ion beams have been produced on three different generators. Some results from the experiments performed on the Gamble 2 generator are presented. The Gamble 2 generator with coaxial anode-cathode configuration, hollow beam cross-section produces power levels of 0.6-1.2 MV with peak ion current of 200 kA. The number of protons in the beam 4x10 16 . Peak ion currents is excess 200 kA, energy 1 MeV, ion current density 1 kA/cm 2 . Magnetic field configuration to provide formation of strong proton layers is shown

  18. PIC (Particle-in-Cell) simulation study on the beam extraction of intense ECR ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yao; Zhang Wenhui; Ma Hongyi; Wu Qi; Fang Xing; Liu Zhanwen; Zhao Hongwei; Yao Ze'en

    2012-01-01

    Electromagnetic particle tracking program MAGIC was used to perform the simulation of beam extraction from high current ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) ion source in this paper. The process of beam particles collision with residual gas was included in the simulation and the spatial distribution patterns of secondary electrons and slow ions from residual gas ionization were shown. Issues of radial space charge self-field, current density distribution and beam emittance were discussed. Simulation results illustrated that beam emittance grows quickly (about 3 times) in the extraction space, the space charge self-field would be neutralized partially by secondary electrons, which makes emittance down. Simulation figures also show that slow ions accumulation is an important contributing factor of negative bias electrode ignition, and this problem was described in the paper. (authors)

  19. Modeling pairwise dependencies in precipitation intensities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vrac

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In statistics, extreme events are classically defined as maxima over a block length (e.g. annual maxima of daily precipitation or as exceedances above a given large threshold. These definitions allow the hydrologist and the flood planner to apply the univariate Extreme Value Theory (EVT to their time series of interest. But these strategies have two main drawbacks. Firstly, working with maxima or exceedances implies that a lot of observations (those below the chosen threshold or the maximum are completely disregarded. Secondly, this univariate modeling does not take into account the spatial dependence. Nearby weather stations are considered independent, although their recordings can show otherwise.

    To start addressing these two issues, we propose a new statistical bivariate model that takes advantages of the recent advances in multivariate EVT. Our model can be viewed as an extension of the non-homogeneous univariate mixture. The two strong points of this latter model are its capacity at modeling the entire range of precipitation (and not only the largest values and the absence of an arbitrarily fixed large threshold to define exceedances. Here, we adapt this mixture and broaden it to the joint modeling of bivariate precipitation recordings. The performance and flexibility of this new model are illustrated on simulated and real precipitation data.

  20. Continuation of full-scale three-dimensional numerical experiments on high-intensity particle and laser beam-matter interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Warren, B.

    2012-12-01

    We present results from the grant entitled, Continuation of full-scale three-dimensional numerical experiments on high-intensity particle and laser beam-matter interactions. The research significantly advanced the understanding of basic high-energy density science (HEDS) on ultra intense laser and particle beam plasma interactions. This advancement in understanding was then used to to aid in the quest to make 1 GeV to 500 GeV plasma based accelerator stages. The work blended basic research with three-dimensions fully nonlinear and fully kinetic simulations including full-scale modeling of ongoing or planned experiments. The primary tool was three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The simulations provided a test bed for theoretical ideas and models as well as a method to guide experiments. The research also included careful benchmarking of codes against experiment. High-fidelity full-scale modeling provided a means to extrapolate parameters into regimes that were not accessible to current or near term experiments, thereby allowing concepts to be tested with confidence before tens to hundreds of millions of dollars were spent building facilities. The research allowed the development of a hierarchy of PIC codes and diagnostics that is one of the most advanced in the world.

  1. Modelling and simulation of beam formation in electron guns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabchevski, S.; Barbarich, I.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a new PC version of the software package GUN-EBT for computer simulation of beam formation in rotationally symmetric electron guns with thermionic cathodes. It is based on a self-consistent physical model which takes into account the beam space charge and the initial velocity effects. The theoretical framework used for both the formulation of the model and for the interpretation of the results of numerical experiments is the formalism of the charged particle dynamics in phase space. This enables not only a trajectory analysis (ray tracing) but also a phase-space analysis of beams to be performed. The package can be used as an effective tool for computer aided design and optimization of electron guns in various electron-optical systems. The operation of the package is illustrated with a typical example. (orig.)

  2. Modelling and simulation of beam formation in electron guns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabchevski, S. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria). Inst. po Elektronika; Mladenov, G. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria). Inst. po Elektronika; Titov, A. [St. Petersburg State Electrotechnical University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Barbarich, I. [St. Petersburg State Electrotechnical University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1996-11-01

    This paper describes a new PC version of the software package GUN-EBT for computer simulation of beam formation in rotationally symmetric electron guns with thermionic cathodes. It is based on a self-consistent physical model which takes into account the beam space charge and the initial velocity effects. The theoretical framework used for both the formulation of the model and for the interpretation of the results of numerical experiments is the formalism of the charged particle dynamics in phase space. This enables not only a trajectory analysis (ray tracing) but also a phase-space analysis of beams to be performed. The package can be used as an effective tool for computer aided design and optimization of electron guns in various electron-optical systems. The operation of the package is illustrated with a typical example. (orig.).

  3. Simple Numerical Model of Laminated Glass Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zemanová

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a simple Finite Element model aimed at efficient simulation of layered glass units. The approach is based on considering the independent kinematics of each layer, tied together via Lagrange multipliers. Validation and verification of the resulting model against independent data demonstrate its accuracy, showing its potential for generalization towards more complex problems. 

  4. A model for Hsub(α) and Hsub(β) emission from a high power hydrogen beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bracco, G.; Ramette, J.

    1980-07-01

    Hsub(α) and Hsub(β) emission from an high power hydrogen beam has been simulated by means of a computer code in order to discuss the role of various parameters (acceleration energy, pressure, impact decay) on the measured intensities. A comparison has been performed with other simplified models and conversion factors are provided to transform the measured line intensity ratios into extracted species proportions

  5. Predictability of bone density at posterior mandibular implant sites using cone-beam computed tomography intensity values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhader, Mustafa; Hudieb, Malik; Khader, Yousef

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the predictability of bone density at posterior mandibular implant sites using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) intensity values. CBCT cross-sectional images for 436 posterior mandibular implant sites were selected for the study. Using Invivo software (Anatomage, San Jose, California, USA), two observers classified the bone density into three categories: low, intermediate, and high, and CBCT intensity values were generated. Based on the consensus of the two observers, 15.6% of sites were of low bone density, 47.9% were of intermediate density, and 36.5% were of high density. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis showed that CBCT intensity values had a high predictive power for predicting high density sites (area under the curve [AUC] =0.94, P < 0.005) and intermediate density sites (AUC = 0.81, P < 0.005). The best cut-off value for intensity to predict intermediate density sites was 218 (sensitivity = 0.77 and specificity = 0.76) and the best cut-off value for intensity to predict high density sites was 403 (sensitivity = 0.93 and specificity = 0.77). CBCT intensity values are considered useful for predicting bone density at posterior mandibular implant sites.

  6. Non-uniform sound intensity distributions when measuring absorption coefficients in reverberation chambers using a phased beam tracing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2010-06-01

    Measured absorption coefficients in reverberation chambers often differ from theoretical random incidence absorption coefficients, because ideal assumptions for the theoretical random incidence absorption coefficient are not fulfilled during measurements in actual reverberation chambers. Therefore sound intensity distributions on absorber under measurement conditions have been simulated using a phased beam tracing, and used as correction functions for reducing discrepancies between the measured and theoretical absorption coefficients. Two reverberation rooms were investigated by assuming that a test specimen was attached to a vertical surface and the floor. The frequency-dependent sound intensity distributions on absorbers were found to be affected by the reverberation chamber geometry and dimensions, the absorption capability of the specimen, and the placement of the specimen. High frequency intensity distributions above 1 kHz were similar for all studied cases, but some variations in low frequency intensity distributions were observed. If the non-uniform intensity distribution and a finite size effect are taken into account for correcting the theoretical absorption coefficients, a good agreement is found between corrected and measured statistical absorption coefficients. The non-uniform sound intensity can account for the discrepancy at high frequencies.

  7. Construction, test and operation in a high intensity beam of a small system of micro-strip gas chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, A.; Bachmann, S.; Boimska, B.; Bouclier, R.; Braem, A.; Camps, C.; Capeáns, M.; Commichau, V.; Dominik, W.; Flügge, G.; Gómez, F.; Hammarstrom, R.; Hangarter, K.; Hoch, M.; Labbé, J. C.; Macke, D.; Manzin, G.; Meijers, F.; Million, G.; Muhlemann, K.; Nagaslaev, V.; Peisert, A.; Ropelewski, L.; Runolfsson, O.; Sauli, F.; Schulte, R.; Schulz, M.; Sharma, A.; Shekhtman, L.; Wolff, C.

    1998-02-01

    We describe the construction, test and installation procedures, and the experience gained with the operation of a small but complete system of high-rate Micro-Strip Gas Chambers, made on thin borosilicate glass with a diamond-like coating with chromium or gold strips. A set of detectors, fully equipped with read-out electronics and each with an active area of 100 × 100 mm 2, was exposed during six months to a high-intensity muon beam at CERN with a peak intensity of ˜ 10 4 mm -2s -1. Continuous monitoring of the performance of the chambers during the beam runs allowed the evaluation of detection efficiency and the monitoring of accidental rates, as well as the study of ambient induced variations and aging in realistic beam conditions. No significant difference has been found in the operation of under-and over-coated plates. Efficiencies could reach ˜ 98% in best operating conditions, although local lower values were often observed due to missing channels (open strips, broken bonds and dead electronic channels). The long-term operation of the chambers has been more difficult than expected, with the appearance of break-downs and loss of efficiency in some detectors, possibly induced by the presence of small gas leaks, to water permeation or to residual reactivity of the quencher gas (dimethylether).

  8. Construction, test and operation in a high intensity beam of a small system of microstrip gas chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Barr, A J; Boimska, B; Bouclier, Roger; Braem, André; Camps, C; Capéans-Garrido, M; Commichau, V; Dominik, Wojciech; Flügge, G; Gómez, F; Hammarström, R; Hangarter, K; Hoch, M; Labbé, J C; Macke, D; Manzin, G; Meijers, F; Million, Gilbert; Mühlemann, K; Nagaslaev, V P; Peisert, Anna; Ropelewski, Leszek; Runólfsson, O; Sauli, Fabio; Schulte, R; Schulz, M; Sharma, A; Shekhtman, L I; Wolff, C

    1998-01-01

    We describe the construction, test and installation procedures, and the experience gained with the operation of a small but complete system of high rate Micro-Strip Gas Chambers, made on thin boro-silicate glass with a diamond-like coating with chromium or gold strips. A set of detectors, fully equipped with readout electronics and each with an active area of 100x100 mm2, was exposed during six months to a high intensity muon beam at CERN with a peak intensity of ~104 mm-2s-1. Continuous monitoring of the performance of the chambers during the beam runs allowed the evaluation of detection efficiency and the monitoring of accidental rates, as well as the study of ambient induced variations and aging in realistic beam conditions. No significant difference has been found in the operation of under- and over-coated plates. Efficiencies could reach ~98% in best operating conditions, although local lower values were often observed due to missing channels (open strips, broken bonds and dead electronic channels). The ...

  9. Forward Modeling of Gyrosynchrotron Intensity Perturbations by Sausage Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznikova, V. E.; Antolin, P.; Van Doorsselaere, T.

    2014-04-01

    To determine the observable radio signatures of the fast sausage standing wave, we examine gyrosynchrotron (GS) emission modulation using a linear three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic model of a plasma cylinder. Effects of the line-of-sight angle and instrumental resolution on perturbations of the GS intensity are analyzed for two models: a base model with strong Razin suppression and a low-density model in which the Razin effect was unimportant. Our finding contradicts previous predictions made with simpler models: an in-phase variation of intensity between low (f f peak) frequencies is found for the low-density model and an anti-phase variation for the base model in the case of a viewing angle of 45°. The spatially inhomogeneous character of the oscillating emission source and the spatial resolution of the model are found to have a significant effect on the resulting intensity.

  10. Forward modeling of gyrosynchrotron intensity perturbations by sausage modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reznikova, V. E.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Antolin, P.

    2014-01-01

    To determine the observable radio signatures of the fast sausage standing wave, we examine gyrosynchrotron (GS) emission modulation using a linear three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic model of a plasma cylinder. Effects of the line-of-sight angle and instrumental resolution on perturbations of the GS intensity are analyzed for two models: a base model with strong Razin suppression and a low-density model in which the Razin effect was unimportant. Our finding contradicts previous predictions made with simpler models: an in-phase variation of intensity between low (f < f peak ) and high (f > f peak ) frequencies is found for the low-density model and an anti-phase variation for the base model in the case of a viewing angle of 45°. The spatially inhomogeneous character of the oscillating emission source and the spatial resolution of the model are found to have a significant effect on the resulting intensity.

  11. Guiding and focusing of fast electron beams produced by ultra-intense laser pulse using a double cone funnel target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Wen-shuai; Cai, Hong-bo; Zhu, Shao-ping

    2015-01-01

    A novel double cone funnel target design aiming at efficiently guiding and focusing fast electron beams produced in high intensity (>10 19  W/cm 2 ) laser-solid interactions is investigated via two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The forward-going fast electron beams are shown to be directed and focused to a smaller size in comparison with the incident laser spot size. This plasma funnel attached on the cone target guides and focuses electrons in a manner akin to the control of liquid by a plastic funnel. Such device has the potential to add substantial design flexibility and prevent inefficiencies for important applications such as fast ignition. Two reasons account for the collimation of fast electron beams. First, the sheath electric fields and quasistatic magnetic fields inside the vacuum gap of the double cone provide confinement of the fast electrons in the laser-plasma interaction region. Second, the interface magnetic fields inside the beam collimator further guide and focus the fast electrons during the transport. The application of this technique to cone-guided fast ignition is considered, and it is shown that it can enhance the laser energy deposition in the compressed fuel plasma by a factor of 2 in comparison with the single cone target case

  12. Intense electron-beam transport in the ion-focused regime through the collision-dominated regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Poukey, J.W.; Welch, D.R.; Mock, R.C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reviews the transport of the 19-MeV, 700-kA, 25-ns Hermes-III electron beam in long gas cells filled with N 2 gas spanning six decades in pressure from 10 3 to ∼10 3 Torr. We show through measurements and theoretical analyses that the beam has two windows of stable transport: a low-pressure window (between ∼1 and ∼100 mTorr) that is dominated by propagation in the semi-collisionless IFR (ion-focused regime), and a high-pressure window (between ∼1 and ∼100 Torr) that is dominated by propagation in the resistive CDR (collision-dominated regime). In the CDR, 79±1.5% of the beam energy is transported over 11 m at 20 Torr. In the IFR, we show that intense radiation fields with controllable rise times and pulse widths can be generated on axis at a bremsstrahlung target. In summary, the measurements and analyses presented here provide a quantitative description of the Hermes-III beam transport over six decades in pressure

  13. A set cover approach to fast beam orientation optimization in intensity modulated radiation therapy for total marrow irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chieh-Hsiu Jason; Aleman, Dionne M [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, 5 King' s College Road, Toronto, ON M5S 3G8 (Canada); Sharpe, Michael B, E-mail: chjlee@mie.utoronto.ca, E-mail: aleman@mie.utoronto.ca, E-mail: michael.sharpe@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Princess Margaret Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, ON M5G 2M9 (Canada)

    2011-09-07

    The beam orientation optimization (BOO) problem in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning is a nonlinear problem, and existing methods to obtain solutions to the BOO problem are time consuming due to the complex nature of the objective function and size of the solution space. These issues become even more difficult in total marrow irradiation (TMI), where many more beams must be used to cover a vastly larger treatment area than typical site-specific treatments (e.g., head-and-neck, prostate, etc). These complications result in excessively long computation times to develop IMRT treatment plans for TMI, so we attempt to develop methods that drastically reduce treatment planning time. We transform the BOO problem into the classical set cover problem (SCP) and use existing methods to solve SCP to obtain beam solutions. Although SCP is NP-Hard, our methods obtain beam solutions that result in quality treatments in minutes. We compare our approach to an integer programming solver for the SCP to illustrate the speed advantage of our approach.

  14. Remote Sensing and Modeling of Cyclone Monica near Peak Intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen L. Durden

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Cyclone Monica was an intense Southern Hemisphere tropical cyclone of 2006. Although no in situ measurements of Monica’s inner core were made, microwave, infrared, and visible satellite instruments observed Monica before and during peak intensity through landfall on Australia’s northern coast. The author analyzes remote sensing measurements in detail to investigate Monica’s intensity. While Dvorak analysis of its imagery argues that it was of extreme intensity, infrared and microwave soundings indicate a somewhat lower intensity, especially as it neared landfall. The author also describes several numerical model runs that were made to investigate the maximum possible intensity for the observed environmental conditions; these simulations also suggest a lower intensity than estimates from Dvorak analysis alone. Based on the evidence from the various measurements and modeling, the estimated range for the minimum sea level pressure at peak intensity is 900 to 920 hPa. The estimated range for the one-minute averaged maximum wind speed at peak intensity is 72 to 82 m/s. These maxima were likely reached about 24 hours prior to landfall, with some weakening occurring afterward.

  15. Atomistic modeling of ion beam induced amorphization in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelaz, Lourdes; Marques, Luis A.; Lopez, Pedro; Santos, Ivan; Aboy, Maria; Barbolla, Juan

    2005-01-01

    Ion beam induced amorphization in Si has attracted significant interest since the beginning of the use of ion implantation for the fabrication of Si devices. Nowadays, a renewed interest in the modeling of amorphization mechanisms at atomic level has arisen due to the use of preamorphizing implants and high dopant implantation doses for the fabrication of nanometric-scale Si devices. In this work, we briefly describe the existing phenomenological and defect-based amorphization models. We focus on the atomistic model we have developed to describe ion beam induced amorphization in Si. In our model, the building block for the amorphous phase is the bond defect or IV pair, whose stability increases with the number of surrounding IV pairs. This feature explains the regrowth behavior of different damage topologies and the kinetics of the crystalline to amorphous transition. The model provides excellent quantitative agreement with experimental results

  16. Initial-beam-loading compensation system for high-intensity electron linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, M.; Matsumoto, T.; Shidara, T.; Fukuda, S.; Kobayashi, H.; Kamiya, Y.; Nakamura, N.; Koseki, T.; Miura, S.

    2005-01-01

    We developed an initial-beam-loading compensation system for electron linacs. This system consists of a ΔΦ-A (phase-to-amplitude) modulator and a fast-phase detector. The ΔΦ-A modulator can modulate the phase and the amplitude of a low-power RF simultaneously. Low-power and high-power tests were successfully carried out at KEK. The result of the high-power tests show that our system can reduce the energy spread from 27 to 0.3% for a 300-mA average current. The system that we developed can be a powerful tool for initial-beam-loading compensation. In addition, a numerical calculation method using the power-flow matrix was formulated to perform a fast beam-energy calculation with a simple algorithm. This method can be used to obtain the target RF waveform for energy-spread compensation

  17. Shear beams in finite element modelling : Software implementation and validation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreppers, G.J.; Hendriks, M.A.N.; Boer, A.; Ferreira, D.; Kikstra, W.P.

    2015-01-01

    Fiber models for beam and shell elements allow for relatively rapid finite element analysis of concrete structures and structural elements. This project aims at the development of the formulation of such elements and a pilot implementation. The reduction of calculation time and degrees of freedom

  18. Generation of a cold, intense relativistic electron beam using a magnetized foilless diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, R.L.; Montgomery, M.D.; Parker, J.V.; Riepe, K.B.; Singer, S.

    1982-01-01

    An annular electron beam with less than 30 mrad of angular velocity spread, a radius of 1 cm, and a current density exceeding 0.4 MA/cm 2 has been generated with a magnetized foilless diode. The diode current loss is limited to less than a few percent by careful design of the tapered transition region connecting a self-magnetically insulated vacuum transmission line to the externally magnetized foilless diode. Details of the transition section design and operating characteristics of the electron beam generator are given

  19. Calculation of back-reflected intensities of a Na-atom beam by standing evanescent E-M field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, J.; Goodman, P.; Smith, A.

    1992-01-01

    A method is described for the computation of the back-scattered intensities of atomic beams, diffracted from the evanescent field generated outside an optical plate by internal counter-propagating laser beams. The method derives from a procedure developed for the similar but importantly differing problem of Low Energy Electron Diffraction, (Lynch and Smith, 1983). Modifications to that theory required for the present problem bring the equations closer to the RHEED solution proposed by Ichimiya (1983). Results from multi-slicing from the same narrow field depth (2 Aangstroems) in this strong field case show the success and also limitations of the program in its present form. Computation to greater depth in the strong field leads to numerical instabilities due to the incorporation of very large tunnelling terms. This requires the application of boundary conditions at each slice rather than the end of the multi-slice calculation. 7 refs., 3 figs

  20. Modeling transmission and scatter for photon beam attenuators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahnesjö, A; Weber, L; Nilsson, P

    1995-11-01

    The development of treatment planning methods in radiation therapy requires dose calculation methods that are both accurate and general enough to provide a dose per unit monitor setting for a broad variety of fields and beam modifiers. The purpose of this work was to develop models for calculation of scatter and transmission for photon beam attenuators such as compensating filters, wedges, and block trays. The attenuation of the beam is calculated using a spectrum of the beam, and a correction factor based on attenuation measurements. Small angle coherent scatter and electron binding effects on scattering cross sections are considered by use of a correction factor. Quality changes in beam penetrability and energy fluence to dose conversion are modeled by use of the calculated primary beam spectrum after passage through the attenuator. The beam spectra are derived by the depth dose effective method, i.e., by minimizing the difference between measured and calculated depth dose distributions, where the calculated distributions are derived by superposing data from a database for monoenergetic photons. The attenuator scatter is integrated over the area viewed from the calculation point of view using first scatter theory. Calculations are simplified by replacing the energy and angular-dependent cross-section formulas with the forward scatter constant r2(0) and a set of parametrized correction functions. The set of corrections include functions for the Compton energy loss, scatter attenuation, and secondary bremsstrahlung production. The effect of charged particle contamination is bypassed by avoiding use of dmax for absolute dose calibrations. The results of the model are compared with scatter measurements in air for copper and lead filters and with dose to a water phantom for lead filters for 4 and 18 MV. For attenuated beams, downstream of the buildup region, the calculated results agree with measurements on the 1.5% level. The accuracy was slightly less in situations