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Sample records for modeling intelligent ontology

  1. Ontology, Epistemology, and Teleology for Modeling and Simulation Philosophical Foundations for Intelligent M&S Applications

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    In this book, internationally recognized experts in philosophy of science, computer science, and modeling and simulation are contributing to the discussion on how ontology, epistemology, and teleology will contribute to enable the next generation of intelligent modeling and simulation applications. It is well understood that a simulation can provide the technical means to display the behavior of a system over time, including following observed trends to predict future possible states, but how reliable and trustworthy are such predictions? The questions about what we can know (ontology), how we gain new knowledge (epistemology), and what we do with this knowledge (teleology) are therefore illuminated from these very different perspectives, as each experts uses a different facet to look at these challenges. The result of bringing these perspectives into one book is a challenging compendium that gives room for a spectrum of challenges: from general philosophy questions, such as can we use modeling and simulation...

  2. A Study on Intelligent User-Centric Logistics Service Model Using Ontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saraswathi Sivamani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Much research has been undergone in the smart logistics environment for the prompt delivery of the product in the right place at the right time. Most of the services were based on time management, routing technique, and location based services. The services in the recent logistics environment aim for situation based logistics service centered around the user by utilizing various information technologies such as mobile devices, computer systems, and GPS. This paper proposes a smart logistics service model for providing user-centric intelligent logistics service by utilizing smartphones in a smart environment. We also develop an OWL based ontology model for the smart logistics for the better understanding among the context information. In addition to basic delivery information, the proposed service model makes use of the location and situation information of the delivery vehicle and user, to draw the route information according to the user’s requirement. With the increase of internet usage, the real-time situations are received which helps to create a more reliable relationship, owing to the Internet of Things. Through this service model, it is possible to engage in the development of various IT and logistics convergence services based on situation information between the deliverer and user which occurs in real time.

  3. Ontology for the Intelligence Analyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    an artillery tractor that runs on wheels ⎣ tracked artillery tractor =def: an artillery tractor that runs on caterpillar track 20...in response to identified situational needs of analysts, and architectural requirements are designed to ensure coherent evolution of the SE resource...Coordinated Evolution of Ontologies to Support Biomedical Data Integration”, Nature Biotechnology, 25 (11), November 2007, 1251-1255. 13

  4. Sentiment analysis and ontology engineering an environment of computational intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Shyi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    This edited volume provides the reader with a fully updated, in-depth treatise on the emerging principles, conceptual underpinnings, algorithms and practice of Computational Intelligence in the realization of concepts and implementation of models of sentiment analysis and ontology –oriented engineering. The volume involves studies devoted to key issues of sentiment analysis, sentiment models, and ontology engineering. The book is structured into three main parts. The first part offers a comprehensive and prudently structured exposure to the fundamentals of sentiment analysis and natural language processing. The second part consists of studies devoted to the concepts, methodologies, and algorithmic developments elaborating on fuzzy linguistic aggregation to emotion analysis, carrying out interpretability of computational sentiment models, emotion classification, sentiment-oriented information retrieval, a methodology of adaptive dynamics in knowledge acquisition. The third part includes a plethora of applica...

  5. Ontology-Based Information Extraction for Business Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saggion, Horacio; Funk, Adam; Maynard, Diana; Bontcheva, Kalina

    Business Intelligence (BI) requires the acquisition and aggregation of key pieces of knowledge from multiple sources in order to provide valuable information to customers or feed statistical BI models and tools. The massive amount of information available to business analysts makes information extraction and other natural language processing tools key enablers for the acquisition and use of that semantic information. We describe the application of ontology-based extraction and merging in the context of a practical e-business application for the EU MUSING Project where the goal is to gather international company intelligence and country/region information. The results of our experiments so far are very promising and we are now in the process of building a complete end-to-end solution.

  6. Annotation modeling with formal ontologies: Implications for informal ontologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumb, L. I.; Freemantle, J. R.; Lederman, J. I.; Aldridge, K. D.

    2009-04-01

    Knowledge representation is increasingly recognized as an important component of any cyberinfrastructure (CI). In order to expediently address scientific needs, geoscientists continue to leverage the standards and implementations emerging from the World Wide Web Consortium's (W3C) Semantic Web effort. In an ongoing investigation, previous efforts have been aimed towards the development of a semantic framework for the Global Geodynamics Project (GGP). In contrast to other efforts, the approach taken has emphasized the development of informal ontologies, i.e., ontologies that are derived from the successive extraction of Resource Description Framework (RDF) representations from eXtensible Markup Language (XML), and then Web Ontology Language (OWL) from RDF. To better understand the challenges and opportunities for incorporating annotations into the emerging semantic framework, the present effort focuses on knowledge-representation modeling involving formal ontologies. Although OWL's internal mechanism for annotation is constrained to ensure computational completeness and decidability, externally originating annotations based on the XML Pointer Language (XPointer) can easily violate these constraints. Thus, the effort of modeling with formal ontologies allows for recommendations applicable to the case of incorporating annotations into informal ontologies.

  7. The ontology supported intelligent system for experiment search in the scientific Research center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvjetković Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ontologies and corresponding knowledge bases can be quite successfully used for many tasks that rely on domain knowledge and semantic structures, which should be available for machine processing and sharing. Using SPARQL queries for retrieval of required elements from ontologies and knowledge bases, can significantly simplify modeling of arbitrary structures of concepts and data, and implementation of required functionalities. This paper describes developed ontology for support of Research Centre for testing of active substances that conducts scientific experiments. According to created ontology corresponding knowledge base was made and populated with real experimental data. Developed ontology and knowledge base are directly used for an intelligent system of experiment search which is based on many criteria from ontology. Proposed system gets the desired search result, which is actually an experiment in the form of a written report. Presented solution and implementation are very flexible and adaptable, and can be used as kind of a template by similar information system dealing with biological or similar complex system.

  8. Ontology modeling in physical asset integrity management

    CERN Document Server

    Yacout, Soumaya

    2015-01-01

    This book presents cutting-edge applications of, and up-to-date research on, ontology engineering techniques in the physical asset integrity domain. Though a survey of state-of-the-art theory and methods on ontology engineering, the authors emphasize essential topics including data integration modeling, knowledge representation, and semantic interpretation. The book also reflects novel topics dealing with the advanced problems of physical asset integrity applications such as heterogeneity, data inconsistency, and interoperability existing in design and utilization. With a distinctive focus on applications relevant in heavy industry, Ontology Modeling in Physical Asset Integrity Management is ideal for practicing industrial and mechanical engineers working in the field, as well as researchers and graduate concerned with ontology engineering in physical systems life cycles. This book also: Introduces practicing engineers, research scientists, and graduate students to ontology engineering as a modeling techniqu...

  9. Designing Network-based Business Model Ontology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hashemi Nekoo, Ali Reza; Ashourizadeh, Shayegheh; Zarei, Behrouz

    2015-01-01

    is going to propose e-business model ontology from the network point of view and its application in real world. The suggested ontology for network-based businesses is composed of individuals` characteristics and what kind of resources they own. also, their connections and pre-conceptions of connections...... such as shared-mental model and trust. However, it mostly covers previous business model elements. To confirm the applicability of this ontology, it has been implemented in business angel network and showed how it works....

  10. Phenomenological and ontological models in natural science

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lokajíček, Miloš

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 4, - (2007), s. 657-669 ISSN 1733-8026 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : science in new age * mathematical models * microscopic world * ontological reflection Subject RIV: AA - Philosophy ; Religion

  11. Validating EHR clinical models using ontology patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Costa, Catalina; Schulz, Stefan

    2017-12-01

    Clinical models are artefacts that specify how information is structured in electronic health records (EHRs). However, the makeup of clinical models is not guided by any formal constraint beyond a semantically vague information model. We address this gap by advocating ontology design patterns as a mechanism that makes the semantics of clinical models explicit. This paper demonstrates how ontology design patterns can validate existing clinical models using SHACL. Based on the Clinical Information Modelling Initiative (CIMI), we show how ontology patterns detect both modeling and terminology binding errors in CIMI models. SHACL, a W3C constraint language for the validation of RDF graphs, builds on the concept of "Shape", a description of data in terms of expected cardinalities, datatypes and other restrictions. SHACL, as opposed to OWL, subscribes to the Closed World Assumption (CWA) and is therefore more suitable for the validation of clinical models. We have demonstrated the feasibility of the approach by manually describing the correspondences between six CIMI clinical models represented in RDF and two SHACL ontology design patterns. Using a Java-based SHACL implementation, we found at least eleven modeling and binding errors within these CIMI models. This demonstrates the usefulness of ontology design patterns not only as a modeling tool but also as a tool for validation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Construction of Fuzzy Ontologies from Fuzzy UML Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Zhang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The success and proliferation of the Semantic Web depends heavily on construction of Web ontologies. However, classical ontology construction approaches are not sufficient for handling imprecise and uncertain information that is commonly found in many application domains. Therefore, great efforts on construction of fuzzy ontologies have been made in recent years. In this paper, we propose a formal approach and develop an automated tool for constructing fuzzy ontologies from fuzzy UML models. , we propose formalization methods of fuzzy UML models and fuzzy ontologies, where fuzzy UML models and fuzzy ontologies can be represented and interpreted by their respective formal definitions and semantic interpretation methods. , we propose an approach for constructing fuzzy ontologies from fuzzy UML models, i.e., transforming fuzzy UML models (including the structure and instance information of fuzzy UML models into fuzzy ontologies. , following the proposed approach, we implement a prototype transformation tool called that can construct fuzzy ontologies from fuzzy UML models. Constructing fuzzy ontologies from fuzzy UML models will facilitate the development of Web ontologies. , in order to show that the constructed fuzzy ontologies may be useful for reasoning on fuzzy UML models, we investigate how to reason on fuzzy UML models based on the constructed fuzzy ontologies, and it turns out that the reasoning tasks of fuzzy UML models can be checked by means of the reasoning mechanism of fuzzy ontologies.

  13. Menthor Editor: An Ontology-Driven Conceptual Modeling Platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreira, João Luiz; Sales, Tiago Prince; Guerson, John; Braga, Bernardo F.B; Brasileiro, Freddy; Sobral, Vinicius

    2016-01-01

    The lack of well-founded constructs in ontology tools can lead to the construction of non-intended models. In this demonstration we present the Menthor Editor, an ontology-driven conceptual modelling platform which incorporates the theories of the Unified Foundational Ontology (UFO). We illustrate

  14. On the general ontological foundations of conceptual modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guizzardi, G.; Herre, Heinrich; Wagner, Gerd; Spaccapietra, Stefano; March, Salvatore T.; Kambayashi, Yahiko

    2002-01-01

    As pointed out in the pioneering work of [WSW99,EW01], an upper level ontology allows to evaluate the ontological correctness of a conceptual model and to develop guidelines how the constructs of a conceptual modeling language should be used. In this paper we adopt the General Ontological Language

  15. Model Validation in Ontology Based Transformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús M. Almendros-Jiménez

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Model Driven Engineering (MDE is an emerging approach of software engineering. MDE emphasizes the construction of models from which the implementation should be derived by applying model transformations. The Ontology Definition Meta-model (ODM has been proposed as a profile for UML models of the Web Ontology Language (OWL. In this context, transformations of UML models can be mapped into ODM/OWL transformations. On the other hand, model validation is a crucial task in model transformation. Meta-modeling permits to give a syntactic structure to source and target models. However, semantic requirements have to be imposed on source and target models. A given transformation will be sound when source and target models fulfill the syntactic and semantic requirements. In this paper, we present an approach for model validation in ODM based transformations. Adopting a logic programming based transformational approach we will show how it is possible to transform and validate models. Properties to be validated range from structural and semantic requirements of models (pre and post conditions to properties of the transformation (invariants. The approach has been applied to a well-known example of model transformation: the Entity-Relationship (ER to Relational Model (RM transformation.

  16. Towards Ontological Foundations for Agent Modeling Concepts using UFO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guizzardi, G.; Wagner, Gerd

    Foundational ontologies provide the basic concepts upon which any domain-specific ontology is built. This paper presents a new foundational ontology, UFO, and shows how it can be used as a foundation of agent concepts and for evaluating agent-oriented modeling methods. UFO is derived from a

  17. On Automatic Modeling and Use of Domain-specific Ontologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Troels; Knappe, Rasmus; Bulskov, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we firstly introduce an approach to the modeling of a domain-specific ontology for use in connection with a given document collection. Secondly, we present a methodology for deriving conceptual similarity from the domain-specific ontology. Adopted for ontology representation is a s...

  18. An ontologically well-founded profile for UML conceptual models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guizzardi, G.; Wagner, Gerd; van Sinderen, Marten J.; Guarino, Nicola; Persson, Anne; Stirna, Janis

    2004-01-01

    UML class diagrams can be used as a language for expressing a conceptual model of a domain. In a series of papers [1,2,3] we have been using the General Ontological Language (GOL) and its underlying upper level ontology, proposed in [4,5], to evaluate the ontological correctness of a conceptual UML

  19. An ontology-driven, diagnostic modeling system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Peter J; Ferraro, Jeffrey P; Holmen, John; Wu, Xinzi; Mynam, Kumar; Ebert, Matthew; Dean, Nathan; Jones, Jason

    2013-06-01

    To present a system that uses knowledge stored in a medical ontology to automate the development of diagnostic decision support systems. To illustrate its function through an example focused on the development of a tool for diagnosing pneumonia. We developed a system that automates the creation of diagnostic decision-support applications. It relies on a medical ontology to direct the acquisition of clinic data from a clinical data warehouse and uses an automated analytic system to apply a sequence of machine learning algorithms that create applications for diagnostic screening. We refer to this system as the ontology-driven diagnostic modeling system (ODMS). We tested this system using samples of patient data collected in Salt Lake City emergency rooms and stored in Intermountain Healthcare's enterprise data warehouse. The system was used in the preliminary development steps of a tool to identify patients with pneumonia in the emergency department. This tool was compared with a manually created diagnostic tool derived from a curated dataset. The manually created tool is currently in clinical use. The automatically created tool had an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.920 (95% CI 0.916 to 0.924), compared with 0.944 (95% CI 0.942 to 0.947) for the manually created tool. Initial testing of the ODMS demonstrates promising accuracy for the highly automated results and illustrates the route to model improvement. The use of medical knowledge, embedded in ontologies, to direct the initial development of diagnostic computing systems appears feasible.

  20. Ontological modeling of electronic health information exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurray, J; Zhu, L; McKillop, I; Chen, H

    2015-08-01

    Investments of resources to purposively improve the movement of information between health system providers are currently made with imperfect information. No inventories of system-level electronic health information flows currently exist, nor do measures of inter-organizational electronic information exchange. Using Protégé 4, an open-source OWL Web ontology language editor and knowledge-based framework, we formalized a model that decomposes inter-organizational electronic health information flow into derivative concepts such as diversity, breadth, volume, structure, standardization and connectivity. The ontology was populated with data from a regional health system and the flows were measured. Individual instance's properties were inferred from their class associations as determined by their data and object property rules. It was also possible to visualize interoperability activity for regional analysis and planning purposes. A property called Impact was created from the total number of patients or clients that a health entity in the region served in a year, and the total number of health service providers or organizations with whom it exchanged information in support of clinical decision-making, diagnosis or treatment. Identifying providers with a high Impact but low Interoperability score could assist planners and policy-makers to optimize technology investments intended to electronically share patient information across the continuum of care. Finally, we demonstrated how linked ontologies were used to identify logical inconsistencies in self-reported data for the study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Hybrid ontology for semantic information retrieval model using keyword matching indexing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uthayan, K R; Mala, G S Anandha

    2015-01-01

    Ontology is the process of growth and elucidation of concepts of an information domain being common for a group of users. Establishing ontology into information retrieval is a normal method to develop searching effects of relevant information users require. Keywords matching process with historical or information domain is significant in recent calculations for assisting the best match for specific input queries. This research presents a better querying mechanism for information retrieval which integrates the ontology queries with keyword search. The ontology-based query is changed into a primary order to predicate logic uncertainty which is used for routing the query to the appropriate servers. Matching algorithms characterize warm area of researches in computer science and artificial intelligence. In text matching, it is more dependable to study semantics model and query for conditions of semantic matching. This research develops the semantic matching results between input queries and information in ontology field. The contributed algorithm is a hybrid method that is based on matching extracted instances from the queries and information field. The queries and information domain is focused on semantic matching, to discover the best match and to progress the executive process. In conclusion, the hybrid ontology in semantic web is sufficient to retrieve the documents when compared to standard ontology.

  2. An Ontology-Based Temporal Scheduling and Complexity Reduction Model for Timetabling Knowledge Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patience Usoro Usip

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Technological tools such as Semantic Web and ontologies have contributed immensely to the reduction of most managerial complexities on daily basis. However, most resolved complexities are solely dependent on the emerging issues which are not general enough to accommodate some specific domain challenges. Temporal scheduling complexities occur in several domains including timetabling, but inter-departmental courses allocation on a general institutional timetable has not been considered. This poses serious managerial concerns and threats to the academic performance of any institution. This paper is aimed at formalizing an ontology model for analyzing temporal scheduling complexities in an existing schedule and giving optimal possible time scheduling resolutions showing their reduction rates for efficient and intelligent knowledge management. Protégé was used in modeling the domain ontology described in the resulted ontograf. The semantics of the formal ontology model is described based on Allen’s interval temporal relations. The use of ontologies make way for easy and intelligent reasoning with knowledge and exposes the need for such knowledge management tool to manage the influx of the numerous data.

  3. A hybrid fuzzy-ontology based intelligent system to determine level of severity and treatment recommendation for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torshizi, Abolfazl Doostparast; Zarandi, Mohammad Hossein Fazel; Torshizi, Ghazaleh Doostparast; Eghbali, Kamyar

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with application of fuzzy intelligent systems in diagnosing severity level and recommending appropriate therapies for patients having Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia. Such an intelligent system can have remarkable impacts on correct diagnosis of the disease and reducing risk of mortality. This system captures various factors from the patients using two modules. The first module determines severity level of the Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia and the second module, which is a decision making unit, obtains output of the first module accompanied by some external knowledge and makes an appropriate treatment decision based on its ontology model and a fuzzy type-1 system. In order to validate efficiency and accuracy of the developed system, a case study is conducted by 44 participants. Then the results are compared with the recommendations of a panel of experts on the experimental data. Then precision and accuracy of the results were investigated based on a statistical analysis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Ontology modeling for generation of clinical pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmine Tehrani

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Increasing costs of health care, fuelled by demand for high quality, cost-effective healthcare has drove hospitals to streamline their patient care delivery systems. One such systematic approach is the adaptation of Clinical Pathways (CP as a tool to increase the quality of healthcare delivery. However, most organizations still rely on are paper-based pathway guidelines or specifications, which have limitations in process management and as a result can influence patient safety outcomes. In this paper, we present a method for generating clinical pathways based on organizational semiotics by capturing knowledge from syntactic, semantic and pragmatic to social level. Design/methodology/approach: The proposed modeling approach to generation of CPs adopts organizational semiotics and enables the generation of semantically rich representation of CP knowledge. Semantic Analysis Method (SAM is applied to explicitly represent the semantics of the concepts, their relationships and patterns of behavior in terms of an ontology chart. Norm Analysis Method (NAM is adopted to identify and formally specify patterns of behavior and rules that govern the actions identified on the ontology chart. Information collected during semantic and norm analysis is integrated to guide the generation of CPs using best practice represented in BPMN thus enabling the automation of CP. Findings: This research confirms the necessity of taking into consideration social aspects in designing information systems and automating CP. The complexity of healthcare processes can be best tackled by analyzing stakeholders, which we treat as social agents, their goals and patterns of action within the agent network. Originality/value: The current modeling methods describe CPs from a structural aspect comprising activities, properties and interrelationships. However, these methods lack a mechanism to describe possible patterns of human behavior and the conditions under which the

  5. Modelling intelligent behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, H. S.; Triffet, T.

    1993-01-01

    An introductory discussion of the related concepts of intelligence and consciousness suggests criteria to be met in the modeling of intelligence and the development of intelligent materials. Methods for the modeling of actual structure and activity of the animal cortex have been found, based on present knowledge of the ionic and cellular constitution of the nervous system. These have led to the development of a realistic neural network model, which has been used to study the formation of memory and the process of learning. An account is given of experiments with simple materials which exhibit almost all properties of biological synapses and suggest the possibility of a new type of computer architecture to implement an advanced type of artificial intelligence.

  6. Real-time context aware reasoning in on-board intelligent traffic systems: An Architecture for Ontology-based Reasoning using Finite State Machines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoter, Arjan; Dalmolen, Simon; Drenth, Eduard; Cornelisse, Erik; Mulder, Wico

    2011-01-01

    In-vehicle information management is vital in intelligent traffic systems. In this paper we motivate an architecture for ontology-based context-aware reasoning for in-vehicle information management. An ontology is essential for system standardization and communication, and ontology-based reasoning

  7. EXPERIMENTS AND RESULTS ON THE USE OF ONTOLOGIES IN THE ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE DOMAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile-Daniel Păvăloaia

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The field of agent-based systems as part of the Artificial Intelligence domain is, now-a-days, quite popular. There are specialized technologies required for building software agents and it should be communicative, capable, autonomous and adaptive. In fact, these are the key characteristics required to help make the Internet activity more successful. The limiting factors in building such systems are being overcome, and new approaches are emerging from information technology research laboratories around the world. The use of ontology has proven to be essential elements in many applications and thus, they have been successfully applied in agent systems technology, knowledge management systems, and e-commerce platforms. The current research aims to present besides some theoretical aspects and examples of using the web agents for two European cities.

  8. An Ontology-Based Framework for Modeling User Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razmerita, Liana

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on the role of user modeling and semantically enhanced representations for personalization. This paper presents a generic Ontology-based User Modeling framework (OntobUMf), its components, and its associated user modeling processes. This framework models the behavior of the users...... and classifies its users according to their behavior. The user ontology is the backbone of OntobUMf and has been designed according to the Information Management System Learning Information Package (IMS LIP). The user ontology includes a Behavior concept that extends IMS LIP specification and defines....... The results of this research may contribute to the development of other frameworks for modeling user behavior, other semantically enhanced user modeling frameworks, or other semantically enhanced information systems....

  9. How to Model People Work Practices from Ontological Transactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    António Gonçalves

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a model to represent people´s work from ontological business transactions according to the concepts of Activity Theory and Enterprise Ontology. With this model we aim at providing a comprehensive and structured modelling approach that, at the same time, avoids excessively detailed descriptions of technology-supported activities. The proposed model is complemented with a set of rules that enables the interrelating transactions described with the Enterprise Ontology language and task descriptions based on Activity Theory. An important benefit of this model is enabling the analysis of manifested contradictions to identify the aspects needing changes within organizational activity systems. The proposed model and rules were applied in a study case.

  10. Ontology-driven education: Teaching anatomy with intelligent 3D games on the web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Trond

    Human anatomy is a challenging and intimidating subject whose understanding is essential to good medical practice, taught primarily using a combination of lectures and the dissection of human cadavers. Lectures are cheap and scalable, but do a poor job of teaching spatial understanding, whereas dissection lets students experience the body's interior first-hand, but is expensive, cannot be repeated, and is often imperfect. Educational games and online learning activities have the potential to supplement these teaching methods in a cheap and relatively effective way, but they are difficult for educators to customize for particular curricula and lack the tutoring support that human instructors provide. I present an approach to the creation of learning activities for anatomy called ontology-driven education, in which the Foundational Model of Anatomy, an ontological representation of knowledge about anatomy, is leveraged to generate educational content, model student knowledge, and support learning activities and games in a configurable web-based educational framework for anatomy.

  11. The ontology of Gero's FBS  model of designing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galle, Per

    2009-01-01

    Recent work by Vermaas and Dorst has led to constructive criticism and conceptual clarification of Gero’s FBS (Function-Behaviour-Structure) model of designing. In this paper Vermaas’ and Dorst’s version of the model is scrutinized, with an emphasis on its temporal aspect and ontological implicat......Recent work by Vermaas and Dorst has led to constructive criticism and conceptual clarification of Gero’s FBS (Function-Behaviour-Structure) model of designing. In this paper Vermaas’ and Dorst’s version of the model is scrutinized, with an emphasis on its temporal aspect and ontological...

  12. Derivation of Event-B Models from OWL Ontologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alkhammash Eman H.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The derivation of formal specifications from large and complex requirements is a key challenge in systems engineering. In this paper we present an approach that aims to address this challenge by building formal models from OWL ontologies. An ontology is used in the field of knowledge representation to capture a clear view of the domain and to produce a concise and unambiguous set of domain requirements. We harness the power of ontologies to handle inconsistency of domain requirements and produce clear, concise and unambiguous set of domain requirements for Event-B modelling. The proposed approach works by generating Attempto Controlled English (ACE from the OWL ontology and then maps the ACE requirements to develop Event-B models. ACE is a subset of English that can be unambiguously translated into first-order logic. There is an injective mapping between OWL ontology and a subset of ACE. ACE is a suitable interlingua for producing the mapping between OWL and Event-B models for many reasons. Firstly, ACE is easy to learn and understand, it hides the math of OWL and would be natural to use by everybody. Secondly ACE has a parser that converts ACE texts into Discourse Representation Structures (DRS. Finally, ACE can be extended to target a richer syntactic subset of Event-B which ultimately would facilitate the translation of ACE requirements to Event-B.

  13. Knowledge modeling of coal mining equipments based on ontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baolong; Wang, Xiangqian; Li, Huizong; Jiang, Miaomiao

    2017-06-01

    The problems of information redundancy and sharing are universe in coal mining equipment management. In order to improve the using efficiency of knowledge of coal mining equipments, this paper proposed a new method of knowledge modeling based on ontology. On the basis of analyzing the structures and internal relations of coal mining equipment knowledge, taking OWL as ontology construct language, the ontology model of coal mining equipment knowledge is built with the help of Protégé 4.3 software tools. The knowledge description method will lay the foundation for the high effective knowledge management and sharing, which is very significant for improving the production management level of coal mining enterprises.

  14. Research on Ontology Modeling of Steel Manufacturing Process Based on Big Data Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao Qing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As an important method that steel industries ride the Indutrie 4.0 wave, knowledge management is expected to be versatile, effective and intelligent. Mechanism modeling difficulties, numerous influencing factors and complex industrial chains hinder the development of knowledge and information integration. Using data potentials, big data analysis can be an effective way to deal with knowledge acquisition as it solves the inaccuracy and imperfection mechanism modeling may lead to. This paper proposes a big data knowledge management system(BDAKMS adhering to data driven, intelligent analysis, service publication, dynamic update principle which can effectively extracts knowledge from mass data. Then, ontology modeling gives the knowledge unified descriptions as well as inference details combined with semantic web techniques.

  15. 'Epistemology models ontology'− In gesprek met John Polkinghorne ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The famous premise of John Polkinghorne, 'epistemology models ontology', has been assessed in this article. It is interpreted that its logic is based on a linear trajectory of knowledge → being. Polkinghorne places much emphasis on the fact that he pursues a 'bottom-up' approach, that is, an inductive way of going about ...

  16. Ontological engineering versus metaphysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tataj, Emanuel; Tomanek, Roman; Mulawka, Jan

    2011-10-01

    It has been recognized that ontologies are a semantic version of world wide web and can be found in knowledge-based systems. A recent time survey of this field also suggest that practical artificial intelligence systems may be motivated by this research. Especially strong artificial intelligence as well as concept of homo computer can also benefit from their use. The main objective of this contribution is to present and review already created ontologies and identify the main advantages which derive such approach for knowledge management systems. We would like to present what ontological engineering borrows from metaphysics and what a feedback it can provide to natural language processing, simulations and modelling. The potential topics of further development from philosophical point of view is also underlined.

  17. DeMO: An Ontology for Discrete-event Modeling and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Gregory A; Miller, John A; Hybinette, Maria; Baramidze, Gregory; York, William S

    2011-01-01

    Several fields have created ontologies for their subdomains. For example, the biological sciences have developed extensive ontologies such as the Gene Ontology, which is considered a great success. Ontologies could provide similar advantages to the Modeling and Simulation community. They provide a way to establish common vocabularies and capture knowledge about a particular domain with community-wide agreement. Ontologies can support significantly improved (semantic) search and browsing, integration of heterogeneous information sources, and improved knowledge discovery capabilities. This paper discusses the design and development of an ontology for Modeling and Simulation called the Discrete-event Modeling Ontology (DeMO), and it presents prototype applications that demonstrate various uses and benefits that such an ontology may provide to the Modeling and Simulation community. PMID:22919114

  18. The Volcanism Ontology (VO): a model of the volcanic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myer, J.; Babaie, H. A.

    2017-12-01

    We have modeled a part of the complex material and process entities and properties of the volcanic system in the Volcanism Ontology (VO) applying several top-level ontologies such as Basic Formal Ontology (BFO), SWEET, and Ontology of Physics for Biology (OPB) within a single framework. The continuant concepts in BFO describe features with instances that persist as wholes through time and have qualities (attributes) that may change (e.g., state, composition, and location). In VO, the continuants include lava, volcanic rock, and volcano. The occurrent concepts in BFO include processes, their temporal boundaries, and the spatio-temporal regions within which they occur. In VO, these include eruption (process), the onset of pyroclastic flow (temporal boundary), and the space and time span of the crystallization of lava in a lava tube (spatio-temporal region). These processes can be of physical (e.g., debris flow, crystallization, injection), atmospheric (e.g., vapor emission, ash particles blocking solar radiation), hydrological (e.g., diffusion of water vapor, hot spring), thermal (e.g., cooling of lava) and other types. The properties (predicates) relate continuants to other continuants, occurrents to continuants, and occurrents to occurrents. The ontology also models other concepts such as laboratory and field procedures by volcanologists, sampling by sensors, and the type of instruments applied in monitoring volcanic activity. When deployed on the web, VO will be used to explicitly and formally annotate data and information collected by volcanologists based on domain knowledge. This will enable the integration of global volcanic data and improve the interoperability of software that deal with such data.

  19. Mathematical modeling creation for curriculum based on ontology. Part 1

    OpenAIRE

    PIYAVSKY S.A.; LARUKHIN V.B.

    2012-01-01

    This article delivers a mathematical optimal formation model of curriculum based on the solution of multi-criteria optimization problem. A mathematical model of optimal curriculum shaping based on the solution of multi-criteria optimization. In combination with the previously developed ontology of the educational process, it allows us to offer information technology of forming curriculum at various levels of training in universities personalized for each students

  20. Embedding the guideline elements model in web ontology language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Nam; Michel, George; Krauthammer, Michael; Shiffman, Richard N

    2009-11-14

    The Guideline Elements Model (GEM) uses XML to represent the heterogeneous knowledge contained in clinical practice guidelines. GEM has important applications in computer aided guideline authoring and clinical decision support systems. However, its XML representation format could limit its potential impact, as semantic web ontology languages, such as OWL, are becoming major knowledge representation frameworks in medical informatics. In this work, we present a faithful translation of GEM from XML into OWL. This translation is intended to keep the knowledge model of GEM intact, as this knowledge model has been carefully designed and has become a recognized standard. An OWL representation would make GEM more applicable in medical informatics systems that rely on semantic web. This work will also be the initial step in making GEM a guideline recommendation ontology.

  1. Ontology and modeling patterns for state-based behavior representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castet, Jean-Francois; Rozek, Matthew L.; Ingham, Michel D.; Rouquette, Nicolas F.; Chung, Seung H.; Kerzhner, Aleksandr A.; Donahue, Kenneth M.; Jenkins, J. Steven; Wagner, David A.; Dvorak, Daniel L.; hide

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides an approach to capture state-based behavior of elements, that is, the specification of their state evolution in time, and the interactions amongst them. Elements can be components (e.g., sensors, actuators) or environments, and are characterized by state variables that vary with time. The behaviors of these elements, as well as interactions among them are represented through constraints on state variables. This paper discusses the concepts and relationships introduced in this behavior ontology, and the modeling patterns associated with it. Two example cases are provided to illustrate their usage, as well as to demonstrate the flexibility and scalability of the behavior ontology: a simple flashlight electrical model and a more complex spacecraft model involving instruments, power and data behaviors. Finally, an implementation in a SysML profile is provided.

  2. Modelling traffic flows with intelligent cars and intelligent roads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Arem, Bart; Tampere, Chris M.J.; Malone, Kerry

    2003-01-01

    This paper addresses the modeling of traffic flows with intelligent cars and intelligent roads. It will describe the modeling approach MIXIC and review the results for different ADA systems: Adaptive Cruise Control, a special lane for Intelligent Vehicles, cooperative following and external speed

  3. Ontology-Navigated Tutoring System for Flipped-Mastery Model

    OpenAIRE

    Masao Okabe

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, in Japan, variety of students get into a university and one of the main roles of introductory courses for freshmen is to make such students well prepared for subsequent intermediate courses. For that purpose, the flipped-mastery model is not enough because videos usually used in a flipped classroom is not adaptive and does not fit all freshmen with different academic performances. This paper proposes an ontology-navigated tutoring system called EduGraph. Using EduGraph, students can...

  4. A novel paradigm for cell and molecule interaction ontology: from the CMM model to IMGT-ONTOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Biology is moving fast toward the virtuous circle of other disciplines: from data to quantitative modeling and back to data. Models are usually developed by mathematicians, physicists, and computer scientists to translate qualitative or semi-quantitative biological knowledge into a quantitative approach. To eliminate semantic confusion between biology and other disciplines, it is necessary to have a list of the most important and frequently used concepts coherently defined. Results We propose a novel paradigm for generating new concepts for an ontology, starting from model rather than developing a database. We apply that approach to generate concepts for cell and molecule interaction starting from an agent based model. This effort provides a solid infrastructure that is useful to overcome the semantic ambiguities that arise between biologists and mathematicians, physicists, and computer scientists, when they interact in a multidisciplinary field. Conclusions This effort represents the first attempt at linking molecule ontology with cell ontology, in IMGT-ONTOLOGY, the well established ontology in immunogenetics and immunoinformatics, and a paradigm for life science biology. With the increasing use of models in biology and medicine, the need to link different levels, from molecules to cells to tissues and organs, is increasingly important. PMID:20167082

  5. Ontological and Epistemological Issues Regarding Climate Models and Computer Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezer, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    Recent philosophical discussions (Parker 2009; Frigg and Reiss 2009; Winsberg, 2009; Morgon 2002, 2003, 2005; Gula 2002) about the ontology of computer simulation experiments and the epistemology of inferences drawn from them are of particular relevance to climate science as computer modeling and analysis are instrumental in understanding climatic systems. How do computer simulation experiments compare with traditional experiments? Is there an ontological difference between these two methods of inquiry? Are there epistemological considerations that result in one type of inference being more reliable than the other? What are the implications of these questions with respect to climate studies that rely on computer simulation analysis? In this paper, I examine these philosophical questions within the context of climate science, instantiating concerns in the philosophical literature with examples found in analysis of global climate change. I concentrate on Wendy Parker’s (2009) account of computer simulation studies, which offers a treatment of these and other questions relevant to investigations of climate change involving such modelling. Two theses at the center of Parker’s account will be the focus of this paper. The first is that computer simulation experiments ought to be regarded as straightforward material experiments; which is to say, there is no significant ontological difference between computer and traditional experimentation. Parker’s second thesis is that some of the emphasis on the epistemological importance of materiality has been misplaced. I examine both of these claims. First, I inquire as to whether viewing computer and traditional experiments as ontologically similar in the way she does implies that there is no proper distinction between abstract experiments (such as ‘thought experiments’ as well as computer experiments) and traditional ‘concrete’ ones. Second, I examine the notion of materiality (i.e., the material commonality between

  6. Cardinal Direction Relations Query Modeling Based on Geo-Ontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, X.; Chen, D.; Zhou, C.; Li, M.; Xiao, W.

    2012-08-01

    Direction relations, as an important spatial relationship, is simply expressed as object prosperity in traditional geo-ontology. The lacking of explicit specifications and reasoning rules of direction relations in geo-ontology result in the difficult or inflexible of spatial reasoning. Also, digital gazetteers provide information on named features, linking the feature's name with its location and its type. Although the location information is incomplete and not exact, the implicit spatial information, for example spatial relationships and spatial scale, can be extract using the appropriate models based on geo-ontology. In this paper, we proposed a novel conceptual framework of direction relations in order to formalize the semantics and implicit information of direction relations, and present an extraction algorithm of implicit information based on previous researches, which will produce a complete query instance of direction relations. At last, the most suitable direction physical model is recommended to calculation module according to relevant rules. And the experimental results show that this direction query model not only extracted the implicit information effectively, but also made a reasonable interpretation for the user's intention.

  7. Interoperation Modeling for Intelligent Domotic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonino, Dario; Corno, Fulvio

    This paper introduces an ontology-based model for domotic device inter-operation. Starting from a previously published ontology (DogOnt) a refactoring and extension is described allowing to explicitly represent device capabilities, states and commands, and supporting abstract modeling of device inter-operation.

  8. Ontological perspective in metamodeling for model transformations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Göknil, Arda; Topaloglu, N.Y.

    2005-01-01

    Model Driven Engineering (MDE) aims to facilitate building larger and more complex, reliable software systems by introducing a higher abstraction level than the code level. The technical space concept discusses how the basic MDE principles may be mapped onto modern platform support and several

  9. Ontological Analysis of Integrated Process Models: testing hypotheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Rosemann

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Integrated process modeling is achieving prominence in helping to document and manage business administration and IT processes in organizations. The ARIS framework is a popular example for a framework of integrated process modeling not least because it underlies the 800 or more reference models embedded in the world's most popular ERP package, SAP R/3. This paper demonstrates the usefulness of the Bunge-Wand-Weber (BWW representation model for evaluating modeling grammars such as those constituting ARIS. It reports some initial insights gained from pilot testing Green and Rosemann's (2000 evaluative propositions. Even when considering all five views of ARIS, modelers have problems representing business rules, the scope and boundary of systems, and decomposing models. However, even though it is completely ontologically redundant, users still find the function view useful in modeling.

  10. On Automatic Modeling and Use of Domain-specific Ontologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Troels; Knappe, Rasmus; Bulskov, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    collection the general ontology is restricted to a domain specific ontology encompassing concepts instantiated in the collection. The resulting domain specific ontology and similarity can be applied for surveying the collection through key concepts and conceptual relations and provides a means for topic...

  11. Multidimensional Learner Model In Intelligent Learning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deliyska, B.; Rozeva, A.

    2009-11-01

    The learner model in an intelligent learning system (ILS) has to ensure the personalization (individualization) and the adaptability of e-learning in an online learner-centered environment. ILS is a distributed e-learning system whose modules can be independent and located in different nodes (servers) on the Web. This kind of e-learning is achieved through the resources of the Semantic Web and is designed and developed around a course, group of courses or specialty. An essential part of ILS is learner model database which contains structured data about learner profile and temporal status in the learning process of one or more courses. In the paper a learner model position in ILS is considered and a relational database is designed from learner's domain ontology. Multidimensional modeling agent for the source database is designed and resultant learner data cube is presented. Agent's modules are proposed with corresponding algorithms and procedures. Multidimensional (OLAP) analysis guidelines on the resultant learner module for designing dynamic learning strategy have been highlighted.

  12. The foundational ontology library ROMULUS

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Khan, ZC

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A purpose of a foundational ontology is to solve interoperability issues among domain ontologies and they are used for ontology- driven conceptual data modelling. Multiple foundational ontologies have been developed in recent years, and most of them...

  13. ONTOLOGICAL MODEL OF STRATEGIC ECONOMIC SECURITY OF ENTERPRISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Zaporozhtseva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Article explains the necessity the application of the ontological approach to modeling the strategic economic security in the formalization of the basic categories of domain company recognized its benefits. Among the advantages of the model distinguishes its versatility and ability to describe various aspects of strategic security - the system strategies and goals of the organization and business processes; possibility of its use at different levels of detail - from the top-level description of the basic categories of management, to design-level analytic applications; as well as the adaptability of the model, with depth on particular aspects determined by practical necessity and not regulated methodology. The model integrates various aspects of the concept of enterprise architecture and organizes conceptual apparatus. Ontological model easy to understand and adjust as business architects and specialists in designing systems of economic security and offers many categories of verbal representation of the domain of the enterprise. Proved the feasibility of using process-functional approach in providing strategic economic security, according to which the components of such a security company proposed as business processes, finance, staff and contractors. The article presents the author's ontological model of strategic economic security, including endangered sites, the presence of factors that threaten the security of the object and the subject of providing security. Further, it is proved that in the subjects of security impact on the object using the tools, measures and activities within the strategy formed the mechanism is implemented managerial decisions to strengthen the strategic economic security. The process of diagnosis, detection, identification of threats of economic security, and the development of enterprise development strategies, taking into account its level of economic security must be under the constant supervision of the process of

  14. Approach for ontological modeling of database schema for the generation of semantic knowledge on the web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozeva, Anna

    2015-11-01

    Currently there is large quantity of content on web pages that is generated from relational databases. Conceptual domain models provide for the integration of heterogeneous content on semantic level. The use of ontology as conceptual model of a relational data sources makes them available to web agents and services and provides for the employment of ontological techniques for data access, navigation and reasoning. The achievement of interoperability between relational databases and ontologies enriches the web with semantic knowledge. The establishment of semantic database conceptual model based on ontology facilitates the development of data integration systems that use ontology as unified global view. Approach for generation of ontologically based conceptual model is presented. The ontology representing the database schema is obtained by matching schema elements to ontology concepts. Algorithm of the matching process is designed. Infrastructure for the inclusion of mediation between database and ontology for bridging legacy data with formal semantic meaning is presented. Implementation of the knowledge modeling approach on sample database is performed.

  15. PDON: Parkinson's disease ontology for representation and modeling of the Parkinson's disease knowledge domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younesi, Erfan; Malhotra, Ashutosh; Gündel, Michaela; Scordis, Phil; Kodamullil, Alpha Tom; Page, Matt; Müller, Bernd; Springstubbe, Stephan; Wüllner, Ullrich; Scheller, Dieter; Hofmann-Apitius, Martin

    2015-09-22

    Despite the unprecedented and increasing amount of data, relatively little progress has been made in molecular characterization of mechanisms underlying Parkinson's disease. In the area of Parkinson's research, there is a pressing need to integrate various pieces of information into a meaningful context of presumed disease mechanism(s). Disease ontologies provide a novel means for organizing, integrating, and standardizing the knowledge domains specific to disease in a compact, formalized and computer-readable form and serve as a reference for knowledge exchange or systems modeling of disease mechanism. The Parkinson's disease ontology was built according to the life cycle of ontology building. Structural, functional, and expert evaluation of the ontology was performed to ensure the quality and usability of the ontology. A novelty metric has been introduced to measure the gain of new knowledge using the ontology. Finally, a cause-and-effect model was built around PINK1 and two gene expression studies from the Gene Expression Omnibus database were re-annotated to demonstrate the usability of the ontology. The Parkinson's disease ontology with a subclass-based taxonomic hierarchy covers the broad spectrum of major biomedical concepts from molecular to clinical features of the disease, and also reflects different views on disease features held by molecular biologists, clinicians and drug developers. The current version of the ontology contains 632 concepts, which are organized under nine views. The structural evaluation showed the balanced dispersion of concept classes throughout the ontology. The functional evaluation demonstrated that the ontology-driven literature search could gain novel knowledge not present in the reference Parkinson's knowledge map. The ontology was able to answer specific questions related to Parkinson's when evaluated by experts. Finally, the added value of the Parkinson's disease ontology is demonstrated by ontology-driven modeling of PINK1

  16. An Ontology-Based Transformation Model for the Digital Forensics Domain

    OpenAIRE

    Grigaliunas, Sarunas; Toldinas, Jevgenijus; Venckauskas, Algimantas

    2017-01-01

    The creation of an ontology makes it possible to form common information structures, to reuse knowledge, to make assumptions within a domain and to analyse every piece of knowledge. In this paper, we aim to create an ontologybased transformation model and a framework to develop an ontology-based transformation system in the digital forensics domain. We describe the architecture of the ontology-based transformation system and its components for assisting computer forensics experts in the appro...

  17. Ontological model for predicting cyberattacks based on virtualized Honeynets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaona-García, Pablo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The honeynets security tools are widely used today for the purpose of gathering information from potential attackers about vulnerabilities in our network. For performing correct use of them is necessary to understand the existing types, structures raised, the tools used and current developments. However, poor planning honeypot or honeynet one could provide unwanted users an access point to the network we want to protect. The purpose of this article is to carry out the approach of an ontological model for identifying the most common attacks types from the use of honeynets, and its implementation on working scenarios. This model will facilitate decision-making for the location of elements and components to computer level in an organization.

  18. Non-monotonic reasoning in conceptual modeling and ontology design: A proposal

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Casini, G

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available -1 2nd International Workshop on Ontologies and Conceptual Modeling (Onto.Com 2013), Valencia, Spain, 17-21 June 2013 Non-monotonic reasoning in conceptual modeling and ontology design: A proposal Giovanni Casini1 and Alessandro Mosca2 1...

  19. The ontology model of FrontCRM framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budiardjo, Eko K.; Perdana, Wira; Franshisca, Felicia

    2013-03-01

    Adoption and implementation of Customer Relationship Management (CRM) is not merely a technological installation, but the emphasis is more on the application of customer-centric philosophy and culture as a whole. CRM must begin at the level of business strategy, the only level that thorough organizational changes are possible to be done. Changes agenda can be directed to each departmental plans, and supported by information technology. Work processes related to CRM concept include marketing, sales, and services. FrontCRM is developed as framework to guide in identifying business processes related to CRM in which based on the concept of strategic planning approach. This leads to processes and practices identification in every process area related to marketing, sales, and services. The Ontology model presented on this paper by means serves as tools to avoid framework misunderstanding, to define practices systematically within process area and to find CRM software features related to those practices.

  20. Towards a reference plant trait ontology for modeling knowledge of plant traits and phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ontology engineering and knowledge modeling for the plant sciences is expected to contribute to the understanding of the basis of plant traits that determine phenotypic expression in a given environment. Several crop- or clade-specific plant trait ontologies have been developed to describe plant tr...

  1. Developing ontological model of computational linear algebra - preliminary considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasielewska, K.; Ganzha, M.; Paprzycki, M.; Lirkov, I.

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a method for application of ontologically represented domain knowledge to support Grid users. The work is presented in the context provided by the Agents in Grid system, which aims at development of an agent-semantic infrastructure for efficient resource management in the Grid. Decision support within the system should provide functionality beyond the existing Grid middleware, specifically, help the user to choose optimal algorithm and/or resource to solve a problem from a given domain. The system assists the user in at least two situations. First, for users without in-depth knowledge about the domain, it should help them to select the method and the resource that (together) would best fit the problem to be solved (and match the available resources). Second, if the user explicitly indicates the method and the resource configuration, it should "verify" if her choice is consistent with the expert recommendations (encapsulated in the knowledge base). Furthermore, one of the goals is to simplify the use of the selected resource to execute the job; i.e., provide a user-friendly method of submitting jobs, without required technical knowledge about the Grid middleware. To achieve the mentioned goals, an adaptable method of expert knowledge representation for the decision support system has to be implemented. The selected approach is to utilize ontologies and semantic data processing, supported by multicriterial decision making. As a starting point, an area of computational linear algebra was selected to be modeled, however, the paper presents a general approach that shall be easily extendable to other domains.

  2. An organizational model to support the flexible workflow based on ontology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Feng; Li Xudong; Zhu Guangying; Zhang Xiankun

    2012-01-01

    Based on ontology theory, the paper addresses an organizational model for flexible workflow. Firstly, the paper describes the conceptual model of the organizational model on ontology chart, which provides a consistent semantic framework of organization. Secondly, the paper gives the formalization of the model and describes the six key ontology elements of the mode in detail. Finally, the paper discusses deeply how the model supports the flexible workflow and indicates that the model has the advantages of cross-area, cross-organization and cross-domain, multi-process support and scalability. Especially, because the model is represented by ontology, the paper produces the conclusion that the model has covered the defect of unshared feature in traditional models, at the same time, it is more capable and flexible. (authors)

  3. Modeling Interactive Intelligences

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-08-01

    New York: Basic Books, 1999. P. 207-10. [5] Piaget , Jean . Play, Dreams, and Imitation in Childhood. New York: Norton, 1962. [6] Dillard, Annie. Living...concepts of reentry and binding. Next, I rely on Jean Piaget’s model of adaptation in order to examine the function of imitation and play in an...rather than metrics should be used. 2. ADAPTATION, SELECTION, IMITATION, AND PLAY Piaget presented adaptive behavior as a combination of accommodation and

  4. Modelling the cybersecurity environment using morphological ontology design engineering

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jansen van Vuuren, JC

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available ). This methodology is based on the combination of three different research methods, i.e. design science, general morphological analysis, and ontology based representation. General morphological analysis offers a solution for extracting meaningful information from...

  5. Using ontologies to model human navigation behavior in information networks: A study based on Wikipedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamprecht, Daniel; Strohmaier, Markus; Helic, Denis; Nyulas, Csongor; Tudorache, Tania; Noy, Natalya F; Musen, Mark A

    The need to examine the behavior of different user groups is a fundamental requirement when building information systems. In this paper, we present Ontology-based Decentralized Search (OBDS), a novel method to model the navigation behavior of users equipped with different types of background knowledge. Ontology-based Decentralized Search combines decentralized search, an established method for navigation in social networks, and ontologies to model navigation behavior in information networks. The method uses ontologies as an explicit representation of background knowledge to inform the navigation process and guide it towards navigation targets. By using different ontologies, users equipped with different types of background knowledge can be represented. We demonstrate our method using four biomedical ontologies and their associated Wikipedia articles. We compare our simulation results with base line approaches and with results obtained from a user study. We find that our method produces click paths that have properties similar to those originating from human navigators. The results suggest that our method can be used to model human navigation behavior in systems that are based on information networks, such as Wikipedia. This paper makes the following contributions: (i) To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work to demonstrate the utility of ontologies in modeling human navigation and (ii) it yields new insights and understanding about the mechanisms of human navigation in information networks.

  6. Transparency of Computational Intelligence Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owotoki, Peter; Mayer-Lindenberg, Friedrich

    This paper introduces the behaviour of transparency of computational intelligence (CI) models. Transparency reveals to end users the underlying reasoning process of the agent embodying CI models. This is of great benefit in applications (e.g. data mining, entertainment and personal robotics) with humans as end users because it increases their trust in the decisions of the agent and their acceptance of its results. Our integrated approach, wherein rules are just one of other transparency factors (TF), differs from previous related efforts which have focused mostly on generation of comprehensible rules as explanations. Other TF include degree of confidence measure and visualization of principal features. The transparency quotient is introduced as a measure of the transparency of models based on these factors. The transparency enabled generalized exemplar model has been developed to demonstrate the TF and transparency concepts introduced in this paper.

  7. Building spatio-temporal database model based on ontological approach using relational database environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, N.; Burney, S.M.A.

    2017-01-01

    Everything in this world is encapsulated by space and time fence. Our daily life activities are utterly linked and related with other objects in vicinity. Therefore, a strong relationship exist with our current location, time (including past, present and future) and event through with we are moving as an object also affect our activities in life. Ontology development and its integration with database are vital for the true understanding of the complex systems involving both spatial and temporal dimensions. In this paper we propose a conceptual framework for building spatio-temporal database model based on ontological approach. We have used relational data model for modelling spatio-temporal data content and present our methodology with spatio-temporal ontological accepts and its transformation into spatio-temporal database model. We illustrate the implementation of our conceptual model through a case study related to cultivated land parcel used for agriculture to exhibit the spatio-temporal behaviour of agricultural land and related entities. Moreover, it provides a generic approach for designing spatiotemporal databases based on ontology. The proposed model is capable to understand the ontological and somehow epistemological commitments and to build spatio-temporal ontology and transform it into a spatio-temporal data model. Finally, we highlight the existing and future research challenges. (author)

  8. A PRACTICAL ONTOLOGY FOR THE LARGE-SCALE MODELING OF SCHOLARLY ARTIFACTS AND THEIR USAGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RODRIGUEZ, MARKO A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; BOLLEN, JOHAN [Los Alamos National Laboratory; VAN DE SOMPEL, HERBERT [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-30

    The large-scale analysis of scholarly artifact usage is constrained primarily by current practices in usage data archiving, privacy issues concerned with the dissemination of usage data, and the lack of a practical ontology for modeling the usage domain. As a remedy to the third constraint, this article presents a scholarly ontology that was engineered to represent those classes for which large-scale bibliographic and usage data exists, supports usage research, and whose instantiation is scalable to the order of 50 million articles along with their associated artifacts (e.g. authors and journals) and an accompanying 1 billion usage events. The real world instantiation of the presented abstract ontology is a semantic network model of the scholarly community which lends the scholarly process to statistical analysis and computational support. They present the ontology, discuss its instantiation, and provide some example inference rules for calculating various scholarly artifact metrics.

  9. Modeling issues & choices in the data mining optimization ontology

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Keet, CM

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe the Data Mining Optimization Ontology (DMOP), which was developed to support informed decision-making at various choice points of the knowledge discovery (KD) process. It can be used as a reference by data miners, but its primary purpose...

  10. A diagnostic ontological model for damages to historical constructions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cacciotti, Riccardo; Blaško, M.; Valach, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 1 (2015), s. 40-48 ISSN 1296-2074 R&D Projects: GA MK(CZ) DF11P01OVV002 Keywords : historical constructions * conservation * ontologies * damage Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage Impact factor: 1.533, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1296207414000259

  11. Towards refactoring the Molecular Function Ontology with a UML profile for function modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burek, Patryk; Loebe, Frank; Herre, Heinrich

    2017-10-04

    Gene Ontology (GO) is the largest resource for cataloging gene products. This resource grows steadily and, naturally, this growth raises issues regarding the structure of the ontology. Moreover, modeling and refactoring large ontologies such as GO is generally far from being simple, as a whole as well as when focusing on certain aspects or fragments. It seems that human-friendly graphical modeling languages such as the Unified Modeling Language (UML) could be helpful in connection with these tasks. We investigate the use of UML for making the structural organization of the Molecular Function Ontology (MFO), a sub-ontology of GO, more explicit. More precisely, we present a UML dialect, called the Function Modeling Language (FueL), which is suited for capturing functions in an ontologically founded way. FueL is equipped, among other features, with language elements that arise from studying patterns of subsumption between functions. We show how to use this UML dialect for capturing the structure of molecular functions. Furthermore, we propose and discuss some refactoring options concerning fragments of MFO. FueL enables the systematic, graphical representation of functions and their interrelations, including making information explicit that is currently either implicit in MFO or is mainly captured in textual descriptions. Moreover, the considered subsumption patterns lend themselves to the methodical analysis of refactoring options with respect to MFO. On this basis we argue that the approach can increase the comprehensibility of the structure of MFO for humans and can support communication, for example, during revision and further development.

  12. Intelligent structural optimization: Concept, Model and Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Dagang; Wang, Guangyuan; Peng, Zhang

    2002-01-01

    Structural optimization has many characteristics of Soft Design, and so, it is necessary to apply the experience of human experts to solving the uncertain and multidisciplinary optimization problems in large-scale and complex engineering systems. With the development of artificial intelligence (AI) and computational intelligence (CI), the theory of structural optimization is now developing into the direction of intelligent optimization. In this paper, a concept of Intelligent Structural Optimization (ISO) is proposed. And then, a design process model of ISO is put forward in which each design sub-process model are discussed. Finally, the design methods of ISO are presented

  13. Automating Ontological Annotation with WordNet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Tratz, Stephen C.; Gregory, Michelle L.; Chappell, Alan R.; Whitney, Paul D.; Posse, Christian; Paulson, Patrick R.; Baddeley, Bob L.; Hohimer, Ryan E.; White, Amanda M.

    2006-01-22

    Semantic Web applications require robust and accurate annotation tools that are capable of automating the assignment of ontological classes to words in naturally occurring text (ontological annotation). Most current ontologies do not include rich lexical databases and are therefore not easily integrated with word sense disambiguation algorithms that are needed to automate ontological annotation. WordNet provides a potentially ideal solution to this problem as it offers a highly structured lexical conceptual representation that has been extensively used to develop word sense disambiguation algorithms. However, WordNet has not been designed as an ontology, and while it can be easily turned into one, the result of doing this would present users with serious practical limitations due to the great number of concepts (synonym sets) it contains. Moreover, mapping WordNet to an existing ontology may be difficult and requires substantial labor. We propose to overcome these limitations by developing an analytical platform that (1) provides a WordNet-based ontology offering a manageable and yet comprehensive set of concept classes, (2) leverages the lexical richness of WordNet to give an extensive characterization of concept class in terms of lexical instances, and (3) integrates a class recognition algorithm that automates the assignment of concept classes to words in naturally occurring text. The ensuing framework makes available an ontological annotation platform that can be effectively integrated with intelligence analysis systems to facilitate evidence marshaling and sustain the creation and validation of inference models.

  14. Ontological Annotation with WordNet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Tratz, Stephen C.; Gregory, Michelle L.; Chappell, Alan R.; Whitney, Paul D.; Posse, Christian; Paulson, Patrick R.; Baddeley, Bob; Hohimer, Ryan E.; White, Amanda M.

    2006-06-06

    Semantic Web applications require robust and accurate annotation tools that are capable of automating the assignment of ontological classes to words in naturally occurring text (ontological annotation). Most current ontologies do not include rich lexical databases and are therefore not easily integrated with word sense disambiguation algorithms that are needed to automate ontological annotation. WordNet provides a potentially ideal solution to this problem as it offers a highly structured lexical conceptual representation that has been extensively used to develop word sense disambiguation algorithms. However, WordNet has not been designed as an ontology, and while it can be easily turned into one, the result of doing this would present users with serious practical limitations due to the great number of concepts (synonym sets) it contains. Moreover, mapping WordNet to an existing ontology may be difficult and requires substantial labor. We propose to overcome these limitations by developing an analytical platform that (1) provides a WordNet-based ontology offering a manageable and yet comprehensive set of concept classes, (2) leverages the lexical richness of WordNet to give an extensive characterization of concept class in terms of lexical instances, and (3) integrates a class recognition algorithm that automates the assignment of concept classes to words in naturally occurring text. The ensuing framework makes available an ontological annotation platform that can be effectively integrated with intelligence analysis systems to facilitate evidence marshaling and sustain the creation and validation of inference models.

  15. Ontology or formal ontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žáček, Martin

    2017-07-01

    Ontology or formal ontology? Which word is correct? The aim of this article is to introduce correct terms and explain their basis. Ontology describes a particular area of interest (domain) in a formal way - defines the classes of objects that are in that area, and relationships that may exist between them. Meaning of ontology consists mainly in facilitating communication between people, improve collaboration of software systems and in the improvement of systems engineering. Ontology in all these areas offer the possibility of unification of view, maintaining consistency and unambiguity.

  16. Ontology driven modeling for the knowledge of genetic susceptibility to disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu; Sakamoto, Norihiro

    2009-04-30

    For the machine helped exploring the relationships between genetic factors and complex diseases, a well-structured conceptual framework of the background knowledge is needed. However, because of the complexity of determining a genetic susceptibility factor, there is no formalization for the knowledge of genetic susceptibility to disease, which makes the interoperability between systems impossible. Thus, the ontology modeling language OWL was used for formalization in this paper. After introducing the Semantic Web and OWL language propagated by W3C, we applied text mining technology combined with competency questions to specify the classes of the ontology. Then, an N-ary pattern was adopted to describe the relationships among these defined classes. Based on the former work of OGSF-DM (Ontology of Genetic Susceptibility Factors to Diabetes Mellitus), we formalized the definition of "Genetic Susceptibility", "Genetic Susceptibility Factor" and other classes by using OWL-DL modeling language; and a reasoner automatically performed the classification of the class "Genetic Susceptibility Factor". The ontology driven modeling is used for formalization the knowledge of genetic susceptibility to complex diseases. More importantly, when a class has been completely formalized in an ontology, the OWL reasoning can automatically compute the classification of the class, in our case, the class of "Genetic Susceptibility Factors". With more types of genetic susceptibility factors obtained from the laboratory research, our ontologies always needs to be refined, and many new classes must be taken into account to harmonize with the ontologies. Using the ontologies to develop the semantic web needs to be applied in the future.

  17. Linking human diseases to animal models using ontology-based phenotype annotation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole L Washington

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Scientists and clinicians who study genetic alterations and disease have traditionally described phenotypes in natural language. The considerable variation in these free-text descriptions has posed a hindrance to the important task of identifying candidate genes and models for human diseases and indicates the need for a computationally tractable method to mine data resources for mutant phenotypes. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that ontological annotation of disease phenotypes will facilitate the discovery of new genotype-phenotype relationships within and across species. To describe phenotypes using ontologies, we used an Entity-Quality (EQ methodology, wherein the affected entity (E and how it is affected (Q are recorded using terms from a variety of ontologies. Using this EQ method, we annotated the phenotypes of 11 gene-linked human diseases described in Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM. These human annotations were loaded into our Ontology-Based Database (OBD along with other ontology-based phenotype descriptions of mutants from various model organism databases. Phenotypes recorded with this EQ method can be computationally compared based on the hierarchy of terms in the ontologies and the frequency of annotation. We utilized four similarity metrics to compare phenotypes and developed an ontology of homologous and analogous anatomical structures to compare phenotypes between species. Using these tools, we demonstrate that we can identify, through the similarity of the recorded phenotypes, other alleles of the same gene, other members of a signaling pathway, and orthologous genes and pathway members across species. We conclude that EQ-based annotation of phenotypes, in conjunction with a cross-species ontology, and a variety of similarity metrics can identify biologically meaningful similarities between genes by comparing phenotypes alone. This annotation and search method provides a novel and efficient means to identify

  18. A measurement model of multiple intelligence profiles of management graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Heamalatha; Awang, Siti Rahmah

    2017-05-01

    In this study, developing a fit measurement model and identifying the best fitting items to represent Howard Gardner's nine intelligences namely, musical intelligence, bodily-kinaesthetic intelligence, mathematical/logical intelligence, visual/spatial intelligence, verbal/linguistic intelligence, interpersonal intelligence, intrapersonal intelligence, naturalist intelligence and spiritual intelligence are the main interest in order to enhance the opportunities of the management graduates for employability. In order to develop a fit measurement model, Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) was applied. A psychometric test which is the Ability Test in Employment (ATIEm) was used as the instrument to measure the existence of nine types of intelligence of 137 University Teknikal Malaysia Melaka (UTeM) management graduates for job placement purposes. The initial measurement model contains nine unobserved variables and each unobserved variable is measured by ten observed variables. Finally, the modified measurement model deemed to improve the Normed chi-square (NC) = 1.331; Incremental Fit Index (IFI) = 0.940 and Root Mean Square of Approximation (RMSEA) = 0.049 was developed. The findings showed that the UTeM management graduates possessed all nine intelligences either high or low. Musical intelligence, mathematical/logical intelligence, naturalist intelligence and spiritual intelligence contributed highest loadings on certain items. However, most of the intelligences such as bodily kinaesthetic intelligence, visual/spatial intelligence, verbal/linguistic intelligence interpersonal intelligence and intrapersonal intelligence possessed by UTeM management graduates are just at the borderline.

  19. Prediction of speech intelligibility based on an auditory preprocessing model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Claus Forup Corlin; Pedersen, Michael Syskind; Dau, Torsten

    2010-01-01

    Classical speech intelligibility models, such as the speech transmission index (STI) and the speech intelligibility index (SII) are based on calculations on the physical acoustic signals. The present study predicts speech intelligibility by combining a psychoacoustically validated model of auditory...

  20. Jacob Lorhard's ontology: A 17th century hypertext on the reality and temporality of the world of intelligibles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Øhrstrøm, P.; Schärfe, H.; Uckelman, S.L.

    2008-01-01

    Jacob Lorhard published his ontology in 1606. In this work the term ontologia ‘ontology’ was used for the first time ever. In this paper, it is argued that Lorhard’s ontology provides a useful key to the understanding of the early 17th-century world view in Protestant Europe. Among other things,

  1. Jacob Lorhard’s Ontology: A 17th Century Hypertext on the Reality and Temporality of the World of Intelligibles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øhrstrøm, Peter; Schärfe, Henrik; Uckelman, Sara

    2008-01-01

    Jacob Lorhard published his ontology in 1606. In this work the term ontologia ‘ontology’ was used for the first time ever. In this paper, it is argued that Lorhard’s ontology provides a useful key to the understanding of the early 17th-century world view in Protestant Europe. Among other things, ...

  2. Computational Intelligence, Cyber Security and Computational Models

    CERN Document Server

    Anitha, R; Lekshmi, R; Kumar, M; Bonato, Anthony; Graña, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    This book contains cutting-edge research material presented by researchers, engineers, developers, and practitioners from academia and industry at the International Conference on Computational Intelligence, Cyber Security and Computational Models (ICC3) organized by PSG College of Technology, Coimbatore, India during December 19–21, 2013. The materials in the book include theory and applications for design, analysis, and modeling of computational intelligence and security. The book will be useful material for students, researchers, professionals, and academicians. It will help in understanding current research trends and findings and future scope of research in computational intelligence, cyber security, and computational models.

  3. The Design and Engineering of Mobile Data Services: Developing an Ontology Based on Business Model Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Debei, Mutaz M.; Fitzgerald, Guy

    This paper addresses the design and engineering problem related to mobile data services. The aim of the research is to inform and advise mobile service design and engineering by looking at this issue from a rigorous and holistic perspective. To this aim, this paper develops an ontology based on business model thinking. The developed ontology identifies four primary dimensions in designing business models of mobile data services: value proposition, value network, value architecture, and value finance. Within these dimensions, 15 key design concepts are identified along with their interrelationships and rules in the telecommunication service business model domain and unambiguous semantics are produced. The developed ontology is of value to academics and practitioners alike, particularly those interested in strategic-oriented IS/IT and business developments in telecommunications. Employing the developed ontology would systemize mobile service engineering functions and make them more manageable, effective, and creative. The research approach to building the mobile service business model ontology essentially follows the design science paradigm. Within this paradigm, we incorporate a number of different research methods, so the employed methodology might be better characterized as a pluralist approach.

  4. Ontology Sparse Vector Learning Algorithm for Ontology Similarity Measuring and Ontology Mapping via ADAL Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Zhu, Linli; Wang, Kaiyun

    2015-12-01

    Ontology, a model of knowledge representation and storage, has had extensive applications in pharmaceutics, social science, chemistry and biology. In the age of “big data”, the constructed concepts are often represented as higher-dimensional data by scholars, and thus the sparse learning techniques are introduced into ontology algorithms. In this paper, based on the alternating direction augmented Lagrangian method, we present an ontology optimization algorithm for ontological sparse vector learning, and a fast version of such ontology technologies. The optimal sparse vector is obtained by an iterative procedure, and the ontology function is then obtained from the sparse vector. Four simulation experiments show that our ontological sparse vector learning model has a higher precision ratio on plant ontology, humanoid robotics ontology, biology ontology and physics education ontology data for similarity measuring and ontology mapping applications.

  5. Language engineering for the Semantic Web: a digital library for endangered languages. Endangered languages, Ontology, Digital library, Multimedia, EMELD, Intelligent querying and retrieval, ImageSpace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Shiyong

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe the effort undertaken at Wayne State University to preserve endangered languages using the state-of-the-art information technologies. In particular, we discuss the issues involved in such an effort, and present the architecture of a distributed digital library for endangered languages which will contain various data of endangered languages in the forms of text, image, video, audio and include advanced tools for intelligent cataloguing, indexing, searching and browsing information on languages and language analysis. We use various Semantic Web technologies such as XML, OLAC, ontologies so that our digital library becomes a useful linguistic resource on the Semantic Web.

  6. COMODI: an ontology to characterise differences in versions of computational models in biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharm, Martin; Waltemath, Dagmar; Mendes, Pedro; Wolkenhauer, Olaf

    2016-07-11

    Open model repositories provide ready-to-reuse computational models of biological systems. Models within those repositories evolve over time, leading to different model versions. Taken together, the underlying changes reflect a model's provenance and thus can give valuable insights into the studied biology. Currently, however, changes cannot be semantically interpreted. To improve this situation, we developed an ontology of terms describing changes in models. The ontology can be used by scientists and within software to characterise model updates at the level of single changes. When studying or reusing a model, these annotations help with determining the relevance of a change in a given context. We manually studied changes in selected models from BioModels and the Physiome Model Repository. Using the BiVeS tool for difference detection, we then performed an automatic analysis of changes in all models published in these repositories. The resulting set of concepts led us to define candidate terms for the ontology. In a final step, we aggregated and classified these terms and built the first version of the ontology. We present COMODI, an ontology needed because COmputational MOdels DIffer. It empowers users and software to describe changes in a model on the semantic level. COMODI also enables software to implement user-specific filter options for the display of model changes. Finally, COMODI is a step towards predicting how a change in a model influences the simulation results. COMODI, coupled with our algorithm for difference detection, ensures the transparency of a model's evolution, and it enhances the traceability of updates and error corrections. COMODI is encoded in OWL. It is openly available at http://comodi.sems.uni-rostock.de/ .

  7. An ontology-based hierarchical semantic modeling approach to clinical pathway workflows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yan; Jiang, Zhibin; Diao, Xiaodi; Yang, Dong; Du, Gang

    2009-08-01

    This paper proposes an ontology-based approach of modeling clinical pathway workflows at the semantic level for facilitating computerized clinical pathway implementation and efficient delivery of high-quality healthcare services. A clinical pathway ontology (CPO) is formally defined in OWL web ontology language (OWL) to provide common semantic foundation for meaningful representation and exchange of pathway-related knowledge. A CPO-based semantic modeling method is then presented to describe clinical pathways as interconnected hierarchical models including the top-level outcome flow and intervention workflow level along a care timeline. Furthermore, relevant temporal knowledge can be fully represented by combing temporal entities in CPO and temporal rules based on semantic web rule language (SWRL). An illustrative example about a clinical pathway for cesarean section shows the applicability of the proposed methodology in enabling structured semantic descriptions of any real clinical pathway.

  8. Model SH intelligent instrument for thickness measuring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Juntao; Jia Weizhuang; Zhao Yunlong

    1995-01-01

    The authors introduce Model SH Intelligent Instrument for thickness measuring by using principle of beta back-scattering and its application range, features, principle of operation, system design, calibration and specifications

  9. An Ontology for Musical Phonographic Records: Contributing with a Representation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Albuquerque, Marcelo; Siqueira, Sean Wolfgand M.; de Saldanha da G. Lanzelotte, Rosana; Braz, Maria Helena L. B.

    Music is a complex domain with some interesting specificities that makes it difficult to be modeled. If different types of music are considered, then the difficulties are even bigger. This paper presents some of the characteristics that makes music such a hard domain to model and proposes an ontology for representing musical phonographic records. This ontology will provide a global representation that can be used to support systems interoperability and data integration, which provides disseminating music worldwide, contributing to culture in the knowledge society.

  10. A reference ontology for harmonizing process-reference models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Jesús Pardo-Calvache

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Desde hace un par de décadas, la calidad del proceso ha sido considerada como uno de los factores principales para la entrega de productos con alta calidad. Una gran variedad de modelos y estándares han surgido como solución a este problema, sin embargo, la implementación de varios modelos para que una empresa cumpla con múltiples requisitos de calidad no es una tarea fácil. La dificultad radica en la falta de directrices específicas y una representación homogénea que facilite el trabajo en esta línea de la ingeniería de software. Para hacer frente a esta situación, en este trabajo se presenta una ontología de modelos de referencia de procesos, llamado PrMO. Esta ontología define una Estructura Común de Elementos de Procesos (ECEP como medio para apoyar la armonización de las diferencias estructurales entre múltiples modelos. La armonización se lleva a cabo a través de la homogeneización de las estructuras de procesos de cada uno de los modelos. PrMO ha sido validada a través de la instanciación de la información contenida en diferentes modelos, tales como CMMI-(ACQ, DEV, ISO (9001, 27001, 27002, 20000- 2, ITIL, COBIT, RISK IT, Val IT, BASEL II, entre otros. Tanto la estructura común (ECEP y el método de homogeneización son presentados junto con un ejemplo de aplicación. Asimismo, se presenta una herramienta web que permite apoyar la homogeneización de los modelos, esto permite ilustrar mejor las ventajas de PrMO. La ontología propuesta podría ser de gran utilidad para las organizaciones y consultores que planean llevar a cabo la armonización de múltiples modelos.

  11. SEMPATH Ontology: modeling multidisciplinary treatment schemes utilizing semantics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrou, Dimitrios Al; Pardalis, Konstantinos V; Bouras, Thanassis D; Karakitsos, Petros; Mentzas, Gregoris N

    2012-03-01

    A dramatic increase of demand for provided treatment quality has occurred during last decades. The main challenge to be confronted, so as to increase treatment quality, is the personalization of treatment, since each patient constitutes a unique case. Healthcare provision encloses a complex environment since healthcare provision organizations are highly multidisciplinary. In this paper, we present the conceptualization of the domain of clinical pathways (CP). The SEMPATH (SEMantic PATHways) Oontology comprises three main parts: 1) the CP part; 2) the business and finance part; and 3) the quality assurance part. Our implementation achieves the conceptualization of the multidisciplinary domain of healthcare provision, in order to be further utilized for the implementation of a Semantic Web Rules (SWRL rules) repository. Finally, SEMPATH Ontology is utilized for the definition of a set of SWRL rules for the human papillomavirus) disease and its treatment scheme. © 2012 IEEE

  12. Ontological models with epistemic constraints: Local reconstruction of a dual-rail qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasiak, Pawel

    2017-10-01

    Restrictions on gaining information may significantly affect perception of the system under study. In this paper we are concerned with mechanisms introducing epistemic constraints in the framework of ontological models and discuss a scheme leading to the minimal operational account which does not rely on the knowledge of the underlying ontology. As a case in point, we construct local ontological model which simulates behaviour of a single quantum particle in dual-rail interferometric circuits. We show that for agents analysing conceivable experimental circuits predictions of the model are indistinguishable from their quantum mechanical counterparts, that is operational account of the model is equivalent to a qubit. Note that it contrasts with the usual understanding the collapse of the wave function as non-local phenomenon, namely the model is local from the construction with any form of 'non-locality' being explained as an epistemic effect due to incomplete information about the system. This illustrates flexibility of the ontological model framework, and in particular the possibility of different interpretations behind the same operational account.

  13. DMTO: a realistic ontology for standard diabetes mellitus treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sappagh, Shaker; Kwak, Daehan; Ali, Farman; Kwak, Kyung-Sup

    2018-02-06

    Treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a complex problem. A clinical decision support system (CDSS) based on massive and distributed electronic health record data can facilitate the automation of this process and enhance its accuracy. The most important component of any CDSS is its knowledge base. This knowledge base can be formulated using ontologies. The formal description logic of ontology supports the inference of hidden knowledge. Building a complete, coherent, consistent, interoperable, and sharable ontology is a challenge. This paper introduces the first version of the newly constructed Diabetes Mellitus Treatment Ontology (DMTO) as a basis for shared-semantics, domain-specific, standard, machine-readable, and interoperable knowledge relevant to T2DM treatment. It is a comprehensive ontology and provides the highest coverage and the most complete picture of coded knowledge about T2DM patients' current conditions, previous profiles, and T2DM-related aspects, including complications, symptoms, lab tests, interactions, treatment plan (TP) frameworks, and glucose-related diseases and medications. It adheres to the design principles recommended by the Open Biomedical Ontologies Foundry and is based on ontological realism that follows the principles of the Basic Formal Ontology and the Ontology for General Medical Science. DMTO is implemented under Protégé 5.0 in Web Ontology Language (OWL) 2 format and is publicly available through the National Center for Biomedical Ontology's BioPortal at http://bioportal.bioontology.org/ontologies/DMTO . The current version of DMTO includes more than 10,700 classes, 277 relations, 39,425 annotations, 214 semantic rules, and 62,974 axioms. We provide proof of concept for this approach to modeling TPs. The ontology is able to collect and analyze most features of T2DM as well as customize chronic TPs with the most appropriate drugs, foods, and physical exercises. DMTO is ready to be used as a knowledge base for

  14. An Intelligence Collection Management Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-01

    classification of inteligence collection requirements in terms of. the a-.- metnodo"c, .ev--e in Chaster Five. 116 APPgENDIX A A METHOD OF RANKING...of Artificial Intelligence Tools and Technigues to!TN’X n~l is n rs aa~emfft-.3-ufnyva: ’A TZ Ashby W. Ecss. An Introduction to Cybernetics. New York

  15. IEA Wind Task 37 System Modeling Framework and Ontology for Wind Turbines and Plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dykes, K; Sanchez Perez Moreno, S.; Zahle, Frederik; Ning, A; McWilliam, M.; Zaayer, M B

    2017-01-01

    This presentation will provide an overview of progress to date in the development of a system modeling framework and ontology for wind turbines and plants as part of the larger IEA Wind Task 37 on wind energy systems engineering. The goals of the effort are to create a set of guidelines for a common

  16. An Application of Structural Equation Modeling for Developing Good Teaching Characteristics Ontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phiakoksong, Somjin; Niwattanakul, Suphakit; Angskun, Thara

    2013-01-01

    Ontology is a knowledge representation technique which aims to make knowledge explicit by defining the core concepts and their relationships. The Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) is a statistical technique which aims to explore the core factors from empirical data and estimates the relationship between these factors. This article presents an…

  17. Modelling speech intelligibility in adverse conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Søren; Dau, Torsten

    2013-01-01

    Jørgensen and Dau (J Acoust Soc Am 130:1475-1487, 2011) proposed the speech-based envelope power spectrum model (sEPSM) in an attempt to overcome the limitations of the classical speech transmission index (STI) and speech intelligibility index (SII) in conditions with nonlinearly processed speech....... Instead of considering the reduction of the temporal modulation energy as the intelligibility metric, as assumed in the STI, the sEPSM applies the signal-to-noise ratio in the envelope domain (SNRenv). This metric was shown to be the key for predicting the intelligibility of reverberant speech as well...... subjected to phase jitter, a condition in which the spectral structure of the intelligibility of speech signal is strongly affected, while the broadband temporal envelope is kept largely intact. In contrast, the effects of this distortion can be predicted -successfully by the spectro-temporal modulation...

  18. Ontology-Based Big Dimension Modeling in Data Warehouse Schema Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iftikhar, Nadeem

    2013-01-01

    partitioning, vertical partitioning and their hybrid. We formalize the design methods and propose an algorithm that describes the modeling process from an OWL ontology to a data warehouse schema. In addition, this paper also presents an effective ontology-based tool to automate the modeling process. The tool......During data warehouse schema design, designers often encounter how to model big dimensions that typically contain a large number of attributes and records. To investigate effective approaches for modeling big dimensions is necessary in order to achieve better query performance, with respect...... to response time. In most cases, the big dimension modeling process is complicated since it usually requires accurate description of business semantics, multiple design revisions and comprehensive testing. In this paper, we present the design methods for modeling big dimensions, which include horizontal...

  19. Feature-opinion pair identification of product reviews in Chinese: a domain ontology modeling method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Pei; Wang, Hongwei; Guo, Kaiqiang

    2013-03-01

    With the emergence of the new economy based on social media, a great amount of consumer feedback on particular products are conveyed through wide-spreading product online reviews, making opinion mining a growing interest for both academia and industry. According to the characteristic mode of expression in Chinese, this research proposes an ontology-based linguistic model to identify the basic appraisal expression in Chinese product reviews-"feature-opinion pair (FOP)." The product-oriented domain ontology is constructed automatically at first, then algorithms to identify FOP are designed by mapping product features and opinions to the conceptual space of the domain ontology, and finally comparative experiments are conducted to evaluate the model. Experimental results indicate that the performance of the proposed approach in this paper is efficient in obtaining a more accurate result compared to the state-of-art algorithms. Furthermore, through identifying and analyzing FOPs, the unstructured product reviews are converted into structured and machine-sensible expression, which provides valuable information for business application. This paper contributes to the related research in opinion mining by developing a solid foundation for further sentiment analysis at a fine-grained level and proposing a general way for automatic ontology construction.

  20. Development of the system of reactor thermophysical data on the basis of ontological modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chusov, I. A.; Kirillov, P. L.; Bogoslovskaya, G. P.; Yunusov, L. K.; Obysov, N. A.; Novikov, G. E.; Pronyaev, V. G.; Erkimbaev, A. O.; Zitserman, V. Yu; Kobzev, G. A.; Trachtengerts, M. S.; Fokin, L. R.

    2017-11-01

    Compilation and processing of the thermophysical data was always an important task for the nuclear industry. The difficulties of the present stage of this activity are explained by sharp increase of the data volume and the number of new materials, as well as by the increased requirements to the reliability of the data used in the nuclear industry. General trend in the fields with predominantly orientation at the work with data (material science, chemistry and others) consists in the transition to a common infrastructure with integration of separate databases, Web-portals and other resources. This infrastructure provides the interoperability, the procedures of the data exchange, storage and dissemination. Key elements of this infrastructure is a domain-specific ontology, which provides a single information model and dictionary for semantic definitions. Formalizing the subject area, the ontology adapts the definitions for the different database schemes and provides the integration of heterogeneous data. The important property to be inherent for ontologies is a possibility of permanent expanding of new definitions, e.g. list of materials and properties. The expansion of the thermophysical data ontology at the reactor materials includes the creation of taxonomic dictionaries for thermophysical properties; the models for data presentation and their uncertainties; the inclusion along with the parameters of the state, some additional factors, such as the material porosity, the burnup rate, the irradiation rate and others; axiomatics of the properties applicable to the given class of materials.

  1. Towards Self-managed Pervasive Middleware using OWL/SWRL ontologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Weishan; Hansen, Klaus Marius

    2008-01-01

    Self-management for pervasive middleware is important to realize the Ambient Intelligence vision. In this paper, we present an OWL/SWRL context ontologies based self-management approach for pervasive middleware where OWL ontology is used as means for context modeling. The context ontologies....../SWRL context ontologies based self-management approach with the self-diagnosis in Hydra middleware, using device state machine and other dynamic context information, for example web service calls. The evaluations in terms of extensibility, performance and scalability show that this approach is effective...

  2. Algorithms to analyze the quality test parameter values of seafood in the proposed ontology based seafood quality analyzer and miner (ONTO SQAM model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinu Sherimon

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Ensuring the quality of food, particularly seafood has increasingly become an important issue nowadays. Quality Management Systems empower any organization to identify, measure, control and improve the quality of the products manufactured that will eventually lead to improved business performance. With the advent of new technologies, now intelligent systems are being developed. To ensure the quality of seafood, an ontology based seafood quality analyzer and miner (ONTO SQAM model is proposed. The knowledge is represented using ontology. The domain concepts are defined using ontology. This paper presents the initial part of the proposed model – the analysis of quality test parameter values. Two algorithms are proposed to do the analysis – Comparison Algorithm and Data Store Updater algorithm. The algorithms ensure that the values of various quality tests are in the acceptable range. The real data sets taken from different seafood companies in Kerala, India, and validated by the Marine Product Export Development Authority of India (MPEDA are used for the experiments. The performance of the algorithms is evaluated using standard performance metrics such as precision, recall, and accuracy. The results obtained show that all the three measures achieved good results.

  3. A Transitive Model For Artificial Intelligence Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, John

    1986-03-01

    A wide range of mathematical techniques have been applied to artificial intelligence problems and some techniques have proved more suitable than others for certain types of problem. We formally define a mathematical model which incorporates some of these successful techniques and we discuss its intrinsic properties. Universal applicability of the model is demonstrated through specific applications to problems drawn from rule-based systems, digital hardware design and constraint satisfaction networks. We also give indications of potential applications to other artificial intelligence problems, including knowledge engineering.

  4. Developing and Validating the Socio-Technical Model in Ontology Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silalahi, Mesnan; Indra Sensuse, Dana; Giri Sucahyo, Yudho; Fadhilah Akmaliah, Izzah; Rahayu, Puji; Cahyaningsih, Elin

    2018-03-01

    This paper describes results from an attempt to develop a model in ontology engineering methodology and a way to validate the model. The approach to methodology in ontology engineering is from the point view of socio-technical system theory. Qualitative research synthesis is used to build the model using meta-ethnography. In order to ensure the objectivity of the measurement, inter-rater reliability method was applied using a multi-rater Fleiss Kappa. The results show the accordance of the research output with the diamond model in the socio-technical system theory by evidence of the interdependency of the four socio-technical variables namely people, technology, structure and task.

  5. The EDEN-IW ontology model for sharing knowledge and water quality data between heterogenous databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stjernholm, M.; Poslad, S.; Zuo, L.

    2004-01-01

    The Environmental Data Exchange Network for Inland Water (EDEN-IW) project's main aim is to develop a system for making disparate and heterogeneous databases of Inland Water quality more accessible to users. The core technology is based upon a combination of: ontological model to represent...... a Semantic Web based data model for IW; software agents as an infrastructure to share and reason about the IW se-mantic data model and XML to make the information accessible to Web portals and mainstream Web services. This presentation focuses on the Semantic Web or Onto-logical model. Currently, we have...... successfully demonstrated the use of our systems to semantically integrate two main database resources from IOW and NERI - these are available on-line. We are in the process of adding further databases and sup-porting a wider variety of user queries such as Decision Support System queries....

  6. Towards an Ontological Learners’ Modelling Approach for Personalised e-Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ali Hosseini

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The rapid advancements in the semantic web technologies has enabled personalised learning based on learner’s characteristics in the learning process. We have implemented a Personalised Adaptive e-Learning system (onto-PAdeL which uses an ontological approach in design-ing learners’ models. Thus, this paper focuses on describing our approach for modelling learners based on their charac-teristics such as abilities, learning style(s, prior knowledge and preferences. The system uses Item Response Theory (IRT for calculating learner’s abilities. The learning style can be represented according to different theories, each of which supports personalisation in different ways. We show that using ontologies for learner modelling, in addition to many different benefits, enables reasoning for adaptive learning.

  7. Pitfalls in alignment of observation models resolved using PROV as an upper ontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, S. J. D.

    2015-12-01

    A number of models for observation metadata have been developed in the earth and environmental science communities, including OGC's Observations and Measurements (O&M), the ecosystems community's Extensible Observation Ontology (OBOE), the W3C's Semantic Sensor Network Ontology (SSNO), and the CUAHSI/NSF Observations Data Model v2 (ODM2). In order to combine data formalized in the various models, mappings between these must be developed. In some cases this is straightforward: since ODM2 took O&M as its starting point, their terminology is almost completely aligned. In the eco-informatics world observations are almost never made in isolation of other observations, so OBOE pays particular attention to groupings, with multiple atomic 'Measurements' in each oboe:Observation which does not have a result of its own and thus plays a different role to an om:Observation. And while SSN also adopted terminology from O&M, mapping is confounded by the fact that SSN uses DOLCE as its foundation and places ssn:Observations as 'Social Objects' which are explicitly disjoint from 'Events', while O&M is formalized as part of the ISO/TC 211 harmonised (UML) model and sees om:Observations as value assignment activities. Foundational ontologies (such as BFO, GFO, UFO or DOLCE) can provide a framework for alignment, but different upper ontologies can be based in profoundly different worldviews and use of incommensurate frameworks can confound rather than help. A potential resolution is provided by comparing recent studies that align SSN and O&M, respectively, with the PROV-O ontology. PROV-O provides just three base classes: Entity, Activity and Agent. om:Observation is sub-classed from prov:Activity, while ssn:Observation is sub-classed from prov:Entity. This confirms that, despite the same name, om:Observation and ssn:Observation denote different aspects of the observation process: the observation event, and the record of the observation event, respectively. Alignment with the simple

  8. development of ontological knowledge representation: learning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    This group of authors describes use of ontologies for knowledge organization in a given domain. In the context of computer science, ontologies have been applied in the field of artificial intelligence in order to facilitate knowledge sharing and reuse of acquired knowledge (15). Soon, ontologies have gained great popularity.

  9. The iOSC3 System: Using Ontologies and SWRL Rules for Intelligent Supervision and Care of Patients with Acute Cardiac Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Martínez-Romero

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Physicians in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU are specially trained to deal constantly with very large and complex quantities of clinical data and make quick decisions as they face complications. However, the amount of information generated and the way the data are presented may overload the cognitive skills of even experienced professionals and lead to inaccurate or erroneous actions that put patients’ lives at risk. In this paper, we present the design, development, and validation of iOSC3, an ontology-based system for intelligent supervision and treatment of critical patients with acute cardiac disorders. The system analyzes the patient’s condition and provides a recommendation about the treatment that should be administered to achieve the fastest possible recovery. If the recommendation is accepted by the doctor, the system automatically modifies the quantity of drugs that are being delivered to the patient. The knowledge base is constituted by an OWL ontology and a set of SWRL rules that represent the expert’s knowledge. iOSC3 has been developed in collaboration with experts from the Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (CICU of the Meixoeiro Hospital, one of the most significant hospitals in the northwest region of Spain.

  10. Intelligence and the brain: a model-based approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kievit, R.A.; van Rooijen, H.; Wicherts, J.M.; Waldorp, L.J.; Kan, K.-J.; Scholte, H.S.; Borsboom, D.

    2012-01-01

    Various biological correlates of general intelligence (g) have been reported. Despite this, however, the relationship between neurological measurements and g is not fully clear. We use structural equation modeling to model the relationship between behavioral Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS)

  11. A model for Business Intelligence Systems’ Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manole VELICANU

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Often, Business Intelligence Systems (BIS require historical data or data collected from var-ious sources. The solution is found in data warehouses, which are the main technology used to extract, transform, load and store data in the organizational Business Intelligence projects. The development cycle of a data warehouse involves lots of resources, time, high costs and above all, it is built only for some specific tasks. In this paper, we’ll present some of the aspects of the BI systems’ development such as: architecture, lifecycle, modeling techniques and finally, some evaluation criteria for the system’s performance.

  12. Modeling speech intelligibility in adverse conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dau, Torsten

    2012-01-01

    by the normal as well as impaired auditory system. Jørgensen and Dau [(2011). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 130, 1475-1487] proposed the speech-based envelope power spectrum model (sEPSM) in an attempt to overcome the limitations of the classical speech transmission index (STI) and speech intelligibility index (SII......) in conditions with nonlinearly processed speech. Instead of considering the reduction of the temporal modulation energy as the intelligibility metric, as assumed in the STI, the sEPSM applies the signal-to-noise ratio in the envelope domain (SNRenv). This metric was shown to be the key for predicting...... the intelligibility of reverberant speech as well as noisy speech processed by spectral subtraction. However, the sEPSM cannot account for speech subjected to phase jitter, a condition in which the spectral structure of speech is destroyed, while the broadband temporal envelope is kept largely intact. In contrast...

  13. Using an ontology as a model for the implementation of the National Cybersecurity Policy Framework for South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jansen van Vuuren, JC

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available ), the Communications Authority of SA (ICASA), the South African Police Services (SAPS), the Department of Defence (DOD), the South African Bureau of Standards (SABS), the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), the South African Banking Risk... stakeholders and tasks will be identified. The authors will involve domain experts to evaluate the contents of the ontology. 6. References Amit, I. I. (2011). Information Security Intelligence Report: A recap of 2010 and prediction for 2011...

  14. Intelligent search in Big Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birialtsev, E.; Bukharaev, N.; Gusenkov, A.

    2017-10-01

    An approach to data integration, aimed on the ontology-based intelligent search in Big Data, is considered in the case when information objects are represented in the form of relational databases (RDB), structurally marked by their schemes. The source of information for constructing an ontology and, later on, the organization of the search are texts in natural language, treated as semi-structured data. For the RDBs, these are comments on the names of tables and their attributes. Formal definition of RDBs integration model in terms of ontologies is given. Within framework of the model universal RDB representation ontology, oil production subject domain ontology and linguistic thesaurus of subject domain language are built. Technique of automatic SQL queries generation for subject domain specialists is proposed. On the base of it, information system for TATNEFT oil-producing company RDBs was implemented. Exploitation of the system showed good relevance with majority of queries.

  15. Model Problems in Technologies for Interoperability: OWL Web Ontology Language for Services (OWL-S)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Metcalf, Chris; Lewis, Grace A

    2006-01-01

    .... The OWL Web Ontology Language for Services (OWL-S) is a language to describe the properties and capabilities of Web Services in such a way that the descriptions can be interpreted by a computer system in an automated manner. This technical note presents the results of applying the model problem approach to examine the feasibility of using OWL-S to allow applications to automatically discover, compose, and invoke services in a dynamic services-oriented environment.

  16. IEA Wind Task 37: Systems Modeling Framework and Ontology for Wind Turbines and Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dykes, Katherine L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Zahle, Frederik [Technical University of Denmark; Merz, Karl [SINTEF Energy Research; McWilliam, Mike [Technical University of Denmark; Bortolotti, Pietro [Technical University Munich

    2017-08-14

    This presentation will provide an overview of progress to date in the development of a system modeling framework and ontology for wind turbines and plants as part of the larger IEA Wind Task 37 on wind energy systems engineering. The goals of the effort are to create a set of guidelines for a common conceptual architecture for wind turbines and plants so that practitioners can more easily share descriptions of wind turbines and plants across multiple parties and reduce the effort for translating descriptions between models; integrate different models together and collaborate on model development; and translate models among different levels of fidelity in the system.

  17. The OntoREA Accounting Model: Ontology-based Modeling of the Accounting Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Fischer-Pauzenberger

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available McCarthy developed a framework for modeling the economic rationale of different business transactions along the enterprise value chain described in his seminal article “The REA Accounting Model – A Generalized Framework for Accounting Systems in a Shared Data Environment” Originally, the REA accounting model was specified in the entity-relationship (ER language. Later on other languages – especially in form of generic data models and UML class models (UML language – were used. Recently, the OntoUML language was developed by Guizzardi and used by Gailly et al. for a metaphysical reengineering of the REA enterprise ontology. Although the REA accounting model originally addressed the accounting domain, it most successfuly is applied as a reference framework for the conceptual modeling of enterprise systems. The primary research objective of this article is to anchor the REA-based models more deeply in the accounting domain. In order to achieve this objective, essential primitives of the REA model are identified and conceptualized in the OntoUML language within the Asset Liability Equity (ALE context of the traditional ALE accounting domain.

  18. An Intelligent System for Modelling, Design and Analysis of Chemical Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gani, Rafiqul

    ICAS, Integrated Computer Aided System, is a software that consists of a number of intelligent tools, which are very suitable, among others, for computer aided modelling, sustainable design of chemical and biochemical processes, and design-analysis of product-process monitoring systems. Each...... of these tools are characterized by a framework that follows an established work-flow and data-flow, developed to guide the user through the many steps of the problem solution process. At each, the specific tool knows which data, model and/or algorithm to use. The tool also provides analysis of the calculated...... results so that the user can make intelligent decisions to proceed to the next step. The tools contain in-house databases, especially designed to work in an integrated manner with tool specific ontology for efficient knowledge management. Examples highlighting the use of the tools willl be given, where...

  19. Model tool to describe chemical structures in XML format utilizing structural fragments and chemical ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Punnaivanam; Alain, Krief; Aghila, Gnanasekaran

    2010-05-24

    We have developed a model structure-editing tool, ChemEd, programmed in JAVA, which allows drawing chemical structures on a graphical user interface (GUI) by selecting appropriate structural fragments defined in a fragment library. The terms representing the structural fragments are organized in fragment ontology to provide a conceptual support. ChemEd describes the chemical structure in an XML document (ChemFul) with rich semantics explicitly encoding the details of the chemical bonding, the hybridization status, and the electron environment around each atom. The document can be further processed through suitable algorithms and with the support of external chemical ontologies to generate understandable reports about the functional groups present in the structure and their specific environment.

  20. Ontology-based vector space model and fuzzy query expansion to retrieve knowledge on medical computational problem solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratsas, Charalampos; Koutkias, Vassilis; Kaimakamis, Evangelos; Bamidis, Panagiotis; Maglaveras, Nicos

    2007-01-01

    Medical Computational Problem (MCP) solving is related to medical problems and their computerized algorithmic solutions. In this paper, an extension of an ontology-based model to fuzzy logic is presented, as a means to enhance the information retrieval (IR) procedure in semantic management of MCPs. We present herein the methodology followed for the fuzzy expansion of the ontology model, the fuzzy query expansion procedure, as well as an appropriate ontology-based Vector Space Model (VSM) that was constructed for efficient mapping of user-defined MCP search criteria and MCP acquired knowledge. The relevant fuzzy thesaurus is constructed by calculating the simultaneous occurrences of terms and the term-to-term similarities derived from the ontology that utilizes UMLS (Unified Medical Language System) concepts by using Concept Unique Identifiers (CUI), synonyms, semantic types, and broader-narrower relationships for fuzzy query expansion. The current approach constitutes a sophisticated advance for effective, semantics-based MCP-related IR.

  1. A Practical Ontology Framework for Static Model Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-26

    throughout the model. We implement our analysis framework on top of Ptolemy II [3], an extensible open source model-based design tool written in Java...While Ptolemy II makes a good testbed for im- plementing and experimenting with new analyses, we also feel that the techniques we present here are...broadly use- ful. For this reason, we aim to make our analysis frame- work orthogonal to the execution semantics of Ptolemy II, allowing it to be

  2. A review on intelligent sensory modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tham, H. J.; Tang, S. Y.; Teo, K. T. K.; Loh, S. P.

    2016-06-01

    Sensory evaluation plays an important role in the quality control of food productions. Sensory data obtained through sensory evaluation are generally subjective, vague and uncertain. Classically, factorial multivariate methods such as Principle Component Analysis (PCA), Partial Least Square (PLS) method, Multiple Regression (MLR) method and Response Surface Method (RSM) are the common tools used to analyse sensory data. These methods can model some of the sensory data but may not be robust enough to analyse nonlinear data. In these situations, intelligent modelling techniques such as Fuzzy Logic and Artificial neural network (ANNs) emerged to solve the vagueness and uncertainty of sensory data. This paper outlines literature of intelligent sensory modelling on sensory data analysis.

  3. Intelligent Mechatronic Systems Modeling, Control and Diagnosis

    CERN Document Server

    Merzouki, Rochdi; Pathak, Pushparaj Mani; Ould Bouamama, Belkacem

    2013-01-01

    Acting as a support resource for practitioners and professionals looking to advance their understanding of complex mechatronic systems, Intelligent Mechatronic Systems explains their design and recent developments from first principles to practical applications. Detailed descriptions of the mathematical models of complex mechatronic systems, developed from fundamental physical relationships, are built on to develop innovative solutions with particular emphasis on physical model-based control strategies. Following a concurrent engineering approach, supported by industrial case studies, and drawing on the practical experience of the authors, Intelligent Mechatronic Systems covers range of topic and includes:  • An explanation of a common graphical tool for integrated design and its uses from modeling and simulation to the control synthesis • Introductions to key concepts such as different means of achieving fault tolerance, robust overwhelming control and force and impedance control • Dedicated chapters ...

  4. Space and Time Ontology: New Models for New Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Lumbreras Sancho

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Nickel proposes a model for movement – and in general, for change – in which each instant in time (characterized as the set of real numbers is assigned to one point in a configuration space. As much as this model seems to intuitively fit to our experience, it implies a number of assumptions about the nature of space and time that are interesting to explore. Different perspectives have been developed across History, and it could well be that the next scientific revolution is set in motion by an innovative conception of space and time. One of this alternative perspectives was proposed by Julian Barbour, who has developed a new model of Physics where time does not exist [Barbour, 1999]. This paper reviews not only this concept but also other similarly provocative ideas that might prove useful for improving our understanding of the universe. Prior to this, the relevance of the philosophy of space and time will be briefly outlined and its history reviewed to provide some background for the discussed models. Finally, an approach where space and time are only defined by convention will be considered.

  5. The Development of an Intelligent Leadership Model for State Universities

    OpenAIRE

    Aleme Keikha; Reza Hoveida; Nour Mohammad Yaghoubi

    2017-01-01

    Higher education and intelligent leadership are considered important parts of every country’s education system, which could potentially play a key role in accomplishing the goals of society. In theories of leadership, new patterns attempt to view leadership through the prism of creative and intelligent phenomena. This paper aims to design and develop an intelligent leadership model for public universities. A qualitativequantitative research method was used to design a basic model of intellige...

  6. Ontology Repositories

    OpenAIRE

    Hartmann, J.; Palma, R.; Gómez-Pérez, A.

    2009-01-01

    The growing use and application of ontologies in the last years has led to an increased interest of researchers and practitioners in the development of ontologies, either from scratch o by reusing existing ones. ...

  7. Quantum ontologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stapp, H.P.

    1988-12-01

    Quantum ontologies are conceptions of the constitution of the universe that are compatible with quantum theory. The ontological orientation is contrasted to the pragmatic orientation of science, and reasons are given for considering quantum ontologies both within science, and in broader contexts. The principal quantum ontologies are described and evaluated. Invited paper at conference: Bell's Theorem, Quantum Theory, and Conceptions of the Universe, George Mason University, October 20-21, 1988. 16 refs

  8. Toward An Ontology of Mutual Recursion: Models, Mind and Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mat Wall-Smith

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In Parables for the Virtual Massumi describes 'The Autonomy of Affect' in our ecology of thought (Massumi 2002 : 35. The object of Stiegler's Technics and Time is 'technics apprehended as the horizon of all possibility to come and all possibility of a future' (Stiegler 1998 : ix. The ecological dynamic described by the recursion between this 'affective autonomy' and a 'technical horizon of possibility' describes a metamodel of the relation between body and world, between perception and expression. I argue that this metamodel allows for the technical architectures that enshrine media processes and models as both the manifestation and modulation of the 'industry' or vitality of mind. I argue that these technical architectures are crucial to the creation and maintenance of dynamic ecologies of living.

  9. LexRDF Model: An RDF-based Unified Model for Heterogeneous Biomedical Ontologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Cui; Pathak, Jyotishman; Solbrig, Harold R; Wei, Wei-Qi; Chute, Christopher G

    2009-10-26

    The Lexical Grid (LexGrid) project is an on-going community-driven initiative coordinated by the Mayo Clinic Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics (BSI). It provides a common terminology model to represent multiple vocabulary and ontology sources as well as a scalable and robust API for accessing such information. While successfully used and adopted in the biomedical and clinical community, an important requirement is to align the existing LexGrid model with emerging Semantic Web standards and specifications. This paper introduces the LexRDF model, which maps the LexGrid model elements to corresponding constructs in W3C specifications such as RDF, OWL, and SKOS. Our mapping specification successfully used W3C standards to represent most of the existing LexGrid components, and those that did not map point out issues in the existing specifications that the W3C may want to consider in future work. With LexRDF, the terminological information represented in LexGrid can be translated to RDF triples, and therefore allowing LexGrid to leverage standard tools and technologies such as SPARQL and RDF triple stores.

  10. A Knowledge Modeling Method for Computer Graphics Design & Production Based on Ontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Tong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As one of the most critical stages of CG (Computer Graphics industry, CG design & production needs the support of professional knowledge and practice experience of multidisciplinary. With the outstanding performance in knowledge sharing, integration and reuse, knowledge modeling could increase greatly the efficiency, reduce the cost and avoid repeated error in CG design & production. However, knowledge modeling of CG design & production differs greatly from those of other fields. On the one hand, it is similar to physical product design, which involves great deal of tacit knowledge such as modeling skills, reasoning knowledge and so on. On the other hand, as film, CG design & production needs a lot of unstructured description information. The heterogeneity between physical product and film makes knowledge modeling more complicated. Thus a systematic knowledge modelling method based on Ontology is proposed to aid CG design & production in this paper. CG animation knowledge is capture and organized from viewpoint of three aspects: requirements and design and production. The knowledge are categorized into static and dynamic knowledge, and Ontology is adopted to construct a hierarchic model to organize the knowledge, so as to offer a uniform communication semantic foundations for designers from different fields. Based on animation script, the CG design task model is proposed to drive the organization and management of different knowledge involved in CG design & production. Finally, we apply this method in the knowledge modeling of naked-eye animation design and production to illustrate effectiveness of this method.

  11. My Corporis Fabrica Embryo: An ontology-based 3D spatio-temporal modeling of human embryo development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabattu, Pierre-Yves; Massé, Benoit; Ulliana, Federico; Rousset, Marie-Christine; Rohmer, Damien; Léon, Jean-Claude; Palombi, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Embryology is a complex morphologic discipline involving a set of entangled mechanisms, sometime difficult to understand and to visualize. Recent computer based techniques ranging from geometrical to physically based modeling are used to assist the visualization and the simulation of virtual humans for numerous domains such as surgical simulation and learning. On the other side, the ontology-based approach applied to knowledge representation is more and more successfully adopted in the life-science domains to formalize biological entities and phenomena, thanks to a declarative approach for expressing and reasoning over symbolic information. 3D models and ontologies are two complementary ways to describe biological entities that remain largely separated. Indeed, while many ontologies providing a unified formalization of anatomy and embryology exist, they remain only descriptive and make the access to anatomical content of complex 3D embryology models and simulations difficult. In this work, we present a novel ontology describing the development of the human embryology deforming 3D models. Beyond describing how organs and structures are composed, our ontology integrates a procedural description of their 3D representations, temporal deformation and relations with respect to their developments. We also created inferences rules to express complex connections between entities. It results in a unified description of both the knowledge of the organs deformation and their 3D representations enabling to visualize dynamically the embryo deformation during the Carnegie stages. Through a simplified ontology, containing representative entities which are linked to spatial position and temporal process information, we illustrate the added-value of such a declarative approach for interactive simulation and visualization of 3D embryos. Combining ontologies and 3D models enables a declarative description of different embryological models that capture the complexity of human

  12. An ontology-driven, case-based clinical decision support model for removable partial denture design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qingxiao; Wu, Ji; Li, Shusen; Lyu, Peijun; Wang, Yong; Li, Miao

    2016-06-01

    We present the initial work toward developing a clinical decision support model for specific design of removable partial dentures (RPDs) in dentistry. We developed an ontological paradigm to represent knowledge of a patient’s oral conditions and denture component parts. During the case-based reasoning process, a cosine similarity algorithm was applied to calculate similarity values between input patients and standard ontology cases. A group of designs from the most similar cases were output as the final results. To evaluate this model, the output designs of RPDs for 104 randomly selected patients were compared with those selected by professionals. An area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic (AUC-ROC) was created by plotting true-positive rates against the false-positive rate at various threshold settings. The precision at position 5 of the retrieved cases was 0.67 and at the top of the curve it was 0.96, both of which are very high. The mean average of precision (MAP) was 0.61 and the normalized discounted cumulative gain (NDCG) was 0.74 both of which confirmed the efficient performance of our model. All the metrics demonstrated the efficiency of our model. This methodology merits further research development to match clinical applications for designing RPDs. This paper is organized as follows. After the introduction and description of the basis for the paper, the evaluation and results are presented in Section 2. Section 3 provides a discussion of the methodology and results. Section 4 describes the details of the ontology, similarity algorithm, and application.

  13. Top-Down, Intelligent Reservoir Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    2010-05-01

    Conventional reservoir simulation and modeling is a bottom-up approach. It starts with building a geological model of the reservoir that is populated with the best available petrophysical and geophysical information at the time of development. Engineering fluid flow principles are added and solved numerically so as to arrive at a dynamic reservoir model. The dynamic reservoir model is calibrated using the production history of multiple wells and the history matched model is used to strategize field development in order to improve recovery. Top-Down, Intelligent Reservoir Modeling approaches the reservoir simulation and modeling from an opposite angle by attempting to build a realization of the reservoir starting with the measured well production behavior (history). The production history is augmented by core, log, well test and seismic data in order to increase the accuracy of the Top-Down modeling technique. Although not intended as a substitute for the conventional reservoir simulation of large, complex fields, this novel approach to reservoir modeling can be used as an alternative (at a fraction of the cost) to conventional reservoir simulation and modeling in cases where performing conventional modeling is cost (and man-power) prohibitive. In cases where a conventional model of a reservoir already exists, Top-Down modeling should be considered as a compliment to, rather than a competition for the conventional technique, to provide an independent look at the data coming from the reservoir/wells for optimum development strategy and recovery enhancement. Top-Down, Intelligent Reservoir Modeling starts with well-known reservoir engineering techniques such as Decline Curve Analysis, Type Curve Matching, History Matching using single well numerical reservoir simulation, Volumetric Reserve Estimation and calculation of Recovery Factors for all the wells (individually) in the field. Using statistical techniques multiple Production Indicators (3, 6, and 9 months cum

  14. Modeling Speech Intelligibility in Hearing Impaired Listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheidiger, Christoph; Jørgensen, Søren; Dau, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    Models of speech intelligibility (SI) have a long history, starting with the articulation index (AI, [17]), followed by the SI index (SI I, [18]) and the speech transmission index (STI, [7]), to only name a few. However, these models fail to accurately predict SI with nonlinearly processed noisy...... speech, e.g. phase jitter or spectral subtraction. Recent studies predict SI for normal-hearing (NH) listeners based on a signal-to-noise ratio measure in the envelope domain (SNRenv), in the framework of the speech-based envelope power spectrum model (sEPSM, [20, 21]). These models have shown good...... is not yet available. As a firrst step towards such a model, this study investigates to what extent eects of hearing impairment on SI can be modeled in the sEPSM framework. Preliminary results show that, by only modeling the loss of audibility, the model cannot account for the higher speech reception...

  15. Modeling Speech Intelligibility in Hearing Impaired Listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheidiger, Christoph; Jørgensen, Søren; Dau, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    speech, e.g. phase jitter or spectral subtraction. Recent studies predict SI for normal-hearing (NH) listeners based on a signal-to-noise ratio measure in the envelope domain (SNRenv), in the framework of the speech-based envelope power spectrum model (sEPSM, [20, 21]). These models have shown good...... agreement with measured data under a broad range of conditions, including stationary and modulated interferers, reverberation, and spectral subtraction. Despite the advances in modeling intelligibility in NH listeners, a broadly applicable model that can predict SI in hearing-impaired (HI) listeners...... is not yet available. As a firrst step towards such a model, this study investigates to what extent eects of hearing impairment on SI can be modeled in the sEPSM framework. Preliminary results show that, by only modeling the loss of audibility, the model cannot account for the higher speech reception...

  16. Model Pembelajaran Berbasis Penstimulasian Multiple Intelligences Siswa

    OpenAIRE

    Edy Legowo

    2017-01-01

    Tulisan ini membahas mengenai penerapan teori multiple intelligences dalam pembelajaran di sekolah. Pembahasan diawali dengan menguraikan perkembangan konsep inteligensi dan multiple intelligences. Diikuti dengan menjelaskan dampak teori multiple intelligences dalam bidang pendidikan dan pembelajaran di sekolah. Bagian selanjutnya menguraikan tentang implementasi teori multiple intelligences dalam praktik pembelajaran di kelas yaitu bagaimana pemberian pengalaman belajar siswa yang difasilita...

  17. Artificial Intelligence Software Engineering (AISE) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Peter A.

    1990-01-01

    The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics has initiated a committee on standards for Artificial Intelligence. Presented are the initial efforts of one of the working groups of that committee. A candidate model is presented for the development life cycle of knowledge based systems (KBSs). The intent is for the model to be used by the aerospace community and eventually be evolved into a standard. The model is rooted in the evolutionary model, borrows from the spiral model, and is embedded in the standard Waterfall model for software development. Its intent is to satisfy the development of both stand-alone and embedded KBSs. The phases of the life cycle are shown and detailed as are the review points that constitute the key milestones throughout the development process. The applicability and strengths of the model are discussed along with areas needing further development and refinement by the aerospace community.

  18. Swarm Intelligence for Urban Dynamics Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghnemat, Rawan; Bertelle, Cyrille; Duchamp, Gérard H. E.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, we propose swarm intelligence algorithms to deal with dynamical and spatial organization emergence. The goal is to model and simulate the developement of spatial centers using multi-criteria. We combine a decentralized approach based on emergent clustering mixed with spatial constraints or attractions. We propose an extension of the ant nest building algorithm with multi-center and adaptive process. Typically, this model is suitable to analyse and simulate urban dynamics like gentrification or the dynamics of the cultural equipment in urban area.

  19. Swarm Intelligence for Urban Dynamics Modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghnemat, Rawan; Bertelle, Cyrille; Duchamp, Gerard H. E.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose swarm intelligence algorithms to deal with dynamical and spatial organization emergence. The goal is to model and simulate the developement of spatial centers using multi-criteria. We combine a decentralized approach based on emergent clustering mixed with spatial constraints or attractions. We propose an extension of the ant nest building algorithm with multi-center and adaptive process. Typically, this model is suitable to analyse and simulate urban dynamics like gentrification or the dynamics of the cultural equipment in urban area.

  20. Emotional Intelligence Model for Managers in Mumbai

    OpenAIRE

    Vaibhav P. Birwatkar

    2014-01-01

    Much of the literature pertinent to management indicates that managers with high emotional intelligence are morale boosters in their workplaces. Previous studies offer limited evidence regarding the impact of manager's emotional intelligence on workplace psychology, productivity and job satisfaction. This research examines the awareness level of the concept of emotional intelligence, the emotional intelligence level of managers across the organizations, whether managers use emotional intellig...

  1. SWARMs Ontology: A Common Information Model for the Cooperation of Underwater Robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Bilbao, Sonia; Martín-Wanton, Tamara; Bastos, Joaquim; Rodriguez, Jonathan

    2017-03-11

    In order to facilitate cooperation between underwater robots, it is a must for robots to exchange information with unambiguous meaning. However, heterogeneity, existing in information pertaining to different robots, is a major obstruction. Therefore, this paper presents a networked ontology, named the Smart and Networking Underwater Robots in Cooperation Meshes (SWARMs) ontology, to address information heterogeneity and enable robots to have the same understanding of exchanged information. The SWARMs ontology uses a core ontology to interrelate a set of domain-specific ontologies, including the mission and planning, the robotic vehicle, the communication and networking, and the environment recognition and sensing ontology. In addition, the SWARMs ontology utilizes ontology constructs defined in the PR-OWL ontology to annotate context uncertainty based on the Multi-Entity Bayesian Network (MEBN) theory. Thus, the SWARMs ontology can provide both a formal specification for information that is necessarily exchanged between robots and a command and control entity, and also support for uncertainty reasoning. A scenario on chemical pollution monitoring is described and used to showcase how the SWARMs ontology can be instantiated, be extended, represent context uncertainty, and support uncertainty reasoning.

  2. SWARMs Ontology: A Common Information Model for the Cooperation of Underwater Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Bilbao, Sonia; Martín-Wanton, Tamara; Bastos, Joaquim; Rodriguez, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    In order to facilitate cooperation between underwater robots, it is a must for robots to exchange information with unambiguous meaning. However, heterogeneity, existing in information pertaining to different robots, is a major obstruction. Therefore, this paper presents a networked ontology, named the Smart and Networking Underwater Robots in Cooperation Meshes (SWARMs) ontology, to address information heterogeneity and enable robots to have the same understanding of exchanged information. The SWARMs ontology uses a core ontology to interrelate a set of domain-specific ontologies, including the mission and planning, the robotic vehicle, the communication and networking, and the environment recognition and sensing ontology. In addition, the SWARMs ontology utilizes ontology constructs defined in the PR-OWL ontology to annotate context uncertainty based on the Multi-Entity Bayesian Network (MEBN) theory. Thus, the SWARMs ontology can provide both a formal specification for information that is necessarily exchanged between robots and a command and control entity, and also support for uncertainty reasoning. A scenario on chemical pollution monitoring is described and used to showcase how the SWARMs ontology can be instantiated, be extended, represent context uncertainty, and support uncertainty reasoning. PMID:28287468

  3. Model Pembelajaran Berbasis Penstimulasian Multiple Intelligences Siswa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edy Legowo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Tulisan ini membahas mengenai penerapan teori multiple intelligences dalam pembelajaran di sekolah. Pembahasan diawali dengan menguraikan perkembangan konsep inteligensi dan multiple intelligences. Diikuti dengan menjelaskan dampak teori multiple intelligences dalam bidang pendidikan dan pembelajaran di sekolah. Bagian selanjutnya menguraikan tentang implementasi teori multiple intelligences dalam praktik pembelajaran di kelas yaitu bagaimana pemberian pengalaman belajar siswa yang difasilitasi guru dapat menstimulasi multiple intelligences siswa. Evaluasi hasil belajar siswa dari pandangan penerapan teori multiple intelligences seharusnya dilakukan menggunakan authentic assessment dan portofolio yang lebih memfasilitasi para siswa mengungkapkan atau mengaktualisasikan hasil belajarnya melalui berbagai cara sesuai dengan kekuatan jenis inteligensinya.

  4. Empirical Evidence regarding Relations among a Model of Epistemic and Ontological Cognition, Academic Performance, and Educational Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Jeffrey Alan; Torney-Purta, Judith; Azevedo, Roger

    2010-01-01

    Models of personal epistemology have not been sufficiently integrated despite conceptual similarities. We attempted to model both dimensional and positional aspects of personal epistemology, as well as examine the domain specificity of these phenomena. The conceptual framework for this study was a new model of epistemic and ontological cognitive…

  5. Ontology for Life-Cycle Modeling of Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) Systems: Experimental Applications Using Revit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Center, Construction Engineering Research Laboratory (ERDC-CERL) has developed a core life- cycle building information model ( BIM ) based on three...was to promote consistency and quality of content created for Building Information Models ( BIMs ) across various disciplines. The HVAC MVD was...MVD. 15. SUBJECT TERMS building information modeling ( BIM ), ontology, Army facilities, heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems

  6. Toward Intelligent Assessment: An Integration of Constructed Response Testing, Artificial Intelligence, and Model-Based Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Randy Elliot

    A new assessment conception is described that integrates constructed-response testing, artificial intelligence, and model-based measurement. The conception incorporates complex constructed-response items for their potential to increase the validity, instructional utility, and credibility of standardized tests. Artificial intelligence methods are…

  7. On the ontological assumptions of the medical model of psychiatry: philosophical considerations and pragmatic tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giordano James

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A common theme in the contemporary medical model of psychiatry is that pathophysiological processes are centrally involved in the explanation, evaluation, and treatment of mental illnesses. Implied in this perspective is that clinical descriptors of these pathophysiological processes are sufficient to distinguish underlying etiologies. Psychiatric classification requires differentiation between what counts as normality (i.e.- order, and what counts as abnormality (i.e.- disorder. The distinction(s between normality and pathology entail assumptions that are often deeply presupposed, manifesting themselves in statements about what mental disorders are. In this paper, we explicate that realism, naturalism, reductionism, and essentialism are core ontological assumptions of the medical model of psychiatry. We argue that while naturalism, realism, and reductionism can be reconciled with advances in contemporary neuroscience, essentialism - as defined to date - may be conceptually problematic, and we pose an eidetic construct of bio-psychosocial order and disorder based upon complex systems' dynamics. However we also caution against the overuse of any theory, and claim that practical distinctions are important to the establishment of clinical thresholds. We opine that as we move ahead toward both a new edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, and a proposed Decade of the Mind, the task at hand is to re-visit nosologic and ontologic assumptions pursuant to a re-formulation of diagnostic criteria and practice.

  8. On the ontological assumptions of the medical model of psychiatry: philosophical considerations and pragmatic tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    A common theme in the contemporary medical model of psychiatry is that pathophysiological processes are centrally involved in the explanation, evaluation, and treatment of mental illnesses. Implied in this perspective is that clinical descriptors of these pathophysiological processes are sufficient to distinguish underlying etiologies. Psychiatric classification requires differentiation between what counts as normality (i.e.- order), and what counts as abnormality (i.e.- disorder). The distinction(s) between normality and pathology entail assumptions that are often deeply presupposed, manifesting themselves in statements about what mental disorders are. In this paper, we explicate that realism, naturalism, reductionism, and essentialism are core ontological assumptions of the medical model of psychiatry. We argue that while naturalism, realism, and reductionism can be reconciled with advances in contemporary neuroscience, essentialism - as defined to date - may be conceptually problematic, and we pose an eidetic construct of bio-psychosocial order and disorder based upon complex systems' dynamics. However we also caution against the overuse of any theory, and claim that practical distinctions are important to the establishment of clinical thresholds. We opine that as we move ahead toward both a new edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, and a proposed Decade of the Mind, the task at hand is to re-visit nosologic and ontologic assumptions pursuant to a re-formulation of diagnostic criteria and practice. PMID:20109176

  9. Ontology Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Vrandecic, Zdenko

    2010-01-01

    Ontology evaluation is the task of measuring the quality of an ontology. It enables us to answer the following main question: How to assess the quality of an ontology for the Web? In this thesis a theoretical framework and several methods breathing life into the framework are presented. The application to the above scenarios is explored, and the theoretical foundations are thoroughly grounded in the practical usage of the emerging Semantic Web.

  10. Business intelligence modeling in launch operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardina, Jorge E.; Thirumalainambi, Rajkumar; Davis, Rodney D.

    2005-05-01

    The future of business intelligence in space exploration will focus on the intelligent system-of-systems real-time enterprise. In present business intelligence, a number of technologies that are most relevant to space exploration are experiencing the greatest change. Emerging patterns of set of processes rather than organizational units leading to end-to-end automation is becoming a major objective of enterprise information technology. The cost element is a leading factor of future exploration systems. This technology project is to advance an integrated Planning and Management Simulation Model for evaluation of risks, costs, and reliability of launch systems from Earth to Orbit for Space Exploration. The approach builds on research done in the NASA ARC/KSC developed Virtual Test Bed (VTB) to integrate architectural, operations process, and mission simulations for the purpose of evaluating enterprise level strategies to reduce cost, improve systems operability, and reduce mission risks. The objectives are to understand the interdependency of architecture and process on recurring launch cost of operations, provide management a tool for assessing systems safety and dependability versus cost, and leverage lessons learned and empirical models from Shuttle and International Space Station to validate models applied to Exploration. The systems-of-systems concept is built to balance the conflicting objectives of safety, reliability, and process strategy in order to achieve long term sustainability. A planning and analysis test bed is needed for evaluation of enterprise level options and strategies for transit and launch systems as well as surface and orbital systems. This environment can also support agency simulation based acquisition process objectives. The technology development approach is based on the collaborative effort set forth in the VTB's integrating operations, process models, systems and environment models, and cost models as a comprehensive disciplined

  11. Business Intelligence Modeling in Launch Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardina, Jorge E.; Thirumalainambi, Rajkumar; Davis, Rodney D.

    2005-01-01

    This technology project is to advance an integrated Planning and Management Simulation Model for evaluation of risks, costs, and reliability of launch systems from Earth to Orbit for Space Exploration. The approach builds on research done in the NASA ARC/KSC developed Virtual Test Bed (VTB) to integrate architectural, operations process, and mission simulations for the purpose of evaluating enterprise level strategies to reduce cost, improve systems operability, and reduce mission risks. The objectives are to understand the interdependency of architecture and process on recurring launch cost of operations, provide management a tool for assessing systems safety and dependability versus cost, and leverage lessons learned and empirical models from Shuttle and International Space Station to validate models applied to Exploration. The systems-of-systems concept is built to balance the conflicting objectives of safety, reliability, and process strategy in order to achieve long term sustainability. A planning and analysis test bed is needed for evaluation of enterprise level options and strategies for transit and launch systems as well as surface and orbital systems. This environment can also support agency simulation .based acquisition process objectives. The technology development approach is based on the collaborative effort set forth in the VTB's integrating operations. process models, systems and environment models, and cost models as a comprehensive disciplined enterprise analysis environment. Significant emphasis is being placed on adapting root cause from existing Shuttle operations to exploration. Technical challenges include cost model validation, integration of parametric models with discrete event process and systems simulations. and large-scale simulation integration. The enterprise architecture is required for coherent integration of systems models. It will also require a plan for evolution over the life of the program. The proposed technology will produce

  12. An intelligent model for liver disease diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Rong-Ho

    2009-09-01

    Liver disease, the most common disease in Taiwan, is not easily discovered in its initial stage; early diagnosis of this leading cause of mortality is therefore highly important. The design of an effective diagnosis model is therefore an important issue in liver disease treatment. This study accordingly employs classification and regression tree (CART) and case-based reasoning (CBR) techniques to structure an intelligent diagnosis model aiming to provide a comprehensive analytic framework to raise the accuracy of liver disease diagnosis. Based on the advice and assistance of doctors and medical specialists of liver conditions, 510 outpatient visitors using ICD-9 (International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision) codes at a medical center in Taiwan from 2005 to 2006 were selected as the cases in the data set for liver disease diagnosis. Data on 340 patients was utilized for the development of the model and on 170 patients utilized to perform comparative analysis of the models. This paper accordingly suggests an intelligent model for the diagnosis of liver diseases which integrates CART and CBR. The major steps in applying the model include: (1) adopting CART to diagnose whether a patient suffers from liver disease; (2) for patients diagnosed with liver disease in the first step, employing CBR to diagnose the types of liver diseases. In the first phase, CART is used to extract rules from health examination data to show whether the patient suffers from liver disease. The results indicate that the CART rate of accuracy is 92.94%. In the second phase, CBR is developed to diagnose the type of liver disease, and the new case triggers the CBR system to retrieve the most similar case from the case base in order to support the treatment of liver disease. The new case is supported by a similarity ratio, and the CBR diagnostic accuracy rate is 90.00%. Actual implementation shows that the intelligent diagnosis model is capable of integrating CART and CBR techniques to

  13. A Fuzzy Student Modeling with Two Intelligent Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mu-Jung

    1999-01-01

    A new fuzzy student modeling method with two intelligent agents, a diagnosis agent and a learning agent, are suggested by this article for several aspects of student modeling in Intelligent Tutoring Systems. Also integrated are fuzzy theories and Fuzzy-Hasse diagrams for student modeling. (Author/AEF)

  14. Ontological dependency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stamper, R.K.

    1996-01-01

    Successful ontological analysis depends upon having the right underlying theory. The work described here, exploring how to understand organisations as systems of social norms found that the familiar objectivist position did not work, eventually replacing it with a radically subjectivist ontology

  15. Artificial intelligence model for sustain ability measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navickiene, R.; Navickas, K.

    2012-01-01

    The article analyses the main dimensions of organizational sustain ability, their possible integrations into artificial neural network. In this article authors performing analyses of organizational internal and external environments, their possible correlations with 4 components of sustain ability, and the principal determination models for sustain ability of organizations. Based on the general principles of sustainable development organizations, a artificial intelligence model for the determination of organizational sustain ability has been developed. The use of self-organizing neural networks allows the identification of the organizational sustain ability and the endeavour to explore vital, social, antropogenical and economical efficiency. The determination of the forest enterprise sustain ability is expected to help better manage the sustain ability. (Authors)

  16. Computational Intelligence in a Human Brain Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viorel Gaftea

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the current trends in brain research domain and the current stage of development of research for software and hardware solutions, communication capabilities between: human beings and machines, new technologies, nano-science and Internet of Things (IoT devices. The proposed model for Human Brain assumes main similitude between human intelligence and the chess game thinking process. Tactical & strategic reasoning and the need to follow the rules of the chess game, all are very similar with the activities of the human brain. The main objective for a living being and the chess game player are the same: securing a position, surviving and eliminating the adversaries. The brain resolves these goals, and more, the being movement, actions and speech are sustained by the vital five senses and equilibrium. The chess game strategy helps us understand the human brain better and easier replicate in the proposed ‘Software and Hardware’ SAH Model.

  17. Concept mapping One-Carbon Metabolism to model future ontologies for nutrient-gene-phenotype interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joslin, A C; Green, R; German, J B; Lange, M C

    2014-09-01

    Advances in the development of bioinformatic tools continue to improve investigators' ability to interrogate, organize, and derive knowledge from large amounts of heterogeneous information. These tools often require advanced technical skills not possessed by life scientists. User-friendly, low-barrier-to-entry methods of visualizing nutrigenomics information are yet to be developed. We utilized concept mapping software from the Institute for Human and Machine Cognition to create a conceptual model of diet and health-related data that provides a foundation for future nutrigenomics ontologies describing published nutrient-gene/polymorphism-phenotype data. In this model, maps containing phenotype, nutrient, gene product, and genetic polymorphism interactions are visualized as triples of two concepts linked together by a linking phrase. These triples, or "knowledge propositions," contextualize aggregated data and information into easy-to-read knowledge maps. Maps of these triples enable visualization of genes spanning the One-Carbon Metabolism (OCM) pathway, their sequence variants, and multiple literature-mined associations including concepts relevant to nutrition, phenotypes, and health. The concept map development process documents the incongruity of information derived from pathway databases versus literature resources. This conceptual model highlights the importance of incorporating information about genes in upstream pathways that provide substrates, as well as downstream pathways that utilize products of the pathway under investigation, in this case OCM. Other genes and their polymorphisms, such as TCN2 and FUT2, although not directly involved in OCM, potentially alter OCM pathway functionality. These upstream gene products regulate substrates such as B12. Constellations of polymorphisms affecting the functionality of genes along OCM, together with substrate and cofactor availability, may impact resultant phenotypes. These conceptual maps provide a foundational

  18. USE OF ONTOLOGIES FOR KNOWLEDGE BASES CREATION TUTORING COMPUTER SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheremisina Lyubov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the use of ontology for the use and development of intelligent tutoring systems. We consider the shortcomings of educational software and distance learning systems and the advantages of using ontology’s in their design. Actuality creates educational computer systems based on systematic knowledge. We consider classification of properties, use and benefits of ontology’s. Characterized approaches to the problem of ontology mapping, the first of which – manual mapping, the second – a comparison of the names of concepts based on their lexical similarity and using special dictionaries. The analysis of languages available for the formal description of ontology. Considered a formal mathematical model of ontology’s and ontology consistency problem, which is that different developers for the same domain ontology can be created, syntactically or semantically heterogeneous, and their use requires a compatible broadcast or display. An algorithm combining ontology’s. The characteristic of the practical value of developing an ontology for electronic educational resources and recommendations for further research and development, such as implementation of other components of the system integration, formalization of the processes of integration and development of a universal expansion algorithms ontology’s software

  19. Intelligent Model for Video Survillance Security System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Vidhya

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Video surveillance system senses and trails out all the threatening issues in the real time environment. It prevents from security threats with the help of visual devices which gather the information related to videos like CCTV’S and IP (Internet Protocol cameras. Video surveillance system has become a key for addressing problems in the public security. They are mostly deployed on the IP based network. So, all the possible security threats exist in the IP based application might also be the threats available for the reliable application which is available for video surveillance. In result, it may increase cybercrime, illegal video access, mishandling videos and so on. Hence, in this paper an intelligent model is used to propose security for video surveillance system which ensures safety and it provides secured access on video.

  20. Medication Reconciliation: Work Domain Ontology, prototype development, and a predictive model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitz, Eliz; Bernstam, Elmer V; Herskovic, Jorge; Zhang, Jiajie; Shneiderman, Ben; Plaisant, Catherine; Johnson, Todd R

    2011-01-01

    Medication errors can result from administration inaccuracies at any point of care and are a major cause for concern. To develop a successful Medication Reconciliation (MR) tool, we believe it necessary to build a Work Domain Ontology (WDO) for the MR process. A WDO defines the explicit, abstract, implementation-independent description of the task by separating the task from work context, application technology, and cognitive architecture. We developed a prototype based upon the WDO and designed to adhere to standard principles of interface design. The prototype was compared to Legacy Health System's and Pre-Admission Medication List Builder MR tools via a Keystroke-Level Model analysis for three MR tasks. The analysis found the prototype requires the fewest mental operations, completes tasks in the fewest steps, and completes tasks in the least amount of time. Accordingly, we believe that developing a MR tool, based upon the WDO and user interface guidelines, improves user efficiency and reduces cognitive load.

  1. Finding the best visualization of an ontology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabritius, Christina Valentin; Madsen, Nadia Lyngaa; Clausen, Jens

    2004-01-01

    An ontology is a classification model for a given domain. In information retrieval ontologies are used to perform broad searches. An ontology can be visualized as nodes and edges. Each node represents an element and each edge a relation between a parent and a child element. Working with an ontology...... should be feasible for on-line processing and what-if analysis of ontologies....

  2. Finding the best visualization of an ontology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabritius, Christina; Madsen, Nadia; Clausen, Jens

    2006-01-01

    An ontology is a classification model for a given domain.In information retrieval ontologies are used to perform broad searches.An ontology can be visualized as nodes and edges. Each node represents an element and each edge a relation between a parent and a child element. Working with an ontology...... should be feasible for on-line processing and what-if analysis of ontologies....

  3. Biological Model Development as an Opportunity to Provide Content Auditing for the Foundational Model of Anatomy Ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lucy L; Grunblatt, Eli; Jung, Hyunggu; Kalet, Ira J; Whipple, Mark E

    2015-01-01

    Constructing a biological model using an established ontology provides a unique opportunity to perform content auditing on the ontology. We built a Markov chain model to study tumor metastasis in the regional lymphatics of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The model attempts to determine regions with high likelihood for metastasis, which guides surgeons and radiation oncologists in selecting the boundaries of treatment. To achieve consistent anatomical relationships, the nodes in our model are populated using lymphatic objects extracted from the Foundational Model of Anatomy (FMA) ontology. During this process, we discovered several classes of inconsistencies in the lymphatic representations within the FMA. We were able to use this model building opportunity to audit the entities and connections in this region of interest (ROI). We found five subclasses of errors that are computationally detectable and resolvable, one subclass of errors that is computationally detectable but unresolvable, requiring the assistance of a content expert, and also errors of content, which cannot be detected through computational means. Mathematical descriptions of detectable errors along with expert review were used to discover inconsistencies and suggest concepts for addition and removal. Out of 106 organ and organ parts in the ROI, 8 unique entities were affected, leading to the suggestion of 30 concepts for addition and 4 for removal. Out of 27 lymphatic chain instances, 23 were found to have errors, with a total of 32 concepts suggested for addition and 15 concepts for removal. These content corrections are necessary for the accurate functioning of the FMA and provide benefits for future research and educational uses.

  4. Effective Tutorial Ontology Modeling on Organic Rice Farming for Non-Science & Technology Educated Farmers Using Knowledge Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanchinda, Jirawit; Chakpitak, Nopasit; Yodmongkol, Pitipong

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the appropriate technologies for sustainable development projects has encouraged grass roots development, which has in turn promoted sustainable and successful community development, which a requirement is to share and reuse this knowledge effectively. This research aims to propose a tutorial ontology effectiveness modeling on organic…

  5. Emotional intelligence is a second-stratum factor of intelligence: evidence from hierarchical and bifactor models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCann, Carolyn; Joseph, Dana L; Newman, Daniel A; Roberts, Richard D

    2014-04-01

    This article examines the status of emotional intelligence (EI) within the structure of human cognitive abilities. To evaluate whether EI is a 2nd-stratum factor of intelligence, data were fit to a series of structural models involving 3 indicators each for fluid intelligence, crystallized intelligence, quantitative reasoning, visual processing, and broad retrieval ability, as well as 2 indicators each for emotion perception, emotion understanding, and emotion management. Unidimensional, multidimensional, hierarchical, and bifactor solutions were estimated in a sample of 688 college and community college students. Results suggest adequate fit for 2 models: (a) an oblique 8-factor model (with 5 traditional cognitive ability factors and 3 EI factors) and (b) a hierarchical solution (with cognitive g at the highest level and EI representing a 2nd-stratum factor that loads onto g at λ = .80). The acceptable relative fit of the hierarchical model confirms the notion that EI is a group factor of cognitive ability, marking the expression of intelligence in the emotion domain. The discussion proposes a possible expansion of Cattell-Horn-Carroll theory to include EI as a 2nd-stratum factor of similar standing to factors such as fluid intelligence and visual processing.

  6. The design ontology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storga, Mario; Andreasen, Mogens Myrup; Marjanovic, Dorian

    2010-01-01

    The article presents the research of the nature, building and practical role of a Design Ontology as a potential framework for the more efficient product development (PD) data-, information- and knowledge- description, -explanation, -understanding and -reusing. In the methodology for development...... of the ontology two steps could be identified: empirical research and computer implementation. Empirical research has included domain documentation analysis (Genetic Design Model System developed by Mortensen 1999), identification of the key concepts and relations between them, and categorisation of the concepts...... and relations into taxonomies. As an epistemological foundation for the concepts formalisation, The Suggested Upper Merged Ontology (SUMO) proposed by IEEE, was reused. As the result of the previously described process, the ontology content has been categorised into six main subcategories divided between...

  7. World modeling for cooperative intelligent vehicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papp, Z.; Brown, C.; Bartels, C.

    2008-01-01

    Cooperative intelligent vehicle systems constitute a promising way to improving traffic throughput, safety and comfort. The state-of-the-art intelligent-vehicle applications usually can be described as a collection of interacting, highly autonomous, complex dynamical systems (the individual

  8. APPLICATION OF COMPUTER SYSTEMS ONTOLOGY IN THE PROCESS OF FUTURE ENGINEER AND EDUCATOR’S PRACTICAL ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Сергій Козіброда

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This article develops the problem of the use of computer systems ontology in the professional activity of future engineers and teachers in the sphere of computer technology. The tasks of automated exchange of formal model descriptions as a main factor of a research performing in the sphere of ontology use have been grounded. The expediency of use of the ontology of computer systems in the following fields of intending engineers and teachers’ training: artificial intelligence, interface, natural language processing, question-answer systems, classification of goods and services semantic mark-up of text, modelling organizational structure of enterprises, systems of reference information (NSI.

  9. A Hyperbolic Ontology Visualization Tool for Model Application Programming Interface Documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, Cody

    2011-01-01

    Spacecraft modeling, a critically important portion in validating planned spacecraft activities, is currently carried out using a time consuming method of mission to mission model implementations and integration. A current project in early development, Integrated Spacecraft Analysis (ISCA), aims to remedy this hindrance by providing reusable architectures and reducing time spent integrating models with planning and sequencing tools. The principle objective of this internship was to develop a user interface for an experimental ontology-based structure visualization of navigation and attitude control system modeling software. To satisfy this, a number of tree and graph visualization tools were researched and a Java based hyperbolic graph viewer was selected for experimental adaptation. Early results show promise in the ability to organize and display large amounts of spacecraft model documentation efficiently and effectively through a web browser. This viewer serves as a conceptual implementation for future development but trials with both ISCA developers and end users should be performed to truly evaluate the effectiveness of continued development of such visualizations.

  10. Model of key success factors for Business Intelligence implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Mesaros

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available New progressive technologies recorded growth in every area. Information-communication technologies facilitate the exchange of information and it facilitates management of everyday activities in enterprises. Specific modules (such as Business Intelligence facilitate decision-making. Several studies have demonstrated the positive impact of Business Intelligence to decision-making. The first step is to put in place the enterprise. The implementation process is influenced by many factors. This article discusses the issue of key success factors affecting to successful implementation of Business Intelligence. The article describes the key success factors for successful implementation and use of Business Intelligence based on multiple studies. The main objective of this study is to verify the effects and dependence of selected factors and proposes a model of key success factors for successful implementation of Business Intelligence. Key success factors and the proposed model are studied in Slovak enterprises.

  11. A watershed model of individual differences in fluid intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kievit, Rogier A; Davis, Simon W; Griffiths, John; Correia, Marta M; Cam-Can; Henson, Richard N

    2016-10-01

    Fluid intelligence is a crucial cognitive ability that predicts key life outcomes across the lifespan. Strong empirical links exist between fluid intelligence and processing speed on the one hand, and white matter integrity and processing speed on the other. We propose a watershed model that integrates these three explanatory levels in a principled manner in a single statistical model, with processing speed and white matter figuring as intermediate endophenotypes. We fit this model in a large (N=555) adult lifespan cohort from the Cambridge Centre for Ageing and Neuroscience (Cam-CAN) using multiple measures of processing speed, white matter health and fluid intelligence. The model fit the data well, outperforming competing models and providing evidence for a many-to-one mapping between white matter integrity, processing speed and fluid intelligence. The model can be naturally extended to integrate other cognitive domains, endophenotypes and genotypes. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. The current landscape of pitfalls in Ontologies

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Keet, CM

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available 2Ontology Engineering Group, Departamento de Inteligencia Artificial, Universidad Polite´cnica de Madrid, Madrid, Spain keet@ukzn.ac.za, {mcsuarez,mpoveda}@fi.upm.es Keywords: Ontology Development : Ontology Quality : Pitfall Abstract: A growing... in Ontologies C. Maria Keet1, Mari Carmen Sua´rez-Figueroa2 and Marı´a Poveda-Villalo´n2 1School of Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science, University of KwaZulu-Natal, and UKZN/CSIR-Meraka Centre for Artificial Intelligence Research, Durban, South Africa...

  13. Prediction of gas compressibility factor using intelligent models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Mohamadi-Baghmolaei

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The gas compressibility factor, also known as Z-factor, plays the determinative role for obtaining thermodynamic properties of gas reservoir. Typically, empirical correlations have been applied to determine this important property. However, weak performance and some limitations of these correlations have persuaded the researchers to use intelligent models instead. In this work, prediction of Z-factor is aimed using different popular intelligent models in order to find the accurate one. The developed intelligent models are including Artificial Neural Network (ANN, Fuzzy Interface System (FIS and Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy System (ANFIS. Also optimization of equation of state (EOS by Genetic Algorithm (GA is done as well. The validity of developed intelligent models was tested using 1038 series of published data points in literature. It was observed that the accuracy of intelligent predicting models for Z-factor is significantly better than conventional empirical models. Also, results showed the improvement of optimized EOS predictions when coupled with GA optimization. Moreover, of the three intelligent models, ANN model outperforms other models considering all data and 263 field data points of an Iranian offshore gas condensate with R2 of 0.9999, while the R2 for best empirical correlation was about 0.8334.

  14. Development of an informatics infrastructure for data exchange of biomolecular simulations: Architecture, data models and ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, J C; Roe, D R; Eilbeck, K; Cheatham, T E; Facelli, J C

    2015-01-01

    Biomolecular simulations aim to simulate structure, dynamics, interactions, and energetics of complex biomolecular systems. With the recent advances in hardware, it is now possible to use more complex and accurate models, but also reach time scales that are biologically significant. Molecular simulations have become a standard tool for toxicology and pharmacology research, but organizing and sharing data - both within the same organization and among different ones - remains a substantial challenge. In this paper we review our recent work leading to the development of a comprehensive informatics infrastructure to facilitate the organization and exchange of biomolecular simulations data. Our efforts include the design of data models and dictionary tools that allow the standardization of the metadata used to describe the biomedical simulations, the development of a thesaurus and ontology for computational reasoning when searching for biomolecular simulations in distributed environments, and the development of systems based on these models to manage and share the data at a large scale (iBIOMES), and within smaller groups of researchers at laboratory scale (iBIOMES Lite), that take advantage of the standardization of the meta data used to describe biomolecular simulations.

  15. Model of intelligent information searching system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yastrebkov, D.I.

    2004-01-01

    A brief description of the technique to search for electronic documents in large archives as well as drawbacks is presented. A solution close to intelligent information searching systems is proposed. (author)

  16. Computational intelligence applications in modeling and control

    CERN Document Server

    Vaidyanathan, Sundarapandian

    2015-01-01

    The development of computational intelligence (CI) systems was inspired by observable and imitable aspects of intelligent activity of human being and nature. The essence of the systems based on computational intelligence is to process and interpret data of various nature so that that CI is strictly connected with the increase of available data as well as capabilities of their processing, mutually supportive factors. Developed theories of computational intelligence were quickly applied in many fields of engineering, data analysis, forecasting, biomedicine and others. They are used in images and sounds processing and identifying, signals processing, multidimensional data visualization, steering of objects, analysis of lexicographic data, requesting systems in banking, diagnostic systems, expert systems and many other practical implementations. This book consists of 16 contributed chapters by subject experts who are specialized in the various topics addressed in this book. The special chapters have been brought ...

  17. SUGOI: automated ontology interchangeability

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Khan, ZC

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A foundational ontology can solve interoperability issues among the domain ontologies aligned to it. However, several foundational ontologies have been developed, hence such interoperability issues exist among domain ontologies. The novel SUGOI tool...

  18. Applying of an Ontology based Modeling Approach to Cultural Heritage Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    POPOVICI, D.-M.

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Any virtual environment (VE built in a classical way is dedicated to a very specific domain. Its modification or even adaptation to another domain requires an expensive human intervention measured in time and money. This way, the product, that means the VE, returns at the first phases of the development process. In a previous work we proposed an approach that combines domain ontologies and conceptual modeling to construct more accurate VEs. Our method is based on the description of the domain knowledge in a standard format and the assisted creation (using these pieces of knowledge of the VE. This permits the explanation within the virtual reality (VR simulation of the semantic of the whole context and of each object. This knowledge may be then transferred to the public users. In this paper we prove the effectiveness of our method on the construction process of an VE that simulates the organization of a Greek-Roman colony situated on the Black Sea coast and the economic and social activities of its people.

  19. EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE AND ORGANIZATIONAL COMPETITIVENESS: MANAGEMENT MODEL APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John N. N. Ugoani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Modern organization theory considers emotional intelligence as the index of competencies that help organizations to develop a vision for competitiveness. It also allows organizational leaders to enthusiastically commit to the vision, and energize organizational members to achieve the vision. To maximize competiveness organizations use models to simplify and clarify thinking, to identify important aspects, to suggest explanations and to predict consequences, and explore other performance areas that would otherwise be hidden in an excess of words. The survey research design was used to explore the relationship between emotional intelligence and organizational competitiveness. The study found that emotional intelligence has strong positive relationship with organizational competitiveness

  20. Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Robert J

    2012-09-01

    Intelligence is the ability to learn from past experience and, in general, to adapt to, shape, and select environments. Aspects of intelligence are measured by standardized tests of intelligence. Average raw (number-correct) scores on such tests vary across the life span and also across generations, as well as across ethnic and socioeconomic groups. Intelligence can be understood in part in terms of the biology of the brain-especially with regard to the functioning in the prefrontal cortex. Measured values correlate with brain size, at least within humans. The heritability coefficient (ratio of genetic to phenotypic variation) is between 0.4 and 0.8. But genes always express themselves through environment. Heritability varies as a function of a number of factors, including socioeconomic status and range of environments. Racial-group differences in measured intelligence have been reported, but race is a socially constructed rather than biological variable. As a result, these differences are difficult to interpret. Different cultures have different conceptions of the nature of intelligence, and also require different skills in order to express intelligence in the environment. WIREs Cogn Sci 2012 doi: 10.1002/wcs.1193 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. An Ontology-Based Tourism Recommender System Based on Spreading Activation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahramian, Z.; Abbaspour, R. Ali

    2015-12-01

    A tourist has time and budget limitations; hence, he needs to select points of interest (POIs) optimally. Since the available information about POIs is overloading, it is difficult for a tourist to select the most appreciate ones considering preferences. In this paper, a new travel recommender system is proposed to overcome information overload problem. A recommender system (RS) evaluates the overwhelming number of POIs and provides personalized recommendations to users based on their preferences. A content-based recommendation system is proposed, which uses the information about the user's preferences and POIs and calculates a degree of similarity between them. It selects POIs, which have highest similarity with the user's preferences. The proposed content-based recommender system is enhanced using the ontological information about tourism domain to represent both the user profile and the recommendable POIs. The proposed ontology-based recommendation process is performed in three steps including: ontology-based content analyzer, ontology-based profile learner, and ontology-based filtering component. User's feedback adapts the user's preferences using Spreading Activation (SA) strategy. It shows the proposed recommender system is effective and improves the overall performance of the traditional content-based recommender systems.

  2. Modeling of biological intelligence for SCM system optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shengyong; Zheng, Yujun; Cattani, Carlo; Wang, Wanliang

    2012-01-01

    This article summarizes some methods from biological intelligence for modeling and optimization of supply chain management (SCM) systems, including genetic algorithms, evolutionary programming, differential evolution, swarm intelligence, artificial immune, and other biological intelligence related methods. An SCM system is adaptive, dynamic, open self-organizing, which is maintained by flows of information, materials, goods, funds, and energy. Traditional methods for modeling and optimizing complex SCM systems require huge amounts of computing resources, and biological intelligence-based solutions can often provide valuable alternatives for efficiently solving problems. The paper summarizes the recent related methods for the design and optimization of SCM systems, which covers the most widely used genetic algorithms and other evolutionary algorithms.

  3. Modeling of Biological Intelligence for SCM System Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengyong Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article summarizes some methods from biological intelligence for modeling and optimization of supply chain management (SCM systems, including genetic algorithms, evolutionary programming, differential evolution, swarm intelligence, artificial immune, and other biological intelligence related methods. An SCM system is adaptive, dynamic, open self-organizing, which is maintained by flows of information, materials, goods, funds, and energy. Traditional methods for modeling and optimizing complex SCM systems require huge amounts of computing resources, and biological intelligence-based solutions can often provide valuable alternatives for efficiently solving problems. The paper summarizes the recent related methods for the design and optimization of SCM systems, which covers the most widely used genetic algorithms and other evolutionary algorithms.

  4. Modeling of Biological Intelligence for SCM System Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shengyong; Zheng, Yujun; Cattani, Carlo; Wang, Wanliang

    2012-01-01

    This article summarizes some methods from biological intelligence for modeling and optimization of supply chain management (SCM) systems, including genetic algorithms, evolutionary programming, differential evolution, swarm intelligence, artificial immune, and other biological intelligence related methods. An SCM system is adaptive, dynamic, open self-organizing, which is maintained by flows of information, materials, goods, funds, and energy. Traditional methods for modeling and optimizing complex SCM systems require huge amounts of computing resources, and biological intelligence-based solutions can often provide valuable alternatives for efficiently solving problems. The paper summarizes the recent related methods for the design and optimization of SCM systems, which covers the most widely used genetic algorithms and other evolutionary algorithms. PMID:22162724

  5. A Model for an Intelligent Support Decision System in Aquaculture

    OpenAIRE

    Novac Ududec, Cornelia / C

    2009-01-01

    The paper purpose an intelligent software system agents–based to support decision in aquculture and the approach of fish diagnosis with informatics methods, techniques and solutions. A major purpose is to develop new methods and techniques for quick fish diagnosis, treatment and prophyilaxis at infectious and parasite-based known disorders, that may occur at fishes raised in high density in intensive raising systems. But, the goal of this paper is to presents a model of an intelligent agents-...

  6. Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Intelligence is the ability to learn from experience and to adapt to, shape, and select environments. Intelligence as measured by (raw scores on) conventional standardized tests varies across the lifespan, and also across generations. Intelligence can be understood in part in terms of the biology of the brain—especially with regard to the functioning in the prefrontal cortex—and also correlates with brain size, at least within humans. Studies of the effects of genes and environment suggest that the heritability coefficient (ratio of genetic to phenotypic variation) is between .4 and .8, although heritability varies as a function of socioeconomic status and other factors. Racial differences in measured intelligence have been observed, but race is a socially constructed rather than biological variable, so such differences are difficult to interpret. PMID:22577301

  7. Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Robert J

    2012-03-01

    Intelligence is the ability to learn from experience and to adapt to, shape, and select environments. Intelligence as measured by (raw scores on) conventional standardized tests varies across the lifespan, and also across generations. Intelligence can be understood in part in terms of the biology of the brain-especially with regard to the functioning in the prefrontal cortex-and also correlates with brain size, at least within humans. Studies of the effects of genes and environment suggest that the heritability coefficient (ratio of genetic to phenotypic variation) is between .4 and .8, although heritability varies as a function of socioeconomic status and other factors. Racial differences in measured intelligence have been observed, but race is a socially constructed rather than biological variable, so such differences are difficult to interpret.

  8. Advances in Intelligent Modelling and Simulation Artificial Intelligence-Based Models and Techniques in Scalable Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Samee; Burczy´nski, Tadeusz

    2012-01-01

    One of the most challenging issues in today’s large-scale computational modeling and design is to effectively manage the complex distributed environments, such as computational clouds, grids, ad hoc, and P2P networks operating under  various  types of users with evolving relationships fraught with  uncertainties. In this context, the IT resources and services usually belong to different owners (institutions, enterprises, or individuals) and are managed by different administrators. Moreover, uncertainties are presented to the system at hand in various forms of information that are incomplete, imprecise, fragmentary, or overloading, which hinders in the full and precise resolve of the evaluation criteria, subsequencing and selection, and the assignment scores. Intelligent scalable systems enable the flexible routing and charging, advanced user interactions and the aggregation and sharing of geographically-distributed resources in modern large-scale systems.   This book presents new ideas, theories, models...

  9. Computational Intelligence Agent-Oriented Modelling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neruda, Roman

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 2 (2006), s. 430-433 ISSN 1109-2777 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0567 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : multi-agent systems * adaptive agents * computational intelligence Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science

  10. Towards ontology based search and knowledgesharing using domain ontologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zambach, Sine

    This paper reports on work in progress. We present work on domain specific verbs and their role as relations in domain ontologies. The domain ontology which is in focus for our research is modeled in cooperation with the Danish biotech company Novo Nordic. Two of the main purposes of domain...... ontologies for enterprises are as background for search and knowledge sharing used for e.g. multi lingual product development. Our aim is to use linguistic methods and logic to construct consistent ontologies that can be used in both a search perspective and as knowledge sharing.This focuses on identifying...... verbs for relations in the ontology modeling. For this work we use frequency lists from a biomedical text corpus of different genres as well as a study of the relations used in other biomedical text mining tools. In addition, we discuss how these relations can be used in broarder perspective....

  11. Modeling intelligent adversaries for terrorism risk assessment: some necessary conditions for adversary models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guikema, Seth

    2012-07-01

    Intelligent adversary modeling has become increasingly important for risk analysis, and a number of different approaches have been proposed for incorporating intelligent adversaries in risk analysis models. However, these approaches are based on a range of often-implicit assumptions about the desirable properties of intelligent adversary models. This "Perspective" paper aims to further risk analysis for situations involving intelligent adversaries by fostering a discussion of the desirable properties for these models. A set of four basic necessary conditions for intelligent adversary models is proposed and discussed. These are: (1) behavioral accuracy to the degree possible, (2) computational tractability to support decision making, (3) explicit consideration of uncertainty, and (4) ability to gain confidence in the model. It is hoped that these suggested necessary conditions foster discussion about the goals and assumptions underlying intelligent adversary modeling in risk analysis. © 2011 Society for Risk Analysis.

  12. An RM-ODP Based Ontology and a CAD Tool for Modeling Hierarchical Systems in Enterprise Architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Lê, Lam Son; Wegmann, Alain

    2005-01-01

    Enterprise Architecture (EA) requires modeling enterprises across multiple levels (from markets down to IT systems) i.e. modeling hierarchical systems. Our goal is to build a Computer Aided Design (CAD) tool for EA. To be able to build this CAD tool, we need an ontology that can be used to describe hierarchical systems. The Reference Model of Open Distributed Processing (RM-ODP) was originally defined for describing IT systems and their environment. RM-ODP can also be suited to general, hier...

  13. Sustainability Reporting Process Model using Business Intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Alxneit, Thorsten Julius

    2015-01-01

    Sustainability including the reporting requirements is one of the most relevant topics for companies. In recent years, many software providers have launched new software tools targeting companies committed to implementing sustainability reporting. But it’s not only companies willing to use their Business Intelligence (BI) solution, there are also basic principles such as the single source of truth and tendencies to combine sustainability reporting with the financial reporting (...

  14. Gradient Learning Algorithms for Ontology Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Zhu, Linli

    2014-01-01

    The gradient learning model has been raising great attention in view of its promising perspectives for applications in statistics, data dimensionality reducing, and other specific fields. In this paper, we raise a new gradient learning model for ontology similarity measuring and ontology mapping in multidividing setting. The sample error in this setting is given by virtue of the hypothesis space and the trick of ontology dividing operator. Finally, two experiments presented on plant and humanoid robotics field verify the efficiency of the new computation model for ontology similarity measure and ontology mapping applications in multidividing setting. PMID:25530752

  15. Gradient learning algorithms for ontology computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Zhu, Linli

    2014-01-01

    The gradient learning model has been raising great attention in view of its promising perspectives for applications in statistics, data dimensionality reducing, and other specific fields. In this paper, we raise a new gradient learning model for ontology similarity measuring and ontology mapping in multidividing setting. The sample error in this setting is given by virtue of the hypothesis space and the trick of ontology dividing operator. Finally, two experiments presented on plant and humanoid robotics field verify the efficiency of the new computation model for ontology similarity measure and ontology mapping applications in multidividing setting.

  16. Gradient Learning Algorithms for Ontology Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Gao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The gradient learning model has been raising great attention in view of its promising perspectives for applications in statistics, data dimensionality reducing, and other specific fields. In this paper, we raise a new gradient learning model for ontology similarity measuring and ontology mapping in multidividing setting. The sample error in this setting is given by virtue of the hypothesis space and the trick of ontology dividing operator. Finally, two experiments presented on plant and humanoid robotics field verify the efficiency of the new computation model for ontology similarity measure and ontology mapping applications in multidividing setting.

  17. International Conference on Computational Intelligence, Cyber Security, and Computational Models

    CERN Document Server

    Ramasamy, Vijayalakshmi; Sheen, Shina; Veeramani, C; Bonato, Anthony; Batten, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    This book aims at promoting high-quality research by researchers and practitioners from academia and industry at the International Conference on Computational Intelligence, Cyber Security, and Computational Models ICC3 2015 organized by PSG College of Technology, Coimbatore, India during December 17 – 19, 2015. This book enriches with innovations in broad areas of research like computational modeling, computational intelligence and cyber security. These emerging inter disciplinary research areas have helped to solve multifaceted problems and gained lot of attention in recent years. This encompasses theory and applications, to provide design, analysis and modeling of the aforementioned key areas.

  18. Mathematical modeling and computational intelligence in engineering applications

    CERN Document Server

    Silva Neto, Antônio José da; Silva, Geraldo Nunes

    2016-01-01

    This book brings together a rich selection of studies in mathematical modeling and computational intelligence, with application in several fields of engineering, like automation, biomedical, chemical, civil, electrical, electronic, geophysical and mechanical engineering, on a multidisciplinary approach. Authors from five countries and 16 different research centers contribute with their expertise in both the fundamentals and real problems applications based upon their strong background on modeling and computational intelligence. The reader will find a wide variety of applications, mathematical and computational tools and original results, all presented with rigorous mathematical procedures. This work is intended for use in graduate courses of engineering, applied mathematics and applied computation where tools as mathematical and computational modeling, numerical methods and computational intelligence are applied to the solution of real problems.

  19. How to keep a reference ontology relevant to the industry: A case study from the smart home

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daniele, L.; Hartog, F. den; Roes, J.

    2016-01-01

    The Smart Appliance REFerence ontology (SAREF) is a shared model of consensus developed in close interaction with the industry to enable semantic interoperability for smart appliances. Smart appliances are intelligent and networked devices that accomplish some household functions, such as cleaning

  20. LEGO-MM: LEarning structured model by probabilistic loGic Ontology tree for MultiMedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jinhui; Chang, Shiyu; Qi, Guo-Jun; Tian, Qi; Rui, Yong; Huang, Thomas S

    2016-09-22

    Recent advances in Multimedia ontology have resulted in a number of concept models, e.g., LSCOM and Mediamill 101, which are accessible and public to other researchers. However, most current research effort still focuses on building new concepts from scratch, very few work explores the appropriate method to construct new concepts upon the existing models already in the warehouse. To address this issue, we propose a new framework in this paper, termed LEGO1-MM, which can seamlessly integrate both the new target training examples and the existing primitive concept models to infer the more complex concept models. LEGOMM treats the primitive concept models as the lego toy to potentially construct an unlimited vocabulary of new concepts. Specifically, we first formulate the logic operations to be the lego connectors to combine existing concept models hierarchically in probabilistic logic ontology trees. Then, we incorporate new target training information simultaneously to efficiently disambiguate the underlying logic tree and correct the error propagation. Extensive experiments are conducted on a large vehicle domain data set from ImageNet. The results demonstrate that LEGO-MM has significantly superior performance over existing state-of-the-art methods, which build new concept models from scratch.

  1. Logical Characterisation of Ontology Construction using Fuzzy Description Logics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badie, Farshad; Götzsche, Hans

    Ontologies based on Description Logics (DLs) have proved to be effective in formally sharing knowledge across semantic technologies, e.g. Semantic Web, Natural Language Processing, Text Analytics, Business intelligence. Our main goal is analysing ontology construction considering vagueness. We have...... had the extension of ontologies with Fuzzy Logic capabilities which plan to make proper backgrounds for ontology driven reasoning and argumentation on vague and imprecise domains. This presentation conceptualises learning from fuzzy classes using the Inductive Logic Programming framework. Then......, employs Description Logics in characterising and analysing fuzzy statements. And finally, provides a conceptual framework describing fuzzy concept learning in ontologies using the Inductive Logic Programming....

  2. Ontologies, Agents and the Grid: An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Drozdowicz, Michal; Ganzha, Maria; Paprzycki, Marcin; Olejnik, Richard; Lirkov, Ivan; Telegin, P.; Senobari, M.

    2009-01-01

    23 pages; One of the important claims that permeate the current view of information management is that ontological demarcation of data and semantic information processing are going to allow us to infuse "intelligence" into information systems. Separately, it is claimed that software agents, combined with ontologies will be the foundation ofWeb 4.0. In our work we are developing an agent-team-based resource management and brokering infrastructure for computational grids. The proposed meta-leve...

  3. Building ontologies with basic formal ontology

    CERN Document Server

    Arp, Robert; Spear, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    In the era of "big data," science is increasingly information driven, and the potential for computers to store, manage, and integrate massive amounts of data has given rise to such new disciplinary fields as biomedical informatics. Applied ontology offers a strategy for the organization of scientific information in computer-tractable form, drawing on concepts not only from computer and information science but also from linguistics, logic, and philosophy. This book provides an introduction to the field of applied ontology that is of particular relevance to biomedicine, covering theoretical components of ontologies, best practices for ontology design, and examples of biomedical ontologies in use. After defining an ontology as a representation of the types of entities in a given domain, the book distinguishes between different kinds of ontologies and taxonomies, and shows how applied ontology draws on more traditional ideas from metaphysics. It presents the core features of the Basic Formal Ontology (BFO), now u...

  4. Forecasting rain events - Meteorological models or collective intelligence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arazy, Ofer; Halfon, Noam; Malkinson, Dan

    2015-04-01

    Collective intelligence is shared (or group) intelligence that emerges from the collective efforts of many individuals. Collective intelligence is the aggregate of individual contributions: from simple collective decision making to more sophisticated aggregations such as in crowdsourcing and peer-production systems. In particular, collective intelligence could be used in making predictions about future events, for example by using prediction markets to forecast election results, stock prices, or the outcomes of sport events. To date, there is little research regarding the use of collective intelligence for prediction of weather forecasting. The objective of this study is to investigate the extent to which collective intelligence could be utilized to accurately predict weather events, and in particular rainfall. Our analyses employ metrics of group intelligence, as well as compare the accuracy of groups' predictions against the predictions of the standard model used by the National Meteorological Services. We report on preliminary results from a study conducted over the 2013-2014 and 2014-2015 winters. We have built a web site that allows people to make predictions on precipitation levels on certain locations. During each competition participants were allowed to enter their precipitation forecasts (i.e. 'bets') at three locations and these locations changed between competitions. A precipitation competition was defined as a 48-96 hour period (depending on the expected weather conditions), bets were open 24-48 hours prior to the competition, and during betting period participants were allowed to change their bets with no limitation. In order to explore the effect of transparency, betting mechanisms varied across study's sites: full transparency (participants able to see each other's bets); partial transparency (participants see the group's average bet); and no transparency (no information of others' bets is made available). Several interesting findings emerged from

  5. A New Browser-based, Ontology-driven Tool for Generating Standardized, Deep Descriptions of Geoscience Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckham, S. D.; Kelbert, A.; Rudan, S.; Stoica, M.

    2016-12-01

    Standardized metadata for models is the key to reliable and greatly simplified coupling in model coupling frameworks like CSDMS (Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System). This model metadata also helps model users to understand the important details that underpin computational models and to compare the capabilities of different models. These details include simplifying assumptions on the physics, governing equations and the numerical methods used to solve them, discretization of space (the grid) and time (the time-stepping scheme), state variables (input or output), model configuration parameters. This kind of metadata provides a "deep description" of a computational model that goes well beyond other types of metadata (e.g. author, purpose, scientific domain, programming language, digital rights, provenance, execution) and captures the science that underpins a model. While having this kind of standardized metadata for each model in a repository opens up a wide range of exciting possibilities, it is difficult to collect this information and a carefully conceived "data model" or schema is needed to store it. Automated harvesting and scraping methods can provide some useful information, but they often result in metadata that is inaccurate or incomplete, and this is not sufficient to enable the desired capabilities. In order to address this problem, we have developed a browser-based tool called the MCM Tool (Model Component Metadata) which runs on notebooks, tablets and smart phones. This tool was partially inspired by the TurboTax software, which greatly simplifies the necessary task of preparing tax documents. It allows a model developer or advanced user to provide a standardized, deep description of a computational geoscience model, including hydrologic models. Under the hood, the tool uses a new ontology for models built on the CSDMS Standard Names, expressed as a collection of RDF files (Resource Description Framework). This ontology is based on core concepts

  6. Intelligent Cloud Learning Model for Online Overseas Chinese Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yidong Chen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available With the development of Chinese economy, oversea Chinese education has been paid more and more attention. However, the overseas Chinese education resource is relatively lack because of historical reasons, which hindered further development . How to better share the Chinese education resources and provide intelligent personalized information service for overseas student is a key problem to be solved. In recent years, the rise of cloud computing provides us an opportunity to realize intelligent learning mode. Cloud computing offers some advantages by allowing users to use infrastructure, platforms and software . In this paper we proposed an intelligent cloud learning model based on cloud computing. The learning model can utilize network resources sufficiently to implement resource sharing according to the personal needs of students, and provide a good practicability for online overseas Chinese education.

  7. Designing and Implementing Basic Sciences Ontology Based on Concepts and Relationships of Relevant Thesauri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molouk Sadat Hosseini Beheshti

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the main portion of knowledge is stored in electronic texts and documents and for transferring that knowledge effectively, we must use proper methods to gather and retrieve relevant information. Ontologies provide means to produce structured documents and use intelligent search instead of keyword search. Ontology defines the common words and concepts used to describe and represent an area of knowledge. However, developing ontologies is a time consuming and labor work, so many ontology developers try to facilitate and speed up this process by reusing other resources. In fact, thesaurus contains semantic information and hierarchical structure that make it an appropriate resource for ontology construction. Therefore, we determined to use the thesauri previously developed at Iranian Research Institute for Information Science and Technology (IRANDOC to construct ontology in basic sciences domain. At first, we synchronized common concepts in thesauri before integrating them as a macro thesaurus and removed inconsistencies. To reduce the amount of time and human resources which were needed for synchronizing process, Thesaurus Synchronizer was developed to illustrate differences between matched cases of two thesauri. It provides powerful tools for demonstrating differences and suggestions for each of the existing matters. Thus, domain experts synchronized each two thesaurus semi-automatically. Then we merged thesauri and transform the data format into ISO 25964 standard. The conceptual model have been designed based on the terms and their relationships in the integrated thesaurus and the concept maps that were designed by domain experts for each of basic sciences (Chemistry, Physics, Biology, Geology and Mathematics. We used the methodology called METHONTOLOGY in this stage. The main activity in this methodology is conceptualization and it enables the construction of ontologies at the knowledge level. Ultimately, the ontology was generated by

  8. Gold-standard evaluation of a folksonomy-based ontology learning model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djuana, E.

    2018-03-01

    Folksonomy, as one result of collaborative tagging process, has been acknowledged for its potential in improving categorization and searching of web resources. However, folksonomy contains ambiguities such as synonymy and polysemy as well as different abstractions or generality problem. To maximize its potential, some methods for associating tags of folksonomy with semantics and structural relationships have been proposed such as using ontology learning method. This paper evaluates our previous work in ontology learning according to gold-standard evaluation approach in comparison to a notable state-of-the-art work and several baselines. The results show that our method is comparable to the state-of the art work which further validate our approach as has been previously validated using task-based evaluation approach.

  9. Evaluation of Artificial Intelligence Based Models for Chemical Biodegradability Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandar Sabljic

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a review of biodegradability modeling efforts including a detailed assessment of two models developed using an artificial intelligence based methodology. Validation results for these models using an independent, quality reviewed database, demonstrate that the models perform well when compared to another commonly used biodegradability model, against the same data. The ability of models induced by an artificial intelligence methodology to accommodate complex interactions in detailed systems, and the demonstrated reliability of the approach evaluated by this study, indicate that the methodology may have application in broadening the scope of biodegradability models. Given adequate data for biodegradability of chemicals under environmental conditions, this may allow for the development of future models that include such things as surface interface impacts on biodegradability for example.

  10. Artificial intelligence support for scientific model-building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Richard M.

    1992-01-01

    Scientific model-building can be a time-intensive and painstaking process, often involving the development of large and complex computer programs. Despite the effort involved, scientific models cannot easily be distributed and shared with other scientists. In general, implemented scientific models are complex, idiosyncratic, and difficult for anyone but the original scientific development team to understand. We believe that artificial intelligence techniques can facilitate both the model-building and model-sharing process. In this paper, we overview our effort to build a scientific modeling software tool that aids the scientist in developing and using models. This tool includes an interactive intelligent graphical interface, a high-level domain specific modeling language, a library of physics equations and experimental datasets, and a suite of data display facilities.

  11. A new paradigm for continuous alignment of business and IT: combining enterprise architecture modeling and enterprise ontology

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hinkelmann, K

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available like "which processes are affected by the replacement of an application?", "which roles are involved in the process?", "why did we decide to customize this specific application?" As shown by [29] and [30] an enterprise ontology (EO) could meet... this request. Describing enterprise architecture as an ontology started in the 1990s with TOVE [31], The Edinburgh Enterprise Ontology [32] and the organizational memory [33]. In contrary to EA enterprise ontologies are concrete representations of (generalized...

  12. Ontological Modeling of Meta Learning Multi-Agent Systems in OWL-DL

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kazík, O.; Neruda, Roman

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 4 (2012), s. 357-362 ISSN 1819-9224 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ME10023 Grant - others:GA UK(CZ) 629612; UK(CZ) SVV-265314 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : data mining * meta learning * roles * description logic * ontology Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science http://www.iaeng.org/IJCS/issues_v39/issue_4/IJCS_39_4_04.pdf

  13. Artificial intelligence and mathematical models for intelligent management of aircraft data

    OpenAIRE

    knight, Peter Robin

    2012-01-01

    Increasingly, large volumes of aircraft data are being recorded in an effort to adapt aircraft maintenance procedures from being time-based towards condition-based techniques. This study uses techniques of artificial intelligence and develops mathematical models to analyse this data to enable improvements to be made in aircraft management, affordability, availability, airworthiness and performance. In addition, it highlights the need to assess the integrity of data before further analysis and...

  14. Towards an Ontology for the Global Geodynamics Project: Automated Extraction of Resource Descriptions from an XML-Based Data Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumb, L. I.; Aldridge, K. D.

    2005-12-01

    Using the Earth Science Markup Language (ESML), an XML-based data model for the Global Geodynamics Project (GGP) was recently introduced [Lumb & Aldridge, Proc. HPCS 2005, Kotsireas & Stacey, eds., IEEE, 2005, 216-222]. This data model possesses several key attributes -i.e., it: makes use of XML schema; supports semi-structured ASCII format files; includes Earth Science affinities; and is on track for compliance with emerging Grid computing standards (e.g., the Global Grid Forum's Data Format Description Language, DFDL). Favorable attributes notwithstanding, metadata (i.e., data about data) was identified [Lumb & Aldridge, 2005] as a key challenge for progress in enabling the GGP for Grid computing. Even in projects of small-to-medium scale like the GGP, the manual introduction of metadata has the potential to be the rate-determining metric for progress. Fortunately, an automated approach for metadata introduction has recently emerged. Based on Gleaning Resource Descriptions from Dialects of Languages (GRDDL, http://www.w3.org/2004/01/rdxh/spec), this bottom-up approach allows for the extraction of Resource Description Format (RDF) representations from the XML-based data model (i.e., the ESML representation of GGP data) subject to rules of transformation articulated via eXtensible Stylesheet Language Transformations (XSLT). In addition to introducing relationships into the GGP data model, and thereby addressing the metadata requirement, the syntax and semantics of RDF comprise a requisite for a GGP ontology - i.e., ``the common words and concepts (the meaning) used to describe and represent an area of knowledge'' [Daconta et al., The Semantic Web, Wiley, 2003]. After briefly reviewing the XML-based model for the GGP, attention focuses on the automated extraction of an RDF representation via GRDDL with XSLT-delineated templates. This bottom-up approach, in tandem with a top-down approach based on the Protege integrated development environment for ontologies (http

  15. Ontological Surprises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leahu, Lucian

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates how we might rethink design as the technological crafting of human-machine relations in the context of a machine learning technique called neural networks. It analyzes Google’s Inceptionism project, which uses neural networks for image recognition. The surprising output...... a hybrid approach where machine learning algorithms are used to identify objects as well as connections between them; finally, it argues for remaining open to ontological surprises in machine learning as they may enable the crafting of different relations with and through technologies....

  16. Uberon: towards a comprehensive multi-species anatomy ontology

    OpenAIRE

    Melissa A. Haendel; Georgios G. Gkoutos; Suzanna E. Lewis; Chris Mungall

    2009-01-01

    The lack of a single unified species-neutral ontology covering the anatomy of a variety of metazoans is a hindrance to translating model organism research to human health. We have developed an Uber-anatomy ontology to fill this need, filling the gap between the CARO upper-level ontology and species-specific anatomical ontologies.

  17. Toward an ontology framework supporting the integration of geographic information with modeling and simulation for critical infrastructure protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrosiano, John J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bent, Russell W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Linger, Steve P [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Protecting the nation's infrastructure from natural disasters, inadvertent failures, or intentional attacks is a major national security concern. Gauging the fragility of infrastructure assets, and understanding how interdependencies across critical infrastructures affect their behavior, is essential to predicting and mitigating cascading failures, as well as to planning for response and recovery. Modeling and simulation (M&S) is an indispensable part of characterizing this complex system of systems and anticipating its response to disruptions. Bringing together the necessary components to perform such analyses produces a wide-ranging and coarse-grained computational workflow that must be integrated with other analysis workflow elements. There are many points in both types of work flows in which geographic information (GI) services are required. The GIS community recognizes the essential contribution of GI in this problem domain as evidenced by past OGC initiatives. Typically such initiatives focus on the broader aspects of GI analysis workflows, leaving concepts crucial to integrating simulations within analysis workflows to that community. Our experience with large-scale modeling of interdependent critical infrastructures, and our recent participation in a DRS initiative concerning interoperability for this M&S domain, has led to high-level ontological concepts that we have begun to assemble into an architecture that spans both computational and 'world' views of the problem, and further recognizes the special requirements of simulations that go beyond common workflow ontologies. In this paper we present these ideas, and offer a high-level ontological framework that includes key geospatial concepts as special cases of a broader view.

  18. Intelligent control of HVAC systems. Part I: Modeling and synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian TOADER

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This is the first part of a work on intelligent type control of Heating, Ventilating and Air-Conditioning (HVAC systems. The study is performed from the perspective of giving a unitary control method to ensure high energy efficiency and air quality improving. To illustrate the proposed HVAC control technique, in this first part it is considered as benchmark problem a single thermal space HVAC system. The construction of the mathematical model is performed only with a view to obtain a framework of HVAC intelligent control validation by numerical simulations. The latter will be reported in a second part of the study.

  19. Technologies for conceptual modelling and intelligent query formulation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Alberts, R

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available modelling and intelligent query formulation R ALBERTS1, K BRITZ1, A GERBER1, K HALLAND1,2, T MEYER1, L PRETORIUS1,2 (1) Knowledge Systems Group, Meraka Institute, CSIR, Pretoria, Gauteng, South Africa (2) School of Computing, University of South... this problem still more pressing: in this case an excess of information can be equivalent to an absence of information It is therefore necessary to use tools that organise data into intelligible and easily-accessible structures and return answers...

  20. The highly intelligent virtual agents for modeling financial markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, G.; Chen, Y.; Huang, J. P.

    2016-02-01

    Researchers have borrowed many theories from statistical physics, like ensemble, Ising model, etc., to study complex adaptive systems through agent-based modeling. However, one fundamental difference between entities (such as spins) in physics and micro-units in complex adaptive systems is that the latter are usually with high intelligence, such as investors in financial markets. Although highly intelligent virtual agents are essential for agent-based modeling to play a full role in the study of complex adaptive systems, how to create such agents is still an open question. Hence, we propose three principles for designing high artificial intelligence in financial markets and then build a specific class of agents called iAgents based on these three principles. Finally, we evaluate the intelligence of iAgents through virtual index trading in two different stock markets. For comparison, we also include three other types of agents in this contest, namely, random traders, agents from the wealth game (modified on the famous minority game), and agents from an upgraded wealth game. As a result, iAgents perform the best, which gives a well support for the three principles. This work offers a general framework for the further development of agent-based modeling for various kinds of complex adaptive systems.

  1. An application of artificial intelligence for rainfall–runoff modeling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This study proposes an application of two techniques of artificial intelligence (AI) for rainfall–runoff modeling: the artificial neural networks (ANN) and .... conventional mathematical analysis does not, or cannot, provide analytical solutions, .... very simple where there exist one-to-one relation- ships between the symbols of the ...

  2. An application of artificial intelligence for rainfall–runoff modeling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This study proposes an application of two techniques of artificial intelligence (AI) for rainfall–runoff modeling: the artificial neural networks (ANN) and the evolutionary computation (EC). Two diff- erent ANN techniques, the feed forward back propagation (FFBP) and generalized regression neural network (GRNN) methods ...

  3. A generic model for camera based intelligent road crowd control ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research proposes a model for intelligent traffic flow control by implementing camera based surveillance and feedback system. A series of cameras are set minimum three signals ahead from the target junction. The complete software system is developed to help integrating the multiple camera on road as feedback to ...

  4. Ontology for Life-Cycle Modeling of Electrical Distribution Systems: Application of Model View Definition Attributes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Building in- formation exchange (COBie), Building Information Modeling ( BIM ) 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...to develop a life-cycle building model have resulted in the definition of a “core” building information model that contains general information de...develop an information -exchange Model View Definition (MVD) for building electrical systems. The objective of the current work was to document the

  5. Better modelling practice : an ontological perpsective on multidisciplinary, model-based problem solving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, H.

    2008-01-01

    Mathematical models are more and more used to support to solve multidisciplinary, real world problems of increasing complexity. They are often plagued by obstacles such as miscommunication between modellers with different disciplinary backgrounds leading to a non-transparent modelling process. Other

  6. Towards Ontology-Driven Information Systems: Guidelines to the Creation of New Methodologies to Build Ontologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Andrey

    2009-01-01

    This research targeted the area of Ontology-Driven Information Systems, where ontology plays a central role both at development time and at run time of Information Systems (IS). In particular, the research focused on the process of building domain ontologies for IS modeling. The motivation behind the research was the fact that researchers have…

  7. Intelligent Transportation and Evacuation Planning A Modeling-Based Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Naser, Arab

    2012-01-01

    Intelligent Transportation and Evacuation Planning: A Modeling-Based Approach provides a new paradigm for evacuation planning strategies and techniques. Recently, evacuation planning and modeling have increasingly attracted interest among researchers as well as government officials. This interest stems from the recent catastrophic hurricanes and weather-related events that occurred in the southeastern United States (Hurricane Katrina and Rita). The evacuation methods that were in place before and during the hurricanes did not work well and resulted in thousands of deaths. This book offers insights into the methods and techniques that allow for implementing mathematical-based, simulation-based, and integrated optimization and simulation-based engineering approaches for evacuation planning. This book also: Comprehensively discusses the application of mathematical models for evacuation and intelligent transportation modeling Covers advanced methodologies in evacuation modeling and planning Discusses principles a...

  8. An empirical analysis of ontology reuse in BioPortal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochs, Christopher; Perl, Yehoshua; Geller, James; Arabandi, Sivaram; Tudorache, Tania; Musen, Mark A

    2017-07-01

    Biomedical ontologies often reuse content (i.e., classes and properties) from other ontologies. Content reuse enables a consistent representation of a domain and reusing content can save an ontology author significant time and effort. Prior studies have investigated the existence of reused terms among the ontologies in the NCBO BioPortal, but as of yet there has not been a study investigating how the ontologies in BioPortal utilize reused content in the modeling of their own content. In this study we investigate how 355 ontologies hosted in the NCBO BioPortal reuse content from other ontologies for the purposes of creating new ontology content. We identified 197 ontologies that reuse content. Among these ontologies, 108 utilize reused classes in the modeling of their own classes and 116 utilize reused properties in class restrictions. Current utilization of reuse and quality issues related to reuse are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Logical Characterisation of Ontology Construction using Fuzzy Description Logics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badie, Farshad; Götzsche, Hans

    Ontologies based on Description Logics (DLs) have proved to be effective in formally sharing knowledge across semantic technologies, e.g. Semantic Web, Natural Language Processing, Text Analytics, Business intelligence. Our main goal is analysing ontology construction considering vagueness. We have......, employs Description Logics in characterising and analysing fuzzy statements. And finally, provides a conceptual framework describing fuzzy concept learning in ontologies using the Inductive Logic Programming....

  10. Ontological View-Driven Semantic Integration in Collaborative Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yunjiao; Ghenniwa, Hamada H.; Shen, Weiming

    In collaborative enterprise networks, semantic heterogeneity is an important factor that hinders collaboration of various information systems. Ontology-driven semantic integration is an important category of solutions for the semantic integration problem. However, in many domains, there are no explicit and formal ontologies available. This paper proposes to adopt ontological views to address such challenges. It investigates the theoretical foundation of ontologies and ontological views. It presents a framework as a solution, based on the theoretical foundation, including the architecture of a semantic integration enabled environment, the modeling and representation of ontological views, and the semantic equivalence relationship discovered from the ontological views.

  11. Computational Intelligence and Decision Making Trends and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Madureira, Ana; Marques, Viriato

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a general overview and original analysis of new developments and applications in several areas of Computational Intelligence and Information Systems. Computational Intelligence has become an important tool for engineers to develop and analyze novel techniques to solve problems in basic sciences such as physics, chemistry, biology, engineering, environment and social sciences.   The material contained in this book addresses the foundations and applications of Artificial Intelligence and Decision Support Systems, Complex and Biological Inspired Systems, Simulation and Evolution of Real and Artificial Life Forms, Intelligent Models and Control Systems, Knowledge and Learning Technologies, Web Semantics and Ontologies, Intelligent Tutoring Systems, Intelligent Power Systems, Self-Organized and Distributed Systems, Intelligent Manufacturing Systems and Affective Computing. The contributions have all been written by international experts, who provide current views on the topics discussed and pr...

  12. Employing the intelligence cycle process model within the Homeland Security Enterprise

    OpenAIRE

    Stokes, Roger L.

    2013-01-01

    CHDS State/Local The purpose of this thesis was to examine the employment and adherence of the intelligence cycle process model within the National Network of Fusion Centers and the greater Homeland Security Enterprise by exploring the customary intelligence cycle process model established by the United States Intelligence Community (USIC). This thesis revealed there are various intelligence cycle process models used by the USIC and taught to the National Network. Given the numerous differ...

  13. National Water Model: Providing the Nation with Actionable Water Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggett, G. R.; Bates, B.

    2017-12-01

    The National Water Model (NWM) provides national, street-level detail of water movement through time and space. Operating hourly, this flood of information offers enormous benefits in the form of water resource management, natural disaster preparedness, and the protection of life and property. The Geo-Intelligence Division at the NOAA National Water Center supplies forecasters and decision-makers with timely, actionable water intelligence through the processing of billions of NWM data points every hour. These datasets include current streamflow estimates, short and medium range streamflow forecasts, and many other ancillary datasets. The sheer amount of NWM data produced yields a dataset too large to allow for direct human comprehension. As such, it is necessary to undergo model data post-processing, filtering, and data ingestion by visualization web apps that make use of cartographic techniques to bring attention to the areas of highest urgency. This poster illustrates NWM output post-processing and cartographic visualization techniques being developed and employed by the Geo-Intelligence Division at the NOAA National Water Center to provide national actionable water intelligence.

  14. An Ontology for Learning Services on the Shop Floor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    An ontology expresses a common understanding of a domain that serves as a basis of communication between people or systems, and enables knowledge sharing, reuse of domain knowledge, reasoning and thus problem solving. In Technology-Enhanced Learning, especially in Intelligent Tutoring Systems and Adaptive Learning Environments, ontologies serve as…

  15. Assessing the practice of biomedical ontology evaluation: Gaps and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amith, Muhammad; He, Zhe; Bian, Jiang; Lossio-Ventura, Juan Antonio; Tao, Cui

    2018-04-01

    With the proliferation of heterogeneous health care data in the last three decades, biomedical ontologies and controlled biomedical terminologies play a more and more important role in knowledge representation and management, data integration, natural language processing, as well as decision support for health information systems and biomedical research. Biomedical ontologies and controlled terminologies are intended to assure interoperability. Nevertheless, the quality of biomedical ontologies has hindered their applicability and subsequent adoption in real-world applications. Ontology evaluation is an integral part of ontology development and maintenance. In the biomedicine domain, ontology evaluation is often conducted by third parties as a quality assurance (or auditing) effort that focuses on identifying modeling errors and inconsistencies. In this work, we first organized four categorical schemes of ontology evaluation methods in the existing literature to create an integrated taxonomy. Further, to understand the ontology evaluation practice in the biomedicine domain, we reviewed a sample of 200 ontologies from the National Center for Biomedical Ontology (NCBO) BioPortal-the largest repository for biomedical ontologies-and observed that only 15 of these ontologies have documented evaluation in their corresponding inception papers. We then surveyed the recent quality assurance approaches for biomedical ontologies and their use. We also mapped these quality assurance approaches to the ontology evaluation criteria. It is our anticipation that ontology evaluation and quality assurance approaches will be more widely adopted in the development life cycle of biomedical ontologies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Ontology for Life-Cycle Modeling of Water Distribution Systems: Model View Definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    requirements, the team followed the Information Delivery Manual ( IDM ) and Model View Definition (MVD) procedures defined by the International Organization...MVD_Format_V2_Proposal_080128.pdf. Wix, J., ed. 2007. “Information Delivery Manual: Guide to Components and Development Methods,” http://www.iai.no/ idm /idm_resources

  17. Ontology for Life-Cycle Modeling of Water Distribution Systems: Application of Model View Definition Attributes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    the Building Smart Alliance website, http://buildingsmartalliance.org/ index.php/projects/commonbimfiles/. The following steps were followed to...updated. 2.3.1 Removing nonessential elements from the models Nonessential building interior features, such as furniture , casework, elec- trical

  18. An intelligent diagnosis model based on rough set theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ze; Huang, Hong-Xing; Zheng, Ye-Lu; Wang, Zhou-Yuan

    2013-03-01

    Along with the popularity of computer and rapid development of information technology, how to increase the accuracy of the agricultural diagnosis becomes a difficult problem of popularizing the agricultural expert system. Analyzing existing research, baseing on the knowledge acquisition technology of rough set theory, towards great sample data, we put forward a intelligent diagnosis model. Extract rough set decision table from the samples property, use decision table to categorize the inference relation, acquire property rules related to inference diagnosis, through the means of rough set knowledge reasoning algorithm to realize intelligent diagnosis. Finally, we validate this diagnosis model by experiments. Introduce the rough set theory to provide the agricultural expert system of great sample data a effective diagnosis model.

  19. Ontorat: automatic generation of new ontology terms, annotations, and axioms based on ontology design patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Zuoshuang; Zheng, Jie; Lin, Yu; He, Yongqun

    2015-01-01

    It is time-consuming to build an ontology with many terms and axioms. Thus it is desired to automate the process of ontology development. Ontology Design Patterns (ODPs) provide a reusable solution to solve a recurrent modeling problem in the context of ontology engineering. Because ontology terms often follow specific ODPs, the Ontology for Biomedical Investigations (OBI) developers proposed a Quick Term Templates (QTTs) process targeted at generating new ontology classes following the same pattern, using term templates in a spreadsheet format. Inspired by the ODPs and QTTs, the Ontorat web application is developed to automatically generate new ontology terms, annotations of terms, and logical axioms based on a specific ODP(s). The inputs of an Ontorat execution include axiom expression settings, an input data file, ID generation settings, and a target ontology (optional). The axiom expression settings can be saved as a predesigned Ontorat setting format text file for reuse. The input data file is generated based on a template file created by a specific ODP (text or Excel format). Ontorat is an efficient tool for ontology expansion. Different use cases are described. For example, Ontorat was applied to automatically generate over 1,000 Japan RIKEN cell line cell terms with both logical axioms and rich annotation axioms in the Cell Line Ontology (CLO). Approximately 800 licensed animal vaccines were represented and annotated in the Vaccine Ontology (VO) by Ontorat. The OBI team used Ontorat to add assay and device terms required by ENCODE project. Ontorat was also used to add missing annotations to all existing Biobank specific terms in the Biobank Ontology. A collection of ODPs and templates with examples are provided on the Ontorat website and can be reused to facilitate ontology development. With ever increasing ontology development and applications, Ontorat provides a timely platform for generating and annotating a large number of ontology terms by following

  20. A Cybernetic Model to Enhance Organizational Intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Schwaninger, Markus

    2003-01-01

    The present paper focuses on the modeling of cognitive processes in organizations. This issue is approached from the perspective of Organizational Cybernetics, the science of control and communication applied to the management of organizations. First, the Team Syntegrity Model is described, which provides a structural architecture for processes of planning, knowledge generation and innovation in turbulent environments. The model is holographic and based on the mathematical structure of polyhe...

  1. An Ontology-Based Context Model for Wireless Sensor Network (WSN Management in the Internet of Things

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Al-Anbuky

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks (WSNs are an enabling technology of context-aware systems. The Internet of Things (IoT, which has attracted much attention in recent years, is an emerging paradigm where everyday objects and spaces are made context-aware and interconnected through heterogeneous networks on a global scale. However, the IoT system can suffer from poor performances when its underlying networks are not optimized. In this paper, an ontology model for representing and facilitating context sharing between network entities in WSNs is proposed for the first time. The context model aims to enable optimal context-aware management of WSNs in IoT, which will also harness the rich context knowledge of IoT systems.

  2. Modeling and simulating human teamwork behaviors using intelligent agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiaocong; Yen, John

    2004-12-01

    Among researchers in multi-agent systems there has been growing interest in using intelligent agents to model and simulate human teamwork behaviors. Teamwork modeling is important for training humans in gaining collaborative skills, for supporting humans in making critical decisions by proactively gathering, fusing, and sharing information, and for building coherent teams with both humans and agents working effectively on intelligence-intensive problems. Teamwork modeling is also challenging because the research has spanned diverse disciplines from business management to cognitive science, human discourse, and distributed artificial intelligence. This article presents an extensive, but not exhaustive, list of work in the field, where the taxonomy is organized along two main dimensions: team social structure and social behaviors. Along the dimension of social structure, we consider agent-only teams and mixed human-agent teams. Along the dimension of social behaviors, we consider collaborative behaviors, communicative behaviors, helping behaviors, and the underpinning of effective teamwork-shared mental models. The contribution of this article is that it presents an organizational framework for analyzing a variety of teamwork simulation systems and for further studying simulated teamwork behaviors.

  3. An ontology for factors affecting tuberculosis treatment adherence behavior in sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogundele OA

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Olukunle Ayodeji Ogundele,1 Deshendran Moodley,1 Anban W Pillay,1 Christopher J Seebregts1,2 1UKZN/CSIR Meraka Centre for Artificial Intelligence Research and Health Architecture Laboratory, School of Mathematics, Statistics and Computer Science, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, KwaZulu-Natal, 2Jembi Health Systems NPC, Cape Town, South Africa Purpose: Adherence behavior is a complex phenomenon influenced by diverse personal, cultural, and socioeconomic factors that may vary between communities in different regions. Understanding the factors that influence adherence behavior is essential in predicting which individuals and communities are at risk of nonadherence. This is necessary for supporting resource allocation and intervention planning in disease control programs. Currently, there is no known concrete and unambiguous computational representation of factors that influence tuberculosis (TB treatment adherence behavior that is useful for prediction. This study developed a computer-based conceptual model for capturing and structuring knowledge about the factors that influence TB treatment adherence behavior in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA.Methods: An extensive review of existing categorization systems in the literature was used to develop a conceptual model that captured scientific knowledge about TB adherence behavior in SSA. The model was formalized as an ontology using the web ontology language. The ontology was then evaluated for its comprehensiveness and applicability in building predictive models. Conclusion: The outcome of the study is a novel ontology-based approach for curating and structuring scientific knowledge of adherence behavior in patients with TB in SSA. The ontology takes an evidence-based approach by explicitly linking factors to published clinical studies. Factors are structured around five dimensions: factor type, type of effect, regional variation, cross-dependencies between factors, and treatment phase. The ontology is

  4. THE FUZZY OVERLAY STUDENT MODEL IN AN INTELLIGENT TUTORING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. I. Popov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the development of the student model for use in an intelligent tutoring system (ITS designed for the evaluation of students’ competencies in different Higher Education Facilities. There are classification and examples of the various student models, the most suitable for the evaluation of competencies is selected and finalized. The dynamic overlay fuzzy student model builded on the domain model based on the concept of didactic units is described in this work. The formulas, chart and diagrams are provided.

  5. Modeling intelligent agent beliefs in a card game scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gołuński, Marcel; Tomanek, Roman; WÄ siewicz, Piotr

    In this paper we explore the problem of intelligent agent beliefs. We model agent beliefs using multimodal logics of belief, KD45(m) system implemented as a directed graph depicting Kripke semantics, precisely. We present a card game engine application which allows multiple agents to connect to a given game session and play the card game. As an example simplified version of popular Saboteur card game is used. Implementation was done in Java language using following libraries and applications: Apache Mina, LWJGL.

  6. Thermal Models for Intelligent Heating of Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thavlov, Anders; Bindner, Henrik W.

    2012-01-01

    using a grey box approach, i.e. by formulating the model using physical knowledge about heat flow, while the parameters in the model are estimated using collected data and statistics. The physical parameters in the model, e.g. heat capacities and resistances to transfer heat, have been estimated...... share of renewable power generation, which is in general intermittent and non-controllable, the consumption side has to be much more flexible than today. To achieve such flexibility, methods for moving power consumption in time, within the hourly timescale, have to be developed. One approach currently...

  7. Implementation of Ontology Mapping for Computational Agents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neruda, Roman

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 1 (2006), s. 58-63 ISSN 1991-8755 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET100300419 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : multi-agent systems * ontology * computational intelligence Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science

  8. Formal ontologies in biomedical knowledge representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, S; Jansen, L

    2013-01-01

    Medical decision support and other intelligent applications in the life sciences depend on increasing amounts of digital information. Knowledge bases as well as formal ontologies are being used to organize biomedical knowledge and data. However, these two kinds of artefacts are not always clearly distinguished. Whereas the popular RDF(S) standard provides an intuitive triple-based representation, it is semantically weak. Description logics based ontology languages like OWL-DL carry a clear-cut semantics, but they are computationally expensive, and they are often misinterpreted to encode all kinds of statements, including those which are not ontological. We distinguish four kinds of statements needed to comprehensively represent domain knowledge: universal statements, terminological statements, statements about particulars and contingent statements. We argue that the task of formal ontologies is solely to represent universal statements, while the non-ontological kinds of statements can nevertheless be connected with ontological representations. To illustrate these four types of representations, we use a running example from parasitology. We finally formulate recommendations for semantically adequate ontologies that can efficiently be used as a stable framework for more context-dependent biomedical knowledge representation and reasoning applications like clinical decision support systems.

  9. Revealing ontological commitments by magic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Thomas L

    2015-03-01

    Considering the appeal of different magical transformations exposes some systematic asymmetries. For example, it is more interesting to transform a vase into a rose than a rose into a vase. An experiment in which people judged how interesting they found different magic tricks showed that these asymmetries reflect the direction a transformation moves in an ontological hierarchy: transformations in the direction of animacy and intelligence are favored over the opposite. A second and third experiment demonstrated that judgments of the plausibility of machines that perform the same transformations do not show the same asymmetries, but judgments of the interestingness of such machines do. A formal argument relates this sense of interestingness to evidence for an alternative to our current physical theory, with magic tricks being a particularly pure source of such evidence. These results suggest that people's intuitions about magic tricks can reveal the ontological commitments that underlie human cognition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A 2013 workshop: vaccine and drug ontology studies (VDOS 2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Cui; He, Yongqun; Arabandi, Sivaram

    2014-03-20

    The 2013 "Vaccine and Drug Ontology Studies" (VDOS 2013) international workshop series focuses on vaccine- and drug-related ontology modeling and applications. Drugs and vaccines have contributed to dramatic improvements in public health worldwide. Over the last decade, tremendous efforts have been made in the biomedical ontology community to ontologically represent various areas associated with vaccines and drugs - extending existing clinical terminology systems such as SNOMED, RxNorm, NDF-RT, and MedDRA, as well as developing new models such as Vaccine Ontology. The VDOS workshop series provides a platform for discussing innovative solutions as well as the challenges in the development and applications of biomedical ontologies for representing and analyzing drugs and vaccines, their administration, host immune responses, adverse events, and other related topics. The six full-length papers included in this thematic issue focuses on three main areas: (i) ontology development and representation, (ii) ontology mapping, maintaining and auditing, and (iii) ontology applications.

  11. Electricity load modelling using computational intelligence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Borg, R.W.

    2005-01-01

    As a consequence of the liberalisation of the electricity markets in Europe, market players have to continuously adapt their future supply to match their customers' demands. This poses the challenge of obtaining a predictive model that accurately describes electricity loads, current in this thesis.

  12. The role of business intelligence in decision process modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Višnja Istrat

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Decision making is a very significant and complex function of management that requires methods and techniques that simplify the process of choosing the best alternative. In modern business, the challenge for managers is to find the alternatives for improving the decision-making process. Decisions directly affect profit generation and positioning of the company in the market. It is well-known that people dealt with the phenomenon of decision making in each phase of the development of society, which has triggered the need to learn more about this process. The main contribution of this paper is to show the significance of business intelligence tools and techniques as support to the decision making process of managers. Research results have shown that business intelligence plays an enormous role in modern decision process modeling.

  13. Modeling and Control of Intelligent Flexible Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-26

    Mexico , Feb. 1993. "Model Correction Using Constrained Eigenstructure Assignment,’llth International Modal Analysis Conference, February 1993, Orlando...repeated modes. Assume the firt p modes am repeared with identify the moda paripion tem #i,. a multiplicity of 2 and the remaining modes are distdnct...c"d & Aerosaace En .eer,.ng Saonu Hemck Pmfenor Stuie Uaivers... of.Vew Yore at •wiqalo Depwone of Enpuriwng Science an .Mec, namc qaio..Y ’ 14.60

  14. The Interaction Network Ontology-supported modeling and mining of complex interactions represented with multiple keywords in biomedical literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özgür, Arzucan; Hur, Junguk; He, Yongqun

    2016-01-01

    The Interaction Network Ontology (INO) logically represents biological interactions, pathways, and networks. INO has been demonstrated to be valuable in providing a set of structured ontological terms and associated keywords to support literature mining of gene-gene interactions from biomedical literature. However, previous work using INO focused on single keyword matching, while many interactions are represented with two or more interaction keywords used in combination. This paper reports our extension of INO to include combinatory patterns of two or more literature mining keywords co-existing in one sentence to represent specific INO interaction classes. Such keyword combinations and related INO interaction type information could be automatically obtained via SPARQL queries, formatted in Excel format, and used in an INO-supported SciMiner, an in-house literature mining program. We studied the gene interaction sentences from the commonly used benchmark Learning Logic in Language (LLL) dataset and one internally generated vaccine-related dataset to identify and analyze interaction types containing multiple keywords. Patterns obtained from the dependency parse trees of the sentences were used to identify the interaction keywords that are related to each other and collectively represent an interaction type. The INO ontology currently has 575 terms including 202 terms under the interaction branch. The relations between the INO interaction types and associated keywords are represented using the INO annotation relations: 'has literature mining keywords' and 'has keyword dependency pattern'. The keyword dependency patterns were generated via running the Stanford Parser to obtain dependency relation types. Out of the 107 interactions in the LLL dataset represented with two-keyword interaction types, 86 were identified by using the direct dependency relations. The LLL dataset contained 34 gene regulation interaction types, each of which associated with multiple keywords. A

  15. Modelling fuel cell performance using artificial intelligence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogaji, S.O.T.; Singh, R.; Pilidis, P.; Diacakis, M. [Power Propulsion and Aerospace Engineering Department, Centre for Diagnostics and Life Cycle Costs, Cranfield University (United Kingdom)

    2006-03-09

    Over the last few years, fuel cell technology has been increasing promisingly its share in the generation of stationary power. Numerous pilot projects are operating worldwide, continuously increasing the amount of operating hours either as stand-alone devices or as part of gas turbine combined cycles. An essential tool for the adequate and dynamic analysis of such systems is a software model that enables the user to assess a large number of alternative options in the least possible time. On the other hand, the sphere of application of artificial neural networks has widened covering such endeavours of life such as medicine, finance and unsurprisingly engineering (diagnostics of faults in machines). Artificial neural networks have been described as diagrammatic representation of a mathematical equation that receives values (inputs) and gives out results (outputs). Artificial neural networks systems have the capacity to recognise and associate patterns and because of their inherent design features, they can be applied to linear and non-linear problem domains. In this paper, the performance of the fuel cell is modelled using artificial neural networks. The inputs to the network are variables that are critical to the performance of the fuel cell while the outputs are the result of changes in any one or all of the fuel cell design variables, on its performance. Critical parameters for the cell include the geometrical configuration as well as the operating conditions. For the neural network, various network design parameters such as the network size, training algorithm, activation functions and their causes on the effectiveness of the performance modelling are discussed. Results from the analysis as well as the limitations of the approach are presented and discussed. (author)

  16. Modelling fuel cell performance using artificial intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogaji, S. O. T.; Singh, R.; Pilidis, P.; Diacakis, M.

    Over the last few years, fuel cell technology has been increasing promisingly its share in the generation of stationary power. Numerous pilot projects are operating worldwide, continuously increasing the amount of operating hours either as stand-alone devices or as part of gas turbine combined cycles. An essential tool for the adequate and dynamic analysis of such systems is a software model that enables the user to assess a large number of alternative options in the least possible time. On the other hand, the sphere of application of artificial neural networks has widened covering such endeavours of life such as medicine, finance and unsurprisingly engineering (diagnostics of faults in machines). Artificial neural networks have been described as diagrammatic representation of a mathematical equation that receives values (inputs) and gives out results (outputs). Artificial neural networks systems have the capacity to recognise and associate patterns and because of their inherent design features, they can be applied to linear and non-linear problem domains. In this paper, the performance of the fuel cell is modelled using artificial neural networks. The inputs to the network are variables that are critical to the performance of the fuel cell while the outputs are the result of changes in any one or all of the fuel cell design variables, on its performance. Critical parameters for the cell include the geometrical configuration as well as the operating conditions. For the neural network, various network design parameters such as the network size, training algorithm, activation functions and their causes on the effectiveness of the performance modelling are discussed. Results from the analysis as well as the limitations of the approach are presented and discussed.

  17. Evaluation Results of an Ontology-based Design Model of Virtual Environments for Upper Limb Motor Rehabilitation of Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Fernández, Cristina; Morán, Alberto L; García-Canseco, Eloísa; Gómez-Montalvo, Jorge R

    2017-03-23

    1) To enhance the content of an ontology for designing virtual environments (VEs) for upper limb motor rehabilitation of stroke patients according to the suggestions and comments of rehabilitation specialists and software developers, 2) to characterize the perceived importance level of the ontology, 3) to determine the perceived usefulness of the ontology, and 4) to identify the safety characteristics of the ontology for VEs design according to the rehabilitation specialists. Using two semi-structured Web questionnaires, we asked six rehabilitation specialists and six software developers to provide us with their perception regarding the level of importance and the usability of the ontology. From their responses we have identified themes related to perceived and required safety characteristics of the ontology. Significant differences in the importance level were obtained for the Stroke Disability, VE Configuration, Outcome Measures, and Safety Calibration classes, which were perceived as highly important by rehabilitation specialists. Regarding usability, the ontology was perceived by both groups with high usefulness, ease of use, learnability and intention of use. Concerning the thematic analysis of recommendations, eight topics for safety characteristics of the ontology were identified: adjustment of therapy strategies; selection and delimitation of movements; selection and proper calibration of the interaction device; proper selection of measuring instruments; gradual modification of the difficulty of the exercise; adaptability and variability of therapy exercises; feedback according to the capabilities of the patient; and real-time support for exercise training. The rehabilitation specialists and software developers confirmed the importance of the information contained in the ontology regarding motor rehabilitation of the upper limb. Their recommendations highlight the safety features and the advantages of the ontology as a guide for the effective design of VEs.

  18. Conceptual Model of Business Value of Business Intelligence Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Popovič, Aleš; Turk, Tomaž; Jaklič, Jurij

    2010-01-01

    With advances in the business intelligence area, there is an increasing interest for the introduction of business intelligence systems into organizations. Although the opinion about business intelligence and its creation of business value is generally accepted, economic justification of investments into business intelligence systems is not always clear. Measuring the business value of business intelligence in practice is often not carried out due to the lack of measurement methods and resourc...

  19. Vaccine and Drug Ontology Studies (VDOS 2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Cui; He, Yongqun; Arabandi, Sivaram

    2016-01-01

    The "Vaccine and Drug Ontology Studies" (VDOS) international workshop series focuses on vaccine- and drug-related ontology modeling and applications. Drugs and vaccines have been critical to prevent and treat human and animal diseases. Work in both (drugs and vaccines) areas is closely related - from preclinical research and development to manufacturing, clinical trials, government approval and regulation, and post-licensure usage surveillance and monitoring. Over the last decade, tremendous efforts have been made in the biomedical ontology community to ontologically represent various areas associated with vaccines and drugs - extending existing clinical terminology systems such as SNOMED, RxNorm, NDF-RT, and MedDRA, developing new models such as the Vaccine Ontology (VO) and Ontology of Adverse Events (OAE), vernacular medical terminologies such as the Consumer Health Vocabulary (CHV). The VDOS workshop series provides a platform for discussing innovative solutions as well as the challenges in the development and applications of biomedical ontologies for representing and analyzing drugs and vaccines, their administration, host immune responses, adverse events, and other related topics. The five full-length papers included in this 2014 thematic issue focus on two main themes: (i) General vaccine/drug-related ontology development and exploration, and (ii) Interaction and network-related ontology studies.

  20. Intelligent diagnosis of jaundice with dynamic uncertain causality graph model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Shao-Rui; Geng, Shi-Chao; Fan, Lin-Xiao; Chen, Jia-Jia; Zhang, Qin; Li, Lan-Juan

    2017-05-01

    Jaundice is a common and complex clinical symptom potentially occurring in hepatology, general surgery, pediatrics, infectious diseases, gynecology, and obstetrics, and it is fairly difficult to distinguish the cause of jaundice in clinical practice, especially for general practitioners in less developed regions. With collaboration between physicians and artificial intelligence engineers, a comprehensive knowledge base relevant to jaundice was created based on demographic information, symptoms, physical signs, laboratory tests, imaging diagnosis, medical histories, and risk factors. Then a diagnostic modeling and reasoning system using the dynamic uncertain causality graph was proposed. A modularized modeling scheme was presented to reduce the complexity of model construction, providing multiple perspectives and arbitrary granularity for disease causality representations. A "chaining" inference algorithm and weighted logic operation mechanism were employed to guarantee the exactness and efficiency of diagnostic reasoning under situations of incomplete and uncertain information. Moreover, the causal interactions among diseases and symptoms intuitively demonstrated the reasoning process in a graphical manner. Verification was performed using 203 randomly pooled clinical cases, and the accuracy was 99.01% and 84.73%, respectively, with or without laboratory tests in the model. The solutions were more explicable and convincing than common methods such as Bayesian Networks, further increasing the objectivity of clinical decision-making. The promising results indicated that our model could be potentially used in intelligent diagnosis and help decrease public health expenditure.

  1. Intelligent diagnosis of jaundice with dynamic uncertain causality graph model*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Shao-rui; Geng, Shi-chao; Fan, Lin-xiao; Chen, Jia-jia; Zhang, Qin; Li, Lan-juan

    2017-01-01

    Jaundice is a common and complex clinical symptom potentially occurring in hepatology, general surgery, pediatrics, infectious diseases, gynecology, and obstetrics, and it is fairly difficult to distinguish the cause of jaundice in clinical practice, especially for general practitioners in less developed regions. With collaboration between physicians and artificial intelligence engineers, a comprehensive knowledge base relevant to jaundice was created based on demographic information, symptoms, physical signs, laboratory tests, imaging diagnosis, medical histories, and risk factors. Then a diagnostic modeling and reasoning system using the dynamic uncertain causality graph was proposed. A modularized modeling scheme was presented to reduce the complexity of model construction, providing multiple perspectives and arbitrary granularity for disease causality representations. A “chaining” inference algorithm and weighted logic operation mechanism were employed to guarantee the exactness and efficiency of diagnostic reasoning under situations of incomplete and uncertain information. Moreover, the causal interactions among diseases and symptoms intuitively demonstrated the reasoning process in a graphical manner. Verification was performed using 203 randomly pooled clinical cases, and the accuracy was 99.01% and 84.73%, respectively, with or without laboratory tests in the model. The solutions were more explicable and convincing than common methods such as Bayesian Networks, further increasing the objectivity of clinical decision-making. The promising results indicated that our model could be potentially used in intelligent diagnosis and help decrease public health expenditure. PMID:28471111

  2. Leave-two-out stability of ontology learning algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jianzhang; Yu, Xiao; Zhu, Linli; Gao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Ontology is a semantic analysis and calculation model, which has been applied to many subjects. Ontology similarity calculation and ontology mapping are employed as machine learning approaches. The purpose of this paper is to study the leave-two-out stability of ontology learning algorithm. Several leave-two-out stabilities are defined in ontology learning setting and the relationship among these stabilities are presented. Furthermore, the results manifested reveal that leave-two-out stability is a sufficient and necessary condition for ontology learning algorithm.

  3. Addressing Diverse Learner Preferences and Intelligences with Emerging Technologies: Matching Models to Online Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ke; Bonk, Curtis J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper critically reviews various learning preferences and human intelligence theories and models with a particular focus on the implications for online learning. It highlights a few key models, Gardner's multiple intelligences, Fleming and Mills' VARK model, Honey and Mumford's Learning Styles, and Kolb's Experiential Learning Model, and…

  4. Dynamic intelligent cleaning model of dirty electric load data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiaoxing [State Key Laboratory of Power Transmission Equipment and System Security and New Technology, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Sun, Caixin [The Key Laboratory of High Voltage Engineering and Electrical New Technology, Ministry of Education, Electrical Engineering College of Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2008-04-15

    There are a number of dirty data in the load database derived from the supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system. Thus, the data must be carefully and reasonably adjusted before it is used for electric load forecasting or power system analysis. This paper proposes a dynamic and intelligent data cleaning model based on data mining theory. Firstly, on the basis of fuzzy soft clustering, the Kohonen clustering network is improved to fulfill the parallel calculation of fuzzy c-means soft clustering. Then, the proposed dynamic algorithm can automatically find the new clustering center (the characteristic curve of the data) with the updated sample data; At last, it is composed with radial basis function neural network (RBFNN), and then, an intelligent adjusting model is proposed to identify the dirty data. The rapid and dynamic performance of the model makes it suitable for real time calculation, and the efficiency and accuracy of the model is proved by test results of electrical load data analysis in Chongqing. (author)

  5. Dynamic intelligent cleaning model of dirty electric load data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Xiaoxing [State Key Laboratory of Power Transmission Equipment and System Security and New Technology, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)], E-mail: mikezxx@tom.com; Sun Caixin [Key Laboratory of High Voltage Engineering and Electrical New Technology, Ministry of Education, Electrical Engineering College of Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2008-04-15

    There are a number of dirty data in the load database derived from the supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system. Thus, the data must be carefully and reasonably adjusted before it is used for electric load forecasting or power system analysis. This paper proposes a dynamic and intelligent data cleaning model based on data mining theory. Firstly, on the basis of fuzzy soft clustering, the Kohonen clustering network is improved to fulfill the parallel calculation of fuzzy c-means soft clustering. Then, the proposed dynamic algorithm can automatically find the new clustering center (the characteristic curve of the data) with the updated sample data; At last, it is composed with radial basis function neural network (RBFNN), and then, an intelligent adjusting model is proposed to identify the dirty data. The rapid and dynamic performance of the model makes it suitable for real time calculation, and the efficiency and accuracy of the model is proved by test results of electrical load data analysis in Chongqing.

  6. Dynamic intelligent cleaning model of dirty electric load data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiaoxing; Sun Caixin

    2008-01-01

    There are a number of dirty data in the load database derived from the supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system. Thus, the data must be carefully and reasonably adjusted before it is used for electric load forecasting or power system analysis. This paper proposes a dynamic and intelligent data cleaning model based on data mining theory. Firstly, on the basis of fuzzy soft clustering, the Kohonen clustering network is improved to fulfill the parallel calculation of fuzzy c-means soft clustering. Then, the proposed dynamic algorithm can automatically find the new clustering center (the characteristic curve of the data) with the updated sample data; At last, it is composed with radial basis function neural network (RBFNN), and then, an intelligent adjusting model is proposed to identify the dirty data. The rapid and dynamic performance of the model makes it suitable for real time calculation, and the efficiency and accuracy of the model is proved by test results of electrical load data analysis in Chongqing

  7. A human performance modelling approach to intelligent decision support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccoy, Michael S.; Boys, Randy M.

    1987-01-01

    Manned space operations require that the many automated subsystems of a space platform be controllable by a limited number of personnel. To minimize the interaction required of these operators, artificial intelligence techniques may be applied to embed a human performance model within the automated, or semi-automated, systems, thereby allowing the derivation of operator intent. A similar application has previously been proposed in the domain of fighter piloting, where the demand for pilot intent derivation is primarily a function of limited time and high workload rather than limited operators. The derivation and propagation of pilot intent is presented as it might be applied to some programs.

  8. A psychoanalyst artificial intelligence model in a computer game

    OpenAIRE

    Muñoz Fernández, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Projecte realitzat en el marc d'un programa de mobilitat amb la Vienna University of Technology. [ANGLÈS] Implementation of an artificial intelligence model based on the psychoanalytic theory of the ID-Ego-SuperEgo of Sigmund Freud into the computer game Unreal Tournament 2004. [CASTELLÀ] Implementación de un modelo de inteligencia artificial basado en la teoría psicoanalítica del ID-Ego-SuperEgo de Sigmund Freud en el videojuego Unreal Tournament 2004. [CATALÀ] Implementació d'un mo...

  9. Modeling the Structure and Effectiveness of Intelligence Organizations: Dynamic Information Flow Simulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Behrman, Robert; Carley, Kathleen

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the Dynamic Information Flow Simulation (DIFS), an abstract model for analyzing the structure and function of intelligence support organizations and the activities of entities within...

  10. An Ontology Design Pattern for Digital Video

    OpenAIRE

    Mitzias, Panagiotis; Riga, Marina; Waddington, Simon; Kontopoulos, Efstratios; Meditskos, Georgios; Laurenson, Pip; Kompatsiaris, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    The paper proposes an Ontology Design Pattern (ODP) for modelling digital video resources, which was developed in the context of the PERICLES domain ontologies for Art & Media. The ODP can be found at this address: http://ontologydesignpatterns.org/wiki/Submissions:DigitalVideo

  11. Application of Artificial Intelligence for Bridge Deterioration Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhang; Wu, Yangyang; Sun, Lijun

    2015-01-01

    The deterministic bridge deterioration model updating problem is well established in bridge management, while the traditional methods and approaches for this problem require manual intervention. An artificial-intelligence-based approach was presented to self-updated parameters of the bridge deterioration model in this paper. When new information and data are collected, a posterior distribution was constructed to describe the integrated result of historical information and the new gained information according to Bayesian theorem, which was used to update model parameters. This AI-based approach is applied to the case of updating parameters of bridge deterioration model, which is the data collected from bridges of 12 districts in Shanghai from 2004 to 2013, and the results showed that it is an accurate, effective, and satisfactory approach to deal with the problem of the parameter updating without manual intervention. PMID:26601121

  12. Application of Artificial Intelligence for Bridge Deterioration Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhang; Wu, Yangyang; Li, Li; Sun, Lijun

    2015-01-01

    The deterministic bridge deterioration model updating problem is well established in bridge management, while the traditional methods and approaches for this problem require manual intervention. An artificial-intelligence-based approach was presented to self-updated parameters of the bridge deterioration model in this paper. When new information and data are collected, a posterior distribution was constructed to describe the integrated result of historical information and the new gained information according to Bayesian theorem, which was used to update model parameters. This AI-based approach is applied to the case of updating parameters of bridge deterioration model, which is the data collected from bridges of 12 districts in Shanghai from 2004 to 2013, and the results showed that it is an accurate, effective, and satisfactory approach to deal with the problem of the parameter updating without manual intervention.

  13. A hierarchical distributed control model for coordinating intelligent systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Richard M.

    1991-01-01

    A hierarchical distributed control (HDC) model for coordinating cooperative problem-solving among intelligent systems is described. The model was implemented using SOCIAL, an innovative object-oriented tool for integrating heterogeneous, distributed software systems. SOCIAL embeds applications in 'wrapper' objects called Agents, which supply predefined capabilities for distributed communication, control, data specification, and translation. The HDC model is realized in SOCIAL as a 'Manager'Agent that coordinates interactions among application Agents. The HDC Manager: indexes the capabilities of application Agents; routes request messages to suitable server Agents; and stores results in a commonly accessible 'Bulletin-Board'. This centralized control model is illustrated in a fault diagnosis application for launch operations support of the Space Shuttle fleet at NASA, Kennedy Space Center.

  14. Advances in Intelligent Modelling and Simulation Simulation Tools and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Oplatková, Zuzana; Carvalho, Marco; Kisiel-Dorohinicki, Marek

    2012-01-01

    The human capacity to abstract complex systems and phenomena into simplified models has played a critical role in the rapid evolution of our modern industrial processes and scientific research. As a science and an art, Modelling and Simulation have been one of the core enablers of this remarkable human trace, and have become a topic of great importance for researchers and practitioners. This book was created to compile some of the most recent concepts, advances, challenges and ideas associated with Intelligent Modelling and Simulation frameworks, tools and applications. The first chapter discusses the important aspects of a human interaction and the correct interpretation of results during simulations. The second chapter gets to the heart of the analysis of entrepreneurship by means of agent-based modelling and simulations. The following three chapters bring together the central theme of simulation frameworks, first describing an agent-based simulation framework, then a simulator for electrical machines, and...

  15. Application of Artificial Intelligence for Bridge Deterioration Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The deterministic bridge deterioration model updating problem is well established in bridge management, while the traditional methods and approaches for this problem require manual intervention. An artificial-intelligence-based approach was presented to self-updated parameters of the bridge deterioration model in this paper. When new information and data are collected, a posterior distribution was constructed to describe the integrated result of historical information and the new gained information according to Bayesian theorem, which was used to update model parameters. This AI-based approach is applied to the case of updating parameters of bridge deterioration model, which is the data collected from bridges of 12 districts in Shanghai from 2004 to 2013, and the results showed that it is an accurate, effective, and satisfactory approach to deal with the problem of the parameter updating without manual intervention.

  16. New challenges in computational collective intelligence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ngoc Thanh; Katarzyniak, Radoslaw Piotr [Wroclaw Univ. of Technology (Poland). Inst. of Informatics; Janiak, Adam (eds.) [Wroclaw Univ. of Technology (Poland). Inst. of Computer Engineering, Control and Robotics

    2009-07-01

    The book consists of 29 chapters which have been selected and invited from the submissions to the 1{sup st} International Conference on Collective Intelligence - Semantic Web, Social Networks and Multiagent Systems (ICCCI 2009). All chapters in the book discuss various examples of applications of computational collective intelligence and related technologies to such fields as semantic web, information systems ontologies, social networks, agent and multiagent systems. The editors hope that the book can be useful for graduate and Ph.D. students in Computer Science, in particular participants to courses on Soft Computing, Multi-Agent Systems and Robotics. This book can also be useful for researchers working on the concept of computational collective intelligence in artificial populations. It is the hope of the editors that readers of this volume can find many inspiring ideas and use them to create new cases intelligent collectives. Many such challenges are suggested by particular approaches and models presented in particular chapters of this book. (orig.)

  17. Forecasting municipal solid waste generation using artificial intelligence modelling approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Maryam; El Hanandeh, Ali

    2016-10-01

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) management is a major concern to local governments to protect human health, the environment and to preserve natural resources. The design and operation of an effective MSW management system requires accurate estimation of future waste generation quantities. The main objective of this study was to develop a model for accurate forecasting of MSW generation that helps waste related organizations to better design and operate effective MSW management systems. Four intelligent system algorithms including support vector machine (SVM), adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS), artificial neural network (ANN) and k-nearest neighbours (kNN) were tested for their ability to predict monthly waste generation in the Logan City Council region in Queensland, Australia. Results showed artificial intelligence models have good prediction performance and could be successfully applied to establish municipal solid waste forecasting models. Using machine learning algorithms can reliably predict monthly MSW generation by training with waste generation time series. In addition, results suggest that ANFIS system produced the most accurate forecasts of the peaks while kNN was successful in predicting the monthly averages of waste quantities. Based on the results, the total annual MSW generated in Logan City will reach 9.4×10(7)kg by 2020 while the peak monthly waste will reach 9.37×10(6)kg. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Emotional intelligence: an integrative meta-analysis and cascading model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Dana L; Newman, Daniel A

    2010-01-01

    Research and valid practice in emotional intelligence (EI) have been impeded by lack of theoretical clarity regarding (a) the relative roles of emotion perception, emotion understanding, and emotion regulation facets in explaining job performance; (b) conceptual redundancy of EI with cognitive intelligence and Big Five personality; and (c) application of the EI label to 2 distinct sets of constructs (i.e., ability-based EI and mixed-based EI). In the current article, the authors propose and then test a theoretical model that integrates these factors. They specify a progressive (cascading) pattern among ability-based EI facets, in which emotion perception must causally precede emotion understanding, which in turn precedes conscious emotion regulation and job performance. The sequential elements in this progressive model are believed to selectively reflect Conscientiousness, cognitive ability, and Neuroticism, respectively. "Mixed-based" measures of EI are expected to explain variance in job performance beyond cognitive ability and personality. The cascading model of EI is empirically confirmed via meta-analytic data, although relationships between ability-based EI and job performance are shown to be inconsistent (i.e., EI positively predicts performance for high emotional labor jobs and negatively predicts performance for low emotional labor jobs). Gender and race differences in EI are also meta-analyzed. Implications for linking the EI fad in personnel selection to established psychological theory are discussed. Copyright 2009 APA, all rights reserved.

  19. Modeling the prediction of business intelligence system effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Sung-Shun; Yang, Ming-Hsien; Koo, Tian-Lih; Hsiao, Pei-I

    2016-01-01

    Although business intelligence (BI) technologies are continually evolving, the capability to apply BI technologies has become an indispensable resource for enterprises running in today's complex, uncertain and dynamic business environment. This study performed pioneering work by constructing models and rules for the prediction of business intelligence system effectiveness (BISE) in relation to the implementation of BI solutions. For enterprises, effectively managing critical attributes that determine BISE to develop prediction models with a set of rules for self-evaluation of the effectiveness of BI solutions is necessary to improve BI implementation and ensure its success. The main study findings identified the critical prediction indicators of BISE that are important to forecasting BI performance and highlighted five classification and prediction rules of BISE derived from decision tree structures, as well as a refined regression prediction model with four critical prediction indicators constructed by logistic regression analysis that can enable enterprises to improve BISE while effectively managing BI solution implementation and catering to academics to whom theory is important.

  20. Use of the CIM Ontology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, Scott; Britton, Jay; Devos, Arnold N.; Widergren, Steven E.

    2006-02-08

    There are many uses for the Common Information Model (CIM), an ontology that is being standardized through Technical Committee 57 of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC TC57). The most common uses to date have included application modeling, information exchanges, information management and systems integration. As one should expect, there are many issues that become apparent when the CIM ontology is applied to any one use. Some of these issues are shortcomings within the current draft of the CIM, and others are a consequence of the different ways in which the CIM can be applied using different technologies. As the CIM ontology will and should evolve, there are several dangers that need to be recognized. One is overall consistency and impact upon applications when extending the CIM for a specific need. Another is that a tight coupling of the CIM to specific technologies could limit the value of the CIM in the longer term as an ontology, which becomes a larger issue over time as new technologies emerge. The integration of systems is one specific area of interest for application of the CIM ontology. This is an area dominated by the use of XML for the definition of messages. While this is certainly true when using Enterprise Application Integration (EAI) products, it is even more true with the movement towards the use of Web Services (WS), Service-Oriented Architectures (SOA) and Enterprise Service Buses (ESB) for integration. This general IT industry trend is consistent with trends seen within the IEC TC57 scope of power system management and associated information exchange. The challenge for TC57 is how to best leverage the CIM ontology using the various XML technologies and standards for integration. This paper will provide examples of how the CIM ontology is used and describe some specific issues that should be addressed within the CIM in order to increase its usefulness as an ontology. It will also describe some of the issues and challenges that will

  1. MODELOS ONTOLÓGICOS DE SOPORTE A LA GESTIÓN DE COMPETENCIAS PROFESIONALES/ ONTOLOGICAL MODELS FOR PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCES MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Blanco-González

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Desde los inicios de la década del 90 del pasado siglo, el desarrollo de nuevas tecnologías asociadas a la gestión del conocimiento marcaron una nueva forma de control que permitió formalizar, capturar, organizar y reutilizar el conocimiento asociado a los escenarios en los que las competencias se ponen de manifiesto, tanto en el ámbito laboral como académico. En la presente investigación se realiza un estudio del estado del arte sobre modelos ontológicos de soporte a la gestión de competencias profesionales, con vistas a caracterizar algunos de éstos en función del aporte que realizan a los requerimientos tecnológicos de un proceso de identificación de competencias. Como resultado se identificaron un conjunto de modelos ontológicos con características y propósitos muy variados, para los cuales fue necesario definir un conjunto de parámetros para su evaluación. Del estudio se pudo concluir que ninguno de los modelos identificados satisface completamente los requerimientos del proceso de identificación de competencias objeto de estudio.

    Abstract

    Since the beginning of the 90s of the past century, the development of new technologies associated to Knowledge Management, marked a new form of control that allowed to formalize, to capture, to organize and to reuse the knowledge associated to each one of the stages in which the competences are manifested, both in the work and academic field. In this research it is carried out a study about the state of the art of ontological models for supporting the professional competences management, with the purpose of characterizing some of them in order to identify their contribution to the technological requirements of a process of competences identification. As the main result, a set of ontological models with very varied characteristics and purposes were identified, and it was necessary to define a set of parameters for its assessment. It was concluded that

  2. Terrorism Risk Modeling for Intelligence Analysis and Infrastructure Protection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Willis, Henry H; LaTourrette, Tom; Kelly, Terrence K; Hickey, Scot; Neill, Samuel

    2007-01-01

    ...? The Office of Intelligence and Analysis (OI&A) at DHS is responsible for using information and intelligence from multiple sources to identify and assess current and future threats to the United States...

  3. Ontologies vs. Classification Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Bodil Nistrup; Erdman Thomsen, Hanne

    2009-01-01

    What is an ontology compared to a classification system? Is a taxonomy a kind of classification system or a kind of ontology? These are questions that we meet when working with people from industry and public authorities, who need methods and tools for concept clarification, for developing meta...... data sets or for obtaining advanced search facilities. In this paper we will present an attempt at answering these questions. We will give a presentation of various types of ontologies and briefly introduce terminological ontologies. Furthermore we will argue that classification systems, e.g. product...... classification systems and meta data taxonomies, should be based on ontologies....

  4. Statistical mechanics of ontology based annotations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyle, David C.; Brass, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    We present a statistical mechanical theory of the process of annotating an object with terms selected from an ontology. The term selection process is formulated as an ideal lattice gas model, but in a highly structured inhomogeneous field. The model enables us to explain patterns recently observed in real-world annotation data sets, in terms of the underlying graph structure of the ontology. By relating the external field strengths to the information content of each node in the ontology graph, the statistical mechanical model also allows us to propose a number of practical metrics for assessing the quality of both the ontology, and the annotations that arise from its use. Using the statistical mechanical formalism we also study an ensemble of ontologies of differing size and complexity; an analysis not readily performed using real data alone. Focusing on regular tree ontology graphs we uncover a rich set of scaling laws describing the growth in the optimal ontology size as the number of objects being annotated increases. In doing so we provide a further possible measure for assessment of ontologies.

  5. A Web-Based Data-Querying Tool Based on Ontology-Driven Methodology and Flowchart-Based Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Xiao-Ou; Chung, Yufang; Liang, Ja-Der; Yang, Pei-Ming; Huang, Guan-Tarn; Lai, Feipei

    2013-01-01

    Background Because of the increased adoption rate of electronic medical record (EMR) systems, more health care records have been increasingly accumulating in clinical data repositories. Therefore, querying the data stored in these repositories is crucial for retrieving the knowledge from such large volumes of clinical data. Objective The aim of this study is to develop a Web-based approach for enriching the capabilities of the data-querying system along the three following considerations: (1) the interface design used for query formulation, (2) the representation of query results, and (3) the models used for formulating query criteria. Methods The Guideline Interchange Format version 3.5 (GLIF3.5), an ontology-driven clinical guideline representation language, was used for formulating the query tasks based on the GLIF3.5 flowchart in the Protégé environment. The flowchart-based data-querying model (FBDQM) query execution engine was developed and implemented for executing queries and presenting the results through a visual and graphical interface. To examine a broad variety of patient data, the clinical data generator was implemented to automatically generate the clinical data in the repository, and the generated data, thereby, were employed to evaluate the system. The accuracy and time performance of the system for three medical query tasks relevant to liver cancer were evaluated based on the clinical data generator in the experiments with varying numbers of patients. Results In this study, a prototype system was developed to test the feasibility of applying a methodology for building a query execution engine using FBDQMs by formulating query tasks using the existing GLIF. The FBDQM-based query execution engine was used to successfully retrieve the clinical data based on the query tasks formatted using the GLIF3.5 in the experiments with varying numbers of patients. The accuracy of the three queries (ie, “degree of liver damage,” “degree of liver damage

  6. Research on geo-ontology construction based on spatial affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Liu, Jiping; Shi, Lihong

    2008-12-01

    Geo-ontology, a kind of domain ontology, is used to make the knowledge, information and data of concerned geographical science in the abstract to form a series of single object or entity with common cognition. These single object or entity can compose a specific system in some certain way and can be disposed on conception and given specific definition at the same time. Ultimately, these above-mentioned worked results can be expressed in some manners of formalization. The main aim of constructing geo-ontology is to get the knowledge of the domain of geography, and provide the commonly approbatory vocabularies in the domain, as well as give the definite definition about these geographical vocabularies and mutual relations between them in the mode of formalization at different hiberarchy. Consequently, the modeling tool of conception model of describing geographic Information System at the hiberarchy of semantic meaning and knowledge can be provided to solve the semantic conception of information exchange in geographical space and make them possess the comparatively possible characters of accuracy, maturity and universality, etc. In fact, some experiments have been made to validate geo-ontology. During the course of studying, Geo-ontology oriented to flood can be described and constructed by making the method based on geo-spatial affairs to serve the governmental departments at all levels to deal with flood. Thereinto, intelligent retrieve and service based on geoontology of disaster are main functions known from the traditional manner by using keywords. For instance, the function of dealing with disaster information based on geo-ontology can be provided when a supposed flood happened in a certain city. The correlative officers can input some words, such as "city name, flood", which have been realized semantic label, to get the information they needed when they browse different websites. The information, including basic geographical information and flood distributing

  7. Markov Chain Ontology Analysis (MCOA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frost H

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biomedical ontologies have become an increasingly critical lens through which researchers analyze the genomic, clinical and bibliographic data that fuels scientific research. Of particular relevance are methods, such as enrichment analysis, that quantify the importance of ontology classes relative to a collection of domain data. Current analytical techniques, however, remain limited in their ability to handle many important types of structural complexity encountered in real biological systems including class overlaps, continuously valued data, inter-instance relationships, non-hierarchical relationships between classes, semantic distance and sparse data. Results In this paper, we describe a methodology called Markov Chain Ontology Analysis (MCOA and illustrate its use through a MCOA-based enrichment analysis application based on a generative model of gene activation. MCOA models the classes in an ontology, the instances from an associated dataset and all directional inter-class, class-to-instance and inter-instance relationships as a single finite ergodic Markov chain. The adjusted transition probability matrix for this Markov chain enables the calculation of eigenvector values that quantify the importance of each ontology class relative to other classes and the associated data set members. On both controlled Gene Ontology (GO data sets created with Escherichia coli, Drosophila melanogaster and Homo sapiens annotations and real gene expression data extracted from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO, the MCOA enrichment analysis approach provides the best performance of comparable state-of-the-art methods. Conclusion A methodology based on Markov chain models and network analytic metrics can help detect the relevant signal within large, highly interdependent and noisy data sets and, for applications such as enrichment analysis, has been shown to generate superior performance on both real and simulated data relative to existing

  8. Markov Chain Ontology Analysis (MCOA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, H Robert; McCray, Alexa T

    2012-02-03

    Biomedical ontologies have become an increasingly critical lens through which researchers analyze the genomic, clinical and bibliographic data that fuels scientific research. Of particular relevance are methods, such as enrichment analysis, that quantify the importance of ontology classes relative to a collection of domain data. Current analytical techniques, however, remain limited in their ability to handle many important types of structural complexity encountered in real biological systems including class overlaps, continuously valued data, inter-instance relationships, non-hierarchical relationships between classes, semantic distance and sparse data. In this paper, we describe a methodology called Markov Chain Ontology Analysis (MCOA) and illustrate its use through a MCOA-based enrichment analysis application based on a generative model of gene activation. MCOA models the classes in an ontology, the instances from an associated dataset and all directional inter-class, class-to-instance and inter-instance relationships as a single finite ergodic Markov chain. The adjusted transition probability matrix for this Markov chain enables the calculation of eigenvector values that quantify the importance of each ontology class relative to other classes and the associated data set members. On both controlled Gene Ontology (GO) data sets created with Escherichia coli, Drosophila melanogaster and Homo sapiens annotations and real gene expression data extracted from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), the MCOA enrichment analysis approach provides the best performance of comparable state-of-the-art methods. A methodology based on Markov chain models and network analytic metrics can help detect the relevant signal within large, highly interdependent and noisy data sets and, for applications such as enrichment analysis, has been shown to generate superior performance on both real and simulated data relative to existing state-of-the-art approaches.

  9. The experimentation of learning models viewed from interpersonal intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhana, M. T. C.; Mardiyana; Pramudya, I.

    2017-11-01

    This research aimed to know experimentation Project Based Learning (PjBL) and Problem Based Learning (PBL) with scientific approach viewed from interpersonal intelligence. The subjects of this research were grade X MIPA students in SMA N 1 Minggir. This research instruments used were test and questionnaire. The result of the research showed that: (1) Students subjected PjBL with scientific approach had a better learning achievement than PBL with scientific approach; (2) students with high interpersonal intelligence had a better learning achievement than low and medium interpersonal intelligence, students with low and medium interpersonal intelligence gave the same learning achievement; (3) In PjBL, students with high interpersonal intelligence had a better learning achievement than low and medium interpersonal intelligence, students with low and medium interpersonal intelligence gave the same learning achievement. In PBL, students with high and medium interpersonal intelligence had a better learning achievement than low interpersonal intelligence, students with high and medium interpersonal intelligence gave the same learning achievement; (4) In high interpersonal intelligence, students subjected PjBL had a better learning achievement than students subjected PBL. In medium and low interpersonal intelligence, students subjected PjBL gave same learning achievement than students subjected PBL.

  10. On prognostic models, artificial intelligence and censored observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, S S; Hamilton, P W; Hughes, J G; Bell, D A

    2001-03-01

    The development of prognostic models for assisting medical practitioners with decision making is not a trivial task. Models need to possess a number of desirable characteristics and few, if any, current modelling approaches based on statistical or artificial intelligence can produce models that display all these characteristics. The inability of modelling techniques to provide truly useful models has led to interest in these models being purely academic in nature. This in turn has resulted in only a very small percentage of models that have been developed being deployed in practice. On the other hand, new modelling paradigms are being proposed continuously within the machine learning and statistical community and claims, often based on inadequate evaluation, being made on their superiority over traditional modelling methods. We believe that for new modelling approaches to deliver true net benefits over traditional techniques, an evaluation centric approach to their development is essential. In this paper we present such an evaluation centric approach to developing extensions to the basic k-nearest neighbour (k-NN) paradigm. We use standard statistical techniques to enhance the distance metric used and a framework based on evidence theory to obtain a prediction for the target example from the outcome of the retrieved exemplars. We refer to this new k-NN algorithm as Censored k-NN (Ck-NN). This reflects the enhancements made to k-NN that are aimed at providing a means for handling censored observations within k-NN.

  11. Time Series Analysis, Modeling and Applications A Computational Intelligence Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Shyi-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Temporal and spatiotemporal data form an inherent fabric of the society as we are faced with streams of data coming from numerous sensors, data feeds, recordings associated with numerous areas of application embracing physical and human-generated phenomena (environmental data, financial markets, Internet activities, etc.). A quest for a thorough analysis, interpretation, modeling and prediction of time series comes with an ongoing challenge for developing models that are both accurate and user-friendly (interpretable). The volume is aimed to exploit the conceptual and algorithmic framework of Computational Intelligence (CI) to form a cohesive and comprehensive environment for building models of time series. The contributions covered in the volume are fully reflective of the wealth of the CI technologies by bringing together ideas, algorithms, and numeric studies, which convincingly demonstrate their relevance, maturity and visible usefulness. It reflects upon the truly remarkable diversity of methodological a...

  12. Complex Topographic Feature Ontology Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varanka, Dalia E.; Jerris, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Semantic ontologies are examined as effective data models for the representation of complex topographic feature types. Complex feature types are viewed as integrated relations between basic features for a basic purpose. In the context of topographic science, such component assemblages are supported by resource systems and found on the local landscape. Ontologies are organized within six thematic modules of a domain ontology called Topography that includes within its sphere basic feature types, resource systems, and landscape types. Context is constructed not only as a spatial and temporal setting, but a setting also based on environmental processes. Types of spatial relations that exist between components include location, generative processes, and description. An example is offered in a complex feature type ‘mine.’ The identification and extraction of complex feature types are an area for future research.

  13. Artificial intelligence and the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clocksin, William F

    2003-08-15

    We consider some of the ideas influencing current artificial-intelligence research and outline an alternative conceptual framework that gives priority to social relationships as a key component and constructor of intelligent behaviour. The framework starts from Weizenbaum's observation that intelligence manifests itself only relative to specific social and cultural contexts. This is in contrast to a prevailing view, which sees intelligence as an abstract capability of the individual mind based on a mechanism for rational thought. The new approach is not based on the conventional idea that the mind is a rational processor of symbolic information, nor does it require the idea that thought is a kind of abstract problem solving with a semantics that is independent of its embodiment. Instead, priority is given to affective and social responses that serve to engage the whole agent in the life of the communities in which it participates. Intelligence is seen not as the deployment of capabilities for problem solving, but as constructed by the continual, ever-changing and unfinished engagement with the social group within the environment. The construction of the identity of the intelligent agent involves the appropriation or 'taking up' of positions within the conversations and narratives in which it participates. Thus, the new approach argues that the intelligent agent is shaped by the meaning ascribed to experience, by its situation in the social matrix, and by practices of self and of relationship into which intelligent life is recruited. This has implications for the technology of the future, as, for example, classic artificial intelligence models such as goal-directed problem solving are seen as special cases of narrative practices instead of as ontological foundations.

  14. Platonic wholes and quantum ontology

    CERN Document Server

    Woszczek, Marek

    2015-01-01

    The subject of the book is a reconsideration of the internalistic model of composition of the Platonic type, more radical than traditional, post-Aristotelian externalistic compositionism, and its application in the field of the ontology of quantum theory. At the centre of quantum ontology is nonseparability. Quantum wholes are atemporal wholes governed by internalistic logic and they are primitive, global physical entities, requiring an extreme relativization of the fundamental notions of mechanics. That ensures quantum theory to be fully consistent with the relativistic causal structure, with

  15. Child cancer follow-up ontology and information system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Subaihi, J.A.; Anton, François; Mioc, Darka

    2013-01-01

    brings the methodology for child cancer treatment plan that produces an ontology to create a conceptual model and a database model. To construct the ontology, the "methontology" method is used as a structured approach for the ontology process. The method guides the ontology developer from scratch...... to building a complete model. The ontology is developed in two phases. In the first phase, research from other countries and process models are reviewed and the generic model is built from this research. The generic model is adapted to the ontology for the Danish hospitals including the NOPHO-ALL 2008...... protocol. To develop the ontology, a data dictionary is first proposed. Then, the relationships between concepts are identified and verified: the oriented graph, where nodes are concepts and oriented edges are dependence relationships, where the definition of the concept at the origin of the edge depends...

  16. A Soft Intelligent Risk Evaluation Model for Credit Scoring Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Khashei

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Risk management is one of the most important branches of business and finance. Classification models are the most popular and widely used analytical group of data mining approaches that can greatly help financial decision makers and managers to tackle credit risk problems. However, the literature clearly indicates that, despite proposing numerous classification models, credit scoring is often a difficult task. On the other hand, there is no universal credit-scoring model in the literature that can be accurately and explanatorily used in all circumstances. Therefore, the research for improving the efficiency of credit-scoring models has never stopped. In this paper, a hybrid soft intelligent classification model is proposed for credit-scoring problems. In the proposed model, the unique advantages of the soft computing techniques are used in order to modify the performance of the traditional artificial neural networks in credit scoring. Empirical results of Australian credit card data classifications indicate that the proposed hybrid model outperforms its components, and also other classification models presented for credit scoring. Therefore, the proposed model can be considered as an appropriate alternative tool for binary decision making in business and finance, especially in high uncertainty conditions.

  17. Temporal Ontologies for Geoscience: Alignment Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, S. J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Time is a central concept in geoscience. Geologic histories are composed of sequences of geologic processes and events. Calibration of their timing ties a local history into a broader context, and enables correlation of events between locations. The geologic timescale is standardized in the International Chronostratigraphic Chart, which specifies interval names, and calibrations for the ages of the interval boundaries. Time is also a key concept in the world at large. A number of general purpose temporal ontologies have been developed, both stand-alone and as parts of general purpose or upper ontologies. A temporal ontology for geoscience should apply or extend a suitable general purpose temporal ontology. However, geologic time presents two challenges: Geology involves greater spans of time than in other temporal ontologies, inconsistent with the year-month-day/hour-minute-second formalization that is a basic assumption of most general purpose temporal schemes; The geologic timescale is a temporal topology. Its calibration in terms of an absolute (numeric) scale is a scientific issue in its own right supporting a significant community. In contrast, the general purpose temporal ontologies are premised on exact numeric values for temporal position, and do not allow for temporal topology as a primary structure. We have developed an ontology for the geologic timescale to account for these concerns. It uses the ISO 19108 distinctions between different types of temporal reference system, also linking to an explicit temporal topology model. Stratotypes used in the calibration process are modelled as sampling-features following the ISO 19156 Observations and Measurements model. A joint OGC-W3C harmonization project is underway, with standardization of the W3C OWL-Time ontology as one of its tasks. The insights gained from the geologic timescale ontology will assist in development of a general ontology capable of modelling a richer set of use-cases from geoscience.

  18. The Construction of Intelligent English Teaching Model Based on Artificial Intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoguang Li

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to build a modernized tool platform that can help students improve their English learning efficiency according to their mastery of knowledge and personality, this paper develops an online intelligent English learning system that uses Java and artificial intelligence language Prolog as the software system. This system is a creative reflection of the thoughts of expert system in artificial intelligence. Established on the Struts Spring Hibernate lightweight JavaEE framework, the system modules are coupled with each other in a much lower degree, which is convenient to future function extension. Combined with the idea of expert system in artificial intelligence, the system developed appropriate learning strategies to help students double the learning effect with half the effort; Finally, the system takes into account the forgetting curve of memory, on which basis the knowledge that has been learned will be tested periodically, intending to spare students’ efforts to do a sea of exercises and obtain better learning results.

  19. Modelling and Intelligent Control of an Elastic Link Robot Manipulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malik Loudini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, precise control of the end-point position of a planar single-link elastic manipulator robot is discussed. The Timoshenko beam theory (TBT has been used to characterize the structural link elasticity including important damping mechanisms. A suitable nonlinear model is derived based on the Lagrangian assumed modes method. Elastic link manipulators are classified as systems possessing highly complex dynamics. In addition, the environment in which they operate may have a lot of disturbances. These give rise to special problems that may be solved using intelligent control techniques. The application of two advanced control strategies based on fuzzy set theory is investigated. The first closed-loop control scheme to be applied is the standard Proportional-Derivative (PD type fuzzy logic controller (FLC, also known as PD-type Mamdani's FLC (MPDFLC. Then, a genetic algorithm (GA is used to optimize the MPDFLC parameters with innovative tuning procedures. Both the MPDFLC and the GA optimized FLC (GAOFLC are implemented and tested to achieve a precise control of the manipulator end-point. The performances of the adopted closed-loop intelligent control strategies are examined via simulation experiments.

  20. Ontological metaphors for negative energy in an interdisciplinary context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin W. Dreyfus

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Teaching about energy in interdisciplinary settings that emphasize coherence among physics, chemistry, and biology leads to a more central role for chemical bond energy. We argue that an interdisciplinary approach to chemical energy leads to modeling chemical bonds in terms of negative energy. While recent work on ontological metaphors for energy has emphasized the affordances of the substance ontology, this ontology is problematic in the context of negative energy. Instead, we apply a dynamic ontologies perspective to argue that blending the substance and location ontologies for energy can be effective in reasoning about negative energy in the context of reasoning about chemical bonds. We present data from an introductory physics for the life sciences course in which both experts and students successfully use this blended ontology. Blending these ontologies is most successful when the substance and location ontologies are combined such that each is strategically utilized in reasoning about particular aspects of energetic processes.

  1. Differences among cell-structure ontologies: FMA, GO, & CCO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Alan P; Li, Xiang; Gennari, John H

    2006-01-01

    When different groups create models or ontologies of the same knowledge domain, this creates challenges for knowledge sharing. To identify these challenges, we compare cellular structure as modeled by the Foundational Model of Anatomy(FMA), the Gene Ontology (GO), and the Cell Component Ontology (CCO). These ontologies all model the physical anatomy of a cell, and we expected them to be similar in scope. However, we discovered that the actual differences among the mare substantial. These differences represent variations based on theory-driven vs. emergent construction,as well as differences in how small application ontologies like the CCO are created from reference ontologies. In this paper, we provide a description and analysis of these differences. By studying differences in language, granularity, breadth of coverage,and model organization, we hope to gain a better understanding of how to map between related ontologies.

  2. An ontology for sensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Michael; Neuhaus, Holger; Bermudez, Luis; Cox, Simon

    2010-05-01

    Sensors and networks of sensors are important ways of monitoring and digitizing reality. As the number and size of sensor networks grows, so too does the amount of data collected. Users of such networks typically need to discover the sensors and data that fit their needs without necessarily understanding the complexities of the network itself. The burden on users is eased if the network and its data are expressed in terms of concepts familiar to the users and their job functions, rather than in terms of the network or how it was designed. Furthermore, the task of collecting and combining data from multiple sensor networks is made easier if metadata about the data and the networks is stored in a format and conceptual models that is amenable to machine reasoning and inference. While the OGC's (Open Geospatial Consortium) SWE (Sensor Web Enablement) standards provide for the description and access to data and metadata for sensors, they do not provide facilities for abstraction, categorization, and reasoning consistent with standard technologies. Once sensors and networks are described using rich semantics (that is, by using logic to describe the sensors, the domain of interest, and the measurements) then reasoning and classification can be used to analyse and categorise data, relate measurements with similar information content, and manage, query and task sensors. This will enable types of automated processing and logical assurance built on OGC standards. The W3C SSN-XG (Semantic Sensor Networks Incubator Group) is producing a generic ontology to describe sensors, their environment and the measurements they make. The ontology provides definitions for the structure of sensors and observations, leaving the details of the observed domain unspecified. This allows abstract representations of real world entities, which are not observed directly but through their observable qualities. Domain semantics, units of measurement, time and time series, and location and mobility

  3. The Proteasix Ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arguello Casteleiro, Mercedes; Klein, Julie; Stevens, Robert

    2016-06-04

    The Proteasix Ontology (PxO) is an ontology that supports the Proteasix tool; an open-source peptide-centric tool that can be used to predict automatically and in a large-scale fashion in silico the proteases involved in the generation of proteolytic cleavage fragments (peptides) The PxO re-uses parts of the Protein Ontology, the three Gene Ontology sub-ontologies, the Chemical Entities of Biological Interest Ontology, the Sequence Ontology and bespoke extensions to the PxO in support of a series of roles: 1. To describe the known proteases and their target cleaveage sites. 2. To enable the description of proteolytic cleaveage fragments as the outputs of observed and predicted proteolysis. 3. To use knowledge about the function, species and cellular location of a protease and protein substrate to support the prioritisation of proteases in observed and predicted proteolysis. The PxO is designed to describe the biological underpinnings of the generation of peptides. The peptide-centric PxO seeks to support the Proteasix tool by separating domain knowledge from the operational knowledge used in protease prediction by Proteasix and to support the confirmation of its analyses and results. The Proteasix Ontology may be found at: http://bioportal.bioontology.org/ontologies/PXO . This ontology is free and open for use by everyone.

  4. The power of an ontology-driven developmental toxicity database for data mining and computational modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modeling of developmental toxicology presents a significant challenge to computational toxicology due to endpoint complexity and lack of data coverage. These challenges largely account for the relatively few modeling successes using the structure–activity relationship (SAR) parad...

  5. Novel approach for dam break flow modeling using computational intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyedashraf, Omid; Mehrabi, Mohammad; Akhtari, Ali Akbar

    2018-04-01

    A new methodology based on the computational intelligence (CI) system is proposed and tested for modeling the classic 1D dam-break flow problem. The reason to seek for a new solution lies in the shortcomings of the existing analytical and numerical models. This includes the difficulty of using the exact solutions and the unwanted fluctuations, which arise in the numerical results. In this research, the application of the radial-basis-function (RBF) and multi-layer-perceptron (MLP) systems is detailed for the solution of twenty-nine dam-break scenarios. The models are developed using seven variables, i.e. the length of the channel, the depths of the up-and downstream sections, time, and distance as the inputs. Moreover, the depths and velocities of each computational node in the flow domain are considered as the model outputs. The models are validated against the analytical, and Lax-Wendroff and MacCormack FDM schemes. The findings indicate that the employed CI models are able to replicate the overall shape of the shock- and rarefaction-waves. Furthermore, the MLP system outperforms RBF and the tested numerical schemes. A new monolithic equation is proposed based on the best fitting model, which can be used as an efficient alternative to the existing piecewise analytic equations.

  6. Translation of overlay models of student knowledge for relative domains based on domain ontology mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sosnovsky, Sergey; Dolog, Peter; Henze, Nicola

    2007-01-01

    The effectiveness of an adaptive educational system in many respects depends on the precision of modeling assumptions it makes about a student. One of the well-known challenges in student modeling is to adequately assess the initial level of student's knowledge when s/he starts working with a sys......The effectiveness of an adaptive educational system in many respects depends on the precision of modeling assumptions it makes about a student. One of the well-known challenges in student modeling is to adequately assess the initial level of student's knowledge when s/he starts working...

  7. Analysis of Intelligent Transportation Systems Using Model-Driven Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Fernández-Isabel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITSs integrate information, sensor, control, and communication technologies to provide transport related services. Their users range from everyday commuters to policy makers and urban planners. Given the complexity of these systems and their environment, their study in real settings is frequently unfeasible. Simulations help to address this problem, but present their own issues: there can be unintended mistakes in the transition from models to code; their platforms frequently bias modeling; and it is difficult to compare works that use different models and tools. In order to overcome these problems, this paper proposes a framework for a model-driven development of these simulations. It is based on a specific modeling language that supports the integrated specification of the multiple facets of an ITS: people, their vehicles, and the external environment; and a network of sensors and actuators conveniently arranged and distributed that operates over them. The framework works with a model editor to generate specifications compliant with that language, and a code generator to produce code from them using platform specifications. There are also guidelines to help researchers in the application of this infrastructure. A case study on advanced management of traffic lights with cameras illustrates its use.

  8. Defining assessment projects and scenarios for policy support: Use of ontology in Integrated Assessment Modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, S.; Ewert, F.; Hongtao, Li; Anthanasiadis, I.N.; Wien, J.J.F.; Therond, O.; Knapen, M.J.R.; Bezlepkina, I.; Alkan-Olsson, J.; Rizzoli, A.E.; Belhouchette, H.; Svensson, M.; Ittersum, van M.K.

    2009-01-01

    Integrated Assessment and Modelling (IAM) provides an interdisciplinary approach to support ex-ante decision-making by combining quantitative models representing different systems and scales into a framework for integrated assessment. Scenarios in IAM are developed in the interaction between

  9. Modeling Common-Sense Decisions in Artificial Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, Michail

    2010-01-01

    A methodology has been conceived for efficient synthesis of dynamical models that simulate common-sense decision- making processes. This methodology is intended to contribute to the design of artificial-intelligence systems that could imitate human common-sense decision making or assist humans in making correct decisions in unanticipated circumstances. This methodology is a product of continuing research on mathematical models of the behaviors of single- and multi-agent systems known in biology, economics, and sociology, ranging from a single-cell organism at one extreme to the whole of human society at the other extreme. Earlier results of this research were reported in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, the three most recent and relevant being Characteristics of Dynamics of Intelligent Systems (NPO -21037), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 26, No. 12 (December 2002), page 48; Self-Supervised Dynamical Systems (NPO-30634), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 27, No. 3 (March 2003), page 72; and Complexity for Survival of Living Systems (NPO- 43302), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 33, No. 7 (July 2009), page 62. The methodology involves the concepts reported previously, albeit viewed from a different perspective. One of the main underlying ideas is to extend the application of physical first principles to the behaviors of living systems. Models of motor dynamics are used to simulate the observable behaviors of systems or objects of interest, and models of mental dynamics are used to represent the evolution of the corresponding knowledge bases. For a given system, the knowledge base is modeled in the form of probability distributions and the mental dynamics is represented by models of the evolution of the probability densities or, equivalently, models of flows of information. Autonomy is imparted to the decisionmaking process by feedback from mental to motor dynamics. This feedback replaces unavailable external information by information stored in the internal knowledge base. Representation

  10. Macromolecular symmetric assembly prediction using swarm intelligence dynamic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degiacomi, Matteo T; Dal Peraro, Matteo

    2013-07-02

    Proteins often assemble in multimeric complexes to perform a specific biologic function. However, trapping these high-order conformations is difficult experimentally. Therefore, predicting how proteins assemble using in silico techniques can be of great help. The size of the associated conformational space and the fact that proteins are intrinsically flexible structures make this optimization problem extremely challenging. Nonetheless, known experimental spatial restraints can guide the search process, contributing to model biologically relevant states. We present here a swarm intelligence optimization protocol able to predict the arrangement of protein symmetric assemblies by exploiting a limited amount of experimental restraints and steric interactions. Importantly, within this scheme the native flexibility of each protein subunit is taken into account as extracted from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We show that this is a key ingredient for the prediction of biologically functional assemblies when, upon oligomerization, subunits explore activated states undergoing significant conformational changes.

  11. a Conceptual Model for the Representation of Landforms Using Ontology Design Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilbert, Eric; Moulin, Bernard; Cortés Murcia, Andrés

    2016-06-01

    A landform is an area of a terrain with its own recognisable shape. Its definition is often qualitative and inherently vague. Hence landforms are difficult to formalise in view of their extraction from a DTM. This paper presents a two-level framework for the representation of landforms. The objective is to provide a structure where landforms can be conceptually designed according to a common model which can be implemented. It follows the principle that landforms are not defined by geometrical characteristics but by salient features perceived by people. Hence, these salient features define a skeleton around which the landform is built. The first level of our model defines general concepts forming a landform prototype while the second level provides a model for the translation of these concepts and landform extraction on a DTM. The model is still under construction and preliminary results together with current developments are also presented.

  12. An ontology-aware integration of clinical models, terminologies and guidelines: an exploratory study of the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maarouf, Haitham; Taboada, María; Rodriguez, Hadriana; Arias, Manuel; Sesar, Ángel; Sobrido, María Jesús

    2017-12-06

    Electronic rating scales represent an important resource for standardized data collection. However, the ability to exploit reasoning on rating scale data is still limited. The objective of this work is to facilitate the integration of the semantics required to automatically interpret collections of standardized clinical data. We developed an electronic prototype for the Scale of the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA), broadly used in neurology. In order to address the modeling challenges of the SARA, we propose to combine the best performances from OpenEHR clinical archetypes, guidelines and ontologies. A scaled-down version of the Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) was built, extracting the terms that describe the SARA tests from free-text sources. This version of the HPO was then used as backbone to normalize the content of the SARA through clinical archetypes. The knowledge required to exploit reasoning on the SARA data was modeled as separate information-processing units interconnected via the defined archetypes. Each unit used the most appropriate technology to formally represent the required knowledge. Based on this approach, we implemented a prototype named SARA Management System, to be used for both the assessment of cerebellar syndrome and the production of a clinical synopsis. For validation purposes, we used recorded SARA data from 28 anonymous subjects affected by Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 36 (SCA36). When comparing the performance of our prototype with that of two independent experts, weighted kappa scores ranged from 0.62 to 0.86. The combination of archetypes, phenotype ontologies and electronic information-processing rules can be used to automate the extraction of relevant clinical knowledge from plain scores of rating scales. Our results reveal a substantial degree of agreement between the results achieved by an ontology-aware system and the human experts.

  13. The MMI Device Ontology: Enabling Sensor Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda, C.; Galbraith, N.; Morris, R. A.; Bermudez, L. E.; Graybeal, J.; Arko, R. A.; Mmi Device Ontology Working Group

    2010-12-01

    The Marine Metadata Interoperability (MMI) project has developed an ontology for devices to describe sensors and sensor networks. This ontology is implemented in the W3C Web Ontology Language (OWL) and provides an extensible conceptual model and controlled vocabularies for describing heterogeneous instrument types, with different data characteristics, and their attributes. It can help users populate metadata records for sensors; associate devices with their platforms, deployments, measurement capabilities and restrictions; aid in discovery of sensor data, both historic and real-time; and improve the interoperability of observational oceanographic data sets. We developed the MMI Device Ontology following a community-based approach. By building on and integrating other models and ontologies from related disciplines, we sought to facilitate semantic interoperability while avoiding duplication. Key concepts and insights from various communities, including the Open Geospatial Consortium (eg., SensorML and Observations and Measurements specifications), Semantic Web for Earth and Environmental Terminology (SWEET), and W3C Semantic Sensor Network Incubator Group, have significantly enriched the development of the ontology. Individuals ranging from instrument designers, science data producers and consumers to ontology specialists and other technologists contributed to the work. Applications of the MMI Device Ontology are underway for several community use cases. These include vessel-mounted multibeam mapping sonars for the Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) program and description of diverse instruments on deepwater Ocean Reference Stations for the OceanSITES program. These trials involve creation of records completely describing instruments, either by individual instances or by manufacturer and model. Individual terms in the MMI Device Ontology can be referenced with their corresponding Uniform Resource Identifiers (URIs) in sensor-related metadata specifications (e

  14. Ontologies to Support RFID-Based Link between Virtual Models and Construction Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kristian Birch; Christiansson, Per; Svidt, Kjeld

    2010-01-01

    as the foundation for information sharing between trading partners, reuse of data from one phase in construction to the next, integration of process and product models with enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems, easy access of information, communication of data through networks, reading of data stored...... of errors, it gives a better production basis, and it improves clarity and enhances communication compared to traditional 2D drafting methods. However, there is still much unutilized potential in the virtual models, especially for use in the construction and operation phases. A digital link between...

  15. Ontology-driven extraction of linguistic patterns for modelling clinical guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serban, Radu; Teije, Annette Ten; Van Harmelen, Frank; Marcos, Mar; Polo-Conde, Cristina

    2005-01-01

    Evidence-based clinical guidelines require frequent updates duo to research and technology advances. The quality of guideline updates can be improved if the knowledge underlying the guideline text is explicitly modelled using the so-called guideline patterns (GPs), mappings between a text fragment

  16. Artificial Life of Soybean Plant Growth Modeling Using Intelligence Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atris Suyantohadi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The natural process on plant growth system has a complex system and it has could be developed on characteristic studied using intelligent approaches conducting with artificial life system. The approaches on examining the natural process on soybean (Glycine Max L.Merr plant growth have been analyzed and synthesized in these research through modeling using Artificial Neural Network (ANN and Lindenmayer System (L-System methods. Research aimed to design and to visualize plant growth modeling on the soybean varieties which these could help for studying botany of plant based on fertilizer compositions on plant growth with Nitrogen (N, Phosphor (P and Potassium (K. The soybean plant growth has been analyzed based on the treatments of plant fertilizer compositions in the experimental research to develop plant growth modeling. By using N, P, K fertilizer compositions, its capable result on the highest production 2.074 tons/hectares. Using these models, the simulation on artificial life for describing identification and visualization on the characteristic of soybean plant growth could be demonstrated and applied.

  17. Space Environment Modelling with the Use of Artificial Intelligence Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstedt, H.; Wintoft, P.; Wu, J.-G.; Gleisner, H.; Dovheden, V.

    1996-12-01

    Space based technological systems are affected by the space weather in many ways. Several severe failures of satellites have been reported at times of space storms. Our society also increasingly depends on satellites for communication, navigation, exploration, and research. Predictions of the conditions in the satellite environment have therefore become very important. We will here present predictions made with the use of artificial intelligence (AI) techniques, such as artificial neural networks (ANN) and hybrids of AT methods. We are developing a space weather model based on intelligence hybrid systems (IHS). The model consists of different forecast modules, each module predicts the space weather on a specific time-scale. The time-scales range from minutes to months with the fundamental time-scale of 1-5 minutes, 1-3 hours, 1-3 days, and 27 days. Solar and solar wind data are used as input data. From solar magnetic field measurements, either made on the ground at Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO) at Stanford, or made from space by the satellite SOHO, solar wind parameters can be predicted and modelled with ANN and MHD models. Magnetograms from WSO are available on a daily basis. However, from SOHO magnetograms will be available every 90 minutes. SOHO magnetograms as input to ANNs will therefore make it possible to even predict solar transient events. Geomagnetic storm activity can today be predicted with very high accuracy by means of ANN methods using solar wind input data. However, at present real-time solar wind data are only available during part of the day from the satellite WIND. With the launch of ACE in 1997, solar wind data will on the other hand be available during 24 hours per day. The conditions of the satellite environment are not only disturbed at times of geomagnetic storms but also at times of intense solar radiation and highly energetic particles. These events are associated with increased solar activity. Predictions of these events are therefore

  18. The Actualization of Literary Learning Model Based on Verbal-Linguistic Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hali, Nur Ihsan

    2017-01-01

    This article is inspired by Howard Gardner's concept of linguistic intelligence and also from some authors' previous writings. All of them became the authors' reference in developing ideas on constructing a literary learning model based on linguistic intelligence. The writing of this article is not done by collecting data empirically, but by…

  19. A UML Profile Oriented to the Requirements Modeling in Intelligent Tutoring Systems Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Guedes , Gilleanes Thorwald Araujo; Vicari , Rosa Maria

    2010-01-01

    International audience; This paper describes a proposal for the creation of a UML profile oriented to the intelligent tutoring systems project. In this paper we shall describe the proposed profile as well as its application into the modeling of the AMEA intelligent tutoring system.

  20. A Bayesian Network Approach to Ontology Mapping

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pan, Rong; Ding, Zhongli; Yu, Yang; Peng, Yun

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents our ongoing effort on developing a principled methodology for automatic ontology mapping based on BayesOWL, a probabilistic framework we developed for modeling uncertainty in semantic web...

  1. A histological ontology of the human cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazo, Claudia; Salazar, Liliana; Corcho, Oscar; Trujillo, Maria; Alegre, Enrique

    2017-10-02

    In this paper, we describe a histological ontology of the human cardiovascular system developed in collaboration among histology experts and computer scientists. The histological ontology is developed following an existing methodology using Conceptual Models (CMs) and validated using OOPS!, expert evaluation with CMs, and how accurately the ontology can answer the Competency Questions (CQ). It is publicly available at http://bioportal.bioontology.org/ontologies/HO and https://w3id.org/def/System . The histological ontology is developed to support complex tasks, such as supporting teaching activities, medical practices, and bio-medical research or having natural language interactions.

  2. Modelling intelligence-led policing to identify its potential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hengst-Bruggeling, M. den; Graaf, H.A.L.M. de; Scheepstal, P.G.M. van

    2014-01-01

    lntelligence-led policing is a concept of policing that has been applied throughout the world. Despite some encouraging reports, the effect of intelligence-led policing is largely unknown. This paper presents a method with which it is possible to identify intelligence-led policing's potential to

  3. Emotional Intelligence Competencies and the Army Leadership Requirements Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-12

    cultural stereotype in the military that suggests the display of emotions is less than desirable, however the ability for military leaders to regulate...enlisting recruits better suited for service in the Air Force. Concerning age, gender , and emotional intelligence competency levels, Boyatzis and Sala...uses in the act of leading. Emotional Intelligence in Action Emotionally competent leaders underwrite a healthy organizational climate

  4. MODELADO CONCEPTUAL DE USUARIOS EN AMBIENTES UBICUOS MEDIANTE AGENTES Y ONTOLOGÍAS MODELAGEM CONCEITUAL DE USUÁRIOS EM AMBIENTES UBÍQUOS MEDIANTE AGENTES E ONTOLOGIAS CONCEPTUAL USER MODELING IN UBIQUITOUS ENVIRONMENTS THROUGH AGENTS AND ONTOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana González

    2011-12-01

    and ontologies. The integration of these two concepts allows capturing, process, and maintaining user information of pervasive systems. The approach consists of conceptual architecture, types of agents that compose the system, basic structure of each agent and communication strategy. It also presents ontology to model users. Later presents two scenarios of interaction of agents: connection request to the system and sending a query. This proposal solves problems such as lack of standardization in the user modeling of ubiquitous systems and the lack of intelligent component for processing the user’s information to offer personal configurations that depend of the users' profile and preferences.

  5. Nuclear Nonproliferation Ontology Assessment Team Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strasburg, Jana D.; Hohimer, Ryan E.

    2012-01-01

    Final Report for the NA22 Simulations, Algorithm and Modeling (SAM) Ontology Assessment Team's efforts from FY09-FY11. The Ontology Assessment Team began in May 2009 and concluded in September 2011. During this two-year time frame, the Ontology Assessment team had two objectives: (1) Assessing the utility of knowledge representation and semantic technologies for addressing nuclear nonproliferation challenges; and (2) Developing ontological support tools that would provide a framework for integrating across the Simulation, Algorithm and Modeling (SAM) program. The SAM Program was going through a large assessment and strategic planning effort during this time and as a result, the relative importance of these two objectives changed, altering the focus of the Ontology Assessment Team. In the end, the team conducted an assessment of the state of art, created an annotated bibliography, and developed a series of ontological support tools, demonstrations and presentations. A total of more than 35 individuals from 12 different research institutions participated in the Ontology Assessment Team. These included subject matter experts in several nuclear nonproliferation-related domains as well as experts in semantic technologies. Despite the diverse backgrounds and perspectives, the Ontology Assessment team functioned very well together and aspects could serve as a model for future inter-laboratory collaborations and working groups. While the team encountered several challenges and learned many lessons along the way, the Ontology Assessment effort was ultimately a success that led to several multi-lab research projects and opened up a new area of scientific exploration within the Office of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Verification.

  6. Constructive Ontology Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousan, William L.

    2010-01-01

    The proliferation of the Semantic Web depends on ontologies for knowledge sharing, semantic annotation, data fusion, and descriptions of data for machine interpretation. However, ontologies are difficult to create and maintain. In addition, their structure and content may vary depending on the application and domain. Several methods described in…

  7. Ontologies vs. Classification Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Bodil Nistrup; Erdman Thomsen, Hanne

    2009-01-01

    data sets or for obtaining advanced search facilities. In this paper we will present an attempt at answering these questions. We will give a presentation of various types of ontologies and briefly introduce terminological ontologies. Furthermore we will argue that classification systems, e.g. product...

  8. Penerapan Model Pembelajaran Atraktif Berbasis Multiple Intelligences Tentang Pemantulan Cahaya pada Cermin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Intan Kusumawati

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui efektivitas penerapan model pembelajaran atraktif berbasis multiple intelligences dalam meremediasi miskonsepsi siswa tentang pemantulan cahaya pada cermin. Pada penelitian ini digunakan bentuk pre-eksperimental design dengan rancangan one group pretest-post test design. Alat pengumpulan data berupa tes pilihan ganda dengan reasoning. Hasil validitas sebesar 4,08 dan reliabilitas 0,537. Siswa dibagi menjadi lima kelompok kecerdasan, yaitu kelompok linguistic intelligence, mathematical-logical intelligence, visual-spatial intelligence, bodily-khinestetic intelligence, dan musical intelligence. Siswa membahas konsep fisika sesuai kelompok kecerdasannya dalam bentuk pembuatan pantun-puisi, teka-teki silang, menggambar kreatif, drama, dan mengarang lirik lagu. Efektivitas penerapan model pembelajaran multiple intelligences menggunakan persamaan effect size. Ditemukan bahwa skor effect size masing-masing kelompok berkategori tinggi sebesar 5,76; 3,76; 4,60; 1,70; dan 1,34. Penerapan model pembelajaran atraktif berbasis multiple intelligences efektif dalam meremediasi miskonsepsi siswa. Penelitian ini diharapkan dapat digunakan pada materi fisika dan sekolah lainnya.

  9. Conceptual querying through ontologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Troels; Bulskov, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    is motivated by an obvious need for users to survey huge volumes of objects in query answers. An ontology formalism and a special notion of-instantiated ontology" are introduced. The latter is a structure reflecting the content in the document collection in that; it is a restriction of a general world......We present here ail approach to conceptual querying where the aim is, given a collection of textual database objects or documents, to target an abstraction of the entire database content in terms of the concepts appearing in documents, rather than the documents in the collection. The approach...... knowledge ontology to the concepts instantiated in the collection. The notion of ontology-based similarity is briefly described, language constructs for direct navigation and retrieval of concepts in the ontology are discussed and approaches to conceptual summarization are presented....

  10. FORMATION OF THE SUBJECTIVE (VIRTUAL) MODELS OF PHYSICAL AND SOCIAL REALITY BY HUMAN CONSCIOUSNESS AND GIVING THEM UNDUE ONTOLOGICAL STATUS (HYPOSTATIZATIONS)

    OpenAIRE

    Lutsenko Y. V.

    2015-01-01

    On the one hand, man is a physical object and a person. Therefore, we interact with the reality, on one hand, directly as a physical object, but on the other hand as a person, i.e. indirectly through our psyche. On the basis of information from the senses, the consciousness of a person creates a subjective model of reality. A man mistakes his subjective model of reality for reality itself, i.e. unnecessarily assigns an ontological status, by the hypostatizations. In fact, as the reality a man...

  11. Predicting chick body mass by artificial intelligence-based models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Ferreira Ponciano Ferraz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to develop, validate, and compare 190 artificial intelligence-based models for predicting the body mass of chicks from 2 to 21 days of age subjected to different duration and intensities of thermal challenge. The experiment was conducted inside four climate-controlled wind tunnels using 210 chicks. A database containing 840 datasets (from 2 to 21-day-old chicks - with the variables dry-bulb air temperature, duration of thermal stress (days, chick age (days, and the daily body mass of chicks - was used for network training, validation, and tests of models based on artificial neural networks (ANNs and neuro-fuzzy networks (NFNs. The ANNs were most accurate in predicting the body mass of chicks from 2 to 21 days of age after they were subjected to the input variables, and they showed an R² of 0.9993 and a standard error of 4.62 g. The ANNs enable the simulation of different scenarios, which can assist in managerial decision-making, and they can be embedded in the heating control systems.

  12. Electron beam lithographic modeling assisted by artificial intelligence technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayamada, Noriaki; Nishimura, Rieko; Miura, Satoru; Nomura, Haruyuki; Kamikubo, Takashi

    2017-07-01

    We propose a new concept of tuning a point-spread function (a "kernel" function) in the modeling of electron beam lithography using the machine learning scheme. Normally in the work of artificial intelligence, the researchers focus on the output results from a neural network, such as success ratio in image recognition or improved production yield, etc. In this work, we put more focus on the weights connecting the nodes in a convolutional neural network, which are naturally the fractions of a point-spread function, and take out those weighted fractions after learning to be utilized as a tuned kernel. Proof-of-concept of the kernel tuning has been demonstrated using the examples of proximity effect correction with 2-layer network, and charging effect correction with 3-layer network. This type of new tuning method can be beneficial to give researchers more insights to come up with a better model, yet it might be too early to be deployed to production to give better critical dimension (CD) and positional accuracy almost instantly.

  13. Ontology-Based Multiple Choice Question Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maha Al-Yahya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With recent advancements in Semantic Web technologies, a new trend in MCQ item generation has emerged through the use of ontologies. Ontologies are knowledge representation structures that formally describe entities in a domain and their relationships, thus enabling automated inference and reasoning. Ontology-based MCQ item generation is still in its infancy, but substantial research efforts are being made in the field. However, the applicability of these models for use in an educational setting has not been thoroughly evaluated. In this paper, we present an experimental evaluation of an ontology-based MCQ item generation system known as OntoQue. The evaluation was conducted using two different domain ontologies. The findings of this study show that ontology-based MCQ generation systems produce satisfactory MCQ items to a certain extent. However, the evaluation also revealed a number of shortcomings with current ontology-based MCQ item generation systems with regard to the educational significance of an automatically constructed MCQ item, the knowledge level it addresses, and its language structure. Furthermore, for the task to be successful in producing high-quality MCQ items for learning assessments, this study suggests a novel, holistic view that incorporates learning content, learning objectives, lexical knowledge, and scenarios into a single cohesive framework.

  14. Use of ontology structure and Bayesian models to aid the crowdsourcing of ICD-11 sanctioning rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Yun; Tu, Samson W; Nyulas, Csongor; Tudorache, Tania; Chalmers, Robert J G; Musen, Mark A

    2017-04-01

    The International Classification of Diseases (ICD) is the de facto standard international classification for mortality reporting and for many epidemiological, clinical, and financial use cases. The next version of ICD, ICD-11, will be submitted for approval by the World Health Assembly in 2018. Unlike previous versions of ICD, where coders mostly select single codes from pre-enumerated disease and disorder codes, ICD-11 coding will allow extensive use of multiple codes to give more detailed disease descriptions. For example, "severe malignant neoplasms of left breast" may be coded using the combination of a "stem code" (e.g., code for malignant neoplasms of breast) with a variety of "extension codes" (e.g., codes for laterality and severity). The use of multiple codes (a process called post-coordination), while avoiding the pitfall of having to pre-enumerate vast number of possible disease and qualifier combinations, risks the creation of meaningless expressions that combine stem codes with inappropriate qualifiers. To prevent that from happening, "sanctioning rules" that define legal combinations are necessary. In this work, we developed a crowdsourcing method for obtaining sanctioning rules for the post-coordination of concepts in ICD-11. Our method utilized the hierarchical structures in the domain to improve the accuracy of the sanctioning rules and to lower the crowdsourcing cost. We used Bayesian networks to model crowd workers' skills, the accuracy of their responses, and our confidence in the acquired sanctioning rules. We applied reinforcement learning to develop an agent that constantly adjusted the confidence cutoffs during the crowdsourcing process to maximize the overall quality of sanctioning rules under a fixed budget. Finally, we performed formative evaluations using a skin-disease branch of the draft ICD-11 and demonstrated that the crowd-sourced sanctioning rules replicated those defined by an expert dermatologist with high precision and recall

  15. Practical ontologies for information professionals

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2071712

    2016-01-01

    Practical Ontologies for Information Professionals provides an introduction to ontologies and their development, an essential tool for fighting back against information overload. The development of robust and widely used ontologies is an increasingly important tool in the fight against information overload. The publishing and sharing of explicit explanations for a wide variety of conceptualizations, in a machine readable format, has the power to both improve information retrieval and identify new knowledge. This new book provides an accessible introduction to the following: * What is an ontology? Defining the concept and why it is increasingly important to the information professional * Ontologies and the semantic web * Existing ontologies, such as SKOS, OWL, FOAF, schema.org, and the DBpedia Ontology * Adopting and building ontologies, showing how to avoid repetition of work and how to build a simple ontology with Protege * Interrogating semantic web ontologies * The future of ontologies and the role of the ...

  16. Hidden Hearing Loss and Computational Models of the Auditory Pathway: Predicting Speech Intelligibility Decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-28

    Title: Hidden Hearing Loss and Computational Models of the Auditory Pathway: Predicting Speech Intelligibility Decline Christopher J. Smalt...to utilize computational models of the auditory periphery and auditory cortex to study the effect of low spontaneous rate ANF loss on the cortical...representation of speech intelligibility in noise. The auditory-periphery model of Zilany et al. (JASA 2009,2014) is used to make predictions of

  17. The application of neural networks with artificial intelligence technique in the modeling of industrial processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saini, K. K.; Saini, Sanju

    2008-01-01

    Neural networks are a relatively new artificial intelligence technique that emulates the behavior of biological neural systems in digital software or hardware. These networks can 'learn', automatically, complex relationships among data. This feature makes the technique very useful in modeling processes for which mathematical modeling is difficult or impossible. The work described here outlines some examples of the application of neural networks with artificial intelligence technique in the modeling of industrial processes.

  18. Crowdsourcing the verification of relationships in biomedical ontologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Jonathan M; Musen, Mark A; Noy, Natalya F

    2013-01-01

    Biomedical ontologies are often large and complex, making ontology development and maintenance a challenge. To address this challenge, scientists use automated techniques to alleviate the difficulty of ontology development. However, for many ontology-engineering tasks, human judgment is still necessary. Microtask crowdsourcing, wherein human workers receive remuneration to complete simple, short tasks, is one method to obtain contributions by humans at a large scale. Previously, we developed and refined an effective method to verify ontology hierarchy using microtask crowdsourcing. In this work, we report on applying this method to find errors in the SNOMED CT CORE subset. By using crowdsourcing via Amazon Mechanical Turk with a Bayesian inference model, we correctly verified 86% of the relations from the CORE subset of SNOMED CT in which Rector and colleagues previously identified errors via manual inspection. Our results demonstrate that an ontology developer could deploy this method in order to audit large-scale ontologies quickly and relatively cheaply.

  19. The Actualization of Literary Learning Model Based on Verbal-Linguistic Intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Ihsan Halil

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This article is inspired by Howard Gardner's concept of linguistic intelligence and also from some authors' previous writings. All of them became the authors' reference in developing ideas on constructing a literary learning model based on linguistic intelligence. The writing of this article is not done by collecting data empirically, but by developing and constructing an existing concept, namely the concept of linguistic intelligence, which is disseminated into a literature-based learning of verbal-linguistic intelligence. The purpose of this paper is to answer the question of how to apply the literary learning model based on the verbal-linguistic intelligence. Then, regarding Gardner's concept, the author formulated a literary learning model based on the verbal-linguistic intelligence through a story-telling learning model with five steps namely arguing, discussing, interpreting, speaking, and writing about literary works. In short, the writer draw a conclusion that learning-based models of verbal-linguistic intelligence can be designed with attention into five components namely (1 definition, (2 characteristics, (3 teaching strategy, (4 final learning outcomes, and (5 figures.

  20. Ontological foundations for evolutionary economics: A Darwinian social ontology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoelhorst, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to further the project of generalized Darwinism by developing a social ontology on the basis of a combined commitment to ontological continuity and ontological commonality. Three issues that are central to the development of a social ontology are addressed: (1) the

  1. Emotional intelligence model for directors of research centers in mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Maricela Trujillo Flores

    2008-01-01

    H5 Social skills exhibited by directors, that are also part of interpersonal intelligence, allow a director to exert a greater influence on the working group, facilitating communication, conflict management, leadership, collaboration, cooperation and development of team skills.

  2. A Semi-Automatic Approach to Construct Vietnamese Ontology from Online Text

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Bao-An; Yang, Don-Lin

    2012-01-01

    An ontology is an effective formal representation of knowledge used commonly in artificial intelligence, semantic web, software engineering, and information retrieval. In open and distance learning, ontologies are used as knowledge bases for e-learning supplements, educational recommenders, and question answering systems that support students with…

  3. (KA)2: building ontologies for the internet: a mid-term report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benjamins, R.; Fensel, D.A.; Decker, S.; Gomez Perez, A.

    1999-01-01

    Ontologies are becoming increasingly more important in many different areas, including the knowledge management area. In knowledge management, ontologies can be used as an instrument to make knowledge assets intelligently accessible to people in organizations through an Intranet or the Internet.

  4. Brucellosis Ontology (IDOBRU as an extension of the Infectious Disease Ontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Yu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Caused by intracellular Gram-negative bacteria Brucella spp., brucellosis is the most common bacterial zoonotic disease. Extensive studies in brucellosis have yielded a large number of publications and data covering various topics ranging from basic Brucella genetic study to vaccine clinical trials. To support data interoperability and reasoning, a community-based brucellosis-specific biomedical ontology is needed. Results The Brucellosis Ontology (IDOBRU: http://sourceforge.net/projects/idobru, a biomedical ontology in the brucellosis domain, is an extension ontology of the core Infectious Disease Ontology (IDO-core and follows OBO Foundry principles. Currently IDOBRU contains 1503 ontology terms, which includes 739 Brucella-specific terms, 414 IDO-core terms, and 350 terms imported from 10 existing ontologies. IDOBRU has been used to model different aspects of brucellosis, including host infection, zoonotic disease transmission, symptoms, virulence factors and pathogenesis, diagnosis, intentional release, vaccine prevention, and treatment. Case studies are typically used in our IDOBRU modeling. For example, diurnal temperature variation in Brucella patients, a Brucella-specific PCR method, and a WHO-recommended brucellosis treatment were selected as use cases to model brucellosis symptom, diagnosis, and treatment, respectively. Developed using OWL, IDOBRU supports OWL-based ontological reasoning. For example, by performing a Description Logic (DL query in the OWL editor Protégé 4 or a SPARQL query in an IDOBRU SPARQL server, a check of Brucella virulence factors showed that eight of them are known protective antigens based on the biological knowledge captured within the ontology. Conclusions IDOBRU is the first reported bacterial infectious disease ontology developed to represent different disease aspects in a formal logical format. It serves as a brucellosis knowledgebase and supports brucellosis data integration and

  5. The effect of learning models and emotional intelligence toward students learning outcomes on reaction rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutiani, Ani; Silitonga, Mei Y.

    2017-08-01

    This research focused on the effect of learning models and emotional intelligence in students' chemistry learning outcomes on reaction rate teaching topic. In order to achieve the objectives of the research, with 2x2 factorial research design was used. There were two factors tested, namely: the learning models (factor A), and emotional intelligence (factor B) factors. Then, two learning models were used; problem-based learning/PBL (A1), and project-based learning/PjBL (A2). While, the emotional intelligence was divided into higher and lower types. The number of population was six classes containing 243 grade X students of SMAN 10 Medan, Indonesia. There were 15 students of each class were chosen as the sample of the research by applying purposive sampling technique. The data were analyzed by applying two-ways analysis of variance (2X2) at the level of significant α = 0.05. Based on hypothesis testing, there was the interaction between learning models and emotional intelligence in students' chemistry learning outcomes. Then, the finding of the research showed that students' learning outcomes in reaction rate taught by using PBL with higher emotional intelligence is higher than those who were taught by using PjBL. There was no significant effect between students with lower emotional intelligence taught by using both PBL and PjBL in reaction rate topic. Based on the finding, the students with lower emotional intelligence were quite hard to get in touch with other students in group discussion.

  6. A Concept Map Knowledge Model of Intelligence Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    performance humaine . Le modèle couvre une vingtaine de sujets différents, il répertorie et définit des douzaines de concepts relevant de l’analyse des...analysis, such as Canadian Association of Professional Intelligence Analysts, and Canadian Association for Security and Intelligence Studies. The map...intentionally left blank. UNCLASSIFIED DOCUMENT CONTROL DATA ( Security classification of the title, body of abstract and indexing annotation must be

  7. The Kano Model Use to Evaluate the Perception of Intelligent and Active Packaging of Slovak Customers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Loučanová

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Intelligent innovation represents any autonomic change with positive impact to the customer. They increase the comfort of the customer and concurrently they represent more effective, more economical, healthier and safer solution. This term is not so usual in Slovakia, however intelligent innovation are present on the market. For that in the article intelligent innovation assessment, we focused on intelligent and active packaging, the occurrence of which we have mostly noticed on the Slovak market. The paper deals with the evaluation of the perception of packaging innovations by using the Kano model. According to research results, intelligent and active packaging influence customers and therefore constitutes a tool of competitiveness in Slovakia. However, considering the specification of their requirements, the degree of impact is very variable and specific to customers of different gender and age.

  8. Does Reading Cause Later Intelligence? Accounting for Stability in Models of Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Drew H; Littlefield, Andrew K

    2017-11-01

    This study reanalyzes data presented by Ritchie, Bates, and Plomin (2015) who used a cross-lagged monozygotic twin differences design to test whether reading ability caused changes in intelligence. The authors used data from a sample of 1,890 monozygotic twin pairs tested on reading ability and intelligence at five occasions between the ages of 7 and 16, regressing twin differences in intelligence on twin differences in prior intelligence and twin differences in prior reading ability. Results from a state-trait model suggest that reported effects of reading ability on later intelligence may be artifacts of previously uncontrolled factors, both environmental in origin and stable during this developmental period, influencing both constructs throughout development. Implications for cognitive developmental theory and methods are discussed. © 2016 The Authors. Child Development © 2016 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  9. Design, modelling, implementation, and intelligent fuzzy control of a hovercraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-khatib, M. M.; Hussein, W. M.

    2011-05-01

    A Hovercraft is an amphibious vehicle that hovers just above the ground or water by air cushion. The concept of air cushion vehicle can be traced back to 1719. However, the practical form of hovercraft nowadays is traced back to 1955. The objective of the paper is to design, simulate and implement an autonomous model of a small hovercraft equipped with a mine detector that can travel over any terrains. A real time layered fuzzy navigator for a hovercraft in a dynamic environment is proposed. The system consists of a Takagi-Sugenotype fuzzy motion planner and a modified proportional navigation based fuzzy controller. The system philosophy is inspired by human routing when moving between obstacles based on visual information including the right and left views from which he makes his next step towards the goal in the free space. It intelligently combines two behaviours to cope with obstacle avoidance as well as approaching a goal using a proportional navigation path accounting for hovercraft kinematics. MATLAB/Simulink software tool is used to design and verify the proposed algorithm.

  10. Semantic interrogation of a multi knowledge domain ontological model of tendinopathy identifies four strong candidate risk genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Colleen J; Jalali Sefid Dashti, Mahjoubeh; Gamieldien, Junaid

    2016-01-25

    Tendinopathy is a multifactorial syndrome characterised by tendon pain and thickening, and impaired performance during activity. Candidate gene association studies have identified genetic factors that contribute to intrinsic risk of developing tendinopathy upon exposure to extrinsic factors. Bioinformatics approaches that data-mine existing knowledge for biological relationships may assist with the identification of candidate genes. The aim of this study was to data-mine functional annotation of human genes and identify candidate genes by ontology-seeded queries capturing the features of tendinopathy. Our BioOntological Relationship Graph database (BORG) integrates multiple sources of genomic and biomedical knowledge into an on-disk semantic network where human genes and their orthologs in mouse and rat are central concepts mapped to ontology terms. The BORG was used to screen all human genes for potential links to tendinopathy. Following further prioritisation, four strong candidate genes (COL11A2, ELN, ITGB3, LOX) were identified. These genes are differentially expressed in tendinopathy, functionally linked to features of tendinopathy and previously implicated in other connective tissue diseases. In conclusion, cross-domain semantic integration of multiple sources of biomedical knowledge, and interrogation of phenotypes and gene functions associated with disease, may significantly increase the probability of identifying strong and unobvious candidate genes in genetic association studies.

  11. Perspectives on ontology learning

    CERN Document Server

    Lehmann, J

    2014-01-01

    Perspectives on Ontology Learning brings together researchers and practitioners from different communities − natural language processing, machine learning, and the semantic web − in order to give an interdisciplinary overview of recent advances in ontology learning.Starting with a comprehensive introduction to the theoretical foundations of ontology learning methods, the edited volume presents the state-of-the-start in automated knowledge acquisition and maintenance. It outlines future challenges in this area with a special focus on technologies suitable for pushing the boundaries beyond the c

  12. Appreciating ontological struggles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danholt, Peter

    Appreciating ontological struggles Peter Danholt, ass. prof., Information studies, Aarhus University In the west – most of us – take for granted that we inhabit a common world, which we share with 6 billion other human beings and multiple other living beings, animals and plants. As Annemarie Mol...... a condition in the world, but as the playing out of an ontological struggle, we become able to appreciate the situation and the treatment differently and in a manner that reconsiders treatment and disease in novel ways. Importantly, when the encounter is conceived of as an ontological struggle it becomes ever...

  13. Visualization and Ontology of Geospatial Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yupo

    Recent events have deepened our conviction that many human endeavors are best described in a geospatial context. This is evidenced in the prevalence of location-based services, as afforded by the ubiquitous cell phone usage. It is also manifested by the popularity of such internet engines as Google Earth. As we commute to work, travel on business or pleasure, we make decisions based on the geospatial information provided by such location-based services. When corporations devise their business plans, they also rely heavily on such geospatial data. By definition, local, state and federal governments provide services according to geographic boundaries. One estimate suggests that 85 percent of data contain spatial attributes.

  14. Ontology and Language for Intelligent Reusable Autonomy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation consists of enabling “thinking” by the autonomous system, so that autonomous strategies may be inferred by the computers as a thought process. The...

  15. Ion Channel ElectroPhysiology Ontology (ICEPO) - a case study of text mining assisted ontology development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elayavilli, Ravikumar Komandur; Liu, Hongfang

    2016-01-01

    Computational modeling of biological cascades is of great interest to quantitative biologists. Biomedical text has been a rich source for quantitative information. Gathering quantitative parameters and values from biomedical text is one significant challenge in the early steps of computational modeling as it involves huge manual effort. While automatically extracting such quantitative information from bio-medical text may offer some relief, lack of ontological representation for a subdomain serves as impedance in normalizing textual extractions to a standard representation. This may render textual extractions less meaningful to the domain experts. In this work, we propose a rule-based approach to automatically extract relations involving quantitative data from biomedical text describing ion channel electrophysiology. We further translated the quantitative assertions extracted through text mining to a formal representation that may help in constructing ontology for ion channel events using a rule based approach. We have developed Ion Channel ElectroPhysiology Ontology (ICEPO) by integrating the information represented in closely related ontologies such as, Cell Physiology Ontology (CPO), and Cardiac Electro Physiology Ontology (CPEO) and the knowledge provided by domain experts. The rule-based system achieved an overall F-measure of 68.93% in extracting the quantitative data assertions system on an independently annotated blind data set. We further made an initial attempt in formalizing the quantitative data assertions extracted from the biomedical text into a formal representation that offers potential to facilitate the integration of text mining into ontological workflow, a novel aspect of this study. This work is a case study where we created a platform that provides formal interaction between ontology development and text mining. We have achieved partial success in extracting quantitative assertions from the biomedical text and formalizing them in ontological

  16. Integrating phenotype ontologies with PhenomeNET

    KAUST Repository

    Rodriguez-Garcia, Miguel Angel

    2017-12-19

    Background Integration and analysis of phenotype data from humans and model organisms is a key challenge in building our understanding of normal biology and pathophysiology. However, the range of phenotypes and anatomical details being captured in clinical and model organism databases presents complex problems when attempting to match classes across species and across phenotypes as diverse as behaviour and neoplasia. We have previously developed PhenomeNET, a system for disease gene prioritization that includes as one of its components an ontology designed to integrate phenotype ontologies. While not applicable to matching arbitrary ontologies, PhenomeNET can be used to identify related phenotypes in different species, including human, mouse, zebrafish, nematode worm, fruit fly, and yeast. Results Here, we apply the PhenomeNET to identify related classes from two phenotype and two disease ontologies using automated reasoning. We demonstrate that we can identify a large number of mappings, some of which require automated reasoning and cannot easily be identified through lexical approaches alone. Combining automated reasoning with lexical matching further improves results in aligning ontologies. Conclusions PhenomeNET can be used to align and integrate phenotype ontologies. The results can be utilized for biomedical analyses in which phenomena observed in model organisms are used to identify causative genes and mutations underlying human disease.

  17. Data mining for ontology development.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, George S.; Strasburg, Jana (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA); Stampf, David (Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Neymotin,Lev (Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Czajkowski, Carl (Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Shine, Eugene (Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC); Bollinger, James (Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC); Ghosh, Vinita (Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Sorokine, Alexandre (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Ferrell, Regina (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Ward, Richard (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Schoenwald, David Alan

    2010-06-01

    A multi-laboratory ontology construction effort during the summer and fall of 2009 prototyped an ontology for counterfeit semiconductor manufacturing. This effort included an ontology development team and an ontology validation methods team. Here the third team of the Ontology Project, the Data Analysis (DA) team reports on their approaches, the tools they used, and results for mining literature for terminology pertinent to counterfeit semiconductor manufacturing. A discussion of the value of ontology-based analysis is presented, with insights drawn from other ontology-based methods regularly used in the analysis of genomic experiments. Finally, suggestions for future work are offered.

  18. Applications of Ontologies in Collaborative Software Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happel, Hans-Jörg; Maalej, Walid; Seedorf, Stefan

    Making distributed teams more efficient is one main goal of Collaborative Software Development (CSD) research. To this end, ontologies, which are models that capture a shared understanding of a specific domain, provide key benefits. Ontologies have formal, machine-interpretable semantics that allow to define semantic mappings for heterogeneous data and to infer implicit knowledge at run-time. Extending development infrastructures and software architectures with ontologies (of problem and solution domains) will address coordination and knowledge sharing challenges in activities such as documentation, requirements specificationrequirements specification , component reuse, error handling, and test case management. The purpose of this article is to provide systematic account of how ontologies can be applied in CSD, and to describe benefits of both existing applications such as "semantic wikissemantic wikis " as well as visionary scenarios such as a "Software Engineering Semantic Websemantic web ".

  19. Learning Ontology from Object-Relational Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaulins Andrejs

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a method of transformation of object-relational model into ontology. The offered method uses learning rules for such complex data types as object tables and collections – arrays of a variable size, as well as nested tables. Object types and their transformation into ontologies are insufficiently considered in scientific literature. This fact served as motivation for the authors to investigate this issue and to write the article on this matter. In the beginning, we acquaint the reader with complex data types and object-oriented databases. Then we describe an algorithm of transformation of complex data types into ontologies. At the end of the article, some examples of ontologies described in the OWL language are given.

  20. A rule-based ontological framework for the classification of molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magka, Despoina; Krötzsch, Markus; Horrocks, Ian

    2014-01-01

    A variety of key activities within life sciences research involves integrating and intelligently managing large amounts of biochemical information. Semantic technologies provide an intuitive way to organise and sift through these rapidly growing datasets via the design and maintenance of ontology-supported knowledge bases. To this end, OWL-a W3C standard declarative language- has been extensively used in the deployment of biochemical ontologies that can be conveniently organised using the classification facilities of OWL-based tools. One of the most established ontologies for the chemical domain is ChEBI, an open-access dictionary of molecular entities that supplies high quality annotation and taxonomical information for biologically relevant compounds. However, ChEBI is being manually expanded which hinders its potential to grow due to the limited availability of human resources. In this work, we describe a prototype that performs automatic classification of chemical compounds. The software we present implements a sound and complete reasoning procedure of a formalism that extends datalog and builds upon an off-the-shelf deductive database system. We capture a wide range of chemical classes that are not expressible with OWL-based formalisms such as cyclic molecules, saturated molecules and alkanes. Furthermore, we describe a surface 'less-logician-like' syntax that allows application experts to create ontological descriptions of complex biochemical objects without prior knowledge of logic. In terms of performance, a noticeable improvement is observed in comparison with previous approaches. Our evaluation has discovered subsumptions that are missing from the manually curated ChEBI ontology as well as discrepancies with respect to existing subclass relations. We illustrate thus the potential of an ontology language suitable for the life sciences domain that exhibits a favourable balance between expressive power and practical feasibility. Our proposed methodology can

  1. Ontology of fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jian; Aydina, Atilla; McGuinness, Deborah L.

    2009-03-01

    Fractures are fundamental structures in the Earth's crust and they can impact many societal and industrial activities including oil and gas exploration and production, aquifer management, CO 2 sequestration, waste isolation, the stabilization of engineering structures, and assessing natural hazards (earthquakes, volcanoes, and landslides). Therefore, an ontology which organizes the concepts of fractures could help facilitate a sound education within, and communication among, the highly diverse professional and academic community interested in the problems cited above. We developed a process-based ontology that makes explicit specifications about fractures, their properties, and the deformation mechanisms which lead to their formation and evolution. Our ontology emphasizes the relationships among concepts such as the factors that influence the mechanism(s) responsible for the formation and evolution of specific fracture types. Our ontology is a valuable resource with a potential to applications in a number of fields utilizing recent advances in Information Technology, specifically for digital data and information in computers, grids, and Web services.

  2. Bayesian Model Averaging of Artificial Intelligence Models for Hydraulic Conductivity Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadiri, A.; Chitsazan, N.; Tsai, F. T.; Asghari Moghaddam, A.

    2012-12-01

    This research presents a Bayesian artificial intelligence model averaging (BAIMA) method that incorporates multiple artificial intelligence (AI) models to estimate hydraulic conductivity and evaluate estimation uncertainties. Uncertainty in the AI model outputs stems from error in model input as well as non-uniqueness in selecting different AI methods. Using one single AI model tends to bias the estimation and underestimate uncertainty. BAIMA employs Bayesian model averaging (BMA) technique to address the issue of using one single AI model for estimation. BAIMA estimates hydraulic conductivity by averaging the outputs of AI models according to their model weights. In this study, the model weights were determined using the Bayesian information criterion (BIC) that follows the parsimony principle. BAIMA calculates the within-model variances to account for uncertainty propagation from input data to AI model output. Between-model variances are evaluated to account for uncertainty due to model non-uniqueness. We employed Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy logic (TS-FL), artificial neural network (ANN) and neurofuzzy (NF) to estimate hydraulic conductivity for the Tasuj plain aquifer, Iran. BAIMA combined three AI models and produced better fitting than individual models. While NF was expected to be the best AI model owing to its utilization of both TS-FL and ANN models, the NF model is nearly discarded by the parsimony principle. The TS-FL model and the ANN model showed equal importance although their hydraulic conductivity estimates were quite different. This resulted in significant between-model variances that are normally ignored by using one AI model.

  3. Rehabilitation robotics ontology on the cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogmus, Zeynep; Papantoniou, Agis; Kilinc, Muhammed; Yildirim, Sibel A; Erdem, Esra; Patoglu, Volkan

    2013-06-01

    We introduce the first formal rehabilitation robotics ontology, called RehabRobo-Onto, to represent information about rehabilitation robots and their properties; and a software system RehabRobo-Query to facilitate access to this ontology. RehabRobo-Query is made available on the cloud, utilizing Amazon Web services, so that 1) rehabilitation robot designers around the world can add/modify information about their robots in RehabRobo-Onto, and 2) rehabilitation robot designers and physical medicine experts around the world can access the knowledge in RehabRobo-Onto by means of questions about robots, in natural language, with the guide of the intelligent userinterface of RehabRobo-Query. The ontology system consisting of RehabRobo-Onto and RehabRobo-Query is of great value to robot designers as well as physical therapists and medical doctors. On the one hand, robot designers can access various properties of the existing robots and to the related publications to further improve the state-of-the-art. On the other hand, physical therapists and medical doctors can utilize the ontology to compare rehabilitation robots and to identify the ones that serve best to cover their needs, or to evaluate the effects of various devices for targeted joint exercises on patients with specific disorders.

  4. Manufacturing ontology through templates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diciuc Vlad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The manufacturing industry contains a high volume of knowhow and of high value, much of it being held by key persons in the company. The passing of this know-how is the basis of manufacturing ontology. Among other methods like advanced filtering and algorithm based decision making, one way of handling the manufacturing ontology is via templates. The current paper tackles this approach and highlights the advantages concluding with some recommendations.

  5. Intelligent decision-making models for production and retail operations

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Zhaoxia

    2016-01-01

    This book provides an overview of intelligent decision-making techniques and discusses their application in production and retail operations. Manufacturing and retail enterprises have stringent standards for using advanced and reliable techniques to improve decision-making processes, since these processes have significant effects on the performance of relevant operations and the entire supply chain. In recent years, researchers have been increasingly focusing attention on using intelligent techniques to solve various decision-making problems. The opening chapters provide an introduction to several commonly used intelligent techniques, such as genetic algorithm, harmony search, neural network and extreme learning machine. The book then explores the use of these techniques for handling various production and retail decision-making problems, such as production planning and scheduling, assembly line balancing, and sales forecasting.

  6. tOWL: a temporal Web Ontology Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milea, Viorel; Frasincar, Flavius; Kaymak, Uzay

    2012-02-01

    Through its interoperability and reasoning capabilities, the Semantic Web opens a realm of possibilities for developing intelligent systems on the Web. The Web Ontology Language (OWL) is the most expressive standard language for modeling ontologies, the cornerstone of the Semantic Web. However, up until now, no standard way of expressing time and time-dependent information in OWL has been provided. In this paper, we present a temporal extension of the very expressive fragment SHIN(D) of the OWL Description Logic language, resulting in the temporal OWL language. Through a layered approach, we introduce three extensions: 1) concrete domains, which allow the representation of restrictions using concrete domain binary predicates; 2) temporal representation , which introduces time points, relations between time points, intervals, and Allen's 13 interval relations into the language; and 3) timeslices/fluents, which implement a perdurantist view on individuals and allow for the representation of complex temporal aspects, such as process state transitions. We illustrate the expressiveness of the newly introduced language by using an example from the financial domain.

  7. Ontology for E-Learning: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colace, Francesco; De Santo, Massimo; Gaeta, Matteo

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The development of adaptable and intelligent educational systems is widely considered one of the great challenges in scientific research. Among key elements for building advanced training systems, an important role is played by methodologies chosen for knowledge representation. In this scenario, the introduction of ontology formalism can…

  8. PSOM2—partitioning-based scalable ontology matching using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Sathiya

    2017-11-16

    Nov 16, 2017 ... algorithms generally do not scale well due to the massive number of complex computations required to achieve matching. One of the methods used .... Even though several ontology matching systems exist, there are only very few matching ...... in Computational Intelligence, vol. 292, pp. 251–269. [12] Hanif ...

  9. Nuclear component design ontology building based on ASME codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao Shiyi; Zhou Yu; He Shuyan

    2005-01-01

    The adoption of ontology analysis in the study of concept knowledge acquisition and representation for the nuclear component design process based on computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW) makes it possible to share and reuse numerous concept knowledge of multi-disciplinary domains. A practical ontology building method is accordingly proposed based on Protege knowledge model in combination with both top-down and bottom-up approaches together with Formal Concept Analysis (FCA). FCA exhibits its advantages in the way it helps establish and improve taxonomic hierarchy of concepts and resolve concept conflict occurred in modeling multi-disciplinary domains. With Protege-3.0 as the ontology building tool, a nuclear component design ontology based ASME codes is developed by utilizing the ontology building method. The ontology serves as the basis to realize concept knowledge sharing and reusing of nuclear component design. (authors)

  10. Intelligent Model Management in a Forest Ecosystem Management Decision Support System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald Nute; Walter D. Potter; Frederick Maier; Jin Wang; Mark Twery; H. Michael Rauscher; Peter Knopp; Scott Thomasma; Mayukh Dass; Hajime Uchiyama

    2002-01-01

    Decision making for forest ecosystem management can include the use of a wide variety of modeling tools. These tools include vegetation growth models, wildlife models, silvicultural models, GIS, and visualization tools. NED-2 is a robust, intelligent, goal-driven decision support system that integrates tools in each of these categories. NED-2 uses a blackboard...

  11. An encoding methodology for medical knowledge using SNOMED CT ontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaker El-Sappagh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge-Intensive Case Based Reasoning (KI-CBR systems mainly depend on ontology. Using ontology as domain knowledge supports the implementation of semantically-intelligent case retrieval algorithms. The case-based knowledge must be encoded with the same concepts of the domain ontology. Standard medical ontologies, such as SNOMED CT (SCT, can play the role of domain ontology to enhance case representation and retrieval. This study has three stages. First, we propose an encoding methodology using SCT. Second, this methodology is used to encode the case-based knowledge. Third, all the used SCT concepts are collected in a reference set, and an OWL2 ontology of 550 pre-coordinated concepts is proposed. A diabetes diagnosis is chosen as a case study of our proposed framework. SCT is used to provide a pre-coordination concept coverage of ∼75% for diabetes diagnosis terms. Whereas, the uncovered concepts in SCT are proposed. The resulting OWL2 ontology will be used as domain knowledge representation in diabetes diagnosis CBR systems. The proposed framework is tested by using 60 real cases.

  12. An ontology for major histocompatibility restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vita, Randi; Overton, James A; Seymour, Emily; Sidney, John; Kaufman, Jim; Tallmadge, Rebecca L; Ellis, Shirley; Hammond, John; Butcher, Geoff W; Sette, Alessandro; Peters, Bjoern

    2016-01-01

    MHC molecules are a highly diverse family of proteins that play a key role in cellular immune recognition. Over time, different techniques and terminologies have been developed to identify the specific type(s) of MHC molecule involved in a specific immune recognition context. No consistent nomenclature exists across different vertebrate species. To correctly represent MHC related data in The Immune Epitope Database (IEDB), we built upon a previously established MHC ontology and created an ontology to represent MHC molecules as they relate to immunological experiments. This ontology models MHC protein chains from 16 species, deals with different approaches used to identify MHC, such as direct sequencing verses serotyping, relates engineered MHC molecules to naturally occurring ones, connects genetic loci, alleles, protein chains and multi-chain proteins, and establishes evidence codes for MHC restriction. Where available, this work is based on existing ontologies from the OBO foundry. Overall, representing MHC molecules provides a challenging and practically important test case for ontology building, and could serve as an example of how to integrate other ontology building efforts into web resources.

  13. Ontology Maintenance using Textual Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yassine Gargouri

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Ontologies are continuously confronted to evolution problem. Due to the complexity of the changes to be made, a maintenance process, at least a semi-automatic one, is more and more necessary to facilitate this task and to ensure its reliability. In this paper, we propose a maintenance ontology model for a domain, whose originality is to be language independent and based on a sequence of text processing in order to extract highly related terms from corpus. Initially, we deploy the document classification technique using GRAMEXCO to generate classes of texts segments having a similar information type and identify their shared lexicon, agreed as highly related to a unique topic. This technique allows a first general and robust exploration of the corpus. Further, we apply the Latent Semantic Indexing method to extract from this shared lexicon, the most associated terms that has to be seriously considered by an expert to eventually confirm their relevance and thus updating the current ontology. Finally, we show how the complementarity between these two techniques, based on cognitive foundation, constitutes a powerful refinement process.

  14. Weaving Emotional Intelligence into a Home Visiting Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enson, Beth; Imberger, Jaci

    2017-01-01

    This article details the impact of Emotional Intelligence (EI) training on the 10-year evolution of the Taos First Steps Home Visiting program. While EI has become standard fare in corporate training and practice, it is less well known in the world of early childhood services. This article highlights interviews with key personnel, both in-house…

  15. Modeling and Evaluation of LTE in Intelligent Transportation Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trichias, K.; van den Berg, Hans Leo; de Jongh, J.; Litjens, R.; Dimitrova, D.C.; Brogle, M.; Braun, T.; Heijenk, Gerhard J.; Meratnia, Nirvana

    The term Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) refers to adding information and communications technology to transport infrastructure and ve- hicles. The IEEE 802.11p standard is considered the main candidate for com- munication within the context of ITS and it performs well for active safety use

  16. A Conversation Model Enabling Intelligent Agents to Give Emotional Support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Zwaan, J.M.; Dignum, V.; Jonker, C.M.

    2012-01-01

    In everyday life, people frequently talk to others to help them deal with negative emotions. To some extent, everybody is capable of comforting other people, but so far conversational agents are unable to deal with this type of situation. To provide intelligent agents with the capability to give

  17. Underwater Signal Modeling for Subsurface Classification Using Computational Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setayeshi, Saeed

    In the thesis a method for underwater layered media (UWLM) modeling is proposed, and a simple nonlinear structure for implementation of this model based on the behaviour of its characteristics and the propagation of the acoustic signal in the media accounting for attenuation effects is designed. The model that responds to the acoustic input is employed to test the artificial intelligence classifiers ability. Neural network models, the basic principles of the back-propagation algorithm, and the Hopfield model of associative memories are reviewed, and they are employed to use min-max amplitude ranges of a reflected signal of UWLM based on attenuation effects, to define the classes of the synthetic data, detect its peak features and estimate parameters of the media. It has been found that there is a correlation between the number of layers in the media and the optimum number of nodes in the hidden layer of the neural networks. The integration of the result of the neural networks that classify and detect underwater layered media acoustic signals based on attenuation effects to prove the correspondence between the peak points and decay values has introduced a powerful tool for UWLM identification. The methods appear to have applications in replacing original system, for parameter estimation and output prediction in system identification by the proposed networks. The results of computerized simulation of the UWLM modeling in conjunction with the proposed neural networks training process are given. Fuzzy sets is an idea that allows representing and manipulating inexact concepts, fuzzy min-max pattern classification method, and the learning and recalling algorithms for fuzzy neural networks implementation is explained in this thesis. A fuzzy neural network that uses peak amplitude ranges to define classes is proposed and evaluated for UWLM pattern recognition. It is demonstrated to be able to classify the layered media data sets, and can distinguish between the peak points

  18. Process model-based atomic service discovery and composition of composite semantic web services using web ontology language for services (OWL-S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulraj, D.; Swamynathan, S.; Madhaiyan, M.

    2012-11-01

    Web Service composition has become indispensable as a single web service cannot satisfy complex functional requirements. Composition of services has received much interest to support business-to-business (B2B) or enterprise application integration. An important component of the service composition is the discovery of relevant services. In Semantic Web Services (SWS), service discovery is generally achieved by using service profile of Ontology Web Languages for Services (OWL-S). The profile of the service is a derived and concise description but not a functional part of the service. The information contained in the service profile is sufficient for atomic service discovery, but it is not sufficient for the discovery of composite semantic web services (CSWS). The purpose of this article is two-fold: first to prove that the process model is a better choice than the service profile for service discovery. Second, to facilitate the composition of inter-organisational CSWS by proposing a new composition method which uses process ontology. The proposed service composition approach uses an algorithm which performs a fine grained match at the level of atomic process rather than at the level of the entire service in a composite semantic web service. Many works carried out in this area have proposed solutions only for the composition of atomic services and this article proposes a solution for the composition of composite semantic web services.

  19. Intelligent Hydraulic Actuator and Exp-based Modelling of Losses in Pumps and .

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Muzhi

    A intelligent fuzzy logic self-organising PD+I controller for a gearrotor hydraulic motor was developed and evaluated. Furthermore, a experimental-based modelling methods with a new software tool 'Dynamodata' for modelling of losses in hydraulic motors and pumps was developed.......A intelligent fuzzy logic self-organising PD+I controller for a gearrotor hydraulic motor was developed and evaluated. Furthermore, a experimental-based modelling methods with a new software tool 'Dynamodata' for modelling of losses in hydraulic motors and pumps was developed....

  20. Intelligent multiagent coordination based on reinforcement hierarchical neuro-fuzzy models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Leonardo Forero; Vellasco, Marley; Figueiredo, Karla

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents the research and development of two hybrid neuro-fuzzy models for the hierarchical coordination of multiple intelligent agents. The main objective of the models is to have multiple agents interact intelligently with each other in complex systems. We developed two new models of coordination for intelligent multiagent systems, which integrates the Reinforcement Learning Hierarchical Neuro-Fuzzy model with two proposed coordination mechanisms: the MultiAgent Reinforcement Learning Hierarchical Neuro-Fuzzy with a market-driven coordination mechanism (MA-RL-HNFP-MD) and the MultiAgent Reinforcement Learning Hierarchical Neuro-Fuzzy with graph coordination (MA-RL-HNFP-CG). In order to evaluate the proposed models and verify the contribution of the proposed coordination mechanisms, two multiagent benchmark applications were developed: the pursuit game and the robot soccer simulation. The results obtained demonstrated that the proposed coordination mechanisms greatly improve the performance of the multiagent system when compared with other strategies.

  1. Handling Real-World Context Awareness, Uncertainty and Vagueness in Real-Time Human Activity Tracking and Recognition with a Fuzzy Ontology-Based Hybrid Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Rodríguez, Natalia; Cadahía, Olmo León; Cuéllar, Manuel Pegalajar; Lilius, Johan; Calvo-Flores, Miguel Delgado

    2014-01-01

    Human activity recognition is a key task in ambient intelligence applications to achieve proper ambient assisted living. There has been remarkable progress in this domain, but some challenges still remain to obtain robust methods. Our goal in this work is to provide a system that allows the modeling and recognition of a set of complex activities in real life scenarios involving interaction with the environment. The proposed framework is a hybrid model that comprises two main modules: a low level sub-activity recognizer, based on data-driven methods, and a high-level activity recognizer, implemented with a fuzzy ontology to include the semantic interpretation of actions performed by users. The fuzzy ontology is fed by the sub-activities recognized by the low level data-driven component and provides fuzzy ontological reasoning to recognize both the activities and their influence in the environment with semantics. An additional benefit of the approach is the ability to handle vagueness and uncertainty in the knowledge-based module, which substantially outperforms the treatment of incomplete and/or imprecise data with respect to classic crisp ontologies. We validate these advantages with the public CAD-120 dataset (Cornell Activity Dataset), achieving an accuracy of 90.1% and 91.07% for low-level and high-level activities, respectively. This entails an improvement over fully data-driven or ontology-based approaches. PMID:25268914

  2. Handling Real-World Context Awareness, Uncertainty and Vagueness in Real-Time Human Activity Tracking and Recognition with a Fuzzy Ontology-Based Hybrid Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Díaz-Rodríguez

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Human activity recognition is a key task in ambient intelligence applications to achieve proper ambient assisted living. There has been remarkable progress in this domain, but some challenges still remain to obtain robust methods. Our goal in this work is to provide a system that allows the modeling and recognition of a set of complex activities in real life scenarios involving interaction with the environment. The proposed framework is a hybrid model that comprises two main modules: a low level sub-activity recognizer, based on data-driven methods, and a high-level activity recognizer, implemented with a fuzzy ontology to include the semantic interpretation of actions performed by users. The fuzzy ontology is fed by the sub-activities recognized by the low level data-driven component and provides fuzzy ontological reasoning to recognize both the activities and their influence in the environment with semantics. An additional benefit of the approach is the ability to handle vagueness and uncertainty in the knowledge-based module, which substantially outperforms the treatment of incomplete and/or imprecise data with respect to classic crisp ontologies. We validate these advantages with the public CAD-120 dataset (Cornell Activity Dataset, achieving an accuracy of 90.1% and 91.07% for low-level and high-level activities, respectively. This entails an improvement over fully data-driven or ontology-based approaches.

  3. Ontology-enriched Visualization of Human Anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pouchard, LC

    2005-12-20

    The project focuses on the problem of presenting a human anatomical 3D model associated with other types of human systemic information ranging from physiological to anatomical information while navigating the 3D model. We propose a solution that integrates a visual 3D interface and navigation features with the display of structured information contained in an ontology of anatomy where the structures of the human body are formally and semantically linked. The displayed and annotated anatomy serves as a visual entry point into a patient's anatomy, medical indicators and other information. The ontology of medical information provides labeling to the highlighted anatomical parts in the 3D display. Because of the logical organization and links between anatomical objects found in the ontology and associated 3D model, the analysis of a structure by a physician is greatly enhanced. Navigation within the 3D visualization and between this visualization and objects representing anatomical concepts within the model is also featured.

  4. Gratitude mediates the effect of emotional intelligence on subjective well-being: A structural equation modeling analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Yuan

    2016-11-01

    This study investigated the relationship among emotional intelligence, gratitude, and subjective well-being in a sample of university students. A total of 365 undergraduates completed the emotional intelligence scale, the gratitude questionnaire, and the subjective well-being measures. The results of the structural equation model showed that emotional intelligence is positively associated with gratitude and subjective well-being, that gratitude is positively associated with subjective well-being, and that gratitude partially mediates the positive relationship between emotional intelligence and subjective well-being. Bootstrap test results also revealed that emotional intelligence has a significant indirect effect on subjective well-being through gratitude.

  5. Optimal model of economic diplomacy of Republic of Croatia in the contexst of global intelligence revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdravko Bazdan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to point to the fact that economic diplomacy is a relatively new practice in international economics, specifically the expansion of the occurrence of Intelligence Revolution. The history in global relations shows that without economic diplomacy there is no optimal economic growth and social development. It is important to note that economic diplomacy should be important for our country and the political elite, as well as for the administration of Croatian economic subjects that want to compete in international market economy. Comparative analysis are particularly highlighted by French experience. Therefore, Croatia should copy the practice of those countries that are successful in economic diplomacy. And in the curricula - especially of our economic faculties - we should introduce the course of Economic Diplomacy. It is important to note, that in order to form our optimal model of economic diplomacy which would be headed by the President of Republic of Croatia formula should be based on: Intelligence Security Agency (SOA, Intelligence Service of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and European Integration, Intelligence Service of the Croatian Chamber of Commerce and the Intelligence Service of the Ministry of Economy, Labor and Entrepreneurship. Described model would consist of intelligence subsystem with at least twelve components.

  6. A methodology for creating ontologies for engineering design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Saeema; Kim, S.; Wallace, K.M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a six-stage methodology for developing ontologies for engineering design, together with the research methods and evaluation of each stage. The methodology focuses upon understanding a user's domain models through empirical research. A case study of an ontology for searching......, indexing, and retrieving engineering knowledge is described. The root concepts of the ontology were elicited from engineering designers. Relationships between concepts are extracted as the ontology is populated. The contribution of this research is a methodology to allow researchers. and industry to create...

  7. Applications of Ontologies in Knowledge Management Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Zobia; Kifor, Claudiu V.

    2014-12-01

    Enterprises are realizing that their core asset in 21st century is knowledge. In an organization knowledge resides in databases, knowledge bases, filing cabinets and peoples' head. Organizational knowledge is distributed in nature and its poor management causes repetition of activities across the enterprise. To get true benefits from this asset, it is important for an organization to "know what they know". That's why many organizations are investing a lot in managing their knowledge. Artificial intelligence techniques have a huge contribution in organizational knowledge management. In this article we are reviewing the applications of ontologies in knowledge management realm

  8. Ontology: ambiguity and accuracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Schiessl

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Ambiguity is a major obstacle to information retrieval. It is source of several researches in Information Science. Ontologies have been studied in order to solve problems related to ambiguities. Paradoxically, “ontology” term is also ambiguous and it is understood according to the use by the community. Philosophy and Computer Science seems to have the most accentuated difference related to the term sense. The former holds undisputed tradition and authority. The latter, in despite of being quite recent, holds an informal sense, but pragmatic. Information Science acts ranging from philosophical to computational approaches so as to get organized collections based on balance between users’ necessities and available information. The semantic web requires informational cycle automation and demands studies related to ontologies. Consequently, revisiting relevant approaches for the study of ontologies plays a relevant role as a way to provide useful ideas to researchers maintaining philosophical rigor, and convenience provided by computers.

  9. Intelligent Adversary Risk Analysis: A Bioterrorism Risk Management Model (PREPRINT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-20

    Society for Risk Analysis, February 20, 2009    1. INTELLIGENT ADVERSARY RISK  ANALISIS  IS DIFFERENT THAN  HAZARD RISK ANALYSIS  Risk analysis has...future work and our conclusions. 1.1. Intelligent adversary risk analysis requires new approaches We believe that risk analysis of uncertain hazards...public panic and social disruption; and require special action for public health preparedness. B to Second highest priority agents include those

  10. Introducing Spoken Dialogue Systems into Intelligent Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Heinroth, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Introducing Spoken Dialogue Systems into Intelligent Environments outlines the formalisms of a novel knowledge-driven framework for spoken dialogue management and presents the implementation of a model-based Adaptive Spoken Dialogue Manager(ASDM) called OwlSpeak. The authors have identified three stakeholders that potentially influence the behavior of the ASDM: the user, the SDS, and a complex Intelligent Environment (IE) consisting of various devices, services, and task descriptions. The theoretical foundation of a working ontology-based spoken dialogue description framework, the prototype implementation of the ASDM, and the evaluation activities that are presented as part of this book contribute to the ongoing spoken dialogue research by establishing the fertile ground of model-based adaptive spoken dialogue management. This monograph is ideal for advanced undergraduate students, PhD students, and postdocs as well as academic and industrial researchers and developers in speech and multimodal interactive ...

  11. Modeling speech intelligibility based on the signal-to-noise envelope power ratio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Søren

    background noise, reverberation and noise reduction processing on speech intelligibility, indicating that the model is more general than traditional modeling approaches. Moreover, the model accounts for phase distortions when it includes a mechanism that evaluates the variation of envelope power across...... (audio) frequency. However, because the SNRenv is based on the long-term average envelope power, the model cannot account for the greater intelligibility typically observed in fluctuating noise compared to stationary noise. To overcome this limitation, a multi-resolution version of the sEPSM is presented...... distorted by reverberation or spectral subtraction. The relationship between the SNRenv based decision-metric and psychoacoustic speech intelligibility is further evaluated by generating stimuli with different SNRenv but the same overall power SNR. The results from the corresponding psychoacoustic data...

  12. Swarm intelligence algorithm for interconnect model order reduction with sub-block structure preserving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinsheng; Wang, Chenxu; Yu, Mingyan

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a generalised sub-block structure preservation interconnect model order reduction (MOR) technique based on the swarm intelligence method, that is, particle swarm optimisation (PSO). The swarm intelligence-based structure preservation MOR can be used for a standard model as a criterion for different structure preservation interconnect MOR methods. In the proposed technique, the PSO method is used for predicting the unknown elements of structure-preserving reduced-order modelling of interconnect circuits. The prediction is based on minimising the difference of transform function between the original full-order and desired reduced-order systems maintaining the full-order structure in the reduced-order model. The proposed swarm-intelligence-based structure-preserving MOR method is compared with published work on structure preservation MOR SPRIM techniques. Simulation and synthesis results verify the accuracy and validity of the new structure-preserving MOR technique.

  13. Exploring an Emotional Intelligence Model With Psychiatric Mental Health Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Traci T

    A lack of emotional skills may affect a nurse's personal well-being and have negative effects on patient outcomes. To compare psychiatric-mental health nurses' (PMHN) scores on the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) to a normed population and compare the emotional intelligence (EI) scores of PMHNs using two tools, MSCEIT and Self-Rated Emotional Intelligence Scale (SREIS). Comparative descriptive and correlational study. PMHNs in the study had a higher mean EI compared with that of 5,000 participants in the normed MSCEIT sample. Significant weak correlations were seen between the perceiving and understanding emotion branches of the MSCEIT and SREIS. The current study added data about a sample of PMHN's EI levels in the United States, which may encourage dialog about EI among PMHNs. Future research is needed to examine the relationship between self-report EI tools (e.g., SREIS) and performance tools (e.g., MSCEIT) to determine if they are measuring the same construct.

  14. An Architectural Approach for Building Medical Ontologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea Adrian FOCŞA

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Starting from a use case scenario related to the Electronic Medical Record (EMR information retrieval, this paper proposes several design principles for an ontology-based EMR system, which will allow the physician to perform a semantic search about a specific body structure or zone/space (affected, explored or treated. The research starts from analyzing the information requirements of the family doctors related to the medical history of their patients. By interviewing a group of family doctors, a set of common questions have been identified and modeled as one generic question. The key terms from this generic question then became the building blocks of an ontology, which was further built incrementally and constantly adjusted depending on the query response (design pattern by querying. Elements from other terminologies/ontologies have been reused thus facilitating interoperability with similar constructions. As a result of this research, we tested and proposed for adoption several basic modeling principles for medical ontologies, among them, the particularities of part-whole relations for body regions/spaces and anatomical components, the requirements for propagation of the medical activities from one class to an upper or subsequent class. These modeling principles have a good degree of generality and could be taken into consideration for building any medical ontology.

  15. Toward a formal ontology for narrative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciotti, Fabio

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the rationale and the first draft of a formal ontology for modeling narrative texts are presented. Building on the semiotic and structuralist narratology, and on the work carried out in the late 1980s by Giuseppe Gigliozzi in Italy, the focus of my research are the concepts of character and of narrative world/space. This formal model is expressed in the OWL 2 ontology language. The main reason to adopt a formal modeling approach is that I consider the purely probabilistic-quantitative methods (now widespread in digital literary studies inadequate. An ontology, on one hand provides a tool for the analysis of strictly literary texts. On the other hand (though beyond the scope of the present work, its formalization can also represent a significant contribution towards grounding the application of storytelling methods outside of scholarly contexts.

  16. Learning expressive ontologies

    CERN Document Server

    Völker, J

    2009-01-01

    This publication advances the state-of-the-art in ontology learning by presenting a set of novel approaches to the semi-automatic acquisition, refinement and evaluation of logically complex axiomatizations. It has been motivated by the fact that the realization of the semantic web envisioned by Tim Berners-Lee is still hampered by the lack of ontological resources, while at the same time more and more applications of semantic technologies emerge from fast-growing areas such as e-business or life sciences. Such knowledge-intensive applications, requiring large scale reasoning over complex domai

  17. Core Semantics for Public Ontologies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Suni, Niranjan

    2005-01-01

    ... (schemas or ontologies) with respect to objects. The DARPA Agent Markup Language (DAML) through the use of ontologies provides a very powerful way to describe objects and their relationships to other objects...

  18. A Method for Building Personalized Ontology Summaries

    OpenAIRE

    Queiroz-Sousa, Paulo Orlando; Salgado, Ana Carolina; Pires, Carlos Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    In the context of ontology engineering, the ontology understanding is the basis for its further developmentand reuse. One intuitive eective approach to support ontology understanding is the process of ontology summarizationwhich highlights the most important concepts of an ontology. Ontology summarization identies an excerpt from anontology that contains the most relevant concepts and produces an abridged ontology. In this article, we present amethod for summarizing ontologies that represent ...

  19. Summarization by domain ontology navigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Troels; Bulskov, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    of the subject. In between these two extremes, conceptual summaries encompass selected concepts derived using background knowledge. We address in this paper an approach where conceptual summaries are provided through a conceptualization as given by an ontology. The ontology guiding the summarization can...... be a simple taxonomy or a generative domain ontology. A domain ontology can be provided by a preanalysis of a domain corpus and can be used to condense improved summaries that better reflects the conceptualization of a given domain....

  20. Structure-based classification and ontology in chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hastings Janna

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent years have seen an explosion in the availability of data in the chemistry domain. With this information explosion, however, retrieving relevant results from the available information, and organising those results, become even harder problems. Computational processing is essential to filter and organise the available resources so as to better facilitate the work of scientists. Ontologies encode expert domain knowledge in a hierarchically organised machine-processable format. One such ontology for the chemical domain is ChEBI. ChEBI provides a classification of chemicals based on their structural features and a role or activity-based classification. An example of a structure-based class is 'pentacyclic compound' (compounds containing five-ring structures, while an example of a role-based class is 'analgesic', since many different chemicals can act as analgesics without sharing structural features. Structure-based classification in chemistry exploits elegant regularities and symmetries in the underlying chemical domain. As yet, there has been neither a systematic analysis of the types of structural classification in use in chemistry nor a comparison to the capabilities of available technologies. Results We analyze the different categories of structural classes in chemistry, presenting a list of patterns for features found in class definitions. We compare these patterns of class definition to tools which allow for automation of hierarchy construction within cheminformatics and within logic-based ontology technology, going into detail in the latter case with respect to the expressive capabilities of the Web Ontology Language and recent extensions for modelling structured objects. Finally we discuss the relationships and interactions between cheminformatics approaches and logic-based approaches. Conclusion Systems that perform intelligent reasoning tasks on chemistry data require a diverse set of underlying computational

  1. Extending Galactic Habitable Zone Modeling to Include the Emergence of Intelligent Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Ian S; Gowanlock, Michael G

    2015-08-01

    Previous studies of the galactic habitable zone have been concerned with identifying those regions of the Galaxy that may favor the emergence of complex life. A planet is deemed habitable if it meets a set of assumed criteria for supporting the emergence of such complex life. In this work, we extend the assessment of habitability to consider the potential for life to further evolve to the point of intelligence--termed the propensity for the emergence of intelligent life, φI. We assume φI is strongly influenced by the time durations available for evolutionary processes to proceed undisturbed by the sterilizing effects of nearby supernovae. The times between supernova events provide windows of opportunity for the evolution of intelligence. We developed a model that allows us to analyze these window times to generate a metric for φI, and we examine here the spatial and temporal variation of this metric. Even under the assumption that long time durations are required between sterilizations to allow for the emergence of intelligence, our model suggests that the inner Galaxy provides the greatest number of opportunities for intelligence to arise. This is due to the substantially higher number density of habitable planets in this region, which outweighs the effects of a higher supernova rate in the region. Our model also shows that φI is increasing with time. Intelligent life emerged at approximately the present time at Earth's galactocentric radius, but a similar level of evolutionary opportunity was available in the inner Galaxy more than 2 Gyr ago. Our findings suggest that the inner Galaxy should logically be a prime target region for searches for extraterrestrial intelligence and that any civilizations that may have emerged there are potentially much older than our own.

  2. Means-End based Functional Modeling for Intelligent Control: Modeling and Experiments with an Industrial Heat Pump System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saleem, Arshad

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a Multilevel Flow Model (MFM) of an industrial heat pump system and its use for diagnostic reasoning. MFM is functional modeling language supporting an explicit means-ends intelligent control strategy for large industrial process plants. The model is used...... in several diagnostic experiments analyzing different fault scenarios. The model and results of the experiments are explained and it is shown how MFM based intelligent modeling and automated reasoning can improve the fault diagnosis process significantly....

  3. Construction of Formal Ontology on Computer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelda FIRAT

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available From a general point of view, the defined reality models by using a formal language are called formal ontology. These general purposeful models can be also used in the special fields of application. Because ontologies are large-scale by their nature, they have the potential of hosting errors and deficiencies in case they are generated by human labor. Besides, an ontology formed such a way will be difficult to be adapted to a application specific. In this study, an application of a computerized formal ontology formation saved from probable problems which are likely to arise using human labor will be introduced. In the application, semantic analysis of Turkish has been targetted as a special application field using corpus-based marking method in the framework of formal concept analysis. Beside the applications of these kinds of natural language processing formal ontologies are used considerably in the field of education as they present the information in the way of semantic structures clearly and meaningfully. The most important reasons of this are the use of the information technologies such as expansion of constructivist approach and the concept maps used for educational reasons.

  4. Process attributes in bio-ontologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade André Q

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biomedical processes can provide essential information about the (mal- functioning of an organism and are thus frequently represented in biomedical terminologies and ontologies, including the GO Biological Process branch. These processes often need to be described and categorised in terms of their attributes, such as rates or regularities. The adequate representation of such process attributes has been a contentious issue in bio-ontologies recently; and domain ontologies have correspondingly developed ad hoc workarounds that compromise interoperability and logical consistency. Results We present a design pattern for the representation of process attributes that is compatible with upper ontology frameworks such as BFO and BioTop. Our solution rests on two key tenets: firstly, that many of the sorts of process attributes which are biomedically interesting can be characterised by the ways that repeated parts of such processes constitute, in combination, an overall process; secondly, that entities for which a full logical definition can be assigned do not need to be treated as primitive within a formal ontology framework. We apply this approach to the challenge of modelling and automatically classifying examples of normal and abnormal rates and patterns of heart beating processes, and discuss the expressivity required in the underlying ontology representation language. We provide full definitions for process attributes at increasing levels of domain complexity. Conclusions We show that a logical definition of process attributes is feasible, though limited by the expressivity of DL languages so that the creation of primitives is still necessary. This finding may endorse current formal upper-ontology frameworks as a way of ensuring consistency, interoperability and clarity.

  5. Using a Foundational Ontology for Reengineering a Software Enterprise Ontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perini Barcellos, Monalessa; de Almeida Falbo, Ricardo

    The knowledge about software organizations is considerably relevant to software engineers. The use of a common vocabulary for representing the useful knowledge about software organizations involved in software projects is important for several reasons, such as to support knowledge reuse and to allow communication and interoperability between tools. Domain ontologies can be used to define a common vocabulary for sharing and reuse of knowledge about some domain. Foundational ontologies can be used for evaluating and re-designing domain ontologies, giving to these real-world semantics. This paper presents an evaluating of a Software Enterprise Ontology that was reengineered using the Unified Foundation Ontology (UFO) as basis.

  6. FOCIH: Form-Based Ontology Creation and Information Harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Cui; Embley, David W.; Liddle, Stephen W.

    Creating an ontology and populating it with data are both labor-intensive tasks requiring a high degree of expertise. Thus, scaling ontology creation and population to the size of the web in an effort to create a web of data—which some see as Web 3.0—is prohibitive. Can we find ways to streamline these tasks and lower the barrier enough to enable Web 3.0? Toward this end we offer a form-based approach to ontology creation that provides a way to create Web 3.0 ontologies without the need for specialized training. And we offer a way to semi-automatically harvest data from the current web of pages for a Web 3.0 ontology. In addition to harvesting information with respect to an ontology, the approach also annotates web pages and links facts in web pages to ontological concepts, resulting in a web of data superimposed over the web of pages. Experience with our prototype system shows that mappings between conceptual-model-based ontologies and forms are sufficient for creating the kind of ontologies needed for Web 3.0, and experiments with our prototype system show that automatic harvesting, automatic annotation, and automatic superimposition of a web of data over a web of pages work well.

  7. From Interactive Open Learner Modelling to Intelligent Mentoring: STyLE-OLM and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, Vania; Brna, Paul

    2016-01-01

    STyLE-OLM (Dimitrova 2003 "International Journal of Artificial Intelligence in Education," 13, 35-78) presented a framework for interactive open learner modelling which entails the development of the means by which learners can "inspect," "discuss" and "alter" the learner model that has been jointly…

  8. A Multidisciplinary Model for Development of Intelligent Computer-Assisted Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ok-choon; Seidel, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    Proposes a schematic multidisciplinary model to help developers of intelligent computer-assisted instruction (ICAI) identify the types of required expertise and integrate them into a system. Highlights include domain types and expertise; knowledge acquisition; task analysis; knowledge representation; student modeling; diagnosis of learning needs;…

  9. Using Game Theory Techniques and Concepts to Develop Proprietary Models for Use in Intelligent Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Timothy Van

    2011-01-01

    This work is about analyzing games as models of systems. The goal is to understand the techniques that have been used by game designers in the past, and to compare them to the study of mathematical game theory. Through the study of a system or concept a model often emerges that can effectively educate students about making intelligent decisions…

  10. Effective Stress Management: A Model of Emotional Intelligence, Self-Leadership, and Student Stress Coping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Jeffery D.; Wu, Jinpei; Godwin, Jeffrey L.; Neck, Christopher P.; Manz, Charles C.

    2012-01-01

    This article develops and presents a model of the relationships among emotional intelligence, self-leadership, and stress coping among management students. In short, the authors' model suggests that effective emotion regulation and self-leadership, as mediated through positive affect and self-efficacy, has the potential to facilitate stress coping…

  11. An Intelligent Tutoring System for Learning Chinese with a Cognitive Model of the Learner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosek, Michal; Lison, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    We present an intelligent tutoring system that lets students of Chinese learn words and grammatical constructions. It relies on a Bayesian, linguistically motivated cognitive model that represents the learner's knowledge. This model is dynamically updated given observations about the learner's behaviour in the exercises, and employed at runtime to…

  12. A collision model for safety evaluation of autonomous intelligent cruise control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touran, A; Brackstone, M A; McDonald, M

    1999-09-01

    This paper describes a general framework for safety evaluation of autonomous intelligent cruise control in rear-end collisions. Using data and specifications from prototype devices, two collision models are developed. One model considers a train of four cars, one of which is equipped with autonomous intelligent cruise control. This model considers the car in front and two cars following the equipped car. In the second model, none of the cars is equipped with the device. Each model can predict the possibility of rear-end collision between cars under various conditions by calculating the remaining distance between cars after the front car brakes. Comparing the two collision models allows one to evaluate the effectiveness of autonomous intelligent cruise control in preventing collisions. The models are then subjected to Monte Carlo simulation to calculate the probability of collision. Based on crash probabilities, an expected value is calculated for the number of cars involved in any collision. It is found that given the model assumptions, while equipping a car with autonomous intelligent cruise control can significantly reduce the probability of the collision with the car ahead, it may adversely affect the situation for the following cars.

  13. Patient Centric Ontology for Telehealth Domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Daniel Bjerring; Hallenborg, Kasper; Demazeau, Yves

    2015-01-01

    to the needs, habits, and personality of the patient through user modeling and context awareness. The ontology will be our foundation for user modeling of patients in the telehealth domain, and hence it is one of the initial steps toward our vision. Compared to other ontologies within the domain, ours has...... explicit focus on: 1) personality traits of the patient, which is vital for fulfillment of our vision in term of adaptability, and 2) use of international standards to describe diseases, func-tioning and physiological measurement – ICD, ICF and SNOMED respectively – to promote interoperability...

  14. Taking Critical Ontology Seriously

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigger, Angela; Horn, Laura

    2017-01-01

    privilege ontology over epistemology – that is, why we need to accept that social reality is constituted by complex power relations that evolve from a constant dialectical interplay of structure and agency over time, and that these power relations are revealed in both ideational and material dimensions...

  15. Dahlbeck and Pure Ontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Jim

    2016-01-01

    This article responds to Johan Dahlbeck's "Towards a pure ontology: Children's bodies and morality" ["Educational Philosophy and Theory," vol. 46 (1), 2014, pp. 8-23 (EJ1026561)]. His arguments from Nietzsche and Spinoza do not carry the weight he supposes, and the conclusions he draws from them about pedagogy would be…

  16. OWL Web Ontology Language

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staab, S.; Studer, R.; Antoniou, Grigoris; Van Harmelen, Frank; Staab, S; Studer, R

    2004-01-01

    The OWL Web Ontology Language is designed for use by applications that need to process the content of information instead of just presenting information to humans. OWL facilitates greater machine interpretability of Web content than that supported by XML, RDF, and RDF Schema (RDF-S) by providing

  17. Minerals ontology: application in the environmental field to silicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galan Saulnier, A.; Garcia Gimenez, R.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the application of an ontology, or up-to-date computerized tool, developed in the field of artificial intelligence and in particular of knowledge engineering, to inert elements, in this case the silicate class, which are minerals of scientific, technical and economic interest. The importance of applying ontology to minerals lies in the fact that these substances are capable of causing negative environmental impacts upon other variables in the natural environment, such as the atmosphere and the hydrosphere, and possible subsequent effects on human health. (Author) 37 refs.

  18. A Proposition Of Knowledge Management Methodology For The Purpose Of Reasoning With The Use Of An Upper-Ontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Szymański

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a proposition of knowledge organization for the purpose of reasoningusing an upper-ontology. It presents a model of integrated ontologies architecture whichconsists of a domain ontologies layer with instances, a shared upper-ontology layer withadditional rules and a layer of ontologies mapping concrete domain ontologies with the upperontology.Thanks to the upper-ontology, new facts were concluded from domain ontologiesduring the reasoning process. A practical realization proposition is given as well. It is basedon some popular SemanticWeb technologies and tools, such as OWL, SWRL, nRQL, Prot´eg´eand Racer.

  19. Ontology-Based High-Level Context Inference for Human Behavior Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Villalonga

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have witnessed a huge progress in the automatic identification of individual primitives of human behavior, such as activities or locations. However, the complex nature of human behavior demands more abstract contextual information for its analysis. This work presents an ontology-based method that combines low-level primitives of behavior, namely activity, locations and emotions, unprecedented to date, to intelligently derive more meaningful high-level context information. The paper contributes with a new open ontology describing both low-level and high-level context information, as well as their relationships. Furthermore, a framework building on the developed ontology and reasoning models is presented and evaluated. The proposed method proves to be robust while identifying high-level contexts even in the event of erroneously-detected low-level contexts. Despite reasonable inference times being obtained for a relevant set of users and instances, additional work is required to scale to long-term scenarios with a large number of users.

  20. Ontology-Based High-Level Context Inference for Human Behavior Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalonga, Claudia; Razzaq, Muhammad Asif; Khan, Wajahat Ali; Pomares, Hector; Rojas, Ignacio; Lee, Sungyoung; Banos, Oresti

    2016-09-29

    Recent years have witnessed a huge progress in the automatic identification of individual primitives of human behavior, such as activities or locations. However, the complex nature of human behavior demands more abstract contextual information for its analysis. This work presents an ontology-based method that combines low-level primitives of behavior, namely activity, locations and emotions, unprecedented to date, to intelligently derive more meaningful high-level context information. The paper contributes with a new open ontology describing both low-level and high-level context information, as well as their relationships. Furthermore, a framework building on the developed ontology and reasoning models is presented and evaluated. The proposed method proves to be robust while identifying high-level contexts even in the event of erroneously-detected low-level contexts. Despite reasonable inference times being obtained for a relevant set of users and instances, additional work is required to scale to long-term scenarios with a large number of users.

  1. A Model for Web-Intelligence Index to Evaluate the Web Intelligence Capacity of Government Web Sites of Sri Lanka

    OpenAIRE

    Abeysiriwardana, Prabath Chaminda; Kodituwakku, S. R.

    2015-01-01

    Web intelligence can be considered as a subset of Artificial Intelligence. It uses existing data in web to produce new data, knowledge and wisdom to support decision making and new predictions for web users. Artificial Intelligence is ever changing and evolving field of computer science and it is extensively used in wide array of web based business applications. Although it is used substantially in web based systems in developed countries, it is not examined whether it is being substantially ...

  2. Epistemology and ontology in core ontologies: FOLaw and LRI-Core, two core ontologies for law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breukers, J.A.P.J.; Hoekstra, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    For more than a decade constructing ontologies for legal domains, we, at the Leibniz Center for Law, felt really the need to develop a core ontology for law that would enable us to re-use the common denominator of the various legal domains. In this paper we present two core ontologies for law. The

  3. MODEL OF SYNTHESIS OF A HARDWARE AND SOFTWARE SYSTEM DESIGNATED FOR AN INTELLIGENT OFFICE BUILDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogirenko Andrey Grigor'evich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The problem of synthesis of technology-intensive constituents of an intelligent office system, implemented in advanced office buildings, is the subject matter of this article. On the basis of the proposed classification and the analysis performed by the author, the general structure of the multilevel distributed system, that has radial treelike lines of communications, is developed. The structure of the intelligent office system designated for advanced real estate facilities represents an integration of two structures, including the functional constituent and the hardware constituent. The model of optimization of the hardware constituent is proposed by the author. The article also contains an overview of the model implementation within the framework of a set of intelligent buildings in the centre of Moscow.

  4. Decade Review (1999-2009): Artificial Intelligence Techniques in Student Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drigas, Athanasios S.; Argyri, Katerina; Vrettaros, John

    Artificial Intelligence applications in educational field are getting more and more popular during the last decade (1999-2009) and that is why much relevant research has been conducted. In this paper, we present the most interesting attempts to apply artificial intelligence methods such as fuzzy logic, neural networks, genetic programming and hybrid approaches such as neuro - fuzzy systems and genetic programming neural networks (GPNN) in student modeling. This latest research trend is a part of every Intelligent Tutoring System and aims at generating and updating a student model in order to modify learning content to fit individual needs or to provide reliable assessment and feedback to student's answers. In this paper, we make a brief presentation of methods used to point out their qualities and then we attempt a navigation to the most representative studies sought in the decade of our interest after classifying them according to the principal aim they attempted to serve.

  5. A Multidisciplinary Artificial Intelligence Model of an Affective Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooman Aghaebrahimi Samani

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A multidisciplinary approach to a novel artificial intelligence system for an affective robot is presented in this paper. The general objective of the system is to develop a robotic system which strives to achieve a high level of emotional bond between humans and robot by exploring human love. Such a relationship is a contingent process of attraction, affection and attachment from humans towards robots, and the belief of the vice versa from robots to humans. The advanced artificial intelligence of the system includes three modules, namely Probabilistic Love Assembly (PLA, based on the psychology of love, Artificial Endocrine System (AES, based on the physiology of love, and Affective State Transition (AST, based on emotions. The PLA module employs a Bayesian network to incorporate psychological parameters of affection in the robot. The AES module employs artificial emotional and biological hormones via a Dynamic Bayesian Network (DBN. The AST module uses a novel transition method for handling affective states of the robot. These three modules work together to manage emotional behaviours of the robot.

  6. Traffic Route Modelling and Assignment with Intelligent Transport System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunicina Nadezhda

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of signal transmitting environment for multimodal traffic control will enhance the integration of emergency and specialized transport routing tools in usual traffic control paradigms - it is one of the opportunities offered by modern intelligent traffic control systems. The improvement of effective electric power use in public transport system is an advantage of Intelligent Transport System (ITS. The research is connected with the improvement of on-line traffic control and adaptation of special traffic lighting alternatives by ITS. The assignment of the nearest appropriate transport will be done by passenger request, but unlike information system, the transport planning is done on demand. The task can be solved with the help of modern technical methods and equipment, as well as by applying control paradigms of the distributed systems. The problem is solved with the help of calculations hyper-graph and scheduling theory. The goal of the research is to develop methods, which support scheduling of the emergency transport, using high performance computing.

  7. Intelligence Reach for Expertise (IREx)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadley, Christina; Schoening, James R.; Schreiber, Yonatan

    2015-05-01

    IREx is a search engine for next-generation analysts to find collaborators. U.S. Army Field Manual 2.0 (Intelligence) calls for collaboration within and outside the area of operations, but finding the best collaborator for a given task can be challenging. IREx will be demonstrated as part of Actionable Intelligence Technology Enabled Capability Demonstration (AI-TECD) at the E15 field exercises at Ft. Dix in July 2015. It includes a Task Model for describing a task and its prerequisite competencies, plus a User Model (i.e., a user profile) for individuals to assert their capabilities and other relevant data. These models use a canonical suite of ontologies as a foundation for these models, which enables robust queries and also keeps the models logically consistent. IREx also supports learning validation, where a learner who has completed a course module can search and find a suitable task to practice and demonstrate that their new knowledge can be used in the real world for its intended purpose. The IREx models are in the initial phase of a process to develop them as an IEEE standard. This initiative is currently an approved IEEE Study Group, after which follows a standards working group, then a balloting group, and if all goes well, an IEEE standard.

  8. Benchmarking ontologies: bigger or better?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixia Yao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A scientific ontology is a formal representation of knowledge within a domain, typically including central concepts, their properties, and relations. With the rise of computers and high-throughput data collection, ontologies have become essential to data mining and sharing across communities in the biomedical sciences. Powerful approaches exist for testing the internal consistency of an ontology, but not for assessing the fidelity of its domain representation. We introduce a family of metrics that describe the breadth and depth with which an ontology represents its knowledge domain. We then test these metrics using (1 four of the most common medical ontologies with respect to a corpus of medical documents and (2 seven of the most popular English thesauri with respect to three corpora that sample language from medicine, news, and novels. Here we show that our approach captures the quality of ontological representation and guides efforts to narrow the breach between ontology and collective discourse within a domain. Our results also demonstrate key features of medical ontologies, English thesauri, and discourse from different domains. Medical ontologies have a small intersection, as do English thesauri. Moreover, dialects characteristic of distinct domains vary strikingly as many of the same words are used quite differently in medicine, news, and novels. As ontologies are intended to mirror the state of knowledge, our methods to tighten the fit between ontology and domain will increase their relevance for new areas of biomedical science and improve the accuracy and power of inferences computed across them.

  9. Ontology-based Information Retrieval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Styltsvig, Henrik Bulskov

    In this thesis, we will present methods for introducing ontologies in information retrieval. The main hypothesis is that the inclusion of conceptual knowledge such as ontologies in the information retrieval process can contribute to the solution of major problems currently found in information...... retrieval. This utilization of ontologies has a number of challenges. Our focus is on the use of similarity measures derived from the knowledge about relations between concepts in ontologies, the recognition of semantic information in texts and the mapping of this knowledge into the ontologies in use......, as well as how to fuse together the ideas of ontological similarity and ontological indexing into a realistic information retrieval scenario. To achieve the recognition of semantic knowledge in a text, shallow natural language processing is used during indexing that reveals knowledge to the level of noun...

  10. Ontologic Model and Architecture for a Spatial Data Infrastructure Sensitive to Context for the World Cup 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OLIVEIRA ,W. M. O.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In large sporting events like the World Cup in 2014, there is an imminent demand for information systems that are able to deliver to the user, useful information such as the location of games, conferences, training or a particular physical structure for their accommodation and feeding, besides showing the best routes to these places. However, the huge volume of information, concerning the events and to the own infrastructure of the World Cup host cities, hamper the search for information that is directly related to a determined user in particular. The Spatial Data Infrastructures aimed at ensuring greater access, availability and exchange of geographic information. This approach, together with the mapping of ontological concepts of the environment where the user is, allow us to provide information relevant to their context. This paper presents a proposed union between these two approaches in order to offer the user an infrastructure that not only consider the simple input of a query, but also be able to refine it and even anticipate information, respecting their environment, interest, individuality and that uses your geographic knowledge as a source of new information.

  11. Modeling a microbial community and biodiversity assay with OBO Foundry ontologies: the interoperability gains of a modular approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca-Serra, Philippe; Walls, Ramona; Parnell, Jacob; Gallery, Rachel; Zheng, Jie; Sansone, Susanna-Assunta; Gonzalez-Beltran, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    The advent of affordable sequencing technology provides for a new generation of explorers who probe the world's microbial diversity. Projects such as Tara Oceans, Moorea Biocode Project and Gut Microbiome rely on sequencing technologies to probe community diversity. Either targeted gene surveys (also known as community surveys) or complete metagenomes are evaluated. The former, being the less costly of the two methods, relies on the identification of specific genomic regions, which can be used as a proxy to estimate genetic distance between related species in a Phylum. For instance, 16 S ribosomal RNA gene surveys are used to probe bacterial communities while internal transcribed spacer surveys, for example, can be used for probing fungal communities. With the explosion of projects and frenzy to explore new domains of life, scientists in the field have issued guidelines to report minimal information (following a checklist), ensuring that information is contextualized in a meaningful way. Yet the semantics of a checklist are not explicit. We demonstrate here how a tabular template can be used to collect information on microbial diversity using an explicit representation in the Resource Description Framework that is consistent with community agreed-upon knowledge representation patterns found in the Ontology for Biomedical Investigations. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  12. A Model of Intelligent Fault Diagnosis of Power Equipment Based on CBR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Ma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays the demand of power supply reliability has been strongly increased as the development within power industry grows rapidly. Nevertheless such large demand requires substantial power grid to sustain. Therefore power equipment’s running and testing data which contains vast information underpins online monitoring and fault diagnosis to finally achieve state maintenance. In this paper, an intelligent fault diagnosis model for power equipment based on case-based reasoning (IFDCBR will be proposed. The model intends to discover the potential rules of equipment fault by data mining. The intelligent model constructs a condition case base of equipment by analyzing the following four categories of data: online recording data, history data, basic test data, and environmental data. SVM regression analysis was also applied in mining the case base so as to further establish the equipment condition fingerprint. The running data of equipment can be diagnosed by such condition fingerprint to detect whether there is a fault or not. Finally, this paper verifies the intelligent model and three-ratio method based on a set of practical data. The resulting research demonstrates that this intelligent model is more effective and accurate in fault diagnosis.

  13. Intelligence: Real or artificial?

    OpenAIRE

    Schlinger, Henry D.

    1992-01-01

    Throughout the history of the artificial intelligence movement, researchers have strived to create computers that could simulate general human intelligence. This paper argues that workers in artificial intelligence have failed to achieve this goal because they adopted the wrong model of human behavior and intelligence, namely a cognitive essentialist model with origins in the traditional philosophies of natural intelligence. An analysis of the word “intelligence” suggests that it originally r...

  14. Intelligent judgements over health risks in a spatial agent-based model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulkareem, Shaheen A; Augustijn, Ellen-Wien; Mustafa, Yaseen T; Filatova, Tatiana

    2018-03-20

    Millions of people worldwide are exposed to deadly infectious diseases on a regular basis. Breaking news of the Zika outbreak for instance, made it to the main media titles internationally. Perceiving disease risks motivate people to adapt their behavior toward a safer and more protective lifestyle. Computational science is instrumental in exploring patterns of disease spread emerging from many individual decisions and interactions among agents and their environment by means of agent-based models. Yet, current disease models rarely consider simulating dynamics in risk perception and its impact on the adaptive protective behavior. Social sciences offer insights into individual risk perception and corresponding protective actions, while machine learning provides algorithms and methods to capture these learning processes. This article presents an innovative approach to extend agent-based disease models by capturing behavioral aspects of decision-making in a risky context using machine learning techniques. We illustrate it with a case of cholera in Kumasi, Ghana, accounting for spatial and social risk factors that affect intelligent behavior and corresponding disease incidents. The results of computational experiments comparing intelligent with zero-intelligent representations of agents in a spatial disease agent-based model are discussed. We present a spatial disease agent-based model (ABM) with agents' behavior grounded in Protection Motivation Theory. Spatial and temporal patterns of disease diffusion among zero-intelligent agents are compared to those produced by a population of intelligent agents. Two Bayesian Networks (BNs) designed and coded using R and are further integrated with the NetLogo-based Cholera ABM. The first is a one-tier BN1 (only risk perception), the second is a two-tier BN2 (risk and coping behavior). We run three experiments (zero-intelligent agents, BN1 intelligence and BN2 intelligence) and report the results per experiment in terms of

  15. An ontology based trust verification of software license agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wenhuan; Li, Xiaoqing; Gan, Zengqin; Wei, Jianguo

    2017-08-01

    When we install software or download software, there will show up so big mass document to state the rights and obligations, for which lots of person are not patient to read it or understand it. That would may make users feel distrust for the software. In this paper, we propose an ontology based verification for Software License Agreement. First of all, this work proposed an ontology model for domain of Software License Agreement. The domain ontology is constructed by proposed methodology according to copyright laws and 30 software license agreements. The License Ontology can act as a part of generalized copyright law knowledge model, and also can work as visualization of software licenses. Based on this proposed ontology, a software license oriented text summarization approach is proposed which performances showing that it can improve the accuracy of software licenses summarizing. Based on the summarization, the underline purpose of the software license can be explicitly explored for trust verification.

  16. Artificial intelligence and exponential technologies business models evolution and new investment opportunities

    CERN Document Server

    Corea, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence is a huge breakthrough technology that is changing our world. It requires some degrees of technical skills to be developed and understood, so in this book we are going to first of all define AI and categorize it with a non-technical language. We will explain how we reached this phase and what historically happened to artificial intelligence in the last century. Recent advancements in machine learning, neuroscience, and artificial intelligence technology will be addressed, and new business models introduced for and by artificial intelligence research will be analyzed. Finally, we will describe the investment landscape, through the quite comprehensive study of almost 14,000 AI companies and we will discuss important features and characteristics of both AI investors as well as investments. This is the “Internet of Thinks” era. AI is revolutionizing the world we live in. It is augmenting the human experiences, and it targets to amplify human intelligence in a future not so distant from...

  17. Implementation of intelligent nuclear material diagnosis module based on the component object model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Yoon; Song, Dae Yong; Ko, Won Il; Ha, Jang Ho; Kim, Ho Dong

    2003-08-01

    In this paper, the implementation techniques of intelligent nuclear material surveillance system based on the COM (Component Object Model) and SOM (Self Organized Mapping) was described. The surveillance system that is to be developed is consist of CCD cameras, neutron monitors, and PC for data acquisition. To develop the system, the properties of the COM based software development technology was investigated, and the characteristics of related platform APIs was summarized. This report could be used for the developers who want to develop the intelligent surveillance system for various experimental environments based on the DVR and sensors using Borland C++ Builder

  18. Business intelligence tools for radiology: creating a prototype model using open-source tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevedello, Luciano M; Andriole, Katherine P; Hanson, Richard; Kelly, Pauline; Khorasani, Ramin

    2010-04-01

    Digital radiology departments could benefit from the ability to integrate and visualize data (e.g. information reflecting complex workflow states) from all of their imaging and information management systems in one composite presentation view. Leveraging data warehousing tools developed in the business world may be one way to achieve this capability. In total, the concept of managing the information available in this data repository is known as Business Intelligence or BI. This paper describes the concepts used in Business Intelligence, their importance to modern Radiology, and the steps used in the creation of a prototype model of a data warehouse for BI using open-source tools.

  19. The Relations between Implicit Intelligence Beliefs, Autonomous Academic Motivation, and School Persistence Intentions: A Mediation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud-Dubé, Andréanne; Guay, Frédéric; Talbot, Denis; Taylor, Geneviève; Koestner, Richard

    2015-01-01

    This study attempts to test a model in which the relation between implicit theories of intelligence and students' school persistence intentions are mediated by intrinsic, identified, introjected, and external regulations. Six hundred and fifty students from a high school were surveyed. Contrary to expectations, results from ESEM analyses indicated…

  20. Implementing Adaptability in the Standard Reference Model for Intelligent Multimedia Presentation Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Rutledge (Lloyd); L. Hardman (Lynda); J.R. van Ossenbruggen (Jacco); D.C.A. Bulterman (Dick)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractThis paper discusses the implementation of adaptability in environments that are based on the Standard Reference Model for Intelligent Multimedia Presentation Systems. This adaptability is explored in the context of style sheets, which are represented in such formats as DSSSL. The use of

  1. Decision Conceptual Model for Innovation Ways using the Competitive Intelligence System

    OpenAIRE

    Mateescu Mihaela; Muscalu Sabin; Bozga Raluca

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a theoretical model that can be used in making decisions regarding theinnovation ways. The innovation strategy is designed with the competitive intelligence system. Thismodel will be implemented software and will be applied in a service company. The results of thepresent study will be communicated in a future paper.

  2. Decision Conceptual Model for Innovation Ways using the Competitive Intelligence System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateescu Mihaela

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a theoretical model that can be used in making decisions regarding theinnovation ways. The innovation strategy is designed with the competitive intelligence system. Thismodel will be implemented software and will be applied in a service company. The results of thepresent study will be communicated in a future paper.

  3. Predicting speech intelligibility in adverse conditions: evaluation of the speech-based envelope power spectrum model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Søren; Dau, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    conditions by comparing predictions to measured data from [Kjems et al. (2009). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 126 (3), 1415-1426] where speech is mixed with four different interferers, including speech-shaped noise, bottle noise, car noise, and cafe noise. The model accounts well for the differences in intelligibility...

  4. Emotional Intelligence and Negative Feelings: A Gender Specific Moderated Mediation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakus, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to clarify the effect of emotional intelligence (EI) on negative feelings (stress, anxiety, burnout and depression) in a gender specific model. Four hundred and twenty-five primary school teachers (326 males, 99 females) completed the measures of EI, stress, anxiety, burnout and depression. The multi-group analysis was performed…

  5. Towards a value model for collaborative, business intelligence-supported risk assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, L.; Daniëls, H.A.M.; Johannesson, P.

    2012-01-01

    Collaborative business intelligence supports risk assessment and in return enhances management control on a business network. Nonetheless, it needs an incentive basis in the first place before it can be implemented, that is, the value model. Starting from the managerial challenges which arise from

  6. Design of an Intelligent Support Agent Model for People with a Cognitive Vulnerability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aziz, A.A.; Klein, M.C.A.; Zhang, B.; Wang, Y.; Kinser, W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the design of an intelligent agent application aimed at supporting people with a cognitive vulnerability to prevent the onset of a depression. For this, a computational model of the cognitive processes around depression is used. The agent application uses the principles of

  7. Completeness, supervenience and ontology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maudlin, Tim W E

    2007-01-01

    In 1935, Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen raised the issue of the completeness of the quantum description of a physical system. What they had in mind is whether or not the quantum description is informationally complete, in that all physical features of a system can be recovered from it. In a collapse theory such as the theory of Ghirardi, Rimini and Weber, the quantum wavefunction is informationally complete, and this has often been taken to suggest that according to that theory the wavefunction is all there is. If we distinguish the ontological completeness of a description from its informational completeness, we can see that the best interpretations of the GRW theory must postulate more physical ontology than just the wavefunction

  8. Ontological interpretation of biomedical database content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana da Silva, Filipe; Jansen, Ludger; Freitas, Fred; Schulz, Stefan

    2017-06-26

    Biological databases store data about laboratory experiments, together with semantic annotations, in order to support data aggregation and retrieval. The exact meaning of such annotations in the context of a database record is often ambiguous. We address this problem by grounding implicit and explicit database content in a formal-ontological framework. By using a typical extract from the databases UniProt and Ensembl, annotated with content from GO, PR, ChEBI and NCBI Taxonomy, we created four ontological models (in OWL), which generate explicit, distinct interpretations under the BioTopLite2 (BTL2) upper-level ontology. The first three models interpret database entries as individuals (IND), defined classes (SUBC), and classes with dispositions (DISP), respectively; the fourth model (HYBR) is a combination of SUBC and DISP. For the evaluation of these four models, we consider (i) database content retrieval, using ontologies as query vocabulary; (ii) information completeness; and, (iii) DL complexity and decidability. The models were tested under these criteria against four competency questions (CQs). IND does not raise any ontological claim, besides asserting the existence of sample individuals and relations among them. Modelling patterns have to be created for each type of annotation referent. SUBC is interpreted regarding maximally fine-grained defined subclasses under the classes referred to by the data. DISP attempts to extract truly ontological statements from the database records, claiming the existence of dispositions. HYBR is a hybrid of SUBC and DISP and is more parsimonious regarding expressiveness and query answering complexity. For each of the four models, the four CQs were submitted as DL queries. This shows the ability to retrieve individuals with IND, and classes in SUBC and HYBR. DISP does not retrieve anything because the axioms with disposition are embedded in General Class Inclusion (GCI) statements. Ambiguity of biological database content is

  9. Insider Threat Indicator Ontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-25

    Figure 12 shows a key with the symbols used to visualize the ontology. Figure 12: Diagram Key CMU/SEI-2016-TR-007 | SOFTWARE ENGINEERING...security guard is defined as an employee who guards, patrols, or monitors a premises to prevent theft, violence , or infractions of rules...malicious actions of an insider. Event Organization isVictimOrganizationOf hasWife hasSpouse This relates a married woman to her spouse. Person Person

  10. Semi-automated ontology generation and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirtzinger, Anthony P.; Anken, Craig S.

    2009-05-01

    Extending the notion of data models or object models, ontology can provide rich semantic definition not only to the meta-data but also to the instance data of domain knowledge, making these semantic definitions available in machine readable form. However, the generation of an effective ontology is a difficult task involving considerable labor and skill. This paper discusses an Ontology Generation and Evolution Processor (OGEP) aimed at automating this process, only requesting user input when un-resolvable ambiguous situations occur. OGEP directly attacks the main barrier which prevents automated (or self learning) ontology generation: the ability to understand the meaning of artifacts and the relationships the artifacts have to the domain space. OGEP leverages existing lexical to ontological mappings in the form of WordNet, and Suggested Upper Merged Ontology (SUMO) integrated with a semantic pattern-based structure referred to as the Semantic Grounding Mechanism (SGM) and implemented as a Corpus Reasoner. The OGEP processing is initiated by a Corpus Parser performing a lexical analysis of the corpus, reading in a document (or corpus) and preparing it for processing by annotating words and phrases. After the Corpus Parser is done, the Corpus Reasoner uses the parts of speech output to determine the semantic meaning of a word or phrase. The Corpus Reasoner is the crux of the OGEP system, analyzing, extrapolating, and evolving data from free text into cohesive semantic relationships. The Semantic Grounding Mechanism provides a basis for identifying and mapping semantic relationships. By blending together the WordNet lexicon and SUMO ontological layout, the SGM is given breadth and depth in its ability to extrapolate semantic relationships between domain entities. The combination of all these components results in an innovative approach to user assisted semantic-based ontology generation. This paper will describe the OGEP technology in the context of the architectural

  11. Intelligent sensor-model automated control of PMR-15 autoclave processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, S.; Kranbuehl, D.; Loos, A.; Hinds, B.; Koury, J.

    1992-01-01

    An intelligent sensor model system has been built and used for automated control of the PMR-15 cure process in the autoclave. The system uses frequency-dependent FM sensing (FDEMS), the Loos processing model, and the Air Force QPAL intelligent software shell. The Loos model is used to predict and optimize the cure process including the time-temperature dependence of the extent of reaction, flow, and part consolidation. The FDEMS sensing system in turn monitors, in situ, the removal of solvent, changes in the viscosity, reaction advancement and cure completion in the mold continuously throughout the processing cycle. The sensor information is compared with the optimum processing conditions from the model. The QPAL composite cure control system allows comparison of the sensor monitoring with the model predictions to be broken down into a series of discrete steps and provides a language for making decisions on what to do next regarding time-temperature and pressure.

  12. Food for thought ... A toxicology ontology roadmap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Barry; Apic, Gordana; Carthew, Philip; Clark, Dominic; Cook, David; Dix, Ian; Escher, Sylvia; Hastings, Janna; Heard, David J; Jeliazkova, Nina; Judson, Philip; Matis-Mitchell, Sherri; Mitic, Dragana; Myatt, Glenn; Shah, Imran; Spjuth, Ola; Tcheremenskaia, Olga; Toldo, Luca; Watson, David; White, Andrew; Yang, Chihae

    2012-01-01

    Foreign substances can have a dramatic and unpredictable adverse effect on human health. In the development of new therapeutic agents, it is essential that the potential adverse effects of all candidates be identified as early as possible. The field of predictive toxicology strives to profile the potential for adverse effects of novel chemical substances before they occur, both with traditional in vivo experimental approaches and increasingly through the development of in vitro and computational methods which can supplement and reduce the need for animal testing. To be maximally effective, the field needs access to the largest possible knowledge base of previous toxicology findings, and such results need to be made available in such a fashion so as to be interoperable, comparable, and compatible with standard toolkits. This necessitates the development of open, public, computable, and standardized toxicology vocabularies and ontologies so as to support the applications required by in silico, in vitro, and in vivo toxicology methods and related analysis and reporting activities. Such ontology development will support data management, model building, integrated analysis, validation and reporting, including regulatory reporting and alternative testing submission requirements as required by guidelines such as the REACH legislation, leading to new scientific advances in a mechanistically-based predictive toxicology. Numerous existing ontology and standards initiatives can contribute to the creation of a toxicology ontology supporting the needs of predictive toxicology and risk assessment. Additionally, new ontologies are needed to satisfy practical use cases and scenarios where gaps currently exist. Developing and integrating these resources will require a well-coordinated and sustained effort across numerous stakeholders engaged in a public-private partnership. In this communication, we set out a roadmap for the development of an integrated toxicology ontology

  13. An Intelligent Ensemble Neural Network Model for Wind Speed Prediction in Renewable Energy Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganayaki, V; Deepa, S N

    2016-01-01

    Various criteria are proposed to select the number of hidden neurons in artificial neural network (ANN) models and based on the criterion evolved an intelligent ensemble neural network model is proposed to predict wind speed in renewable energy applications. The intelligent ensemble neural model based wind speed forecasting is designed by averaging the forecasted values from multiple neural network models which includes multilayer perceptron (MLP), multilayer adaptive linear neuron (Madaline), back propagation neural network (BPN), and probabilistic neural network (PNN) so as to obtain better accuracy in wind speed prediction with minimum error. The random selection of hidden neurons numbers in artificial neural network results in overfitting or underfitting problem. This paper aims to avoid the occurrence of overfitting and underfitting problems. The selection of number of hidden neurons is done in this paper employing 102 criteria; these evolved criteria are verified by the computed various error values. The proposed criteria for fixing hidden neurons are validated employing the convergence theorem. The proposed intelligent ensemble neural model is applied for wind speed prediction application considering the real time wind data collected from the nearby locations. The obtained simulation results substantiate that the proposed ensemble model reduces the error value to minimum and enhances the accuracy. The computed results prove the effectiveness of the proposed ensemble neural network (ENN) model with respect to the considered error factors in comparison with that of the earlier models available in the literature.

  14. Research on land registration procedure ontology of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhongjun; Du, Qingyun; Zhang, Weiwei; Liu, Tao

    2009-10-01

    Land registration is public act which is to record the state-owned land use right, collective land ownership, collective land use right and land mortgage, servitude, as well as other land rights required the registration according to laws and regulations onto land registering books. Land registration is one of the important government affairs , so it is very important to standardize, optimize and humanize the process of land registration. The management works of organization are realized through a variety of workflows. Process knowledge is in essence a kind of methodology knowledge and a system which including the core and the relational knowledge. In this paper, the ontology is introduced into the field of land registration and management, trying to optimize the flow of land registration, to promote the automation-building and intelligent Service of land registration affairs, to provide humanized and intelligent service for multi-types of users . This paper tries to build land registration procedure ontology by defining the land registration procedure ontology's key concepts which represent the kinds of processes of land registration and mapping the kinds of processes to OWL-S. The land registration procedure ontology shall be the start and the basis of the Web service.

  15. An Ontology for Software Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Thong Chee; Jusoh, Yusmadi Yah; Adbullah, Rusli; Alwi, Nor Hayati

    2013-01-01

    Software agents communicate using ontology. It is important to build an ontology for specific domain such as Software Engineering Education. Building an ontology from scratch is not only hard, but also incur much time and cost. This study aims to propose an ontology through adaptation of the existing ontology which is originally built based on a…

  16. Development of an Ontology for Periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Asami; Takai-Igarashi, Takako; Nakaya, Jun; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    In the clinical dentists and periodontal researchers' community, there is an obvious demand for a systems model capable of linking the clinical presentation of periodontitis to underlying molecular knowledge. A computer-readable representation of processes on disease development will give periodontal researchers opportunities to elucidate pathways and mechanisms of periodontitis. An ontology for periodontitis can be a model for integration of large variety of factors relating to a complex disease such as chronic inflammation in different organs accompanied by bone remodeling and immune system disorders, which has recently been referred to as osteoimmunology. Terms characteristic of descriptions related to the onset and progression of periodontitis were manually extracted from 194 review articles and PubMed abstracts by experts in periodontology. We specified all the relations between the extracted terms and constructed them into an ontology for periodontitis. We also investigated matching between classes of our ontology and that of Gene Ontology Biological Process. We developed an ontology for periodontitis called Periodontitis-Ontology (PeriO). The pathological progression of periodontitis is caused by complex, multi-factor interrelationships. PeriO consists of all the required concepts to represent the pathological progression and clinical treatment of periodontitis. The pathological processes were formalized with reference to Basic Formal Ontology and Relation Ontology, which accounts for participants in the processes realized by biological objects such as molecules and cells. We investigated the peculiarity of biological processes observed in pathological progression and medical treatments for the disease in comparison with Gene Ontology Biological Process (GO-BP) annotations. The results indicated that peculiarities of Perio existed in 1) granularity and context dependency of both the conceptualizations, and 2) causality intrinsic to the pathological processes

  17. Nursing theories as nursing ontologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaming, Don

    2004-10-01

    By understanding the constructions of knowledge we currently label nursing theories as nursing ontologies, nurses can perceive these conceptualizations differently. Paul Ricoeur and Stephen White offer a conceptualization of ontology that differs from traditional, realist perspectives because they assume that a person's experience of a phenomenon (e.g., nursing) will change, but also maintain some stability. Discussing nursing ontologies, rather than nursing theories, might increase philosophy's status in nursing and may also more accurately reflect the experience of being a nurse.

  18. Semantic Similarity in Biomedical Ontologies

    OpenAIRE

    Pesquita, Catia; Faria, Daniel; Falc?o, Andr? O.; Lord, Phillip; Couto, Francisco M.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, ontologies have become a mainstream topic in biomedical research. When biological entities are described using a common schema, such as an ontology, they can be compared by means of their annotations. This type of comparison is called semantic similarity, since it assesses the degree of relatedness between two entities by the similarity in meaning of their annotations. The application of semantic similarity to biomedical ontologies is recent; nevertheless, several studies hav...

  19. Owlready: Ontology-oriented programming in Python with automatic classification and high level constructs for biomedical ontologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, Jean-Baptiste

    2017-07-01

    Ontologies are widely used in the biomedical domain. While many tools exist for the edition, alignment or evaluation of ontologies, few solutions have been proposed for ontology programming interface, i.e. for accessing and modifying an ontology within a programming language. Existing query languages (such as SPARQL) and APIs (such as OWLAPI) are not as easy-to-use as object programming languages are. Moreover, they provide few solutions to difficulties encountered with biomedical ontologies. Our objective was to design a tool for accessing easily the entities of an OWL ontology, with high-level constructs helping with biomedical ontologies. From our experience on medical ontologies, we identified two difficulties: (1) many entities are represented by classes (rather than individuals), but the existing tools do not permit manipulating classes as easily as individuals, (2) ontologies rely on the open-world assumption, whereas the medical reasoning must consider only evidence-based medical knowledge as true. We designed a Python module for ontology-oriented programming. It allows access to the entities of an OWL ontology as if they were objects in the programming language. We propose a simple high-level syntax for managing classes and the associated "role-filler" constraints. We also propose an algorithm for performing local closed world reasoning in simple situations. We developed Owlready, a Python module for a high-level access to OWL ontologies. The paper describes the architecture and the syntax of the module version 2. It details how we integrated the OWL ontology model with the Python object model. The paper provides examples based on Gene Ontology (GO). We also demonstrate the interest of Owlready in a use case focused on the automatic comparison of the contraindications of several drugs. This use case illustrates the use of the specific syntax proposed for manipulating classes and for performing local closed world reasoning. Owlready has been successfully

  20. CREATION OF IT-ORIENTED ONTOLOGICAL FRAMEWORK FOR THE PURPOSE OF MAKING EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS ON THE BASE OF COMPETENCIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Korotenko

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Taking into account the expansion of computing application scopes there is a need to identify the links and features of the constantly emerging professional competencies of the new sections of computing knowledge to improve the process of forming new curricula. Methodology. Authors propose the new approach aimed to build specialized knowledge bases generated using artificial intelligence technology and focused on the use of multiple heterogeneous resources or data sources on specific educational topics is proposed. As a tool, ensuring the formation of the base ontology the Protégé 4.2 ontology editor is used. As one of the modules of the developed system of semantic analysis, which provides access to ontology and the possibility of its processing, the Apache Jena Java framework should be used, which forms the software environment for working with data in RDF, RDFS and OWL formats, and also supports the ability to form queries to Ontologies in the SPARQL language. The peculiarity of this approach is the binding of information resources of the three-platform presentation of the disciplinary structure in the context of identifying the links of professional competencies. Findings. The model and structure of the IT-oriented ontological framework designed to ensure the components convergence of the university three-platform information and communication environment are developed. The structure of the knowledge base ontology-basis, describing the main essence of the educational standards of the "Information Technologies" branch is formed. Originality. Within the framework of design and formation of the knowledge sector disciplinary structure "Information Technologies" in the context of the competence approach to education, the architecture of the competence descriptors of semantic analysis system is proposed. It implements the algorithm for integrating the ontological and product models of knowledge representation about the subject domain

  1. Finite-element-model updating using computational intelligence techniques applications to structural dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Marwala, Tshilidzi

    2010-01-01

    Finite element models (FEMs) are widely used to understand the dynamic behaviour of various systems. FEM updating allows FEMs to be tuned better to reflect measured data and may be conducted using two different statistical frameworks: the maximum likelihood approach and Bayesian approaches. Finite Element Model Updating Using Computational Intelligence Techniques applies both strategies to the field of structural mechanics, an area vital for aerospace, civil and mechanical engineering. Vibration data is used for the updating process. Following an introduction a number of computational intelligence techniques to facilitate the updating process are proposed; they include: • multi-layer perceptron neural networks for real-time FEM updating; • particle swarm and genetic-algorithm-based optimization methods to accommodate the demands of global versus local optimization models; • simulated annealing to put the methodologies into a sound statistical basis; and • response surface methods and expectation m...

  2. Intelligence in Artificial Intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Datta, Shoumen Palit Austin

    2016-01-01

    The elusive quest for intelligence in artificial intelligence prompts us to consider that instituting human-level intelligence in systems may be (still) in the realm of utopia. In about a quarter century, we have witnessed the winter of AI (1990) being transformed and transported to the zenith of tabloid fodder about AI (2015). The discussion at hand is about the elements that constitute the canonical idea of intelligence. The delivery of intelligence as a pay-per-use-service, popping out of ...

  3. Application of the Financial Industry Business Ontology (FIBO) for development of a financial organization ontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, G. G.; Tuzovsky, A. F.; Aksenova, N. V.

    2017-01-01

    The article considers an approach to a formalized description and meaning harmonization for financial terms and means of semantic modeling. Ontologies for the semantic models are described with the help of special languages developed for the Semantic Web. Results of FIBO application to solution of different tasks in the Russian financial sector are given.

  4. Ontology authoring with Forza

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Keet, CM

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available step to make the construction of ontologies more agile and apt to the needs of organisations and business enterprises. Permission to make digital or hard copies of all or part of this work for personal or classroom use is granted without fee provided... is permitted. To copy otherwise, or re- publish, to post on servers or to redistribute to lists, requires prior specific permission and/or a fee. Request permissions from Permissions@acm.org. CIKM’13, October 27 - November 01 2013, San Francisco, CA, USA...

  5. Comparison of two intelligent models to estimate the instantaneous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mostafa Zamani Mohiabadi

    2017-07-25

    Jul 25, 2017 ... 2014) has combined empirical models and a Bayesian neural network (BNN) model to estimate daily global solar radiation on a horizon- tal surface in Ghardaıa, Algeria. In their model, the maximum and minimum air temperatures of the year 2006 have been used to estimate the coefficients of the empirical ...

  6. Cognitive-Operative Model of Intelligent Learning Systems Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laureano-Cruces, Ana Lilia; Ramirez-Rodriguez, Javier; Mora-Torres, Martha; de Arriaga, Fernando; Escarela-Perez, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    In this paper behavior during the teaching-learning process is modeled by means of a fuzzy cognitive map. The elements used to model such behavior are part of a generic didactic model, which emphasizes the use of cognitive and operative strategies as part of the student-tutor interaction. Examples of possible initial scenarios for the…

  7. Model of facilitation of emotional intelligence to promote wholeness ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The facilitation of inherent affective and mental resourcefulness and resilience was the main concept of the model. Step two comprised the definition and classification of central and related concepts. Step three provides a description of the model. The model operates in three phases namely the dependent phase, partially ...

  8. Leader emotional intelligence, transformational leadership, trust and team commitment: Testing a model within a team context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton F. Schlechter

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This exploratory study tested a model within a team context consisting of transformational-leadership behaviour, team-leader emotional intelligence, trust (both in the team leader and in the team members and team commitment. It was conducted within six manufacturing plants, with 25 teams participating. Of the 320 surveys distributed to these teams, 178 were received (which equals a 56% response rate. The surveys consisted of the multi-factor leadership questionnaire (MLQ, the Swinburne University emotional intelligence test (SUEIT, the organisational-commitment scale (OCS (adapted for team commitment and the workplace trust survey (WTS. The validity of these scales was established using exploratory factor analysis (EFA and confrmatory factor analysis (CFA. The Cronbach alpha was used to assess the reliability of the scales. The model was tested using structural equation modelling (SEM; an acceptable level of model ft was found. Signifcant positive relationships were further found among all the constructs. Such an integrated model has not been tested in a team context before and the positive fndings therefore add to existing teamwork literature. The fnding that transformational leadership and leader emotional intelligence are positively related to team commitment and trust further emphasises the importance of effective leadership behaviour in team dynamics and performance.

  9. Leader emotional intelligence, transformational leadership, trust and team commitment: Testing a model within a team context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton F. Schlechter

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This exploratory study tested a model within a team context consisting of transformational-leadership behaviour, team-leader emotional intelligence, trust (both in the team leader and in the team members and team commitment. It was conducted within six manufacturing plants, with 25 teams participating. Of the 320 surveys distributed to these teams, 178 were received (which equals a 56% response rate. The surveys consisted of the multi-factor leadership questionnaire (MLQ, the Swinburne University emotional intelligence test (SUEIT, the organisational-commitment scale (OCS (adapted for team commitment and the workplace trust survey (WTS. The validity of these scales was established using exploratory factor analysis (EFA and confrmatory factor analysis (CFA. The Cronbach alpha was used to assess the reliability of the scales. The model was tested using structural equation modelling (SEM; an acceptable level of model ft was found. Signifcant positive relationships were further found among all the constructs. Such an integrated model has not been tested in a team context before and the positive fndings therefore add to existing teamwork literature. The fnding that transformational leadership and leader emotional intelligence are positively related to team commitment and trust further emphasises the importance of effective leadership behaviour in team dynamics and performance.

  10. Swarm Intelligence-Based Hybrid Models for Short-Term Power Load Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianzhou Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Swarm intelligence (SI is widely and successfully applied in the engineering field to solve practical optimization problems because various hybrid models, which are based on the SI algorithm and statistical models, are developed to further improve the predictive abilities. In this paper, hybrid intelligent forecasting models based on the cuckoo search (CS as well as the singular spectrum analysis (SSA, time series, and machine learning methods are proposed to conduct short-term power load prediction. The forecasting performance of the proposed models is augmented by a rolling multistep strategy over the prediction horizon. The test results are representative of the out-performance of the SSA and CS in tuning the seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA and support vector regression (SVR in improving load forecasting, which indicates that both the SSA-based data denoising and SI-based intelligent optimization strategy can effectively improve the model’s predictive performance. Additionally, the proposed CS-SSA-SARIMA and CS-SSA-SVR models provide very impressive forecasting results, demonstrating their strong robustness and universal forecasting capacities in terms of short-term power load prediction 24 hours in advance.

  11. ONSET: Automated foundational ontology selection and explanation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Khan, Z

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that using a foundational ontology for domain ontology development is beneficial in theory and practice. However, developers have difficulty with choosing the appropriate foundational ontology, and why. In order to solve...

  12. Ontologies and tag-statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tibély, Gergely; Vicsek, Tamás; Pollner, Péter; Palla, Gergely

    2012-01-01

    Due to the increasing popularity of collaborative tagging systems, the research on tagged networks, hypergraphs, ontologies, folksonomies and other related concepts is becoming an important interdisciplinary area with great potential and relevance for practical applications. In most collaborative tagging systems the tagging by the users is completely ‘flat’, while in some cases they are allowed to define a shallow hierarchy for their own tags. However, usually no overall hierarchical organization of the tags is given, and one of the interesting challenges of this area is to provide an algorithm generating the ontology of the tags from the available data. In contrast, there are also other types of tagged networks available for research, where the tags are already organized into a directed acyclic graph (DAG), encapsulating the ‘is a sub-category of’ type of hierarchy between each other. In this paper, we study how this DAG affects the statistical distribution of tags on the nodes marked by the tags in various real networks. The motivation for this research was the fact that understanding the tagging based on a known hierarchy can help in revealing the hidden hierarchy of tags in collaborative tagging systems. We analyse the relation between the tag-frequency and the position of the tag in the DAG in two large sub-networks of the English Wikipedia and a protein-protein interaction network. We also study the tag co-occurrence statistics by introducing a two-dimensional (2D) tag-distance distribution preserving both the difference in the levels and the absolute distance in the DAG for the co-occurring pairs of tags. Our most interesting finding is that the local relevance of tags in the DAG (i.e. their rank or significance as characterized by, e.g., the length of the branches starting from them) is much more important than their global distance from the root. Furthermore, we also introduce a simple tagging model based on random walks on the DAG, capable of

  13. Ontologies and tag-statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibély, Gergely; Pollner, Péter; Vicsek, Tamás; Palla, Gergely

    2012-05-01

    Due to the increasing popularity of collaborative tagging systems, the research on tagged networks, hypergraphs, ontologies, folksonomies and other related concepts is becoming an important interdisciplinary area with great potential and relevance for practical applications. In most collaborative tagging systems the tagging by the users is completely ‘flat’, while in some cases they are allowed to define a shallow hierarchy for their own tags. However, usually no overall hierarchical organization of the tags is given, and one of the interesting challenges of this area is to provide an algorithm generating the ontology of the tags from the available data. In contrast, there are also other types of tagged networks available for research, where the tags are already organized into a directed acyclic graph (DAG), encapsulating the ‘is a sub-category of’ type of hierarchy between each other. In this paper, we study how this DAG affects the statistical distribution of tags on the nodes marked by the tags in various real networks. The motivation for this research was the fact that understanding the tagging based on a known hierarchy can help in revealing the hidden hierarchy of tags in collaborative tagging systems. We analyse the relation between the tag-frequency and the position of the tag in the DAG in two large sub-networks of the English Wikipedia and a protein-protein interaction network. We also study the tag co-occurrence statistics by introducing a two-dimensional (2D) tag-distance distribution preserving both the difference in the levels and the absolute distance in the DAG for the co-occurring pairs of tags. Our most interesting finding is that the local relevance of tags in the DAG (i.e. their rank or significance as characterized by, e.g., the length of the branches starting from them) is much more important than their global distance from the root. Furthermore, we also introduce a simple tagging model based on random walks on the DAG, capable of

  14. The Ontology for Biomedical Investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandrowski, Anita; Brinkman, Ryan; Brochhausen, Mathias; Brush, Matthew H; Bug, Bill; Chibucos, Marcus C; Clancy, Kevin; Courtot, Mélanie; Derom, Dirk; Dumontier, Michel; Fan, Liju; Fostel, Jennifer; Fragoso, Gilberto; Gibson, Frank; Gonzalez-Beltran, Alejandra; Haendel, Melissa A; He, Yongqun; Heiskanen, Mervi; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Jensen, Mark; Lin, Yu; Lister, Allyson L; Lord, Phillip; Malone, James; Manduchi, Elisabetta; McGee, Monnie; Morrison, Norman; Overton, James A; Parkinson, Helen; Peters, Bjoern; Rocca-Serra, Philippe; Ruttenberg, Alan; Sansone, Susanna-Assunta; Scheuermann, Richard H; Schober, Daniel; Smith, Barry; Soldatova, Larisa N; Stoeckert, Christian J; Taylor, Chris F; Torniai, Carlo; Turner, Jessica A; Vita, Randi; Whetzel, Patricia L; Zheng, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The Ontology for Biomedical Investigations (OBI) is an ontology that provides terms with precisely defined meanings to describe all aspects of how investigations in the biological and medical domains are conducted. OBI re-uses ontologies that provide a representation of biomedical knowledge from the Open Biological and Biomedical Ontologies (OBO) project and adds the ability to describe how this knowledge was derived. We here describe the state of OBI and several applications that are using it, such as adding semantic expressivity to existing databases, building data entry forms, and enabling interoperability between knowledge resources. OBI covers all phases of the investigation process, such as planning, execution and reporting. It represents information and material entities that participate in these processes, as well as roles and functions. Prior to OBI, it was not possible to use a single internally consistent resource that could be applied to multiple types of experiments for these applications. OBI has made this possible by creating terms for entities involved in biological and medical investigations and by importing parts of other biomedical ontologies such as GO, Chemical Entities of Biological Interest (ChEBI) and Phenotype Attribute and Trait Ontology (PATO) without altering their meaning. OBI is being used in a wide range of projects covering genomics, multi-omics, immunology, and catalogs of services. OBI has also spawned other ontologies (Information Artifact Ontology) and methods for importing parts of ontologies (Minimum information to reference an external ontology term (MIREOT)). The OBI project is an open cross-disciplinary collaborative effort, encompassing multiple research communities from around the globe. To date, OBI has created 2366 classes and 40 relations along with textual and formal definitions. The OBI Consortium maintains a web resource (http://obi-ontology.org) providing details on the people, policies, and issues being addressed

  15. The Ontology for Biomedical Investigations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Bandrowski

    Full Text Available The Ontology for Biomedical Investigations (OBI is an ontology that provides terms with precisely defined meanings to describe all aspects of how investigations in the biological and medical domains are conducted. OBI re-uses ontologies that provide a representation of biomedical knowledge from the Open Biological and Biomedical Ontologies (OBO project and adds the ability to describe how this knowledge was derived. We here describe the state of OBI and several applications that are using it, such as adding semantic expressivity to existing databases, building data entry forms, and enabling interoperability between knowledge resources. OBI covers all phases of the investigation process, such as planning, execution and reporting. It represents information and material entities that participate in these processes, as well as roles and functions. Prior to OBI, it was not possible to use a single internally consistent resource that could be applied to multiple types of experiments for these applications. OBI has made this possible by creating terms for entities involved in biological and medical investigations and by importing parts of other biomedical ontologies such as GO, Chemical Entities of Biological Interest (ChEBI and Phenotype Attribute and Trait Ontology (PATO without altering their meaning. OBI is being used in a wide range of projects covering genomics, multi-omics, immunology, and catalogs of services. OBI has also spawned other ontologies (Information Artifact Ontology and methods for importing parts of ontologies (Minimum information to reference an external ontology term (MIREOT. The OBI project is an open cross-disciplinary collaborative effort, encompassing multiple research communities from around the globe. To date, OBI has created 2366 classes and 40 relations along with textual and formal definitions. The OBI Consortium maintains a web resource (http://obi-ontology.org providing details on the people, policies, and issues being

  16. An Extensible, Ontology-based, Distributed Information System Architecture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chao, Alan I; Krikeles, Basil C; Lusignan, Angela E; Starczewski, Edward

    2003-01-01

    ...), which facilitates the construction of scalable, flexible distributed systems. XDA is based on a simple ontology mechanism that enables the definition and maintenance of high-level object models to capture the shared semantics necessary for interoperability...

  17. Adding a little reality to building ontologies for biology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip Lord

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many areas of biology are open to mathematical and computational modelling. The application of discrete, logical formalisms defines the field of biomedical ontologies. Ontologies have been put to many uses in bioinformatics. The most widespread is for description of entities about which data have been collected, allowing integration and analysis across multiple resources. There are now over 60 ontologies in active use, increasingly developed as large, international collaborations. There are, however, many opinions on how ontologies should be authored; that is, what is appropriate for representation. Recently, a common opinion has been the "realist" approach that places restrictions upon the style of modelling considered to be appropriate. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we use a number of case studies for describing the results of biological experiments. We investigate the ways in which these could be represented using both realist and non-realist approaches; we consider the limitations and advantages of each of these models. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: From our analysis, we conclude that while realist principles may enable straight-forward modelling for some topics, there are crucial aspects of science and the phenomena it studies that do not fit into this approach; realism appears to be over-simplistic which, perversely, results in overly complex ontological models. We suggest that it is impossible to avoid compromise in modelling ontology; a clearer understanding of these compromises will better enable appropriate modelling, fulfilling the many needs for discrete mathematical models within computational biology.

  18. An Ecosystem of Intelligent ICT Tools for Speech-Language Therapy Based on a Formal Knowledge Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Bykbaev, Vladimir; López-Nores, Martín; Pazos-Arias, José; Quisi-Peralta, Diego; García-Duque, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    The language and communication constitute the development mainstays of several intellectual and cognitive skills in humans. However, there are millions of people around the world who suffer from several disabilities and disorders related with language and communication, while most of the countries present a lack of corresponding services related with health care and rehabilitation. On these grounds, we are working to develop an ecosystem of intelligent ICT tools to support speech and language pathologists, doctors, students, patients and their relatives. This ecosystem has several layers and components, integrating Electronic Health Records management, standardized vocabularies, a knowledge database, an ontology of concepts from the speech-language domain, and an expert system. We discuss the advantages of such an approach through experiments carried out in several institutions assisting children with a wide spectrum of disabilities.

  19. Physical properties of biological entities: an introduction to the ontology of physics for biology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L Cook

    Full Text Available As biomedical investigators strive to integrate data and analyses across spatiotemporal scales and biomedical domains, they have recognized the benefits of formalizing languages and terminologies via computational ontologies. Although ontologies for biological entities-molecules, cells, organs-are well-established, there are no principled ontologies of physical properties-energies, volumes, flow rates-of those entities. In this paper, we introduce the Ontology of Physics for Biology (OPB, a reference ontology of classical physics designed for annotating biophysical content of growing repositories of biomedical datasets and analytical models. The OPB's semantic framework, traceable to James Clerk Maxwell, encompasses modern theories of system dynamics and thermodynamics, and is implemented as a computational ontology that references available upper ontologies. In this paper we focus on the OPB classes that are designed for annotating physical properties encoded in biomedical datasets and computational models, and we discuss how the OPB framework will facilitate biomedical knowledge integration.

  20. Self-supervised Chinese ontology learning from online encyclopedias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Fanghuai; Shao, Zhiqing; Ruan, Tong

    2014-01-01

    Constructing ontology manually is a time-consuming, error-prone, and tedious task. We present SSCO, a self-supervised learning based chinese ontology, which contains about 255 thousand concepts, 5 million entities, and 40 million facts. We explore the three largest online Chinese encyclopedias for ontology learning and describe how to transfer the structured knowledge in encyclopedias, including article titles, category labels, redirection pages, taxonomy systems, and InfoBox modules, into ontological form. In order to avoid the errors in encyclopedias and enrich the learnt ontology, we also apply some machine learning based methods. First, we proof that the self-supervised machine learning method is practicable in Chinese relation extraction (at least for synonymy and hyponymy) statistically and experimentally and train some self-supervised models (SVMs and CRFs) for synonymy extraction, concept-subconcept relation extraction, and concept-instance relation extraction; the advantages of our methods are that all training examples are automatically generated from the structural information of encyclopedias and a few general heuristic rules. Finally, we evaluate SSCO in two aspects, scale and precision; manual evaluation results show that the ontology has excellent precision, and high coverage is concluded by comparing SSCO with other famous ontologies and knowledge bases; the experiment results also indicate that the self-supervised models obviously enrich SSCO.

  1. Analysis of traversable pits model to make intelligent wheeled vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Abbasi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the issue of passing wheeled vehicles from pits is discussed. The issue is modeled by defining the limits of passing wheeled vehicles. The proposed model has been studied based on changes in the effective parameters. Finally, in order to describe the problem, the proposed model has been solved for wheeled vehicles based on the effective parameters by using one of the numerical methods.

  2. A Heat Dynamic Model for Intelligent Heating of Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thavlov, Anders; Bindner, Henrik W.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a heat dynamic model for prediction of the indoor temperature in an office building. The model has been used in several flexible load applications, where the indoor temperature is allowed to vary around a given reference to provide power system services by shifting the heating...... of the building in time. This way the thermal mass of the building can be used to absorb energy from renewable energy source when available and postpone heating in periods with lack of renewable energy generation. The model is used in a model predictive controller to ensure the residential comfort over a given...

  3. Artificial intelligence techniques for modeling database user behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Steve; Graves, Sara J.

    1990-01-01

    The design and development of the adaptive modeling system is described. This system models how a user accesses a relational database management system in order to improve its performance by discovering use access patterns. In the current system, these patterns are used to improve the user interface and may be used to speed data retrieval, support query optimization and support a more flexible data representation. The system models both syntactic and semantic information about the user's access and employs both procedural and rule-based logic to manipulate the model.

  4. Evaluating the Risk of Metabolic Syndrome Based on an Artificial Intelligence Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome is worldwide public health problem and is a serious threat to people's health and lives. Understanding the relationship between metabolic syndrome and the physical symptoms is a difficult and challenging task, and few studies have been performed in this field. It is important to classify adults who are at high risk of metabolic syndrome without having to use a biochemical index and, likewise, it is important to develop technology that has a high economic rate of return to simplify the complexity of this detection. In this paper, an artificial intelligence model was developed to identify adults at risk of metabolic syndrome based on physical signs; this artificial intelligence model achieved more powerful capacity for classification compared to the PCLR (principal component logistic regression model. A case study was performed based on the physical signs data, without using a biochemical index, that was collected from the staff of Lanzhou Grid Company in Gansu province of China. The results show that the developed artificial intelligence model is an effective classification system for identifying individuals at high risk of metabolic syndrome.

  5. A methodology for the design of experiments in computational intelligence with multiple regression models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Lozano, Carlos; Gestal, Marcos; Munteanu, Cristian R; Dorado, Julian; Pazos, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    The design of experiments and the validation of the results achieved with them are vital in any research study. This paper focuses on the use of different Machine Learning approaches for regression tasks in the field of Computational Intelligence and especially on a correct comparison between the different results provided for different methods, as those techniques are complex systems that require further study to be fully understood. A methodology commonly accepted in Computational intelligence is implemented in an R package called RRegrs. This package includes ten simple and complex regression models to carry out predictive modeling using Machine Learning and well-known regression algorithms. The framework for experimental design presented herein is evaluated and validated against RRegrs. Our results are different for three out of five state-of-the-art simple datasets and it can be stated that the selection of the best model according to our proposal is statistically significant and relevant. It is of relevance to use a statistical approach to indicate whether the differences are statistically significant using this kind of algorithms. Furthermore, our results with three real complex datasets report different best models than with the previously published methodology. Our final goal is to provide a complete methodology for the use of different steps in order to compare the results obtained in Computational Intelligence problems, as well as from other fields, such as for bioinformatics, cheminformatics, etc., given that our proposal is open and modifiable.

  6. The Application of Collaborative Business Intelligence Technology in the Hospital SPD Logistics Management Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tongzhu; Shen, Aizong; Hu, Xiaojian; Tong, Guixian; Gu, Wei

    2017-06-01

    We aimed to apply collaborative business intelligence (BI) system to hospital supply, processing and distribution (SPD) logistics management model. We searched Engineering Village database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) and Google for articles (Published from 2011 to 2016), books, Web pages, etc., to understand SPD and BI related theories and recent research status. For the application of collaborative BI technology in the hospital SPD logistics management model, we realized this by leveraging data mining techniques to discover knowledge from complex data and collaborative techniques to improve the theories of business process. For the application of BI system, we: (i) proposed a layered structure of collaborative BI system for intelligent management in hospital logistics; (ii) built data warehouse for the collaborative BI system; (iii) improved data mining techniques such as supporting vector machines (SVM) and swarm intelligence firefly algorithm to solve key problems in hospital logistics collaborative BI system; (iv) researched the collaborative techniques oriented to data and business process optimization to improve the business processes of hospital logistics management. Proper combination of SPD model and BI system will improve the management of logistics in the hospitals. The successful implementation of the study requires: (i) to innovate and improve the traditional SPD model and make appropriate implement plans and schedules for the application of BI system according to the actual situations of hospitals; (ii) the collaborative participation of internal departments in hospital including the department of information, logistics, nursing, medical and financial; (iii) timely response of external suppliers.

  7. A methodology for the design of experiments in computational intelligence with multiple regression models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Fernandez-Lozano

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The design of experiments and the validation of the results achieved with them are vital in any research study. This paper focuses on the use of different Machine Learning approaches for regression tasks in the field of Computational Intelligence and especially on a correct comparison between the different results provided for different methods, as those techniques are complex systems that require further study to be fully understood. A methodology commonly accepted in Computational intelligence is implemented in an R package called RRegrs. This package includes ten simple and complex regression models to carry out predictive modeling using Machine Learning and well-known regression algorithms. The framework for experimental design presented herein is evaluated and validated against RRegrs. Our results are different for three out of five state-of-the-art simple datasets and it can be stated that the selection of the best model according to our proposal is statistically significant and relevant. It is of relevance to use a statistical approach to indicate whether the differences are statistically significant using this kind of algorithms. Furthermore, our results with three real complex datasets report different best models than with the previously published methodology. Our final goal is to provide a complete methodology for the use of different steps in order to compare the results obtained in Computational Intelligence problems, as well as from other fields, such as for bioinformatics, cheminformatics, etc., given that our proposal is open and modifiable.

  8. Ontology through a Mindfulness Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearance, Deborah; Holmes, Kimberley

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, when ontology is taught in a graduate studies course on social research, there is a tendency for this concept to be examined through the process of lectures and readings. Such an approach often leaves graduate students to grapple with a personal embodiment of this concept and to comprehend how ontology can ground their research.…

  9. Tracking Changes during Ontology Evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noy, Natalya F.; Kunnatur, Sandhya; Klein, Michel; Musen, Mark A.

    2004-01-01

    As ontology development becomes a collaborative process, developers face the problem of maintaining versions of ontologies akin to maintaining versions of software code or versions of documents in large projects. Traditional versioning systems enable users to compare versions, examine changes, and

  10. Application of artificial intelligence models in water quality forecasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeon, I S; Kim, J H; Jun, K W

    2008-06-01

    The real-time data of the continuous water quality monitoring station at the Pyeongchang river was analyzed separately during the rainy period and non-rainy period. Total organic carbon data observed during the rainy period showed a greater mean value, maximum value and standard deviation than the data observed during the non-rainy period. Dissolved oxygen values during the rainy period were lower than those observed during the non-rainy period. It was analyzed that the discharge due to rain fall from the basin affects the change of the water quality. A model for the forecasting of water quality was constructed and applied using the neural network model and the adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system. Regarding the models of levenberg-marquardt neural network, modular neural network and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system, all three models showed good results for the simulation of total organic carbon. The levenberg-marquardt neural network and modular neural network models showed better results than the adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system model in the forecasting of dissolved oxygen. The modular neural network model, which was applied with the qualitative data of time in addition to quantitative data, showed the least error.

  11. Conceptual Modeling for the Design of Intelligent and Emergent Information Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Loucopoulos, Pericles; Fayoumi, Amjad

    2016-01-01

    A key requirement to today’s fast changing economic environment is the ability of organizations to adapt dynamically in an effective and efficient manner. Information and Communication Technologies play a crucially important role in addressing such adaptation requirements. The notion of ‘intelligent software’ has emerged as a means by which enterprises can respond to changes in a reactive manner but also to explore, in a pro-active manner, possibilities for new business models. The developmen...

  12. Application of artificial intelligence (AI) concepts to the development of space flight parts approval model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, G. S.

    1997-01-01

    A cost effective model which uses the artificial intelligence techniques in the selection and approval of parts is presented. The knowledge which is acquired from the specialists for different part types are represented in a knowledge base in the form of rules and objects. The parts information is stored separately in a data base and is isolated from the knowledge base. Validation, verification and performance issues are highlighted.

  13. Uberon, an integrative multi-species anatomy ontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    We present Uberon, an integrated cross-species ontology consisting of over 6,500 classes representing a variety of anatomical entities, organized according to traditional anatomical classification criteria. The ontology represents structures in a species-neutral way and includes extensive associations to existing species-centric anatomical ontologies, allowing integration of model organism and human data. Uberon provides a necessary bridge between anatomical structures in different taxa for cross-species inference. It uses novel methods for representing taxonomic variation, and has proved to be essential for translational phenotype analyses. Uberon is available at http://uberon.org PMID:22293552

  14. SmartWeld/SmartProcess - intelligent model based system for the design and validation of welding processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchner, J.

    1996-04-01

    Diagrams are presented on an intelligent model based system for the design and validation of welding processes. Key capabilities identified include `right the first time` manufacturing, continuous improvement, and on-line quality assurance.

  15. Intelligence: Real or artificial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlinger, Henry D.

    1992-01-01

    Throughout the history of the artificial intelligence movement, researchers have strived to create computers that could simulate general human intelligence. This paper argues that workers in artificial intelligence have failed to achieve this goal because they adopted the wrong model of human behavior and intelligence, namely a cognitive essentialist model with origins in the traditional philosophies of natural intelligence. An analysis of the word “intelligence” suggests that it originally referred to behavior-environment relations and not to inferred internal structures and processes. It is concluded that if workers in artificial intelligence are to succeed in their general goal, then they must design machines that are adaptive, that is, that can learn. Thus, artificial intelligence researchers must discard their essentialist model of natural intelligence and adopt a selectionist model instead. Such a strategic change should lead them to the science of behavior analysis. PMID:22477051

  16. Comparison of two intelligent models to estimate the instantaneous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... they are 85.46 (w/m2), 3.08 (w/m2) and 5.41, respectively. As the results indicate, both models are able to estimate the amount of radiation well, while the neural network has a higher accuracy. The output of the modes for six other cities of Iran, with similar climate conditions, also proves the ability of the proposed models.

  17. Modeling and Control of Multivariable Process Using Intelligent Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subathra Balasubramanian

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available For nonlinear dynamic systems, the first principles based modeling and control is difficult to implement. In this study, a fuzzy controller and recurrent fuzzy controller are developed for MIMO process. Fuzzy logic controller is a model free controller designed based on the knowledge about the process. In fuzzy controller there are two types of rule-based fuzzy models are available: one the linguistic (Mamdani model and the other is Takagi–Sugeno model. Of these two, Takagi-Sugeno model (TS has attracted most attention. The fuzzy controller application is limited to static processes due to their feedforward structure. But, most of the real-time processes are dynamic and they require the history of input/output data. In order to store the past values a memory unit is needed, which is introduced by the recurrent structure. The proposed recurrent fuzzy structure is used to develop a controller for the two tank heating process. Both controllers are designed and implemented in a real time environment and their performance is compared.

  18. Model business intelligence system design of quality products by using data mining in R Bakery Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitriana, R.; Saragih, J.; Luthfiana, N.

    2017-12-01

    R Bakery company is a company that produces bread every day. Products that produced in that company have many different types of bread. Products are made in the form of sweet bread and wheat bread which have different tastes for every types of bread. During the making process, there were defects in the products which the defective product turns into reject product. Types of defects that are produced include burnt, sodden bread and shapeless bread. To find out the information about the defects that have been produced then by applying a designed model business intelligence system to create database and data warehouse. By using model business Intelligence system, it will generate useful information such as how many defect that produced by each of the bakery products. To make it easier to obtain such information, it can be done by using data mining method which data that we get is deep explored. The method of data mining is using k-means clustering method. The results of this intelligence business model system are cluster 1 with little amount of defect, cluster 2 with medium amount of defect and cluster 3 with high amount of defect. From OLAP Cube method can be seen that the defect generated during the 7 months period of 96,744 pieces.

  19. A review on integration of artificial intelligence into water quality modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Kwok-wing

    2006-07-01

    With the development of computing technology, numerical models are often employed to simulate flow and water quality processes in coastal environments. However, the emphasis has conventionally been placed on algorithmic procedures to solve specific problems. These numerical models, being insufficiently user-friendly, lack knowledge transfers in model interpretation. This results in significant constraints on model uses and large gaps between model developers and practitioners. It is a difficult task for novice application users to select an appropriate numerical model. It is desirable to incorporate the existing heuristic knowledge about model manipulation and to furnish intelligent manipulation of calibration parameters. The advancement in artificial intelligence (AI) during the past decade rendered it possible to integrate the technologies into numerical modelling systems in order to bridge the gaps. The objective of this paper is to review the current state-of-the-art of the integration of AI into water quality modelling. Algorithms and methods studied include knowledge-based system, genetic algorithm, artificial neural network, and fuzzy inference system. These techniques can contribute to the integrated model in different aspects and may not be mutually exclusive to one another. Some future directions for further development and their potentials are explored and presented.

  20. Heidegger, ontological death, and the healing professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aho, Kevin A

    2016-03-01

    In Being and Time, Martin Heidegger introduces a unique interpretation of death as a kind of world-collapse or breakdown of meaning that strips away our ability to understand and make sense of who we are. This is an 'ontological death' in the sense that we cannot be anything because the intelligible world that we draw on to fashion our identities and sustain our sense of self has lost all significance. On this account, death is not only an event that we can physiologically live through; it can happen numerous times throughout the finite span of our lives. This paper draws on Arthur Frank's (At the will of the body: reflections on illness. Houghton, Boston, 1991) narrative of critical illness to concretize the experience of 'ontological death' and illuminate the unique challenges it poses for health care professionals. I turn to Heidegger's conception of 'resoluteness' (Entschlossenheit) to address these challenges, arguing for the need of health care professionals to help establish a discursive context whereby the critically ill can begin to meaningfully express and interpret their experience of self-loss in a way that acknowledges the structural vulnerability of their own identities and is flexible enough to let go of those that have lost their significance or viability.