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Sample records for modeling individual migraine

  1. Pharmacological migraine provocation: a human model of migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashina, Messoud; Hansen, Jakob Møller

    2010-01-01

    for migraine mechanisms. So far, however, animal models cannot predict the efficacy of new therapies for migraine. Because migraine attacks are fully reversible and can be aborted by therapy, the headache- or migraine-provoking property of naturally occurring signaling molecules can be tested in a human model....... If a naturally occurring substance can provoke migraine in human patients, then it is likely, although not certain, that blocking its effect will be effective in the treatment of acute migraine attacks. To this end, a human in vivo model of experimental headache and migraine in humans has been developed...

  2. Can nitric oxide induce migraine in normal individuals?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jes; Ashina, Messoud

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: For many years, scientists have debated the possibility that an individual "migraine threshold" determines the likelihood with which individuals may express migraine attacks. DISCUSSION: Recent discoveries provided evidence for both genetic and environmental influences on individual...

  3. Forecasting Individual Headache Attacks Using Perceived Stress: Development of a Multivariable Prediction Model for Persons With Episodic Migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houle, Timothy T; Turner, Dana P; Golding, Adrienne N; Porter, John A H; Martin, Vincent T; Penzien, Donald B; Tegeler, Charles H

    2017-07-01

    To develop and validate a prediction model that forecasts future migraine attacks for an individual headache sufferer. Many headache patients and physicians believe that precipitants of headache can be identified and avoided or managed to reduce the frequency of headache attacks. Of the numerous candidate triggers, perceived stress has received considerable attention for its association with the onset of headache in episodic and chronic headache sufferers. However, no evidence is available to support forecasting headache attacks within individuals using any of the candidate headache triggers. This longitudinal cohort with forecasting model development study enrolled 100 participants with episodic migraine with or without aura, and N = 95 contributed 4626 days of electronic diary data and were included in the analysis. Individual headache forecasts were derived from current headache state and current levels of stress using several aspects of the Daily Stress Inventory, a measure of daily hassles that is completed at the end of each day. The primary outcome measure was the presence/absence of any headache attack (head pain > 0 on a numerical rating scale of 0-10) over the next 24 h period. After removing missing data (n = 431 days), participants in the study experienced a headache attack on 1613/4195 (38.5%) days. A generalized linear mixed-effects forecast model using either the frequency of stressful events or the perceived intensity of these events fit the data well. This simple forecasting model possessed promising predictive utility with an AUC of 0.73 (95% CI 0.71-0.75) in the training sample and an AUC of 0.65 (95% CI 0.6-0.67) in a leave-one-out validation sample. This forecasting model had a Brier score of 0.202 and possessed good calibration between forecasted probabilities and observed frequencies but had only low levels of resolution (ie, sharpness). This study demonstrates that future headache attacks can be forecasted for a diverse group of

  4. Human migraine models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Helle Klingenberg

    2001-01-01

    , which is a human experience. A set-up for investigations of experimental headache and migraine in humans, has been evaluated and headache mechanisms explored by using nitroglycerin and other headache-inducing agents. Nitric oxide (NO) or other parts of the NO activated cascade seems to be responsible...

  5. Towards a reliable animal model of migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jes; Jansen-Olesen, Inger

    2012-01-01

    The pharmaceutical industry shows a decreasing interest in the development of drugs for migraine. One of the reasons for this could be the lack of reliable animal models for studying the effect of acute and prophylactic migraine drugs. The infusion of glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) is the best validated...... and most studied human migraine model. Several attempts have been made to transfer this model to animals. The different variants of this model are discussed as well as other recent models....

  6. Towards a pragmatic human migraine model for drug testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Emma Katrine; Olesen, Jes

    2017-01-01

    Background A model for the testing of novel anti-migraine drugs should preferably use healthy volunteers for ease of recruiting. Isosorbide-5-mononitrate (5-ISMN) provokes headache in healthy volunteers with some migraine features such as pulsating pain quality and aggravation by physical activity.......003). Difference in area under the headache score curve (AUC) 0-4 hours between sumatriptan and placebo was not significant ( p = 0.30). Conclusion 5-ISMN is a very powerful inducer of migraine-like headache in healthy individuals but the headache does not respond to sumatriptan. The model is not useful for future...

  7. Migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... processed foods may trigger migraines. Skipping meals or fasting also can trigger attacks. Food additives. The sweetener ... weight or maintain a healthy body weight, and obesity is thought to be a factor in migraines. ...

  8. Migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... headache Migraine cause CT scan of the brain Central nervous system and peripheral nervous system References Becker WJ. Acute migraine treatment in adults. Headache . 2015;55(6):778-793. PMID: 25877672 ...

  9. Animal Migraine Models for Drug Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen-Olesen, Inger; Tfelt-Hansen, Peer; Olesen, Jes

    2013-01-01

    Migraine is number seven in WHO's list of all diseases causing disability and the third most costly neurological disorder in Europe. Acute attacks are treatable by highly selective drugs such as the triptans but there is still a huge unmet therapeutic need. Unfortunately, drug development...... for headache has almost come to a standstill partly because of a lack of valid animal models. Here we review previous models with emphasis on optimal characteristics of a future model. In addition to selection of animal species, the method of induction of migraine-like changes and the method of recording...... responses elicited by such measures are crucial. The most naturalistic way of inducing attacks is by infusion of endogenous signaling molecules that are known to cause migraine in patients. The most valid response is recording of neural activity in the trigeminal system. The most useful headache related...

  10. Migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SEARCH Definition Treatment ... is often described as an intense pulsing or throbbing pain in one area of the head. However, it is much more; the International Headache Society diagnoses a migraine by its pain and number ...

  11. Migraines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may trigger migraines: Aged, canned, cured or processed meat, including bologna, game, ham, herring, hot dogs, pepperoni and sausage Aged cheese Alcoholic beverages, especially red wine Aspartame Avocados Beans, ... Lentils Meat tenderizer Monosodium glutamate (MSG) Nuts and peanut butter ...

  12. Migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Certain foods and food additives such as Alcohol Chocolate Aged cheeses Monosodium glutamate (MSG) Some fruits and ... consistent sleep schedule and eating regular meals. Hormone therapy may help some women whose migraines seem to ...

  13. Pearls and pitfalls in human pharmacological models of migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashina, Messoud; Hansen, Jakob Møller; Olesen, Jes

    2013-01-01

    In vitro studies have contributed to the characterization of receptors in cranial blood vessels and the identification of new possible anti-migraine agents. In vivo animal models enable the study of vascular responses, neurogenic inflammation, peptide release and genetic predisposition and thus......- or migraine-provoking property of naturally occurring signaling molecules can be tested in a human model. If such an endogenous substance can provoke migraine in human patients, then it is likely, although not certain, that blocking its effect will be effective in the treatment of acute migraine attacks...... an important role in translational migraine research leading to the identification of three new principally different targets in the treatment of acute migraine attacks and has been used to examine other endogenous signaling molecules as well as genetic susceptibility factors. New additions to the model...

  14. A naturalistic glyceryl trinitrate infusion migraine model in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramachandran, Roshni; Bhatt, Deepak Kumar; Ploug, Kenneth Beri

    2012-01-01

    Glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) infusion is a reliable method to provoke migraine-like headaches in humans. Previous studies have simulated this human model in anaesthetized or in awake rodents using GTN doses 10,000 times higher than used in humans. The relevance of such toxicological doses to migraine...

  15. The stigma of migraine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William B Young

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: People who have a disease often experience stigma, a socially and culturally embedded process through which individuals experience stereotyping, devaluation, and discrimination. Stigma has great impact on quality of life, behavior, and life chances. We do not know whether or not migraine is stigmatizing. METHODS: We studied 123 episodic migraine patients, 123 chronic migraine patients, and 62 epilepsy patients in a clinical setting to investigate the extent to which stigma attaches to migraine, using epilepsy as a comparison. We used the stigma scale for chronic illness, a 24-item questionnaire suitable for studying chronic neurologic diseases, and various disease impact measures. RESULTS: Patients with chronic migraine had higher scores (54.0±20.2 on the stigma scale for chronic illness than either episodic migraine (41.7±14.8 or epilepsy patients (44.6±16.3 (p<0.001. Subjects with migraine reported greater inability to work than epilepsy subjects. Stigma correlated most strongly with the mental component score of the short form of the medical outcomes health survey (SF-12, then with ability to work and migraine disability score for chronic and episodic migraine and the Liverpool impact on epilepsy scale for epilepsy. Analysis of covariance showed adjusted scores for the stigma scale for chronic illness were similar for chronic migraine (49.3; 95% confidence interval, 46.2 to 52.4 and epilepsy (46.5; 95% confidence interval, 41.6 to 51.6, and lower for episodic migraine (43.7; 95% confidence interval, 40.9 to 46.6. Ability to work was the strongest predictor of stigma as measured by the stigma scale for chronic illness. CONCLUSION: In our model, adjusted stigma was similar for chronic migraine and epilepsy, which were greater than for episodic migraine. Stigma correlated most strongly with inability to work, and was greater for chronic migraine than epilepsy or episodic migraine because chronic migraine patients had less ability

  16. Animal models of pain and migraine in drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munro, Gordon; Jansen-Olesen, Inger; Olesen, Jes

    2017-01-01

    of the most commonly used models and methods employed within 'pain and migraine' drug development will be presented. Recent advances within these disciplines suggest that, with the addition of a few extra carefully chosen ancillary models and/or endpoints, the relative value in terms of resources used...

  17. Association of expression of DRD2 rs1800497 polymorphism with migraine risk in Han Chinese individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Y

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Yingfeng Deng, Jianping Huang, Huijun Zhang, Xueqin Zhu, Qin Gong Department of Anesthesiology, The Affiliated Hospital of Medical School, Ningbo University, Ningbo, ChinaBackground: Previous studies suggested that single-nucleotide polymorphisms in dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2 are the susceptibility loci for migraine. This study was aimed at evaluating the contribution of DRD2 rs1800497 and its expression to migraine risk in Han Chinese subjects. Methods: In total, 250 patients with migraine and 250 age- and sex-matched control subjects were included in this study. TaqMan allelic discrimination assay was used for DRD2 rs1800497 genotyping. Plasma DRD2 concentration was determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: Significant associations were observed for the rs1800497 genotype (χ2=6.37, p=0.041 and allele (χ2=4.69, p=0.03; odds ratio [OR]=1.33, 95% CI=1.03–1.72, power=58% frequencies between the migraine and control groups. Sex analysis indicated a positive association for rs1800497 between female patients with migraine and control individuals (genotype: χ2=7.84, p=0.019; allele: χ2=6.60, p=0.010; OR=1.61, 95% CI=1.12–2.30, power=73.4%. Furthermore, a significant association was observed only in female patients with migraine without aura (MO (genotype: χ2=6.88, p=0.032; allele: χ2=5.65, p=0.017; OR=1.59, 95% CI=1.08–2.36, power=65.1%. The mean plasma DRD2 levels in the control group (mean±SD: 24.20±2.78 were significantly lower than those in the migraine with aura (MA (30.86±3.69, p<0.0001 and MO groups (31.88±4.99, p<0.0001. Additionally, there was a sex-based difference in DRD2 expression in the MA (male vs female: 29.46±3.59 vs 32.27±3.27, p<0.01 and MO groups (male vs female: 29.18±3.50 vs 34.58±4.84, p<0.0001. Moreover, plasma DRD2 levels in patients were significantly different among the three genotypes (CC vs CT vs TT: 24.76±3.76 vs 30.93±3.85 vs 37.06±3.95, p<0.0001. Similar results were observed

  18. Migraine is the most prevalent primary headache in individuals with temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Ana L; Gonçalves, Daniela A G; Castanharo, Sabrina M; Speciali, José G; Bigal, Marcelo E; Camparis, Cinara M

    2010-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of primary headaches (HA) in adults with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) who were assessed in a specialty orofacial pain clinic, as well as in controls without TMD. The sample consisted of 158 individuals with TMD seen at a university-based specialty clinic, as well as 68 controls. The Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD were used to diagnose the TMD patients. HAs were assessed using a structured interview and classified according to the Second Edition of the International Classification for Headache Disorders. Data were analyzed by chi-square tests with a significance level of 5% and odds ratio (OR) tests with a 95% confidence interval (CI). HAs occurred in 45.6% of the control group (30.9% had migraine and 14.7% had tension-type headache [TTH]) and in 85.5% of individuals with TMD. Among individuals with TMD, migraine was the most prevalent primary HA (55.3%), followed by TTH (30.2%); 14.5% had no HA. In contrast to controls, the odds ratio (OR) for HA in those with TMD was 7.05 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.65-13.61; P = .000), for migraine, the OR was 2.76 (95% CI = 1.50-5.06; P = .001), and for TTH, the OR was 2.51 (95% CI = 1.18-5.35; P = .014). Myofascial pain/arthralgia was the most common TMD diagnosis (53.2%). The presence of HA or specific HAs was not associated with the time since the onset of TMD (P = .714). However, migraine frequency was positively associated with TMD pain severity (P = .000). TMD was associated with increased primary HA prevalence rates. Migraine was the most common primary HA diagnosis in individuals with TMD.

  19. Investigation of carbachol and PACAP38 in a human model of migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytz, Henrik Winther

    2011-01-01

    and VIP in migraine and head pain. In study I-III we investigated acetylcholine, via the analogue carbachol, and PACAP38 in a human model of migraine. In study IV we studied if PACAP38 and VIP might induce central sensitization, neurogenic inflammation and mast cell degranulation in a cutaneous model...... in migraine patients as well as sustained dilatation of cephalic vessels. In study IV VIP and PACAP38 evoked skin pain, central sensitization, neurogenic inflammation and mast cell degranulation, but VIP showed to be more potent than PACAP38 in inducing neurogenic inflammation and mast cell degranulation...... that neurogenic inflammation and mast cell degranulation are unlikely to cause PACAP38 induced migraine. The present thesis contributes to our knowledge on migraine pathophysiology and suggests PAC1 receptor antagonism as a new target for migraine treatment....

  20. Aerobic Exercise for Reducing Migraine Burden: Mechanisms, Markers, and Models of Change Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irby, Megan B; Bond, Dale S; Lipton, Richard B; Nicklas, Barbara; Houle, Timothy T; Penzien, Donald B

    2016-02-01

    Engagement in regular exercise routinely is recommended as an intervention for managing and preventing migraine, and yet empirical support is far from definitive. We possess at best a weak understanding of how aerobic exercise and resulting change in aerobic capacity influence migraine, let alone the optimal parameters for exercise regimens as migraine therapy (eg, who will benefit, when to prescribe, optimal types, and doses/intensities of exercise, level of anticipated benefit). These fundamental knowledge gaps critically limit our capacity to deploy exercise as an intervention for migraine. Clear articulation of the markers and mechanisms through which aerobic exercise confers benefits for migraine would prove invaluable and could yield insights on migraine pathophysiology. Neurovascular and neuroinflammatory pathways, including an effect on obesity or adiposity, are obvious candidates for study given their role both in migraine as well as the changes known to accrue with regular exercise. In addition to these biological pathways, improvements in aerobic fitness and migraine alike also are mediated by changes in psychological and sociocognitive factors. Indeed a number of specific mechanisms and pathways likely are operational in the relationship between exercise and migraine improvement, and it remains to be established whether these pathways operate in parallel or synergistically. As heuristics that might conceptually benefit our research programs here forward, we: (1) provide an extensive listing of potential mechanisms and markers that could account for the effects of aerobic exercise on migraine and are worthy of empirical exploration and (2) present two exemplar conceptual models depicting pathways through which exercise may serve to reduce the burden of migraine. Should the promise of aerobic exercise as a feasible and effective migraine therapy be realized, this line of endeavor stands to benefit migraineurs (including the many who presently remain

  1. The migraine ACE model: evaluating the impact on time lost and medical resource Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro, J J; Caro, G; Getsios, D; Raggio, G; Burrows, M; Black, L

    2000-04-01

    To describe the Migraine Adaptive Cost-Effectiveness Model in the context of an analysis of a simulated population of Canadian patients with migraine. The high prevalence of migraine and its substantial impact on patients' ability to function normally present a significant economic burden to society. In light of the recent availability of improved pharmaceutical treatments, a model was developed to assess their economic impact. The Migraine Adaptive Cost-Effectiveness Model incorporates the costs of time lost from both work and nonwork activities, as well as medical resource and medication use. Using Monte Carlo techniques, the model simulates the experience of a population of patients with migraine over the course of 1 year. As an example, analyses of a Canadian population were carried out using data from a multinational trial, surveys, national statistics, and the available literature. Using customary therapy, mean productivity losses (amounting to 84 hours of paid work time, 48 hours of unpaid work time, and 113 hours of leisure time lost) were estimated to cost $1949 (in 1997 Canadian dollars) per patient, with medical expenditures adding an average of $280 to the cost of illness. With customary treatment patterns, the costs of migraine associated with reduced functional capacity are substantial. The migraine model represents a flexible tool for the economic evaluation of different migraine treatments in various populations.

  2. Migraine Trainers as Models: the effectiveness of Lay trainerswith migraine for behavioural attack prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.Y.M. Mérelle (Saskia)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractMigraine is a chronic brain disorder, characterized by attacks of severe headache accompanied by nausea, vomiting and sensitivity to light, sound and smell. Attacks can be preceded by premonitory symptoms such as fatigue, muscular stiff ness or negative aff ect. It has been shown that

  3. Determining of migraine prognosis using latent growth mixture models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasdelen, Bahar; Ozge, Aynur; Kaleagasi, Hakan; Erdogan, Semra; Mengi, Tufan

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents a retrospective study to classify patients into subtypes of the treatment according to baseline and longitudinally observed values considering heterogenity in migraine prognosis. In the classical prospective clinical studies, participants are classified with respect to baseline status and followed within a certain time period. However, latent growth mixture model is the most suitable method, which considers the population heterogenity and is not affected drop-outs if they are missing at random. Hence, we planned this comprehensive study to identify prognostic factors in migraine. The study data have been based on a 10-year computer-based follow-up data of Mersin University Headache Outpatient Department. The developmental trajectories within subgroups were described for the severity, frequency, and duration of headache separately and the probabilities of each subgroup were estimated by using latent growth mixture models. SAS PROC TRAJ procedures, semiparametric and group-based mixture modeling approach, were applied to define the developmental trajectories. While the three-group model for the severity (mild, moderate, severe) and frequency (low, medium, high) of headache appeared to be appropriate, the four-group model for the duration (low, medium, high, extremely high) was more suitable. The severity of headache increased in the patients with nausea, vomiting, photophobia and phonophobia. The frequency of headache was especially related with increasing age and unilateral pain. Nausea and photophobia were also related with headache duration. Nausea, vomiting and photophobia were the most significant factors to identify developmental trajectories. The remission time was not the same for the severity, frequency, and duration of headache.

  4. Sleep in Patients with Chronic Migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chun-Pai; Wang, Shuu-Jiun

    2017-09-01

    The biological and pathophysiological interaction between sleep and chronic migraine (CM) remains to be fully elucidated. In this article, we provide a narrative review of the literature on sleep disturbance and CM, highlighting recent advances in sleep research and insights into mechanisms that could mediate a role of sleep disturbances in migraine chronification. We discuss the potential for cognitive-behavioral insomnia therapy (CBTi) as an intervention for CM with comorbid insomnia. Finally, we propose a model of the mechanisms underlying the interactions among sleep physiology, maladaptive migraine-coping behaviors, and coexisting factors which contribute to sleep disturbances in CM based on conceptual models used in sleep research. Insomnia is the most common sleep complaint among patients with CM. CM patients experience more frequent and severe insomnia symptoms than patients with episodic migraine (EM). It has been suggested that sleep disturbances may predispose individuals to migraine attacks, which may affect the pain-processing trigeminovascular system and thus play a role in migraine progression. Encouraging but limited evidence suggests that management of insomnia via behavioral sleep therapy may reverse CM to EM and possibly prevent migraine chronification. Migraine has a complex relationship with sleep. The use of objective sleep study such as polysomnographic microstructural sleep analysis and actigraphy could help connect sleep disturbances and processes related to CM. Future longitudinal studies should examine whether effective behavioral treatments such as CBTi can reverse migraine chronification.

  5. Vagus nerve stimulation inhibits trigeminal nociception in a rodent model of episodic migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan L. Hawkins

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion:. Our findings demonstrate that nVNS inhibits mechanical nociception and represses expression of proteins associated with peripheral and central sensitization of trigeminal neurons in a novel rodent model of episodic migraine.

  6. Food insecurity and migraine in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, Joseph M; Gordon, Kevin E; Kuhle, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of household food insecurity in individuals reporting migraine within a large population-based sample of Canadians. The Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) uses a stratified cluster sample design to obtain information on Canadians ≥12 years of age. Data on household food insecurity were assessed for individuals who reported having migraine or not, providing a current point prevalence. This was assessed for stability in two CCHS datasets from four and eight years earlier. Factors associated with food insecurity among those reporting migraine were examined and a logistic regression model of food insecurity was developed. We also examined whether food insecurity was associated with other reported chronic health conditions. Of 48,645 eligible survey respondents, 4614 reported having migraine (weighted point prevalence 10.2%). Food insecurity was reported by 14.8% who reported migraine compared with 6.8% of those not reporting migraine, giving an odds ratio of 2.4 (95% confidence interval 2.0-2.8%). This risk estimate was stable over the previous eight years. The higher risk for food insecurity was not unique to migraine and was seen with some, but not all, chronic health conditions reported in the CCHS. Food insecurity is more frequent among individuals reporting migraine in Canada. © International Headache Society 2015.

  7. Nitroglycerin provocation in normal subjects is not a useful human migraine model?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedskov, J F; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg; Olesen, J

    2010-01-01

    Provoking delayed migraine with nitroglycerin in migraine sufferers is a cumbersome model. Patients are difficult to recruit, migraine comes on late and variably and only 50-80% of patients develop an attack. A model using normal volunteers would be much more useful, but it should be validated...... aspirin 1000 mg, zolmitriptan 5 mg or placebo to normal healthy volunteers. The design was double-blind, placebo-controlled three-way crossover. Our hypothesis was that these drugs would be effective in the treatment of the mild constant headache induced by long-lasting GTN infusion. The headaches did...... experiment suggests that headache caused by direct nitric oxide (NO) action in the continued presence of NO is very resistance to analgesics and to specific acute migraine treatments. This suggests that NO works very deep in the cascade of events associated with vascular headache, whereas tested drugs work...

  8. Neurovascular pharmacology of migraine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MaassenVanDenBrink, Antoinette; Chan, Kayi Y.

    2008-01-01

    Migraine is a paroxysmal neurovascular disorder, which affects a significant proportion of the population. Since dilation of cranial blood vessels is likely to be responsible for the headache experienced in migraine, many experimental models for the study of migraine have focussed on this feature.

  9. Meta-analysis of 375,000 individuals identifies 38 susceptibility loci for migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gormley, Padhraig; Anttila, Verneri; Winsvold, Bendik S

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is a debilitating neurological disorder affecting around one in seven people worldwide, but its molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. There is some debate about whether migraine is a disease of vascular dysfunction or a result of neuronal dysfunction with secondary vascular chan...

  10. Meta-analysis of 375,000 individuals identifies 38 susceptibility loci for migraine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Gormley; H. Stefansson (Hreinn); B.S. Winsvold (Bendik); P. Palta (Priit); T. Esko (Tõnu); T.H. Pers (Tune); K.-H. Farh (Kai-How); Cuenca-Leon, E. (Ester); Muona, M. (Mikko); Furlotte, N.A. (Nicholas A.); K.H. Kurth (Karl); A. Ingason (Andres); G. Mcmahon (George); L. Ligthart (Lannie); G.M. Terwindt (Gisela); U. Todt (Unda); B. Müller-Myhsok (Bertram); Ran, C. (Caroline); Gordon, S.G. (Scott G.); A.H. Stam (Anine); S. Steinberg (Stacy); H. Göbel (Hartmut); M. Koiranen (Markku); L. Quaye (Lydia); Adams, H.H.H. (Hieab H.H.); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); A.-P. Sarin; Wedenoja, J. (Juho); D.A. Hinds (David A.); Buring, J.E. (Julie E.); M. Schürks (Markus); P.M. Ridker (Paul); Hrafnsdottir, M.G. (Maria Gudlaug); H. Stefansson (Hreinn); S.M. Ring (Susan); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); B.W.J.H. Penninx (Brenda); M. Färkkilä (Markus); V. Artto (Ville); E. Hämäläinen (Eija); S. Lucae (Susanne); R. Malik (Rainer); A.C. Heath (Andrew C.); P.A. Madden (Pamela); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); G.W. Montgomery (Grant); Kurki, M.I. (Mitja I.); M. Kals (Mart); R. Mägi (Reedik); Pärn, K. (Kalle); E. Hamalainen (Eija); Huang, H. (Hailiang); Byrnes, A.E. (Andrea E.); L. Franke (Lude); J. Huang (Jian); E. Stergiakouli (Evangelia); P.H. Lee (Phil); Sandor, C. (Cynthia); Webber, C. (Caleb); Cader, Z. (Zameel); B. Müller-Myhsok (B.); S. Schreiber (Stefan); T. Meitinger (Thomas); K. Hagen (Knut); V. Salomaa (Veikko); K. Heikkilä (Kauko); E. Loehrer (Elizabeth); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); Hofman, A. (Albert); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); L. Cherkas (Lynn); Pedersen, L.M. (Linda M.); Stubhaug, A. (Audun); Nielsen, C.S. (Christopher S.); Männikkö, M. (Minna); E. Mihailov (Evelin); L. Milani (Lili); S. Steinberg (Stacy); Esserlind, A.-L. (Ann-Louise); Christensen, A.F. (Anne Francke); Hansen, T.F. (Thomas Folkmann); T.M. Werge (Thomas); J. Kaprio (Jaakko); A. Aromaa (Arpo); O. Raitakari (Olli); M.A. Ikram (Arfan); M.K. Ikram (Kamran); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); A. Metspalu (Andres); C. Kubisch (Christian); D.P. Strachan (David); M.D. Ferrari (Michel); Belin, A.C. (Andrea C.); C. Kubisch (Christian); M. Wessman (Maija); A.M.J.M. Maagdenberg (Arn); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); Smith, G.D. (George Davey); Stefansson, K. (Kari); N. Eriksson (Nicholas); M.J. Daly (Mark); B.M. Neale (Benjamin); J. Olesen (Jes); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); D.R. Nyholt (Dale); A. Palotie (Aarno)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractMigraine is a debilitating neurological disorder affecting around one in seven people worldwide, but its molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. There is some debate about whether migraine is a disease of vascular dysfunction or a result of neuronal dysfunction with secondary

  11. Meta-analysis of 375,000 individuals identifies 38 susceptibility loci for migraine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gormley, P.; Anttila, V.; Winsvold, B.S.; Palta, P.; Esko, T.; Pers, T.H.; Farh, K.H.; Cuenca-Leon, E.; Muona, M.; Furlotte, N.A.; Kurth, T.; Ingason, A.; McMahon, G.; Ligthart, R.S.L.; Terwindt, G.M.; Kallela, M.; Freilinger, T.; Ran, C.; Gordon, S.G.; Stam, A.H.; Steinberg, S.; Borck, G.; Koiranen, M.; Quaye, L.; Adams, H.H.H.; Lehtimäki, T.; Sarin, A.P.; Wedenoja, J.; Hinds, D.A.; Buring, J.E.; Schürks, M.; Ridker, P.M.; Gudlaug Hrafnsdottir, M.; Stefansson, H.; Ring, S.M.; Hottenga, J.J.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Färkkilä, M.; Artto, V.; Kaunisto, M.A.; Vepsäläinen, S.; Malik, R.; Heath, A.C.; Madden, P.A.F.; Martin, N.G.; Montgomery, G.W.; Kurki, M.I.; Kals, M.; Mägi, R.; Pärn, K.; Hämaläinen, E.; Huang, H.; Byrnes, A.E.; Franke, L.; Huang, J.; Stergiakouli, E.; Lee, P.H.; Sandor, C.; Webber, C.; Cader, Z.; Müller-Myhsok, B.; Schreiber, S; Meitinger, T.; Eriksson, J.G.; Salomaa, V.; Heikkilä, K.; Loehrer, A.G.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Hofman, A.; van Duijn, C.M.; Cherkas, L.; Pedersen, L.; Stubhaug, A.; Nielsen, C.S.; Männikkö, M.; Mihailov, E.; Milani, L.; Göbel, H.; Esserlind, A.L.; Francke Christensen, A.; Folkmann Hansen, T.; Werge, T.; Kaprio, J.; Aromaa, A.; Raitakari, O.; Ikram, M.A.; Spector, T.D.; Järvelin, M.R.; Metspalu, A.; Kubisch, C.; Strachan, D.P.; Ferrari, M.D.; Belin, A.C.; Dichgans, M.; Wessman, M.; van den Maagdenberg, A.M.J.M.; Zwart, J.A.; Boomsma, D.I.; Davey Smith, G.; Stefansson, K.; Eriksson, N.; Daly, M.J.; Neale, B.M.; Olesen, J.; Chasman, D.I.; Nyholt, DR; Palotie, A.; Posthuma, D.

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is a debilitating neurological disorder affecting around one in seven people worldwide, but its molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. There is some debate about whether migraine is a disease of vascular dysfunction or a result of neuronal dysfunction with secondary vascular

  12. Meta-analysis of 375,000 individuals identifies 38 susceptibility loci for migraine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gormley, Padhraig; Anttila, Verneri; Winsvold, Bendik S.; Palta, Priit; Esko, Tonu; Pers, Tune H.; Farh, Kai-How; Cuenca-Leon, Ester; Muona, Mikko; Furlotte, Nicholas A.; Kurth, Tobias; Ingason, Andres; McMahon, George; Ligthart, Lannie; Terwindt, Gisela M.; Kallela, Mikko; Freilinger, Tobias M.; Ran, Caroline; Gordon, Scott G.; Stam, Anine H.; Steinberg, Stacy; Borck, Guntram; Koiranen, Markku; Quaye, Lydia; Adams, Hieab H. H.; Lehtimaki, Terho; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Wedenoja, Juho; Hinds, David A.; Buring, Julie E.; Schurks, Markus; Ridker, Paul M.; Hrafnsdottir, Maria Gudlaug; Stefansson, Hreinn; Ring, Susan M.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Farkkila, Markus; Artto, Ville; Kaunisto, Mari; Vepsalainen, Salli; Malik, Rainer; Heath, Andrew C.; Madden, Pamela A. F.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Kurki, Mitja I.; Kals, Mart; Magi, Reedik; Franke, Lude

    Migraine is a debilitating neurological disorder affecting around one in seven people worldwide, but its molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. There is some debate about whether migraine is a disease of vascular dysfunction or a result of neuronal dysfunction with secondary vascular

  13. Migraine Subclassification via a Data-Driven Automated Approach Using Multimodality Factor Mixture Modeling of Brain Structure Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwedt, Todd J; Si, Bing; Li, Jing; Wu, Teresa; Chong, Catherine D

    2017-07-01

    The current subclassification of migraine is according to headache frequency and aura status. The variability in migraine symptoms, disease course, and response to treatment suggest the presence of additional heterogeneity or subclasses within migraine. The study objective was to subclassify migraine via a data-driven approach, identifying latent factors by jointly exploiting multiple sets of brain structural features obtained via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Migraineurs (n = 66) and healthy controls (n = 54) had brain MRI measurements of cortical thickness, cortical surface area, and volumes for 68 regions. A multimodality factor mixture model was used to subclassify MRIs and to determine the brain structural factors that most contributed to the subclassification. Clinical characteristics of subjects in each subgroup were compared. Automated MRI classification divided the subjects into two subgroups. Migraineurs in subgroup #1 had more severe allodynia symptoms during migraines (6.1 ± 5.3 vs. 3.6 ± 3.2, P = .03), more years with migraine (19.2 ± 11.3 years vs 13 ± 8.3 years, P = .01), and higher Migraine Disability Assessment (MIDAS) scores (25 ± 22.9 vs 15.7 ± 12.2, P = .04). There were not differences in headache frequency or migraine aura status between the two subgroups. Data-driven subclassification of brain MRIs based upon structural measurements identified two subgroups. Amongst migraineurs, the subgroups differed in allodynia symptom severity, years with migraine, and migraine-related disability. Since allodynia is associated with this imaging-based subclassification of migraine and prior publications suggest that allodynia impacts migraine treatment response and disease prognosis, future migraine diagnostic criteria could consider allodynia when defining migraine subgroups. © 2017 American Headache Society.

  14. Effect of Sapindus trifoliatus on hyperalgesic in vivo migraine models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.K. Arulmozhi

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Phytotherapies have offered alternative sources of therapy for migraine and gained much importance in prophylactic treatment. Sapindus trifoliatus is a medium-sized deciduous tree growing wild in south India that belongs to the family Sapindaceae. The pericarp is reported for various medicinal properties. A thick aqueous solution of the pericarp is used for the treatment of hemicrania, hysteria or epilepsy in folklore medicine. We have investigated the antihyperalgesic effects of the lyophilized aqueous extract of S. trifoliatus in animal models predictive of experimental migraine models using morphine withdrawal-induced hyperalgesia on the hot-plate test and on 0.3% acetic acid-induced abdominal constrictions in adult male Swiss albino mice. The extract significantly (N = 10, P < 0.05 increased the licking latency in the hot-plate test when administered ip at 10 mg/kg (6.70 ± 0.39 s in saline control vs 18.76 ± 0.96 s in S. trifoliatus-treated animals and significantly (N = 10, P < 0.001 reduced the abdominal constrictions when administered ip at 2 and 10 mg/kg (40.20 ± 1.36 in saline control vs 30.20 ± 1.33 and 23.00 ± 0.98 for 2 and 10 mg/kg, ip, respectively, in S. trifoliatus-treated animals. Furthermore, when administered ip at 20 and 100 mg/kg, the extract significantly (N = 10, P < 0.05 inhibited the apomorphine-induced climbing behavior in mice (climbing duration 15.75 ± 5.0 min for saline control vs 11.4 ± 1.28 and 3.9 ± 1.71 min for 20 and 100 mg/kg, respectively, in S. trifoliatus-treated animals. In receptor radioligand-binding studies, the extract exhibited affinity towards D2 receptors. The findings suggest that dopamine D2 antagonism could be the mechanism involved in the antihyperalgesic activity of the aqueous extract of S. trifoliatus.

  15. Menstrual migraine

    OpenAIRE

    Simić Svetlana; Slankamenac Petar; Cvijanović Milan; Banić-Horvat Sofija; Jovin Zita; Ilin Miroslav

    2007-01-01

    Introduction. The prevalence of migraine in childhood and adolescence has not changed to a great extent, but it increases in adolescence, especially in female adolescents. Menstrual migraine – definition. There are two types of menstrual migraine: true menstrual migraine and menstrual related migraine. True menstrual migraine occurs predominantly around menstruation, whereas menstrual related migraine occurs during menstruation, but also at other times during the month. Causes. Exaggerated or...

  16. Meta-analysis of 375,000 individuals identifies 38 susceptibility loci for migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormley, Padhraig; Anttila, Verneri; Winsvold, Bendik S; Palta, Priit; Esko, Tonu; Pers, Tune H; Farh, Kai-How; Cuenca-Leon, Ester; Muona, Mikko; Furlotte, Nicholas A; Kurth, Tobias; Ingason, Andres; McMahon, George; Ligthart, Lannie; Terwindt, Gisela M; Kallela, Mikko; Freilinger, Tobias M; Ran, Caroline; Gordon, Scott G; Stam, Anine H; Steinberg, Stacy; Borck, Guntram; Koiranen, Markku; Quaye, Lydia; Adams, Hieab H H; Lehtimäki, Terho; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Wedenoja, Juho; Hinds, David A; Buring, Julie E; Schürks, Markus; Ridker, Paul M; Hrafnsdottir, Maria Gudlaug; Stefansson, Hreinn; Ring, Susan M; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Färkkilä, Markus; Artto, Ville; Kaunisto, Mari; Vepsäläinen, Salli; Malik, Rainer; Heath, Andrew C; Madden, Pamela A F; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Kurki, Mitja I; Kals, Mart; Mägi, Reedik; Pärn, Kalle; Hämäläinen, Eija; Huang, Hailiang; Byrnes, Andrea E; Franke, Lude; Huang, Jie; Stergiakouli, Evie; Lee, Phil H; Sandor, Cynthia; Webber, Caleb; Cader, Zameel; Muller-Myhsok, Bertram; Schreiber, Stefan; Meitinger, Thomas; Eriksson, Johan G; Salomaa, Veikko; Heikkilä, Kauko; Loehrer, Elizabeth; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hofman, Albert; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Cherkas, Lynn; Pedersen, Linda M; Stubhaug, Audun; Nielsen, Christopher S; Männikkö, Minna; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Göbel, Hartmut; Esserlind, Ann-Louise; Christensen, Anne Francke; Hansen, Thomas Folkmann; Werge, Thomas; Kaprio, Jaakko; Aromaa, Arpo J; Raitakari, Olli; Ikram, M Arfan; Spector, Tim; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Metspalu, Andres; Kubisch, Christian; Strachan, David P; Ferrari, Michel D; Belin, Andrea C; Dichgans, Martin; Wessman, Maija; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Zwart, John-Anker; Boomsma, Dorret I; Smith, George Davey; Stefansson, Kari; Eriksson, Nicholas; Daly, Mark J; Neale, Benjamin M; Olesen, Jes; Chasman, Daniel I; Nyholt, Dale R; Palotie, Aarno

    2016-08-01

    Migraine is a debilitating neurological disorder affecting around one in seven people worldwide, but its molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. There is some debate about whether migraine is a disease of vascular dysfunction or a result of neuronal dysfunction with secondary vascular changes. Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have thus far identified 13 independent loci associated with migraine. To identify new susceptibility loci, we carried out a genetic study of migraine on 59,674 affected subjects and 316,078 controls from 22 GWA studies. We identified 44 independent single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) significantly associated with migraine risk (P < 5 × 10(-8)) that mapped to 38 distinct genomic loci, including 28 loci not previously reported and a locus that to our knowledge is the first to be identified on chromosome X. In subsequent computational analyses, the identified loci showed enrichment for genes expressed in vascular and smooth muscle tissues, consistent with a predominant theory of migraine that highlights vascular etiologies.

  17. The stress and migraine interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauro, Khara M; Becker, Werner J

    2009-10-01

    There are several ways in which stress may interact with migraine in those predisposed to migraine attacks. These interactions may result from biochemical changes related to the physiological stress response, as, for example, the release of corticotrophin releasing hormone, or from changes induced by the psychological response to stressors. Stress is the factor listed most often by migraine sufferers as a trigger for their attacks, but in addition there is evidence that stress can help initiate migraine in those predisposed to the disorder, and may also contribute to migraine chronification. Migraine attacks themselves can act as a stressor, thereby potentially leading to a vicious circle of increasing migraine frequency. Since the important factor in the stress-migraine interaction is likely the individual's responses to stressors, rather than the stressors themselves, the acquisition of effective stress management skills has the potential to reduce the impact of stressors on those with migraine.

  18. Comorbidity of Migraine

    OpenAIRE

    Shuu-Jiun Wang; Shuu-Jiun Wang; Jong-Ling Fuh; Jong-Ling Fuh; Ping-Kun Chen; Ping-Kun Chen

    2010-01-01

    Migraine is a common neurological disorder and can cause severely disabling during attacks. The highest prevalence occurs between the ages of 25 and 55 years, potentially the most productive period of life. Migraine leads to a burden not only to the individual, but also to the family and society. Prior studies have found migraine occurs with some illness at a greater than coincidental rate than is seen in the general population. These occurrences are called “comorbidity”, which me...

  19. A unique inbred rat strain with sustained cephalic hypersensitivity as a model of chronic migraine-like pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munro, Gordon; Petersen, Steffen; Jansen-Olesen, Inger

    2018-01-01

    Animal models of migraine-like pain enabling ongoing study of behaviour typically involve the systemic administration of chemical vasodilators or dural administration of inflammatory algogens. However, neither method mediates prolonged effects on behavior indicative of enduring pathophysiological...... in preclinical migraine drug discovery....

  20. Investigation of Psychological Health and Migraine Headaches Among Personnel According to Effort-Reward Imbalance Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Darami

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: The relationship between physical-mental health and Migraine headaches and stress, especially job stress, is known. Many factors can construct job stress in work settings. The factor that has gained much attention recently is inequality (imbalance of employees’ effort versus the reward they gain. The aim of the current attempt was to investigate the validity of effort-reward imbalance model and indicate the relation of this model with migraine headaches and psychological well-being among subjects in balance and imbalance groups. Methods: Participants were 180 personnel of Oil distribution company located in Isfahan city, and instruments used were General health questionnaire (Goldberg & Hilier, Social Re-adjustment Rating Scale (Holmes & Rahe, Ahvaz Migraine Questionnaire (Najariyan and Effort-reward imbalance scale (Van Vegchel & et al.   Results: The result of exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis for investigating the Construct validity of the effort-reward imbalance model showed that in both analyses, the two factor model was confirmed. Moreover, findings indicate that balance group was in better psychological (p<0/01 and physical (migraine (p<0/05 status comparing to the imbalance group. These findings indicate the significance of justice to present appropriate reward relative to personnel performance on their health.   Conclusion: Implication of these findings can improve Iranian industrial personnel health from both physical and psychological aspects.  

  1. Studies on the Pathophysiology and Genetic Basis of Migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, Claudia F; Sutherland, Heidi G.; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2013-01-01

    Migraine is a neurological disorder that affects the central nervous system causing painful attacks of headache. A genetic vulnerability and exposure to environmental triggers can influence the migraine phenotype. Migraine interferes in many facets of people’s daily life including employment commitments and their ability to look after their families resulting in a reduced quality of life. Identification of the biological processes that underlie this relatively common affliction has been difficult because migraine does not have any clearly identifiable pathology or structural lesion detectable by current medical technology. Theories to explain the symptoms of migraine have focused on the physiological mechanisms involved in the various phases of headache and include the vascular and neurogenic theories. In relation to migraine pathophysiology the trigeminovascular system and cortical spreading depression have also been implicated with supporting evidence from imaging studies and animal models. The objective of current research is to better understand the pathways and mechanisms involved in causing pain and headache to be able to target interventions. The genetic component of migraine has been teased apart using linkage studies and both candidate gene and genome-wide association studies, in family and case-control cohorts. Genomic regions that increase individual risk to migraine have been identified in neurological, vascular and hormonal pathways. This review discusses knowledge of the pathophysiology and genetic basis of migraine with the latest scientific evidence from genetic studies. PMID:24403849

  2. Menstrual migraine

    OpenAIRE

    Moschiano, Franca; Grazzi, Licia; D?Amico, Domenico; Schieroni, Ferdinando; Bussone, Gennaro

    2001-01-01

    An association between migraine and menstruation can be ascertained by use of a diary for a minimum of three cycles. The pathophysiological and clinical peculiarities of menstrual migraine indicate that its management should differ from that of non?menstrual migraine. NSAIDS or migraine-specific medications (e.g. triptans) are often effective for the acute management of menstrual migraine. Preventive treatment is indicated when the attacks are long?lasting, severe and disabling and do not res...

  3. Vestibular migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lempert, Thomas; Olesen, Jes; Furman, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents diagnostic criteria for vestibular migraine, jointly formulated by the Committee for Classification of Vestibular Disorders of the Bárány Society and the Migraine Classification Subcommittee of the International Headache Society (IHS). The classification includes vestibular...... migraine and probable vestibular migraine. Vestibular migraine will appear in an appendix of the third edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD) as a first step for new entities, in accordance with the usual IHS procedures. Probable vestibular migraine may be included...... in a later version of the ICHD, when further evidence has been accumulated. The diagnosis of vestibular migraine is based on recurrent vestibular symptoms, a history of migraine, a temporal association between vestibular symptoms and migraine symptoms and exclusion of other causes of vestibular symptoms...

  4. Spinal Cord Injury and Migraine Headache: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Freda M; Cragg, Jacquelyn J; Weisskopf, Marc G; Kramer, John K

    2015-01-01

    Migraine headaches are a common neurological condition, negatively impacting health and quality of life. The association between migraines and spinal cord injury (SCI) is intriguing to consider from the perspective that migraine headaches may be acquired in response to damage in the spinal cord [corrected].The primary objective of this study was to further examine the association between SCI and migraine headache, controlling for potential confounding variables. A secondary objective was to determine the impact of migraine headaches on self-perceived health. Data from a sample of 61,047 participants were obtained from the cross-sectional Canadian Community Health Survey. Multivariable logistic regression was used to explore the association between SCI and migraine headache using probability weights and adjusting for confounders. The multivariable age- and sex-adjusted model revealed a strong association between SCI and migraine headache, with an adjusted odds ratio for migraine of 4.82 (95% confidence interval [3.02, 7.67]) among those with SCI compared to those without SCI. Further, individuals who experienced both SCI and migraine tended to report poorer perceived general health compared with the other groups (i.e., SCI and no migraine). In conclusion, this study established a strong association between SCI and migraine headache. Further research is needed to explore the possible mechanisms underlying this relationship. Improvements in clinical practice to minimize this issue could result in significant improvements in quality of life.

  5. Spinal Cord Injury and Migraine Headache: A Population-Based Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freda M Warner

    Full Text Available Migraine headaches are a common neurological condition, negatively impacting health and quality of life. The association between migraines and spinal cord injury (SCI is intriguing to consider from the perspective that migraine headaches may be acquired in response to damage in the spinal cord [corrected].The primary objective of this study was to further examine the association between SCI and migraine headache, controlling for potential confounding variables. A secondary objective was to determine the impact of migraine headaches on self-perceived health. Data from a sample of 61,047 participants were obtained from the cross-sectional Canadian Community Health Survey. Multivariable logistic regression was used to explore the association between SCI and migraine headache using probability weights and adjusting for confounders. The multivariable age- and sex-adjusted model revealed a strong association between SCI and migraine headache, with an adjusted odds ratio for migraine of 4.82 (95% confidence interval [3.02, 7.67] among those with SCI compared to those without SCI. Further, individuals who experienced both SCI and migraine tended to report poorer perceived general health compared with the other groups (i.e., SCI and no migraine. In conclusion, this study established a strong association between SCI and migraine headache. Further research is needed to explore the possible mechanisms underlying this relationship. Improvements in clinical practice to minimize this issue could result in significant improvements in quality of life.

  6. Migraine aura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charles, Andrew; Hansen, Jakob Møller

    2015-01-01

    classification of migraine aura is becoming both broader and more detailed. Traditionally viewed as a primary event that triggers a migraine attack, studies regarding the timing of aura relative to other symptoms of migraine indicate that it may not in fact play a primary role in initiating an attack. Careful....... SUMMARY: There has been significant evolution of concepts regarding the causes of migraine aura, how it is best defined, and how it fits into the picture of the migraine disorder as a whole. Regardless of its exact role in the genesis of migraine, an increased understanding of aura has the potential...

  7. Comorbidity of Migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuu-Jiun Wang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Migraine is a common neurological disorder and can cause severely disabling during attacks. The highest prevalence occurs between the ages of 25 and 55 years, potentially the most productive period of life. Migraine leads to a burden not only to the individual, but also to the family and society. Prior studies have found migraine occurs with some illness at a greater than coincidental rate than is seen in the general population. These occurrences are called “comorbidity”, which means that these disorders are interrelated with migraine. To delineate migraine comorbidity is important because it can help improve treatment strategies and understand the possible pathophysiology of migraine. The comorbid illnesses in patients with migraine include stroke, sub-clinical vascular brain lesions, coronary heart disease, hypertension, patent foramen ovale, psychiatric diseases (depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, panic disorder, and suicide, restless legs syndrome, epilepsy, and asthma. In this paper, we review the existing epidemiological and hospital based studies and illustrate the connections between these illness and migraine.

  8. The Effect of Orem's Self-Care Model on Quality of Life in Patients with Migraine: a Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudzadeh Zarandi, Fatemeh; Raiesifar, Afsaneh; Ebadi, Abbas

    2016-03-01

    Many aspects of the lives of migraineurs are commonly affected by the condition, including occupational affairs, social and family life, responsibilities and ultimately the quality of life. This study was designed to determine the effect of orem's self-care nursing model on quality of life in patients with a migraine. This study was carried out in Tehran, Iran. According to the pre-post design of the randomized clinical trial, 88 patients were selected. After obtaining approval from the ethics committee of the Baqiyatallah Medical Sciences University's Research Deputy; Patients who signed the informed consent aged 20-55 years and without any more disease or disability affecting the quality of life were selected and randomly assigned to a group. Data collection tools were a demographic questionnaire, general health survey short form (SF36), and Orem cognition form and self-care checklist. Self-care model were held as four 30-45 minutes training sessions based on self-care deficit needs for the experimental group. The quality of life scores was measured in two stages, before and three months after intervention then were compared in both groups. Data were analyzed with statistical software SPSS and use of descriptive analysis tests, Chi-square, Mann-Whitney u and Wilcoxon. The final analysis was performed on 43 experimental and 40 controls. No significant difference was detected in the two groups in terms of demographic variables (P>0.05). All dimensions of quality of life including physical functioning, physical role limitation, body pain, general health, vitality, social functioning and emotional role limitation and mental health in the experimental group showed a significant increase after intervention compared to the control group (Pmodel improves function and overall quality of life and reduces the high cost of a migraine and migraine-related disability to individuals and society.

  9. Sex differences in the prevalence, symptoms, and associated features of migraine, probable migraine and other severe headache: results of the American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention (AMPP) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buse, Dawn C; Loder, Elizabeth W; Gorman, Jennifer A; Stewart, Walter F; Reed, Michael L; Fanning, Kristina M; Serrano, Daniel; Lipton, Richard B

    2013-09-01

    The strikingly higher prevalence of migraine in females compared with males is one of the hallmarks of migraine. A large global body of evidence exists on the sex differences in the prevalence of migraine with female to male ratios ranging from 2:1 to 3:1 and peaking in midlife. Some data are available on sex differences in associated symptoms, headache-related disability and impairment, and healthcare resource utilization in migraine. Few data are available on corresponding sex differences in probable migraine (PM) and other severe headache (ie, nonmigraine-spectrum severe headache). Gaining a clear understanding of sex differences in a range of severe headache disorders may help differentiate the range of headache types. Herein, we compare sexes on prevalence and a range of clinical variables for migraine, PM, and other severe headache in a large sample from the US population. This study analyzed data from the 2004 American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention Study. Total and demographic-stratified sex-specific, prevalence estimates of headache subtypes (migraine, PM, and other severe headache) are reported. Log-binomial models are used to calculate sex-specific adjusted prevalence ratios and 95% confidence intervals for each across demographic strata. A smoothed sex prevalence ratio (female to male) figure is presented for migraine and PM. One hundred sixty-two thousand seven hundred fifty-six individuals aged 12 and older responded to the 2004 American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention Study survey (64.9% response rate). Twenty-eight thousand two hundred sixty-one (17.4%) reported "severe headache" in the preceding year (23.5% of females and 10.6% of males), 11.8% met International Classification of Headache Disorders-2 criteria for migraine (17.3% of females and 5.7% of males), 4.6% met criteria for PM (5.3% of females and 3.9% of males), and 1.0% were categorized with other severe headache (0.9% of females and 1.0% of males). Sex differences were observed in

  10. Menstrual Migraine

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-01-01

    The association between migraine and menstruation was determined using diary data from 155 women of median age 44 years (range, 15 to 58 years) who were not using hormonal contraception and attended the City of London Migraine Clinic, UK.

  11. Migrainous infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurell, K; Artto, V; Bendtsen, L

    2011-01-01

    Migrainous infarction (MI), i.e. an ischemic stroke developing during an attack of migraine with aura is rare and the knowledge of its clinical characteristics is limited. Previous case series using the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD) included......Migrainous infarction (MI), i.e. an ischemic stroke developing during an attack of migraine with aura is rare and the knowledge of its clinical characteristics is limited. Previous case series using the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD) included...

  12. Increased susceptibility to cortical spreading depression in the mouse model of familial hemiplegic migraine type 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Leo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Familial hemiplegic migraine type 2 (FHM2 is an autosomal dominant form of migraine with aura that is caused by mutations of the α2-subunit of the Na,K-ATPase, an isoform almost exclusively expressed in astrocytes in the adult brain. We generated the first FHM2 knock-in mouse model carrying the human W887R mutation in the Atp1a2 orthologous gene. Homozygous Atp1a2(R887/R887 mutants died just after birth, while heterozygous Atp1a2(+/R887 mice showed no apparent clinical phenotype. The mutant α2 Na,K-ATPase protein was barely detectable in the brain of homozygous mutants and strongly reduced in the brain of heterozygous mutants, likely as a consequence of endoplasmic reticulum retention and subsequent proteasomal degradation, as we demonstrate in transfected cells. In vivo analysis of cortical spreading depression (CSD, the phenomenon underlying migraine aura, revealed a decreased induction threshold and an increased velocity of propagation in the heterozygous FHM2 mouse. Since several lines of evidence involve a specific role of the glial α2 Na,K pump in active reuptake of glutamate from the synaptic cleft, we hypothesize that CSD facilitation in the FHM2 mouse model is sustained by inefficient glutamate clearance by astrocytes and consequent increased cortical excitatory neurotransmission. The demonstration that FHM2 and FHM1 mutations share the ability to facilitate induction and propagation of CSD in mouse models further support the role of CSD as a key migraine trigger.

  13. Stress and Migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spotlight On News Content Capsule Contact Understanding Migraine Stress and Migraine Doctor Q&A Managing Migraine Migraine ... of Headache Disorders Cluster Headache Post-Traumatic Headache Stress and Migraine March 16, 2017 How to cope ...

  14. Accurate Classification of Chronic Migraine via Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwedt, Todd J.; Chong, Catherine D.; Wu, Teresa; Gaw, Nathan; Fu, Yinlin; Li, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Background The International Classification of Headache Disorders provides criteria for the diagnosis and subclassification of migraine. Since there is no objective gold standard by which to test these diagnostic criteria, the criteria are based on the consensus opinion of content experts. Accurate migraine classifiers consisting of brain structural measures could serve as an objective gold standard by which to test and revise diagnostic criteria. The objectives of this study were to utilize magnetic resonance imaging measures of brain structure for constructing classifiers: 1) that accurately identify individuals as having chronic vs. episodic migraine vs. being a healthy control; and 2) that test the currently used threshold of 15 headache days/month for differentiating chronic migraine from episodic migraine. Methods Study participants underwent magnetic resonance imaging for determination of regional cortical thickness, cortical surface area, and volume. Principal components analysis combined structural measurements into principal components accounting for 85% of variability in brain structure. Models consisting of these principal components were developed to achieve the classification objectives. Ten-fold cross validation assessed classification accuracy within each of the ten runs, with data from 90% of participants randomly selected for classifier development and data from the remaining 10% of participants used to test classification performance. Headache frequency thresholds ranging from 5–15 headache days/month were evaluated to determine the threshold allowing for the most accurate subclassification of individuals into lower and higher frequency subgroups. Results Participants were 66 migraineurs and 54 healthy controls, 75.8% female, with an average age of 36 +/− 11 years. Average classifier accuracies were: a) 68% for migraine (episodic + chronic) vs. healthy controls; b) 67.2% for episodic migraine vs. healthy controls; c) 86.3% for chronic

  15. Cognitive functioning in adolescents with migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Andréia Costa-Silva

    Full Text Available Although migraine is highly prevalent in children and teenagers, it often goes undetected in these patients, resulting in underdiagnosis and inadequate treatment. Several studies have investigated cognitive changes in adults with migraine. However, there are few studies focusing on children and adolescents. Objective : To investigate cognitive performance of adolescents with migraine. Methods : Twenty-eight adolescents diagnosed with migraine and twenty-six individuals without a history of headache were recruited for the study. All participants were evaluated using standardized neuropsychological tests. Results : Adolescents with migraine had worse performance on tests evaluating short- and long-term verbal memory, attention, executive function, and speed of processing information than controls. Conclusion : Cognitive dysfunction is common in adolescents with migraine. Since the cognitive deficits found in adolescents with migraine are similar to those reported in adults with migraine, cognitive impairment seems to persist throughout life.

  16. Exploring genes and pathways involved in migraine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eising, E.

    2017-01-01

    The research in this thesis was aimed at identifying genes and molecular pathways involved in migraine. To this end, two gene expression analyses were performed in brain tissue obtained from transgenic mouse models for familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM), a monogenic subtype of migraine with aura.

  17. Comparative effects of traditional Chinese and Western migraine medicines in an animal model of nociceptive trigeminovascular activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yonglie; Martins-Oliveira, Margarida; Akerman, Simon; Goadsby, Peter J

    2017-01-01

    Background Migraine is a highly prevalent and disabling disorder of the brain with limited therapeutic options, particularly for preventive treatment. There is a need to identify novel targets and test their potential efficacy in relevant preclinical migraine models. Traditional Chinese medicines have been used for millennia and may offer avenues for exploration. Methods We evaluated two traditional Chinese medicines, gastrodin and ligustrazine, and compared them to two Western approaches with propranolol and levetiracetam, one effective and one ineffective, in an established in vivo rodent model of nociceptive durovascular trigeminal activation. Results Intravenous gastrodin (30 and 100 mg/kg) significantly inhibited nociceptive dural-evoked neuronal firing in the trigeminocervical complex. Ligustrazine (10 mg/kg) and propranolol (3 mg/kg) also significantly inhibited dural-evoked trigeminocervical complex responses, although the timing of responses of ligustrazine does not match its pharmacokinetic profile. Levetiracetam had no effects on trigeminovascular responses. Conclusion Our data suggest gastrodin has potential as an anti-migraine treatment, whereas ligustrazine seems less promising. Interestingly, in line with clinical trial data, propranolol was effective and levetiracetam not. Exploration of the mechanisms and modelling effects of Chinese traditional therapies offers novel route for drug discovery in migraine.

  18. Headaches and Migraines: Migraine 101 Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Headaches and Migraines Migraine 101 Quiz Past Issues / Spring 2009 Table of ... the facts when it comes to headaches and migraines? Test your knowledge with this quick quiz. True/ ...

  19. Brain stimulation in migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brighina, Filippo; Cosentino, Giuseppe; Fierro, Brigida

    2013-01-01

    Migraine is a very prevalent disease with great individual disability and socioeconomic burden. Despite intensive research effort in recent years, the etiopathogenesis of the disease remains to be elucidated. Recently, much importance has been given to mechanisms underlying the cortical excitability that has been suggested to be dysfunctional in migraine. In recent years, noninvasive brain stimulation techniques based on magnetic fields (transcranial magnetic stimulation, TMS) and on direct electrical currents (transcranial direct current stimulation, tDCS) have been shown to be safe and effective tools to explore the issue of cortical excitability, activation, and plasticity in migraine. Moreover, TMS, repetitive TMS (rTMS), and tDCS, thanks to their ability to interfere with and/or modulate cortical activity inducing plastic, persistent effects, have been also explored as potential therapeutic approaches, opening an interesting perspective for noninvasive neurostimulation for both symptomatic and preventive treatment of migraine and other types of headache. In this chapter we critically review evidence regarding the role of noninvasive brain stimulation in the pathophysiology and treatment of migraine, delineating the advantages and limits of these techniques together with potential development and future application. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Human models of migraine - short-term pain for long-term gain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashina, Messoud; Hansen, Jakob Møller; Á Dunga, Bára Oladóttir

    2017-01-01

    Migraine is a complex disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of headache, and is one of the most prevalent and disabling neurological disorders. A key feature of migraine is that various factors can trigger an attack, and this phenomenon provides a unique opportunity to investigate disease...

  1. Predictive validity of endpoints used in electrophysiological modelling of migraine in the trigeminovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Bence; Kardos, Péter; Orosz, Szabolcs; Tarnawa, István; Csekő, Csongor; Lévay, György; Farkas, Sándor; Lendvai, Balázs; Kovács, Péter

    2015-11-02

    The trigeminovascular system has a pivotal role in the pathomechanism of migraine. The aim of the present study was to further develop existing models of migraine making them more suitable for testing the effects of compounds with presumed antimigraine activity in anaesthetised rats. Simultaneous recording of ongoing activity of spontaneously active neurons in the trigeminocervical complex as well as their discharges evoked by electrical stimulation of the dura mater via activation of A- and C-sensory fibres were carried out. Effects of sumatriptan, propranolol and topiramate were evaluated prior to and after application of a mixture containing inflammatory mediators on the dura. Propranolol (10 mg/kg s.c) and topiramate (30 mg/kg s.c.) resulted in a tendency to decrease the level of both spontaneous and evoked activity, while sumatriptan (1 mg/kg s.c.) did not exhibit any effect on recorded parameters. Application of an inflammatory soup to the dura mater boosted up spontaneous activity, which could be significantly attenuated by propranolol and topiramate but not by sumatriptan. In addition, all compounds prevented the delayed increase of spontaneous firing. In contrast to the ongoing activity, evoked responses were not augmented by inflammatory mediators. Nevertheless, inhibitory effect of propranolol and topiramate was evident when considering A- or C-fibre responses. Findings do not support the view that electrically evoked responses are useful for the measurement of trigeminal sensitization. It is proposed however, that inhibition of enhanced firing (immediate and/or delayed) evoked by inflammatory mediators as an endpoint have higher predictive validity regarding the clinical effectiveness of compounds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Patent foramen ovale and migraine: a cross-sectional study from the Northern Manhattan Study (NOMAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundek, Tatjana; Elkind, Mitchell S V; Di Tullio, Marco R; Carrera, Emmanuel; Jin, Zhezhen; Sacco, Ralph L; Homma, Shunichi

    2008-09-30

    A causal relationship between patent foramen ovale (PFO) and migraine has been hypothesized, and improvement of migraine frequency and severity after percutaneous PFO closure has been reported. Population-based data on the relationship between PFO and migraine are sparse, however. The objective of this study was to examine the association between PFO and migraine among stroke-free individuals in an urban, population-based, multiethnic cohort. As a part of the ongoing Northern Manhattan Study (NOMAS), 1101 stroke-free subjects were assessed for self-reported history of migraine. The presence of PFO was assessed by transthoracic echocardiography. The mean age of the group was 69+/-10 years; 58% were women. Forty-eight percent were Caribbean Hispanic, 24% were white, 26% were black, and 2% were another race/ethnicity. The prevalence of self-reported migraine was 16% (13% migraine with aura). The prevalence of PFO was 15%. Migraine was significantly more frequent among younger subjects, women, and Hispanics. The prevalence of PFO was not significantly different between subjects who had migraine (26/178, or 14.6%) and those who did not (138/923, or 15.0%; P=0.9). In an adjusted multivariate logistic regression model, the presence of PFO was not associated with increased prevalence of migraine (odds ratio 1.01, 95% confidence interval 0.63 to 1.61). Increasing age was associated with lower prevalence of migraine in both subjects with a PFO (odds ratio 0.94, 95% confidence interval 0.90 to 0.99 per year) and those without PFO (odds ratio 0.97, 95% confidence interval 0.95 to 0.99 per year). The observed lack of association between PFO and migraine (with or without aura) was not modified by diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cigarette smoking, or dyslipidemia. In this multiethnic, elderly, population-based cohort, PFO detected with transthoracic echocardiography and agitated saline was not associated with self-reported migraine. The causal relationship between PFO and

  3. Ophthalmoplegic migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bek, Semai; Genc, Gencer; Demirkaya, Seref; Eroglu, Erdal; Odabasi, Zeki

    2009-05-01

    According to the International Headache Society, ophthalmoplegic migraine is recurrent attacks of headache with migrainous characteristics associated with paresis of one or more ocular cranial nerves (commonly the third nerve) in the absence of any demonstrable intracranial lesion. We report a patient with typical clinical features of ophthalmoplegic migraine. A 21-year-old man had right frontal throbbing headaches recurring twice a year. His headache lasted for 1 to 5 days and was followed by slight drooping of his eyelid and double vision that lasted for approximately 3 months. On examination he had ptosis and adduction paralysis of the right eye. Brain MRI revealed a thickened, enhancing right oculomotor nerve. He was treated with methylprednisolone 1000 mg/d IV for 5 days. Only 2 weeks later, clinical improvement was observed and 3 months later the oculomotor nerve enhancement resolved. Ophthalmoplegic migraine has been considered to have a microvascular, ischemic etiology, but more recently it has been reclassified as a demyelinating condition affecting the oculomotor. To our knowledge, this is the first ophthalmoplegic migraine case presented pretreatment and post-treatment with clinical photographic documentation and an MRI showing enduring thickening of the oculomotor nerve although symptoms and contrast enhancement resolved.

  4. Basilar migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, W F; Kuhn, S C; Daylida, L

    1997-03-01

    Basilar migraine is a complicated headache which the International Headache Society describes as 'migraine with aura symptoms clearly originating from the brainstem or from both occipital lobes'. For years this headache was thought to originate from a transient disturbance in the vertebrobasilar circulation, but more recent studies suggest that a central neuronal disorder may be the source of migraine. Basilar migraines may have certain symptoms which are similar to other neurologic, vascular, psychiatric and metabolic diseases, yet there are specific criteria which can help differentiate it from other diagnoses. It is characterized by a throbbing occipital headache which may be preceded by an aura. The unusual symptoms of basilar migraine, which may precede and continue throughout the duration of the headache and even after it, include bilateral visual symptoms, altered mental status, vertigo, gait ataxia, bilateral paresthesia, bilateral paralysis and dysarthria. We describe a 29-year-old black female whose husband brought her to the emergency department complaining of confusion, headache, and left-sided weakness for 2 h prior to arrival.

  5. Pharmacological synergy: the next frontier on therapeutic advancement for migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenfeld, Andrew; Gennings, Chris; Cady, Roger

    2012-04-01

    The burden of migraine significantly impacts the individual sufferer, their families, the workplace, and society. The World Health Organization has identified migraine as an urgent public health priority and has initiated a global initiative to reduce the burden of migraine. Underlying the World Health Organization initiative is the need to discover means of optimizing migraine treatments and make them accessible to the broader portion of the world population. Development of acute migraine medications over the past several decades has largely centered on engineering highly specific receptor molecules that alter migraine pathophysiological mechanisms to abort or reverse the acute attack of migraine. The first product of this line of discovery was sumatriptan and heralded as a landmark therapeutic breakthrough. Sumatriptan is a 5-HT-1B/D receptor agonist considered to activate receptors involved in the pathophysiology specific to migraine. Large-scale regulatory/clinical studies demonstrated statistical superiority for sumatriptan over placebo in reduction or elimination of headache, nausea, photophobia, and phonophobia. Since the introduction of sumatriptan, 6 other triptan products have been released in the United States as acute treatments for migraine, all having the same mechanism of action and similar efficacy. Despite their utility as migraine abortive medications, the triptans do not successfully treat all attacks of migraine or necessarily treat all migraine associated symptoms. In fact, in less than 25% of attacks do subjects obtain and maintain a migraine-free response to treatment for at least beyond 24 hours. A wide range of non-triptan medications also have demonstrated efficacy in acute migraine. These include non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), opioids, phenothiazines, and valproic acid to name a few. Given the distinctly different mechanisms of actions of these various medications, it is likely that several unique pathophysiological

  6. Association between migraine, lifestyle and socioeconomic factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le, Han; Tfelt-Hansen, Peer; Skytthe, Axel

    2011-01-01

    or studying. The risk was increased for men compared to women in subjects with heavy physical exercise, intake of alcohol, and body mass index >25. Migraine was associated with several lifestyle and socioeconomic factors. Most associations such as low education and employment status were probably due......To investigate whether sex-specific associations exist between migraine, lifestyle or socioeconomic factors. We distinguished between the subtypes migraine with aura (MA) and migraine without aura (MO). In 2002, a questionnaire containing validated questions to diagnose migraine and questions...... on lifestyle and socioeconomic factors was sent to 46,418 twin individuals residing in Denmark. 31,865 twin individuals aged 20-71 were included. The twins are representative of the Danish population with regard to migraine and other somatic diseases and were used as such in the present study. An increased...

  7. Migraine Headaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... migraine triggers include: stress menstruation (periods) skipping meals dehydration too much caffeine (more than 200 mg a day, such as the amount of caffeine in energy drinks) some foods (alcohol, cheese, citrus fruits, pizza, chocolate, ice cream, lunch meats and hot ...

  8. Migraine and Common Morbidities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... routine eating and drinking habits. Prolonged periods of fasting, dehydration, or hyperglycemia (too much sugar) may all ... More › Related Articles Retinal Migraine Tinnitus and Headache Obesity and Migraine Abdominal Migraine Opioid Narcotics and Headache ...

  9. Migraine Variants in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Headaches in Children FAQ Migraine Variants In Children Children Get Migraines Too! Learn More Migraine Information Find Help Doctors & Resources Get Connected Join the Conversation Follow Us on Social Media Company About News Resources Privacy Policy Contact Phone: ...

  10. Coexisting typical migraine in familial hemiplegic migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Møller; Thomsen, Lise Lykke; Olesen, Jes

    2010-01-01

    In contrast to patients with migraine with aura (MA) and migraine without aura (MO), most patients with familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) do not report migraine-like attacks after pharmacologic provocation with glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), a donor of nitric oxide. In the present study, we examined...... patients with FHM without known gene mutations and hypothesized that 1) GTN would cause more migraine-like attacks in patients with FHM compared to controls, and 2) GTN would cause more migraine attacks in patients with FHM with coexisting MA or MO compared to the pure FHM phenotype....

  11. Proposal of a model for multidisciplinary treatment program of chronic migraine with medication overuse: preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazzi, L; Prunesti, A; Bussone, G

    2015-05-01

    The treatment of patients with chronic migraine associated with medication overuse is challenging in clinical practice; different strategies of treatment have been recently developed, multidisciplinary treatment approaches have been developed in academic headache centers. Education and support of patients are necessary to improve patients' adherence to pharmacological treatments as well as to non-pharmacological therapies. This study reports a clinical experience conducted at our Headache center with a group of female patients, suffering from chronic migraine complicated by medication overuse, treated by a multidisciplinary approach and followed for a period of 1 year after withdrawal. Results confirm the efficacy of a multifaceted treatment to manage this problematic category of patients.

  12. Increased risk of migraine in patients with psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, A.; Mallbris, L.; Gislason, G. H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Psoriasis and migraine are common conditions with potential overlap of pathophysiological mechanisms. Both these diseases have been associated with increased cardiovascular risk but little is known about their interplay. Objective: We sought to investigate the link between psoriasis...... and adjusted incidence rate ratios were estimated by Poisson regression models. Results: The study comprised a total of 5,379,859 individuals, including 53,006 and 6831 patients with mild and severe psoriasis, respectively, and 6243 patients with psoriatic arthritis. Fully adjusted incidence rate ratios...... for migraine were 1.37 (95% confidence interval 1.30-1.45), 1.55 (95% confidence interval 1.29-1.86), and 1.92 (95% confidence interval 1.65-2.22) for mild psoriasis, severe psoriasis, and psoriatic arthritis, respectively. Stratification for sex revealed increased risk of migraine in both male and female...

  13. Prostaglandins and prostaglandin receptor antagonism in migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonova, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Human models of headache may contribute to understanding of prostaglandins' role in migraine pathogenesis. The current thesis investigated the migraine triggering effect of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in migraine patients without aura, the efficacy of a novel EP4 receptor antagonist, BGC20....... The infusion of PGE2 caused the immediate migraine-like attacks and vasodilatation of the middle cerebral artery in migraine patients without aura. The highly specific and potent EP4 receptor antagonist, BGC20-1531, was not able to attenuate PGE2-induced headache and vasodilatation of both intra- and extra......-cerebral arteries. The intravenous infusion of PGF2α did not induce headache or statistically significant vasoconstriction of cerebral arteries in healthy volunteers. Novel data on PGE2-provoked immediate migraine-like attacks suggest that PGE2 may be one of the important final products in the pathogenesis...

  14. Glutamate-system defects behind psychiatric manifestations in a familial hemiplegic migraine type 2 disease-mutation mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøttger, Pernille; Pedersen, Simon Glerup; Gesslein, Bodil

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is a complex brain disorder, and understanding the complexity of this prevalent disease could improve quality of life for millions of people. Familial Hemiplegic Migraine type 2 (FHM2) is a subtype of migraine with aura and co-morbidities like epilepsy/seizures, cognitive impairments...

  15. Migraine and ischemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wammes-van der Heijden, E.A.

    2009-01-01

    An association between migraine and ischemic events, especially ischemic stroke, has been debated for many years. Whether migraine is a risk factor for ischemic events or ischemia triggers migraine, or both, is still unclear. This thesis explores different relationships between migraine and

  16. Managing migraine by patient profile: role of frovatriptan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, Roger K; Farmer, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    For the last quarter of a century, triptans have been available for acute treatment of migraine but with little guidance on which of the different triptan products to use for which patient or which attack of migraine. In this article, we propose a structured approach to analysis of individual migraine attacks and patient characteristics as a means of defining and optimizing acute intervention. Assessment of patient and attack profiles includes the "5-Ps": pattern, phenotype, patient, pharmacology, and precipitants. Attending to these five components of information can assist in developing an individualized behavioral, pharmacological, and nonpharmacological comprehensive treatment plan for most migraine patients. This clinical approach is then focused on frovatriptan because of its unique molecular signature and potential novel clinical applications. Frovatriptan like all triptans is indicated for acute treatment of migraine but its role has been explored in management of several unique migraine phenotypes. Frovatriptan has the longest half-life of any triptan and consequently is often promoted for acute treatment of migraine of longer duration. It has also been studied as a short-term preventive treatment in women with menstrual-related migraine. Given that 60% of female migraineurs suffer from menstrual-related migraine, this population is the obvious group for continued study. Small studies have also explored frovatriptan's use in treating migraine predicted by premonitory symptoms as a preventive for the headache phase of migraine. By identifying patient and attack profiles, clinicians may effectively determine the viability of frovatriptan as an effective pharmacological intervention for migraine.

  17. What Is an Ocular Migraine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... When to seek help What is an ocular migraine? Is it a sign of something serious? Answers ... and retinal migraine, which could signal something serious. Migraine aura affecting your vision Ocular migraine sometimes describes ...

  18. Functional crosstalk in culture between macrophages and trigeminal sensory neurons of a mouse genetic model of migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franceschini Alessia

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enhanced activity of trigeminal ganglion neurons is thought to underlie neuronal sensitization facilitating the onset of chronic pain attacks, including migraine. Recurrent headache attacks might establish a chronic neuroinflammatory ganglion profile contributing to the hypersensitive phenotype. Since it is difficult to study this process in vivo, we investigated functional crosstalk between macrophages and sensory neurons in primary cultures from trigeminal sensory ganglia of wild-type (WT or knock-in (KI mice expressing the Cacna1a gene mutation (R192Q found in familial hemiplegic migraine-type 1. After studying the number and morphology of resident macrophages in culture, the consequences of adding host macrophages on macrophage phagocytosis and membrane currents mediated by pain-transducing P2X3 receptors on sensory neurons were examined. Results KI ganglion cultures constitutively contained a larger number of active macrophages, although no difference in P2X3 receptor expression was found. Co-culturing WT or KI ganglia with host macrophages (active as much as resident cells strongly stimulated single cell phagocytosis. The same protocol had no effect on P2X3 receptor expression in WT or KI co-cultures, but it largely enhanced WT neuron currents that grew to the high amplitude constitutively seen for KI neurons. No further potentiation of KI neuronal currents was observed. Conclusions Trigeminal ganglion cultures from a genetic mouse model of migraine showed basal macrophage activation together with enhanced neuronal currents mediated by P2X3 receptors. This phenotype could be replicated in WT cultures by adding host macrophages, indicating an important functional crosstalk between macrophages and sensory neurons.

  19. Functional crosstalk in culture between macrophages and trigeminal sensory neurons of a mouse genetic model of migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschini, Alessia; Nair, Asha; Bele, Tanja; van den Maagdenberg, Arn Mjm; Nistri, Andrea; Fabbretti, Elsa

    2012-11-21

    Enhanced activity of trigeminal ganglion neurons is thought to underlie neuronal sensitization facilitating the onset of chronic pain attacks, including migraine. Recurrent headache attacks might establish a chronic neuroinflammatory ganglion profile contributing to the hypersensitive phenotype. Since it is difficult to study this process in vivo, we investigated functional crosstalk between macrophages and sensory neurons in primary cultures from trigeminal sensory ganglia of wild-type (WT) or knock-in (KI) mice expressing the Cacna1a gene mutation (R192Q) found in familial hemiplegic migraine-type 1. After studying the number and morphology of resident macrophages in culture, the consequences of adding host macrophages on macrophage phagocytosis and membrane currents mediated by pain-transducing P2X3 receptors on sensory neurons were examined. KI ganglion cultures constitutively contained a larger number of active macrophages, although no difference in P2X3 receptor expression was found. Co-culturing WT or KI ganglia with host macrophages (active as much as resident cells) strongly stimulated single cell phagocytosis. The same protocol had no effect on P2X3 receptor expression in WT or KI co-cultures, but it largely enhanced WT neuron currents that grew to the high amplitude constitutively seen for KI neurons. No further potentiation of KI neuronal currents was observed. Trigeminal ganglion cultures from a genetic mouse model of migraine showed basal macrophage activation together with enhanced neuronal currents mediated by P2X3 receptors. This phenotype could be replicated in WT cultures by adding host macrophages, indicating an important functional crosstalk between macrophages and sensory neurons.

  20. The NRP1 migraine risk variant shows evidence of association with menstrual migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Charmaine E; Sutherland, Heidi G; Maher, Bridget H; Lea, Rodney A; Haupt, Larisa M; Frith, Alison; Anne MacGregor, E; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2018-04-18

    In 2016, a large meta-analysis brought the number of susceptibility loci for migraine to 38. While sub-type analysis for migraine without aura (MO) and migraine with aura (MA) found some loci showed specificity to MO, the study did not test the loci with respect to other subtypes of migraine. This study aimed to test the hypothesis that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) robustly associated with migraine are individually or collectively associated with menstrual migraine (MM). Genotyping of migraine susceptibility SNPs was conducted using the Agena MassARRAY platform on DNA samples from 235 women diagnosed with menstrual migraine as per International Classification for Headache Disorders II (ICHD-II) criteria and 140 controls. Alternative genotyping methods including restriction fragment length polymorphism, pyrosequencing and Sanger sequencing were used for validation. Statistical analysis was performed using PLINK and SPSS. Genotypes of 34 SNPs were obtained and investigated for their potential association with menstrual migraine. Of these SNPs, rs2506142 located near the neuropilin 1 gene (NRP1), was found to be significantly associated with menstrual migraine (p = 0.003). Genomic risk scores were calculated for all 34 SNPs as well as a subset of 7 SNPs that were nearing individual significance. Overall, this analysis suggested these SNPs to be weakly predictive of MM, but of no prognostic or diagnostic value. Our results suggest that NRP1 may be important in the etiology of MM. It also suggests some genetic commonality between common migraine subtypes (MA and MO) and MM. The identification of associated SNPs may be the starting point to a better understanding of how genetic factors may contribute to the menstrual migraine sub-type.

  1. Job stress is associated with migraine in current workers: the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, I S; Griep, R H; Alves, M G M; Goulart, A C; Lotufo, P A; Barreto, S M; Chor, D; Benseñor, I M

    2014-10-01

    Migraine is an important source of social burden and work-related costs. Studies addressing the association of migraine with job stress are rare. The aim of this paper was to study the association of job stress components and migraine using structured, validated questionnaires that were part of the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil). The ELSA-Brasil is a multicentre cohort of 15,105 civil servants (12,096 current workers) in Brazil. Job strain was assessed using the 17-item Brazilian version of the Swedish Demand-Control-Support Questionnaire. Headache episodes in the preceding 12 months were assessed using a questionnaire based on the International Headache Society criteria. We analysed the association between job stress domains and migraine in men and women using adjusted logistic regression and interaction models. We included 3113 individuals without headache and 3259 migraineurs. Low job control [odds ratio (OR) 1.30; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.10-1.53], high job demands (OR 1.37; 95% CI 1.18-1.59) and low social support (OR 1.49; 95% CI 1.29-1.71) were associated with migraine. Job control was more strongly associated with migraine in women (p for interaction = 0.02). High-strain (high demand and low control) jobs were associated with migraine in both men (OR 1.48; 95% CI 1.11-1.97) and women (OR 1.51; 95% CI 1.17-1.95). We observed a strong association between high-strain jobs and migraine. Job control was a stronger migraine-related factor for women. Low social support was associated with migraine in both sexes. © 2014 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  2. Migraine vestibulaire 

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lempert, T; Olesen, J; Furman, J

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents diagnostic criteria for vestibular migraine, jointly formulated by the Committee for Classification of Vestibular Disorders of the Bárány Society and the Migraine Classification Subcommittee of the International Headache Society (IHS). The classification includes vestibular...... migraine and probable vestibular migraine. Vestibular migraine will appear in an appendix of the third edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD) as a first step for new entities, in accordance with the usual IHS procedures. Probable vestibular migraine may be included...... in a later version of the ICHD, when further evidence has been accumulated. The diagnosis of vestibular migraine is based on recurrent vestibular symptoms, a history of migraine, a temporal association between vestibular symptoms and migraine symptoms and exclusion of other causes of vestibular symptoms...

  3. Migraine & paediatric obesity: a plausible link?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarit Ravid

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and migraine are both highly prevalent disorders in the general population, influenced by genetic and environmental risk factors. In recent studies, obesity was found to be a strong risk factor for transformed migraine and, among migraineurs, obesity was associated with frequent headaches and higher disability scores. Suggested mechanisms included: (i obesity as a pro-inflammatory state may be associated with neurovascular inflammation in patients with migraine; (ii elevated levels of plasma calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP in obese individuals may play a role as an important post-synaptic mediator of trigeminovascular inflammation in migraine; (iii dismodulation in the hypothalamic neuropeptide, orexin, in obese persons may be associated with increased susceptibility to neurogenic inflammation causing migraine attacks; and (iv leptin and adiponectin can activate proinflammatory cytokine release that is involved in the pathogenesis of migraine. In addition, both conditions are associated with psychiatric co-morbidities, such as depression and anxiety, that can further increase headache frequency and disability. Therefore, the effect of obesity on migraine outcome is important. Weight and BMI should be measured and calculated in all children presenting with migraine, and weight control should be a part of the treatment.

  4. Glutamate-system defects behind psychiatric manifestations in a familial hemiplegic migraine type 2 disease-mutation mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøttger, Pernille; Pedersen, Simon Glerup; Gesslein, Bodil

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is a complex brain disorder, and understanding the complexity of this prevalent disease could improve quality of life for millions of people. Familial Hemiplegic Migraine type 2 (FHM2) is a subtype of migraine with aura and co-morbidities like epilepsy/seizures, cognitive impairments...... sex hormone cycle and the glutamate system and a link to co-morbid psychiatric manifestations of FHM2....

  5. The pathophysiology of migraine: implications for clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Andrew

    2018-02-01

    The understanding of migraine pathophysiology is advancing rapidly. Improved characterisation and diagnosis of its clinical features have led to the view of migraine as a complex, variable disorder of nervous system function rather than simply a vascular headache. Recent studies have provided important new insights into its genetic causes, anatomical and physiological features, and pharmacological mechanisms. The identification of new migraine-associated genes, the visualisation of brain regions that are activated at the earliest stages of a migraine attack, a greater appreciation of the potential role of the cervical nerves, and the recognition of the crucial role for neuropeptides are among the advances that have led to novel targets for migraine therapy. Future management of migraine will have the capacity to tailor treatments based on the distinct mechanisms of migraine that affect individual patients. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Behavioural management of migraine

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Helen; Newman, Craig; Noad, Rupert; Weatherby, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    It is important to recognise that migraine is a ′biological′ and not a ′psychological′ entity. However, psychological factors can be involved in migraine in 4 different ways:- 1) Migraines can be triggered by psychological stressors; 2) Severe migraine can itself be a cause of significant psychological stress which can, in turn, exacerbate the problem; 3) Even if psychological stress is not significantly involved in the genesis of the headache, pain management techniques can help people cope ...

  7. Ischemic strokes and migraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bousser, M.G.; Baron, J.C.; Chiras, J.

    1985-11-01

    Lasting neurological deficits, though most infrequent, do occur in migrainous subjects and are well documented by clinical angiographic computed tomographic (CT scan) and even pathological studies. However the mechanism of cerebral ischemia in migraine remains widely unknown and the precise role of migraine in the pathogenesis of ischemic strokes is still debated. (orig./MG).

  8. Acupuncture for migraine prophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Linde

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Acupuncture is often used for migraine prophylaxis but its effectiveness is still controversial. This review (along with a companion review on 'Acupuncture for tension-type headache' represents an updated version of a Cochrane review originally published in Issue 1, 2001, of The Cochrane Library. OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether acupuncture is a more effective than no prophylactic treatment/routine care only; b more effective than 'sham' (placebo acupuncture; and c as effective as other interventions in reducing headache frequency in patients with migraine. METHODS: Search methods: The Cochrane Pain, Palliative & Supportive Care Trials Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Complementary Medicine Field Trials Register were searched to January 2008. Selection criteria: We included randomized trials with a post-randomization observation period of at least 8 weeks that compared the clinical effects of an acupuncture intervention with a control (no prophylactic treatment or routine care only, a sham acupuncture intervention or another intervention in patients with migraine. Data collection and analysis: Two reviewers checked eligibility; extracted information on patients, interventions, methods and results; and assessed risk of bias and quality of the acupuncture intervention. Outcomes extracted included response (outcome of primary interest, migraine attacks, migraine days, headache days and analgesic use. Pooled effect size estimates were calculated using a random-effects model. MAIN RESULTS: Twenty-two trials with 4419 participants (mean 201, median 42, range 27 to 1715 met the inclusion criteria. Six trials (including two large trials with 401 and 1715 patients compared acupuncture to no prophylactic treatment or routine care only. After 3 to 4 months patients receiving acupuncture had higher response rates and fewer headaches. The only study with long-term follow up saw no evidence that effects dissipated up

  9. Acute migraine medication adherence, migraine disability and patient satisfaction: A naturalistic daily diary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seng, Elizabeth K; Robbins, Matthew S; Nicholson, Robert A

    2017-09-01

    Objective To examine the influence of acute migraine medication adherence on migraine disability and acute medication satisfaction. Methods Adults with migraine completed three months of daily electronic diaries assessing headache symptoms, acute medication taken, acute medication satisfaction, and daily migraine disability. Repeated measures mixed-effects models examined the effect of initial medication type [migraine-specific medication (MSM) vs. over-the-counter analgesic (OTC) vs. an opiate/barbiturate], the severity of pain at dosing, and their interaction with daily migraine disability and satisfaction with acute medication. Results Participants (N = 337; 92.5% female; 91.1% Caucasian, non-Hispanic; 84.0% with episodic migraine) recorded 29,722 diary days. Participants took acute medication on 96.5% of 8090 migraine days. MSM was most frequently taken first (58%), followed by OTC (29.9%) and an opiate/barbiturate (12.1%). Acute medication was most frequently taken when pain was mild (41.2%), followed by moderate (37.7%) and severe pain (11.4%). Initially dosing with MSM while pain was mild was associated with the lowest daily disability [medication × pain at dosing F (4, 6336.12) = 58.73, p migraine disability and highest acute medication satisfaction.

  10. IASM: Individualized activity space modeler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanzadeh, Kamyar

    2018-01-01

    Researchers from various disciplines have long been interested in analyzing and describing human mobility patterns. Activity space (AS), defined as an area encapsulating daily human mobility and activities, has been at the center of this interest. However, given the applied nature of research in this field and the complexity that advanced geographical modeling can pose to its users, the proposed models remain simplistic and inaccurate in many cases. Individualized Activity Space Modeler (IASM) is a geographic information system (GIS) toolbox, written in Python programming language using ESRI's Arcpy module, comprising four tools aiming to facilitate the use of advanced activity space models in empirical research. IASM provides individual-based and context-sensitive tools to estimate home range distances, delineate activity spaces, and model place exposures using individualized geographical data. In this paper, we describe the design and functionality of IASM, and provide an example of how it performs on a spatial dataset collected through an online map-based survey.

  11. Outpatient Combined Group and Individual Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment for Patients With Migraine and Tension-Type Headache in a Routine Clinical Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Sandra; Jürgens, Tim P; Klinger, Regine

    2015-09-01

    To test the long-term clinical effectiveness (follow-up at 3, 6 and 12 months) of an outpatient combined group and individual cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) for headache patients following standard medical care. A decrease in headache intensity, frequency, headache-specific impairment, depression, and change of pain-related cognitions was expected. The efficacy of CBT for primary headaches has been confirmed in research, yet the translation into clinical practice has remained untested thus far. In this single-group outcome study, 87 headache patients diagnosed with migraine and/or tension-type headache received (1) headache-specific medication for 10 weeks and (2) a subsequent CBT treatment made up of 13 individual and 12 group sessions consisting of psychoeducation, progressive muscle relaxation, coping strategies for pain and stress, and goal setting skills. Booster group sessions after 3 and 6 months were implemented to stimulate individual goal attainment, and follow-up measures were recorded up to 12 months. A significant decrease was found for all primary and secondary outcome criteria, ie, average headache intensity (prae M: 6.0, standard deviation [SD]: 1.5 vs follow-up [FU] 1 year M: 5.1, SD: 1.9), headache frequency (prae M: 16.0, SD: 9.5 vs FU 1 year M: 13.4, SD: 9.9), and catastrophizing (prae M: 3.4, SD: 1.0 vs FU 1 year M: 2.6, SD: 1.1). Coping strategies were increased (prae M: 3.4, SD: .9 vs FU 1 year M: 4.0, SD: 1.0). CBT treatment is a useful component within a routine clinical setting and can improve standard medical care thereby helping patients in managing their headache pain. © 2015 American Headache Society.

  12. Molecular factors in migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalska, Marta; Prendecki, Michał; Kozubski, Wojciech; Lianeri, Margarita; Dorszewska, Jolanta

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is a common neurological disorder that affects 11% of adults worldwide. This disease most likely has a neurovascular origin. Migraine with aura (MA) and more common form - migraine without aura (MO) – are the two main clinical subtypes of disease. The exact pathomechanism of migraine is still unknown, but it is thought that both genetic and environmental factors are involved in this pathological process. The first genetic studies of migraine were focused on the rare subtype of MA: familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM). The genes analysed in familial and sporadic migraine are: MTHFR, KCNK18, HCRTR1, SLC6A4, STX1A, GRIA1 and GRIA3. It is possible that migraine is a multifactorial disease with polygenic influence. Recent studies have shown that the pathomechanisms of migraine involves both factors responsible for immune response and oxidative stress such as: cytokines, tyrosine metabolism, homocysteine; and factors associated with pain transmission and emotions e.g.: serotonin, hypocretin-1, calcitonin gene-related peptide, glutamate. The correlations between genetic variants of the HCRTR1 gene, the polymorphism 5-HTTLPR and hypocretin-1, and serotonin were observed. It is known that serotonin inhibits the activity of hypocretin neurons and may affect the appearance of the aura during migraine attack. The understanding of the molecular mechanisms of migraine, including genotype-phenotype correlations, may contribute to finding markers important for the diagnosis and treatment of this disease. PMID:27191890

  13. Premonitory symptoms in migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurell, Katarina; Artto, Ville; Bendtsen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To describe the frequency and number of premonitory symptoms (PS) in migraine, the co-occurrence of different PS, and their association with migraine-related factors. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, a validated questionnaire was sent to Finnish migraine families between 2002 and 2013...... to obtain data on 14 predefined PS, migraine diagnoses, demographic factors, and migraine characteristics. The estimated response rate was 80%. RESULTS: Out of 2714 persons, 2223 were diagnosed with migraine. Among these, 77% reported PS, with a mean number of 3.0 symptoms compared to 30% (p ....5 symptoms (p migraine headaches. Yawning was the most commonly reported symptom (34%) among migraineurs. Females reported PS more frequently than males (81 versus 64%, p 

  14. Effects of Millimeter-Wave Electromagnetic Radiation on the Experimental Model of Migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivachenko, I B; Medvedev, D S; Molodtsova, I D; Panteleev, S S; Sokolov, A Yu; Lyubashina, O A

    2016-02-01

    Effects of millimeter-wave electromagnetic radiation (40 GHz frequency, 0.01 mW power) on the spontaneous fi ring of convergent neurons of the spinal trigeminal nucleus and their responses to electrical stimulation of the dura mater were studied in neurophysiological experiments on rats. Irradiation of the area of cutaneous receptive fields of spinal trigeminal nucleus reversibly inhibited both spontaneous discharges and activity induced by electrical stimulation of the dura mater. The second and third exposures to electromagnetic radiation with an interval of 10 min were ineffective. These results suggest that suppression of neuronal excitability in the spinal trigeminal ganglion can be a mechanism of the anti-migraine effects of electromagnetic radiation observed in clinical practice.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: sporadic hemiplegic migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Sporadic hemiplegic migraine Sporadic hemiplegic migraine Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Sporadic hemiplegic migraine is a rare form of migraine headache. Migraines ...

  16. Rumination in migraine: Mediating effects of brooding and reflection between migraine and psychological distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokonyei, Gyongyi; Szabo, Edina; Kocsel, Natalia; Edes, Andrea; Eszlari, Nora; Pap, Dorottya; Magyar, Mate; Kovacs, David; Zsombok, Terezia; Elliott, Rebecca; Anderson, Ian Muir; William Deakin, John Francis; Bagdy, Gyorgy; Juhasz, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The relationship between migraine and psychological distress has been consistently reported in cross-sectional and longitudinal studies. We hypothesised that a stable tendency to perseverative thoughts such as rumination would mediate the relationship between migraine and psychological distress. Design and Main Outcomes Measures: Self-report questionnaires measuring depressive rumination, current psychological distress and migraine symptoms in two independent European population cohorts, recruited from Budapest (N = 1139) and Manchester (N = 2004), were used. Structural regression analysis within structural equation modelling was applied to test the mediational role of brooding and reflection, the components of rumination, between migraine and psychological distress. Sex, age and lifetime depression were controlled for in the analysis. Results: Migraine predicted higher brooding and reflection scores, and brooding proved to be a mediator between migraine and psychological distress in both samples, while reflection mediated the relationship significantly only in the Budapest sample. Conclusions: Elevated psychological distress in migraine is partially attributed to ruminative response style. Further studies are needed to expand our findings to clinical samples and to examine how rumination links to the adjustment to migraine. PMID:27616579

  17. Variability of clinical features in attacks of migraine with aura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob M; Goadsby, Peter J; Charles, Andrew C

    2016-01-01

    . CONCLUSION: These findings are consistent with variable involvement of different brain regions during a migraine attack. The variable occurrence of nausea, and phonophobia in conjunction with photophobia, both defining features of migraine, may be an important consideration in designing clinical studies......BACKGROUND: There is significant variability in the clinical presentation of migraine, both among patients, and between attacks in an individual patient. We examined clinical features of migraine with aura in a large group of patients enrolled in a clinical trial, and compared retrospective...... a detailed retrospective description of the clinical features of their attacks of migraine. During the trial, clinical symptoms in migraine attacks starting with aura were recorded prospectively in 861 attacks. RESULTS: Retrospectively reported visual aura symptoms were variable and often overlapping...

  18. Magnetic resonance image abnormality in migraine with aura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziegler, D.K.; Batnitzky, S.; Barter, R.; McMillan, J.H. (Kansas Univ., Kansas City, KS (United States). Medical Center)

    1991-07-01

    Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 18 patients with migraine characterized by aura consisting of both visual symtoms and parasthesias. 15 headache-free individuals of the same age range were used as controls. Records were radomized and read in blind fashion by two neuroradiologists. Small subcortical white matter lesions were seen in three migraine cases and two controls. In one migraine case cortical infarctions were seen. In two controls, small areas of increased density similar to those in migraine were seen. No consistent correlation of migraine or its duration with cerebral atrophy was found. It is concluded that identification of both these MRI findings (small subcortical white lesions and cerebral atrophy) as significantly associated with migraine is doubtful. 21 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Magnetic resonance image abnormality in migraine with aura

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, D.K.; Batnitzky, S.; Barter, R.; McMillan, J.H.

    1991-01-01

    Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 18 patients with migraine characterized by aura consisting of both visual symtoms and parasthesias. 15 headache-free individuals of the same age range were used as controls. Records were radomized and read in blind fashion by two neuroradiologists. Small subcortical white matter lesions were seen in three migraine cases and two controls. In one migraine case cortical infarctions were seen. In two controls, small areas of increased density similar to those in migraine were seen. No consistent correlation of migraine or its duration with cerebral atrophy was found. It is concluded that identification of both these MRI findings (small subcortical white lesions and cerebral atrophy) as significantly associated with migraine is doubtful. 21 refs., 2 figs

  20. Morphological Abnormalities of Thalamic Subnuclei in Migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magon, Stefano; May, Arne; Stankewitz, Anne

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: The thalamus contains third-order relay neurons of the trigeminal system, and animal models as well as preliminary imaging studies in small cohorts of migraine patients have suggested a role of the thalamus in headache pathophysiology. However, larger studies using advanced imaging te...... is a disorder of the CNS in which not only is brain function abnormal, but also brain structure is undergoing significant remodeling....... a fully automated multiatlas approach. Deformation-based shape analysis was performed to localize surface abnormalities. Differences between patients with migraine and healthy subjects were assessed using an ANCOVA model. After correction for multiple comparisons, performed using the false discovery rate.......9) was observed in patients. This large-scale study indicates structural thalamic abnormalities in patients with migraine. The thalamic nuclei with abnormal volumes are densely connected to the limbic system. The data hence lend support to the view that higher-order integration systems are altered in migraine...

  1. Migraine and the risk of post-traumatic stress disorder among a cohort of pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Lauren E; Aponte, Christina; Perez Hernandez, Rigoberto; Velez, Juan Carlos; Gelaye, Bizu; Sánchez, Sixto E; Williams, Michelle A; Peterlin, B Lee

    2017-12-01

    Individually both migraine and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) prevalence estimates are higher among women. However, there is limited data on the association of migraine and PTSD in women during pregnancy. We examined the association between migraine and PTSD among women attending prenatal clinics in Peru. Migraine was characterized using the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD)-III beta criteria. PTSD was assessed using the PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version (PCL-C). Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) after adjusting for confounders. Of the 2922 pregnant women included, 33.5% fulfilled criteria for any migraine (migraine 12.5%; probable migraine 21.0%) and 37.4% fulfilled PTSD criteria. Even when controlling for depression, women with any migraine had almost a 2-fold increased odds of PTSD (OR: 1.97; 95% CI: 1.64-2.37) as compared to women without migraine. Specifically, women with migraine alone (i.e. excluding probable migraine) had a 2.85-fold increased odds of PTSD (95% CI: 2.18-3.74), and women with probable migraine alone had a 1.61-fold increased odds of PTSD (95% CI: 1.30-1.99) as compared to those without migraine, even after controlling for depression. In those women with both migraine and comorbid depression, the odds of PTSD in all migraine categories were even further increased as compared to those women without migraine. In a cohort of pregnant women, irrespective of the presence or absence of depression, the odds of PTSD is increased in those with migraine. Our findings suggest the importance of screening for PTSD, specifically in pregnant women with migraine.

  2. Managing migraine by patient profile: role of frovatriptan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cady RK

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Roger K Cady, Kathleen Farmer Headache Care Center, Springfield, MO, USA Abstract: For the last quarter of a century, triptans have been available for acute treatment of migraine but with little guidance on which of the different triptan products to use for which patient or which attack of migraine. In this article, we propose a structured approach to analysis of individual migraine attacks and patient characteristics as a means of defining and optimizing acute intervention. Assessment of patient and attack profiles includes the “5-Ps”: pattern, phenotype, patient, pharmacology, and precipitants. Attending to these five components of information can assist in developing an individualized behavioral, pharmacological, and nonpharmacological comprehensive treatment plan for most migraine patients. This clinical approach is then focused on frovatriptan because of its unique molecular signature and potential novel clinical applications. Frovatriptan like all triptans is indicated for acute treatment of migraine but its role has been explored in management of several unique migraine phenotypes. Frovatriptan has the longest half-life of any triptan and consequently is often promoted for acute treatment of migraine of longer duration. It has also been studied as a short-term preventive treatment in women with menstrual-related migraine. Given that 60% of female migraineurs suffer from menstrual-related migraine, this population is the obvious group for continued study. Small studies have also explored frovatriptan’s use in treating migraine predicted by premonitory symptoms as a preventive for the headache phase of migraine. By identifying patient and attack profiles, clinicians may effectively determine the viability of frovatriptan as an effective pharmacological intervention for migraine. Keywords: frovatriptan, acute treatment, preventive therapy, early intervention

  3. Gender aspects of the relationship between migraine and cardiovascular risk factors: A cross-sectional evaluation in the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulart, Alessandra C; Santos, Itamar S; Lotufo, Paulo A; Benseñor, Isabela M

    2015-10-01

    The relationship between cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) and migraine is controversial and might be different in both genders. These associations were evaluated in Brazilian middle-aged men and women from the Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil). The cross-sectional relationship between our main outcome, which was migraine headache (definite, probable and overall), and CVRF was evaluated in the total sample and according to gender. We calculated frequencies and odds ratios (95% CI) for this relationship using binary and multinomial logistic regression analyses in crude, age-adjusted and multivariable models adjusted by potential confounders. Of 14,953 individuals who completed the data about headache and CVRF, the frequency of one-year migraine was of 29.5% (22.5% in women and 7.0% in men). In the multivariable-adjusted regression analyses, an inverse association between hypertension (OR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.36-0.79), metabolic syndrome (OR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.43-0.99) and definite migraine were confirmed for men, but not for women. In the opposite direction, a positive association between migraine headaches (definite, probable and overall) and dyslipidemia (overall migraine OR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.13-1.38) was observed only for women, but not for men. A gender influence on the relationship between migraine and CVRF was verified in the ELSA-Brasil. © International Headache Society 2015.

  4. Adding Additional Acute Medications to a Triptan Regimen for Migraine and Observed Changes in Headache-Related Disability: Results From the American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention (AMPP) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buse, Dawn C; Serrano, Daniel; Reed, Michael L; Kori, Shashi H; Cunanan, Cedric M; Adams, Aubrey Manack; Lipton, Richard B

    2015-06-01

    their triptan regimen. The study sample (N = 2128) included 111 individuals who added another triptan, 118 who added an opioid or barbiturate, and 69 who added an NSAID, with referent groups of approximately 600 cases in each group who remained consistent. In general, MIDAS scores were higher among those who made changes from one year to the next compared with those who did not make changes in therapy. In fully adjusted models, adding triptans or NSAIDs was associated with increased disability for HFEM/CM cases at follow-up but decreased disability at follow-up for MFEM cases, resulting in significant interaction effects for both adding triptans and NSAIDs, respectively (15.88, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.75, 31.01, 38.52, 95% CI 12.43, 64.61). While the effects of adding vs staying consistent on the outcome of headache-related disability varied by medication type added and headache frequency strata, in general, these results suggest that for individuals with migraine, adding acute therapies to current triptan use is generally not associated with reductions in headache-related disability. The results were strongest among persons with HFEM and CM. These results identify important unmet medical needs in current migraine management, especially among patients with high-frequency migraine, and suggest that alternative treatment strategies are needed to improve patient outcomes. © 2015 American Headache Society.

  5. Understanding Menstrual Migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Anne H

    2018-04-01

    Menstrual-related migraine is very prevalent, very disabling, yet very easy to manage given a good understanding of its cause. This article is intended to help with that understanding and to enable headache specialists to prescribe or create effective hormonal preventives of menstrual-related migraine. © 2018 American Headache Society.

  6. Migraine and brain changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meinders, I.H.

    2018-01-01

    This thesis describes the longitudinal population-based CAMERA-study on the association between migraine and brain changes (e.g. white matter hyperintensities, infarct-like and other lesions) and possible causes and consequences of those brain changes. Women with migraine showed higher incidence of

  7. Patients' preference in migraine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, François (Frans)

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is about migraine. Three elements are discussed. First element is preventive treatment, second element is attack treatment and the third part focuses on medication overuse headache. The preventive treatment of migraine is a valuable intervention in primary care. If preventive treatment

  8. Periodontal disease as a potential factor of migraine chronification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameijeira, Pablo; Leira, Yago; Blanco, Juan; Leira, Rogelio

    2017-05-01

    Migraine is a hereditary constitutional base disorder, which is characterized by recurrent episodes of headache pulsatile characteristics associated with photophobia/phonophobia, nausea and/or vomiting. The main complication in migraine is the chronicity of the process, now recognized as a chronic migraine. Although pathogenic mechanisms that may influence the pathophysiology of migraine and its possible chronicity are not fully understood, previous studies have shown in patients with migraine molecular alterations of systemic inflammation, neurogenic inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, innate immunity, dysfunction of matrix proteases and blood-brain barrier. Periodontal disease is an inflammatory lesion caused by bacteria. After the bacterial infection begins, an immune response that will be responsible for individual susceptibility appears. More advanced forms of periodontitis have demonstrated molecular alterations of inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, dysfunction of matrix proteases and innate immunity, similar to those observed in migraine. Furthermore, the main molecular mediators of neurogenic inflammation related to activation of the trigeminovascular system, which are characteristic of migraine, are overexpressed in gingival crevicular fluid and mucosa in patients with periodontal disease. Hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, insulin resistance, stroke or coronary artery disease are comorbidities that periodontal disease and migraine could share. Therefore, several mechanisms and hypotheses could explain the possible association between both diseases. However, epidemiological and molecular studies will be necessary to provide a better understanding of this potential association, which could be implicated in the chronification of migraine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Osler on migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boes, Christopher J

    2015-03-01

    William Osler's 1892 textbook The Principles and Practice of Medicine became the dominant medical text in the English-speaking world. Osler was labeled a therapeutic nihilist by some. The topic of migraine, including treatment, was succinctly covered in his text. The objectives of this study were to review Osler's thoughts on migraine, and outline his therapeutic recommendations. Preventively Osler mentioned bromides, iron, arsenic, nitroglycerin, and cannabis. Acutely he recommended coffee, chloroform, cannabis, antipyrin, antifebrin, phenacetin, caffeine citrate, nux vomica, or ergot. He thought cannabis was the most satisfactory remedy. Osler was not a therapeutic nihilist when it came to migraine, and his treatment recommendations were similar to other writers of his time. Osler did not draw upon his personal experience to contribute new knowledge about migraine. Regardless, given the popularity and clarity of his text, Osler's well-summarized migraine chapter had a great influence on practicing physicians.

  10. Cerebral hemodynamics in migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hachinski, V C; Olesen, Jes; Norris, J W

    1977-01-01

    Clinical and angiographic findings in migraine are briefly reviewed in relation to cerebral hemodynamic changes shown by regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) studies. Three cases of migraine studied by the intracarotid xenon 133 method during attacks are reported. In classic migraine, with typical...... prodromal symptoms, a decrease in cerebral blood flow has been demonstrated during the aura. Occasionally, this flow decrease persists during the headache phase. In common migraine, where such prodromata are not seen, a flow decrease has not been demonstrated. During the headache phase of both types...... of migraine, rCBF has usually been found to be normal or in the high range of normal values. The high values may represent postischemic hyperemia, but are probably more frequently secondary to arousal caused by pain. Thus, during the headache phase rCBF may be subnormal, normal or high. These findings do...

  11. Why does sleep stop migraine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigal, Marcelo E; Hargreaves, Richard J

    2013-10-01

    The relationship between sleep and migraine headaches is complex. Changes in sleep patterns can trigger migraine attacks, and sleep disorders may be associated with increased migraine frequency. Furthermore, migraine patients and their doctors very consistently report that sleep relieves already established migraine attacks. Herein we will try to answer the question, "Why does sleep stop migraine?" Since evidence for this relationship is largely based on empirical clinical observation, we will not provide a clinical review of the association. Instead, we will focus on the pathophysiology of migraine attacks and its intersections with sleep biology.

  12. Contact lenses, migraine, and allodynia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Bulent Timucin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical trials and electrophysiologic studies demonstrated increased perceptual sensitivity in patients suffering from migraines. At least, one triggering factor is described in 85% of migraine patients. The aim of this report was to investigate the relationship between contact lens (CL usage and migraine attacks in two cases. Two patients who were diagnosed with migraine reported that the frequency of migraine attacks increased after they switched to using CL with different base curves (BCs. These two patients, who began using CL with different BCs experienced discomfort and dryness of the eye. The ocular complaints were followed by migraine attacks. CL intolerance was also developed during migraine attack in one of the cases. The frequency of migraine attacks decreased and allodynia relieved significantly when flatter BCs were selected. CL related stimulus could have triggered the migraine attack. CLs should be well fitted in migraine patients with allodynia.

  13. Migraine generator network and spreading depression dynamics as neuromodulation targets in episodic migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlem, Markus A.

    2013-12-01

    Migraine is a common disabling headache disorder characterized by recurrent episodes sometimes preceded or accompanied by focal neurological symptoms called aura. The relation between two subtypes, migraine without aura (MWoA) and migraine with aura (MWA), is explored with the aim to identify targets for neuromodulation techniques. To this end, a dynamically regulated control system is schematically reduced to a network of the trigeminal nerve, which innervates the cranial circulation, an associated descending modulatory network of brainstem nuclei, and parasympathetic vasomotor efferents. This extends the idea of a migraine generator region in the brainstem to a larger network and is still simple and explicit enough to open up possibilities for mathematical modeling in the future. In this study, it is suggested that the migraine generator network (MGN) is driven and may therefore respond differently to different spatio-temporal noxious input in the migraine subtypes MWA and MWoA. The noxious input is caused by a cortical perturbation of homeostasis, known as spreading depression (SD). The MGN might even trigger SD in the first place by a failure in vasomotor control. As a consequence, migraine is considered as an inherently dynamical disease to which a linear course from upstream to downstream events would not do justice. Minimally invasive and noninvasive neuromodulation techniques are briefly reviewed and their rational is discussed in the context of the proposed mechanism.

  14. Andrographis Paniculata shows anti-nociceptive effects in an animal model of sensory hypersensitivity associated with migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Rosaria; Siani, Francesca; Demartini, Chiara; Zanaboni, Annamaria; Nappi, Giuseppe; Davinelli, Sergio; Scapagnini, Giovanni; Tassorelli, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Administration of nitroglycerin (NTG) to rats induces a hyperalgesic condition and neuronal activation of central structures involved in migraine pain. In order to identify therapeutic strategies for migraine pain, we evaluated the anti-nociceptive activity of Andrographis Paniculata (AP), a herbaceous plant, in the hyperalgesia induced by NTG administration in the formalin test. We also analyzed mRNA expression of cytokines in specific brain areas after AP treatment. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were pre-treated with AP extract 30 minutes before NTG or vehicle injection. The data show that AP extract significantly reduced NTG-induced hyperalgesia in phase II of the test, 4 hours after NTG injection. In addition, AP extract reduced IL-6 mRNA expression in the medulla and mesencephalon and also mRNA levels of TNFalpha in the mesencephalic region. These findings suggest that AP extract may be a potential therapeutic approach in the treatment of general pain, and possibly of migraine.

  15. Multilocus analysis reveals three candidate genes for Chinese migraine susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, X-K; Fang, J; Yu, Z-Z; Lin, Q; Lu, C-X; Qu, H-L; Ma, Q-L

    2017-08-01

    Several genome-wide association studies (GWASs) in Caucasian populations have identified 12 loci that are significantly associated with migraine. More evidence suggests that serotonin receptors are also involved in migraine pathophysiology. In the present study, a case-control study was conducted in a cohort of 581 migraine cases and 533 ethnically matched controls among a Chinese population. Eighteen polymorphisms from serotonin receptors and GWASs were selected, and genotyping was performed using a Sequenom MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry iPLEX platform. The genotypic and allelic distributions of MEF2D rs2274316 and ASTN2 rs6478241 were significantly different between migraine patients and controls. Univariate and multivariate analysis revealed significant associations of polymorphisms in the MEF2D and ASTN2 genes with migraine susceptibility. MEF2D, PRDM16 and ASTN2 were also found to be associated with migraine without aura (MO) and migraine with family history. And, MEF2D and ASTN2 also served as genetic risk factors for the migraine without family history. The generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis identified that MEF2D and HTR2E constituted the two-factor interaction model. Our study suggests that the MEF2D, PRDM16 and ASTN2 genes from GWAS are associated with migraine susceptibility, especially MO, among Chinese patients. It appears that there is no association with serotonin receptor related genes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Behavioural management of migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Helen; Newman, Craig; Noad, Rupert; Weatherby, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    It is important to recognise that migraine is a ‘biological’ and not a ‘psychological’ entity. However, psychological factors can be involved in migraine in 4 different ways:- 1) Migraines can be triggered by psychological stressors; 2) Severe migraine can itself be a cause of significant psychological stress which can, in turn, exacerbate the problem; 3) Even if psychological stress is not significantly involved in the genesis of the headache, pain management techniques can help people cope with their pain more effectively; 4) Longitudinal data demonstrate a complex bidirectional association between mood disorders and migraine. Treatment of a co-existing mood disorder, for example with cognitive behavioural techniques, may therefore reduce the impact of migraine. It would thus appear logical to view medical and psychological approaches as potentially synergistic rather than mutually exclusive. Functional imaging indicates that cognition, emotions, and pain experiences change the way the brain processes pain inputs. This may provide a physiological rationale for psychological interventions in pain management. As most studies of psychological management of migraine have been relatively small and the approach often varies between clinicians, the magnitude of benefit, optimum method of delivery, and the length of intervention are uncertain. PMID:23024569

  17. Behavioural management of migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Brown

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is important to recognise that migraine is a ′biological′ and not a ′psychological′ entity. However, psychological factors can be involved in migraine in 4 different ways:- 1 Migraines can be triggered by psychological stressors; 2 Severe migraine can itself be a cause of significant psychological stress which can, in turn, exacerbate the problem; 3 Even if psychological stress is not significantly involved in the genesis of the headache, pain management techniques can help people cope with their pain more effectively; 4 Longitudinal data demonstrate a complex bidirectional association between mood disorders and migraine. Treatment of a co-existing mood disorder, for example with cognitive behavioural techniques, may therefore reduce the impact of migraine. It would thus appear logical to view medical and psychological approaches as potentially synergistic rather than mutually exclusive. Functional imaging indicates that cognition, emotions, and pain experiences change the way the brain processes pain inputs. This may provide a physiological rationale for psychological interventions in pain management. As most studies of psychological management of migraine have been relatively small and the approach often varies between clinicians, the magnitude of benefit, optimum method of delivery, and the length of intervention are uncertain.

  18. Migraine induced by hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arngrim, Nanna; Schytz, Henrik Winther; Britze, Josefine

    2016-01-01

    in the visual cortex were measured by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The circumference of cranial arteries was measured by 3 T high-resolution magnetic resonance angiography. Hypoxia induced migraine-like attacks in eight patients compared to one patient after sham (P = 0.039), aura in three...... and possible aura in 4 of 15 patients. Hypoxia did not change glutamate concentration in the visual cortex compared to sham, but increased lactate concentration (P = 0.028) and circumference of the cranial arteries (P ... suggests that hypoxia may provoke migraine headache and aura symptoms in some patients. The mechanisms behind the migraine-inducing effect of hypoxia should be further investigated....

  19. Frequency of Migraine as a Chief Complaint in Otolaryngology Outpatient Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad Ali, Maria; Al Zayer, Maha

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To identify the frequency of typical (headache and dizziness) and common atypical (ear fullness, pressure, pain, tinnitus, facial fullness, and nasal congestion) migraine symptoms as chief complaints among patients presenting to otolaryngology clinic. Methods. This is a descriptive study of prospectively collected data from a general otolaryngology practice. Typical migraine presentations were diagnosed by applying international headache society (IHS) criteria for migraine headache and Neuhauser's criteria for migrainous vertigo. Atypical otologic and rhinologic migraine symptoms were diagnosed using individualized criteria. Charts were reviewed at 6-month interval from the first presentation. Results. Out of 1002 consecutive patients, 10.8% presented with “migrainous chief complaint.” All migrainous chief complaint patients had a history of headache but not all of them presented with headache. Corrected female to male ratio in the migraine group was 3 to 1; age distributions were significantly different between the migraine and nonmigraine groups by applying t-test. Out of the atypical complaints, 86% of the patients had a history of concomitant typical presentation. Conclusion. Actual diagnostic criteria for migraine do not satisfy the diversity of its presentation. Investigating the history of migraine is enough to diagnose most atypical presentations. Sound knowledge about migraine seems essential for any ENT practitioner. PMID:25695049

  20. The prophylactic effect of valproate on glyceryltrinitrate induced migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedskov, Jesper Filtenborg; Thomsen, L L; Iversen, H K

    2004-01-01

    In this study the human glyceryltrinitrate (GTN) model of migraine was for the first time used to test the effect of a prophylactic drug. We chose to test valproate due to its well documented effect as a migraine prophylactic drug. Efficacy of this compound would support the usefulness of the mod...

  1. The migraine postdrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giffin, Nicola J; Lipton, Richard B; Silberstein, Stephen D

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To report migraine postdrome symptoms in patients who report nonheadache symptoms as part of their attacks. METHODS: A prospective daily electronic diary study was conducted over 3 months in 120 patients with migraine. Nonheadache symptoms before, during, and after headache were...... pain resolved. There was no relationship between medication taken for the headache and the duration of the postdrome. The severity of the migraine was not associated with the duration of the postdrome. Overall state of health scores remained low during the postdrome. CONCLUSION: Nonheadache symptoms...... in the postdrome were common and may contribute to the distress and disability in the patients studied. Postdrome symptoms merit larger observational studies and careful recording in clinical trials of acute and preventive migraine treatments....

  2. The migraine postdrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giffin, Nicola J.; Lipton, Richard B; Silberstein, Stephen D

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To report migraine postdrome symptoms in patients who report nonheadache symptoms as part of their attacks.  Methods: A prospective daily electronic diary study was conducted over 3 months in 120 patients with migraine. Nonheadache symptoms before, during, and after headache were...... pain resolved. There was no relationship between medication taken for the headache and the duration of the postdrome. The severity of the migraine was not associated with the duration of the postdrome. Overall state of health scores remained low during the postdrome.  Conclusion: Nonheadache symptoms...... in the postdrome were common and may contribute to the distress and disability in the patients studied. Postdrome symptoms merit larger observational studies and careful recording in clinical trials of acute and preventive migraine treatments....

  3. Reduction in perceived stress as a migraine trigger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipton, Richard B.; Hall, Charles B.; Tennen, Howard; DeFreitas, Tiffani A.; Borkowski, Thomas M.; Grosberg, Brian M.; Haut, Sheryl R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To test whether level of perceived stress and reductions in levels of perceived stress (i.e., “let-down”) are associated with the onset of migraine attacks in persons with migraine. Methods: Patients with migraine from a tertiary headache center were invited to participate in a 3-month electronic diary study. Participants entered data daily regarding migraine attack experience, subjective stress ratings, and other data. Stress was assessed using 2 measures: the Perceived Stress Scale and the Self-Reported Stress Scale. Logit-normal, random-effects models were used to estimate the odds ratio for migraine occurrence as a function of level of stress over several time frames. Results: Of 22 enrolled participants, 17 (median age 43.8 years) completed >30 days of diaries, yielding 2,011 diary entries including 110 eligible migraine attacks (median 5 attacks per person). Level of stress was not generally associated with migraine occurrence. However, decline in stress from one evening diary to the next was associated with increased migraine onset over the subsequent 6, 12, and 18 hours, with odds ratios ranging from 1.5 to 1.9 (all p values < 0.05) for the Perceived Stress Scale. Decline in stress was associated with migraine onset after controlling for level of stress for all time points. Findings were similar using the Self-Reported Stress Scale. Conclusions: Reduction in stress from one day to the next is associated with migraine onset the next day. Decline in stress may be a marker for an impending migraine attack and may create opportunities for preemptive pharmacologic or behavioral interventions. PMID:24670889

  4. Importance of Pain Acceptance in Relation to Headache Disability and Pain Interference in Women With Migraine and Overweight/Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillis, Jason; Graham Thomas, J; Seng, Elizabeth K; Lipton, Richard B; Pavlović, Jelena M; Rathier, Lucille; Roth, Julie; O'Leary, Kevin C; Bond, Dale S

    2017-05-01

    Pain acceptance involves willingness to experience pain and engaging in valued activities while pain is present. Though pain acceptance could limit both headache-related disability and pain interference in individuals with migraine, few studies have addressed this issue. This study evaluated whether higher levels of total pain acceptance and its two subcomponents, pain willingness and activity engagement, were associated with lower levels of headache-related impairment in women who had both migraine and overweight/obesity. In this cross-sectional study, participants seeking weight loss and headache relief in the Women's Health and Migraine trial completed baseline measures of pain acceptance (Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire [CPAQ]), headache-related disability (Headache Impact Test-6), and pain interference (Brief Pain Inventory). Migraine headache frequency and pain intensity were assessed daily via smartphone diary. Using CPAQ total and subcomponent (pain willingness and activity engagement) scores, headache frequency, pain intensity, and body mass index (BMI) as predictors in linear regression, headache-related disability, and pain interference were modeled as outcomes. On average, participants (n = 126; age = 38.5 ± 8.2 years; BMI = 35.3 ± 6.6 kg/m 2 ) reported 8.4 ± 4.7 migraine days/month and pain intensity of 6.0 ± 1.5 on a 0-10 scale on headache days. After correcting for multiple comparisons (adjusted α = .008), pain willingness was independently associated with both lower headache-related disability (P treatment-seeking women with migraine and overweight/obesity. Future studies are needed to clarify direction of causality and test whether strategies designed to help women increase pain willingness, or relinquish ineffective efforts to control pain, can improve functional outcomes in women who have migraine and overweight/obesity. © 2017 American Headache Society.

  5. Odors as triggering and worsening factors for migraine in men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A M Lima

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the role of odors in triggering or worsening migraine in men. METHOD: Ninety-eight male migraineurs from the general population were assessed individually through questionnaires. Environmental factors relating to their migraine were reported, with special focus on the role of odors. RESULTS: Odors were the second most frequent triggering factor for migraine attacks (48%, behind stressful situations (59%. Likewise, odors were the second most frequent worsening factor (73%, just behind excessive light (74%. Thirty-three individuals (33.4% stated that odors were both triggering and worsening factors for their migraine attacks. Perfume, cigarette smoke and cleaning products were the most frequent migraine-related odors reported by these male migraineurs. CONCLUSION: This was the first study to assess the role of odors in migraine exclusively in men. There was a high degree of odor-related migraine among these men, thus suggesting that patient education could alert such individuals to gender-related factors, since different triggering and worsening factors have been reported by males and females.

  6. Commonly Used Acute Migraine Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... impact during MHAM What is Migraine and Headache Awareness Month? June is Migraine and Headache Awareness Month, ... approved last week, which is called erenumab, the brand name of which is Aimovig, is a monoclonal ...

  7. Sphenopalatine ganglion neuromodulation in migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Sabrina; Schoenen, Jean; Ashina, Messoud

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this article is to review the prospect of treating migraine with sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) neurostimulation. BACKGROUND: Fuelled by preliminary studies showing a beneficial effect in cluster headache patients, the potential of treating migraine with neurostimulation...

  8. Direct and Indirect Healthcare Resource Utilization and Costs Among Migraine Patients in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonafede, Machaon; Sapra, Sandhya; Shah, Neel; Tepper, Stewart; Cappell, Katherine; Desai, Pooja

    2018-05-01

    clinical characteristics. A second analysis, conducted among the migraine patients only, compared the odds of having a short-term disability claim between (1) patients treated with acute or preventive migraine medications only during the baseline period and patients with no migraine treatment during baseline and (2) patients treated with both acute and preventive migraine medications during the baseline period and patients with no migraine treatment during baseline, after controlling for patient demographic and clinical characteristics. Migraine patients had total annual direct plus indirect costs that were $8924 (in 2014 United States dollars) higher than those of demographically similar individuals without evidence of migraine. Migraine patients' mean annual direct all-cause healthcare costs were $6575 higher than those of matched patients without migraine ($11,010 [standard deviation = $19,663] vs $4436 [standard deviation=$13,081]; P costs were $2350 higher in the migraine cohort than in the matched no migraine patients ($11,294 vs $8945. Migraine patients were 2.0 times more likely as their nonmigraine counterparts to use opioids (45.5% vs 21.9%; P cost burden in the United States. Compared to matched nonmigraine patients, migraine patients were more likely to have work loss and longer periods of work loss, leading to significantly higher indirect costs. Migraine patients also had higher levels of healthcare utilization, despite the relatively stable prevalence of migraine and the available acute and preventive treatment options for migraine management. © 2018 American Headache Society.

  9. Understanding migraine and psychiatric comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seng, Elizabeth K; Seng, Cynthia D

    2016-06-01

    This article describes recent trends in our understanding of the role of psychiatric disorders in the experience and treatment of migraine, and the role of migraine in the experience and treatment of psychiatric disorders. Although the majority of studies evaluating psychiatric comorbidity in migraine have focused on depression, anxiety, and bipolar disorders are highly associated with migraine and relevant for prognosis and treatment planning. Comorbid psychiatric disorders may be associated with poorer treatment response for some acute pharmacotherapies; however, people with comorbid migraine and mood or anxiety disorders can achieve large responses to preventive pharmacologic and behavioral therapies. Emerging research is developing and evaluating behavioral treatments designed to manage cooccurring migraine and mood or anxiety disorders. Stigma related to psychiatric disorders has been well characterized, and could exacerbate extant migraine-related stigma. Anxiety and mood disorders are prevalent in people with migraine, although not ubiquitous. Psychiatric comorbidity is associated with greater migraine symptoms and disability; however, people with comorbid depression or anxiety are amenable to preventive migraine treatment. Research regarding migraine treatment strategies optimized for people with comorbid psychiatric disorders is critical to advancing care and reducing stigma for this important subpopulation of people with migraine.

  10. Low levels of serum serotonin and amino acids identified in migraine patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Caixia; Liu, Jia; Zhou, Juntuo; Liang, Hui; Wang, Yayun; Sun, Yinping; Ma, Bin; Yin, Yuxin

    2018-02-05

    Migraine is a highly disabling primary headache associated with a high socioeconomic burden and a generally high prevalence. The clinical management of migraine remains a challenge. This study was undertaken to identify potential serum biomarkers of migraine. Using Liquid Chromatography coupled to Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS), the metabolomic profile of migraine was compared with healthy individuals. Principal component analysis (PCA) and Orthogonal partial least squares-discriminant analysis (orthoPLS-DA) showed the metabolomic profile of migraine is distinguishable from controls. Volcano plot analysis identified 10 serum metabolites significantly decreased during migraine. One of these was serotonin, and the other 9 were amino acids. Pathway analysis and enrichment analysis showed tryptophan metabolism (serotonin metabolism), arginine and proline metabolism, and aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis are the three most prominently altered pathways in migraine. ROC curve analysis indicated Glycyl-l-proline, N-Methyl-dl-Alanine and l-Methionine are potential sensitive and specific biomarkers for migraine. Our results show Glycyl-l-proline, N-Methyl-dl-Alanine and l-Methionine may be as specific or more specific for migraine than serotonin which is the traditional biomarker of migraine. We propose that therapeutic manipulation of these metabolites or metabolic pathways may be helpful in the prevention and treatment of migraine. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Migraine - Prophylactic Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chowdhury Debashish

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Preventive therapy in migraine constitutes an important aspect of migraine management especially in patients who are not controlled or have significant disability despite taking drugs for acute management. In spite of te recent advances in understanding of the pathophysiology of migraine, the mechanisms of action of many preventive drugs are largely unknown. Further, these provide only about 50% reduction in frequency in about 2/3rds of migraine sufferers. Hence, risk-benefit ratio must be considered while prescribing these agents. Recent efforts to undertake large-scale meta-analysis to assess the efficacy of these agents have been rewarding and consensus guidelines have evolved. Propanolol, metoprolol, amitriptyline, sodium valproate, flunarizine and lisuride have emerged as first line drugs. The role of newer anti-convulsants and botox injections in refractory cases are being investigated. Availability, co-morbidities, medical contraindications, concomitant acute therapy and costs are important determinants for choosing a particular agent. This article reviews the guidelines to be followed in choosing the prophylactic treatment options for migraine.

  12. Neurotrophins and Migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, L B; Teixeira, A L; Domingues, R B

    2017-01-01

    Neurotrophins (NTs) have been implicated in generation and modulation of nociceptive pathways. Change in NTs levels is associated with painful conditions and neurological diseases such as migraine. Currently, it is generally recognized that migraine headaches result from the activation and sensitization of trigeminal sensory afferent fibers leading to neuropeptides release such as calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP). This triggers an inflammatory cascade causing a neurogenic inflammation. The agents responsible for trigeminal activation and release of neuropeptides are still unclear. It is known that the transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor-1 (TRPV1) is an important mediator of CGRP and SP release. TRPV1 is closely associated with tyrosine receptors kinases (Trk), which are NTs receptors. NTs can act on TRPV1 increasing its sensitivity to painful stimuli, therefore predisposing to hyperalgesia. Upregulation of ion channels and pain receptors in dorsal root ganglion neurons may be alternative mechanisms by which NTs contribute to pain development. Only a few studies have been performed to investigate the role of NTs in migraine. These studies have reported changes in NTs levels in migraine patients either during the migraine attack or in free-headache periods. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Preventive Migraine Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberstein, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review: This article reviews the evidence base for the preventive treatment of migraine. Recent Findings: Evidence-based guidelines for the preventive treatment of migraine have recently been published by the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) and the Canadian Headache Society (CHS), providing valuable guidance for clinicians. Strong evidence exists to support the use of metoprolol, timolol, propranolol, divalproex sodium, sodium valproate, and topiramate for migraine prevention, according to the AAN. Based on best available evidence, adverse event profile, and expert consensus, topiramate, propranolol, nadolol, metoprolol, amitriptyline, gabapentin, candesartan, Petasites (butterbur), riboflavin, coenzyme Q10, and magnesium citrate received a strong recommendation for use from the CHS. Summary: Migraine preventive drug treatments are underutilized in clinical practice. Principles of preventive treatment are important to improve compliance, minimize side effects, and improve patient outcomes. Choice of preventive treatment of migraine should be based on the presence of comorbid and coexistent illness, patient preference, reproductive potential and planning, and best available evidence. PMID:26252585

  14. Migraine, Osmophobia, and Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha-Filho, Pedro Augusto Sampaio; Marques, Karine Sobral; Torres, Rinailda Cascia Santos; Leal, Kamila Nazare Ribas

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the association between osmophobia and the characteristics of patients and their headaches, among migraine patients. This was a cross-sectional study. Patients who consecutively sought medical attendance in a primary care unit were asked about their headaches over the last 12 months. Those who had migraine were included. A semi-structured interview, the Headache Impact Test and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were used. 147 patients had migraine; 78 had osmophobia; 60 had significant anxiety symptoms; and 78 had significant depression symptoms. The mean age of these patients was 43.2 years (± 13.7); 91.2% were women. The mean length of time with complaints of headache was 13.8 years (± 12). Among the migraine patients, those with anxiety, more years of headache history, and phonophobia presented significantly more osmophobia (multivariate logistic regression). Osmophobia in migraine patients is associated with significant anxiety symptoms, length of headache history, and phonophobia. © 2015 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Dipyridamole may induce migraine in patients with migraine without aura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruuse, C; Lassen, L H; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg

    2006-01-01

    Dipyridamole inhibits phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) and adenosine re-uptake. The most prominent side-effect is headache. We examined the migraine-generating effects of dipyridamole as well as the cerebral blood velocity response in a single-blind study, including 10 patients with migraine without aura...... repeatedly. Headache was induced in all migraine patients and in eight of 10 healthy subjects (P = 0.47) with no significant difference in headache intensity (P = 0.53). However, five patients but only one healthy subject experienced the symptoms of migraine without aura, according to ICHD-2 criteria, within....... Thus, dipyridamole induces symptoms of migraine and an initial decrease in V(mca) in migraine patients, but not significantly more than in healthy subjects. This relatively low frequency of migraine induction, compared with nitric oxide donors and sildenafil, is probably due to the less specific action...

  16. Migraine and risk of hemorrhagic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaist, David; González-Pérez, Antonio; Ashina, Messoud

    2014-01-01

    to select 10,000 controls free from hemorrhagic stroke. Using unconditional logistic regression models, we calculated the risk of hemorrhagic stroke associated with migraine, adjusting for age, sex, calendar year, alcohol, body mass index, hypertension, previous cerebrovascular disease, oral contraceptive......BACKGROUND: We investigated the association between hemorrhagic stroke and migraine using data from The Health Improvement Network database. FINDINGS: We ascertained 1,797 incident cases of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and 1,340 of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Density-based sampling was used...

  17. Modelling individual difference in visual categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jianhong; Palmeri, Thomas J

    Recent years has seen growing interest in understanding, characterizing, and explaining individual differences in visual cognition. We focus here on individual differences in visual categorization. Categorization is the fundamental visual ability to group different objects together as the same kind of thing. Research on visual categorization and category learning has been significantly informed by computational modeling, so our review will focus both on how formal models of visual categorization have captured individual differences and how individual difference have informed the development of formal models. We first examine the potential sources of individual differences in leading models of visual categorization, providing a brief review of a range of different models. We then describe several examples of how computational models have captured individual differences in visual categorization. This review also provides a bit of an historical perspective, starting with models that predicted no individual differences, to those that captured group differences, to those that predict true individual differences, and to more recent hierarchical approaches that can simultaneously capture both group and individual differences in visual categorization. Via this selective review, we see how considerations of individual differences can lead to important theoretical insights into how people visually categorize objects in the world around them. We also consider new directions for work examining individual differences in visual categorization.

  18. The Impact of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder on the Burden of Migraine: Results From the National Comorbidity Survey-Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Aruna S; Scher, Ann I; Vieira, Rebeca V A; Merikangas, Kathleen R; Metti, Andrea L; Peterlin, B Lee

    2015-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been linked with migraine in prior studies. To evaluate the individual and joint burdens of migraine and PTSD in a population-based cohort. The National Comorbidity Survey-Replication (NCS-R) is a general population study conducted in the United States from February 2001-April 2003. PTSD and migraine were assessed, and four groups defined based on their migraine and PTSD status. The four groups included those with no migraine and no PTSD (controls, n=4535), those with migraine and without PTSD (migraine alone, n=236), those with PTSD and without migraine (PTSD alone, n=244), and those with both migraine and PTSD (mig+PTSD, n=68). Logistic and Poisson regression models were used to assess the association between dichotomous/multilevel outcome variables indicating financial, health, and interpersonal burdens and each migraine/PTSD group. Compared to controls, those with Mig+PTSD were more likely to be in the low poverty index (48% vs 41%, AOR 2.16; CI: 1.10, 4.24) and were less likely to be working for pay or profit in the past week (50% vs 68%, AOR 0.42; CI: 0.24, 0.74) but not those with migraine or PTSD alone. Additionally, the number of days where work quality was cut due to physical or mental health or substance abuse in the past month was greater in all groups compared to controls: (1) migraine alone: mean 2.57 (SEM 0.32) vs mean 1.09 (SEM 0.08) days, ARR=2.39; CI: 2.19, 2.62; (2) PTSD alone: mean 2.43 (SEM 0.33) vs mean 1.09 (SEM 0.08) days, ARR=2.09; CI: 1.91, 2.29; (3) mig+PTSD: mean 8.2 (SEM 0.79) vs 1.09 (SEM 0.08) days, ARR 6.79; CI 6.16, 7.49; and was over 2.5-fold greater in those mig+PTSD than migraine alone (mean 8.0 [SEM 0.79] vs 2.6 days [SEM 0.72], ARR 2.77; CI: 2.45, 3.14). The likelihood of having difficulty getting along or maintaining a social life was also increased in all groups relative to controls: (1) migraine alone: 21% vs 5.4%, AOR 4.20; CI: 2.62, 6.74; (2) PTSD alone: 18% vs 5.4%, AOR 3.40; CI

  19. Emerging Role of (EndoCannabinoids in Migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinja Leimuranta

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In this mini-review, we summarize recent discoveries and present new hypotheses on the role of cannabinoids in controlling trigeminal nociceptive system underlying migraine pain. Individual sections of this review cover key aspects of this topic, such as: (i the current knowledge on the endocannabinoid system (ECS with emphasis on expression of its components in migraine related structures; (ii distinguishing peripheral from central site of action of cannabinoids, (iii proposed mechanisms of migraine pain and control of nociceptive traffic by cannabinoids at the level of meninges and in brainstem, (iv therapeutic targeting in migraine of monoacylglycerol lipase and fatty acid amide hydrolase, enzymes which control the level of endocannabinoids; (v dual (possibly opposing actions of cannabinoids via anti-nociceptive CB1 and CB2 and pro-nociceptive TRPV1 receptors. We explore the cannabinoid-mediated mechanisms in the frame of the Clinical Endocannabinoid Deficiency (CECD hypothesis, which implies reduced tone of endocannabinoids in migraine patients. We further discuss the control of cortical excitability by cannabinoids via inhibition of cortical spreading depression (CSD underlying the migraine aura. Finally, we present our view on perspectives of Cannabis-derived (extracted or synthetized marijuana components or novel endocannabinoid therapeutics in migraine treatment.

  20. Migraine and pregnancy: an internet survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allais, Gianni; Rolando, Sara; De Lorenzo, Cristina; Manzoni, Gian Camillo; Messina, Paolo; Benedetto, Chiara; d'Onofrio, Florindo; Bonavita, Vincenzo; Bussone, Gennaro

    2013-05-01

    Data in the literature show that migraine tends to improve during pregnancy in most migrainous women. The aim of this Internet survey was to obtain the most likely cross section of the situation in the general population with respect to the presence and course of migraine in pregnancy. All women who participated were asked to answer questions pertaining to their history of pregnancy and headache. One thousand and eighteen women participated in the survey; only 775 met the eligibility criteria for inclusion. One hundred and ninety-five women (25.2 %) reported having had a headache only before pregnancy, 425 (54.8 %) before and during pregnancy, and 155 (20.0 %) only during pregnancy. Women suffering from headache before and/or during pregnancy were much more likely to have headaches with more migrainous features at the ID Migraine Screener test when compared to women whose headache began during pregnancy. "Definite migraines" were 277/620 (44.7 %) and 26/155 (16.8 %), respectively, in the two groups (p < 0.0001). Among the 620 females that suffered from headache before pregnancy, 375 (60.5 %) improved, 195 (31.5 %) showed complete resolution of the disorder, and 180 (29.0 %) had a reduction in headache frequency. Moreover, the multinomial logistic model (with headache pattern as dependent variable) proved fetal presentation as significant (p = 0.0042). Women with "new headache" (No/Yes pattern) had an OR (95 % CI) of 1.9 (1.2-3.0) of breech presentation at delivery versus those with a stable pattern of headache (Yes/Yes). Finally, women with not recent pregnancy stated they suffered from headache less than the women with recent pregnancy.

  1. What is Migraine? | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Migraine Headaches What is Migraine? Past Issues / Fall 2015 Table of Contents If ... exhausted or weak following a migraine. Who Gets Migraines? Migraines occur in both children and adults, but ...

  2. EQ-5D™-derived utility values for different levels of migraine severity from a UK sample of migraineurs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stafford Megan R

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To estimate utility values for different levels of migraine pain severity from a United Kingdom (UK sample of migraineurs. Methods One hundred and six migraineurs completed the EQ-5D to evaluate their health status for mild, moderate and severe levels of migraine pain severity for a recent migraine attack, and for current health defined as health status within seven days post-migraine attack. Statistical tests were used to evaluate differences in mean utility scores by migraine severity. Results Utility scores for each health state were significantly different from 1.0 (no problems on any EQ-5D dimension (p  Conclusions Results indicate that all levels of migraine pain are associated with significantly reduced utility values. As severity worsened, utility decreased and severe migraine pain was considered a health state worse than death. Results can be used in cost-utility models examining the relative economic value of therapeutic strategies for migraine in the UK.

  3. Migraines: What a Pain!

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals ... the brain drops. So the brain sends a message: "Hey, guys, we need some more ... Because it involves changes in blood vessels, a migraine is a vascular ( ...

  4. Communication issues in migraine diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmeads, John

    2002-06-01

    To examine the importance of good communication when informing the patient of the diagnosis of migraine; to review the essentials of successful communication between physician and patient on the aspect of diagnosis; to survey learning resources for physicians on communicating information to patients. This paper is based on observations made by the author of the successful interactions of numerous international "headache experts" with their patients, on a review of the medical education literature pertaining to the teaching of communication skills, and on 30 years of not always successful communication with patients. Communicating the diagnosis of migraine is an opportunity to educate and reassure the patient, to lay the foundation for rational treatment and to help establish the successful doctor-patient relationship which is essential for effective management. No matter how accurate the diagnosis, failure to communicate it effectively to the patient (and often to significant others) may impair interactions with the patient and compromise therapy. Effective communication of a diagnosis requires clarity, relevance to the patient, a positive attitude, and reinforcement through repetition, questioning and dialogue. In terms of using the diagnosis to lay a foundation for therapy, it is useful to explain the symptoms as transient physical dysfunction of normal tissues, to indicate that there are multiple mechanisms underlying the dysfunction of which only some may presently be susceptible to treatment and to stress the relevance of emotions as factors which may powerfully affect, for better or worse, the underlying disturbed physiology of migraine. Into this model can be "plugged" all the relevant therapies for migraine. This is the ideal, but every day experience in the headache consultant's office suggest that in both primary care and specialist practice, it is infrequently attained. There are scant resources other than example for physicians to learn communication of

  5. Energy Metabolism Impairment in Migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevoli, Sabina; Favoni, Valentina; Cortelli, Pietro

    2018-06-22

    Migraine is a common disabling neurological disorder which is characterised by recurring headache associated with a variety of sensory and autonomic symptoms. The pathophysiology of migraine remains not entirely understood, although many mechanisms involving the central and peripheral nervous system are now becoming clear. In particular, it is widely accepted that migraine is associated with energy metabolic impairment of the brain. The purpose of this review is to present an update overview of the energy metabolism involvement in the migraine pathophysiology. Several biochemical, morphological and magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies have confirmed the presence of energy production deficiency together with an increment of energy consumption in migraine patients. An increment of energy demand over a certain threshold create metabolic and biochemical preconditions for the onset of the migraine attack. The defect of oxidative energy metabolism in migraine is generalized. It remains to be determined if the mitochondrial deficit in migraine is primary or secondary. Riboflavin and Co-Enzyme Q10, both physiologically implicated in mitochondrial respiratory chain functioning, are effective in migraine prophylaxis, supporting the hypothesis that improving brain energy metabolism may reduce the susceptibility to migraine. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. Depression and Anxiety in Migraine Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spotlight On News Content Capsule Contact Understanding Migraine Depression and Anxiety in Migraine Patients Doctor Q&A ... of Headache Disorders Cluster Headache Post-Traumatic Headache Depression and Anxiety in Migraine Patients August 13, 2015 ...

  7. [Is childhood migraine an immature form of adult migraine?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozge, Aynur

    2007-01-01

    Childhood migraine is a common problem among the primary complaints of the pediatric population. But for the general practitioners there are little known about clinical characteristics and management strategies. Headache practitioners commonly notice the age related differences of headache characteristics and management schedules. This paper primarily aimed to answer the question if pediatric migraine is an unmaturated form of adult migraine, by discussing the pathophysiological basis, clinical forms and management strategies.

  8. Patent foramen ovale, ischemic stroke and migraine: systematic review and stratified meta-analysis of association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Daniel; Gregson, John; Willeit, Peter; Stephan, Blossom; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam; Brayne, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Observational data have reported associations between patent foramen ovale (PFO), cryptogenic stroke and migraine. However, randomized trials of PFO closure do not demonstrate a clear benefit either because the underlying association is weaker than previously suggested or because the trials were underpowered. In order to resolve the apparent discrepancy between observational data and randomized trials, we investigated associations between (1) migraine and ischemic stroke, (2) PFO and ischemic stroke, and (3) PFO and migraine. Eligibility criteria were consistent; including all studies with specifically defined exposures and outcomes unrestricted by language. We focused on studies at lowest risk of bias by stratifying analyses based on methodological design and quantified associations using fixed-effects meta-analysis models. We included 37 studies of 7,686 identified. Compared to reports in the literature as a whole, studies with population-based comparators showed weaker associations between migraine with aura and cryptogenic ischemic stroke in younger women (OR 1.4; 95% CI 0.9-2.0; 1 study), PFO and ischemic stroke (HR 1.6; 95 CI 1.0-2.5; 2 studies; OR 1.3; 95% CI 0.9-1.9; 3 studies), or PFO and migraine (OR 1.0; 95% CI 0.6-1.6; 1 study). It was not possible to look for interactions or effect modifiers. These results are limited by sources of bias within individual studies. The overall pairwise associations between PFO, cryptogenic ischemic stroke and migraine do not strongly suggest a causal role for PFO. Ongoing randomized trials of PFO closure may need larger numbers of participants to detect an overall beneficial effect. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Association between migraine and suicidal behavior among Ethiopian adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berhane, Hanna Y; Jamerson-Dowlen, Bethannie; Friedman, Lauren E; Berhane, Yemane; Williams, Michelle A; Gelaye, Bizu

    2018-02-12

    Despite the significant impact of migraine on patients and societies, few studies in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) have investigated the association between migraine and suicidal behavior. The objective of our study is to examine the extent to which migraines are associated with suicidal behavior (including suicidal ideation, plans, and attempts) in a well-characterized study of urban dwelling Ethiopian adults. We enrolled 1060 outpatient adults attending St. Paul hospital in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Standardized questionnaires were used to collect data on socio-demographics, and lifestyle characteristics. Migraine classification was based on the International Classification of Headache Disorders-2 diagnostic criteria. The Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) was used to assess depression and suicidal behaviors (i.e. ideation, plans and attempts). Multivariable logistic regression models were used to estimate adjusted odds ratio (AOR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). The prevalence of suicidal behavior was 15.1%, with a higher suicidal behavior among those who had migraines (61.9%). After adjusting for confounders including substance use and socio-demographic factors, migraine was associated with a 2.7-fold increased odds of suicidal behavior (AOR = 2.7; 95% CI 1.88-3.89). When stratified by their history of depression in the past year, migraine without depression was significantly associated with suicidal behavior (AOR: 2.27, 95% Cl: 1.49-3.46). The odds of suicidal behavior did not reach statistical significance in migraineurs with depression (AOR: 1.64, 95% CI: 0.40-6.69). Our study indicates that migraine is associated with increased odds of suicidal behavior in this population. Given the serious public health implications this has, attention should be given to the treatment and management of migraine at a community level.

  10. Bipolar Affective Disorder and Migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birk Engmann

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper consists of a case history and an overview of the relationship, aetiology, and treatment of comorbid bipolar disorder migraine patients. A MEDLINE literature search was used. Terms for the search were bipolar disorder bipolar depression, mania, migraine, mood stabilizer. Bipolar disorder and migraine cooccur at a relatively high rate. Bipolar II patients seem to have a higher risk of comorbid migraine than bipolar I patients have. The literature on the common roots of migraine and bipolar disorder, including both genetic and neuropathological approaches, is broadly discussed. Moreover, bipolar disorder and migraine are often combined with a variety of other affective disorders, and, furthermore, behavioural factors also play a role in the origin and course of the diseases. Approach to treatment options is also difficult. Several papers point out possible remedies, for example, valproate, topiramate, which acts on both diseases, but no first-choice treatments have been agreed upon yet.

  11. Migraine: treatments, comorbidities, and quality of life, in the USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malone CD

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Christopher D Malone,1 Amrita Bhowmick,2 Amy B Wachholtz,11Department of Psychiatry, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, 2Health Union, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: This study sought to characterize the experience of stress, treatment patterns, and medical and disability profile in the migraineur population to better understand how the experience of migraines impacts the social and psychological functioning of this group. A 30-minute self-report survey was presented via a migraine-specific website with data collection occurring between May 15 and June 15, 2012. Recruitment for the study was done through online advertisements. In total, 2,907 individuals began the survey and 2,735 met the inclusion criteria for the study. The sample was predominantly female (92.8%. Migraine-associated stress was correlated with length of time since first onset of symptoms (P<0.01 and number of symptoms per month (P<0.01. Disorders related to stress, such as depression (P<0.01 and anxiety (P<0.01, were also positively correlated with the measured stress resulting from migraines. Migraine-associated stress must be understood as a multidimensional experience with broader impacts of stress on an individual correlating much more highly with negative mental and physical health profiles. Stress resulting from frequent migraine headaches may contribute to the development of medical and psychological comorbidities and may be a part of a cyclical relationship wherein stress is both a cause and effect of the social and medical impairments brought about by migraine.Keywords: characteristics, migraine, headache, stress, treatment satisfaction

  12. Food and migraine in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Bouhairet

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Migraine headaches are a common problem worldwide, especially in adolescents. They are usually chronic, with frequent relapses. Therefore, any dietary risk factor for headaches has important implications on migraineurs. However, the association between migraine and diet needs to be examined further. Objective To investigate the association between diet and migraine in adolescents. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study in August to September 2009 on 13 - 18 year old adolescents in a senior high school in Medan, North Sumatera. We included subjects diagnosed with migraine, according to the International Headache Society (IHS criteria. Ninety participants completed the questionnaire. Foods we observed for a link to migraine included milk, chocolate, ice cream, cheese, bread, instant noodles, meatballs, chili sauce, sweetener, yoghurt, pizza, and other foods and beverages. Results Of the 90 participants with migraines, there were more females (61.1% than males. There were statistically significant associations between migraine and triggering foods (P = 0.045, 95% CI 0.59 to 0.79 as well as between migraine and family history of migraine (P = 0.043, 95% CI 0.46 to 0.66. Stress (P = 0.164, menstruation (P = 0.369, and sound or light (P= 0.577 had no significant association with migraine. A wide variety of foods and beverages were implicated as migraine precipitants. The most common were chili sauce (75.8%, ice cream (71.0%, milk (67.7%, instant noodles (67.7%, chocolate (61.3%, peanuts (59.7%, cheese (54.8% and meatballs (54.8%. Conclusion Food and family history have a significant association with the occurrence of migraine in adolescents.

  13. Allodynia Is Associated With Initial and Sustained Response to Acute Migraine Treatment: Results from the American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipton, Richard B; Munjal, Sagar; Buse, Dawn C; Bennett, Alix; Fanning, Kristina M; Burstein, Rami; Reed, Michael L

    2017-07-01

    In a population sample of persons with migraine treating with a single category of acute migraine medication, to identify rates and factors associated with acute treatment outcomes, including 2-hour pain freedom (2hPF), 24-hour pain response (24hPR), and 24-hour sustained pain response (24hSPR). Key predictors include acute treatment type (triptans and other medication categories), the influence of allodynia on response to medication, and the interaction between medication category and presence of allodynia in response to treatment among people with migraine. Cutaneous allodynia was previously associated with inadequate 2hPF, 24hPR, and 24hSPR (sustained response at 24 hours among those with adequate 2hPF) among people with migraine in the American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention (AMPP) Study. The AMPP Study obtained data from a representative US sample of persons with migraine by mailed questionnaire. The 2006 survey included 8233 people with migraine aged 18 or over who completed the Migraine Treatment Optimization Questionnaire (mTOQ). mTOQ was used to assess acute treatment outcomes including 2hPF, 24hPR, and 24hSPR. Eligible individuals used only a single category of acute prescription migraine treatments (n  =  5236, 63.6%). This sample was stratified into 5 categories of type of acute prescription headache medication used (triptans, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, barbiturate-combinations, opioids, and opioid combinations and ergot alkaloids). Separate binary logistic regression models evaluated: (1) triptans vs other medication types; (2) presence of allodynia vs no allodynia; and (3) the interaction of medication category with allodynia. Sociodemographic variables, health insurance status, over-the-counter and preventive medication use were included as covariates. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were generated for each acute treatment outcome. Among eligible participants, the mean age was 46 years, and 82.5% were women

  14. Synesthesia and Migraine: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alstadhaug Karl B

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synesthesia is, as visual migraine aura, a common and fascinating perceptual phenomenon. Here we present a unique case with synesthesias exclusively during visual migraine auras. Case presentation A 40-year-old woman with a cyclic mood disorder had suffered from migraine with visual aura for several years. On several occasions she had experienced "mixing of senses" during the aura phase. Staring at strong bright light she could experience intense taste of lemon with flow from the salivary glands. Conclusion Acquired synesthesia, exclusively coincident with migraine aura, gives support to the idea of an anomalous cortical processing underlying the phenomenon.

  15. Bivalves: From individual to population modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saraiva, S.; van der Meer, J.; Kooijman, S.A.L.M.

    2014-01-01

    An individual based population model for bivalves was designed, built and tested in a 0D approach, to simulate the population dynamics of a mussel bed located in an intertidal area. The processes at the individual level were simulated following the dynamic energy budget theory, whereas initial egg

  16. Individual Hearing Loss: Characterization, Modelling, Compensation Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santurette, Sébastien; Dau, Torsten; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    account for such individual differences, which make it challenging to find adequate compensation strategies in hearing devices. How to characterize, model, and compensate for individual hearing loss were the main topics of the fifth International Symposium on Auditory and Audiological Research (ISAAR...

  17. Fluctuations in episodic and chronic migraine status over the course of 1 year: implications for diagnosis, treatment and clinical trial design

    OpenAIRE

    Serrano, Daniel; Lipton, Richard B.; Scher, Ann I.; Reed, Michael L.; Stewart, Walter (Buzz) F.; Adams, Aubrey Manack; Buse, Dawn C.

    2017-01-01

    Background Relatively little is known about the stability of a diagnosis of episodic migraine (EM) or chronic migraine (CM) over time. This study examines natural fluctuations in self-reported headache frequency as well as the stability and variation in migraine type among individuals meeting criteria for EM and CM at baseline. Methods The Chronic Migraine Epidemiology and Outcomes (CaMEO) Study was a longitudinal survey of US adults with EM and CM identified by a web-questionnaire. A validat...

  18. Genetic bases of the nutritional approach to migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marchis, Maria Laura; Guadagni, Fiorella; Silvestris, Erica; Lovero, Domenica; Della-Morte, David; Ferroni, Patrizia; Barbanti, Piero; Palmirotta, Raffaele

    2018-03-08

    Migraine is a common multifactorial and polygenic neurological disabling disorder characterized by a genetic background and associated to environmental, hormonal and food stimulations. A large series of evidence suggest a strong correlation between nutrition and migraine and indicates several commonly foods, food additives and beverages that may be involved in the mechanisms triggering the headache attack in migraine-susceptible persons. There are foods and drinks, or ingredients of the same, that can trigger the migraine crisis as well as some foods play a protective function depending on the specific genetic sensitivity of the subject. The recent biotechnological advances have enhanced the identification of some genetic factors involved in onset diseases and the identification of sequence variants of genes responsible for the individual sensitivity to migraine trigger-foods. Therefore many studies are aimed at the analysis of polymorphisms of genes coding for the enzymes involved in the metabolism of food factors in order to clarify the different ways in which people respond to foods based on their genetic constitution. This review discusses the latest knowledge and scientific evidence of the role of gene variants and nutrients, food additives and nutraceuticals interactions in migraine.

  19. Canadian Headache Society guideline for migraine prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringsheim, Tamara; Davenport, W Jeptha; Mackie, Gordon; Worthington, Irene; Aubé, Michel; Christie, Suzanne N; Gladstone, Jonathan; Becker, Werner J

    2012-03-01

    The primary objective of this guideline is to assist the practitioner in choosing an appropriate prophylactic medication for an individual with migraine, based on current evidence in the medical literature and expert consensus. This guideline is focused on patients with episodic migraine (headache on ≤ 14 days a month). Through a comprehensive search strategy, randomized, double blind, controlled trials of drug treatments for migraine prophylaxis and relevant Cochrane reviews were identified. Studies were graded according to criteria developed by the US Preventive Services Task Force. Recommendations were graded according to the principles of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) Working Group. In addition, a general literature review and expert consensus were used for aspects of prophylactic therapy for which randomized controlled trials are not available. Prophylactic drug choice should be based on evidence for efficacy, side-effect profile, migraine clinical features, and co-existing disorders. Based on our review, 11 prophylactic drugs received a strong recommendation for use (topiramate, propranolol, nadolol, metoprolol, amitriptyline, gabapentin, candesartan, butterbur, riboflavin, coenzyme Q10, and magnesium citrate) and 6 received a weak recommendation (divalproex sodium, flunarizine, pizotifen, venlafaxine, verapamil, and lisinopril). Quality of evidence for different medications varied from high to low. Prophylactic treatment strategies were developed to assist the practitioner in selecting a prophylactic drug for specific clinical situations. These strategies included: first time strategies for patients who have not had prophylaxis before (a beta-blocker and a tricyclic strategy), low side effect strategies (including both drug and herbal/vitamin/mineral strategies), a strategy for patients with high body mass index, strategies for patients with co-existent hypertension or with co-existent depression and /or

  20. Prophylactic treatment of vestibular migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Cavalcante Salmito

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Vestibular migraine (VM is now accepted as a common cause of episodic vertigo. Treatment of VM involves two situations: the vestibular symptom attacks and the period between attacks. For the latter, some prophylaxis methods can be used. The current recommendation is to use the same prophylactic drugs used for migraines, including β-blockers, antidepressants and anticonvulsants. The recent diagnostic definition of vestibular migraine makes the number of studies on its treatment scarce. Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of prophylactic treatment used in patients from a VM outpatient clinic. Methods: Review of medical records from patients with VM according to the criteria of the Bárány Society/International Headache Society of 2012 criteria. The drugs used in the treatment and treatment response obtained through the visual analog scale (VAS for dizziness and headache were assessed. The pre and post-treatment VAS scores were compared (the improvement was evaluated together and individually, per drug used. Associations with clinical subgroups of patients were also assessed. Results: Of the 88 assessed records, 47 were eligible. We included patients that met the diagnostic criteria for VM and excluded those whose medical records were illegible and those of patients with other disorders causing dizziness and/or headache that did not meet the 2012 criteria for VM. 80.9% of the patients showed improvement with prophylaxis (p < 0.001. Amitriptyline, Flunarizine, Propranolol and Topiramate improved vestibular symptoms (p < 0.001 and headache (p < 0.015. The four drugs were effective in a statistically significant manner. There was a positive statistical association between the time of vestibular symptoms and clinical improvement. There was no additional benefit in hypertensive patients who used antihypertensive drugs as prophylaxis or depressed patients who used antidepressants in relation to other prophylactic drugs. Drug

  1. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies new susceptibility loci for migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anttila, Verneri; Winsvold, Bendik S; Gormley, Padhraig

    2013-01-01

    Migraine is the most common brain disorder, affecting approximately 14% of the adult population, but its molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. We report the results of a meta-analysis across 29 genome-wide association studies, including a total of 23,285 individuals with migraine (cases) an...

  2. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies new susceptibility loci for migraine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anttila, Verneri; Winsvold, Bendik S.; Gormley, Padhraig; Kurth, Tobias; Bettella, Francesco; McMahon, George; Kallela, Mikko; Malik, Rainer; de Vries, Boukje; Terwindt, Gisela; Medland, Sarah E.; Todt, Unda; McArdle, Wendy L.; Quaye, Lydia; Koiranen, Markku; Ikram, M. Arfan; Lehtimaki, Terho; Stam, Anine H.; Ligthart, Lannie; Wedenoja, Juho; Dunham, Ian; Neale, Benjamin M.; Palta, Priit; Hamalainen, Eija; Schuerks, Markus; Rose, Lynda M.; Buring, Julie E.; Ridker, Paul M.; Steinberg, Stacy; Stefansson, Hreinn; Jakobsson, Finnbogi; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Evans, David M.; Ring, Susan M.; Farkkila, Markus; Artto, Ville; Kaunisto, Mari A.; Freilinger, Tobias; Schoenen, Jean; Frants, Rune R.; Pelzer, Nadine; Weller, Claudia M.; Zielman, Ronald; Heath, Andrew C.; Madden, Pamela A. F.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Borck, Guntram; Goebel, Hartmut; Heinze, Axel

    Migraine is the most common brain disorder, affecting approximately 14% of the adult population, but its molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. We report the results of a meta-analysis across 29 genome-wide association studies, including a total of 23,285 individuals with migraine (cases) and

  3. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies new susceptibility loci for migraine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anttila, V.; Winsvold, B.S.; Gormley, P.; Kurth, T.; Bettella, F.; McMahon, G.; Kallela, M.; Malik, R.; de Vries, B.; Terwindt, G.; Medland, S.E.; Todt, U.; McArdle, W.L.; Quaye, L.; Koiranen, M.; Ikram, M.A.; Lehtimäki, T.; Stam, A.H.; Ligthart, R.S.L.; Wedenoja, J.; Dunham, I.; Neale, B. M.; Palta, P.; Hamalainen, E.; Schürks, M.; Rose, L.M.; Buring, J.E.; Ridker, P.M.; Steinberg, S.; Stefansson, H.; Jakobsson, F.; Lawlor, D.A.; Evans, D.M.; Ring, S.M.; Färkkilä, M.; Artto, V.; Kaunisto, M.A.; Freilinger, T.; Schoenen, J.; Frants, R.R.; Pelzer, N.; Weller, C.M.; Zielman, R.; Heath, A.C.; Madden, P.A.F.; Montgomery, G.W.; Martin, N.G.; Borck, G.; Göbel, H.; Heinze, A.; Heinze-Kuhn, K.; Williams, F.M.; Hartikainen, A.-L.; Pouta, A.; van den Ende, J..; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Hofman, A.; Amin, N.; Hottenga, J.J.; Vink, J.M.; Heikkilä, K.; Alexander, M.; Muller-Myhsok, B.; Schreiber, S; Meitinger, T.; Wichmann, H. E.; Aromaa, A.; Eriksson, J.G.; Traynor, B.J.; Trabzuni, D.; Rossin, E.; Lage, K.; Jacobs, S.B.; Gibbs, J.R.; Birney, E.; Kaprio, J.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Boomsma, D.I.; van Duijn, C.M.; Raitakari, O.; Jarvelin, M.-R.; Zwart, J.A.; Cherkas, L.; Strachan, D.P.; Kubisch, C.; Ferrari, M.D.; van den Maagdenberg, A.M.J.M.; Dichgans, M.; Wessman, M.; Smith, G.D.; Stefansson, K.; Daly, M.J.; Nyholt, DR; Chasman, D.I.; Palotie, A.

    2013-01-01

    Migraine is the most common brain disorder, affecting approximately 14% of the adult population, but its molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. We report the results of a meta-analysis across 29 genome-wide association studies, including a total of 23,285 individuals with migraine (cases) and

  4. Dietary intake patterns and diet quality in a nationally representative sample of women with and without severe headache or migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, E Whitney; Lipton, Richard B; Peterlin, B Lee; Raynor, Hollie A; Thomas, J Graham; O'Leary, Kevin C; Pavlovic, Jelena; Wing, Rena R; Bond, Dale S

    2015-04-01

    The role of diet in migraine is not well understood. We sought to characterize usual dietary intake patterns and diet quality in a nationally representative sample of women with and without severe headache or migraine. We also examined whether the relationship between migraine and diet differs by weight status. In this analysis, women with migraine or severe headache status was determined by questionnaire for 3069 women, ages 20-50 years, who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Study, 1999-2004. Women who experienced severe headaches or migraines were classified as migraine for the purposes of this analysis. Dietary intake patterns (micro- and macronutrient intake and eating frequency) and diet quality, measured by the Healthy Eating Index, 2005, were determined using one 24-hour dietary recall. Dietary intake patterns did not significantly differ between women with and without migraine. Normal weight women with migraine had significantly lower diet quality (Healthy Eating Index, 2005 total scores) than women without migraine (52.5 ± 0.9 vs. 45.9 ± 1.0; P quality differs by migraine status in normal weight women. Prospective analyses are needed to establish how diet relates to migraine onset, characteristics, and clinical features in individuals of varying weight status. © 2015 American Headache Society.

  5. [Prophylactic treatments of migraine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massiou, H

    2000-01-01

    Prophylactic treatment is mainly intended to reduce the frequency of migraine attacks. It is usually proposed to patients who suffer from two or more attacks per month. It should also be considered in patients who suffer from less frequent, but prolonged, disabling attacks with a poor response to abortive treatment, and who consider that their quality of life is reduced between attacks. Excessive intake of acute medication, more than twice a week, is a strong indication for prophylactic treatment. In order to obtain a good compliance to treatment, the patient must be informed of the expected efficacy of the drugs, and of their most frequent side effects. Thus, the choice of a prophylactic drug is made together with the patient. Based on the results of published controlled trials, the main prophylactic drugs are some betablockers, methysergide, pizotifene, oxetorone, flunarizine, amitriptyline, NSAIDs, and sodium valproate. Some less evaluated drugs such as aspirin, DHE, indoramine, verapamil, may be useful. Other substances such as riboflavin and new antiepileptic dugs are being evaluated. The choice of the drug to start with depends on several considerations. The first step is to make sure that there are no contra indications, and no possible interaction with the abortive medications. Then, possible side effects will be taken into account, for example, weight gain is a problem for most young women and patients who practice sports may not tolerate betablockers. Associated pathologies have to be checked. For example, a hypertensive migraine sufferers may benefit from betablockers; in a patient who suffers both from migraine and tension type headaches or from depression, amitriptyline is the first choice drug. The type of migraine should also be considered; for instance, in frequent attacks with aura, aspirin is recommended and betablockers avoided. In most cases, prophylaxis should be given as monotherapy, and it is often necessary to try successively several drugs

  6. Vomiting and migraine-related clinical parameters in pediatric migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidlitz-Markus, Tal; Haimi-Cohen, Yishai; Zeharia, Avraham

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the characteristics of vomiting in pediatric migraineurs and the relationship of vomiting with other migraine-related parameters. The cohort included children and adolescents with migraine attending a headache clinic of a tertiary pediatric medical center from 2010 to 2016. Patients were identified by a retrospective database search. Data were collected from medical files. The presence of vomiting was associated with background and headache-related parameters. The study group included 453 patients, 210 boys (46.4%) and 243 girls (53.6%), of mean age 11.3 ± 3.7 years. Vomiting was reported by 161 patients (35.5%). On comparison of patients with and without vomiting, vomiting was found to be significantly associated with male gender (54% vs 42.1%, P migraine onset (8.0 ± 3. years vs 9.6 ± 3.7 years, P migraine (67% vs 58.7%, P migraine (24.1% vs 10.1%, P migraine in both parents (9.3% vs 3.1%, P = .007), and migraine in either parent (57.5% vs 45.5%, P = .02). The higher rate of vomiting in the younger patients and the patients with awakening pain may be explained by a common underlying pathogenetic mechanism of vomiting and migraine involving autonomic nerve dysfunction/immaturity. The association of vomiting with parental migraine points to a genetic component of vomiting and migraine. It should be noted that some of the findings may simply reflect referral patterns in the tertiary clinic. © 2017 American Headache Society.

  7. Migraine and its psychiatric comorbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minen, Mia Tova; Begasse De Dhaem, Olivia; Kroon Van Diest, Ashley; Powers, Scott; Schwedt, Todd J; Lipton, Richard; Silbersweig, David

    2016-07-01

    Migraine is a highly prevalent and disabling neurological disorder associated with a wide range of psychiatric comorbidities. In this manuscript, we provide an overview of the link between migraine and several comorbid psychiatric disorders, including depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder. We present data on psychiatric risk factors for migraine chronification. We discuss the evidence, theories and methods, such as brain functional imaging, to explain the pathophysiological links between migraine and psychiatric disorders. Finally, we provide an overview of the treatment considerations for treating migraine with psychiatric comorbidities. In conclusion, a review of the literature demonstrates the wide variety of psychiatric comorbidities with migraine. However, more research is needed to elucidate the neurocircuitry underlying the association between migraine and the comorbid psychiatric conditions and to determine the most effective treatment for migraine with psychiatric comorbidity. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  8. Decreased Openness to Experience Is Associated with Migraine-Type Headaches in Subjects with Lifetime Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magyar, Mate; Gonda, Xenia; Pap, Dorottya; Edes, Andrea; Galambos, Attila; Baksa, Daniel; Kocsel, Natalia; Szabo, Edina; Bagdy, Gyorgy; Elliott, Rebecca; Kokonyei, Gyongyi; Juhasz, Gabriella

    2017-01-01

    Migraine and depression frequently occur as comorbid conditions, and it has been hypothesized that migraine with and without depression may have a different genetic background. A distinct personality trait constellation has been described in migraineurs. Less attention, however, was paid to personality differences in migraineurs with and without depression which may also shed light on differences in the neurobiological, background. The aim of our study was to investigate big five personality traits, headaches, and lifetime depression (DEP) in a large European general population sample. Relationship between DEP, Big Five Inventory personality traits, and headaches identified by the ID-Migraine Questionnaire were investigated in 3,026 individuals from Budapest and Manchester with multivariate and logistic regression analyses. Both DEP and migraine(ID) showed differences in personality traits. Neuroticism was an independent risk factor for both conditions while a significant interaction effect appeared between the two in the case of openness. Namely, subjects with migraine(ID) and without DEP scored higher on openness compared to those who had depression. While we confirmed previous results that high neuroticism is a risk factor for both depression and migraine, openness to experience was significantly lower in the co-occurrence of migraine and depression. Our results suggest that increased openness, possibly manifested in optimal or advantageous cognitive processing of pain experience in migraine may decrease the risk of co-occurrence of depression and migraine and thus may provide valuable insight for newer prevention and intervention approaches in the treatment of these conditions.

  9. Lateral pterygoid muscle volume and migraine in patients with temporomandibular disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro Lopes, Sergio Lucio Pereira; Ferreira Costa, Andre Luiz; Oliveira Gamba, Thiago; Flores, Isadora Luana; Cruz, Adriana Dibo; Min, Li Li

    2015-01-01

    Lateral pterygoid muscle (LPM) plays an important role in jaw movement and has been implicated in Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). Migraine has been described as a common symptom in patients with TMDs and may be related to muscle hyperactivity. This study aimed to compare LPM volume in individuals with and without migraine, using segmentation of the LPM in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the TMJ. Twenty patients with migraine and 20 volunteers without migraine underwent a clinical examination of the TMJ, according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMDs. MR imaging was performed and the LPM was segmented using the ITK-SNAP 1.4.1 software, which calculates the volume of each segmented structure in voxels per cubic millimeter. The chi-squared test and the Fisher's exact test were used to relate the TMD variables obtained from the MR images and clinical examinations to the presence of migraine. Logistic binary regression was used to determine the importance of each factor for predicting the presence of a migraine headache. Patients with TMDs and migraine tended to have hypertrophy of the LPM (58.7%). In addition, abnormal mandibular movements (61.2%) and disc displacement (70.0%) were found to be the most common signs in patients with TMDs and migraine. In patients with TMDs and simultaneous migraine, the LPM tends to be hypertrophic. LPM segmentation on MR imaging may be an alternative method to study this muscle in such patients because the hypertrophic LPM is not always palpable.

  10. Lateral pterygoid muscle volume and migraine in patients with temporomandibular disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro Lopes, Sergio Lucio Pereira [Dept. of Diagnosis and Surgery, Sao Jose dos Campos Dental School, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Ferreira Costa, Andre Luiz [Dept. of Pediatric Dentistry and Orthodontics, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Oliveira Gamba, Thiago; Flores, Isadora Luana [Dept. of ral Diagnosis, School of Dentistry, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Cruz, Adriana Dibo [Dept. of Specific Formation, Area of Radiology, Nova Friburgo Dental School, Fluminense Federal University, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Min, Li Li [Laboratory of Neuroimaging, Dept. of Neurology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-03-15

    Lateral pterygoid muscle (LPM) plays an important role in jaw movement and has been implicated in Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). Migraine has been described as a common symptom in patients with TMDs and may be related to muscle hyperactivity. This study aimed to compare LPM volume in individuals with and without migraine, using segmentation of the LPM in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the TMJ. Twenty patients with migraine and 20 volunteers without migraine underwent a clinical examination of the TMJ, according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMDs. MR imaging was performed and the LPM was segmented using the ITK-SNAP 1.4.1 software, which calculates the volume of each segmented structure in voxels per cubic millimeter. The chi-squared test and the Fisher's exact test were used to relate the TMD variables obtained from the MR images and clinical examinations to the presence of migraine. Logistic binary regression was used to determine the importance of each factor for predicting the presence of a migraine headache. Patients with TMDs and migraine tended to have hypertrophy of the LPM (58.7%). In addition, abnormal mandibular movements (61.2%) and disc displacement (70.0%) were found to be the most common signs in patients with TMDs and migraine. In patients with TMDs and simultaneous migraine, the LPM tends to be hypertrophic. LPM segmentation on MR imaging may be an alternative method to study this muscle in such patients because the hypertrophic LPM is not always palpable.

  11. One hundred years of migraine research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer C; Koehler, Peter J

    2011-01-01

    ); oligemia in the wake of CSD in rats (1982); neurogenic inflammation theory of migraine (1987); a new headache classification (1988); the discovery of sumatriptan (1988); migraine and calcitonin gene-related peptide (1990); the brainstem "migraine generator" and PET studies (1995); migraine...

  12. Trigger factors for familial hemiplegic migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Møller; Hauge, Anne Werner; Ashina, Messoud

    2011-01-01

    The aim was to identify and describe migraine trigger factors in patients with familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) from a population-based sample.......The aim was to identify and describe migraine trigger factors in patients with familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) from a population-based sample....

  13. Genetics of migraine and related syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, Anine Henrike

    2014-01-01

    In this dissertation clinical genetic investigations on migraine, related syndromes and comorbid conditions are described. The first migraine syndrome studied is Familial Hemiplegic Migraine (FHM), a monogenic migraine variant. The clinical spectrum of FHM1-3 and the relation with closely related

  14. Future possibilities in migraine genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudkjøbing, Laura Aviaja; Esserlind, Ann-Louise; Olesen, Jes

    2012-01-01

    Migraine with and without aura (MA and MO, respectively) have a strong genetic basis. Different approaches using linkage-, candidate gene- and genome-wide association studies have been explored, yielding limited results. This may indicate that the genetic component in migraine is due to rare...... variants; capturing these will require more detailed sequencing in order to be discovered. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) techniques such as whole exome and whole genome sequencing have been successful in finding genes in especially monogenic disorders. As the molecular genetics research progresses......, the technology will follow, rendering these approaches more applicable in the search for causative migraine genes in MO and MA. To date, no studies using NGS in migraine genetics have been published. In order to gain insight into the future possibilities of migraine genetics, we have looked at NGS studies...

  15. Positron emission tomography and migraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabriat, H.

    1992-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a brain imaging technique that allows in vivo studies of numerous physiological parameters. There have been few PET studies in migraine patients. Cerebral blood flow changes with no variations in brain oxygen consumption have been reported in patients with prolonged neurologic manifestations during migraine attacks. Parenteral administration of reserpine during migraine headache has been followed by a fall in the overall cerebral uptake of glucose. The small sample sizes and a number of methodologic problems complicate the interpretation of these results. Recent technical advances and the development of new PET tracers can be expected to provide further insight into the pathophysiology of migraine. Today cerebral cortex 5 HT 2 serotonin receptors can be studied in migraine patients with PET

  16. Modeling Individual Cyclic Variation in Human Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Emma; Althoff, Tim; Leskovec, Jure

    2018-04-01

    Cycles are fundamental to human health and behavior. Examples include mood cycles, circadian rhythms, and the menstrual cycle. However, modeling cycles in time series data is challenging because in most cases the cycles are not labeled or directly observed and need to be inferred from multidimensional measurements taken over time. Here, we present Cyclic Hidden Markov Models (CyH-MMs) for detecting and modeling cycles in a collection of multidimensional heterogeneous time series data. In contrast to previous cycle modeling methods, CyHMMs deal with a number of challenges encountered in modeling real-world cycles: they can model multivariate data with both discrete and continuous dimensions; they explicitly model and are robust to missing data; and they can share information across individuals to accommodate variation both within and between individual time series. Experiments on synthetic and real-world health-tracking data demonstrate that CyHMMs infer cycle lengths more accurately than existing methods, with 58% lower error on simulated data and 63% lower error on real-world data compared to the best-performing baseline. CyHMMs can also perform functions which baselines cannot: they can model the progression of individual features/symptoms over the course of the cycle, identify the most variable features, and cluster individual time series into groups with distinct characteristics. Applying CyHMMs to two real-world health-tracking datasets-of human menstrual cycle symptoms and physical activity tracking data-yields important insights including which symptoms to expect at each point during the cycle. We also find that people fall into several groups with distinct cycle patterns, and that these groups differ along dimensions not provided to the model. For example, by modeling missing data in the menstrual cycles dataset, we are able to discover a medically relevant group of birth control users even though information on birth control is not given to the model.

  17. Bivalves: From individual to population modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva, S.; van der Meer, J.; Kooijman, S. A. L. M.; Ruardij, P.

    2014-11-01

    An individual based population model for bivalves was designed, built and tested in a 0D approach, to simulate the population dynamics of a mussel bed located in an intertidal area. The processes at the individual level were simulated following the dynamic energy budget theory, whereas initial egg mortality, background mortality, food competition, and predation (including cannibalism) were additional population processes. Model properties were studied through the analysis of theoretical scenarios and by simulation of different mortality parameter combinations in a realistic setup, imposing environmental measurements. Realistic criteria were applied to narrow down the possible combination of parameter values. Field observations obtained in the long-term and multi-station monitoring program were compared with the model scenarios. The realistically selected modeling scenarios were able to reproduce reasonably the timing of some peaks in the individual abundances in the mussel bed and its size distribution but the number of individuals was not well predicted. The results suggest that the mortality in the early life stages (egg and larvae) plays an important role in population dynamics, either by initial egg mortality, larvae dispersion, settlement failure or shrimp predation. Future steps include the coupling of the population model with a hydrodynamic and biogeochemical model to improve the simulation of egg/larvae dispersion, settlement probability, food transport and also to simulate the feedback of the organisms' activity on the water column properties, which will result in an improvement of the food quantity and quality characterization.

  18. Individual model evaluation and probabilistic weighting of models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atwood, C.L.

    1994-01-01

    This note stresses the importance of trying to assess the accuracy of each model individually. Putting a Bayesian probability distribution on a population of models faces conceptual and practical complications, and apparently can come only after the work of evaluating the individual models. Moreover, the primary issue is open-quotes How good is this modelclose quotes? Therefore, the individual evaluations are first in both chronology and importance. They are not easy, but some ideas are given here on how to perform them

  19. α7 Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated anti-inflammatory effect in a chronic migraine rat model via the attenuation of glial cell activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Q

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Qing Liu,1 Chaoyang Liu,1 Li Jiang,1 Maolin Li,1 Ting Long,1 Wei He,1 Guangcheng Qin,2 Lixue Chen,2 Jiying Zhou1 1Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China; 2Laboratory Research Center, The First Affiliated Hospital, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China Background: Evidence suggests that the activation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR can greatly decrease the neuroinflammation response. Neuroinflammation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of chronic migraine (CM. Clinical observations also show that nicotine gum induces analgesic effects in migraine patients. However, whether α7nAChR is involved in CM is unclear.Objective: To investigate the role of α7nAChR in CM and provide a new therapeutic target for CM.Materials and methods: Thirty-six male Sprague–Dawley rats were distributed randomly into control, CM, PNU-282987, and α-bungarotoxin groups (n=9 rats in each group. The CM model was established by the recurrent daily administration of inflammatory soup on the dura over the course of 1 week. The hind paw threshold and facial allodynia were assessed by the von Frey test. The expression levels of α7nAChR, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interleukin-1 beta were analyzed by Western blot and real-time fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The location of α7nAChR in the hippocampus was quantified by immunofluorescence, as well as the microglial and astrocyte alterations. Changes in the calcitonin gene-related peptide and the phosphorylated JNK protein among different groups were measured by Western blot.Results: We found that the expression of α7nAChR was reduced after repeated inflammatory soup administration. The increased expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1 beta, and calcitonin gene-related peptide in CM group were significantly decreased by PNU-282987 and aggravated by α-bungarotoxin. Moreover, PNU-282987

  20. Peculiarities of Hemiplegic Migraine in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Moiseeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the individual peculiarities of a rare disease — hemiplegic migraine — in 3 patients (two girls aged 2 and 14 years old and a boy of 16 years. In common clinical aspect there was a correlation between the migraine-attack and the slight head trauma in all patients. Attack symptoms were almost identical: hemiparesis, aphasia, ataxia. The family history for migraine was burdened in both girls. A genetic testing in the boy and in the smallest girl demonstrated CACNA1A gene mutation, in the teen girl — ATP1A2 gene mutation. The electroencephalograms in all patients during the acute phase presented signs of hemipcortical brain dysfunction. The magnetic resonance imaging revealed prominent but reversible hemicortical oedema. The repeated MRI studies diagnosed nonrelevant for this disease hemicortical atrophy (girl 2 years and atrophy of the cerebellum (the boy. Due to the rarity of the disease so far there are no clear guidelines for its treatment and prevention. In view of the pathogenesis for the prevention patients were prescribed medications changing the activity of cytoplasmic calcium and sodium canals.

  1. Chiropractic management using a brain-based model of care for a 15-year-old adolescent boy with migraine headaches and behavioral and learning difficulties: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Kurt W.; Cambron, Jerrilyn

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this report is to describe chiropractic management, using a brain-based model of care, of a teen who had migraine headaches and several social and learning difficulties. Clinical features A 15-year-old adolescent boy with a chronic history of migraines and more than 10 years of learning and behavioral difficulties, including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, and Tourette syndrome, presented for chiropractic care. Intervention and outcome The patient received spinal manipulation and was given home physical coordination activities that were contralateral to the side of the involved basal ganglia and ipsilateral to the involved cerebellum, along with interactive metronome training. Quantitative changes were noted in neurological soft signs, tests of variables of attention Conners’ Parent Rating Scale, the California Achievement Test, grade point, and reduction of medications. The patient reported qualitative improvements in tics, attention, reading, vision, health, relationships with his peers and his family, and self-esteem. Conclusion The patient with migraine headaches and learning difficulties responded well to the course of chiropractic care. This study suggests that there may be value in a brain-based model of care in the chiropractic management of conditions that are beyond musculoskeletal in nature. PMID:24396330

  2. The burden of migraine in the United States: current and emerging perspectives on disease management and economic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazard, Elisabeth; Munakata, Julie; Bigal, Marcelo E; Rupnow, Marcia F T; Lipton, Richard B

    2009-01-01

    Migraine is often perceived as a low-impact condition that imposes a limited burden to society and the health-care system. This study reviews the current understanding of the burden of migraine in the U.S., the history of economic understanding of migraine treatment and identifies emergent trends for future studies evaluating clinical and economic outcomes of migraine treatment. This study traced the history of economic articles published on migraine by performing a literature search using PubMed MEDLINE database and ancestral searches of relevant articles. The intention was not to provide an exhaustive review of every article or adjudicate between studies with different findings. Migraine affects millions of individuals worldwide, generally during the most productive years of a person's life. Studies show that migraineurs are underdiagnosed, undertreated, and experience substantial decreases in functioning and productivity, which in turn translates into diminished quality of life for individuals, and financial burdens to both health-care systems and employers. Economic evaluations of migraine therapies have evolved with new clinical developments beginning with cognitive-behavioral therapy, introduction of triptans, concern over medication overuse, and emergence of migraine prophylaxis. Now recent clinical studies suggest that migraine may be a progressive disease with cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and long-term neurologic effects. Migraine imposes a substantial burden on patients, families, employers and societies. The economic standards by which migraine and treatment are evaluated have evolved in response to clinical developments. Emerging evidence suggests that migraine is a chronic and progressive disease. If confirmed, approaches to acute and prophylactic treatments and economic evaluations of migraine treatment may require major reconsideration.

  3. [The migraine of Immanual Kant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podoll, K; Hoff, P; Sass, H

    2000-07-01

    The German philosopher Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) suffered, since his forties, from a migraine with aura which showed a significant exacerbation in his seventies, coinciding with the onset of symptoms of a senile dementia of Alzheimer's type. Recorded symptoms of Kant's migraine include recurrent scintillating scotomas, one episode of diplopia, two episodes of complete amaurosis and frequent headaches described as oppressions of the head. The said symptoms of Kant's migraine can be traced not only in his letters and in accounts of his contemporary biographers, but also in the philosopher's published work.

  4. Association of posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms with migraine and headache after a natural disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcaya, Mariana C; Lowe, Sarah R; Asad, Asad L; Subramanian, S V; Waters, Mary C; Rhodes, Jean

    2017-05-01

    Previous research shows that migraine and general headache symptoms increase after traumatic events. Questions remain about whether posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) produces migraine/headache symptoms, or if individuals afflicted by migraine/headache are especially likely to develop PTSD. We test whether PTSD symptoms following a natural disaster are associated with higher odds of reporting frequent headaches/migraines postdisaster. We decompose PTSD into intrusion, avoidance, and hyperarousal symptom clusters to examine which, if any, are uniquely related to headache/migraine postdisaster. We use prospectively collected pre- and postdisaster data to explore whether overall PTSD symptoms and symptom clusters are associated with migraine/headache in a sample of Hurricane Katrina survivors. We account for severity of hurricane exposure and control for baseline migraine and headache problems to reduce the probability that heightened PTSD susceptibility among those who already suffered from the conditions could explain observed associations. PTSD symptoms were associated with higher odds of experiencing frequent headaches or migraines with a standard deviation change in PTSD score corresponding to over twice the odds (95% confidence interval [1.64, 2.68]) of having trouble with frequent headaches or migraines in the post-Katrina period. Each additional point on the intrusion subscale (sample M [SD] = 1.6 [1.1]) was associated with 55% higher odds of reporting frequent headache/migraine (95% confidence interval [1.03, 2.33]), but we found no association with avoidance or hyperarousal symptoms. Clinicians and disaster planners should be aware that disaster survivors might be at heightened risk of migraine/headache episodes, and those experiencing intrusive reminders may be most affected. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Evaluation of the function of the vestibular system in patients with migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzeski, Maciej; Stepień, Adam; Kaczorowski, Zbigniew

    2008-01-01

    Migraine is a common disorder with 1-year prevalence of 17.2% in women and 6% in men. Otoneurological symptoms such as phonophobia, tinnitus, vertigo, and dizziness are quite common in migraine. It is estimated that vertigo and dizziness are associated with migraine in 10% of all dizzy patients. The aim of the study was to evaluate the function of the vestibular system using electronystagmography (ENG) and videonystagmography (VNG) in patients with migraine compared to healthy controls. Sixty-two patients (46 women and 16 men) aged 20-35 years (mean age: 28.4 years) with migraine were qualified to the study. All other illnesses that can cause dysfunction of the vestibular system were excluded. The control group consisted of 31 healthy volunteers fulfilling the same demographic criteria as the migraine group (mean age: 29.2 years). Vertigo or dizziness was reported by 41 patients with migraine (66.1%). In ENG/VNG examination changes suggesting impairment of the peripheral or central part of the vestibular system were found in 34 patients (54.8%). In the control group, any abnormalities in ENG/VNG examination were present in 22.6% of individuals (p=0.0031). No statistical significance was found in the frequency of any ENG/VNG abnormalities in subgroups of patients with migraine with aura and migraine without aura. Factors predisposing to dysfunction of the vestibular system in our group of migraineurs were the frequency and duration of the migraine. Vertigo and dizziness are frequent co-existing symptoms in patients with migraine. ENG/VNG abnormali-ties are significantly more frequent in migraineurs than in healthy controls.

  6. Persistent post-traumatic headache vs. migraine: an MRI study demonstrating differences in brain structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwedt, Todd J; Chong, Catherine D; Peplinski, Jacob; Ross, Katherine; Berisha, Visar

    2017-08-22

    The majority of individuals with post-traumatic headache have symptoms that are indistinguishable from migraine. The overlap in symptoms amongst these individuals raises the question as to whether post-traumatic headache has a unique pathophysiology or if head trauma triggers migraine. The objective of this study was to compare brain structure in individuals with persistent post-traumatic headache (i.e. headache lasting at least 3 months following a traumatic brain injury) attributed to mild traumatic brain injury to that of individuals with migraine. Twenty-eight individuals with persistent post-traumatic headache attributed to mild traumatic brain injury and 28 individuals with migraine underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging on a 3 T scanner. Regional volumes, cortical thickness, surface area and curvature measurements were calculated from T1-weighted sequences and compared between subject groups using ANCOVA. MRI data from 28 healthy control subjects were used to interpret the differences in brain structure between migraine and persistent post-traumatic headache. Differences in regional volumes, cortical thickness, surface area and brain curvature were identified when comparing the group of individuals with persistent post-traumatic headache to the group with migraine. Structure was different between groups for regions within the right lateral orbitofrontal lobe, left caudal middle frontal lobe, left superior frontal lobe, left precuneus and right supramarginal gyrus (p right lateral orbitofrontal lobe, right supramarginal gyrus, and left superior frontal lobe and no differences when comparing the migraine cohort to healthy controls. In conclusion, persistent post-traumatic headache and migraine are associated with differences in brain structure, perhaps suggesting differences in their underlying pathophysiology. Additional studies are needed to further delineate similarities and differences in brain structure and function that are associated with post

  7. INDIVIDUAL BASED MODELLING APPROACH TO THERMAL ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diadromous fish populations in the Pacific Northwest face challenges along their migratory routes from declining habitat quality, harvest, and barriers to longitudinal connectivity. Changes in river temperature regimes are producing an additional challenge for upstream migrating adult salmon and steelhead, species that are sensitive to absolute and cumulative thermal exposure. Adult salmon populations have been shown to utilize cold water patches along migration routes when mainstem river temperatures exceed thermal optimums. We are employing an individual based model (IBM) to explore the costs and benefits of spatially-distributed cold water refugia for adult migrating salmon. Our model, developed in the HexSim platform, is built around a mechanistic behavioral decision tree that drives individual interactions with their spatially explicit simulated environment. Population-scale responses to dynamic thermal regimes, coupled with other stressors such as disease and harvest, become emergent properties of the spatial IBM. Other model outputs include arrival times, species-specific survival rates, body energetic content, and reproductive fitness levels. Here, we discuss the challenges associated with parameterizing an individual based model of salmon and steelhead in a section of the Columbia River. Many rivers and streams in the Pacific Northwest are currently listed as impaired under the Clean Water Act as a result of high summer water temperatures. Adverse effec

  8. Sexual Dysfunction in Women With Migraine and Overweight/Obesity: Relative Frequency and Association With Migraine Severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Dale S; Pavlović, Jelena M; Lipton, Richard B; Graham Thomas, J; Digre, Kathleen B; Roth, Julie; Rathier, Lucille; O'Leary, Kevin C; Evans, E Whitney; Wing, Rena R

    2017-03-01

    Previous studies suggest that migraine might be associated with female sexual dysfunction (FSD), although this association may be complicated by overweight/obesity. To disentangle relationships of migraine and obesity with FSD, we examined: (1) FSD rates in women who had migraine and obesity with a matched sample of women with obesity who were free of migraine and (2) associations between indices of migraine severity and FSD in a larger sample of participants with migraine and overweight/obesity, controlling for important confounders. Women with migraine and obesity seeking behavioral weight loss treatment to decrease headaches (n = 37) and nonmigraine controls (n = 37) with obesity seeking weight loss via bariatric surgery were matched on age (±5 years), body mass index (BMI; ±3 kg/m 2 ), and reported sexual activity during the past month. Both groups completed the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI), with a validated FSFI-total cutoff score used to define FSD. In participants with migraine and overweight/obesity (n = 105), separate logistic regression models evaluated associations of migraine attack frequency, intensity, and duration with odds of having FSD, controlling for age, BMI, depression, and anxiety. On average, participants and matched controls had severe obesity (BMI = 42.4 ± 3.8 kg/m 2 ; range = 35-49.9) and were 37.3 ± 7.2 years of age (range = 22-50). FSD rate did not differ between migraine participants and controls (56.8% vs. 54.1%, P = .82). In the larger sample of participants with migraine and overweight/obesity (38.2 ± 7.8 years of age; BMI = 34.8 ± 6.4 [range = 25-50 kg/m 2 ]; 8.0 ± 4.3 migraine days/month, maximum pain intensity = 5.9 ± 1.4 on 0-10 scale; average attack duration = 18.3 ± 9.7 hours), FSD was not associated with attack frequency (P = .31), pain intensity (P = .92), or attack duration (P = .35) but was associated with more severe anxiety

  9. Migraine attacks among medical students in Soochow University, Southeast China: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu X

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Xiao Gu,1,2 Yaojie Xie1 1School of Nursing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong; 2Intensive Care Unit, Suzhou Municipal Hospital, Suzhou, China Purpose: Migraine is one of the most common primary headache disorders and is burdensome to both the individual and society, influencing the academic performance and quality of daily lives of medical students worldwide. This study aimed to investigate the migraine prevalence in a sample of university medical students in China and to examine the features and typical trigger factors of migraine among these students. Patients and methods: From May 2016 to August 2016, a total of 1,060 medical students who were enrolled in Soochow University in Jiangsu Province in China were chosen through stratified random sampling. A self-administered questionnaire that included the ID MigraineTM for screening of migraine cases was used to collect data. The frequency, severity, duration of migraine attacks, and relevant trigger factors were measured for migraine cases. In total, 986 students completed the questionnaire. Results: The overall migraine prevalence among students was 7.91%, with 4.64% in male and 9.84% in female students. Junior-grade students had a higher migraine prevalence than senior students (prevalence of migraine of year 1 to year 5 undergraduates: 10.83%, 8.9% vs. 6.25%, 4.42%, 5.33%, P<0.05; prevalence of migraine of year 1 to year 3 graduates: 9.68%, 9.71% vs. 6.38%, P<0.05. Students with a positive family history were more likely to suffer migraine than those without (OR=8.48, 95% CI: 4.33–16.59. Stress (n=73, 93.59%, lack of sleep (n=72, 92.31%, and change of sleeping time (n=68, 87.18% were the top three trigger factors among the students. Conclusion: Migraine was common among medical students from a university in China, and especially higher in female and junior-grade students, and those with a family history of migraine. Reducing stress and improving sleep quality might be effective

  10. Individualized Biomathematical Modeling of Fatigue and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-29

    Interactions and Transitions 53 New Discoveries , Inventions, or Patent Disclosures 56 FA9550-06-1-0055 Individualized Biomathematical Modeling of Fatigue...Old Dominion University, not supported on grant) Daniel J. Mollicone, Ph.D. ( Pulsar Informatics, Inc., not supported on grant) Christopher G...Mott, M.S. ( Pulsar Informatics, Inc., not supported on grant) Erik Olofsen, M.S. (Leiden University, the Netherlands, not supported on grant

  11. Characteristics of menstrual versus non-menstrual migraine during pregnancy: a longitudinal population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovski, Beáta Éva; Vetvik, Kjersti G; Lundqvist, Christofer; Eberhard-Gran, Malin

    2018-04-02

    Migraine is a common headache disorder that affects mostly women. In half of these, migraine is menstrually associated, and ranges from completely asymptomatic to frequent pain throughout pregnancy. The aim of the study was to define the pattern (frequency, intensity, analgesics use) of migrainous headaches among women with and without menstural migraine (MM) during pregnancy, and define how hormonally-related factors affect its intensity. The analysis was based upon data from 280 women, 18.6% of them having a self-reported MM. Women with MM described a higher headache intensity during early pregnancy and postpartum compared those without MM, but both groups showed improvement during the second half of pregnancy and directly after delivery. Hormonal factors and pre-menstrual syndrome had no effect upon headache frequency, but may affect headache intensity. Individual treatment plan is necessary for women with migrainous headaches during pregnancy, especially for those suffering highest symptoms load.

  12. The relationship between levels of plasma-soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) and presence of migraine attack and aura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Nigar; Yılmaz, Mustafa; Sirin, Burcu; Yılmaztekin, Sureyya; Kutlu, Gülnihal

    2017-10-01

    Migraine is one of the most common types of pain associated with sterile inflammatory conditions. Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is a potential novel inflammatory marker. We aim to determine the association between serum values of suPAR, procalcitonin, fibrinogen, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and migraine disease characteristics. The study involved a total of 60 migraine patients (33 patients in the interictal period, 27 patients in the attack period) and 30 healthy individuals. The serum values of suPAR were found to be significantly higher in migraine patients in the attack period than in migraine patients in the interictal period, and in healthy individuals (p migraine with aura patients than in migraine without aura patients. When we subdivided migraine patients according to frequency of attack (attacks/month), significant differences were found between the suPAR and procalcitonin levels (measured during the attack period) of those in the frequent-attack group (4-5 or more) versus those in the less frequent attack group (less than 4). Serum levels of procalcitonin were shown to be significantly higher in migraine patients during the attack period compared with migraine patients in the interictal period and in control subjects (p = .001 for both). Significant differences were found between plasma levels of fibrinogen in migraine patients versus control subjects (p migraine patients versus the control group. These findings may show that presenting a high level of suPAR in migraine patients with attack and aura results to predisposition to occurring on the symptoms and that high levels of suPAR, procalcitonin and fibrinogen in patients with migraine result in neurogenic inflammation during migraine headaches.

  13. Management of migraine in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marielle A Kabbouche

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Marielle A Kabbouche1,2, Deborah K Gilman31Department of Pediatrics, Department of 2Neurology, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center; 3Department of Psychology, Columbus Children’s Hospital, OH, USAAbstract: Headaches in children and adolescents are still under-diagnosed. 75% of children are affected by primary headache by the age of 15 with 28% fitting the ICHD2 criteria of migraine. Migraine is considered a chronic disorder that can severely impact a child’s daily activities, including schooling and socializing. Early recognition and aggressive therapy, with acute and prophylactic treatments, as well as intensive biobehavioral interventions, are essential to control the migraine attacks and reverse the progression into intractable disabling headache.Keywords: migraine, children, adolescents, headache, biofeedback

  14. Arterial responses during migraine headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Helle Klingenberg; Nielsen, T H; Olesen, J

    1990-01-01

    The superficial temporal artery has been thought to be the main focus of pain during migraine attacks, but its diameter has never been measured directly. The use of a new, high-resolution ultrasound machine to measure arterial size in 25 migraine patients with unilateral head pain showed...... that the lumen was wider on the painful than on the non-painful side during a migraine attack. The diameters of both radial arteries and the temporal artery on the non-painful side were smaller during than between attacks. The generalised vasoconstriction was not shared by the temporal artery on the affected...... side, which suggests a local vasodilatory response. The findings suggest that cephalic arteries may play a role in migraine pathogenesis....

  15. Migraine headaches in a nutshell

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to severe pain intensity, aggravation by movement, and a pulsating feeling. ... This article aims to provide a concise, high-level overview of the classification, management and treatment of migraine. ... hypersensitivity to light, sound and odour.7.

  16. Can Weather Changes Trigger Migraines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of a migraine. Making healthy lifestyle choices — eat healthy foods, exercise regularly, drink enough water, get enough sleep and keep your stress under control. These factors can help reduce the ...

  17. Why is migraine so common?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmeads, J

    1998-08-01

    Migraine is clearly a very common biological disorder, but this knowledge has not been sufficient as yet to ensure completely effective treatment strategies. There appears to be discrepancy between what migraine patients desire as the outcome of consultations and what doctors think patients want. Patients seem, from Packard's selective study (11), to want explanation and reassurance before they get pain relief, whereas doctors view pain relief as the most important aim of management. It is possible that doctors still have underlying assumptions about psychological elements of migraine which color their perceptions of their patients. Communicating the relevance of scientific progress in migraine to neurologists and PCPs is an important challenge, as is calling attention to the patient's expectations from treatment. To be effective in improving education in this area, perhaps we should first ascertain the level of knowledge about the biology and treatment of headache among general neurologists.

  18. Vestibular migraine: who is the patient?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Bruno; Teggi, Roberto

    2017-05-01

    Vestibular migraine has been classified as a specific entity in which vestibular symptomatology is defined as part of the migrainous disorder. New and appropriate diagnostic criteria have been proposed by the Barany and International Headache Societies. The diagnosis of vestibular migraine mainly depends on the patient history. The NIVE project is a prospectic multicentric study on vestibular migraine. The aim of this project is to evaluate demographics, epidemiology, clinical manifestations of migraine and vertigo in a large cohort of Caucasian patients affected by vestibular migraine.

  19. Gender differences in sex life issues – A population-based study of migraine sufferers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ojanlatva Ansa

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Migraine is considered to have a negative influence on sex life. The present study was to analyse the perceptions of importance of and satisfaction with sex life as well as the expression of interest in sex among people having migraines in a prospective follow-up mail survey in 1998 and 2003. Methods The random sample was stratified according to gender and age in four age groups (20–24, 30–34, 40–44, and 50–54 years. Altogether 25 898 individuals responded to the baseline and 19 626 to the follow-up questionnaire (75.8% response rate. We examined as to how the perceptions of sex life of those suffering from migraine changed during a 5-year follow-up. Conditional logistic regression was used to analyse the data of the responses on self-reported migraine in the baseline and follow-up surveys (N = 2 977, 79.2% women. Each person with migraine was assigned a gender- and age-matched control in the analysis. Results All three outcome variables tended to decrease in value. Importance of sex life was higher among men with migraine than among their controls. Among women migraine lessened interest in sex life. Conclusion Our findings suggested that migraine has a different impact on sex life among women from that among men.

  20. Importance of Pain Acceptance in Relation to Headache Disability and Pain Interference in Women with Migraine and Overweight/Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillis, Jason; Thomas, J. Graham; Seng, Elizabeth K.; Lipton, Richard B.; Pavlovic, Jelena; Rathier, Lucille; Roth, Julie; O’Leary, Kevin C.; Bond, Dale S.

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pain acceptance involves willingness to experience pain and engaging in valued activities while pain is present. Though pain acceptance could limit both headache-related disability and pain interference in individuals with migraine, few studies have addressed this issue. The current study evaluated whether higher levels of total pain acceptance and it’s 2 subcomponents, pain willingness and activity engagement, were associated with lower levels of headache-related impairment in women who had both migraine and overweight/obesity. METHODS In this cross-sectional study, participants seeking weight loss and headache relief in the Women’s Health and Migraine (WHAM) trial completed baseline measures of pain acceptance (Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire [CPAQ]), headache-related disability (Headache Impact Test-6 [HIT-6]), and pain interference (Brief Pain Inventory [BPI]). Migraine headache frequency and pain intensity were assessed daily via smartphone diary. Using CPAQ total and subcomponent (pain willingness and activity engagement) scores, headache frequency, pain intensity, and BMI as predictors in linear regression, headache-related disability and pain interference were modeled as outcomes. RESULTS On average, participants (n=126; age=38.5±8.2 years; BMI=35.3±6.6 kg/m2) reported 8.4±4.7 migraine days/month and pain intensity of 6.0±1.5 on a 0–10 scale on headache days. After correcting for multiple comparisons (adjusted α=.008), pain willingness was independently associated with both lower headache related disability (pheadache related disability (p=.128; β= −.138) and pain interference (p=.042; β= −.154). CPAQ Total Score was not associated with headache related disability (p=.439; β=.066) and pain interference (p=.305; β=.074). Pain intensity was significantly associated with outcomes in all analyses (p’s headache-related disability and general pain interference in treatment-seeking women with migraine and overweight

  1. Temporomandibular disorders and migraine headache

    OpenAIRE

    Demarin, Vida; Bašić Kes, Vanja

    2010-01-01

    Migraine headache and temporomandibular disorders show significant overlap in the area or distribution of pain, the gender prevalence and age distribution. Temporomandibular disorders may cause headaches per se, worsen existent primary headaches, and add to the burden of headache disorders. The patients with combined migraine and tension-type headaches had a higher prevelance of temporomandibular disorders. Evidence supporting a close relationship include the increased masticatory...

  2. Acute treatment of migraine headaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Frederick R

    2010-04-01

    Optimum acute treatment of migraine requires prevention of headache as a top priority. Recognition of the multitude of migraine presentations, the frequency of total headache attacks, and number of days of headache disability are critical. Successful treatment requires excellent patient-clinician communication enhancing confidence and mutual trust based on patient needs and preferences. Optimum management of acute migraine nearly always requires pharmacologic treatment for rapid resolution. Migraine-specific triptans, dihydroergotamine, and several antiinflammatories have substantial empirical clinical efficacy. Older nonspecific drugs, particularly butalbital and opioids, contribute to medication overuse headache and are to be avoided. Clinicians should utilize evidence-based acute migraine-specific therapy stressing the imperative acute treatment goal of early intervention, but not too often with the correct drug, formulation, and dose. This therapy needs to provide cost-effective fast results, meaningful to the patient while minimizing the need for additional drugs. Migraine-ACT evaluates 2-hour pain freedom with return to normal function, comfort with treatment, and consistency of response. Employ a thoroughly educated patient, formulary, testimonials, stratification, and rational cotherapy against the race to central sensitization for optimum outcomes. Thieme Medical Publishers.

  3. Migraine attacks the Basal Ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bigal Marcelo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With time, episodes of migraine headache afflict patients with increased frequency, longer duration and more intense pain. While episodic migraine may be defined as 1-14 attacks per month, there are no clear-cut phases defined, and those patients with low frequency may progress to high frequency episodic migraine and the latter may progress into chronic daily headache (> 15 attacks per month. The pathophysiology of this progression is completely unknown. Attempting to unravel this phenomenon, we used high field (human brain imaging to compare functional responses, functional connectivity and brain morphology in patients whose migraine episodes did not progress (LF to a matched (gender, age, age of onset and type of medication group of patients whose migraine episodes progressed (HF. Results In comparison to LF patients, responses to pain in HF patients were significantly lower in the caudate, putamen and pallidum. Paradoxically, associated with these lower responses in HF patients, gray matter volume of the right and left caudate nuclei were significantly larger than in the LF patients. Functional connectivity analysis revealed additional differences between the two groups in regard to response to pain. Conclusions Supported by current understanding of basal ganglia role in pain processing, the findings suggest a significant role of the basal ganglia in the pathophysiology of the episodic migraine.

  4. Migraine and magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Younis, Samaira; Hougaard, Anders; Vestergaard, Mark B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation in the meth......Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation...... in the methodology and quality of the MRS migraine studies over time, some results were consistent and reproducible. 31P-MRS studies suggested reduced availability of neuronal energy and implied a mitochondrial dysfunction in the migraine brain. 1H-MRS studies reported interictal abnormalities in the excitatory...... and inhibitory neurotransmitters, glutamate and g-aminobutyric acid (GABA), suggesting persistent altered excitability in migraine patients. N-Acetylaspartate levels were decreased in migraine, probably due to a mitochondrial dysfunction and abnormal energy metabolism. The reported abnormalities may increase...

  5. Migraine patients consistently show abnormal vestibular bedside tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Teixeira Maranhão

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Migraine and vertigo are common disorders, with lifetime prevalences of 16% and 7% respectively, and co-morbidity around 3.2%. Vestibular syndromes and dizziness occur more frequently in migraine patients. We investigated bedside clinical signs indicative of vestibular dysfunction in migraineurs.Objective To test the hypothesis that vestibulo-ocular reflex, vestibulo-spinal reflex and fall risk (FR responses as measured by 14 bedside tests are abnormal in migraineurs without vertigo, as compared with controls.Method Cross-sectional study including sixty individuals – thirty migraineurs, 25 women, 19-60 y-o; and 30 gender/age healthy paired controls.Results Migraineurs showed a tendency to perform worse in almost all tests, albeit only the Romberg tandem test was statistically different from controls. A combination of four abnormal tests better discriminated the two groups (93.3% specificity.Conclusion Migraine patients consistently showed abnormal vestibular bedside tests when compared with controls.

  6. Migraine patients consistently show abnormal vestibular bedside tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranhão, Eliana Teixeira; Maranhão-Filho, Péricles; Luiz, Ronir Raggio; Vincent, Maurice Borges

    2016-01-01

    Migraine and vertigo are common disorders, with lifetime prevalences of 16% and 7% respectively, and co-morbidity around 3.2%. Vestibular syndromes and dizziness occur more frequently in migraine patients. We investigated bedside clinical signs indicative of vestibular dysfunction in migraineurs. To test the hypothesis that vestibulo-ocular reflex, vestibulo-spinal reflex and fall risk (FR) responses as measured by 14 bedside tests are abnormal in migraineurs without vertigo, as compared with controls. Cross-sectional study including sixty individuals - thirty migraineurs, 25 women, 19-60 y-o; and 30 gender/age healthy paired controls. Migraineurs showed a tendency to perform worse in almost all tests, albeit only the Romberg tandem test was statistically different from controls. A combination of four abnormal tests better discriminated the two groups (93.3% specificity). Migraine patients consistently showed abnormal vestibular bedside tests when compared with controls.

  7. Refractory chronic migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martelletti, Paolo; Katsarava, Zaza; Lampl, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The debate on the clinical definition of refractory Chronic Migraine (rCM) is still far to be concluded. The importance to create a clinical framing of these rCM patients resides in the complete disability they show, in the high risk of serious adverse events from acute and preventative drugs...... and in the uncontrolled application of therapeutic techniques not yet validated.The European Headache Federation Expert Group on rCM presents hereby the updated definition criteria for this harmful subset of headache disorders. This attempt wants to be the first impulse towards the correct identification...... of these patients, the correct application of innovative therapeutic techniques and lastly aim to be acknowledged as clinical entity in the next definitive version of the International Classification of Headache Disorders 3 (ICHD-3 beta)....

  8. Low 5-HT1B receptor binding in the migraine brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deen, Marie; Hansen, Hanne D; Hougaard, Anders

    2018-01-01

    Background The pathophysiology of migraine may involve dysfunction of serotonergic signaling. In particular, the 5-HT1B receptor is considered a key player due to the efficacy of 5-HT1B receptor agonists for treatment of migraine attacks. Aim To examine the cerebral 5-HT1B receptor binding....... Patients who reported migraine brain regions involved in pain modulation as regions of interest and applied a latent variable model (LVM) to assess the group effect on binding across these regions. Results Our data...... support a model wherein group status predicts the latent variable ( p = 0.038), with migraine patients having lower 5-HT1B receptor binding across regions compared to controls. Further, in a whole-brain voxel-based analysis, time since last migraine attack correlated positively with 5-HT1B receptor...

  9. Ischaemia-induced (symptomatic) migraine attacks may be more frequent than migraine-induced ischaemic insults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jes; Friberg, L; Olsen, T S

    1993-01-01

    deficits after the very first migraine attack, severe atherosclerosis, risk factors for stroke, high age and no family history of migraine. In these cases the evidence indicates that thromboembolic ischaemia had triggered an attack of migraine with aura (likely symptomatic migraine). Three young females...

  10. Visual Disturbances: Related to Migraine or Not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... impact during MHAM What is Migraine and Headache Awareness Month? June is Migraine and Headache Awareness Month, ... approved last week, which is called erenumab, the brand name of which is Aimovig, is a monoclonal ...

  11. Hair Transplantation in Migraine Headache Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safvet Ors, MD

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions:. This report details 6 patients who experienced abatement of migraine headache symptoms following hair transplantation. The positive effects of hair transplantation on migraine headache and potential mechanisms of action are also discussed.

  12. Migraine, the heart and the brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppen, H.

    2018-01-01

    The association between migraine and silent ischemic brain lesions was investigated. Also the occurence of right-to-left shunts in different migraine groups and controls. The functional consequences of silent ischemic brain lesions were investigated.

  13. Migraine Medications and Antidepressants: A Risky Mix?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What are the health risks associated with taking migraine medications and antidepressants at the same time? Answers ... W. Swanson, M.D. Reports suggest that combining migraine medications called triptans with certain antidepressants — including selective ...

  14. Epigone migraine vertigo (EMV): a late migraine equivalent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagnini, P; Vannucchi, P; Giannoni, B; Pecci, R

    2014-02-01

    Migrainous headache is determined by pathogenetic mechanisms that are also able to affect the peripheral and/or central vestibular system, so that vestibular symptoms may substitute and/or present with headache. We are convinced that there can be many different manifestations of vestibular disorders in migrainous patients, representing true different clinical entities due to their different characteristics and temporal relashionship with headache. Based on such considerations, we proposed a classification of vertigo and other vestibular disorders related to migraine, and believe that a particular variant of migraine-related vertigo should be introduced, namely "epigone migraine vertigo" (EMV): this could be a kind of late migraine equivalent, i.e. a kind of vertigo, migrainous in origin, starting late in the lifetime that substitutes, as an equivalent, pre-existing migraine headache. To clarify this particular clinical picture, we report three illustrative clinical cases among 28 patients collected during an observation period of 13 years (November 1991 - November 2004). For all patients, we collected complete personal clinical history. All patients underwent standard neurotological examination, looking for spontaneous-positional, gaze-evoked and caloric induced nystagmus, using an infrared video camera. We also performed a head shaking test (HST) and an head thrust test (HTT). Ocular motility was tested looking at saccades and smooth pursuit. To exclude other significant neurological pathologies, a brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with gadolinium was performed. During the three months after the first visit, patients were invited to keep a diary noting frequency, intensity and duration of vertigo attacks. After that period, we suggested that they use prophylactic treatment with flunarizine (5 mg per day) and/or acetylsalicylic acid (100 mg per day), or propranolol (40 mg twice a day). All patients were again recommended to note in their diary the frequency

  15. Transcranial magnetic simulation in the treatment of migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipton, Richard B; Pearlman, Starr H

    2010-04-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a diagnostic and therapeutic modality that is being developed as both an acute and preventive treatment for migraine. TMS delivers a fluctuating magnetic field from the scalp surface to induce current in the subjacent cortex. Magnetic pulses are delivered one at a time in single-pulse TMS (sTMS) or as a train of pulses in repetitive TMS (rTMS). For most of its 30-year history, TMS has been delivered in clinical and research settings using large tabletop devices. Based on the theory that sTMS may disrupt cortical spreading depression, sTMS has been studied and shown to be effective as an acute treatment for migraine with aura. Subsequent work in animal models confirms that sTMS disrupts cortical spreading depression. To make outpatient self-treatment possible, a portable device has been developed for acute treatment of migraine with aura. Based on the theory that rTMS alters brain excitability and neurotransmitter activity, rTMS has been studied as a preventive migraine treatment. A small body of evidence suggests that rTMS may have a role, but further studies are needed. In this review, we summarize the data on TMS as a treatment of migraine, and we suggest directions for future research. Copyright 2010 The American Society for Experimental NeuroTherapeutics, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Biofeedback as Prophylaxis for Pediatric Migraine: A Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubberud, Anker; Varkey, Emma; McCrory, Douglas C; Pedersen, Sindre Andre; Linde, Mattias

    2016-08-01

    Migraine is a common problem in children and adolescents, but few satisfactory prophylactic treatments exist. Our goal was to investigate the pooled evidence for the effectiveness of using biofeedback to reduce childhood migraine. A systematic search was conducted across the databases Medline, Embase, CENTRAL, CINAHL, and PsychINFO. Prospective, randomized controlled trials of biofeedback for migraine among children and adolescents were located in the search. Data on reduction of mean attack frequency and a series of secondary outcomes, including adverse events, were extracted. Risk of bias was also assessed. Forest plots were created by using a fixed effects model, and mean differences were reported. Five studies with a total of 137 participants met the inclusion criteria. Biofeedback reduced migraine frequency (mean difference, -1.97 [95% confidence interval (CI), -2.72 to -1.21]; P Biofeedback demonstrated no adjuvant effect when combined with other behavioral treatment; neither did it have significant advantages over active treatment. Only 40% of bias judgments were deemed as "low" risk. Methodologic issues hampered the meta-analyses. Only a few studies were possible to include, and they suffered from incomplete reporting of data and risk of bias. Biofeedback seems to be an effective intervention for pediatric migraine, but in light of the limitations, further investigation is needed to increase our confidence in the estimate. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  17. Migraine and subclinical atherosclerosis in the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulart, Alessandra C; Santos, Itamar S; Bittencourt, Márcio S; Lotufo, Paulo A; Benseñor, Isabela M

    2016-08-01

    The relationship between migraine and coronary heart disease (CHD) remains controversial. We aimed to investigate the association of subclinical atherosclerosis and migraine with or without aura compared to a non-migraine subgroup (reference) in a large Brazilian multicentric cohort study, the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil). Migraine diagnostic was based on International Headache Society criteria, and aura symptoms were validated by a medical doctor in a sub-sample of the ELSA-Brasil, who also underwent coronary artery calcium score (CAC) and carotid intima-media thickness (C-IMT) evaluations. Subclinical atherosclerosis indexes (CAC and C-IMT) were analyzed as dependent variables and migraine (all, with aura, without aura) as an independent variable in the linear and multinomial logistic regression models adjusted for possible confounders. Of 3217 ELSA participants free from CVD at baseline, we found a migraine frequency of 11.9% (5.1% with aura and 6.8% without aura). Overall, migraineurs were mostly women, younger and had lower frequency of CV risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes and low HDL-cholesterol, compared to non-migraineurs. The strongest inverse correlation between migraine and subclinical atherosclerosis was verified with CAC score. However, all associations lost their significance after multivariate adjustment. In this cross-sectional evaluation of the ELSA study, migraine was not associated with subclinical atherosclerosis, regardless of aura symptoms. © International Headache Society 2015.

  18. Serum Bilirubin and Their Association With C-Reactive Protein in Patients With Migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, You-Fan; Xie, Li-Qiu; Xiang, Yang; Xu, Gui-Dan

    2016-11-01

    Increased levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) have been considered as a marker in assessing neurogenic inflammation of migraine patients. An inverse relationship between serum bilirubin and CRP has been observed in various diseases. Therefore, we analyzed serum bilirubin levels in migraine patients, and investigated the relationship between serum bilirubin and CRP in migraineurs. A total of 86 newly diagnosed migraine patients were consecutively recruited to this study. Significantly lower median serum total bilirubin, conjugated bilirubin (CB) and unconjugated bilirubin were found in patients with migraine than healthy controls, and the levels of CRP were significantly higher in migraine patients than healthy controls. A negative correlation between CRP and CB was observed in patients with migraine (r = -0.255, P = 0.018). In a multiple linear regression model, the concentrations of CRP remained negatively correlated with CB. Our study demonstrates that serum bilirubin concentrations are decreased in migraineurs, and CB levels were found to be positively correlated with CRP in migraine patents. However, larger cross-sectional and prospective studies are needed to establish whether serum bilirubin may be a useful biomarker for assessing neurogenic inflammation in migraine patients and eventually guiding the therapy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Prevention for Pediatric and Adolescent Migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, Carolyn; Lewis, Kara Stuart; Little, Robert; Rastogi, Reena Gogia; Yonker, Marcy

    2015-01-01

    Children and adolescents can experience significant disability from frequent migraine. A number of tools have been developed to help quantify the impact of migraine in this population. Many preventative medications used in adults are routinely used to prevent migraines in children, although there has been less rigorous study. This article reviews the indications and evidence for the use of migraine preventatives, such as antidepressants, antihypertensives, anticonvulsants, antihistamines, and botulinum toxin, in this population. © 2015 American Headache Society.

  20. mRNA expression profile of prostaglandin D2 receptors in rat trigeminovascular system, and effect of prostaglandins in rat migraine models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sekeroglu, A.; Jansen-Olesen, I.; Gupta, S.

    2015-01-01

    not changed in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis. Conclusions: PGD2 induced vasodilation of MMA is mainly mediated by activation of DP1 receptors. Furthermore, high expression of DP1 mRNA in TG and DRG suggest that PGD2 might play a role in migraine pathophysiology. However, infusion of PG mix in awake rats did...

  1. Prodromal functioning of migraine patients relative to their interictal state--an ecological momentary assessment study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan H Houtveen

    Full Text Available Smartphones were used in an online Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA design to test prodromal functioning relative to the interictal state in migraine patients. Eighty-seven participants completed an electronic diary 4 times daily during 3-6 weeks to monitor their migraine attacks. Twice daily the diary additionally included 16 multi-answer questions covering physical symptoms (30 items, cognitive-affective functioning (25 items and external factors (25 items. Eight clustered prodromal features were identified in the current study: sensory sensitivity, pain/stiffness, fatigue, cognitive functioning, positive affect, negative affect, effort spent and stressors encountered. Per feature, individual change scores with interictal control days--excluding 24-hour post-attack recovery--were computed for six 12-hour pre-attack time windows covering three prodromal days. Linear mixed model (fixed-effect analysis established significant increases in sensory sensitivity, pain/stiffness and fatigue, and a tendency for increased negative affect, in the 12 hours prior to the attack. Positive affect and cognitive functioning were impaired both in the 25-36 hour and--more strongly--in the 12-hour time window before the attack. No effects were found for effort spent and stressors encountered. Exploratory (random effect analysis revealed significant individual differences in the change scores in sensory sensitivity, pain/stiffness, fatigue and negative affect. It is concluded that the prodromal change in migraine--relative to interictal functioning--predominantly exists within the last 12 hours before attack onset. Individual diversity is large, however. Future research should zoom in to identify prodrome development within the 12 pre-attack hours as well as to isolate individual patterns.

  2. The impact of migraine on health status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Essink-Bot, M L; van Royen, L; Krabbe, P; Bonsel, G J; Rutten, F F

    PROBLEMS: What is the effect of migraine on health status, defined as the patient's physical, psychological, and social functioning? And, suppose that the health status of migraine sufferers appears to be impaired, to what extent is this a consequence of migraine-associated comorbidity rather than

  3. The impact of migraine on health status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Essink-Bot, M. L.; van Royen, L.; Krabbe, P.; Bonsel, G. J.; Rutten, F. F.

    1995-01-01

    PROBLEMS--What is the effect of migraine on health status, defined as the patient's physical, psychological, and social functioning? And, suppose that the health status of migraine sufferers appears to be impaired, to what extent is this a consequence of migraine-associated comorbidity rather than

  4. Migraine symptomatology and major depressive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligthart, Lannie; Penninx, Brenda; Nyholt, Dale R.; Distel, Marijn A.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Smit, Johannes H.; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    Introduction and objective: Migraine and major depressive disorder (MDD) frequently co-occur, but it is unclear whether depression is associated with a specific subtype of migraine. The objective of this study was to investigate whether migraine is qualitatively different in MDD patients (N = 1816)

  5. Common Variant Burden Contributes to the Familial Aggregation of Migraine in 1,589 Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormley, Padhraig; Kurki, Mitja I; Hiekkala, Marjo Eveliina; Veerapen, Kumar; Häppölä, Paavo; Mitchell, Adele A; Lal, Dennis; Palta, Priit; Surakka, Ida; Kaunisto, Mari Anneli; Hämäläinen, Eija; Vepsäläinen, Salli; Havanka, Hannele; Harno, Hanna; Ilmavirta, Matti; Nissilä, Markku; Säkö, Erkki; Sumelahti, Marja-Liisa; Liukkonen, Jarmo; Sillanpää, Matti; Metsähonkala, Liisa; Koskinen, Seppo; Lehtimäki, Terho; Raitakari, Olli; Männikkö, Minna; Ran, Caroline; Belin, Andrea Carmine; Jousilahti, Pekka; Anttila, Verneri; Salomaa, Veikko; Artto, Ville; Färkkilä, Markus; Runz, Heiko; Daly, Mark J; Neale, Benjamin M; Ripatti, Samuli; Kallela, Mikko; Wessman, Maija; Palotie, Aarno

    2018-05-16

    Complex traits, including migraine, often aggregate in families, but the underlying genetic architecture behind this is not well understood. The aggregation could be explained by rare, penetrant variants that segregate according to Mendelian inheritance or by the sufficient polygenic accumulation of common variants, each with an individually small effect, or a combination of the two hypotheses. In 8,319 individuals across 1,589 migraine families, we calculated migraine polygenic risk scores (PRS) and found a significantly higher common variant burden in familial cases (n = 5,317, OR = 1.76, 95% CI = 1.71-1.81, p = 1.7 × 10 -109 ) compared to population cases from the FINRISK cohort (n = 1,101, OR = 1.32, 95% CI = 1.25-1.38, p = 7.2 × 10 -17 ). The PRS explained 1.6% of the phenotypic variance in the population cases and 3.5% in the familial cases (including 2.9% for migraine without aura, 5.5% for migraine with typical aura, and 8.2% for hemiplegic migraine). The results demonstrate a significant contribution of common polygenic variation to the familial aggregation of migraine. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Migraine classification using magnetic resonance imaging resting-state functional connectivity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Catherine D; Gaw, Nathan; Fu, Yinlin; Li, Jing; Wu, Teresa; Schwedt, Todd J

    2017-08-01

    Background This study used machine-learning techniques to develop discriminative brain-connectivity biomarkers from resting-state functional magnetic resonance neuroimaging ( rs-fMRI) data that distinguish between individual migraine patients and healthy controls. Methods This study included 58 migraine patients (mean age = 36.3 years; SD = 11.5) and 50 healthy controls (mean age = 35.9 years; SD = 11.0). The functional connections of 33 seeded pain-related regions were used as input for a brain classification algorithm that tested the accuracy of determining whether an individual brain MRI belongs to someone with migraine or to a healthy control. Results The best classification accuracy using a 10-fold cross-validation method was 86.1%. Resting functional connectivity of the right middle temporal, posterior insula, middle cingulate, left ventromedial prefrontal and bilateral amygdala regions best discriminated the migraine brain from that of a healthy control. Migraineurs with longer disease durations were classified more accurately (>14 years; 96.7% accuracy) compared to migraineurs with shorter disease durations (≤14 years; 82.1% accuracy). Conclusions Classification of migraine using rs-fMRI provides insights into pain circuits that are altered in migraine and could potentially contribute to the development of a new, noninvasive migraine biomarker. Migraineurs with longer disease burden were classified more accurately than migraineurs with shorter disease burden, potentially indicating that disease duration leads to reorganization of brain circuitry.

  7. Toward a rational understanding of migraine trigger factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, V T; Behbehani, M M

    2001-07-01

    The typical migraine patient is exposed to a myriad of migraine triggers on a daily basis. These triggers potentially can act at various sites within the cerebral vasculature and the central nervous system to promote the development of migraine headache. The challenge to the physician is in the identification and avoidance of migraine trigger factors within patients suffering from migraine headache. Only through a rational approach to migraine trigger factors can physicians develop an appropriate treatment strategy for migraine patients.

  8. Migraine and cognitive function: Baseline findings from the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health: ELSA-Brasil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino Baena, Cristina; Goulart, Alessandra Carvalho; Santos, Itamar de Souza; Suemoto, Claudia Kimie; Lotufo, Paulo Andrade; Bensenor, Isabela Judith

    2017-01-01

    Background The association between migraine and cognitive performance is unclear. We analyzed whether migraine is associated with cognitive performance among participants of the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health, ELSA-Brasil. Methods Cross-sectional analysis, including participants with complete information about migraine and aura at baseline. Headache status (no headaches, non-migraine headaches, migraine without aura and migraine with aura), based on the International Headache Society classification, was used as the dependent variable in the multilinear regression models, using the category "no headache" as reference. Cognitive performance was measured with the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease word list memory test (CERAD-WLMT), the semantic fluency test (SFT), and the Trail Making Test version B (TMTB). Z-scores for each cognitive test and a composite global score were created and analyzed as dependent variables. Multivariate models were adjusted for age, gender, education, race, coronary heart disease, heart failure, hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, body mass index, smoking, alcohol use, physical activity, depression, and anxiety. In women, the models were further adjusted for hormone replacement therapy. Results We analyzed 4208 participants. Of these, 19% presented migraine without aura and 10.3% presented migraine with aura. All migraine headaches were associated with poor cognitive performance (linear coefficient β; 95% CI) at TMTB -0.083 (-0.160; -0.008) and poorer global z-score -0.077 (-0.152; -0.002). Also, migraine without aura was associated with poor cognitive performance at TMTB -0.084 (-0.160, -0.008 and global z-score -0.077 (-0.152; -0.002). Conclusion In participants of the ELSA-study, all migraine headaches and migraine without aura were significantly and independently associated with poorer cognitive performance.

  9. Harnessing migraines for neural regeneration

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    Jonathan M Borkum

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The success of naturalistic or therapeutic neuroregeneration likely depends on an internal milieu that facilitates the survival, proliferation, migration, and differentiation of stem cells and their assimilation into neural networks. Migraine attacks are an integrated sequence of physiological processes that may protect the brain from oxidative stress by releasing growth factors, suppressing apoptosis, stimulating neurogenesis, encouraging mitochondrial biogenesis, reducing the production of oxidants, and upregulating antioxidant defenses. Thus, the migraine attack may constitute a physiologic environment conducive to stem cells. In this paper, key components of migraine are reviewed – neurogenic inflammation with release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP and substance P, plasma protein extravasation, platelet activation, release of serotonin by platelets and likely by the dorsal raphe nucleus, activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and, in migraine aura, cortical spreading depression – along with their potential neurorestorative aspects. The possibility is considered of using these components to facilitate successful stem cell transplantation. Potential methods for doing so are discussed, including chemical stimulation of the TRPA1 ion channel, conjoint activation of a subset of migraine components, invasive and noninvasive deep brain stimulation of the dorsal raphe nucleus, transcranial focused ultrasound, and stimulation of the Zusanli (ST36 acupuncture point.

  10. Trajectories and models of individual growth

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    Arseniy Karkach

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available It has long been recognized that the patterns of growth play an important role in the evolution of age trajectories of fertility and mortality (Williams, 1957. Life history studies would benefit from a better understanding of strategies and mechanisms of growth, but still no comparative research on individual growth strategies has been conducted. Growth patterns and methods have been shaped by evolution and a great variety of them are observed. Two distinct patterns - determinate and indeterminate growth - are of a special interest for these studies since they present qualitatively different outcomes of evolution. We attempt to draw together studies covering growth in plant and animal species across a wide range of phyla focusing primarily on the noted qualitative features. We also review mathematical descriptions of growth, namely empirical growth curves and growth models, and discuss the directions of future research.

  11. The relationship between migraine and lipid sub-fractions among individuals without cardiovascular disease: A cross-sectional evaluation in the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulart, Alessandra C; Lotufo, Paulo A; Santos, Itamar S; Bittencourt, Márcio S; Santos, Raul D; Blaha, Michael J; Jones, Steven; Toth, Peter P; Kulkarni, Krishnaji; Benseñor, Isabela M

    2018-03-01

    Introduction Recent studies have explored the relationship between dyslipidemia and migraine in a cardiovascular context. Thus, we aimed to evaluate the possible association between lipids, lipoprotein subfractions and migraine according to aura symptoms in the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil). Methods 1,560 women and 1,595 men, without CVD or lipid disorders requiring medication, underwent a baseline clinical assessment. Total-cholesterol and its sub-fractions (LDL, VLDL and HDL subclass cholesterol); triglycerides and triglyceride-rich lipoprotein cholesterol [TRL-C (VLDL 1+2 -C VLDL 3 -C + IDL-C)] were determined by vertical auto profile (VAP). We also calculated logarithmic LDL density ratio [LLDR = ln ((LDL 3 -C + LDL 4 -C)/(LDL 1 -C + LDL 2 -C))], T-Chol/HDL-C and triglycerides/HDL-C ratios. Odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were obtained to evaluate the relationship between lipids tertiles and migraine for both sexes. Results Main findings revealed positive associations between migraine without aura (MO) and the highest tertiles of VLDL-C (OR, 1.61; 95%CI, 1.07-2.40) and TRL-C (OR, 1.55; 95% CI, 1.03-2.34) in women. In men, the highest tertile of VLDL 3 -C (OR, 3.87; 95%CI, 1.23-12.19) was positively associated with MO, as well. Conclusions In middle-aged participants without CVD or lipid disorders requiring medication, the worst lipid profile was determined by the highest levels of TRL-C and their cholesterol-rich remnants in migraineurs without aura for both sexes.

  12. Serial MRI in a case of familial hemiplegic migraine

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    Butteriss, D.J.A.; Birchall, D. [Department of Neuroradiology, Regional Neurosciences Centre Newcastle General Hospital, Westgate Road, NE4 6BE, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Ramesh, V. [Department of Paediatric Neurology, Regional Neurosciences Centre Newcastle General Hospital, Westgate Road, NE4 6BE, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom)

    2003-05-01

    We report MRI findings in a patient with familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) with repeated episodes of hemiparesis. FHM is caused by a penetrant autosomal dominant genetic mutation; several mutations have been genotyped, involving brain-expressed ion channels. We found cerebral oedema, dilatation of intracerebral vessels and decreased water diffusion contralateral to the hemiparesis, not respecting vascular territories, with subsequent complete resolution of both clinical and imaging abnormalities. These results are thought to be consistent with an underlying primary neuronal pathology with secondary vascular effects, as opposed to the traditional, primarily vascular, model of migraine aetiology. (orig.)

  13. Statistical testing of association between menstruation and migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barra, Mathias; Dahl, Fredrik A; Vetvik, Kjersti G

    2015-02-01

    To repair and refine a previously proposed method for statistical analysis of association between migraine and menstruation. Menstrually related migraine (MRM) affects about 20% of female migraineurs in the general population. The exact pathophysiological link from menstruation to migraine is hypothesized to be through fluctuations in female reproductive hormones, but the exact mechanisms remain unknown. Therefore, the main diagnostic criterion today is concurrency of migraine attacks with menstruation. Methods aiming to exclude spurious associations are wanted, so that further research into these mechanisms can be performed on a population with a true association. The statistical method is based on a simple two-parameter null model of MRM (which allows for simulation modeling), and Fisher's exact test (with mid-p correction) applied to standard 2 × 2 contingency tables derived from the patients' headache diaries. Our method is a corrected version of a previously published flawed framework. To our best knowledge, no other published methods for establishing a menstruation-migraine association by statistical means exist today. The probabilistic methodology shows good performance when subjected to receiver operator characteristic curve analysis. Quick reference cutoff values for the clinical setting were tabulated for assessing association given a patient's headache history. In this paper, we correct a proposed method for establishing association between menstruation and migraine by statistical methods. We conclude that the proposed standard of 3-cycle observations prior to setting an MRM diagnosis should be extended with at least one perimenstrual window to obtain sufficient information for statistical processing. © 2014 American Headache Society.

  14. Vestibular migraine: clinical and epidemiological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligia Oliveira Gonçalves Morganti

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Vestibular migraine (VM is one of the most often common diagnoses in neurotology, but only recently has been recognized as a disease. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the clinical and epidemiological profile of patients with VM. METHODS: This was a retrospective, observational, and descriptive study, with analysis of patients' records from an outpatient VM clinic. RESULTS: 94.1% of patients were females and 5.9% were males. The mean age was 46.1 years; 65.6% of patients had had headache for a longer period than dizziness. A correlation was detected between VM symptoms and the menstrual period. 61.53% of patients had auditory symptoms, with tinnitus the most common, although tonal audiometry was normal in 68.51%. Vectoelectronystagmography was normal in 67.34%, 10.20% had hyporeflexia, and 22.44% had vestibular hyperreflexia. Electrophysiological assessment showed no abnormalities in most patients. Fasting plasma glucose and glycemic curve were normal in most patients, while the insulin curve was abnormal in 75%. 82% of individuals with MV showed abnormalities on the metabolism of carbohydrates. CONCLUSION: VM affects predominantly middle-aged women, with migraine headache representing the first symptom, several years before vertigo. Physical, auditory, and vestibular evaluations are usually normal. The most frequent vestibular abnormality was hyperreflexia. Most individuals showed abnormality related to carbohydrate metabolism.

  15. Ineffective acute treatment of episodic migraine is associated with new-onset chronic migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipton, Richard B; Fanning, Kristina M; Serrano, Daniel; Reed, Michael L; Cady, Roger; Buse, Dawn C

    2015-02-17

    To test the hypothesis that ineffective acute treatment of episodic migraine (EM) is associated with an increased risk for the subsequent onset of chronic migraine (CM). In the American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention Study, respondents with EM in 2006 who completed the Migraine Treatment Optimization Questionnaire (mTOQ-4) and provided outcome data in 2007 were eligible for analyses. The mTOQ-4 is a validated questionnaire that assesses treatment efficacy based on 4 aspects of response to acute treatment. Total mTOQ-4 scores were used to define categories of acute treatment response: very poor, poor, moderate, and maximum treatment efficacy. Logistic regression models were used to examine the dichotomous outcome of transition from EM in 2006 to CM in 2007 as a function of mTOQ-4 category, adjusting for covariates. Among 5,681 eligible study respondents with EM in 2006, 3.1% progressed to CM in 2007. Only 1.9% of the group with maximum treatment efficacy developed CM. Rates of new-onset CM increased in the moderate treatment efficacy (2.7%), poor treatment efficacy (4.4%), and very poor treatment efficacy (6.8%) groups. In the fully adjusted model, the very poor treatment efficacy group had a more than 2-fold increased risk of new-onset CM (odds ratio = 2.55, 95% confidence interval 1.42-4.61) compared to the maximum treatment efficacy group. Inadequate acute treatment efficacy was associated with an increased risk of new-onset CM over the course of 1 year. Improving acute treatment outcomes might prevent new-onset CM, although reverse causality cannot be excluded. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  16. Migraine and risk of stroke: a national population-based twin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, Maria; Sieurin, Johanna; Sjölander, Arvid; Waldenlind, Elisabet; Sjöstrand, Christina; Wirdefeldt, Karin

    2017-10-01

    Numerous studies have indicated an increased risk for stroke in patients with migraine, especially migraine with aura; however, many studies used self-reported migraine and only a few controlled for familial factors. We aimed to investigate migraine as a risk factor for stroke in a Swedish population-based twin cohort, and whether familial factors contribute to an increased risk. The study population included twins without prior cerebrovascular disease who answered a headache questionnaire during 1998 and 2002 for twins born 1935-58 and during 2005-06 for twins born between 1959 and 1985. Migraine with and without aura and probable migraine was defined by an algorithm mapping on to clinical diagnostic criteria according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders. Stroke diagnoses were obtained from the national patient and cause of death registers. Twins were followed longitudinally, by linkage of national registers, from date of interview until date of first stroke, death, or end of study on 31 Dec 2014. In total, 8635 twins had any migraineous headache, whereof 3553 had migraine with aura and 5082 had non-aura migraineous headache (including migraine without aura and probable migraine), and 44 769 twins had no migraine. During a mean follow-up time of 11.9 years we observed 1297 incident cases of stroke. The Cox proportional hazards model with attained age as underlying time scale was used to estimate hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals for stroke including ischaemic and haemorrhagic subtypes related to migraine with aura, non-aura migraineous headache, and any migraineous headache. Analyses were adjusted for gender and cardiovascular risk factors. Where appropriate; within-pair analyses were performed to control for confounding by familial factors. The age- and gender-adjusted hazard ratio for stroke related to migraine with aura was 1.27 (95% confidence interval 1.00-1.62), P = 0.05, and 1.07 (95% confidence interval 0.91-1.26), P = 0

  17. Maternal stress and childhood migraine: a new perspective on management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esposito M

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Maria Esposito,1 Beatrice Gallai,2 Lucia Parisi,3 Michele Roccella,3 Rosa Marotta,4 Serena Marianna Lavano,4 Antonella Gritti,5 Giovanni Mazzotta,6 Marco Carotenuto11Center for Childhood Headache, Clinic of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, Department of Mental Health, Physical, and Preventive Medicine, Second University of Naples, Naples, 2Unit of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, University of Perugia, Perugia, 3Child Neuropsychiatry, Department of Psychology, University of Palermo, Palermo, 4Department of Psychiatry, "Magna Graecia" University of Catanzaro, Catanzaro, 5Suor Orsola Benincasa University, Naples, 6Unit of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, Azienda Sanitaria Locale 4, Terni, ItalyBackground: Migraine without aura is a primary headache which is frequent and disabling in the developmental age group. No reports are available concerning the prevalence and impact of migraine in children on the degree of stress experienced by parents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of maternal stress in a large pediatric sample of individuals affected by migraine without aura.Methods: The study population consisted of 218 children (112 boys, 106 girls of mean age 8.32 ± 2.06 (range 6–13 years suffering from migraine without aura and a control group of 405 typical developing children (207 boys, 198 girls of mean age 8.54 ± 2.47 years. Mothers of children in each group answered the Parent Stress Index-Short Form (PSI-SF questionnaire to assess parental stress levels.Results: The two groups were matched for age (P = 0.262, gender (P = 0.983, and body mass index adjusted for age (P = 0.106. Mothers of children with migraine without aura reported higher mean PSI-SF scores related to the Parental Distress domain (P < 0.001, Dysfunctional Parent-Child Interaction domain (P < 0.001, Difficult Child subscale (P < 0.001, and Total Stress domain than mothers of controls (P < 0.001. No differences between the two groups were

  18. Quality of Life and Migraine Disability among Female Migraine Patients in a Tertiary Hospital in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik, Munvar Miya; Hassan, Norul Badriah; Gan, Siew Hua

    2015-01-01

    Background. Disability caused by migraine may be one of the main causes of burden contributing to poor quality of life (QOL) among migraine patients. Thus, this study aimed to measure QOL among migraine sufferers in comparison with healthy controls. Methods. Female diagnosed migraine patients (n= 100) and healthy controls (n=100) completed the Malay version of the World Health Organization QOL Brief (WHOQOL-BREF) questionnaire. Only migraine patients completed the Malay version of the Migraine Disability Assessment questionnaire. Results. Females with migraines had significantly lower total WHOQOL-BREF scores (84.3) than did healthy controls (91.9, Pmigraine patients with lower total QOL scores had 1.2 times higher odds of having disability than patients with higher total QOL scores. Conclusions. The present study showed that migraine sufferers experienced significantly lower QOL than the control group from a similar population. Disability was severe and frequent and was associated with lower QOL among the migraine patients. PMID:25632394

  19. Sex and the Migraine Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsook, D; Erpelding, N; Lebel, A; Linnman, C; Veggeberg, R; Grant, PE; Buettner, C; Becerra, L; Burstein, R

    2014-01-01

    The brain responds differently to environmental and internal signals that relates to the stage of development of neural systems. While genetic and epigenetic factors contribute to a premorbid state, hormonal fluctuations in women may alter the set point of migraine. The cyclic surges of gonadal hormones may directly alter neuronal, glial and astrocyte function throughout the brain. Estrogen is mainly excitatory and progesterone inhibitory on brain neuronal systems. These changes contribute to the allostatic load of the migraine condition that most notably starts at puberty in girls. PMID:24662368

  20. Migraine and magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Younis, Samaira; Hougaard, Anders; Vestergaard, Mark B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation in the meth......Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation...

  1. Migraine among medical students in Kuwait University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hashel, Jasem Y; Ahmed, Samar Farouk; Alroughani, Raed; Goadsby, Peter J

    2014-05-10

    Medical students routinely have triggers, notably stress and irregular sleep, which are typically associated with migraine. We hypothesized that they may be at higher risk to manifest migraine. We aimed to determine the prevalence of migraine among medical students in Kuwait University. This is cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study. Participants who had two or more headaches in the last 3 months were subjected to two preliminary questions and participants with at least one positive response were asked to perform the validated Identification of Migraine (ID Migraine™) test. Frequency of headache per month and its severity were also reported. Migraine headache was suggested in 27.9% subjects based on ID-Migraine™. Migraine prevalence (35.5% and 44%, versus 31.1%, 25%, 21.1%, 14.8%, 26.5%, p Kuwait University compared to other published studies. The migraine prevalence, frequency and headache severity, all increased in the final two years of education.

  2. Unilateral nasal pain with migraine features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Mónica; Montojo, Teresa; de la Casa, Beatriz; Vela, Lydia; Pareja, Juan A

    2013-09-01

    Migraine attacks exclusively felt in the face are very rare, the pain involving the territories supplied by the second and third branches of the trigeminal nerve. Two patients suffering from heminasal pain attacks accompanied with typical migrainous features and responsive to oral or intranasal triptans - but not to intranasal lidocaine or oxymetazoline. In one patient, the attacks could be precipitated upon slight touching on the tip of the nose, in the other attacks were preceded by the nasal sensation typically heralding sneezing. Migraine pain mostly develops within the innervation territory of the first branch of the trigeminal nerve, which includes the nose. Therefore, episodes of unilateral nasal pain with migrainous features could be considered a migraine with unusual topography (nasal migraine). Painful nasal attacks occasionally preceded by stimulation of trigeminal afferents in the nose, could be conceived of as migraine-tic syndrome.

  3. Serotonergic mechanisms in the migraine brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Marie Deen; Christensen, Casper Emil; Hougaard, Anders

    2017-01-01

    role of brain serotonergic mechanisms remains a matter of controversy. Methods We systematically searched PubMed for studies investigating the serotonergic system in the migraine brain by either molecular neuroimaging or electrophysiological methods. Results The literature search resulted in 59 papers......, of which 13 were eligible for review. The reviewed papers collectively support the notion that migraine patients have alterations in serotonergic neurotransmission. Most likely, migraine patients have a low cerebral serotonin level between attacks, which elevates during a migraine attack. Conclusion...... This review suggests that novel methods of investigating the serotonergic system in the migraine brain are warranted. Uncovering the serotonergic mechanisms in migraine pathophysiology could prove useful for the development of future migraine drugs....

  4. Headache impact of chronic and episodic migraine: results from the American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buse, Dawn; Manack, Aubrey; Serrano, Daniel; Reed, Michael; Varon, Sepideh; Turkel, Catherine; Lipton, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The Headache Impact Test-6 (HIT-6) has been demonstrated to be a reliable and valid measure that assesses the impact of headaches on the lives of persons with migraine. Originally used in studies of episodic migraine (EM), HIT-6 is finding increasing applications in chronic migraine (CM) research. (1) To examine the headache-impact on persons with migraine (EM and CM) using HIT-6 in a large population sample; (2) to identify predictors of headache-impact in this sample; (3) to assess the magnitude of effect for significant predictors of headache-impact in this sample. The American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention study is a longitudinal, population-based study that collected data from persons with severe headache from 2004 to 2009 through annual, mailed surveys. Respondents to the 2009 survey who met International Classification of Headache Disorders 2 criteria for migraine reported at least 1 headache in the preceding year, and completed the HIT-6 questionnaire were included in the present analysis. Persons with migraine were categorized as EM (average headache days per month) or CM (average ≥15 headache days per month). Predictors of headache-impact examined include: sociodemographics; headache days per month; a composite migraine symptom severity score (MSS); an average pain severity rating during the most recent long-duration headache; depression; and anxiety. HIT-6 scores were analyzed both as continuous sum scores and using the standard, validated categories: no impact; some impact; substantial impact; and severe impact. Group contrasts were based on descriptive statistics along with linear regression models. Multiple imputation techniques were used to manage missing data. There were 7169 eligible respondents (CM = 373, EM = 6554). HIT-6 scores were normally distributed. After converting sum HIT-6 scores to the standard categories, those with CM were significantly more likely to experience "severe" headache impact (72.9% vs 42.3%) and had higher odds of

  5. Decreased Openness to Experience Is Associated with Migraine-Type Headaches in Subjects with Lifetime Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mate Magyar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionMigraine and depression frequently occur as comorbid conditions, and it has been hypothesized that migraine with and without depression may have a different genetic background. A distinct personality trait constellation has been described in migraineurs. Less attention, however, was paid to personality differences in migraineurs with and without depression which may also shed light on differences in the neurobiological, background. The aim of our study was to investigate big five personality traits, headaches, and lifetime depression (DEP in a large European general population sample.MethodsRelationship between DEP, Big Five Inventory personality traits, and headaches identified by the ID-Migraine Questionnaire were investigated in 3,026 individuals from Budapest and Manchester with multivariate and logistic regression analyses.ResultsBoth DEP and migraine(ID showed differences in personality traits. Neuroticism was an independent risk factor for both conditions while a significant interaction effect appeared between the two in the case of openness. Namely, subjects with migraine(ID and without DEP scored higher on openness compared to those who had depression.ConclusionWhile we confirmed previous results that high neuroticism is a risk factor for both depression and migraine, openness to experience was significantly lower in the co-occurrence of migraine and depression. Our results suggest that increased openness, possibly manifested in optimal or advantageous cognitive processing of pain experience in migraine may decrease the risk of co-occurrence of depression and migraine and thus may provide valuable insight for newer prevention and intervention approaches in the treatment of these conditions.

  6. The effect of anxiety and depression on the risk of irritable bowel syndrome in migraine patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mei-Fong; Yang, Yu-Wen; Chen, Yen-Yu

    2017-10-01

    Bidirectional co-morbidity between migraine and depression has been observed. Mood disorders are associated with an increased risk of both migraine and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The aim of this study was to evaluate the risk of developing IBS in patients with migraine and to compare the risks between those with and without anxiety or depression. This research used the data contained in the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). A total of 2859 subjects with migraine and 5718 age-, sex-, hypertension-, diabetes-, mood disorder-matched controls were identified. Both cohorts excluded subjects with pre-existing catastrophic illness and IBS diagnosed before the index visit or within 30days after the index visit. All individuals of both cohorts were tracked until either having the diagnosis of IBS, loss of follow-up, or IBS free up to 7years. During the 7-year follow-up period, 8.4% of patients with migraine and 5.4% of control cohort developed IBS. Migraine is associated with an increased risk of developing IBS (HR=1.58, 95% CI: 1.33-1.87). When separating the cohort into those with mood disorder and without it, migraine is a significant risk factor of IBS in patients without mood disorders, but not in patients with co-existed mood disorders. The findings of this study suggest that migraine is a risk factor of future IBS development for those without comorbid anxiety or depression. However, migraine does not contribute significantly additional risk to IBS development in patients with comorbid anxiety or depression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Responsiveness of migraine-ACT and MIDAS questionnaires for assessing migraine therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, María Luisa; Baos, Vicente; Láinez, Miguel; Pascual, Julio; López-Gil, Arturo

    2008-10-01

    Migraine is frequently undertreated. The 4-item Migraine Assessment of Current Therapy (Migraine-ACT) questionnaire is a simple and reliable tool to identify patients requiring a change in current acute migraine treatment. To investigate the responsiveness of the Migraine-ACT tool, and compare it with that of the Migraine Disability Assessment (MIDAS) questionnaire, for patients with migraine at 1100 primary care sites in Spain. Patients eligible for this open-label, 2-visit prospective study reported migraine for >1 year and >or=1 migraine attack per month and were new to the clinic or on follow-up care for MIDAS questionnaires were administered, and patient satisfaction with treatment was recorded, at baseline and at 3 months. A total of 3272 patients, 78% female, were enrolled, and 2877 (88%) returned for the 3-month visit. Investigators changed baseline migraine treatment for 72% of returning patients; 85% and 80% of these patients had improved Migraine-ACT and MIDAS scores at 3 months, respectively. Patients who reported being completely or very satisfied with migraine treatment numbered 492 (15%) at baseline and 1406 (49%) at 3 months. Migraine-ACT and MIDAS score agreement for improvement at 3 months was poor (kappa = 0.339). Both the mean MIDAS score and the distribution of Migraine-ACT scores improved over the course of 3 months; however, Migraine-ACT scores were significantly (P MIDAS scores. The area under the curve in the receiver-operating characteristic analysis was significantly (P MIDAS (0.70) questionnaire. These results suggest that the Migraine-ACT questionnaire can be used more reliably than the MIDAS questionnaire for detecting improvements in treatment of new and follow-up patients with migraine.

  8. The effects of Maras powder use on patients with migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İnanç Y

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Yılmaz İnanç,1 Fatma Özlem Orhan,2 Yusuf İnanç3 1Department of Neurology, Kahramanmaraş Sütçüimam University School of Medicine, Kahramanmaraş, Turkey; 2Department of Psychiatry, Kahramanmaraş Sütçüimam University School of Medicine, Kahramanmaraş, Turkey; 3Department of Neurology, Gaziantep University School of Medicine, Kahramanmaraş, Turkey Background: It is accepted that smoking often triggers migraine. However, studies evaluating the relationship between the use of smokeless tobacco and migraine are limited, and there is no clear consensus on the subject. In this study, it was aimed to evaluate the relationship between migraine and Maras powder, which is the most common smokeless tobacco in Turkey. Subjects and methods: The study included a total of 600 subjects, consisting of 300 patients (aged >18 years diagnosed with a migraine according to the International Headache Society (IHS-ICHD-3 Beta criteria after presenting at Sütçü Imam University Medical Faculty Neurology Policlinic with the complaint of headache between July 2016 and December 2016 and a control group of 300 individuals with similar features of age, gender, and educational level. A questionnaire was administered to each patient to record the status of smoking or using Maras powder. Results: In the migraine patient group, 16.4% smoked and 9.7% used Maras powder. In the control group, the rate of smoking was 8.5% and the rate of Maras powder use was 11.86%. In males diagnosed with a migraine, the use of Maras powder was found to be at a higher rate than smoking (p<0.001. The Visual Pain Score and the headache frequency values were higher in those who smoked or used Maras powder than in non-users (p<0.001. The Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence Smokeless Tobacco results of the patients diagnosed with migraine and who used Maras powder were found to be higher than of those who smoked (Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence; p<0.001. When patients were

  9. Triptans and migraine: advances in use, administration, formulation, and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macone, Amanda E; Perloff, Michael D

    2017-03-01

    Recent triptan development has focused on new administration methods and formulations, triptan combination therapies, treatment in menstrually related migraines, and novel serotonin receptor subtype agonists (5HTf). Areas covered: Clinical triptan research related to migraine was reviewed, analyzing EMBASE and PUBMED data bases from 01/01/2011 to 06/29/2016, with a focus on clinical trials of class 1 or 2 level of evidence. There have been advances in drug combination therapies, as well as administration devices that aid in ease of use, increase efficacy, and decrease adverse reactions. Some new agents and devices have similar or less efficacy compared to previous generic triptan formulations. New agents have action at the 5HTf receptor subtype, and avoid vascular side effects of classic 5Ht1b/d agonists, however adverse reactions may limit their clinic use. Long half-life triptans, frovatriptan and naratriptan, do appear to have good benefit in menstral related migraine. Expert opinion: Recent advances in triptan development can offer some advantages to migraine therapy and patient preferences, but have a much higher cost compared to individual generic triptan agents. In the coming years, triptan advances with high efficacy, limiting ADRs and cost are welcomed, in this regard the 5HT1b/d triptans are already well established.

  10. Pattern reversal visual evoked potentials in migraine subjects without aura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro F. Moreira Filho

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available Twenty seven patients with migraine without aura were investigated. The age was between 12 and 54 years; 5 were men and 22 women. The diagnosis of migraine was made according to the classification proposed by the International Headache Society. The method of visual evoked potential was performed with pattern reversal (VEP-PR, with monocular stimulation. The stimulation was performed with pattern reversal with 4x4 cm black and white and red and green squared screen placed 1 meter from the nasion at stimulus frequency 1/s; 128 individual trials were analysed. The VEP-PR with black/white and red/green study showed a significant increase of value of the P-100 latency in 10 migraine patients. In 8 cases the LP100 in VEP-PR black/white was normal but in VEP-PR red/green the LP100 showed increase. Specifically in 1 of our cases, LP100 were normal in VEP-PR black/white but in the red/green there were no reproductice waves. On basis of these observations we consider that the method of VEP-PR is an useful instrument for investigation of migraine patients without aura.

  11. Herbal medicines in migraine prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeWeerdt, CJ; Bootsma, HPR; Hendriks, H

    The efficacy of feverfew capsules on migraine prophylaxis was investigated in a randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study in which 50 patients, who had not used feverfew before, participated. The capsules were filled with a dried alcoholic extract of feverfew on microcristalline

  12. Comorbidity of Migraine with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasmer, Ole Bernt; Riise, Trond; Lund, Anders; Dilsaver, Steven C.; Hundal, Oivind; Oedegaard, Ketil J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate how often drugs used to treat migraine and ADHD are prescribed to the same patients to assess, indirectly, the comorbidity of these disorders. Method: We used data from the Norwegian prescription database for 2006, including the total Norwegian population (N = 4,640,219). Results:…

  13. Migraine headaches in a nutshell

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    According to the International Headache Society, a migraine is a headache that lasts for 4–72 hours and presents with at least two of the following symptoms: unilateral localisation, moderate to severe pain intensity, aggravation by movement, and a pulsating feeling. The headache is also usually accompanied by nausea ...

  14. Association Between Obesity and Migraine in Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovic, Jelena M; Vieira, Julio R; Lipton, Richard B; Bond, Dale S

    2017-08-25

    Migraine is a common and highly disabling condition that is particularly prevalent among women and especially women of reproductive age. The tremendous rise in adiposity in the Western world has led to an epidemic of obesity in women. The particular effects of obesity on women with migraine of various ages are the focus of this review. Conflicting findings from various studies with different approaches and populations have made challenging definitive conclusions about associations between migraine and obesity. While the association between obesity and migraine frequency has been consistently demonstrated and obesity is considered a risk factor for progression from episodic to chronic migraine, the association between obesity and migraine prevalence is still somewhat debated and appears to be dependent on gender and age, with the most consistent effects observed in women younger than 55 years of age. Association between migraine and obesity is most commonly observed in women of reproductive age. The multimodal changes associated with age and hormonal change in women likely play a role in this relationship, as obesity does not appear to be related to migraine in women over 55 years of age. Future studies focusing on the migraine-obesity relationship in women should examine the effects of age, endogenous hormonal state, and exogenous hormones on migraine and obesity.

  15. The Relationship between Migraine and Nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayçıl Özturan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Migraine is a kind of headache accompanied by neurologic, gastrointestinal, and autonomous variations. The roles of factors that trigger migraine, especially nutrition triggers, have become much more questionable with the increase in the rate of migraine occurrence. Some patients with migraine have stated that their headache attacks start without any reason. However, inner triggers such as hormonal changes or external triggers such as air exchange, some smells or the association of both triggers can start the headache. Each patient may not have same sensitivity to these triggers. A single factor might become prominent in some patients, but more than one factor may need to be required in other patients. Although the connection between migraine and the factors such as stress, environmental factors, chronic diseases, and nutritional and sleep status has been known, their mechanisms are still not clear. Nutritional status and the effects of nutrition play an important role being pain triggers in everybody, especially children and young people who suffer from migraine headache. Considering the migraine triggers generally, it has been suggested in studies that there is at least one nutrition-related trigger and hunger is the most frequently reported trigger in terms of diet. Moreover it is known that chocolate, tea, coffee, cheese, and alcohol may trigger migraine because of some specific elements within them. In recently conducted studies, using some functional foods have raised on the treatment of migraine. For this reason, the relationship between migraine and triggering factors as food and nutrition are examined in this study.

  16. Migraine Headache Treatment & Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Migraine Headaches Treatment & Research Past Issues / Fall 2015 Table of Contents Nondrug Options to Manage Migraine Pain Dr. Josephine P. Briggs discusses complementary migraine ...

  17. Anxiety and depression symptoms and migraine: a symptom-based approach research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peres, Mario Fernando Prieto; Mercante, Juliane P P; Tobo, Patricia R; Kamei, Helder; Bigal, Marcelo Eduardo

    2017-12-01

    Anxiety and mood disorders have been shown to be the most relevant psychiatric comorbidities associated with migraine, influencing its clinical course, treatment response, and clinical outcomes. Limited information is available on how specific anxiety and depression symptoms are related to migraine. Symptoms-based approach, a current trend in mental health research, may improve our understanding in migraine comorbidity. The purpose of this study was to analyze how anxiety and depression aspects are related to migraine through a symptom-based approach. We studied 782 patients from the general population who completed a self-administered questionnaire assessing demographics, headache features, anxiety and depression symptoms. A binary logistic regression analyses were conducted to test the association between all four ratings in GAD-7 (anxiety) and PHQ-9 (depression) scales subitems as covariates, and migraine vs no headache as the outcome. The leading Odd Ratios (OR) observed in individuals with migraine relative to those without migraine were anxiety related, "Not being able to stop or control worrying" on a daily basis [OR (CI 95%)] 49.2 (13.6-178.2), "trouble relaxing" 25.7 (7.1-92.6), "Feeling nervous, anxious or on edge" on a daily basis 25.4 (6.9-93.8), and "worrying too much about different things" 24.4 (7.7-77.6). Although the hallmark symptoms of depression are emotional (hopelessness and sadness), the highest scores found were physical: apetite, fatigue, and poor sleep. Irritability had a significant increase in migraine risk [OR 3.8 (1.9-7.8) if experienced some days, 7.5 (2.7-20.7) more than half the days, and 22.0 (5.7-84.9) when experienced nearly every day]. Anxiety was more robustly associated with increase in migraine risk than depression. Lack of ability to properly control worrying and to relax are the most prominent issues in migraine psychiatric comorbidity. Physical symptoms in depression are more linked to migraine than emotional symptoms. A

  18. The rs4846049 polymorphism in the 3’UTR region of the MTHFR gene increases the migraine susceptibility in an Iranian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salehi M

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mohaddeseh Salehi,1,* Mona Amin-Beidokhti,2,* Behnam Safarpour Lima,3 Milad Gholami,2 Gholam-Reza Javadi,1 Reza Mirfakhraie2,4 1Department of Biology, Islamic Azad University, Science and Research Branch, 2Department of Medical Genetics, 3Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, 4Genomic Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran *These authors contributed equally to this work Introduction: Migraine is a painful complex neurovascular disease characterized by recurrent moderate-to-severe headaches. Increased level of homocysteine is related to dilation of cerebral vessels and endothelial injury that could trigger migraine attacks. Functional polymorphisms in the MTHFR gene affect homocysteine metabolism and, therefore, play an important role in the etiology of the disease. Objectives: We aimed to investigate the possible association between MTHFR gene rs4846049, C677T, and A1298C polymorphisms and the risk of migraine in Iranian population. Methods: In this genetic association study, 498 individuals were enrolled, including 223 migraine patients and 275 healthy controls. Genotyping was performed using tetra-primer ARMS-PCR for rs4846049 and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism for C677T and A1298C polymorphisms. Results: The association between rs4846049 and C677T polymorphisms and migraine was observed. For the rs4846049 polymorphism, the association was detected under a dominant model (P=0.007; odds ratio [OR] =0.60; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.41–0.87, and for the C677T polymorphism, the TT genotype frequency was significantly different in the studied groups (P=0.009; OR =2.48; 95% CI, 1.25–4.92. No significant differences in the genotype or allele frequencies were found for the A1298C polymorphism between the migraineurs and controls. Conclusion: Present data provide evidence for the association of rs4846049 and C677T polymorphisms in the MTHFR gene and migraine. Further studies are

  19. Meta-analysis of the relationship between multiple sclerosis and migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakpoor, Julia; Handel, Adam E; Giovannoni, Gavin; Dobson, Ruth; Ramagopalan, Sreeram V

    2012-01-01

    Studies investigating a proposed association between multiple sclerosis (MS) and migraine have produced conflicting results and a great range in the prevalence rate of migraine in MS patients. By meta-analysing all available data we aimed to establish an overall estimate of any association in order to more accurately inform clinicians and care-givers about a potential association between MS and migraine. Pubmed and EMBASE were searched to identify suitable studies. Studies were included if they were a case-control study or cohort study in which controls were not reported to have another neurological condition, were available in English, and specified migraine as a headache sub-type. The odds ratio (OR) of migraine in MS patients vs. controls was calculated using the inverse variance with random effects model in Review Manager 5.1. Eight studies were selected for inclusion, yielding a total of 1864 MS patients and 261563 control subjects. We found a significant association between migraine and MS (OR = 2.60, 95% CI 1.12-6.04), although there was significant heterogeneity. Sensitivity analysis showed that migraine without aura was associated with MS OR = 2.29 (95% CI 1.14-4.58), with no significant heterogeneity. MS patients are more than twice as likely to report migraine as controls. Care providers should be alerted to ask MS patients about migraine in order to treat it and potentially improve quality of life. Future work should further investigate the temporal relationship of this association and relationship to the clinical characteristics of MS.

  20. Meta-analysis of the relationship between multiple sclerosis and migraine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Pakpoor

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies investigating a proposed association between multiple sclerosis (MS and migraine have produced conflicting results and a great range in the prevalence rate of migraine in MS patients. By meta-analysing all available data we aimed to establish an overall estimate of any association in order to more accurately inform clinicians and care-givers about a potential association between MS and migraine. METHODS: Pubmed and EMBASE were searched to identify suitable studies. Studies were included if they were a case-control study or cohort study in which controls were not reported to have another neurological condition, were available in English, and specified migraine as a headache sub-type. The odds ratio (OR of migraine in MS patients vs. controls was calculated using the inverse variance with random effects model in Review Manager 5.1. RESULTS: Eight studies were selected for inclusion, yielding a total of 1864 MS patients and 261563 control subjects. We found a significant association between migraine and MS (OR = 2.60, 95% CI 1.12-6.04, although there was significant heterogeneity. Sensitivity analysis showed that migraine without aura was associated with MS OR = 2.29 (95% CI 1.14-4.58, with no significant heterogeneity. CONCLUSIONS: MS patients are more than twice as likely to report migraine as controls. Care providers should be alerted to ask MS patients about migraine in order to treat it and potentially improve quality of life. Future work should further investigate the temporal relationship of this association and relationship to the clinical characteristics of MS.

  1. Nonpainful remote electrical stimulation alleviates episodic migraine pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarnitsky, David; Volokh, Lana; Ironi, Alon; Weller, Boaz; Shor, Merav; Shifrin, Alla; Granovsky, Yelena

    2017-03-28

    To evaluate the efficacy of remote nonpainful electrical upper arm skin stimulation in reducing migraine attack pain. This is a prospective, double-blinded, randomized, crossover, sham-controlled trial. Migraineurs applied skin electrodes to the upper arm soon after attack onset for 20 minutes, at various pulse widths, and refrained from medications for 2 hours. Patients were asked to use the device for up to 20 attacks. In 71 patients (299 treatments) with evaluable data, 50% pain reduction was obtained for 64% of participants based on best of 200-μs, 150-μs, and 100-μs pulse width stimuli per individual vs 26% for sham stimuli. Greater pain reduction was found for active stimulation vs placebo; for those starting at severe or moderate pain, reduction (1) to mild or no pain occurred in 58% (25/43) of participants (66/134 treatments) for the 200-μs stimulation protocol and 24% (4/17; 8/29 treatments) for placebo ( p = 0.02), and (2) to no pain occurred in 30% (13/43) of participants (37/134 treatments) and 6% (1/17; 5/29 treatments), respectively ( p = 0.004). Earlier application of the treatment, within 20 minutes of attack onset, yielded better results: 46.7% pain reduction as opposed to 24.9% reduction when started later ( p = 0.02). Nonpainful remote skin stimulation can significantly reduce migraine pain, especially when applied early in an attack. This is presumably by activating descending inhibition pathways via the conditioned pain modulation effect. This treatment may be proposed as an attractive nonpharmacologic, easy to use, adverse event free, and inexpensive tool to reduce migraine pain. NCT02453399. This study provides Class III evidence that for patients with an acute migraine headache, remote nonpainful electrical stimulation on the upper arm skin reduces migraine pain. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  2. The KATP channel in migraine pathophysiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Karagholi, Mohammad Al-Mahdi; Hansen, Jakob Møller; Severinsen, Johanne

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To review the distribution and function of KATP channels, describe the use of KATP channels openers in clinical trials and make the case that these channels may play a role in headache and migraine. DISCUSSION: KATP channels are widely present in the trigeminovascular system and play...... an important role in the regulation of tone in cerebral and meningeal arteries. Clinical trials using synthetic KATP channel openers report headache as a prevalent-side effect in non-migraine sufferers, indicating that KATP channel opening may cause headache, possibly due to vascular mechanisms. Whether KATP...... channel openers can provoke migraine in migraine sufferers is not known. CONCLUSION: We suggest that KATP channels may play an important role in migraine pathogenesis and could be a potential novel therapeutic anti-migraine target....

  3. MIGRAINE: BASIC PRINCIPLES OF TREATMENT AND PREVENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. R. Esin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern recommendations for the migraine attack treatment and it's prophylaxis are analyzed in this review. Established, that acetylsalicylic acid, diclofenac potassium, ibuprofen, naproxen, paracetamol, metamizol and their combination with caffeine are drugs of the first choice for migraine attack treatment. Metoclopramide and domperidone are used to reduce nausea and vomiting. Also triptans are high effective drugs for migraine attack treatment. Metoprolol, propranolol, flunarizine, valproic acid can be used for migraine prophylaxis. Drugs of the second choice are: amitriptyline, venlafaxine, naproxen and bisoprolol.

  4. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies in migraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montagna, P.; Cortelli, P.; Barbiroli, B. (Inst. of Medical Pathology, Univ. of Bologna (Italy))

    1994-06-01

    The authors describe the method of [sup 31]phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy and review the results when it is applied to the study of brain and muscle energy metabolism in migraine subjects. Brain energy metabolism appears to be abnormal in all major subtypes of migraine when measured both during and between attacks. Impaired energy metabolism is also documented in skeletal muscle. It is suggested that migraine is associated with a generalized disorder of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and that this may constitute a threshold for the triggering of migraine attacks. 47 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Migraine and structural abnormalities in the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Anders; Amin, Faisal Mohammad; Ashina, Messoud

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The aim is to provide an overview of recent studies of structural brain abnormalities in migraine and to discuss the potential clinical significance of their findings. RECENT FINDINGS: Brain structure continues to be a topic of extensive research in migraine. Despite advances...... in neuroimaging techniques, it is not yet clear if migraine is associated with grey matter changes. Recent large population-based studies sustain the notion of increased prevalence of white matter abnormalities in migraine, and possibly of silent infarct-like lesions. The clinical relevance of this association...

  6. Migraine, cerebrovascular disease and the metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra J Sinclair

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence is emerging that migraine is not solely a headache disorder. Observations that ischemic stroke could occur in the setting of a migraine attack, and that migraine headaches could be precipitated by cerebral ischemia, initially highlighted a possibly association between migraine and cerebrovascular disease. More recently, large population-based studies that have demonstrated that migraineurs are at increased risk of stroke outside the setting of a migraine attack have prompted the concept that migraine and cerebrovascular disease are comorbid conditions. Explanations for this association are numerous and widely debated, particularly as the comorbid association does not appear to be confined to the cerebral circulation as cardiovascular and peripheral vascular disease also appear to be comorbid with migraine. A growing body of evidence has also suggested that migraineurs are more likely to be obese, hypertensive, hyperlipidemic and have impaired insulin sensitivity, all features of the metabolic syndrome. The comorbid association between migraine and cerebrovascular disease may consequently be explained by migraineurs having the metabolic syndrome and consequently being at increased risk of cerebrovascular disease. This review will summarise the salient evidence suggesting a comorbid association between migraine, cerebrovascular disease and the metabolic syndrome.

  7. Model and Analysis of Individual Rehearsals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristoffer; Frimodt-Møller, Søren

    2013-01-01

    to the score and the instrument, respectively, when applicable. Via these observations, hypotheses are formed and discussed regarding the development of a musician’s Long Term Memory (LTM) in relation to the score, as well as how much s/he is able to store in Short Term Memory (STM) while playing....... of this attention over time, and discusses how this attention is dependent on the musician’s ability to memorize. A selection of musicians (playing guitar, bass clarinet, or violin) was made to individually rehearse short pieces (by Beethoven and Bach) up to and exceeding 20 times. The musicians were instructed...

  8. MIDAS (Migraine Disability Assessment: a valuable tool for work-site identification of migraine in workers in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yara Dadalti Fragoso

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: MIDAS was developed as a fast and efficient method for identification of migraine in need of medical evaluation and treatment. It was necessary to translate MIDAS, originally written in English, so as to apply it in Brazil and make it usable by individuals from a variety of social-economic-cultural backgrounds. OBJECTIVE: To translate and to apply MIDAS in Brazil. SETTING: Assessment of a sample of workers regularly employed by an oil refinery. SETTING: Refinaria Presidente Bernardes, Cubatão, São Paulo, Brazil. PARTICIPANTS: 404 workers of the company who correctly answered a questionnaire for the identification and evaluation of headache. When the individual considered it to be pertinent to his own needs, there was the option to answer MIDAS as well. METHODS: MIDAS, originally written in English, was translated into Brazilian Portuguese by a neurologist and by a translator specializing in medical texts. The final version of the translation was obtained when, for ten patients to whom it was applied, the text seemed clear and the results were consistent over three sessions. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: Prevalence and types of primary headaches, evaluation of MIDAS as a tool for identification of more severe cases. RESULTS: From the total of 419 questionnaires given to the employees, 404 were returned correctly completed. From these, 160 persons were identified as presenting headaches, 44 of whom considered it worthwhile answering MIDAS. Nine of these individuals who answered MIDAS were identified as severe cases of migraine due to disability caused by the condition. An interview on a later date confirmed these results. Three were cases of chronic daily headache (transformed migraine and six were cases of migraine. CONCLUSIONS: MIDAS translated to Brazilian Portuguese was a useful tool for identifying severe cases of migraine and of transformed migraine in a working environment. The workers did not consider MIDAS to be difficult to answer. Their

  9. Experience of Surgical Treatment for Occipital Migraine in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shang-Hsi; Lin, Huwang-Chi; Jeng, Chu-Hsu; Hsieh, Cheng-Han; Lin, Yu-Hsien; Chen, Cha-Chun

    2016-03-01

    Refractory migraine surgery developed since 2003 has excellent results over the past 10 years. According to the pioneer of migraine surgery, Dr. Bahman Guyuron, 5 major surgical classifications of migraines are described in the field of plastic surgery, namely, frontal migraine, temporal migraine, rhinogenic migraine, occipital migraine, and auriculotemporal migraine. In this study, we present the preliminary surgical results of the occipital migraine surgery. A total of 22 patients with simple occipital migraines came to our outpatient clinic for help from June 2014 to February 2015. Thirteen cases were excluded owing to ineligibility for operation or other reasons. The patients who concurrently experienced other types of migraines were precluded even if they received combined migraine surgery. Therefore, 9 simple occipital migraine cases were enrolled in this study. Migraine severity was evaluated by uniform questionnaires to identify the source of migraine. Neurolysis was performed under general anesthesia, with the patient in a prone position. Postoperative conditions were evaluated at the second, fourth, sixth, and eighth weeks by posttreatment questionnaires. Of all the 9 patients, 5 experienced single-sided migraines of greater occipital nerve origin (2 left-sided and 3 right-sided cases). Two patients had bilateral migraines of greater occipital nerve origin, and unilateral right lesser occipital nerve origin was noted in one patient. The last patient had right-sided migraines of greater and lesser occipital nerve origin. As a result in the follow-up, a response rate greater than 90% was documented, and complete resolution was observed in 2 patients. Drug doses were reduced more than 50% in the remaining patients. The overall efficacy of occipital migraine surgery in this study was 88.8% (8/9 cases). Some patients with migraine are good candidates for surgical resolution with appropriate and meticulous selection. Similar to what is observed in Western

  10. Estimation of response from longitudinal binary data with nonignorable missing values in migraine trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Fang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In migraine trials pain relief responses from a headache at specific time points and sustained pain relief response over a period of time are important efficacy measures. When there are missing records of individual time point pain scores and/or headache recurrences during a migraine trial, the common approach used in practice to estimate the sustained response is statistically inconsistent even if the data are missing completely at random. Methods dealing with nonignorable longitudinal missing data usually assume certain models for the missing mechanism which can not be checked as they involve unobserved data. Taking advantage of the specific definition of the ‘sustained pain relief’ response, we propose two estimating methods based on intuitive imputation, which do not require model assumptions on the missing probability or specification of the correlation structure among the longitudinal observations. The consistency of the proposed methods is discussed in theory and their empirical performances are assessed through intensive simulation studies. The simulation results show that the proposed methods perform well in terms of reducing bias and mean square error except in several extreme cases which are unlikely to happen in real trials. The application of the proposed methods is illustrated in a real data analysis.

  11. Migraine and invasive epithelial ovarian cancer risk in the Nurses' Health Study II and the Women's Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Megan S; Rist, Pamela M; Winter, Anke C; Kurth, Tobias; Tworoger, Shelley S

    2018-02-01

    Migraine is a common primary headache disorder, which predominantly impacts women. Recently, migraine has been hypothesized to be associated with hormonally related cancers; however, the potential association between migraine and ovarian cancer has not been studied. Therefore, we evaluated the association between migraine and invasive epithelial ovarian cancer risk in two prospective cohorts, the Nurses' Health Study II (NHSII) and the Women's Health Study (WHS). Our prospective analysis included 113,124 NHSII participants aged 25-42 at study baseline as well as 33,490 participants in the WHS who were 45 years or older at study entry. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate the hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between migraine and ovarian cancer risk in each cohort. In secondary analyses, we stratified by age and menopausal status. After adjusting for potential covariates, there was no statistically significant association between migraine and ovarian cancer risk in either the NHSII (HR = 1.29, 95%CI: 0.96, 1.74) or the WHS (HR = 0.60, 95%CI: 0.34, 1.06). In stratified analysis in the NHSII, there was a statistically significant positive association between migraine and ovarian cancer risk among women <45 years of age (HR = 1.76, 95%CI: 1.01, 3.07). We did not observe a clear association between migraine and ovarian cancer risk in two large prospective cohort studies. © 2017 UICC.

  12. Genetic analysis of GRIA2 and GRIA4 genes in migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, Claudia F; Sutherland, Heidi G; Haupt, Larisa M; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2014-02-01

    Migraine is a brain disorder affecting ∼12% of the Caucasian population. Genes involved in neurological, vascular, and hormonal pathways have all been implicated in predisposing individuals to developing migraine. The migraineur presents with disabling head pain and varying symptoms of nausea, emesis, photophobia, phonophobia, and occasionally visual sensory disturbances. Biochemical and genetic studies have demonstrated dysfunction of neurotransmitters: serotonin, dopamine, and glutamate in migraine susceptibility. Glutamate mediates the transmission of excitatory signals in the mammalian central nervous system that affect normal brain function including cognition, memory and learning. The aim of this study was to investigate polymorphisms in the GRIA2 and GRIA4 genes, which encode subunits of the ionotropic AMPA receptor for association in an Australian Caucasian population. Genotypes for each polymorphism were determined using high resolution melt analysis and the RFLP method. Statistical analysis showed no association between migraine and the GRIA2 and GRIA4 polymorphisms investigated. Although the results of this study showed no significant association between the tested GRIA gene variants and migraine in our Australian Caucasian population further investigation of other components of the glutamatergic system may help to elucidate if there is a relationship between glutamatergic dysfunction and migraine. © 2013 American Headache Society.

  13. Temporomandibular disorder-type pain and migraine headache in women: a preliminary twin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesh, Octavia; Noonan, Carolyn; Buchwald, Dedra S; Goldberg, Jack; Afari, Niloo

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether shared genetic influences are responsible for the association between pain from temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and migraine headache. Data were obtained from 1,236 monozygotic and 570 dizygotic female twin pairs from the University of Washington Twin Registry. TMD pain was assessed with a question about persistent or recurrent pain in the jaw, temple, in front of the ear, or in the ear. The presence of migraine headache was determined by self-report of doctor-diagnosed migraine. Univariate and bivariate structural equation models estimated the components of variance attributable to genetic and environmental influences. The best fitting univariate models indicated that additive genetic effects contributed 27% of the variance in TMD pain (95% confidence interval = 15% to 38%) and 49% of the variance in migraine headache (95% confidence interval = 40% to 57%). The best-fitting bivariate model revealed that 12% of the genetic component of TMD pain is shared with migraine headache. These preliminary findings suggest that the association between TMD pain and migraine headache in women may be partially due to a modest shared genetic risk for both conditions. Future studies can focus on replicating these findings with symptom- and diagnosis-based instruments.

  14. Fisiopatologia da enxaqueca Migraine pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAURICE B. VINCENT

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available A fisiopatologia da enxaqueca ainda não foi completamente elucidada. As principais estruturas envolvidas parecem ser o sistema nervoso central (córtex e tronco cerebral, o sistema trigeminovascular e os vasos correspondentes, outras fibras autonômicas que inervam estes vasos, e os vários agentes vasoativos locais, como a SP, CGRP, NO, VIP, NPY, ACh, NA, NKA, entre outros. A depressão alastrante é o fenômeno neurológico que provavelmente justifica achados experimenais e clínicos na enxaqueca. Ela tem velocidade de propagação semelhante à aura, ativa o núcleo espinhal do trigêmeo e está relacionada à liberação de CGRP e NO. Alterações circulatórias detectadas por métodos complementares reforçam o papel da depressão alastrante. A identificação de anormalidades em pelo menos três loci (cromossomas 19 e 1 na enxaqueca hemiplégica familiar ocorreu recentemente. Elas estão relacionadas a anormalidades nos canais de cálcio voltagem dependentes tipo P/Q, específicos do sistema nervoso central, que regulam a liberação de vários neurotransmissores, incluindo possivelmente a serotonina. A exemplo de outras anormalidades neurológicas paroxísticas que resultam da hiperexcitabilidade da membrana plasmática, é possível que a enxaqueca ocorra devido a uma desordem de canais iônicos.The pathophysiology of migraine is not yet fully understood. The most important structures involved seem to be the central nervous system (cortex and brain stem, the trigeminovascular system and related cranial arteries, other autonomic fibres innervating such vessels, and various local vasoactive agents, including SP, CGRP, NO, VIP, NPY, ACh, NA, NKA, among others. The spreading depression phenomenon may explain clinical as well experimental findings in migraine. Its propagation velocity mirrors what is found in clinical aura, it may activate the spinal trigeminal nucleus and may induce CGRP and NO release. Circulatory changes detected with

  15. Mental Models, Magical Thinking, And Individual Differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phil Turner

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Broadly, there are two mutually exclusive accounts of how people (non-specialist users reason about and conceptualize interactive technology. The first is based on classical cognitive psychology and is characterized by the term mental model. The second, drawing on concepts from social cognition, observes that people often anthropomorphize technology. We argue that people are able to exhibit both of these quite different styles of cognition, which Baron-Cohen has described as systemizing and empathizing. The former is associated with the drive to analyze, explore, and construct a system, whereas the latter is the ability to spontaneously tune into another’s thoughts and feelings. The propensity to systemize might give rise to a mental model, while the empathizing tendency might tend to anthropomorphize technology. We present an empirical study that lends support for the above position.

  16. Brain structural properties predict psychologically mediated hypoalgesia in an 8-week sham acupuncture treatment for migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jixin; Mu, Junya; Liu, Qianqian; Dun, Wanghuan; Zhang, Ming; Tian, Jie

    2017-09-01

    Neuroimaging studies described brain structural changes that comprise the mechanisms underlying individual differences in migraine development and maintenance. However, whether such interindividual variability in migraine was observed in a pretreatment scan is a predisposition for subsequent hypoalgesia to placebo treatment that remains largely unclear. Using T1-weighted imaging, we investigated this issue in 50 healthy controls (HC) and 196 patients with migraine without aura (MO). An 8-week double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled acupuncture was used, and we only focused on the data from the sham acupuncture group. Eighty patients participated in an 8-weeks sham acupuncture treatment, and were subdivided (50% change in migraine days from baseline) into recovering (MOr) and persisting (MOp) patients. Optimized voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and functional connectivity analysis were performed to evaluate brain structural and functional changes. At baseline, MOp and MOr had similar migraine activity, anxiety and depression; reduced migraine days were accompanied by decreased anxiety in MOr. In our findings, the MOr group showed a smaller volume in the left medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), and decreased mPFC-related functional connectivity was found in the default mode network. Additionally, the reduction in migraine days after placebo treatment was significantly associated with the baseline gray matter volume of the mPFC which could also predict post-treatment groups with high accuracy. It indicated that individual differences for the brain structure in the pain modulatory system at baseline served as a substrate on how an individual facilitated or diminished hypoalgesia responses to placebo treatment in migraineurs. Hum Brain Mapp 38:4386-4397, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Migraine and structural changes in the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bashir, Asma; Lipton, Richard B; Ashina, Sait

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the association between migraine without aura (MO) and migraine with aura (MA) and 3 types of structural brain abnormalities detected by MRI: white matter abnormalities (WMAs), infarct-like lesions (ILLs), and volumetric changes in gray and white matter (GM, WM) regions....

  18. Migraine genetics : from monogenic to complex forms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanmolkot, Kaate Raymond Josepha

    2008-01-01

    Migraine has a strong genetic component, but the identification of these factors has proven difficult mainly because of the complex interaction of multiple loci and environmental factors. Unraveling its molecular basis and deciphering pathways leading to migraine attacks will help identifying novel

  19. Functional Imaging and Migraine: New Connections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwedt, Todd J.; Chong, Catherine D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review Over the last several years, a growing number of brain functional imaging studies have provided insights into mechanisms underlying migraine. This manuscript reviews the recent migraine functional neuroimaging literature and provides recommendations for future studies that will help fill knowledge gaps. Recent Findings Positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have identified brain regions that might be responsible for mediating the onset of a migraine attack and those associated with migraine symptoms. Enhanced activation of brain regions that facilitate processing of sensory stimuli suggests a mechanism by which migraineurs are hypersensitive to visual, olfactory, and cutaneous stimuli. Resting state functional connectivity MRI studies have identified numerous brain regions and functional networks with atypical functional connectivity in migraineurs, suggesting that migraine is associated with aberrant brain functional organization. Summary fMRI and PET studies that have identified brain regions and brain networks that are atypical in migraine have helped to describe the neurofunctional basis for migraine symptoms. Future studies should compare functional imaging findings in migraine to other headache and pain disorders and should explore the utility of functional imaging data as biomarkers for diagnostic and treatment purposes. PMID:25887764

  20. Nurses improve migraine management in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenstra, Petra; Kollen, Boudewijn J.; de Jong, Gosse; Baarveld, Frans; van den Berg, J. S. Peter

    Introduction Migraine is a common disorder with a high burden. Adequate treatment results in improvement of quality of life. Migraine patients are mainly treated by general practitioners (GPs), but there is still room for improvement. This study investigated whether primary care nurses could improve

  1. Genetics Home Reference: familial hemiplegic migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... features of an aura can include difficulty with speech, confusion, and drowsiness. An aura typically develops gradually over a few minutes and lasts about an hour. Unusually severe migraine episodes have been reported in some people with familial hemiplegic migraine . These ...

  2. The pathophysiology of the migraine attack

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.L.H. Spierings

    1980-01-01

    textabstractMigraine, a word of French origin, is a mediaeval corruption of the Greek hemicrania". Its etymological meaning, half-headache, indicates two important features of the disorder, the headache and its onesidedness. In classical migraine, the headache is preceded by an 'aura' of

  3. Cost and predictors of lost productive time in chronic migraine and episodic migraine: results from the American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention (AMPP) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Daniel; Manack, Aubrey N; Reed, Michael L; Buse, Dawn C; Varon, Sepideh F; Lipton, Richard B

    2013-01-01

    To quantify the cost differences and predictors of lost productive time (LPT) in persons with chronic migraine (CM) and episodic migraine (EM). The American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention (AMPP) study is a US national longitudinal survey of severe headache. Cost estimates were obtained via U.S. Census income data. To elucidate the unique predictors of LPT, the optimal distribution for modeling was determined. Zero inflation models for LPT were predicted from sociodemographics, headache features, characteristics and disability, medication use, and depression. The interaction between headache status and age was the primary effect of interest. The eligible sample included 6329 persons with EM and 374 persons with CM. Men with CM aged 45 to 54 years cost employers nearly $200 per week more than do their EM counterparts. Likewise, for women, costs were higher for CM, with the cost differential between EM and CM being $90 per week. After comprehensive adjustment, increases in LPT with age were significantly higher in CM than in EM (rate ratio 1.03; 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.05). When age was recoded to a decade, metric rates of LPT increased 25% more per decade for CM than for EM (rate ratio 1.25; 95% confidence interval 1.004-1.5). LPT is more costly and increases more rapidly for those with CM than for those with EM as age increases. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Modeling individual animal histories with multistate capture–recapture models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebreton, Jean-Dominique; Nichols, James D.; Barker, Richard J.; Pradel, Roger; Spendelow, Jeffrey A.

    2009-01-01

    Many fields of science begin with a phase of exploration and description, followed by investigations of the processes that account for observed patterns. The science of ecology is no exception, and recent decades have seen a focus on understanding key processes underlying the dynamics of ecological systems. In population ecology, emphasis has shifted from the state variable of population size to the demographic processes responsible for changes in this state variable: birth, death, immigration, and emigration. In evolutionary ecology, some of these same demographic processes, rates of birth and death, are also the determinants of fitness. In animal population ecology, the estimation of state variables and their associated vital rates is especially problematic because of the difficulties in sampling such populations and detecting individual animals. Indeed, early capture–recapture models were developed for the purpose of estimating population size, given the reality that all animals are not caught or detected at any sampling occasion. More recently, capture–recapture models for open populations were developed to draw inferences about survival in the face of these same sampling problems. The focus of this paper is on multi‐state mark–recapture models (MSMR), which first appeared in the 1970s but have undergone substantial development in the last 15 years. These models were developed to deal explicitly with biological variation, in that animals in different “states” (classes defined by location, physiology, behavior, reproductive status, etc.) may have different probabilities of survival and detection. Animal transitions between states are also stochastic and themselves of interest. These general models have proven to be extremely useful and provide a way of thinking about a remarkably wide range of important ecological processes. These methods are now at a stage of refinement and sophistication where they can readily be used by biologists to tackle a wide

  5. Prednisolone reduces nitric oxide-induced migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, P; Daugaard, D; Lassen, L H

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) induces delayed migraine attacks in migraine patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether pre-treatment with prednisolon could decrease this effect of GTN. METHODS: In this double-blind, randomized and placebo-controlled, crossover...... study 15 migraineurs with migraine without aura were pre-treated with 150 mg of prednisolone or placebo followed by a 20-min infusion of GTN (0.5 ug/kg/min). One hour after the GTN-infusion, the participants were sent home, but continued to rate headache and possible associated symptoms by filling out...... a headache diary every hour for 12 h. There were two equal primary efficacy end-points: frequency of delayed migraine and intensity of delayed headache. RESULTS: Nine patients experienced a GTN headache fulfilling the diagnostic criteria for migraine without aura on the placebo day compared with four...

  6. Migraine and Mental Health in a Population-Based Sample of Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Serena L; Potter, Beth K; Ma, Jinhui; Colman, Ian

    2017-01-01

    To explore the relationship between migraine and anxiety disorders, mood disorders and perceived mental health in a population-based sample of adolescents. The Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) is a cross-sectional health survey sampling a nationally representative group of Canadians. In this observational study, data on all 61,375 participants aged 12-19 years from six survey cycles were analyzed. The relationships between self-reported migraine, perceived mental health, and mood/anxiety disorders were modeled using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. The migraine-depression association was also explored in a subset of participants using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview-Short Form (CIDI-SF) depression scale. The odds of migraine were higher among those with mood disorders, with the strongest association in 2011-2 (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]=4.59; 95% confidence interval [CI 95%]=3.44-6.12), and the weakest in 2009-10 (aOR=3.06, CI 95%=2.06-4.55). The migraine-mood disorders association was also significant throughout all cycles, other than 2011-2, when the CIDI-SF depression scale was employed. The odds of migraine were higher among those with anxiety disorders, with the strongest association in 2011-2 (aOR=4.21, CI 95%=3.31-5.35) and the weakest in 2010 (aOR=1.87, CI 95%=1.10-3.37). The inverse association between high perceived mental health and the odds of migraine was observed in all CCHS cycles, with the strongest association in 2011-2 (aOR=0.58, CI 95%=0.48-0.69) and the weakest in 2003-4 (aOR=0.75, CI 95%=0.62-0.91). This study provides evidence, derived from a large population-based sample of adolescents, for a link between migraine and mood/anxiety disorders.

  7. Psychological Factors Associated with Chronic Migraine and Severe Migraine-Related Disability: an Observational Study in a Tertiary Headache Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seng, Elizabeth K.; Buse, Dawn C.; Klepper, Jaclyn E.; Mayson, Sarah Jo; Grinberg, Amy S.; Grosberg, Brian M.; Pavlovic, Jelena M.; Robbins, Matthew S.; Vollbracht, Sarah E.; Lipton, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate relationships among modifiable psychological factors and chronic migraine and severe migraine-related disability in a clinic-based sample of persons with migraine. Background Evidence evaluating relationships between modifiable psychological factors and chronic migraine and severe migraine-related disability is lacking in people with migraine presenting for routine clinical care. Methods Adults with migraine completed surveys during routinely scheduled visits to a tertiary headache center. Participants completed surveys assessing chronic migraine (meeting criteria for migraine with ≥15 headache days in the past month), severe migraine disability (Migraine Disability Assessment Scale score ≥ 21), and modifiable psychological factors [depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-9), anxious symptoms (Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7), Pain Catastrophizing Scale and Headache Specific Locus of Control]. Logistic regression evaluated relationships between modifiable psychological factors and chronic migraine and severe migraine disability. Results Among 90 eligible participants the mean age was 45.0 (SD = 12.4); 84.8% were women. One-third (36.0%) met study criteria for chronic migraine; half of participants (51.5%) reported severe migraine-related disability. Higher depressive symptoms (OR = 1.99, 95% CI = 1,11, 3.55) and chance HSLC (OR = 1.85, 95% CI = 1.13, 1.43) were associated with chronic migraine. Higher depressive symptoms (OR = 3.54, 95%CI = 1.49, 8.41), anxiety symptoms (OR = 3.65, 95% CI = 1.65, 8.06), and pain catastrophizing (OR = 1.95, 95% CI = 1.14, 3.35), were associated with severe migraine-related disability. Conclusions Psychiatric symptoms and pain catastrophizing were strongly associated with severe migraine-related disability. Depression and chance locus of control were associated with chronic migraine. This study supports the need for longitudinal observational studies to evaluate relationships among naturalistic

  8. The Impact on Individualizing Student Models on Necessary Practice Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung In; Brunskill, Emma

    2012-01-01

    When modeling student learning, tutors that use the Knowledge Tracing framework often assume that all students have the same set of model parameters. We find that when fitting parameters to individual students, there is significant variation among the individual's parameters. We examine if this variation is important in terms of instructional…

  9. Individual-based modeling of ecological and evolutionary processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeAngelis, D.L.; Mooij, W.M.

    2005-01-01

    Individual-based models (IBMs) allow the explicit inclusion of individual variation in greater detail than do classical differential and difference equation models. Inclusion of such variation is important for continued progress in ecological and evolutionary theory. We provide a conceptual basis

  10. The PACAP receptor: a novel target for migraine treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytz, Henrik W; Olesen, Jes; Ashina, Messoud

    2010-01-01

    The origin of migraine pain has not yet been clarified, but accumulating data point to neuropeptides present in the perivascular space of cranial vessels as important mediators of nociceptive input during migraine attacks. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is present in s......) receptor, which suggests a possible signaling pathway implicated in migraine pain. This review summarizes the current evidence supporting the involvement of PACAP in migraine pathophysiology and the PAC(1) receptor as a possible novel target for migraine treatment....

  11. Acupuncture for the prevention of episodic migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linde, Klaus; Allais, Gianni; Brinkhaus, Benno; Fei, Yutong; Mehring, Michael; Vertosick, Emily A.; Vickers, Andrew; White, Adrian R

    2016-01-01

    Background Acupuncture is often used for migraine prevention but its effectiveness is still controversial. We present an update of our Cochrane review from 2009. Objectives To investigate whether acupuncture is a) more effective than no prophylactic treatment/routine care only; b) more effective than sham (placebo) acupuncture; and c) as effective as prophylactic treatment with drugs in reducing headache frequency in adults with episodic migraine. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL: 2016, issue 1); MEDLINE (via Ovid, 2008 to January 2016); Ovid EMBASE (2008 to January 2016); and Ovid AMED (1985 to January 2016). We checked PubMed for recent publications to April 2016. We searched the World Health Organization (WHO) Clinical Trials Registry Platform to February 2016 for ongoing and unpublished trials. Selection criteria We included randomized trials at least eight weeks in duration that compared an acupuncture intervention with a no-acupuncture control (no prophylactic treatment or routine care only), a sham-acupuncture intervention, or prophylactic drug in participants with episodic migraine. Data collection and analysis Two reviewers checked eligibility; extracted information on participants, interventions, methods and results, and assessed risk of bias and quality of the acupuncture intervention. The primary outcome was migraine frequency (preferably migraine days, attacks or headache days if migraine days not measured/reported) after treatment and at follow-up. The secondary outcome was response (at least 50% frequency reduction). Safety outcomes were number of participants dropping out due to adverse effects and number of participants reporting at least one adverse effect. We calculated pooled effect size estimates using a fixed-effect model. We assessed the evidence using GRADE and created ’Summary of findings’ tables. Main results Twenty-two trials including 4985 participants in total (median 71, range

  12. Hair Transplantation in Migraine Headache Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ors, Safvet

    2017-09-01

    Migraine headache is a primary neurologic disease affecting millions of people worldwide. As a consequence, quality of life is diminished, productivity suffers (through loss of work force), and treatment costs are substantial. The occurrence rate in the general population is quite high, with women accounting for 3 of every 4 cases. Between January 2011 and May 2012, a total of 221 patients received hair transplants. Another 590 patients underwent hair transplantation between June 2012 and December 2016. Initially (first interval), patients were not questioned on migraine headaches in preoperative visits, but questioning was regularly done thereafter. Overall, 150 patients given transplants in the first period were surveyed by phone regarding preoperative migraine headaches. Aside from the 1 incidental discovery, no other instances of migraine emerged. Headache origins were occipital-frontal in 2 patients, occipital-temporal in 2 patients, and occipital-temporal-frontal in the 2 others. Donor/receiver areas in hair transplantation and migraine trigger zones shared locations. Headache frequencies ranged from 4 to 8 days per month (average, 6 days), and pain scores were 5-8 (10 being highest). Duration of pain was 3-5 hours (average, 4 hours). All six patients had used various medications, such as triptans, ergot, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, before hair transplantation. The 1 female patient was a 32-year-old seeking treatment for alopecia, with a 6-year history of migraine headaches. The male patients presenting with androgenetic alopecia (grade 4-5 by Norwood classification) had 6- to 20-year migrainous histories. After hair transplantation, each migraine sufferer was checked once in the first month and then once every 3 months. Those who could not appear in person after the first year were evaluated by phone every 3 months. Migraine headaches had ceased in all 6 patients, none of whom used medical treatments for migraines thereafter. The postoperative

  13. Temporomandibular disorder in chronic migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Latysheva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rationale: For many years, temporomandibular disorder (TMD has been studied primarily by dentists and maxillofacial surgeons. However, new data is emerging that TMD is comorbid with various types of headache; however this association has not been studied in detail. Aim: To analyze TMD prevalence and clinical structure in patients with migraine. Materials and methods: We assessed 84 patients with chronic migraine (CM and 42 patients with episodic migraine (EM. TMD was diagnosed according to the Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders: Clinical Protocol and Assessment Instruments 2014. We also performed subgroup analysis for low-frequency EM (less than 4 headache days per month, LFEM vs. high-frequency EM and CM (over 10 headache days per month, HFEM + CM. Results: In both groups, myofascial pain was the most prevalent form of TMD. The prevalence of TMD was higher in CM as compared to EM (52.4% vs. 28.6%, correspondingly, р = 0.02. Even more evident differences were observed between LFEM and HFEM + CM (18.2% vs. 51.6%, correspondingly, р < 0.009. The difference was significant for painrelated TMD only. The prevalence of bruxism was comparable across LFEM and HFEM + CM (18% vs. 30.5%, correspondingly, р = 0.3 and significantly lower than TMD prevalence in HFEM + CM (30.5% vs. 51.6%, correspondingly, p = 0.005. The anxiety level in patients with and without TMD was also comparable (8.1 ± 4.1 vs. 8.3 ± 4.7, correspondingly, р = 0.8. Conclusion: CM patients have a high prevalence of pain-related TMD (52.4%. The prevalence of TMD in LFEM is comparable to that in the general population. The presence of bruxism or anxiety cannot be associated with a high TMD prevalence in our patients. In CM, pain in the masticatory muscles may be caused by anti-nociceptive dysfunction, mirroring central sensitization and disrupted descending modulation of pain.

  14. Real-time individualization of the unified model of performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianbo; Ramakrishnan, Sridhar; Laxminarayan, Srinivas; Balkin, Thomas J; Reifman, Jaques

    2017-12-01

    Existing mathematical models for predicting neurobehavioural performance are not suited for mobile computing platforms because they cannot adapt model parameters automatically in real time to reflect individual differences in the effects of sleep loss. We used an extended Kalman filter to develop a computationally efficient algorithm that continually adapts the parameters of the recently developed Unified Model of Performance (UMP) to an individual. The algorithm accomplishes this in real time as new performance data for the individual become available. We assessed the algorithm's performance by simulating real-time model individualization for 18 subjects subjected to 64 h of total sleep deprivation (TSD) and 7 days of chronic sleep restriction (CSR) with 3 h of time in bed per night, using psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) data collected every 2 h during wakefulness. This UMP individualization process produced parameter estimates that progressively approached the solution produced by a post-hoc fitting of model parameters using all data. The minimum number of PVT measurements needed to individualize the model parameters depended upon the type of sleep-loss challenge, with ~30 required for TSD and ~70 for CSR. However, model individualization depended upon the overall duration of data collection, yielding increasingly accurate model parameters with greater number of days. Interestingly, reducing the PVT sampling frequency by a factor of two did not notably hamper model individualization. The proposed algorithm facilitates real-time learning of an individual's trait-like responses to sleep loss and enables the development of individualized performance prediction models for use in a mobile computing platform. © 2017 European Sleep Research Society.

  15. Risk of preterm delivery and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy in relation to maternal co-morbid mood and migraine disorders during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cripe, Swee May; Frederick, Ihunnaya O; Qiu, Chunfang; Williams, Michelle A

    2011-03-01

    We evaluated the risks of preterm delivery and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy among pregnant women with mood and migraine disorders, using a cohort study of 3432 pregnant women. Maternal pre-pregnancy or early pregnancy (migraine diagnoses were ascertained from interview and medical record review. We fitted generalised linear models to derive risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of preterm delivery and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy for women with isolated mood, isolated migraine and co-morbid mood-migraine disorders, respectively. Reported RR were adjusted for maternal age, race/ethnicity, marital status, parity, smoking status, chronic hypertension or pre-existing diabetes mellitus, and pre-pregnancy body mass index. Women without mood or migraine disorders were defined as the reference group. The risks for preterm delivery and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy were more consistently elevated among women with co-morbid mood-migraine disorders than among women with isolated mood or migraine disorder. Women with co-morbid disorders were almost twice as likely to deliver preterm (adjusted RR=1.87, 95% CI 1.05, 3.34) compared with the reference group. There was no clear evidence of increased risks of preterm delivery and its subtypes with isolated migraine disorder. Women with mood disorder had elevated risks of pre-eclampsia (adjusted RR=3.57, 95% CI 1.83, 6.99). Our results suggest an association between isolated migraine disorder and pregnancy-induced hypertension (adjusted RR=1.42, 95% CI 1.00, 2.01). This is the first study examining perinatal outcomes in women with co-morbid mood-migraine disorders. Pregnant women with a history of migraine may benefit from screening for depression during prenatal care and vigilant monitoring, especially for women with co-morbid mood and migraine disorders. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Pharmacogenomics and migraine: possible implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, P.; Brosen, K.

    2008-01-01

    Pharmacogenomics is the science about how inherited factors influence the effects of drugs. Drug response is always a result of mutually interacting genes with important modifications from environmental and constitutional factors. Based on the genetic variability of pharmacokinetic and in some...... cases pharmacodynamic variability we mention possible implications for the acute and preventive treatment of migraine. Pharmacogenomics will most likely in the future be one part of our therapeutic armamentarium and will provide a stronger scientific basis for optimizing drug therapy on the basis...

  17. The KATP channel in migraine pathophysiology: a novel therapeutic target for migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Karagholi, Mohammad Al-Mahdi; Hansen, Jakob Møller; Severinsen, Johanne; Jansen-Olesen, Inger; Ashina, Messoud

    2017-08-23

    To review the distribution and function of K ATP channels, describe the use of K ATP channels openers in clinical trials and make the case that these channels may play a role in headache and migraine. K ATP channels are widely present in the trigeminovascular system and play an important role in the regulation of tone in cerebral and meningeal arteries. Clinical trials using synthetic K ATP channel openers report headache as a prevalent-side effect in non-migraine sufferers, indicating that K ATP channel opening may cause headache, possibly due to vascular mechanisms. Whether K ATP channel openers can provoke migraine in migraine sufferers is not known. We suggest that K ATP channels may play an important role in migraine pathogenesis and could be a potential novel therapeutic anti-migraine target.

  18. Clinical Pain Catastrophizing in Women With Migraine and Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Dale S; Buse, Dawn C; Lipton, Richard B; Thomas, J Graham; Rathier, Lucille; Roth, Julie; Pavlovic, Jelena M; Evans, E Whitney; Wing, Rena R

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is related to migraine. Maladaptive pain coping strategies (eg, pain catastrophizing) may provide insight into this relationship. In women with migraine and obesity, we cross-sectionally assessed: (1) prevalence of clinical catastrophizing; (2) characteristics of those with and without clinical catastrophizing; and (3) associations of catastrophizing with headache features. Obese women migraineurs seeking weight loss treatment (n = 105) recorded daily migraine activity for 1 month via smartphone and completed the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS). Clinical catastrophizing was defined as total PCS score ≥30. The six-item Headache Impact Test (HIT-6), 12-item Allodynia Symptom Checklist (ASC-12), Headache Management Self-Efficacy Scale (HMSE), and assessments for depression (Centers for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale) and anxiety (seven-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale) were also administered. Using PCS scores and body mass index (BMI) as predictors in linear regression, we modeled a series of headache features (ie, headache days, HIT-6, etc) as outcomes. One quarter (25.7%; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 17.2-34.1%) of participants met criteria for clinical catastrophizing: they had higher BMI (37.9 ± 7.5 vs 34.4 ± 5.7 kg/m(2) , P = .035); longer migraine attack duration (160.8 ± 145.0 vs 97.5 ± 75.2 hours/month, P = .038); higher HIT-6 scores (68.7 ± 4.6 vs 64.5 ± 3.9, P duration (β = 0.390, P duration, higher pain sensitivity, greater headache impact, and lower headache management self-efficacy. In all participants, PCS scores were related to several migraine characteristics, above and beyond the effects of obesity. Prospective studies are needed to determine sequence and mechanisms of relationships between catastrophizing, obesity, and migraine. © 2015 American Headache Society.

  19. Migraine Management During Menstruation and Menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGregor, E Anne

    2015-08-01

    Migraine is most prevalent in women during their reproductive years. An understanding of the effects of menstruation and menopause on migraine can enable neurologists to provide targeted and appropriate medical and hormonal strategies, enabling their patients to achieve better control of migraine and reduced disability. This article reviews the effects of hormonal events on migraine and summarizes the evidence-based options available for management. Estrogen "withdrawal" during the late luteal phase of the natural menstrual cycle and the hormone-free interval of combined hormonal contraceptives has long been implicated in the pathophysiology of menstrual migraine. However, more recent research suggests that other independent mechanisms may be relevant. Prostaglandin inhibitors used for management of dysmenorrhea are effective for associated menstrual migraine, suggesting a common pathophysiology. The interplay between serotonin and estrogen also deserves further research. Menstrual and perimenopausal migraine can be managed effectively using a variety of strategies, the choice of which depends on the efficacy of acute treatment, predictability and regularity of menstruation, use of contraception, and presence of menstrual disorders or perimenopausal vasomotor symptoms.

  20. Migraine accompagnee: Clinical and neutroradiological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, E.M.

    1981-01-01

    This study analyses clinical data, EEC and X-ray findings of 102 stationary examined migraine patients, 62 of whom suffered from migraine accompagnee. Sex distribution, age at onset of disease, hereditary disease disposition and EEC findings largely correspond to the data given in literature. As it had been expected, the X-ray images of the skull and the cerebral angiographies performed in 46 patients suffering from migraine accompagnee did not show any pathological findings. The X-ray images were compared with those taken of patients without migraine anamnesis in order to detect non-pathologic variations. Neither differences in the intensity of vascular and diplovenous marking could be found in the native images of the skull nor any variations of the circle of Willisi. The dependency of the posterior cerebral artery on the carotid circulation existing in 41% of the migraine accompagnee does not lead to any particular alteration of the accompanying symptoms and signs. The idea is discussed to divide the migraine syndrome into simple, focal and complicated migraine on the basis of a uniform pathogenesis. (orig./MG) [de

  1. Migraine: Clinical pattern and psychiatric comorbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjeet Singh Bhatia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Migraine is a common disorder which has psychiatric sequelae. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the clinical pattern and psychiatric comorbidity of migraine. Materials and Methods: 100 cases of migraine seen over a period of one year were analysed to know the sociodemographic characteristics, clinical pattern and psychiatric morbidity. Results: Maximum patients were between 31-40 years of age group (40%, females (78.0%, married (76% and housewives (56.0%. Family history of migraine was present in 12% cases. Average age of onset was 22 years. Unilateral and throbbing type of headache was most common. The commonest frequency was one to two per week. Migraine without aura was commonest sub-type (80%. Generalized anxiety disorder (F41.1 was the most common psychiatric disorder (34%, followed by mixed anxiety and depressive disorder (F41.2 (18% and depressive episode (F32 (14%. In 22% cases, no psychiatric disorder could be elicited. Conclusion: The present study confirms that majority patients with migraine had psychiatric disorders. This needs timely detection and appropriate intervention to treat and control the migraine effectively.

  2. The role of exercise in migraine treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koseoglu, E; Yetkin, M F; Ugur, F; Bilgen, M

    2015-09-01

    This review aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the literature on the use of exercise for migraine treatment with regard to its efficacy, mechanism of action and role in practice. Many randomized studies have reported the efficacy of prophylactic treatment of migrane with medications such as beta blockers or antiepileptic drugs. Studies on alternative approaches, like aerobic exercise and biofeedback, are however limited but also considered to be effective. Scientific databases were searched with keywords "exercise" and "migraine". The resulting publications were gathered, examined and discussed throughly. Past studies had limitations and were few in number, but more recent randomized controlled studies have concretely provided level of evidence about the effectiveness of exercise in prophylactic treatment of migraine. Core properties of exercise like intensity, duration, frequency, type and warming up period are required to be monitored while treating migraine to increase the beneficial effects and, also to prevent injuries and side effects which may include exertional headache. Isometric neck exercise is helpful when the migraine is accompanied by neck pain. Patient population with low beta endorphin level in blood, high physical fitness and high motivation receives significant benefits from the exercise treatment. The action of exercise on migraine is in general related to neurochemical factors, psychological states and increase in cardivascular and cerebrovascular fitness. Considering its effectiveness and minimal side effects, migraine patients should often be encouraged to practice physical exercise with intensity, frequency and duration that should be carefully instituted to achieve the most beneficial outcome while preventing potential injuries and side effects.

  3. Risk Factor and Comorbidity of Migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woro Riyadina

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Migraine is a chronic daily headache which interfere a quality of life. The purpose of this research is to obtain the prevalence, risk factors, and comorbidity of migraine. Methods: A cross sectional study involving 4771 subjects in 5 villages in the district of Central Bogor, Bogor City 2011–2012. Data collection was performed using WHO STEPS (interview, measurement, physical examination, and laboratory test. Results: In this study, the migraine prevalence was 22.43%, with significant risk factors were sex, age, and stress (p < 0.05. Comorbidity of migraine was coronary heart diseases (p < 0.05. There was no significant correlation between migraine with marital status, level of education, smoking, hypertension, obesity, total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, trigliseride level, and diabetes mellitus (p > 0.05. Conclusions: Risk factors which have significant association with migraine are sex, age, and stress, whereas coronary heart disease existed as a comorbidity with migraine.

  4. Migraine Care Challenges and Strategies in US Uninsured and Underinsured Adults: A Narrative Review, Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charleston, Larry; Royce, Jeffrey; Monteith, Teshamae S; Broner, Susan W; O'Brien, Hope L; Manrriquez, Salvador L; Robbins, Matthew S

    2018-04-01

    To review the scope of the problem facing individuals with migraine who are under- or uninsured. In this first of a 2-part narrative review, we will explore migraine epidemiology and the challenges that face this vulnerable population. Implementation of the Affordable Care Act has improved access to health care for many individuals who were previously uninsured, but there are many, particularly those of certain demographics, who are at high risk for worse outcomes. A narrative review was performed after a series of discussions within the Underserved Populations in Headache Medicine Special Interest Section meetings of the American Headache Society. Literature was reviewed for key concepts underpinning conceptual boundaries and a broad overview of the subject matter. Published guidelines, state-specific Medicaid websites, headache quality measurement set, literature review, and expert opinion were used to tailor suggested treatment options and therapeutic strategies. Migraine is common, yet remains underdiagnosed and associated with worse outcomes among those of under-represented backgrounds and those who are underinsured or uninsured. Low socioeconomics may play an important role in the disease progression, characteristics, outcome, and quality of life of patients with migraine and other headache disorders. Other barriers to optimal care include time constraints, lack of access to specialty providers, transportation, and financial limitations. There are many barriers and challenges that affect people with migraine who are underinsured or uninsured, particularly those of under-represented racial backgrounds and of lower socioeconomic status. © 2018 American Headache Society.

  5. Prevalence of neck pain in migraine and tension-type headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashina, Sait; Bendtsen, Lars; Lyngberg, Ann C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We assessed the prevalence of neck pain in the population in relation to headache. METHODS: In a cross-sectional study, a total of 797 individuals completed a headache interview and provided self-reported data on neck pain. We identified migraine, TTH or both migraine and TTH (M......+TTH) groups. Pericranial tenderness was recorded in 496 individuals. A total tenderness score (TTS) was calculated as the sum of local scores with a maximum score of 48. RESULTS: The one-year prevalence of neck pain was 68.4% and higher in those with vs. without primary headache (85.7% vs. 56.7%; adjusted...... OR 3.0, 95% CI 2.0-4.4, pneck pain (56.7%) was significantly higher in those with M+TTH (89.3%), pure TTH (88.4%) and pure migraine (76.2%) (p

  6. Neurophysiology of visual aura in migraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Koichi

    2007-01-01

    Visual processing in migraine has been targeted because the visual symptoms that are commonly associated with attack, either in the form of aura or other more subtle symptoms, indicate that the visual pathways are involved in migrainous pathophysiology. The visual aura of the migraine attack has been explained by the cortical spreading depression (CSD) of Leao, neuroelectric event beginning in the occipital cortex and propagating into contiguous brain region. Clinical observations suggest that hyperexcitability occurs not only during the attack, typically in the form of photophobia, but also between attacks. Numerous human neuroimaging, neurophysiological and psychophysical studies have identified differences in cortical visual processing in migraine. The possibility of imaging the typical visual aura with BOLD functional MRI has revealed multiple neurovascular events in the occipital cortex within a single attack that closely resemble CSD. As transient synchronized neuronal excitation precedes CSD, changes in cortical excitability underlie the migraine attack. Independent evidence for altered neuronal excitability in migraineurs between attacks emerges from visual evoked potentials (VEPs) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), recordings of cortical potentials and psychophysics. Recently, both TMS and psychophysical studies measuring visual performance in migraineurs have used measures which presumably measure primary visual (V1) and visual association cortex. Our VEP and blink reflex study showed that migraine patients exhibiting allodynia might show central sensitization of braistem trigeminal neuron and had contrast modulation dysfunction during the cortical visual processing of V1 and visual association cortex in-between attacks. In pathophysiology of migraine, these neurophysiological and psychophysical studies indicate that abnormal visual and trigeminal hyperexcitability might persist between migraine attacks. The influence of migraine on cortical

  7. Individualism in plant populations: using stochastic differential equations to model individual neighbourhood-dependent plant growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Qiming; Schneider, Manuel K; Pitchford, Jonathan W

    2008-08-01

    We study individual plant growth and size hierarchy formation in an experimental population of Arabidopsis thaliana, within an integrated analysis that explicitly accounts for size-dependent growth, size- and space-dependent competition, and environmental stochasticity. It is shown that a Gompertz-type stochastic differential equation (SDE) model, involving asymmetric competition kernels and a stochastic term which decreases with the logarithm of plant weight, efficiently describes individual plant growth, competition, and variability in the studied population. The model is evaluated within a Bayesian framework and compared to its deterministic counterpart, and to several simplified stochastic models, using distributional validation. We show that stochasticity is an important determinant of size hierarchy and that SDE models outperform the deterministic model if and only if structural components of competition (asymmetry; size- and space-dependence) are accounted for. Implications of these results are discussed in the context of plant ecology and in more general modelling situations.

  8. A model for individual egg production in chickens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grossman, M.; Koops, W.J.

    2001-01-01

    Our primary objective was to improve on an existing model for the individual weekly egg production curve by modeling the curve as a sum of logistic functions: one for the increasing phase of production and a sum for the decreasing phases. To illustrate the model, we used four data sets from two

  9. Individualized Next-Generation Biomathematical Modeling of Fatigue and Performance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Van Dongen, Hans P

    2006-01-01

    .... This project employed a cutting-edge technique called Bayesian forecasting to develop a novel biomathematical performance model to predict responses to sleep loss and circadian displacement for individual subjects...

  10. ASSESSING INDIVIDUAL PERFORMANCE ON INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ADOPTION: A NEW MODEL

    OpenAIRE

    Diah Hari Suryaningrum

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to propose a new model in assessing individual performance on information technology adoption. The new model to assess individual performance was derived from two different theories: decomposed theory of planned behavior and task-technology fit theory. Although many researchers have tried to expand these theories, some of their efforts might lack of theoretical assumptions. To overcome this problem and enhance the coherence of the integration, I used a theory from social scien...

  11. Cervical Muscle Strength and Muscle Coactivation During Isometric Contractions in Patients With Migraine: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florencio, Lidiane Lima; de Oliveira, Anamaria Siriani; Carvalho, Gabriela Ferreira; Tolentino, Gabriella de Almeida; Dach, Fabiola; Bigal, Marcelo Eduardo; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Bevilaqua Grossi, Débora

    2015-01-01

    This cross-sectional study investigated potential differences in cervical musculature in groups of migraine headaches vs. non-headache controls. Differences in cervical muscle strength and antagonist coactivation during maximal isometric voluntary contraction (MIVC) were analyzed between individuals with migraine and non-headache subjects and relationships between force with migraine and neck pain clinical aspects. A customized hand-held dynamometer was used to assess cervical flexion, extension, and bilateral lateral flexion strength in subjects with episodic migraine (n=31), chronic migraine (n = 21) and healthy controls (n = 31). Surface electromyography (EMG) from sternocleidomastoid, anterior scalene, and splenius capitis muscles were recorded during MIVC to evaluate antagonist coactivation. Comparison of main outcomes among groups was conducted with one-way analysis of covariance with the presence of neck pain as covariable. Correlations between peak force and clinical variables were demonstrated by Spearman's coefficient. Chronic migraine subjects exhibited lower cervical extension force (mean diff. from controls: 4.4 N/kg; mean diff from episodic migraine: 3.7 N/kg; P = .006) and spent significantly more time to generate peak force during cervical flexion (mean diff. from controls: 0.5 seconds; P = .025) and left lateral-flexion (mean diff. from controls: 0.4 seconds; mean diff. from episodic migraine: 0.5 seconds; P = .007). Both migraine groups showed significantly higher antagonist muscle coactivity of the splenius capitis muscle (mean diff. from controls: 20%MIVC, P = .03) during cervical flexion relative to healthy controls. Cervical extension peak force was moderately associated with the migraine frequency (rs: -0.30, P = .034), neck pain frequency (rs: -0.26, P = .020), and neck pain intensity (rs: -0.27, P = .012). Patients with chronic migraine exhibit altered muscle performance, took longer to reach peak of

  12. Hearing voices: does it give your patient a headache? A case of auditory hallucinations as acoustic aura in migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van der Feltz-Cornelis CM

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Christina M van der Feltz-Cornelis1–3, Henk Biemans1, Jan Timmer11Clinical Centre for Body, Mind and Health, GGz Breburg, Tilburg, The Netherlands; 2Faculty of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Tilburg University, Tilburg, The Netherlands; 3Trimbos Instituut, Utrecht, The NetherlandsObjective: Auditory hallucinations are generally considered to be a psychotic symptom. However, they do occur without other psychotic symptoms in a substantive number of cases in the general population and can cause a lot of individual distress because of the supposed association with schizophrenia. We describe a case of nonpsychotic auditory hallucinations occurring in the context of migraine.Method: Case report and literature review.Results: A 40-year-old man presented with imperative auditory hallucinations that caused depressive and anxiety symptoms. He reported migraine with visual aura as well which started at the same time as the auditory hallucinations. The auditory hallucinations occurred in the context of nocturnal migraine attacks, preceding them as aura. No psychotic disorder was present. After treatment of the migraine with propranolol 40 mg twice daily, explanation of the etiology of the hallucinations, and mirtazapine 45 mg daily, the migraine subsided and no further hallucinations occurred. The patient recovered.Discussion: Visual auras have been described in migraine and occur quite often. Auditory hallucinations as aura in migraine have been described in children without psychosis, but this is the first case describing auditory hallucinations without psychosis as aura in migraine in an adult. For description of this kind of hallucination, DSM-IV lacks an appropriate category.Conclusion: Psychiatrists should consider migraine with acoustic aura as a possible etiological factor in patients without further psychotic symptoms presenting with auditory hallucinations, and they should ask for headache symptoms when they take the history. Prognosis may be

  13. Modelling of individual subject ozone exposure response kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelegle, Edward S; Adams, William C; Walby, William F; Marion, M Susan

    2012-06-01

    A better understanding of individual subject ozone (O(3)) exposure response kinetics will provide insight into how to improve models used in the risk assessment of ambient ozone exposure. To develop a simple two compartment exposure-response model that describes individual subject decrements in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1)) induced by the acute inhalation of O(3) lasting up to 8 h. FEV(1) measurements of 220 subjects who participated in 14 previously completed studies were fit to the model using both particle swarm and nonlinear least squares optimization techniques to identify three subject-specific coefficients producing minimum "global" and local errors, respectively. Observed and predicted decrements in FEV(1) of the 220 subjects were used for validation of the model. Further validation was provided by comparing the observed O(3)-induced FEV(1) decrements in an additional eight studies with predicted values obtained using model coefficients estimated from the 220 subjects used in cross validation. Overall the individual subject measured and modeled FEV(1) decrements were highly correlated (mean R(2) of 0.69 ± 0.24). In addition, it was shown that a matrix of individual subject model coefficients can be used to predict the mean and variance of group decrements in FEV(1). This modeling approach provides insight into individual subject O(3) exposure response kinetics and provides a potential starting point for improving the risk assessment of environmental O(3) exposure.

  14. Treatment of Menstrual-Related Migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available A review and meta-analysis of therapy trials for menstrual-related migraine headache (MRM and evidence-based recommendations for acute and short-term preventive treatment are reported from Toronto Western Hospital, ON, Canada.

  15. Emerging migraine treatments and drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jes; Ashina, Messoud

    2011-01-01

    Migraine has a 1-year prevalence of 10% and high socioeconomic costs. Despite recent drug developments, there is a huge unmet need for better pharmacotherapy. In this review we discuss promising anti-migraine strategies such as calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonists and 5......-hydroxytrypamine (5-HT)(1F) receptor agonists, which are in late-stage development. Nitric oxide antagonists are also in development. New forms of administration of sumatriptan might improve efficacy and reduce side effects. Botulinum toxin A has recently been approved for the prophylaxis of chronic migraine....... Tonabersat, a cortical spreading depression inhibitor, has shown efficacy in the prophylaxis of migraine with aura. Several new drug targets such as nitric oxide synthase, the 5-HT(1D) receptor, the prostanoid receptors EP(2) and EP(4), and the pituitary adenylate cyclase receptor PAC1 await development...

  16. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide and migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zagami, Alessandro S; Edvinsson, Lars; Goadsby, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide (PACAP) is found in human trigeminocervical complex and can trigger migraine. PACAP levels were measured using a sensitive radioimmunoassay. Stimulation of the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) in cat elevated PACAP levels in cranial blood. Patients...

  17. Dietary Treatment for Migraine Under Six Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Clinical factors and response to treatment were compared in children < 6 years and older children treated for migraine by nonpharmacologic measures in a pediatric headache clinic at Schneider Children’s Medical Center, Petah Tiqwa, Israel.

  18. Migraine Pathophysiology - Evolution Of Our Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinha K.K

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The biologic basis of migraine had remained unclear until about 15 years, but current migraine research has made some major advances to explain its mechanism. Migraine is currently conceived to originate in the brain. The trigger of an attack starts a depolarising event very similar to "spreading depression" of Leao in a brain that is already hyperexcitable. Hyperexcitability of cell membrane is perhaps genetically determined. Cortical depolarising events drive the trigeminovascular system through mechanisms that are largely hypothetical but might include a migraine generating centre in the brainstem to produce changes in the vessels of the cranium and meninges. Pain sensations carrying impulses are relayed back, first reaching the trigeminal ganglion caudalis and the trigeminal cervical complex in upper cervical cord from where they are relayed further up through various transmitting pathways to the brainstem, thalamus and the cortex where pain is finally perceived and registered.

  19. Professional tools and a personal touch - experiences of physical therapy of persons with migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutberg, Stina; Kostenius, Catrine; Öhrling, Kerstin

    2013-09-01

    The aim was to explore the lived experience of physical therapy of persons with migraine. Data were collected by conducting narrative interviews with 11 persons with migraine. Inspired by van Manen, a hermeneutic phenomenological method was used to analyse the experiences of physical therapy which these persons had. Physical therapy for persons with migraine meant making an effort in terms of time and energy to improve their health by meeting a person who was utilising his or her knowledge and skill to help. Being respected and treated as an individual and having confidence in the physical therapist were highlighted aspects. The analysis revealed a main theme, "meeting a physical therapist with professional tools and a personal touch". The main theme included four sub-themes, "investing time and energy to feel better", "relying on the competence of the physical therapist", "wanting to be treated and to become involved as an individual" and "being respected in a trustful relationship". The therapeutic relationship with the physical therapist is important and the findings of this study can increase awareness about relational aspects of physical therapy and encourage thoughtfulness among physical therapists and other healthcare professionals interacting with persons with migraine. Physical therapists use both professional tools and a personal touch in their interaction with persons with migraine and this article can increase physical therapists' awareness and encourage thoughtfulness in their professional practice. Being respected and treated as an individual and having confidence in the physical therapist are important aspects of the therapeutic relationship and indicate a need for patient-centred care. By making the effort of spending the time and energy required, physical therapy could be a complement or an alternative to medication to ease the consequences of migraine.

  20. Signs of temporomandibular disorders in migraine patients: a prospective, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuginski-Barbosa, Juliana; Macedo, Henrique R; Bigal, Marcelo Eduardo; Speciali, José Geraldo

    2010-06-01

    To identify signs of temporomandibular disorders and cervical pain in individuals with episodic and chronic (transformed) migraine (CM), relative to controls without headaches. In this prospective, controlled, double-blind study, we examined 93 individuals divided in 3 groups: episodic migraine EM, (n=31), CM chronic migraine (n=34), and controls without migraine (n=28). We recorded signs of temporomandibular disorders, and of pain in the neck, after the protocol of Helkimo (1974). We calculated the odds ratio (OR) and confidence intervals (CI) of symptoms as a function of headache status. Data from all groups were paired and compared using the chi test. The level of significance was 5% in 2-tailed tests. Relative to controls, participants with EM and CM were significantly more likely to have tenderness in the masticatory muscles [controls=28%, migraine=54%, (OR=3.0, 95% CI=1.1-8.9), CM=73% (OR=6.9, 95% CI=2.3-21.2)], and in the temporomandibular joint [controls=25%, migraine=61%, (OR=4.7, 95% CI=1.5-14.5), CM=61% (OR=4.8, 95% CI=1.6-14.5)]. They were numerically (but nonsignificantly) more likely to have limited lateral jaw movements (CM=34%; EM=26%; NP=18%), joint sounds (CM=44%; EM=29%; NP=28%), and tenderness in neck muscles (CM=64%; EM=51%; NP=35%). In a tertiary care population, individuals with EM and CM are more likely to have tenderness at the temporomandibular joint and on the masticatory muscles, relative to controls. Studies are needed to investigate whether treatment of 1 disorder will improve the other.

  1. A Network-Individual-Resource Model for HIV Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Blair T.; Redding, Colleen A.; DiClemente, Ralph J.; Mustanski, Brian S.; Dodge, Brian M.; Sheeran, Paschal; Warren, Michelle R.; Zimmerman, Rick S.; Fisher, William A.; Conner, Mark T.; Carey, Michael P.; Fisher, Jeffrey D.; Stall, Ronald D.; Fishbein, Martin

    2014-01-01

    HIV is transmitted through dyadic exchanges of individuals linked in transitory or permanent networks of varying sizes. To optimize prevention efficacy, a complementary theoretical perspective that bridges key individual level elements with important network elements can be a foundation for developing and implementing HIV interventions with outcomes that are more sustainable over time and have greater dissemination potential. Toward that end, we introduce a Network-Individual-Resource (NIR) model for HIV prevention that recognizes how exchanges of resources between individuals and their networks underlies and sustains HIV-risk behaviors. Individual behavior change for HIV prevention, then, may be dependent on increasing the supportiveness of that individual's relevant networks for such change. Among other implications, an NIR model predicts that the success of prevention efforts depends on whether the prevention efforts (1) prompt behavior changes that can be sustained by the resources the individual or their networks possess; (2) meet individual and network needs and are consistent with the individual's current situation/developmental stage; (3) are trusted and valued; and (4) target high HIV-prevalence networks. PMID:20862606

  2. Hemiplegic Migraine Presenting with Prolonged Somnolence: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Saleh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hemiplegic migraine is a rare and complex disease, characterized by migraine with a reversible motor aura. Hemiplegic migraine can be easily misdiagnosed at its first presentation with an atypical severe form of migraine, a stroke, multiple sclerosis, metabolic disorders, conversion disorder or an epilepsy. We present the case of a young 24-year-old male patient, who since the age of 4 years had been having multiple episodes of migraine associated with hemiparesis, paraesthesia, prolonged somnolence, aphasia and confusion. We review the literature and discuss important diagnostic findings in hemiplegic migraine to help establishing a prompt diagnosis.

  3. Prevalence of neck pain in migraine and tension-type headache: a population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashina, Sait; Bendtsen, Lars; Lyngberg, Ann C; Lipton, Richard B; Hajiyeva, Nazrin; Jensen, Rigmor

    2015-03-01

    We assessed the prevalence of neck pain in the population in relation to headache. In a cross-sectional study, a total of 797 individuals completed a headache interview and provided self-reported data on neck pain. We identified migraine, TTH or both migraine and TTH (M+TTH) groups. Pericranial tenderness was recorded in 496 individuals. A total tenderness score (TTS) was calculated as the sum of local scores with a maximum score of 48. The one-year prevalence of neck pain was 68.4% and higher in those with vs. without primary headache (85.7% vs. 56.7%; adjusted OR 3.0, 95% CI 2.0-4.4, pneck pain (56.7%) was significantly higher in those with M+TTH (89.3%), pure TTH (88.4%) and pure migraine (76.2%) (pneck pain had higher TTS than individuals without neck pain (15.1±10.5 vs. 8.4±8.0, pNeck pain is highly prevalent in the general population and even more prevalent in individuals with primary headaches. Prevalence is highest in coexistent M+TTH, followed by pure TTH and migraine. Myofascial tenderness is significantly increased in individuals with neck pain. © International Headache Society 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  4. Cognitive processing of visual images in migraine populations in between headache attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickleborough, Marla J S; Chapman, Christine M; Toma, Andreea S; Handy, Todd C

    2014-09-25

    People with migraine headache have altered interictal visual sensory-level processing in between headache attacks. Here we examined the extent to which these migraine abnormalities may extend into higher visual processing such as implicit evaluative analysis of visual images in between migraine events. Specifically, we asked two groups of participants--migraineurs (N=29) and non-migraine controls (N=29)--to view a set of unfamiliar commercial logos in the context of a target identification task as the brain electrical responses to these objects were recorded via event-related potentials (ERPs). Following this task, participants individually identified those logos that they most liked or disliked. We applied a between-groups comparison of how ERP responses to logos varied as a function of hedonic evaluation. Our results suggest migraineurs have abnormal implicit evaluative processing of visual stimuli. Specifically, migraineurs lacked a bias for disliked logos found in control subjects, as measured via a late positive potential (LPP) ERP component. These results suggest post-sensory consequences of migraine in between headache events, specifically abnormal cognitive evaluative processing with a lack of normal categorical hedonic evaluation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Associations between stress and migraine and tension-type headache: results from a school-based study in adolescents from grammar schools in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milde-Busch, Astrid; Blaschek, Astrid; Heinen, Florian; Borggräfe, Ingo; Koerte, Inga; Straube, Andreas; Schankin, Christoph; von Kries, Rüdiger

    2011-05-01

    Stress is considered the major contributor to migraine and tension-type headache in adolescents. Previous studies have focused on general stressors, whereas the aim of the present study was to investigate associations between individuals' stressful experiences and different types of headache. Adolescents from 10th and 11th grades of grammar schools filled in questionnaires. Stressful experiences were measured with the Trier Inventory of Chronic Stress. Type of headache was classified according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders. Linear regressions, adjusted for sex and grade, were calculated to estimate differences in stress scores that can be attributed to migraine, tension-type headache or miscellaneous headache. A total of 1260 questionnaires were analysed. Tension-type headache, migraine and co-existing migraine plus tension-type headache were found in 48.7%, 10.2% and 19.8% of the participants. In subjects with migraine or co-existing migraine plus tension-type headache, high increases in stress scores were found in all investigated dimensions, whereas much weaker and inconsistent associations were found in subjects with tension-type headache only. The characteristic of migraine is more associated with stressful experiences than this is the case for tension-type headache. This suggests that adolescent migraine patients might especially benefit from behavioural interventions regarding stress.

  6. Alexithymia and its impact on quality of life in a group of Brazilian women with migraine without aura

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Migraine is a type of primary headache widely known for its impact on quality of life of patients. Although the psychological aspects of the disease are receiving increasing attention in current research, some of them, as alexithymia, are still seldom explored. This study aimed to provide evidence on the relationships between markers of depression, anxiety, alexithymia, self-reflection, insight and quality of life in migraine. Methods Forty female outpatients from a Brazilian specialized headache hospital service and a paired control group were compared. Results The results revealed that women with migraine had higher levels of depression, anxiety and alexithymia, and lower levels of quality of life, self-reflection and insight, compared to controls. Quality of life in women with migraine was predicted by levels of depression and one alexithymia factor (ability to express emotions and fantasies). A binary regression analysis between clinical and control groups revealed the migraine group to comprise individuals with high anxiety, low quality of life in the physical domain and the presence of a concrete thinking style. Conclusions The results highlight the relevance of considering psychological variables in the routine healthcare practices for migraine patients in general, while keeping steady attention to individual case features. PMID:23565860

  7. Individual based and mean-field modeling of direct aggregation

    KAUST Repository

    Burger, Martin

    2013-10-01

    We introduce two models of biological aggregation, based on randomly moving particles with individual stochasticity depending on the perceived average population density in their neighborhood. In the firstorder model the location of each individual is subject to a density-dependent random walk, while in the second-order model the density-dependent random walk acts on the velocity variable, together with a density-dependent damping term. The main novelty of our models is that we do not assume any explicit aggregative force acting on the individuals; instead, aggregation is obtained exclusively by reducing the individual stochasticity in response to higher perceived density. We formally derive the corresponding mean-field limits, leading to nonlocal degenerate diffusions. Then, we carry out the mathematical analysis of the first-order model, in particular, we prove the existence of weak solutions and show that it allows for measure-valued steady states. We also perform linear stability analysis and identify conditions for pattern formation. Moreover, we discuss the role of the nonlocality for well-posedness of the first-order model. Finally, we present results of numerical simulations for both the first- and second-order model on the individual-based and continuum levels of description. 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Individual based and mean-field modeling of direct aggregation

    KAUST Repository

    Burger, Martin; Haskovec, Jan; Wolfram, Marie-Therese

    2013-01-01

    We introduce two models of biological aggregation, based on randomly moving particles with individual stochasticity depending on the perceived average population density in their neighborhood. In the firstorder model the location of each individual is subject to a density-dependent random walk, while in the second-order model the density-dependent random walk acts on the velocity variable, together with a density-dependent damping term. The main novelty of our models is that we do not assume any explicit aggregative force acting on the individuals; instead, aggregation is obtained exclusively by reducing the individual stochasticity in response to higher perceived density. We formally derive the corresponding mean-field limits, leading to nonlocal degenerate diffusions. Then, we carry out the mathematical analysis of the first-order model, in particular, we prove the existence of weak solutions and show that it allows for measure-valued steady states. We also perform linear stability analysis and identify conditions for pattern formation. Moreover, we discuss the role of the nonlocality for well-posedness of the first-order model. Finally, we present results of numerical simulations for both the first- and second-order model on the individual-based and continuum levels of description. 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Hybrid Modelling of Individual Movement and Collective Behaviour

    KAUST Repository

    Franz, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Mathematical models of dispersal in biological systems are often written in terms of partial differential equations (PDEs) which describe the time evolution of population-level variables (concentrations, densities). A more detailed modelling approach is given by individual-based (agent-based) models which describe the behaviour of each organism. In recent years, an intermediate modelling methodology - hybrid modelling - has been applied to a number of biological systems. These hybrid models couple an individual-based description of cells/animals with a PDE-model of their environment. In this chapter, we overview hybrid models in the literature with the focus on the mathematical challenges of this modelling approach. The detailed analysis is presented using the example of chemotaxis, where cells move according to extracellular chemicals that can be altered by the cells themselves. In this case, individual-based models of cells are coupled with PDEs for extracellular chemical signals. Travelling waves in these hybrid models are investigated. In particular, we show that in contrary to the PDEs, hybrid chemotaxis models only develop a transient travelling wave. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  10. Management of Pediatric Migraine: Current Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrizman, Marina; Pakalnis, Ann

    2018-02-01

    Migraine is one of the most common neurologic conditions in pediatrics. It can be a significant stressor, causing absences from school and interruption of parents' work and family schedules. The mainstay of treatment remains educating patients about healthy lifestyle practices and the influences of sleep, stressors, and hydration on triggering migraine attacks. Psychological therapies such as biofeedback or cognitive-behavioral therapy may be beneficial in some patients, especially those with prominent psychological comorbidities. New advances in the pathophysiology of migraine and additional pediatric approval of abortive therapy with triptans have led to significant advances in the management of migraine in children. Some challenges to preventive therapy were recently noted with the negative results obtained in the Childhood and Adolescent Migraine Prevention Study, which compared prescription drugs to placebo. Inherent differences between adult and pediatric headaches, with shorter duration of pediatric migraine and prominent placebo effect, present recurring challenges for clinicians. [Pediatr Ann. 2018;47(2):e55-e60.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Refractory migraine in a headache clinic population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandez-Torron Roberto

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many migraineurs who seek care in headache clinics are refractory to treatment, despite advances in headache therapies. Epidemiology is poorly characterized, because diagnostic criteria for refractory migraine were not available until recently. We aimed to determine the frequency of refractory migraine in patients attended in the Headache Unit in a tertiary care center, according to recently proposed criteria. Methods The study population consisted of a consecutive sample of 370 patients (60.8% females with a mean age of 43 years (range 14-86 evaluated for the first time in our headache unit over a one-year period (between October 2008 and October 2009. We recorded information on clinical features, previous treatments, Migraine Disability Assessment Score (MIDAS, and final diagnosis. Results Overall migraine and tension-type headache were found in 46.4% and 20.5% of patients, respectively. Refractory migraine was found in 5.1% of patients. In refractory migraineurs, the mean MIDAS score was 96, and 36.8% were medication-overusers. Conclusions Refractory migraine is a relatively common and very disabling condition between the patients attended in a headache unit. The proposed operational criteria may be useful in identifying those patients who require care in headache units, the selection of candidates for combinations of prophylactic drugs or invasive treatments such as neurostimulation, but also to facilitate clinical studies in this patient group.

  12. Gender differences in sex life issues A population-based study of migraine sufferers

    OpenAIRE

    Sumanen, Markku PT; Ojanlatva, Ansa; Rantala, Anna; Sillanmäki, Lauri H; Mattila, Kari J

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Migraine is considered to have a negative influence on sex life. The present study was to analyse the perceptions of importance of and satisfaction with sex life as well as the expression of interest in sex among people having migraines in a prospective follow-up mail survey in 1998 and 2003. Methods The random sample was stratified according to gender and age in four age groups (20–24, 30–34, 40–44, and 50–54 years). Altogether 25 898 individuals responded to the baseline...

  13. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies new susceptibility loci for migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anttila, Verneri; Winsvold, Bendik S; Gormley, Padhraig; Kurth, Tobias; Bettella, Francesco; McMahon, George; Kallela, Mikko; Malik, Rainer; de Vries, Boukje; Terwindt, Gisela; Medland, Sarah E; Todt, Unda; McArdle, Wendy L; Quaye, Lydia; Koiranen, Markku; Ikram, M Arfan; Lehtimäki, Terho; Stam, Anine H; Ligthart, Lannie; Wedenoja, Juho; Dunham, Ian; Neale, Benjamin M; Palta, Priit; Hamalainen, Eija; Schürks, Markus; Rose, Lynda M; Buring, Julie E; Ridker, Paul M; Steinberg, Stacy; Stefansson, Hreinn; Jakobsson, Finnbogi; Lawlor, Debbie A; Evans, David M; Ring, Susan M; Färkkilä, Markus; Artto, Ville; Kaunisto, Mari A; Freilinger, Tobias; Schoenen, Jean; Frants, Rune R; Pelzer, Nadine; Weller, Claudia M; Zielman, Ronald; Heath, Andrew C; Madden, Pamela A F; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Borck, Guntram; Göbel, Hartmut; Heinze, Axel; Heinze-Kuhn, Katja; Williams, Frances M K; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Pouta, Anneli; van den Ende, Joyce; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hofman, Albert; Amin, Najaf; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Vink, Jacqueline M; Heikkilä, Kauko; Alexander, Michael; Muller-Myhsok, Bertram; Schreiber, Stefan; Meitinger, Thomas; Wichmann, Heinz Erich; Aromaa, Arpo; Eriksson, Johan G; Traynor, Bryan; Trabzuni, Daniah; Rossin, Elizabeth; Lage, Kasper; Jacobs, Suzanne B R; Gibbs, J Raphael; Birney, Ewan; Kaprio, Jaakko; Penninx, Brenda W; Boomsma, Dorret I; van Duijn, Cornelia; Raitakari, Olli; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Zwart, John-Anker; Cherkas, Lynn; Strachan, David P; Kubisch, Christian; Ferrari, Michel D; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Dichgans, Martin; Wessman, Maija; Smith, George Davey; Stefansson, Kari; Daly, Mark J; Nyholt, Dale R; Chasman, Daniel; Palotie, Aarno

    2013-08-01

    Migraine is the most common brain disorder, affecting approximately 14% of the adult population, but its molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. We report the results of a meta-analysis across 29 genome-wide association studies, including a total of 23,285 individuals with migraine (cases) and 95,425 population-matched controls. We identified 12 loci associated with migraine susceptibility (P<5×10(-8)). Five loci are new: near AJAP1 at 1p36, near TSPAN2 at 1p13, within FHL5 at 6q16, within C7orf10 at 7p14 and near MMP16 at 8q21. Three of these loci were identified in disease subgroup analyses. Brain tissue expression quantitative trait locus analysis suggests potential functional candidate genes at four loci: APOA1BP, TBC1D7, FUT9, STAT6 and ATP5B.

  14. Simulating individual-based models of epidemics in hierarchical networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quax, R.; Bader, D.A.; Sloot, P.M.A.

    2009-01-01

    Current mathematical modeling methods for the spreading of infectious diseases are too simplified and do not scale well. We present the Simulator of Epidemic Evolution in Complex Networks (SEECN), an efficient simulator of detailed individual-based models by parameterizing separate dynamics

  15. Individual Learning Accounts and Other Models of Financing Lifelong Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetze, Hans G.

    2007-01-01

    To answer the question "Financing what?" this article distinguishes several models of lifelong learning as well as a variety of lifelong learning activities. Several financing methods are briefly reviewed, however the principal focus is on Individual Learning Accounts (ILAs) which were seen by some analysts as a promising model for…

  16. Investigating Individual Differences in Toddler Search with Mixture Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthier, Neil E.; Boucher, Kelsea; Weisner, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Children's performance on cognitive tasks is often described in categorical terms in that a child is described as either passing or failing a test, or knowing or not knowing some concept. We used binomial mixture models to determine whether individual children could be classified as passing or failing two search tasks, the DeLoache model room…

  17. Prescription Patterns and the Cost of Migraine Treatments in German General and Neurological Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Louis; Kostev, Karel

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze prescription patterns and the cost of migraine treatments in general practices (GPs) and neurological practices (NPs) in Germany. This study included 43,149 patients treated in GPs and 13,674 patients treated in NPs who were diagnosed with migraine in 2015. Ten different families of migraine therapy were included in the analysis: triptans, analgesics, anti-emetics, beta-blockers, antivertigo products, gastroprokinetics, anti-epileptics, calcium channel blockers, tricyclic antidepressants, and other medications (all other classes used in the treatment of migraine including homeopathic medications). The share of migraine therapies and their costs were estimated for GPs and NPs. The mean age was 44.4 years in GPs and 44.1 years in NPs. Triptans and analgesics were the 2 most commonly prescribed families of drugs in all patients and in the 9 specific subgroups. Interestingly, triptans were more commonly prescribed in NPs than in GPs (30.9% to 55.0% vs. 30.0% to 44.7%), whereas analgesics were less frequently given in NPs than in GPs (11.5% to 17.2% vs. 35.3% to 42.4%). Finally, the share of patients who received no therapy was higher in NPs than in GPs (33.9% to 58.4% vs. 27.5% to 37.9%). The annual cost per patient was €66.04 in GPs and €94.71 in NPs. Finally, the annual cost per patient increased with age and was higher in women and in individuals with private health insurance coverage than in men and individuals with public health insurance coverage. Triptans and analgesics were the 2 most commonly prescribed drugs for the treatment of migraine. Furthermore, approximately 30% to 40% of patients did not receive any therapy. Finally, the annual cost per patient was higher in NPs than in GPs. © 2016 World Institute of Pain.

  18. Positron emission tomography and migraine. Tomographie par emission de positons et migraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chabriat, H. (CEA, 91 - Orsay (France). Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot)

    1992-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a brain imaging technique that allows in vivo studies of numerous physiological parameters. There have been few PET studies in migraine patients. Cerebral blood flow changes with no variations in brain oxygen consumption have been reported in patients with prolonged neurologic manifestations during migraine attacks. Parenteral administration of reserpine during migraine headache has been followed by a fall in the overall cerebral uptake of glucose. The small sample sizes and a number of methodologic problems complicate the interpretation of these results. Recent technical advances and the development of new PET tracers can be expected to provide further insight into the pathophysiology of migraine. Today cerebral cortex 5 HT{sub 2} serotonin receptors can be studied in migraine patients with PET.

  19. Individual-based modeling of ecological and evolutionary processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAngelis, Donald L.; Mooij, Wolf M.

    2005-01-01

    Individual-based models (IBMs) allow the explicit inclusion of individual variation in greater detail than do classical differential-equation and difference-equation models. Inclusion of such variation is important for continued progress in ecological and evolutionary theory. We provide a conceptual basis for IBMs by describing five major types of individual variation in IBMs: spatial, ontogenetic, phenotypic, cognitive, and genetic. IBMs are now used in almost all subfields of ecology and evolutionary biology. We map those subfields and look more closely at selected key papers on fish recruitment, forest dynamics, sympatric speciation, metapopulation dynamics, maintenance of diversity, and species conservation. Theorists are currently divided on whether IBMs represent only a practical tool for extending classical theory to more complex situations, or whether individual-based theory represents a radically new research program. We feel that the tension between these two poles of thinking can be a source of creativity in ecology and evolutionary theory.

  20. Migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... federal government website managed by the Office on Women's Health in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services . 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20201 1-800-994- ...

  1. Gendering the migraine market: do representations of illness matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempner, Joanna

    2006-10-01

    Migraine is a common, debilitating and costly disorder. Yet help-seeking for and rates of diagnosis of migraine are low. Drawing on ethnographic observations of pharmaceutical marketing practices at professional headache conferences and a content analysis of migraine advertising, principally in the USA, this paper demonstrates: (1) that the pharmaceutical industry directs its marketing of migraine medication to women; and (2) as part of this strategy, pharmaceutical advertisements portray women as the prototypical migraine sufferer, through representations that elicit hegemonic femininity. This strategy creates the impression that migraine is a "women's disorder", which, in turn, exacerbates gender bias in help seeking and diagnosis of migraine and reifies presumptions about the epidemiology of the disorder. I conclude that these pharmaceutical marketing practices have a paradoxical effect: even as they educate and raise awareness about migraine, they also create barriers to help seeking and diagnosis.

  2. Migraine and risk of perioperative ischemic stroke and hospital readmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timm, Fanny P; Houle, Timothy T; Grabitz, Stephanie D

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether patients with migraine are at increased risk of perioperative ischemic stroke and whether this may lead to an increased hospital readmission rate. DESIGN: Prospective hospital registry study. SETTING: Massachusetts General Hospital and two satellite campuses between...... was hospital readmission within 30 days of surgery. Exploratory outcomes included post-discharge stroke and strata of neuroanatomical stroke location. RESULTS: 10 179 (8.2%) patients had any migraine diagnosis, of whom 1278 (12.6%) had migraine with aura and 8901 (87.4%) had migraine without aura. 771 (0.......9 (2.9 to 5.0) for migraine without aura, and 6.3 (3.2 to 9.5) for migraine with aura. : Patients with migraine had a higher rate of readmission to hospital within 30 days of discharge (adjusted odds ratio 1.31, 1.22 to 1.41). CONCLUSIONS: Surgical patients with a history of migraine are at increased...

  3. Tips for Starting Yoga in Adults with Migraines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... impact during MHAM What is Migraine and Headache Awareness Month? June is Migraine and Headache Awareness Month, ... approved last week, which is called erenumab, the brand name of which is Aimovig, is a monoclonal ...

  4. Migraine's House of Headaches…and Visiting the Neighbors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Headache) Migraine in Women Secondary Headaches Headaches in Children FAQ Learn More Migraine Information Find Help Doctors & Resources Get Connected Join the Conversation Follow Us on Social Media Company About News Resources Privacy Policy Contact Phone: ...

  5. Level of physical activity, well-being, stress and self-rated health in persons with migraine and co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krøll, Lotte Skytte; Hammarlund, Catharina Sjödahl; Westergaard, Maria Lurenda; Nielsen, Trine; Sloth, Louise Bönsdorff; Jensen, Rigmor Højland; Gard, Gunvor

    2017-12-01

    The prevalence of migraine with co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain is high in the general population. However, there is very little literature on the characteristics of these combined conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate a) the prevalence of migraine with co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain in a clinic-based sample, b) the level of physical activity, psychological well-being, perceived stress and self-rated health in persons with migraine and co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain compared to healthy controls, c) the perceived ability of persons with migraine and co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain to perform physical activity, and d) which among the three conditions (migraine, tension-type headache or neck pain) is rated as the most burdensome condition. The study was conducted at a tertiary referral specialised headache centre where questionnaires on physical activity, psychological well-being, perceived stress and self-rated health were completed by 148 persons with migraine and 100 healthy controls matched by sex and average age. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to assess characteristics of migraine, tension-type headache and neck pain. Out of 148 persons with migraine, 100 (67%) suffered from co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain. Only 11% suffered from migraine only. Persons with migraine and co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain had lower level of physical activity and psychological well-being, higher level of perceived stress and poorer self-rated health compared to healthy controls. They reported reduced ability to perform physical activity owing to migraine (high degree), tension-type headache (moderate degree) and neck pain (low degree). The most burdensome condition was migraine, followed by tension-type headache and neck pain. Migraine with co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain was highly prevalent in a clinic-based sample. Persons with migraine and co

  6. Individual-based modelling and control of bovine brucellosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepomuceno, Erivelton G.; Barbosa, Alípio M.; Silva, Marcos X.; Perc, Matjaž

    2018-05-01

    We present a theoretical approach to control bovine brucellosis. We have used individual-based modelling, which is a network-type alternative to compartmental models. Our model thus considers heterogeneous populations, and spatial aspects such as migration among herds and control actions described as pulse interventions are also easily implemented. We show that individual-based modelling reproduces the mean field behaviour of an equivalent compartmental model. Details of this process, as well as flowcharts, are provided to facilitate the reproduction of the presented results. We further investigate three numerical examples using real parameters of herds in the São Paulo state of Brazil, in scenarios which explore eradication, continuous and pulsed vaccination and meta-population effects. The obtained results are in good agreement with the expected behaviour of this disease, which ultimately showcases the effectiveness of our theory.

  7. Relationship between motion sickness, migraine and menstruation in crew members of a "round the world" yacht race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunfeld, E; Gresty, M A

    1998-11-15

    The similarities between the symptoms reported by patients with migraine and those experienced by severely motion sick individuals raises the question of whether the two conditions involve common mechanisms. In women, attacks of migraine may follow the menstrual cycle, and anecdote suggests this may also be true of motion sickness. The aim of this study was to determine whether there was a cyclical pattern in the occurrence of migraine/headache and motion sickness among crew members of a "round the world" yacht race. The participants were asked to complete pre- and postrace questionnaires that related to their susceptibility to motion sickness and headache/migraine; additionally, the female subjects were asked for details about their menstrual cycle. During the race the subjects completed a logbook to record the occurrence of motion sickness (using a four-point scale), migraine/headache (including the type of headache), menstruation, medication consumption and duties aboard the yacht. Female sailors were found to be more prone to motion sickness than the males. Motion sickness was also found to be linked to time at sea, and subjects who suffered migraine during the race were also more susceptible to motion sickness. A distinct pattern was found in the occurrence of motion sickness and headache that related to the menstrual cycle, although motion sickness and headache did not generally occur together in most of the subjects. A cyclical pattern was not obvious for the male subjects.

  8. Cognitive, Personality, and Family Factors in Patients with Migraine Headache

    OpenAIRE

    Reza Johari-Fard; Farzad Goli; Amirreza Boroumand

    2014-01-01

    Migraine is a disorder that has debilitating pain, and affects all aspects of life, including the academic, social, and family life of patients. In addition, studies show the effects of migraine on patient's relationships with family members such as spouse, children, and other family members. In addition to physical pain, migraines are tied to significant psychological and economic costs. Migraineurs tend to have high levels of depression and anxiety, and migraine headaches have a profoundly ...

  9. Factors contributing to migraine headache surgery failure and success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Kelsey; Lee, Michelle; Davis, Janine; Guyuron, Bahman

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors that contribute to migraine headache surgery failure and success. A retrospective chart review was conducted of patients who underwent surgery for migraine headaches performed by the senior author (B.G.) and had at least 11 months of follow-up. The study population included three groups: migraine surgery success, improvement, and failure. Thirty-six unique data points were collected for each patient. A total of 169 patients met inclusion criteria. Of these, 66 patients comprised the migraine surgery success group (S, complete elimination of migraine headaches); 67 comprised the migraine surgery improvement group (I, >50 percent reduction in migraine frequency, intensity, or duration); and 36 comprised the migraine surgery failure group (F, I, p=0.02), migraine frequency (SI, p=0.003; S>F, p=0.04), history of head or neck injury (SI, p=0.02), increased intraoperative bleeding (SF, p=0.0006; I>F, p=0.0004), site II (S>F, p=0.015), single operative site (SI, p=0.05; S>F, p=0.04). Factors associated with migraine surgery failure include increased intraoperative bleeding and surgery on fewer trigger sites. Factors associated with migraine surgery success are older age of migraine onset, higher rate of visual symptoms versus improvement group, surgery at site I or II, and deactivating all four operative sites. Risk, III.

  10. Individual differences in emotion word processing: A diffusion model analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Christina J; Kuchinke, Lars

    2016-06-01

    The exploratory study investigated individual differences in implicit processing of emotional words in a lexical decision task. A processing advantage for positive words was observed, and differences between happy and fear-related words in response times were predicted by individual differences in specific variables of emotion processing: Whereas more pronounced goal-directed behavior was related to a specific slowdown in processing of fear-related words, the rate of spontaneous eye blinks (indexing brain dopamine levels) was associated with a processing advantage of happy words. Estimating diffusion model parameters revealed that the drift rate (rate of information accumulation) captures unique variance of processing differences between happy and fear-related words, with highest drift rates observed for happy words. Overall emotion recognition ability predicted individual differences in drift rates between happy and fear-related words. The findings emphasize that a significant amount of variance in emotion processing is explained by individual differences in behavioral data.

  11. Genetic and biochemical changes of the serotonergic system in migraine pathobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, Claudia Francesca; Smith, Robert Anthony; Griffiths, Lyn Robyn

    2017-12-01

    Migraine is a brain disorder characterized by a piercing headache which affects one side of the head, located mainly at the temples and in the area around the eye. Migraine imparts substantial suffering to the family in addition to the sufferer, particularly as it affects three times more women than men and is most prevalent between the ages of 25 and 45, the years of child rearing. Migraine typically occurs in individuals with a genetic predisposition and is aggravated by specific environmental triggers. Attempts to study the biochemistry of migraine began as early as the 1960s and were primarily directed at serotonin metabolism after an increase of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), the main metabolite of serotonin was observed in urine of migraineurs. Genetic and biochemical studies have primarily focused on the neurotransmitter serotonin, considering receptor binding, transport and synthesis of serotonin and have investigated serotonergic mediators including enzymes, receptors as well as intermediary metabolites. These studies have been mainly assayed in blood, CSF and urine as the most accessible fluids. More recently PET imaging technology integrated with a metabolomics and a systems biology platform are being applied to study serotonergic biology. The general trend observed is that migraine patients have alterations of neurotransmitter metabolism detected in biological fluids with different biochemistry from controls, however the interpretation of the biological significance of these peripheral changes is unresolved. In this review we present the biology of the serotonergic system and metabolic routes for serotonin and discuss results of biochemical studies with regard to alterations in serotonin in brain, cerebrospinal fluid, saliva, platelets, plasma and urine of migraine patients.

  12. Efficacy of topical Rose (Rosa damascena Mill.) oil for migraine headache: A randomized double-blinded placebo-controlled cross-over trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazi, Maria; Hashempur, Mohammad Hashem; Taghizadeh, Mohsen; Heydari, Mojtaba; Shariat, Abdolhamid

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of topical formulation of Rosa damascena Mill. (R. damascena) oil on migraine headache, applying syndrome diffrentiation model. Forty patients with migraine headache were randomly assigned to 2 groups of this double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over trial. The patients were treated for the first 2 consecutive migraine headache attacks by topical R. damascena oil or placebo. Then, after one week of washout period, cross-over was done. Pain intensity of the patients' migraine headache was recorded at the beginnig and ten-sequence time schadule of attacks up to 24h. In addition, photophobia, phonophobia, and nausea and/or vomitting (N/V) of the patients were recorded as secondary outcomes. Finally, gathered data were analysed in a syndrome differentiation manner to assess the effect of R. damascena oil on Hot- and Cold-type migraine headache. Mean pain intensity of the patients' migraine headache in the different time-points after R. damascena oil or placebo use, was not significantly different. Additionally, regarding mean scores of N/V, photophobia, and phonophobia severity of the patients, no significant differences between the two groups were observed. Finally, applying syndrome differentiation model, the mean score of migraine headache pain intensity turned out to be significantly lower in patients with "hot" type migraine syndrome at in 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120min after R. damascena oil application compared to "cold" types (P values: 0.001, 0.001, <0.001, <0.001, and 0.02; respectively). It seems that syndrome differentiation can help in selection of patients who may benefit from the topical R. damascena oil in short-term relief of pain intensity in migraine headache. Further studies of longer follow-up and larger study population, however, are necessitated for more scientifically rigorous judgment on efficacy of R. damascena oil for patients with migraine headache. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Migraine accompagnee: Clinical and neutroradiological findings. Migraine Accompagnee: Klinische und neutroradiologische Befunde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, E M

    1981-01-01

    This study analyses clinical data, EEC and X-ray findings of 102 stationary examined migraine patients, 62 of whom suffered from migraine accompagnee. Sex distribution, age at onset of disease, hereditary disease disposition and EEC findings largely correspond to the data given in literature. As it had been expected, the X-ray images of the skull and the cerebral angiographies performed in 46 patients suffering from migraine accompagnee did not show any pathological findings. The X-ray images were compared with those taken of patients without migraine anamnesis in order to detect non-pathologic variations. Neither differences in the intensity of vascular and diplovenous marking could be found in the native images of the skull nor any variations of the circle of Willis. The dependency of the posterior cerebral artery on the carotid circulation existing in 41% of the migraine accompagnee does not lead to any particular alteration of the accompanying symptoms and signs. The idea is discussed to divide the migraine syndrome into simple, focal and complicated migraine on the basis of a uniform pathogenesis. (orig./MG).

  14. Migraine accompagnee: Clinical and neutroradiological findings. Migraine Accompagnee: Klinische und neutroradiologische Befunde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, E M

    1981-01-01

    This study analyses clinical data, EEC and X-ray findings of 102 stationary examined migraine patients, 62 of whom suffered from migraine accompagnee. Sex distribution, age at onset of disease, hereditary disease disposition and EEC findings largely correspond to the data given in literature. As it had been expected, the X-ray images of the skull and the cerebral angiographies performed in 46 patients suffering from migraine accompagnee did not show any pathological findings. The X-ray images were compared with those taken of patients without migraine anamnesis in order to detect non-pathologic variations. Neither differences in the intensity of vascular and diplovenous marking could be found in the native images of the skull nor any variations of the circle of Willis. The dependency of the posterior cerebral artery on the carotid circulation existing in 41% of the migraine accompagnee does not lead to any particular alteration of the accompanying symptoms and signs. The idea is discussed to divide the migraine syndrome into simple, focal and complicated migraine on the basis of a uniform pathogenesis.

  15. Workplace disability in migraine: an Italian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amico, D; Genco, S; Perini, F

    2004-10-01

    Workplace disability due to migraine has not been extensively researched in non-English speaking countries. We assessed the repercussions of headache, and particularly of migraine, on work in a sample of employees from an Italian company (Bulgari). Information was obtained through a self-answering questionnaire in "all headaches" sufferers, and through direct interview in migraine sufferers (diagnosis according to IHS criteria). Headache frequency, pain intensity and headache-related disability were higher in migraineurs than in "all headaches" sufferers. About a quarter of migraineurs missed at least one day in the three months prior to the interview due to headache, and around 10% lost two or more days over the same period. Moore than 50% of migraineurs reported 1-7 days per month at work with headache, with reduction in productivity level by 50% or more in 15% of respondents. Our data confirmed that headaches, and particularly migraine, cause a considerable reduction in workplace productivity. Workplace interventions to effectively manage migraine are needed.

  16. Abdominal migraine in childhood: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scicchitano B

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Beatrice Scicchitano,1 Gareth Humphreys,1 Sally G Mitton,2 Thiagarajan Jaiganesh1 1Children's Emergency Department, 2Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, St Georges Hospital, St Georges Healthcare NHS Trust, Tooting, London, United Kingdom Abstract: The childhood condition of abdominal migraine has been described under many different synonyms, including "abdominal epilepsy", "recurrent abdominal pain", "cyclical vomiting syndrome", and "functional gastrointestinal disorder". In the early literature, abdominal migraine is included in the "childhood periodic syndrome", first described by Wyllie and Schlesinger in 1933. Abdominal migraine has emerged over the last century as a diagnostic entity in its own right thanks to the development of well defined diagnostic criteria and its recent inclusion in the International Headache Society's Classification of Headache disorders. Despite this progress, little is known about the pathophysiology of the condition, and the treatment options are poorly defined. Here we summarize the recent literature, with particular focus on establishing the diagnosis of abdominal migraine and its pathophysiology, and suggest an approach to management. Keywords: abdominal migraine, recurrent abdominal pain, abdominal epilepsy, cyclical vomiting

  17. Individual loss reserving with the Multivariate Skew Normal model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pigeon, M.; Antonio, K.; Denuit, M.

    2011-01-01

    In general insurance, the evaluation of future cash ows and solvency capital has become increasingly important. To assist in this process, the present paper proposes an individual discrete-time loss re- serving model describing the occurrence, the reporting delay, the timeto the first payment, and

  18. Modelling community, family, and individual determinants of childhood dental caries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijster, D.; Loveren, C. van; Dusseldorp, E.; Verrips, G.H.W.

    2014-01-01

    This cross-sectional study empirically tested a theoretical model of pathways and inter-relationships among community, family, and individual determinants of childhood dental caries in a sample of 630, 6-year-old children from the Netherlands. Children's decayed, missing, and filled teeth (dmft)

  19. Individual based model of slug population and spatial dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choi, Y.H.; Bohan, D.A.; Potting, R.P.J.; Semenov, M.A.; Glen, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    The slug, Deroceras reticulatum, is one of the most important pests of agricultural and horticultural crops in UK and Europe. In this paper, a spatially explicit individual based model (IbM) is developed to study the dynamics of a population of D. reticulatum. The IbM establishes a virtual field

  20. Safety and efficacy of AMG 334 for prevention of episodic migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Hong Yan; Dodick, David W; Silberstein, Stephen D

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) pathway is a promising target for preventive therapies in patients with migraine. We assessed the safety and efficacy of AMG 334, a fully human monoclonal antibody against the CGRP receptor, for migraine prevention. METHODS: In this multicentre...... in monthly migraine days from baseline to the last 4 weeks of the 12-week double-blind treatment phase. The primary endpoint was calculated using the least squares mean at each timepoint from a generalised linear mixed-effect model for repeated measures. Safety endpoints were adverse events, clinical...... laboratory values, vital signs, and anti-AMG 334 antibodies. The study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01952574. An open-label extension phase of up to 256 weeks is ongoing and will assess the long-term safety of AMG 334. FINDINGS: From Aug 6, 2013, to June 30, 2014, 483 patients were...

  1. An Individual-based Probabilistic Model for Fish Stock Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Buti

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We define an individual-based probabilistic model of a sole (Solea solea behaviour. The individual model is given in terms of an Extended Probabilistic Discrete Timed Automaton (EPDTA, a new formalism that is introduced in the paper and that is shown to be interpretable as a Markov decision process. A given EPDTA model can be probabilistically model-checked by giving a suitable translation into syntax accepted by existing model-checkers. In order to simulate the dynamics of a given population of soles in different environmental scenarios, an agent-based simulation environment is defined in which each agent implements the behaviour of the given EPDTA model. By varying the probabilities and the characteristic functions embedded in the EPDTA model it is possible to represent different scenarios and to tune the model itself by comparing the results of the simulations with real data about the sole stock in the North Adriatic sea, available from the recent project SoleMon. The simulator is presented and made available for its adaptation to other species.

  2. Modelling biological invasions: Individual to population scales at interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Belmonte-Beitia, J.

    2013-10-01

    Extracting the population level behaviour of biological systems from that of the individual is critical in understanding dynamics across multiple scales and thus has been the subject of numerous investigations. Here, the influence of spatial heterogeneity in such contexts is explored for interfaces with a separation of the length scales characterising the individual and the interface, a situation that can arise in applications involving cellular modelling. As an illustrative example, we consider cell movement between white and grey matter in the brain which may be relevant in considering the invasive dynamics of glioma. We show that while one can safely neglect intrinsic noise, at least when considering glioma cell invasion, profound differences in population behaviours emerge in the presence of interfaces with only subtle alterations in the dynamics at the individual level. Transport driven by local cell sensing generates predictions of cell accumulations along interfaces where cell motility changes. This behaviour is not predicted with the commonly used Fickian diffusion transport model, but can be extracted from preliminary observations of specific cell lines in recent, novel, cryo-imaging. Consequently, these findings suggest a need to consider the impact of individual behaviour, spatial heterogeneity and especially interfaces in experimental and modelling frameworks of cellular dynamics, for instance in the characterisation of glioma cell motility. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Modelling biological invasions: Individual to population scales at interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Belmonte-Beitia, J.; Woolley, T.E.; Scott, J.G.; Maini, P.K.; Gaffney, E.A.

    2013-01-01

    Extracting the population level behaviour of biological systems from that of the individual is critical in understanding dynamics across multiple scales and thus has been the subject of numerous investigations. Here, the influence of spatial heterogeneity in such contexts is explored for interfaces with a separation of the length scales characterising the individual and the interface, a situation that can arise in applications involving cellular modelling. As an illustrative example, we consider cell movement between white and grey matter in the brain which may be relevant in considering the invasive dynamics of glioma. We show that while one can safely neglect intrinsic noise, at least when considering glioma cell invasion, profound differences in population behaviours emerge in the presence of interfaces with only subtle alterations in the dynamics at the individual level. Transport driven by local cell sensing generates predictions of cell accumulations along interfaces where cell motility changes. This behaviour is not predicted with the commonly used Fickian diffusion transport model, but can be extracted from preliminary observations of specific cell lines in recent, novel, cryo-imaging. Consequently, these findings suggest a need to consider the impact of individual behaviour, spatial heterogeneity and especially interfaces in experimental and modelling frameworks of cellular dynamics, for instance in the characterisation of glioma cell motility. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Emerging migraine treatments and drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jes; Ashina, Messoud

    2011-01-01

    Migraine has a 1-year prevalence of 10% and high socioeconomic costs. Despite recent drug developments, there is a huge unmet need for better pharmacotherapy. In this review we discuss promising anti-migraine strategies such as calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonists and 5....... Tonabersat, a cortical spreading depression inhibitor, has shown efficacy in the prophylaxis of migraine with aura. Several new drug targets such as nitric oxide synthase, the 5-HT(1D) receptor, the prostanoid receptors EP(2) and EP(4), and the pituitary adenylate cyclase receptor PAC1 await development....... The greatest need is for new prophylactic drugs, and it seems likely that such compounds will be developed in the coming decade....

  5. Sublingual piroxicam in migraine without aura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravishankar, K; Tayade, Himanshu; Mandlik, Rahul

    2011-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the analgesic efficacy of a single dose of sublingual piroxicam to that of a placebo during acute attacks of migraine without aura. The drug (N = 30) or a placebo (N = 30) was administered, on randomisation and double-blind basis, to 60 patients between 18 and 50 years of age suffering from migraine without aura. The patients were instructed to take a single tablet sublingually [corresponding to piroxicam 40 mg or placebo] and the severity of the painful symptomatology and associated symptoms were evaluated by this study. The patients treated with sublingual piroxicam showed a significant (P piroxicam administration. In 83.3%, the drug resulted in excellent to good response as compared to only 10% in the placebo group. No local and systemic side effects were reported with sublingual piroxicam. The present study has demonstrated that for the acute management of migraine without aura sublingual piroxicam showed significant analgesic effect with excellent tolerability.

  6. Noninvasive neuromodulation in migraine and cluster headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starling, Amaal

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of this narrative review is to provide an overview of the currently available noninvasive neuromodulation devices for the treatment of migraine and cluster headache. Over the last decade, several noninvasive devices have undergone development and clinical trials to evaluate efficacy and safety. Based on this body of work, single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation, transcutaneous supraorbital neurostimulation, and noninvasive vagal nerve stimulation devices have been cleared by the United States Food and Drug Administration and are available for clinical use for the treatment of primary headache disorders. Overall, these novel noninvasive devices appear to be safe, well tolerated, and have demonstrated promising results in clinical trials in both migraine and cluster headache. This narrative review will provide a summary and update of the proposed mechanisms of action, evidence, safety, and future directions of various currently available modalities of noninvasive neuromodulation for the treatment of migraine and cluster headache.

  7. Trigger factors in migraine with aura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauge, A W; Kirchmann, M; Olesen, J

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify trigger factors in migraine with aura (MA). A total of 629 MA patients representative of the Danish population were sent a questionnaire listing 16 trigger factors thought to be relevant as well as space for free text. Distinction was made between...... attacks with or without aura within each patient. The questionnaire was returned by 522 patients of whom 347 had current MA attacks. In total 80% with current attacks (278/347) indicated that at least one factor triggered their migraine, and 67% (187/278) in this group indicated that they were aware...... of at least one factor often or always giving rise to an attack of MA. Forty-one per cent (113/278) had co-occurring attacks of migraine without aura (MO). Stress (following stress), bright light, intense emotional influences, stress (during stress) and sleeping too much or too little were the trigger factors...

  8. The role of sleep in migraine attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Inamorato

    1993-11-01

    Full Text Available Migraine attacks may be precipitated by sleep deprivation or excessive sleep and sleep is also associated with relief of migraine attacks. In view of this variable relationship we studied the records of 159 consecutive outpatients of our Headache Unit. In 121 records there was reference to sleep involvement, in 55% by a single form and in 45% by more than one form. When only one form was related, relief was most common (70%. 30% of that group of patients had the migraine attack precipitated by sleep, 24% by deprivation and 6% by sleep excess. When the effects of sleep were multiple, these effects were as expected logically in 65%: «in accordance» group (e.g attack precipitated by sleep deprivation and relieved by sleep onset. In a second group, («conflicting» where the involvement was not logical, there were three different combinations of sleep involvement, possibly due to more than one pathophysiological mechanism.

  9. Migraine: A look down the nose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehlberger, Thomas; Wormald, Justin C R; Hachach-Haram, Nadine; Mosahebi, Afshin

    2017-07-01

    Studies have suggested that contact between opposing mucosal surfaces in the nasal wall and cavity can be a target of the surgical treatment of migraines. Unfortunately, not enough is known about the role of nasal pathology in the pathogenesis of this condition. The co-existence of further rhinological disorders can be an impediment to defining the cause and effect of anatomical variants. The authors compared the MRI scans of migraine- and non-migraine patients (MPs and NMPs, respectively) to determine the prevalence of such mucosal contact points in order to extrapolate whether there is a significant association with migraines. Coronal and axial MRI brain scans of 522 patients (412 migraineurs and 110 non-migraineurs) were analysed for the prevalence of anatomical variations of the nasal cavity, e.g. concha bullosa, septal deviations, mucosal swelling and contact points. The results showed no significant difference between MPs and NMPs patients for any of the parameters examined. Moreover, 87% MPs and 79% NMPs had at least one contact point. The most frequent contact point was between the middle turbinate and the septum, observed in 54% of MPs and 45% of NMPs. Contact points with the nasal mucosa are highly prevalent in both MPs and NMPs. Although a contact point does not cause a migraine in the absence of the disease, the concomitant presence of migraine and contact points can trigger an attack, and therefore, it is necessary to differentiate or exclude a rhinological disorder in these patients. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Aspirin is first-line treatment for migraine and episodic tension-type headache regardless of headache intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampl, Christian; Voelker, Michael; Steiner, Timothy J

    2012-01-01

    (1) To establish whether pre-treatment headache intensity in migraine or episodic tension-type headache (ETTH) predicts success or failure of treatment with aspirin; and (2) to reflect, accordingly, on the place of aspirin in the management of these disorders. Stepped care in migraine management uses symptomatic treatments as first-line, reserving triptans for those in whom this proves ineffective. Stratified care chooses between symptomatic therapy and triptans as first-line on an individual basis according to perceived illness severity. We questioned the 2 assumptions underpinning stratified care in migraine that greater illness severity: (1) reflects greater need; and (2) is a risk factor for failure of symptomatic treatment but not of triptans. With regard to the first assumption, we developed a rhetorical argument that need for treatment is underpinned by expectation of benefit, not by illness severity. To address the second, we reviewed individual patient data from 6 clinical trials of aspirin 1000 mg in migraine (N = 2079; 1165 moderate headache, 914 severe) and one of aspirin 500 and 1000 mg in ETTH (N = 325; 180 moderate, 145 severe), relating outcome to pre-treatment headache intensity. In migraine, for headache relief at 2 hours, a small (4.7%) and non-significant risk difference (RD) in therapeutic gain favored moderate pain; for pain freedom at 2 hours, therapeutic gains were almost identical (RD: -0.2%). In ETTH, for headache relief at 2 hours, RDs for both aspirin 500 mg (-4.2%) and aspirin 1000 mg (-9.7%) favored severe pain, although neither significantly; for pain freedom at 2 hours, RDs (-14.2 and -3.6) again favored severe pain. In neither migraine nor ETTH does pre-treatment headache intensity predict success or failure of aspirin. This is not an arguable basis for stratified care in migraine. In both disorders, aspirin is first-line treatment regardless of headache intensity. © 2011 American Headache Society.

  11. Recurrent Wernicke's aphasia: migraine and not stroke!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Nishant Kumar; Rossetti, Andrea O; Ménétrey, André; Carota, Antonio

    2009-05-01

    We report the clinical findings of a 40-year-old woman with recurrent migraine presenting with Wernicke's aphasia in accordance with the results of a standardized battery for language assessment (Boston Aphasia Diagnostic Examination). The patient had no evidence of parenchymal or vascular lesions on MRI and showed delta and theta slowing over the left posterior temporal leads on the EEG. Although the acute onset of a fluent aphasia suggested stroke as a likely etiology, the recurrence of aphasia as the initial symptom of migraine was related to cortical spreading depression and not to stroke.

  12. Flunarizine versus metoprolol in migraine prophylaxis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, P S; Larsen, B H; Rasmussen, M J

    1991-01-01

    The prophylactic effect of flunarizine and metoprolol was studied in a multi-center randomized, double-blind trial of 149 patients with migraine with or without aura. After a 4-week placebo run-in period, patients were randomly allocated to treatment with flunarizine 10 mg daily or metoprolol 200......). Depression was the most serious side-effect occurring in 8% on flunarizine and 3% on metoprolol. We conclude that both drugs are effective in the prevention of migraine attacks but a higher number of dropouts occurred on flunarizine because of depression or weight gain....

  13. Popular sweetner sucralose as a migraine trigger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rajendrakumar M; Sarma, Rakesh; Grimsley, Edwin

    2006-09-01

    Sucralose (trichlorogalactosucrose, or better known as Splenda) is an artificial sweetener from native sucrose that was approved by the FDA on April 1, 1998 (April Fool's Day). This observation of a potential causal relationship between sucralose and migraines may be important for physicians to remember this can be a possible trigger during dietary history taking. Identifying further triggers for migraine headaches, in this case sucralose, may help alleviate some of the cost burden (through expensive medical therapy or missed work opportunity) as well as provide relief to migraineurs.

  14. The Migraine-Ischemic Stroke Relation in Young Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Pezzini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the strong epidemiologic evidence linking migraine and ischemic stroke in young adults, the mechanisms explaining this association remain poorly understood. The observation that stroke occurs more frequently during the interictal phase of migraine prompts to speculation that an indirect relation between the two diseases might exist. In this regard, four major issues might be considered which may be summarized as follows: (1 the migraine-ischemic stroke relation is influenced by specific risk factors such as patent foramen ovale or endothelial dysfunction and more frequent in particular conditions like spontaneous cervical artery dissection; (2 migraine is associated with an increased prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors; (3 the link is caused by migraine-specific drugs; (4 migraine and ischemic vascular events are linked via a genetic component. In the present paper, we will review epidemiological studies, discuss potential mechanisms of migraine-induced stroke and comorbid ischemic stroke, and pose new research questions.

  15. The Migraine-Ischemic Stroke Relation in Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzini, Alessandro; Del Zotto, Elisabetta; Giossi, Alessia; Volonghi, Irene; Costa, Paolo; Dalla Volta, Giorgio; Padovani, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    In spite of the strong epidemiologic evidence linking migraine and ischemic stroke in young adults, the mechanisms explaining this association remain poorly understood. The observation that stroke occurs more frequently during the interictal phase of migraine prompts to speculation that an indirect relation between the two diseases might exist. In this regard, four major issues might be considered which may be summarized as follows: (1) the migraine-ischemic stroke relation is influenced by specific risk factors such as patent foramen ovale or endothelial dysfunction and more frequent in particular conditions like spontaneous cervical artery dissection; (2) migraine is associated with an increased prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors; (3) the link is caused by migraine-specific drugs; (4) migraine and ischemic vascular events are linked via a genetic component. In the present paper, we will review epidemiological studies, discuss potential mechanisms of migraine-induced stroke and comorbid ischemic stroke, and pose new research questions. PMID:21197470

  16. Evaluation of a Workplace-Based Migraine Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Wayne N; Chen, Chin-Yu; Li, Xingquan; McCluskey, Maureen; Erickson, Denise; Schultz, Alyssa B

    2016-08-01

    Migraine affects approximately 10% of working-age adults and is associated with increased health care costs, absenteeism, and presenteeism in the workplace. A migraine education program was offered to United States employees of a global financial services organization. Two hundred forty three employees (46% response rate) completed both a baseline and 6-month follow-up migraine questionnaire. The program included webinars, E-mailed educational tips, and intranet-based resources. No change was found in the frequency of migraines but improvements were observed in the severity, workdays missed, effectiveness at work during migraine, and work/activity limitations. Participants reported taking action to identify and reduce migraine triggers. A worksite disease education program for migraine headache has the potential to significantly impact lost productivity and absenteeism for migraineurs.

  17. Fluctuations in episodic and chronic migraine status over the course of 1 year: implications for diagnosis, treatment and clinical trial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Daniel; Lipton, Richard B; Scher, Ann I; Reed, Michael L; Stewart, Walter Buzz F; Adams, Aubrey Manack; Buse, Dawn C

    2017-10-04

    Relatively little is known about the stability of a diagnosis of episodic migraine (EM) or chronic migraine (CM) over time. This study examines natural fluctuations in self-reported headache frequency as well as the stability and variation in migraine type among individuals meeting criteria for EM and CM at baseline. The Chronic Migraine Epidemiology and Outcomes (CaMEO) Study was a longitudinal survey of US adults with EM and CM identified by a web-questionnaire. A validated questionnaire was used to classify respondents with EM (<15 headache days/month) or CM (≥15 headache days/month) every three months for a total of five assessments. We described longitudinal persistence of baseline EM and CM classifications. In addition, we modelled longitudinal variation in headache day frequency per month using negative binomial repeated measures regression models (NBRMR). Among the 5464 respondents with EM at baseline providing four or five waves of data, 5048 (92.4%) had EM in all waves and 416 (7.6%) had CM in at least one wave. Among 526 respondents with CM at baseline providing four or five waves of data, 140 (26.6%) had CM in every wave and 386 (73.4%) had EM for at least one wave. Individual plots revealed striking within-person variations in headache days per month. The NBRMR model revealed that the rate of headache days increased across waves of observation 19% more per wave for CM compared to EM (rate ratio [RR], 1.19; 95% CI, 1.13-1.26). After adjustment for covariates, the relative difference changed to a 26% increase per wave (RR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.2-1.33). Follow-up at three-month intervals reveals a high level of short-term variability in headache days per month. As a consequence, many individuals cross the CM diagnostic boundary of ≥15 headache days per month.Nearly three quarters of persons with CM at baseline drop below this diagnostic boundary at least once over the course of a year. These findings are of interest in the consideration of headache

  18. Individual Subjective Initiative Merge Model Based on Cellular Automaton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-Jie Xu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The merge control models proposed for work zones are classified into two types (Hard Control Merge (HCM model and Soft Control Merge (SCM model according to their own control intensity and are compared with a new model, called Individual Subjective Initiative Merge (ISIM model, which is based on the linear lane-changing probability strategy in the merging area. The attention of this paper is paid to the positive impact of the individual subjective initiative for the whole traffic system. Three models (ISIM, HCM, and SCM are established and compared with each other by two order parameters, that is, system output and average vehicle travel time. Finally, numerical results show that both ISIM and SCM perform better than HCM. Compared with SCM, the output of ISIM is 20 vehicles per hour higher under the symmetric input condition and is more stable under the asymmetric input condition. Meanwhile, the average travel time of ISIM is 2000 time steps less under the oversaturated input condition.

  19. Cortical Spreading Depression Closes Paravascular Space and Impairs Glymphatic Flow: Implications for Migraine Headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schain, Aaron J; Melo-Carrillo, Agustin; Strassman, Andrew M; Burstein, Rami

    2017-03-15

    Functioning of the glymphatic system, a network of paravascular tunnels through which cortical interstitial solutes are cleared from the brain, has recently been linked to sleep and traumatic brain injury, both of which can affect the progression of migraine. This led us to investigate the connection between migraine and the glymphatic system. Taking advantage of a novel in vivo method we developed using two-photon microscopy to visualize the paravascular space (PVS) in naive uninjected mice, we show that a single wave of cortical spreading depression (CSD), an animal model of migraine aura, induces a rapid and nearly complete closure of the PVS around surface as well as penetrating cortical arteries and veins lasting several minutes, and gradually recovering over 30 min. A temporal mismatch between the constriction or dilation of the blood vessel lumen and the closure of the PVS suggests that this closure is not likely to result from changes in vessel diameter. We also show that CSD impairs glymphatic flow, as indicated by the reduced rate at which intraparenchymally injected dye was cleared from the cortex to the PVS. This is the first observation of a PVS closure in connection with an abnormal cortical event that underlies a neurological disorder. More specifically, the findings demonstrate a link between the glymphatic system and migraine, and suggest a novel mechanism for regulation of glymphatic flow. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Impairment of brain solute clearance through the recently described glymphatic system has been linked with traumatic brain injury, prolonged wakefulness, and aging. This paper shows that cortical spreading depression, the neural correlate of migraine aura, closes the paravascular space and impairs glymphatic flow. This closure holds the potential to define a novel mechanism for regulation of glymphatic flow. It also implicates the glymphatic system in the altered cortical and endothelial functioning of the migraine brain. Copyright © 2017

  20. Numerical study of the stopping of aura during migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moussa A.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This work is devoted to the study of migraine with aura in the human brain. Following [6], we class migraine as a propagation of a wave of depolarization through the cells. The mathematical model used, based on a reaction-diffusion equation, is briefly presented. The equation is considered in a duct containing a bend, in order to model one of the numerous circumvolutions of the brain. For a wide set of parameters, one can establish the existence of a critical radius below which the wave stops. The approximation scheme used for the simulations is first described and then a numerical study is realized, precising the dependence of the critical radius with respect to the different parameters of the model. Ce travail est consacré à l’étude de l’évolution d’une migraine avec aura dans le cerveau humain. Suivant [6], nous assimilons la migraine à une onde de dépolarisation attaquant les cellules du cerveau. Le modèle mathématique retenu, basé sur une équation de réaction-diffusion, est brièvement rappelé. Le domaine d’espace utilisé est constitué d’un conduit présentant un coude, afin de représenter l’une des nombreuses circonvolutions cérébrales. Pour une importante classe de paramètres, il est possible de mettre en évidence l’existence d’un rayon critique au delà duquel le front d’onde n’arrive pas à dépasser le coude. Après une description du schéma d’approximation utilisé, une étude numérique a été réalisée, visant à préciser la dépendance du rayon critique en fonction des différents paramètres du modèle.

  1. Improved Mental Acuity Forecasting with an Individualized Quantitative Sleep Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brent D. Winslow

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Sleep impairment significantly alters human brain structure and cognitive function, but available evidence suggests that adults in developed nations are sleeping less. A growing body of research has sought to use sleep to forecast cognitive performance by modeling the relationship between the two, but has generally focused on vigilance rather than other cognitive constructs affected by sleep, such as reaction time, executive function, and working memory. Previous modeling efforts have also utilized subjective, self-reported sleep durations and were restricted to laboratory environments. In the current effort, we addressed these limitations by employing wearable systems and mobile applications to gather objective sleep information, assess multi-construct cognitive performance, and model/predict changes to mental acuity. Thirty participants were recruited for participation in the study, which lasted 1 week. Using the Fitbit Charge HR and a mobile version of the automated neuropsychological assessment metric called CogGauge, we gathered a series of features and utilized the unified model of performance to predict mental acuity based on sleep records. Our results suggest that individuals poorly rate their sleep duration, supporting the need for objective sleep metrics to model circadian changes to mental acuity. Participant compliance in using the wearable throughout the week and responding to the CogGauge assessments was 80%. Specific biases were identified in temporal metrics across mobile devices and operating systems and were excluded from the mental acuity metric development. Individualized prediction of mental acuity consistently outperformed group modeling. This effort indicates the feasibility of creating an individualized, mobile assessment and prediction of mental acuity, compatible with the majority of current mobile devices.

  2. Use of a structured migraine diary improves patient and physician communication about migraine disability and treatment outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baos, V; Ester, F; Castellanos, A; Nocea, G; Caloto, M T; Gerth, W C

    2005-03-01

    Migraine is frequently undertreated, perhaps because impaired communication between patients and physicians underestimate the disability associated with migraine attacks. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the benefits of a structured migraine diary used during a prospective open-label study of triptan-naive patients in Spain for recording information on response to therapy for a pre-study migraine attack and three consecutive migraine attacks, the first and third treated with rizatriptan 10-mg wafer and the second with usual non-triptan therapy. Of 97 patients (83% women; mean age, 39 years) who completed the study, all reported moderate to severe pain, and two-thirds reported severe to total impairment during migraine attacks. At study end, 72% of patients reported that the migraine diary helped communication with their doctor about migraine, and 70% were more or much more satisfied than before the study with level of overall medical care provided by their doctor. Patients who reported the diary to be useful also reported higher overall satisfaction with medical care (p better communicate with their patients about migraine, and all reported that it enabled them to assess differences in pain intensity and disability across patients. We conclude that a structured migraine diary can be a valuable aid for improving communication between physicians and patients regarding migraine disability and treatment outcomes.

  3. In-office Discussions of Migraine: Results from the American Migraine Communication Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Steven R.; Cady, Roger K.; Brandes, Jan Lewis; Simons, Suzanne E.; Bain, Philip A.; Nelson, Meaghan R.

    2008-01-01

    Background Research indicates that successful migraine assessment and treatment depends on information obtained during patient and healthcare professional (HCP) discussions. However, no studies outline how migraine is actually discussed during clinical encounters. Objective Record naturally occurring HCP–migraineur interactions, analyzing frequency and impairment assessment, and preventive treatment discussions. Design HCPs seeing high volumes of migraineurs were recruited for a communication study. Patients likely to discuss migraine were recruited immediately before their normally scheduled appointment and, once consented, were audio- and video-recorded without a researcher present. Separate post-visit interviews were conducted with patients and HCPs. All interactions were transcribed. Participants Sixty patients (83% female; mean age 41.7) were analyzed. Patients were diagnosed with migraine 14 years and experienced 5 per month, on average. Approach Transcripts were analyzed using sociolinguistic techniques such as number and type of questions asked and post-visit alignment on migraine frequency and impairment. American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention Study guidelines were utilized. Results Ninety-one percent of HCP-initiated, migraine-specific questions were closed-ended/short answer; assessments focused on frequency and did not focus on attention on impairment. Open-ended questions in patient post-visit interviews yielded robust impairment-related information. Post-visit, 55% of HCP–patient pairs were misaligned regarding frequency; 51% on impairment. Of the 20 (33%) patients who were preventive medication candidates, 80% did not receive it and 50% of their visits lacked discussion of prevention. Conclusions Sociolinguistic analysis revealed that HCPs often used narrowly focused, closed-ended questions and were often unaware of how migraine affected patients’ lives as a result. It is recommended that HCPs assess impairment using open-ended questions

  4. In-office discussions of migraine: results from the American Migraine Communication Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipton, Richard B; Hahn, Steven R; Cady, Roger K; Brandes, Jan Lewis; Simons, Suzanne E; Bain, Philip A; Nelson, Meaghan R

    2008-08-01

    Research indicates that successful migraine assessment and treatment depends on information obtained during patient and healthcare professional (HCP) discussions. However, no studies outline how migraine is actually discussed during clinical encounters. Record naturally occurring HCP-migraineur interactions, analyzing frequency and impairment assessment, and preventive treatment discussions. HCPs seeing high volumes of migraineurs were recruited for a communication study. Patients likely to discuss migraine were recruited immediately before their normally scheduled appointment and, once consented, were audio- and video-recorded without a researcher present. Separate post-visit interviews were conducted with patients and HCPs. All interactions were transcribed. Sixty patients (83% female; mean age 41.7) were analyzed. Patients were diagnosed with migraine 14 years and experienced 5 per month, on average. Transcripts were analyzed using sociolinguistic techniques such as number and type of questions asked and post-visit alignment on migraine frequency and impairment. American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention Study guidelines were utilized. Ninety-one percent of HCP-initiated, migraine-specific questions were closed-ended/short answer; assessments focused on frequency and did not focus on attention on impairment. Open-ended questions in patient post-visit interviews yielded robust impairment-related information. Post-visit, 55% of HCP-patient pairs were misaligned regarding frequency; 51% on impairment. Of the 20 (33%) patients who were preventive medication candidates, 80% did not receive it and 50% of their visits lacked discussion of prevention. Sociolinguistic analysis revealed that HCPs often used narrowly focused, closed-ended questions and were often unaware of how migraine affected patients' lives as a result. It is recommended that HCPs assess impairment using open-ended questions in combination with the ask-tell-ask technique.

  5. Migraine--more than a headache: women's experiences of living with migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutberg, Stina; Öhrling, Kerstin

    2012-01-01

    In this qualitative study the aim was to explore the meaning of living with migraine. In-depth interviews were conducted with ten women about their experience of living with migraine. Halfway through the interview, the women drew a picture of what living with migraine is like, and the interview continued with the conversation being guided by the picture. The interviews were analyzed using a hermeneutic phenomenological method inspired by van Manen. The analysis revealed an essence "Being obliged to endure a life accompanied by an unpredictable and invisible disorder" and three themes "Being besieged by an attack", "Struggling in a life characterized by uncertainty" and "Living with an invisible disorder." Migraine is a debilitating disorder which accompanies life in the sense that it or the threat of its return is always present, and yet invisible to others. The struggle of enduring life with migraine is worsened by the feeling of having an invisible disorder and of being doubted. There is a need to increase the knowledge among healthcare professionals about what it means to live with migraine, something this qualitative study offers.

  6. Migraine – more than a headache: Women's experiences of living with migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutberg, Stina; Öhrling, Kerstin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose In this qualitative study the aim was to explore the meaning of living with migraine. Methods In-depth interviews were conducted with ten women about their experience of living with migraine. Halfway through the interview, the women drew a picture of what living with migraine is like, and the interview continued with the conversation being guided by the picture. The interviews were analyzed using a hermeneutic phenomenological method inspired by van Manen. Results The analysis revealed an essence “Being obliged to endure a life accompanied by an unpredictable and invisible disorder" and three themes “Being besieged by an attack” “Struggling in a life characterized by uncertainty"and “Living with an invisible disorder." Conclusions Migraine is a debilitating disorder which accompanies life in the sense that it or the threat of its return is always present, and yet invisible to others. The struggle of enduring life with migraine is worsened by the feeling of having an invisible disorder and of being doubted. There is a need to increase the knowledge among healthcare professionals about what it means to live with migraine, something this qualitative study offers. PMID:21981545

  7. INDIVIDUAL-BASED MODELS: POWERFUL OR POWER STRUGGLE?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willem, L; Stijven, S; Hens, N; Vladislavleva, E; Broeckhove, J; Beutels, P

    2015-01-01

    Individual-based models (IBMs) offer endless possibilities to explore various research questions but come with high model complexity and computational burden. Large-scale IBMs have become feasible but the novel hardware architectures require adapted software. The increased model complexity also requires systematic exploration to gain thorough system understanding. We elaborate on the development of IBMs for vaccine-preventable infectious diseases and model exploration with active learning. Investment in IBM simulator code can lead to significant runtime reductions. We found large performance differences due to data locality. Sorting the population once, reduced simulation time by a factor two. Storing person attributes separately instead of using person objects also seemed more efficient. Next, we improved model performance up to 70% by structuring potential contacts based on health status before processing disease transmission. The active learning approach we present is based on iterative surrogate modelling and model-guided experimentation. Symbolic regression is used for nonlinear response surface modelling with automatic feature selection. We illustrate our approach using an IBM for influenza vaccination. After optimizing the parameter spade, we observed an inverse relationship between vaccination coverage and the clinical attack rate reinforced by herd immunity. These insights can be used to focus and optimise research activities, and to reduce both dimensionality and decision uncertainty.

  8. Professional tools and a personal touch – experiences of physical therapy of persons with migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostenius, Catrine; Öhrling, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim was to explore the lived experience of physical therapy of persons with migraine. Method: Data were collected by conducting narrative interviews with 11 persons with migraine. Inspired by van Manen, a hermeneutic phenomenological method was used to analyse the experiences of physical therapy which these persons had. Results: Physical therapy for persons with migraine meant making an effort in terms of time and energy to improve their health by meeting a person who was utilising his or her knowledge and skill to help. Being respected and treated as an individual and having confidence in the physical therapist were highlighted aspects. The analysis revealed a main theme, “meeting a physical therapist with professional tools and a personal touch”. The main theme included four sub-themes, “investing time and energy to feel better”, “relying on the competence of the physical therapist”, “wanting to be treated and to become involved as an individual” and “being respected in a trustful relationship”. Conclusions: The therapeutic relationship with the physical therapist is important and the findings of this study can increase awareness about relational aspects of physical therapy and encourage thoughtfulness among physical therapists and other healthcare professionals interacting with persons with migraine. PMID:23311671

  9. Design of Individualized Wheelchairs Using AHP and Kano Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanli Yuan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available To study how to design different grades of individualized wheelchairs according to users' needs, a personalized wheelchair design method based on AHP and Kano model is proposed. The AHP model determines the relative importance of characteristics of customers' demands. The subfunctions of manual wheelchairs and their attributes are given. The weight coefficients are calculated. 20 experts (10 are the members of the research team, 5 are doctors, and 5 are wheelchair designers are involved in the above two parts of the work. Kano model represents the types of user requirements. 30 participants' (wheelchair users needs are divided into 5 categories: M, O, E, I, and R. According to the types of user needs and the weight of each subfunction, three manual wheelchair models are built. Traditional design method usually cannot satisfy the requirements of users and product structure, so this paper makes a contribution to solve this problem. The method can be used to design individualized wheelchairs which may improve the product quality and customers' satisfaction. Meanwhile it also can reduce the design time, thereby reducing the design cost.

  10. The mechanism of functional up-regulation of P2X3 receptors of trigeminal sensory neurons in a genetic mouse model of familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swathi K Hullugundi

    Full Text Available A knock-in (KI mouse model of FHM-1 expressing the R192Q missense mutation of the Cacna1a gene coding for the α1 subunit of CaV2.1 channels shows, at the level of the trigeminal ganglion, selective functional up-regulation of ATP -gated P2X3 receptors of sensory neurons that convey nociceptive signals to the brainstem. Why P2X3 receptors are constitutively more responsive, however, remains unclear as their membrane expression and TRPV1 nociceptor activity are the same as in wildtype (WT neurons. Using primary cultures of WT or KI trigeminal ganglia, we investigated whether soluble compounds that may contribute to initiating (or maintaining migraine attacks, such as TNFα, CGRP, and BDNF, might be responsible for increasing P2X3 receptor responses. Exogenous application of TNFα potentiated P2X3 receptor-mediated currents of WT but not of KI neurons, most of which expressed both the P2X3 receptor and the TNFα receptor TNFR2. However, sustained TNFα neutralization failed to change WT or KI P2X3 receptor currents. This suggests that endogenous TNFα does not regulate P2X3 receptor responses. Nonetheless, on cultures made from both genotypes, exogenous TNFα enhanced TRPV1 receptor-mediated currents expressed by a few neurons, suggesting transient amplification of TRPV1 nociceptor responses. CGRP increased P2X3 receptor currents only in WT cultures, although prolonged CGRP receptor antagonism or BDNF neutralization reduced KI currents to WT levels. Our data suggest that, in KI trigeminal ganglion cultures, constitutive up-regulation of P2X3 receptors probably is already maximal and is apparently contributed by basal CGRP and BDNF levels, thereby rendering these neurons more responsive to extracellular ATP.

  11. Cranial computed tomography in pediatric migraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez-Cermeno, J.C.; Gobernado, J.M.; Freije, R.; Zaragoza, E.; Gimeno, A.

    1984-04-01

    Two migraine children showed low-density areas with irregular enhancement patterns on CT scans of the head after contrast infusion. Angiography was normal in both patients. These abnormalities probably were due to transient blood-brain barrier damage. This knowledge is important when excluding other disorders like vascular malformations.

  12. Chronic migraine--classification, characteristics and treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diener, Hans-Christoph; Dodick, David W; Goadsby, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    excluded patients who had headaches for =15 days per month. Despite this lack of reliable data, a wealth of expert opinion and a few evidence-based treatment options are available for managing chronic migraine. Trial data are available for topiramate and botulinum toxin type A, and expert opinion suggests...

  13. Brain atrophy following hemiplegic migraine attacks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelzer, Nadine; Hoogeveen, Evelien S.; Ferrari, Michel D.; Poll-The, Bwee Tien; Kruit, Mark C.; Terwindt, Gisela M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Patients with hemiplegic migraine (HM) may sometimes develop progressive neurological deterioration of which the pathophysiology is unknown. Patient We report a 16-year clinical and neuroradiological follow-up of a patient carrying a de novo p.Ser218Leu CACNA1A HM mutation who had nine

  14. Trigger factors and mechanisms in migraine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonman, Geurt Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    Migraine is a severe headache syndrome, affecting approximately 33% of females and 13% of males. Patients suffer from recurring headache episodes in combination with nausea, vomiting, phono and photophobia. It is a paroxysmal disorder for which several several trigger factors have been identified by

  15. Epidemiology of migraine among students in Mali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssoufa Maiga

    2017-06-01

    In conclusion, migraine is common among students of Gao, it is more important in female. It has a negative impact on academic performance. It is therefore necessary to control its management to reduce the extent of the disease in this environment.

  16. Individual-based model for radiation risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, O.

    A mathematical model is developed which enables one to predict the life span probability for mammals exposed to radiation. It relates statistical biometric functions with statistical and dynamic characteristics of an organism's critical system. To calculate the dynamics of the latter, the respective mathematical model is used too. This approach is applied to describe the effects of low level chronic irradiation on mice when the hematopoietic system (namely, thrombocytopoiesis) is the critical one. For identification of the joint model, experimental data on hematopoiesis in nonirradiated and irradiated mice, as well as on mortality dynamics of those in the absence of radiation are utilized. The life span probability and life span shortening predicted by the model agree with corresponding experimental data. Modeling results show the significance of ac- counting the variability of the individual radiosensitivity of critical system cells when estimating the radiation risk. These findings are corroborated by clinical data on persons involved in the elimination of the Chernobyl catastrophe after- effects. All this makes it feasible to use the model for radiation risk assessments for cosmonauts and astronauts on long-term missions such as a voyage to Mars or a lunar colony. In this case the model coefficients have to be determined by making use of the available data for humans. Scenarios for the dynamics of dose accumulation during space flights should also be taken into account.

  17. Estimation of Nonlinear Dynamic Panel Data Models with Individual Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper suggests a generalized method of moments (GMM based estimation for dynamic panel data models with individual specific fixed effects and threshold effects simultaneously. We extend Hansen’s (Hansen, 1999 original setup to models including endogenous regressors, specifically, lagged dependent variables. To address the problem of endogeneity of these nonlinear dynamic panel data models, we prove that the orthogonality conditions proposed by Arellano and Bond (1991 are valid. The threshold and slope parameters are estimated by GMM, and asymptotic distribution of the slope parameters is derived. Finite sample performance of the estimation is investigated through Monte Carlo simulations. It shows that the threshold and slope parameter can be estimated accurately and also the finite sample distribution of slope parameters is well approximated by the asymptotic distribution.

  18. Conceptual Models of the Individual Public Service Provider

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lotte Bøgh; Pedersen, Lene Holm; Bhatti, Yosef

    are used to gain insight on the motivation of public service providers; namely principal-agent theory, self-determination theory and public service motivation theory. We situate the theoretical discussions in the context of public service providers being transferred to private organizations......Individual public service providers’ motivation can be conceptualized as either extrinsic, autonomous or prosocial, and the question is how we can best theoretically understand this complexity without losing too much coherence and parsimony. Drawing on Allison’s approach (1969), three perspectives...... theoretical – to develop a coherent model of individual public service providers – but the empirical illustration also contributes to our understanding of motivation in the context of public sector outsourcing....

  19. Symptom dimensions of affective disorders in migraine patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louter, M A; Pijpers, J A; Wardenaar, K J; van Zwet, E W; van Hemert, A M; Zitman, F G; Ferrari, M D; Penninx, B W; Terwindt, G M

    2015-11-01

    A strong association has been established between migraine and depression. However, this is the first study to differentiate in a large sample of migraine patients for symptom dimensions of the affective disorder spectrum. Migraine patients (n=3174) from the LUMINA (Leiden University Medical Centre Migraine Neuro-analysis Program) study and patients with current psychopathology (n=1129), past psychopathology (n=477), and healthy controls (n=561) from the NESDA (Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety) study, were compared for three symptom dimensions of depression and anxiety. The dimensions -lack of positive affect (depression specific); negative affect (nonspecific); and somatic arousal (anxiety specific)- were assessed by a shortened adaptation of the Mood and Anxiety Symptom Questionnaire (MASQ-D30). Within the migraine group, the association with migraine specific determinants was established. Multivariate regression analyses were conducted. Migraine patients differed significantly (pmigraine patients were predominantly similar to the past psychopathology group. For the somatic arousal dimension, migraine patients scores were more comparable with the current psychopathology group. Migraine specific determinants for high scores on all dimensions were high frequency of attacks and cutaneous allodynia during attacks. This study shows that affective symptoms in migraine patients are especially associated with the somatic arousal component. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Examination of fluctuations in atmospheric pressure related to migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuma, Hirohisa; Okuma, Yumiko; Kitagawa, Yasuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Japan has four seasons and many chances of low atmospheric pressure or approaches of typhoon, therefore it has been empirically known that the fluctuation of weather induces migraine in people. Generally, its mechanism has been interpreted as follows: physical loading, attributed by atmospheric pressure to human bodies, compresses or dilates human blood vessels, which leads to abnormality in blood flow and induces migraine. We report our examination of the stage in which migraine tends to be induced focusing on the variation of atmospheric pressure. Subjects were 34 patients with migraine, who were treated in our hospital. The patients included 31 females and three males, whose mean age was 32 ± 6.7. 22 patients had migraine with aura and 12 patients had migraine without aura. All of patients with migraine maintained a headache diary to record atmospheric pressures when they developed a migraine. The standard atmospheric pressure was defined as 1013 hPa, and with this value as the criterion, we investigated slight fluctuations in the atmospheric pressure when they developed a migraine. It was found that the atmospheric pressure when the patients developed a migraine was within 1003-1007 hPa in the approach of low atmospheric pressure and that the patients developed a migraine when the atmospheric pressure decreased by 6-10 hPa, slightly less than the standard atmospheric pressure. Small decreases of 6-10 hPa relative to the standard atmospheric pressure of 1013 hPa induced migraine attacks most frequently in patients with migraine.

  1. Relationship between MIDAS, depression, anxiety and alexithymia in migraine patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalınay Dikmen, Pınar; Onur Aysevener, Elif; Kosak, Seda; Ilgaz Aydınlar, Elif; Sağduyu Kocaman, Ayşe

    2017-11-16

    The co-existence of psychiatric comorbidities with migraine is well known; however, the relationship between alexithymia and migraine has not been persuasively shown yet. The aim of the study was to assess the relationships between migraine-related disability, depression, anxiety and alexithymia. One hundred and forty-five migraine patients (33.18 ± 8.6; 111 females, 34 males), and 50 control subjects (29.06 ± 7.6; 34 females, 16 males) were prospectively enrolled for the study. The participants completed a demographic data form and Migraine Disability Assessment Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, Beck Anxiety Inventory and Toronto Alexithymia Score-20 (TAS-20). All migraine patients were more depressive (p = 0.01) and anxious (p = 0.001) than the healthy subjects. TAS-20 scores of the migraine sufferers and the control group did not indicate alexithymia. The migraine-related disability of all migraine patients was severe (27.84 ± 29.22). Depression and anxiety scores in the migraine patients were highly correlated with each other and TAS-20 (r = 0.485, p = 0.001) and all its subscales in turn: difficulty in identifying (r = 0.435, p < 0.001) and describing feelings (r = 0.451, p = 0.001) and externally oriented thinking (r = 0.302, p = 0.001). Moreover, logistic regression analysis revealed that depression and anxiety predicted alexithymia. Our findings showed a complex relationship between migraine, depression, anxiety and alexithymia. On the other hand, alexithymia apparently was not directly connected to migraine, but its presence could be predicted in migraine patients because of co-morbid depression and anxiety.

  2. [The importance of chronic migraine in a general neurology service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracia-Naya, M; Alarcia-Alejos, R; Modrego-Pardo, P J

    Chronic migraine is a primary headache that is difficult to treat and has an important impact on the patient's quality of life. The international headache classification recently modified the criteria for chronic migraine and therefore few studies have been conducted that analyse groups according to these new criteria. AIM. To analyse a group of patients with chronic migraine who were referred to a general neurology service. The first 100 patients with migraine were selected. Researchers established and analysed a number of subgroups of patients with episodic, chronic or chronic migraine with probable headache due to medication abuse, in accordance with the International Headache Society (IHS) headache classification and its revised version from 2006. Of the total sample of 738 new patients, 100 (13.5%) suffered from migraines and of these 100 new patients with migraine 42 (5.6% of the total series) satisfied criteria for chronic migraine and 15 patients with chronic migraine met the criteria for probable headache due to medication abuse. Before visiting the neurology service, only 41% had been diagnosed as suffering from migraine, 38% had received no information about this condition, only 17% took triptans for symptomatic relief and 23% had followed some kind of preventive treatment. One notable finding was the importance of episodic and chronic migraine in a general neurology service, on applying the recent IHS criteria. A high percentage of patients with chronic migraine who were referred to the neurology service have not been diagnosed or given any information or proper treatment; an elevated degree of self-medication and medication abuse also exists. Preventive treatment and triptans in cases of intense migraines are still not commonly used in primary care.

  3. Individual-based modeling of fish: Linking to physical models and water quality.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, K.A.

    1997-08-01

    The individual-based modeling approach for the simulating fish population and community dynamics is gaining popularity. Individual-based modeling has been used in many other fields, such as forest succession and astronomy. The popularity of the individual-based approach is partly a result of the lack of success of the more aggregate modeling approaches traditionally used for simulating fish population and community dynamics. Also, recent recognition that it is often the atypical individual that survives has fostered interest in the individual-based approach. Two general types of individual-based models are distribution and configuration. Distribution models follow the probability distributions of individual characteristics, such as length and age. Configuration models explicitly simulate each individual; the sum over individuals being the population. DeAngelis et al (1992) showed that, when distribution and configuration models were formulated from the same common pool of information, both approaches generated similar predictions. The distribution approach was more compact and general, while the configuration approach was more flexible. Simple biological changes, such as making growth rate dependent on previous days growth rates, were easy to implement in the configuration version but prevented simple analytical solution of the distribution version.

  4. Cognitive development in children with migraine and their healthy unaffected siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverkamp, F; Hönscheid, A; Müller-Sinik, K

    2002-09-01

    The discussion about neuropsychological sequalae from migraine occurring in adults is controversial. The purpose of our study was to examine whether children with migraine may be at risk for impaired intellectual development compared with their siblings free of migraine.

  5. Analytical models approximating individual processes: a validation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favier, C; Degallier, N; Menkès, C E

    2010-12-01

    Upscaling population models from fine to coarse resolutions, in space, time and/or level of description, allows the derivation of fast and tractable models based on a thorough knowledge of individual processes. The validity of such approximations is generally tested only on a limited range of parameter sets. A more general validation test, over a range of parameters, is proposed; this would estimate the error induced by the approximation, using the original model's stochastic variability as a reference. This method is illustrated by three examples taken from the field of epidemics transmitted by vectors that bite in a temporally cyclical pattern, that illustrate the use of the method: to estimate if an approximation over- or under-fits the original model; to invalidate an approximation; to rank possible approximations for their qualities. As a result, the application of the validation method to this field emphasizes the need to account for the vectors' biology in epidemic prediction models and to validate these against finer scale models. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Modeling Structural, Dyadic, and Individual Factors: The Inclusion and Exclusion Model of HIV Related Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Albarracin, Dolores; Tannenbaum, Melanie B.; Glasman, Laura R.; Rothman, Alexander J.

    2010-01-01

    Changing HIV-related behaviors requires addressing the individual, dyadic, and structural influences that shape them. This supplement of AIDS & Behavior presents frameworks that integrate these three influences on behavior. Concepts from these frameworks were selected to model the processes by which structural factors affect individual HIV-related behavior. In the Inclusion/Exclusion Model, material and symbolic inclusions and exclusions (sharing versus denying resources) regulate individuals...

  7. Individual acceptance of the biogas innovation: A structural equation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmann, Carsten H.; Arens, Ludwig; Theuvsen, Ludwig

    2013-01-01

    The rapid spread of biogas production in Germany has resulted in an increased public debate over this new business branch. Today the production of biogas is much more controversially debated than several years ago. At the same time it could be proven that even among farmers themselves the acceptance of biogas production in some regions is somewhat dampened due to accompanying “collateral damages”. Therefore, the goal of this paper is to identify relevant influencing factors that determine the acceptance of the innovation “biogas” among farmers by applying a causal analysis. Initial results among the five investigated determinants show that not only an individual attitude toward biogas but also the farmers' personal innovativeness strongly and significantly influences an individual's acceptance of the innovation “biogas”. -- Highlights: •Strong expansion of biogas production based on renewable resources in Germany since 2004. •Low acceptance of biogas production in some regions. •Identification of influencing factors that determine the individual acceptance of the biogas innovation among German farmers. •Compared to existing studies, personal innovativeness was taken into account in the causal model. •Results are important for the further expansion of biogas production in Germany as well as in other countries

  8. Flunarizine in the prophylaxis of migrainous vertigo: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepcha, Anjali; Amalanathan, Sophia; Augustine, Ann Mary; Tyagi, Amit Kumar; Balraj, Achamma

    2014-11-01

    Migrainous vertigo is a common cause of dizziness presenting to an otorhinolaryngology/otoneurology clinic. Although it causes a substantial burden to the individual and society there are no randomized controlled trails on prophylactic medication for this condition. Flunarizine, a calcium channel blocker has been used effectively in both migraine and vestibular conditions. This randomized control trial was undertaken in a tertiary academic referral center to evaluate the efficacy of flunarizine in patients with migrainous vertigo when compared to non-specific vestibular treatment of betahistine and vestibular exercises. The effect of flunarizine on two particularly disabling symptoms of vertigo and headache was studied. A total of 48 patients who were diagnosed with definitive migrainous vertigo completed the study of 12 weeks duration. Patients in arm A received 10-mg flunarizine daily along with betahistine 16 mg and paracetamol 1 gm during episodes, and arm B received only betahistine and paracetamol during episodes. Symptom scores were noted at the start of the study and at the end of 12 weeks. Analysis of the frequency of vertiginous episodes showed a significant difference between arm A and arm B (p = 0.010) and improvement in severity of vertigo between the two groups (p = 0.046). Headache frequency and severity did not improve to a significant degree in arm A as compared to arm B. The main side effects were weight gain and somnolence and this was not significantly different between the two groups. Flunarizine (10 mg) is effective in patients with migrainous vertigo who suffer from considerable vestibular symptoms.

  9. Altered functional connectivity of amygdala underlying the neuromechanism of migraine pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiye; Chen, Xiaoyan; Liu, Mengqi; Dong, Zhao; Ma, Lin; Yu, Shengyuan

    2017-12-01

    The amygdala is a large grey matter complex in the limbic system, and it may contribute in the neurolimbic pain network in migraine. However, the detailed neuromechanism remained to be elucidated. The objective of this study is to investigate the amygdala structural and functional changes in migraine and to elucidate the mechanism of neurolimbic pain-modulating in the migraine pathogenesis. Conventional MRI, 3D structure images and resting state functional MRI were performed in 18 normal controls (NC), 18 patients with episodic migraine (EM), and 16 patients with chronic migraine (CM). The amygdala volume was measured using FreeSurfer software and the functional connectivity (FC) of bilateral amygdala was computed over the whole brain. Analysis of covariance was performed on the individual FC maps among groups. The increased FC of left amygdala was observed in EM compared with NC, and the decreased of right amygdala was revealed in CM compared with NC. The increased FC of bilateral amygdala was observed in CM compared with EM. The correlation analysis showed a negative correlation between the score of sleep quality (0, normal; 1, mild sleep disturbance; 2, moderate sleep disturbance; 3, serious sleep disturbance) and the increased FC strength of left amygdala in EM compared with NC, and a positive correlation between the score of sleep quality and the increased FC strength of left amygdala in CM compared with EM, and other clinical variables showed no significant correlation with altered FC of amygdala. The altered functional connectivity of amygdala demonstrated that neurolimbic pain network contribute in the EM pathogenesis and CM chronicization.

  10. Sleep terrors antecedent is common in adolescents with migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libânia Melo Nunes Fialho

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Migraines and sleep terrors (STs are highly prevalent disorders with striking similarities. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the antecedent of STs by comparing adolescents suffering from migraines with healthy controls in a large consecutive series. METHODS: All patients were subjected to a detailed headache questionnaire and were instructed to keep a headache diary during a two-month period. The age range was 10 to 19 years. The diagnosis of STs was defined according to the International Classification of Sleep Disorders. RESULTS: A total of 158 participants were evaluated. Of these participants, 50 suffered from episodic migraines (EMs, 57 had chronic migraines (CMs and 51 were control subjects (CG. Participants who had a history of STs had significantly more migraines than participants who did not. CONCLUSIONS: Migraine is strongly associated with a history of STs in the adolescent population independent of demographics and pain intensity.

  11. Psychiatric comorbidities and photophobia in patients with migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Stefan; Beisteiner, Roland; Manecke, Maike; Aslan, Tuna Stefan; Wöber, Christian

    2017-12-01

    Based on recent findings and our own impressions we took a closer look at the relationship between (inter)ictal photophobia and psychometric variables in migraine patients with photophobia. For this study we included 29 (27 female) migraine patients and 31 (18 female) controls with a mean age of 31.6 ± 12.5 years and 24.0 ± 4.1 years, respectively. All participants filled out the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS). Interictal photophobia in patients was significantly higher than photophobia in controls (p = .001). Patients showed statistically significantly higher levels of depressive symptoms (p migraine and depression, it might be possible that depression contributes to interictal photophobia in patients with migraine. The same may be true for anxiety and stress. Both are also related to migraine and their possible impact on photophobia in migraine may be explained by pupillary dysfunction.

  12. Modeling structured population dynamics using data from unmarked individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Evan H. Campbell; Zipkin, Elise; Thorson, James T.; See, Kevin; Lynch, Heather J.; Kanno, Yoichiro; Chandler, Richard; Letcher, Benjamin H.; Royle, J. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The study of population dynamics requires unbiased, precise estimates of abundance and vital rates that account for the demographic structure inherent in all wildlife and plant populations. Traditionally, these estimates have only been available through approaches that rely on intensive mark–recapture data. We extended recently developed N-mixture models to demonstrate how demographic parameters and abundance can be estimated for structured populations using only stage-structured count data. Our modeling framework can be used to make reliable inferences on abundance as well as recruitment, immigration, stage-specific survival, and detection rates during sampling. We present a range of simulations to illustrate the data requirements, including the number of years and locations necessary for accurate and precise parameter estimates. We apply our modeling framework to a population of northern dusky salamanders (Desmognathus fuscus) in the mid-Atlantic region (USA) and find that the population is unexpectedly declining. Our approach represents a valuable advance in the estimation of population dynamics using multistate data from unmarked individuals and should additionally be useful in the development of integrated models that combine data from intensive (e.g., mark–recapture) and extensive (e.g., counts) data sources.

  13. The Migraine-Ischemic Stroke Relation in Young Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Pezzini, Alessandro; Del Zotto, Elisabetta; Giossi, Alessia; Volonghi, Irene; Costa, Paolo; Dalla Volta, Giorgio; Padovani, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    In spite of the strong epidemiologic evidence linking migraine and ischemic stroke in young adults, the mechanisms explaining this association remain poorly understood. The observation that stroke occurs more frequently during the interictal phase of migraine prompts to speculation that an indirect relation between the two diseases might exist. In this regard, four major issues might be considered which may be summarized as follows: (1) the migraine-ischemic stroke relation is influenced by s...

  14. Using Search Engines to Investigate Shared Migraine Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Sara M; Turner, Dana P; Sexton, Katherine E; Deng, Hao; Houle, Timothy T

    2017-09-01

    To investigate migraine patterns in the United States using Google search data and utilize this information to better understand societal-level trends. Additionally, we aimed to evaluate time-series relationships between migraines and social factors. Extensive research has been done on clinical factors associated with migraines, yet population-level social factors have not been widely explored. Migraine internet search data may provide insight into migraine trends beyond information that can be gleaned from other sources. In this longitudinal analysis of open access data, we performed a time-series analysis in which about 12 years of Google Trends data (January 1, 2004 to August 15, 2016) were assessed. Data points were captured at a daily level and Google's 0-100 adjusted scale was used as the primary outcome to enable the comparison of relative popularity in the migraine search term. We hypothesized that the volume of relative migraine Google searches would be affected by societal aspects such as day of the week, holidays, and novel social events. Several recurrent social factors that drive migraine searches were identified. Of these, day of the week had the most significant impact on the volume of Google migraine searches. On average, Mondays accumulated 13.31 higher relative search volume than Fridays (95% CI: 11.12-15.51, P ≤ .001). Surprisingly, holidays were associated with lower relative migraine search volumes. Christmas Day had 13.84 lower relative search volumes (95% CI: 6.26-21.43, P ≤ .001) and Thanks giving had 20.18 lower relative search volumes (95% CI: 12.55-27.82, P ≤ .001) than days that were not holidays. Certain novel social events and extreme weather also appear to be associated with relative migraine Google search volume. Social factors play a crucial role in explaining population level migraine patterns, and thus, warrant further exploration. © 2017 American Headache Society.

  15. A STUDY ON EEG ABNORMALITIES IN CHILDREN WITH MIGRAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subinay Mandal

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Migraine is one of the common causes of headache in children. Migraine and epilepsy are both common episodic neurological disorders. The comorbidity of these two conditions is well known. Many researcher have pointed out that neuronal hyperexcitability is the initiating event for occurrence of migraine attack. The aim of the paper was to evaluate the EEG in children with migraine. MATERIALS AND METHODS We retrospectively analysed records of children who attended our paediatric outpatient department with diagnoses as suffering from migraine based on International Headache Society (IHS diagnostic criteria. Apart from detailed clinical history, EEG of every patient was collected and analysed. EEG was performed interictally at least 24 hours after the last episode of headache attack in all the cases. RESULTS 56 children (age range, 4-14 years constituted our study group. 64.3% children had migraine without aura (common type and in 23.2% cases had migraine with aura (classic type other were with migraine variants. Abnormal EEG was reported in 30.3% children. 17% of children with migraine without history of seizure had abnormal EEG. Sixty one percent of patients with aura had abnormal EEG. History of either febrile fits or afebrile fits was present in total 17.1% of cases. The type of paroxysmal discharges we came across was- a Sharp waves, b Spikes and c Spike and slow wave complexes. Abnormal paroxysmal sharp and spike-wave complexes (also called spike-and-slow-wave complexes were the most common EEG abnormality. CONCLUSION EEG abnormality was found in significant number of children with migraine both with and without history of seizure in our study. This indicates neuronal hyperexcitability during episodes of migraine. So, EEG should be considered in patients with clinical diagnoses of migraine to exclude association of any seizure activity.

  16. Biomechanical Evaluations of Hip Fracture Using Finite Element Model that Models Individual Differences of Femur

    OpenAIRE

    田中, 英一; TANAKA, Eiichi; 山本, 創太; YAMAMOTO, Sota; 坂本, 誠二; SAKAMOTO, Seiji; 中西, 孝文; NAKANISHI, Takafumi; 原田, 敦; HARADA, Atsushi; 水野, 雅士; MIZUNO, Masashi

    2004-01-01

    This paper is concerned with an individual finite element modeling system for femur and biomechanical evaluations of the influences of loading conditions, bone shape and bone density on risks of hip fracture. Firstly, a method to construct an individual finite element model by morphological parameters that represent femoral shapes was developed. Using the models with different shapes constructed by this method, the effects of fall direction, posture of upper body, femur shape and bone density...

  17. Acute Confusional Migraine: Distinct Clinical Entity or Spectrum of Migraine Biology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashar M. Farooqi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this review is to explore the literature reports of acute confusional migraine (ACM including patient characteristics, migraine symptomatology, and proposed diagnostic criteria. A literature review was conducted using PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science using the terms “confusional migraine” and “confusional state in migraine”. All the relevant articles from 1970 to 2016 were included. A total of 120 patients were found in the literature. Most of the cases were seen in the pediatric population with a slight male predominance. Personal or family history of migraine was common. Most patients had a headache prior to the confusional state. In addition to confusion and agitation, some developed visual (32.5% and/or sensory symptoms (19% and/or speech problems (39% either prior to or during the confusional state. Data on treatment outcomes is lacking. Patients with most common forms of migraine report attention and cognitive disturbances but awareness remains intact as opposed to patients with ACM. ACM is a distinct entity and should be included as part of the appendix of International Classification of Headache Disoders-3 beta version (ICHD-3β criteria. Prospective studies are needed to further study this disorder and its association with other migraine forms.

  18. Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF -308G>A, Nitric Oxide Synthase 3 (NOS3 +894G>T Polymorphisms and Migraine Risk: A Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Chen

    Full Text Available Conflicting data have been reported on the association between tumor necrosis factor (TNF -308G>A and nitric oxide synthase 3 (NOS3 +894G>T polymorphisms and migraine. We performed a meta-analysis of case-control studies to evaluate whether the TNF -308G>A and NOS3 +894G>T polymorphisms confer genetic susceptibility to migraine.We performed an updated meta-analysis for TNF -308G>A and a meta-analysis for NOS3 +894G>T based on studies published up to July 2014. We calculated study specific odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI assuming allele contrast, dominant model, recessive model, and co-dominant model as pooled effect estimates.Eleven studies in 6682 migraineurs and 22591 controls for TNF -308G>A and six studies in 1055 migraineurs and 877 controls for NOS3 +894G>T were included in the analysis. Neither indicated overall associations between gene polymorphisms and migraine risk. Subgroup analyses suggested that the "A" allele of the TNF -308G>A variant increases the risk of migraine among non-Caucasians (dominant model: pooled OR = 1.82; 95% CI 1.15 - 2.87. The risk of migraine with aura (MA was increased among both Caucasians and non-Caucasians. Subgroup analyses suggested that the "T" allele of the NOS3 +894G>T variant increases the risk of migraine among non-Caucasians (co-dominant model: pooled OR = 2.10; 95% CI 1.14 - 3.88.Our findings appear to support the hypothesis that the TNF -308G>A polymorphism may act as a genetic susceptibility factor for migraine among non-Caucasians and that the NOS3 +894G>T polymorphism may modulate the risk of migraine among non-Caucasians.

  19. Migraine headache in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sina, Farzad; Razmeh, Saeed; Habibzadeh, Neda; Zavari, Arefeh; Nabovvati, Mona

    2017-08-29

    Migraine is a neurological disorder that afflicts many people in the world and can cause severe disability during the attacks. The pathophysiology of migraine is complex and not fully understood. It seems that migraine is common in idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). However, the association between migraine headache and IIH is still unclear. The present study was conducted to assess the prevalence of migraine headache and associated factors in IIH patients. In this cross-sectional study, a total of 68 patients diagnosed with IIH underwent a medical history interview and a neurological examination. The diagnosis of migraine was based on the four diagnostic criteria of the International Classification of Headache Disorders 3rd edition. Forty-five patients (63.2%) met the diagnostic criteria of migraine headache. There was no significant difference between patients with and without migraine headache in respect of their age, gender, body mass. This study revealed high prevalence of migraine headache in IIH patients; appropriate treatment can reduce their headache and prevent unnecessary treatments for IIH.

  20. A nitric oxide donor (nitroglycerin) triggers genuine migraine attacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, L L; Kruuse, C; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg

    1994-01-01

    Supersensitivity to induction of headache and arterial dilatation by a donor of nitric oxide (nitroglycerin) has recently been demonstrated in migraine sufferers. The aims of the present study were to examine whether the nitric oxide donor nitroglycerin may induce a typical migraine attack......, to exclude placebo-related effects and to describe the relation between middle cerebral artery dilatation and provoked migraine. Nitroglycerin (0.5 μg/kg/min for 20 min) or placebo was infused into 12 migraine patients in a double-blind cross-over trial. Blood velocity in the middle cerebral artery...

  1. Optimizing prophylactic treatment of migraine: Subtypes and patient matching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Dib

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Michel DibFédération du système nerveux central, Hôpital de la Salpêtrière, Assistance Publique- Hôpitaux de Paris, FranceAbstract: Advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of migraine have resulted in important breakthroughs in treatment. For example, understanding of the role of serotonin in the cerebrovascular circulation has led to the development of triptans for the acute relief of migraine headaches, and the identification of cortical spreading depression as an early central event associated wih migraine has brought renewed interest in antiepileptic drugs for migraine prophylaxis. However, migraine still remains inadequately treated. Indeed, it is apparent that migraine is not a single disease but rather a syndrome that can manifest itself in a variety of pathological conditions. The consequences of this may be that treatment needs to be matched to particular patients. Clinical research needs to be devoted to identifying which sort of patients benefit best from which treatments, particularly in the field of prophylaxis. We propose four patterns of precipitating factors (adrenergic, serotoninergic, menstrual, and muscular which may be used to structure migraine prophylaxis. Finally, little is known about long-term outcome in treated migraine. It is possible that appropriate early prophylaxis may modify the long-term course of the disease and avoid late complications.Keywords: migraine, diagnosis, treatment, prophylaxis, subtypes

  2. Familial Hemiplegic Migraine and Recurrent Episodes of Psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LaBianca, Sonja; Jensen, Rigmor; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M

    2015-01-01

    Familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) is a rare autosomal dominant form of migraine with motor aura. We present a case report of a father and son with very similar attacks of hemiplegic migraine and recurrent episodes of accompanying psychoses. Previously, such episodes led to hospitalization...... and extended clinical examinations, which further worsened the psychoses. Since the episodes were recognized as related to the hemiplegic migraine, a treatment strategy combining sleep and sedation was initiated and progression onto psychosis was almost completely avoided in both father and son. Genetic...

  3. Infant Colic and Migraine: Is There a Connection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FOR MORE INFORMATION AAN Patients and Caregivers site http://patients.aan.com/go/home Migraine Research Foundation http://www.migraineresearchfoundation.org American Headache Society Committee for ...

  4. Treatment of Chronic Migraine with Focus on Botulinum Neurotoxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara M. Schaefer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Migraine is the most common neurological disorder, and contributes to disability and large healthcare costs in the United States and the world. The treatment of migraine until recently has focused on medications, both abortive and prophylactic, but treatment of chronic migraine has been revolutionized with the introduction of botulinum toxin injection therapy. In this review, we explore the current understanding of migraine pathophysiology, and the evolution of the use of botulinum toxin therapy including proposed pathophysiological mechanisms through animal data. We also discuss the similarities and differences between three injection techniques.

  5. Effects of migraine disease on the vestibulocochlear system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Zaim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Migraine patients have tendency to have vestibular and auditory system problems. The aim of this study is to evaluate vestibule cochlear system of patients with migraine with Transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE video-nystagmography (VNG and caloric test. Methods:39 patients diagnosed with migraine and control group of 21 healthy volunteers were included in this study. Before they were included in the study, all of them were examined and those who has acute otitis media, chronic otitis media, tympanic membrane perforation, external otitis, ear surgery history and head trauma were excluded from the study. All patients and volunteers were tested by TEOAE, VNG and caloric tests. In evaluating the statistical data, SPSS 15.0 was utilized. Results: When TEOAE values for the migraine group and for the control group are compared, it is found statistically significant that the TEOAE values for the migraine group is lower than those for the control group. This result shows that there can be a pathology that is able to affect cochlear functions in migraine disease. As for VNG test results, a statistically significant difference cannot be determined between migraine and control groups. More over, the identification of canal paresis in caloric test indicates that peripheral vestibular problems accompany migraine disease. Conclusion:Evaluating vestibulocochlear system of migraine patients with TEOAE, VNG and caloric tests has been an important task for identifying vestibular imperfections accompanying these patients and for predicting potential auricular pathologies. J Clin Exp Invest 2015; 6(1: 1-4

  6. The Use of the Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for the Treatment of Migraine and Tension Type Headaches

    OpenAIRE

    Yasemin Akkoca; Þehnaz Yýldýrým; Levent Ertuðrul Ýnan

    2015-01-01

    Headache, which affects a large part of the community and causes loss of workforce, is gaining importance in terms of the burden which it brings on the society, by its function of restricting individuals social activities as well as increasing the health expenditure likewise drug consumption. Migraine and tension headaches are primary headaches which any organic causes can not be determined for them. For the treatment of headaches of this type besides the use of medicine, exercises with bio-f...

  7. Steady States in SIRS Epidemical Model of Mobile Individuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Duanming; He Minhua; Yu Xiaoling; Pan Guijun; Sun Hongzhang; Su Xiangying; Sun Fan; Yin Yanping; Li Rui; Liu Dan

    2006-01-01

    We consider an epidemical model within socially interacting mobile individuals to study the behaviors of steady states of epidemic propagation in 2D networks. Using mean-field approximation and large scale simulations, we recover the usual epidemic behavior with critical thresholds δ c and p c below which infectious disease dies out. For the population density δ far above δ c , it is found that there is linear relationship between contact rate λ and the population density δ in the main. At the same time, the result obtained from mean-field approximation is compared with our numerical result, and it is found that these two results are similar by and large but not completely the same.

  8. Steady States in SIRS Epidemical Model of Mobile Individuals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Duan-Ming; LIU Dan; HE Min-Hua; YU Xiao-Ling; PAN Gui-Jun; SUN Hong-Zhang; SU Xiang-Ying; SUN Fan; YIN Yan-Ping; LI Rui

    2006-01-01

    We consider an epidemical model within socially interacting mobile individuals to study the behaviors of steady statesof epidemic propagation in 2D networks. Using mean-field approximation and large scale simulations, we recover the usual epidemic behavior with critical thresholds δc and pc below which infectious disease dies out. For the population density δ far above δc, it is found that there is linear relationship between contact rate λ and the population density δ in the main. At the same time, the result obtained from mean-field approximation is compared with our numerical result, and it is found that these two results are similar by and large but not completely the same.

  9. A model of individualized canonical microcircuits supporting cognitive operations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Kunze

    Full Text Available Major cognitive functions such as language, memory, and decision-making are thought to rely on distributed networks of a large number of basic elements, called canonical microcircuits. In this theoretical study we propose a novel canonical microcircuit model and find that it supports two basic computational operations: a gating mechanism and working memory. By means of bifurcation analysis we systematically investigate the dynamical behavior of the canonical microcircuit with respect to parameters that govern the local network balance, that is, the relationship between excitation and inhibition, and key intrinsic feedback architectures of canonical microcircuits. We relate the local behavior of the canonical microcircuit to cognitive processing and demonstrate how a network of interacting canonical microcircuits enables the establishment of spatiotemporal sequences in the context of syntax parsing during sentence comprehension. This study provides a framework for using individualized canonical microcircuits for the construction of biologically realistic networks supporting cognitive operations.

  10. Dosha brain-types: A neural model of individual differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, Frederick T; Wallace, Robert Keith

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores brain patterns associated with the three categories of regulatory principles of the body, mind, and behavior in Ayurveda, called Vata, Pitta, and Kapha dosha. A growing body of research has reported patterns of blood chemistry, genetic expression, physiological states, and chronic diseases associated with each dosha type. Since metabolic and growth factors are controlled by the nervous system, each dosha type should be associated with patterns of functioning of six major areas of the nervous system: The prefrontal cortex, the reticular activating system, the autonomic nervous system, the enteric nervous system, the limbic system, and the hypothalamus. For instance, the prefrontal cortex, which includes the anterior cingulate, ventral medial, and the dorsal lateral cortices, would exhibit a high range of functioning in the Vata brain-type leading to the possibility of being easily overstimulated. The Vata brain-type performs activity quickly. Learns quickly and forgets quickly. Their fast mind gives them an edge in creative problem solving. The Pitta brain-type reacts strongly to all challenges leading to purposeful and resolute actions. They never give up and are very dynamic and goal oriented. The Kapha brain-type is slow and steady leading to methodical thinking and action. They prefer routine and needs stimulation to get going. A model of dosha brain-types could provide a physiological foundation to understand individual differences. This model could help individualize treatment modalities to address different mental and physical dysfunctions. It also could explain differences in behavior seen in clinical as well as in normal populations.

  11. Dosha brain-types: A neural model of individual differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick T Travis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores brain patterns associated with the three categories of regulatory principles of the body, mind, and behavior in Ayurveda, called Vata, Pitta, and Kapha dosha. A growing body of research has reported patterns of blood chemistry, genetic expression, physiological states, and chronic diseases associated with each dosha type. Since metabolic and growth factors are controlled by the nervous system, each dosha type should be associated with patterns of functioning of six major areas of the nervous system: The prefrontal cortex, the reticular activating system, the autonomic nervous system, the enteric nervous system, the limbic system, and the hypothalamus. For instance, the prefrontal cortex, which includes the anterior cingulate, ventral medial, and the dorsal lateral cortices, would exhibit a high range of functioning in the Vata brain-type leading to the possibility of being easily overstimulated. The Vata brain-type performs activity quickly. Learns quickly and forgets quickly. Their fast mind gives them an edge in creative problem solving. The Pitta brain-type reacts strongly to all challenges leading to purposeful and resolute actions. They never give up and are very dynamic and goal oriented. The Kapha brain-type is slow and steady leading to methodical thinking and action. They prefer routine and needs stimulation to get going. A model of dosha brain-types could provide a physiological foundation to understand individual differences. This model could help individualize treatment modalities to address different mental and physical dysfunctions. It also could explain differences in behavior seen in clinical as well as in normal populations.

  12. Transcranial Doppler sonography in familial hemiplegic migraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierelli, F.; Pauri, F.; Cupini, L.M.; Fiermonte, G.; Rizzo, P.A.

    1991-01-01

    A patient affected by familial hemiplegic migraine underwent transcranial Doppler sonography twice: the first during a spontaneous attack with right hemiparesis and aphasia, the second during a headachefree period. During the attack the following haemodynamic changes were seen: (a) bilateral increase in the middle cerebral artery and anterior cerebral artery blood flow velocities (this increase was more pronounced on the left side), (b) decreased systo-diastolic ratio and pulsatility index on the right side, (c) increased systo-diastolic ratio and pulsatility index on the left side. The results indicate that during the attack in this familial hemiplegic migraine patient, a diffuse vasoconstriction of the basal cerebral arteries developed. Moreover, transcranial Doppler sonography data suggest that a prolonged vasoconstriction of the peripheral arterioles could play a role in determining the neurological symptoms in this syndrome. 13 refs., 1 figs., 1 tab

  13. Transcranial Doppler sonography in familial hemiplegic migraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierelli, F.; Pauri, F.; Cupini, L.M.; Fiermonte, G.; Rizzo, P.A. (Universita la Sapienza, Roma (Italy))

    1991-02-01

    A patient affected by familial hemiplegic migraine underwent transcranial Doppler sonography twice: the first during a spontaneous attack with right hemiparesis and aphasia, the second during a headachefree period. During the attack the following haemodynamic changes were seen: (a) bilateral increase in the middle cerebral artery and anterior cerebral artery blood flow velocities (this increase was more pronounced on the left side), (b) decreased systo-diastolic ratio and pulsatility index on the right side, (c) increased systo-diastolic ratio and pulsatility index on the left side. The results indicate that during the attack in this familial hemiplegic migraine patient, a diffuse vasoconstriction of the basal cerebral arteries developed. Moreover, transcranial Doppler sonography data suggest that a prolonged vasoconstriction of the peripheral arterioles could play a role in determining the neurological symptoms in this syndrome. 13 refs., 1 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Botulinum toxin type a for chronic migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenazi, Avi

    2010-03-01

    Chronic migraine (CM) is the leading cause of chronic daily headache, a common and debilitating headache syndrome. The management of CM patients is challenging, with only limited benefit from available oral preventive medications. Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) has been used extensively to treat disorders associated with increased muscle tone. More recent scientific data support an analgesic effect of the toxin. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of BoNT make it an appealing candidate for migraine prevention. Results from older clinical trials on the efficacy of the toxin in CM were inconclusive. However, recent trials using more stringent inclusion criteria have shown positive results, supporting the use of the toxin in some patients with this disorder. This review summarizes the scientific data on the analgesic properties of BoNT, as well as the clinical data on the efficacy of the toxin in treating CM.

  15. Migraine, vertigo and migrainous vertigo: Links between vestibular and pain mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaban, Carey D

    2011-01-01

    This review develops the hypothesis that co-morbid balance disorders and migraine can be understood as additive effects of processing afferent vestibular and pain information in pre-parabrachial and pre-thalamic pathways, that have consequences on cortical mechanisms influencing perception, interoception and affect. There are remarkable parallel neurochemical phenotypes for inner ear and trigeminal ganglion cells and these afferent channels appear to converge in shared central pathways for vestibular and nociceptive information processing. These pathways share expression of receptors targeted by anti-migraine drugs. New evidence is also presented regarding the distribution of serotonin receptors in the planum semilunatum of the primate cristae ampullaris, which may indicate involvement of inner ear ionic homeostatic mechanisms in audiovestibular symptoms that can accompany migraine.

  16. Prevalence of migraine in a diverse community--electronic methods for migraine ascertainment in a large integrated health plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressman, Alice; Jacobson, Alice; Eguilos, Roderick; Gelfand, Amy; Huynh, Cynthia; Hamilton, Luisa; Avins, Andrew; Bakshi, Nandini; Merikangas, Kathleen

    2016-04-01

    The growing availability of electronic health data provides an opportunity to ascertain diagnosis-specific cases via systematic methods for sample recruitment for clinical research and health services evaluation. We developed and implemented a migraine probability algorithm (MPA) to identify migraine from electronic health records (EHR) in an integrated health plan. We identified all migraine outpatient diagnoses and all migraine-specific prescriptions for a five-year period (April 2008-March 2013) from the Kaiser Permanente, Northern California (KPNC) EHR. We developed and evaluated the MPA in two independent samples, and derived prevalence estimates of medically-ascertained migraine in KPNC by age, sex, and race. The period prevalence of medically-ascertained migraine among KPNC adults during April 2008-March 2013 was 10.3% (women: 15.5%, men: 4.5%). Estimates peaked with age in women but remained flat for men. Prevalence among Asians was half that of whites. We demonstrate the feasibility of an EHR-based algorithm to identify cases of diagnosed migraine and determine that prevalence patterns by our methods yield results comparable to aggregate estimates of treated migraine based on direct interviews in population-based samples. This inexpensive, easily applied EHR-based algorithm provides a new opportunity for monitoring changes in migraine prevalence and identifying potential participants for research studies. © International Headache Society 2015.

  17. Prevalence of migraine in a diverse community—electronic methods for migraine ascertainment in a large integrated health plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressman, Alice; Jacobson, Alice; Eguilos, Roderick; Gelfand, Amy; Huynh, Cynthia; Hamilton, Luisa; Avins, Andrew; Bakshi, Nandini; Merikangas, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The growing availability of electronic health data provides an opportunity to ascertain diagnosis-specific cases via systematic methods for sample recruitment for clinical research and health services evaluation. We developed and implemented a migraine probability algorithm (MPA) to identify migraine from electronic health records (EHR) in an integrated health plan. Methods We identified all migraine outpatient diagnoses and all migraine-specific prescriptions for a five-year period (April 2008–March 2013) from the Kaiser Permanente, Northern California (KPNC) EHR. We developed and evaluated the MPA in two independent samples, and derived prevalence estimates of medically-ascertained migraine in KPNC by age, sex, and race. Results The period prevalence of medically-ascertained migraine among KPNC adults during April 2008–March 2013 was 10.3% (women: 15.5%, men: 4.5%). Estimates peaked with age in women but remained flat for men. Prevalence among Asians was half that of whites. Conclusions We demonstrate the feasibility of an EHR-based algorithm to identify cases of diagnosed migraine and determine that prevalence patterns by our methods yield results comparable to aggregate estimates of treated migraine based on direct interviews in population-based samples. This inexpensive, easily applied EHR-based algorithm provides a new opportunity for monitoring changes in migraine prevalence and identifying potential participants for research studies. PMID:26069243

  18. Cerebral angiography in patients with complicated migraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeiler, K.; Wessely, P.; Holzner, F.

    1985-08-01

    38 patients (mean age: 29 years) were investigated by means of complete 4-vessel angiography: all of them were suffering from complicated migraine without detectable vascular malformation. Stenoses of the great craniocervical vessels were found in 11 patients (28.9%), but there was not a single case of vascular occlusion. A correlation between the localization of the stenosis, the localization of the headache and the presumed region of the transient cerebral function disturbance was found only in a few patients. Concerning the morphological changes of the small intracranial arterial branches, there was hardly an difference between clinically affected and non-affected territories of the middle cerebral artery. The angiograms of the 38 cases of complicated migraine were compared with the angiograms of 40 patients suffering from strokes in the young and those of 49 patients with transient ischaemic attacks. There were remarkably fewer stenoses or occlusions in the great craniocervical arteries of patients suffering from complicated migraine (28.9%) than in the vessels of cases of stroke in the young (52.5%). However, the incidence was comparable with the results in patients with transient ischaemic attacks (34.7%). The degree of morphological changes in the small intracranial arterial branches is likely to depend primarily on the patient's age and less on the diagnosis. The results suggest that in almost 30% of patients with complicated migraine - even at juvenile age-stenoses of the great craniocervical vessels might be found. However, considering the fact that most of the stenoses are without haemodynamic significance and their localization is not in agreement with the clinical data, the pathogenetic value of these vessel wall changes is highly questionable. (Author).

  19. Migraine headaches among university students using id migraine test as a screening tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caylan Ayse

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Migraine is a significant health problem, especially for the young people, due to its frequency and accompanying morbidity, causing disability and loss of performance. In this study, our aim was to determine the prevalence of migraine headaches among university students in Edirne, a Turkish city. Methods In this cross-sectional and descriptive study, study population was composed of students registered to Trakya University in the academic year of 2008-2009. Out of these, 3694 of them accepted to participate. Participants who had two or more headaches in the last 3 months formed the headache group. Afterwards, two preliminary questions were applied to the headache group and participants with at least one affirmative response were asked to perform the validated ID-Migraine™ test. Results The mean age of 3694 students participated in the study was 19.23 ± 1.84 (17-39 years, with adolescents:adult ratio being 2.5:1. 1613 students (43.7% did have at least two headaches in the last three months. Migraine-type headache was detected in 266 subjects (7.2% based on the ID-Migraine™ test. Of the migraine group, 72 were male (27.1% and 194 were female (72.9%. There was no significant difference in migraine prevalence between adolescent and adult age groups. Conclusions With a prevalence similar to adults, primary care physicians should be aware of the probability of migraine headaches in university students in order to maintain a successful school performance.

  20. Acid-sensing ion channels and migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-qi KANG

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs are ligand-gated ion channels that are activated by extracellular protons (H+, which belong to epithelial sodium channels/degenerin (ENaC/DEG superfamily. ASICs are widely distributed in central nervous system, peripheral nervous system, digestive system and some tumor tissues. Different ASIC subunits play important roles in various pathophysiological processes such as touch, sour taste, learning and memory, including inflammation, ischemic stroke, pain, learning and memory decline, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis (MS, migraine, irritable bowel syndrome and tumor. Research over the last 2 decades has achieved substantial advances in migraine pathophysiology. It is now largely accepted that inflammatory pathways play a key role and three main events seem to take place: cortical spreading depression (CSD, activation of the trigeminovascular system (i.e. dural nociceptors, peripheral and central sensitization of this pain pathway. However, the exact mechanisms that link these three events to each other and to inflammation have so far remained to be studied. This article takes an overview of newly research advances in structure, distribution and the relationship with migraine of ASICs.  DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.09.013

  1. Selectivity in Genetic Association with Sub-classified Migraine in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasman, Daniel I.; Anttila, Verneri; Buring, Julie E.; Ridker, Paul M.; Schürks, Markus; Kurth, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Migraine can be sub-classified not only according to presence of migraine aura (MA) or absence of migraine aura (MO), but also by additional features accompanying migraine attacks, e.g. photophobia, phonophobia, nausea, etc. all of which are formally recognized by the International Classification of Headache Disorders. It remains unclear how aura status and the other migraine features may be related to underlying migraine pathophysiology. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 12 independent loci at which single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with migraine. Using a likelihood framework, we explored the selective association of these SNPs with migraine, sub-classified according to aura status and the other features in a large population-based cohort of women including 3,003 active migraineurs and 18,108 free of migraine. Five loci met stringent significance for association with migraine, among which four were selective for sub-classified migraine, including rs11172113 (LRP1) for MO. The number of loci associated with migraine increased to 11 at suggestive significance thresholds, including five additional selective associations for MO but none for MA. No two SNPs showed similar patterns of selective association with migraine characteristics. At one extreme, SNPs rs6790925 (near TGFBR2) and rs2274316 (MEF2D) were not associated with migraine overall, MA, or MO but were selective for migraine sub-classified by the presence of one or more of the additional migraine features. In contrast, SNP rs7577262 (TRPM8) was associated with migraine overall and showed little or no selectivity for any of the migraine characteristics. The results emphasize the multivalent nature of migraine pathophysiology and suggest that a complete understanding of the genetic influence on migraine may benefit from analyses that stratify migraine according to both aura status and the additional diagnostic features used for clinical characterization of

  2. An X chromosome association scan of the Norfolk Island genetic isolate provides evidence for a novel migraine susceptibility locus at Xq12.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridget H Maher

    Full Text Available Migraine is a common and debilitating neurovascular disorder with a complex envirogenomic aetiology. Numerous studies have demonstrated a preponderance of women affected with migraine and previous pedigree linkage studies in our laboratory have identified susceptibility loci on chromosome Xq24-Xq28. In this study we have used the genetic isolate of Norfolk Island to further analyse the X chromosome for migraine susceptibility loci.An association approach was employed to analyse 14,124 SNPs spanning the entire X chromosome. Genotype data from 288 individuals comprising a large core-pedigree, of which 76 were affected with migraine, were analysed. Although no SNP reached chromosome-wide significance (empirical α = 1 × 10(-5 ranking by P-value revealed two primary clusters of SNPs in the top 25. A 10 SNP cluster represents a novel migraine susceptibility locus at Xq12 whilst a 11 SNP cluster represents a previously identified migraine susceptibility locus at Xq27. The strongest association at Xq12 was seen for rs599958 (OR = 1.75, P = 8.92 × 10(-4, whilst at Xq27 the strongest association was for rs6525667 (OR = 1.53, P = 1.65 × 10(-4. Further analysis of SNPs at these loci was performed in 5,122 migraineurs from the Women's Genome Health Study and provided additional evidence for association at the novel Xq12 locus (P<0.05.Overall, this study provides evidence for a novel migraine susceptibility locus on Xq12. The strongest effect SNP (rs102834, joint P = 1.63 × 10(-5 is located within the 5'UTR of the HEPH gene, which is involved in iron homeostasis in the brain and may represent a novel pathway for involvement in migraine pathogenesis.

  3. Treatment in chronic migraine: choice of reabilitation strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana STANESCU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Migraine is a disabling neurologic condition with a spontaneous clinical evolution into a chronic form. Migraine progression from an episodic into a chronic form is realized through a period of time involving several months or years, during which an increase attack frequency occurs. .According to the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-3 chronic migraine is a type of primary headache occurring on 15 or more days per month for more than 3 months, in which more than 8 days per month headache meet criteria for migraine with or without aura or respond to specific migraine treatment. The prevalence of chronic migraine is estimated between 1- 3% of general population. Persons with chronic migraine are more likely to suffer from severe disability; chronic migraine has an important socio-economic impact. Diagnostic approach in chronic migraine includes exclusion of a secondary headache disorder and confirmation of a primary episodic headache. When a patient is found to overuse pain medication, diagnosis of both chronic migraine and MOH should be considered. Treating episodic migraine early and managing attack frequency using preventive medication and behavioural interventions will be benefic in reducing the risk of chronicisation. Lifestyle changes are important for avoiding triggers for migraine attacks; treatment of comorbidities is equally important because these conditions exacerbate patient’s tendency to have headaches. The initial relief step for drug abusers always relies in drug withdrawal. For migraine attacks treatment begins with non-pharmacologic interventions (staying in a quiet, dark room, pressure on painful areas, applying cold compresses , simple OTC analgetics (NSAIDs, paracetamol, aspirin, acetaminophen. If these are not effective, triptans are the drugs of choice. Preventive treatment is always recommended in patients with chronic migraine because the high frequency of headache attacks. Treatment should be

  4. Do Personality Traits Mediate the Relationship Between Childhood Abuse and Migraine? An Exploration of the Relationships in Young Adults Using the Add Health Dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Monita; Elhai, Jon D; Amialchuk, Aliaksandr A; Tietjen, Gretchen E

    2018-02-01

    Personality traits (especially neuroticism) and childhood maltreatment have been independently related to many negative health outcomes later in life, including migraine. Studies have also shown the association between childhood maltreatment and maladaptive personality traits. The mediating role of personality traits on the relationship between childhood maltreatment and depression, psychological distress, and alcohol dependence has been extensively studied. However, this type of mediation has not been studied in the case of the development of migraine. This study investigated (1) the main effects of childhood abuse on personality traits, and of personality traits on migraine, and (2) the mediating role of neuroticism, on the relationship between childhood abuse and migraine in young adults. We analyzed retrospective, cross-sectional data from 13,493 adults aged 24-32 years in Wave 4 of the National Longitudinal Survey of Adolescent Health ("Add Health") data set. Participants were queried regarding maltreatment (emotional, physical, and sexual) during childhood, current Big Five personality traits (using mini International Personality Item Pool), current depression (using Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale), perceived stress (Using Cohen's Perceived Stress Scale), and diagnosis of migraine by a health care provider. Linear and logistic regressions were used to assess the main effects of childhood maltreatment on the five personality traits (openness to experience, conscientiousness, extraversion, agreeableness, and neuroticism) and the main effect of the personality traits on self-reported provider diagnosis of migraine. A structural equation model (SEM) was used to examine the mediating role of neuroticism on the relationship between childhood maltreatment and migraine. Linear regression models showed that childhood abuse independently predicted increased neuroticism (β = 0.338, SE=±0.05, P personality traits on migraine revealed that only

  5. Effect of weather on temporal pain patterns in patients with temporomandibular disorders and migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioffi, I; Farella, M; Chiodini, P; Ammendola, L; Capuozzo, R; Klain, C; Vollaro, S; Michelotti, A

    2017-05-01

    Patients with masticatory muscle pain and migraine typically report that the intensity of pain fluctuates over time and is affected by weather changes. Weather variables, such as ambient temperature and humidity, may vary significantly depending on whether the individual is outdoor or indoor. It is, therefore, important to assess these variables at the individual level using portable monitors, during everyday life. This study aimed to determine and compare the temporal patterns of pain in individuals affected with facial and head pain and to investigate its relation with weather changes. Eleven patients (27·3 ± 7·4 years) with chronic masticatory muscle pain (MP) and twenty (33·1 ± 8·7 years) with migraine headache (MH) were asked to report their current pain level on a visual analogue scale (VAS) every hour over fourteen consecutive days. The VAS scores were collected using portable data-loggers, which were also used to record temperature, atmospheric pressure and relative humidity. VAS scores varied markedly over time in both groups. Pain VAS scores fluctuate less in the MP group than in the MH group, but their mean, minimum and maximum values were higher than those of migraine patients (all P < 0·05). Pain scores <2 cm were more common in the MH than in the MP group (P < 0·001). Perceived intensity of pain was negatively associated with atmospheric pressure in the MP group and positively associated with temperature and atmospheric in the MH group. Our results reveal that patients with masticatory muscle pain and patients with migraine present typical temporal pain patterns that are influenced in a different way by weather changes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Sumatriptan (subcutaneous route of administration) for acute migraine attacks in adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derry, Christopher J; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Migraine is a highly disabling condition for the individual and also has wide-reaching implications for society, healthcare services, and the economy. Sumatriptan is an abortive medication for migraine attacks, belonging to the triptan family. Subcutaneous administration may be preferable to oral for individuals experiencing nausea and/or vomiting Objectives To determine the efficacy and tolerability of subcutaneous sumatriptan compared to placebo and other active interventions in the treatment of acute migraine attacks in adults. Search methods We searched Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, online databases, and reference lists for studies through 13 October 2011. Selection criteria We included randomised, double-blind, placebo- and/or active-controlled studies using subcutaneous sumatriptan to treat a migraine headache episode, with at least 10 participants per treatment arm. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We used numbers of participants achieving each outcome to calculate relative risk (or ‘risk ratio’) and numbers needed to treat to benefit (NNT) or harm (NNH) compared to placebo or a different active treatment. Main results Thirty-five studies (9365 participants) compared subcutaneous sumatriptan with placebo or an active comparator. Most of the data were for the 6 mg dose. Sumatriptan surpassed placebo for all efficacy outcomes. For sumatriptan 6 mg versus placebo the NNTs were 2.9, 2.3, 2.2, and 2.1 for pain-free at one and two hours, and headache relief at one and two hours, respectively, and 6.1 for sustained pain-free at 24 hours. Results for the 4 mg and 8 mg doses were similar to the 6 mg dose, with 6 mg significantly better than 4 mg only for pain-free at one hour, and 8 mg significantly better than 6 mg only for headache relief at one hour. There was no evidence of increased migraine relief if a second dose of sumatriptan 6

  7. Individualized Risk Model for Venous Thromboembolism After Total Joint Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvizi, Javad; Huang, Ronald; Rezapoor, Maryam; Bagheri, Behrad; Maltenfort, Mitchell G

    2016-09-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) after total joint arthroplasty (TJA) is a potentially fatal complication. Currently, a standard protocol for postoperative VTE prophylaxis is used that makes little distinction between patients at varying risks of VTE. We sought to develop a simple scoring system identifying patients at higher risk for VTE in whom more potent anticoagulation may need to be administered. Utilizing the National Inpatient Sample data, 1,721,806 patients undergoing TJA were identified, among whom 15,775 (0.9%) developed VTE after index arthroplasty. Among the cohort, all known potential risk factors for VTE were assessed. An initial logistic regression model using potential predictors for VTE was performed. Predictors with little contribution or poor predictive power were pruned from the data, and the model was refit. After pruning of variables that had little to no contribution to VTE risk, using the logistic regression, all independent predictors of VTE after TJA were identified in the data. Relative weights for each factor were determined. Hypercoagulability, metastatic cancer, stroke, sepsis, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease had some of the highest points. Patients with any of these conditions had risk for postoperative VTE that exceeded the 3% rate. Based on the model, an iOS (iPhone operating system) application was developed (VTEstimator) that could be used to assign patients into low or high risk for VTE after TJA. We believe individualization of VTE prophylaxis after TJA can improve the efficacy of preventing VTE while minimizing untoward risks associated with the administration of anticoagulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Bariatric Surgery Promising in Migraine Control: a Controlled Trial on Weight Loss and Its Effect on Migraine Headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razeghi Jahromi, Soodeh; Abolhasani, Maryam; Ghorbani, Zeinab; Sadre-Jahani, Solmaz; Alizadeh, Zahra; Talebpour, Mohammad; Meysamie, Alipasha; Togha, Mansoureh

    2018-01-01

    There is evidence that substantial weight loss through bariatric surgery (BS) may result in short-term improvement of migraine severity. However, it still remains to be seen whether smaller amounts of weight loss have a similar effect on migraine headache. This study has been designed to compare the effects of weight reduction through BS and non-surgical modifications. Migraine characteristics were assessed at 1 month before (T0), 1 month (T1), and 6 months (T2) after BS (vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG) (n = 25) or behavioral therapy (BT) (n = 26) in obese women (aged 18-60 years) with migraine headache. Migraine was diagnosed using the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHDIIβ) criteria. There was significant reduction in the visual analog scale (VAS) from the baseline to T1 and T2 in both groups. The number of migraine-free days showed a significant increase within each group (p migraine characteristics, age, changes in weight, BMI, body fat, and fat-free mass from T0 to T2, the BS group showed statistically significant lower VAS and duration of migraine attacks and a significantly higher number of migraine-free days than the BT group at T1 and T2 (p ≤ 0.028). Our results indicated that far before significant weight reduction after BS (VSG), there was marked alleviation in the severity and duration of migraine and a significant increase in the number of migraine-free days in obese female migraineurs. However, the effects in the BT group were not comparable with the effects in the BS group.

  9. Explorations in combining cognitive models of individuals and system dynamics models of groups.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backus, George A.

    2008-07-01

    This report documents a demonstration model of interacting insurgent leadership, military leadership, government leadership, and societal dynamics under a variety of interventions. The primary focus of the work is the portrayal of a token societal model that responds to leadership activities. The model also includes a linkage between leadership and society that implicitly represents the leadership subordinates as they directly interact with the population. The societal model is meant to demonstrate the efficacy and viability of using System Dynamics (SD) methods to simulate populations and that these can then connect to cognitive models depicting individuals. SD models typically focus on average behavior and thus have limited applicability to describe small groups or individuals. On the other hand, cognitive models readily describe individual behavior but can become cumbersome when used to describe populations. Realistic security situations are invariably a mix of individual and population dynamics. Therefore, the ability to tie SD models to cognitive models provides a critical capability that would be otherwise be unavailable.

  10. No abnormalities of intrinsic brain connectivity in the interictal phase of migraine with aura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Anders; Amin, F M; Magon, S

    2015-01-01

    if cortical dysfunction is present at rest, i.e. in the absence of any external stimuli. Functional magnetic resonance imaging is a powerful technique for evaluating resting state functional connectivity, i.e. coherence of brain activity across cerebral areas. The objective of this study was to investigate...... resting-state functional brain connectivity in migraineurs with aura outside of attacks using functional magnetic resonance imaging. METHODS: Forty patients suffering from migraine with visual aura and 40 individually age and gender matched healthy controls with no history or family history of migraine......, and in a data-driven exploratory fashion (dual regression) in order to reveal any possible between-group differences of resting state networks. Age, gender, attack frequency and disease duration were included as nuisance variables. RESULTS: No differences of functional connectivity were found between patients...

  11. MIGRAINE AND TENSION-TYPE HEADACHE IN CHILDREN: THE APPROACH TO EFFECTIVE TREATMENT. PART 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Sergeev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric neurologists often have to prescribe drugs off-label in children, according to individual approach to every patient and weighing possible benefits and risk of side-effects. Multidisciplinary approach to migraine and tension-type headache treatment in children, including correction of comorbid psychiatric and somatic disorders, is a critical point in decrease of frequency and severity of headaches and normalization of everyday children’s activity. In the second part of the article the authors discuss the problems of symptomatic (episodic drugs taking in order to arrest a headache attack and preventive (regular prolonged drug taking directed on decrease of frequency and severity of headaches medical treatment of migraine and tension-type headaches in pediatric practice.

  12. Distinctive anatomical and physiological features of migraine aura revealed by 18 years of recording

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Møller; Baca, Serapio Michael; Vanvalkenburgh, Paul

    2013-01-01

    insight into basic aura mechanisms. An individual made detailed drawings of his visual percept of migraine aura in real time during more than 1000 attacks of migraine aura without headache over 18 years. Drawings were made in a consistent fashion documenting the shape and location of the aura wavefront...... originated centrally (within 10° eccentricity), but there were also other distinct sites of initiation in the visual field. Auras beginning centrally preferentially propagated first through lower nasal field (69-77% of all auras) before travelling to upper and temporal fields, on both sides. Some auras...... propagated from peripheral to central regions of the visual field-these typically followed the reverse path of those travelling in the opposite direction. The mean velocity of the perceived visual phenomenon did not differ between attacks starting peripherally and centrally. The estimated speed...

  13. Migraine Nurses in Primary Care : Costs and Benefits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Jan S. P.; Steiner, Timothy J.; Veenstra, Petra J. L.; Kollen, Boudewijn J.

    Objective. We examined the costs and benefits of introducing migraine nurses into primary care. Background. Migraine is one of the most costly neurological diseases. Methods. We analyzed data from our earlier nonrandomized cohort study comparing an intervention group of 141 patients, whose care was

  14. Chocolate and migraine: the history of an ambiguous association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Mattiuzzi, Camilla; Cervellin, Gianfranco

    2014-12-17

    Migraine is a highly prevalent condition and an important cause of disability. Although the pathogenesis of this condition is complex and multifaceted, several environmental factors have been associated with development and aggravation of headache attacks. Among the various foods that have been implicated in migraine, chocolate has been regarded as detrimental on the basis of old and mostly anecdotal evidence. Therefore, this article is aimed to provide an overview on the current scientific evidence about the relationship between chocolate and migraine. Taken together, the information gathered from epidemiological and provocative studies attests that the potential causal association between chocolate and migraine remains largely enigmatic. The analysis of epidemiological surveys reveals a highly heterogeneous picture, with frequency of migraine episodes attributable to chocolate ranging from 0 to 22.5%. Even in those studies reporting a more convincing association, the risk of migraine after chocolate ingestion was found to be 2- to 3-fold lower than that reported for exposure to other conventional triggers such as stress, fasting, lack of sleep and alcohol beverages. The results of the double-blind studies are instead unequivocal, and clearly demonstrate that the risk of developing a headache attack after ingestion of chocolate is as likely as administering placebo in patients with migraine. It can hence be concluded that the widespread belief that chocolate and cocoacontaining foods should be absolutely avoided by migraine patients lacks of a reliable scientific basis.

  15. Headaches and Migraines: Headache Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are thought to involve abnormal functioning of the brain's blood vessels. Migraines cause severe pain on one or both ... migraines. Toxic: The second most common type of vascular headache, toxic ... They are brought on by stressful events and involve the tightening or tensing of facial ...

  16. CGRP may play a causative role in migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, L H; Haderslev, P A; Jacobsen, V B

    2002-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) has been detected in increased amounts in external jugular venous blood during migraine attacks. However, it is unknown whether this is secondary to migraine or whether CGRP may cause headache. In a double-blind crossover study, the effect of human alphaCGRP...... attacks may play a causative role....

  17. Societal perspective on the burden of migraine in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Roijen, L.; Essink-Bot, M. L.; Koopmanschap, M. A.; Michel, B. C.; Rutten, F. F.

    1995-01-01

    This study presents a comprehensive overview of the societal burden of migraine in The Netherlands. We assessed the direct and indirect costs of this disease, and the health status of patients with migraine. We developed the 'illness and labour' (I&L) questionnaire to collect data on the effect of

  18. The Effect of Migraine Headache on Educational Attainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Daniel I.; Sabia, Joseph J.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the fact that migraine headaches are common and debilitating, little is known about their effect on educational attainment. Using data drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, we estimate the relationship between migraine headache and three outcomes: high school grade point average, the probability of graduating…

  19. Migraine headaches in a nutshell | Schellack | South African Family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article aims to provide a concise, high-level overview of the classification, management and treatment of migraine. Migraine is a common, debilitating neurological disorder that is characterised by the presence of severe headaches, which may last anything from a few hours to a few days (4–72 hours). Thus, the ...

  20. Diagnosis and Development of Screening Items for Migraine in Neurological Practice in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuu-Jiun Wang

    2008-06-01

    Conclusion: Migraine was the most common headache diagnosis in the neurologists’ clinics. Probable migraine was not completely adopted as a migraine spectrum among neurologists. In contrast to ID™, moderate or severe headache intensity replaced headache-related disability as one screening item for migraine in Taiwan.

  1. Functional Assessment and Treatment of Migraine Reports and School Absences in an Adolescent with Asperger's Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvans, Rebecca K.; LeBlanc, Linda A.

    2009-01-01

    Psychological interventions for migraines typically include biofeedback training, stress-management training, or relaxation training and are implemented without consideration of environmental variables that might maintain migraines or complaints of migraines. An adolescent with daily reports of migraines that negatively impacted school attendance…

  2. Matrix metalloproteinases during and outside of migraine attacks without aura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashina, M.; Tvedskov, J.F.; Thiesen, Kerstin Lipka

    2010-01-01

    Ashina M, Tvedskov JF, Lipka K, Bilello J, Penkowa M & Olesen J. Matrix metalloproteinases during and outside of migraine attacks without aura. Cephalalgia 2009. London. ISSN 0333-1024To test the hypothesis that permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is altered during migraine attack due...... to enhanced activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), we investigated MMP-3, MMP-9 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteases (TIMP)-1 in the external jugular vein during and outside of migraine attacks in 21 patients with migraine without aura. In addition, we measured plasma levels of several other...... of MMP-3 in the external jugular (P = 0.002) and cubital (P = 0.008) vein during attacks compared with outside of attacks. We found no correlation of ictal or interictal MMP-3, MMP-9 and TIMP-1 to migraine duration and frequency analysed in 21 patients (P > 0.05). There was no difference between ictal...

  3. Family studies to find rare high risk variants in migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rikke Dyhr; Christensen, Anne Francke; Olesen, Jes

    2017-01-01

    genetic variants with bigger effect size may be involved in the disease. Since migraine has a tendency to cluster in families, a family approach might be the way to find these variants. This is also indicated by identification of migraine-associated loci in classical linkage-analyses in migraine families....... A single migraine study using a candidate-gene approach was performed in 2010 identifying a rare mutation in the TRESK potassium channel segregating in a large family with migraine with aura, but this finding has later become questioned. The technologies of next-generation sequencing (NGS) now provides...... an affordable tool to investigate the genetic variation in the entire exome or genome. The family-based study design using NGS is described in this paper. We also review family studies using NGS that have been successful in finding rare variants in other common complex diseases in order to argue the promising...

  4. Remission of migraine after clipping of saccular intracranial aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebedeva, E R; Busygina, A V; Kolotvinov, V S

    2015-01-01

    interview. The remission rates of migraine and tension-type headache (TTH) in these patients were compared to 92 patients from a headache center. Diagnoses were made according to the ICHD-2. RESULTS: During 1 year preceding rupture 51 patients with SIA had migraine. During the year after clipping......BACKGROUND: Unruptured saccular intracranial aneurysm (SIA) is associated with an increased prevalence of migraine, but it is unclear whether this is altered by clipping of the aneurysm. The aim of our study was to determine whether remission rate of migraine and other recurrent headaches...... was greater in patients with SIA after clipping than in controls. METHODS: We prospectively studied 87 SIA patients with migraine or other recurrent headaches. They were interviewed about headaches in the preceding year before and 1 year after clipping using a validated semi-structured neurologist conducted...

  5. Is Celiac Disease an Etiological Factor in Children With Migraine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcı, Oya; Yılmaz, Deniz; Sezer, Taner; Hızlı, Şamil

    2016-06-01

    To determine the prevalence of celiac disease in children and adolescents with migraine, the authors investigated serum levels of tissue transglutaminase antibody immunoglobulin A and total immunoglobulin A from 81 children with migraine and in a healthy control group of 176 children. Study participants who were positive for tissue transglutaminase immunoglobulin A antibodies underwent a duodenal biopsy. Two patients in the migraine group (2.5%) and 1 in the control group (0.57%) tested positive for serum tissue transglutaminase immunoglobulin A antibodies (P > .05). Duodenal biopsy did not confirm celiac disease in both groups, and these patients were considered "potential celiac" cases. In the present study, children with migraine did not exhibit a higher prevalence rate of celiac disease compared with healthy controls. Therefore, the screening test for celiac disease is not a necessary part of the management of migraine in children. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. Didactic Migraine Education in US Doctor of Pharmacy Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padiyara, Rosalyn S.; Schommer, Jon C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To compare didactic migraine education in doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) programs in the United States with the Headache Consortium's evidence-based migraine treatment recommendations. Methods A self-administered survey instrument was mailed to all 90 Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) approved PharmD programs in the United States. Results Seventy-seven programs responded (86%) and 69 useable survey instruments were analyzed. Fifty-five percent of programs discussed the Consortium's guidelines, 49% discussed the selection of nonprescription versus prescription agents, 45% recommended a butalbital-containing product as migraine treatment, and 20% educated students about tools for assessing migraine-related debilitation. At least 50% of programs taught information consistent with the remaining Consortium recommendations. Conclusion Approximately half of the PharmD programs teach concepts about migraine headache treatment consistent with the US Headache Consortium's recommendations. PMID:20221355

  7. Migraine with visual aura associated with thicker visual cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaist, David; Hougaard, Anders; Garde, Ellen

    2018-01-01

    Until recent years it was believed that migraine with aura was a disorder causing intermittent neurological symptoms, with no impact on brain structure. However, recent MRI studies have reported increased cortical thickness of visual and somatosensory areas in patients with migraine with aura...... number of subjects. In this cross-sectional study, we recruited females aged 30-60 years from the nationwide Danish Twin Registry. Brain MRI of females with migraine with aura (patients), their co-twins, and unrelated migraine-free twins (controls) were performed at a single centre and assessed...... for cortical thickness in predefined cortical areas (V1, V2, V3A, MT, somatosensory cortex), blinded to headache diagnoses. The difference in cortical thickness between patients and controls adjusted for age, and other potential confounders was assessed. Comparisons of twin pairs discordant for migraine...

  8. Calcitonin gene-related peptide does not cause the familial hemiplegic migraine phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J.M.; Thomsen, L.L.; Olesen, J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a migraine trigger that plays a crucial role in migraine pathophysiology, and CGRP antagonism is efficient in the treatment of migraine attacks. Familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) is a dominantly inherited subtype of migraine w...... without aura. This indicates that the pathophysiologic pathways underlying migraine headache in FHM may be different from the common types of migraine and questions whether CGRP antagonists would be effective in the treatment of FHM patients Udgivelsesdato: 2008/9/9...

  9. Patent foramen ovale and migraine attacks: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lip, Philomena Z Y; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2014-05-01

    Migraine headache and the presence of a patent foramen ovale have been associated with each other, although the precise pathophysiological mechanism(s) are uncertain. The purpose of this systematic review was to identify the extent of patent foramen ovale prevalence in migraineurs and to determine whether closure of a patent foramen ovale would improve migraine headache. An electronic literature search was performed to select studies between January 1980 and February 2013 that were relevant to the prevalence of patent foramen ovale and migraine, and the effects of intervention(s) on migraine attacks. Of the initial 368 articles presented by the initial search, 20 satisfied the inclusion criteria assessing patent foramen ovale prevalence in migraineurs and 21 presented data on patent foramen ovale closure. In case series and cohort studies, patent foramen ovale prevalence in migraineurs ranged from 14.6% to 66.5%. Case-control studies reported a prevalence ranging from 16.0% to 25.7% in controls, compared with 26.8% to 96.0% for migraine with aura. The extent of improvement or resolution of migraine headache attack symptoms was variable. In case series, intervention ameliorated migraine headache attack in 13.6% to 92.3% of cases. One single randomized trial did not show any benefit from patent foramen ovale closure. The data overall do not exclude the possibility of a placebo effect for resolving migraine following patent foramen ovale closure. This systematic review demonstrates firstly that migraine headache attack is associated with a higher prevalence of patent foramen ovale than among the general population. Observational data suggest that some improvement of migraine would be observed if the patent foramen ovale were to be closed. A proper assessment of any interventions for patent foramen ovale closure would require further large randomized trials to be conducted given uncertainties from existing trial data. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Prophylactic treatment of migraine; the patient's view, a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dekker Frans

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prophylactic treatment is an important but under-utilised option for the management of migraine. Patients and physicians appear to have reservations about initiating this treatment option. This paper explores the opinions, motives and expectations of patients regarding prophylactic migraine therapy. Methods A qualitative focus group study in general practice in the Netherlands with twenty patients recruited from urban and rural general practices. Three focus group meetings were held with 6-7 migraine patients per group (2 female and 1 male group. All participants were migraine patients according to the IHS (International Headache Society; 9 had experience with prophylactic medication. The focus group meetings were analysed using a general thematic analysis. Results For patients several distinguished factors count when making a decision on prophylactic treatment. The decision of a patient on prophylactic medication is depending on experience and perspectives, grouped into five categories, namely the context of being active or passive in taking the initiative to start prophylaxis; assessing the advantages and disadvantages of prophylaxis; satisfaction with current migraine treatment; the relationship with the physician and the feeling to be heard; and previous steps taken to prevent migraine. Conclusion In addition to the functional impact of migraine, the decision to start prophylaxis is based on a complex of considerations from the patient's perspective (e.g. perceived burden of migraine, expected benefits or disadvantages, interaction with relatives, colleagues and physician. Therefore, when advising migraine patients about prophylaxis, their opinions should be taken into account. Patients need to be open to advice and information and intervention have to be offered at an appropriate moment in the course of migraine.

  11. The Frequency of Factor V Leiden, Prothrombin G20210A and Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase C677T Mutations in Migraine Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruhsen Öcal

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Migraine is an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke, but its pathophysiology is still unclear. Genetic factors that predispose patients to thrombosis have been studied in patients with migraine to highlight the pathogenesis, but the results remain controversial. In this study, the frequencies of factor V Leiden (FVL, prothrombin (Pt G20210A and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T mutations were investigated. METHODS: One hundred and sixty patients aged of 15 to 55 years with no history of systemic disease and who had been diagnosed as migraine according to the International Headache Society (IHS diagnostic criteria at Baskent University Hospital Neurology Outpatient Clinics were investigated for FVL, Pt G20210A and MTHFR C677T mutations from their genomic DNA, and the results were compared with those of healthy controls. RESULTS: One hundred and fifty five (96.9% of 160 migraine patients were homozygote normal, 5 (3.1% were heterozygote and none of them were homozygote mutant for FVL. The control group had 9.8% heterozygote individuals but the difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p> 0.05. There were no homozygote mutant individuals in the Turkish population study in normal subjects like our study. Thirty nine (24.4% of 160 migraine patients were heterozygote and 8 (5% were homozygote mutant for MTHFR C677T. The control group had 37 (34.9% heterozygote and 6 (5.6% homozygote mutant individuals. The difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p= 0.15. Three (1.9% of 160 migraine patients were heterozygote and 5 (2.9% of the control group were heterozygote mutant for Pt G20210A mutation. The control group had 37 (34.9% heterozygote and 6 (5.6% homozygote mutant individuals. The difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p= 0.420. CONCLUSION: Our study indicates that FVL, Pt G20210A and MTHFR C677T gene mutations, which are considered

  12. The Frequency of Factor V Leiden, Prothrombin G20210A and Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase C677T Mutations in Migraine Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruhsen Öcal

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Migraine is an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke, but its pathophysiology is still unclear. Genetic factors that predispose patients to thrombosis have been studied in patients with migraine to highlight the pathogenesis, but the results remain controversial. In this study, the frequencies of factor V Leiden (FVL, prothrombin (Pt G20210A and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T mutations were investigated. METHODS: One hundred and sixty patients aged of 15 to 55 years with no history of systemic disease and who had been diagnosed as migraine according to the International Headache Society (IHS diagnostic criteria at Baskent University Hospital Neurology Outpatient Clinics were investigated for FVL, Pt G20210A and MTHFR C677T mutations from their genomic DNA, and the results were compared with those of healthy controls. RESULTS: One hundred and fifty five (96.9% of 160 migraine patients were homozygote normal, 5 (3.1% were heterozygote and none of them were homozygote mutant for FVL. The control group had 9.8% heterozygote individuals but the difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p> 0.05. There were no homozygote mutant individuals in the Turkish population study in normal subjects like our study. Thirty nine (24.4% of 160 migraine patients were heterozygote and 8 (5% were homozygote mutant for MTHFR C677T. The control group had 37 (34.9% heterozygote and 6 (5.6% homozygote mutant individuals. The difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p= 0.15. Three (1.9% of 160 migraine patients were heterozygote and 5 (2.9% of the control group were heterozygote mutant for Pt G20210A mutation. The control group had 37 (34.9% heterozygote and 6 (5.6% homozygote mutant individuals. The difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p= 0.420. CONCLUSION: Our study indicates that FVL, Pt G20210A and MTHFR C677T gene mutations, which are considered

  13. Beta-endorphin and ACTH in plasma during attacks of common and classic migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, F W; Jensen, K; Blegvad, N

    1985-01-01

    Plasma levels of beta-endorphin and ACTH were measured during and outside migraine attacks in 17 patients with common migraine and 11 patients with classic migraine. Specific radioimmunoassays for beta-endorphin and ACTH were used. The beta-endorphin assay did not cross-react with beta-lipotropin...... migraine. Accordingly, we could not add evidence to the theory of a dysfunction of the endogenous opioid system in migraine....

  14. Tetra-ataxiometric Posturography in Patients with Migrainous Vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongun, Nedim; Atalay, Nilgun S; Degirmenci, Eylem; Sahin, Fusun; Bir, Levent Sinan

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is a common disorder characterized by headache attacks frequently accompanied by vestibular symptoms like dizziness, vertigo, and balance disorders. Clinical studies support a strong link between migraine and vertigo rather than between other headache types and vertigo or nonvertiginous dizziness. There is a lack of consensus regarding the pathophysiology of migrainous vertigo. Activation of central vestibular processing during migraine attacks and vasospasm-induced ischemia of the labyrinth are reported as the probable responsible mechanisms. Because vestibular examination alone does not provide enough information for diagnosis of migrainous vertigo, posturography systems which provide objective assessment of somatosensory, vestibular, and visual information would be very helpful to show concomitant involvement of the vestibular and somato-sensorial systems. There are few posturographic studies on patients with migraine but it seems that how balance is affected in patients with migraine and/or migrainous vertigo is still not clear. We want to investigate balance function in migraineurs with and without vertigo with a tetra-ataxiometric posturography system and our study is the first study in which tetra-ataxiometric static posturography was used to evaluate postural abnormalities in a well-defined population of patients with migrainous vertigo. To investigate balance functions in migraineurs with and without vertigo with a tetra-ataxiometric posturography system. Prospective, nonrandomized, controlled study. Pamukkale University Hospital, Neurology and Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation outpatient clinics. Sixteen patients with migrainous vertigo, 16 patients with migraine without aura and no vestibular symptoms, and 16 controls were included in the study. Computerized static posturography system was performed and statistical analyses of fall, Fourier, Stability, and Weight distribution indexes were performed. The tetra-ataxiometric posturography device

  15. Considerations in representing human individuals in social ecological models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredo, Michael J.; Teel, Tara L.; Gavin, Michael C.; Fulton, David C.

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter we focus on how to integrate the human individual into social-ecological systems analysis, and how to improve research on individual thought and action regarding the environment by locating it within the broader social-ecological context. We discuss three key questions as considerations for future research: (1) is human thought conceptualized as a dynamic and adaptive process, (2) is the individual placed in a multi-level context (including within-person levels, person-group interactions, and institutional and structural factors), and (3) is human thought seen as mutually constructed with the social and natural environment. Increased emphasis on the individual will be essential if we are to understand agency, innovation, and adaptation in social-ecological systems.

  16. A model of individual differences in learning air traffic control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taatgen, NA; Altmann, EM; Cleeremans, A; Schunn, CD; Gray, WD

    2001-01-01

    Individual differences in skill acquisition are influenced by several architectural factors. According to Ackerman's theory, general intelligence, speed of proceduralization and psychomotor speed influence different stages of skill acquisition. Ackerman tested this theory by correlating performance

  17. Update on the prophylaxis of migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schürks, Markus; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Goadsby, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Migraine prophylaxis is a stepwise procedure with lifestyle advice followed by consideration of medications. Patients should be advised to try to maintain a regular lifestyle, with regular sleep, meals, exercise, and management of stress, perhaps through relaxation techniques or other ways that are sensible for them. If this regimen does not adequately control their migraines, preventatives are indicated. Patients can choose between evidence-based nutraceuticals such as riboflavin, feverfew, butterbur, or coenzyme Q10, or more traditional pharmacotherapeutics. Medicine choices are somewhat limited by what is available in each country, but from the full range, the medicines of first choice are beta-adrenoceptor blockers, flunarizine, topiramate, and valproic acid. Beta-adrenoceptor blockers are particularly useful in patients also suffering from hypertension or tachycardia. Following recent studies, topiramate has become a first choice for episodic as well as chronic migraine. It is the only prophylactic drug that may lead to weight loss, but it is sometimes associated with adverse cognitive effects. Valproic acid and flunarizine also have very good prophylactic properties. However, valproic acid is often associated with adverse effects, and flunarizine is unavailable in many countries, including the United States. If sequential monotherapies are ineffective, combinations of first-line drugs should be tried before advancing to drugs of second choice, which are associated with more adverse effects or have less well-established prophylactic properties. Amitriptyline should be used carefully because of its anticholinergic effects, although it is useful in comorbid tension-type headache, depression, and sleep disorders. Methysergide is very effective, but it has been supplanted or even made unavailable in many countries because of its well-described association with retroperitoneal fibrosis. Pizotifen has a slightly better safety profile but is unavailable in the United

  18. THE WORLD-MODELLING POTENCY OF THE INDIVIDUAL METAPHOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlova, M.S.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes individual metaphors as a fundamental component of the artistic worldview. The research discusses the correlation between the individual metaphor and interdiscourse markedness that allows identifying some peculiarities of cultural identity of the English-language literary text. The central place belongs to the propositions connected with the ways of reality conceptualization in the minds of the English-speaking mentality, which are necessary for correct interpretation of the cultural-specific information.

  19. 42 CFR Appendix to Part 54a - Model Notice of Individuals Receiving Substance Abuse Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Model Notice of Individuals Receiving Substance... ORGANIZATIONS RECEIVING DISCRETIONARY FUNDING UNDER TITLE V OF THE PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE ACT, 42 U.S.C. 290aa...—Model Notice of Individuals Receiving Substance Abuse Services Model Notice to Individuals Receiving...

  20. Relapsing Painful Ophthalmoplegic Neuropathy: No longer a "Migraine," but Still a Headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stacy V; Schuster, Nathaniel M

    2018-06-14

    Recurrent painful ophthalmoplegic neuropathy (RPON), formerly known as ophthalmoplegic migraine, is an uncommon disorder with repeated episodes of ocular cranial nerve neuropathy associated with ipsilateral headache. This review discusses the clinical presentation, current understanding of the pathophysiology, key differential diagnoses, and evaluation and treatment of RPON. The literature is limited due to the rarity of the disorder. Recent case reports and series continue to suggest the age of first attack is most often during childhood or adolescence as well as a female predominance. Multiple recent case reports and series demonstrate focal enhancement of the affected cranial nerve, as the nerve root exits the brainstem. This finding contributed to the current classification of the disorder as a neuropathy, with the present understanding that it is due to a relapsing-remitting inflammatory or demyelinating process. The link to migraine remains a cause of disagreement in the literature. RPON is a complex disorder with features of inflammatory neuropathy and an unclear association with migraine. Regardless, the overall prognosis is good for individual episodes, but permanent nerve damage may accumulate with repeated attacks. A better understanding of the pathogenesis is needed to clarify whether it truly represents a single disorder and to guide its treatment. Until that time, a combined approach with acute and preventive therapies can mitigate acute symptoms as well as attempt to limit recurrence of this disabling syndrome.

  1. A novel ATP1A2 gene mutation in an Irish familial hemiplegic migraine kindred.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fernandez, Desiree M

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVE: We studied a large Irish Caucasian pedigree with familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) with the aim of finding the causative gene mutation. BACKGROUND: FHM is a rare autosomal-dominant subtype of migraine with aura, which is linked to 4 loci on chromosomes 19p13, 1q23, 2q24, and 1q31. The mutations responsible for hemiplegic migraine have been described in the CACNA1A gene (chromosome 19p13), ATP1A2 gene (chromosome 1q23), and SCN1A gene (chromosome 2q24). METHODS: We performed linkage analyses in this family for chromosome 1q23 and performed mutation analysis of the ATP1A2 gene. RESULTS: Linkage to the FHM2 locus on chromosome 1 was demonstrated. Mutation screening of the ATP1A2 gene revealed a G to C substitution in exon 22 resulting in a novel protein variant, D999H, which co-segregates with FHM within this pedigree and is absent in 50 unaffected individuals. This residue is also highly conserved across species. CONCLUSIONS: We propose that D999H is a novel FHM ATP1A2 mutation.

  2. Prevalence of migraine in the Canadian household population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramage-Morin, Pamela L; Gilmour, Heather

    2014-06-01

    Based on data from the 2010 and 2011 Canadian Community Health Surveys and the 2011 Survey of Living with Neurological Conditions in Canada, this article provides information about migraine among people living in private households. In 2010/2011, an estimated 8.3% of Canadians (2.7 million) reported that they had been diagnosed with migraine by a health professional. Females were more likely than males to report migraine: 11.8% versus 4.7%. Migraine prevalence was highest among people in their 30s and 40s: 17.0% for women and 6.5% for men. Compared with the national figure, the prevalence of migraine was lower in Quebec (6.8%) and higher in Manitoba (9.5%), Nova Scotia (9.1%) and Ontario (8.8%). Among people who reported a migraine diagnosis, 42% took prescription medication for their condition, and 56% incurred medication-related out-of-pocket expenses. Migraine was highly comorbid with depression and affected many aspects of daily life including education, work, sleep, and driving.

  3. Modeling structural, dyadic, and individual factors: the inclusion and exclusion model of HIV related behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarracin, Dolores; Tannenbaum, Melanie B; Glasman, Laura R; Rothman, Alexander J

    2010-12-01

    Changing HIV-related behaviors requires addressing the individual, dyadic, and structural influences that shape them. This supplement of AIDS & Behavior presents frameworks that integrate these three influences on behavior. Concepts from these frameworks were selected to model the processes by which structural factors affect individual HIV-related behavior. In the Inclusion/Exclusion Model, material and symbolic inclusions and exclusions (sharing versus denying resources) regulate individuals' ability and motivation to detect, prevent, and treat HIV. Structural interventions create inclusions that increase one's ability or motivation to perform these behaviors or exclusions that hinder one's ability or motivation to execute counterproductive behaviors. The need to expand research regarding multilevel influences on HIV-related behavior is also discussed, particularly concerning further understanding of sustained behavior change and effective dissemination of evidence-based intervention strategies.

  4. Headache Characteristics and Clinical Features of Elderly Migraine Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rijk, Pablo; Resseguier, Noémie; Donnet, Anne

    2018-04-01

    To investigate the headache characteristics and clinical features of elderly migraine patients at a tertiary headache center. We retrospectively reviewed 239 records of migraine patients, over the age of 64 at the first visit, who had migraine as defined by the International Classification of Headache Disorders 3rd edition (beta version) from 2006 to 2015 based on the Marseille registry at Timone Hospital. 13.8% (33/239) patients had migraine with aura only, 13.0% (31/239) had both diagnoses. Of the patients who presented with migraine with aura, 13.4% (32/239) presented with aura without headache. Unilateral pain location was reported by 58.6% (140/239) of patients and the throbbing type of pain was present in 50.2% (120/239) of our study group. Photo- and phonophobia were observed in 77.4% (185/239) and 79.5% (190/239) of patients. Seventy-nine out of 239 (30.1%) patients were found to have probable medication overuse. Within this group, 31.65% (25/79) overused triptan and 70.9% (56/79) overused combination analgesics. We found higher frequencies of migraine for patients whose age at onset of migraine was younger than 18 years, and low frequency migraine was reported more frequently in the later onset group (P = .0357). We assess the headache characteristics of elderly migraine patients who were seen at our tertiary headache center and report the high frequency of probable medication overuse headache in this study group. Finally, we suggest that age of onset is an important factor in the clinical profile of these patients. © 2017 American Headache Society.

  5. The relationship between migraine headache and asthma features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirican, Nigar; Demirci, Seden; Cakir, Munire

    2017-06-01

    Migraine and asthma are comorbid chronic disorders with episodic attacks thought to involve inflammatory and neurological mechanisms. The objective of the present study is to investigate the relationship of asthma features between the asthma patients with migraine and those without migraine headache. A cross-sectional study was conducted from October 2015 to June 2016. Physician-diagnosed asthma patients aged 18 years and above were included. Demographic data, pulmonary function test and treatment of asthma were recorded. Asthma control was assessed using the asthma control test (ACT) and asthma control questionnaire (ACQ). The diagnosis of migraine was made by the neurologist with face-to face examinations based on the International Classification of Headache Disorders, third edition beta (ICHD-III-beta) criteria. Data about the age at onset, frequency of headache attacks, duration of headache attack, the presence of aura, and severity of headache were recorded. The severity of headache was evaluated using visual analogue scale (VAS). Overall 121 asthma patients were included in this study. Migraine was found to be present in 32 (26.4%) of patients. No statistically significant difference was found between asthma group and asthma with migraine groups in terms of pulmonary function test parameters. The mean ACT score in asthma with migraine patients group was significantly lower than the asthma groups. Morever, in the group asthma with migraine, a negative significant correlations were found between ACT scores with VAS scores. This study demonstrates that migraine headache may be associated with poor asthma control. On the other hand, it should not be forgotten that ACT is a subjective test and can be affected from by many clinical parameters.

  6. Prophylaxis of migraine headaches with riboflavin: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D F; Saluja, H S

    2017-08-01

    Migraine headache is a relatively common, debilitating condition that costs our healthcare system over 78 billion dollars per year. Riboflavin has been advocated as a safe, effective prophylactic therapy for the prevention of migraines. The purpose of this study was to provide a systematic review of the current role of riboflavin in the prophylaxis of migraine headache. A MEDLINE literature search inclusive of the dates 1966-2016 was performed using the search terms: riboflavin and migraine disorders. Excerpta Medica was searched from 1980 to 2016 using the search terms: riboflavin and migraine. Additionally, Web of Science was searched using the terms riboflavin and migraine inclusive of 1945-2016. Bibliographies of all relevant papers were reviewed for additional citations. We utilized the PRISMA guidelines to select English language, human, clinical trials of riboflavin as a single entity or in combination, review articles, and supporting pharmacokinetic and pharmacogenomic data assessing the efficacy and mechanism of riboflavin therapy in the prophylactic treatment of migraine headache. A total of 11 clinical trials reveal a mixed effect of riboflavin in the prophylaxis of migraine headache. Five clinical trials show a consistent positive therapeutic effect in adults; four clinical trials show a mixed effect in paediatric and adolescent patients, and two clinical trials of combination therapy have not shown benefit. Adverse reactions with riboflavin have generally been mild. Riboflavin is well tolerated, inexpensive and has demonstrated efficacy in the reduction of adult patient's migraine headache frequency. Additional data are needed, however, to resolve questions involving pharmacokinetic issues and pharmacogenomic implications of therapy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. The borderland of migraine and epilepsy in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapakse, Thilinie; Buchhalter, Jeffrey

    2016-06-01

    To provide a review on the spectrum of migraine-epilepsy disorders in children. The migraine-epilepsy continuum covers a fascinating array of disorders that share many clinical similarities but also differ fundamentally in pathophysiology. In the pediatric population, its study can be complicated by the young age of those affected and the lack of clear understanding of the neurobiology of these disorders within the developing brain. This review serves to discuss the borderland of migraine and epilepsy in children. It will focus on epidemiology and comorbidity of the two disorders, possible mechanisms for shared pathophysiology informed by basic and translational science, and an overview of clinical similarities and differences. It will also discuss differentiation of migraine aura from childhood occipital epilepsies. Finally, the review concludes with a discussion of current classification methods for capturing cases on the migraine-epilepsy spectrum and a call for a united approach towards a better definition of this spectrum of disorders. Recent advances examining the migraine-epilepsy spectrum show clinicopathological similarities between the two disorders in children. Epidemiology demonstrates reciprocally increased incidences of epilepsy in migraineurs and of migraines in children with epilepsy, however, prospective longitudinal in children are currently lacking. Clinically, the two disorders show similarity in preictal, ictal, and postictal phenomena, with close temporal association of the two conditions described by the controversial term of "migralepsy." Basic science research has contributed significant improvements in understanding the generation of both of these episodic neurological conditions, with common links seen at a cellular level involving synaptic glutamate release and the provocation of varying propagation methods including cortical spreading depression in migraine and the paroxysmal depolarizing shift in epilepsy. Despite these significant

  8. Cognitive, Personality, and Family Factors in Patients with Migraine Headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Johari-Fard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Migraine is a disorder that has debilitating pain, and affects all aspects of life, including the academic, social, and family life of patients. In addition, studies show the effects of migraine on patient's relationships with family members such as spouse, children, and other family members. In addition to physical pain, migraines are tied to significant psychological and economic costs. Migraineurs tend to have high levels of depression and anxiety, and migraine headaches have a profoundly negative impact on sufferers’ quality of life. In the present research, we investigated the correlations and regressions of cognitive, personality, and family factors with migraine headache, to find predictor factors of migraine. In this study, the following questionnaires were used: For migraine: six-item Headache Impact Test (HIT-6, and Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire Version 2.1.; for cognitive factors: Irrational Beliefs Test and Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale; for personality factors: NEO Personality Inventory; and for family factors: Family Assessment Device. This project was on 58 women with migraine headaches, diagnosed by neurologist. The findings show that, there is a significant regression between cognitive, personality, and family factors and HIT-6. In cognitive factors, frustration reactivity and anxious overconcern, in personality factors, extraversion trait, and in family factors, affective involvement are significant. Moreover, there is a significant regression between cognitive, personality, and family factors and MSQ. In cognitive factors, frustration reactivity, anxious overconcern, and helplessness, in personality factors, agreeableness and consciousness, and in family factors, affective involvement and general functioning are significant. This project showed that cognitive, personality, and family factors have a correlation with migraine headache.

  9. Hybrid Modelling of Individual Movement and Collective Behaviour

    KAUST Repository

    Franz, Benjamin; Erban, Radek

    2013-01-01

    Mathematical models of dispersal in biological systems are often written in terms of partial differential equations (PDEs) which describe the time evolution of population-level variables (concentrations, densities). A more detailed modelling

  10. Origin of pain in migraine: evidence for peripheral sensitisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jes; Burstein, Rami; Ashina, Messoud

    2009-01-01

    , in our view, neuronal hyperexcitability depends on activation of peripheral nociceptors. Although the onset of a migraine attack might take place in deep-brain structures, some evidence indicates that the headache phase depends on nociceptive input from perivascular sensory nerve terminals. The input......Migraine is the most common neurological disorder, and much has been learned about its mechanisms in recent years. However, the origin of painful impulses in the trigeminal nerve is still uncertain. Despite the attention paid recently to the role of central sensitisation in migraine pathophysiology...

  11. Pediatric hemiplegic migraine: susceptibility weighted and MR perfusion imaging abnormality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altinok, Deniz; Agarwal, Ajay; Ascadi, Gyula; Luat, Aimee; Tapos, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    We report on an 11-year-old girl suffering from a typical attack of hemiplegic migraine with characteristic abnormalities in perfusion MR and susceptibility-weighted MR imaging findings. The imaging abnormalities were resolved 48 h after the attack. Susceptibility-weighted MR imaging findings correlated well with the MR perfusion, thus it can be used along with conventional MRI for evaluation of children with complex migraine attacks. Susceptibility-weighted MR imaging might have a diagnostic role in assessing the vascular events in hemiplegic migraine. (orig.)

  12. The metaphysical art of Giorgio de Chirico. Migraine or epilepsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanke, Olaf; Landis, Theodor

    2003-01-01

    It has been suggested that the great Italian painter Giorgio de Chirico (1888-1978), who developed the unique style of 'metaphysical art', suffered from migraine and used some of his morbid manifestations as a source of inspiration for his paintings. Yet, whereas many of the symptoms that de Chirico described are rare in migraine, they are frequently encountered in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Here we rediscuss de Chirico's symptoms critically and suggest that, if his symptoms were of neurological origin, they rather relate to temporal lobe epilepsy than migraine. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  13. Pediatric hemiplegic migraine: susceptibility weighted and MR perfusion imaging abnormality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altinok, Deniz; Agarwal, Ajay [Children' s Hospital of Michigan, Department of Radiology, Detroit, MI (United States); Ascadi, Gyula; Luat, Aimee; Tapos, Daniela [Children' s Hospital of Michigan, Department of Neurology, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2010-12-15

    We report on an 11-year-old girl suffering from a typical attack of hemiplegic migraine with characteristic abnormalities in perfusion MR and susceptibility-weighted MR imaging findings. The imaging abnormalities were resolved 48 h after the attack. Susceptibility-weighted MR imaging findings correlated well with the MR perfusion, thus it can be used along with conventional MRI for evaluation of children with complex migraine attacks. Susceptibility-weighted MR imaging might have a diagnostic role in assessing the vascular events in hemiplegic migraine. (orig.)

  14. Circadian and seasonal variation of migraine attacks in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriani, Stefano; Fiumana, Elisa; Manfredini, Roberto; Boari, Benedetta; Battistella, Pier Antonio; Canetta, Elisabetta; Pedretti, Stefania; Borgna-Pignatti, Caterina

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the rhythmicity of migraine episodes without aura in a pediatric population. Time of occurrence of 2517 migraine attacks in 115 children was recorded, by means of a diary, both by hourly and monthly intervals. A significant circadian variation, characterized by a peak in the afternoon (P < .001) and one in the early morning (P= .002) was found. A seasonal peak was also observed between November and January, while a nadir was observed in July. The clustering of attacks in the morning and midday and in autumn-winter, with a minimum frequency in July, suggests that school activities may represent an important cause of migraine.

  15. A Job Retention Model for Individuals with Mental Retardation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornes, Sandra

    2006-01-01

    This structured literature review examines the literature and addresses issues of job retention for adult workers with moderate to mild mental retardation (MR), investigating the relationships between work-related social behaviors, self-determination, person-job congruency of individuals with MR, and their job performance and job satisfaction with…

  16. My IEP: A Student-Directed Individualized Education Program Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Students with disabilities need to be more involved in planning and presenting individualized education program (IEP) meetings, and teachers need an effective, efficient curriculum to teach students how. "My IEP" curriculum uses folding graphic organizers to teach students to self-direct IEP meetings, targeting self-advocacy and…

  17. Therapeutic Enactment: Integrating Individual and Group Counseling Models for Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westwood, Marvin J.; Keats, Patrice A.; Wilensky, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce the reader to a group-based therapy model known as therapeutic enactment. A description of this multimodal change model is provided by outlining the relevant background information, key concepts related to specific change processes, and the differences in this model compared to earlier psychodrama…

  18. Building aggregate timber supply models from individual harvest choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksym Polyakov; David N. Wear; Robert Huggett

    2009-01-01

    Timber supply has traditionally been modelled using aggregate data. In this paper, we build aggregate supply models for four roundwood products for the US state of North Carolina from a stand-level harvest choice model applied to detailed forest inventory. The simulated elasticities of pulpwood supply are much lower than reported by previous studies. Cross price...

  19. The enhancement mechanism of wine-processed Radix Scutellaria on NTG-induced migraine rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Cheng-Long; He, Xin; Dong, Cui-Lan; Song, Zi-Jing; Ji, Jun; Wang, Xue; Wang, Ling; Wang, Jiao-Ying; Du, Wen-Juan; Wang, Chong-Zhi; Yuan, Chun-Su; Guo, Chang-Run; Zhang, Chun-Feng

    2017-07-01

    To elucidate the increasing dissolution and enhancement mechanism of wine-processed Radix Scutellaria (RS) by fractal theory in nitroglycerin (NTG)-induced migraine rats. We prepared three RS from the process with 10% (S1), 15% (S2), 20% (S3) (v/m) rice wine. Mercury intrusion porosimetry and scanning electron microscope were employed to explore the internal structure of RS and the components dissolution of RS was analyzed by HPLC. Rats were randomly allocated into following groups and orally given different solutions for 10days: normal group (NOR, normal saline), model group (MOD, normal saline), Tianshu capsule group (TSC, 0.425mg/kg), ibuprofen group (IBU, 0.0821mg/kg), crude RS group (CRU, 1.04mg/kg) and wine-processed RS group (WP, 1.04mg/kg) followed by bolus subcutaneously injection of NTG (10mg/kg) to induce migraine model except NOR. Biochemical indexes (nitric oxide-NO, calcitonin-gene-related peptide-CGRP, and endothelin-ET) and c-fos positive cells were measured with commercial kits and immunohistochemical method, separately. Total surface area significantly increased in wine-processed RS (pWine-processed RS could be a promising candidate medicine for migraine treatment due to its increased component dissolution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Hypersomnia in children affected by migraine without aura: a questionnaire-based case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esposito M

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Maria Esposito,1 Michele Roccella,2 Lucia Parisi,2 Beatrice Gallai,3 Marco Carotenuto11Center for Childhood Headache, Unit of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, Department of Mental Health, Physical, and Preventive Medicine, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy; 2Child Neuropsychiatry, Department of Psychology, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy; 3Unit of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, University of Perugia, Perugia, ItalyBackground: The relationship between sleep and headache is meaningful and complex. Children affected by migraines tend to show many sleep disorders, such as insufficient sleep duration and excessive daytime somnolence. Therefore, the aim of this study is to assess the rate of reported sleep habits and self-reported sleepiness in a large pediatric sample of individuals affected by migraine without aura (MoA.Methods: The study population consisted of 271 children aged between 6 and 13 years affected by MoA. The control group was composed of 305 typically developing children. To assess the sleep habits of all individuals (MoA and control, parents filled out the Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children, and to check the degree of subjective perceived daytime sleepiness, all subjects were administered the Pediatric Daytime Sleepiness Scale.Results: The two study groups were matched for age (P = 0.124, sex distribution (P = 0.775, and body mass index z-score (P = 0.107. Parents of children affected by MoA reported a higher total score of sleep disorder symptoms (P < 0.001, disorders of initiating and maintaining (P < 0.001, and disorders of arousal (P < 0.001 than did parents of controls. No significant differences were found in disorders of excessive somnolence. Conversely, in the Pediatric Daytime Sleepiness Scale, migraine children had higher scores (24.67 ± 3.19 vs 11.94 ± 4.81; P < 0.001 and a reduction in referred total sleep time mean duration (469.83 ± 98.112 vs 527.94 ± 83.02; P < 0.001 than typically