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Sample records for modeling gypsum plaster

  1. Submicrometric Picture of Plaster Hydration: Optimization of the Addition of Gypsum Needles

    OpenAIRE

    Morgado , G.; Collet , M.; Lespiat , Rémi; Rétot , Hélène; Lemarchand , Annie

    2017-01-01

    International audience; Dissolution of plaster grains and precipitation of gypsum needles are described on a mesoscopic scale in view of the optimization of reaction kinetics when gypsum needles are used as additives. We update a kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm and introduce efficient geometrical tests to check the contacts between monocrystals. The simulations successfully reproduce the acceleration of the reaction in the presence of added gypsum needles. We develop an analytical model which n...

  2. PPF-reinforced, ESP-lightened gypsum plaster

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    García Santos, A.

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available A new construction material has been obtained by adding aggregate to gypsum plaster which, without reducing the bending strength of plain gypsum plaster without aggregates, lowers its density, and consequently the weight of the construction elements made from the agglomerated material, by half.The aggregates used were expanded polystyrene beads and short polypropylene fibre.The new material addresses one of the issues of cardinal interest in construction materials and construction element research, namely the need to lighten materials so as to ease the burden on buildings’ bearing structures while facilitating assembly of construction units, by a single worker wherever possible.With a water / binder ratio of 0.7 and 2% (by weight of plaster of expanded polystyrene and 2% of polypropylene fibre aggregates, the decline in density achieved was 50,88% over plain gypsum plaster and 32.88% over plasterboard.Se ha obtenido un nuevo material de construcción aditivando el yeso o la escayola, mediante la incorporación de agregados, de modo que sin reducir la resistencia a flexotracción de una escayola sin ningún tipo de adición, reduce su densidad a la mitad, y por tanto, el peso de los elementos constructivos que puedan realizarse basándose en él.El material está compuesto por una adición de gránulos de poliestireno expandido y fibras cortadas de polipropileno.El nuevo material incide sobre aquellos aspectos de más interés en el campo de la investigación en construcción, en donde se intenta reducir el peso de los materiales, de modo que se grave lo menos posible la estructura resistente de las edificaciones, a la par que se facilitan los procedimientos de montaje de las unidades constructivas, al poder ser manejadas por un solo operario.La escayola, con relación de agua/conglomerante de 0,7, y con adiciones del 2% en peso (sobre la cantidad de escayola, tanto de poliestireno expandido como de fibras de polipropileno, permite reducir la

  3. Estimates of the radiation dose from phospho-gypsum plaster-board if used in domestic buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, R.S.; Peggie, J.R.; Leith, I.S.

    1991-02-01

    This report presents the results of a study carried out to estimate the annual effective dose equivalent contribution from phospho-gypsum plaster-board if it were used as an internal lining in buildings. The study considered four sources of radiation exposure that would arise in such use, such as inhalation of 222 Rn and its daughters, inhalation of phospho-gypsum dust and exposure to beta and gamma radiation. Measurements of the 22 6Ra content and 222 Rn exhalation rate were made for a number of samples of phospho-gypsum plaster-board, and the behaviour of 222 Rn and its daughters in a typical building was modelled. The results of the study suggest that, for building ventilation rates greater than approximately 0.5 air changes per hour, the contribution to the total annual effective dose equivalent from inhalation of radon ( 222 Rn) and its daughters ( 218 Po, 214 Pb, 214 Po) exhaled from the phospho-gypsum plaster-board should be well below the recommended limit of 1 milli-Sievert for members of the public. The total annual effective dose equivalent from all these sources should be less than 0.6 milli-Sieverts, provided reasonable work practices are observed during installation of the phospho-gypsum plaster-board and the ventilation rate is kept above approximately 0.5 air changes per hour. 31 refs., 12 tabs., 5 figs

  4. Estimates of inhalation doses resulting from the possible use of phospho-gypsum plaster-board in Australian homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, R S; Peggie, J R; Leith, I S

    1995-04-01

    Current materials used as internal lining in Australian buildings are based on natural gypsum of low radium content. A study was carried out to estimate the contribution to the annual effective dose due to airborne contamination from chemical by-product gypsum plaster-board of higher radium content if it were used as an internal lining. The 226Ra content and 222Rn exhalation rate were measured for several samples of the plaster-board, and the behavior of 222Rn and its progeny (218Po, 214Pb, 214Bi, and 214Po) in a typical building was modeled numerically, using the results of the exhalation rate measurements as input. For building ventilation rates greater than approximately 0.5 air changes per hour, the contribution to the total annual effective dose from inhalation of 222Rn and its progeny exhaled from the phospho-gypsum plaster-board is estimated to be below 1 mSv. This contribution is reduced if the surface of the plaster-board is coated with paint or cardboard, or if the very fine particles are removed from the phospho-gypsum during manufacture of the plaster-board. The effective doses arising from dust generation during the installation of the plaster-board are also estimated to be below 1 mSv. The recommended action level of 200 Bq m-3 for radon in air in Australia corresponds to an annual effective dose of approximately 6 mSv. The study indicates that the suggested acceptable level of 185 Bq kg-1 for the 226Ra concentration in the plaster-board may be too restrictive under Australian conditions.

  5. Populations of some molds in water-damaged homes may differ if the home was constructed with gypsum drywall compared to plaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starting in the 1940s, gypsum drywall began replacing plaster and lathe in the U.S. home construction industry. Our goal was to evaluate whether some mold populations differ in water- damaged homes primarily constructed with gypsum drywall compared to plaster. The dust samples fr...

  6. Suitability of Gypsum for the Production of Gypsum Plaster an Example from the Abu-Ruweis Evaporites (Upper Triassic), as Subayhi Area, Northwest Jordan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saqqa, W.; Arikat, M.

    2003-01-01

    The gypsum of Abu Ruweis Formation (Upper Triassic) of the northwestern Jordan was chemically, physically and mechanically assessed for likely industrial uses. Chemical results indicate that the investigated gypsum (calcium sulfate dihydrate) is highly pure. This is confirmed by the high ratios of CaO (32-33%) andSO 3 (41-43%) and the very low content of other elements such as Mg, Al and Si. Trace elements are also negligible. The CaSO 4 % (86-88%), purity ratio (CaO/SO 3 ) (0.85) , and combined water (≅5%) for β-hemihydrate gypsum agree well with the jordanian standards for gypsum plaster. Thermal analyses indicate that the temperature required to obtain hemihydrate gypsum falls between 175deg-200deg. A significant mass variation or maximum loss on weight (-20%) was achieved after initial dehydration by heating to 200deg. Heating to 225deg is far enough to evolve all combined water molecules. The results of fineness, consistency, setting time, compressive strength and flexural strength for β-hemilhydrate agree, in most of the case, with the local and international standards intended for gypsum building components. The study showed that the absorption and consistency ratios for final gypsum product are proportional to porosity, whilst the consistency itself decreases with the increase of applied stresses. (author)

  7. Effect of different forms of silica on the physical and mechanical properties of gypsum plaster composites

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    Khalil, A. A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Gypsum plaster/silica composites prepared by dry blending (0.2-10 % natural sand, silica fume or silica gel and subsequently hydrated. Their physical and mechanical properties, including normal consistency, setting time, apparent porosity, bulk density and compressive strength, were determined after hydration for 7- and 28-days. The results indicated that adding different forms of silica lowered the bulk density and increased the normal consistency, setting time, apparent porosity and, to some limited extent, compressive strength of the composites. This improvement in properties can be attributed to the existence of silica in the interstitial pores in the hardened plaster matrices. While most of the composites revealed only scant rises in compressive strength, their composition was beneficial in so far as it included either a readily available low-cost constituent (sand or industrial by-products. Consequently, the formed plaster-silica composites are of economic value, contribute to a cleaner environment by minimizing waste and can be used for applications where high porosity, lightweight units are required or recommended for low-cost buildings.Se prepararon pastas compuestas de yeso y sílice mediante la mezcla en seco de yeso con distintas proporciones (0,2- 10 % de arena natural, o gel o humo de sílice, procediéndose a continuación a su hidratación. A fin de determinar las propiedades físicas y mecánicas de las pastas, a los 7 y los 28 días de hidratación se hallaron su fluidez, tiempo de fraguado, porosidad aparente, densidad aparente y resistencia a la compresión. Los resultados obtenidos indican que al incorporar las distintas modalidades de sílice a la mezcla, disminuyó la densidad aparente y aumentaron la fluidez, el tiempo de fraguado, la porosidad aparente y, en menor medida, la resistencia a la compresión de las muestras. Se considera que esta mejora de las propiedades del material se debe a la presencia de sílice en los

  8. Dimensional changes in plaster cast models due to the position of the impression tray during setting

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    Betina Grehs Porto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The objective of this study was to assess whether the positioning of the impression tray could cause distortion to plaster casts during gypsum setting time.Materials and Methods: Fifteen pairs of master models were cast with alginate impression material and immediately filled with gypsum. Impressions were allowed to set with the tray in the noninverted position (Group A or in the inverted position (Group B. The plaster models were digitized using a laser scanner (3Shape R-700, 3Shape A/S, Copenhagen, Denmark. Measurements of tooth size and distance were obtained using O3d software (Widialabs, Brazil measurement tools. Data were analyzed by paired t-test and linear regression with 5% significance.Results and Conclusion: Most of the measurements from both groups were similar, except forthe lower intermolar distance. It was not possible to corroborate the presence of distortions due to the position of the impression tray during gypsum setting time.

  9. Development of materials that cover the deposits of gypsum exploited in the polo plasterer in Pernambuco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rego, S.A.B.C.; Moraes, A.S. de; Anjos, I.F. dos; Lira, B.B.

    2012-01-01

    The mineral clay found on the surface of gypsum deposits in the region of Recife - PE are considered mining tailings and job search reference in new industrial applications for these minerals, ores. In this context, we performed the characterization of these materials with the purpose of its use as inorganic pigments in the ceramic coating. These minerals present 'in locus' different colors ranging from beige to reddish. After heat treatment at 1000° C their colors have varied tones that can be used as natural pigments in the ceramic industry. The techniques of fluorescence X-ray diffraction X-ray, infrared and colorimetry were applied in the characterization of mineral-ore in question. Using mineral processing techniques we obtain a physical separation of clay minerals associated. The use of concentrated after processing showed that the material has the potential to replace traditional pigments used in ceramic industry, and thus represent a new alternative on the market of natural pigments. Another potential comprehensive analysis of the material is its use associated with polymers in order to develop new materials. (author)

  10. Comparison of the surface roughness of gypsum models constructed using various impression materials and gypsum products

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    Yi-Chih Chang

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: The surface roughness of stone models was mainly determined by the type of alginate impression material, and was less affected by the type of silicone rubber impression material or gypsum product, or the storage time before repouring.

  11. Comparison of linear measurements and analyses taken from plaster models and three-dimensional images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto, Betina Grehs; Porto, Thiago Soares; Silva, Monica Barros; Grehs, Renésio Armindo; Pinto, Ary dos Santos; Bhandi, Shilpa H; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Bandéca, Matheus Coelho; dos Santos-Pinto, Lourdes Aparecida Martins

    2014-11-01

    Digital models are an alternative for carrying out analyses and devising treatment plans in orthodontics. The objective of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and the reproducibility of measurements of tooth sizes, interdental distances and analyses of occlusion using plaster models and their digital images. Thirty pairs of plaster models were chosen at random, and the digital images of each plaster model were obtained using a laser scanner (3Shape R-700, 3Shape A/S). With the plaster models, the measurements were taken using a caliper (Mitutoyo Digimatic(®), Mitutoyo (UK) Ltd) and the MicroScribe (MS) 3DX (Immersion, San Jose, Calif). For the digital images, the measurement tools used were those from the O3d software (Widialabs, Brazil). The data obtained were compared statistically using the Dahlberg formula, analysis of variance and the Tukey test (p < 0.05). The majority of the measurements, obtained using the caliper and O3d were identical, and both were significantly different from those obtained using the MS. Intra-examiner agreement was lowest when using the MS. The results demonstrated that the accuracy and reproducibility of the tooth measurements and analyses from the plaster models using the caliper and from the digital models using O3d software were identical.

  12. Housing: plastered versus un-plastered brooder walls in poultry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An investigation was carried out to study the health impact of inadequate brooder house with poor make-up on chicks. Two brooder houses were constructed with a mixture of sand and cementitious materials consisting of lime and/or gypsum to form concrete blocks. Brooder 1 was plastered with cement (cemented) and ...

  13. Adhesive plasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.; Swain, Ronald L.; Banker, John G.; Edwards, Charlene C.

    1978-01-01

    Adhesive plaster compositions are provided by treating particles of Y.sub.2 O.sub.3, Eu.sub.2 O.sub.3, Gd.sub.2 O.sub.3 or Nd.sub.2 O.sub.3 with dilute acid solutions. The resulting compositions have been found to spontaneously harden into rigid reticulated masses resembling plaster of Paris. Upon heating, the hardened material is decomposed into the oxide, yet retains the reticulated rigid structure.

  14. Comparing the reliability and accuracy of clinical measurements using plaster model and the digital model system based on crowding severity.

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    Liang, Yu-Ming; Rutchakitprakarn, Lalita; Kuang, Shou-Hsin; Wu, Tzu-Ying

    2018-01-25

    This study aims to clarify whether 3Shape™ digital model system could be applied in orthodontic diagnostic analysis with certainty, especially under different crowding condition. Reliability, accuracy and efficiency of 3Shape™ digital model system were assessed by comparing them with traditional plaster cast. 29 plaster casts with permanent dentition were transformed into digital models by 3Shape™ D800 scanner. All 29 models were categorized into mild-crowding (arch length discrepancy 3 mm and 8 mm). Fourteen linear measurements were made manually using a digital caliper on plaster casts and virtually using the 3Shape™ Ortho Analyzer software by two examiners. Intra-class Correlation Coefficient (ICC) was used to evaluate intra-examiner reliability, inter-examiner reliability and reliability between two model systems. Paired t test was used to evaluate accuracy between two model systems. Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Mann-Whitney U test was used to evaluate the measurement differences between 3 groups in two model systems. Both intra-examiner and inter-examiner reliability were generally excellent for all measurements made on 3Shape™ digital model and plaster cast (ICC: 0.752-0.993). Reliability between different model systems was also excellent (ICC: 0.897-0.998). Half of the accuracy test showed statistically significant differences (p systems, the mandibular required space showed significant difference (p = 0.012) between mild crowding group (0.27 + 0.01 mm) and severe crowding group (0.20 + 0.09 mm). However, the differences were less than 0.5 mm and would not affect clinical decision. Using 3Shape™ digital model system instead of plaster casts for orthodontic diagnostic measurements is clinically acceptable. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Taiwan LLC.

  15. Technical economical study of plaster production in a continuous rotate kiln using natural gas; Estudo tecnico-economico do processo de producao de gesso em forno rotativo continuo com uso de gas natural

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benachour, M. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Santos, Valdemir A. dos [Universidade Catolica de Pernambuco (UNICAP), Recife, PE (Brazil); Peres, Luciano dos S. [Instituto de Tecnologia de Pernambuco (ITEP), Recife, PE (Brazil); Campos, Michel F. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Zimmerle, Sergio R.T.S. [Companhia Pernambucana de Gas - COPERGAS, Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    At Araripe Gypsum Site, Pernambuco State, gypsum is dehydrated to produce plaster using wood and BPF oil as major fuels, which generate serious environmental impacts. Natural gas provides important advantages over conventional fuels. Using this gas improves the thermal efficiency of direct contact process, producing no contamination in final product, also reducing considerably environmental pollution levels. In this scope, a rotate kiln was designed in pilot scale, where was carried out gypsum dehydration tests to produce beta plaster using natural gas. In this work are presented mathematical models to simulate the axial profiles of the gypsum conversion and the gas and solid temperatures on the axial length of the kiln. The mathematical models are used as restrictions to obtention of the operational optimized conditions to a minimum gypsum conversion of the 85%. The simulation results were compared to experimental ones and were obtained a good agreement between both the values. (author)

  16. Properties of type IV plaster considering variation in the mold/model position during setting stage

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    Tarcisio José de Arruda Paes Junior

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the influence of the position of the mold during the setting stage of type IV stone plaster Durone (Dentsply Ind. Com., Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on the following properties: surface hardness and roughness. Methods: For the roughness test, two groups (n=6 in the form of pellets were prepared. In the first group, the surface of the base of the device was turned down during the plaster setting stage (N, in the second group this position was inverted, which has been described as an act of capsize it (E. For analysis, a roughness meter with reading precision of 0.01 μm was used. With regard to the hardness analysis, two groups with conical-shaped samples were obtained. The plasters were left to set under the same conditions of the mold/model position described for the previous experiment. Hardness measurement was performed in a durometer with a spherical penetrating tip for Rockwell readout. Three measurements were performed for each test specimen in both tests. Results: The hardness (N - 39.8, standard deviation = 3.3, E - 30.8, standard deviation = 5.6 and roughness data (N - 0.67, standard deviation = 0.17, E - 0.74, standard deviation = 0.13 submitted to the Student’s-t test (5% showed no statistically significant differences for the roughness test (0.489, but showed statistically significant differences for the hardness test (0.014. Conclusion: The variation in the mold/model position influenced the final characteristics of the specimens in terms of hardness, since those obtained with the capsize technique showed lower surface hardness, whereas for roughness these differences were not statistically significant.

  17. Agreement in the determination of preformed wire shape templates on plaster models and customized digital arch form diagrams on digital models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camardella, Leonardo Tavares; Sá, Maiara da Silva Bezerra; Guimarães, Luciana Campos; Vilella, Beatriz de Souza; Vilella, Oswaldo de Vasconcellos

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the accuracy of preformed wire shape templates on plaster models and those of customized digital arch form diagrams on digital models. Twenty pairs of dental plaster models were randomly selected from the archives of the Department of Orthodontics of Federal Fluminense University, Niterói, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. All plaster model samples were scanned in a plaster model scanner to create the respective digital models. Three examiners defined the arch form on the mandibular arch of these models by selecting the ideal preformed wire shape template on each plaster model or by making a customized digital arch form on the digital models using a digital arch form customization tool. These 2 arch forms were superimposed by the best-fit method. The greatest differences in the 6 regions on the superimposed arches were evaluated. Each examiner presented a descriptive analysis with the means, standard deviation, and minimum and maximum intervals of the differences on the superimpositions. Intraclass correlation coefficient and paired t tests were used to evaluate the accuracy of the superimpositions. Among the 6 regions analyzed in the superimpositions, the largest differences in the anterior and premolar regions were considered clinically insignificant, whereas the largest differences in the right molar region, especially the second molar area, were considered clinically significant by all 3 examiners. The intraclass correlation coefficients showed a weak correlation in the premolar region and moderate correlations in the anterior and molar regions. The paired t test showed statistically significant differences in the left anterior and premolar regions. The superimpositions between the arch forms on plaster and digital models were considered accurate, and the differences were not clinically significant, with the exception of the second molar area. Despite the favorable results, the requirement of correcting some software problems may

  18. Validity of Intraoral Scans Compared with Plaster Models: An In-Vivo Comparison of Dental Measurements and 3D Surface Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Dental measurements have been commonly taken from plaster dental models obtained from alginate impressions can. Through the use of an intraoral scanner, digital impressions now acquire the information directly from the mouth. The purpose of this study was to determine the validity of the intraoral scans compared to plaster models. Materials and Methods Two types of dental models (intraoral scan and plaster model) of 20 subjects were included in this study. The subjects had impressions taken of their teeth and made as plaster model. In addition, their mouths were scanned with the intraoral scanner and the scans were converted into digital models. Eight transverse and 16 anteroposterior measurements, 24 tooth heights and widths were recorded on the plaster models with a digital caliper and on the intraoral scan with 3D reverse engineering software. For 3D surface analysis, the two models were superimposed by using best-fit algorithm. The average differences between the two models at all points on the surfaces were computed. Paired t-test and Bland-Altman plot were used to determine the validity of measurements from the intraoral scan compared to those from the plaster model. Results There were no significant differences between the plaster models and intraoral scans, except for one measurement of lower intermolar width. The Bland-Altman plots of all measurements showed that differences between the two models were within the limits of agreement. The average surface difference between the two models was within 0.10 mm. Conclusions The results of the present study indicate that the intraoral scans are clinically acceptable for diagnosis and treatment planning in dentistry and can be used in place of plaster models. PMID:27304976

  19. Validity of Intraoral Scans Compared with Plaster Models: An In-Vivo Comparison of Dental Measurements and 3D Surface Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Zhang

    Full Text Available Dental measurements have been commonly taken from plaster dental models obtained from alginate impressions can. Through the use of an intraoral scanner, digital impressions now acquire the information directly from the mouth. The purpose of this study was to determine the validity of the intraoral scans compared to plaster models.Two types of dental models (intraoral scan and plaster model of 20 subjects were included in this study. The subjects had impressions taken of their teeth and made as plaster model. In addition, their mouths were scanned with the intraoral scanner and the scans were converted into digital models. Eight transverse and 16 anteroposterior measurements, 24 tooth heights and widths were recorded on the plaster models with a digital caliper and on the intraoral scan with 3D reverse engineering software. For 3D surface analysis, the two models were superimposed by using best-fit algorithm. The average differences between the two models at all points on the surfaces were computed. Paired t-test and Bland-Altman plot were used to determine the validity of measurements from the intraoral scan compared to those from the plaster model.There were no significant differences between the plaster models and intraoral scans, except for one measurement of lower intermolar width. The Bland-Altman plots of all measurements showed that differences between the two models were within the limits of agreement. The average surface difference between the two models was within 0.10 mm.The results of the present study indicate that the intraoral scans are clinically acceptable for diagnosis and treatment planning in dentistry and can be used in place of plaster models.

  20. Measurements using orthodontic analysis software on digital models obtained by 3D scans of plaster casts : Intrarater reliability and validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnota, Judith; Hey, Jeremias; Fuhrmann, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine the reliability and validity of measurements performed on digital models with a desktop scanner and analysis software in comparison with measurements performed manually on conventional plaster casts. A total of 20 pairs of plaster casts reflecting the intraoral conditions of 20 fully dentate individuals were digitized using a three-dimensional scanner (D700; 3Shape). A series of defined parameters were measured both on the resultant digital models with analysis software (Ortho Analyzer; 3Shape) and on the original plaster casts with a digital caliper (Digimatic CD-15DCX; Mitutoyo). Both measurement series were repeated twice and analyzed for intrarater reliability based on intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). The results from the digital models were evaluated for their validity against the casts by calculating mean-value differences and associated 95 % limits of agreement (Bland-Altman method). Statistically significant differences were identified via a paired t test. Significant differences were obtained for 16 of 24 tooth-width measurements, for 2 of 5 sites of contact-point displacement in the mandibular anterior segment, for overbite, for maxillary intermolar distance, for Little's irregularity index, and for the summation indices of maxillary and mandibular incisor width. Overall, however, both the mean differences between the results obtained on the digital models versus on the plaster casts and the dispersion ranges associated with these differences suggest that the deviations incurred by the digital measuring technique are not clinically significant. Digital models are adequately reproducible and valid to be employed for routine measurements in orthodontic practice.

  1. Computational modeling of latent-heat-storage in PCM modified interior plaster

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    Fořt, Jan; Maděra, Jiří; Trník, Anton; Pavlíková, Milena; Pavlík, Zbyšek [Department of Materials Engineering and Chemistry, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Thákurova 7, 166 29 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2016-06-08

    The latent heat storage systems represent a promising way for decrease of buildings energy consumption with respect to the sustainable development principles of building industry. The presented paper is focused on the evaluation of the effect of PCM incorporation on thermal performance of cement-lime plasters. For basic characterization of the developed materials, matrix density, bulk density, and total open porosity are measured. Thermal conductivity is accessed by transient impulse method. DSC analysis is used for the identification of phase change temperature during the heating and cooling process. Using DSC data, the temperature dependent specific heat capacity is calculated. On the basis of the experiments performed, the supposed improvement of the energy efficiency of characteristic building envelope system where the designed plasters are likely to be used is evaluated by a computational analysis. Obtained experimental and computational results show a potential of PCM modified plasters for improvement of thermal stability of buildings and moderation of interior climate.

  2. Rapid prototyping of a complex model for the manufacture of plaster molds for slip casting ceramic

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    D. P. C. Velazco

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Computer assisted designing (CAD is well known for several decades and employed for ceramic manufacturing almost since the beginning, but usually employed in the first part of the projectual ideation processes, neither in the prototyping nor in the manufacturing stages. The rapid prototyping machines, also known as 3D printers, have the capacity to produce in a few hours real pieces using plastic materials of high resistance, with great precision and similarity with respect to the original, based on unprecedented digital models produced by means of modeling with specific design software or from the digitalization of existing parts using the so-called 3D scanners. The main objective of the work is to develop the methodology used in the entire process of building a part in ceramics from the interrelationship between traditional techniques and new technologies for the manufacture of prototypes. And to take advantage of the benefits that allow us this new reproduction technology. The experience was based on the generation of a complex piece, in digital format, which served as the model. A regular 15 cm icosahedron presented features complex enough not to advise the production of the model by means of the traditional techniques of ceramics (manual or mechanical. From this digital model, a plaster mold was made in the traditional way in order to slip cast clay based slurries, freely dried in air and fired and glazed in the traditional way. This experience has shown the working hypothesis and opens up the possibility of new lines of work to academic and technological levels that will be explored in the near future. This technology provides a wide range of options to address the formal aspect of a part to be performed for the field of design, architecture, industrial design, the traditional pottery, ceramic art, etc., which allow you to amplify the formal possibilities, save time and therefore costs when drafting the necessary and appropriate matrixes

  3. Hydrogeological flow in gypsum karst areas: some examples from northern Italy and main circulation models

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    Bartolomeo Vigna

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A Messinian succession containing gypsum beds crops out in northern Italy, mainly in Piedmont and along the northern flank of the Apennine mountains in Emilia-Romagna. These gypsum bodies have been extensively quarried at the surface, in outcrops, and through underground quarries. In Emilia-Romagna these gypsum outcrops can be rather extensive, several km long and up to 1 km wide, while in Piedmont they are mostly covered by silty-marly deposits of Upper Messinian and Pliocene age and show only sparse and small outcrops. The underground quarrying of these evaporite bodies in Piedmont has allowed studying in detail their hydrogeology, and the ways in which water flows through these karst rocks. In contrast, in Emilia-Romagna the hydrogeology of these aquifers has been studied with traditional spring water monitoring and speleological methods. On the basis of the results it has been possible to define three conceptual models regarding the water circulation in these evaporites, similar to the models existing for carbonate aquifers. The models represent aquifers with decreasing vulnerability to pollution, from the more vulnerable system with dominant conduit drainage, characterizing most of the known gypsum aquifers, to those with interconnected conduit drainage and with dispersive circulation.

  4. Modeling grain size variations of aeolian gypsum deposits at White Sands, New Mexico, using AVIRIS imagery

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    Ghrefat, H.A.; Goodell, P.C.; Hubbard, B.E.; Langford, R.P.; Aldouri, R.E.

    2007-01-01

    Visible and Near-Infrared (VNIR) through Short Wavelength Infrared (SWIR) (0.4-2.5????m) AVIRIS data, along with laboratory spectral measurements and analyses of field samples, were used to characterize grain size variations in aeolian gypsum deposits across barchan-transverse, parabolic, and barchan dunes at White Sands, New Mexico, USA. All field samples contained a mineralogy of ?????100% gypsum. In order to document grain size variations at White Sands, surficial gypsum samples were collected along three Transects parallel to the prevailing downwind direction. Grain size analyses were carried out on the samples by sieving them into seven size fractions ranging from 45 to 621????m, which were subjected to spectral measurements. Absorption band depths of the size fractions were determined after applying an automated continuum-removal procedure to each spectrum. Then, the relationship between absorption band depth and gypsum size fraction was established using a linear regression. Three software processing steps were carried out to measure the grain size variations of gypsum in the Dune Area using AVIRIS data. AVIRIS mapping results, field work and laboratory analysis all show that the interdune areas have lower absorption band depth values and consist of finer grained gypsum deposits. In contrast, the dune crest areas have higher absorption band depth values and consist of coarser grained gypsum deposits. Based on laboratory estimates, a representative barchan-transverse dune (Transect 1) has a mean grain size of 1.16 ??{symbol} (449????m). The error bar results show that the error ranges from - 50 to + 50????m. Mean grain size for a representative parabolic dune (Transect 2) is 1.51 ??{symbol} (352????m), and 1.52 ??{symbol} (347????m) for a representative barchan dune (Transect 3). T-test results confirm that there are differences in the grain size distributions between barchan and parabolic dunes and between interdune and dune crest areas. The t-test results

  5. Does the contact time of alginate with plaster cast influence its properties?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Marquezan

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to verify the influence of the time of contact between alginate and gypsum after the modeling procedure on the properties of the plaster cast, such as surface detail, dimensional stability and microhardness. Thirty cylindrical specimens of orthodontic gypsum Type III were made by means of impressions of a stainless steel master model which had five reference lines in the upper surface. The samples were divided into two groups: Group 1 (G1 - with time of contact of 1 hour; and Group 2 (G2 - 12 hours of contact. All the specimens were stored up to 48 hours until they underwent laboratory testing. Surface detail and dimensional stability were tested by one calibrated examiner using a visual analysis and a profilometer (Profile Projector Nikon model 6C, Nikon Corporation, Tokyo, Japan, respectively, to evaluate the quality of reproduction of the lines and the distances between them. The microhardness was determined for each sample by making six indentations with a Vickers diamond pyramid indenter (Buehler, Lake Bluff, USA under a load of 100 gF for 15 s. The results showed significant difference (P £ 0.05 between groups in two of the three properties examined: surface detail and microhardness, which decreased as the time of contact rose. The 12-hour time of contact between alginate and the plaster cast is not recommended because it influences the quality of the plaster cast.

  6. Does the contact time of alginate with plaster cast influence its properties?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Marquezan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to verify the influence of the time of contact between alginate and gypsum after the modeling procedure on the properties of the plaster cast, such as surface detail, dimensional stability and microhardness. Thirty cylindrical specimens of orthodontic gypsum Type III were made by means of impressions of a stainless steel master model which had five reference lines in the upper surface. The samples were divided into two groups: Group 1 (G1 - with time of contact of 1 hour; and Group 2 (G2 - 12 hours of contact. All the specimens were stored up to 48 hours until they underwent laboratory testing. Surface detail and dimensional stability were tested by one calibrated examiner using a visual analysis and a profilometer (Profile Projector Nikon model 6C, Nikon Corporation, Tokyo, Japan, respectively, to evaluate the quality of reproduction of the lines and the distances between them. The microhardness was determined for each sample by making six indentations with a Vickers diamond pyramid indenter (Buehler, Lake Bluff, USA under a load of 100 gF for 15 s. The results showed significant difference (P £ 0.05 between groups in two of the three properties examined: surface detail and microhardness, which decreased as the time of contact rose. The 12-hour time of contact between alginate and the plaster cast is not recommended because it influences the quality of the plaster cast.

  7. Impacts of a clay plaster on indoor air quality assessed using chemical and sensory measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darling, Erin K.; Cros, Clement J.; Wargocki, Pawel

    2012-01-01

    plaster as a PRM for improving air quality by controlling ozone, perceived air quality (PAQ) was determined in the presence of eight combinations of an emitting and reactive pollutant source (new carpet), clay plaster applied to gypsum wallboard, and chamber air with and without ozone. A panel of 24 human....... Perceived air quality was most acceptable and concentrations of aldehydes were lowest when only clay plaster or both clay plaster and carpet were present in the chambers without ozone. The least acceptable PAQ and the highest concentrations of aldehydes were observed when carpet and ozone were present...... together; addition of clay plaster for this condition improved PAQ and considerably decreased aldehyde concentrations....

  8. Possibilities to improve electromagnetic shielding of plaster composites adding carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samková, A.; Kulhavý, P.; Pechočiaková, M.

    2017-10-01

    This paper studies size of electromagnetic shielding in plaster composites, using different volume fractions of carbon fibers. Conventional types of plaster, which are normally used in construction (i.e. cement, lime, gypsum and lime cement) were the main parts of the created composites The carbon microfibers with a length of 8 mm were added as reinforcing and simultaneously shielding element into plaster samples. The tested samples were created at three different volume fractions of the fibres and also into the base plaster for possibilities of their comparison. The results of carried measurement show that the electromagnetic shielding in the plaster composite grows with increasing fiber content in the tested ratio almost linearly.

  9. Intra-arch dimensional measurement validity of laser-scanned digital dental models compared with the original plaster models: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca Canto, G; Pachêco-Pereira, C; Lagravere, M O; Flores-Mir, C; Major, P W

    2015-05-01

    A systematic review was undertaken to evaluate the validity of intra-arch dimensional measurements made from laser-scanned digital dental models in comparison with measurements directly obtained from the original plaster casts (gold standard). Finally included articles were only those reporting studies that compared measurements from digital models produced from laser scanning against their plaster models. Measurements from the original plaster models should have been made using a manual or digital caliper (gold standard). Articles that used scans from impressions or digital photographs were discarded. Detailed individual search strategies for Cochrane, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PubMed, and LILACS were developed. The references cited in the selected articles were also checked for any references that could have been missed in the electronic database searches. A partial gray literature search was undertaken using Google Scholar. The methodology of selected studies was evaluated using the 14-item quality assessment tool for diagnostic accuracy studies (QUADAS). Only 16 studies were finally included for the qualitative/quantitative synthesis. The selected studies consistently agree that the validity of measurements obtained after using a laser scanner from plaster models is similar to direct measurements. Any stated differences would be unlikely clinically relevant. There is consistent scientific evidence to support the validity of measurements from digital dental models in comparison with intra-arch dimensional measurements directly obtained from them. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Assessing agreement in measurements of orthodontic study models: Digital caliper on plaster models vs 3-dimensional software on models scanned by structured-light scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan Hassan, Wan Nurazreena; Othman, Siti Adibah; Chan, Chee Seng; Ahmad, Roshahida; Ali, Siti Nor'Ain; Abd Rohim, Anis

    2016-11-01

    In this study we aimed to compare measurements on plaster models using a digital caliper, and on 3-dimensional (3D) digital models, produced using a structured-light scanner, using 3D software. Fifty digital models were scanned from the same plaster models. Arch and tooth size measurements were made by 2 operators, twice. Calibration was done on 10 sets of models and checked using the Pearson correlation coefficient. Data were analyzed by error variances, repeatability coefficient, repeated-measures analysis of variance, and Bland-Altman plots. Error variances ranged between 0.001 and 0.044 mm for the digital caliper method, and between 0.002 and 0.054 mm for the 3D software method. Repeated-measures analysis of variance showed small but statistically significant differences (P <0.05) between the repeated measurements in the arch and buccolingual planes (0.011 and 0.008 mm, respectively). There were no statistically significant differences between methods and between operators. Bland-Altman plots showed that the mean biases were close to zero, and the 95% limits of agreement were within ±0.50 mm. Repeatability coefficients for all measurements were similar. Measurements made on models scanned by the 3D structured-light scanner were in good agreement with those made on conventional plaster models and were, therefore, clinically acceptable. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Linear dimensional changes in plaster die models using different elastomeric materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson Ricardo Pereira

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Dental impression is an important step in the preparation of prostheses since it provides the reproduction of anatomic and surface details of teeth and adjacent structures. The objective of this study was to evaluate the linear dimensional alterations in gypsum dies obtained with different elastomeric materials, using a resin coping impression technique with individual shells. A master cast made of stainless steel with fixed prosthesis characteristics with two prepared abutment teeth was used to obtain the impressions. References points (A, B, C, D, E and F were recorded on the occlusal and buccal surfaces of abutments to register the distances. The impressions were obtained using the following materials: polyether, mercaptan-polysulfide, addition silicone, and condensation silicone. The transfer impressions were made with custom trays and an irreversible hydrocolloid material and were poured with type IV gypsum. The distances between identified points in gypsum dies were measured using an optical microscope and the results were statistically analyzed by ANOVA (p < 0.05 and Tukey's test. The mean of the distances were registered as follows: addition silicone (AB = 13.6 µm, CD=15.0 µm, EF = 14.6 µm, GH=15.2 µm, mercaptan-polysulfide (AB = 36.0 µm, CD = 36.0 µm, EF = 39.6 µm, GH = 40.6 µm, polyether (AB = 35.2 µm, CD = 35.6 µm, EF = 39.4 µm, GH = 41.4 µm and condensation silicone (AB = 69.2 µm, CD = 71.0 µm, EF = 80.6 µm, GH = 81.2 µm. All of the measurements found in gypsum dies were compared to those of a master cast. The results demonstrated that the addition silicone provides the best stability of the compounds tested, followed by polyether, polysulfide and condensation silicone. No statistical differences were obtained between polyether and mercaptan-polysulfide materials.

  12. Effects of Panax ginseng-containing herbal plasters on compressed intervertebral discs in an in vivo rat tail model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chow Daniel H K

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tienchi (Panax notoginseng has been used in conservative treatments for back pain as a major ingredient of many herbal medicines. This study aims to investigate the effects of a herbal medicine containing tienchi on compressed intervertebral discs in rats. Methods Using an in vivo rat tail model, intervertebral disc compression was simulated in the caudal 8–9 discs of 25 rats by continuous static compression (11 N for 2 weeks. An herbal medicine plaster (in which the major ingredient was tienchi was externally applied to the compressed disc (n=9 for three weeks, and held in place by an adhesive bandage, in animals in the Chinese Medicine (CM group. The effect of the bandage was evaluated in a separate placebo group (n=9, while no intervention with unrestricted motion was provided to rats in an additional control group (n=7. Disc structural properties were quantified by in vivo disc height measurement and in vitro morphological analysis. Results Disc height decreased after the application of compression (P P = 0.006 and placebo (P = 0.003 groups, but was maintained in the CM group (P = 0.494. No obvious differences in disc morphology were observed among the three groups (P = 0.896. Conclusion The tienchi-containing herbal plaster had no significant effect on the morphology of compressed discs, but maintained disc height in rats.

  13. GyPSuM: A Detailed Tomographic Model of Mantle Density and Seismic Wave Speeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, N A; Forte, A M; Boschi, L; Grand, S P

    2010-03-30

    GyPSuM is a tomographic model fo mantle seismic shear wave (S) speeds, compressional wave (P) speeds and detailed density anomalies that drive mantle flow. the model is developed through simultaneous inversion of seismic body wave travel times (P and S) and geodynamic observations while considering realistic mineral physics parameters linking the relative behavior of mantle properties (wave speeds and density). Geodynamic observations include the (up to degree 16) global free-air gravity field, divergence of the tectonic plates, dynamic topography of the free surface, and the flow-induced excess ellipticity of the core-mantle boundary. GyPSuM is built with the philosophy that heterogeneity that most closely resembles thermal variations is the simplest possible solution. Models of the density field from Earth's free oscillations have provided great insight into the density configuration of the mantle; but are limited to very long-wavelength solutions. Alternatively, simply scaling higher resolution seismic images to density anomalies generates density fields that do not satisfy geodynamic observations. The current study provides detailed density structures in the mantle while directly satisfying geodynamic observations through a joint seismic-geodynamic inversion process. Notable density field observations include high-density piles at the base of the superplume structures, supporting the fundamental results of past normal mode studies. However, these features are more localized and lower amplitude than past studies would suggest. When we consider all seismic anomalies in GyPSuM, we find that P and S-wave speeds are strongly correlated throughout the mantle. However, correlations between the high-velocity S zones in the deep mantle ({approx} 2000 km depth) and corresponding P-wave anomalies are very low suggesting a systematic divergence from simplified thermal effects in ancient subducted slab anomalies. Nevertheless, they argue that temperature variations are

  14. New yttria plasters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holcombe, C.E.; Edwards, C.C.; Carpenter, D.A.

    1978-01-01

    A new, sinterable yttria (Y 2 O 3 ) plaster was developed. The properties of this plaster depend on: (1) starting-power characteristics, (2) type and concentration of the acid used for the liquid phase, and (3) the liquid-to powder (L/P) ratios. Physical and chemical properties of the yttria plaster were investigated. Plasters formed in the yttria/acid/water (dilute-acids) system were determined to consist mostly of needle (or plate)-shaped hydroxysalt binder phases analogous to precipitates in the YX 3 /sodium hydroxide/water system (where X represents either Cl - or NO 3 - ). The binder phases were shown to be of the form Y 2 (OH)/sub 6-m/X/sub m/ x nH 2 O, where m and n generally equal one. The decomposition behavior on heating yttria plasters was studied by thermal analyses. The nitric acid-produced plasters decomposed to yttria below 600 0 C in argon; the hydrochloric acid-produced plasters decomposed to yttria by 1520 0 C in argon or by 1100 0 C in air. Examination of scandium oxide and the rare-earth oxides showed that several exhibited a plaster-forming behavior similar to yttria

  15. New yttria plasters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcombe, C.E.; Edwards, C.C.; Carpenter, D.A.

    1978-01-01

    A new, sinterable yttria (Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/) plaster was developed. The properties of this plaster depend on: (1) starting-power characteristics, (2) type and concentration of the acid used for the liquid phase, and (3) the liquid-to powder (L/P) ratios. Physical and chemical properties of the yttria plaster were investigated. Plasters formed in the yttria/acid/water (dilute-acids) system were determined to consist mostly of needle (or plate)-shaped hydroxysalt binder phases analogous to precipitates in the YX/sub 3//sodium hydroxide/water system (where X represents either Cl/sup -/ or NO/sub 3//sup -/). The binder phases were shown to be of the form Y/sub 2/(OH)/sub 6-m/X/sub m/ x nH/sub 2/O, where m and n generally equal one. The decomposition behavior on heating yttria plasters was studied by thermal analyses. The nitric acid-produced plasters decomposed to yttria below 600/sup 0/C in argon; the hydrochloric acid-produced plasters decomposed to yttria by 1520/sup 0/C in argon or by 1100/sup 0/C in air. Examination of scandium oxide and the rare-earth oxides showed that several exhibited a plaster-forming behavior similar to yttria.

  16. Virtualizing ancient Rome: 3D acquisition and modeling of a large plaster-of-Paris model of imperial Rome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidi, Gabriele; Frischer, Bernard; De Simone, Monica; Cioci, Andrea; Spinetti, Alessandro; Carosso, Luca; Micoli, Laura L.; Russo, Michele; Grasso, Tommaso

    2005-01-01

    Computer modeling through digital range images has been used for many applications, including 3D modeling of objects belonging to our cultural heritage. The scales involved range from small objects (e.g. pottery), to middle-sized works of art (statues, architectural decorations), up to very large structures (architectural and archaeological monuments). For any of these applications, suitable sensors and methodologies have been explored by different authors. The object to be modeled within this project is the "Plastico di Roma antica," a large plaster-of-Paris model of imperial Rome (16x17 meters) created in the last century. Its overall size therefore demands an acquisition approach typical of large structures, but it also is characterized extremely tiny details typical of small objects (houses are a few centimeters high; their doors, windows, etc. are smaller than 1 centimeter). This paper gives an account of the procedures followed for solving this "contradiction" and describes how a huge 3D model was acquired and generated by using a special metrology Laser Radar. The procedures for reorienting in a single reference system the huge point clouds obtained after each acquisition phase, thanks to the measurement of fixed redundant references, are described. The data set was split in smaller sub-areas 2 x 2 meters each for purposes of mesh editing. This subdivision was necessary owing to the huge number of points in each individual scan (50-60 millions). The final merge of the edited parts made it possible to create a single mesh. All these processes were made with software specifically designed for this project since no commercial package could be found that was suitable for managing such a large number of points. Preliminary models are presented. Finally, the significance of the project is discussed in terms of the overall project known as "Rome Reborn," of which the present acquisition is an important component.

  17. Visible and Mid-Infrared Gypsum Optical Constants for Modeling of Martian Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roush, Ted L.; Esposito, Francesca; Rossmann, George R.; Colangeli, Luigi

    2007-08-01

    Introduction: Recent and on-going remote and in situ observations indicate that sulfates are present in significant abundances at various locations on Mars [1-7]. The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) imaging spectrometer (CRISM) is returning hyperspectral data at higher spatial resolution [8] than the OMEGA instrument on the Mars Express Mission [3]. Data from both OMEGA and CRISM have provided spectral evidence for the presence of gypsum and various hydrated sulfates on the Martian surface [e.g. 3-7] Thus, the optical properties of sulfates, in general, are of interest to quantitative interpretation of this increasing volume of remotely sensed data. This is because optical constants describe how a material interacts with electromagnetic radiation and represent the fundamental values used in radiative transfer calculations describing a variety of physical environments. Such environments include atmospheres where aerosols are present, planetary and satellite regoliths, and circumstellar dust clouds. Here we focus upon gypsum because of its applicability due to its identification on Mars. Also, gypsum is a mineral that is readily available in samples sizes that are suitable for study using a variety of spectral measurements. In the infrared (>5 μm) several studies reporting the optical constants of gypsum can be used in evaluating the approach used here. Most importantly, there is a general lack of data regarding the optical constants for gypsum at visible and mid-infrared wavelengths (0.4-5 μm) that are being observed by OMEGA and CRISM. Background: In the infrared, there have been several studies focused at determining the optical constants of gypsum using classical dispersion models [9-11]. These have used a variety of samples including; crystals, compressed pellets of pure materials, and grains suspended in a KBr matrix. Spectral measurements of gypsum, and other sulfates, have existed for about 100 years at visible and mid-infrared wavelengths (0.4-5 μm) [e

  18. Evaluation of the simulation robot for mandibular movements with the patient-specific 3-dimensional plaster model and mandibular movement data: clinical application of the physical simulation robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikawa, Tomoko; Ogawa, Takumi; Shigeta, Yuko; Hirabayashi, Rio; Fukushima, Shunji; Otake, Yoshito; Hattori, Asaki; Suzuki, Naoki

    2008-01-01

    We developed a multi-phase simulation system for patients with jaw deformity and dysfunction as a collaborate study between our departments. The intended application of the physical simulation robot was to evaluate its function based on well it quantitatively measured the movement of the individual patient. This physical simulation robot consists of a 6-degree-of-freedom robotic manipulator and a plaster model of patient-specific bone geometry. Each plaster model was mounted on the serial-articulated robotic manipulator. To establish the accuracy of the robot movement, the programmed movement of the robotic arm was validated using an optical tracking device. The results of the physical simulation robot corresponded with the data from the 4D analysis system. We could construct interactive relations between the 4D analysis system that was presented by virtual reality and the simulation robot which was constructed from physical simulation.

  19. Thermal modelling of gypsum plasterboard assemblies exposed to standard fire tests

    OpenAIRE

    Lázaro Urrutia, David; Puente González, Eduardo; Lázaro Urrutia, Mariano; Lázaro Urrutia, Pedro Gervasio; Peña Guijarro, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Gypsum plasterboards are widely used for compartmentation and for retarding the spread of fire in buildings. Although numerous heat transfer studies have been conducted, literature indicates there are extensive differences in the thermal properties used in these studies. Comprehensive experimental and numerical analyses have been conducted to elucidate the leading factor in the ablation of a gypsum board system when it is exposed to the standard fire resistance test. A methodology based on bo...

  20. Plaster-Wrap Dragons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, Shelly

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how her students constructed a three-dimensional sculpture of a dragon using plaster wrap and other materials. The dragons were formed from modest means--using only a toilet-paper tube, newsprint, tape and wire.

  1. Analysis of the Relationship between Density and Mechanical Strength of Lightened Gypsums: Proposal for a Coefficient of Lightening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Santa Cruz Astorqui

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article develops a relationship between the reduction of density in lightened gypsum and the addition of expanded and/or extruded polystyrene waste from the construction sector and their mechanical behavior. The equations determined in this study allow us to know the flexural and compressive strengths of a lightened gypsum/plaster compound once its density is known. The results show that there is an exponential relationship between the density of the compound and its strength. The methodology followed included a compilation of the results obtained in previous research works on lightweight gypsums, analyzing the relationship between density and mechanical strength and comparing them with the equations developed in this research. The results obtained by previous researchers have a good adjustment with the proposed models, and only perlite compounds present greater deviations in the compressive strength analysis. Also, a dimensionless lightening coefficient is defined which can help to determine the best application for a lightweight gypsum compound, comparing it with an ideal lightweight gypsum.

  2. Automatic gender determination from 3D digital maxillary tooth plaster models based on the random forest algorithm and discrete cosine transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkoç, Betül; Arslan, Ahmet; Kök, Hatice

    2017-05-01

    One of the first stages in the identification of an individual is gender determination. Through gender determination, the search spectrum can be reduced. In disasters such as accidents or fires, which can render identification somewhat difficult, durable teeth are an important source for identification. This study proposes a smart system that can automatically determine gender using 3D digital maxillary tooth plaster models. The study group was composed of 40 Turkish individuals (20 female, 20 male) between the ages of 21 and 24. Using the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm, tooth models were aligned, and after the segmentation process, models were transformed into depth images. The local discrete cosine transform (DCT) was used in the process of feature extraction, and the random forest (RF) algorithm was used for the process of classification. Classification was performed using 30 different seeds for random generator values and 10-fold cross-validation. A value of 85.166% was obtained for average classification accuracy (CA) and a value of 91.75% for the area under the ROC curve (AUC). A multi-disciplinary study is performed here that includes computer sciences, medicine and dentistry. A smart system is proposed for the determination of gender from 3D digital models of maxillary tooth plaster models. This study has the capacity to extend the field of gender determination from teeth. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Hydrogeology of Gypsum formations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klimchouk A.

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Detailed explanation of hydrogeological characteristics of gypsum aquifers is given in various situations: deep-seated karst-confined conditions, subjacent, entrenched and denuded karst types-semi-confined, phreatic and vadose conditions. The hydrogeological evolution of barren exposed gypsum karst and flow velocities in gypsum karst aquifers is also discussed.

  4. MODIFIED GYPSUM BINDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KONDRATEVA N. V.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Statement of the problem. A disadvantage of the gypsum binder is the limited water resistance of products that historically led to the use of gypsum products mostly for internal construction and finishing works. To regulate the process of hydration and structure formation of the use of chemical additives that are introduced with the mixing water or in the production of the binder. As a rule, substances that increase the solubility of the gypsum binder referred to as the hardening accelerator, and substances which retard the solubility of the inhibitors of hardening of the mixture. Most accelerators and retarders hardening affect adversely on the final strength of the mixture. More effective impact on gypsum binder additives have plasticizers. The purpose of the article. Getting gypsum binder modified with the aim of improving its water resistance and improvement of some technological factors (the time of hardening, water gypsum ratio, etc. would reduce its shortcomings and expand the scope of application of the binder. Conclusion. The result of the research reviewed changes in the basic properties of the gypsum binder with the introduction of additives, plasticizers, and selected the most effective supplements to significantly reduce water gypsum ratio, to improve strength properties and to obtain gypsum binder more dense structure.

  5. Use of waste gypsum to replace natural gypsum as set retarders in portland cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandara, Chea; Azizli, Khairun Azizi Mohd; Ahmad, Zainal Arifin; Sakai, Etsuo

    2009-05-01

    The present study is focused on clarifying the influence of waste gypsum (WG) in replacing natural gypsum (NG) in the production of ordinary Portland cement (OPC). WG taken from slip casting moulds in a ceramic factory was formed from the hydration of plaster of paris. Clinker and 3-5wt% of WG was ground in a laboratory ball mill to produce cement waste gypsum (CMWG). The same procedure was repeated with NG to substitute WG to prepare cement natural gypsum (CMNG). The properties of NG and WG were investigated via X-ray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC)/thermogravimetric (TG) to evaluate the properties of CMNG and CMWG. The mechanical properties of cement were tested in terms of setting time, flexural and compressive strength. The XRD result of NG revealed the presence of dihydrate while WG contained dihydrate and hemihydrate. The content of dihydrate and hemihydrates were obtained via DSC/TG, and the results showed that WG and NG contained 12.45% and 1.61% of hemihydrate, respectively. Furthermore, CMWG was found to set faster than CMNG, an average of 15.29% and 13.67% faster for the initial and final setting times, respectively. This was due to the presence of hemihydrate in WG. However, the values obtained for flexural and compressive strength were relatively the same for CMNG and CMWG. Therefore, this result provides evidence that WG can be used as an alternative material to NG in the production of OPC.

  6. Interpreting the GyPSuM Tomography Model in Terms of Thermal Heterogeneity and Major Oxide Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremner, P. M.; Forte, A. M.; Simmons, N. A.; Grand, S.

    2017-12-01

    Global seismic mantle tomography has advanced greatly over the past two decades with improved methods and increasing data coverage. However, interpreting these velocity distributions as thermochemical distributions remains challenging, and is the focus of our work here. Several groups of researchers [e.g., Forte & Mitrovica 2001, Cobden et al. 2009] have calculated the sensitivity of density and seismic velocities to temperature and compositional variations to estimate thermochemical heterogeneity in the lower mantle. Building on this work, we have assembled new expressions to calculate these derivatives throughout Earth's mantle, and included five major oxides: SiO2, MgO, FeO, Al2O3, and CaO. To do this, we constructed a layered 1-D compositional Earth model, and calculated its seismic and density profile using the mineral physics software package BurnMan [Cottaar et al. 2014]. Likewise, we calculated a series of profiles by systematically perturbing the compositional structure within individual layers and the temperature. From these profiles, we calculated the temperature and compositional derivatives, and determined the relative perturbations to shear velocity, bulk sound velocity, and density in terms of temperature and mineral concentration. We applied these new expressions to the 3-D GyPSuM tomography model [Simmons et al. 2010] in order to reinterpret the model's heterogeneity in terms of large-scale temperature and major element perturbations. The GyPSuM model is ideal because it incorporates P and S seismic travel times, geodynamic observations related to mantle density (and also includes initial, simplified mineral physical constraints) to simultaneously invert for global distributions of density and P and S velocities. The importance of this analysis is underscored by the ongoing debate concerning the interpretation of the Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces and their dynamic relationship to the convecting mantle. In addition to gaining insight into major

  7. Comparative evaluation of feldespatic crowns fitness made from additional silicon impression and gypsum cast by CAD/CAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faramarz Zakavi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Marginal fit is one of the key factors in the success of fixed restoration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the fitness of feldespatic crowns made from additional silicon impression and gypsum cast by CAD/CAM.   Materials and Methods: 10 intact extracted upper premolar teeth were used for this experimental study. After preparation of the mounted teeth with radial shoulder finish line, 2 Vita Mark II feldespatic CAD/CAM machined crowns were fabricated for each tooth (one from scanning the additional silicone impression of the prepared tooth and the other one from the plaster model. Marginal gap of each crown was measured using SEM in two points on the mesial and 2 points on the buccal surface. Data were analyzed using Paired t-test with SPSS version 17 software (P<0.05.   Results: The mean of marginal gaps in crowns fabricated from additional silicone and model plaster were (155.13±37.11 and (130.18±12.35, respectively. However, no significant difference emerged between marginal gaps of the two methods (P=0.055. Also, the mean of marginal gaps in crowns fabricated from additional silicone and model plaster was higher in mesial (157.82±44.41 compared to buccal (127.50±24.26 region (P=0.003.   Conclusion: Marginal fit was not significantly differen ce between crown s made of the plaster casts and silicone molds and both methods showed the same results .

  8. Gypsum crystals observed in experimental and natural sea ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geilfus, Nicolas-Xavier; Galley, Ryan; Cooper, Marc

    2013-01-01

    of authigenic gypsum in sea ice during its formation represents a new observation of precipitate formation and potential marine deposition in polar seas. Citation: Geilfus, N.-X., R. J. Galley, M. Cooper, N. Halden, A. Hare, F. Wang, D. H. Søgaard, and S. Rysgaard (2013), Gypsum crystals observed......Although gypsum has been predicted to precipitate in sea ice, it has never been observed. Here we provide the first report on gypsum precipitation in both experimental and natural sea ice. Crystals were identified by X-ray diffraction analysis. Based on their apparent distinguishing characteristics......, the gypsum crystals were identified as being authigenic. The FREeZing CHEMistry (FREZCHEM) model results support our observations of both gypsum and ikaite precipitation at typical in situ sea ice temperatures and confirms the “Gitterman pathway” where gypsum is predicted to precipitate. The occurrence...

  9. Consolidation of renders and plasters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    van Hees, R.; Veiga, R.; Slížková, Zuzana

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 1 (2017), s. 50-65 ISSN 1359-5997 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219 Keywords : consolidants * plasters * requirements * selection * assessment Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage OBOR OECD: Materials engineering Impact factor: 2.607, year: 2016 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1617/s11527-016-0894-5

  10. Thermophysical properties of hydrophobised lime plasters - The influence of ageing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlíková, Milena; Zemanová, Lucie; Pavlík, Zbyšek

    2017-07-01

    The building envelope is a principal responsible for buildings energy loses. Lime plasters as the most popular finishing materials of historical buildings and culture monuments influence the thermal behaviour as well as construction material of masonry. On this account, the effect of ageing on the thermophysical properties of a newly designed lime plasters containing hydrophobic admixture is analysed in the paper. For the comparative purposes, the reference lime plaster is tested. The ageing is accelerated with controlled carbonation process to simulate the final plasters properties. Basic characterization of the tested materials is done using bulk density, matrix density, and porosity measurements. Thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity are experimentally assessed using a transient impulse method. The obtained data revealed the significant changes of the both studied thermal parameters in the dependence on plasters composition and age. The assessed material parameters will be stored in a material database, where will find use as an input data for computational modelling of heat transport in this type of porous building materials and evaluation of energy-savings and sustainability issues.

  11. Dehydration of gypsum rock by solar energy: preliminary study

    OpenAIRE

    López-Delgado, Aurora; López-Andrés, Sol; Padilla, Isabel; Alvarez, M.; Galindo, R.; Váquez, A. J.

    2014-01-01

    The dehydration process of gypsum rock was studied under concentrated solar energy by using a Fresnel lens with power density of 260 Wcm-2. Temperatures higher than 700¿C were attained for 1 min of solar exposure. The effect of grain size of sample and radiation exposure time on the formation of bassanite and anhydrite was studied by XRD. The complete transformation of dihydrate into hemihydrate and/or anhydrate phases is complete for the finer size sample. Plaster composed of 92.7% of anhydr...

  12. Compaction of FGD-gypsum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoop, B.T.J.; Larbi, J.A.; Heijnen, W.M.M.

    1996-01-01

    It is shown that it is possible to produce compacted gypsum with a low porosity and a high strength on a laboratory scale by uniaxial compaction of flue gas desulphurization (FGD-) gypsum powder. Compacted FGD-gypsum cylinders were produced at a compaction pres-sure between 50 and 500 MPa yielding

  13. Heat storage in gypsum. Final report to the Energy Agency; Vaermelagring i Gips. Slutrapport foer Energimyndigheten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhuri, Punya (Process Improvements, Plankgatan 26, Norrkoeping (Sweden)); Kindh, Torgny (Environnet AB, Norrkoeping (Sweden)); Lawrence, David; Wahlstroem, Krister (Dept. of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linkoeping Univ., Linkoeping (Sweden))

    2007-06-15

    The Swedish Energy Agency's project 'energy storage in gypsum', began in April 2007 and finished a year later. The objective was to demonstrate the potential of using gypsum to store and retrieve low-grade heat at a pilot scale (i.e. using 200 kg of gypsum). Gypsum undergoes a reversible reaction with water in which it stores or releases energy. Preliminary work indicated that when using commercially available gypsum powder, a packed bed would not allow sufficient mass or heat transfer. Preliminary work also revealed that simple fluidization was not possible with the very fine particles: stirred fluidization was the solution used. A pilot-scale unit was constructed (essentially a closed tank about 1 m in diameter and 1 m high). To store energy, hot, dry air is contacted with the gypsum to bring the temperature of the powder to about 110 deg C. Once the powder is 'dried' it is returned to room temperature and isolated from the surroundings - in this state energy is stored indefinitely. To recover the heat, water was atomized, mixed with warm air (to vaporize the water) and reacted with the gypsum. Typically we were able to recover about 6 kWh of energy, which is only about 20% of what is possible. This is partly the result of too little insulation on the reactor and a hesitation to over-hydrate the gypsum (which would result in solid plaster). We anticipate that this will at least double with increased operating experience. Overall gypsum behaves at a pilot scale as was expected; in terms of energy storage for space heating, it shows great promise. Our experiences to date have shown that using gypsum with a larger particle size (to allow simple fluidization) is an important improvement.

  14. Mechanism of gypsum hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacheco, G.

    1991-06-01

    Full Text Available There is an hypothesis that the mechanism o f gypsum hydration and dehydration is performed through two simultaneous phenomena. In this study we try to clear up this phenomenon using chlorides as accelerators or a mixture of ethanol-methanol as retarders to carry out the gypsum setting. Natural Mexican gypsum samples and a hemihydrate prepared in the laboratory are used. The following analytical techniques are used: MO, DRX, DTA, TG and DTG. In agreement with the obtained results, it can be concluded: that colloid formation depends on the action of accelerators or retarders and the crystals are a consequence of the quantity of hemihydrate formed.

    En el mecanismo de hidratación y deshidratación del yeso existe la hipótesis de que éste se efectúa por dos fenómenos simultáneos. Este estudio intenta esclarecer estos fenómenos, empleando: cloruros como aceleradores o mezcla etanol-metanol como retardadores para efectuar el fraguado del yeso. Se emplean muestras de yeso de origen natural mexicano y hemihydrate preparado en laboratorio; se utilizan técnicas analíticas: MO, DRX, DTA, TG y DTG. De acuerdo a los resultados obtenidos se puede deducir: que la formación del coloide depende de la acción de los agentes aceleradores o retardadores y que los cristales son consecuencia de la cantidad de hemihidrato formado.

  15. The hydrophobic modification of gypsum binder by peat products: physico-chemical and technological basis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Misnikov

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Gypsum binder is a quick-setting and fast-hardening material that is used widely in the construction industry for plastering and as an ingredient of concrete, other binding materials, etc. The issue addressed here is its short shelf life (around three months which arises because it is hygroscopic, i.e. it readily absorbs moisture and begins to set during transport and storage. The main methods that are currently available for protecting gypsum binder against unwanted exposure to moisture and water vapour are considered, and hydrophobic modification with the bitumen released during peat thermolysis (a method previously considered for cement is proposed as a promising alternative. Because there is overlap in the temperature ranges used in the manufacture of gypsum binder and those required for the initial stages of thermal decomposition of the organic matter in peat, it is expected that hydrophobisation could be achieved during the established manufacturing process without any changes to plant or procedures. The optimum concentration of organic (peat additive for gypsum rock mined from the Shushokskoye deposit in Russia is derived experimentally. With 0.5–1 % of peat additive, the strength grading of the gypsum plaster is preserved and its storage time without caking and hydration increases, even under adverse conditions (100 % relative humidity. The proposed method is compatible with current gypsum production technology, it does not require any changes in equipment, and the prices of mineral raw materials and semi-finished peat products are approximately the same. Thus, the incorporation of hydrophobic modification using peat into the manufacturing process for gypsum binder is unlikely to increase the cost of the product.

  16. Thermophysical properties of hydrophobised lime plaster - Experimental analysis of moisture effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlíková, Milena; Pernicová, Radka; Pavlík, Zbyšek

    2016-07-01

    Lime plasters are the most popular finishing materials in renewal of historical buildings and culture monuments. Because of their limited durability, new materials and design solutions are investigated in order to improve plasters performance in harmful environmental conditions. For the practical use, the plasters mechanical resistivity and the compatibility with substrate are the most decisive material parameters. However, also plasters hygric and thermal parameters affecting the overall hygrothermal function of the renovated structures are of the particular importance. On this account, the effect of moisture content on the thermophysical properties of a newly designed lime plasters containing hydrophobic admixture is analysed in the paper. For the comparative purposes, the reference lime and cement-lime plasters are tested as well. Basic characterization of the tested materials is done using bulk density, matrix density, and porosity measurements. Thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity in the broad range of moisture content are experimentally accessed using a transient impulse method. The obtained data reveals the significant increase of the both studied thermal parameters with increasing moisture content and gives information on plasters behaviour in a highly humid environment and/or in the case of their possible direct contact with liquid water. The accessed material parameters will be stored in a material database, where can find use as an input data for computational modelling of coupled heat and moisture transport in this type of porous building materials.

  17. Gypsum karst in Western Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klimchouk A.

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The great gypsum karst of the Western Ukraine, which is associated with Miocene (Badenian gypsum, provides the worlds foremost examples of intrastratal gypsum karst and speleogenesis under artesian conditions. Differential neotectonic movements have resulted in various parts of the territory displaying different types (stages of intrastratal karst, from deep-seated, through subjacent, to entrenched. Internal gypsum karstification proceeded mainly under confined hydrogeological conditions. While such development still continues in part of the territory, other parts exhibit entrenched karst settings. Huge relict maze cave systems have been explored here, five of which are currently the longest known gypsum caves in the world. They account for well over half of the total length of gypsum cave that has been explored. This unique concentration of large caves reflects the local coincidence of specific structural prerequisites of speleogenesis (character and extent of fissuring, favourable regional evolution (rapid uplift, and fossilization of maze systems, the presence of overlying limestone aquifers, and a widespread clayey protective cover (which prevented the total infilling and/or destruction of the caves. Surface karst evolved as a consequence of the internal karstification in the gypsum, and the karst landform assemblages differ between the territories that present different types of karst.

  18. Atomic Oxygen Cleaning of Unpainted Plaster Sculptures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Miller, Sharon K.

    2017-01-01

    Atomic oxygen erosion of polymers has been found to be a threat to spacecraft in low Earth orbit. As a result ground facilities have been developed to identify coatings to protect polymers such as used for solar array blankets. As a result of extensive laboratory testing, it was discovered that soot and other organic contamination on paintings could be readily removed by atomic oxygen interactions with minimal damage to the artwork. No method, other than dusting, has been found to be effective in the cleaning of unpainted plaster sculptures This presentation discusses the atomic oxygen interaction processes and how effective they are for cleaning soot damaged unpainted plaster sculptures.

  19. The Jettencave, Southern Harz Mountains, Germany: Geophysical observations and a structural model of a shallow cave in gypsum/anhydrite-bearing rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Georg; Romanov, Douchko

    2017-12-01

    Gypsum and anhydrite are soluble rocks, where fissures and bedding partings can be enlarged with time by the dissolution of the mineral species through water. The selective enlargement results in sub-surface voids acting as preferential flow path for the drainage of the rock. With time, larger cavities develop, and a network of cave passages can evolve. If the enlarged cave voids are not too deep under the surface, geophysical measurements can be used to detect, identify and trace these structures. We have used gravity measurements (GRAV), electrical resistivity imaging (ERI), self-potential measurements (SP), electrical conductivity measurements (EC), and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) above the cave Jettenhöhle, a cave located in the southern Harz Mountains in Germany. The Jettencave is developed in the Hauptanhydrit formation of the Permian Zechstein sequence, characterised by large breakdown rooms and an exposed water table. The overburden of the cave is only around 10-15 m, and dolomitic rocks are located in close vicinity. We present results from our geophysical surveys in vicinity of the cave. We are able to identify the cave geometry from GRAV, ERI, and GPR measurements, which distinguish the local lithology of the Permian Zechstein rocks in the area. From the ERI and EC measurements, we derive information on the void volume in the soluble rocks. We finally present a three-dimensional structural model of the Jettencave and its surroundings, based on our geophysical results and the hydrological interpretation.

  20. Thermochemical reduction of pelletized gypsum mixed with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This can facilitate recovery of treatment costs and prevention of environmental pollution from gypsum waste-dumps. Thermal reduction using rotary kilns to recover valuable materials from waste gypsum remains a critical and controversial process because of waste gypsum handling problems, environmental pollution due to ...

  1. Growth of indoor fungi on gypsum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segers, Frank J J; van Laarhoven, Karel A; Wosten, Han; Dijksterhuis, Jan

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: To have a better understanding of fungal growth on gypsum building materials to prevent indoor fungal growth. METHODS AND RESULTS: Gypsum is acquired by mining or as a by-product of flue-gas desulfurization or treatment of phosphate ore for the production of fertilizer. Natural gypsum,

  2. Study of plaster finishes on San Pedro de los Francos church at Calatayud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez de Rojas, Mª I

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This study of the plaster finishes on San Pedro de los Francos Church at Calatayud revealed, firstly, the stratigraphic sequence based on the interpretation of the bonding interfaces; and secondly, the evolution of placement techniques from mudéjar style textured and painted false stonework (15th century to the smooth plastering and paint typical of later phases. Finally, scanning electron microscope (SEM, energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX and X-ray diffraction (XRD studies showed that gypsum and anhydrite are the main components of both binder and aggregate in these mortars. In other words, they constitute traditional multiphase plasters whose coarser particles or aggregate were a byproduct of the artisanal manufacturing process.El estudio de los enlucidos de la iglesia de San Pedro de los Francos de Calatayud ha permitido demostrar, en primer lugar, la secuencia estratigráfica mediante la lectura de la interfase de adherencia; en segundo lugar, la evolución de las técnicas de aplicación, desde el enlucido mudéjar, un fingido de piedra agramilado y pintado (siglo XV, hasta los enlucidos lisos y pinturas aplicados posteriormente. Y, finalmente, a través de los estudios de microscopía electrónica de barrido (SEM, microanálisis por energía dispersiva de rayos X (EDX y de difracción de rayos X (DRX, se ha determinado que son morteros en los que tanto el conglomerante como el árido son yeso y anhidrita, que correspondería a un yeso tradicional multifase, cuyos granos más gruesos analizados como áridos proceden del producto obtenido artesanalmente.

  3. The Multifaceted Role of Plaster Casts in Contemporary Museums

    OpenAIRE

    Moyeda, Alissa Ann

    2017-01-01

    Plaster casts typically based on well known artworks were displayed in European and American museums and galleries prior to the twentieth century. Though popular, these plaster casts were never seen to be equivalent in value to the original, authentic pieces. In recent years there has been a resurgence of interest in plaster casts and many museums collections have been pulling casts out of storage to put on display. Current usage of casts in European and American museums is overwhelmingly for...

  4. Cutaneous irritancy of an ibuprofen medicated plaster in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maganji, Manisha; Connolly, Mark P; Bhatt, Aomesh

    2018-04-01

    To assess the irritation and contact sensitization potential of a 200 mg ibuprofen medicated plaster. This double-blind, phase-1 placebo controlled study had two phases; the induction phase to evaluate the irritant potential of continuous application of the plaster, and the challenge phase to assess contact sensitivity (allergy). The cumulative irritancy potential was evaluated using an adaptation of the Shelanski method. Healthy adults (≥18 years of age) (N = 210) were treated simultaneously with one ibuprofen medicated and one placebo plaster applied in a randomized fashion to either the left or right side of the lower back. During the induction phase, plasters were applied on Days 1, 3, 5, 8, 10, 12, 15, 17, and 19 and the final plaster removed on Day 22. At each scheduled visit plasters and applications sites were assessed for degree of adhesion and skin irritation (score of 1 = no irritation to 7 = strong reaction spreading beyond test sites), respectively. The challenge phase followed a two-week washout period. A plaster was applied on Day 36 for 48 h and assessment occurred on Days 38, 39, and 40. The mean cumulative irritation score during the induction phase was lower for the ibuprofen medicated plaster than the placebo plaster (0.32 vs. 1.23, respectively). Three (1.4%) subjects experience a dermal reaction of grade ≥3 for the ibuprofen medicated plaster compared with 27 (12.7%) for the placebo plaster. Following challenge with ibuprofen or placebo plasters, 12 subjects (6.2%) with the ibuprofen medicated plaster and four (2.2%) with the placebo plaster had skin reaction of assessment grade higher than the induction phase. One subject for the ibuprofen and two for the placebo plaster had reactions with grade >2. No subjects showed an increase in sensitization on Day 39 or 40 compared with Day 38. The findings indicate that the both the irritancy and contact sensitization of the ibuprofen medicated plaster is acceptable.

  5. Water-resistant gypsum binder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panchenko Alexander I.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors developed a multi-component gypsum binder (MGB with an improved (by 1.8 to 2.2 times water resistance value in comparison with the initial gypsum and a softening factor value within the range of 0.85 to 0.91 through the introduction of a complex additive containing carbide mud and bio-silica. The use of a complex additive provides for the formation of a denser structure due to the formation of low-base calcium hydrated silicates at early stages of the hardening process under wet or dry air conditions. The developed binding agent has a lower (by 2.5 to 3 times open porosity, a greater compressive strength (by 1.4 to 1.6 times for a dry state and by 2.6 times in a water-saturated state and does not require any special curing conditions in contrast to the other multi-component gypsum binders. The authors show the influence of mud-and-silica additive on the properties of hardened MGB and suggest a method of computation of the optimum MGB composition for given components.

  6. Experimental and numerical studies of hybrid PCM embedded in plastering mortar for enhanced thermal behaviour of buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kheradmand, Mohammad; Azenha, Miguel; Aguiar, José L.B. de; Castro-Gomes, João

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a methodology for improvement of energy efficiency in buildings through the innovative simultaneous incorporation of three distinct phase change materials (here termed as hybrid PCM) in plastering mortars for façade walls. The thermal performance of a hybrid PCM mortar was experimentally evaluated by comparing the behaviour of a prototype test cell (including hybrid PCM plastering mortar) subjected to realistic daily temperature profiles, with the behaviour of a similar prototype test cell, in which no PCM was added. A numerical simulation model was employed (using ANSYS-FLUENT) to validate the capacity of simulating temperature evolution within the prototype containing hybrid PCM, as well as to understand the contribution of hybrid PCM to energy efficiency. Incorporation of hybrid PCM into plastering mortars was found to have the potential to significantly reduce heating/cooling temperature demands for maintaining the interior temperature within comfort levels when compared to normal mortars (without PCM), or even mortars comprising a single type of PCM. - Highlights: • New concept of incorporation of more than 1 type of PCM in plastering mortars (hybrid PCM). • Assessment of thermal performance of hybrid PCM plastering mortar. • Thermo-physical properties of plastering mortars modified with PCMs incorporation. • Experimental and numerical simulations of thermal behaviour on laboratory scale prototype.

  7. Antipyretic and anti-asthmatic activities of traditional Chinese herb-pairs, Ephedra and Gypsum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Fen; Xing, Xue-Feng; Tang, Qing-Fa; Chen, Fei-Long; Guo, Yang; Song, Shuai; Tan, Xiao-Mei; Luo, Jia-Bo

    2016-06-01

    Mahuang-Shigao herb-pair is a famous formula composed of Ephedra and Gypsum. The herb-pair is frequently used for treating cold symptoms and bronchial asthma in the clinical practice of Chinese medicine (CM). In the present study, we evaluated evidence for the benefit of combined use of Ephedra and Gypsum by analyzing the antipyretic and anti-asthmatic activities of Ephedra-Gypsum. The antipyretic effects of Ephedra-Gypsum were evaluated in yeast-induced hyperthermia test. Thirty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 5 groups, including control group, standard aspirin group, and 3 Ephedra- Gypsum groups of different doses (6, 12, 24 g/kg). Ephedra-Gypsum extract and asprin were administered orally 6 h after the injection of yeast solution and body temperature was measured every 1 h for 8 h. The antiasthmatic effects of Ephedra-Gypsum were evaluated using an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthmatic rat model. Thirty-six male SD rats were randomly divided into 6 groups. Rats were alternately sensitized and OVA+Al(OH) challenged by exposure to mists of ovalbumin. Ephedra-Gypsum extracts (6, 12, 24 g/kg) or dexamethasone were administered 45 min prior to the allergen challenge for 8 days. Latent period and the weight of wet to dry ratio of lung were determined. In addition, the eosinophils in blood and white blood cell (WBC) were counted by an YZ-Hemavet Analyzer. The Ephedra-Gypsum extracts at test dose (6, 12, 24 g/kg) significantly and dose-dependently attenuated yeast-induced fever in rats. The Ephedra-Gypsum extracts also prolonged the latent period, reduced OVA-induced increases in eosinophils and WBC, and decreased the wet and dry weight ratio of the lungs in the anti-asthmatic test. These findings indicate that the Ephedra-Gypsum extract has antipyretic and anti-asthmatic properties. Hence, the results support additional scientific evidence in prescriptions.

  8. Investigation of field temperature in moulds of foamed plaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pawlak

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Plaster moulds used in precision foundry are characterized by a very low permeability which, in the case of classic plaster moulds, equals to about 0,01÷0,02 m2/(MPa·s. One of the most effective methods for increasing the permeability is a foaming treatment. Another characteristic feature of plaster is its very good insulating power which has influence on the process of solidification and cooling of a cast and also on a knock-out property. This insulating power is a function of thermophysical properties of plaster which, in turn, depend mainly on the mineralogical composition of the mould material, its bulk density as well as on the temperature of the pouring alloy. In the case of a foamed plaster mould an increase of the degree of foaming increases its porosity which causes a change in its thermophysical properties, thereby increasing susceptibility of the mass to overheating. The susceptibility of the plaster layer surrounding the cast to overheating is favorable because it makes it easier to knock-out of the cast by immersing the hot mould in cold water. Thermal and phase tensions that are created during this process cause fast destruction of plaster. This paper describes our investigations aimed at the determination of the dependence of the mould temperature field on the time of the cast stay in the mould, as recorded in a process of an unsteady heat flow. The determined data were planned to be used for estimation of the technological properties of the plaster mould. The tests were carried out using the plaster α-Supraduro and Alkanol XC (foaming agent. The test mould had a diameter of Ø 120 mm with centrally situated mould cavity of Ø 30 mm. Plaster moulds with a degree of foaming 20; 32,5 and 45% and comparatively from non-foaming plaster were tested and their temperatures were measured at the distance x=2; 9; 21; 25;27; 30 mm from the mould cavity within 25 min. Analysis of the results leads to the conclusion, that the highest

  9. Development of Latent Heat Storage Phase Change Material Containing Plaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana BAJARE

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the development of latent heat storage Phase Change Material (PCM containing plaster as in passive application. Due to the phase change, these materials can store higher amounts of thermal energy than traditional building materials and can be used to add thermal inertia to lightweight constructions. It was shown that the use of PCMs have advantages stabilizing the room temperature variations during summer days, provided sufficient night ventilation is allowed. Another advantage of PCM usage is stabilized indoor temperature on the heating season. The goal of this study is to develop cement and lime based plaster containing microencapsulated PCM. The plaster is expected to be used for passive indoor applications and enhance the thermal properties of building envelope. The plaster was investigated under Scanning Electron Microscope and the mechanical, physical and thermal properties of created plaster samples were determined.

  10. Growth of indoor fungi on gypsum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segers, F J J; van Laarhoven, K A; Wösten, H A B; Dijksterhuis, J

    2017-08-01

    To have a better understanding of fungal growth on gypsum building materials to prevent indoor fungal growth. Gypsum is acquired by mining or as a by-product of flue-gas desulphurization or treatment of phosphate ore for the production of fertilizer. Natural gypsum, flue-gas gypsum and phosphogypsum therefore have different mineral compositions. Here, growth of fungi on these types of gypsum was assessed. Conidia of the indoor fungi Aspergillus niger, Cladosporium halotolerans and Penicillium rubens were inoculated and observed using microscopic techniques including low-temperature scanning electron microscopy. Elemental analysis of gypsum was done using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy and segmented flow analysis. Moisture content of the gypsum was determined using a dynamic vapour sorption apparatus. Aspergillus niger, C. halotolerans and P. rubens hardly germinated on natural gypsum and flue-gas gypsum. The latter two fungi did show germination, outgrowth, and conidiation on phosphogypsum, while A. niger hardly germinated on this substrate. Other experiments show that C. halotolerans and P. rubens can develop in pure water, but A. niger does not. The observations show that the lack of germination of three indoor fungi is explained by the low amount of phosphor in natural, flue-gas and laboratory-grade gypsum. Additionally, C. halotolerans and P. rubens can develop in pure water, while conidia of A. niger do not show any germination, which is explained by the need for organic molecules of this species to induce germination. Indoor fungal growth is a potential threat to human health and causes damage to building materials. This study possibly helps in the application of the right type of gypsum in buildings. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  11. Mineral potential of clays that cover the gypsum deposits in Araripina-PE region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lira, B.B.; Anjos, I.F. dos; Rego, S.A.B.C.

    2011-01-01

    In the present work the applicability of the clays that cover the deposits of Gypsum Plaster in the region of Araripina - PE for use as the ceramic pigments and for bricks production in the red ceramic industry was analyzed. The clay minerals contained the illite, kaolinite and smectite, with high proportion of the last one. The possibility of industrial application of this mineral clay is considerable; however, the mining industries that mine and process the gypsum in the region do not take the clays into account as the potential mineral. In general, industries use the clay minerals in manufacturing processes or as key raw materials, or as the alternatives for some kinds of the chemical processing industries. This paper aims to highlight the potential of materials that cover the deposits of gypsum in reference. The material sampled from different deposit layers was characterized and the physical treatment of ore was applied. The results showed that the material analyzed can be used in various kinds of industry, such as the production of natural ceramic pigments. (author)

  12. Effect of preparation variables of plaster molds for slip casting of sanitary ware

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael E. Ochoa

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A full factorial design was used to evaluate the effect of various preparation conditions for making plaster molds for slip casting of sanitary ware. We investigated the relationships between the processing conditions, microstructure, and final properties of the plaster molds. The results showed that the rheological behavior, and hence, the time during which the plaster suspension is pourable for making the plaster molds (before an important increase in viscosity due to the precipitation of gypsum crystals were dependent on the preparation conditions. Variations in the chemical composition, pore size distribution, and microstructure explained the statistically significant effect of preparation variables (including the mixing time, water temperature, and water quality. Preparation conditions that promoted high initial viscosity of the plaster suspension (accelerative effect of the setting time developed less porous structure in the mold that principally increased the compressive strength (16%, deionized water instead of tap water and the casting rate (9%, water at 25 °C instead of 38 °C. According to the results are proposed optimum conditions to make the molds while avoiding unnecessary energy use. Resumen: Mediante un diseño factorial completo se evaluaron diferentes condiciones de preparación de moldes de yeso para colado tradicional de muebles sanitarios. Se investigó la relación entre procesamiento, microestructura y propiedades del molde. Los resultados mostraron que el comportamiento reológico y por lo tanto el tiempo durante el cual la suspensión de yeso se puede verter para conformar los moldes (antes de un incremento importante de viscosidad debido a la formación de cristales de yeso fueron dependientes de las condiciones de preparación. Variaciones en composición química, distribución de tamaño de poro y microestructura explicaron el efecto estadísticamente significativo de las variables de preparación (que incluyeron

  13. Gypsum hydration: a theoretical and experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Qingliang; Brouwers, Jos; de Korte, A.C.J.; Fischer, H.B; Bode, K.A.

    2009-01-01

    Calcium sulphate dihydrate (CaSO4·2H2O or gypsum) is used widely as building material because of its excellent fire resistance, aesthetics, and low price. Hemihydrate occurs in two formations of α- and β-type. Among them β-hemihydrate is mainly used to produce gypsum plasterboard since the hydration

  14. CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF SOME NIGERIAN GYPSUM AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    X-ray fluorescence analyzer (XRF) was employed in the analysis of some local and imported stocks of gypsum and limestone utilized by a leading cement manufacturing industry in Nigeria. In addition, the recycled dust standard reference samples were also analyzed along with the raw materials in question. The gypsum ...

  15. Thermochemical reduction of pelletized gypsum mixed with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-04-03

    Apr 3, 2015 ... problems and improve waste gypsum conversion yields, pelletization of waste gypsum in the presence of binders (starch and cellulose) ... construction of a 20 Mℓ/d emergency neutralization plant for. AMD treatment as one ... powders derived from agricultural residues such as maize cobs are comparable to ...

  16. Health economic evidence of 5% lidocaine medicated plaster in post-herpetic neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liedgens H

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Hiltrud Liedgens,1 Marko Obradovic,1 Mark Nuijten2 1Grunenthal GmbH, Aachen, Germany; 2Ars Accessus Medica, Amsterdam, the Netherlands Background: Post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN is the most common and most debilitating complication of herpes zoster, and involves considerable associated costs. Objective: This paper presents results from nine health economic studies undertaken in eight European countries that compared lidocaine medicated plaster with gabapentin and/or pregabalin in PHN. It aims to support the increasing need for published cost-effectiveness data for health care decision-making processes in Europe. Methods: All studies were based on a similar core Markov model with data derived from clinical trials, local Delphi panels, and official national price and tariff lists. The main outcome measure was cost per quality-adjusted life year gained; time without pain or intolerable adverse events was also included as a secondary outcome measure. All studies focused on an elderly population of patients with PHN who had insufficient pain relief with standard analgesics and could not tolerate or had contraindications to tricyclic antidepressants. Results: Despite considerable differences in many of the variables used, the results showed remarkable similarity and suggested that use of lidocaine medicated plaster offered cost-savings in many of the countries studied, where it proved a highly cost-effective alternative to both gabapentin and pregabalin. Conclusion: Lidocaine medicated plaster is a cost-effective alternative to gabapentin and pregabalin in the treatment of PHN. These savings are largely the result of the superior safety profile of the lidocaine medicated plaster. Keywords: post-herpetic neuralgia, zoster, cost-effectiveness, lidocaine, plaster

  17. Ternary binder based plasters with improved thermal insulating ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čáchová, M.; Koňáková, D.; Vejmelková, E.; Vyšvařil, M.

    2017-10-01

    New kind of plasters with improved thermal insulating ability are presented in this article. Improvement was reached by utilization of lightweight expanded perlite with high porosity. The second used aggregate was silica sand. Regarding the binder, three kind were combined for the reason of better plaster performance. Pure lime, Portland cement and pozzolanic ceramic powder were employed. Basic physical properties and thermal characteristics were determined. The porosity of plasters reached desired higher value about 50% and the thermal conductivity in dry state was lower than 0.16 Wm‑1K‑1.

  18. Effect of an admixture from Agave americana on the physical and mechanical properties of plaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ochoa, J. C.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Physical and mechanical properties of a plaster paste added with an organic admixture, of the leaves of Agave americana, were studied. Plastic consistency behavior was evaluated and the water/gypsum(w/g ratio was determined for each dosage of the admixture. Admixtur eeffect on setting was evaluated too. The chemical transformation of the hemihydrated form to gypsum (dihydrated form was studied using a novel technique based on a moisture analyzer by halogen light. Flexural and compressive strengths were measured. The results show that ,for the same consistency, accordingly mechanical strengths were improved too. The setting times were increased which would enhance the application time of plaster and would reduce plastic shrinkage, common problems in this type of material. The changes in these physical properties not substantially affect the final mechanical strengths.

    Se estudiaron algunas propiedades físicas y mecánicas de pastas de yeso de construcción adicionadas con un aditivo de origen orgánico, producto de las hojas de la planta Agave americana. Se evaluó el comportamiento plástico de la pasta mediante ensayos de consistencia y se determinó, para cada dosificación, su relación agua/ yeso (a/y. Se evaluó la incidencia del aditivo en los tiempos de fraguado. La transformación química del hemihidrato a yeso dihidrato se estudió mediante una novedosa técnica basada en un analizador de humedad por luz halógena. Se midieron las resistencias mecánicas a flexo-tracción y a compresión. Los resultados del estudio muestran que, para una misma consistencia, se mejoran las resistencias mecánicas. Los tiempos de fraguado de la pasta se aumentaron lo que ayudaría mejorar los tiempos de aplicación del yeso y a disminuir las retracciones plásticas. Las modificaciones de estas propiedades físicas no afectan considerablemente las resistencias mecánicas finales.

  19. Investigation of the type and content of gypsum on the dimensional stability and mechanical properties of gypsum particleboard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Rangavar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study in order to investigate the effect of gypsum type on the physical and mechanical properties of gypsum Particleboard were used from two type Jebel and Micronize gypsum. To obtain the suitable amount of gypsum in manufacturing gypsum particleboard was used from the three levels 2.5:1, 2.75:1 and 3:1 of gypsum to dried mass of wooden materials. Physical and mechanical properties of manufactured board were carried out in accordance with European Norms (EN standard. The result showed that gypsum particleboard manufactured Jebel gypsum have the most mechanical properties (Bending strength, modulus of elasticity and internal bond strength, but physical properties (water absorption and thickness swelling of this boards was more than the boards manufactured from Micronize gypsum. Furthermore using 2.75 times gypsum to dried mass of wooden materials is also suitable in production gypsum particleboard.

  20. Measurement of soil moisture using gypsum blocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis Dela, B.

    For the past 50 years, gypsum blocks have been used to determine soil moisture content. This report describes a method for calibrating gypsum blocks for soil moisture measurements. Moisture conditions inside a building are strongly influenced by the moisture conditions in the soil surrounding...... the building. Consequently, measuring the moisture of the surrounding soil is of great importance for detecting the source of moisture in a building. Up till now, information has been needed to carry out individual calibrations for the different types of gypsum blocks available on the market and to account...

  1. Effects of gypsum on trace metals in soils and earthworms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mined gypsum has been beneficially used for many years as an agricultural amendment. Currently a large amount of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum is produced by removal of SO2 from flue gas streams when fuels with high S content are burned. The FGD gypsum, similar to mined gypsum, can enhance c...

  2. Corrosion of bare and galvanized steel in gypsum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez, Mercedes

    1988-12-01

    Full Text Available Gypsum is a relatively low-cost building material much abounding in our country. When it is put in contact with steel, it may produce high corrosion rates due to its pH value (close to 7. This work reports the results obtained in studying the corrosion rates of bare and galvanized steel in contact with gypsum and plaster, as well as the influence curing thermal treatment applied to gypsum, enviromental relative humidity and addition of compounds with different natures and purposes may have in such process. In-situ observations, as well as the measurement of the Polarization Resistance and the weight loss have been used as measurement technics. From the results obtained it has been possible to deduce that galvanized steel has better behaviour in dry enviroments than bare steel in the same conditions and moist atmosphere induces proportionally more corrosion in galvanized steel than in bare one. Additions to gypsum do not modified these conclusions, though it may be pointed out that addition of nitrites or lime improves the behaviour of bare steel, while galvanized behaviour is not modified. The addition of lime is not recommended because phenomena of dilated along time expansion may take place.

    El yeso es un material de construcción de relativo bajo coste y que, además, es muy abundante en nuestro país. Debido a su pH cercano a la neutralidad, cuando entra en contacto con el acero, este puede corroerse a elevadas velocidades. En esta comunicación se presentan los resultados de un estudio sobre la velocidad de corrosión del acero desnudo y galvanizado en contacto con yeso y escayola y la influencia que tienen: el tratamiento térmico del curado del yeso, la humedad relativa ambiental y la adición de aditivos de diversa naturaleza y finalidad. Como técnicas de medida se han utilizado la medida de la Resistencia de Polarización y de la pérdida de peso, así como observaciones visuales. De los resultados se puede deducir que en

  3. Adsorption of phosphonates on gypsum crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijnen, M.P.C.; Van Rosmalen, G.M.

    1986-01-01

    The absorption of phosphonate inhibitors at the crystal surface of gypsum has been determined from the decrease in phosphonate concentration of the bulk solution. The phosphonate was therefore oxidized to orthophosphate and spectrophotometrically determined as a molybdovanadophosphoric acid complex.

  4. Gypsum and hydrohalite dynamics in sea ice brines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Benjamin M.; Papadimitriou, Stathys; Day, Sarah J.; Kennedy, Hilary

    2017-09-01

    Mineral authigenesis from their dissolved sea salt matrix is an emergent feature of sea ice brines, fuelled by dramatic equilibrium solubility changes in the large sub-zero temperature range of this cryospheric system on the surface of high latitude oceans. The multi-electrolyte composition of seawater results in the potential for several minerals to precipitate in sea ice, each affecting the in-situ geochemical properties of the sea ice brine system, the habitat of sympagic biota. The solubility of two of these minerals, gypsum (CaSO4 ·2H2O) and hydrohalite (NaCl · 2H2O), was investigated in high ionic strength multi-electrolyte solutions at below-zero temperatures to examine their dissolution-precipitation dynamics in the sea ice brine system. The gypsum dynamics in sea ice were found to be highly dependent on the solubilities of mirabilite and hydrohalite between 0.2 and - 25.0 ° C. The hydrohalite solubility between - 14.3 and - 25.0 ° C exhibits a sharp change between undersaturated and supersaturated conditions, and, thus, distinct temperature fields of precipitation and dissolution in sea ice, with saturation occurring at - 22.9 ° C. The sharp changes in hydrohalite solubility at temperatures ⩽-22.9 °C result from the formation of an ice-hydrohalite aggregate, which alters the structural properties of brine inclusions in cold sea ice. Favourable conditions for gypsum precipitation in sea ice were determined to occur in the region of hydrohalite precipitation below - 22.9 ° C and in conditions of metastable mirabilite supersaturation above - 22.9 ° C (investigated at - 7.1 and - 8.2 ° C here) but gypsum is unlikely to persist once mirabilite forms at these warmer (>-22.9 °C) temperatures. The dynamics of hydrohalite in sea ice brines based on its experimental solubility were consistent with that derived from thermodynamic modelling (FREZCHEM code) but the gypsum dynamics derived from the code were inconsistent with that indicated by its

  5. Estimating gypsum equirement under no-till based on machine learning technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaine Margarete Guimarães

    Full Text Available Chemical stratification occurs under no-till systems, including pH, considering that higher levels are formed from the soil surface towards the deeper layers. The subsoil acidity is a limiting factor of the yield. Gypsum has been suggested when subsoil acidity limits the crops root growth, i.e., when the calcium (Ca level is low and/or the aluminum (Al level is toxic in the subsoil layers. However, there are doubts about the more efficient methods to estimate the gypsum requirement. This study was carried out to develop numerical models to estimate the gypsum requirement in soils under no-till system by the use of Machine Learning techniques. Computational analyses of the dataset were made applying the M5'Rules algorithm, based on regression models. The dataset comprised of soil chemical properties collected from experiments under no-till that received gypsum rates on the soil surface, throughout eight years after the application, in Southern Brazil. The results showed that the numerical models generated by rule induction M5'Rules algorithm were positively useful contributing for estimate the gypsum requirements under no-till. The models showed that Ca saturation in the effective cation exchange capacity (ECEC was a more important attribute than Al saturation to estimate gypsum requirement in no-till soils.

  6. Plasters and mortars with extremely high concentrations of radium in Joachimsthal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.; Moucka, L.

    1993-01-01

    In 1898 Mme Curie used wastes from the uranium factory in Joachimsthal for separation of the new element, radium. This waste was unfortunately also used in plasters and mortars for restoration of houses after frequent fires and conflagrations in the past century. Concentrations of 100 kBq.kg -1 and gamma dose rates of 40 μGy.h -1 in contact with the wall are not rare events in these houses; but the wastes are usually not the worst sources of radon there. Results of measurements obtained in a house investigated in detail are evaluated and intercompared, using relations and models (dose rates, exhalation rates, radium and radon concentrations, air exchange rates). Basic remedy measure (knock off of plasters, removal of a vault and of filling under floors) are proposed, and a new measurement is required before providing definitive measures. (author). 2 refs, 4 figs, 3 tabs

  7. Cement Materials Based on Cellulosic Fibers for Plasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hospodarova, Viola; Stevulova, Nadezda; Junak, Jozef; Geffert, Anton; Kacik, Frantisek; Briancin, Jaroslav

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents physical and mechanical properties of cementitious composites/plasters containing cellulosic fibers in portion 2.0% and 5.0% of filler replacement after 28 days of hardening. Cellulosic fibers (Greencel) originated from bleached wood pulp and unbleached waste paper used in this experimental work were characterized from the point of view cellulose structure. Experimental investigations reveal that adding cellulosic fibers reduces composites density (up to 8.2 %) in comparison with composites without any fibers. Moreover, the presence of wood pulp and recycled fibers in composites cause higher values of water absorbability than sample without fibers. Also, the decrease in compressive strength values for tested fiber cement plasters was observed (14.1 - 18.0 MPa) in comparison to reference sample (26.6 MPa). But the identified compressive strength values are in accordance with European standard (5 MPa) for plasters.

  8. Cement Materials Based on Cellulosic Fibers for Plasters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hospodarova Viola

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents physical and mechanical properties of cementitious composites/plasters containing cellulosic fibers in portion 2.0% and 5.0% of filler replacement after 28 days of hardening. Cellulosic fibers (Greencel originated from bleached wood pulp and unbleached waste paper used in this experimental work were characterized from the point of view cellulose structure. Experimental investigations reveal that adding cellulosic fibers reduces composites density (up to 8.2 % in comparison with composites without any fibers. Moreover, the presence of wood pulp and recycled fibers in composites cause higher values of water absorbability than sample without fibers. Also, the decrease in compressive strength values for tested fiber cement plasters was observed (14.1 - 18.0 MPa in comparison to reference sample (26.6 MPa. But the identified compressive strength values are in accordance with European standard (5 MPa for plasters.

  9. Gastrointestinal obstruction due to plaster ingestion: a case-report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashtar Reza

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plaster ingestion forming gastric bezoar is a strange way to attempt suicide and this method has not yet been reported. It may lead to a mechanical obstruction of the gut, especially the pyloric region, and could manifest with abdominal pain, epigastric distress, nausea, vomiting, and fullness. Case presentation Herein we report a case of a 37 year-old woman presenting with plaster ingestion and gastric outlet obstruction, who underwent surgery. At six months follow-up the patient was fully recovered. Conclusion Plaster has no toxic or erosive effects. Endoscopic or surgical removing of such material is recommended. Moreover, psychiatric intervention and management is imperative to prevent recurrence in such cases.

  10. Design of Cold-Formed Steel Screw Connections with Gypsum Sheathing at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Load-bearing cold-formed steel (CFS walls sheathed with double layers of gypsum plasterboard on both sides have demonstrated good fire resistance and attracted increasing interest for use in mid-rise CFS structures. As the main connection method, screw connections between CFS and gypsum sheathing play an important role in both the structural design and fire resistance of this wall system. However, studies on the mechanical behavior of screw connections with double-layer gypsum sheathing are still limited. In this study, 200 monotonic tests of screw connections with single- or double-layer gypsum sheathing at both ambient and elevated temperatures were conducted. The failure of screw connections with double-layer gypsum sheathing in shear was different from that of single-layer gypsum sheathing connections at ambient temperature, and it could be described as the breaking of the loaded sheathing edge combined with significant screw tilting and the loaded sheathing edge flexing fracture. However, the screw tilting and flexing fracture of the loaded sheathing edge gradually disappear at elevated temperatures. In addition, the influence of the loaded edge distance, double-layer sheathing and elevated temperatures is discussed in detail with clear conclusions. A unified design formula for the shear strength of screw connections with gypsum sheathing is proposed for ambient and elevated temperatures with adequate accuracy. A simplified load–displacement model with the post-peak branch is developed to evaluate the load–displacement response of screw connections with gypsum sheathing at ambient and elevated temperatures.

  11. Gypsum bonded investment for micro-structure casting of ZnAl4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Chuang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The effects of sintering temperature on the surface roughness of gypsum bonded investments were investigated to find the appropriate sintering temperature applied for micro-investment casting. The surface roughness tests were carried out at sintering temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1,000 ℃ for investment compounds mixed from calcium sulphate α-hemihydrate and quartz powder (wt.%, 6:4; 5:5, 4:6, 3:7. In this experiment, each investment compound was prepared by pouring the investment materials into a plastic bottle with the good surface roughness (Ra ~0.2 μm. DTA-TG curves were measured using a thermal analyzer to investigate the difference of surface roughness at different temperatures. The results show that the surface roughness of gypsum bonded investment is temperature sensitive. The preheating temperature of the mold should be up to 600 ℃, but not over 700 ℃, and the investment compound with 60 % plaster and 40 % quartz powder is applicable for preparing the micro-structures. The micro-structures with 100 μm diameter were produced in the present studies. The results show that the surface roughness of the casting is only Ra ~0.51 µm, slightly rougher than that of the investment mold.

  12. GYPSUM DEPOSITS IN THE REPUBLIC OF CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anto Gabrić

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The occurences and deposits of gypsum can be found in big karst poljes (Sinjsko, Vrličko, Petrovo, Kosovo and Kninsko as well as in tectonnically predestined river valleys of Zrmanja, Butišnica and Una. There also appear spatially localized occurences on the island of Vis and in the vicinity of Samobor. Evaporites (gypsum and anhydrite with adjoining overlying clastic rocks (red sandstones, siltites and pelites, carbonate rocks (dolomites and limestones and porous carbonate breccias (Rauhwackes were deposited during the period of Upper Permian. The recent position of the Upper Permian beds is a result of complex tectonic, particularly neotectonic, movements and diapiric displacements. Evaporites were deposited in marginal areas of the epicontinental marine basin, in a period of favourable conditions for the sabkha and playa sedimentation due to the continuous shoreline progradation. The Upper Permian age of these sediments in Dalmatio is proved by the characteristic mineral paragenesis and palinological determinations in elastics rocks, as well as by isotope analyses of sulphure in gypsum. Gypsum is a significant ore mineral resource in building, cement production, as well as in a number of tehnological processes used in chemical industry and elsewhere. According to the recent investigations gypsum is predestined to serve as an ore mineral resource of significant perspectives (the paper is published in Croatian.

  13. Ultraslow growth rates of giant gypsum crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Driessche, A. E. S.; García-Ruíz, J. M.; Tsukamoto, K.; Patiño-Lopez, L. D.; Satoh, H.

    2011-01-01

    Mineralogical processes taking place close to equilibrium, or with very slow kinetics, are difficult to quantify precisely. The determination of ultraslow dissolution/precipitation rates would reveal characteristic timing associated with these processes that are important at geological scale. We have designed an advanced high-resolution white-beam phase-shift interferometry microscope to measure growth rates of crystals at very low supersaturation values. To test this technique, we have selected the giant gypsum crystals of Naica ore mines in Chihuahua, Mexico, a challenging subject in mineral formation. They are thought to form by a self-feeding mechanism driven by solution-mediated anhydrite-gypsum phase transition, and therefore they must be the result of an extremely slow crystallization process close to equilibrium. To calculate the formation time of these crystals we have measured the growth rates of the {010} face of gypsum growing from current Naica waters at different temperatures. The slowest measurable growth rate was found at 55 °C, 1.4 ± 0.2 × 10-5 nm/s, the slowest directly measured normal growth rate for any crystal growth process. At higher temperatures, growth rates increase exponentially because of decreasing gypsum solubility and higher kinetic coefficient. At 50 °C neither growth nor dissolution was observed indicating that growth of giant crystals of gypsum occurred at Naica between 58 °C (gypsum/anhydrite transition temperature) and the current temperature of Naica waters, confirming formation temperatures determined from fluid inclusion studies. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of applying advanced optical techniques in laboratory experiments to gain a better understanding of crystal growth processes occurring at a geological timescale. PMID:21911400

  14. The production of precipitated calcium carbonate from industrial gypsum wastes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Beer, Morris

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available industrial applications and uses. However, gypsum is an industrial solid waste product generated in various industrial processes. Large stockpiles of gypsum waste exist with little or no usage and commercial applications. The potential for the production...

  15. Gypsum karst in Italy: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Waele, Jo; Chiarini, Veronica; Columbu, Andrea; D'Angeli, Ilenia M.; Madonia, Giuliana; Parise, Mario; Piccini, Leonardo; Vattano, Marco; Vigna, Bartolomeo; Zini, Luca; Forti, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    Although outcropping only rarely in Italy, gypsum karst has been described in detail since the early XXth century (Marinelli, 1917). Gypsum caves are now known from almost all Italian regions (Madonia & Forti, 2003), but are mainly localised along the northern border of the Apennine chain (Emilia Romagna and Marche regions), Calabria, and Sicily, where the major outcrops occur. Recently, important caves have also been discovered in the underground gypsum quarries in Piedmont (Vigna et al., 2010). During the late 80s and 90s several multidisciplinary studies have been carried out in many gypsum areas. All this work converged into a comprehensive overview in 2003 (Madonia & Forti, 2003). Further detailed studies focused on the gypsum areas of Emilia Romagna (Chiesi et al., 2010; Forti & Lucci, 2010; Demaria et al., 2012; De Waele & Pasini, 2013; Ercolani et al., 2013; Columbu et al., 2015; Lucci & Piastra, 2015; Tedeschi et al., 2015) and of Sicily (Madonia & Vattano, 2011). Sinkholes related to Permo-Triassic gypsum have been studied in Friuli Venezia Giulia (Zini et al., 2015). This presentation will review the state of the art regarding different aspects of evaporite karst in Italy focusing on the main new results. References Chiesi M., et al. (2010) - Origin and evolution of a salty gypsum/anhydrite karst spring: the case of Poiano (Northern Apennines, Italy). Hydrogeology Journal, 18, pp. 1111-1124. Columbu A. et al. (2015) - Gypsum caves as indicators of climate-driven river incision and aggradation in a rapidly uplifting region. Geology, 43(6), 539-542. Demaria D. et al. (Eds.) (2012), Le Grotte Bolognesi, GSB-USB, 431 p. De Waele J., Pasini G. (2013) - Intra-messinian gypsum palaeokarst in the northern Apennines and its palaeogeographic implications. Terra Nova 25, pp. 199-205. Ercolani M., et al. (Eds.) (2013), I Gessi e la Cave i Monte Tondo. Studio multidisciplinare di un'area carsica nella Vena del Gesso Romagnola. Memorie Ist. It. Spel. II(26), 559 p

  16. Production of polymer-plaster composite by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazineu, Maria Helena Paranhos; Santos, Valdemir Alexandre dos; Dantas, Carlos Costa

    2009-01-01

    The estimated amount of plaster wastes in the construction industry is 45%. The reduction of this waste is of concern, because the cost of lost material and the waste management can affect the competitiveness of the company. The mixture of plaster with a particular resin generates a composite, which gives the pre-molded obtained from this mixture, special properties. In this case, the plasticity of the plaster generates pre-molded products with wealth of details. Additionally, the use of nuclear techniques for the initiation of polymerization reaction for obtaining this type of composite can eliminate the need for a heat source which is the conventional way to obtain polymerization, considerably reducing the costs of the process. As a function of the availability and the cost of styrene monomer, in the initial phase of the research test samples were prepared from plaster composites with this type of material. The test samples, composed of plaster and styrene, were irradiated in the presence of a Cs-137 (662 keV) gamma source for a period of time of two days in an air pressurized chamber. Tests of resistance to compression, tensile strength in bending and water absorption, were based on a type of experimental design, CCRD (Central Composite Rotatable Design). The percent average weight of polymer by weight of the test sample was 14.0%. The presence of a polymerized resin gives the sample qualities such as being highly impervious to water and high mechanical strength, allowing its use in the manufacture of different types of materials. (author)

  17. Mechanical properties of gypsum board at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    S.M. Cramer; O.M. Friday; R.H. White; G. Sriprutkiat

    2003-01-01

    Gypsum board is a common fire barrier used in house and general building construction. Recently, evaluation of the collapses of the World Trade Center Towers highlighted the potential role and failure of gypsum board in containing the fires and resisting damage. The use of gypsum board as primary fire protection of light-flame wood or steel construction is ubiquitous....

  18. Alfalfa Responses to Gypsum Application Measured Using Undisturbed Soil Columns

    OpenAIRE

    Tirado-Corbalá, Rebecca; Slater, Brian K.; Dick, Warren A.; Barker, Dave

    2017-01-01

    Gypsum is an excellent source of Ca and S, both of which are required for crop growth. Large amounts of by-product gypsum [Flue gas desulfurization gypsum-(FGDG)] are produced from coal combustion in the United States, but only 4% is used for agricultural purposes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of (1) untreated, (2) short-term (4-year annual applications of gypsum totaling 6720 kg ha−1), and (3) long-term (12-year annual applications of gypsum totaling 20,200 kg ha−1...

  19. The effect of tectosilicates micronized additives on physical and mechanical properties improvements of Cob (Kahgel plaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Bater

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Kahgel (Cob is one of the oldest traditional mortars in Iran. Kahgel plaster consists of high clay content, dried mud and a portion of straw fibers to defend the mortar against shrinkage cracks. The ancient waterproof covering is very efficient at protecting the building dry during the heavy rain showers, but low durability and the need for renewal of plaster due to erosion of rainfall suggest that Kahgel plaster is weak and unstable. So, it is very essential and necessary in finding appropriate scientific methods to enhance the durability and lifespan of Kahgel plaster. Studies on the stabilization and improvement of Kahgel plaster properties indicated that using some special tectosilicatesadditives can be improved significantly the physical and mechanical properties of earth and earthen materials such as Kahgel plaster. The effect of different micronized tectosilicatesadditives used to build the different samples of Kahgel plaster on physical and mechanical properties to enhance the durability of Kahgel plaster showed that Microsilica at 6% (by weight of Khahgel, reduced hydraulic conductivity of the Kahgel plaster at 33% level and micronizedZeolite at 3% (by weight of Khahgel, is increased by 85%.  In addition Microsilica and micronizedZeolite at 3% (by weight of Khahgel, increased compression strength of the Kahgel plaster at 73% and 36%, respectively. In addition micronized Kaolin and Bentonite, increased uniaxial compression strength of the Kahgel plaster at 39 % and 33 %, respectively. In addition evaluation of water erosion of  the samples during rainfall by rainfall simulator showed that use of Microsilica, Feldspar, Zeolite and Kaolin 3% (by weight of Khahgel, the minimum sample’s total dry material loss of the Kahgel plaster reduced to 10/5% and the maximum decrease to 37/7%  and increase durability of the Kahgel plaster against water erosion. Experimental results indicated that in addition to the type and percentage of additives

  20. Physical and mechanical characterization of gypsum boards containing phase change materials for latent heat storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver-Ramírez, A.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the design and manufacture of a gypsum board which, despite its 45 % wt content of phase change materials, meets the minimum physical and mechanical requirements laid down in the legislation on gypsum plasters (Spanish and European standard UNE EN 13279 and Spanish specifications for gypsum acceptance, RY 85. Under this design, a one-metre square, 1.5-cm thick board contains 4.75 kg of PCM, much more than in any prior drylining (the maximum attained to date is 3 kg per m2. The mechanical and physical characteristics of this new composite were previously improved with two joint-action additives: polypropylene fibres and melamine formaldehyde as a dispersing agent. In the 20-30 ºC temperature range, a gypsum board 1.5 cm thick containing this percentage of PCMs can store five times more thermal energy than conventional plasterboard of the same thickness, and the same amount of energy as half-foot hollow brick masonry.

    En esta investigación se ha diseñado y fabricado un panel de escayola que incorpora un 45% en peso de material de cambio de fase, manteniendo las propiedades físicas y mecánicas exigidas en la normativa de aplicación para yesos de construcción (UNE EN 13279 y referencias a la RY 85. Así, un panel de 1,0 m2 y 1,5 cm de espesor, contiene 4,75 kg de PCM, cantidad muy superior a la conseguida hasta la fecha (3 kg/m2. Para ello se ha mejorado previamente sus prestaciones mecánicas y físicas mediante adiciones binarias: fibras de polipropileno y dispersión de melanina formaldehído. Este porcentaje es capaz de almacenar en 1,5 cm de espesor cinco veces la energía térmica de un panel de cartón yeso con el mismo espesor y la misma cantidad que una fábrica de 1/2 pie de ladrillo hueco, en el rango de temperaturas próximas a la de confort (20-30 ºC.

  1. [Full contact plaster cast for conservative treatment of Charcot foot].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trieb, K; Ramadani, F; Hofstaetter, S G

    2015-01-01

    The gold standard for treatment of early stages of Charcot foot are immobilization with a full contact plaster cast, whereby different periods and loading concepts are described in the literature. The etiology, disease course and preparation for an early conservative therapy are described and a key point is a full contact plaster cast. An overview of the etiology, pathogenesis and indications for correct evaluation of the wound situation is given. The correct technique for the total cast is described and illustrated step by step with pictures. If treatment of Charcot foot is initiated in the early stages prevention or healing of ulcers can be achieved; therefore, the correct indications and technique are necessary and the cast should be changed periodically which is a key point of the healing process. Healing results in a reduction of redness, temperature and swelling which should be measured and documented. Treatment of Charcot foot by full contact cast and immobilization should be initiated as soon as possible.

  2. In vivo effects of Pain Relieving Plaster on closed soft tissue injury in rabbit ears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yong-Zhi

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Soft tissue injury imposes major public health burdens worldwide. The positive effect of China's Tibetan medicine and the Lamiophlomis rotata-based herbal Pain Relieving Plaster (PRP on healing closed soft tissue injury (CSTI has been reported. The herbs contained in Plaster are also referred as 'blood-activating and stasis-dispelling' in herbal medicine. The formula of the plaster contains four China's Tibetan medical herbs, including Lamiophlomis rotata, Oxytropis falcate Bunge, Curcuma longa Linn, and Myricaria bracteata. Two of these herbs (Lamiophlomis rotate; Curcuma longa Linn are commonly used in different formulae of Chinese medicine. The objective of this study is to use an interdisciplinary approach to test the hypothesis that the formula and its components influence the process of CSTI. Methods In vivo models have been established in 30 rabbit ear pinnae and studied for: (1 blood flow velocity (BFV which was affected by pressure of 21.2 kg/cm2 for 30 second over the local rabbit ear tissue; (2 edema formation of the closed soft tissue injury; (3 in vivo local temperature change. Results The results of in vivo studies indicated that CSTI significantly increased the velocity of blood flow and increased edema formation within the control group. The PRP extracts for 5 hours significantly slowed down the BFV of CSTI in rabbit ears, markedly decreased the elevated edema level from the 3rd to the 5th day. Conclusion The ingredients contained in the formula have positive effects in healing CSTI and further study is worth exploring.

  3. [Conservative treatment of cervical radiculopathy with 5% lidocaine medicated plaster].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattozzi, I

    2015-02-01

    Cervical radiculopathy is a mixed pain syndrome characterized by neuropathic, skeletal and myofascial pain. This condition is frequently found in developed countries and is a significant source of disability and a reason for frequent medical consultation. In our Pain Therapy Centre, cervical radiculopathy is initially treated with bi-weekly cycles of mesotherapy coupled, at least 15 days later, with physiotherapy to reach the complete mobilization of cervical spine. Cervical radiculopathy is a localized neuro-pathic pain and in agreement with international guidelines, we checked if patients treated topically with 5% lidocaine medicated plaster may benefit in improving pain management and in reducing the time necessary to start physiotherapy. A retrospective study was carried out on 60 patients, of which 30 were treated with mesotherapy and 30 were treated with 5% lidocaine medicated plaster. Data for a total of 30 days observation were collected from the patient medical records. In particular, besides medical history, intensity of pain, intensity of allodynia and pain were considered. For all analyzed parameters, both treatments were effective, but patients treated with 5% lidocaine medicated plaster showed faster control of the painful symptoms, an essential condition for an earlier rehabilitative treatment.

  4. Study on effects of wood fiber content on physical, mechanical, and acoustical properties of wood-fiber-filled gypsum composites

    OpenAIRE

    Ramezani, Hamed; Shahdab, Sina; Nouri, Ali

    2012-01-01

    The Acoustical model of wood-fiber-filled gypsum composites panel is presented. The transmission loss coefficients of the composite structures were calculated by an approximated approach. However, the physical and mechanical properties of board specimens including; water absorption, thickness swelling, bending modulus of elasticity, bending modulus of rupture, internal bond, and compression parallel to the surface obtained experimentally. Finally, the effects of wood fibers to gypsum mixing r...

  5. Effect of shelf life on compressive strength of type iv gypsum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumastuti, K. S.; Irawan, B.; Damiyanti, M.

    2017-08-01

    Type IV gypsum, as a dental material for an indirect restoration’s working model, should have strength and abrasive-resistant properties. These properties depend on the product’s shelf life and its proper storage, which sometimes are easily missed by sellers. The aim of this research was to observe the effect of shelf life on the compressive strength of type IV gypsum with different production dates. Twenty cylindrical specimens were separated into two groups with different production dates and tested with a universal testing with the crosshead speed of 1 mm per minute and a load of 2,500 kgf. The data were analyzed with independent t-tests. There was a significant difference (p<0.05) in the compressive strength between the two groups with an increase in compressive strength seen in the gypsum that was stored longer.

  6. Ternary gypsum-based materials: Composition, properties and utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doleželová, M.; Svora, P.; Vimmrová, A.

    2017-10-01

    In spite of the fact that gypsum is one of the most environmentally friendly binders, utilization of gypsum products is relatively narrow. The main problem of gypsum materials is their low resistance to the wet environment and radical decrease of mechanical properties with increasing moisture. The solution of the problem could be in use of composed gypsum-based binders, usually ternary, comprising gypsum, pozzolan and alkali activator of pozzolan reaction. These materials have a better moisture resistance and often also better mechanical properties. Paper provides literature survey of the possible compositions, properties and ways of utilization of the composed gypsum-based binders with latent hydraulic and pozzolan materials together with some results of present research performed by authors.

  7. Treatment of low-energy tibial shaft fractures: plaster cast compared with intramedullary nailing

    OpenAIRE

    Toivanen, J.A.K.; Honkonen, S.E.; Koivisto, A.-M.; Järvinen, M.J.

    2001-01-01

    We analyzed data from 87 patients who had displaced closed or open grade I simple or spiral wedge tibial shaft fractures caused by low-energy impact. Fifty-four patients were treated with plaster cast and 33 with intramedullary locking nail (IMLN). Delayed union only occurred in 8 patients after plaster cast treatment. Forty-two patients in the IMLN group and one in the plaster cast group suffered from anterior knee pain. Final treatment outcome, healing time, hospitalization time and duratio...

  8. Seepage Analysis of Upper Gotvand Dam Concerning Gypsum Karstification (2D and 3D Approaches)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadrekarimi, Jamshid; Kiyani, Majid; Fakhri, Behnam

    2011-01-01

    Upper Gotvand Dam is constructed on the Karun River at the south west of Iran. In this paper, 2D and 3D models of the dam together with the foundation and abutments were established, and several seepage analyses were carried out. Then, the gypsum veins that are scattered throughout the foundation...

  9. PCM-enhanced lime plasters for vernacular and contemporary architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoridou, Magdalini; Kyriakou, Loucas; Ioannou, Ioannis

    2016-04-01

    In 1997, the European Union (EU) pledged to reduce the amount of greenhouse gas emissions by 20% below the levels of 1990 by the end of 2020. In recent years it has become evident that, in order to reach that goal, EU Member States must take measures to encourage sustainability in the building industry, which is a major energy consumer. Such measures should involve the use of innovative, environmentally friendly materials and methods in new constructions, as well as the renovation of existing properties by upgrading their current state of energy efficiency. Phase Change Materials (PCMs) have the ability to absorb and release thermal energy, in the form of latent heat, during the melting or solidifying processes respectively. Thus, they may be used as additives in the production of thermally efficient composite building materials. A PCM-enhanced plaster is a heat storage medium combining an appropriate PCM with a cementitious or non-cementitious matrix to produce a low-cost thermal storage material with structural and thermostatic properties. Although innovative technologies, such as PCMs, have certainly contributed to the boost in the evolution of the building materials industry in recent years, a significant proportion of these technologies and practices have not yet been fully exploited in materials based on traditional principles. This paper focuses on the design and production of novel cementless PCM-enhanced lime plasters, in line with the traditional production technology of lime composites. The new plasters are produced using either hydrated or natural hydraulic lime binder, crushed calcarenite sand (0-2 mm) and commercial microencapsulated PCM in powder form (5% w/w of solids). Results from comparative tests between reference mixtures and mixtures with the addition of PCM, carried out 28, 56 and 90 days after laboratory production, prove the potential of PCMs in enhancing the thermal performance of traditional lime-based composites. The modified composites

  10. Lightened plaster: alternative solutions to cellular solids addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Del Río, M.

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The following paper pretends to analyze different processes in order to lightweighters gypsum as an alternative way at the cellular fillers addition, in order to establish the most suitable ones for the manufacture of plasterboard. Outstanding the process which uses foamings addition to lighten gypsum uses nowdays only to manufacture cellular concrete.

    En este artículo se presenta el análisis de diferentes procedimientos para aligerar la escayola, como alternativas a la adición de sólidos celulares, determinando los más adecuados para la realización de prefabricados. Dentro de estos procedimientos cabe destacar la adición de espumantes, hasta ahora sólo utilizados para la fabricación de hormigones celulares.

  11. Effect of paint on vapour resistivity in plaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Villanueva, L.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The vapour resistivity of plaster coatings such as paint and their effectiveness as water repellents were studied in several types of plaster. To this end, painted, unpainted and pigmented specimens were tested. Experimental values were collected on diffusion and vapour permeability, or its inverse, water vapour resistivity.The data obtained were very useful for evaluating moisture exchange between plaster and the surrounding air, both during initial drying and throughout the life of the material. They likewise served as a basis for ensuring the proper evacuation of water vapour in walls, and use of the capacity of the porous network in plaster products to regulate moisture content or serve as a water vapour barrier to avoid condensation.Briefly, the research showed that pigments, water-based paints and silicon-based water repellents scantly raised vapour resistance. Plastic paints, enamels and lacquers, however, respectively induced five-, ten- and twenty-fold increases in vapour resistivity, on average.Se estudia el fenómeno de la resistividad al vapor de los de yeso y el efecto impermeabilizante que producen los recubrimientos de pintura sobre diversos tipos de yeso y escayola. Para ello, se ensayan probetas desnudas y recubiertas con distintos tipos de pintura, así como coloreados en masa. Se obtienen valores experimentales de la difusividad o permeabilidad al vapor o su inverso la resistividad al vapor de agua.Los datos obtenidos son muy útiles para valorar el fenómeno del intercambio de humedad entre el yeso y el ambiente, tanto durante el proceso de su secado inicial, como en el transcurso de su vida. Así como para disponer soluciones adecuadas para la evacuación del vapor de agua a través de los cerramientos, para utilizar la capacidad de regulación de la humedad, que proporciona el entramado poroso de los productos de yeso, o para impedir el paso del vapor de agua y evitar condensaciones.Como resumen de la investigación, se

  12. Health survey in gypsum mines in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandi Subroto

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mining is a hazardous occupation in which workers are exposed to adverse conditions. In India, gypsum mining is mainly carried out in the state of Rajasthan, which contributes about 99% of the total production. Objective: The present study was carried out in 12 different gypsum mines in Rajasthan state to determine the health status of the miners. Materials and Methods: One hundred and fifty workers engaged in mining activities were included in the study and their health status was compared with that of 83 office staff of the same mines. The health status of the employees was evaluated using a standardized medical questionnaire and pulmonary function testing. Statistical Analysis: The unpaired ′t′ test was used to determine whether there was any significant difference between the miners and the controls and the chi-square test to compare the prevalences of various respiratory impairments in workers with that in controls; we also examined the differences between smokers and nonsmokers. Results: Our findings show that the literacy rate is low (42% among the miners. Pulmonary restrictive impairment was significantly higher amongst smokers as compared to nonsmokers in both miners and controls. Hypertension (22.6%, diabetes (8.8%, and musculoskeletal morbidity (8% were the common diseases in miners. Conclusion: This study shows that there is high morbidity amongst miners, thus indicating the need for regular health checkups, health education, use of personal protective devices, and engineering measures for control of the workplace environment.

  13. Flue gas desulfurization gypsum and fly ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-05-01

    The Cumberland Fossil Plant (CUF) is located in Stewart County, Tennessee, and began commercial operation in 1972. This is the Tennessee Valley Authority's newest fossil (coal-burning) steam electric generating plant. Under current operating conditions, the plant burns approximately seven million tons of coal annually. By-products from the combustion of coal are fly ash, approximately 428,000 tons annually, and bottom ash, approximately 115,000 tons annually. Based on historical load and projected ash production rates, a study was initially undertaken to identify feasible alternatives for marketing, utilization and disposal of ash by-products. The preferred alternative to ensure that facilities are planned for all by-products which will potentially be generated at CUF is to plan facilities to handle wet FGD gypsum and dry fly ash. A number of different sites were evaluated for their suitability for development as FGD gypsum and ash storage facilities. LAW Engineering was contracted to conduct onsite explorations of sites to develop information on the general mature of subsurface soil, rock and groundwater conditions in the site areas. Surveys were also conducted on each site to assess the presence of endangered and threatened species, wetlands and floodplains, archaeological and cultural resources, prime farmland and other site characteristics which must be considered from an environmental perspective

  14. Occurrence and geochemistry of Nafada Gypsum, north-eastern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gypsum deposits occur in numerous locations within the Senonian Fika Shale at Nafada, northeastern Nigeria. Geologic investigations at Baro Winde and Wuro Dabo mines indicate the occurrence of three varieties of gypsum namely, Balatino laminated, Alabaster and Satin Spar. These are interlayered within shale and ...

  15. Mechanical, Hygric and Thermal Properties of Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tesárek

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The reference measurements of basic mechanical, thermal and hygric parameters of hardened flue gas desulfurization gypsum are carried out. Moisture diffusivity, water vapor diffusion coefficient, thermal conductivity, volumetric heat capacity and linear thermal expansion coefficient are determined with the primary aim of comparison with data obtained for various types of modified gypsum in the future. 

  16. Salt transport and crystallization in plaster layers: A nuclear magnetic resonance study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petkovic, J.; Pel, L.; Huinink, H.P.; Kopinga, K.; Hees, R.P.J. van

    2005-01-01

    The durability and performance of specially developed restoration plasters or renders, are not always as good as expected. Salt crystallization is one of the causes of the observed degradation processes. To understand these processes in more detail, we investigated whether transport in the plasters

  17. 3-D Wizardry: Design in Papier-Mache, Plaster, and Foam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, George

    Papier-mache, plaster, and foam are inexpensive and versatile media for 3-dimensional classroom and studio art experiences. They can be used equally well by elementary, high school, or college students. Each medium has its own characteristic. Papier-mache is pliable but dries into a hard, firm surface that can be waterproofed. Plaster can be…

  18. Gypsum plasterboards enhanced with phase change materials: A fire safety assessment using experimental and computational techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolaitis Dionysios I.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Phase Change Materials (PCM can be used for thermal energy storage, aiming to enhance building energy efficiency. Recently, gypsum plasterboards with incorporated paraffin-based PCM blends have become commercially available. In the high temperature environment developed during a fire, the paraffins, which exhibit relatively low boiling points, may evaporate and, escaping through the gypsum plasterboard's porous structure, emerge to the fire region, where they may ignite, thus adversely affecting the fire resistance characteristics of the building. Aiming to assess the fire safety behaviour of such building materials, an extensive experimental and computational analysis is performed. The fire behaviour and the main thermo-physical physical properties of PCM-enhanced gypsum plasterboards are investigated, using a variety of standard tests and devices (Scanning Electron Microscopy, Thermo Gravimetric Analysis, Cone Calorimeter. The obtained results are used to develop a dedicated numerical model, which is implemented in a CFD code. CFD simulations are validated using measurements obtained in a cone calorimeter. In addition, the CFD code is used to simulate an ISO 9705 room exposed to fire conditions, demonstrating that PCM addition may indeed adversely affect the fire safety of a gypsum plasterboard clad building.

  19. The plasters of the Sacro Monte of Varallo Sesia. From the characterisation to the proposition of a restorative mix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Formia

    2014-01-01

    The plasters characterisation realised in laboratory for in situ integration is also presented. These plasters should meet functional and aesthetical requirements and must satisfy the compatibility issues not only related to the physical-chemical aspects.

  20. Optimal plaster conformation derived using a custom-made jig to obtain maximum strength of protective plaster of Paris for hand surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theopold, Christoph; Bush, James A; Wilson, Stuart W; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2007-11-01

    Surgical repair of soft tissue trauma in the upper limb frequently requires postoperative immobilization to prevent tension across repaired tendons, vessels, or nerves. A plaster of Paris backslab, placed on either the volar or the dorsal surface, is frequently used, as it is inexpensive and easy to apply. In an effort to improve upon the strength of plaster of Paris backslabs, we designed a custom-made jig to subject angled backslabs (n = 5 per group) of various designs to a torsional force. We tested 10-layered backslabs with 0, 1, or 2 ridges and 15-layered backslabs without ridges. We demonstrate that the addition of longitudinal reinforcing ridges on the convex surface of backslabs can improve simple backslabs in terms of breaking strength, plaster stiffness, and failure load. The optimal design employs a single, centrally placed ridge, which provides the maximum support in the axis of the net force acting across the angle, the fulcrum of angle backslabs. The formation of two parallel longitudinal ridges does not offer any additional support. Backslabs can be strengthened significantly by placement of a single reinforcing ridge. This allows plaster weight and thickness to be kept to a minimum, reducing the setting time of the plaster and contributing to patient comfort. These findings demonstrate the ideal construction of angled plaster of Paris backslabs for the protection of soft tissue repairs.

  1. Permeability of gypsum samples dehydrated in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milsch, Harald; Priegnitz, Mike; Blöcher, Guido

    2011-09-01

    We report on changes in rock permeability induced by devolatilization reactions using gypsum as a reference analog material. Cylindrical samples of natural alabaster were dehydrated in air (dry) for up to 800 h at ambient pressure and temperatures between 378 and 423 K. Subsequently, the reaction kinetics, so induced changes in porosity, and the concurrent evolution of sample permeability were constrained. Weighing the heated samples in predefined time intervals yielded the reaction progress where the stoichiometric mass balance indicated an ultimate and complete dehydration to anhydrite regardless of temperature. Porosity showed to continuously increase with reaction progress from approximately 2% to 30%, whilst the initial bulk volume remained unchanged. Within these limits permeability significantly increased with porosity by almost three orders of magnitude from approximately 7 × 10-19 m2 to 3 × 10-16 m2. We show that - when mechanical and hydraulic feedbacks can be excluded - permeability, reaction progress, and porosity are related unequivocally.

  2. Measuring the gypsum content of C&D debris fines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musson, Stephen E; Xu, Qiyong; Townsend, Timothy G

    2008-11-01

    Construction and demolition (C&D) debris recycling facilities often produce a screened material intended for use as alternative daily cover (ADC) at active landfills or for shaping and grading at closed landfills. This product contains soil and small pieces of wood, concrete, gypsum drywall, shingles and other components of C&D debris. Concerns have been raised over the contribution of gypsum drywall in C&D debris fines to odor problems at landfills where the product is used. To address such concerns, limitations may be placed on the percentage of gypsum (or sulfate) that can occur, and standardized testing procedures are required to permit valid compliance testing. A test procedure was developed for measuring the gypsum content in C&D debris fines. The concentration of sulfate leached in an aqueous solution was used to estimate the initial gypsum content of the sample. The impact of sample size and leaching time were evaluated. Precision and accuracy increased with increasing gypsum content. Results from replicate samples had an average relative standard deviation of 9%. The gypsum content of fines obtained from different facilities in the US varied widely from 1% to over 25%. These variations not only occurred between differing facilities, but within batches produced within a single facility.

  3. Alfalfa Responses to Gypsum Application Measured Using Undisturbed Soil Columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Tirado-Corbalá

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Gypsum is an excellent source of Ca and S, both of which are required for crop growth. Large amounts of by-product gypsum [Flue gas desulfurization gypsum-(FGDG] are produced from coal combustion in the United States, but only 4% is used for agricultural purposes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of (1 untreated, (2 short-term (4-year annual applications of gypsum totaling 6720 kg ha−1, and (3 long-term (12-year annual applications of gypsum totaling 20,200 kg ha−1 on alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. growth and nutrient uptake, and gypsum movement through soil. The study was conducted in a greenhouse using undisturbed soil columns of two non-sodic soils (Celina silt loam and Brookston loam. Aboveground growth of alfalfa was not affected by gypsum treatments when compared with untreated (p > 0.05. Total root biomass (0–75 cm for both soils series was significantly increased by gypsum application (p = 0.04, however, increased root growth was restricted to 0–10 cm depth. Soil and plant analyses indicated no unfavorable environmental impact from of the 4-year and 12-year annual application of FGDG. We concluded that under sufficient water supply, by-product gypsum is a viable source of Ca and S for land application that might benefit alfalfa root growth, but has less effect on aboveground alfalfa biomass production. Undisturbed soil columns were a useful adaptation of the lysimeter method that allowed detailed measurements of alfalfa nutrient uptake, root biomass, and yield and nutrient movement in soil.

  4. Process for reducing radioactive contamination in waste product gypsum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, P.H. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A process is described for reducing the radioactive contamination in waste product gypsum in which waste product gypsum is reacted with a dilute sulfuric acid containing barium sulfate to form an acid slurry at an elevated temperature, the slurry is preferably cooled, the acid component is separated from the solid, and the resulting solid is separated into a fine fraction and a coarse fraction. The fine fraction predominates in barium sulfate and radioactive contamination. The coarse fraction predominates in a purified gypsum product of reduced radioactive contamination

  5. [Acupuncture combined with moxibustion plaster for nerve-root type cervical spondylosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li-an; Zhang, Shu; Wang, Hajying; Tang Lixin

    2016-02-01

    To compare the clinical efficacy differences between acupuncture combined with moxi-bustion plaster and electroacupuncture (EA) for nerve-root type cervical spondylosis. A total of 60 casesof nerve-root type cervical spondylosis were randomly divided into a plaster group and an EA group, 30 cases ineach one. Patients in the plaster group were treated with regular acupuncture at Jiaji(EX-B 2) points and ashipoints, combined with moxibustion plaster at Gaohuang (BL 43); patients in the EA group were treated with EAat identical acupoints as plaster group. The treatment was given once a day, and 5 days were taken as one course;there was an interval of 2 days between courses and totally 2 courses were performed. The pain questionnaires andquantitative score of signs and symptoms were observed before and after treatment in the two groups. The clinicalefficacy of the two groups was compared. The total effective rate was 96. 7% (29/30) in the plastergroup, which was not significantly different from 93. 3% (28/30) in the EA group (P>0. 05). After treatment,PRI, VAS and PPI were all reduced in the two groups (all Pspondylosis; EA issuperior to acupuncture combined with moxibustion plaster on relieving pain, while acupuncture combined withmoxibustion plaster is superior to EA on improving life quality, muscle strength and feeling.

  6. The Effect of Aloe, Gelfoam, Plaster on Bone Formation in applying to the bone defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Eui Hwan [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Chosun University and Oral Biology Research Center, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Su Gwan [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, College of Dentistry, Chosun University and Oral Biology Research Center, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-08-15

    This study was to evaluate the effects of Aloe, Gelfoam, and Plaster of Paris on bone healing. Four experimental defects were created for placement of the three materials in the right femur of dogs. One defect served as an empty control site. The evaluation was performed at 1-, 6-, and 12-weeks by light microscopy and NIH image program. Radiographic and Histologic examinations showed new bone formation in the presence of Aloe, Gelfoam, and Plaster of Paris and similar bone healing reactions. On the basis of these findings, it was concluded that Aloe, Gelfoam, and Plaster of Paris may be adequate agents for use in bone procurement.

  7. The Effect of Aloe, Gelfoam, Plaster on Bone Formation in applying to the bone defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Eui Hwan; Kim, Su Gwan

    1999-01-01

    This study was to evaluate the effects of Aloe, Gelfoam, and Plaster of Paris on bone healing. Four experimental defects were created for placement of the three materials in the right femur of dogs. One defect served as an empty control site. The evaluation was performed at 1-, 6-, and 12-weeks by light microscopy and NIH image program. Radiographic and Histologic examinations showed new bone formation in the presence of Aloe, Gelfoam, and Plaster of Paris and similar bone healing reactions. On the basis of these findings, it was concluded that Aloe, Gelfoam, and Plaster of Paris may be adequate agents for use in bone procurement.

  8. Gypsum crystals in the inner shelf sediments off Maharashtra, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Hashimi, N.H.; Ambre, N.V.

    Gypsum crystals have been found in the inner shelf silty clay/clayey silt off the Maharashtra Coast between Vengurla and Bombay. Generally these occur as euhedral single or twinned crystals of selenite. Very often shells are found embedded within...

  9. Radium uptake by recrystallized gypsum: an incorporation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lestini, Leslie; Beaucaire, Catherine; Vercouter, Thomas; Descostes, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Batch experiments of 226 Ra uptake by recrystallized gypsum CaSO 4 .2H 2 O(s), monitored over 200 days, have shown that the published value for the distribution coefficient of 226 Ra between gypsum and an aqueous phase, 0.03 (Gnanapragasam and Lewis, 1995), is an upper limit. This suggests that this value needs to be confirmed. A solid solution between gypsum and radium sulfate (Ca,Ra)SO 4 .2H 2 O(s) cannot be considered per se, which is not surprising considering gypsum's high solubility product (lg Ks = -4.58) and the ionic radius of VIII Ra (1.48 A), when compared to that of VIII Ca (1.12 A). (authors)

  10. Characterization mixtures of thick gypsum with addition of treated waste from laminated plasterboards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez-Orejón, A.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available nvironmental protection involves the reuse of construction and demolition waste. In order to improve recycling, waste from laminated plasterboards is used in the cement and laminated gypsum boards manufacture.This article analyzes the use of ground and burnt laminated plasterboard (BLG waste mixed with thick gypsum (TG. Physical-mechanical characterization of superficial hardness and mechanical strength has been performed on different batches of plaster powder materials with different BLG waste particle sizes to determine its suitability. Coarse particle sizes were preferred in order to reduce the waste treatment. From all the mixtures studied, the one with the best results was TG + 5% BLG1.25 which forms a material of higher superficial hardness and strength. The results obtained in the study have proved suitable products for building use (both as renders and as prefabricated elements enabling for a reduction in the consumption of natural resources.La protección del medio ambiente implica la reutilización de los residuos de construcción y demolición. Los residuos de placas de yeso laminado se utilizan en la fabricación de cemento y de placas de yeso laminado. En este artículo se ha estudiado la utilización deresiduos de placa de yeso laminado cocido (YLC mezclado con yeso grueso (YG, realizándose la caracterización físico-mecánica de dureza superficial y resistencias mecánicas, para determinar su idoneidad formando materiales de yeso en polvo con distintas granulometrías de residuos de (YLC, teniendo preferencia por granulometrías gruesas, que reducen el tratamiento del residuo. De las mezclas estudiadas la que mejores resultados ha ofrecido es YG + 5%YLC1,25 formando un material de mayor dureza superficial y resistencia. De los resultados obtenidos en el estudio se puede afirmar que se han conseguido productos aptos para su utilización en edificación posibilitando una reducción del consumo de recursos naturales.

  11. Characterization of a lime-pozzolan plaster containing phase change material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlíková, Milena; Pavlík, Zbyšek; Trník, Anton; Pokorný, Jaroslav; Černý, Robert [Department of Materials Engineering and Chemistry, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Thákurova 7, 166 29 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-03-10

    A PCM (Phase Change Material) modified lime-pozzolan plaster for improvement of thermal energy storage of building envelopes is studied in the paper. The investigated plaster is composed of lime hydrate, pozzolan admixture based on metakaolin and mudstone, silica sand, water and paraffin wax encapsulated in polymer capsule. The reference plaster without PCM application is studied as well. The analyzed materials are characterized by bulk density, matrix density, total open porosity, compressive strength and pore size distribution. The temperature of phase change, heat of fusion and crystallization are studied using DSC (Difference Scanning Calorimetry) analysis performed in air atmosphere. In order to get information on materials hygrothermal performance, determination of thermal and hygric properties is done in laboratory conditions. Experimental data reveal a substantial improvement of heat storage capacity of PCM-modified plaster as compared to the reference material without PCM.

  12. Characterization of a lime-pozzolan plaster containing phase change material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlíková, Milena; Pavlík, Zbyšek; Trník, Anton; Pokorný, Jaroslav; Černý, Robert

    2015-01-01

    A PCM (Phase Change Material) modified lime-pozzolan plaster for improvement of thermal energy storage of building envelopes is studied in the paper. The investigated plaster is composed of lime hydrate, pozzolan admixture based on metakaolin and mudstone, silica sand, water and paraffin wax encapsulated in polymer capsule. The reference plaster without PCM application is studied as well. The analyzed materials are characterized by bulk density, matrix density, total open porosity, compressive strength and pore size distribution. The temperature of phase change, heat of fusion and crystallization are studied using DSC (Difference Scanning Calorimetry) analysis performed in air atmosphere. In order to get information on materials hygrothermal performance, determination of thermal and hygric properties is done in laboratory conditions. Experimental data reveal a substantial improvement of heat storage capacity of PCM-modified plaster as compared to the reference material without PCM

  13. [Case-control study on close reduction and plaster slab fixation combined with plaster external traction for the treatment of pediatric Gartland type III supracondylar humerus fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yu-Xiang; Wei, Xiao-Chun; Li, Hai-Ming

    2014-07-01

    To compare the therapeutic effects between close reduction and plaster slab fixation combined with plaster external traction and operation for the treatment of pediatric closed Gartland type III supracondylar humerus fractures without neurovascular injury complications. From June 2009 to June 2012, 151 children with closed Gartland III supracondylar humerus fractures were retrospectively studied and divided into two groups, including 87 boys and 64 girls, ranging in age from 1 to 12 years old with an average of 5.3 years old. Among them, 76 children (conservative group) were treated with close reduction and plaster slab fixation combined with plaster external traction; 75 children (operation group) underwent surgical operation. The time of elbow joint function exercise, the healing time of fracture, the function recovery of elbow joint and carrying angle was recorded and analyzed. The therapeutic effects were evaluated by the Flynn criteria system. All patients were followed up from 6 to 36 months (18.3 months on average). The average time of fracture healing and elbow joint functional exercise of the conservative group was shorter than those of operation group (P 0.05). According to Flynn criteria system, in conservative group, the result was excellent in 31 cases, good in 35, fair in 7, and poor in 3; in operation group, 27 in excellent, 30 in good, 17 in fair and 1 in poor; there was no significant difference between two groups in therapeutic effects (P > 0.05). Close reduction and plaster slab fixation combined with plaster external traction in treatment of pediatric closed Gartland type III supracondylar humerus fractures without neurovascular injury complications,which has similar effect to surgical treatment, and the time of fracture healing and elbow joint function exercise are significantly shorter.

  14. The topical 5% lidocaine medicated plaster in localized neuropathic pain: a reappraisal of the clinical evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de León-Casasola OA

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Oscar A de León-Casasola,1,2 Victor Mayoral3 1Department of Anesthesiology, Division of Pain Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, 2University at Buffalo, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. NY, USA; 3Anesthesiology Department, Pain Management Unit, University Hospital of Bellvitge, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Spain Abstract: Topical 5% lidocaine medicated plasters represent a well-established first-line option for the treatment of peripheral localized neuropathic pain (LNP. This review provides an updated overview of the clinical evidence (randomized, controlled, and open-label clinical studies, real-life daily clinical practice, and case series. The 5% lidocaine medicated plaster effectively provides pain relief in postherpetic neuralgia, and data from a large open-label controlled study indicate that the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster is as effective as systemic pregabalin in postherpetic neuralgia and painful diabetic polyneuropathy but with an improved tolerability profile. Additionally, improved analgesia and fewer side effects were experienced by patients treated synchronously with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster, further demonstrating the value of multimodal analgesia in LNP. The 5% lidocaine medicated plaster provides continued benefit after long-term (≤7 years use and is also effective in various other LNP conditions. Minor application-site reactions are the most common adverse events associated with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster; there is minimal risk of systemic adverse events and drug–drug interactions. Although further well-controlled studies are warranted, the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster is efficacious and safe in LNP and may have particular clinical benefit in elderly and/or medically compromised patients because of the low incidence of adverse events. Keywords: 5% lidocaine medicated plaster, clinical evidence, localized neuropathic pain, postherpetic neuralgia, review

  15. Characteristics, resource utilization and safety profile of patients prescribed with neuropathic pain treatments: a real-world evidence study on general practices in Europe - the role of the lidocaine 5% medicated plaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Pablo; Pegoraro, Valeria; Liedgens, Hiltrud

    2017-08-01

    To identify characteristics, resource utilization, and safety profile of patients prescribed with lidocaine 5% medicated plaster, pregabalin, gabapentin, amitriptyline and duloxetine when experiencing pain in the real-world setting of general practitioners (GPs) in Europe. Retrospective analysis on real world data from IMS Health Longitudinal Patient Database. Patients with at least one prescription of the drugs of interest during 2014 were selected and those with a non-neuropathic pain-related diagnosis were excluded. Patients' demographic and clinical characteristics, resource utilization data and adverse drug reactions (ADRs) as described in the leaflet were extracted. The association between treatments and ADR occurrence was evaluated applying multivariate logistic models. A total of 70,515 patients were selected from Italy, Germany, the UK, Spain and Belgium. Lidocaine 5% medicated plaster patients were the oldest in Italy, the UK and Spain and the most health impaired in Italy, Spain and Belgium. No relevant differences in the number of co-prescriptions, specialist visits, examinations and hospitalizations were found. Significantly less lidocaine 5% plasters patients experienced ADRs, with odds ratios in favor of lidocaine 5% medicated plasters ranging from 3.41 (p = .036) to 52.33 (p lidocaine 5% medicated plaster patients showing a better safety profile, but also a comparable level of resource utilization. A possible re-evaluation of the scientific value coming from this retrospective study in building up a diagnostic as well as a therapeutic algorithm is suggested.

  16. Two distinctive new species of Commicarpus (Nyctaginaceae) from gypsum outcrops in eastern Ethiopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ib; Gilbert, Michael G.; Weber, Odile

    2016-01-01

    in Commicarpus, being a small self-supporting shrub to 0.8 (– 1) m high. Both new species occur in small populations with restricted distribution; models based on the available information show that the potential distribution is also restricted. C. macrothamnus is here evaluated as Vulnerable (VU), while C......During field trips in 2013 and 2014, two distinctive plants belonging to the genus Commicarpus were collected in the Lele Hills, Bale Zone, eastern Ethiopia, on outcrops of sedimentary rock belonging to the Gorrahei Formation with high contents of gypsum. The plants are here described as two new....... leleensis, only known from the type, should remain Data Deficient (DD). Outcrops of gypsum with restricted-range species are well known from eastern Ethiopia and Somalia, but the locality with the two new species of Commicarpus is the most north-western and one of the highest sites recorded so far...

  17. Preparation of Plaster Moulage (Cast in Plastic Surgery patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana R

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to describe the technique of making casts using alginate compound for negative and dental stone plaster for positive impressions. With certain modifications a cast could be made of any part of the body and one can make a museum of interesting cases. Casts serve as useful teaching material especially in cleft lip and palate patients to study the effect of surgery on growth and development of the cleft lip-palate-nose complex in relation to the remaining face. It also helps in planning reconstruction in cases of facial defects, recording serial changes in multistage surgery, pre-operative and post-operative comparison as in rhinoplasty, ear reconstruction, hand etc; for comparing results before and after treatment in keloid and hypertrophic scars, fabrication of implants and preparation of prosthesis. In spite of newer modalities like 3-D imaging and stereolithography, the usefulness of this old technique in certain interesting cases can not be denied.

  18. Design and properties of plaster mortars manufactured with ladle furnace slag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodríguez, A.; Gutiérrez-González, S.; Horgnies, M.; Calderón, V.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • This study analyses plaster with ladle furnace slag as a mineral aggregate. • Tests are completed by characterizing the influences of two admixtures. • Microstructure, physical and mechanical results confirm the feasibility of these materials. • These new materials are potentially useful as plaster mortars for use in masonry. - Abstract: This study deals with the properties of a series of plasters containing different proportions of ladle furnace slag used as mineral aggregate. The tests characterise the influences of two admixtures: a superfluidifier to reduce the water absorption (SikaMix®) of mortar plaster and an adhesive emulsion to improve the surface adherence (SikaLatex®). The physical and mechanical results confirm the feasibility of employing ladle furnace slag as a mineral aggregate, which induces an increase in density, in vapour permeability and in porosity. The results highlight also a decrease of adherence, durability and mechanical strength, proportionally to the amount of plaster substituted by slag. Scanning electron microscopy imaging and elemental mapping show good interaction between the various constituents. The thermal degradation of the mixtures reflects an improvement in strength resistance in relation to temperature, as further slag is incorporated. The economical study suggests that these recycled materials are cost-effectively viable and may be applied as plaster mortars for use in masonry

  19. Tratamentos superficiais visando à melhoria da aderência entre gesso e taliscas de bambu Surface treatments aimed at improving the adhesion between plaster and bamboo slivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibelle G Silva

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available O gesso é um aglomerante com aplicações sobretudo na fabricação de placas de forro, elementos decorativos e em paredes divisórias. No entanto, utilizando-se de uma baixa relação água/gesso e procedimentos tais como vibração, torna-se possível obter resistências mecânicas compatíveis para outras aplicações na construção civil, como é o caso de elementos estruturais. A investigação reportada no presente trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar, experimentalmente, a possibilidade de se melhorar o compósito estudado. Foram realizados tratamentos para redução da absorção de água pelas taliscas, por meio da utilização de extrato vegetal B Carbon, resina polimérica e piche. Na tentativa de melhorar a aderência na interface gesso/bambu foram utilizados adesivo epóxi, massa plástica e piche, além de confeccionados corpos de prova de gesso reforçados com taliscas de bambu, tratadas com diferentes produtos, cuja eficiência foi avaliada em ensaios mecânicos. Observou-se que, para ocorrer uma boa aderência na interface do compósito, são necessários tratamentos complementares que reduzam os efeitos da instabilidade dimensional.The gypsum is a binder with applications primarily in the manufacture of ceiling tile, decorative elements and partition walls. However, using a low water/plaster ratio and procedures such as vibration, it is possible to obtain mechanical strength compatible to other applications in construction as in the case of structural elements. The research reported in this study aimed to evaluate experimentally the possibility of improving the compound studied. Treatments were carried out to reduce water absorption by slivers through the use of plant extract B Carbon, polymer resin, and tar. In an attempt to improve the adhesion at the interface plaster/epoxy adhesive, bamboo, plastic and tar mass were used. Test specimens were made of plaster reinforced with slivers of bamboo, treated with different products

  20. Interaction of gypsum with lead in aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astilleros, J.M., E-mail: jmastill@geo.ucm.es [Dpto. Cristalografia y Mineralogia, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Jose Antonio Novais, 2, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Godelitsas, A. [Department of Mineralogy and Petrology, Faculty of Geology and Geoenvironment, University of Athens, Panepistimioupoli Zographou, 15784 Athens (Greece); Rodriguez-Blanco, J.D. [School of Earth and Environments, Faculty of Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Fernandez-Diaz, L. [Dpto. Cristalografia y Mineralogia, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Jose Antonio Novais, 2, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Prieto, M. [Dpto. de Geologia, Universidad de Oviedo, E-30005 Oviedo (Spain); Lagoyannis, A.; Harissopulos, S. [Tandem Accelerator Laboratory, Institute of Nuclear Physics, NCSR ' Demokritos' , GR-15310 Attiki (Greece)

    2010-07-15

    Sorption processes on mineral surfaces are a critical factor in controlling the distribution and accumulation of potentially harmful metals in the environment. This work investigates the effectiveness of gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O) to sequester Pb. The interaction of gypsum fragments with Pb-bearing solutions (10, 100 and 1000 mg/L) was monitored by performing macroscopic batch-type experiments conducted at room temperature. The aqueous phase composition was periodically determined by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS), Ion Chromatography (IC) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Regardless of the [Pb{sub aq}]{sub initial}, a [Pb{sub aq}]{sub final} < 4 mg/L was always reached. The uptake process was fast (t < 1 h) for [Pb{sub aq}]{sub initial} {>=} 100 mg/L and significantly slower (t > 1 week) for [Pb{sub aq}]{sub initial} = 10 mg/L. Speciation calculations revealed that after a long time of interaction (1 month), all the solutions reached equilibrium with respect to both gypsum and anglesite. For [Pb{sub aq}]{sub initial} {>=} 100 mg/L, sorption takes place mainly via the rapid dissolution of gypsum and the simultaneous formation of anglesite both on the gypsum surface and in the bulk solution. In the case of [Pb{sub aq}]{sub initial} = 10 mg/L, no anglesite precipitation was observed, but surface spectroscopy (proton Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy, p-RBS) confirmed the formation of Pb-bearing surface layers on the (0 1 0) gypsum surface in this case also. This study shows that the surface of gypsum can play an important role in the attenuation of Pb in contaminated waters.

  1. Hydration modeling of calcium sulphates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Korte, A.C.J.; Brouwers, H.J.H.; Al-Mattarneh, Hashem; Mustapha, Kamal N.; Nuruddin, Muhd Fadhil

    2008-01-01

    The CEMHYD3D model has been extended at the University of Twente in the last ten years [1,2]. At present the cement hydration model is extended for the use of gypsum. Although gypsum was present in the model already, the model was not suitable for high contents of gypsum and did not include the

  2. Fate of Mercury in Synthetic Gypsum Used for Wallboard Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jessica Marshall Sanderson

    2006-06-01

    This report presents and discusses results from Task 5 of the study ''Fate of Mercury in Synthetic Gypsum Used for Wallboard Production,'' performed at a full-scale commercial wallboard plant. Synthetic gypsum produced by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems on coal-fired power plants is commonly used in the manufacture of wallboard. The FGD process is used to control the sulfur dioxide emissions which would result in acid rain if not controlled. This practice has long benefited the environment by recycling the FGD gypsum byproduct, which is becoming available in increasing quantities, decreasing the need to landfill this material, and increasing the sustainable design of the wallboard product. However, new concerns have arisen as recent mercury control strategies developed for power plants involve the capture of mercury in FGD systems. The objective of this study is to determine whether any mercury is released into the atmosphere when the synthetic gypsum material is used as a feedstock for wallboard production. The project is being co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42080), USG Corporation, and EPRI. USG Corporation is the prime contractor, and URS Group is a subcontractor. The project scope includes five discrete tasks, each conducted at various USG wallboard plants using synthetic gypsum from different FGD systems. The five tasks were to include (1) a baseline test, then variations representing differing power plant (2) emissions control configurations, (3) treatment of fine gypsum particles, (4) coal types, and (5) FGD reagent types. However, Task 5, which was to evaluate gypsum produced from an alternate FGD reagent, could not be conducted as planned. Instead, Task 5 was conducted at conditions similar to a previous task, Task 3, although with gypsum from an alternate FGD system. In this project, process stacks in the wallboard plant have been sampled using the Ontario

  3. Fate of Mercury in Synthetic Gypsum Used for Wallboard Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jessica Sanderson

    2007-12-31

    This report presents and discusses results from the project 'Fate of Mercury in Synthetic Gypsum Used for Wallboard Production', performed at five different full-scale commercial wallboard plants. Synthetic gypsum produced by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems on coal-fired power plants is commonly used in the manufacture of wallboard. This practice has long benefited the environment by recycling the FGD gypsum byproduct, which is becoming available in increasing quantities, decreasing the need to landfill this material, and increasing the sustainable design of the wallboard product. However, new concerns have arisen as recent mercury control strategies involve the capture of mercury in FGD systems. The objective of this study has been to determine whether any mercury is released into the atmosphere at wallboard manufacturing plants when the synthetic gypsum material is used as a feedstock for wallboard production. The project has been co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42080), USG Corporation, and EPRI. USG Corporation is the prime contractor, and URS Group is a subcontractor. The project scope included seven discrete tasks, each including a test conducted at various USG wallboard plants using synthetic gypsum from different wet FGD systems. The project was originally composed of five tasks, which were to include (1) a base-case test, then variations representing differing power plant: (2) emissions control configurations, (3) treatment of fine gypsum particles, (4) coal types, and (5) FGD reagent types. However, Task 5,could not be conducted as planned and instead was conducted at conditions similar to Task 3. Subsequently an opportunity arose to test gypsum produced from the Task 5 FGD system, but with an additive expected to impact the stability of mercury, so Task 6 was added to the project. Finally, Task 7 was added to evaluate synthetic gypsum produced at a power plant from an

  4. EXPERIENCE OF USING THE MONTE-CARLO METHOD IN DETERMINING OPTIMAL PLASTER COMPOSITIONS WITH IMPROVED STRENGTH PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khrystyna Moskalova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering that modern building materials impose increasing performance requirements, it is necessary to expand the range of building materials and improve their multicomponent composition. The effects of polymer and porous components (expanded perlite sand and carbonate filler – limestone-shell rock in cement-lime light plaster on the physico-mechanical properties of the mixtures under equal workability conditions of mixtures are analyzed based on experimental-statistical modeling. The results of the physico-mechanical and operational experiments confirm the rationality of using porous fillers and additives to improve certain specific properties of the final product. The so-called Monte-Carlo method is implemented for determining an optimal composition of multicomponent cement-lime light plaster, based on multivariate statistical modeling and iterative random scanning of property fields. According to the results of the computational experiment, a composition that reduces the number of expensive mixture components and improves the physical and mechanical characteristics of the resulting composition is selected.

  5. Converting SDAP into gypsum in a wet limestone scrubber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogh, F. [Faelleskemikerne, Elsamprojekt A/S, Fredericia (Denmark)

    1996-12-01

    The ELSAM power pool has an installed electrical capacity of approx. 5 GW{sub e}, mainly firing import coal. The major base load units are equipped with desulphurization units and three different desulphurization technologies are used: the wet limestone gypsum process, the spray dry absorption process and a sulphuric acid process. Gypsum and sulphuric acid are commercialized, whereas it has been difficult to utilize the spray dry absorption product (SDAP). The main constituents of SDAP are calcium sulphide, calcium chloride, hydrated lime and impurities mainly originating from fly ash. Sulphide can be oxidized into sulphate in acidic solution - the reaction is utilized in the wet limestone gypsum process - and the possibility of using any spare capacity in the wet limestone gypsum units to oxidize the sulphide content of SDAP into sulphate and produce usable gypsum has been investigated in the laboratory and in a 400 MW{sub e} equivalent wet limestone unit. The limestone inhibition effect of the addition of SDAP is currently being studied in the laboratory in order to determine the effect of different SDAP types (plant/coal sources) on limestone reactivity before further long-term full-scale tests are performed and permanent use of the process planned. (EG)

  6. Synthesis on research results of FGD gypsum briquetting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosturkiewicz Bogdan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available FGD gypsum products can be characterized by significant solubility in water and dusting in dry state. These characteristics can cause a considerable pollution of air, water and soil. Among many approaches of preparing utilization of this waste, the process of compaction using briquetting has proved to be very effective. Using FGD gypsum products a new material of fertilizers characteristics has been acquired and this material is resistant to the conditions of transportation. This paper presents results of experimental briquetting of flue gas desulphurisation products in a roll press. The experiments were conducted in a laboratory roll presses LPW 450 and LPW 1100 equipped with two interchangeable forming rings that form material into saddle-shaped briquettes with volume 6,5 cm3 and 85 cm3. The experiments were conducted with various percentage amounts of FGD gypsum moisture. The results provided information regarding influence of moisture and roll press configuration on quality of briquettes. On the basis of obtained results, technological process and a general outline of technological line for FGD gypsum were developed. Two roll presses of own construction with different outputs were identified as appropriate for this purpose. A range of necessary works related to their adaptation for the FGD gypsum briquetting were pointed out.

  7. Towards establishing a combined rate law of nucleation and crystal growth - The case study of gypsum precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendel, Pedro M.; Gavrieli, Ittai; Wolff-Boenisch, Domenik; Ganor, Jiwchar

    2018-03-01

    The main obstacle in the formulation of a quantitative rate-model for mineral precipitation is the absence of a rigorous method for coupling nucleation and growth processes. In order to link both processes, we conducted a series of batch experiments in which gypsum nucleation was followed by crystal growth. Experiments were carried out using various stirring methods in several batch vessels made of different materials. In the experiments, the initial degree of supersaturation of the solution with respect to gypsum (Ωgyp) was set between 1.58 and 1.82. Under these conditions, heterogeneous nucleation is the dominant nucleation mode. Based on changes in SO42- concentration with time, the induction time of gypsum nucleation and the following rate of crystal growth were calculated for each experiment. The induction time (6-104 h) was found to be a function of the vessel material, while the rates of crystal growth, which varied over three orders of magnitude, were strongly affected by the stirring speed and its mode (i.e. rocking, shaking, magnetic stirrer, and magnetic impeller). The SO42- concentration data were then used to formulate a forward model that couples the simple rate laws for nucleation and crystal growth of gypsum into a single kinetic model. Accordingly, the obtained rate law is based on classical nucleation theory and heterogeneous crystal growth.

  8. Effect of Time on Gypsum-Impression Material Compatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, John Boram

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the compatibility of dental gypsum with three recently introduced irreversible hydrocolloid (alginate) alternatives. The test materials were Alginot® (Kerr™), Position Penta Quick® (3M ESPE™) and Silgimix ® (Sultan Dental™). The irreversible hydrocolloid impression material, Jeltrate Plus antimicrobial® (Dentsply Caulk™) served as the control. Materials and Methods: Testing of materials was conducted in accordance with ANSI/ADA Specification No. 18 for Alginate Impression Materials. Statistical Analysis: The 3-Way ANOVA test was used to analyze measurements between different time points at a significance level of (p Outcome: It was found that there was greater compatibility between gypsum and the alternative materials over time than the traditional irreversible hydrocolloid material that was tested. A statistically significant amount of surface change/incompatibility was found over time with the combination of the dental gypsum products and the control impression material (Jeltrate Plus antimicrobial®).

  9. Chemical properties of an Oxisol after gypsum application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Roncaratti de Moraes

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Gypsum utilization is a critical practice in agriculture because of the high solubility and consequent relative neutralization of subsurface toxic aluminum. However, it has been observed that in most cases, gypsum is being randomly utilized without scientifically established parameters or even the need to use it as a soil amendment at all. The objective of this study was to evaluate the chemical composition and electrical conductivity of an Oxisol’s saturation extract under different gypsum doses (0, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, and 8.0 Mg ha-1. This experiment was conducted in a greenhouse environment. Soil columns (V = 1.57 dm3 were filled with sifted (2 mm soil collected from the upper layer (0-20 cm. The experimental design adopted was completely randomized with five repetitions. The treatments consisted of a 5 × 2 factorial through five gypsum doses (0.0, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, and 8.0 Mg ha-1 of gypsum consisting of 224.1 g kg-1 S, 314.8 g kg-1 CaO, and 7 g kg-1 P2O5 and two depth evaluations (0-10 and 10-20 cm. After the treatments, soil from both 0-10 cm and 10-20 cm layers was removed from the columns, sifted once (2 mm, and subjected to vacuum extraction to assess the saturation extract. The data acquired was processed and submitted to variance analysis (when due and adjusted to regression equations when statistically relevant. Significant increases were observed for Ca, Mg, K, P, and S, although Al, Si, and pH presented no statistically significant difference. The electrical conductivity value of this soil in particular is directly related to the gypsum dose.

  10. Triple oxygen isotope systematics of structurally bonded water in gypsum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herwartz, Daniel; Surma, Jakub; Voigt, Claudia; Assonov, Sergey; Staubwasser, Michael

    2017-07-01

    The triple oxygen isotopic composition of gypsum mother water (gmw) is recorded in structurally bonded water in gypsum (gsbw). Respective fractionation factors have been determined experimentally for 18O/16O and 17O/16O. By taking previous experiments into account we suggest using 18αgsbw-gmw = 1.0037; 17αgsbw-gmw = 1.00195 and θgsbw-gmw = 0.5285 as fractionation factors in triple oxygen isotope space. Recent gypsum was sampled from a series of 10 ponds located in the Salar de Llamara in the Atacama Desert, Chile. Total dissolved solids (TDS) in these ponds show a gradual increase from 23 g/l to 182 g/l that is accompanied by an increase in pond water 18O/16O. Gsbw falls on a parallel curve to the ambient water from the saline ponds. The offset is mainly due to the equilibrium fractionation between gsbw and gmw. However, gsbw represents a time integrated signal biased towards times of strong evaporation, hence the estimated gmw comprises elevated 18O/16O compositions when compared to pond water samples taken on site. Gypsum precipitation is associated with algae mats in the ponds with lower salinity. No evidence for respective vital effects on the triple oxygen isotopic composition of gypsum hydration water is observed, nor are such effects expected. In principle, the array of δ18Ogsbw vs. 17Oexcess can be used to: (1) provide information on the degree of evaporation during gypsum formation; (2) estimate pristine meteoric water compositions; and (3) estimate local relative humidity which is the controlling parameter of the slope of the array for simple hydrological situations. In our case study, local mining activities may have decreased deep groundwater recharge, causing a recent change of the local hydrology.

  11. Interaction of gypsum and the rhizome of Anemarrhena asphodeloides plays an important role in anti-allergic effects of byakkokakeishito in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Toshiaki; Shiraki, Yusaku; Mizukami, Hajime

    2014-07-01

    Gypsum is a crude mineral drug used in the formulas of Japanese kampo medicine and traditional Chinese medicine. The present study aimed to evaluate the anti-allergic effect of byakkokakeishito extract (BKT), which consists of gypsum (natural hydrous calcium sulfate), Anemarrhena Rhizome (rhizome of Anemarrhena asphodeloides), Cinnamon Bark (bark of trunk of Cinnamomum cassia), Oriza Seed (seed of Oryza sativa), and Glycyrrhiza (root and stolon of Glycyrrhiza uralensis), and to clarify the role of gypsum in the formula. We prepared BKT by boiling a mixture of various quantities of gypsum and fixed amounts of the other four crude drugs in water. We evaluated the anti-allergic activity of the formulations using three different murine models of allergy: contact dermatitis induced by painting hapten onto skin; allergic dermatitis-like symptoms induced by cutaneous injection of mite-antigen; and skin passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) reaction using ovalbumin as antigen. The calcium content in the various BKT samples was dose-dependently increased up to 60 g/day of human dosage. BKT significantly suppressed the allergic symptoms in the three different experimental models. The effect of BKT was augmented by increasing the gypsum dosage only in the PCA reaction model. The extract prepared from a mixture of Anemarrhena Rhizome and gypsum exhibited an effect comparable to that of BKT. BKT exhibits an anti-allergic effect in several animal models, which may provide experimental evidence for the clinical use of BKT in allergic diseases. Gypsum may augment the anti-allergic activity of BKT, presumably through increasing intestinal absorption of Anemarrhena Rhizome-derived active constituents.

  12. Preparation and evaluation of transdermal plasters containing norfloxacin: a novel treatment for burn wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpharm, Kamal Dua; Ramana, M V; Sara, U V S; Agrawal, D K; Mpharm, Kavita Pabreja; Chakravarthi, Srikumar

    2010-06-21

    In an attempt for better treatment of bacterial infections and burn wounds, plaster formulations containing different concentrations of norfloxacin were prepared using polymers like polyvinylpyrrolidone and polyvinyl alcohol and evaluated for physicochemical parameters, in vitro drug release, antimicrobial activity, and burn wound healing properties. The prepared formulations were compared with silver sulfadiazine cream 1%, USP. Plaster formulations containing different concentrations of norfloxacin were prepared by solvent casting method using combination of polymers like polyvinylpyrrolidone and polyvinyl alcohol. These plasters were characterized for drug content, thickness, percentage elongation, tensile strength, in vitro drug release properties, and antimicrobial activity against various strains of aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms. The wound healing property was evaluated by histopathological examination and by measuring the wound contraction. The in vitro release and in vitro skin permeation followed the first-order kinetics followed by diffusion as dominant release mechanism. In spite of the significant antimicrobial and wound healing effects produced by plasters, the observed values were less than the values obtained with silver sulfadiazine 1% cream (P norfloxacin transdermal plasters could be employed as an alternative to commercial silver sulfadiazine 1% cream.

  13. Application of Ceramic Powder as Supplementary Cementitious Material in Lime Plasters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika ČÁCHOVÁ

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the properties of plasters based on lime – brick powder binder of varying composition (ceramics content from 0 to 80 % are studied. The plasters are prepared with a constant water amount. The pore size distribution is thus influenced in a positive way; the total porosity increases with the ceramics content but the volume of capillary pores is reduced. It results in lower water vapor diffusion resistance factor while the apparent moisture diffusivity coefficient increases just moderately. The influence of ceramic on strength of plasters is not found very important. The thermal conductivity of plasters containing ceramics is lower than those with the pure lime what is again in agreement with the pore size distribution. It can be concluded that fine brick powder can be used as pozzolanic admixture in lime based plasters with a positive influence on its functional parameters.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.3.7433

  14. Characterization of quality recycled gypsum and plasterboard with maximized recycled content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jiménez-Rivero

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The quality of secondary materials is imperative to promote a circular economy. In order to improve the way in which the quality of recycled gypsum is assessed, European guidelines on recycled gypsum (RG quality criteria have been outlined in the framework of the Life+ Gypsum to Gypsum (GtoG project. Such GtoG guidelines, along with the European Standard on gypsum plasterboard EN 520, provided the basis for this study. During the GtoG project, gypsum recycling and plasterboard manufacturing processes were monitored by testing the gypsum feedstock and the plasterboard produced. The aim of this paper is to discuss the results obtained on relevant parameters that characterize gypsum as a secondary raw material, as well as the resulting product. The minimum requirements were fulfilled by 56% of the RG samples and 86% of the plasterboard with increased RG.

  15. Palaeoclimatic significance of gypsum pseudomorphs in the inner shelf sediments off Machalipatnam bay

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.

    after gypsum. The origin of the pseudo-gypsum has been discussed and it is suggested that these are indicators of late Pleistocene climatic aridity. The bay sediments deposited during late Pleistocene were subsequently eroded by waves and currents due...

  16. Light Steel-Timber Frame with Composite and Plaster Bracing Panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Scotta

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The proposed light-frame structure comprises steel columns for vertical loads and an innovative bracing system to efficiently resist seismic actions. This seismic force resisting system consists of a light timber frame braced with an Oriented Strand Board (OSB sheet and an external technoprene plaster-infilled slab. Steel brackets are used as foundation and floor connections. Experimental cyclic-loading tests were conduced to study the seismic response of two shear-wall specimens. A numerical model was calibrated on experimental results and the dynamic non-linear behavior of a case-study building was assessed. Numerical results were then used to estimate the proper behavior factor value, according to European seismic codes. Obtained results demonstrate that this innovative system is suitable for the use in seismic-prone areas thanks to the high ductility and dissipative capacity achieved by the bracing system. This favorable behavior is mainly due to the fasteners and materials used and to the correct application of the capacity design approach.

  17. Influence of tooth dimension on the initial mobility based on plaster casts and X-ray images : A numerical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Martin; Dirk, Cornelius; Reimann, Susanne; Keilig, Ludger; Konermann, Anna; Jäger, Andreas; Bourauel, Christoph

    2017-07-01

    The goal was to determine the influence of different geometric parameters of the tooth on the initial tooth mobility and the position of the center of resistance employing numerical models based on scaled X-ray images and plaster casts. The dimensions of tooth 21 were measured in 21 patients, using radiographs and dental casts. Length and mesiodistal width of the tooth were obtained from the X-ray image and the orovestibular diameter from the plaster cast. Finite element models were generated. Cortical and cancellous bone and the periodontal ligament were simulated to create realistic models. Root length (11-17 mm), mesiodistal width (6-10 mm) and orovestibular thickness (7-9 mm) were varied in 1-mm steps to generate 105 models. In the simulation, each model was loaded with a force of 10 N in vestibulopalatinal direction and with a torque of 10 Nmm to determine tooth displacements and center of resistance. Initial tooth displacement and thus mobility increased with decreasing total root surface. The shortest, slimmest and thinnest tooth showed a total deflection of 0.14 mm at the incisal edge, while the longest, widest and thickest tooth showed a total deflection of 0.10 mm. Changes in mesiodistal width had the greatest influence on initial tooth mobility and changes in orovestibular thickness the least. The teeth's center of resistance was positioned between 37 and 43% of the root length measured from the cervical margin of the alveolar bone. The center of resistance of the longest dental root investigated was located around 6% more cervically compared to the one of the shortest dental root. The influence of root width and thickness on the position of the center of resistance was significantly lower than root length. Geometric parameters significantly impact initial tooth mobility and position of the center of resistance. Thus, tooth dimensions should be considered in orthodontic treatment planning. Dental radiographs represent a sufficient validation tool

  18. Suitability of coarse-grade gypsum for sodic soil reclamation: a laboratory experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elshout, van den S.; Kamphorst, A.

    1990-01-01

    Costs of sodic soil reclamation can be reduced when coarse-grade gypsum is used, as the production and transport prices of this gypsum are much lower than that of agricultural-grade gypsum. In a feasibility study laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate the leaching water requirements for

  19. Influence of gypsum on efflorescence in ceramic tiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, C.M.O.L.; Nascimento, R.M.; Martinelli, A.E.

    2009-01-01

    The red ceramic industry is recognized as of major importance in Piaui State. The State capital, Teresina, is the greatest producer of this material, which is used mainly for masonry sealing blocks. One of the most frequent problems in this kind of products is the efflorescence.This paper has the main objective of studying the influence of gypsum on tiles, using the local industry production standards. The raw materials were characterized by FRX, DRX, thermal analysis and sulfates. Extruded test specimens were made with the addition of 1%, 3% and 5% of gypsum in the ceramic paste, burned at 850 deg C, 950 deg C and 1050 deg C and submitted to further technological and analysis for MEV. The reference ceramic paste did not show tendency to efflorescence formation after burning for samples with 1% gypsum added to the paste. The reference ceramic paste showed tendency to efflorescence formation after drying and consolidated efflorescence after burning for samples with 5% gypsum added to the paste. (author)

  20. Composite Gypsum Binders with Silica-containing Additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernysheva, N. V.; Lesovik, V. S.; Drebezgova, M. Yu; Shatalova, S. V.; Alaskhanov, A. H.

    2018-03-01

    New types of fine mineral additives are proposed for designing water-resistant Composite Gypsum Binders (CGB); these additives significantly differ from traditional quartz feed: wastes from wet magnetic separation of Banded Iron Formation (BIF WMS waste), nanodispersed silica powder (NSP), chalk. Possibility of their combined use has been studied as well.

  1. preliminary estimate of gypsum deposit based on wenner and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dogara M. D. and Aloa J. O.

    Department of Physics, Kaduna State University, Kaduna, Nigeria. *E-Mail of the corresponding author: dogaramatoh@yahoo.com ... The chemical composition of gypsum is CaSO4.2H2O and is very similar to ... exploitation is an everyday activity that is currently going on, but, on a 'wild cat' basis. The mining industry in Edo ...

  2. Preparation of gypsum/polymer composites using radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aji, Z.

    2007-05-01

    Gypsum composites have been prepared with different monomers using Gamma radiation: acrylamide, butyl acrylate, butyl methacrylate, methyl methacrylate, and methyl acrylate. The conversion of polymerization was determined as a function of absorbed dose. The data show that conversion of polymerization increases by increasing the dose.(author)

  3. Development of gypsum alteration on marble and limestone

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, E.S.

    1996-01-01

    Blackened alteration crusts of gypsum plus particulates that form on sheltered areas on marble and limestone buildings pose a challenge for rehabilitation and cleaning. Fresh marble and limestone samples exposed at monitored exposure sites present conditions of simple geometry and well-documented exposures but have short exposure histories (one to five years). The gypsum alteration crusts that develop on these samples provide insight into the early stages and rate of alteration crust formation. Alteration crusts from buildings give a longer, but less well known exposure history and present much more complex surfaces for gypsum accumulation. Integrated observations and measurements of alteration crusts from exposure samples and from buildings identify four factors that are important in the formation and development of alteration crusts on marble and limestone: (1) pollution levels, (2) exposure to rain or washing, (3) geometry of exposure of the stone surface, and (4) permeability of the stone. The combination of these factors contributes to both the distribution and the physical characteristics of the gypsum crusts which may affect cleaning decisions.

  4. Theoretical and Numerical Investigation of the Cavity Evolution in Gypsum Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Einstein, Herbert H.

    2017-11-01

    When water flows through a preexisting cylindrical tube in gypsum rock, the nonuniform dissolution alters the tube into an enlarged tapered tube. A 2-D analytical model is developed to study the transport-controlled dissolution in an enlarged tapered tube, with explicit consideration of the tapered geometry and induced radial flow. The analytical model shows that the Graetz solution can be extended to model dissolution in the tapered tube. An alternative form of the governing equations is proposed to take advantage of the invariant quantities in the Graetz solution to facilitate modeling cavity evolution in gypsum rock. A 2-D finite volume model was developed to validate the extended Graetz solution. The time evolution of the transport-controlled and the reaction-controlled dissolution models for a single tube with time-invariant flow rate are compared. This comparison shows that for time-invariant flow rate, the reaction-controlled dissolution model produces a positive feedback between the tube enlargement and dissolution, while the transport-controlled dissolution does not.

  5. Physicochemical Properties and Cellular Responses of Strontium-Doped Gypsum Biomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Pouria, Amir; Bandegani, Hadis; Pourbaghi-Masouleh, Milad; Hesaraki, Saeed; Alizadeh, Masoud

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes some physical, structural, and biological properties of gypsum bioceramics doped with various amounts of strontium ions (0.19–2.23 wt%) and compares these properties with those of a pure gypsum as control. Strontium-doped gypsum (gypsum:Sr) was obtained by mixing calcium sulfate hemihydrate powder and solutions of strontium nitrate followed by washing the specimens with distilled water to remove residual salts. Gypsum was the only phase found in the composition of both pu...

  6. Preparation of Waste GFRP Fiber Reinforced Gypsum Block with Water-resistant and Energy Storage Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Meng-Meng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gypsum block possesses good performances such as volume stability, lightweight and thermal insulation, is recognized as typical eco-friendly building material. However, its poor water resistance characteristics restrict the application. The semi-hydrated desulphurization gypsum is modified with steel slag, granulated blast-furnace and carbide slag (SGC composite powder as well as waste glass-reinforced plastic (GFRP fiber, aiming at producing water-resistant gypsum block. The proper mass proportioning of the modified gypsum block is obtained: semi-hydrated desulphurization gypsum 75%, SGC 25% and waste GFRP fiber 1.0%. The product is of softening coefficient of 0.84 and thermal flexural strength of 8.6 MPa. Phase change energy storage material (PCM is used to increase the energy saving characteristics of the block. Compared with ordinary gypsum walls, the modified gypsum block with CA-SA exhibits good energy storage property.

  7. Restorian of outdoor plaster pavement floors in a medieval Czech castle

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slížková, Zuzana; Drdácký, Miloš

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 3 (2008), s. 81-98 ISSN 1355-6207 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA103/06/1609 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20710524 Keywords : floor plaster * metakaoline modified mortar * medieval castle rampart * non-standard testing Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage

  8. Mineralogical and textural characterization of mortars and plasters from the archaeological site of Barsinia, northern Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Mohammad AL-Naddaf

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Twelve mortar and plaster samples excavated in the archaeological site of Barsinia were mineralogically and petrographically examined by XRay Diffraction (XRD and Stereo and Polarized Light Microscopy, while the total carbonate content was measured using a DietrichFruhling Calcimeter. The physical properties of the samples, such as water uptake under atmospheric pressure and under vacuum, together with density and porosity, were measured. Only twelve samples were available for the purposes of this study: 8 plaster samples and 4 mortar samples. Eleven samples out of the total number of samples were mortars or plasters with lime binder and silica aggregate; calcite and quartz were identified in all of these samples. In most of the samples one or more pozzolanic components were detected; a hydraulic effect therefore exists in practically most of the studied mortars. Excluding the plasters taken from waterbearing constructions such as cisterns, and the mortar sample from the compact floor, the binder content is high; in general, the overall porosity of the studied samples is high. Porosity and petrographic investigation results suggest that the burning temperature of the limestone was low and/or the duration of the combustion was short; such preparation conditions produce a desirable quicklime. Owing to the significant compositional and textural differences between the samples that were reported, there is consequently no suitable general mortar that can be adopted for the restoration of the whole site.

  9. A Photodegradation Study of Three Common Paint and Plaster Biocides under monochromatic UV Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minelgaite, Greta; Vollertsen, Jes; Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning

    2014-01-01

    Photodegradation of the three common paint-and-plaster biocides (carbendazim, diuron and terbutryn) was investigated at controlled laboratory conditions. Samples prepared in two types of water (demineralized water and pond water) were subjected to 254 nm monochromatic UV light. Light intensity (W m...

  10. Simulation and Prediction of Ion Transport in the Reclamation of Sodic Soils with Gypsum Based on the Support Vector Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinman Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of gypsum on the physical and chemical characteristics of sodic soils is nonlinear and controlled by multiple factors. The support vector machine (SVM is able to solve practical problems such as small samples, nonlinearity, high dimensions, and local minima points. This paper reports the use of the SVM regression method to predict changes in the chemical properties of sodic soils under different gypsum application rates in a soil column experiment and to evaluate the effect of gypsum reclamation on sodic soils. The research results show that (1 the SVM soil solute transport model using the Matlab toolbox represents the change in Ca2+ and Na+ in the soil solution and leachate well, with a high prediction accuracy. (2 Using the SVM model to predict the spatial and temporal variations in the soil solute content is feasible and does not require a specific mathematical model. The SVM model can take full advantage of the distribution characteristics of the training sample. (3 The workload of the soil solute transport prediction model based on the SVM is greatly reduced by not having to determine the hydrodynamic dispersion coefficient and retardation coefficient, and the model is thus highly practical.

  11. Validation of plaster endocast morphology through 3D CT image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenemann, P Thomas; Gee, James; Avants, Brian; Holloway, Ralph L; Monge, Janet; Lewis, Jason

    2007-02-01

    A crucial component of research on brain evolution has been the comparison of fossil endocranial surfaces with modern human and primate endocrania. The latter have generally been obtained by creating endocasts out of rubber latex shells filled with plaster. The extent to which the method of production introduces errors in endocast replicas is unknown. We demonstrate a powerful method of comparing complex shapes in 3-dimensions (3D) that is broadly applicable to a wide range of paleoanthropological questions. Pairs of virtual endocasts (VEs) created from high-resolution CT scans of corresponding latex/plaster endocasts and their associated crania were rigidly registered (aligned) in 3D space for two Homo sapiens and two Pan troglodytes specimens. Distances between each cranial VE and its corresponding latex/plaster VE were then mapped on a voxel-by-voxel basis. The results show that between 79.7% and 91.0% of the voxels in the four latex/plaster VEs are within 2 mm of their corresponding cranial VEs surfaces. The average error is relatively small, and variation in the pattern of error across the surfaces appears to be generally random overall. However, inferior areas around the cranial base and the temporal poles were somewhat overestimated in both human and chimpanzee specimens, and the area overlaying Broca's area in humans was somewhat underestimated. This study gives an idea of the size of possible error inherent in latex/plaster endocasts, indicating the level of confidence we can have with studies relying on comparisons between them and, e.g., hominid fossil endocasts. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Basic Properties of Flue-Gas Desulfurization Gypsum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovacs Ferenc

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Several hundred thousand of FGD gypsum is produced annually at the Matra Power Plant (Hungary as a byproduct of generating electricity and protecting the environment. Chemical and mechanical characteristics of this material were studied of the Department of Mining and Geotechnical Engineering, University of Miskolc (Hungary. The material in question was found dead gypsum which can be calcined easily to obtain a relatively high-strength (15-25 MPa and clean binding material. Furthermore, grain composites were made of it by adding fly ash, which the power plant can provide the expected producers with, thus decreasing the energy consumption of calcining and utilizing a small part of coal combustion wastes.

  13. Research on Crack Formation in Gypsum Partitions with Doorway by Means of FEM and Fracture Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kania, Tomasz; Stawiski, Bohdan

    2017-10-01

    Cracking damage in non-loadbearing internal partition walls is a serious problem that frequently occurs in new buildings within the short term after putting them into service or even before completion of construction. Damage in partition walls is sometimes so great that they cannot be accepted by their occupiers. This problem was illustrated by the example of damage in a gypsum partition wall with doorway attributed to deflection of the slabs beneath and above it. In searching for the deflection which causes damage in masonry walls, fracture mechanics applied to the Finite Element Method (FEM) have been used. For a description of gypsum behaviour, the smeared cracking material model has been selected, where stresses are transferred across the narrowly opened crack until its width reaches the ultimate value. Cracks in the Finite Element models overlapped the real damage observed in the buildings. In order to avoid cracks under the deflection of large floor slabs, the model of a wall with reinforcement in the doorstep zone and a 40 mm thick elastic junction between the partition and ceiling has been analysed.

  14. Biological sulfate removal from gypsum contaminated construction and demolition debris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijjanapanich, Pimluck; Annachhatre, Ajit P; Esposito, Giovanni; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Lens, Piet N L

    2013-12-15

    Construction and demolition debris (CDD) contains high levels of sulfate that can cause detrimental environmental impacts when disposed without adequate treatment. In landfills, sulfate can be converted to hydrogen sulfide under anaerobic conditions. CDD can thus cause health impacts or odor problems to landfill employees and surrounding residents. Reduction of the sulfate content of CDD is an option to overcome these problems. This study aimed at developing a biological sulfate removal system to reduce the sulfate content of gypsum contaminated CDD in order to decrease the amount of solid waste, to improve the quality of CDD waste for recycling purposes and to recover sulfur from CDD. The treatment leached out the gypsum contained in CDD by water in a leaching column. The sulfate loaded leachate was then treated in a biological sulfate reducing Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactor to convert the sulfate to sulfide. The UASB reactor was operated at 23 ± 3 °C with a hydraulic retention time and upflow velocity of 15.5 h and 0.1 m h(-1), respectively while ethanol was added as electron donor at a final organic loading rate of 3.46 g COD L(-1) reactor d(-1). The CDD leachate had a pH of 8-9 and sulfate dissolution rates of 526.4 and 609.8 mg L(-1) d(-1) were achieved in CDD gypsum and CDD sand, respectively. Besides, it was observed that the gypsum dissolution was the rate limiting step for the biological treatment of CDD. The sulfate removal efficiency of the system stabilized at around 85%, enabling the reuse of the UASB effluent for the leaching step, proving the versatility of the bioreactor for practical applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Lime and gypsum application on the wheat crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caires Eduardo Fávero

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Root growth and crop yield can be affected by chemical modifications of the soil profile owing to lime and gypsum applications. A field trial was carried out on a dystrophic Clayey Rhodic Hapludox at Ponta Grossa, PR, Brazil, aiming to evaluate lime (without or with incorporation into the soil and gypsum effects on root growth, mineral nutrition and grain yield of wheat (cv. OR 1. A randomized complete block design was used, with three replications, in a split-plot experiment. Treatments with dolomitic limestone (without lime and 4.5 t ha-1 of lime applied on the surface, in total rate and 1/3 of the requirement per year during 3 years, or incorporated into the soil were applied in July 1998 (main plots and the rates of gypsum (0, 3, 6 and 9 t ha-1 in October 1998 (subplots. Wheat was evaluated in the 2000 winter season. In conditions of water deficit absence, there was no limitation in root growth in depth, for exchangeable Ca of 6 mmol c dm-3. Lime incorporation of lime increased the Mg concentration in the leaves, but wheat yield was not influenced by the correction of soil acidity through liming treatments. Gypsum increased the concentrations of Ca and S in wheat leaves, with significant effects on grain yield. The critical level of S-SO4(2- in the 0-20 cm soil layer, extracted by ammonium acetate 0.5 mol L-1 in acetic acid 0.25 mol L-1, was 25.8 mg dm-3.

  16. occurrence and geochemistry of nafada gypsum, north-eastern nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DJFLEX

    2010-03-18

    Mar 18, 2010 ... The container was placed in a. “HERZOG” palletizing machine for 10 seconds after which a pellet was produced. The procedure was repeated for each gypsum sample. Each pellet was analyzed for SiO2, Al2O3, CaO, MgO, SO3, K2O, Na2O,. MgCO3, combine water and purity, using X-ray spectrometer.

  17. Comparison of Energy Dissipation, Stiffness, and Damage of Structural Oriented Strand Board (OSB, Conventional Gypsum, and Viscoelastic Gypsum Shearwalls Subjected to Cyclic Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew S. Blasetti

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A key element in the seismic load resisting system of a wood framed structure is the shear wall which is typically sheathed on one side with plywood or oriented strand board (OSB and gypsum on the other. The shear capacity of gypsum sheathed shear walls is typically neglected in high seismic areas due to the susceptibility of conventional drywall screw connections to damage caused by earthquakes. The earthquake resistance of an innovative viscoelastic (VE gypsum shearwall is evaluated and compared to conventional structural and non-structural walls. Ten 8 ft × 8 ft wood framed wall specimens of three configurations [nailed-OSB, screw-gypsum, and VE polymer-gypsum] were subjected to a cyclic test protocol. The energy dissipation, stiffness, and damage characteristics of all shearwalls are reported herein. Testing results indicate the VE-gypsum walls can dissipate more energy than the OSB structural panels and 500% more energy that the conventional gypsum sheathed walls and contains a constant source of energy dissipation not seen in the structural and non-structural walls. The wall stiffness of the OSB wall degrades at a far greater rate that the VE gypsum wall and at continued cycling degrades below the VE wall stiffness. Unlike both of the conventional wall types, the VE wall showed no visible or audible signs of damage when subjected to shear displacements up to 1.

  18. Manufacturing of calcium phosphate scaffolds by pseudomorphic transformation of gypsum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo Batista, H. de.; Batista Cardoso, M.; Sales Vasconcelos, A.; Vinicius Lia Fook, M.; Rodriguez Barbero, M. A.; Garcia Carrodeguas, R.

    2016-08-01

    Carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHAp) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) have been employed for decades as constituents of scaffolds for bone regeneration because they chemically resemble bone mineral. In this study, the feasibility to manufacture CHAp/β-TCP scaffolds by pseudomorphic transformation of casted blocks of gypsum was investigated. The transformation was carried out by immersing the precursor gypsum block in 1 M (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HPO{sub 4}/1.33 M NH{sub 4}OH solution with liquid/solid ratio of 10 mL/g and autoclaving at 120 degree centigrade and 203 kPa (2 atm) for 3 h at least. Neither shape nor dimensions significantly changed during transformation. The composition of scaffolds treated for 3 h was 70 wt.% CHAp and 30 wt.% β-TCP, and their compressive and diametral compressive strengths were 6.5 ± 0.7 and 5.3 ±0.7 MPa, respectively. By increasing the time of treatment to 6 h, the composition of the scaffold enriched in β-TCP (60 wt.% CHAp and 40 wt.% β-TCP) but its compressive and diametral compressive strengths were not significantly affected (6.7 ± 0.9 and 5.4 ± 0.6 MPa, respectively). On the basis of the results obtained, it was concluded that this route is a good approach to the manufacturing of biphasic (CHAp/β-TCP) scaffolds from previously shaped pieces of gypsum. (Author)

  19. Constraints from sulfur isotopes on the origin of gypsum at concrete/claystone interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerouge, Catherine; Claret, Francis; Tournassat, Christophe; Grangeon, Sylvain; Gaboreau, Stéphane; Boyer, Bernard; Borschnek, Daniel; Linard, Yannick

    Two in situ concrete/claystone interfaces were sampled at the laboratory level in the Andra Meuse/Haute Marne (France) Underground Research Laboratory (URL) in order to study five years of interactions between Callovian-Oxfordian (COx) claystone and two cementitious materials (concrete bottom slab and shotcrete on the walls of the main gallery), with a specific focus on sulfur. Combined mineralogical, chemical and sulfur isotopic investigations were carried out to define the degree of the perturbation of the sulfur system in the claystone and in both the cementitious materials. At both interfaces, results show that the main perturbation on the claystone side is the formation of scarce μm-sized gypsum, the sulfur content of which is essentially derived from pyrite oxidation. The distribution of gypsum is highly correlated with the fissure network of the damaged zone due to excavation of the gallery. Its presence is also often associated with a loss of cohesion of the concrete/claystone interface. Due to the small amounts of gypsum and its μm-size, measurements were performed by ion microprobe. Adaptations were needed on account of the reactivity of gypsum and sulfates in general under the beam. The use of ion microprobe analysis provided evidence of high local isotopic heterogeneity that could be attributed to kinetic fractionation effects. Some analyses suggest a minor contribution of dissolved sulfates in pore water of claystone and possibly of concrete. The perturbation on the concrete side is marked by a significant increase in the bulk sulfur content within three millimeters of the interface with the claystone, showing a sulfur gradient from claystone to concrete. The main objective of this work was to define the extent of the chemical and mineralogical perturbations, taking into account in situ URL conditions, i.e. hydrodynamic conditions (shotcrete sprayed on the gallery walls and subjected to ventilation of the galleries), damaged zone of claystone induced

  20. Archaeomagnetic studies in central Mexico—dating of Mesoamerican lime-plasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueda-Tanabe, Y.; Soler-Arechalde, A. M.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Barba, L.; Manzanilla, L.; Rebolledo-Vieyra, M.; Goguitchaichvili, A.

    2004-11-01

    For the first time results of an archaeomagnetic study of unburned lime-plasters from Teotihuacan and Tenochtitlan in central Mesoamerica are presented. Plasters made of lime, lithic clasts and water, appear during the Formative Period and were used for a variety of purposes in floors, sculptures, ceramics and supporting media for mural paintings in the Oaxaca and Maya area. In Central Mexico, grinded volcanic scoria rich in iron minerals is incorporated into the lime-plasters mixture. Samples were selected from two archaeological excavation projects in the Teopancazco residential compound of Teotihuacan and the large multi-stage structure of Templo Mayor in Tenochtitlan, where chronological information is available. The intensity of remanent magnetization (natural remanent magnetization (NRM)) and low-field susceptibility are weak reflecting low relative content of magnetic minerals. NRM directions are well grouped and alternating field demagnetization shows single or two-component magnetizations. Rockmagnetic experiments point to fine-grained titanomagnetites with pseudo-single domain behavior. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) measurements document a depositional fabric, with normal to free-surface minimum AMS axes. Characteristic mean site directions were correlated to the paleosecular variation curve for Mesoamerica. Data from Templo Mayor reflect recent tilting of the structures. Teopancazco mean site declinations show good correspondence with the reference curve, in agreement with the radiocarbon dating. Dates for four stages of Teotihuacan occupancy based on the study of lime-plasters range from AD 350 to 550. A date for a possible Mazapa occupation around AD 850 or 950 is also suggested based on the archaeomagnetic correlation. The archaeomagnetic record of a plaster floor in Teopancazco differed from the other nearby sites pointing to a thermoremanent magnetization; comparison with the reference curve suggests dates around AD 1375 or 1415. The

  1. Soil management and application of agricultural gypsum in a Planosol for soybean cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enio Marchesan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: This study investigated the effects of soil management systems, tillage, and application of gypsum agricultural to soil, on soybean development in lowland areas. The experiment was carried out on an Alfisol in a randomized complete block design in a factorial arrangement. The two soil tillage practices were without deep tillage and with deep tillage. Gypsum treatments were no gypsum application, 500kg of gypsum ha-1, 1000kg of gypsum ha-1, and 1500kg of gypsum ha-1. Deep tillage resulted in less soil resistance to root penetration during ryegrass cultivation during the soybean offseason, 11 months after applying the management treatments, resulting in higher dry mass of ryegrass in the offseason and higher soybean yield in the following year.

  2. Evolution of microstructure and elastic wave velocities in dehydrated gypsum samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milsch, Harald; Priegnitz, Mike

    2012-12-01

    We report on changes in P and S-wave velocities and rock microstructure induced by devolatilization reactions using gypsum as a reference analog material. Cylindrical samples of natural alabaster were dehydrated in air, at ambient pressure, and temperatures between 378 and 423 K. Dehydration did not proceed homogeneously but via a reaction front moving sample inwards separating an outer highly porous rim from the remaining gypsum which, above approximately 393 (±5) K, concurrently decomposed into hemihydrate. Overall porosity was observed to continuously increase with reaction progress from approximately 2% for fully hydrated samples to 30% for completely dehydrated ones. Concurrently, P and S-wave velocities linearly decreased with porosity from 5.2 and 2.7 km/s to 1.0 and 0.7 km/s, respectively. It is concluded that a linearized empirical Raymer-type model extended by a critical porosity term and based on the respective time dependent mineral and pore volumes reasonably replicates the P and S-wave data in relation to reaction progress and porosity.

  3. Moisture buffer capacity of cement-lime plasters with enhanced thermal storage capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fořt, Jan; Pavlíková, Milena; Pavlík, Zbyšek

    2017-07-01

    Indoor air temperature and relative humidity represent important parameters for health and working efficiency of buildings occupants. Beside the moderation of temperature, investigation of hygric properties of building materials with connection to indoor relative humidity variation became recognized as a relevant factor for energy efficient building maintenance. The moisture buffer value introduced in the Nordtest protocol can be used for estimation of moisture buffer capacity of building materials or their multi-layered systems. In this paper, both the ideal and real moisture buffer values are examined on the basis of simulation of diurnal relative humidity fluctuations in plasters with incorporated PCM admixture. Retrieved data points to a complex effect of the tested plasters on possible moderation of buildings interior climate.

  4. Pre-contamination of new gypsum wallboard with potentially harmful fungal species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Birgitte; Dosen, Ina; Lewinska, Anna Malgorzata

    2017-01-01

    Gypsum wallboard is a popular building material, but is also very frequently overgrown by Stachybotrys chartarum after severe and/or undetected water damage. The purpose of this study was to determine whether Stachybotrys and other fungi frequently isolated from wet gypsum wallboard are already...... present in the panels directly from the factory. Surface-disinfected gypsum disks were wetted with sterile water, sealed, and incubated for 70 days. The results showed that Neosartorya hiratsukae (≡ Aspergillus hiratsukae) was the most dominant fungus on the gypsum wallboard followed by Chaetomium...

  5. FGD [flue gas desulfurization] gypsum in the United Germany: Trends of demand and supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, V.

    1991-01-01

    1990 was the first year in which all flue gas desulfurization (FGD) units in West Germany suplied the gypsum industry in Germany and some other European countries with FGD-gypsum. The effect on the gypsum market was not as significant as anticipated, mainly due to wrong estimates based on the most conservative conditions assumed by the power stations in their applications for permission. These estimates generally assumed high sulfur coal at full load throughout the year, whereas most West German boilers fire low sulfur coal and run only at peak times, resulting in much less FGD gypsum on the market than the German gypsum industry had been prepared to use. The unification of Germany has changed the situation of the gypsum industry dramatically. Reserves of natural gypsum in the middle of Germany are now much more accessible, and a great number of lignite-fired power stations must be fitted with FGD equipment as soon as possible. At the same time, the market for gypsum building products will improve dramatically due to the poor condition of many buildings in east Germany, which will require rehabilitation. These circumstances imply a bright future for both natural and FGD-based gypsum in Germany. 8 refs., 5 figs

  6. Carbonate replacement of lacustrine gypsum deposits in two Neogene continental basins, eastern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anadón, P.; Rosell, L.; Talbot, M. R.

    1992-07-01

    Bedded nonmarine gypsum deposits in the Miocene Teruel and Cabriel basins, eastern Spain, are partly replaced by carbonate. The Libros gypsum (Teruel Graben) is associated with fossiliferous carbonate wackestones and finely laminated, organic matter-rich mudstones which accumulated under anoxic conditions in a meromictic, permanent lake. The gypsum is locally pseudomorphed by aragonite or, less commonly, replaced by calcite. Low δ 13C values indicate that sulphate replacement resulted from bacterial sulphate reduction processes that were favoured by anacrobic conditions and abundant labile organic matter in the sediments. Petrographic evidence and oxygen isotopic composition suggest that gypsum replacement by aragonite occurred soon after deposition. A subsequent return to oxidising conditions caused some aragonite to be replaced by diagenetic gypsum. Native sulphur is associated with some of these secondary gypsum occurrences. The Los Ruices sulphate deposits (Cabriel Basin) contain beds of clastic and selenitic gypsum which are associated with limestones and red beds indicating accumulation in a shallow lake. Calcite is the principal replacement mineral. Bacterial sulphate reduction was insignificant in this basin because of a scarcity of organic matter. Stable isotope composition of diagenetic carbonate indicates that gypsum replacement occurred at shallow burial depths due to contact with dilute groundwaters of meteoric origin. Depositional environment evidently has a major influence upon the diagenetic history of primary sulphate deposits. The quantity of preserved organic matter degradable by sulphate-reducing bacteria is of particular importance and, along with groundwater composition, is the main factor controlling the mechanism of gypsum replacement by carbonate.

  7. Effect of lipidmicrosphere prostaglandin combined with Shengji plaster on bedsore healing in III and IV degree

    OpenAIRE

    Su-Fang Gao; Qing-Fu Song; Shu-Ping Gao

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effect of lipidmicrosphere prostaglandin (Lipo PGE1) combined with Shengji plaster on the bedsore healing. Methods: A total of 100 patients with bedsores in III and IV degree who were admitted in our hospital from January, 2013 to January, 2015 were included in the study and divided into the observation group and the control group with 50 cases in each group according to different treatment protocols. The blood glucose, infection, and blood pressure in...

  8. Effect of lipidmicrosphere prostaglandin combined with Shengji plaster on bedsore healing in III and IV degree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Fang Gao

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe the effect of lipidmicrosphere prostaglandin (Lipo PGE1 combined with Shengji plaster on the bedsore healing. Methods: A total of 100 patients with bedsores in III and IV degree who were admitted in our hospital from January, 2013 to January, 2015 were included in the study and divided into the observation group and the control group with 50 cases in each group according to different treatment protocols. The blood glucose, infection, and blood pressure in the two groups were effectively controlled. The patients in the observation group were given intravenous drip of Lipo PGE1 and external application of Shengji plaster, while the patients in the control group were given intravenous drip of Chuanxiongqin injection and external application of Shengji plaster. Four-week treatment was regarded as one course. The specimens on the wound surface of bedsores 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks after treatment were collected. SABC developing method was used to observe the blood capillary density value (/10 HP. TcPO2 1 cm around the wound surface and the skin temperature were measured. Results: The blood capillary density values 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks after treatment in the observation group were significantly higher than those in the control group (P<0.05. The bedsore wound surface skin temperature 2, 4, 6, and 8 h after medication in the observation group was significantly lower than that in the control group (P<0.05, while TcPO2 was significantly higher than that in the control group (P<0.05. Conclusions: Lipo PGE1 combined with Shengji plaster can effectively improve the blood circulation on the wound surface of bedsores, and promote the bedsore healing.

  9. Development of Innovative Aerogel Based Plasters: Preliminary Thermal and Acoustic Performance Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinzia Buratti

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The thermal and acoustic properties of innovative insulating systems used as building coatings were investigated: Granular silica aerogel was mixed with natural plaster in different percentages. This coating solution is transpiring and insulating, thanks to the use of a natural lime coat and aerogel, a highly porous light material with very low thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivity of the proposed solution was evaluated by means of a Heat Flow meter apparatus (EN ISO 12667, considering different percentages of aerogel. The natural plaster without aerogel has a thermal conductivity of about 0.50 W/m K; considering a percentage of granular aerogel of about 90% in volume, the thermal conductivity of the insulating natural coating falls to 0.050 W/m K. Increasing the percentage of granular aerogel, a value of about 0.018–0.020 W/m K can be reached. The acoustic properties were also evaluated in terms of the acoustic absorption coefficient, measured by means of a Kundt’s Tube (ISO 10534-2. Two samples composed by a plasterboard support, an insulation plaster with aerogel (thicknesses 10 mm and 30 mm respectively and a final coat were assembled. The results showed that the absorption coefficient strongly depends on the final coat, so the aerogel-based plaster layer moderately influences the final value. The application of this innovative solution can be a useful tool for new buildings, but also for the refurbishment of existing ones. This material is in development: until now, the best value of the thermal conductivity obtained from manufacturers is about 0.015 W/m K.

  10. [Characteristics and principles of acupoint selection in auricular plaster therapy for hypertension based on literature analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yan; Li, Chen; Du, Yuzheng; Chen, Aixia; Jin, Jiu; Zhao, Qi

    2017-07-12

    The characteristics and principles of acupoint selection in auricular plaster therapy for hypertension were explored. By searching CNKI (search time from 1950 to November of 2015), VIP database (search time from 1989 to November of 2015) and WanFang Database (search time from 1983 to November of 2015), the clinical research literature regarding auricular plaster therapy for hypertension was collected, and frequency statistics method was used for analysis. As a result, totally 117 articles were included. The auricular points with frequency from high to low were Jiangyagou, Shenmen (TF 4 ), Gan (CO 12 ), Xin (CO 15 ), Shen (CO 10 ), Jiaogan (AH 6a ), Pizhixia (AT 4 ), Jiangyadian and Neifenmi. The TCM syndromes with frequency from high to low were excessive accumulation of phlegm-dampness syndrome, upper hyperactivity of liver yang syndrome, yin deficiency and yang hyperactivity syndrome and excessive liver-fire syndrome. In conclusion, based on cross-reference of TCM and modern medicine combination of zangfu and meridians differentiation and valuing the auricular points from clinical experience, the auricular plaster therapy for hypertension was characterized with "treating the principal and subordinate symptoms simultaneously and respectively" and "differentiation-based selection of auricular points to regulate zangfu ", which could fully take the anti-hypertension advantages of non-pharmacotherapy.

  11. The potential role of cattail-reinforced clay plaster in sustainable building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Georgiev

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable development is a key goal in town and country planning, as well as in the building industry. The main aims are to avoid inefficient land use, to improve the energy efficiency of buildings and, thus, to move towards meeting the challenges of climate change. In this article we consider how the use of a traditional low-energy building material, namely clay, might contribute. Recent research has identified a promising connection between the reinforcement of clay for internal wall plastering with fibres from the wetland plant Typha latifolia (cattail and the positive environmental effects of cultivating this species. If large quantities of Typha fibres were to be used in building, the need for cultivation of the plant would increase and create new possibilities for the renaturalisation of polluted or/and degraded peatlands. We explore the topic first on the basis of literature, considering the suitability of Typha for this application and possibilities for its sustainable cultivation, as well as implications for the life cycle analyses of buildings in which it is used. We then report (qualitatively the results of testing different combinations of clay with natural plant (straw and cattail fibres for their suitability as a universal plaster, which demonstrate clearly the superior properties of Typha fibres as a reinforcement material for clay plaster mortars.

  12. Mud-plastered granary-baskets at a Celtic Oppidum near Čarnok (Vojvodina, Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medović Aleksandar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Celtic Oppidum near Čarnok (Bačka, Vojvodina, Serbia remains of four mud-plastered granarybaskets were discovered. They are all dated to the period Gomolava VI-B (first half of the 1st century B.C.. Hulled barley and broomcorn millet were stored in the granary-baskets. The mesh of the granary-baskets was composed of young branches of oak tree (Quercus, common English elm tree (Ulmus cf. campestris L., poplar / willow (Populus / Salix, purgin buckthorn (Rhamnus cf. cathartica L., wayfaring tree (Viburnum cf. lantana L., spindle tree (Euonymus cf. europaeus L., barberry (Berberis vulgaris L. and a Pomoidae-tree. At least four different tree taxa were used for basket making. Construction of two-thousand-year old mud-plastered granary-baskets from the Pannonian plain is very similar to that of traditional granaries in some present-day villages in Africa. Additionally, one non-plastered basket was also discovered at Oppidum. It was build out of maple (Acer, barberry, buckthorn (Rhamnus and branches of a pomaceous fruits tree (Pomoidae. .

  13. Effect of Shengji Yuhong plaster on the wound healing after anal fistula surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Zhong Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe the effect of Shengji Yuhong plaster on the wound healing after anal fistula surgery. Methods: A total of 120 patients with anal fistula who were admitted in our hospital from January, 2011 to December, 2013 for operation were included in the study and randomized into the observation group and the control group with 50 cases in each group after operation. The patients in the observation group were given external application of Shengji Yuhong plaster, while the patients in the control group were given vaselinum ribbon gauze. The patients in the two groups were given 3-week treatment. The wound area, granulation form, healing rate, healing time, and adverse reactions 1, 2, 3 weeks after operation in the two groups were compared. Results: The wound area 1, 2, 4 weeks after operation in the observation group was significantly less than that in the control group (P<0.05. The granulation form score was significantly lower than that in the control group (P<0.05. The wound repairing rate and the total effective rate were significantly higher than those in the control group (P<0.05, and the average healing time was significantly faster than that in the control group (P<0.05. Conclusions: Shengji Yuhong plaster can significantly shorten the wound healing time in patients after anal fistula surgery and is beneficial for the postoperative rehabilitation.

  14. Utilization of ground waste seashells in cement mortars for masonry and plastering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lertwattanaruk, Pusit; Makul, Natt; Siripattarapravat, Chalothorn

    2012-11-30

    In this research, four types of waste seashells, including short-necked clam, green mussel, oyster, and cockle, were investigated experimentally to develop a cement product for masonry and plastering. The parameters studied included water demand, setting time, compressive strength, drying shrinkage and thermal conductivity of the mortars. These properties were compared with those of a control mortar that was made of a conventional Portland cement. The main parameter of this study was the proportion of ground seashells used as cement replacement (5%, 10%, 15%, or 20% by weight). Incorporation of ground seashells resulted in reduced water demand and extended setting times of the mortars, which are advantages for rendering and plastering in hot climates. All mortars containing ground seashells yielded adequate strength, less shrinkage with drying and lower thermal conductivity compared to the conventional cement. The results indicate that ground seashells can be applied as a cement replacement in mortar mixes and may improve the workability of rendering and plastering mortar. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Light in the darkening on Naica gypsum crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo-Sandoval, I.; Fuentes-Cobas, L. E.; Esparza-Ponce, H. E.; Carreno-Márquez, J.; Montero-Cabrera, M. E., E-mail: elena.montero@cimav.edu.mx [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV), Miguel de Cervantes 120, Chihuahua, Chih 31109, México (Mexico); Fuentes-Montero, M. E. [Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Autónoma de Chihuahua, Campus Universitario#2, Circuito Universitario, C.P.31125, Chihuahua, Chih. México (Mexico); Reyes-Cortes, M. [Facultad de Ingeniería. Universidad Autónoma de Chihuahua, Campus Universitario#2, Circuito Universitario, C.P.31125, Chihuahua, Chih. México (Mexico)

    2015-07-23

    Naica mine is located in a semi-desertic region at the central-south of Chihuahua State. The Cave of Swords was discovered in 1910 and the Cave of Crystals 90 years later at Naica mines. It is expected that during the last century the human presence has changed the microclimatic conditions inside the cave, resulting in the deterioration of the crystals and the deposition of impurities on gypsum surfaces. As a contribution to the clarification of the mentioned issues, the present work refers to the use of synchrotron radiation for the identification of phases on these surfaces. All the experiments were performed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and radiography-aided X-ray diffraction (RAXRD) experiments were performed at beamline 11-3. X-Ray micro-fluorescence (μ-SXRF) and micro-X-ray absorption (μ-XANES) were measured at beamline 2-3. Representative results obtained may be summarized as follows: a) Gypsum, galena, sphalerite, hematite and cuprite at the surface of the gypsum crystals were determined. b) The samples micro-structure is affected by impurities. c) The elemental distributions and correlations (0.6-0.9) of Cu, K, Fe, Mn, Pb, Zn, Ca and S were identified by μ-SXRF. The correlations among elemental contents confirmed the phase identification, with the exception of manganese and potassium due to the amorphous nature of some impurity compounds in these samples. The compounds hematite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), β-MnO{sub 2}, Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MnO and/or MnCO{sub 3}, PbS, PbCO{sub 3} and/or PbSO4, ZnO{sub 4}, ZnS and/or smithsonite (ZnCO{sub 3}), CuS + Cu Oxide were identified by XANES. Plausibly, these latter compounds do not form crystalline phases.

  16. Nucleation and growth of the Naica giant gypsum crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otálora, Fermín; García-Ruiz, JuanMa

    2014-04-07

    The Cave of Giant Crystals in the Naica mine (Mexico) is one of the most amazing displays of mineral beauty ever created in nature. In addition to the colossal crystals of gypsum, which in some cases exceed eleven meters in length and one meter in thickness, the scenery fashioned by the crystalline beams that thrust through the darkness of the cave from floor to ceiling with a luster like moonlight is a unique example of harmony based on crystal symmetry. We review the crystallogenesis of this remarkable and challenging phenomenon of mineralization near equilibrium that can be used to teach the basics of nucleation and crystal growth.

  17. Treatment of allergic rhinitis with acupoint herbal plaster: an oligonucleotide chip analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiue, Horng-Sheng; Lee, Yun-Shien; Tsai, Chi-Neu; Chang, Hen-Hong

    2016-11-04

    Allergic rhinitis is regarded as an imbalanced Th1/Th2 cell-mediated response. The present study used microarray analysis to compare gene expression levels between allergic rhinitis patients before and after a series of acupoint herbal plaster applications. In this experimental pilot study, volunteers experiencing sneezing, runny nose, and congestion for more than 9 months in the year following initial diagnoses were included after diagnostic confirmation by otolaryngologists to exclude patients with sinusitis and nasal polyps. Patients with persistent allergic rhinitis each received four acupoint herbal plaster treatments applied using the moxibustion technique. Clinical outcomes were evaluated using the Rhinitis Quality of Life Questionnaire (RQLQ). Peripheral blood samples were analyzed using an ImmunoCAP Phadiatop test, and patients were classified as phadiatop (Ph)-positive or -negative. Microarray results were analyzed for genes that were differentially expressed between (1) Ph-positive and -negative patients treated with herbal plaster; and (2) before and after herbal plaster treatment in the Ph-positive patient group. Unsupervised and supervised methods were used for gene-expression data analysis. Nineteen Ph-positive and four Ph-negative participants with persistent allergic rhinitis were included in the study. RQLQ results indicated that the 19 Ph-positive volunteers experienced improvement in six of seven categories following acupoint herbal plaster treatments, whereas the four Ph-negative participants reported improvement in only two categories. Hierarchical clustering and principle component analysis of the gene expression profiles of Ph-positive and -negative participants indicated the groups exhibited distinct physiological responses to acupoint herbal treatment. Evaluation of gene networks using MetaCore identified that the "Immune response_IL-13 signaling via JAK-STAT" and the "Inflammation_Interferon signaling" were down- and up

  18. Synthesis of partial stabilized cement–gypsum as new dental retrograde filling material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadhasivam, S.; Chen, Jung-Chih; Savitha, S.; Hsu, Ming-Xiang; Hsu, Chung-King; Lin, Chun-Pin; Lin, Feng-Huei

    2012-01-01

    The study describes the sol–gel synthesis of a new dental retrograde filling material partial stabilized cement (PSC)–gypsum by adding different weight percentage of gypsum (25% PSC + 75% gypsum, 50% PSC + 50% gypsum and 75% PSC + 25% gypsum) to the PSC. The crystalline phase and hydration products of PSC–gypsum were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. The handling properties such as setting time, viscosity, tensile strength, porosity and pH, were also studied. The XRD and microstructure analysis demonstrated the formation of hydroxyapatite and removal of calcium dihydrate during its immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) on day 10 for 75% PSC + 25% gypsum. The developed PSC–gypsum not only improved the setting time but also greatly reduced the viscosity, which is very essential for endodontic surgery. The cytotoxic and cell proliferation studies indicated that the synthesized material is highly biocompatible. The increased alkaline pH of the PSC–gypsum also had a remarkable antibacterial activity. - Highlights: ► A new dental retrograde filling material PSC–gypsum was developed. ► PSC–gypsum cement has shown excellent initial and final setting time as 15–35 min. ► It not only improved the setting time but also retain the viscosity, 2 Pa·s. ► High alkaline pH of the cement had a remarkable antibacterial activity. ► Cytotoxicity studies revealed that the synthesized material is highly biocompatible.

  19. Synthesis of partial stabilized cement-gypsum as new dental retrograde filling material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadhasivam, S. [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Division of Medical Engineering Research, National Health Research Institute, Zhunan, Miaoli County, Taiwan (China); Chen, Jung-Chih [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Medical Device Innovation Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan,Taiwan (China); Savitha, S. [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Ming-Xiang; Hsu, Chung-King [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chun-Pin [School of Dentistry and Graduate Institute of Clinical Dentistry, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University and National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Feng-Huei, E-mail: double@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Division of Medical Engineering Research, National Health Research Institute, Zhunan, Miaoli County, Taiwan (China)

    2012-10-01

    The study describes the sol-gel synthesis of a new dental retrograde filling material partial stabilized cement (PSC)-gypsum by adding different weight percentage of gypsum (25% PSC + 75% gypsum, 50% PSC + 50% gypsum and 75% PSC + 25% gypsum) to the PSC. The crystalline phase and hydration products of PSC-gypsum were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. The handling properties such as setting time, viscosity, tensile strength, porosity and pH, were also studied. The XRD and microstructure analysis demonstrated the formation of hydroxyapatite and removal of calcium dihydrate during its immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) on day 10 for 75% PSC + 25% gypsum. The developed PSC-gypsum not only improved the setting time but also greatly reduced the viscosity, which is very essential for endodontic surgery. The cytotoxic and cell proliferation studies indicated that the synthesized material is highly biocompatible. The increased alkaline pH of the PSC-gypsum also had a remarkable antibacterial activity. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new dental retrograde filling material PSC-gypsum was developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PSC-gypsum cement has shown excellent initial and final setting time as 15-35 min. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It not only improved the setting time but also retain the viscosity, 2 Pa{center_dot}s. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High alkaline pH of the cement had a remarkable antibacterial activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cytotoxicity studies revealed that the synthesized material is highly biocompatible.

  20. Radiological properties of a wax-gypsum compensator material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plessis, F.C.P. du; Willemse, C.A.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the radiological properties of a compensator material consisting of wax and gypsum is presented. Effective attenuation coefficients (EACs) have been determined from transmission measurements with an ion chamber in a Perspex phantom. Measurements were made at 80 and 100 cm source-to-skin distance (SSD) for beam energies of 6, 8, and 15 MV, for field sizes ranging from narrow beam geometries up to 40x40 cm 2 , and at measurement depths of maximum dose build-up, 5 and 10 cm. A parametrization equation could be constructed to predict the EAC values within 4% uncertainty as a function of field size and depth of measurement. The EAC dependence on off-axis position was also quantified at each beam energy and SSD. It was found that the compensator material reduced the required thickness for compensation by 26% at 8 MV when compared to pure paraffin wax for a 10x10 cm 2 field. Relative surface ionization (RSI) measurements have been made to quantify the effect of scattered electrons from the wax-gypsum compensator. Results indicated that for 80 cm SSD the RSI would exceed 50% for fields larger than 15x15 cm 2 . At 100 cm SSD the RSI values were below 50% for all field sizes used

  1. The utilization of red gypsum waste for glazes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose Aini Kamarudin; Mohd Shahir Zakaria

    2007-01-01

    Red gypsum (RG) is a by-product during the extraction of titanium (IV) oxide from the ilmenite ores and it causes problems such as storing anf environmental pollution. In this study red gypsum, a reddish brown semi-solid mud, which is the industrial waste of a local company in Malaysia, was investigated for use in the making of glazes for the ceramic industry. The major constituents of RG are hydrated CaSO 4 (70 wt %), Fe 2 O 3 (30 wt %) and small amount of Al 2 O 3 . The total accumulation of RG in Malaysia is at least 340000 tons per year. It was found that the addition of up to 36 % of the RG waste was possible in the production of glazes. The glazes which contain different compositions were examined for their surface hardness properties, chemical strengths in 5 % NHO 3 and 5 % NaOH solutions and crazing behavior at 180 degree Celsius under 5 bars of pressure for 2 hours. (author)

  2. Dental dam clamp adaptation method on carved gypsum cast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazacu, N C E

    2014-01-01

    Dental Dam is the safest and most efficient isolation technique in endodontics and restorative dentistry, but it also used in esthetics, orthodontics, prosthetics, pedodontics and periodontology (for teeth immobilization). While in most cases the standard clamps are efficient, in some clinical situations clamp adaptation is mandatory in order to assure a tight contact on the tooth. The purpose of this study is to list the elements of the clamp, which should be modified in order to assure a secure constriction of the clamp on the anchor tooth, by using the carved gypsum cast method. 100 patients were examined, diagnosed and treated for various diagnoses like simple decay, gangrene, chronic apical periodontitis, and endodontic retreatments. The clamps used in this study were produced by Hu-Friedy, Hygenic, KKD, SDI, Hager & Werken. In 10 cases, the anchor tooth did not provide enough stability to the standard clamp--as provided by the producer. Therefore, we have done some adjustments to some of the elements of the clamp: the arch, the wings, the plateau, the active area, and the contact points. In 6 cases, major clamp adaptations on carved gypsum cast were imperative. The classic clamps cannot provide a grip to be enough in all the clinical cases due to the huge variety and position and implantation of the anchor teeth. Therefore, in such situations, the clamps should be adapted in order to provide stability and assure the safe isolation during the treatment. The modified clamps will be useful in similar cases, so they must be kept.

  3. Microstructure and mechanical properties of gypsum composites reinforced with recycled cellulose pulp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magaly Araújo Carvalho

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of waste fibers for the reinforcement of brittle matrices is considered opportune for the sustainable management of urban solid residues. This paper examines the microstructure and mechanical properties of a composite material made of gypsum reinforced with cellulose fibers from discarded Kraft cement bag. Two different kinds of gypsum were used, natural gypsum (NG and recycled gypsum (RG, both with an addition of 10% by mass of limestone. For the production of samples, slurry vacuum de-watering technique followed by pressing was evaluated revealing to be an efficient and innovative solution for the composites under evaluation. The composite was analyzed based on flexural strength tests, scanning electron microscopy (SEM imaging, secondary electron (SE detection, and pseudo-adiabatic calorimetry. The morphology of the fractured surfaces of flexural test samples revealed large gypsum crystals double the original size surrounding the fibers, but with the same overall aspect ratio. Natural fibers absorb large amounts of water, causing the water/gypsum ratio of the paste to increase. The predominance of fiber pullout, damaged or removed secondary layers and incrusted crystals are indicative of the good bonding of the fiber to the gypsum matrix and of the high mechanical resistance of composites. This material is a technically better substitute for the brittle gypsum board, and it stands out particularly for its characteristics of high impact strength and high modulus of rupture.

  4. Investigation of Parameters Affecting Gypsum Dewatering Properties in a Wet Flue Gas Desulphurization Pilot Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Brian Brun; Kiil, Søren

    2012-01-01

    Wet flue gas desulphurization (FGD) plants with forced oxidation, installed at coal and oil fired power plants for removal of SO2(g), must produce gypsum of high quality. However, quality issues such as an excessive moisture content, due to poor gypsum dewatering properties, may occur from time...

  5. Hydrology of marginal evaporitic basins during the Messinian Salinity Crisis: isotopic investigation of gypsum deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Kilany, Aida; Caruso, Antonio; Dela Pierre, Francesco; Natalicchio, Marcello; Rouchy, Jean-Marie; Pierre, Catherine; Balter, Vincent; Aloisi, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The deposition of gypsum in Messinian Mediterranean marginal basins is controlled by basin restriction and the local hydrological cycle (evaporation/precipitation rates and relative importance of continental vs marine water inputs). We are using the stable isotopic composition of gypsum as a proxy of the hydrological cycle that dominated at the moment of gypsum precipitation. We studied the Messinian Caltanissetta (Sicily) and Tertiary Piedmont (north western Italy) basins where we carried out a high-resolution isotopic study of gypsum layers composing gypsum-marl cycles. These cycles are thought to be the sedimentary expression of astronomical precession cycles, lasting approximately 20 kyr, during which the marginal basins experienced a succession of arid and a wet conditions. We determined the isotopic composition of gypsum hydration water (18O and D), of the sulphate ion (34S, 18O) and of Strontium (87/86Sr), all of which are potentially affected by the hydrological cycle. In our samples, the mother water from which gypsum precipitated is considerably lighter (-4.0 micro-scale. This is an essential step in interpreting the isotopic signals of gypsum because we can expect the 18O and D composition of Messinian continental input to be not too dissimilar from that of modern meteoric waters involved in diagenetic processes.

  6. Surface Coating of Gypsum-Based Molds for Maxillofacial Prosthetic Silicone Elastomeric Material: The Surface Topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaf, Salah; Ariffin, Zaihan; Husein, Adam; Reza, Fazal

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to compare the surface roughness of maxillofacial silicone elastomers fabricated in noncoated and coated gypsum materials. This study was also conducted to characterize the silicone elastomer specimens after surfaces were modified. A gypsum mold was coated with clear acrylic spray. The coated mold was then used to produce modified silicone experimental specimens (n = 35). The surface roughness of the modified silicone elastomers was compared with that of the control specimens, which were prepared by conventional flasking methods (n = 35). An atomic force microscope (AFM) was used for surface roughness measurement of silicone elastomer (unmodified and modified), and a scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to evaluate the topographic conditions of coated and noncoated gypsum and silicone elastomer specimens (unmodified and modified) groups. After the gypsum molds were characterized, the fabricated silicone elastomers molded on noncoated and coated gypsum materials were evaluated further. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis of gypsum materials (noncoated and coated) and silicone elastomer specimens (unmodified and modified) was performed to evaluate the elemental changes after coating was conducted. Independent t test was used to analyze the differences in the surface roughness of unmodified and modified silicone at a significance level of p silicone elastomers processed against coated gypsum materials (p silicone elastomers. Silicone elastomers with lower surface roughness of maxillofacial prostheses can be obtained simply by coating a gypsum mold. © 2014 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  7. Effects of fluidized gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum on non-target freshwater and sediment dwelling organims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluidized gas desulfurization gypsum is a popular agricultural soil amendment used to increase calcium and sulfur contents, and reduce aluminum toxicity. Due to its surface application in conservation tillage systems and high solubility, the soluble components of gypsum may be transferred with agri...

  8. An important tool with no instruction manual: A review of gypsum use in agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land application of gypsum has been studied and utilized in agriculture and environmental remediation for many years. Most of the published literature has focused on gypsum application impacts on soil properties rather than crop yields. This literature review was conducted to (i) gather results from...

  9. The Growth of Gypsum in the Presence of Hexavalent Chromium: A Multiscale Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Morales

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The sorption of dissolved inorganic pollutants into the structure of minerals is an important process that controls the mobility and fate of these pollutants in the Earth’s crust. It also modifies the surface structure and composition of the host mineral, affecting its crystallization kinetics. Here, we investigate the effect of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI, on the nucleation and growth of gypsum by conducting two types of experiments: (i in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM observations of the growth of gypsum {010} surfaces in the presence of Cr(VI and (ii gypsum precipitation experiments by mixing aqueous solutions containing variable amounts of Cr(VI. Gypsum precipitation is progressively delayed when occurring from solutions bearing increasing Cr(VI concentrations. Chemical analyses of gypsum precipitates show that gypsum incorporates small Cr(VI amounts that correlate with the content of this ion in the aqueous solution. Gypsum cell parameters variation reflects this incorporation. At the molecular scale, Cr(VI induces a slowdown of step advance rates on gypsum {010} surfaces accompanied by the roughening of nanostep edges and the so-called “template effect”. This effect involves the reproduction of the original nanotopography after the completion of individual advancing monolayers and appears as a general nanoscale phenomenon occurring during growth of solid solutions from aqueous solutions even in the case of compositionally-restricted solid solutions.

  10. Compósitos à base de gesso com resíduos de EVA e vermiculita Gypsum-based composites with EVA waste and vermiculite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilia P. de Oliveira

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available O gesso é um dos materiais de construção mais antigos de que se tem conhecimento. Algumas de suas propriedades lhes conferem vantagens, tais como resistência ao fogo e isolamentos térmico e acústico. Objetivou-se, com este trabalho, avaliar as propriedades físico-mecânicas de compósitos à base de gesso com a incorporação de resíduos da indústria de calçados, o etileno acetato de vinila (EVA e a vermiculita. O desenvolvimento desses compósitos tem como propósito a produção de elementos de revestimento para proteção térmica de alvenarias. Para determinar a influência dos teores de resíduo de EVA e vermiculita e da relação água/gesso nas propriedades massa específica aparente e nas resistências a flexão e a compressão, foram incorporados cinco diferentes percentuais desses materiais, combinados com três relações água/gesso. Os resultados foram analisados por meio da estatística multivariável e indicaram que a massa específica aparente de ambos os compósitos e a resistência à flexão do compósito com vermiculita, mostraram maior dependência da relação água/gesso; por sua vez, o percentual de agregado apresentou maior influência na resistência à flexão do compósito com EVA e na resistência a compressão de ambos os compósitos.Gypsum is one of the oldest known building materials. Some of its properties confer advantages such as fire resistance, thermal and acoustic insulation. This work aims to study the physical and mechanical properties of gypsum-based composite with the incorporation of residues from the footwear industry ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA and vermiculite. The aim to develop these composites is to produce components for thermal protection of masonry. To determine the influence of different residue levels of EVA and vermiculite, and the water/plaster ratio on the bulk density, flexural and compressive strength, five different percentages of these materials were incorporated combined with

  11. Gypsum blocks produced from TiO2 production by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yihe; Wang, Fan; Huang, Hongwei; Guo, Yuxi; Li, Baoying; Liu, Yangyang; Chu, Paul K

    2016-01-01

    Calcined titanium gypsum was investigated by the ways of XRD (powder X-ray diffraction), XRF (X-ray fluorescence) and TG-DTA (thermogravimetric-differential thermal analyses). It was employed as raw material for making lightweight materials. The influence of cement, amount of water/solid (W/S) ratio, water-reducing agent, citric acid content and the hydration age on the gypsum blocks was investigated. The results showed that the optimum W/S ratio, cement content and water-reducing agent are 0.9, 10% and 2 wt% for the calcined gypsum from titanium gypsum, respectively. The 5.96 MPa was attained after 7 days of ageing. It was also found that the citric acid is inappropriate to be used in the production of gypsum blocks from TiO2 production by-products.

  12. Environmental impacts of the gypsum mining operation at Maqna area, Tabuk, Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harthi, Abbas

    2001-11-01

    The impacts of quarrying of the gypsum deposits on the environment at Maqna, Tabuk, were evaluated by intensive field studies including in situ testing, mapping and sampling of gypsum and well water. Field and laboratory tests were made to determine the engineering properties including tensile and compressive strengths, unit weight, fracture spacing and the rock quality designation (RQD) values. Results were used to determine the most suitable method for quarrying and extraction. Chemical analyses of gypsum and water well samples were conducted along with mineralogical analysis using X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). Results show that there are no harmful impacts on the environment of the studied area associated with the extraction and quarrying of the gypsum deposits at the Maqna area. They also revealed that the gypsum can be quarried using a ripping technique, which does not create noise and/or vibration in the surrounding areas.

  13. ESR Studies and Dating of Egyptian Gypsum at Ras Mala'ab, Sinai, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Monem, A. A.; Abdei-Razek, Y. A.; Rasheed, N. M.; Hassan, G.M.; Eissa, H.M.; El-Morsy, M.

    2007-01-01

    A gypsum sample from the famous gypsum-anhydrite evaporitic deposit composing the Ras Mala'ab Formation, Upper Miocene, occurring at Ras Mala'ab, on the east coast of the Gulf of Suez, was subjected to (ESR) dosimetric studies. Also, (ESR) was used to date the formation or most recent recrystallization of that gypsum. The gypsum derivative (ESR) spectrum is characterized by the large broad Fe 2+ signal (g=2.50) and HF-sixtet Mn 2+ signals. Only the characteristic gypsum signal (G l, g=2.0040) was detected between the third and fourth lines of the HF-Mn 2+ which is attributed to the electron-center SO 3 - . This signal was sensitive to artificial γ-irradiation and showed significant enhancement using a γ-dose of 550 Gy. Also, the signal was very stable up to 400 o C. The gypsum sample with a total dose (TD) of 1500 Gy, determined graphically by extrapolating the linear relationship between defect concentration and the artificial γ-doses for (G l, g=2.0040) and an annual dose (D) due to cosmic rays (0.3 mGy), yielded an age of 5.00 Ma. This could mean the age of formation or latest recrystallization of this gypsum deposit. The geologic age assignment of the Ras Mala'ab Group including the evaporitic gypsum unit, is Middle to Late Miocene. It is directly overlain by the Pliocene elastics at the locality of Ras Mala'ab. This might suggest that these evaporitic gypsum facies represent the top of the Miocene in the Gulf of Suez area, since the Miocene-Pliocene boundary is now put at 5.00-5.50 Ma ago. Therefore, the ESR age of the Ras Mala'ab gypsum is consistent with the geologic age assignment

  14. The Role of Biofilms in the Sedimentology of Actively Forming Gypsum Deposits at Guerrero Negro, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Marilyn B.; Des Marais, David J.; Turk, Kendra A.; Parenteau, Mary N.; Jahnke, Linda L.; Kubo, Michael D. Y.

    2009-11-01

    Actively forming gypsum deposits at the Guerrero Negro sabkha and saltern system provided habitats for stratified, pigmented microbial communities that exhibited significant morphological and phylogenetic diversity. These deposits ranged from meter-thick gypsum crusts forming in saltern seawater concentration ponds to columnar microbial mats with internally crystallized gypsum granules developing in natural anchialine pools. Gypsum-depositing environments were categorized as forming precipitation surfaces, biofilm-supported surfaces, and clastic surfaces. Each surface type was described in terms of depositional environment, microbial diversity, mineralogy, and sedimentary fabrics. Precipitation surfaces developed in high-salinity subaqueous environments where rates of precipitation outpaced the accumulation of clastic, organic, and/or biofilm layers. These surfaces hosted endolithic biofilms comprised predominantly of oxygenic and anoxygenic phototrophs, sulfate-reducing bacteria, and bacteria from the phylum Bacteroidetes. Biofilm-supported deposits developed in lower-salinity subaqueous environments where light and low water-column turbulence supported dense benthic microbial communities comprised mainly of oxygenic phototrophs. In these settings, gypsum granules precipitated in the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) matrix as individual granules exhibiting distinctive morphologies. Clastic surfaces developed in sabkha mudflats that included gypsum, carbonate, and siliclastic particles with thin gypsum/biofilm components. Clastic surfaces were influenced by subsurface brine sheets and capillary evaporation and precipitated subsedimentary gypsum discs in deeper regions. Biofilms appeared to influence both chemical and physical sedimentary processes in the various subaqueous and subaerially exposed environments studied. Biofilm interaction with chemical sedimentary processes included dissolution and granularization of precipitation surfaces, formation of

  15. Optimal fluorite/gypsum mineralizer ratio in Portland cement clinkering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobón, J. I.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of the joint effect of fluorite and gypsum as mineralizers in the manufacture of Portland cement. A laboratory- scale Box-Behnken statistical design was used to quantify the effects of the explanatory variables fluorite content (0.00, 0.25, 0.50, and 0.75%, fluorite/gypsum ratio (2/15, 1/3 and 8/15, and clinkering temperature (1250, 1300, and 1350 °C on the response variable free CaO content in the clinker produced. The clinker was characterized by the ethylene method, XRD, DSC and optical microscopy. Free CaO decreases of 81% and 56% were found in the mineralized clinker, compared to the same clinker without mineralizers, at 1300 °C and 1250 °C, respectively. Petrographic analysis showed that at lower temperatures, the amount of alite in the mineralized clinker was higher than the amount of alite in the clinker without mineralizers. The best condition was found for the fluorite/gypsum ratio of 2/15.Este artículo presenta el efecto combinado de la fluorita y el yeso como mineralizadores. Se usó el diseño experimental estadístico Box-Behnken, a escala de laboratorio, para cuantificar el efecto de la fluorita en porcentajes de 0.00, 0.25, 0.50 y 0.75%; relaciones fluorita/yeso de 2/15, 1/3 y 8/15; con temperaturas de clinkerización de 1250, 1300 y 1350 °C y la cal libre como variable de respuesta. El clínker producido fue caracterizado midiendo el contenido de cal libre por el método de etileno, DRX, DSC y microscopía óptica. Se encontró un descenso de la cal libre del 81 y 56% en el clinker mineralizado en comparación con el clinker sin mineralizadores a 1300 y 1250 °C respectivamente. El análisis petrográfico mostró que la cantidad de alita en el clinker mineralizado a bajas temperaturas es más alta que en el clinker sin mineralizadores. La mejor condición se encontró para la relación fluorita/yeso de 2/15.

  16. From alginate impressions to digital virtual models: accuracy and reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalstra, Michel; Melsen, Birte

    2009-03-01

    To compare the accuracy and reproducibility of measurements performed on digital virtual models with those taken on plaster casts from models poured immediately after the impression was taken, the 'gold standard', and from plaster models poured following a 3-5 day shipping procedure of the alginate impression. Direct comparison of two measuring techniques. The study was conducted at the Department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, University of Aarhus, Denmark in 2006/2007. Twelve randomly selected orthodontic graduate students with informed consent. Three sets of alginate impressions were taken from the participants within 1 hour. Plaster models were poured immediately from two of the sets, while the third set was kept in transit in the mail for 3-5 days. Upon return a plaster model was poured as well. Finally digital models were made from the plaster models. A number of measurements were performed on the plaster casts with a digital calliper and on the corresponding digital models using the virtual measuring tool of the accompanying software. Afterwards these measurements were compared statistically. No statistical differences were found between the three sets of plaster models. The intra- and inter-observer variability are smaller for the measurements performed on the digital models. Sending alginate impressions by mail does not affect the quality and accuracy of plaster casts poured from them afterwards. Virtual measurements performed on digital models display less variability than the corresponding measurements performed with a calliper on the actual models.

  17. POLYMER RESIDUE BASED HYDROPHOBIC-FUNGICIDAL ADDITIVE AND PLASTER DRY MIX BASED ON IT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chikichev Artur Andreevich

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Subject of study is the effect of additives on the structure formation of cement. Improvement of the re-sistance to aggressive media of materials for wet rooms. Objective is to develop a scientifically grounded composition of a plaster dry construction mix with increased water resistance and funginertness, with the use of locally available materials and man-made waste.The study was carried out by standard methods of research using XRF and DTA. The hydrophobic fungicidal additive based on the polymer residue of turpentine production and fly ash with the ratio by weight ZU: PO = 1.15: 1 was developed. It has been established that while adding the de-veloped additive in an amount of 2.5 % of the mass of cement, the rate of hydration of cement minerals and resistibility of the sand-cement mortar decrease in early strength with medium workability concrete mix. This creates conditions for the formation of a dense structure with increased resistance to aggressive envi-ronments.Using new hydrophobic fungicidal additive, a dry plaster mortar for wet rooms has been developed. It has increased water resistance values corresponding to the W8 grade and funginertness especially with respect to A. Niger, the pathogen and widespread decomposer.The additive is effective; it is developed on the basis of industrial wastes and recycled materials. Its use in the composition of materials with increased requirements for watertightness and biostability makes it pos-sible to reduce their cost and environmental stress, to increase the efficiency of the use of natural re-sources. The use of the developed plaster mixture will increase the resistance of walls of wet rooms to aggressive environments.

  18. 5% lidocaine medicated plaster double effect in a case of orofacial localized neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casale R

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Roberto Casale,1,2 Yuriy Romanenko,2,3 Massimo Allegri4–6 1Department of Clinical Neurophysiology and Pain Rehabilitation Unit, Foundation "Salvatore Maugeri", Research and Care Institute, IRCCS, Pavia, Italy; 2EFIC Montescano Pain School, Montescano, Italy; 3Department of Neurology, Lugansk City Hospital 4, Lugansk, Ukraine; 4Department of Clinical, Surgical, Diagnostic and Pediatric Sciences University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy; 5Pain Therapy Service Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, Italy; 6SIMPAR group, Pavia, Italy Abstract: Localized neuropathic pain (LNP is a type of neuropathic pain that is characterized by “consistent and limited area(s of maximum pain associated with negative or positive sensory signs and/or spontaneous symptoms characteristic of neuropathic pain”. This definition encompasses a huge number of neuropathic orofacial pain syndromes. We present a case report of a patient who was affected with sleep apnea syndrome treated with nocturnal oxygen mask delivery, in whom orofacial LNP hampered the wearing of a mask due to unbearable burning and throbbing pain. The application of 5% lidocaine medicated plaster during the night led to an impressive reduction of both the pain level and the size of the painful area due to the plaster's pharmacological mechanisms, which were associated with a secondary benefit due to its mechanical protective action. This case report shows how these two factors could be of clinical value and have to be considered more systematically in the treatment of LNP in reducing pain and the size of the painful area. Keywords: trigeminal pain, localized neuropathic pain, topical treatment, 5% lidocaine medicated plaster

  19. Dispersebility degree influence of glass fibre E in the mechanical behaviour and workability of plaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    del Río Merino, M.

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Although there are many research studies about plaster strengthened with glass fibre E in Spain, there are no publications which advise the users (plasterers, manufacturers of prefabricated blocks or suspended ceilings, etc about the most appropriated types of fibre E in respect to its dispersebility degree in the matrix, its lengths, the percentage, or even the type of strengthening, etc. The study of the use of this strengthener is to achieve an improvement in the mechanical behaviour of plaster as well as better conditions in the paste workability. The company Vetrotex, with the technical personnel and together with the Department of Architectural Constructions and their control (E. U. A. T. M. have started a serious research on plaster strengthened with E fibre. Conclusions shown in this first article are about the influence of the dispersebility degree of glass fibres in the mechanical behaviour of the compound as well as its workability. The degree of dispersibility of the fibres in the matrix is closely related to the type of covering used in the production of the strengthening fibres.

    Aunque existen muchos trabajos de investigación sobre el refuerzo del yeso con fibra de vidrio E en España, no hay publicaciones que asesoren a los usuarios (aplicadores de yeso proyectado, fabricantes de prefabricados como bloques o falsos techos, etc. de los tipos défibra de vidrio E más adecuados, atendiendo a su grado de dispersabilidad en la matriz, las longitudes, el porcentaje, e incluso el tipo de refuerzo, etc., a efectos de conseguir un aumento del comportamiento mecánico del yeso/escayola y unas ciertas condiciones de trabajabilidad de la pasta. La empresa Vetrotex, a través de sus técnicos y en colaboración con el Departamento de Construcciones Arquitectónicas y su control (E. U. A. T. M., decide acometer un estudio en profundidad de la escayola reforzada con fibra de vidrio E. En este primer artículo se presentan las

  20. Constructive applications of composite gypsum reinforced with Typha Latifolia fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia Santos, A.

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The present research analyses the possibility to reinforce gypsum using enea fibres (Typha Latifolia creating a compound material in wich the fibres contribute to increase mechanical resistance, producing as well a reduction of the weight and a possible regulation of the set time.

    La investigación presente analiza la posibilidad de reforzar los morteros de escayola mediante la utilización dé fibras de Typha Latifolia, creando un material compuesto en el que las fibras contribuyen al aumento de resistencia mecánica, a la vez que se produce una reducción del peso y una regulación de los tiempos de fraguado. Las propiedades de estos materiales hacen que, en determinadas aplicaciones, su utilización resulte ventajosa con respecto a materiales tradicionales.

  1. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry with gypsum wallboard (drywall).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jeroen W; Burdette, Kevin E; Inrig, Elizabeth L; Dewitt, Regina; Mistry, Rajesh; Rink, W Jack; Boreham, Douglas R

    2010-09-01

    Gypsum wallboard (drywall) represents an attractive target for retrospective dosimetry by optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) in the event of a radiological accident or malicious use of nuclear material. In this study, wallboard is shown to display a radiation-induced luminescence signal (RIS) as well as a natural background signal (NS), which is comparable in intensity to the RIS. Excitation and emission spectra show that maximum luminescence intensity is obtained for stimulation with blue light-emitting diodes (470 nm) and for detection in the ultraviolet region (290-370 nm). It is necessary to decrease the optical stimulation power dramatically in order to adequately separate the RIS from the interfering background signal. The necessary protocols are developed for accurately measuring the absorbed dose as low as 500 mGy and demonstrate that the RIS decays logarithmically with storage time, with complete erasure expected within 1-4 d.

  2. The Messinian marine to nonmarine gypsums of Jumilla (Northern Betic Cordillera, SE Spain): Isotopic and Sr concentration constraints on the origin of parent brines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Carlos; Vilas, Lorenzo; Arias, Consuelo

    2015-10-01

    The origin of the Messinian Hoya de la Sima (HS) gypsum (Betic foreland) is constrained using 87Sr/86Sr, δ34S, Sr concentration, and petrographic data. The Lower and Middle HS units consist of subaqueous vertically-aligned and stromatolitic selenites, the latter containing unusual microbial depositional textures. The Upper Unit consists of very-shallow-water bioturbated lenticular gypsum with Paracamelus ichnites. 87Sr/86Sr and δ34S indicate precipitation from predominantly marine waters, with upward increasing continental influence. Mixing models between Messinian seawater and continental water that dissolved Triassic evaporites show that the percentages of seawater required to explain the measured 87Sr/86Sr are analogous to the percentages obtained using δ34S, supporting precipitation from such mixtures. 87Sr/86Sr and δ34S of Lower HS selenites resemble those of the Primary Lower Gypsum (PLG) of the Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC), in both cases indicating precipitation from seawater-continental water mixtures in which most Sr and SO4 were supplied by Messinian seawater. In the Lower HS selenites, Sr concentrations indicate contributing continental waters with Sr/Ca ratios similar to seawater. However, Sr concentrations of PLG selenites from other Betic basins (Bajo Segura, Sorbas indicate parent waters with Sr/Ca ratios lower than seawater. If the Sr contents of the betic PLG selenites are representative, it is unlikely that the Lower HS selenites represent the PLG. However, we cannot completely discard that option since different LPG subbasins could have had variable Sr/Ca. The HS gypsums formed coevally to diapirism of Triassic evaporites, in a restricted lagoonal basin developed during or slightly after a phase of strike-slip faulting in the Betic Cordillera. More general implications of this work are that Sr concentrations, combined with 87Sr/86Sr and δ34S data, provide key constraints on the origin of parent brines, and using Sr concentrations as

  3. Triple oxygen and hydrogen isotopes of gypsum hydration water for quantitative paleo-humidity reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gázquez, Fernando; Morellón, Mario; Bauska, Thomas; Herwartz, Daniel; Surma, Jakub; Moreno, Ana; Staubwasser, Michael; Valero-Garcés, Blas; Delgado-Huertas, Antonio; Hodell, David A.

    2018-01-01

    Atmospheric relative humidity is an important parameter affecting vegetation yet paleo-humidity proxies are scarce and difficult to calibrate. Here we use triple oxygen (δ17O and δ18O) and hydrogen (δD) isotopes of structurally-bound gypsum hydration water (GHW) extracted from lacustrine gypsum to quantify past changes in atmospheric relative humidity. An evaporation isotope-mass-balance model is used together with Monte Carlo simulations to determine the range of climatological conditions that simultaneously satisfy the stable isotope results of GHW, and with statistically robust estimates of uncertainty. We apply this method to reconstruct the isotopic composition of paleo-waters of Lake Estanya (NE Spain) and changes in normalized atmospheric relative humidity (RHn) over the last glacial termination and Holocene (from ∼15 to 0.6 cal. kyrs BP). The isotopic record indicates the driest conditions occurred during the Younger Dryas (YD; ∼12-13 cal. kyrs BP). We estimate a RHn of ∼40-45% during the YD, which is ∼30-35% lower than today. Because of the southward displacement of the Polar Front to ∼42°N, it was both windier and drier during the YD than the Bølling-Allerød period and Holocene. Mean atmospheric moisture gradually increased from the Preboreal to Early Holocene (∼11 to 8 cal. kyrs BP, 50-60%), reaching 70-75% RHn from ∼7.5 cal. kyrs BP until present-day. We demonstrate that combining hydrogen and triple oxygen isotopes in GHW provides a powerful tool for quantitative estimates of past changes in relative humidity.

  4. The Effect of Orthodontic Model Fabrication Procedures on Gypsum Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-01

    and metal dies. Journal of the American Dental Association (1981), 103:408-411. 21. Mason, H. J.: Impregnation of stone dies with acrylic resin ...impregnated with acrylic resin . Journal of Dental Research (1971), 50(2):507. 28. Schneider, R. L. and Taylor, T. D.: Compressive strength and surface...casts or to methods of improving the strength and durability of casts. Recent studies have looked at the effect of repeated sprayings of disinfectants

  5. Use of gypsum residues as a corrective for saline-sodic soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Medeiros dos Santos

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the hugest problems faced by the civil construction sector is the final destination of residues, especially gypsum, which presents recycling restrictions. However, these residues present a high amount of calcium in their composition, and can be alternatively used for replacing mined gypsum as a saline-sodic soil corrective. This study aimed at evaluating the efficiency of gypsum residues from the civil construction, when compared to mined gypsum, for correcting a saline-sodic soil. A randomized blocks design was used, in a factorial arrangement consisting of two kinds of corrective (gypsum residue and mined gypsum and five leaching depths (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 times the soil pores volume, with three replications. Electric conductivity, soluble cations and sodium adsorption ratio were evaluated in the soil saturation extract. The use of gypsum residue proved to be effective in leaching salts and soluble sodium in saline-sodic soil, and can be recommended as a calcium source for recovering from sodicity.

  6. UTILIZATION OF MINERAL FIBER WASTE IN THE PRODUCTION OF GYPSUM PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solov'ev Vitaliy Nikolaevich

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Subject: the effectiveness of using compositions with the use of basalt fibers is proven, but the composition must be selected depending on the binder and additives chosen. Research objectives: we examine the possibility of waste recycling of basalt fiber production during manufacturing of modified gypsum composite material with improved characteristics. Materials and methods: as a raw material, a gypsum binder of Samara production was used. As a reinforcement additive, a disperse waste of basalt fiber production of Tver region was used. Studying characteristics of the gypsum binder and modified mixture, and also comparative analysis of these characteristics by average density, total porosity, strength in compression and flexure of the gypsum composite were carried out using standard techniques. Results: dependence of physical and mechanical properties of the modified gypsum material on the content of the basalt fiber additive is established. It was found that an increase in concentration of the additive requires an increased water content or additional use of plasticizer. Conclusions: modification of gypsum stone with a mineral basalt additive will increase the strength, density and durability of thin-walled gypsum products, and, consequently, the demand for products due to ensuring their high quality in transportation and installation.

  7. Towards understanding the influence of porosity on mechanical and fracture behaviour of quasi-brittle materials : Experiments and modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, D; Savija, B.; Smith, G.E.; Flewitt, P.E.J.; Lowe, T.; Schlangen, H.E.J.G.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, porosity-property relationships of quasi-brittle materials are explored through a combined experimental and numerical approach. In the experimental part, hemihyrate gypsum plaster powder (CaSO 4 ⋅1/2H 2 O CaSO4⋅1/2H2O) and expanded spherical polystyrene beads (1.5–2.0 mm dia.) have

  8. Influence of Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Amendments on Heavy Metal Distribution in Reclaimed Sodic Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qun; Wang, Shujuan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Ning; Zhao, Bo; Zhuo, Yuqun; Chen, Changhe

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum has become an effective soil amendment for sodic soil reclamation, it carries extra heavy metal contamination into the soil environment. The fate of heavy metals introduced by FGD gypsum in sodic or saline–alkali soils is still unclear. This work aims to investigate the effects of FGD gypsum addition on the heavy metal distributions in a sodic soil. Original soil samples were collected from typical sodic land in north China. Soil column leaching tests were conducted to investigate the influence of FGD gypsum addition on the soil properties, especially on distribution profiles of the heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Cr, As, and Hg) in the soil layers. Results showed that pH, electrical conductivity, and exchangeable sodium percentage in amended soils were significantly reduced from 10.2 to 8.46, 1.8 to 0.2 dS/m, and 18.14% to 1.28%, respectively. As and Hg concentrations in the soils were found to be positively correlated with FGD gypsum added. The amount of Hg in the leachate was positively correlated with FGD gypsum application ratio, whereas a negative correlation was observed between the Pb concentration in the leachate and the FGD gypsum ratio. Results revealed that heavy metal concentrations in soils complied well with Environmental Quality Standard for Soils in China (GB15618-1995). This work helps to understand the fate of FGD gypsum-introduced heavy metals in sodic soils and provides a baseline for further environmental risk assessment associated with applying FGD gypsum for sodic soil remediation. PMID:26064038

  9. Plastering mortar with antibacterial and antifungal properties studied by 1H NMR relaxometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumate, E.; Aciu, C.; Manea, D. L.; Moldovan, D.; Chelcea, R.; Fechete, R.

    2017-12-01

    The Plastering mortars, with good antibacterial (in particular Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and antifungal (Aspergillus niger and Penicillium chrysogenum) properties, were studied by 1D NMR relaxometry and internal humidity measurements. Three recipes based on plastering mortar with variable content (0, 5 and 10 %) of Ag/ZnO nanopowders and with adequate physical characteristics regarding the mechanical strengths (CS IV), good adhesion to the substrate and low water absorption by capillarity (W2) were considered. The distributions of transverse relaxation times T2 were measured at 2 h after preparation (for mortar pasta) and then for the same samples at 2, 7, and 28 days during the hydration of mineralogical components. The T2 distributions are characterized by four components associated with hydration water and water in three types of pores of different dimension. The dimension of pores formed during hydration process are strongly dependent on the Ag/ZnO nanopowders content but finally at 28 days the pores distributions, as resulted from the T2 distributions, looks similar. Finally, the transverse relaxation ratio was linearly correlated to the compressive strength and the hydration behaviour during 132 days measured with a dedicated humidity sensor embedded inside sampled was discussed.

  10. Natural radioactivity of the cement, lime and plaster in the Zacatecas State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mireles, F.; Davila, J. I.; Lopez, H.; Pinedo, J. L.; Rios, C.; Saucedo, S. A.; Cespedes, N.

    2012-10-01

    The construction materials are the main radiation gamma source inside the houses room and the buildings, followed by the terrestrial and cosmic radiation. The radioactivity levels of the construction materials were obtained to establish reference levels and of population exposure. In this work the study of 56 samples of construction materials is presented, 24 of cement, 20 of lime and 12 of plaster, of the marks more sold in the municipalities of Zacatecas and Guadalupe of the Zacatecas State, Mexico. The objective is the study of the concentration in activity of the radioisotopes 238 U, 232 Th, 40 K and 137 Cs, using a gamma rays spectrometry system based on a hyper pure germanium detector. The obtained results of activity concentration of the interest radioisotopes show similar values average to those published by UNSCEAR 1993. The population of the municipalities of Zacatecas and Guadalupe is exposed to the environmental gamma radiation coming from the contained radioisotopes in the construction materials; the annual equivalent effective dose by the cement is in the range of 116 at 562 μSv a -1 with an average of 340 μSv a -1 , of the lime is in the range of 36 at 212 μSv a -1 with an average of 87 μSv a -1 , and of the plaster is in the range of 16 at 27 μSv a -1 with an average of 22 μSv a -1 , this exposure does not represent any risk for the population's health. (Author)

  11. Influence of shelf life on the setting time of type IV gypsum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapsari, M. L.; Irawan, B.; Damiyanti, M.

    2017-08-01

    Although expired materials can exhibit a deterioration in their properties, expired type IV gypsum can still be found on the market. In order to evaluate the influence of the shelf life on its setting time, two groups of type IV gypsum (GC Fuji rock EP) with different expiration dates were used in this research. The setting time tests were done in a mold using a Vicat Needle apparatus. The results of the statistical analysis showed a significant difference (pshelf life did influence the setting time of the type IV gypsum.

  12. Determination of Radium 226 in mexican phosphate fertilizers and gypsum by gamma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godinez A, M.C.

    1995-01-01

    The 226 Ra isotope was determined in 17, 20 and 46% m/m phosphate fertilizers and gypsum. The samples of the fertilizers were dissolved in 10% v/v nitric acid solutions. The barium sulphate method was used for the precipitation of 226 Ra. On the other hand, alkaline fusion method was used to separate the 226 Ra from gypsum. The results indicated that 226 Ra was present in the phosphate fertilizers and gypsum. The 226 Ra concentrations present in these materials were between 10 -4 - 10 -5 μg g -1 . (Author)

  13. Accuracy of three-dimensional dental resin models created by fused deposition modeling, stereolithography, and Polyjet prototype technologies:A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebong, Raymund E; Stewart, Kelton T; Utreja, Achint; Ghoneima, Ahmed A

    2018-03-06

    The aim of this study was to assess the dimensional accuracy of fused deposition modeling (FDM)-, Polyjet-, and stereolithography (SLA)-produced models by comparing them to traditional plaster casts. A total of 12 maxillary and mandibular posttreatment orthodontic plaster casts were selected from the archives of the Orthodontic Department at the Indiana University School of Dentistry. Plaster models were scanned, saved as stereolithography files, and printed as physical models using three different three-dimensional (3D) printers: Makerbot Replicator (FDM), 3D Systems SLA 6000 (SLA), and Objet Eden500V (Polyjet). A digital caliper was used to obtain measurements on the original plaster models as well as on the printed resin models. Comparison between the 3D printed models and the plaster casts showed no statistically significant differences in most of the parameters. However, FDM was significantly higher on average than were plaster casts in maxillary left mixed plane (MxL-MP) and mandibular intermolar width (Md-IMW). Polyjet was significantly higher on average than were plaster casts in maxillary intercanine width (Mx-ICW), mandibular intercanine width (Md-ICW), and mandibular left mixed plane (MdL-MP). Polyjet was significantly lower on average than were plaster casts in maxillary right vertical plane (MxR-vertical), maxillary left vertical plane (MxL-vertical), mandibular right anteroposterior plane (MdR-AP), mandibular right vertical plane (MdR-vertical), and mandibular left vertical plane (MdL-vertical). SLA was significantly higher on average than were plaster casts in MxL-MP, Md-ICW, and overbite. SLA was significantly lower on average than were plaster casts in MdR-vertical and MdL-vertical. Dental models reconstructed by FDM technology had the fewest dimensional measurement differences compared to plaster models.

  14. Gypsum-induced decay in granite monuments in Northwestern Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Hermo, B.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common forms of decay in granite monuments is the detachment of the superficial layer of the stone (plaques, plaquettes and scales. Previous studies of granite monuments in the northwest Iberian Peninsula revealed a direct relation between this type of weathering and the presence of calcium sulphate, and a mechanism whereby the salt causes this type of decay was suggested. In the present study, various hypotheses as regards the origin of the gypsum found in granite monuments are proposed. The study involved analysis of the contents of ions soluble in water, the results of X-ray diffraction analyses and the ratios of CaO/SO3 in samples of stone, mortar and deposits collected from different monuments. It was concluded that in most cases the gypsum originated from old paintworks or/and from the joint mortars, although inputs from other sources cannot be discounted, as discussed

    Una de las formas de deterioro más frecuente en los monumentos graníticos es la separación de la capa superficial de la piedra (placas, plaquetas y escamas. En trabajos anteriores centrados en monumentos del noroeste de la Península Ibérica, se constató la relación directa entre esta forma de alteración y la presencia de sulfato de calcio y se propuso el mecanismo a través del cual esta sal provoca este tipo de deterioro. En este trabajo se plantean varias hipótesis acerca del origen del yeso encontrado en monumentos graníticos. Para ello se comparan los contenidos de iones solubilizados en agua, los resultados de difracción de rayos X y las relaciones OCa/SO3 de muestras de piedra, morteros y depósitos recogidas en diferentes monumentos. Se llega a la conclusión de que en la mayor parte de los casos el yeso procede de antiguas pinturas o de revestimientos superficiales y de los morteros de juntas entre sillares, pero no se puede descartar la contribución de otros aportes, los cuales se discuten también en este artículo.

  15. Rehabilitation of gypsum-mined lands in the Indian desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, K.D.; Kumar, S.; Gough, L.P.

    2001-01-01

    The economic importance of mining in the Indian Desert is second only to agriculture. Land disturbed by mining, however, has only recently been the focus of rehabilitation efforts. This research assesses the success of rehabilitation plans used to revegetate gypsum mine spoils within the environmental constraints of the north-west Indian hot-desert ecosystem. The rehabilitation plan first examined both mined and unmined areas and established assessments of existing vegetative cover and the quality of native soils and mine spoils. Tests were made on the effect of the use, and conservation, of available water through rainwater harvesting, amendment application (for physical and chemical spoil modification), plant establishment protocols, and the selection of appropriate germ plasm. Our results show that the resulting vegetative cover is capable of perpetuating itself under natural conditions while concurrently meeting the needs of farmers. Although the mine spoils are deficient in organic matter and phosphorus, they possess adequate amounts of all other nutrients. Total boron concentrations (>5.0 mg kg-1) in both the topsail and mine spoil indicate potentially phytotoxic conditions. Electrical conductance of mine spoil is 6-10 times higher than for topsail with a near-neutral pH. Populations of spoil fungi, Azotobactor, and nitrifying bacteria are low. The soil moisture storage in rainwater harvesting plots increased by 8% over the control and 48% over the unmined area. As a result of rehabilitation efforts, mine spoils show a steady buildup in organic carbon, and P and K due to the decomposition of farmyard manure and the contribution of nitrogen fixation by the established leguminous plant species. The rehabilitation protocol used at the site appears to have been successful. Following revegetation of the area with a mixture of trees, shrubs, and grasses, native implanted species have become established. Species diversity, measured in terms of species richness

  16. Characterization of gypsum plasterboard with polyurethane foam waste reinforced with polypropylene fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Alameda

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Gypsum plasterboard that incorporates various combinations of polyurethane foam waste and polypropylene fibers in its matrix is studied. The prefabricated material was characterized in a series of standardized tests: bulk density, maximum breaking load under flexion stress, total water absorption, surface hardness, thermal properties, and reaction to fire performance. Polypropylene fibers were added to the polyurethane gypsum composites to improve the mechanical behavior of the plasterboard under loading. The results indicate that increased quantities of polymer waste led to significant reductions in the weight/surface ratio, the mechanical strength and the surface hardness of the gypsum, as well as improving its thermal resistance. The polypropylene fibers showed good adhesion to the polymer and the gypsum matrix, which enhanced the mechanical performance and the absorption capacity of these compounds. The non-combustibility test demonstrated the potential of the new material for use in internal linings.

  17. Coal Combustion Residual Beneficial Use Evaluation: Fly Ash Concrete and FGD Gypsum Wallboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains documents related to the evaluation of coal combustion residual beneficial use of fly ash concrete and FGD gypsum wallboard including the evaluation itself and the accompanying appendices

  18. Reliability of linear measurements on a virtual bilateral cleft lip and palate model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterkamp, B.C.M.; van der Meer, W.J.; Rutenfrans, M.; Dijkstra, P.U.

    Objective: To assess the reliability and validity of measurements performed on three-dimensional virtual models of neonatal bilateral cleft lip and palate patients, compared with measurements performed on plaster cast models. Materials and Methods: Ten high-quality plaster cast models of bilateral

  19. Efficacy and safety assessment of acute sports-related traumatic soft tissue injuries using a new ibuprofen medicated plaster: results from a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predel, Hans-Georg; Connolly, Mark P; Bhatt, Aomesh; Giannetti, Bruno

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the efficacy and safety of a recently developed ibuprofen medicated plaster in the treatment of acute sports impact injuries/contusions. In this double-blind, multi-center, placebo-controlled, parallel group, phase 3 study (EudraCT Number: 2012-003257-2) patients (n = 132; ages 18 to 60 years) diagnosed with acute sports-related traumatic blunt soft tissue injury/contusion to the upper or lower limbs were randomized to receive either ibuprofen 200 mg plaster (n = 64) or placebo plaster (n = 68). Plasters were administered once daily for five consecutive days. The primary assessment was the area under the curve (AUC) of the visual analogue scale (VAS) of pain on movement (POM) over 0 to 72 h (VAS 0-72 ). The ibuprofen medicated plaster was associated with a reduction in pain on movement (POM) based on lower VAS AUC 0-72h (2399.4 mm*h) compared with placebo (4078.9 mm*h) (least squares mean difference: - 1679.5 mm*h; P ibuprofen medicated plaster compared with placebo at 12, 48, 24, and 120 h (P ibuprofen medicated plaster was associated with greater reduction in tenderness/pain than placebo at each timepoint (P values ibuprofen plaster, and n = 6 [8.8%] for placebo). All drug-related AEs were administration site reactions and were mild in intensity. The results of this study indicate that ibuprofen medicated plaster results in rapid and clinically relevant reduction of pain in patients suffering from blunt musculoskeletal injuries or recurrent pain. The ibuprofen medicated plaster was well tolerated.

  20. The effect of disinfection of alginate impressions with 35% beetle juice spray on stone model linear dimensional changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anggra Yudha Ramadianto

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Dimensional stability of alginate impression is very important for treatment in dentistry. This study was to find the effect of the beetle juice spray procedure on alginate impression on gypsum model linear dimensional changes. This experimental study used 25 samples, divided into 5 groups. The first group, as control, were the alginate impressions filled with dental stone immediately after forming. The other four groups were the alginate impressions gel spray each 1,2,3, and 4 times with 35% beetle juice and then filled with dental stone. Dimensional changes were measured in the lower part of the plaster model from buccal-lingual and mesial-distal direction and also measured in the outer distance between the upper part of the stone model by using Mitutoyo digital micrometre and profile projector scaled 0,001 mm. The results of mesial-distal diameter average of the control group and group 2,3,4, and 5 were 9.909 mm, 9.852 mm, 9.845 mm, 9.824 mm, and 9.754 mm. Meanwhile, the results of buccal-lingual diameter average were 9.847 mm, 9.841 mm, 9.826 mm, 9.776 mm, and 9.729 mm. The results of the outer distance between the upper part of the stone model were 31.739 mm, 31.689 mm, 31.682 mm, 31.670 mm, and 31.670 mm. The data of this study was evaluated statistically based on the variant analysis. The conclusion of this study was statistically, there was no significant effect on gypsum model linear dimensional changes obtained from alginate impressions sprayed with 35% beetle juice.

  1. Functional treatment versus plaster for simple elbow dislocations (FuncSiE: a randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verleisdonk Egbert JMM

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elbow dislocations can be classified as simple or complex. Simple dislocations are characterized by the absence of fractures, while complex dislocations are associated with fractures. After reduction of a simple dislocation, treatment options include immobilization in a static plaster for different periods of time or so-called functional treatment. Functional treatment is characterized by early active motion within the limits of pain with or without the use of a sling or hinged brace. Theoretically, functional treatment should prevent stiffness without introducing increased joint instability. The primary aim of this randomized controlled trial is to compare early functional treatment versus plaster immobilization following simple dislocations of the elbow. Methods/Design The design of the study will be a multicenter randomized controlled trial of 100 patients who have sustained a simple elbow dislocation. After reduction of the dislocation, patients are randomized between a pressure bandage for 5-7 days and early functional treatment or a plaster in 90 degrees flexion, neutral position for pro-supination for a period of three weeks. In the functional group, treatment is started with early active motion within the limits of pain. Function, pain, and radiographic recovery will be evaluated at regular intervals over the subsequent 12 months. The primary outcome measure is the Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand score. The secondary outcome measures are the Mayo Elbow Performance Index, Oxford elbow score, pain level at both sides, range of motion of the elbow joint at both sides, rate of secondary interventions and complication rates in both groups (secondary dislocation, instability, relaxation, health-related quality of life (Short-Form 36 and EuroQol-5D, radiographic appearance of the elbow joint (degenerative changes and heterotopic ossifications, costs, and cost-effectiveness. Discussion The successful

  2. OPTIMIZING THE COMPOSITION AND THE FEATURES OF GYPSUM BINDER PRODUCED IN A KETTLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pustovgar Andrey Petrovich

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors considered the gypsum binder obtained in a kettle SMA-158A in the enterprise LLC “MaykopGipsStroy”. The initial gypsum binder burnt at a temperature of 120 °Сwith the following unloading out of the kettle possessed unstable physical, mechanical and operational characteristics, that’s why the grade of gypsum binder was changed from G4-AII to G5-BII for different lots, which greatly reduced its application in the composition of dry mortars. It was stated, that instability of the features of gypsum binder is determined by the essential underburning of the system, which was characterized by residual content of calcium sulfate dihydrate in amount from 2 to 7 % by weight. In frames of the investigation the authors succeeded in raising the grade of the produced gypsum binder (from G4-5 to G6 due to optimization of the technological parameters of the burning process, as well as to stabilize the composition and features, to lay down temperature and time parameters allowing to control the technological process in order to obtain the gypsum binder with specified characteristics.

  3. Oxidation of North Dakota scrubber sludge for soil amendment and production of gypsum. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassett, D.J.; Moe, T.A.

    1997-10-01

    Cooperative Power`s Coal Creek Station (CCS) the North Dakota Industrial Commission, and the US Department of Energy provided funds for a research project at the Energy and Environmental Research Center. The goals of the project were (1) to determine conditions for the conversion of scrubber sludge to gypsum simulating an ex situ process on the laboratory scale; (2) to determine the feasibility of scaleup of the process; (3) if warranted, to demonstrate the ex situ process for conversion on the pilot scale; and (4) to evaluate the quality and handling characteristics of the gypsum produced on the pilot scale. The process development and demonstration phases of this project were successfully completed focusing on ex situ oxidation using air at low pH. The potential to produce a high-purity gypsum on a commercial scale is excellent. The results of this project demonstrate the feasibility of converting CCS scrubber sludge to gypsum exhibiting characteristics appropriate for agricultural application as soil amendment as well as for use in gypsum wallboard production. Gypsum of a purity of over 98% containing acceptable levels of potentially problematic constituents was produced in the laboratory and in a pilot-scale demonstration.

  4. Gypsum as an alternative flocculant for the treatment of coal mine effluent waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-11-01

    Groundwater and precipitation become contaminated with high levels of suspended sediment at operating coal strip mines. In the presence of sodium and smectite clays, the clays in the sediment become dispersed and will not settle. The water must be treated with flocculant before release into receiving watercourses. A study was conducted to evaluate the use of low-cost gypsum as an environmentally safe means of treating coal mine effluent. Key design information on the rate of gypsum dissolution and clay settling at various temperatures was determined in the laboratory. Quarry grade gypsum was found to have a satisfactorily high dissolution rate for field operation, and the rate constants of gypsum dissolution were determined. Settling rates of suspended sediments after gypsum treatment were sufficient for use with a lagoon-based treatment process. Settling after gypsum treatment could be divided into three periods: formation of clay flocs, linear or near-linear settling of the flocs, and compaction of settled flocs. The delay time, linear settling rate, and final residue volume under test conditions were determined. Free settlement occurred when clay concentration was low and hindered settling occurred at high clay concentration. Delay time, linear settling rate, and final residue volume were all affected by temperature. A field pilot treatment process design was prepared, and the treatment process system and subsystems plus the integrated facilities which comprise the pilot plant are included along with equipment specifications and design drawings. 10 refs., 30 figs., 11 tabs.

  5. Gypsum amendment to soil can reduce selenium uptake by alfalfa grown in the presence of coal fly ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, M.A.; Rubin, G.; Woodbury, P.B.; Weinstein, L.H.

    1993-01-01

    Experiments in the field and greenhouse were conducted in the presence of coal fly ash to determine whether gypsum can reduce Se concentration in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.). In the field experiment, conducted at a coal fly ash landfill, 11.2 t ha -1 gypsum was applied to soil as a top dressing to test the effect of gypsum in reducing selenium (Se) concentration in aboveground plant tissue. There were four treatment combinations of gypsum over a two year period, 1990, and 1991: (0, 0), (0, 11.2) (11.2, 0) and (11.2, 11.2). In 1991, the Se concentration was lower in alfalfa grown with gypsum, regardless of whether the gypsum was applied in both years or in only one year, indicating that the effect of gypsum application in the first year persisted into the second year. Since there was no increase in aboveground biomass with added gypsum, differences in Se concentration reflect a competitive interaction between S and Se. In the greenhouse experiment, 12 soil treatments were tested: three levels of fly ash (0, 10 and 20%) in combination with each of four levels of gypsum (0, 2.5, 5 and 7.5%). The Se concentration in alfalfa grown in 10% fly ash declined linearly with increasing gypsum dose, resulting in a reduction in Se concentration of 0.04 ± 0.02 μg g -1 for each 1% gypsum added for the first harvest and 0.06 ± 0.03 μg g -1 for each 1% gypsum added in the second harvest. Based on these results, gypsum may prove useful as a management tool to reduce the uptake of Se by plants growing on coal fly ash landfills

  6. Treatment of localized neuropathic pain of different etiologies with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster – a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Likar R

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rudolf Likar,1 Susanne Demschar,1 Ingo Kager,1 Stefan Neuwersch,1 Wolfgang Pipam,1 Reinhard Sittl2 1Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Hospital Klagenfurt, Klagenfurt, Austria; 2Department of Anesthesiology, Interdisciplinary Pain Centre, University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany Objective: To assess the efficacy and safety of the topical 5% lidocaine medicated plaster in the treatment of localized neuropathic pain. Study design: This was a case series at an Austrian pain clinic, using retrospective analysis. Patients and methods: Data of 27 patients treated for localized neuropathic pain with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster were retrospectively analyzed. Assessment included changes in overall pain intensity, in intensity of different pain qualities, and of hyperalgesia and allodynia, and changes in sleep quality. Results: Patients (17 female, ten male; mean age 53.4±11.4 years presented mainly with dorsalgia (16 patients or postoperative/posttraumatic pain (seven patients; one patient suffered from both. The mean overall pain intensity prior to treatment with lidocaine medicated plaster was 8.4±1.2 on the 11-point Likert scale. In the majority of cases, the lidocaine plaster was applied concomitantly with preexisting pain medication (81.5% of the patients. During the 6-month observation period, overall mean pain intensity was reduced by almost 5 points (4.98 to 3.5±2.6. Substantial reductions were also observed for neuralgiform pain (5 points from 7.9±2.6 at baseline and burning pain (3 points from 5.2±4.1. Sleep quality improved from 4.6±2.6 at baseline to 5.5±1.8. Stratification by pain diagnosis showed marked improvements in overall pain intensity for patients with dorsalgia or postoperative/posttraumatic pain. The lidocaine plaster was well tolerated. Conclusion: Overall, topical treatment with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster was associated with effective pain relief and was well tolerated. Keywords

  7. Radiation sterilization of a bifunctional cement formulation of hydroxilapatite-plaster-polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainz Vidal, D; Rodriquez Napoles, D; Fuentes Estevez, G; Guerra, M; Arcis Soriano, W; Peon Aves, E; Diaz Argota, J M; Zaldivar Silva, D

    1999-06-18

    A sterilization method based on the use of gamma ionizing radiation was applied to a cement formulation of hydroxilapatite, plaster and polymers to be used in bone restorations in dental, aesthetic, and neurological surgery. After the cement was exposed to a dose of 21.5 kGy it reached the sterility assurance level which was necessary for its employment in surgical applications as specified by International Standard ISO ordinate 11137: Radiation Sterilization of Health Care Products. No variation in the initial cement composition or processing parameters, such as working or setting time and molding quality was observed due to sterilization. Its characteristics as a drug delivery system were also not affected. Therefore, radiation sterilization provides a feasible alternative to conventional sterilization methods such as dry/wet heat and ethylene oxide.

  8. Liquid moisture diffusivity of environmentally exposed plasters accessed by inverse analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Záleská, Martina; Pavlíková, Milena; Pavlík, Zbyšek

    2017-07-01

    Two types of commercially produced plasters exposed to the real environmental conditions are studied in terms of measurement moisture transport parameters in the conditions of one-sided water uptake. The Boltzmann transformation method is used to process the data from measured moisture content profiles and the liquid water diffusivity is determined. For researched materials, the basic physical properties as bulk density, matrix density and total open porosity are measured in respect to their age and climatic loading. The obtained results point to the coupled disruptive processes taking place within the material exposure to the real central Europe environment, whereas the climatic loading leads to the significant acceleration of liquid moisture transport what is highly negative finding from the point of view of materials functionality and service life.

  9. Cleaning plaster surfaces with agar-agar gels: evaluation of the technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Tortajada Hernando

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Cleaning plaster surfaces represent a challenge for conservators It should only be performed following fully tested methods that guarantee the conservation of such fragile material. The goal of this work is to establishing a suitable cleaning method for this type of artworks from the tested concentrations and time of applications, using agar gels on plaster supports. Morphological, porosity and weight variations have been studied. Confocal and stereomicroscopy have been used as analytical techniques, as well as the measurement of water vapor permeability and weight have been taken on the samples. La limpieza de superficies de yeso-escayola con geles de agar-agar: evaluación de la técnica Resumen: La limpieza segura y eficiente de las superficies de yeso constituye un reto y una responsabilidad para el conservador-restaurador, y debe llevarse a cabo siguiendo métodos testados que garanticen su correcta conservación. La intención de este trabajo es determinar, a partir de las concentraciones y tiempos de aplicación ensayados, cuáles serían los parámetros óptimos para la ejecución de una limpieza eficaz e inocua empleando geles de agar-agar sobre soportes de yeso. Se han comprobado las posibles variaciones morfológicas de la superficie, las variaciones de la porosidad y del peso, así como la presencia de residuos, para lo cual se ha empleado la microscopía confocal, microscopía binocular, la medida de la permeabilidad al vapor de agua y la medida del peso de las muestras.

  10. Evaluation of Bone Change by Digital Subtraction Radiography After Implantation of Tooth ash-plaster Mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Duk; Kim, Kwang Won; Cho, Young Gon; Kim, Dong Kie; Choi, Eui Hwan [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Chosun University and Oral Biology Research Center, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-08-15

    To assess the methods for the clinical evaluation of the longitudinal bone changes after implantation of tooth ash-plaster mixture into the defect area of human jaws. Tooth ash-plaster mixtures were implanted into the defects of 8 human jaws. 48 intraoral radiograms taken with copper step wedge as reference at soon, 1st, 2nd, 4th, and 6th week after implantation of mixture were used. X-ray taking was standardized by using Rinn XCP device customized directly to the individual dentition with resin bite block. The images inputted by Quick scanner were digitized and analyzed by NIH image program. Cu-equivalent values were measured at the implanted sites from the periodic digital images. Analysis was performed by the bidirectional subtraction with color enhancement and the surface plot of resliced contiguous image. The obtained results by the two methods were compared with Cu-equivalent value changes. The average determination coefficient of Cu-equivalent equations was 0.9988 and the coefficient of variation of measured Cu values ranged from 0.08-0.10. The coefficient of variation of Cu-equivalent values measured at the areas of the mixture and the bone by the conversion equation ranged from 0.06-0.09. The analyzed results by the bidirectional subtraction with color enhancement were coincident with the changes of Cu-equivalent values. The surface plot of the resliced contiguous image showed the three dimensional view of the longitudinal bone changes on one image and also coincident with Cu-equivalent value changes after implantation. The bidirectional subtraction with color enhancement and the surface plot of the resliced contiguous image was very effective and reasonable to analyze clinically and qualitatively the longitudinal bone change. These methods are expected to be applicable to the non-destructive test in other fields.

  11. Properties of mortars made by uncalcined FGD gypsum-fly ash-ground granulated blast furnace slag composite binder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Shiyun; Ni Kun; Li Jinmei

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The mortar with uncalcined FGD gypsum has suitable workability. ► The strength of mortar with uncalcined FGD gypsum is higher than that of mortar without uncalcined FGD gypsum. ► The dry shrinkage of mortar with uncalcined FGD gypsum is lower than that of mortar without uncalcined FGD gypsum. ► The leaching of sulfate ion of mortar is studied. - Abstract: A series of novel mortars were developed from composite binder of uncalcined FGD gypsum, fly ash (FA) and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS) for the good utilization of flue gas desulphurization (FGD) gypsum. At a fixed ratio (20%) of GGBFS to the composite binder, keeping consistency of the mortar between 9.5 and 10.0 cm, the properties of the composite mortar were studied. The results show that higher water/binder (W/B) is required to keep the consistency when increasing the percentage of FGD gypsum. No obvious influences of the W/B and content of FGD gypsum on the bleeding of paste were observed which keeps lower than 2% under all experimental conditions tried. The highest compressive and flexural strengths (ratio is 20% FGD gypsum, 20% GGBFS and 60% FA) are 22.6 and 4.3 MPa at 28 days, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results indicate that massive ettringite crystals and C–S–H gels exist in the hydration products. At 90 days the mortars with FGD gypsum is dramatically smaller drying shrinkage (563–938 micro strain) than that without FGD gypsum (about 2250 micro strain). The release of the SO 4 2- from the mortar was analyzed, indicating that the dissolution of sulfate increases with FGD gypsum. The concentration of SO 4 2- releasing from the mortar with 10% FGD gypsum is almost equal to that obtained from the mortar without FGD gypsum. The release of SO 4 2- from the mortar with 20% FGD gypsum is 9200 mg·m −2 , which is lower than that from the mortar with 95% cement clinker and 5% FGD gypsum.

  12. Comparative evaluation of few physical properties of epoxy resin, resin-modified gypsum and conventional type IV gypsum die materials: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujjarlapudi, Manmohan Choudary; Reddy, S Varalakshmi; Madineni, Praveen Kumar; Ealla, Kranti Kiran Reddy; Nunna, Venkata Narayana; Manne, Sanjay Dutt

    2012-01-01

    To compare and evaluate few physical properties of epoxy resin, resin-modified gypsum and conventional type-IV gypsum die material. In the present study, dimensional accuracy, surface detail reproduction and transverse strength of three die materials like epoxy resin (Diemet-E), resin-modified gypsum (Synarock) and conventional type-IV gypsum (Ultrarock) are analyzed. For dimensional accuracy, master die (Bailey's die) is used and calibrations were made with digital microscope. For surface detail reproduction and transverse strength, rectangular stainless steel master die (Duke's die) was used and calibrations were made with Toolmaker's microscope and Instron universal testing machine respectively. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed on the means and standard deviation for groups of each test. The results of the study showed statistically significant difference among these materials in dimensional accuracy, surface detail reproduction and transverse strength. Epoxy resin exhibited superiority in dimensional accuracy, surface detail reproduction and transverse strength and is nearest to the standards of accurate die material.

  13. Cancer mortality in towns in the vicinity of installations for the production of cement, lime, plaster, and magnesium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Pérez, Javier; López-Abente, Gonzalo; Castelló, Adela; González-Sánchez, Mario; Fernández-Navarro, Pablo

    2015-06-01

    Our objective was to investigate whether there might be excess cancer mortality in the vicinity of Spanish installations for the production of cement, lime, plaster, and magnesium oxide, according to different categories of industrial activity. An ecologic study was designed to examine municipal mortality due to 33 types of cancer (period 1997-2006) in Spain. Population exposure to pollution was estimated on the basis of distance from town to industrial facility. Using spatial Besag-York-Mollié regression models with integrated nested Laplace approximations for Bayesian inference, we assessed the relative risk of dying from cancer in a 5-km zone around installations, analyzed the effect of category of industrial activity according to the manufactured product, and conducted individual analyses within a 50-km radius of each installation. Excess all cancer mortality (relative risk, 95% credible interval) was detected in the vicinity of these installations as a whole (1.04, 1.01-1.07 in men; 1.03, 1.00-1.06 in women), and, principally, in the vicinity of cement installations (1.05, 1.01-1.09 in men). Special mention should be made of the results for tumors of colon-rectum in both sexes (1.07, 1.01-1.14 in men; 1.10, 1.03-1.16 in women), and pleura (1.71, 1.24-2.28), peritoneum (1.62, 1.15-2.20), gallbladder (1.21, 1.02-1.42), bladder (1.11, 1.03-1.20) and stomach (1.09, 1.00-1.18) in men in the vicinity of all such installations. Our results suggest an excess risk of dying from cancer, especially in colon-rectum, in towns near these industries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Physical properties of salt, anhydrite and gypsum : preliminary report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Eugene C.; Robie, Richard A.; Books, Kenneth G.

    1958-01-01

    This summary is the result of a search of the available literature. Emphasis is placed on the mechanical and calorimetric properties of salt; the measurements of elastic, thermal, magnetic, and mass properties of salt are merely tabulated. Under hydrostatic pressure 100 percent at a nearly constant stress difference of about 300 kg/cm2. Similarily, under temperatures > 400?C at one atmosphere, salt deforms plastically to strains > 100 percent under stress differences of about 100 kg/cm2. Entha1pies were calculated for various temperatures to 2,000? C from the low temperature and high temperature heat capacities and the heats of solution of the following minerals: salt (or halite), NaCl; anhydrite, CaS04; quartz, Si02; and calcite, CaC03. Three combinations of these minerals were assumed to represent three possible natural salt beds, and the heats required to raise the temperature of each to 1,500?C and to 2,000?C were calculated. For a half and half mixture of salt and anhydrite, 1,300 cal/gm were required to raise the temperature to 2,000?C. For an evaporite containing 60 percent salt and about equal amounts of anhydrite, calcite, and quartz, 1,100 cal/gm are required to raise the temperature to 2,OOO?C. Most of the measurements of the elastic moduli were made on single crystals of salt, anhydrite, and gypsum. For the most part, the measurements of density, magnetic susceptibility, and other properties were made on natural salt samples.

  15. Distinctive Accessory Minerals, Textures and Crystal Habits in Biofilm Associated Gypsum Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, M.; Des Marais, D.; Jahnke, L.; Parenteau, M.

    2008-12-01

    Gypsum-depositing environments near Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico were investigated in order to differentiate the influence of microbial activity versus nonbiological processes upon sedimentary fabrics and minerals. Field sites were located in sabkhas (mudflats and anchialine pools) and in seawater concentration ponds in the salt production facility operated by Exportadora de Sal, S. A. Gypsum (CaSO4.2H2O) was classified according to sedimentary environment (e.g., mudflats, anchialine pools, saltern ponds, surface and subsurface sediments), sedimentary texture, mineral composition, crystal habit, brine composition and other geochemical and biological factors. Gypsum types that develop in the absence of biofilms include water column precipitates (pelagic grains) and subsedimentary crystalline discs that form from phreatic brine ripening. Subsedimentary gypsum forming in sabkha environments had a sinuous axial microtexture and poikilitically enclosed detrital particles whereas water column precipitates exhibited euhedral prismatic habits and extensive penetrative twinning. Gypsum that was influenced by biofilms included cumulate crusts and gypsooids / gypsolite developing in anchialine pools and in saltern concentration ponds. Gypsum precipitating within subaqueous benthic microbial mats, or biofilm/sediment surfaces offered compelling evidence of biofilm influence on crystal textures and habits. Biofilm effects include irregular high relief surface textures, accessory minerals (elemental sulfur, Ca-carbonate, Sr/Ca-sulfate, Mg-oxide and Mg- sulfate) and distinctive crystal habits. Elemental sulfur, Ca-carbonate, and Sr/Ca-sulfate are known byproducts of bacterially mediated sulfate reduction (BSR). Populations of gypsum crystals within biofilms exhibited euhedral to lensoidal morphologies with unique equant and distorted prismatic forms. These forms had been shown to arise from form- and face-specific inhibition by bioorganic functional groups (Cody

  16. Urea Hydrolysis and Calcium Carbonate Precipitation in Gypsum-Amended Broiler Litter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Christopher D; Cabrera, Miguel L; Rothrock, Michael J; Kissel, D E

    2018-01-01

    Broiler () litter is subject to ammonia (NH) volatilization losses. Previous work has shown that the addition of gypsum to broiler litter can increase nitrogen mineralization and decrease NH losses due to a decrease in pH, but the mechanisms responsible for these effects are not well understood. Therefore, three laboratory studies were conducted to evaluate the effect of gypsum addition to broiler litter on (i) urease activity at three water contents, (ii) calcium carbonate precipitation, and (iii) pH. The addition of gypsum to broiler litter increased ammonium concentrations ( litter pH by 0.43 to 0.49 pH units after 5 d ( litter only increased on Day 0 for broiler litter with low (0.29 g HO g) and high (0.69 g HO g) water contents, and on Day 3 for litter with medium (0.40 g HO g) water content ( litter with gypsum also caused an immediate decrease in litter pH (0.22 pH units) due to the precipitation of calcium carbonate (CaCO) from gypsum-derived calcium and litter bicarbonate. Furthermore, as urea was hydrolyzed, more urea-derived carbon precipitated as CaCO in gypsum-treated litter than in untreated litter ( litter with gypsum favors the precipitation of CaCO, which buffers against increases in litter pH that are known to facilitate NH volatilization. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  17. Properties of mortars made by uncalcined FGD gypsum-fly ash-ground granulated blast furnace slag composite binder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Shiyun; Ni, Kun; Li, Jinmei

    2012-07-01

    A series of novel mortars were developed from composite binder of uncalcined FGD gypsum, fly ash (FA) and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS) for the good utilization of flue gas desulphurization (FGD) gypsum. At a fixed ratio (20%) of GGBFS to the composite binder, keeping consistency of the mortar between 9.5 and 10.0 cm, the properties of the composite mortar were studied. The results show that higher water/binder (W/B) is required to keep the consistency when increasing the percentage of FGD gypsum. No obvious influences of the W/B and content of FGD gypsum on the bleeding of paste were observed which keeps lower than 2% under all experimental conditions tried. The highest compressive and flexural strengths (ratio is 20% FGD gypsum, 20% GGBFS and 60% FA) are 22.6 and 4.3 MPa at 28 days, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results indicate that massive ettringite crystals and C-S-H gels exist in the hydration products. At 90 days the mortars with FGD gypsum is dramatically smaller drying shrinkage (563-938 micro strain) than that without FGD gypsum (about 2250 micro strain). The release of the SO(4)(2-) from the mortar was analyzed, indicating that the dissolution of sulfate increases with FGD gypsum. The concentration of SO(4)(2-) releasing from the mortar with 10% FGD gypsum is almost equal to that obtained from the mortar without FGD gypsum. The release of SO(4)(2-) from the mortar with 20% FGD gypsum is 9200 mg·m(-2), which is lower than that from the mortar with 95% cement clinker and 5% FGD gypsum. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Gypsum dissolution risk analysis in the Prealpine part of the Vaud County (Western Switzerland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolet, Pierrick; Choffet, Marc; Bohren, Delphine; Derron, Marc-Henri; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Lauraux, Bertrand; Lance, Jean-Marc; Champod, Eric

    2013-04-01

    Subsidence or collapse due to bedrock dissolution is a relatively common phenomenon in Vaud County (Western Switzerland). Indeed, soluble rocks are present in the Jura and Prealpine parts. Solubility is significantly higher in evaporitic rocks (such as gypsum) than in Limestones, resulting in possibly important dissolution during a building's lifetime. In Limestone, subsidence results mainly from cover collapse over existing voids. This study aims at evaluating the cost of this phenomenon for the building portfolio of the region in which gypsum occurs. Currently, 2.5% of the portfolio value is located over gypsum-bearing formations and is therefore potentially affected. Since this phenomenon is not covered by the public building insurance yet, no centralized event record exists. Therefore, a survey has been conducted with the affected communities to estimate the events frequency and damage severity. Some records from the archives of BERTAND LAURAUX SA have been added and allow to compare reparation costs with insured values. From these cases, a frequency and a buildings vulnerability distribution are established. The vulnerability distribution is considered to represent the reality, whereas the frequency is corrected to take into account the different amount of information gathered in the different municipalities and the incompleteness of the inventory, even in the communities with more information. Assuming that the distribution of collapse events occurs with a constant average frequency and is time-independent, insurance financial years are modeled with a number of cases assigned randomly following a Poisson distribution. A Monte Carlo simulation is performed, where the affected buildings value is chosen among the potentially affected portfolio and its corresponding damage rate is assigned following the distribution previously established. The maximum damage for each building is limited to CHF 1,000,000 (EUR 827,000), to ignore unrealistic values. Thus, a cost

  19. The use of soil gypsum concentration as an indicator of arable land degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robledo, Irene; Marqués Pérez, Maria Jose; Hernandez, Zulimar; Carral, Pilar; Crittenden, Stephen; Sastre, Blanca; Bienes, Ramón

    2017-04-01

    Gypsiferous soils are frequent in arid and semi-arid areas. These soils can be used for farming but shallow soils and steep slopes are detrimental to establishing their profitability. Tillage of sloping land increases risk of soil erosion processes that lead to diminished thickness of the richer topsoil layer. Topsoil loss exposes subsoil layers with higher gypsum concentration. This increased gypsum concentration can influence the potential biomass production and agricultural suitability of gypsiferous soils. In the literature, soils having more than 15% gypsum tend to have weak soil structure and inhibited root growth. Consequently, there is a need to diagnose these eroded soils and to develop a soil protection strategy for arable land if continued soil loss is to be abated and productivity is to be restored or maintained. Indicators to establish the level of degradation are needed, particularly ones that are easy to measure. We hypothesize that pale soil colours indicate proximity to soil conditions linked to high concentrations of gypsum that are detrimental to plant growth. Spain leads the list of European countries having gypsiferous soils, with an area of approximately 35 000 sq km covered. Gypsiferous soils analysed in this study are located at the centre of Spain, where average temperature is 16°C and soils receive around 400 mm of rainfall per year. Sampling was conducted in various areas of a sloping agricultural land with olive trees. Topsoil disturbed samples were randomly collected, in addition, six 70 cm deep soil core were collected. Two soil cores at the top, two in the middle, and two at the bottom slope areas were taken. Colour and gypsum concentration were analysed in the soil samples and also for sub-samples each 5 cm of the core samples. Gypsum was analysed by chemical and thermogravimetric methods. Other parameters like aggregate stability, electrical conductivity, water retention, and bulk density were also analysed. Gypsum concentration

  20. Effect of alginate chemical disinfection on bacterial count over gypsum cast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haralur, Satheesh B; Al-Dowah, Omir S; Gana, Naif S; Al-Hytham, Abdullah

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of sodium hypochlorite (1 : 10) and iodophor disinfectants on alginate impressions along with their effect on the survived bacterium count on the gypsum cast. Four alginate impression on each dentate patients were made, of which Group I were not washed or disinfected, Group II impressions were merely washed with water, Group III were disinfected by spraying with sodium hypochlorite (1 : 10), Group IV were disinfected with iodophor (1 : 213). Gypsum cast (type III) were made from all the impression. Impressions and gypsum cast were swabbed in mid palatal region for bacterial culture. Bacterial colony counting done after 3 days of incubation at 37℃ in blood agar media. The data obtained was analyzed by one way ANOVA test at a significant difference level of 0.05. Group I and Group II showed significantly more bacteria compared to Group III and Group IV. Bacterial colonies on the alginate impression and gypsum cast in group disinfected with Sodium hypochlorite (1 : 10) were 0.18, 0.82 respectively compared to group treated with iodophor (1 : 213). There was an increase in bacterial count on dental cast compared to source alginate impressions. Sodium hypochlorite (1 : 10) was found to be better disinfectant for alginate impression. There was an indication of increase in number of bacteria from alginate impression to making of dental cast. Additional gypsum cast disinfectant procedures need to be encouraged to completely eliminate cross infection to dental laboratory.

  1. Gypsum-permineralized microfossils and their relevance to the search for life on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopf, J William; Farmer, Jack D; Foster, Ian S; Kudryavtsev, Anatoliy B; Gallardo, Victor A; Espinoza, Carola

    2012-07-01

    Orbital and in situ analyses establish that aerially extensive deposits of evaporitic sulfates, including gypsum, are present on the surface of Mars. Although comparable gypsiferous sediments on Earth have been largely ignored by paleontologists, we here report the finding of diverse fossil microscopic organisms permineralized in bottom-nucleated gypsums of seven deposits: two from the Permian (∼260 Ma) of New Mexico, USA; one from the Miocene (∼6 Ma) of Italy; and four from Recent lacustrine and saltern deposits of Australia, Mexico, and Peru. In addition to presenting the first report of the widespread occurrence of microscopic fossils in bottom-nucleated primary gypsum, we show the striking morphological similarity of the majority of the benthic filamentous fossils of these units to the microorganisms of a modern sulfuretum biocoenose. Based on such similarity, in morphology as well as habitat, these findings suggest that anaerobic sulfur-metabolizing microbial assemblages have changed relatively little over hundreds of millions of years. Their discovery as fossilized components of the seven gypsiferous units reported suggests that primary bottom-nucleated gypsum represents a promising target in the search for evidence of past life on Mars. Key Words: Confocal laser scanning microscopy-Gypsum fossils-Mars sample return missions-Raman spectroscopy-Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument-Sulfuretum.

  2. Effects of addition of adipic acid to a limestone-gypsum FGD installation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Middlekamp, J.; Broek, S.; Kock, A.F.J.M. [KEMA, Arnhem (Netherlands)

    1995-08-01

    Addition of organic buffers such as adipic acid to the scrubber liquor of limestone-sludge Flue Gas Desulphurization (FGD) installations is common practice in the USA. Major effects are an increased SO{sub 2} removal efficiency, better limestone utilization and improved operational performance of the FGD installations. For application of these organic buffers under Western European conditions, where lime stone-gypsum FGD systems are installed for desulphurization, the impact of these compounds on both the gypsum quality and the performance of the wastewater treatment systems is an important issue. From research work on pilot-plant scale performed at the laboratories of KEMA on behalf of the Dutch Electricity Production Companies, the addition of organic buffers also showed positive effects on the limestone-gypsum process. Adipic acid was found to be the most promising additive. At Hoogovens Technical Services (HTS E&E) adipic acid was considered to be a good additive in limestone-gypsum FGD installation of the 600 MWe coal fired Amer-9 power station of the Production Company EPZ was carried out to establish the following items: effect on SO{sub 2} absorption; effect on net power consumption of the FGD installation; influence on the gypsum quality; influence on the wastewater quality and performance of the wastewater treatment system; influence on process control of the FGD installation; loss of adipic acid through chemical degradation and wastewater discharge. This paper describes the highlights of this program. 4 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  3. Evaluation of the work of a hydrocyclone for the thickening of the gypsum pulp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Eugenia Peña-Durán

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The work presents the results obtained in a laboratory scale study, using a hydrocyclone, in order to identify the most favorable operating conditions to increase the percentage of solid in the gypsum pulp obtained in the neutralization, one of the stages processing of nickel laterites. For the tests, a pilot plant was used: a hydrocyclone, a pulp storage tank and a centrifugal pump, selecting as study parameters: solid concentration at the entrance and working pressure, to analyze the influence of these Variables on the percentage of solid at the hydrocyclone outlet. The experiments were carried out at three levels applying a complete multilevel factorial experiment design, resulting in nine experiments, with two replicates each to guarantee the reliability of the results. The operating conditions of the hydrocyclone at which the desired percentage of solid was reached were determined and the statistical processing was performed using the professional program STATGRAPHICS.Centurion.XV.v15.2.14, proving that the working pressure was the variable that significantly influenced with a positive effect on the solids percentage at the discharge of the hydrocyclone. In the results it was observed that for the high level of working pressure (262 kPa the highest percentage of solids was obtained for each of the percent of solids in the feed, confirmed aspect in the statistical model that denotes in terms of amount Influence of the measured variables.

  4. Comparison of space analysis performed on plaster vs. digital dental casts applying Tanaka and Johnston's equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia Olien Sanches

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to compare dental size measurements, their reproducibility and the application of Tanaka and Johnston regression equation in predicting the size of canines and premolars on plaster and digital dental casts. METHODS: Thirty plaster casts were scanned and digitized. Mesiodistal measurements of the teeth were then performed with a digital caliper on the plaster and digital casts using O3d software system (Widialabs©.The sum of the sizes of the lower incisors was used to obtain predictive values of the sizes of the premolars and canines using the regression equation, and these values were compared with the actual sizes of the teeth. The data were statistically analyzed by applying to the results Pearson's correlation test, Dahlberg's formula, paired t-test and analysis of variance (pOBJETIVO: comparar medidas de tamanhos dentários, suas reprodutibilidades e a aplicação da equação de regressão de Tanaka e Johnston na predição do tamanho dos caninos e pré-molares em modelos de gesso e digital. MÉTODOS: trinta modelos de gesso foram escaneados para obtenção dos modelos digitais. As medidas do comprimento mesiodistal dos dentes foram obtidas com paquímetro digital nos modelos de gesso e nos modelos digitais utilizando o software O3d (Widialabs. A somatória do tamanho dos incisivos inferiores foi utilizada para obter os valores de predição do tamanho dos pré-molares e caninos utilizando equação de regressão, e esses valores foram comparados ao tamanho real dos dentes. Os dados foram analisados estatisticamente, aplicando-se aos resultados o teste de correlação de Pearson, a fórmula de Dahlberg, o teste t pareado e a análise de variância (p < 0,05. RESULTADOS: excelente concordância intraexaminador foi observada nas medidas realizadas em ambos os modelos. O erro aleatório não esteve presente nas medidas obtidas com paquímetro, e o erro sistemático foi mais frequente no modelo digital

  5. Comparison of orthodontic measurements on dental plaster casts and 3D scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radeke, Johanna; von der Wense, Cynthia; Lapatki, Bernd G

    2014-07-01

    Over recent years, we have witnessed a growing trend in orthodontics toward the use of three-dimensional (3D) techniques for diagnostic purposes, treatment planning, and fabricating appliances. This study was undertaken to compare the traditional manual technique of using vernier calipers to take orthodontic measurements on plaster dental casts versus an all-digital measuring technique based on virtual 3D scans of casts. In this study, we focused on the quantitative agreement between and time requirements of both methods. Plaster casts obtained from the jaws of 55 fully dentate patients who had not previously undergone orthodontic treatment underwent 3D scanning using a white-light scanner (d-Station (3D); Breuckmann, Meersburg, Germany). Once the casts had been blinded by an independent individual, three examiners with different degrees of expertise in dentistry and orthodontics measured the mesiodistal widths of teeth 6-6 in each jaw. A randomized sequence was used when taking the measurements three times using OnyxCeph(3TM) analysis software (Image Instruments, Chemnitz, Germany) and a dental vernier caliper. Bland-Altman plots were used to illustrate the level of agreement between the two methods, standard deviations of repeated measurements were calculated to assess their reproducibility, and the Wilcoxon's signed-rank test was employed to compare their time requirements. The Bland-Altman analysis of all single values revealed no statistically significant difference between the software-based and caliper-based measurements of mesiodistal tooth width. Assuming the presence of normal distribution, the limits of agreement disclosed a 95% probability for the software values to range between +0.499 and -0.545 mm of the same value measured with the caliper. The standard deviations of repeated measurements were 0.33 mm with the software and 0.21 mm with the caliper. The digital method required significantly less time (p<0.01); however, differences were observed to be

  6. A DOC coagulant, gypsum treatment can simultaneously reduce As, Cd and Pb uptake by medicinal plants grown in contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyuck Soo; Seo, Byoung-Hwan; Kuppusamy, Saranya; Lee, Yong Bok; Lee, Jae-Hwang; Yang, Jae-E; Owens, Gary; Kim, Kwon-Rae

    2018-02-01

    The efficiency of gypsum, as a dissolved organic carbon (DOC) coagulator, for the simultaneous immobilization of two heavy metals (Cd and Pb) and one metalloid (As) in agricultural soils near an abandoned mining site was examined. The agricultural soil was defined as long-term contaminated as As (1540mgkg -1 ), Cd (55mgkg -1 ) and Pb (1283mgkg -1 ) concentrations exceeded the Korean guideline values for As (25mgkg -1 ), Cd (4mgkg -1 ), and Pb (200mgkg -1 ). Gypsum was incorporated into the contaminated soil at 3% (w/w). In comparison two commonly using immobilizing agents (lime and compost), together with a mixture (lime+gypsum) were also included in the pot trial for the cultivation of two medical plants (A. gigas and A. macrocephala) and to evaluate the effectiveness of gypsum on As, Cd and Pb immobilization. The results showed that even though pH change-induced immobilizing agents such as lime were more effective than gypsum at immobilizing Cd and Pb, addition of gypsum also effectively reduced heavy metal phytoavailability as indicated by decreases in the concentration of Cd and Pb in medicinal plants. Furthermore, gypsum and gypsum+ lime were also most effective in reducing As concentrations in both plants studied. This was mainly attributed to significant decreases in soil DOC (48-64%) when gypsum and gypsum+lime were applied to the soil. Consequently, it was concluded that enhanced DOC coagulation with gypsum, could be considered as a promising technique for the immobilization of both metals (Cd and Pb) and metalloids (As) in agricultural soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. An evaluation of the mechanical properties of Type III and Type IV gypsum mixed with two disinfectant solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Sunitha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: This in-vitro study was conducted to evaluate the strength and properties of Type III and Type IV gypsum mixed with disinfectant solutions. Materials and Methods: Type III and Type IV gypsum were used for the study. Three different mixing solutions namely waterqueous solutions of 0.525% sodium hypochlorite and 2% glutaraldehyde were used. Gypsum materials were subjected to further modification by adding a mixture of 1.0% gum arabic and 0.132% calcium hydroxide before mixing with the disinfectant solutions, at two different liquid/powder (L/P ratios for each. Both, the unmodified and the modified gypsum were tested for compressive and tensile strength after one hour and one week from the start of the mix. The crystalline configuration of the fracture fragments of the unmodified and modified set gypsum were studied under the scanning electron microscope. Results: The disinfectant solutions reduced the strength of both Type III and Type IV gypsum. Water showed higher-strength, which was followed by 0.525% sodium hypochlorite and 2% glutaraldehyde. The modified Type III and Type IV gypsum with reduced L/P ratio also showed strength values less than that of the control groups. Interpretation and Conclusion: Chemical disinfectants reduced the strength of gypsum when used as water substitutes. Gum Arabic and calcium hydroxide additives permitted lower L/P ratio, however, there was still excess water retained in the set gypsum that lowered the strength values of Type III and Type IV gypsum. Hence, further reduction of L/P ratio may increase the properties of the modified Type III and Type IV gypsum.

  8. Model and mechanism of erosion fracture of refractories at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrajtis, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    A calculational technique to evaluate the refractory erosion resistance is proposed. It is shown that under erosion fracture due to breaking off flow erosion plasters are formed which cover all the fractured surface. The proposed model and mechanism of erosion fracture and erosion plaster stability allow one to perform evaluation calculations of erosion characteristics of refractiories based on zirconium dioxide

  9. Analysis of cubic and orthorhombic C3A hydration in presence of gypsum and lime

    KAUST Repository

    Kirchheim, A. P.

    2009-02-26

    Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) have been used to study the microstructural changes and phase development that take place during the hydration of cubic (pure) and orthorhombic (Na-doped) tricalcium aluminate (C3A) and gypsum in the absence and presence of lime. The results demonstrate that important differences occur in the hydration of each C3A polymorph and gypsum when no lime is added; orthorhombic C3A reacts faster with gypsum than the cubic phase, forming longer ettringite needles; however, the presence of lime slows down the formation of ettringite in the orthorhombic sample. Additional rheometric tests showed the possible effects on the setting time in these cementitious mixes.

  10. STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF COMPOSITE MATERIAL BASED ON GYPSUM BINDER AND CARBON NANOTUBES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHUMAK Anastasia Gennadievna

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to carry out a number of studies in the area of nanomodi­fication of gypsum binder matrix and to investigate the influence of multilayer carbon nanotubes on the structure, physical and mechanical properties of obtained compos­ites. The study of the gypsum binders structure formation mechanisms with the use of nanoadditives makes it possible to control the production processes of gypsum materi­als and articles with the given set of properties. The main tasks of the binder nanomodification are: even distribution of carbon nanostructures over the whole volume of material and provision of stability for the nanodimensional modifier during production process of the construction composite.

  11. The effect of magnesium on partial sulphate removal from mine water as gypsum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolonen, Emma-Tuulia; Rämö, Jaakko; Lassi, Ulla

    2015-08-15

    The aim of this research was to investigate the effect of magnesium on the removal efficiency of sulphate as gypsum from mine water. The precipitation conditions were simulated with MINEQL + software and the simulation results were compared with the results from laboratory jar test experiments. Both the simulation and the laboratory results showed that magnesium in the mine water was maintaining sulphate in a soluble form as magnesium sulphate (MgSO4) at pH 9.6. Thus magnesium was preventing the removal of sulphate as gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O). However, change in the lime precipitation pH from 9.6 to 12.5 resulted in magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH)2) precipitation and improved sulphate removal. Additionally, magnesium hydroxide could act as seed crystals for gypsum precipitation or co-precipitate sulphate further enhancing the removal of sulphate from mine water. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Petroleum Sludge as gypsum replacement in cement plants: Its Impact on Cement Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benlamoudi, Ali; Kadir, Aeslina Abdul; Khodja, Mohamed

    2017-08-01

    Due to high cost of cement manufacturing and the huge amount of resources exhaustion, companies are trying to incorporate alternative raw materials or by-products into cement production so as to produce alternative sustainable cement. Petroleum sludge is a dangerous waste that poses serious imparts on soil and groundwater. Given that this sludge contains a high percentage of anhydrite (CaSO4), which is the main component of gypsum (CaSO4.2H2O), it may play the same gypsum role in strength development. In this research, a total replacement of gypsum (100%) has been substituted by petroleum sludge in cement production and has led to an increase of 28.8% in UCS values after 28 curing days. Nevertheless, the burning of this waste has emitted a considerable amount of carbon monoxide (CO) gas that needs to be carefully considered prior to use petroleum sludge within cement plants.

  13. Efficacy and tolerability of a new ibuprofen 200mg plaster in patients with acute sports-related traumatic blunt soft tissue injury/contusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predel, Hans-Georg; Giannetti, Bruno; Connolly, Mark P; Lewis, Fraser; Bhatt, Aomesh

    2018-01-01

    Ibuprofen is used for the treatment of non-serious pain. This study assessed the efficacy and safety of a new ibuprofen plaster for the treatment of pain associated with acute sports impact injuries/contusions. In this randomised, double-blind, multi-centre, placebo controlled, parallel group study, adults (n = 130; 18-58 years of age) diagnosed with acute sports-related blunt soft tissue injury/contusion were randomized to receive either ibuprofen 200 mg plaster or placebo plaster. Plasters were administered once daily for five consecutive days. The primary assessment was area under the visual analogue scale (VAS) of pain on movement (POM) over 0 to three days (VAS AUC 0-3d ). Other endpoints included algometry AUC from 0 to three days (AUC 0-3d ) and 0 to five days (AUC 0-5d ), to evaluate improvement of sensitivity at the injured site, and patient and investigator global assessment of efficacy. Safety was monitored throughout the study. The ibuprofen plaster resulted in superior reduction in AUC 0-3d compared with placebo; the Least Squares (LS) mean difference was 662.82 mm*h in favour of the ibuprofen 200mg plaster (P = 0.0011). The greater improvement in VAS AUC of POM was also observed after 12 h, 24 h, and five days of therapy. Tenderness also significantly improved with the ibuprofen plaster compared with placebo; LS mean difference in algometry/tenderness AUC 0-3d was 1.87 N/cm 2 *d and AUC 0-5d was 1.87 N/cm 2 *d (P values ≤0.0004). At all study timepoints, a greater percentage of patients and investigators rated the effectiveness of the ibuprofen 200 mg plaster as good/excellent than the placebo plaster. Treatment-emergent adverse events for the ibuprofen plaster were few (≤1.5%) and were mild in severity. The results of this study indicate 200 mg plaster is effective and safe for the treatment of pain due to acute sports-related traumatic blunt soft tissue injury/contusion in adults.

  14. The influence of the pore structure on the moisture transport in lime plaster-brick systems as studied by NMR

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nunes, Cristiana Lara; Pel, L.; Kunecký, Jiří; Slížková, Zuzana

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 142, July (2017), s. 395-409 ISSN 0950-0618 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219 Keywords : drying * moisture transport * NMR * pore water distribution * plaster * brick * lime * metakaolin * water-repellent * linseed oil Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage OBOR OECD: Materials engineering Impact factor: 3.169, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0950061817304543

  15. A controlled clinical study on the new topical dosage form of DHEP plasters in patients suffering from localized inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, M; Bahous, I

    1993-01-01

    In this clinical study the efficacy and the tolerability of a new topical formulation, DHEP plaster, have been evaluated. The plaster consists of an auto-adhesive medicated gauze pad of standard dimensions (10 x 15 cm) containing 180 mg DHEP. The reference drug was a well-known topical drug, diclofenac diethylammonium (DDA) emulgel at 1.16%. Treatments were applied to the affected area for 14 days: DHEP plaster b.i.d. and DDA emulgel q.i.d. A total of 190 patients, affected by various inflammatory diseases, participated in this clinical study. In both treatment groups (DHEP n = 96 patients, DDA n = 94 patients) a clear improvement in the disease and a rapid reduction in pain were observed. The statistical comparison between the two treatments showed a significant difference in favour of DHEP. However a comparison of the results, according to the different diagnoses, did not reveal any statistical significance. Both treatments were well tolerated, although five (DHEP n = 2, DDA n = 3) out of the 190 patients (2.6%) showed transient side effects (pruritus or erythema, both of light intensity).

  16. Gypsum addition to soils contaminated by red mud: implications for aluminium, arsenic, molybdenum and vanadium solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehoux, Alizée P; Lockwood, Cindy L; Mayes, William M; Stewart, Douglas I; Mortimer, Robert J G; Gruiz, Katalin; Burke, Ian T

    2013-10-01

    Red mud is highly alkaline (pH 13), saline and can contain elevated concentrations of several potentially toxic elements (e.g. Al, As, Mo and V). Release of up to 1 million m(3) of bauxite residue (red mud) suspension from the Ajka repository, western Hungary, caused large-scale contamination of downstream rivers and floodplains. There is now concern about the potential leaching of toxic metal(loid)s from the red mud as some have enhanced solubility at high pH. This study investigated the impact of red mud addition to three different Hungarian soils with respect to trace element solubility and soil geochemistry. The effectiveness of gypsum amendment for the rehabilitation of red mud-contaminated soils was also examined. Red mud addition to soils caused a pH increase, proportional to red mud addition, of up to 4 pH units (e.g. pH 7 → 11). Increasing red mud addition also led to significant increases in salinity, dissolved organic carbon and aqueous trace element concentrations. However, the response was highly soil specific and one of the soils tested buffered pH to around pH 8.5 even with the highest red mud loading tested (33 % w/w); experiments using this soil also had much lower aqueous Al, As and V concentrations. Gypsum addition to soil/red mud mixtures, even at relatively low concentrations (1 % w/w), was sufficient to buffer experimental pH to 7.5-8.5. This effect was attributed to the reaction of Ca(2+) supplied by the gypsum with OH(-) and carbonate from the red mud to precipitate calcite. The lowered pH enhanced trace element sorption and largely inhibited the release of Al, As and V. Mo concentrations, however, were largely unaffected by gypsum induced pH buffering due to the greater solubility of Mo (as molybdate) at circumneutral pH. Gypsum addition also leads to significantly higher porewater salinities, and column experiments demonstrated that this increase in total dissolved solids persisted even after 25 pore volume replacements. Gypsum

  17. Effective and Economic Offloading of Diabetic Foot Ulcers in India with the Bohler Iron Plaster Cast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikia, Priyanka; Hariharan, Rajalakshmi; Shankar, Nachiket; Gaur, Anil Kumar; Jose, Naveen Matthew

    2016-04-01

    Economic constraints are a major obstacle to the implementation of offloading casts in India. The aim of this study is to monitor the healing and activity limitations related to Bohler iron plaster cast (BIPC) when used for offloading diabetic neuropathic plantar foot ulcers. Thirty patients were cast for 1 month and evaluated for healing using the Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH), and for activity limitation using the Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS). The change in the scores after intervention was the outcome measure. There was good healing as evidenced by a statistical difference in mean PUSH scores. The baseline PUSH score of 9.76-0.41 (T1-SEM) was greater than follow-up PUSH score of 6.32 + 0.41 (T2 + SEM) and the p value <0.0001. Improvement was seen in ulcer area, exudate, and tissue type. There was no mobility effect as there was no significant difference in LEFS. Significant negative correlation was there between PUSH and LEFS. The r value was less than -0.7 both at baseline and after intervention. The combined benefits of good healing, lack of affect on lower extremity function, the ease of application and dressing, and relative affordability make BIPC a commendable offloading modality for the management of diabetic plantar ulcers.

  18. Plaster mortars with polymer fibers and additives investigated by 1H NMR relaxometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustea, Andrei; Manea, Daniela L.; Jumate, Elena; Orbán, Yvette A.; Fechete, Radu

    2017-12-01

    Plaster mortars with polypropylene (pp) fibers and/or additives were investigated by 1H NMR relaxometry. Two recipes are proposed and are based on a commercially available mortar or are self-prepared and have different content of polypropylene fibers, which play the role of reinforcement agent, and/or Sika additive which is a waterproofing agent. The distributions of transverse relaxation times, T2 were obtained at 1, 3, 7 and 28 days after preparation. For the majority of T2-distributions four peaks are observed and, are associated with the hydration water (to the mineralogical components) and water in small, medium and large pores. The evolution in time, from 1 to 28 days, of the T2-distributions indicates the effects of pp fibers and Sika additive in the formation of pore microstructure. The degree of homogeneity of prepared receipts was evaluated from the relative peak-width and compared with mechanical measurements. Finally, we shown that the inverse of the transverse relaxation time values, T2-1, characteristic to the hydration water depends linearly on the resistance at compression measured for the 1÷28 days period, proving the important role of hydrations to the mechanical properties of the final product.

  19. A Photodegradation Study of Three Common Paint and Plaster Biocides under monochromatic UV Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minelgaite, Greta; Vollertsen, Jes; Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning

    2014-01-01

    Photodegradation of the three common paint-and-plaster biocides (carbendazim, diuron and terbutryn) was investigated at controlled laboratory conditions. Samples prepared in two types of water (demineralized water and pond water) were subjected to 254 nm monochromatic UV light. Light intensity (W m...... results demonstrated that diuron and terbutryn were readily degradable at the tested conditions, while carbendazim remained stable throughout the 28 – 34 hours of the experiments. Photodegradation rate constants of diuron and terbutryn were found to be slightly higher in demineralized water (0.0183 – 0.......0227 m2 kJ-1 and 0.0279 – 0.0341 m2 kJ-1 for diuron and terbutryn, respectively) compared with pond water (0.0152 – 0.02 m2 kJ-1 and 0.0233 – 0.0283 m2 kJ-1 for diuron and terbutryn, respectively). The findings of this study demonstrate the general photodegradation tendencies of the three biocides...

  20. Trichobezoar, Rapunzel Syndrome, Tricho-Plaster Bezoar – A Report of Three Cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czerwińska, Katarzyna; Bekiesińska-Figatowska, Monika; Brzewski, Michał; Gogolewski, Michał; Wolski, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Trichobezoar is an uncommon entity observed mostly in young women. Symptoms in presenting patients are usually due to the large mass of the bezoar or malabsorption of nutrients. Trichobezoar is almost always associated with trichotillomania and trichophagia. Three teenage girls, aged 13, 15, and 16, were diagnosed due to palpable epigastric masses. Additionally the oldest patient presented with symptoms of ileus while the other two patients had weight loss and anaemia. Besides the 15-year-old patient complained of paroxysmal abdominal pains. Patients were subjected to plain radiographic examinations of abdomen which revealed large epigastric tumours, with additional calcifications observed in the youngest girl. Subsequent gastroscopy (the 15-year-old patient) or ultrasonographic examination and computed tomography scans (13- and 16-year-old patients) allowed to establish the diagnosis of giant bezoars: trichobezoars in two older patients and tricho-plaster bezoar in the youngest one. All the tumours were surgically resected and psychiatric treatment was undertaken. 1. Trichobezoar should be taken into consideration in differential diagnosis of epigastric tumours in children, especially teenage girls. 2. The conventional ultrasonographic and radiographic examinations of the abdomen are insufficient for determination of the nature of the mass. A thorough medical history interview and clinical examination may give directions regarding the further diagnosis.3. Trichotillomania and trichophagia are obsessive-compulsive disorders, and therefore patients with trichobezoars should be under psychiatric care to prevent recurrence of the disease

  1. Pain in the room of plasters of the traumatology emergency unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inmaculada Aponte Tomillo

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In the emergency department the pain is the symptom more frequent than they undergo the patients, the presence of this one is considered like a useless and unnecessary suffering since it can get to control itself by means of the drug administration. The objective of this study is to know the existence and intensity the pain and if analgesia is administered in the traumatology emergency unit. It has been realised by means of a questionnaire in that picks up the variables: sex, age, diagnosis, pain and administration of analgesia. With respect to the result it exists 39,4% of fractures of radio, followed of 24,2% of fracture of metacarpianos. The pain in the room of plasters: Visual scale Analogical EVA (10 the 15,2% and EVA (7 the 21,2% of the patients. As far as the administration of analgesia to the 59,1% of the patients no was administered to him. In conclusion, the intensity of the pain that undergoes our patients during the manipulation of the fractures is because a percentage very lifted is reduced and immobilized without analgesia administration. This high prevalence of the pain puts in prohibition the welfare quality.

  2. Gypsum and organic matter distribution in a mixed construction and demolition waste sorting process and their possible removal from outputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, A; Tojo, Y; Matsuo, T; Matsuto, T; Yamada, M; Asakura, H; Ono, Y

    2010-03-15

    With insufficient source separation, construction and demolition (C&D) waste becomes a mixed material that is difficult to recycle. Treatment of mixed C&D waste generates residue that contains gypsum and organic matter and poses a risk of H(2)S formation in landfills. Therefore, removing gypsum and organic matter from the residue is vital. This study investigated the distribution of gypsum and organic matter in a sorting process. Heavy liquid separation was used to determine the density ranges in which gypsum and organic matter were most concentrated. The fine residue that was separated before shredding accounted for 27.9% of the waste mass and contained the greatest quantity of gypsum; therefore, most of the gypsum (52.4%) was distributed in this fraction. When this fine fraction was subjected to heavy liquid separation, 93% of the gypsum was concentrated in the density range of 1.59-2.28, which contained 24% of the total waste mass. Therefore, removing this density range after segregating fine particles should reduce the amount of gypsum sent to landfills. Organic matter tends to float as density increases; nevertheless, separation at 1.0 density could be more efficient. (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of Synthetic Gypsum Recovered via Wet Flue-Gas Desulfurization from Electric Power Plants for Use in Foundries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Biernacki

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates possible use of waste gypsum (synthetic, recovered via flue-gas desulfurization from coal-fired electric powerplants, in foundries. Energy sector, which in Eastern Europe is mostly composed from coal-fired electric power plants, is one of the largestproducers of sulfur dioxide (SO2.In order to protect the environment and reduce the amount of pollution flue-gas desulfurization (FGD is used to remove SO2 fromexhaust flue gases of fossil-fuel power plants. As a result of this process gypsum waste is produced that can be used in practicalapplications.Strength and permeability tests have been made and also in-depth analysis of energy consumption of production process to investigateways of preparing the synthetic gypsum for casting moulds application. This paper also assesses the chemical composition, strength andpermeability of moulds made with synthetic gypsum, in comparison with moulds made with traditional GoldStar XL gypsum and withceramic molds. Moreover examination of structure of synthetic gypsum, the investigations on derivatograph and calculations of energyconsumption during production process of synthetic gypsum in wet flue-gas desulfurization were made.After analysis of gathered data it’s possible to conclude that synthetic gypsum can be used as a material for casting mould. There is nosignificant decrease in key properties, and on the other hand there is many additional benefits including low energy consumption,decreased cost, and decreased environmental impact.

  4. Biosignatures in modern sulfates: texture, composition and depositional environments of gypsum deposits at Guerrero Negro, Baja, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, M. B.; Des Marais, D. J.; Jahnke, L. L.; Turk, K.; Kubo, M.

    2007-12-01

    Gypsum (CaSO4·H2O) is an important phase in biogeochemistry and sedimentology as a mineral sink for sulfur, a paleoclimatic indicator, and an endolithic niche for phototrophic and chemotrophic bacteria. Sulfate deposits are also important targets of exploration for evidence of habitable environments and life on Mars. Gypsum deposits from a range of sedimentary environments at the Guerrero Negro crystallizer ponds and sabkha settings were investigated for microscale structure and composition to differentiate fabrics formed under microbial influence from those formed under abiogenic conditions. Sub-sedimentary gypsum forms in sabkha environments as mm to cm scale selenite discs (termed bird beak gypsum; Warren, 2006) and selenite disc aggregates. Selenite discs and other sub-sedimentary gypsum are characterized by a sinuous axial microtexture and poikilitically enclosed detrital particles. Sub-aqueous gypsum forms as cements, granules (termed gypsooids), and massive botryoidal crusts that line the sediment water interface and margins of managed crystallizer ponds and natural anchialine pools. Sub-aqueous gypsum exhibits a wide range of textures and mineral/biofilm associations that include amorphous to euhedral, tabular, needle and lensoidal morphologies. Elemental sulfur forms rinds on prismatic, growth aligned gypsum twins and reticulate magnesian carbonate is interspersed with both twinned crystals and rosette aggregates in stratified sub-aqueous environments. Intracrystalline biofilms and cell material was observed in association with nearly all sub-aqueous morphologies but only scarce evidence has been found for intercrystalline microbial communities. Columnar microbial communities living in anchialine pools were found to host precipitation of mm scale gypsum granules in their EPS matrix. Fine scale gypsum textures are unlikely to persist through diagenetic alteration, but understanding their primary associations with sulfur and carbonates is necessary for

  5. The effect of carbonates and gypsum precipitation in the root zone on the chemical composition of groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilberbrand, Michael

    1995-09-01

    Dissolution of a solid phase in the unsaturated zone is usually assumed to be the main factor transforming the composition of atmospheric water to that of groundwater. However, the opposite mechanism, namely a precipitation of insoluble and slightly soluble salts from rain water penetrating the root zone, may predominate, especially in arid regions. Field study of pore fluids in the unsaturated zone was carried out in the southern Ukraine, where the climate is temperate continental. Pore fluid samples were taken from soils and loessial loams at different depths in boreholes of about 1 m diameter with insulated walls. The bore-holes were drilled to groundwater levels situated in loess loams at depths of 10-24 m. The sampling was performed using vacuum lysimeters. In the upper 0.5-2.5 m well-washed layer the infiltrating water composition changed from a HCO 3SO 4Ca type water to a SO 4Na type, the latter corresponding to groundwater composition. The root zone acts as a geochemical barrier which retains the calcium predominating in rain and irrigation water, owing to calcite and gypsum precipitation. This precipitation is accompanied by HCO 3 and SO 4 removal from the pore fluids and by an increase in the total dissolved solids (TDS) as a result of evapotranspiration. The observed profiles of calcium concentration in pore fluids, the manifestations of alkalization and the calcite accumulation are explained by the precipitating action of the root zone. Similar patterns were found in loess-covered arid regions of southern Israel (the Negev) on the basis of reported data on the composition of rain water, saturated soil extracts and the phreatic groundwater in sediments of the Avedat Group. A simple steady-state model of the transformation of rainwater composition to groundwater composition was developed and applied. It is based on the exclusion of CaMg carbonates and gypsum from rain water. Annual precipitation rates (6-13 g m -2 year -1) and the composition

  6. Gypsum-carbonate speleothems from Cueva de las Espadas (Naica mine, Mexico: mineralogy and palaeohydrogeological implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Frías Jesús

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Some of the most outstanding hypogenic gypsum speleothems worldwide have been recently discovered in the Naica mines. The Cueva de las Espadas (Swords Cave, which lies at 120 m depth, hosts a rare type of speleothem called “espada” (“sword”. This study contributes to the understanding of the mineralogical composition of these singular speleothems, by means of their examination using micro-Raman spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy and EDX microprobe. Our data revealed a complex mineralogy comprising a high-purity selenite core covered by several layers of calcite, aragonite and gypsum. Solid inclusions of polymetallic oxides (Mn-Pb-Zn and graphite were also detected. The position of the water table during the genesis of the “espada” speleothems (over the past 60 kyr was deduced from their mineralogy. Water level fluctuations at around -120 m depth led to environmental changes within the Cueva de las Espadas. The selenite core and gypsum layers were precipitated under biphasic (water-rock conditions when the cave was submerged under hydrothermal water. The aragonite precipitation required triphasic (air-water-rock conditions and occurred when the water table intercepted the cave, allowing the CO2 exchange necessary for carbonate precipitation. Solid inclusions were trapped in an aerobic environment when the gypsum-aragonite boundary condition occurred. A thin calcite layer was precipitated under vadose conditions after the water table definitively moved out of the cave.

  7. Use of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Gypsum as a Heavy Metal Stabilizer in Contaminated Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) gypsum is a synthetic by-product generated from the flue gas desulfurization process in coal power plants. It has several beneficial applications such as an ingredient in cement production, wallboard production and in agricultural practice as a soil...

  8. Morphology and stability of aggregates of an Oxisol according to tillage system and gypsum application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Régis de Souza

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Morphological characterization and aggregate stability is an important factor in evaluating management systems. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the stability and morphology of the aggregates of a dystrophic Oxisol managed with no-tillage and conventional tillage with and without the residual action of gypsum. The experimental design was randomized blocks arranged in split-split plot, where the treatments were two soil management systems (plots with 0 and 2000 kg ha-1 of gypsum (subplots and five depths (0-0.05, 0.05-0.10, 0.10-0.15, 0.15-0.20 and 0.20-0.30 m as the subsubplots, with four replications. The aggregate morphology was determined through images and later evaluated by the Quantporo software. Stability was determined by the wet method. The results showed that the no-tillage system, with or without gypsum residual effect, provided the aggregates with the largest geometric diameters. The combination of no-tillage system and the gypsum residual effect provided rougher aggregates.

  9. Results using flue gas desulfurization gypsum in soilless substrates for greenhouse crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent availability of Flue Gas Desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) has led to interested in its possible use in horticulture greenhouse production. Three studies were conducted to determine the effects of increasing rates of FGDG on six greenhouse crops. In the first study, substrates (6:1 pine bark:san...

  10. LCA of Recycling Options for Gypsum from Construction and Demolition Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butera, Stefania; Møller, Jacob; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    Large amounts of gypsum waste are annually produced from the construction and demolition sector. Its landfilling is becoming more and more expensive due to stricter EU regulations, while its recycling together with the rest of construction and demolition waste might be hampered due to technical...

  11. Comparison of gypsum and potassium silicate for reclamation of saline sodic soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahra, N.; Sarwar, G.; Muhammad, S.

    2015-01-01

    Relative efficiency of gypsum, potassium silicate and their combinations at different levels for reclamation of saline sodic soil was tested. Treatments were replicated thrice. All pots were arranged according to completely randomized design and treatments were applied to the soil according to treatment plan. Appropriate time was given to achieve the reclamation of saline sodic soil and relative efficiency was assessed through laboratory analysis. After this, rice seedling (Shaheen Basmati) was transplanted in all the pots i.e., 3 plants per pot. Necessary N, P and K fertilizers were applied at the recommended rate. After crop harvest, soil samples were taken for analysis of pH, electrical conductivity (EC), sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) and exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP) of soil. All the amendments when used alone or in combination with each other improved the chemical parameters of soil. All levels of gypsum (100%, 75% and 50% G.R) proved effective in lowering pH, EC, SAR and ESP of saline sodic soil. Similar trend was observed with the use of all levels of potassium -1 silicate (225, 150 and 75mg per kg soil) of soil. Combinations of gypsum and potassium silicate also remained better in this regard. The most effective treatment was application of the full required rate of gypsum. (author)

  12. Microbial Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Stachybotrys chartarum growing on Gypsum Wallboard and Ceiling tile

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study compared seven toxigenic strains of S. chartarum found in water-damaged buildings to characterize the microbial volatile organic compound (MVOC) emissions profile while growing on gypsum wallboard (W) and ceiling tile (C) coupons. The inoculated coupons with their sub...

  13. The Thermal Damage Properties of Mudstone, Gypsum and Rock Salt from Yingcheng, Hubei, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Chen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The impacts of temperature on the surface thermal damage of rock salt, gypsum and mudstone from the Yingcheng salt mine, China were investigated by the surface crack growth and propagation tests at different temperatures. We found that: (a high temperature could strengthen the rock salt molecular thermal motion and weaken the cohesion among the rock salt grains, so that the grain boundaries were more prone to slip and thus develop into cracks; (b high temperature could make the water molecules evaporate from rock specimens, which should change the physical properties of gypsum and mudstone; and (c high temperature had a significant effect on the interface between rock salt and gypsum and mudstone, therefore it should be easy to produce cracks with white or light yellow cumulate powder here. The surface crack growth and propagation of the rock salt, gypsum and mudstone have a positive correlation with the temperature by stereo microscope and the method of binary images, which could observe the surface thermal damage properties. Finally, the fractal dimension of the rock salt surface cracks was calculated based on fractal theory, and the evolution of the surface thermal damage was found from 50 to 260 °C.

  14. Responses to Environmental Stress in Plants Adapted to Mediterranean Gypsum Habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep V. LLINARES

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Gypsum areas are stressful environments inhabited by gypsophytes, plants that are exclusive for such habitats, and by plants that grow on gypsum but also on other soil types, the so-called gypsovags. To investigate possible differences between gypsovags and gypsophytes with respect to basic stress response mechanisms, two common osmolytes, glycine betaine and total soluble sugars, as well as monovalent (Na+ and K+ and bivalent (Ca2+ and Mg2+ cations, were quantified, under field conditions, in two Iberian endemic gypsophytes (Gypsophila struthium subsp. hispanica and Ononis tridentata and two common Mediterranean gypsovags (Rosmarinus officinalis and Helianthemum syriacum. Their spatial variation according to a topographic gradient and their temporal variation over a period of three successive seasons were correlated with climatic data and soil characteristics. This analysis confirmed that water stress is the main environmental stress factor in gypsum habitats, whereas the percentage of gypsum in the soil does not seem to play any relevant role in the activation of stress responses in plants. Glycine betaine may contribute to stress tolerance in the gypsophytes, but not in the gypsovags, according to the close correlation found between the level of this osmolyte and the gypsophily of the investigated taxa. Cation contents in the plants did not correlate with those present in the soil, but the gypsophytes have higher levels of Ca2+ and Mg2+ than the gypsovags, under all environmental conditions, which may represent an adaptation mechanism to their specific habitat.

  15. Composition of gypsum from the Koběřice quarry (Czech Republic)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Konečný, Pavel; Plevová, Eva; Vaculíková, Lenka; Kožušníková, Alena; Peterková, J.; Hundáková, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 2 (2011), s. 145-156 ISSN 1214-9705 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : gypsum * Kobeřice quarry * spectroscopy Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 0.530, year: 2011 http://www.irsm.cas.cz/abstracts/AGG/02_11/5_Konecny.pdf

  16. Characterization of gypsum crystals exposed to a high CO2 concentration fog using x-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carreño-Márquez, I. J. A.; Castillo-Sandoval, I.; Esparza-Ponce, H. E.; Fuentes-Cobas, L.; Montero-Cabrera, M. E.

    2015-01-01

    In Chihuahua State, a little town called Naica has the largest gypsum single crystals in the world. The growth of these structures has been described as a long and stable process developed over thousands of years. Due to the change in the environmental conditions, these crystals could suffer alterations on their surface. In this project we study the cause of possible deterioration of the giant crystals and intend to suggest measures for their preservation. For this sake, our first experiment consists on several gypsum crystals that have been subjected in a climate chamber to a fog at high CO 2 concentration and 51 °C for a period of time of six months, extracting two crystals every 15 days. Then the crystals have been characterized through Grazing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction using a diffractometer PanAlytical X’PertPro with two different detectors; Xe-filled proportional detector and a Pixel 3D detector. The results were compared to determine which technique is the most suitable to study the degradation of gypsum single crystals. In the two cases, we have identified only the gypsum phase, but with different crystal plane orientations

  17. Assessment of Mercury in Soils, Crops, Earthworms, and Water when Soil is Treated with Gypsum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum from fossil fuel combustion has many potential uses in agriculture, but there is concern about the potential environmental effects of its elevated mercury (Hg) concentration. The wet limestone scrubbing process that removes sulfur from flue gas (and produces gyp...

  18. Multi-technique investigation of Roman decorated plasters from Villa dei Quintili (Rome, Italy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crupi, Vincenza, E-mail: vcrupi@unime.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e di Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Messina, Viale Ferdinando Stagno d’Alcontres 31, 98166 Messina (Italy); Galli, Giuliana [Soprintendenza Speciale per i Beni Archeologici di Roma, Villa dei Quintili, via Appia Nuova 1092, 00197 Roma (Italy); La Russa, Mauro Francesco [Dipartimento di Biologia, Ecologia e Scienze della Terra (DiBEST), Università degli Studi della Calabria, Via Pietro Bucci, 87036 Arcavacata di Rende (Cs) (Italy); Longo, Francesca; Maisano, Giacomo; Majolino, Domenico [Dipartimento di Fisica e di Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Messina, Viale Ferdinando Stagno d’Alcontres 31, 98166 Messina (Italy); Malagodi, Marco [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università di Pavia, Via Taramelli 12, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Pezzino, Antonino [Dipartimento di Scienze Biologiche, Geologiche e Ambientali—Sezione di Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Catania, Corso Italia 57, 95129 Catania (Italy); Ricca, Michela [Dipartimento di Biologia, Ecologia e Scienze della Terra (DiBEST), Università degli Studi della Calabria, Via Pietro Bucci, 87036 Arcavacata di Rende (Cs) (Italy); Rossi, Barbara [Elettra – Sincrotrone Trieste, Strada Statale 14 km 163.5, Area Science 70 Park, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Trento, via Sommarive 14, 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); Ruffolo, Silvestro Antonio [Dipartimento di Biologia, Ecologia e Scienze della Terra (DiBEST), Università degli Studi della Calabria, Via Pietro Bucci, 87036 Arcavacata di Rende (Cs) (Italy); and others

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • A multi-technique non-invasive approach using portable instrumentation is proposed. • Due to the use of different techniques, pigments of same color were distinguished. • The experimental results shed light on the used painting methodologies. • The experimental results provided useful information for restoration processes. • This work is the first study of coloring matter used in Villa dei Quintili. - Abstract: In the present study, we investigated by the joint use of portable instrumentations, namely a handheld X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyser and a portable Raman spectrometer, the painted surface of plasters withdrawn from different areas of an important Roman monumental complex, known as Villa dei Quintili (Rome, Italy), dated back to the first half of the 2nd century a.C. XRF and Raman measurements contributed to the identification of the pigments through the elemental and molecular composition, respectively. In particular, the multi-technique non-invasive approach proved to be crucial for distinguishing two different reddish pigments. In order to confirm and integrate XRF and Raman results, two micro-destructive laboratory methods, namely optical microscopy (OM) and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDS), were also employed on the same samples. All the experimental results shed light on the material characterizing the painted surface layer and the painting methodologies, providing in principle useful information for proper restoration processes. It is worth underlining that this experimental investigation takes part of a recent multidisciplinary study performed on this impressive archaeological site, aimed to characterize for the first time the monumental complex from an archaeometric point of view.

  19. Investigation on the Permeability Evolution of Gypsum Interlayer Under High Temperature and Triaxial Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Meng; Yechao, You; Jie, Chen; Yaoqing, Hu

    2017-08-01

    The permeability of the surrounding rock is a critical parameter for the designing and assessment of radioactive waste disposal repositories in the rock salt. Generally, in the locations that are chosen for radioactive waste storage, the bedded rock salt is a sedimentary rock that contains NaCl and Na2SO4. Most likely, there are also layers of gypsum ( {CaSO}_{ 4} \\cdot 2 {H}_{ 2} {O)} present in the salt deposit. Radioactive wastes emit a large amount of heat and hydrogen during the process of disposal, which may result in thermal damage of the surrounding rocks and cause a great change in their permeability and tightness. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the permeability evolution of the gypsum interlayer under high temperature and high pressure in order to evaluate the tightness and security of the nuclear waste repositories in bedded rock salt. In this study, a self-designed rock triaxial testing system by which high temperature and pressure can be applied is used; the μCT225kVFCB micro-CT system is also employed to investigate the permeability and microstructure of gypsum specimens under a constant hydrostatic pressure of 25 MPa, an increasing temperature (ranging from 20 to 650 °C), and a variable inlet gas pressure (1, 2, 4, 6 MPa). The experimental results show: (a) the maximum permeability measured during the whole experiment is less than 10-17 m2, which indicates that the gypsum interlayer has low permeability under high temperature and pressure that meet the requirements for radioactive waste repository. (b) Under the same temperature, the permeability of the gypsum specimen decreases at the beginning and then increases as the pore pressure elevates. When the inlet gas pressure is between 0 and 2 MPa, the Klinkenberg effect is very pronounced. Then, as the pore pressure increases, the movement behavior of gas molecules gradually changes from free motion to forced directional motion. So the role of free movement of gas molecules gradually

  20. Efficacy and Safety of Calcipotriol Plus Betamethasone Dipropionate Aerosol Foam Compared with Betamethasone 17-Valerate-Medicated Plaster for the Treatment of Psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queille-Roussel, Catherine; Rosen, Monika; Clonier, Fabrice; Nørremark, Kasper; Lacour, Jean-Philippe

    2017-04-01

    Fixed combination calcipotriol as hydrate (Cal) 50 µg/g plus betamethasone as dipropionate (BD) 0.5 mg/g aerosol foam is an alcohol-free treatment for psoriasis. Betamethasone 17-valerate 2.25 mg (BV)-medicated plasters are recommended for treating psoriasis plaques localized in difficult-to-treat (DTT; elbow, knee, anterior face of the tibia) areas. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of Cal/BD foam with BV-medicated plaster in patients with plaque psoriasis. In this phase IIa, randomized, single-center, investigator-blinded, 4-week study, both Cal/BD foam and BV-medicated plaster were applied once daily to six test sites (three for each treatment). The primary efficacy endpoint was absolute change in total clinical score (TCS; sum of erythema, scaling, and infiltration); secondary endpoints were changes from baseline in each individual clinical score, ultrasonographic changes (total skin and echo-poor band thickness), and safety; and post hoc analysis was change from baseline in TCS on DTT areas. Thirty-five patients were included. Least-squares mean change in TCS from baseline was significantly greater for Cal/BD foam (-5.8) than BV-medicated plaster (-3.7; difference -2.2; 95% confidence interval -2.6 to -1.8; p foam were observed from day 8 for each clinical sign. Absolute total skin and echo-poor band thickness change was significantly greater for Cal/BD foam than for BV-medicated plaster (both p foam was significantly more effective than BV-medicated plaster on DTT areas after 4 weeks (p foam demonstrated superior efficacy versus BV-medicated plasters, including on DTT areas, in patients with plaque psoriasis. NCT02518048.

  1. Effect of temperature and concentration principle on gypsum scaling in desalination units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Ahmed, Samia; Tlili, Mohamed; Ben Amor, Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    Tunisia (North Africa) is currently confronted to the crucial problem of the public, agricultural and industrial feed water supply, in particular in the center and south areas. Production of fresh water by seawater and brackish water desalination has proved to be an alternative for these regions. However, all the desalination processes are based on the concentration principle of waters already presented higher salinity. So, scale problem can occurs by the accumulation of minerals such as CaCO 3 and CaSO 4 . These salts form hard and strongly adhering deposits on the surfaces and their formation is favoured by the decrease of their solubility with increasing temperature. The main object of this investigation is the study and the control of calcium sulphate deposition causes and conditions in the thermal desalination plant. For this purpose, the effect of different water temperatures (30-90 degree) and saturation states (3-10), on homogeneous nucleation and growth of gypsum, variety usually met, was examined. Gypsum was precipitated by mixing aqueous CaCl 2 and Na 2 SO 4 solutions. It was found that, with increasing temperature or supersaturation, the induction time decreases and the growth rate increases. At the same saturation state, the effect of temperature on reducing induction time is more significant for T<50 degree whereas the growth rate of gypsum crystals is more influenced when the temperature exceeds 50 degree. This value can be considered as a critical temperature; once reached the gypsum scaling threat becomes serious. By using classical nucleation theory, the interfacial tension and the nucleation rate values were estimated. It was shown that the interfacial tension is, as well, temperature dependent. The calculation of nucleation rate showed that: i) by increasing temperature, the number of formed nuclei does not change. The effect of this parameter is limited at the kinetic of formation and growth of these nuclei, ii) the water concentration

  2. IMPACT OF NANOMODIFIERS ON MECHANICAL AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF GYPSUM BINDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DEREVIANKO V. N.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Problem statement. In the next 10 years, more than 90% of materials will be replaced with new materials – nanocomposites [1]. The nanocomponents application will allow manufacture of high-strength materials with reduced production cost and will ensure demand for products [2]. Researches aimed to determination of carbon nanotube type nanomodifier concentration impact on the physical and mechanical properties of gypsum binders are important today and must result in creation of competitive strong nano-materials. Purpose. Research of carbon nanotube (CNT type nanomodifier concentration impact on the physical and mechanical properties of gypsum binders. Conclusion. Sample microstructure analysis revealed that the non-modified gypsum sample structure is dominated by prismatic and lamellar crystals randomly distributed throughout the matrix volume. In this case, loose structure with increased porosity is formed, which results in sample mechanical strength reduction. In the CNT-modified gypsum matrix, well-ordered and homogeneous structure is formed with larger needle-shaped crystals, which results in the phase-contacting area increase, porosity reduction and thus the physical and mechanical characteristics improvement. It is experimentally proved that at the identical nano-modifier content in the gypsum matrix (0.035 %, maximum compression strength gain is achieved with the use of CNT and makes 28- 30%. At the use of initial carbon nanotubes, increase in strength at the same nano-modifier content makes 13-15%. The Ca2+ ions interaction with the graphene-like carbon surface was investigated by the DFT method. Capability is demonstrated of the covalent calcium bonding with the hexagonal carbon surface cell as a result of overlap of Ca2+ valence 3p orbitals and carbon 2р orbitals.

  3. Accuracy and reproducibility of 3D digital tooth preparations made by gypsum materials of various colors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Fa-Bing; Wang, Chao; Dai, Hong-Wei; Fan, Yu-Bo; Song, Jin-Lin

    2018-02-01

    The study aimed to identify the accuracy and reproducibility of preparations made by gypsum materials of various colors using quantitative and semi-quantitative three-dimensional (3D) approach. A titanium maxillary first molar preparation was created as reference dataset (REF). Silicone impressions were duplicated from REF and randomized into 6 groups (n=8). Gypsum preparations were formed and grouped according to the color of gypsum materials, and light-scanned to obtain prepared datasets (PRE). Then, in terms of accuracy, PRE were superimposed on REF using the best-fit-algorithm and PRE underwent intragroup pairwise best-fit alignment for assessing reproducibility. Root mean square deviation (RMSD) and degrees of similarity (DS) were computed and analyzed with SPSS 20.0 statistical software (α=.05). In terms of accuracy, PREs in 3D directions were increased in the 6 color groups (from 19.38 to 20.88 µm), of which the marginal and internal variations ranged 51.36 - 58.26 µm and 18.33 - 20.04 µm, respectively. On the other hand, RMSD value and DS-scores did not show significant differences among groups. Regarding reproducibility, both RMSD and DS-scores showed statistically significant differences among groups, while RMSD values of the 6 color groups were less than 5 µm, of which blue color group was the smallest (3.27 ± 0.24 µm) and white color group was the largest (4.24 ± 0.36 µm). These results were consistent with the DS data. The 3D volume of the PREs was predisposed towards an increase during digitalization, which was unaffected by gypsum color. Furthermore, the reproducibility of digitalizing scanning differed negligibly among different gypsum colors, especially in comparison to clinically observed discrepancies.

  4. Study of mixed mode fracture toughness and fracture trajectories in gypsum interlayers in corrosive environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiankai, Bao; Jinchang, Zhao

    2018-01-01

    Based on the engineering background of water dissolving mining for hydrocarbon storage in multi-laminated salt stratum, the mixed mode fracture toughness and fracture trajectory of gypsum interlayers soaked in half-saturated brine at various temperatures (20°C, 50°C and 80°C) were studied by using CSNBD (centrally straight-notched Brazilian disc) specimens with required inclination angles (0°, 7°, 15°, 22°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 75°, 90°) and SEM (scanning electron microscopy). The results showed: (i) The fracture load of gypsum specimens first decreased then increased with increasing inclination angle, due to the effect of friction coefficient. When soaked in brine, the fracture toughness of gypsum specimens gradually decreased with increasing brine temperature. (ii) When soaked in brine, the crystal boundaries of gypsum separated and became clearer, and the boundaries became more open between the crystals with increasing brine temperature. Besides, tensile micro-cracks appeared on the gypsum crystals when soaked in 50°C brine, and the intensity of tensile cracks became more severe when soaking in 80°C brine. (iii) The experimental fracture envelopes derived from the conventional fracture criteria and lay outside these conventional criteria. The experimental fracture envelopes were dependent on the brine temperature and gradually expanded outward as brine temperature increases. (iv) The size of FPZ (fracture process zone) was greatly dependent on the damage degree of materials and gradually increased with increase of brine temperature. The study has important implication for the control of shape and size of salt cavern. PMID:29410841

  5. Arsenic Removal By Gypsum and Calcite: The Continuum Between Soption and Solid Solution Precipitation Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, G. Roman; Charlet, L.; Cuello, G.

    The sorption of As onto mineral surface, via the precipitation of Ca3(AsO4)2, controls the As solubility in industrial and mining sites. In spite of the progress in environmental chemistry, there is little data on As sorption reactions in calcite and gypsum and on the precipitation/dissolution of Ca3(AsO4)2. Recent studies have reported that As (III) can be adsorbed by the calcite and As(V) by the gypsum. In order to determine the kinetic reactions developed during the As (III, V) uptake by calcite and gypsum from aqueous solutions, we have performed adsorption isotherm and neutron diffraction experiments. The influence of pH and CO2(g) concentration was also tested. Our results show a continuum between adsorption and the formation of solid solutions Ca(SO4,HAsO4) and Ca(CO3, HAsO3 ). Higher As adsorption was registered for both, calcite and gypsum at increasing CO2(g) levels in aqueous solutions and pH conditions between 7 and 10. The study of the interaction of different arsenic compounds with geological materials is of regional relevance concerning both environmental and health aspects. Immobilisation of arsenic in presence of gypsum (CaSO4 .2H2O) and calcite (CaCO3) should be undertaken to remove arsenic in calcium rich sites if their long-term stability is assessed. Understanding the behavior of the different compounds of As is necessary to estimate and predict possible consequences to forecasted or accidental events and to propose remediation actions at the concerned sites.

  6. Gypsum and Legume Residue as a Strategy to Improve Soil Conditions in Sustainability of Agrosystems of the Humid Tropics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanoel Gomes de Moura

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Gypsum combined with leguminous residue may extend rootability and improve growth and maize grain yield. The aim of this study was to evaluate the combined effects of gypsum and leguminous residue on soil rootability in the root zone and on maize grain yield in a cohesive tropical soil. We used seven treatments: (i control; (ii urea; (iii leguminous; (iv 6 t/ha of gypsum with leguminous or (v with urea or (vi with both; and (vii 12 t/ha of gypsum with urea and leguminous. Gypsum was applied in January 2010 and soil samples were analyzed in 2012–2015. Maize was sown in 2011–2013 and 2015, when maize yield was determined. Soil penetration strength and the analysis of plant tissue was performed in 2015. The leaf area index, nitrogen accumulation amount, total N concentration and amount of N remobilization were also determined in 2015. Gypsum with leguminous residue modified the root zone by increasing calcium and organic matter levels and by reducing soil penetration strength. The leaf area index and the remobilization of nitrogen to grains increased, due to greater uptake before and after tasseling. The gypsum and leguminous residue combination is a more suitable strategy to improve agrosystems in cohesive soils of the humid tropics.

  7. Soil fertility, nutrition and yield of maize and barley with gypsum application on soil surface in no-till

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Michalovicz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Annual crop yield and nutrition have shown differentiated responses to modifications in soil chemical properties brought about by gypsum application. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of gypsum application rates on the chemical properties of a Latossolo Bruno (Clayey Oxisol, as well as on the nutrition and yield of a maize-barley succession under no-till. The experiment was set up in November 2009 in Guarapuava, Parana, Brazil, applying gypsum rates of 0.0, 1.5, 3.0, 4.5, and 6.0 Mg ha-1 to the soil surface upon sowing maize, with crop succession of barley. Gypsum application decreased the levels of Al3+ and Mg2+ in the 0.0-0.1 m layer and increased soil pH in the layers from 0.2-0.6 m depth. Gypsum application has increased the levels of Ca2+ in all soil layers up to 0.6 m, and the levels of S-SO4(2- up to 0.8 m. In both crops, the leaf concentrations of Ca and S were increased while Mg concentrations have decreased as a function of gypsum rates. There was also an effect of gypsum rates on grain yield, with a quadratic response of maize and a linear increase for barley. Yield increases were up to 11 and 12 % in relation to control for the maximum technical efficiency (MTE rates of 3.8 and 6.0 Mg ha-1 of gypsum, respectively. Gypsum application improved soil fertility in the profile, especially in the subsurface, as well as plant nutrition, increasing the yields of maize and barley.

  8. Crop Response to Gypsum Application to Subtropical Soils Under No-Till in Brazil: a Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tales Tiecher

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The use of gypsum to improve the root environment in tropical soils in the southeastern and central-western regions of Brazil is a widespread practice with well-established recommendation criteria. However, only recently gypsum began to be used on subtropical soils in South of Brazil, so available knowledge of its effect on crop yield is incipient and mainly for soils under no-till (NT systems. Avaiable studies span a wide range of responses, from a substantial increase to a slight reduction in crop yield. Also, the specific conditions leading to a favorable effect of gypsum application on crop yield are yet to be accurately identified. The primary objectives of this study were to examine previously reported results to assess the likelihood of a crop response to gypsum and to develop useful recommendation criteria for gypsum application to subtropical soils under NT in Brazil. For this purpose, we examined the results of a total of 73 growing seasons, reported in 20 different scientific publications that assessed grain yield as a function of gypsum rates. Four different scenarios were examined, by the occurrence or not of high subsurface acidity (viz., Al saturation >20 % and/or exchangeable Ca 3 cmolc dm-3 failed to increase crop yield, irrespective of the soil water status. Under these conditions, high gypsum rates (6-15 Mg ha−1 may even reduce grain yield, possibly by inducing K and Mg deficiency. On the other hand, applying gypsum to soils with high subsurface acidity increased yield by 16 % in corn (87 % of cases and by 19 % in winter cereals (83 % of cases, whether or not the soil was water-deficient. By contrast, soybean yield was only increased by gypsum applied in the simultaneous presence of high soil subsurface acidity and water deficiency (average increase 27 %, 100 % of cases.

  9. Effect of amino acids on the precipitation kinetics and Ca isotopic composition of gypsum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harouaka, Khadouja; Kubicki, James D.; Fantle, Matthew S.

    2017-12-01

    Stirred gypsum (CaSO4 · 2H2O) precipitation experiments (initial Ωgypsum = 2.4 ± 0.14, duration ≈ 1.0-1.5 h) were conducted in the presence of the amino acids glycine (190 μM), L-alanine (190 μM), D- and L-arginine (45 μM), and L-tyrosine (200 μM) to investigate the effect of simple organic compounds on both the precipitation kinetics and Ca isotopic composition of gypsum. Relative to abiotic controls, glycine, tyrosine, and alanine inhibited precipitation rates by ∼22%, 27%, and 29%, respectively, while L- and D-arginine accelerated crystal growth by ∼8% and 48%, respectively. With the exception of tyrosine, amino acid induced inhibition resulted in fractionation factors (αs-f) associated with precipitation that were no more than 0.3‰ lower than amino acid-free controls. In contrast, the tyrosine and D- and L-arginine experiments had αs-f values associated with precipitation that were similar to the controls. Our experimental results indicate that Ca isotopic fractionation associated with gypsum precipitation is impacted by growth inhibition in the presence of amino acids. Specifically, we propose that the surface-specific binding of amino acids to gypsum can change the equilibrium fractionation factor of the bulk mineral. We investigate the hypothesis that amino acids can influence the growth of gypsum at specific crystal faces via adsorption and that different faces have distinct fractionation factors (αface-fluid). Accordingly, preferential sorption of amino acids at particular faces changes the relative, face-specific mass fluxes of Ca during growth, which influences the bulk isotopic composition of the mineral. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggest that the energetic favorability of glycine sorption onto gypsum crystal faces occurs in the order: (1 1 0) > (0 1 0) > (1 2 0) > (0 1 1), while glycine sorption onto the (-1 1 1) face was found to be energetically unfavorable. Face-specific fractionation factors constrained by

  10. Solid phase microextraction, sand flies, oviposition pheromones, plaster of Paris and siloxanes-What is in common?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulart, Thais Marchi; Tosta, Christiann Davis; Machado, Vicente Estevam; da Rocha Silva, Flávia Benini; de Castro, Camila Feitosa; Ortiz, Dennys Ghenry Samillan; Oliveira, Wanderson Henrique Cruz; Pinto, Mara Cristina

    2017-04-01

    Sand flies are natural hosts of various microorganisms. Due to their epidemiological importance, sand fly colonies are kept in laboratories to be studied in terms of their biology and vector/host/parasite interactions. In order to investigate the presence of oviposition pheromones in Nyssomyia neivai, experiments using Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME) were performed. However, siloxanes which is an external class of contamination, present in breeding containers made by plaster used to maintain sand flies in colonies, may be hindered the experiments. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Study of the laser cleaning on plaster sculptures. The effect of laser irradiation on the surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelosi, C.; Fodaro, D.; Sforzini, L.; Rubino, A. R.; Falqui, A.

    2013-06-01

    The focus of this paper is to study the effects caused by the laser irradiation on nineteenth and twentieth century plaster sculptures. Before applying the laser cleaning on the sculptures, it was tested on samples prepared in laboratory according to the results of the scientific investigation carried out on the selected works of art. The characterization of the surface finishing materials of the sculptures was performed by Fourier Transform Infrared spectrometry (FTIR), X-ray Fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF), UV fluorescence photography, and internal micro stratigraphic analysis. Regarding the finishing materials, shellac, zinc white, siccative oil and proteins were found on the surfaces. The results of the scientific investigation, together with the examination of the ancient technical manuals, were used to create the laboratory samples to carry out the irradiation tests with laser. The laser irradiation and cleaning tests were carried out with a Q-switched Nd:YAG system. The irradiated surfaces were analyzed before and after the laser tests with the aid of a video microscope and a reflectance spectrophotometer, in order to evaluate the color changes of the surfaces. The possible morphological modifications caused by laser irradiation were also investigated by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) together with ancillary Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) elemental analysis. Concerning the laser cleaning test on the samples, in general little color changes were observed both with the 532 and 1064 nm wavelength. Total color changes, expressed as Δ E*, are always small apart from the samples made of shellac and zinc white in linseed oil, as finishing layer. As regards these samples the surface irradiated with the laser greyed lightly, corresponding to a decrease of L* parameter (lightness). SEM imaging of the treated and not-treated samples, both at low and high magnification, does not show evidence of significant morphological differences due to the laser beam

  12. Efektivitas Plester Luka Pada Aplikasi Penutup Luka Insisi Pasca Operasi (EFFECTIVENESS OF WOUND PLASTER FOR COVERING POST-SURGERY INCISION WOUND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deska Gilang Mustika

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A study on the difference of wound incision healing in mice (Ratus novergicus between the wound covered with a plaster compared to the wound that was closed using simple interruptedsutures in terms of macroscopic and microscopic observation has been done. A total of 16 malewhite rats with a weight range of 200 gram randomly divided into two groups. Incision was madeinto linea alba to both group. Incision at linea alba was closed with simple interupted suture, and subcutan was closed with subcutaneous suture using vicril 4/0. The first group of the skin incisionclosed with wound plaster, while the second group the incision is closed with simple interruptedsutures using non-absorbable thread. Results showed that no difference was observed between thewound that covered with plaster compared to the wound that closed with simple interruptedsutures. However, there was a significant difference on the density of collagen in microscopicexamination.

  13. The Influence of Interaction between Hydrophobic Stearate and Pozzolanic Additive on Hygric Transport and Storage Properties of Lime-based Plaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radka PERNICOVA

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper water transport and storage parameters of hydrophobic plasters are studies. This article is focused on behavior of water and its degradation process inside of material matrix. Most of physic-chemical deteriorations of building materials are related to the penetration of moisture into building structure. For higher resistance of penetration water into materials, hydrophobic additions are used. Especially inner hydrophobic additive was applied to the interior structure to reduce destructive effect of water. Water storage parameters are slightly better for plaster without hydrophobisation. However, from the quantitative point of view the difference was not so important. Comparative measurements with pure lime-metakaolin plaster were done as well.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.24.1.17876

  14. Radioecology of and radiation dose from Dutch waste gypsum released into the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koster, H.W.; Weers, A.W. van; Netherlands Energy Research Foundation, Petten)

    1985-11-01

    The Dutch industries release 9 kinds of waste gypsum, 90% of the total quantity is phosphogypsum. Only waste gypsums from the phosphate industries show increased radioactivity, the strongest in phosphogypsum. All phosphogypsum, 2 Tg.a -1 , is disposed of into the Rhine at Rotterdam. This leads to an increase of radionuclides, from the U-238 chain, along the Dutch coast. The calculated increase of activity concentrations in sea food causes an increase of the individual radiation dose of maximal 150 μSv.a -1 and of the Dutch population dose of 170 manSv.a -1 . Stacking of the phosphogypsum would result in a dose increase of one order of magnitude lower. The need for environmental disposal or stacking of at least the fine and coarse fractions of the phosphogypsum, which are difficult to recycle, will remain. (Auth.)

  15. Dehydration reactions of gypsum: A neutron and X-ray diffraction study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abriel, W.; Reisdorf, K.; Pannetier, J.

    1990-03-01

    The kinetics of the dehydration of gypsum was investigated by powder diffraction methods. Using the incoherent scattering effect of H with the neutron beam, the background intensity as a measure of the water content was checked in the temperature range 295-623 K. The superposed Bragg peaks yielded four major phases: Gypsum, subhydratesCaSO 4(H 2O) x (1 > x > 0),AIII-CaSO 4, AII-CaSO 4. For the subhydrates a maximum water content of x > = 0.74was determined. A different kinetic was found using Guinier X-ray technique with the heated sample prepared on a thin foil. Only with high local H 2O steam pressure, produced in the comparable larger sample container of the neutron diffraction experiment, could this high H 2O occupation of the subhydrate tunnel structure be found. A topotactic mechanism can describe the phase transitions for this reaction.

  16. Inflammatory potential of low doses of airborne fungi from fungal infested damp and dry gypsum boards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Sofie Marie; Gunnarsen, Lars Bo; Madsen, Anne Mette

    2017-01-01

    This study has investigated the total inflammatory potential (TIP) of low concentration fungal samples from moisture-damaged and fungal infested gypsum boards. The fungal aerosols were generated from damp and dried surfaces, and sampled using filter sampling and liquid impingement. The TIP...... association was found between concentration of fungi and the TIP of the samples. This is likely due to the J-shaped dose response curve. The aerosol samples from the dried gypsum boards had a significantly higher TIP compared to aerosols from the damp surfaces. However, the J-shaped dose-response curve...... weakens the conclusion on the influence of surfaces dampness, sampling time, fungal species or sampling methods. It could, however, be concluded that samples from both damp and dry surfaces induce inflammation in the HL60 cells, despite the low concentration of fungi. Thus, a dried fungal infestation...

  17. Precipitation of heavy metals from coal ash leachate using biogenic hydrogen sulfide generated from FGD gypsum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaranjan, Madawala Liyanage Duminda; Annachhatre, Ajit P

    2013-01-01

    Investigations were undertaken to utilize flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum for the treatment of leachate from the coal ash (CA) dump sites. Bench-scale investigations consisted of three main steps namely hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) production by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) using sulfate from solubilized FGD gypsum as the electron acceptor, followed by leaching of heavy metals (HMs) from coal bottom ash (CBA) and subsequent precipitation of HMs using biologically produced sulfide. Leaching tests of CBA carried out at acidic pH revealed the existence of several HMs such as Cd, Cr, Hg, Pb, Mn, Cu, Ni and Zn. Molasses was used as the electron donor for the biological sulfate reduction (BSR) process which produced sulfide rich effluent with concentration up to 150 mg/L. Sulfide rich effluent from the sulfate reduction process was used to precipitate HMs as metal sulfides from CBA leachate. HM removal in the range from 40 to 100% was obtained through sulfide precipitation.

  18. Influence of the gypsum dehydration temperature and alkali additives on the properties of anhydrite cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leskeviciene V.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available While dehydrating gypsum with additives at the temperatures of 800°C and 900°C the influence of alkali additives on both the crystalline structure of anhydrite and properties of anhydrite binder was investigated. The industrial and household wastes including other lowcost materials were used as additives. Having heated them with gypsum the anhydrite with alkali activation properties was obtained. The properties of such substances were evaluated using the methods of chemical, diffractive X-ray scanning and scanning electron microscopy (SEM analyses. Some additives, e.g. 5 % ground glass waste, were found to increase crystal agglomerate formation of anhydrite binder, accelerate the hydration process of anhydrite and double the compressive strength of hydrated samples compared to samples without additives.

  19. Influence of Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum on Reducing Soluble Phosphorus in Successive Runoff Events from a Coastal Plain Bermudagrass Pasture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Dexter B; Torbert, H Allen

    2016-05-01

    Controlling the threat that pastures intensively managed with poultry litter (PL) pose to accelerating eutrophication is a major issue in the southeastern United States. Gypsum (CaSO) has been identified as a promising management tool for ameliorating litter P losses to runoff. Thus, research was conducted to elucidate gypsum's residual effects on P losses from a bermudagrass ( L.) pasture. Runoff events (60 min) were created using rainfall simulations. Treatments consisted of applying four flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum rates (0, 2.2, 4.4, and 8.9 Mg ha) to bermudagrass fertilized with 13.4 Mg ha PL plus a nonfertilized check (no litter or gypsum) and 8.9 Mg ha FGD gypsum only as controls. Rainfall simulations (∼ 85 mm h) were conducted immediately, 5 wk, and 6 mo (i.e., at the end of growing season) after PL application to determine gypsum's effectiveness at controlling P loss over successive runoff events. The greatest dissolved P (DP) in runoff occurred immediately after PL application. Gypsum effectively reduced cumulative DP concentration losses (54%) compared with PL alone in initial runoff events. Gypsum reduced DP concentrations in succeeding runoff events also regardless of timing, suggesting that its effect is persistent and will not diminish over a growing season. Generally, maximum DP reductions were achieved with 8.9 Mg ha. However, it was surmised from this study that optimal P reduction in a bermudagrass pasture can be achieved with 4.4 Mg ha. Information ascertained from this study may be useful in aiding land managers making prescriptions for management practices that reduce DP losses from agricultural fields. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  20. Effect of alginate chemical disinfection on bacterial count over gypsum cast

    OpenAIRE

    Haralur, Satheesh B.; Al-Dowah, Omir S.; Gana, Naif S.; Al-Hytham, Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the efficacy of sodium hypochlorite (1 : 10) and iodophor disinfectants on alginate impressions along with their effect on the survived bacterium count on the gypsum cast. MATERIALS AND METHODS Four alginate impression on each dentate patients were made, of which Group I were not washed or disinfected, Group II impressions were merely washed with water, Group III were disinfected by spraying with sodium hypochlorite (1 : 10), Group IV were disinfected with iodophor (1 : 21...

  1. The effect of gypsum products and separating materials on the typography of denture base materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firtell, D N; Walsh, J F; Elahi, J M

    1980-09-01

    The typography of polymethyl methacrylate processed against various gypsum products coated with various separating materials was studied under an SEM. Tinfoil and two commercial tin foil substitutes were used as separating material during processing, and the surfaces of the resulting acrylic resin forms were studied for topographical differences. Tinfoil and alpha 2 hemihydrates produced the smoothest surfaces. As a practical solution, a good quality tinfoil substitute and alpha 1 hemihydrate could be used when processing polymethyl methacrylate resin.

  2. Elementary characterization of samples of Portland cement, natural gypsum and phosphogypsum mortars from Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narloch, Danielle Cristine; Paschuk, Sergei Anatolyevich; Corrêa, Janine Nicolosi; Torres, Catarina Alzira Peddis; Mazer, Wellington; Macioski, Gustavo; Lara, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    Portland cement, the basic ingredient of concrete and is manufactured by crushing, milling and proportioning limestone, sand, clay, iron ore and secondary materials such as shells, chalk or marl combined with shale slate or blast furnace slag, fly ash, gypsum, phosphogypsum, and some others. Evaluating the physical and mineralogical characteristics of the cement and its chemical composition is essential to establish the quality of the product. Therefore, the objective of this work was to characterize and quantify the most common chemical elements in the samples of Brazilian Portland cement, natural gypsum, and phosphogypsum mortars by means of X-ray dispersive energy spectroscopy (EDXRF), as well as to evaluate the strength of these mortars. For analysis of the compressive strength, initially prepared samples were submitted to a destructive mechanical test. Subsequently samples were milled and compacted to form thin tablets, which were submitted to the EDXRF analysis. The qualitative and quantitative analyzes showed that for phosphogypsum mortar the largest mass fractions were found of 49.8±2.5% (Si), 24.66±0.96% (S) and 22.10±0.42% (Ca). For gypsum mortar those values were found of 43.41±0.45% (Ca), 33.8 ± 0.8% (S) and 18.9±1.2% (Si), respectively; and for Portland cement mortar, the predominant elements in those samples have the mass fractions of 64.20±0.52% (Ca) and 27.3±1.5% (Si). The results showed that obtained values of mass fraction of the elements Si, S, K, Ca, Ti, Fe are in rather good agreement with quantities indicated for manufacture. Besides, gypsum and phosphogypsum presented almost the same composition and compressive strength. (author)

  3. Elementary characterization of samples of Portland cement, natural gypsum and phosphogypsum mortars from Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narloch, Danielle Cristine; Paschuk, Sergei Anatolyevich; Corrêa, Janine Nicolosi; Torres, Catarina Alzira Peddis; Mazer, Wellington; Macioski, Gustavo [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), PR (Brazil); Lara, Alessandro [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Fisica; Casali, Juliana Machado, E-mail: janine_nicolosi@hotmail.com, E-mail: alellara@hotmail.com, E-mail: jucasali@gmail.com [Instituto Federal de Santa Catarina (IFSC), Florianópolis, SC (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Portland cement, the basic ingredient of concrete and is manufactured by crushing, milling and proportioning limestone, sand, clay, iron ore and secondary materials such as shells, chalk or marl combined with shale slate or blast furnace slag, fly ash, gypsum, phosphogypsum, and some others. Evaluating the physical and mineralogical characteristics of the cement and its chemical composition is essential to establish the quality of the product. Therefore, the objective of this work was to characterize and quantify the most common chemical elements in the samples of Brazilian Portland cement, natural gypsum, and phosphogypsum mortars by means of X-ray dispersive energy spectroscopy (EDXRF), as well as to evaluate the strength of these mortars. For analysis of the compressive strength, initially prepared samples were submitted to a destructive mechanical test. Subsequently samples were milled and compacted to form thin tablets, which were submitted to the EDXRF analysis. The qualitative and quantitative analyzes showed that for phosphogypsum mortar the largest mass fractions were found of 49.8±2.5% (Si), 24.66±0.96% (S) and 22.10±0.42% (Ca). For gypsum mortar those values were found of 43.41±0.45% (Ca), 33.8 ± 0.8% (S) and 18.9±1.2% (Si), respectively; and for Portland cement mortar, the predominant elements in those samples have the mass fractions of 64.20±0.52% (Ca) and 27.3±1.5% (Si). The results showed that obtained values of mass fraction of the elements Si, S, K, Ca, Ti, Fe are in rather good agreement with quantities indicated for manufacture. Besides, gypsum and phosphogypsum presented almost the same composition and compressive strength. (author)

  4. Mechanical properties of simulated Mars materials: gypsum-rich sandstones and lapilli tuff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Carolyn; Lockner, David; Okubo, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Observations by the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Opportunity, and other recent studies on diagenesis in the extensive equatorial layered deposits on Mars, suggest that the likely lithologies of these deposits are gypsum-rich sandstones and tuffaceous sediments (for example, Murchie and others, 2009; Squyres and others, 2012; Zimbelman and Scheidt, 2012). Of particular interest is how the diagenesis history of these sediments (degree of cementation and composition) influences the strength and brittle behavior of the material. For instance, fractures are more common in lower porosity materials under strain, whereas deformation bands, characterized by distributed strain throughout a broader discontinuity in a material, are common in higher porosity sedimentary materials. Such discontinuities can either enhance or restrict fluid flow; hence, failure mode plays an important role in determining the mechanics of fluid migration through sediments (Antonellini and Aydin, 1994; 1995; Taylor and Pollard, 2000; Ogilvie and Glover, 2001). As part of a larger study to characterize processes of fault-controlled fluid flow in volcaniclastic and gypsum-rich sediments on Mars, we have completed a series of laboratory experiments to focus on how gypsum clast content and degree of authigenic cementation affects the strength behavior of simulated Mars rocks. Both axial deformation and hydrostatic pressure tests were done at room temperature under dry conditions.

  5. Clay stabilization by using gypsum and paddy husk ash with reference to UCT and CBR value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesyanto; Iskandar, R.; Hastuty, I. P.; Dianty, W. O.

    2018-02-01

    Clays that have low shear strength need to be stabilized in order to meet the technical requirements to serve as a subgrade material. One of the usual soil stabilization methods is by adding chemicals such as Portland cement, lime, and bitumen. The clay stabilization research was done by adding gypsum and paddy husk ash. The research goals were to find out the value of engineering properties of clay due to the addition of 2% gypsum and 2% - 15% paddy husk ash. The soil was classified as Clay - Low Plasticity (CL) based on USCS and was classified as A-7-6 (10) based on AASHTO classification system. The UCT value of original soil was 1.41 kg/cm2. While the CBR soaked and unsoaked values of original soil were 4.41% and 6.23% respectively. The research results showed the addition of paddy husk ash decreased the value of unconfined compressive strength as well as CBR. The stabilized soil by 2% gypsum and 0% paddy husk ash gave maximum UCT value of 1.67 kg/cm2, while the maximum value of CBR were found 6.71% for CBR soaked and 8.00% for CBR unsoaked. The addition of paddy husk ash did not alter the soil classification according to AASHTO or USCS, even degrade the engineering properties of original soil.

  6. Developing biodiversity indicators on a stakeholders' opinions basis: the gypsum industry Key Performance Indicators framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitz, Carline; Mahy, Grégory; Vermeulen, Cédric; Marlet, Christine; Séleck, Maxime

    2016-07-01

    This study aims to establish a common Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) framework for reporting about the gypsum industry biodiversity at the European level. In order to integrate different opinions and to reach a consensus framework, an original participatory process approach has been developed among different stakeholder groups: Eurogypsum, European and regional authorities, university scientists, consulting offices, European and regional associations for the conservation of nature, and the extractive industry. The strategy is developed around four main steps: (1) building of a maximum set of indicators to be submitted to stakeholders based on the literature (Focus Group method); (2) evaluating the consensus about indicators through a policy Delphi survey aiming at the prioritization of indicator classes using the Analytic Hierarchy Process method (AHP) and of individual indicators; (3) testing acceptability and feasibility through analysis of Environmental Impact Assessments (EIAs) and visits to three European quarries; (4) Eurogypsum final decision and communication. The resulting framework contains a set of 11 indicators considered the most suitable for all the stakeholders. Our KPIs respond to European legislation and strategies for biodiversity. The framework aims at improving sustainability in quarries and at helping to manage biodiversity as well as to allow the creation of coherent reporting systems. The final goal is to allow for the definition of the actual biodiversity status of gypsum quarries and allow for enhancing it. The framework is adaptable to the local context of each gypsum quarry.

  7. How soil type (gypsum or limestone) influences the properties and composition of thyme honey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Porto, Amelia Virginia; Martín Arroyo, Tomás; Bartolomé Esteban, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work was to determine the influence of the soil substrate on the characteristics and properties of a specific type of honey. As such, we analysed the features of a typical single-flower honey, thyme honey, produced in a specific Mediterranean region. Thymus is a genus of aromatic perennial plants that are native to Europe, North Africa and Asia. A total of 70 honey samples from hives situated on limestone (38 samples) or gypsum soils (32 samples) were studied. The physical and chemical properties of each samples were analyzed using standard assays. Within the same geographical area and despite a similar thyme pollen content, we observed variation in the physicochemical, antioxidant and sensorial characteristics of monofloral honeys. The quantification of certain physicochemical parameters of the honey indicated these features were influenced by the soil type. Indeed, the soil type of the hives' settlement area, limestone or gypsum, influences the conductivity, antioxidant capacity, colour and floristic composition. The present work demonstrates that soil type (gypsum or limestone) influences the characteristics of honey, potentially providing added market value to these products.

  8. Biological influences on modern sulfates: Textures and composition of gypsum deposits from Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Marilyn B.; Des Marais, David J.; Parenteau, Mary N.; Jahnke, Linda L.; Turk, Kendra A.; Kubo, Michael D. Y.

    2010-01-01

    Gypsum (CaSO 4·2H 2O) deposits from a range of sedimentary environments at Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico were investigated for microscale texture and composition in order to differentiate features formed under substantial microbial influence from those for which microbial effects were relatively minor or absent. Gypsum deposits were classified according to their sedimentary environment, textures, crystal habit, brine composition and other geochemical factors. The environments studied included subaqueous sediments in anchialine pools and in solar salterns, as well as subsurface sediments of mudflats and saltpans. Gypsum that developed in the apparent absence of biofilms included crystals precipitated in the water column and subsedimentary discs that precipitated from phreatic brines. Subsedimentary gypsum developed in sabkha environments exhibited a sinuous microtexture and poikilitically enclosed detrital particles. Water column precipitates had euhedral prismatic habits and extensive penetrative twinning. Gypsum deposits influenced by biofilms included bottom nucleated crusts and gypsolites developing in anchialine pools and saltern ponds. Gypsum precipitating within benthic biofilms, and in biofilms within subaerial sediment surfaces provided compelling evidence of biological influences on crystal textures and habits. This evidence included irregular, high relief surface textures, accessory minerals (S°, Ca-carbonate, Sr/Ca-sulfate and Mg-hydroxide) and distinctive crystal habits such as equant forms and crystals having distorted prism faces.

  9. [Study on microwave digestion of gypsum for the determination of multielement by ICP-OES and ICP-MS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Song, Qiang; Yang, Rui-ming; Yao, Qiang; Chen, Chang-he

    2010-09-01

    Three acids (HNO3, HNO3/HF and HNO3 /HF+ H3BO3) were used to decompose gypsum with microwave digestion system. The contents of 10 mineral elements (Al, Ca, Mg, Fe, K, Na, S, Ti, Si and Sr) in gypsum were determined by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) while 6 heavy metals (V, Cr, Mn, Zn, Se and Ce) were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). GBW03109a, GBW03110 and FGD-2 were used as gypsum standard reference materials. The results showed that two-step microwave digestion with HNO3/HF at 210 degrees C and then adding H3BO3 for the removal of HF and fluorides completely decomposed the gypsums, while this method achieved good recoveries for all elements in the three gypsum standard reference materials. The recovery was from 88% to 112% and the RSD of tests was below 3%. The method was applied to the elemental analysis for flue gas desulfurization gypsums from three coal-fired power plants.

  10. The next chapter in experimental petrology: Metamorphic dehydration of polycrystalline gypsum captured in 3D microtomographic time series datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedford, John; Fusseis, Florian; Leclere, Henry; Wheeler, John; Faulkner, Dan

    2016-04-01

    Nucleation and growth of new minerals in response to disequilibrium is the most fundamental metamorphic process. However, our current kinetic models of metamorphic reactions are largely based on inference from fossil mineral assemblages, rather than from direct observation. The experimental investigation of metamorphism has also been limited, typically to concealed vessels that restrict the possibility of direct microstructural monitoring. Here we present one of the first time series datasets that captures a metamorphic reaction, dehydration of polycrystalline gypsum to form hemihydrate, in a series of three dimensional x-ray microtomographic datasets. We achieved this by installing an x-ray transparent hydrothermal cell (Fusseis et al., 2014, J. Synchrotron Rad. 21, 251-253) in the microtomography beamline 2BM at the Advanced Photon Source (USA). In the cell, we heated a millimetre-sized sample of Volterra Alabaster to 388 K while applying an effective pressure of 5 MPa. Using hard x-rays that penetrate the pressure vessel, we imaged the specimen 40 times while it reacted for approximately 10 hours. Each microtomographic dataset was acquired in 300 seconds without interrupting the reaction. Our absorption microtomographic data have a voxel size of 1.3 μm, which suffices to analyse the reaction progress in 4D. Gypsum can clearly be distinguished from hemihydrate and pores, which form due to the large negative solid volume change. On the resolved scale, the first hemihydrate needles appear after about 2 hours. Our data allow tracking of individual needles throughout the entire experiment. We quantified their growth rates by measuring their circumference. While individual grains grow at different rates, they all start slowly during the initial nucleation stage, then accelerate and grow steadily between about 200 and 400 minutes before reaction rate decelerates again. Hemihydrate needles are surrounded by porous haloes, which grow with the needles, link up and

  11. Laboratory Salinization of Brazilian Alluvial Soils and the Spectral Effects of Gypsum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Clenio J. Moreira

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Irrigation-induced salinization is an important land degradation process that affects crop yield in the Brazilian semi-arid region, and gypsum has been used as a corrective measure for saline soils. Fluvent soil samples (180 were treated with increasing levels of salinization of NaCl, MgCl2 and CaCl2. The salinity was gauged using electrical conductivity (EC. Gypsum was added to one split of these samples before they were treated by the saline solutions. Laboratory reflectance spectra were measured at nadir under a controlled environment using a FieldSpec spectrometer, a 250-W halogen lamp and a Spectralon panel. Variations in spectral reflectance and brightness were evaluated using principal component analysis, as well as the continuum-removed absorption depths of major features at 1450, 1950, 1750 and 2200 nm for both the gypsum-treated (TG and non-treated (NTG air-dried soil samples as a function of EC. Pearson’s correlation coefficients of reflectance and the band depth with EC were also obtained to establish the relationships with salinity. Results showed that NTG samples presented a decrease in reflectance and brightness with increasing CaCl2 and MgCl2 salinization. The reverse was observed for NaCl. Gypsum increased the spectral reflectance of the soil. The best negative correlations between reflectance and EC were observed in the 1500–2400 nm range for CaCl2 and MgCl2, probably because these wavelengths are most affected by water absorption, as Ca and Mg are much more hygroscopic than Na. These decreased after chemical treatment with gypsum. The most prominent features were observed at 1450, 1950 and 1750 nm in salinized-soil spectra. The 2200-nm clay mineral absorption band depth was inversely correlated with salt concentration. From these features, only the 1750 and 2200 nm ones are within atmospheric absorption windows and can be more easily measured using hyperspectral sensors.

  12. Surface controlled dissolution rates of gypsum in aqueous solutions exhibit nonlinear dissolution kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeschke, Alexander A.; Vosbeck, Katrin; Dreybrodt, Wolfgang

    2001-01-01

    The effective dissolution rates of gypsum are determined by mixed kinetics, where the rate constants of dissolution at the surface and the transport constant of molecular diffusion of dissolved material are similar. To obtain the surface reaction rate law it is necessary to know the transport constant. We have determined the surface rate law for monocrystalline selenite by using a rotating disc set-up, where the transport coefficients are well known. As a result, up to a calcium concentration of 0.6 · ceq, we find a nearly linear rate law Rs = ksl (1- cs/ ceq) n1, where cs is the total calcium concentration at the surface and ceq the equilibrium concentration with respect to gypsum, n1 = 1.2 ± 0.2, and ksl = 1.1 · 10 -4 mmol cm -2 s -1 ± 15%. We also employed batch-experiments for selenite, alabaster and gypsum rock samples. The result of these experiments were interpreted by using a transport constant determined by NaCl dissolution experiments under similar physical conditions. The batch experiments reveal a dissolution rate law Rs = ksl (1- cs/ ceq) n1, ksl = 1.3 · 10 -4 mmol · cm -2 s -1, n1 = 1.2 ± 0.2 for c ≤ 0.94 · ceq. Close to equilibrium a nonlinear rate law, Rs = ks2 (1- cs/ ceq) n2, is observed, where ks2 is in the order of 10 mmol · cm -2 s -1 and n2 ≈ 4.5. The experimentally observed gypsum dissolution rates from the batch experiments could be accurately fitted, with only minor variations of the surface reaction constant obtained from the rotating disk experiment and the transport coefficient from the NaCl dissolution batch experiment. Batch experiments on pure synthetic gypsum, reveal a linear rate law up to equilibrium. This indicates inhibition of dissolution in natural samples close to equilibrium, as is known also for calcite minerals.

  13. The gypsophyte Gypsophila struthium as nurse plant for vegetation recovery in degraded gypsum substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    María Foronda, Ana; Pueyo, Yolanda; Castillejo, José Miguel; Alados, Conceción L.

    2017-04-01

    Degraded areas such as quarries or dumps are devoid of vegetation where the spontaneous vegetation recovery is a very slow process that requires restoration actions, especially under harsh environmental conditions such as arid conditions and special substrates. Specifically, gypsum substrates have physical and chemical limitations such as surface crusts, poor water availability or high concentrations of SO4 and Ca. Some plants, the so called gypsophytes, are adapted to tolerate such limitations and thus, might be able to establish in gypsum bare soils. Thus, well adapted gypsophytes might play an important role in vegetation recovery by acting as ecosystem engineers, improving the environmental conditions under their canopy and facilitating the establishment of other species. Facilitation is being recently considered as a key process in restoration practices because it might enhance restoration effectiveness by favoring the plant establishment and therefore, plant succession. The aim of this study was to test the effectiveness of a gypsophyte (Gypsophila struthium) in facilitating the establishment and development of other species and thus in vegetation recovery of degraded gypsum substrates. To address this objective, a sowing and planting experiment was set in November 2014 in a gypsum dump located in Andorra municipality (Teruel, NE Spain). Forty well-established adults of G. struthium previously planted in that dump were employed as nurse plants in the experiment. Two species were used as test species in the experiment: Helianthemum squamatum (gypsophyte) and Stipa lagascae (non-gypsophyte). Seeds and seedlings of those test species were sowed and planted in two different microsites: under the canopy and in the surrounding bare soil of each G. struthium individual (n=80 per test species). Germination, survival and growth of test species were surveyed twice a year during two years. Soil compaction and soil temperature were seasonally measured at both microsites

  14. Fabrication and properties of microencapsulated-paraffin/gypsum-matrix building materials for thermal energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Junfeng; Wang Xinyu; Wang Shengbao; Zhao Yunhui; Huang Zhen

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: DSC curves of microPCMs/gypsum composite samples before and after a thermal cycling treatment. Highlights: ► Microcapsules containing paraffin was fabricated by in-situ polymerization. ► Methanol-modified melamine–formaldehyde (MMF) was used as shell material. ► MicroPCMs/gypsum-matrix building materials were applied for solar energy storage. ► The structure and thermal conductivity of composites had been investigated. - Abstract: Microencapsulated phase change materials (microPCMs) have been widely applied in solid matrix as thermal-storage or temperature-controlling functional composites. The aim of this work was to prepare and investigate the properties of microPCMs/gypsum-matrix building materials for thermal energy storage. MicroPCMs contain paraffin was fabricated by in situ polymerization using methanol-modified melamine–formaldehyde (MMF) as shell material. A series of microPCMs samples were prepared under emulsion stirring rates in range of 1000–3000 r min −1 with core/shell weight ratios of 3/1, 2/1, 1/1, 1/2 and 1/3, respectively. The shell of microPCMs was smooth and compact with global shape, its thickness was not greatly affected by the core/shell ratio and emulsion stirring rate. DSC tests showed that the shell of microPCMs did not influence the phase change behavior of pure paraffin. It was found from TGA analysis that microPCMs samples containing paraffin lost their weight at the temperature of nearly 250 °C, which indicated that the PCM had been protected by shell. More shell material in microPCMs could enhance the thermal stability and provide higher compact condition for core material. After a 100-times thermal cycling treatment, the microPCMs contain paraffin also nearly did not change the phase change behaviors of PCM. With the increasing of weight contents of microPCMs in gypsum board, the thermal conductivity (λ) values of composites had decreased. The simulation of temperature tests proved that the

  15. Reforestation and landscape reconstruction in gypsum mine area from the semiarid region of NE Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittar, S. M. B.; Straaten, P. V.; de Araujo Vieura Santos, M. de Fatima; Agra Bezerra da Silva, Y. J.; da Silva, M.; Saraiva de Melo Pinheiro, T.; Gusmao Didier de Moraes, F.; de Aguiar Accioly, A. M.; Alves de Santana, S. R.; dos Santos, H. A.; de Carvalho, D. M.; de Lima Ferreira, G.; de Carvalho Santos, C.

    2012-04-01

    In the Araripe region, Northeast Brazil, exist the world's second largest reserve of gypsum, estimated at over than one billion tons, which accounts for 95% of the Brazilian production and constitutes an important segment of the regional economy. The gypsum deposit occurs in the Lower Cretaceous Santana Formation of the Araripe basin, which is constituted by siltstones, marls, limestones, shales and gypsum layers. The ore extraction is from an open pit, on simple benches with a height of about 15 meters. Activities in mining operations involve stripping, drilling, loading explosives, blast, fragmentation and block loading / transport. Currently, gypsum mining and processing results in major changes in the landscape (pits and wastes heaps sedimentary rocks and soil mixture), deforestation of the "caatinga" ecosystem for use as firewood in small calcinations, dust pollution and changes in hydrology. To promote environmental remediation of this area, a multidisciplinary research has being done with the aim to support reforestation at the wastes heaps. The study involved the following activities: collection and physical, chemical and mineralogical characterization of mine waste materials; a floristic survey around the mines (botanical identification and measuring physical parameters in 16 plots, in order to identify which species are best suited to the conditions of the substrate at the mine site); an experiment (randomized block design) developed in a greenhouse, where seedlings of various native tree species were grown in a "constructed soil" made up of gypsum waste combined with chicken, goat and cattle manure, aimed to select tree species and soil treatment to be used in a waste heap; and an assessment of water quality for irrigation of the reforestation areas. The waste materials consist of large clayey aggregates, which may present physical/chemical properties unfavorable for plant development. The mineralogy of the sand fraction (> 85% quartz, gypsum and

  16. Polymeric-SiO2-PCMs for improving the thermal properties of gypsum applied in energy efficient buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borreguero, Ana M.; Serrano, Angel; Garrido, Ignacio; Rodríguez, Juan F.; Carmona, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Inorganic–organic PCM microcapsules were incorporated into gypsum. • The physical and thermal properties of the gypsum composites were studied. • The gypsum composites presented better properties than some previously investigated. • 10.20 kW h/operating cycle could be saved in a room with 1 m 3 of this material. • 1.26 kg of CO 2 emissions could be reduced per one operating cycle. - Abstract: A new thermoregulating material containing the commercial paraffin Rubitherm®RT27 stabilized by SiO 2 with a polymeric shell from polystyrene–divinylbenzene (Polymeric-SiO 2 -PCMs) was incorporated into gypsum up to a 15 mass ratio respect to the initial hemihydrate in order to develop building materials with a high thermal energy store (TES) capacity. The effect of this material on the gypsum crystals and the main physical, thermal and mechanical properties were studied and compared to those caused by another three kinds of thermoregulating materials. Polymeric-SiO 2 -PCMs presented the lowest agglomeration and therefore, the best distribution into the gypsum pores. As expected, the thermoregulating effect of the PCM improved the thermal properties of the gypsum since, the higher the microcapsules content, the higher the equivalent heat capacity (c p ) and the accumulated heat power (q acc ). Considering a conversion of 100% of the accumulated heat into electricity savings, the addition of a 15% of microcapsules respect to the hemihydrate allowed to save 10.20 kW h/m 3 and, consequently, reduced the CO 2 emissions in a 1.26 kg of CO 2 per operating cycle. Besides, the addition of the Polymeric-SiO 2 -PCMs reduces the gypsum density, but it is always higher than 600 kg/m 3 , as required by the European regulation EN 13279-2. The thermal conductivity (k) is also reduced by the microcapsules addition but for the case of a content of 15%. On the other hand, the porosity is barely affected just varying always less than a 3.5%. Finally, despite of the

  17. Building a diagnostic algorithm on localized neuropathic pain (LNP and targeted topical treatment: focus on 5% lidocaine-medicated plaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casale R

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Roberto Casale,1,2 Consalvo Mattia31Department of Clinical Neurophysiology and Pain Rehabilitation Unit, Foundation “Salvatore Maugeri”, Research and Care Institute, IRCCS, Pavia, Italy; 2EFIC Montescano Pain School, Montescano, Italy; 3Department of Medical-Surgical Sciences, Section of Anaesthesia, Intensive Care and Pain Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, Sapienza University of Rome, ItalyAbstract: Within the broad definition of neuropathic pain, the refinement of clinical diagnostic procedures has led to the introduction of the concept of localized neuropathic pain (LNP. It is characterized by consistent and circumscribed area(s of maximum pain, which are associated with negative or positive sensory signs and/or spontaneous symptoms typical of neuropathic pain. This description outlines the clinical features (currently lacking in guidelines and treatment recommendations in patients for whom topical targeted treatment with 5% lidocaine-medicated plaster is suggested as first-line therapy. Few epidemiologic data are present in the literature but it is generally estimated that about 60% of neuropathic pain conditions are localized, and therefore identifiable as LNP. A mandatory clinical criterion for the diagnosis of LNP is that signs and symptoms must be present in a clearly identified and defined area(s. Cartographic recordings can help to define each area and to assess variations. The diagnosis of LNP relies on careful neurological examination more than on pain questionnaires, but it is recognized that they can be extremely useful for recording the symptom profiles and establishing a more targeted treatment. The most widely studied frequent/relevant clinical presentations of LNP are postherpetic neuralgia, diabetic neuropathy, and neuropathic postoperative pain. They successfully respond to treatment with 5% lidocaine-medicated plaster with equal if not better pain control but with fewer side effects versus conventional systemic

  18. Accuracy and precision of polyurethane dental arch models fabricated using a three-dimensional subtractive rapid prototyping method with an intraoral scanning technique

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jae-Hong; Kim, Ki-Baek; Kim, Woong-Chul; Kim, Ji-Hwan; Kim, Hae-Young

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy and precision of polyurethane (PUT) dental arch models fabricated using a three-dimensional (3D) subtractive rapid prototyping (RP) method with an intraoral scanning technique by comparing linear measurements obtained from PUT models and conventional plaster models. Methods Ten plaster models were duplicated using a selected standard master model and conventional impression, and 10 PUT models were duplicated using the 3D subtractive RP techn...

  19. Optimization of the level and range of working temperature of the PCM in the gypsum-microencapsulated PCM thermal energy storage unit for summer conditions in Central Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łapka, P.; Jaworski, M.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper thermal energy storage (TES) unit in a form of a ceiling panel made of gypsum-microencapsulated PCM composite with internal U-shaped channels was considered and optimal characteristics of the microencapsulated PCM were determined. This panel may be easily incorporated into, e.g., an office or residential ventilation system in order to reduce daily variations of air temperature during the summer without additional costs related to the consumption of energy for preparing air parameters to the desired level. For the purpose of the analysis of heat transfer in the panel, a novel numerical simulator was developed. The numerical model consists of two coupled parts, i.e., the 1D which deals with the air flowing through the U-shaped channel and the 3D which deals with heat transfer in the body of the panel. The computational tool was validated based on the experimental study performed on the special set-up. Using this tool an optimization of parameters of the gypsum-microencapsulated PCM composite was performed in order to determine its most appropriate properties for the application under study. The analyses were performed for averaged local summer conditions in Warsaw, Poland.

  20. Contaminant mobility and carbon sequestration downstream of the Ajka (Hungary) red mud spill: The effects of gypsum dosing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renforth, P; Mayes, W M; Jarvis, A P; Burke, I T; Manning, D A C; Gruiz, K

    2012-04-01

    A number of emergency pollution management measures were enacted after the accidental release of caustic bauxite processing residue that occurred in Ajka, western Hungary in October, 2010. These centred on acid and gypsum dosing to reduce pH and minimise mobility of oxyanion contaminants mobile at high pH. This study assessed the effectiveness of gypsum dosing on contaminant mobility and carbon sequestration through assessment of red mud and gypsum-affected fluvial sediments via elemental analysis and stable isotope analysis. There was a modest uptake of contaminants (notably As, Cr, and Mn) on secondary carbonate-dominated deposits in reaches subjected to gypsum dosing. C and O stable isotope ratios of carbonate precipitates formed as a result of gypsum dosing were used to quantify the importance of the neutralisation process in sequestering atmospheric carbon dioxide. This process was particularly pronounced at sites most affected by gypsum addition, where up to 36% of carbonate-C appears to be derived from atmospheric in-gassing of CO(2). The site is discussed as a large scale analogue for potential remedial approaches and carbon sequestration technologies that could be applied to red mud slurries and other hyperalkaline wastes. The results of this work have substantial implications for the aluminium production industry in which 3-4% of the direct CO(2) emissions may be offset by carbonate precipitation. Furthermore, carbonation by gypsum addition may be important for contaminant remediation, also providing a physical stabilisation strategy for the numerous historic stockpiles of red mud. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Wall Painting Investigation by Means of Non-invasive Terahertz Time-Domain Imaging (THz-TDI): Inspection of Subsurface Structures Buried in Historical Plasters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dandolo, Corinna Ludovica Koch; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2016-01-01

    of terahertz time-domain imaging (THz-TDI). Subsurface structures have been detected at different depths inside the lime-based plaster of the wall painting until approximately 1 cm from the surface. The surface morphology of the buried structures has been 3D imaged in detail, providing a substantial...

  2. Study of the rheological properties of casting slips obtained from titanium oxide and bariun titanate in order to obtain pieces by means of casting in plaster moulds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amarante Junior, A.

    1986-01-01

    The behaviour of titanium-oxide (TiO 2 ) and barium titanate used in slip casting with plaster moulds is studied. Some data in several tests, as well as materials and methods applied are presented. (M.J.C.) [pt

  3. Kinetics of oil saponification by lead salts in ancient preparations of pharmaceutical lead plasters and painting lead mediums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotte, M; Checroun, E; Susini, J; Dumas, P; Tchoreloff, P; Besnard, M; Walter, Ph

    2006-12-15

    Lead soaps can be found in archaeological cosmetics as well as in oil paintings, as product of interactions of lead salts with oil. In this context, a better understanding of the formation of lead soaps allows a follow-up of the historical evolution of preparation recipes and provides new insights into conservation conditions. First, ancient recipes of both pharmaceutical lead plasters and painting lead mediums, mixtures of oil and lead salts, were reconstructed. The ester saponification by lead salts is determined by the preparation parameters which were quantified by FT-IR spectrometry. In particular, ATR/FT-IR spectrometer was calibrated by the standard addition method to quantitatively follow the kinetics of this reaction. The influence of different parameters such as temperature, presence of water and choice of lead salts was assessed: the saponification is clearly accelerated by water and heating. This analysis provides chemical explanations to the historical evolution of cosmetic and painting preparation recipes.

  4. Classification of multi-layered plaster in St. Abbondio Cloister at Como, Italy: an analytical tool for architectural archaeology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sansonetti, A.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available St. Abbondio, at Como, Italy, is one of the most outstandingRomanesque basilicas in Northern Italy. Theentire building, and particularly the cloister, has beenthe object of a number of restorations over the centuries,as well as a significant conservation endeavourconducted between 2000 and 2003. In the in-depthdiagnostic survey undertaken on that occasion, thecomposition and morphology of the plaster in bothinteriors and exteriors were determined to obtain furtherinsight into the history of the cloister and its conservation.Plaster representative of the various phasesof construction were characterized with techniquessuch as powder X-ray diffraction, mercury intrusionporosimetry, thin section optical microscopy and atomicspectrometry. As a result of these analyses, groupsof samples with similar characteristics could be identified,confirming historiographic hypotheses on thesequence of the restoration and conservation workdone on the building and establishing a possible toolfor architectural archaeology.S. Abbondio (Como, Italia es una de las mas extraordinariasbasilicas romanicas presentes en el norte de Italia.El edificio entero y en particular el claustro ha sido expuestoa varias intervenciones durante los ultimos siglos, enparticular los ultimos trabajos de conservacion ejecutadosentre los anos 2000 y 2003. En esta ocasion se ha efectuadouna vasta campana diagnostica sobre los revoquestanto internos como externos, destinada a clasificarlosdesde el punto de vista compositivo-morfologico y paradescubrir la historia sobre la conservacion del claustro.Revoques representativos de las diferentes fases constructivashan sido identificados con la utilizacion de metodoscomo el analisis de difraccion de rayos X en polvo,porosimetria por intrusion de mercurio, microscopia opticapara secciones finas y espectrometria atomica. Losresultados han permitido agrupar las muestras que presentabancaracteristicas similares, confirmando hipotesishistoricas sobre la

  5. Long-term erosion rate measurements in gypsum caves of Sorbas (SE Spain) by the Micro-Erosion Meter method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, Laura; De Waele, Jo; Calaforra, José Maria; Forti, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The present work deals with the results of long-term micro-erosion measurements in the most important gypsum cave of Spain, the Cueva del Agua (Sorbas, Almeria, SE Spain). Nineteen MEM stations were positioned in 1992 in a wide range of morphological and environmental settings (gypsum floors and walls, carbonate speleothems, dry conduits and vadose passages) inside and outside the cave, on gypsum and carbonate bedrocks and exposed to variable degree of humidity, different air flow and hydrodynamic conditions. Four different sets of stations have been investigated: (1) the main cave entrance (Las Viñicas spring); (2) the main river passage; (3) the abandoned Laboratory tunnel; and (4) the external gypsum surface. Data over a period of about 18 years are available. The average lowering rates vary from 0.014 to 0.016 mm yr- 1 near the main entrance and in the Laboratory tunnel, to 0.022 mm - 1 on gypsum floors and 0.028 mm yr- 1 on carbonate flowstones. The denudation data from the external gypsum stations are quite regular with a rate of 0.170 mm yr- 1. The observations allowed the collecting of important information concerning the feeding of the karst aquifer not only by infiltrating rainwater, but under present climate conditions also by water condensation of moist air flow. This contribution to the overall karst processes in the Cueva del Agua basin represents over 20% of the total chemical dissolution of the karst area and more than 50% of the speleogenetically removed gypsum in the cave system, thus representing all but a secondary role in speleogenesis. Condensation-corrosion is most active along the medium walls, being slower at the roof and almost absent close to the floor. This creates typical corrosion morphologies such as cupola, while gypsum flowers develop where evaporation dominates. This approach also shows quantitatively the morphological implications of condensation-corrosion processes in gypsum karst systems in arid zones, responsible for an

  6. THE INFLUENCE OF GYPSUM TREATMENT ON PHOSPHORUS RETENTION IN BOTTOM SEDIMENTS AND ON THE WATER OF MAN-MADE LAKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilianna Bartoszek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a research covering the stability of phosphorus retention in the bottom sediments, resulting from application of gypsum in anoxic conditions and in slightly acidic environment (pH~5 of solutions. The present work also contains an analysis of possible effects of gypsum application for water from the reservoir, on the basis of selected parameters of overlying water. Undisturbed deposit cores extracted from two research stations on the Solina Reservoir have been a subject to a 10-weeks long exposure in determinate conditions, after application of gypsum. The conducted research indicated that retention capacities of deposits, which become increased after the use of gypsum, will decrease over time (e.g. after winter period. Application of gypsum led to a quite significant increase in concentrations of calcium in solutions. Intense release of iron from the sediments into the solutions and decrease in SO42- content, during the said 10-week exposure in anoxic conditions, indicates the use of iron (III and sulphates as electron acceptors in process of oxidization of an organic substance.

  7. High Levels of Antibiotic Resistance but No Antibiotic Production Detected Along a Gypsum Gradient in Great Onyx Cave, KY, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Lavoie

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A preliminary study of antibiotic production and antibiotic resistance was conducted in Great Onyx Cave in Mammoth Cave National Park, KY, to determine if gypsum (CaSO4∙2H2O affects these bacterial activities. The cave crosses through the width of Flint Ridge, and passages under the sandstone caprock are dry with different amounts of gypsum. The Great Kentucky Desert hypothesis posits that gypsum limits the distribution of invertebrates in the central areas of Great Onyx Cave. Twenty-four bacterial isolates were cultivated from swabs and soils. Using three methods (soil crumb, soil crumb with indicator bacteria, and the cross-streak method using isolated bacteria we did not detect any production of antibiotics. Antibiotic resistance was widespread, with all 24 isolates resistant to a minimum of two antibiotics of seven tested, with three isolates resistant to all. Antibiotic resistance was high and not correlated with depth into the cave or the amount of gypsum. The Great Kentucky Desert hypothesis of the negative effects of gypsum seems to have no impact on bacterial activity.

  8. The impact of gypsum mine water: A case study on morphology and DNA integrity in the freshwater invertebrate, Gammarus balcanicus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ternjej, Ivančica; Mihaljević, Zlatko; Ivković, Marija; Previšić, Ana; Stanković, Igor; Maldini, Krešimir; Želježić, Davor; Kopjar, Nevenka

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate how exposure to heavy metal-rich waters from gypsum mining affects the morphology and levels of primary DNA damage in Gammarus balcanicus. Chemical analysis revealed increased concentrations of metals in water and sediment collected at a site impacted by gypsum mine wastewaters. The specimens also showed elevated total tissue metal levels when compared with the organisms collected at the reference site. The most prominent increase was observed for strontium, followed by iron, nickel, vanadium, aluminium, and manganese. The major pathway of entry for these toxic substances was through the degraded exoskeleton as a consequence of excessive strontium input (unbalanced calcium/strontium ratio) and altered permeability. Disturbed exoskeleton integrity was observed only in individuals collected downstream of the gypsum mine, which was confirmed by electron microscopy. Levels of primary DNA damage were evaluated using the alkaline comet assay in the haemolymph of the specimens. - Highlights: • Our findings suggest toxic potential of gypsum mine wastewaters. • The Gammarus specimens showed elevated total tissue metal levels. • Strontium uptake disturbed exoskeleton integrity. • Corrupted cuticle altered permeability to other toxic substances. • Combined effects of all contaminants caused genotoxicity. - Gypsum mine wastewaters have genotoxic potential and affect the gammarid exoskeleton morphology and biochemistry associated with a high strontium uptake

  9. Climatic control on the growth of gigantic gypsum crystals within hypogenic caves (Naica mine, Mexico)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, Paolo S.; Fricker, Mattias B.; Günther, Detlef; Forti, Paolo; Mercuri, Anna-Maria; Loreti, Mara; Capaccioni, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    Three hypogenic caves within the Naica mine of Mexico ( Cueva de los Cristales — CLC, Ojo de la Reina — OR, and Cueva de las Velas — CLV) host spectacular gypsum crystals up to 11 m in length. These caves are close to another shallow cave of the area ( Cueva de las Espadas — CLE), with which they cover a 160 m-deep vertical section of the local drainage basin. Similar to other hypogenic caves, all these caves lack a direct connection with the land surface and should be unrelated with climate. A record of multi-technique fluid inclusion data and pollen spectra from cave and mine gypsum indicates surprisingly that climatic changes occurring at Naica could have controlled fluid composition in these caves, and hence crystal growth. Microthermometry and LA-ICP-Mass Spectrometry of fluid inclusions indicate that the shallow, chemically peculiar, saline fluid (up to 7.7 eq. wt.%NaCl) of CLE could have formed from evaporation, during a dry and hot climatic period. The fluid of the deep caves was instead of low salinity (˜ 3.5 eq. wt.% NaCl) and chemically homogeneous, and was poorly affected by evaporation. We propose that mixing of these two fluids, generated at different depths of the Naica drainage basin, determined the stable supersaturation conditions for the gigantic gypsum crystals to grow. Fluid mixing was controlled by the hydraulic communication between CLE and the other deep caves, and must have taken place during cycles of warm-dry and fresh-wet climatic periods, which are known to have occurred in the region. Pollen grains from a 35 ka-old gypsum crystal of CLC corresponds to a fairly homogenous catchment basin made of a mixed broadleaf wet forest, which suggests precipitation during a fresh-wet climatic period and confirms our interpretation of the fluid inclusion data. The unusual combination of geological and geochemical factors of Naica suggests that other hypogenic caves found elsewhere may not host similar crystals. However, this work shows that

  10. [THE MYCOBIOTA IN STUDYING THE RESISTANCE OF GYPSUM PLASTERBOARD TO MICROSCOPIC FUNGI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pysmenna, Yu B; Subbota, A G; Nakonechna, L T

    2015-01-01

    The resistance of two types of gypsum plasterboard: ordinary and water-resistant to microscopic fungi was studied. It was found that under conditions of high relative humidity and direct influence of water at constant temperature (29 ± 2) degrees C all samples of plasterboard were not resistant to fungi. Furthermore, the contaminating mycobiota of uninfected fragments of plasterboard was revealed under these conditions. It was discovered that the test cultures Aspergillus terreus and Trichoderma viride were the most active at the stage of developed mycelium.

  11. Arctic gypsum endoliths: a biogeochemical characterization of a viable and active microbial community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziolkowski, L. A.; Mykytczuk, N. C. S.; Omelon, C. R.; Johnson, H.; Whyte, L. G.; Slater, G. F.

    2013-11-01

    Extreme environmental conditions such as those found in the polar regions on Earth are thought to test the limits of life. Microorganisms living in these environments often seek protection from environmental stresses such as high UV exposure, desiccation and rapid temperature fluctuations, with one protective habitat found within rocks. Such endolithic microbial communities, which often consist of bacteria, fungi, algae and lichens, are small-scale ecosystems comprised of both producers and consumers. However, the harsh environmental conditions experienced by polar endolithic communities are thought to limit microbial diversity and therefore the rate at which they cycle carbon. In this study, we characterized the microbial community diversity, turnover rate and microbe-mineral interactions of a gypsum-based endolithic community in the polar desert of the Canadian high Arctic. 16S/18S/23S rRNA pyrotag sequencing demonstrated the presence of a diverse community of phototrophic and heterotrophic bacteria, archaea, algae and fungi. Stable carbon isotope analysis of the viable microbial membranes, as phospholipid fatty acids and glycolipid fatty acids, confirmed the diversity observed by molecular techniques and indicated that present-day atmospheric carbon is assimilated into the microbial community biomass. Uptake of radiocarbon from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing during the 1960s into microbial lipids was used as a pulse label to determine that the microbial community turns over carbon on the order of 10 yr, equivalent to 4.4 g C m-2 yr-1 gross primary productivity. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs indicated that mechanical weathering of gypsum by freeze-thaw cycles leads to increased porosity, which ultimately increases the habitability of the rock. In addition, while bacteria were adhered to these mineral surfaces, chemical analysis by micro-X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) spectroscopy suggests little evidence for microbial alteration of minerals

  12. An analysis of the persistent presence of opportunistic pathogens on patient-derived dental impressions and gypsum casts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egusa, Hiroshi; Watamoto, Takao; Abe, Keike; Kobayashi, Munemasa; Kaneda, Yoshitoshi; Ashida, Shunji; Matsumoto, Takuya; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the persistent presence of microorganisms on patient-derived dental impressions and gypsum casts, while highlighting important human pathogens such as Candida, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The practices and opinions regarding cross-infection control from 59 general dentists in Japan were obtained via a questionnaire. Alginate impressions were made from 56 patients. Using a brain heart infusion agar medium, impression and imprint cultures were carried out to visualize the microbial contamination on the surfaces of the impressions and gypsum casts, respectively. The colonies on the surfaces of the 30 impression cultures and 26 imprint cultures were collected by swabbing and then inoculated onto selective agar plates to detect streptococci, staphylococci, Candida, MRSA, and P aeruginosa. The questionnaire showed that only 54% of general dentists had a cross-infection policy in their dental clinics, and only 30% to 40% were aware of the possible persistence of MRSA or P aeruginosa on impressions and gypsum casts. The impression/imprint cultures grew a large number of visible bacterial colonies on all of impression/gypsum cast samples investigated. Selective agar cultures demonstrated the presence of streptococci (100, 100%), staphylococci (56.7, 65.4%), Candida (30, 46.2%), MRSA (26.7, 15.4%), and P aeruginosa (6.7, 7.7%) on the impressions and the gypsum casts, respectively. This investigation showed that patient-derived dental impressions and gypsum casts are contaminated with numerous microbes, including Candida, MRSA, and P aeruginosa, which are known pathogens responsible for nosocomial and/or life-threatening infection in the immunocompromised host.

  13. Biogeochemical oxidation of calcium sulfite hemihydrate to gypsum in flue gas desulfurization byproduct using sulfur-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Duane; Smith, Jacques J; Chen, Linxi; Kreinberg, Allison; Wallace, Brianna; White, Robby

    2017-10-01

    Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) is a well-established air treatment technology for coal and oil combustion gases that commonly uses lime or pulverized limestone aqueous slurries to precipitate sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) as crystalline calcium salts. Under forced oxidation (excess oxygen) conditions, FGD byproduct contains almost entirely (>92%) gypsum (CaSO 4 ·2H 2 O), a useful and marketable commodity. In contrast, FGD byproduct formed in oxygen deficient oxidation systems contains a high percentage of hannebachite (CaSO 3 ·0.5H 2 O) to yield a material with no commercial value, poor dewatering characteristics, and that is typically disposed in landfills. Hannebachite in FGD byproduct can be chemically converted to gypsum; however, the conditions that support rapid formation of gypsum require large quantities of acids or oxidizers. This work describes a novel, patent pending application of microbial physiology where a natural consortium of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) was used to convert hannebachite-enriched FGD byproduct into a commercially valuable, gypsum-enriched product (US Patent Assignment 503373611). To optimize the conversion of hannebachite into gypsum, physiological studies on the SOB were performed to define their growth characteristics. The SOB were found to be aerobic, mesophilic, neutrophilic, and dependent on a ready supply of ammonia. They were capable of converting hannebachite to gypsum at a rate of approximately five percent per day when the culture was applied to a 20 percent FGD byproduct slurry and SOB growth medium. 16S rDNA sequencing revealed that the SOB consortium contained a variety of different bacterial genera including both SOB and sulfate-reducing bacteria. Halothiobacillus, Thiovirga and Thiomonas were the dominant sulfur-oxidizing genera. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The radiological implications of using by-product gypsum as a building material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Riordan, M.C.; Duggan, M.J.; Rose, W.B.; Bradford, G.F.

    1972-12-01

    By-product gypsum, produced as a waste in the phosphate industry, could be used in bulk as a building material, but it has a higher radium content than other building materials and thus raises the question whether or not the resulting radiation doses to individuals and to the population of the country as a whole are acceptable. The typical radium content is 25 pCi/g, and the corresponding dose rate from γ rays to the gonads and bone-marrow of the occupants of a house would be 30 mrad/y, if by-product gypsum were a substantial constituent. This is comparable with the regional variations in the dose rate due to natural background radiation in Great Britain and less than the local variations. If as many as 10% of all new houses were eventually so constructed, the resulting gonad dose rate averaged over the population would ultimately reach 3 mrad/y, or about 3% of that from the natural background. The report also deals with exposures to β radiation and to radon; these exposures are less than the regional variations in natural exposures. All the annual doses are at least a factor of 10 below the dose limits recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for exposure of members of the public; these dose limits relate to the total exposure from all sources of radiation except natural background and exposures for medical purposes. (author)

  15. The production of hydroxyapatite prototypes from solid bodies of Gypsum/Polyvinyl Alcohol composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, Amanda Alves; Ferraz, Andrea de Vasconcelos; Dantas, Alan Christie; Olivier, Nelson Cardenas, E-mail: andrea.ferraz@univasf.edu.br [Universidade Federal do Vale do Sao Francisco (UNIVASF), Juazeiro, BA (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Prototypes of porous hydroxyapatite (HAp) were produced from Gypsum/PVA composite, using a mass proportion of 15% polymer. The material was obtained by means of chemical conversion in (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HPO{sub 4} 0.5 mol.L{sup -1} solution and NH{sub 4}OH 6.0 mol.L{sup -1} alkaline medium for pH control, maintained between 6.0 and 9.0. The reaction occurred at a temperature of 100°C at different test times. The obtained HAp was characterized by several techniques, such as FTIR, which identified the SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} groups characteristic for the Gypsum block, and the PO{sub 4}{sup 2-} groups that are attributed to the biomaterial HAp, besides XRD and SEM, which made it possible to confirm a successful conversion of the material. Tests for mechanical resistance to compression (σ{sub c}) were carried out for both materials as well. (author)

  16. Investigation of Dynamic Crack Coalescence Using a Gypsum-Like 3D Printing Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chao; Zhao, Gao-Feng; Zhu, Jianbo; Zhao, Yi-Xin; Shen, Luming

    2016-10-01

    Dynamic crack coalescence attracts great attention in rock mechanics. However, specimen preparation in experimental study is a time-consuming and difficult procedure. In this work, a gypsum-like material by powder bed and inkjet 3D printing technique was applied to produce specimens with preset cracks for split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) test. From micro X-ray CT test, it was found that the 3D printing technique could successfully prepare specimens that contain preset cracks with width of 0.2 mm. Basic mechanical properties of the 3D printing material, i.e., the elastic modulus, the Poisson's ratio, the density, the compressive strength, the indirect tensile strength, and the fracture toughness, were obtained and reported. Unlike 3D printed specimens using polylactic acid, these gypsum-like specimens can produce failure patterns much closer to those observed in classical rock mechanical tests. Finally, the dynamic crack coalescence of the 3D printed specimens with preset cracks were captured using a high-speed camera during SHPB tests. Failure patterns of these 3D printed specimens are similar to the specimens made by Portland cement concrete. Our results indicate that sample preparation by 3D printing is highly competitive due to its quickness in prototyping, precision and flexibility on the geometry, and high material homogeneity.

  17. Some properties of saline-alkaline soils of Aydin-Söke plain and activity of gypsum as amelioration material

    OpenAIRE

    Aydın, Gönül; Atatanır, Levent; Yorulmaz, Alper

    2008-01-01

    The study has been carried out in two different areas; a farmer area in Söke Plain and in experimental station of Adnan Menderes University. The aims of study, are to determine of some physical and chemical properties of the soils and to search of activity of gypsum (CaSO4) used in alkaline soils having high sodium. For this purpose, 50,100 and 150 kg/da gypsum were applied to the experimental soils besides control. These applications were made in autumn after harvest period and b...

  18. Use of 5% lidocaine medicated plaster to treat localized neuropathic pain secondary to traumatic injury of peripheral nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Correa-Illanes G

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Gerardo Correa-Illanes,1 Ricardo Roa,2 José Luis Piñeros,2 Wilfredo Calderón31Rehabilitation Department, 2Burns and Plastic Surgery Department, Hospital del Trabajador, 3Plastic Surgery Department, Hospital del Salvador, Santiago, ChileObjective: The efficacy of 5% lidocaine medicated plaster (LMP has previously been demonstrated in post-traumatic localized neuropathic pain. This study evaluated the use of LMP in localized neuropathic pain secondary to traumatic peripheral nerve injury.Patients and methods: This prospective observational study enrolled patients with traumatic injuries to peripheral nerves that were accompanied by localized neuropathic pain of more than 3 months duration. Demographic variables, pain intensity (measured using the numeric rating scale; NRS, answers to the Douleur Neuropathique 4 (DN4 questionnaire, and the size of the painful area were recorded.Results: Nineteen patients were included, aged (mean ± standard deviation 41.4 ± 15.7 years. Nerve injuries affected the upper (eight patients or lower (11 patients limbs. The mean duration of pain before starting treatment with LMP was 22.6 ± 43.5 months (median 8 months. Mean baseline values included: NRS 6.7 ± 1.6, painful area 17.8 ± 10.4 cm2 (median 18 cm2, and DN4 score 6.7 ± 1.4. The mean duration of treatment with LMP was 19.5 ± 10.0 weeks (median 17.4 weeks. Mean values after treatment were: NRS 2.8 ± 1.5 (≥3 point reduction in 79% of patients, ≥50% reduction in 57.9% of patients and painful area 2.1 ± 2.3 cm2 (median 1 cm2, ≥50% reduction in 94.7% of patients. Functional improvement after treatment was observed in 14/19 patients (73.7%.Conclusion: LMP effectively treated traumatic injuries of peripheral nerves which presented with chronic localized neuropathic pain, reducing both pain intensity and the size of the painful area.Keywords: chronic post-surgical pain, chronic post-traumatic pain, 5% lidocaine medicated plaster, neuropathic pain

  19. Reinforced plaster by means of the synergic action between concrete additives (superfluidifiers, fluidiflers and airing-plasticizers and E glass fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    del Río Merino, M.

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Through the analysis of the different compounds (plaster + additives + E glass fibres we pretend to demostrate that a synergic action is present between certain concrete additives (superfluidifiers, fluidiflers, and airingplasticizers and E glass fibre, on the basis of the flection resistance of plaster matrix based compound materials.

    Mediante el análisis de diferentes compuestos (escayola + aditivos + fibras de vidrio E se pretende demostrar que existe una acción sinérgica entre ciertos aditivos del hormigón (superfluidificantes, fluidificantes y aireantes-plastificantes y los refuerzos a base de fibras de vidrio E, sobre la resistencia a flexión de los materiales compuestos de matriz principal escayola.

  20. Late-stage anhydrite-gypsum-siderite-dolomite-calcite assemblages record the transition from a deep to a shallow hydrothermal system in the Schwarzwald mining district, SW Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burisch, Mathias; Walter, Benjamin F.; Gerdes, Axel; Lanz, Maximilian; Markl, Gregor

    2018-02-01

    The majority of hydrothermal vein systems of economic interest occur at relatively shallow crustal levels, although many of them formed at significantly greater depths. Their present position is a consequence of uplift and erosion. Although, many aspects of their formation are well constrained, the temporal chemical evolution of such systems during uplift and erosion is still poorly understood. These vein minerals comprise calcite, dolomite-ankerite, siderite-magnesite, anhydrite and gypsum forming the last gangue assemblages in Jurassic and Tertiary sulphide-fluorite-quartz-barite veins of the Schwarzwald mining district, SW Germany. Mineral textures of samples from nine localities reveal that in these sequences, mineral precipitation follows a recurring pattern: early calcite is followed by anhydrite or gypsum, siderite and/or dolomite. This succession may repeat up to three times. In-situ (LA-ICP-MS) U-Pb age dating of 15 carbonates from three subsequent generations of the late-stage vein assemblage yield robust ages between 20 and 0.6 Ma. Each mineral sequence forms in a distinctive period of about 2-5 Ma. These ages clearly relate these late-stage mineral phases to the youngest geological episode of the Schwarzwald, which is associated with the Cenozoic Rhine Graben rifting and basement uplift. Based on thermodynamic modelling, the formation of the observed mineral assemblages required an deeply sourced Mg-, Fe- and SO4-rich fluid (b), which was episodically mixed with a shallow crustal HCO3-rich fluid (a). As a consequence of fluid mixing, concentrations of Mg, Fe and SO4 temporarily increased and initiated the formation of the observed sulphate-carbonate mineral sequences. This discontinuous large-scale vertical fluid mixing was presumably directly related to episodes of active tectonics associated with the Cenozoic strike-slip regime of the Upper Rhine Graben. Analogously, episodic fluid mixing is a major key in the formation of older (Jurassic to early

  1. Use of polyurethane foam inside plaster casts to prevent the onset of heel sores in the population at risk. A controlled clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forni, Cristiana; Loro, Loretta; Tremosini, Morena; Mini, Sandra; Pignotti, Elettra; Bigoni, Ombretta; Guzzo, Giuseppe; Bellini, Laura; Trofa, Carmela; Di Cataldo, Anna M; Guzzi, Marilena

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to test the effectiveness of polyurethane foam in contact with the heel inside a plaster cast to decrease the rate of pressure sores in the population at most risk. The rate of pressure sores caused by the plaster cast is reported to be 14-15% in the paediatric population, 33.3% in patients having undergone chemotherapy for bone tumours and 43% in orthopaedic patients who already have sore skin when the cast is applied (grade 1 lesion) to the heel. Controlled clinical trial. From November 2007-January 2009, all consecutive subjects requiring lower limb casts having undergone chemotherapy and/or presenting heel soreness received polyurethane foam in contact with the skin of the heel before applying the cast. The results were compared with those of patients with the same risk factors but were not administered the foam and were enrolled from May 2005-August 2006. In total, 156 patients were enrolled, 85 in the control group and 71 in the experimental group. In the experimental group, 2 of the 56 patients (3.6%) with sore skin developed a pressure sore compared with 21 of 49 (42.9%) in the control group without polyurethane foam (p polyurethane foam in contact with the skin of the heel inside a plaster cast prevents the formation of pressure sores. This study provides evidence that using polyurethane foam to prevent sores even inside plaster casts in populations at most risk is a simple and cost-effective strategy and decreases the discomfort, pain and risks in these patients. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Lipid and Phylogenetic Analysis of a Gypsum-hosted Endoevaporitic Microbial Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, K. A.; Jahnke, L. L.; Green, S. J.; Kubo, M. D.; Vogel, M. B.; Des Marais, D. J.

    2007-12-01

    Gypsum evaporites host diverse, productive and volumetrically significant microbial communities and are relevant modern-day analogs to both Precambrian sabkha deposits and, potentially, Martian evaporites. Extensive evaporites form in subaqueous environments of high salinity ponds (>150 permil) maintained by the Exportadora de Sal, S. A. (ESSA) in Guerrero Negro, B.C.S., Mexico. A gypsarenite (reworked clastic gypsum) crust found along the southeast margin of ESSA's Pond 9 was collected in February 2004 and each vibrantly colored layer in the top centimeter was sampled. Extant microbial communities from each layer were characterized using complementary culture-independent molecular techniques, lipid biomarker analysis, and compound specific isotopic analysis. Coupling molecular analysis with lipid biomarker analysis revealed that oxygenic photosynthetic organisms dominate the surface layers (top 3 mm). Polar lipids from the surface layers consisted predominantly of glycolipids, which are characteristic of algae, cyanobacteria and green anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria. Consistent with prior analyses of gypsum evaporites, 16S rRNA gene clone libraries indicate that cyanobacterial populations belong primarily to the genus Cyanothece. The bacterial community below the surface layers is more diverse and dominated by anaerobic organisms. Phototrophic purple sulfur bacteria, sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), and Bacteroidetes were particularly abundant. The relative abundances of SRB increased with depth; Desulfobacteraceae clones were distributed throughout the crust, but not at the surface, while Desulfovibrionaceae clones were found predominantly in the deepest layers. These molecular results are consistent with fatty acid biomarker analysis. δ13C values of major lipid classes in the crust and sediment range from 14 to 36‰, which is considerably lower than corresponding values for benthic Microcoleus-dominated cyanobacterial mats found at lower salinities at ESSA

  3. Assessment of functional treatment versus plaster of Paris in the treatment of grade 1 and 2 lateral ankle sprains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeem, Muhammad; Rahimnajjad, Muhammad Kazim; Rahimnajjad, Nasir Ali; Idrees, Zaki; Shah, Ghazanfar Ali; Abbas, Ghulam

    2015-03-01

    Despite the common occurrence of ankle sprains, no treatment is considered to be the gold standard for the management of such sprains. We assessed functional treatment versus plaster of Paris (POP) for the treatment of lateral ankle sprains, with pain and function employed as the outcome measures. 126 Patients were eligible for inclusion. They were assigned to either the functional treatment Tubigrip (TG) group or the POP group after applying block randomization. Characteristics such as age, dominant ankle, and gender were assessed at baseline. Pain and functional assessments were done using the visual analog scale (VAS) and the Karlsson score (KS) at baseline (at the start of the study) and during the 2nd and 6th weeks, respectively. Data on other subjective parameters, such as the number of painkillers used, the number of days taken off work, and the number of sleepless nights, were requested from the patients at the end of the study. SPSS version 16 was used for analysis, and p knee POP cast. Level I.

  4. Assessment of the physical and mechanical properties of plaster of Paris bandage cast used as a splinting and casting materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Parmar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the physical and mechanical properties of plaster of Paris (POP bandage cast used as a splinting and casting materials. Materials and Methods: POP casts were divided into three Groups A, B and C with 2, 3 and 8 layer for POP bandage, respectively (n=6 in each group. Handling characters, technical easiness or difficulties, setting time, weight, diameter and thickness of the casts were recorded for different groups. The casts were mounted on universal testing machine and axial load was applied @ 10 mm/min until failure. The load deflection graphs were plotted. The maximum force at which failure of the casts occurred was recorded. Stress, strain, modulus of elasticity (MOE and stiffness of casts were calculated. Result: Construction of POP bandage cast was messy and required 45-60 min for hardening. 8 layer POP cast was comparatively heavier in weight and thicker in cross section than 3 layer cast followed by 2 layer cast. Under axial compression, the load bearing capacity of 8 layer POP casts was more than 2 and 3 layer cast. Conclusion: The values of load bearing capacity, stress, stiffness and MOE of cast were the highest for 8 layer POP cast followed by 2 and 3 layer cast. Use if splints with POP cast is recommended due to its poor mechanical properties.

  5. Use of Gypsum as a Preventive Measure for Strength Deterioration during Curing in Class F Fly Ash Geopolymer System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Yubin; Oh, Jae Eun

    2015-01-01

    This study discusses strength deterioration during the curing process of fly ash geopolymer and the use of CaSO4·2H2O (gypsum) as a deterioration remedy when the ash was synthesized using a 10M NaOH and Na-silicate solution. The strength decline was mainly due to the widespread formation of nanometer-sized cracks that were related to excessive Na and Si concentrations at an early age. Use of 2 wt% CaSO4·2H2O resulted in the best measured strength by temporarily reducing Na and Si concentrations; Na was absorbed by SO42−, up to 11% in the matrix within one day, and formed Na2SO4 (thenardite), which gradually dissolved over time, slowly releasing Na ions. However, more than 4% gypsum suppressed overall strength development because too many Na ions were locked into Na2SO4 and could not participate in geopolymerization. The addition of gypsum impeded glass dissolution and even halted the process when more than 4% gypsum was used.

  6. Evaluation of flue-gas desulfurization gypsum in poultry litter as a substrate component for greenhouse horticultural crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study was conducted to evaluate the growth response and consumer preference of three plant species to substrate blends containing flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG). Substrate blends used in this study were derived from a previous experiment that evaluated the use of FGD Gas a bedding material...

  7. Synthesis of high-purity precipitated calcium carbonate during the process of recovery of elemental sulphur from gypsum waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beer, M; Doucet, F J; Maree, J P; Liebenberg, L

    2015-12-01

    We recently showed that the production of elemental sulphur and calcium carbonate (CaCO3) from gypsum waste by thermally reducing the waste into calcium sulphide (CaS) followed by its direct aqueous carbonation yielded low-grade carbonate products (i.e. production of high-grade CaCO3 (i.e. >99 mass% as CaCO3) or precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC). The process used an acid gas (H2S) to improve the aqueous dissolution of CaS, which is otherwise poorly soluble. The carbonate product was primarily calcite (99.5%) with traces of quartz (0.5%). Calcite was the only CaCO3 polymorph obtained; no vaterite or aragonite was detected. The product was made up of micron-size particles, which were further characterised by XRD, TGA, SEM, BET and true density. Results showed that about 0.37 ton of high-grade PCC can be produced from 1.0 ton of gypsum waste, and generates about 0.19 ton of residue, a reduction of 80% from original waste gypsum mass to mass of residue that needs to be discarded off. The use of gypsum waste as primary material in replacement of mined limestone for the production of PPC could alleviate waste disposal problems, along with converting significant volumes of waste materials into marketable commodities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Influence of gypsum on efflorescence in ceramic tiles; Influence da gipsita no surgimento de eflorescencia em telhas ceramicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteiro, C.M.O.L. [Servico Nacional de Aprendizagem Industrial (SENAI), Teresina, PI (Brazil); Nascimento, R.M.; Martinelli, A.E. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (PPgCEM/UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencia e Engenharia de Materiais

    2009-07-01

    The red ceramic industry is recognized as of major importance in Piaui State. The State capital, Teresina, is the greatest producer of this material, which is used mainly for masonry sealing blocks. One of the most frequent problems in this kind of products is the efflorescence.This paper has the main objective of studying the influence of gypsum on tiles, using the local industry production standards. The raw materials were characterized by FRX, DRX, thermal analysis and sulfates. Extruded test specimens were made with the addition of 1%, 3% and 5% of gypsum in the ceramic paste, burned at 850 deg C, 950 deg C and 1050 deg C and submitted to further technological and analysis for MEV. The reference ceramic paste did not show tendency to efflorescence formation after burning for samples with 1% gypsum added to the paste. The reference ceramic paste showed tendency to efflorescence formation after drying and consolidated efflorescence after burning for samples with 5% gypsum added to the paste. (author)

  9. Synthesis of high-purity precipitated calcium carbonate during the process of recovery of elemental sulphur from gypsum waste

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Beer, Morris

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We recently showed that the production of elemental sulphur and calcium carbonate (CaCO3) from gypsum waste by thermally reducing the waste into calcium sulphide (CaS) followed by its direct aqueous carbonation yielded low-grade carbonate products...

  10. Gypsum (CaSO42H2O) scaling on polybenzimidazole and cellulose acetate hollow fiber membranes under forward osmosis

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Si Cong

    2013-11-08

    We have examined the gypsum (CaSO42H2O) scaling phenomena on membranes with different physicochemical properties in forward osmosis (FO) processes. Three hollow fiber membranes made of (1) cellulose acetate (CA), (2) polybenzimidazole (PBI)/polyethersulfone (PES) and (3) PBI-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS)/polyacrylonitrile (PAN) were studied. For the first time in FO processes, we have found that surface ionic interactions dominate gypsum scaling on the membrane surface. A 70% flux reduction was observed on negatively charged CA and PBI membrane surfaces, due to strong attractive forces. The PBI membrane surface also showed a slightly positive charge at a low pH value of 3 and exhibited a 30% flux reduction. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) force measurements confirmed a strong repulsive force between gypsum and PBI at a pH value of 3. The newly developed PBI-POSS/PAN membrane had ridge morphology and a contact angle of 51.42 14.85 after the addition of hydrophilic POSS nanoparticles and 3 min thermal treatment at 95 C. Minimal scaling and an only 1.3% flux reduction were observed at a pH value of 3. Such a ridge structure may reduce scaling by not providing a locally flat surface to the crystallite at a pH value of 3; thus, gypsum would be easily washed away from the surface. 2013 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

  11. Crystallisation of Gypsum and Prevention of Foaming in Wet Flue Gas Desulphurisation (FGD) Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Brian Brun

    faces. Excessive foaming within wet FGD-plants has been associated with a range of operational problems as well as an increased degree of SO2 absorption. Foaming agents include surfactants, macromolecules (such as polymers or proteins), and finely dispersed solids. The foaming ability of particles......, electrolytes and buffers, present in a wet FGD-plant, has been investigated by laboratory scale Bikerman experiments. Adipic acid, as well as a combination of small particles and an electrolyte, have been demonstrated to generate weak transient foams. Pilot plant experiments showed an increased absorption......The aim of this project is to investigate two operational problems, which have been experienced during wet flue gas desulphurisation (FGD) operation, i.e. poor gypsum dewatering properties and foaming. The results of this work can be used for the optimization of wet FGD-plants in terms...

  12. Application of reject of gypsum from Trindade/PE in ceramic masses formulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Thalles Confessor de; Souza, Marcondes Mendes de; Almeida, Ana Beatriz Dantas de; Farias, Debora Santos Umbelino de; Nobrega, Luiz Felipe Pereira de Medeiros; Mendes, Luciana Bezerra

    2016-01-01

    The mining industry is a major producer of waste is to be harmful to the environment besides not being made possible for use in producing means, since the product of economic interest has been extracted. In order to reduce this problem, this work shows the characterization of the waste generated by gypsum mining in Trindade/PE in the ceramic coating. The residue was collected, ground and sieved to #200, then was chemically characterized by XRF analysis process, to evaluate its potential to be incorporated into the formulation of ceramic material, the material studied can be used in porcelain tile formulation as a flux element for that were obtained in the laboratory ceramic bodies adding the residue then were performed physical testing of linear shrinkage, water absorption and flexural breaking strain technically order to evaluate the addition of this residue ceramic coating. (author)

  13. Effect of Ammonium Chloride Solution on the Growth of Phosphorus Gypsum Whisker and Its Modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouwei Jian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Phosphogypsum is the by-product of phosphate of fertilizer or phosphate which causes serious environmental pollution. In this work, a series of phosphogypsum whiskers were prepared using phosphogypsum as raw materials and NH4Cl as additive through the atmospheric water solution method. The results showed that the ammonium chloride solution has a great influence on phosphogypsum whiskers growth and the solubility. The best whisker aspect ratio of phosphogypsum was preferred in 1 mol/L NH4Cl solution, in which the solubility achieved 6.434 mg/mL and the aspect ratio reached 69.29. Besides, NH4Cl was found to have a modified effect on gypsum whiskers’ growth and it can be used to get mesh or dendritic whiskers.

  14. Coagulation-condensation structure formation in aqueous suspensions of mixtures of sulfur and gypsum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Toshtay

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of structure formation in hydrosuspensions of powdered sulfur and its mixtures with gypsum was investigated. The effect of cationic (CTAB and anionic (SDBS surfactants on the surface tension of water; ζ-potential of the sulfur particles and wettability of sulfur was learned. Both surfactants at low concentrations; lead to an increase in plastic strength (Pm of the suspension; and at high concentrations (above CMC – they lead to Pm reduce. In addition; it was found that the surfactants substantially change ζ-potential of the sulfur particles – cationic surfactants  lead to charge exchange and anionic surfactants increase the negative charge of the particles. These changes are the result to restructuring in the adsorption layers of surfactants - the formation of a saturated mono-layer while up to Pm maximum; bilayer - after CMC (while the Pm is reducing.

  15. [Determination of multi-element contents in gypsum by ICP-AES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhong-bao; Bai, Yong-zhi; Cui, Jin-hua; Mei, Yi-fei; Ma, Zhen-zhu

    2014-08-01

    The content of multi-element in gypsum was determined by ICP-AES. The sample was pretreated by acid-soluble method or alkali-fusion method. Acid-soluble method is suitable for the determination of CaO, SOs, Al2O3, Fe2O3, MgO, K2O, Na2O, TiO2, P2O5, MnO, SrO and BaO. Alkali-fusion method is suitable for the determination of CaO, SO3, SiO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, MgO, TiO2, P2O5, MnO, SrO, BaO and B2O3. Different series standard solutions were prepared considering the properties and content of elements and solution matrix. The limit of detection and quantification were confirmed for each element under their best analysis spectral lines. The recoveries of the two pretreatment methods were from 93% to 110%, besides that for TiO2 was 81%-87% as pretreated by acid-soluble method. All RSDs (n=6) of tests were from 0.70%-3.42%. The accuracies of CaO and SO3 with ICP-AES method were less than the chemical analysis method. The determination of CaO and SO3 with ICP-AES method is only suitable for the case of low accuracy requirement. The results showed that the method can be used for the determination of multi-element contents in gypsum, with simple operation, fast analysis and reliable results. Total elements can be analysed with both acid-soluble method and alkali-fusion method.

  16. Expansion of high flow mixtures of gypsum-bonded investments in contact with absorbent liners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodovici, Edméa; Meira, Josete Barbosa Cruz; Filho, Leonardo Eloy Rodrigues; Ballester, Rafael Yagüe

    2005-06-01

    To evaluate the expansion of high flow mixtures of gypsum-bonded investments in contact with two dry absorbent liners since early setting. Cristobalite-Dentsply and Cristobalite-Polidental gypsum-bonded investments were tested under 10 setting conditions (n=4): Normal and Hygroscopic (controls); four conditions of 'Dry-Lining' (set in contact with 3 different amounts of dry cellulose liner: 0.2, 0.4 or 0.8 g and with 0.1 g of a granulated Super Absorbent polymer liner) and four conditions of 'Dry-Lining with hygroscopic expansion' (initially setting in contact with dry absorbents, as 'Dry-Lining' conditions, followed by water immersion immediately after loss of gloss). The percent of expansion at 2h was analyzed. The 'Dry-Lining' condition, with 0.4 and 0.8 g of cellulose, for brand Dentsply (1.41+/-0.13 and 1.42+/-0.16) and Polidental (1.14+/-0.17 and 1.01+/-0.22) allowed a significant higher expansion than the controls Normal (Dentsply=0.30+/-0.04, Polidental=0.31+/-0.05) (PSuper Absorbent did not produce different expansion (Dentsply=0.86+/-0.02, Polidental=0.79+/-0.18) than the controls Normal and Hygroscopic (Dentsply=2.93+/-0.17, Polidental=2.12+/-0.40). The water removal with dry cellulose absorbent liner before loss of gloss increased the potential of setting expansion for Normal and Hygroscopic conditions. Thus, when using high fluid mixtures, which are more desirable for investment pouring, it will be possible to obtain enough setting expansion potential in order to adequately compensate for wax and alloy shrinkage in the casting process.

  17. Effect Of Coir Fibres On The Compaction And Unconfined Compressive Strength Of Bentonite-Lime-Gypsum Mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilak B. Vidya

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the effect of coir fibres on the compaction and unconfined compressive strength of a bentonite-lime-gypsum mixture. The coir fiber content varied from 0.5 to 2 %. The results indicated that the dry unit weight and the optimum moisture content of a bentonite – lime mix increased with the addition of gypsum. The unconfined compressive strength of the bentonite increased with the increase in the lime content up to 8 %. Beyond 8 %, the unconfined compressive strength decreased. The dry unit weight of the reference mix decreased, and the optimum moisture content increased with the addition of coir fibre. The unconfined compressive strength of the bentonite + 8 % lime mix increased up to 4 % with the gypsum. Beyond 4 %, the unconfined compressive strength decreased. The unconfined compressive strength of the reference mix increased with the addition of coir fibre up to a fibre content of 1.5 %. The unconfined compressive strength of the reference mix-coir fibre composite was less in comparison to the reference mix. The unconfined compressive strength of the bentonite increased with the addition of lime and gypsum and with the increase in the curing period. The improvement in the post-peak region was better for the reference mix with reinforced coir fibres as compared to the unreinforced reference mix. The improved post-peak behaviour of the bentonite-lime-gypsum-coir fibre mixture could boost the construction of temporary roads on such problematic soils. Further, its use will also provide an environmental motivation for providing a means of consuming large quantities of coir fibres.

  18. Mould filling of Ag-Pd-Cu-Au and Ag-Zn-Sn-In alloy castings made using a rapidly prepared gypsum-bonded investment material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Hiroshi; Inoue, Shoko; Miyauchi, Hideaki; Watanabe, Kouichi; Takahashi, Yutaka

    2008-12-01

    Mandibular premolar-shaped wax patterns of full crowns with a marginal angle of 300 were prepared. Two semiprecious alloys were cast using a rapidly prepared gypsum-bonded investment material or a conventional gypsum-bonded investment. A precise impression was taken and cut into four segments. Scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate the mould filling of each segment. The mould filling of the silver-palladium-copper-gold alloy was worse than that of the silver-zinc-tin-indium alloy. The mould filling of both alloys cast with the rapidly prepared gypsum-bonded investment material was superior to that using the conventional investment.

  19. Diaphyseal femoral fractures below the age of six years: Results of plaster application and long term followup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nunzio Catena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:In children less than 6 years, the treatment of femoral shaft fracture is often non surgical, using closed reduction and casting. The literature reports many experience about this type of trauma but none of these has a long term followup. We present a retrospective study on a group of femoral diaphyseal fractures treated nonsurgically in children up to 6 years of age, with a minimum of 10 year followup. Materials and Methods:48 cases (36 males/12 females with femoral diaphyseal fractures treated between January 1988 and December 1998 were reviewed. Patients with fractures due to obstetrical trauma and pathologic fractures were excluded. The mean age of the patients was 3.3 ± 1.1 years (range 5 months-6 years. Right side was involved in 21 cases (44%, and left side in 27 cases (56%. In 34 cases (71%, closed reduction was performed and hip spica was applied with the hip and knee flexed to 45΀. In 8 cases (17%, skeletal traction was applied to perform fracture reduction and the traction pin was embedded in plaster while in the remaining 6 cases (12%, the Delitala pressure apparatus was applied after casting. Results:All fractures healed in our study. There were no complications (infection or vascular nervous issues, axial deviations, consolidation delays, or pseudoarthrosis. In 13 cases (27%, followup examinations showed mean lengthening of 1.3 ± 0.75 (range 0.5-2.5 cm of the fractured lower limb. All these patients were treated with skin traction before treatment and presented with 2.08 ± 0.28 cm mean initial femoral shortening. In 1 case (2% with 2.5 cm lengthening, epiphysiodesis of the ipsilateral knee was performed. No patients showed prolonged difficulty with gait disorders. Conclusion:On the basis of our results conservative treatment of femoral shaft fractures in children can be considered less invasive and safe procedure.

  20. Evaluation of digital model accuracy and time-dependent deformation of alginate impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesur, M G; Omurlu, I K; Ozer, T

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of digital models produced with the three-dimensional dental scanner, and to test the dimensional stability of alginate impressions for durations of immediately (T0), 1 day (T1), and 2 days (T2). A total of sixty impressions were taken from a master model with an alginate, and were poured into plaster models in three different storage periods. Twenty impressions were directly scanned (negative digital models), after which plaster models were poured and scanned (positive digital models) immediately. The remaining 40 impressions were poured after 1 and 2 days. In total, 9 points and 11 linear measurements were used to analyze the plaster models, and negative and positive digital models. Time-dependent deformation of the alginate impressions and the accuracy of the conventional plaster models and digital models were evaluated separately. Plaster models, negative and positive digital models showed significant differences in nearly all measurements at T (0), T (1), and T (2) times (P 0.05), but they demonstrated statistically significant differences at T (2) time (P impressions is practicable method for orthodontists.

  1. Origin and diagenetic evolution of gypsum and microbialitic carbonates in the Late Sag of the Namibe Basin (SW Angola)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Gindre-Chanu; Edoardo, Perri; Ian, Sharp R.; Peacock, D. C. P.; Roger, Swart; Ragnar, Poulsen; Hercinda, Ferreira; Vladimir, Machado

    2016-08-01

    Ephemeral evaporitic conditions developed within the uppermost part of the transgressive Late Sag sequence in the Namibe Basin (SW Angola), leading to the formation of extensive centimetre- to metre-thick sulphate-bearing deposits and correlative microbialitic carbonates rich in pseudomorphs after evaporite crystals. The onshore pre-salt beds examined in this study are located up to 25 m underneath the major mid-Aptian evaporitic succession, which is typified at the outcrop by gypsiferous Bambata Formation and in the subsurface by the halite-dominated Loeme Formation. Carbonate-evaporite cycles mostly occur at the top of metre-thick regressive parasequences, which progressively onlap and overstep landward the former faulted (rift) topography, or fill major pre-salt palaeo-valleys. The sulphate beds are made up of alabastrine gypsum associated with embedded botryoidal nodules, dissolution-related gypsum breccia, and are cross-cut by thin satin-spar gypsum veins. Nodular and fine-grained fabrics are interpreted as being diagenetic gypsum deposits resulting from the dissolution and recrystallisation of former depositional subaqueous sulphates, whereas gypsum veins and breccia result from telogenetic processes. The carbonates display a broader diversity of facies, characterised by rapid lateral variations along strike. Thin dolomitic and calcitic bacterial-mediated filamentous microbialitic boundstones enclose a broad variety of evaporite pseudomorphs and can pass laterally over a few metres into sulphate beds. Dissolution-related depositional breccias are also common and indicate early dissolution of former evaporite layers embedded within the microbialites. Sulphate and carbonate units are interpreted as being concomitantly deposited along a tide-dominated coastal supra- to intertidal- sabkha and constitute high-frequency hypersaline precursor events, prior to the accumulation of the giant saline mid-Aptian Bambata and Loeme Formations. Petrographic and geochemical

  2. Technical Note: Historic gypsum-kilns (Morata de Tajuña, Madrid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Llamas Borrajo, J. F.

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available In the locality of Morata de Tajuña and surroundings there was an important settlement of gypsum pits and limekilns, together with other historical industries, now disappear. These activities were developed mainly during the 1960´s and 70´s, but its production decreased because of changes in the productive processes (substitution of discontinuous processes by continuous ones, higher kilns, etc. (1. Nevertheless, some of these furnaces still remain, as well as ancient workers who have provided important information. Within the research project funded by the Madrid´s Government, entitled: Industrial archaeology: Conservation of the mining and metallurgical heritage of Madrid (IV, ancient gypsum pits have been identified and inventoried. The ancient gypsiferous extraction history was recovered and the productive processes fluxes were reconstructed. The state of the heritage is evaluated and the conservation of some of the elements is recommended. Likewise, the intangible heritage was also investigated, being able to show a legend related with these kilns.En Morata de Tajuña y pueblos limítrofes hay una importante tradición yesera y calera, así como de otras industrias de materiales de la construcción ya desaparecidas, sobre todo en los años 60-70 del pasado siglo, debido a cambios en los sistemas productivos (paso de sistemas discontinuos a continuos, hornos mayores, etc. (1. Por eso aún se conservan algunos hornos y también viven antiguos productores, a los que hemos podido preguntar sobre los procesos productivos. En el marco de un proyecto de investigación de la Consejería de Educación de la Comunidad de Madrid titulado “Arqueología Industrial: conservación del patrimonio minero-metalúrgico madrileño (IV” se están identificando e inventariando viejas yeserías, recuperando la historia yesera local, reconstruyendo los flujos productivos y entrevistando a antiguos operarios. De esta manera, se pretende evaluar

  3. Self-disinfecting Alginate vs Conventional Alginate: Effect on Surface Hardness of Gypsum Cast-An in vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavan, Ranjith; George, Navia; Thummala, Niharika R; Ravi, S V; Nagpal, Ajay

    2017-11-01

    For the construction of any dental prosthesis, accurate impressions are necessary. Hence, we undertook the present study to evaluate and compare the surface hardness of gypsum casts poured from impressions made using conventional alginate and self-disinfecting alginate. A total of 30 impressions of stainless steel die were made, out of which 15 impressions were made with conventional alginate and 15 were made with self-disinfecting alginate and poured using Type III dental stone. Thirty stone specimens were subjected for hardness testing. Data were analyzed using independent samples t-test to compare the mean surface hardness. Difference in surface hardness was statistically insignificant (p > 0.05). Surface hardness of gypsum casts poured using impressions made from self-disinfecting alginate and conventional alginates were comparable. Self-disinfecting alginates may be employed in clinical practice as safe and effective materials to overcome the infection control issues without compromising on the properties of the material.

  4. Quantifying mold biomass on gypsum board: Comparison of ergosterol and beta-N-acetylhexosaminidase as mold biomass parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reeslev, M.; Miller, M.; Nielsen, Kristian Fog

    2003-01-01

    Two mold species, Stachybotrys chartarum and Aspergillus versicolor, were inoculated onto agar overlaid with cellophane, allowing determination of a direct measurement of biomass density by weighing. Biomass density, ergosterol content, and beta-N-acetylhexosaminidase (3.2.1.52) activity were...... monitored from inoculation to stationary phase. Regression analysis showed a good linear correlation to biomass density for both ergosterol content and beta-N-acetylhexosaminidase activity. The same two mold species were inoculated onto wallpapered gypsum board, from which a direct biomass measurement...... density from ergosterol content and beta-N-acetylhexosaminidase activity were determined. The CFs were used to estimate the biomass density of the molds grown on gypsum board. The biomass densities estimated from ergosterol content and beta-N-acetylhexosaminidase activity data gave similar results...

  5. Interaction of gypsum and the rhizome of Anemarrhena asphodeloides plays an important role in anti-allergic effects of byakkokakeishito in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Makino, Toshiaki; Shiraki, Yusaku; Mizukami, Hajime

    2014-01-01

    Gypsum is a crude mineral drug used in the formulas of Japanese kampo medicine and traditional Chinese medicine. The present study aimed to evaluate the anti-allergic effect of byakkokakeishito extract (BKT), which consists of gypsum (natural hydrous calcium sulfate), Anemarrhena Rhizome (rhizome of Anemarrhena asphodeloides), Cinnamon Bark (bark of trunk of Cinnamomum cassia), Oriza Seed (seed of Oryza sativa), and Glycyrrhiza (root and stolon of Glycyrrhiza uralensis), and to clarify the ro...

  6. A study of the effectiveness of the use of gypsum and volcanic ash against the stability of clay soil in terms of UCT and CBR values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesyanto; Iskandar, R.; Hastuty, IP; Lubis, AIU

    2018-02-01

    Soil stabilization is an effort to improve engineering properties of soil. The conventional soil stabilization is by adding additives to the soil such as Portland cement, lime, and bitumen. The clay stabilization research was done by adding gypsum and volcanic ash. The research purposes were to find out the value of engineering properties of clay due to the addition of 2% gypsum and 2% - 15% volcanic ash. The soil was classified as Clay - Low Plasticity (CL) based on USCS and was classified as A-7-6 (10) based on AASHTO classification system. The UCT values of original soil and original soil plus 2% gypsum were 1.40 kg/cm2 and 1.66 kg/cm2 respectively. The CBR soaked and unsoaked values of original soil were 4.44% and 6.28% correspondingly. Meanwhile, CBR soaked and CBR unsoaked values of original soil plus 2% gypsum were 6.74% and 8.02% respectively. The research results showed that the additives materials of gypsum and volcanic ash improved the engineering properties of clay. The UCT result from the stabilized soil by 2% gypsum and 10% volcanic ash gave value of 2.79 kg/cm2 (increased 99.28% from original soil). For CBR test, the most effective mixture were in variation of 2% gypsum and 9% volcanic ash which gave value of 9.07% (104.27% increase from original soil) for CBR soaked and 10.29% (63.85% increase from original soil) for CBR unsoaked. The stabilized soil with 2% gypsum and 9% volcanic ash was classified as CL based on USCS and was classified as A-6 (4) based on AASHTO classification system.

  7. Factors affecting the precipitation of pure calcium carbonate during the direct aqueous carbonation of flue gas desulfurization gypsum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Kyungsun; Jang, Young-Nam; Kim, Wonbaek; Lee, Myung Gyu; Shin, Dongbok; Bang, Jun-Hwan; Jeon, Chi Wan; Chae, Soo Chun

    2014-01-01

    The mineral carbonation of FGD (flue gas desulfurization) gypsum was carried out through CO 2 sorption into ammonia solution containing FGD gypsum. High-purity calcium carbonate was precipitated from DCC (dissolved calcium carbonate) solution which was extracted during the induction period. The factors affecting the preparation of pure calcium carbonate were examined under the following conditions: CO 2 flow rate (1–3 L/min), ammonia content (4–12%), and S/L (solid-to-liquid) ratio (5–300 g/L). X-Ray diffraction study revealed that the PCC (precipitated calcium carbonate) was round-shaped vaterite. The induction time for PCC decreased as the CO 2 flow rate increased. The maximum formation efficiency for pure PCC was seen to increase linearly with the ammonia content. The formation efficiency for pure PCC was the highest (90%) for S/L ratio of 5 g/L but it decreased as S/L ratio increased. On the other hand, S/L ratio didn't affect the maximum solubility limit of DCC. It is believed that the pure PCC would add an economic value to the FGD gypsum carbonation for industrial CO 2 sequestration. - Highlights: • Pure and white CaCO 3 was synthesized using induction period during direct carbonation of FGD gypsum. • Its formation efficiency was increased with ammonia content but decreased with solid-to-liquid ratio. • This method is expected to extend to other industrial CO 2 sequestration for the enhanced economic value of precipitated CaCO 3

  8. Wall Painting Investigation by Means of Non-invasive Terahertz Time-Domain Imaging (THz-TDI): Inspection of Subsurface Structures Buried in Historical Plasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandolo, Corinna Ludovica Koch; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2016-02-01

    Characterization of subsurface features of wall paintings is important in conservation and technical art history as well as in building archaeology and architecture fields. In this study, an area of the apsidal wall painting of Nebbelunde Church (Rødby, Denmark) has been investigated by means of terahertz time-domain imaging (THz-TDI). Subsurface structures have been detected at different depths inside the lime-based plaster of the wall painting until approximately 1 cm from the surface. The surface morphology of the buried structures has been 3D imaged in detail, providing a substantial contribution in their characterization.

  9. NANOTECHNOLOGY IN THE CULTURAL HERITAGE - INFLUENCE OF NANOSPENSIONS ADOPTED BY NANOPARTICLES OF TiO2 FOR CLEANING THE SURFACE OF HISTORICAL PLASTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klára Kroftová

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The continuous development of nanostructure and the study of physico - chemical processes in the nanometer range lead to new methods that can slow down the degradation processes of a work of art, or even restore damage caused, for example, by an inappropriate restoration process. The use of nanosuspensions based on calcium hydroxide is probably the most widespread application of nanomaterials in heritage care, especially in the field of hardening of lime building materials (plaster, limestone, etc.. In combination with titanium dioxide, it should be a successful suspension in the fight against biological agents, surface contamination or in the protection of UV-resistant building materials.

  10. Potential of soil amendments (Biochar and Gypsum) in increasing water use efficiency of Abelmoschus esculentus L. Moench.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batool, Aniqa; Taj, Samia; Rashid, Audil; Khalid, Azeem; Qadeer, Samia; Saleem, Aansa R; Ghufran, Muhammad A

    2015-01-01

    Water being an essential component for plant growth and development, its scarcity poses serious threat to crops around the world. Climate changes and global warming are increasing the temperature of earth hence becoming an ultimate cause of water scarcity. It is need of the day to use potential soil amendments that could increase the plants' resistance under such situations. Biochar and gypsum were used in the present study to improve the water use efficiency (WUE) and growth of Abelmoschus esculentus L. Moench (Lady's Finger). A 6 weeks experiment was conducted under greenhouse conditions. Stress treatments were applied after 30 days of sowing. Plant height, leaf area, photosynthesis, transpiration rate (Tr), stomatal conductance and WUE were determined weekly under stressed [60% field capacity (F.C.)] and non-stressed (100% F.C.) conditions. Stomatal conductance and Tr decreased and reached near to zero in stressed plants. Stressed plants also showed resistance to water stress upto 5 weeks and gradually perished at sixth week. On the other hand, WUE improved in stressed plants containing biochar and gypsum as compared to untreated plants. Biochar alone is a better strategy to promote plant growth and WUE specifically of A. esculentus, compared to its application in combination with gypsum.

  11. Potential of Soil Amendments (Biochar and Gypsum in increasing Water Use Efficiency of Abelmoschus esculentus L. Moench

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniqa eBatool

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Water being an essential component for plant growth and development, its scarcity poses serious threat to crops around the world. Climate changes and global warming are increasing the temperature of earth hence becoming an ultimate cause of water scarcity. It is need of the day to use potential soil amendments that could increase the plants’ resistance under such situations. Biochar and gypsum were used in the present study to improve the water use efficiency and growth of Abelmoschus esculentus L. Moench (Lady’s Finger. A six weeks experiment was conducted under greenhouse conditions. Stress treatments were applied after thirty days of sowing. Plant height, leaf area, photosynthesis, transpiration rate, stomatal conductance and water use efficiency were determined weekly under stressed (60% field capacity and non-stressed (100% field capacity conditions. Stomatal conductance and transpiration rate decreased and reached near to zero in stressed plants. Stressed plants also showed resistance to water stress upto five weeks and gradually perished at sixth week. On the other hand, water use efficiency improved in stressed plants containing biochar and gypsum as compared to untreated plants. Biochar alone is a better strategy to promote plant growth and WUE specifically of Abelmoschus esculentus, compared to its application in combination with gypsum.

  12. Remediation of saline-sodic soil with flue gas desulfurization gypsum in a reclaimed tidal flat of southeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yumei; Li, Xiaping; Dick, Warren A; Chen, Liming

    2016-07-01

    Salinization and sodicity are obstacles for vegetation reconstruction of coastal tidal flat soils. A study was conducted with flue gas desulfurization (FGD)-gypsum applied at rates of 0, 15, 30, 45 and 60Mg/ha to remediate tidal flat soils of the Yangtze River estuary. Exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP), exchangeable sodium (ExNa), pH, soluble salt concentration, and composition of soluble salts were measured in 10cm increments from the surface to 30cm depth after 6 and 18months. The results indicated that the effect of FGD-gypsum is greatest in the 0-10cm mixing soil layer and 60Mg/ha was the optimal rate that can reduce the ESP to below 6% and decrease soil pH to neutral (7.0). The improvement effect was reached after 6months, and remained after 18months. The composition of soluble salts was transformed from sodic salt ions mainly containing Na(+), HCO3(-)+CO3(2-) and Cl(-) to neutral salt ions mainly containing Ca(2+) and SO4(2-). Non-halophyte plants were survived at 90%. The study demonstrates that the use of FGD-gypsum for remediating tidal flat soils is promising. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Problems and possible remedies concerning NORM in by-Product gypsum produced by the phosphate industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnett, W.C.; Hull, C.D

    1996-01-01

    Large quantities (∼ 30 million tons/year) of phosphogypsum are produced as a by-product of fertilizer production in Florida. The sedimentary phosphate rock, used as the raw material for phosphoric acid production, is enriched in uranium and daughter products. Relatively high concentrations of some of these U-series daughters, particularly 226 Ra (av. = 910 Bq.Kg -1 ), prevent use of the by-product gypsum for construction or other purposes. The material is thus stockpiled on huge stacks which are unsightly and a potential threat to the surrounding air and especially groundwater resources. It is estimated that ∼ 10 9 tons of this material will be on Florida stacks by the turn of the century. We have been investigating the detailed radiochemistry of phosphogypsum in the hope that can understanding of how these radionuclides are fixed in the material may lead to cost-effective purification schemes. Our work has focused on the distribution of 226 Ra but has also included 210 Pb and 210 Po (av. = 860 Bq.Kg -1 ) which are also enriched in phosphogypsum. This paper summarizes the problems associated with this material and reviews its radiochemistry as elucidated by sequential extraction and other methodologies. We also present some possible alternatives to long-term storage as a solution to the phosphogypsum problem. (author)

  14. Inhibition of hydrogen sulfide generation from disposed gypsum drywall using chemical inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiyong; Townsend, Timothy; Bitton, Gabriel

    2011-07-15

    Disposal of gypsum drywall in landfills has been demonstrated to elevate hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) concentrations in landfill gas, a problem with respect to odor, worker safety, and deleterious effect on gas-to-energy systems. Since H(2)S production in landfills results from biological activity, the concept of inhibiting H(2)S production through the application of chemical agents to drywall during disposal was studied. Three possible inhibition agents - sodium molybdate (Na(2)MoO(4)), ferric chloride (FeCl(3)), and hydrated lime (Ca(OH)(2)) - were evaluated using flask and column experiments. All three agents inhibited H(2)S generation, with Na(2)MoO(4) reducing H(2)S generation by interrupting the biological sulfate reduction process and Ca(OH)(2) providing an unfavorable pH for biological growth. Although FeCl(3) was intended to provide an electron acceptor for a competing group of bacteria, the mechanism found responsible for inhibiting H(2)S production in the column experiment was a reduction in pH. Application of both Na(2)MoO(4) and FeCl(3) inhibited H(2)S generation over a long period (over 180 days), but the impact of Ca(OH)(2) decreased with time as the alkalinity it contributed was neutralized by the generated H(2)S. Practical application and potential environmental implications need additional exploration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A microscopy study of hyphal growth of Penicillium rubens on gypsum under dynamic humidity conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Laarhoven, Karel A; Huinink, Hendrik P; Adan, Olaf C G

    2016-05-01

    To remediate indoor fungal growth, understanding the moisture relations of common indoor fungi is crucial. Indoor moisture conditions are commonly quantified by the relative humidity (RH). RH is a major determinant of the availability of water in porous indoor surfaces that fungi grow on. The influence of steady-state RH on growth is well understood. Typically, however, the indoor RH constantly changes so that fungi have to endure frequent periods of alternating low and high RH. Knowledge of how common indoor fungi survive and are affected by the low-RH periods is limited. In particular, the specific effects of a drop in RH on the growth of the mycelium remain unclear. In this work, video microscopy was used to monitor hyphal growth of Penicillium rubens on gypsum substrates under controlled dynamic humidity conditions. The effect of a single period of low RH (RH = 50-90%) interrupting favourable conditions (RH = 97%) was tested. It was found that hyphal tips ceased to extend when exposed to any tested decrease in RH. However, new hyphal growth always emerges, seemingly from the old mycelium, suggesting that this indoor fungus does not rely only on conidia to survive the humidity patterns considered. These findings are a fundamental step in unravelling the effect of RH on indoor fungal growth. © 2016 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. Removal of Hg, As in FGD gypsum by different aqueous ammonia (amines) during CO2 sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenyi, Tan; Wenhui, Fan; Hongyi, Li; Zixin, Zhang; Yunkun, Zhu

    2017-12-01

    CO 2 sequestration by flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) has become a promising FGDG disposal technology due to simultaneous CO 2 emission reduction and FGDG conversion into calcium carbonate. In this paper, another merit of the novel technology, i.e., the removal of toxic elements (e.g., Hg and As) in FGDG, will be addressed for the first time. In three different aqueous ammonia (or amines) media, removal efficiencies of Hg and As in FGDG samples were evaluated during CO 2 sequestration. Higher than 90% and 20% removal efficiencies, respectively, for Hg and As are achieved at 40°C in aqueous ammonia media, but they decrease at elevated temperatures. Ammonia loss takes place at 80°C and pH varies greatly with temperatures in aqueous ammonia. This is disadvantageous for the formation of Hg-ammonia complexes and for the yield of carbonates, which are responsible for Hg or As re-adsorption. The sequential chemical extraction method suggests that the speciation changes of Hg are induced by FGDG carbonation, and that unstable Hg speciation in triethanolamine increases at elevated temperatures.

  17. Indoor Pollution Emissions from Building Materials; Case of Study: Gypsum Boards Indoor Pollution Emissions from Building Materials; Case of Study: Gypsum Boards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silverio Hernández Moreno

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Este reporte presenta una evaluación de las emisiones de materiales de construcción, al interior de los edificios que pueden causar daño a la salud de los usuarios durante la ocupación, pues emiten sustancias tóxicas al interior de los edificios. Este reporte presenta un caso de studio que evalúa a los tableros de yeso, frecuentemente usados en la construcción de muros divisorios y falsos plafones. La parte experimental se basa en un espacio tridimensional el cual simula un cuarto de cualquier tipo de edificación; por ejemplo: un salón de clases u oficina. Las condiciones ambientales al interior, tales como: ventilación, temperatura y humedad, afectan directamente las emisiones de sustancias químicas por los materiales de construcción. La metodología se basa en la comparación de materiales convencionales y materiales alternativos con distinta composición y similares características, en donde usamos métodos de prueba, condiciones ambientales, instrumentos y herramientas similares. Este es un estudio muy importante para entender los problemas relacionadoscon la contaminación ambiental, específicamente del aire y sus efectos en el interior de los edificios, y que se relaciona directamente con la salud pública e indirectamente con los sistemas constructivos y la selección de materiales en los edificios. Las pruebas concluyen que los materiales alternativos (de contenido reciclado son mejores que los tradicionales, porque reducen la contaminación del aire al interior de los edificios. This report presents an evaluation of emissions from indoor building materials that may cause health damage to the people who occupy the building, since these materials emit toxic chemicals into the air and indoor surfaces. This report presents a case study which evaluates Gypsum Boards, frequently used in the construction of dividing walls and ceilings. The experimental part of this report is based on a three-dimensional space that simulates a

  18. Assessment of the usefulness of silicone plaster application on a postoperative scar in women after mastectomy because of breast malignancy: a preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lipińska

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the natural process of wound healing a scar is formed, which by its build, colour, and function does not resemble healthy tissue. This concerns not only the appearance of the outer integument, but above all, the deeper layers, which are also subject to the process of scarring. In some cases, a disorder of the decomposition and synthesis of collagen takes place and then hypertrophied scars and colloids are formed. Therefore, in physiotherapeutic practice, a scar should be seen in the three-dimensional aspect. Oncology patients can have so-called silicone dressings applied in the healing process of hypertrophied scars and colloids. The therapy using plasters with silicone gel is safe and non-invasive. Aim of the research: To assess the impact of silicone plasters on postoperative scars in the rehabilitation of women after mastectomy. Material and methods : The study, in which women after mastectomy took part, was performed in the Holycross Cancer Centre in Kielce. The assessment of a postoperative scar was based on the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS. Results and conclusions: Silicone dressings applied on a postoperative scar influenced its flexibility, colour, and size. The achieved results are satisfactory, and the applied method is effective and promising. However, the methods used to assess the scar, which are commonly recommended but not quite objective, raise some reservations and doubts among the authors.

  19. EVALUATION OF CEMENT THIXOTROPY FOR THE CEMENT OF OIL WELLS IN AREAS WITH LOSSES: EFFECT OF PLASTER AND DAIRY OF HIGH FURNACES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Bouziani

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Cementing of oil and gas wells can be a very delicate operation. Among the concerns of service companies, during this operation are the nature and conditions of the formations in well. This is the case of cementing operations in southern Algeria, specifically on the fields of In-Amen, where the formations in lost zones are naturally weak and highly permeable. In these areas, drilling fluids (muds and cements pumped will be, completely or partially lost, what we call "lost circulation". Thixotropic cements are useful to overcome lost circulation problems. They are characterized by a special rheological behavior, allowing it to plug lost zones when they are pumped. Our work aims to assess the thixotropy of cements perapred with two types of cement (class G Asland cement and CEM I 42.5 portland cement with the plaster, using a viscometer with coaxial cylinder (couette type. Moreover, the effect of blast furnace slag (LHF on the properties and thixotropic mixtures prepared was also studied. The results show that portland cement (available locally can produce mixes with higher and more stable thixotropy than the class G cement (from importation, which is a practical and economical for cementing job operations in wells with loss zones. The results also show that the effect of LHF is positive, since in addition to his contribution to long term performances, especially the durability of hardened concrete, it improves the thixotropy of cement made of plaster.

  20. EVALUATION OF THE THIXOTROPY OF OIL-WELL CEMENTS USED FOR CEMENTING LOST CIRCULATION ZONES: EFFECT OF PLASTER AND BLAST FURNACE SLAG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Bouziani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cementing of oil and gas wells can be a very delicate operation. Among the concerns of service companies, during this operation are the nature and conditions of the formations in well. This is the case of cementing operations in southern Algeria, specifically on the fields of In-Amen, where the formations in lost zones are naturally weak and highly permeable. In these areas, drilling fluids (muds and cements pumped will be, completely or partially lost, what we call "lost circulation". Thixotropic cements are useful to overcome lost circulation problems. They are characterized by a special rheological behavior, allowing it to plug lost zones when they are pumped.Our work aims to assess the thixotropy of cements perapred with two types of cement (class G Asland cement and CEM I 42.5 portland cement with the plaster, using a viscometer with coaxial cylinder (couette type. Moreover, the effect of blast furnace slag (LHF on the properties and thixotropic mixtures prepared was also studied. The results show that portland cement (available locally can produce mixes with higher and more stable thixotropy than the class G cement (from importation, which is a practical and economical for cementing job operations in wells with loss zones. The results also show that the effect of LHF is positive, since in addition to his contribution to long term performances, especially the durability of hardened concrete, it improves the thixotropy of cement made of plaster.

  1. Mobile dental NOG-types used in working dental models

    OpenAIRE

    Vladikova, Julija; Dimova, Cena; Arslanov, Hadis; Apostoloski, Pavle

    2015-01-01

    A working dental model is a model made from the mold taken from an intervention in the mouth (in the fixed prostheticsthat is preparation of the teeth) and on which it is directly modeled and a fixed prosthetic construction is made. We pour a hard or super hard plaster. The mold is made first by mixing the super hard plaster, a small quantity is poured on the protruding part of the mold (distal part of the palate) by tapping in slowly it slides in the lumen of all the molded teeth. In this wa...

  2. Residual effects of monoammonium phosphate, gypsum and elemental sulfur on cadmium phytoavailability and translocation from soil to wheat in an effluent irrigated field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qayyum, Muhammad Farooq; Rehman, Muhammad Zia Ur; Ali, Shafaqat; Rizwan, Muhammad; Naeem, Asif; Maqsood, Muhammad Aamer; Khalid, Hinnan; Rinklebe, Jörg; Ok, Yong Sik

    2017-05-01

    Cadmium (Cd) accumulation in agricultural soils is one of the major threats to food security. The application of inorganic amendments such as mono-ammonium phosphate (MAP), gypsum and elemental sulfur (S) could alleviate the negative effects of Cd in crops. However, their long-term residual effects on decreasing Cd uptake in latter crops remain unclear. A field that had previously been applied with treatments including control and 0.2, 0.4 and 0.8% by weight of each MAP, gypsum and S, and grown with wheat and rice and thereafter wheat in the rotation was selected for this study. Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) was grown in the same field as the third crop without further application of amendments to evaluate the residual effects of the amendments on Cd uptake by wheat. Plants were harvested at maturity and grain, and straw yield along with Cd concentration in soil, straw, and grains was determined. The addition of MAP and gypsum significantly increased wheat growth and yield and decreased Cd accumulation in straw and grains compared to control while the reverse was found in S application. Both MAP and gypsum decreased AB-DTPA extractable Cd in soil while S increased the bioavailable Cd in soil. Both MAP and gypsum increased the Cd immobilization in the soil and S decreased Cd immobilization in a dose-additive manner. We conclude that MAP and gypsum had a significant residual effect on decreasing Cd uptake in wheat. The cost-benefit ratio revealed that gypsum is an effective amendment for decreasing Cd concentration in plants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. In situ flash X-ray observation of projectile penetration processes and crater cavity growth in porous gypsum target analogous to low-density asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Minami; Arakawa, Masahiko; Hasegawa, Sunao; Fujita, Yukihiro; Kadono, Toshihiko

    2012-11-01

    projectile mass, was successfully fitted by a power law equation when another scaling parameter was used for the crater formation in strength regime, πY=Yt/ρtvi2, where Yt is the target material strength, as follows: πV=1.69×10-1πY-0.51. As a result, the crater formed on porous gypsum was revealed to be more than one order of magnitude smaller than that formed on basalt. Based on our experimental results, which visualize how crater cavities on porous cohesive materials grow with projectile penetration, we are able to discuss compression and excavation processes during crater formation quantitatively. This observation enables us to investigate and revise numerical models and crater scaling laws for high-velocity impacts into porous cohesive materials.

  4. Accuracy of a computed tomography scanning procedure to manufacture digital models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darroudi, Amir M; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie; Ongkosuwito, Edwin M; Suttorp, Christiaan Maarten; Bronkhorst, Ewald M; Breuning, K Hero

    2017-05-01

    Accurate articulation of the digital dental casts is crucial in orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning. We aimed to determine the accuracy of manufacturing digital dental casts from computed tomography scanning of plaster casts regarding linear dimensions and interarch relationships and to test whether eventual differences in interarch relationships between plaster and digital casts would affect orthodontic diagnostics. Plaster casts with the wax bites of 2 patients were used to create digital dental casts with a computed tomography scanner. This was repeated 4 times with a 1-week interval. Linear distances were measured on plaster and digital models twice by 2 observers. Next, the 4 digital models of each patient were scored twice by 5 observers for interarch variables. Digital vs plaster measurements showed high Pearson correlation coefficients (>0.954), whereas the mean difference was small (<0.1 mm) and not significant. The interarch scorings, however, showed significant differences for all variables, except overjet for model 1. We found substantial interarch inaccuracies of the digital models. These inaccuracies are probably due to a lack of built-in "collision control" in the software and manual articulation of the digital models by a human operator. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Pore formation during dehydration of a polycrystalline gypsum sample observed and quantified in a time-series synchrotron X-ray micro-tomography experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusseis, F.; Schrank, C.; Liu, J.; Karrech, A.; Llana-Fúnez, S.; Xiao, X.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.

    2012-03-01

    We conducted an in-situ X-ray micro-computed tomography heating experiment at the Advanced Photon Source (USA) to dehydrate an unconfined 2.3 mm diameter cylinder of Volterra Gypsum. We used a purpose-built X-ray transparent furnace to heat the sample to 388 K for a total of 310 min to acquire a three-dimensional time-series tomography dataset comprising nine time steps. The voxel size of 2.2 μm3 proved sufficient to pinpoint reaction initiation and the organization of drainage architecture in space and time. We observed that dehydration commences across a narrow front, which propagates from the margins to the centre of the sample in more than four hours. The advance of this front can be fitted with a square-root function, implying that the initiation of the reaction in the sample can be described as a diffusion process. Novel parallelized computer codes allow quantifying the geometry of the porosity and the drainage architecture from the very large tomographic datasets (20483 voxels) in unprecedented detail. We determined position, volume, shape and orientation of each resolvable pore and tracked these properties over the duration of the experiment. We found that the pore-size distribution follows a power law. Pores tend to be anisotropic but rarely crack-shaped and have a preferred orientation, likely controlled by a pre-existing fabric in the sample. With on-going dehydration, pores coalesce into a single interconnected pore cluster that is connected to the surface of the sample cylinder and provides an effective drainage pathway. Our observations can be summarized in a model in which gypsum is stabilized by thermal expansion stresses and locally increased pore fluid pressures until the dehydration front approaches to within about 100 μm. Then, the internal stresses are released and dehydration happens efficiently, resulting in new pore space. Pressure release, the production of pores and the advance of the front are coupled in a feedback loop.

  6. Pore formation during dehydration of polycrystalline gypsum observed and quantified in a time-series synchrotron radiation based X-ray micro-tomography experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusseis, F.; Schrank, C.; Liu, J.; Karrech, A.; Llana-Fúnez, S.; Xiao, X.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.

    2011-10-01

    We conducted an in-situ X-ray micro-computed tomography heating experiment at the Advanced Photon Source (USA) to dehydrate an unconfined 2.3 mm diameter cylinder of Volterra Gypsum. We used a purpose-built X-ray transparent furnace to heat the sample to 388 K for a total of 310 min to acquire a three-dimensional time-series tomography dataset comprising nine time steps. The voxel size of 2.2 μm3 proved sufficient to pinpoint reaction initiation and the organization of drainage architecture in space and time. We observed that dehydration commences across a narrow front, which propagates from the margins to the centre of the sample in more than four hours. The advance of this front can be fitted with a square-root function, implying that the initiation of the reaction in the sample can be described as a diffusion process. Novel parallelized computer codes allow quantifying the geometry of the porosity and the drainage architecture from the very large tomographic datasets (6.4 × 109 voxel each) in unprecedented detail. We determined position, volume, shape and orientation of each resolvable pore and tracked these properties over the duration of the experiment. We found that the pore-size distribution follows a power law. Pores tend to be anisotropic but rarely crack-shaped and have a preferred orientation, likely controlled by a pre-existing fabric in the sample. With on-going dehydration, pores coalesce into a single interconnected pore cluster that is connected to the surface of the sample cylinder and provides an effective drainage pathway. Our observations can be summarized in a model in which gypsum is stabilized by thermal expansion stresses and locally increased pore fluid pressures until the dehydration front approaches to within about 100 μm. Then, the internal stresses are released and dehydration happens efficiently, resulting in new pore space. Pressure release, the production of pores and the advance of the front are coupled in a feedback loop. We

  7. Pore formation during dehydration of a polycrystalline gypsum sample observed and quantified in a time-series synchrotron X-ray micro-tomography experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Fusseis

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We conducted an in-situ X-ray micro-computed tomography heating experiment at the Advanced Photon Source (USA to dehydrate an unconfined 2.3 mm diameter cylinder of Volterra Gypsum. We used a purpose-built X-ray transparent furnace to heat the sample to 388 K for a total of 310 min to acquire a three-dimensional time-series tomography dataset comprising nine time steps. The voxel size of 2.2 μm3 proved sufficient to pinpoint reaction initiation and the organization of drainage architecture in space and time.

    We observed that dehydration commences across a narrow front, which propagates from the margins to the centre of the sample in more than four hours. The advance of this front can be fitted with a square-root function, implying that the initiation of the reaction in the sample can be described as a diffusion process.

    Novel parallelized computer codes allow quantifying the geometry of the porosity and the drainage architecture from the very large tomographic datasets (20483 voxels in unprecedented detail. We determined position, volume, shape and orientation of each resolvable pore and tracked these properties over the duration of the experiment. We found that the pore-size distribution follows a power law. Pores tend to be anisotropic but rarely crack-shaped and have a preferred orientation, likely controlled by a pre-existing fabric in the sample. With on-going dehydration, pores coalesce into a single interconnected pore cluster that is connected to the surface of the sample cylinder and provides an effective drainage pathway.

    Our observations can be summarized in a model in which gypsum is stabilized by thermal expansion stresses and locally increased pore fluid pressures until the dehydration front approaches to within about 100 μm. Then, the internal stresses are released and dehydration happens efficiently, resulting in new pore space. Pressure release, the production of pores and the

  8. Uptake and speciation of uranium in synthetic gypsum (CaSO4•2H2O): Applications to radioactive mine tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jinru; Sun, Wei; Desmarais, Jacques; Chen, Ning; Feng, Renfei; Zhang, Patrick; Li, Dien; Lieu, Arthur; Tse, John S; Pan, Yuanming

    2018-01-01

    Phosphogypsum formed from the production of phosphoric acid represents by far the biggest accumulation of gypsum-rich wastes in the world and commonly contains elevated radionuclides, including uranium, as well as other heavy metals and metalloids. Therefore, billions-of-tons of phosphogypsum stockpiled worldwide not only possess serious environmental problems but also represent a potential uranium resource. Gypsum is also a major solid constituent in many other types of radioactive mine tailings, which stems from the common usage of sulfuric acid in extraction processes. Therefore, management and remediation of radioactive mine tailings as well as future beneficiation of uranium from phosphogysum all require detailed knowledge about the nature and behavior of uranium in gypsum. However, little is known about the uptake mechanism or speciation of uranium in gypsum. In this study, synthesis experiments suggest an apparent pH control on the uptake of uranium in gypsum at ambient conditions: increase in U from 16 μg/g at pH = 6.5 to 339 μg/g at pH = 9.5. Uranium L 3 -edge synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopic analyses of synthetic gypsum show that uranyl (UO 2 ) 2+ at the Ca site is the dominant species. The EXAFS fitting results also indicate that uranyl in synthetic gypsum occurs most likely as carbonate complexes and yields an average U-O distance ∼0.25 Å shorter than the average Ca-O distance, signifying a marked local structural distortion. Applications to phosphogypsum from the New Wales phosphoric acid plant (Florida, USA) and uranium mine tailings from the Key Lake mill (Saskatchewan, Canada) show that gypsum is an important carrier of uranium over a wide range of pH and controls the fate of this radionuclide in mine tailings. Also, development of new technologies for recovering U from phosphogypsum in the future must consider lattice-bound uranyl in gypsum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Bacterial communities and the nitrogen cycle in the gypsum soils of Cuatro Ciénegas Basin, coahuila: a Mars analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Lozano, Nguyen E; Eguiarte, Luis E; Bonilla-Rosso, Germán; García-Oliva, Felipe; Martínez-Piedragil, Celeste; Rooks, Christine; Souza, Valeria

    2012-07-01

    The OMEGA/Mars Express hyperspectral imager identified gypsum at several sites on Mars in 2005. These minerals constitute a direct record of past aqueous activity and are important with regard to the search of extraterrestrial life. Gale Crater was chosen as Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity's landing site because it is rich in gypsum, as are some desert soils of the Cuatro Ciénegas Basin (CCB) (Chihuahuan Desert, Mexico). The gypsum of the CCB, which is overlain by minimal carbonate deposits, was the product of magmatic activity that occurred under the Tethys Sea. To examine this Mars analogue, we retrieved gypsum-rich soil samples from two contrasting sites with different humidity in the CCB. To characterize the site, we obtained nutrient data and analyzed the genes related to the N cycle (nifH, nirS, and nirK) and the bacterial community composition by using 16S rRNA clone libraries. As expected, the soil content for almost all measured forms of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus were higher at the more humid site than at the drier site. What was unexpected is the presence of a rich and divergent community at both sites, with higher taxonomic diversity at the humid site and almost no taxonomic overlap. Our results suggest that the gypsum-rich soils of the CCB host a unique microbial ecosystem that includes novel microbial assemblies.

  10. Determination of boron content and isotopic composition in gypsum by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy and positive thermal ionization mass spectrometry using phase transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yun-Qi; Peng, Zhang-Kuang; Yang, Jian; Xiao, Ying-Kai; Zhang, Yan-Ling

    2017-12-01

    As a stable isotope, boron plays an important role in hydrogeology, environmental geochemistry, ore deposit geochemistry and marine paleoclimatology. However, there is no report of boron isotopic composition in gypsum. This is mainly confined to complete dissolution of Gypsum by water or acid. In this study, gypsum was converted to calcium carbonate (CaCO 3 ) with ammonium bicarbonate(NH 4 HCO 3 ) by two steps at 50°C. In every step, the mass ratio of NH 4 HCO 3 /CaSO 4 ·2H 2 O was twice, and conversion rate reached more than 98%. Converted CaCO 3 was totally dissolved with hydrochloric acid (the dissolution rate was over 99%). In order to overcome the difficulties of the matrix interference and the detection limit of Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES), we use Amberlite IRA 743 resin to purify and enrichment the boron at first, then eluting boron from the resin with 10mL 0.1mol/L hydrochloric acid at 75°C. The boron isotopic composition of natural gypsum samples was determined using positive thermal ionization mass spectrometry (P-TIMS). The boron isotopic composition of gypsum may be an excellent indicator for the formation environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Geochemistry and microbial diversity of cave waters in the gypsum karst aquifers of Emilia Romagna region, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angeli, Ilenia M; Serrazanetti, Diana I; Montanari, Chiara; Vannini, Lucia; Gardini, Fausto; De Waele, Jo

    2017-11-15

    Fifty-seven control points of waters (sinking streams, rivers in caves, and resurgences) hosted in gypsum karst areas in Emilia Romagna region (N-Italy) were sampled in the framework of a Project LIFE+08NAT/IT/000369 "Gypsum" in the period 2010-2014. The microbiology and chemistry of these waters have been analyzed to evaluate the impact of human activities or natural factors, in the gypsum karst systems. Waters have been analyzed for major chemistry (Ca, Mg, Na, K, SO 4 , HCO 3 , Cl, NO 3 ) and some minor constituents (F, Br, NH 4 and PO 4 ), measuring pH, electric conductivity (EC), total dissolved solids (TDS) and temperature (T) in situ. The same samples have been analyzed with traditional microbiology techniques focused on total microbial count and on fecal microbiota, as index of human and/or animal contamination, and molecular biology techniques (sequencing of 16S rRNA segment and PCR-DGGE), focused on the characterization of microbial populations in the different sampling sites and determination of their variations and/or changes during the five years of the project. As expected, waters tend to be increasingly mineralized from sinking streams to resurgences, with only local and temporarily high contents in nitrates and ammonium, often related to the presence of bat colonies. PCR-DGGE revealed ecological changes, in terms of microbial populations present in the bulk water samples, in different sampling sites within the same cave. Although the impact of fecal microorganisms only rarely exceeded 2 log UFC/ml, the results evidenced fluctuations of these microorganisms mainly correlated to the season and to the biological activity of bats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Growth of cowpea plants inoculated with Rhizobium in a saline-sodic soil after application of gypsum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Jessyka Pereira Brito Fontenele

    Full Text Available Two experiments were carried out with the aim of evaluating the growth of cowpea cultivated in saline-sodic soils corrected with gypsum: one experiment in the laboratory, to identify the best level of gypsum for the correction of the saline-sodic soils of the state of Pernambuco, Brazil; and the other in a greenhouse, after correction of the soils. As the test plant, the cowpea cultivar pele de moça, inoculated with Rhizobium strain BR3267 was used. The experiments were arranged in a randomised block design in a 2 x 5 factorial arrangement, two soils and five levels of the gypsum requirement (GR, equivalent to 50, 100, 150, 200 and 250% of the GR of the soil, as determined by the Schoonover M-1 method, with five replications. The following were evaluated: electrical conductivity of the soil saturation extract (EC, soil exchangeable sodium and percentage of soil exchangeable sodium (ESP, number of nodules (NN, nodule dry weight (NDW, shoot dry weight (SDW, shoot height (PH and nitrogen concentration (N in the shoots. Application of 100% of the GR, followed by the enough water for leaching, was effective for the correction of soil sodicity. The application of increasing levels of soil GR resulted in an increase in the number of nodules, dry weight of the nodules and shoots, and the height and levels of N absorbed by the plants in soil S2. In soil S1, the use of levels of 200 and 250% of soil the GR caused a decrease in all the variables under study.

  13. A simple idea for reducing the cost and weight of plaster-cast orthoses Uma ideia simples para diminuir custo e peso das talas gessadas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Esmanhotto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To reduce the cost and weight of plaster molded orthosis (increasing patient comfort, keeping the same resistance. METHODS: 22 plaster orthosis were analysed, 11 with conventional shape and 11 with pyramidal shape. It was compared, in theory (mathematcally and practice, the change of weight (and consequently cost and flexion resistance between conventional shape and pyramidal shape. RESULTS: Theorical analysis: weight and cost decrease of 26.7%-38.9%, according to the layers disposition of the cast. Laboratorial analysis: cast´s weight decrease of 34.5% (p = 0.000005 and resistance increase of 26.7% (p = 0.03. CONCLUSION: plaster molded orthosis made in a pyramidal shape, have a statistically significant decrease of weight (and consequently cost and statistically significant increase of resistance if compared with traditional shape. OBJETIVO: Diminuir o custo e o peso (aumentando o conforto para o paciente das talas gessadas, mantendo resistência semelhante. MÉTODOS: Foram analisadas 22 talas de gesso, 11 com formato convencional e 11 com formato piramidal. Foi feita comparação, teórica (matemática e prática, entre as talas convencionais e as piramidais quanto à mudança de peso (e consequentemente de custo e à resistência à flexão. RESULTADOS: Análise matemática – diminuição peso e custo entre 26,7% e 38,9%, variando conforme a disposição das camadas da tala. Análise prática – diminuição do peso em 34,5% (p = 0,000005 e resistência aumentada em 26,7% (p = 0,03. CONCLUSÃO: A tala gessada com formato piramidal apresenta diminuição estatisticamente significativa de peso (e consequentemente de custo, com aumento estatisticamente significativo da resistência, se comparada à tala de formato convencional.

  14. Use of the “red gypsum” industrial waste as substitute of natural gypsum for commercial cements manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gázquez, M. J.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this research has been the valorisation of a waste from the TiO2 production process (sulphate method, called red gypsum, in the production of cements. This waste is mainly formed by di-hydrate calcium sulphate and iron hydroxides. To cover this objective it has been necessary to perform the physico-chemical characterisation of the red gypsum as well as the main components in the production of cements and of the new cements generated. Moreover, for the red gypsum, has been analyzed its radioactive content because it is generated in a NORM (Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials industry. Finally, the most important properties of the obtained cements with different proportions of red gypsum in their composition have been studied by comparing them with the standard ones obtained in a Portland cement. Lastly, we have demonstrated that the new cements fulfil all the quality tests imposed by the European legislation.

    El objetivo de esta investigación ha sido analizar la valorización de un residuo generado en el proceso de producción de dióxido de titanio (vía sulfato, denominado yeso rojo, en la producción de cementos. Dicho residuo está compuesto fundamentalmente por sulfato de calcio di-hidratado e hidróxidos de hierro. Para ello, ha sido necesaria la caracterización físico-química del yeso rojo, así como la de los otros componentes fundamentales en la fabricación de cementos y de los cementos generados con el mencionado residuo. Además, en el caso del yeso rojo, se ha analizado su contenido radiactivo al generarse éste en una industria NORM (Natural Occurring Radioactive Materials. Posteriormente, se han estudiado las propiedades más importantes de los cementos producidos con diferentes porcentajes de yeso rojo añadido, comparando estas mezclas con las propiedades de un cemento Portland comercial, comprobándose que se cumplen todas las normas Europeas de calidad exigibles.

  15. Reciclado de placas de yeso laminado aligeradas con residuos de poliuretano = Recycling of gypsum plasterboard lightened with polyurethane waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourdes Alameda

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo presenta los resultados de un proceso experimental de reutilización de residuos obtenidos de desechos de placas de yeso laminado elaboradas con residuos poliméricos de origen industrial (espuma de poliuretano y reforzadas con fibras de polipropileno, para la fabricación de nuevas placas de yeso laminado. Para ello, se expone la metodología de reciclado de placas prefabricadas buscando de esta forma aumentar el ciclo de vida del yeso y de los residuos de poliuretano empleados. Para ello se detalla el proceso de fabricación las nuevas placas así como su caracterización mediante ensayos físicos y mecánicos a través de ensayos normalizados para placas de yeso laminado (densidad aparente, resistencia a flexión, absorción total en agua y dureza superficial. Los resultados obtenidos indican que es posible reciclar este tipo de prefabricados de una manera sencilla. De la misma forma se ha demostrado que las nuevas placas fabricadas con el residuo recuperado, presentan un buen comportamiento mecánico, a la par que se reduce su capacidad de absorción de agua y se aumenta su dureza su superficial. Abstract This paper presents the results of an experimental process of reusing waste obtained from waste gypsum plasterboard made from polymeric industrial waste (polyurethane foam and polypropylene fibers whit the aim to manufacturer new gypsum plasterboards. Therefore, a methodology to recycle is presented to increase the life cycle of waste gypsum. The manufacturing process of the plates is detailed as well as their physical and mechanical characterization by means of standardized for gypsum plasterboard (bulk density, flexion strength, total water absorption and surface hardness. The results indicate that it is possible to recycle this type of prefabricated in a simple way. Likewise it has been demonstrated that new plates made with the residue reusing, have good mechanical strength, at the same time reduce the capacity of water

  16. Relative Shock Effects in Mixed Powders of Calcite, Gypsum, and Quartz: A Calibration Scheme from Shock Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Mary S.

    2009-01-01

    The shock behavior of calcite and gypsum is important in understanding the Cretaceous/Tertiary event and other terrestrial impacts that contain evaporite sediments in their targets. Most interest focuses on issues of devolatilization to quantify the production of CO2 or SO2 to better understand their role in generating a temporary atmosphere and its effects on climate and biota [e.g., papers in 1,2,3,4]. Devolatilization of carbonate is also important because the dispersion and fragmentation of ejecta is strongly controlled by the expansion of large volumes of gas during the impact process as well [5,6]. Shock recovery experiments for calcite yield seemingly conflicting results: early experimental devolatilization studies [7,8,9] suggested that calcite was substantially outgassed at 30 GPa (> 50%). However, the recent petrographic work of [10,11,12] presented evidence that essentially intact calcite is recovered from 60 GPa experiments. [13] reported results of shock experiments on anhydrite, gypsum, and mixtures of those phases with silica. Their observations indicate little or no devolatilization of anhydrite shocked to 42 GPa and that the fraction of sulfur, by mass, that degassed is approx.10(exp -2) of theoretical prediction. In another (preliminary) report of shock experiments on calcite, anhydrite, and gypsum, [14] observe calcite recrystallization when shock loaded at 61 GPa, only intensive plastic deformation in anhydrite shock loaded at 63 GPa, and gypsum converted to anhydrite when shock loaded at 56 GPa. [15] shock loaded anhydrite and quartz to a peak pressure of 60 GPa. All of the quartz grains were trans-formed to glass and the platy anhydrite grains were completely pseudomorphed by small crystallized anhydrite grains. However, no evidence of interaction between the two phases could be observed and they suggest that recrystallization of anhydrite grains is the result of a solid state transformation. [16] reanalyzed the calcite and anhydrite shock

  17. Moisture parameters and fungal communities associated with gypsum drywall in buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedesko, Sandra; Siegel, Jeffrey A

    2015-12-08

    Uncontrolled excess moisture in buildings is a common problem that can lead to changes in fungal communities. In buildings, moisture parameters can be classified by location and include assessments of moisture in the air, at a surface, or within a material. These parameters are not equivalent in dynamic indoor environments, which makes moisture-induced fungal growth in buildings a complex occurrence. In order to determine the circumstances that lead to such growth, it is essential to have a thorough understanding of in situ moisture measurement, the influence of building factors on moisture parameters, and the levels of these moisture parameters that lead to indoor fungal growth. Currently, there are disagreements in the literature on this topic. A literature review was conducted specifically on moisture-induced fungal growth on gypsum drywall. This review revealed that there is no consistent measurement approach used to characterize moisture in laboratory and field studies, with relative humidity measurements being most common. Additionally, many studies identify a critical moisture value, below which fungal growth will not occur. The values defined by relative humidity encompassed the largest range, while those defined by moisture content exhibited the highest variation. Critical values defined by equilibrium relative humidity were most consistent, and this is likely due to equilibrium relative humidity being the most relevant moisture parameter to microbial growth, since it is a reasonable measure of moisture available at surfaces, where fungi often proliferate. Several sources concur that surface moisture, particularly liquid water, is the prominent factor influencing microbial changes and that moisture in the air and within a material are of lesser importance. However, even if surface moisture is assessed, a single critical moisture level to prevent fungal growth cannot be defined, due to a number of factors, including variations in fungal genera and

  18. An exploratory microdialysis study investigating the effect of repeated application of a diclofenac epolamine medicated plaster on prostaglandin concentrations in skeletal muscle after standardized physical exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burian, Angela; Frangione, Valeria; Rovati, Stefano; Mautone, Giuseppe; Leuratti, Chiara; Vaccani, Angelo; Crevenna, Richard; Keilani, Mohammad; Burian, Bernhard; Brunner, Martin; Zeitlinger, Markus

    2013-12-01

    Muscle injuries and extensive exercise are associated with cyclo-oxygenase dependent formation of inflammatory prostaglandins. Since the effect of topical administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on local cyclo-oxygenase is unknown, the present exploratory, open label, non-randomized study set out to measure exercise induced release of prostaglandins before and after epicutaneous administration of diclofenac. Microdialysis was used to determine the local interstitial concentration of PGE2 and 8-iso-PGF2α as well as diclofenac concentrations in the vastus lateralis under rest, dynamic exercise and during recovery in 12 healthy subjects at baseline and after a treatment phase applying a total of seven plasters medicated with 180 mg of diclofenac epolamine over 4 days. At baseline PGE2 concentrations were 1169 ± 780 pg ml(-1) at rest and 1287 ± 459 pg ml(-1) during dynamic exercise and increased to 2005 ± 1126 pg ml(-1) during recovery. After treatment average PGE2 concentrations were 997 ± 588 pg ml(-1) at rest and 1339 ± 892 pg ml(-1) during exercise. In contrast with the baseline phase no increase in PGE2 concentrations was recorded during the recovery period after treatment (PGE2 1134 ± 874 pg ml(-1)). 8-iso-PGF2α was neither affected by exercise nor by treatment with diclofenac. Local and systemic concentrations of diclofenac were highly variable but comparable with previous clinical pharmacokinetic studies. We can hypothesize an effect of topical diclofenac epolamine plaster on limiting the increase of local concentrations of the pro-inflammatory prostaglandin PGE2 induced in the muscle of healthy human subjects following standardized physical exercise. No effect of diclofenac treatment on 8-iso-PGF2α concentrations was observed, mainly since isoprostane is produced by a free radical-catalyzed lipid peroxidation mechanism independent of cyclo-oxygenases. © 2013 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2013 The

  19. Natural radioactivity of the cement, lime and plaster in the Zacatecas State; Radiactividad natural del cemento, cal y yeso en el Estado de Zacatecas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mireles, F.; Davila, J. I.; Lopez, H.; Pinedo, J. L.; Rios, C.; Saucedo, S. A.; Cespedes, N., E-mail: fmireles@uaz.edu.mx [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    The construction materials are the main radiation gamma source inside the houses room and the buildings, followed by the terrestrial and cosmic radiation. The radioactivity levels of the construction materials were obtained to establish reference levels and of population exposure. In this work the study of 56 samples of construction materials is presented, 24 of cement, 20 of lime and 12 of plaster, of the marks more sold in the municipalities of Zacatecas and Guadalupe of the Zacatecas State, Mexico. The objective is the study of the concentration in activity of the radioisotopes {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, {sup 40}K and {sup 137}Cs, using a gamma rays spectrometry system based on a hyper pure germanium detector. The obtained results of activity concentration of the interest radioisotopes show similar values average to those published by UNSCEAR 1993. The population of the municipalities of Zacatecas and Guadalupe is exposed to the environmental gamma radiation coming from the contained radioisotopes in the construction materials; the annual equivalent effective dose by the cement is in the range of 116 at 562 {mu}Sv a{sup -1} with an average of 340 {mu}Sv a{sup -1}, of the lime is in the range of 36 at 212 {mu}Sv a{sup -1} with an average of 87 {mu}Sv a{sup -1}, and of the plaster is in the range of 16 at 27 {mu}Sv a{sup -1} with an average of 22 {mu}Sv a{sup -1}, this exposure does not represent any risk for the population's health. (Author)

  20. Radon exhalation in some building construction materials and effect of plastering and paints on the radon exhalation rate using fired bricks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Anil; Mahur, A.K.; Rajendra Prasad; Sonkawade, R.G.; Sharma, A.C.

    2013-01-01

    The technological endeavors of human beings have modified the levels of radiation exposure slightly. The emanation of radon is primarily associated with radium and its ultimate precursor uranium. The radiation dose received by human beings from indoor radon and its progeny is the largest of all doses received either by natural or man-made sources. In order to investigate the effect of paints available in the market on the radon exhalation rate from building materials, several bricks were collected. These bricks were plastered with a mixture of cement and sand. Before measurements bricks were dried for 24 hours. These plastered bricks were then coated with white wash and again dried for 1- 2 hours. After drying the bricks were coated with different brands and colors of paints. Radon exhalation rates measurements were carried out for these painted bricks using 'Sealed can Technique' cylindrical plastic 'Can' of 7.5 cm height and 7.0 cm diameter was sealed to the individual samples by plastic can. In each 'Can' a LR-115 type II plastic detector (2 cm 2cm) was fixed at the top inside of the 'Can', such that the sensitive surface of the detector faces the material and is freely exposed to the emergent radon. Radon decays in the volume of the can record the alpha particles resulting from the 218 Po and 214 Po deposited on the inner wall of the 'Can'. Radon and its daughters will reach an equilibrium in concentration after one week or more. Hence the equilibrium activity of the emergent radon can be obtained from the geometry of the can and the time of exposure. The results will be discussed. (author)

  1. The comparison of safety level in kilns in two gypsum production factories by Failure modes and effects Analysis (FMEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Alimohammadi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA is a qualitative method for determination of components' fails and study of its effects on machineries. In present study, kilns safety level of two gypsum factories examine.MethodsProduction process of gypsum and especially kilns structure studied. FMEAmethod conducted by four steps including determination of analysis insight, information gathering, making of list of kilns' components and filling up the FMEA tables. On the other hand, the effects of fails on production, how to fail, failure rates, severity of fails, and controls of fails considered.  Furthermore, the cost of fails and priority of control methods studied.ResultsCrack and deformation of shoe plats had highest failure rate in two factories kilns. Some fails such as separation of bricks in kiln of second factory is less than the other one. Meanwhile, some fails including wrapping of kilns trunk, ring corrosion, and fracture of truster's shaft is only present in first kiln.ConclusionPresent study shows that technical features and design of kilns is most important factors in decreasing of failure rates and its cost.

  2. Simultaneous and continuous stabilization of As and Pb in contaminated solution and soil by a ferrihydrite-gypsum sorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameda, Kentaro; Hashimoto, Yohey; Wang, Shan-Li; Hirai, Yasumasa; Miyahara, Hidetaka

    2017-04-05

    For the increasing need of stabilization both cationic and anionic metal(loid)s simultaneously, we newly developed a metal sorbent (FIXALL), consisting mainly of ferrihydrite and gypsum. The objectives of this study were to determine the molecular mechanisms of Pb and As stabilization in an aqueous system and to examine a simultaneous and long-term (up to 754days) effect on Pb and As stabilization in an anthropogenically contaminated soil using the FIXALL sorbent. When the solution contained a low concentration of Pb (5mgL -1 ), the mechanisms of Pb removal by FIXALL were based chiefly on the formation of inner-sphere surface complex with ferrihydrite. In the highly concentrated Pb solution (1200mgL -1 ), contrarily, the removal of Pb by FIXALL was the direct consequence of the dissolution of gypsum and subsequent precipitation of PbSO 4 , which strengthens the drawback of low capability of ferrihydrite for Pb removal. Regardless of initial concentrations, the primary mechanism of FIXALL for As stabilization is attributed to the formation of inner-sphere surface complex with ferrihydrite. A contaminated soil study demonstrated that FIXALL could decrease the concentration of water soluble As and Pb simultaneously and continuously for 754days without notable changes in their chemical species and soil pH. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Successful lichen translocation on disturbed gypsum areas: A test with adhesives to promote the recovery of biological soil crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros, M.; Ayerbe, J.; Casares, M.; Cañadas, E. M.; Lorite, J.

    2017-04-01

    The loss of biological soil crusts represents a challenge for the restoration of disturbed environments, specifically in particular substrates hosting unique lichen communities. However, the recovery of lichen species affected by mining is rarely addressed in restoration projects. Here, we evaluate the translocation of Diploschistes diacapsis, a representative species of gypsum lichen communities affected by quarrying. We tested how a selection of adhesives could improve thallus attachment to the substrate and affect lichen vitality (as CO2 exchange and fluorescence) in rainfall-simulation and field experiments. Treatments included: white glue, water, hydroseeding stabiliser, gum arabic, synthetic resin, and a control with no adhesive. Attachment differed only in the field, where white glue and water performed best. Adhesives altered CO2 exchange and fluorescence yield. Notably, wet spoils allowed thalli to bind to the substrate after drying, revealing as the most suitable option for translocation. The satisfactory results applying water on gypsum spoils are encouraging to test this methodology with other lichen species. Implementing these measures in restoration projects would be relatively easy and cost-effective. It would help not only to recover lichen species in the disturbed areas but also to take advantage of an extremely valuable biological material that otherwise would be lost.

  4. Utilization of desulfurization gypsum to producing SO{sub 2} and CaO in multi-stage fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Zhu; Wang, Tao; Yang, Hairui; Zhang, Hai; Zhang, Zuyi [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Thermal Engineering; Ministry of Education, Beijing (China). Key Lab. for Thermal Science and Power Engineering

    2013-07-01

    With emission control becomes more and more stringent, flue gas desulphurization (FGD) is commonly employed for desulfurization. However, the product of FGD, gypsum, causes the unexpected environmental problems. How to utilize the byproduct of FGD effectively and economically is a challenging task. This paper proposed the new technical process to produce SO{sub 2} and CaO by reducing the gypsum in multi-stage fluidized bed reactor with different atmosphere. In addition, some preliminary experiments were carried out in PTGA. The results show that CO concentration has little effect on the initial decomposing temperature, but affect the decomposing rate of phosphogypsum obviously. The decomposing product composed of CaS and CaO simultaneously. The ratio of the two products was determined by CO concentration. Lower CO content benefits to produce more CO product and more SO{sub 2}. The decomposition reaction of phosphogypsum in reducing atmosphere is parallel competition reaction. Therefore, it is necessary to eliminate the effect of CaS and other byproduct efficiently by the new technology, which utilize multi-atmosphere in multistage fluidized bed reactors.

  5. Flue-gas desulfurization gypsum effects on urea-degrading bacteria and ammonia volatilization from broiler litter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Christopher D; Cabrera, Miguel L; Rothrock, Michael J; Kissel, D E

    2017-08-01

    A major concern of the broiler industry is the volatilization of ammonia (NH3) from the mixture of bedding material and broiler excretion that covers the floor of broiler houses. Gypsum has been proposed as a litter amendment to reduce NH3 volatilization, but reports of NH3 abatement vary among studies and the mechanism responsible for decreasing NH3 volatilization is not well understood. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of adding 20 or 40% flue-gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) to broiler litter on pH, electrical conductivity (EC), water potential, urea-degrading bacteria abundance, NH3 and carbon dioxide (CO2) evolution, and nitrogen (N) mineralization in several 21-d experiments. The addition of FGDG to broiler litter increased EC by 24 to 33% (P mineralization by 10 to 11% (P = 0.0001) as compared to litters not amended with FGDG. Furthermore, the addition of FGDG to broiler litter decreased NH3 volatilization by 18 to 28% (P litter pH values compared to un-amended litter (P litter with 20% FGDG can decrease NH3 volatilization and increase the fertlizer value of broiler litter. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  6. Evaluation of Digital Model Accuracy and Time‑dependent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Materials and Methods: A total of sixty impressions were taken from a master model with an alginate, and were poured into plaster models in three different storage ... Arch perimeter measurements did not differ at T (0) and T (1) times (P > 0.05), but they demonstrated statistically significant differences at T (2) time (P < 0.05) ...

  7. Incorporation of gypsum waste in ceramic block production: Proposal for a minimal battery of tests to evaluate technical and environmental viability of this recycling process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinho-Castro, Alcione P; Testolin, Renan C; Janke, Leandro; Corrêa, Albertina X R; Radetski, Claudemir M

    2012-01-01

    Civil engineering-related construction and demolition debris is an important source of waste disposed of in municipal solid waste landfills. After clay materials, gypsum waste is the second largest contributor to the residential construction waste stream. As demand for sustainable building practices grows, interest in recovering gypsum waste from construction and demolition debris is increasing, but there is a lack of standardized tests to evaluate the technical and environmental viability of this solid waste recycling process. By recycling gypsum waste, natural deposits of gypsum might be conserved and high amounts of the waste by-product could be reused in the civil construction industry. In this context, this paper investigates a physical property (i.e., resistance to axial compression), the chemical composition and the ecotoxicological potential of ceramic blocks constructed with different proportions of clay, cement and gypsum waste, and assesses the feasibility of using a minimal battery of tests to evaluate the viability of this recycling process. Consideration of the results for the resistance to axial compression tests together with production costs revealed that the best formulation was 35% of plastic clay, 35% of non-plastic clay, 10% of Portland cement and 20% of gypsum waste, which showed a mean resistance of 4.64MPa. Energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry showed calcium and sulfur to be the main elements, while quartz, gypsum, ettringite and nacrite were the main crystalline compounds found in this formulation. Ecotoxicity tests showed that leachate from this formulation is weakly toxic toward daphnids and bacteria (EC(20%)=69.0 and 75.0, respectively), while for algae and fish the leachate samples were not toxic at the EC(50%) level. Overall, these results show that the addition of 20% of gypsum waste to the ceramic blocks could provide a viable substitute for clay in the ceramics industry and the tests applied in this study proved to be a useful tool

  8. Filler de grafito reciclado de EDM en pastas de yeso = EDM recycled graphite filler in gypsum pastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Flores

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available El grafito puede obtenerse de forma natural o sintética, pero este último se ha utilizado en carreteras debido a su dureza, así como en placas de cerámica fina. Se demuestran las posibilidades de la adición del polvo de grafito isostático procedente del fresado de moldes fabricados por Electroerosión de Penetración (EDM en compuestos a base de yeso. Para ello se prepararon mezclas de yeso industrial con adiciones en porcentajes diferentes de grafito EDM para evaluar las propiedades físicas y mecánicas, caracterizando previamente ambos materiales. El yeso fue sustituido por grafito en cinco fracciones diferentes, 5, 10, 15, 20 y 25%, en peso, en la preparación de las mezclas. En la designación Y-0.7G-0 y Y-0.6G-0 de las series de probetas prismáticas de 40x40x160mm, la letra Y se refiere al yeso y G significa grafito (G-0 probetas patrón sin grafito, con relaciones agua/yeso (a/y 0,7 y 0,6. Después del análisis de los resultados obtenidos, se realizó unas nuevas series con la adición de plastificante y también con mayor cantidad de grafito, 25 a 50% en peso y otras relaciones a/y basadas en su trabajabilidad, para verificar la incidencia en la resistencia a flexión y compresión. Abstract Graphite can be obtained naturally or synthetically, but the latter has been used on roads because of its hardness, as well as in thin ceramic plates. The possibilities of the addition of the isostatic graphite powder from the milling of molds made by EDM in gypsum-based compounds are demonstrated. For this purpose mixtures of industrial gypsum with additions in different percentages of EDM graphite were prepared to evaluate the physical and mechanical properties, previously characterizing both materials. The gypsum was replaced by graphite in five different fractions, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25% by weight, in the preparation of the mixtures. In the designation Y-0.7G-0 and Y-0.6G-0 of the series of prismatic specimens of 40x40x160mm, the letter Y

  9. Ultrasonically nebulised electrolysed oxidising water: a promising new infection control programme for impressions, metals and gypsum casts used in dental hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, G; Yu, X; Gu, Z

    2008-04-01

    Controlling the transmission of infectious diseases by impressions, metals and dental casts in dental hospitals remains a challenge. Current disinfection methods have various drawbacks. This study introduced and provided a preliminary evaluation of the feasibility of using ultrasonically nebulised, electrolysed oxidising water (UNEOW) as a new infection control programme. UNEOW was produced from freshly generated electrolysed oxidising water (EOW). Samples of impressions, titanium and gypsum were subjected to the following treatments: (1) immersion in 1% sodium hypochlorite for 10min; (2) immersion in EOW for 10min; (3) exposure to UNEOW for 15, 30 and 45min; (4) no disinfection (control). Bactericidal efficacy was examined using Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis var. niger spores as indicators. Dimensional accuracy, surface quality, and effect of corrosion were also evaluated for the different samples. Results showed that except for B. subtilis var. niger spores on gypsum casts, the bacterial reduction log(10) values after 30-45min treatment with UNEOW were all above 4. The impression dimensional changes showed no difference between control and UNEOW groups, but both were significantly lower than the EOW and sodium hypochlorite groups (Pimpressions and gypsum casts. No assessable corrosion was found on the titanium surface after a 45min treatment with UNEOW. The findings indicated that use of UNEOW is a feasible and promising approach for controlling the transmission of infectious diseases by impressions, gypsum casts and denture metals in dental facilities.

  10. Gypsum-Catalyzed One-Pot Synthesis of 3,4-Dihydropyrimidin-2(1H Under Solvent-Free Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taoues Boumoud

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In view of the emerging importance of the green chemistry principles in chemical and pharmaceutical industries, we disclose, herein, a new economic approach producing the biologically active dihydropyrimidinones in good yields using the solventless one-pot Biginelli condensation in the presence of gypsum as an environmental friendly and recycled catalyst.

  11. Gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O Scaling on Polybenzimidazole and Cellulose Acetate Hollow Fiber Membranes under Forward Osmosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-Shung Chung

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We have examined the gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O scaling phenomena on membranes with different physicochemical properties in forward osmosis (FO processes. Three hollow fiber membranes made of (1 cellulose acetate (CA, (2 polybenzimidazole (PBI/polyethersulfone (PES and (3 PBI-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS/polyacrylonitrile (PAN were studied. For the first time in FO processes, we have found that surface ionic interactions dominate gypsum scaling on the membrane surface. A 70% flux reduction was observed on negatively charged CA and PBI membrane surfaces, due to strong attractive forces. The PBI membrane surface also showed a slightly positive charge at a low pH value of 3 and exhibited a 30% flux reduction. The atomic force microscopy (AFM force measurements confirmed a strong repulsive force between gypsum and PBI at a pH value of 3. The newly developed PBI-POSS/PAN membrane had ridge morphology and a contact angle of 51.42° ± 14.85° after the addition of hydrophilic POSS nanoparticles and 3 min thermal treatment at 95 °C. Minimal scaling and an only 1.3% flux reduction were observed at a pH value of 3. Such a ridge structure may reduce scaling by not providing a locally flat surface to the crystallite at a pH value of 3; thus, gypsum would be easily washed away from the surface.

  12. Gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O) Scaling on Polybenzimidazole and Cellulose Acetate Hollow Fiber Membranes under Forward Osmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Si Cong; Su, Jincai; Fu, Feng-Jiang; Mi, Baoxia; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2013-11-08

    We have examined the gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O) scaling phenomena on membranes with different physicochemical properties in forward osmosis (FO) processes. Three hollow fiber membranes made of (1) cellulose acetate (CA), (2) polybenzimidazole (PBI)/polyethersulfone (PES) and (3) PBI-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS)/polyacrylonitrile (PAN) were studied. For the first time in FO processes, we have found that surface ionic interactions dominate gypsum scaling on the membrane surface. A 70% flux reduction was observed on negatively charged CA and PBI membrane surfaces, due to strong attractive forces. The PBI membrane surface also showed a slightly positive charge at a low pH value of 3 and exhibited a 30% flux reduction. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) force measurements confirmed a strong repulsive force between gypsum and PBI at a pH value of 3. The newly developed PBI-POSS/PAN membrane had ridge morphology and a contact angle of 51.42° ± 14.85° after the addition of hydrophilic POSS nanoparticles and 3 min thermal treatment at 95 °C. Minimal scaling and an only 1.3% flux reduction were observed at a pH value of 3. Such a ridge structure may reduce scaling by not providing a locally flat surface to the crystallite at a pH value of 3; thus, gypsum would be easily washed away from the surface.

  13. A Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy Study of Cubic and Orthorhombic C3A and Their Hydration Products in the Presence of Gypsum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Rheinheimer

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows the microstructural differences and phase characterization of pure phases and hydrated products of the cubic and orthorhombic (Na-doped polymorphs of tricalcium aluminate (C3A, which are commonly found in traditional Portland cements. Pure, anhydrous samples were characterized using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and X-ray diffraction (XRD and demonstrated differences in the chemical and mineralogical composition as well as the morphology on a micro/nano-scale. C3A/gypsum blends with mass ratios of 0.2 and 1.9 were hydrated using a water/C3A ratio of 1.2, and the products obtained after three days were assessed using STXM. The hydration process and subsequent formation of calcium sulfate in the C3A/gypsum systems were identified through the changes in the LIII edge fine structure for Calcium. The results also show greater Ca LII binding energies between hydrated samples with different gypsum contents. Conversely, the hydrated samples from the cubic and orthorhombic C3A at the same amount of gypsum exhibited strong morphological differences but similar chemical environments.

  14. Geomorphological Evidence of Plausible Water Activity and Evaporatic Deposition in Interdune Areas of the Gypsum-rich Olympia Undae Dune Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szynkiewicz, A.; Ewing, R. C.; Fishbaugh, K. E.; Bourke, M. C.; Bustos, D.; Pratt, L. M.

    2009-03-01

    New morphological features (e.g., cross-bedding strata, bright patches), revealed by HiRISE for the gypsum-rich Olympia Undae Dune Field, appear to indicate the change(s) in paleoenvironmental conditions likely controlled by climate fluctuations in the North Pole of Mars.

  15. Gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O) Scaling on Polybenzimidazole and Cellulose Acetate Hollow Fiber Membranes under Forward Osmosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Si Cong; Su, Jincai; Fu, Feng-Jiang; Mi, Baoxia; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2013-01-01

    We have examined the gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O) scaling phenomena on membranes with different physicochemical properties in forward osmosis (FO) processes. Three hollow fiber membranes made of (1) cellulose acetate (CA), (2) polybenzimidazole (PBI)/polyethersulfone (PES) and (3) PBI-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS)/polyacrylonitrile (PAN) were studied. For the first time in FO processes, we have found that surface ionic interactions dominate gypsum scaling on the membrane surface. A 70% flux reduction was observed on negatively charged CA and PBI membrane surfaces, due to strong attractive forces. The PBI membrane surface also showed a slightly positive charge at a low pH value of 3 and exhibited a 30% flux reduction. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) force measurements confirmed a strong repulsive force between gypsum and PBI at a pH value of 3. The newly developed PBI-POSS/PAN membrane had ridge morphology and a contact angle of 51.42° ± 14.85° after the addition of hydrophilic POSS nanoparticles and 3 min thermal treatment at 95 °C. Minimal scaling and an only 1.3% flux reduction were observed at a pH value of 3. Such a ridge structure may reduce scaling by not providing a locally flat surface to the crystallite at a pH value of 3; thus, gypsum would be easily washed away from the surface. PMID:24957062

  16. Land subsidence and caprock dolines caused by subsurface gypsum dissolution and the effect of subsidence on the fluvial system in the Upper Tigris Basin (between Bismil Batman, Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, Uğur

    2005-11-01

    Karstification-based land subsidence was found in the Upper Tigris Basin with dimensions not seen anywhere else in Turkey. The area of land subsidence, where there are secondary and tertiary subsidence developments, reaches 140 km 2. Subsidence depth ranges between 40 and 70 m. The subsidence was formed as a result of subsurface gypsum dissolution in Lower Miocene formation. Although there are limestones together with gypsum and Eocene limestone below them in the area, a subsidence with such a large area is indicative of karstification in the gypsum. The stratigraphical cross-sections taken from the wells and the water analyses also verify this fact. The Lower Miocene gypsum, which shows confined aquifer features, was completely dissolved by the aggressive waters injected from the top and discharged through by Zellek Fault. This resulted in the development of subsidence and formation of caprock dolines on loosely textured Upper Miocene-Pliocene cover formations. The Tigris River runs through the subsidence area between Batman and Bismil. There are four terrace levels as T1 (40 m), T2 (30 m), T3 (10 m) and T4 (4-5 m) in the Tigris River valley. It was also found that there were some movements of the levels of the terraces in the valley by subsidence. The subsidence developed gradually throughout the Quaternary; however no terrace was formed purely because of subsidence.

  17. Modern High-Yielding Maize, Wheat and Soybean Cultivars in Response to Gypsum and Lime Application on No-Till Oxisol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Dalla Nora

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Modern maize, wheat, and soybean cultivars are usually characterized by a short cycle, high shoot-root ratio, and high responsiveness to nutrient input. Continuous no-tillage management (NTS frequently leads to a steep gradient in soil chemical quality with depth, thus decreasing yield under conditions of acid subsoil and water stress. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of gypsum, applied separately or in combination with lime, on the yield of cultivars used in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The study consisted of four experiments conducted on a typic Hapludox under NTS. The experiment was arranged in a randomized block design with three replications. Experiments I and II were carried out on soils with a satisfactory chemical soil quality and tested treatments of gypsum applications ranging from 0.0 to 6.5 Mg ha-1. The other experiments were carried out on acid soil (experiment III and a soil with an abrupt drop in chemical quality (experiment IV. Experiment III was arranged in a split plot design, where plots corresponded to gypsum rates between 0.0 and 5.0 Mg ha-1, and subplots to two lime rates (0.0 and 2.0 Mg ha-1. Experiment IV was conducted in a split plot design, with plots consisting of gypsum rates from 0.0 to 6.0 Mg ha-1 and subplots of lime rates from 0.0 to 4.8 Mg ha-1. Of a set of 17 harvests investigated during the experimental period, 82 % responded with yield increases to gypsum and lime inputs. The gypsum rate that induced the highest grain yield was high (4.7 Mg ha-1 and similarly, the maximum technical efficiency of lime was higher than the currently recommended. Furthermore, the combined application of lime and gypsum increased yield. There was a correlation between grain yield with the chemical quality of the soil layer 0.25-0.40 m in experiment I, 0.00-0.40 m in experiment II, and the 0.00-0.25 m in experiment IV. Only in experiment III, where the surface layer was acidic, the diagnostic layer usually

  18. Manufacture of ammonium sulfate fertilizer from gypsum-rich byproduct of flue gas desulfurization - A prefeasibility cost estimate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, I.-Ming; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Lytle, J.M.; Achorn, F.P.

    1996-01-01

    Costs for constructing and operating a conceptual plant based on a proposed process that converts flue gas desulfurization (FGD)-gypsum to ammonium sulfate fertilizer has been calculated and used to estimate a market price for the product. The average market price of granular ammonium sulfate ($138/ton) exceeds the rough estimated cost of ammonium sulfate from the proposed process ($111/ ton), by 25 percent, if granular size ammonium sulfate crystals of 1.2 to 3.3 millimeters in diameters can be produced by the proposed process. However, there was at least ??30% margin in the cost estimate calculations. The additional costs for compaction, if needed to create granules of the required size, would make the process uneconomical unless considerable efficiency gains are achieved to balance the additional costs. This study suggests the need both to refine the crystallization process and to find potential markets for the calcium carbonate produced by the process.

  19. Conversion of calcium sulphide to calcium carbonate during the process of recovery of elemental sulphur from gypsum waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beer, M; Maree, J P; Liebenberg, L; Doucet, F J

    2014-11-01

    The production of elemental sulphur and calcium carbonate (CaCO3) from gypsum waste can be achieved by thermally reducing the waste into calcium sulphide (CaS), which is then subjected to a direct aqueous carbonation step for the generation of hydrogen sulphide (H2S) and CaCO3. H2S can subsequently be converted to elemental sulphur via the commercially available chemical catalytic Claus process. This study investigated the carbonation of CaS by examining both the solution chemistry of the process and the properties of the formed carbonated product. CaS was successfully converted into CaCO3; however, the reaction yielded low-grade carbonate products (i.e. 99 mass% as CaCO3) or precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The study of Influencing Maintenance Factors on Failures of Two gypsum Kilns by Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iraj Alimohammadi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Developing technology and using equipment in Iranian industries caused that maintenance system would be more important to use. Using proper management techniques not only increase the performance of production system but also reduce the failures and costs. The aim of this study was to determine the quality of maintenance system and the effects of its components on failures of kilns in two gypsum production companies using Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA. Furthermore the costs of failures were studied. After the study of gypsum production steps in the factories, FMEA was conducted by the determination of analysis insight, information gathering, making list of kilns’ component and filling up the FMEA’s tables. The effects of failures on production, how to fail, failure rate, failure severity, and control measures were studied. The evaluation of maintenance system was studied by a check list including questions related to system components. The costs of failures were determined by refer in accounting notebooks and interview with the head of accounting department. It was found the total qualities of maintenance system in NO.1 was more than NO.2 but because of lower quality of NO.1’s kiln design, number of failures and their costs were more. In addition it was determined that repair costs in NO.2’s kiln were about one third of NO.1’s. The low severity failures caused the most costs in comparison to the moderate and low ones. The technical characteristics of kilns were appeared to be the most important factors in reducing of failures and costs.

  1. Gypsum scarps and asymmetric fluvial valleys in evaporitic terrains. The role of river migration, landslides, karstification and lithology (Ebro River, NE Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, J.; Gutiérrez, F.

    2017-11-01

    Most of the Spanish fluvial systems excavated in Tertiary evaporitic gypsum formations show asymmetric valleys characterized by a stepped sequence of fluvial terraces on one valley flank and kilometric-long and > 100-m high prominent river scarp on the opposite side of the valley. Scarp undermining by the continuous preferential lateral migration of the river channel toward the valley margin leads to vertical to overhanging unstable slopes affected by a large number of slope failures that become the main geological hazard for villages located at the toe of the scarps. Detailed mapping of the gypsum scarps along the Ebro and Huerva Rivers gypsum scarps demonstrates that landslides and lateral spreading processes are predominant when claystones crop out at the base of the scarp, while rockfalls and topples become the dominant movement in those reaches where the rock mass is mainly constituted by evaporites. The dissolution of gypsum nodules, seasonal swelling and shrinking, and dispersion processes contribute to a decrease in the mechanical strength of claystones. The existence of dissolution-enlarged joints, sinkholes, and severely damaged buildings at the toe of the scarp from karstic subsidence demonstrates that the interstratal karstification of evaporites becomes a triggering factor in the instability of the rock mass. The genesis of asymmetric valleys and river gypsum scarps in the study area seem to be caused by the random migration of the river channel in the absence of lateral tilting related to tectonics or dissolution-induced subsidence. Once the scarp is developed, its preservation depends on the physicochemical properties of the substratum, the ratio between bedrock erosion and river incision rates, and climatic conditions that favour runoff erosion versus dissolution.

  2. Effect of polyvinylsiloxane material and impression handling on the accuracy of digital models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camardella, Leonardo Tavares; Alencar, David Silveira; Breuning, Hero; de Vasconcellos Vilella, Oswaldo

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and reliability of measurements on digital models obtained by scanning impressions 5, 10, and 15 days after they were made from 2 soft putty polyvinylsiloxane (PVS) materials. Thirty volunteers were selected for making impressions of their dentitions with alginate to create a plaster model and with PVS impression material to create a digital model by laser scanning. Three examiners made the plaster model measurements with digital calipers and repeated these measurements on the digital models made from the scanned PVS impressions. A total of 34 distances were evaluated. Paired t tests were used to evaluate intraexaminer error and the accuracy of the digital model measurements. Measurement reproducibility and reliability among examiners were tested. Although statistically significant differences between measurements on plaster and digital models were found, these discrepancies were not clinically significant except for overbite. Both plaster and digital models had high intraclass correlation coefficient values. Digital models acquired by laser scanning of 2 types of soft putty PVS material may be used with clinically acceptable accuracy, reliability, and reproducibility, even at a postscanning interval of 15 days. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Reproducibility, reliability and validity of measurements obtained from Cecile3 digital models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Adolfo Watanabe-Kanno

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the reproducibility, reliability and validity of measurements in digital models compared to plaster models. Fifteen pairs of plaster models were obtained from orthodontic patients with permanent dentition before treatment. These were digitized to be evaluated with the program Cécile3 v2.554.2 beta. Two examiners measured three times the mesiodistal width of all the teeth present, intercanine, interpremolar and intermolar distances, overjet and overbite. The plaster models were measured using a digital vernier. The t-Student test for paired samples and interclass correlation coefficient (ICC were used for statistical analysis. The ICC of the digital models were 0.84 ± 0.15 (intra-examiner and 0.80 ± 0.19 (inter-examiner. The average mean difference of the digital models was 0.23 ± 0.14 and 0.24 ± 0.11 for each examiner, respectively. When the two types of measurements were compared, the values obtained from the digital models were lower than those obtained from the plaster models (p < 0.05, although the differences were considered clinically insignificant (differences < 0.1 mm. The Cécile digital models are a clinically acceptable alternative for use in Orthodontics.

  4. Effects of intermittent pneumatic compression of the thigh on blood flow velocity in the femoral and popliteal veins: developing a new physical prophylaxis for deep vein thrombosis in patients with plaster-cast immobilization of the leg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Keisuke; Takahira, Naonobu; Sakamoto, Miki; Yamaoka-Tojo, Minako; Katagiri, Masato; Kitagawa, Jun

    2016-11-01

    Patients with plaster-cast immobilization of the lower limb have an estimated venous thromboembolism rate of 2.5 % without prophylaxis, which includes many fatal cases. However, there is no practical physical prophylaxis for deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) in these patients. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of intermittent pneumatic compression on the thigh alone (IPC to the thigh) on peak blood velocity (PBV) in the legs and to consider the possibility that IPC of the thigh could be used as physical prophylaxis for DVT in patients with plaster-cast immobilization of the lower leg. Nine healthy male volunteers and eighteen elderly males were recruited. We immobilized each subject's right lower leg and ankle with a plaster splint, and applied the ActiveCare+S.F.T.(®) (Medical Compression Systems, Inc.) device to each subject's right thigh. The PBV in the superficial femoral vein (PBVFV) and the popliteal vein (PBVPV) were measured using duplex Doppler ultrasonography. IPC to the thigh resulted in a 2.3-fold increase in PBVFV and a 3.0-fold increase in PBVPV compared with resting at supine in the elderly group. Although IPC to the thigh also increased PBVFV and PBVPV significantly in the sitting position, the change ratios of PBV in the supine and sitting positions were equal (2.6-fold increase in PBVFV and 2.9-fold increase in PBVPV). IPC to the thigh in supine and sitting positions significantly increased PBVFV and PBVPV, and could be a useful prophylaxis for DVT in patients with plaster-cast immobilization of the lower leg.

  5. Analysis of the strengthenings of mixed glass fibers E and fibers AR in plaster, as an alternative to monofiber (homogeneous strengthenings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    del Río Merino, M.

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The company Vetrotex in collaboration with the Department of Architectural Constructions and their control (E.U.A.T of the Polytechnic University of Madrid, have deeply researched on plaster strengthened with glass fiber E. The conclusions of the influence of the dispersibility of glass fiber in the compound mechanical behavior and in its workability have been published in an earlier article. Here now are the results and conclusions of a study on mixed strengthenings of glass fibers E and AR combined at a 50%, as an alternative to the homogenous strengthening.

    La empresa Vetrotex, a través de sus técnicos y en colaboración con el Departamento de Construcciones Arquitectónicas y su control (E.U.A.T de la UPM, decide acometer un estudio en profundidad de la escayola reforzada con fibra de vidrio E. En un primer artículo se presentaron las conclusiones sobre la influencia del grado de dispersabilidad de las fibras de vidrio en el comportamiento mecánico del compuesto y en su trabajabilidad. En este segundo artículo se presentan los resultados y conclusiones del estudio de los refuerzos mixtos de fibras de vidrio E en combinación al 50% con fibras de vidrio AR, como alteruativa a los refuerzos actuales homogéneos.

  6. Isotope ratios of (235)U/(238)U and (137)Cs/(235)U in black rain streaks on plaster wall caused by fallout of the Hiroshima atomic bomb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Endo, Satoru; Fujikawa, Yoko

    2012-02-01

    Radiological investigations of fallout from the atomic bomb detonated over Hiroshima city on 6 August 1945 are important to estimate doses for inhabitants. The authors have analyzed the concentrations of (137)Cs, (235)U, and (238)U in streaks of black rain caused by the atomic bomb using gamma-ray spectroscopy and the ICP-QMS method. The black rain streaks were deposited on a plaster wall of a house located 3.7 km west of the hypocenter that has been kept in the same condition as after the rainfall. Cesium-137 ((137)Cs) was detected from black streak samples. Concentration of (137)Cs in the black rain streaks is twice as high as fallout deposition on the ground in this area. A (235)U/(238)U atom ratio of 0.00887 was found, which is higher than the natural ratio, reflecting the fact that the atomic bomb "Little Boy" used enriched uranium as fuel. The ratio (137)Cs/(235)U was determined to be 0.0091, which is about eight times higher than the estimated ratio of 0.00113 based on the fission yield.

  7. Evolution characteristic of gypsum-salt rocks of the upper member of Oligocene Lower Ganchaigou Fm in the Shizigou area, western Qaidam Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinghong Yi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Over years of oil and gas exploration in the Qaidam Basin, reservoirs have been discovered in many layers. In the Shizigou area, western Qaidam Basin, the upper member of Oligocene Lower Ganchaigou Fm is an important target for oil and gas exploration, and gypsum-salt rocks are the high-quality caprocks for the preservation of oil and gas reservoirs in this area. For predicting oil and gas exploration direction and target in the western Qaidam Basin and providing guidance for its oil and gas exploration deployment, its depositional characteristics and environment of gypsum-salt rocks in this area were investigated based on the core observation, thin section identification, and analysis of grain size, sensitivity parameter ratios (Sr/Cu, Fe/Mn, (Fe + Al/(Ca + Mg, V/(V + Ni and Pr/Ph, pyrite content and inclusions. The following characteristics are identified. First, gypsum-salt rocks are mainly distributed in the depocenter of the lake basin and their thickness decreases towards the margin of the basin. They are laterally transformed into carbonate rocks or terrigenous clastic rocks. They are areally distributed in the shape of irregular ellipse. Second, gypsum-salt rocks are vertically developed mainly in the middle and upper parts of the upper member of Lower Ganchaigou Fm and they are interbedded with carbonate rocks or terrigenous clastic rocks. Their single layer thickness changes greatly, and there are many layers with good continuity. Third, Sand Group III to Group I in the upper member of Lower Ganchaigou Fm (inter-salt are of reductive water environment of semi-deep to deep lake facies due to their sedimentation in an arid and hot climate. It is concluded that gypsum-salt rocks of the upper member of Lower Ganchaigou Fm are distributed widely with great accumulative thickness in this area; and that they are originated from deep lake water by virtue of evaporation, concentration and crystallization in an arid and hot climate instead

  8. Evaluation of the use of digital study models in postgraduate orthodontic programs in the United States and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastry, Shruti; Park, Jae Hyun

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the extent, experience, and trends associated with digital model use, as well as the advantages of using a particular study model type (digital or plaster) in postgraduate orthodontic programs in the United States and Canada. An electronic survey consisting of 14 questions was sent to 72 program directors or chairpersons of accredited orthodontic postgraduate programs in the United States and Canada. Fifty-one responded for a 71% response rate. Sixty-five percent of the schools use plaster study models compared with 35% that use digital models. The most common advantages of plaster models were a three-dimensional feel and the ability for them to be mounted on an articulator. The most common advantages of digital models were the ease of storage and retrieval, and the residents' exposure to new technology. About one third of the plaster model users reported that they wanted to switch to digital models in the future, with 12% planning to do so within 1 year. Based on our study, 35% of accredited orthodontic postgraduate programs in the United States and Canada are using digital study models in most cases treated in their programs, and the trend is for increased digital model use in the future.

  9. Wheat yield and chemical composition as influenced by integrated use of gypsum, pressmud and fym in saline-sodic soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad, D.; Khattak, R.A.

    2011-01-01

    Crop yields are limited under salt-affected soils receiving saline irrigation water. A field experiment was conducted on silty clay loam saline sodic soil [fine loamy, mixed, hyperthermic Typic Haplustepts, ECe 8.03-11.76 dS m/sup -1/, SAR=15.8-17.9] to investigate the effect of gypsum (G), pressmud (PM), and farmyard manure (FYM) applied alone or in various combinations on soil reclamation and mitigating the adverse effects of saline tube-well waters (ECiw = 5.5 dSm/sup -1/, SAR = 10.0). Treatments included the amendments (AM) ; G (6.0 Mg ha-1), PM (7.0 Mg ha/sup -1/), G+PM (3.0 + 3.5 Mg ha/sup -1/) equivalent to 100% gypsum requirement (GR) applied alone or with 4.0 Mg ha/sup -1/ FYM in two factorial [4 AM x 2 FYM] RCB design with three replications. Sole application of G, PM, and G+PM significantly increased wheat plant height, grain and biomass yield by 24-28%, 27-36%, and 37-39% over control which further increased to 42-46%, 68-87% and 61-73%, respectively, when these AM were applied in combination with 4.0 Mg FYM ha/sup -1/. Wheat leaf K and Ca+Mg concentrations increased while Na was depressed by G and PM but was highest in FYM treated plants. Due to increases in tissue [K], the K:Na ratio was higher in G and PM treated plots and lowest in control and FYM alone. The K:Na ratio in tissue was positively correlated to Ca+Mg:Na ratio (r/sup 2/ = 0.53) and K:Na ratio (r2 = 0.43) in the soil solution. The post harvest soil SAR significantly (P < 0.01) decreased from 13.03 in control to 5.40, 7.73 and 6.27 with G, PM and G+PM treated plots, respectively. Water soluble K increased by 2-3 times with sole AM and 4-5 times with AM+FYM applications. In spite of saline irrigation the lower SAR values and high K values revealed the significant role of AM application for better management of these soils. The comparable increases in wheat grain yield and decreases in post harvest soil SAR and EC suggest that PM could be as effective as gypsum in these saline-sodic soils

  10. Characterization of mudejar mortars from St. Gil Abbot church (Zaragoza, Spain: Investigation of the manufacturing technology of ancient gypsum mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igea, J.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This work has been focused on the investigation of the technological procedure of Mudejar mortars applied to the characterization of a group of unaltered samples from an example church of Mudejar architecture of Aragon. The research was carried out using multi-analytical techniques including petrographic study, chemistry and mineralogical analysis. All mortars present a homogeneous composition. The binder is made up of a mixture of gypsum and a very low proportion of lime, while the main components of the aggregate are gypsum and carbonate rock fragments, both in a different thermal state of decomposition. The results have proved that both, binder and aggregates display the same composition in these mortars. These aggregates are the by-product of a grinding process of the previously burnt raw materials which have had a positive influence on the properties of the mortars in improving their quality.

    Este trabajo se ha centrado en la investigación de la tecnología de fabricación de morteros mudéjares mediante la caracterización de un conjunto de muestras inalteradas procedentes de una iglesia representativa de la arquitectura Mudéjar aragonesa. La investigación se llevó a cabo mediante el uso combinado de técnicas analíticas incluyendo el estudio petrográfico y el análisis químico y mineralógico. Todos los morteros presentan una composición constante formada por una mezcla de yeso y cal, en muy baja proporción, como ligante, mientras que el árido está formado por fragmentos de rocas yesíferas y carbonatadas en distinto estado de descomposición térmica. Los resultados confirman que en la fabricación de los morteros, ligante y áridos presentan la misma composición, siendo éstos últimos el subproducto de la misma materia prima calcinada, incorporados para elaborar el mortero, tras un proceso de molienda. Esta característica ha influido positivamente en las propiedades de los morteros, mejorando su calidad.

  11. Preliminary U-Th Dating of Endogenic Gypsum From Lake Petén-Itzá, Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, V. C.; Gallup, C. D.; Hodell, D.; Anselmetti, F.; Brenner, M.; Ariztegui, D.

    2007-05-01

    Uranium-thorium dating of lake sediments can provide accurate ages beyond the range of radiocarbon dating. Many lakes have endogenic precipitation of calcium bearing minerals that allow for substitution by uranium within their crystal structures. The water chemistry of Lake Petén-Itzá, located in northern Guatemala, is dominated by calcium, sulfate and carbonate ions (Deevey et al. 1980; Curtis et al. 1998). Changes in regional climate due to suspected shifts in the ITCZ over the past 85,000 years resulted in both calcite and gypsum deposition, especially during drier periods (Hodell et al. 2006). Both precipitates incorporate uranium from the lake water and can be used for U-Th dating. U-Th dating is problematic in lake systems for several reasons: the potential for 1) diagenetic alteration or dissolution while the endogenic precipitates are settling and after deposition and 2) contamination by detrital thorium. Contamination is a primary issue because of the difficulty of separating the precipitates from the sediment. Despite these concerns, U-Th dating of lake sediments has the potential to be successful with careful selection of precipitates and thorough analysis of the precipitate, the lake system, and the diagenetic environment. Preliminary samples of Lake Petén-Itzá gypsum contain euhedral crystals, indicating a lack of post-depositional alteration. However, the samples have high background thorium levels, indicating the necessity of using the U-Th total sample dissolution isochron dating method (as described by Ku, 2000) to quantify authigenic thorium. Curtis J.H., Brenner M., Hodell D.A., Balser R.A., Islebe G.A., Hooghiemstra H. 1998. A multi-proxy study of Holocene environmental change in the Maya lowlands of Petén, Guatemala. Journal of Paleolimnology 19, 139-159. Deevey E.S., Brenner M., Flannery M.S., Yezdani G.H. 1980. Lakes Yaxha and Scanab, Petén, Guatemala: Limnology and hydrology. Arch. Hydrobiol. 57, 419-460. Hodell D.A., Anselmetti F

  12. Accuracy and precision of polyurethane dental arch models fabricated using a three-dimensional subtractive rapid prototyping method with an intraoral scanning technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Hong; Kim, Ki-Baek; Kim, Woong-Chul; Kim, Ji-Hwan; Kim, Hae-Young

    2014-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy and precision of polyurethane (PUT) dental arch models fabricated using a three-dimensional (3D) subtractive rapid prototyping (RP) method with an intraoral scanning technique by comparing linear measurements obtained from PUT models and conventional plaster models. Ten plaster models were duplicated using a selected standard master model and conventional impression, and 10 PUT models were duplicated using the 3D subtractive RP technique with an oral scanner. Six linear measurements were evaluated in terms of x, y, and z-axes using a non-contact white light scanner. Accuracy was assessed using mean differences between two measurements, and precision was examined using four quantitative methods and the Bland-Altman graphical method. Repeatability was evaluated in terms of intra-examiner variability, and reproducibility was assessed in terms of inter-examiner and inter-method variability. The mean difference between plaster models and PUT models ranged from 0.07 mm to 0.33 mm. Relative measurement errors ranged from 2.2% to 7.6% and intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.93 to 0.96, when comparing plaster models and PUT models. The Bland-Altman plot showed good agreement. The accuracy and precision of PUT dental models for evaluating the performance of oral scanner and subtractive RP technology was acceptable. Because of the recent improvements in block material and computerized numeric control milling machines, the subtractive RP method may be a good choice for dental arch models.

  13. Preliminary Examination of the System Fly Ash-Bottom Ash-Flue Gas Desulphurization Gypsum-Portland Cement-Water for Road Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Tokalic

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an investigation into the use of three power plant wastes: fly ash, flue gas desulphurization gypsum, and bottom ash for subbase layers in road construction. Two kinds of mixtures of these wastes with Portland cement and water were made: first with fly ash consisting of coarser particles (<1.651 mm and second with fly ash consisting of smaller particles (<0.42 mm. The mass ratio of fly ash-Portland cement-flue gas desulphurization gypsum-bottom ash was the same (3 : 1 : 1 : 5 in both mixtures. For both mixtures, the compressive strength, the mineralogical composition, and the leaching characteristics were determined at different times, 7 and 28 days, after preparation. The obtained results showed that both mixtures could find a potential use for subbase layers in road construction.

  14. A new use of hydroxyapatite-based consolidant: cleaning and consolidation of stones in one step by reaction with gypsum crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina Piernas, Eduardo; Rueda Quero, Lucia; Cultrone, Giuseppe; Ruiz Agudo, Encarnación

    2015-04-01

    The reaction between diammonium hydrogen phosphate (DAP) and calcite in the stone to form hydroxyapatite (HAP) had provided a new product to consolidate limestone or Ca-rich stones, for example sandstones with carbonatic cement. However, what does it happen with the stones without Ca-bearing compounds? Obviously, HAP cannot form. In the other hand, recent research about consolidation with DAP show a good interaction between carbonatic stones and HAP, improving their mechanical properties. For these reasons, we propose a new method for the consolidation of building stone capable of cleaning the gypsum crust and consolidating stones at the same time, based in the Ferroni-Dini method [1] and using DAP. Based on this method, we aim at obtaining a consolidating component reacting DAP (instead of ammonium carbonate) and the gypsum contained in the crust of weathered stones in polluted environments. As an advantage, we do not need to use barium hydroxide (the second step required in the Ferroni-Dini method), thereby reducing the time necessary to carry out the consolidation. Here, we report different tests to evaluate this new procedure. In a first set of experiments, a DAP solution was poured on a gypsum (dihydrate calcium sulphate) saturated solution and by monitoring the free calcium content of the solution using an ion-selective electrode we have evaluated the fluctuations in the content in calcium of the solution and the speed of the reaction. Once the reaction finished, we analyzed the solids formed to verify the formation of hydroxyapatite by FTIR and microRAMAN. The second test consisted in the alteration of limestone blocks with sulfuric acid to obtain a crust of gypsum and, after that, the samples were consolidated by means of cellulose compress soaked in DAP 3M during different reaction times (30 minutes, 1 hour and 4 hours, at controlled temperature -20 °C- and relative humidity -40% HR-). The samples were then analyzed by XRD, FTIR, microRAMAN and SEM-EDX to

  15. Geologic Conceptual Model of Mosul Dam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    geomechanical characteristics or geotechnical properties. As an example, if the locations and depths of zones of high grout-take are known, these zones can...Dam safety Foundation grout Geologic model GIS Gypsum Hydrogeology Iraq geology Karst 3-D modeling 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION

  16. Arsenic leaching and speciation in C&D debris landfills and the relationship with gypsum drywall content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianye; Kim, Hwidong; Dubey, Brajesh; Townsend, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    The effects of sulfide levels on arsenic leaching and speciation were investigated using leachate generated from laboratory-scale construction and demolition (C&D) debris landfills, which were simulated lysimeters containing various percentages of gypsum drywall. The drywall percentages in lysimeters were 0, 1, 6, and 12.4wt% (weight percent) respectively. With the exception of a control lysimeter that contained 12.4wt% of drywall, each lysimeter contained chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood, which accounts for 10wt% of the C&D waste. During the period of study, lysimeters were mostly under anaerobic conditions. Leachate analysis results showed that sulfide levels increased as the percentage of drywall increased in landfills, but arsenic concentrations in leachate were not linearly correlated with sulfide levels. Instead, the arsenic concentrations decreased as sulfide increased up to approximately 1000μg/L, but had an increase with further increase in sulfide levels, forming a V-shape on the arsenic vs. sulfide plot. The analysis of arsenic speciation in leachate showed different species distribution as sulfide levels changed; the fraction of arsenite (As(III)) increased as the sulfide level increased, and thioarsenate anions (As(V)) were detected when the sulfide level further increased (>10 4 μg/L). The formation of insoluble arsenic sulfide minerals at a lower range of sulfide and soluble thioarsenic anionic species at a higher range of sulfide likely contributed to the decreasing and increasing trend of arsenic leaching. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Impact of leaching conditions on constituents release from Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum (FGDG) and FGDG-soil mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koralegedara, N H; Al-Abed, S R; Arambewela, M K J; Dionysiou, D D

    2017-02-15

    The interest in using Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum (FGDG) for land applications has increased recently. This study evaluates the leaching characteristics of trace elements in "modern" FGDG (produced after fly ash removal) and FGDG-mixed soil (SF) under different environmental conditions using recently approved EPA leaching methods (1313-1316). These methods employ various pH and liquid-solid (LS) ratios under batch leaching, column percolation and diffusion controlled release scenarios. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Protocol (TCLP) and Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Protocol (SPLP) were used for comparison. The data obtained from new EPA methods provide broad insight into constituent release from FGDG and SF when compared to TCLP and SPLP. The release of toxic elements such as Hg, As, Pb, Co, Cd and Cr from SF was negligible. High release of B from FGDG was observed under all tested conditions; however, its release from SF was low. Both FGDG and SF released Se under all pH conditions (2-13) and LS ratios (1-10) in low concentrations (0.02-0.2mg/L). The data from this study could be used to investigate potential use of "modern" FGDG for new beneficial land applications. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Nonpolar Surface Modification Using Fatty Acids and Its Effect on Calcite from Mineral Carbonation of Desulfurized Gypsum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Wan Jeon

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available CaCO3 is often used as an additive in many industries. However, additional functions are required to expand its applicability. This entails modification of its physicochemical properties. Accordingly, in this study, a particle surface modification treatment was performed on CaCO3 produced from desulfurized gypsum for a range of industrial applications. In the experiment, fatty acids were used to modify the CaCO3 surface, and the scale of the modification effect was based on the degree of change associated with a polar surface taking on nonpolar surface properties. In the preliminary modification experiment, stearic acid was dissolved in 2-propanol or chloroform, and the extent of the reaction and the active ratio were measured according to the stearic acid concentration. The results showed that the effective active ratio, considering the activity to unit adsorption, was higher in 2-propanol than in chloroform. Consequently, the modification solvent used in the experiment changed the CaCO3 surface from a hydrophilic, polarized form to a hydrophobic, nonpolarized form. These results will also allow the CaCO3 produced to be used as a filler in a range of chemical industries.

  19. Analytical results, geology, and sample locality map of mercury-sulfur-gypsum mineralization at Crater, Inyo County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, M.S.; Marsh, S.P.; Roemer, T.A.

    1984-01-01

    The Crater mercury-su l fur-gypsum ~ineral ized area is located in east-central California along the crest of the Last Chance Range, west of the north end of Death Valley (fig. 1). The area is in the northwest quarter of the Last Chance Range 15-minute quadrangle and occupies the area between 117 39 and 117 45 longitude and 37 10 and 37 15 latitudP.. The area studied lies between 5000 ( 1525 m) and 6000 ( 1830 m) feet above sea level. Relief isgenerally moderate but can be extreme in some places, as at Hanging Rock Canyon (plate 1). The climate is arid, and there are no active streams in the area. The range fronts east and west of the area are precipitous and incised by many steep canyons, whereas the range crest has relatively low relief. The old abandoned town and mine site of Crater 1 ie in this area of low relief. Access to the Crater area is by paved and dirt roads from Big Pine to the west or from the north end of the Death Valley National Monument to the southeast.

  20. Application of coal fly ash to circumneutral mine waters for the removal of sulphates as gypsum and ettringite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madzivire, G.; Petrik, L.F.; Gitari, W.M.; Ojumu, T.V.; Balfour, G. [University of Western Cape, Cape Town (South Africa)

    2010-02-15

    South African power stations generate large amounts of highly alkaline fly ash (FA). This waste product has a serious impact on the environment. Acid mine drainage (AMD) is another environmental problem associated with mining. AMD has high heavy metal content in addition to high sulphate concentrations. Several studies have shown that 80-90% of sulphates can be removed when FA is co-disposed with AMD rich in Fe and Al. In South Africa, sources of contaminated mine waters, unlike AMD have circumneutral pH and much lower concentrations of Fe and Al, but rich in Ca and Mg. Treatment of such waters with FA resulted in no significant removal of sulphates when treated to pH less than 10. Subsequent treatment of circumneutral mine water to pH greater than 11 resulted in more than 60% sulphate removal. Treatment of circumneutral mine water to pH greater than 11 with FA followed by seeding with gypsum crystals and the addition of amorphous Al(OH){sub 3} resulted in removal of sulphate to levels below the Department of Water Affairs and Forestry (DWAF) water quality effluent limit (500 ppm).

  1. Fabrication of calcite blocks from gypsum blocks by compositional transformation based on dissolution-precipitation reactions in sodium carbonate solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Kunio; Kawachi, Giichiro; Tsuru, Kanji; Yoshimoto, Ayami

    2017-03-01

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO 3 ) has been used as a bone substitute, and is a precursor for carbonate apatite, which is also a promising bone substitute. However, limited studies have been reported on the fabrication of artificial calcite blocks. In the present study, cylindrical calcite blocks (ϕ6×3mm) were fabricated by compositional transformation based on dissolution-precipitation reactions using different calcium sulfate blocks as a precursor. In the dissolution-precipitation reactions, both CaSO 4 ·2H 2 O and CaSO 4 transformed into calcite, a polymorph of CaCO 3 , while maintaining their macroscopic structure when immersed in 1mol/L Na 2 CO 3 solution at 80°C for 1week. The diametral tensile strengths of the calcite blocks formed using CaSO 4 ·2H 2 O and CaSO 4 were 1.0±0.3 and 2.3±0.7MPa, respectively. The fabrication of calcite blocks using CaSO 4 ·2H 2 O and CaSO 4 proposed in this investigation may be a useful method to produce calcite blocks because of the self-setting ability and high temperature stability of gypsum precursors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Richness, diversity and evenness of vegetation upon rehabilitation of gypsum mine spoiled lands in the Indian arid zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S.; Sharma, K.D.; Sharma, U.K.; Gough, L.P.

    1998-01-01

    Richness, diversity and evenness of vegetation, after rehabilitation of gypsum mine spoils at Barmer were investigated in plots protected and planted one year and four years ago. There were four water harvesting treatments, viz., half-moon terraces, micro-catchments with 5% slope, ridge and furrow and control, wherein, indigenous and exotic trees and shrubs were planted at 5 ?? 5 m spacing. Sampling of the planted and natural vegetation, using quadrats and transacts, revealed much less species richness in unplanted control as compared to all treatments and in all the years. The species richness that increased initially (within one year) gradually declined over time (during four year), though the extent varied in different treatments. The water harvesting treatment showing maximum initial increase in richness also showed maximum decline over time, though decline was more in annual species. Two perennial species increased in richness with time. This was further proved from the trends in diversity and evenness indices. It was concluded that natural successional process was accelerated by rehabilitation providing stability to the habitat.

  3. Detection of pigments of halophilic endoliths from gypsum: Raman portable instrument and European Space Agency's prototype analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culka, Adam; Osterrothová, Kateřina; Hutchinson, Ian; Ingley, Richard; McHugh, Melissa; Oren, Aharon; Edwards, Howell G M; Jehlička, Jan

    2014-12-13

    A prototype instrument, under development at the University of Leicester, for the future European Space Agency (ESA) ExoMars mission, was used for the analysis of microbial pigments within a stratified gypsum crust from a hypersaline saltern evaporation pond at Eilat (Israel). Additionally, the same samples were analysed using a miniaturized Raman spectrometer, featuring the same 532 nm excitation. The differences in the position of the specific bands, attributed to carotenoid pigments from different coloured layers, were minor when analysed by the ESA prototype instrument; therefore, making it difficult to distinguish among the different pigments. The portable Delta Nu Advantage instrument allowed for the discrimination of microbial carotenoids from the orange/green and purple layers. The purpose of this study was to complement previous laboratory results with new data and experience with portable or handheld Raman systems, even with a dedicated prototype Raman system for the exploration of Mars. The latter is equipped with an excitation wavelength falling within the carotenoid polyene resonance region. The ESA prototype Raman instrument detected the carotenoid pigments (biomarkers) with ease, although further detailed distinctions among them were not achieved. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparison of Two Methods of Obtaining Digital Orthodontic Models: Direct vs. Indirect

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-17

    evaluated by comparing digital measurements of both tooth size, overbite , and overjet to those made on the original plaster models. Statistically...significant differences were found for tooth size and overbite but were considered clinically irrelevant. With the recent increase in the interest

  5. A cone-beam computed tomography triple scan procedure to obtain a three-dimensional augmented virtual skull model appropriate for orthognathic surgery planning.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swennen, G.R.J.; Mollemans, W.; Clercq, C. De; Abeloos, J.V.S.; Lamoral, P.; Lippens, F.R.C.; Neyt, N.; Casselman, J.W.; Schutyser, F.A.C.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present a new approach to acquire a three-dimensional virtual skull model appropriate for orthognathic surgery planning without the use of plaster dental models and without deformation of the facial soft-tissue mask. A "triple" cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan

  6. [Further characterization of percutaneous analgesic and anti-inflammatory medicine--the patient preference for smell/fragrance of cataplasm or plaster based on results of 2,351 outpatient questionnaires].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijiri, Shinichiro

    2012-08-01

    This single center questionnaire survey began in 13 February 2012 and ended in 13 April 2012 at our clinic. Patients were received the questionnaire to measure preference about smell/fragrance of percutaneous analgesic and anti-inflammatory medicine, including cataplasm or plaster. The questionnaire consisted of the following two questions: [which do you prefer, fragrance free medicine or fragrance medicine? why do you prefer either one?] We studied 2,351 outpatients (613 male and 1,738 female) aged 64.9 +/- 17.2 years, had had various orthopedic diseases. Sixteen hundred and fifty patients (retired persons, housewives, and students) did not have work, and 701 patients had work. Of 701 patients, 325 patients had work as a service trade. Fifteen hundred and thirteen patients (64.4%) preferred fragrance free medicine, and only 76 patients (3.2%) preferred fragrance medicine. The others (32.4%) answered that whichever could be sufficient. Patients who preferred fragrance free medicine were significantly younger than patients who preferred fragrance medicine (64.9 +/- 16.7 years and 69.0 +/- 13.2 years, respectively). Of patients who preferred fragrance free medicine, 37.4 % of patients answered that they wanted to make it secret to have cataplasm or plaster, and 15.7% of patients answered that they would be troubled if a smell occurs during work. Compared with male patients, female patients tended to prefer fragrance free medicine, irrespective of age. Furthermore, female patients had had work as a service trade, were more likely to prefer fragrance free medicine, compared with female patients had had no job (77.5 % versus 64.9%, psmell/fragrance, as more important factor, as well as effectiveness, safety, and sticky, on the occasion of prescription of cataplasm or plaster.

  7. Manufacturing of mortars and concretes non-traditionals, by Portland cement, metakaoline and gypsum (15.05%

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talero, R.

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available In a thorough previous research (1, it appeared that creation, evolution and development of the values of compressive mechanical strength (CS and flexural strength (FS, measured in specimens 1x1x6cm of mortar type ASTM C 452-68 (2, manufactured by ordinary Portland cement P-1 (14.11% C3A or PY-6 (0.00% C3A, metakaolin and gypsum (CaSO4∙2H2O -or ternary cements, CT-, were similar to the ones commonly developed in mortars and concretes of OPC. This paper sets up the experimental results obtained from non-traditional mortars and concretes prepared with such ternary cements -TC-, being the portland cement/metakaolin mass ratio, as follows: 80/20, 70/30 and 60/40. Finally, the behaviour of these cements against gypsum attack, has been also determined, using the following parameters: increase in length (ΔL%, compressive, CS, and flexural, FS, strengths, and ultrasound energy, UE. Experimental results obtained from these non-traditional mortars and concretes, show an increase in length (ΔL, in CS and FS, and in UE values, when there is addition of metakaolin.

    En una exhaustiva investigación anterior (1, se pudo comprobar que la creación, evolución y desarrollo de los valores de resistencias mecánicas a compresión, RMC, y flexotracción, RMF, proporcionados por probetas de 1x1x6 cm, de mortero 1:2,75, selenitoso tipo ASTM C 452-68 (2 -que habían sido preparadas con arena de Ottawa, cemento portland, P-1 (14,11% C3A o PY- 6 (0,00% C3A, metacaolín y yeso (CaSO4∙2H2O-, fue semejante a la que, comúnmente, desarrollan los morteros y hormigones tradicionales de cemento portland. En el presente trabajo se exponen los resultados experimentales obtenidos de morteros y hormigones no tradicionales, preparados con dichos cementos ternarios, CT, siendo las proporciones porcentuales en masa ensayadas, cemento portland/metacaolín, las siguientes: 80/20, 70

  8. Microbial diversity in the deep-subsurface hydrothermal aquifer feeding the giant gypsum crystal-bearing Naica mine, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie eRagon

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Naica mine in Northern Mexico is famous for its giant gypsum crystals, which may reach up to 11 m long and contain fluid inclusions that might have captured microorganisms during their formation. These crystals formed under particularly stable geochemical conditions in cavities filled by low salinity hydrothermal water at 54-58°C. We have explored the microbial diversity associated to these deep, saline hydrothermal waters collected in the deepest (ca. 700-760 m mineshafts by amplifying, cloning and sequencing small-subunit ribosomal RNA genes using primers specific for archaea, bacteria and eukaryotes. Eukaryotes were not detectable in the samples and the prokaryotic diversity identified was very low. Two archaeal operational taxonomic units (OTUs were detected in one sample. They clustered with, respectively, basal Thaumarchaeota lineages and with a large clade of environmental sequences branching at the base of the Thermoplasmatales within the Euryarchaeota. Bacterial sequences belonged to the Candidate Division OP3, Firmicutes and the Alpha- and Beta-Proteobacteria. Most of the lineages detected appear autochthonous to the Naica system, since they had as closest representatives environmental sequences retrieved from deep sediments or the deep subsurface. In addition, the high GC content of 16S rRNA gene sequences belonging to the archaea and to some OP3 OTUs suggests that at least these lineages are thermophilic. Attempts to amplify diagnostic functional genes for methanogenesis (mcrA and sulfate reduction (dsrAB were unsuccessful, suggesting that those activities, if present, are not important in the aquifer. By contrast, genes encoding archaeal ammonium monooxygenase (AamoA were amplified, suggesting that Naica Thaumarchaeota are involved in nitrification. These organisms are likely thermophilic chemolithoautotrophs adapted to thrive in an extremely energy-limited environment.

  9. Seismic testing of a three-hour fire-rated steel-framed gypsum drywall partition for nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thulin, F.A. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The test specimen measured 1.22 by 3.05 m and consisted of three layers of 12.7 mm SHEETROCK Brand FIRECODE 'C' Gypsum Panels screw-attached to both sides of USG Steel 35SJ18 Studs 610 mm on centers. The specimen was first mounted in the earthquake simulator with the studs oriented horizontally and the runners vertically. Each runner was secured to a shaker support through which horizontal sinusoidal movement was induced normal to the surface of the wall. The damping ratio was found to be 9%. The average dynamic EI of the panel was 177000 GNxmm 2 . After the OBE scans, the specimen withstood the SSE scan for frequencies between 4 and 25 Hz. Resonance occured at 9 Hz. With a support acceleration of 3.0 gsub(e), the midspan acceleration reached 6.83 gsub(e). The same specimen was rotated 90 0 to a horizontal position with each runner attached to the corresponding shaker support which induced sinusoidal motion parallel to the runners. In the SSE shake at a frequency of 9 Hz and a support acceleration of 3.0 gsub(e), the midspan acceleration reached 4.66 gsub(e). To confirm the structural integrity of the specimen, it was then mounted in a vacuum chamber and tested in accordance with ASTM E 72. The rollers were spaced at 2.98 m. The panel yielded at a uniform load of 20.8 kN (equivalent to force at 8.8 gsub(e) acceleration) and failed at 26.3 kN (11.1 gsub(e)); both values greater than the 6.83 gsub(e) maximum dynamic midspan acceleration. The average static EI was 136000 GNxmm 2 - close to the 177000 GNxmm 2 dynamic EI. This transverse load test showed that the specimen was not structurally damaged by the shaker tests simulating earthquakes in nuclear plants. (orig./HP)

  10. Microbial diversity in the deep-subsurface hydrothermal aquifer feeding the giant gypsum crystal-bearing Naica Mine, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragon, Marie; Van Driessche, Alexander E. S.; García-Ruíz, Juan M.; Moreira, David; López-García, Purificación

    2013-01-01

    The Naica Mine in northern Mexico is famous for its giant gypsum crystals, which may reach up to 11 m long and contain fluid inclusions that might have captured microorganisms during their formation. These crystals formed under particularly stable geochemical conditions in cavities filled by low salinity hydrothermal water at 54–58°C. We have explored the microbial diversity associated to these deep, saline hydrothermal waters collected in the deepest (ca. 700–760 m) mineshafts by amplifying, cloning and sequencing small-subunit ribosomal RNA genes using primers specific for archaea, bacteria, and eukaryotes. Eukaryotes were not detectable in the samples and the prokaryotic diversity identified was very low. Two archaeal operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were detected in one sample. They clustered with, respectively, basal Thaumarchaeota lineages and with a large clade of environmental sequences branching at the base of the Thermoplasmatales within the Euryarchaeota. Bacterial sequences belonged to the Candidate Division OP3, Firmicutes and the Alpha- and Beta-proteobacteria. Most of the lineages detected appear autochthonous to the Naica system, since they had as closest representatives environmental sequences retrieved from deep sediments or the deep subsurface. In addition, the high GC content of 16S rRNA gene sequences belonging to the archaea and to some OP3 OTUs suggests that at least these lineages are thermophilic. Attempts to amplify diagnostic functional genes for methanogenesis (mcrA) and sulfate reduction (dsrAB) were unsuccessful, suggesting that those activities, if present, are not important in the aquifer. By contrast, genes encoding archaeal ammonium monooxygenase (AamoA) were amplified, suggesting that Naica Thaumarchaeota are involved in nitrification. These organisms are likely thermophilic chemolithoautotrophs adapted to thrive in an extremely energy-limited environment. PMID:23508882

  11. Human-induced hydrological changes and sinkholes in the gypsum karst of Lesina Marina area (Foggia Province, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidelibus, M. D.; Gutierrez, F.; Spilotro, G.

    2009-04-01

    The Lesina Lagoon is located in the East-West-trending northern cost of Gargano (southern Italy). The lagoon is fed by springs draining the northern side of the Gargano Mesozoic carbonate aquifer and is connected with the sea by three channels, including the 2.2 km long Acquarotta Canal with a N-S orientation. The sea-side mouth of this canal was frequently clogged by sand accumulation. In 1927, the path of the northern section of this canal was changed to improve the water exchange between the lagoon and the Adriatic Sea for environmental and fish-farming purposes. The new portion of the canal, 8.5 m wide and 1.5 m deep, was excavated in evaporite bedrock and in a small outcrop of igneous rocks situated in the coast that inhibits sand accumulation. The Acquarotta Canal conveys water in both directions depending on the relative water levels of the lagoon and the sea. Initially the reach of the canal dug in gypsum was lined with concrete, which was replaced in 1993 by gabions for scenery improvement. The northern reach of the canal is dug in Upper Triassic gypsiferous sediments of the Burano Anhydrite Formation. The evaporite bedrock is mantled by unconsolidated deposits a few meters thick, largely made up of loose sand. The exposures found in the banks of the canal and in some sinkholes reveal that the gypsum has a high density of dissolutional conduits and cavities. Locally, it also shows open fractures and brecciated structure (crackle, mosaic and chaotic packbreccias) caused by dissolution-induced collapse processes. These voids, either of solutional or mechanical origin, are partially filled with detrital sediments derived from the mantling deposits. These features seem to correspond to a paleokarst, probably developed at several depths controlled by different and much lower sea level stands during the Quaternary. The construction Acquarotta Canal has caused significant changes in the local hydrology. According to the piezometric series recorded at several

  12. Source Characterization of the 2015 Collapse in Gypsum Mine in Shandong, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H.; Chu, R.; Sheng, M.

    2016-12-01

    Source parameters of mining earthquakes are essential to investigating pressure redistribution and accumulation due to underground excavation. On 25 December 2015, a local magnitude 4.0 earthquake occurred at 07:56:12 BJT in Pingyi County, China (latitude: 35.5°N, longitude: 117.7°E) with a depth of 0 km. This earthquake is caused by underground cave collapse. In this paper, we used sliding-window cross-correlation method to detect aftershocks of this event. The result indicates there are at least six aftershocks within ten minutes after the earthquake. Then we inverted focal mechanisms and depths of the mainshock and the largest aftershock with three-component broadband seismic waveform data recorded by the National Seismic Network. We use the generalized Cut-and-Paste (gCAP) method to obtain their moment tensors, which allows for a characterization of the relative amounts of deviatoric and isotropic source components. This gCAP method divides three component waveforms into Pnl and surface wave segments, and allows adjustable time shifts between observed and synthetic data, so that it reduces the influence of uncertainties in the 1-D velocity model. The results show that both events have similar focal mechanisms, which contains obvious non-double-couple component with a large proportion of isotropic source component. The mechanisms are dominated by 80% implosive isotropic energy and 20% thrusting double couple energy. Such mechanisms might be explained by an asymmetric collapse of the mine cavity due to unevenly distributed in situ stresses, sympathetic shear on a roof fault, or between the roof and floor of the mine.

  13. Digital models: How can dental arch form be verified chairside?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Alana; Braga, Emanuel; de Araújo, Telma Martins

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Plaster dental casts are routinely used during clinical practice to access maxillary dental arch form and assist on fabrication of individualized orthodontic archwires. Recently introduced, digital model technology may offer a limitation for the obtainment of a dental physical record. In this context, a tool for dental arch form assessment for chairside use is necessary when employing digital models. In this regard, paper print of the dental arch seems thus to be useful. Methods: In the present study, 37 lower arch models were used. Intercanine and intermolar widths and dental arch length measurements were performed and compared using plaster dental casts, digital models and paper print image of the models. Ortho Insight 3D scanner was employed for model digitalization. Results: No statistically significant differences were noted regarding the measurements performed on the plaster or digital models (p> 0.05). Paper print images, however, showed subestimated values for intercanine and intermolar widths and overestimated values for dental arch length. Despite being statistically significant (p< 0.001), the differences were considered clinically negligible. Conclusion: The present study suggests that paper print images obtained from digital models are clinically accurate and can be used as a tool for dental arch form assessment for fabrication of individualized orthodontic archwires. PMID:29364382

  14. Digital models: How can dental arch form be verified chairside?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alana Tavares

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Plaster dental casts are routinely used during clinical practice to access maxillary dental arch form and assist on fabrication of individualized orthodontic archwires. Recently introduced, digital model technology may offer a limitation for the obtainment of a dental physical record. In this context, a tool for dental arch form assessment for chairside use is necessary when employing digital models. In this regard, paper print of the dental arch seems thus to be useful. Methods: In the present study, 37 lower arch models were used. Intercanine and intermolar widths and dental arch length measurements were performed and compared using plaster dental casts, digital models and paper print image of the models. Ortho Insight 3D scanner was employed for model digitalization. Results: No statistically significant differences were noted regarding the measurements performed on the plaster or digital models (p> 0.05. Paper print images, however, showed subestimated values for intercanine and intermolar widths and overestimated values for dental arch length. Despite being statistically significant (p< 0.001, the differences were considered clinically negligible. Conclusion: The present study suggests that paper print images obtained from digital models are clinically accurate and can be used as a tool for dental arch form assessment for fabrication of individualized orthodontic archwires.

  15. Organic geochemistry of endoevaporitic environments: Microbial diversity and lipid biomarkers from gypsum deposits at the E.S.S.A Salt Works, Guerrero Negro, Baja, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, M. B.; Des Marais, D. J.; Jahnke, L. L.; Turk, K. A.; Kubo, M. D.

    2006-12-01

    We report lipid biomarker distributions and microbial diversity of endoevaporitic microbial communities from the gypsum crystallizer pond (Pond #9; ~170 % salinity) at the Exportadora de Sal, (ESSA) salt works in Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico. According to phylogenetic analysis using 16S rRNA sequences, gypsum crusts from this system host stratified communities of unicellular cyanobacteria (orange Euhalothece), filamentous cyanobacteria (green Oscillatoria), purple sulfur bacteria (Chromatium), and other halophilic microorganisms. Lipids collected from spatially discrete horizons of the crust indicate a shift in C16, C18 and C19 fatty acids from lower concentrations in the upper aerobic layers to higher concentrations in the deeper anaerobic zones of the crust. Compound specific isotopic analyses (CSIA) of fatty acids differentiate the more abundant C16, C18 and C19 homologues as isotopically lighter (~ -20% to -25% δ13C VPDB) from C15, C17 and C20 homologues which are isotopically heavier (~ -14% to -19% δ13C VPDB) and occur in lower abundance. CSIA of multiple compound classes reveals that gypsum domain lipids have significantly lighter δ13C values than those of lipids from the laminated benthic microbial mats living at lower salinities (i.e. ~100% to 115% salinity) in the ESSA system. This isotopic effect is consistent with intensive internal nutrient cycling within the crust. Squalane/squalene were detected in extracts from the gypsum crust indicating the presence of archaea. Diploptene is the most abundant triterpenoid of the C28 C32 hopanoids. Branched alkanes with quaternary substituted carbons (BAQCs) were also detected. These compounds have been linked with sulfur oxidizing microbial activity, which is known to be a major respiratory process in the crust's internal O2 budget (Sørensen et al., 2004). Abundant organosulfur compounds (OSC) and thiacycloalkanes in extracts indicate a vigorous internal sulfur cycle that influences both

  16. [Quantitative evaluation of printing accuracy and tissue surface adaptation of mandibular complete denture polylactic acid pattern fabricated by fused deposition modeling technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, K H; Wang, Y; Chen, H; Zhao, Y J; Zhou, Y S; Sun, Y C

    2017-06-09

    Objective: To quantitatively evaluate the adaptation of polylactic acid (PLA) pattern of mandibular complete denture fabricated by fused deposition modeling (FDM) technology. Methods: A mandibular complete denture digital model was designed through a complete denture design software based on a pair of standard maxillomandibular edentulous plaster model and their occlusion bases. Ten PLA mandibular complete dentures were printed with a FDM machine. The dentures were scanned with and without the plaster model using a three-dimensional (3D) scanner. In Geomagic software, the scanning data of printed dentures were registered to its computer aided design (CAD) data, and the printing error was analyzed using the multipoint registration command. For quantitatively evaluating the adaptation of the denture, the data of plaster model and PLA denture were registered to the whole data of denture located in the plaster model using the best-fit alignment command, the 3D deviation of the plaster model and tissue surface of the denture represent the space between them. The overall area was separated into three parts: primary stress-bearing area, secondary stress-bearing area and border seal area, and the average deviations of these three parts were measured. The values were analyzed using analysis of variance. Results: