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Sample records for modeling group iv

  1. Transferable tight-binding model for strained group IV and III-V materials and heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yaohua; Povolotskyi, Michael; Kubis, Tillmann; Boykin, Timothy B.; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2016-07-01

    It is critical to capture the effect due to strain and material interface for device level transistor modeling. We introduce a transferable s p3d5s* tight-binding model with nearest-neighbor interactions for arbitrarily strained group IV and III-V materials. The tight-binding model is parametrized with respect to hybrid functional (HSE06) calculations for varieties of strained systems. The tight-binding calculations of ultrasmall superlattices formed by group IV and group III-V materials show good agreement with the corresponding HSE06 calculations. The application of the tight-binding model to superlattices demonstrates that the transferable tight-binding model with nearest-neighbor interactions can be obtained for group IV and III-V materials.

  2. 3D continuum phonon model for group-IV 2D materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willatzen, Morten; Lew Yan Voon, Lok C.; Gandi, Appala Naidu

    2017-01-01

    . In this paper, we use the model to not only compare the phonon spectra among the group-IV materials but also to study whether these phonons differ from those of a compound material such as molybdenum disulfide. The origin of quadratic modes is clarified. Mode coupling for both graphene and silicene is obtained......, contrary to previous works. Our model allows us to predict the existence of confined optical phonon modes for the group-IV materials but not for molybdenum disulfide. A comparison of the long-wavelength modes to density-functional results is included....

  3. Bifactor model of WISC-IV: Applicability and measurement invariance in low and normal IQ groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Rapson; Vance, Alasdair; Watson, Shaun

    2017-07-01

    This study examined the applicability and measurement invariance of the bifactor model of the 10 Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Edition (WISC-IV) core subtests in groups of children and adolescents (age range from 6 to 16 years) with low (IQ ≤79; N = 229; % male = 75.9) and normal (IQ ≥80; N = 816; % male = 75.0) IQ scores. Results supported this model in both groups, and there was good support for measurement invariance for this model across these groups. For all participants together, the omega hierarchical and explained common variance (ECV) values were high for the general factor and low to negligible for the specific factors. Together, the findings favor the use of the Full Scale IQ (FSIQ) scores of the WISC-IV, but not the subscale index scores. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Thermal conductivity of group-IV semiconductors from a kinetic-collective model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tomas, C; Cantarero, A; Lopeandia, A F; Alvarez, F X

    2014-09-08

    The thermal conductivity of group-IV semiconductors (silicon, germanium, diamond and grey tin) with several isotopic compositions has been calculated from a kinetic-collective model. From this approach, significantly different to Callaway-like models in its physical interpretation, the thermal conductivity expression accounts for a transition from a kinetic (individual phonon transport) to a collective (hydrodynamic phonon transport) behaviour of the phonon field. Within the model, we confirm the theoretical proportionality between the phonon-phonon relaxation times of the group-IV semiconductors. This proportionality depends on some materials properties and it allows us to predict the thermal conductivity of the whole group of materials without the need to fit each material individually. The predictions on thermal conductivities are in good agreement with experimental data over a wide temperature range.

  5. Thermal conductivity of group-IV semiconductors from a kinetic-collective model

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tomas, C.; Cantarero, A.; Lopeandia, A. F.; Alvarez, F. X.

    2014-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of group-IV semiconductors (silicon, germanium, diamond and grey tin) with several isotopic compositions has been calculated from a kinetic-collective model. From this approach, significantly different to Callaway-like models in its physical interpretation, the thermal conductivity expression accounts for a transition from a kinetic (individual phonon transport) to a collective (hydrodynamic phonon transport) behaviour of the phonon field. Within the model, we confirm the theoretical proportionality between the phonon–phonon relaxation times of the group-IV semiconductors. This proportionality depends on some materials properties and it allows us to predict the thermal conductivity of the whole group of materials without the need to fit each material individually. The predictions on thermal conductivities are in good agreement with experimental data over a wide temperature range. PMID:25197256

  6. Transferable tight binding model for strained group IV and III-V heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yaohua; Povolotskyi, Micheal; Kubis, Tillmann; Boykin, Timothy; Klimeck, Gerhard

    Modern semiconductor devices have reached critical device dimensions in the range of several nanometers. For reliable prediction of device performance, it is critical to have a numerical efficient model that are transferable to material interfaces. In this work, we present an empirical tight binding (ETB) model with transferable parameters for strained IV and III-V group semiconductors. The ETB model is numerically highly efficient as it make use of an orthogonal sp3d5s* basis set with nearest neighbor inter-atomic interactions. The ETB parameters are generated from HSE06 hybrid functional calculations. Band structures of strained group IV and III-V materials by ETB model are in good agreement with corresponding HSE06 calculations. Furthermore, the ETB model is applied to strained superlattices which consist of group IV and III-V elements. The ETB model turns out to be transferable to nano-scale hetero-structure. The ETB band structures agree with the corresponding HSE06 results in the whole Brillouin zone. The ETB band gaps of superlattices with common cations or common anions have discrepancies within 0.05eV.

  7. 3D continuum phonon model for group-IV 2D materials

    KAUST Repository

    Willatzen, Morten

    2017-06-30

    A general three-dimensional continuum model of phonons in two-dimensional materials is developed. Our first-principles derivation includes full consideration of the lattice anisotropy and flexural modes perpendicular to the layers and can thus be applied to any two-dimensional material. In this paper, we use the model to not only compare the phonon spectra among the group-IV materials but also to study whether these phonons differ from those of a compound material such as molybdenum disulfide. The origin of quadratic modes is clarified. Mode coupling for both graphene and silicene is obtained, contrary to previous works. Our model allows us to predict the existence of confined optical phonon modes for the group-IV materials but not for molybdenum disulfide. A comparison of the long-wavelength modes to density-functional results is included.

  8. Direct Bandgap Group IV Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-21

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2017-0049 Direct Bandgap group IV Materials Hung Hsiang Cheng NATIONAL TAIWAN UNIVERSITY Final Report 01/21/2016 DISTRIBUTION A...NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) NATIONAL TAIWAN UNIVERSITY 1 ROOSEVELT RD. SEC. 4 TAIPEI CITY, 10617 TW 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING...14. ABSTRACT Direct bandgap group IV materials have been long sought for in both academia and industry for the implementation of photonic devices

  9. 3D continuum phonon model for group-IV 2D materials

    KAUST Repository

    Willatzen, Morten; Lew Yan Voon, Lok C; Gandi, Appala; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2017-01-01

    A general three-dimensional continuum model of phonons in two-dimensional materials is developed. Our first-principles derivation includes full consideration of the lattice anisotropy and flexural modes perpendicular to the layers and can thus

  10. Solutions of group IV elements in liquid lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dadd, A.T.; Hubberstey, P.; Roberts, P.G.

    1982-01-01

    The solubilities of tin (0.00 = 22 Sn 5 . A simple thermochemical cycle is used to demonstrate that, whereas carbon dissolves endothermically in both liquid lithium and liquid sodium, the heavier Group IV elements dissolve exothermically. A similar cycle is used to derive solvation enthalpies (for the neutral gaseous species) for all Group IV elements in the two solvents. The trend in solvation enthalpy: C > Si > Ge > Sn > Pb is indicative of a diminishing affinity of solvent for solute and is attributed to the increasing metallic character of the solute as the Group is descended. (author)

  11. View from... Group IV Photonics: Industry meets academia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pile, David

    2012-12-01

    Silicon photonics and devices based on group IV elements are overcoming the tough economic downturns that have rocked industry over the past 12 years. Cross fertilization between academia and industry may lead to new devices that are both innovative and profitable.

  12. Type IV Wind Turbine Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anca Daniela; Margaris, Ioannis D.

    . In the project, this wind turbine model will be further incorporated in a wind power plant model together with the implementation in the wind power control level of the new control functionalities (inertial response, synchronising power and power system damping). For this purpose an aggregate wind power plant......This document is created as part of the EaseWind project. The goal of this project is to develop and investigate new control features for primary response provided by wind power plants. New control features as inertial response, synchronising power and power system damping are of interest to EaseWind...... project to be incorporated in the wind power plant level. This document describes the Type 4 wind turbine simulation model, implemented in the EaseWind project. The implemented wind turbine model is one of the initial necessary steps toward integrating new control services in the wind power plant level...

  13. Core level shifts in group IV semiconductors and semimetals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, S.; Tosatti, E.

    1981-08-01

    We calculate the core level binding energy shift from the isolated atom to the crystalline solid, for group IV elemental semiconductors. This is done by simple extension of Johansson and Martensson's scheme for metals. We show that the core level energy in a nonmetal must be measured by the photo absorption (''core exciton'') threshold rather than by photo emission. As a byproduct, a simple scheme is also devised to evaluate impurity heats of solutions in semiconductors. (author)

  14. Synthesis and Properties of Group IV Graphane Analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberger, Joshua

    Similar to how carbon networks can be sculpted into low-dimensional allotropes such as fullerenes, nanotubes, and graphene with fundamentally different properties, it is possible to create similar ligand terminated sp3-hybridized honeycomb graphane derivatives containing Ge or Sn that feature unique and tunable properties. Here, we will describe our recent success in the creation of hydrogen and organic-terminated group IV graphane analogues, from the topochemical deintercalation of precursor Zintl phases, such as CaGe2. We will discuss how the optical, electronic, and thermal properties of these materials can be systematically controlled by substituting either the surface ligand or via alloying with other Group IV elements. Additionally, we have also developed an epitopotaxial approach for integrating precise thicknesses of germanane layers onto Ge wafers that combines the epitaxial deposition of CaGe2 precursor phases with the topotactic interconversion into the 2D material. Finally, we will describe our recent efforts on the synthesis and crystal structures of Sn-containing graphane alloys in order to access novel topological phenomena predicted to occur in these graphanes.

  15. Group IV nanotube transistors for next generation ubiquitous computing

    KAUST Repository

    Fahad, Hossain M.

    2014-06-04

    Evolution in transistor technology from increasingly large power consuming single gate planar devices to energy efficient multiple gate non-planar ultra-narrow (< 20 nm) fins has enhanced the scaling trend to facilitate doubling performance. However, this performance gain happens at the expense of arraying multiple devices (fins) per operation bit, due to their ultra-narrow dimensions (width) originated limited number of charges to induce appreciable amount of drive current. Additionally arraying degrades device off-state leakage and increases short channel characteristics, resulting in reduced chip level energy-efficiency. In this paper, a novel nanotube device (NTFET) topology based on conventional group IV (Si, SiGe) channel materials is discussed. This device utilizes a core/shell dual gate strategy to capitalize on the volume-inversion properties of an ultra-thin (< 10 nm) group IV nanotube channel to minimize leakage and short channel effects while maximizing performance in an area-efficient manner. It is also shown that the NTFET is capable of providing a higher output drive performance per unit chip area than an array of gate-all-around nanowires, while maintaining the leakage and short channel characteristics similar to that of a single gate-all-around nanowire, the latter being the most superior in terms of electrostatic gate control. In the age of big data and the multitude of devices contributing to the internet of things, the NTFET offers a new transistor topology alternative with maximum benefits from performance-energy efficiency-functionality perspective. © (2014) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  16. 77 FR 16508 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Group IV Polymers and Resins...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-21

    ... National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Group IV Polymers and Resins; Pesticide... Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Group IV Polymers and Resins; National Emission Standards for Hazardous... proposed rule titled, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Group IV Polymers...

  17. Two-dimensional multiferroics in monolayer group IV monochalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua; Qian, Xiaofeng

    2017-03-01

    Low-dimensional multiferroic materials hold great promises in miniaturized device applications such as nanoscale transducers, actuators, sensors, photovoltaics, and nonvolatile memories. Here, using first-principles theory we predict that two-dimensional (2D) monolayer group IV monochalcogenides including GeS, GeSe, SnS, and SnSe are a class of 2D semiconducting multiferroics with giant strongly-coupled in-plane spontaneous ferroelectric polarization and spontaneous ferroelastic lattice strain that are thermodynamically stable at room temperature and beyond, and can be effectively modulated by elastic strain engineering. Their optical absorption spectra exhibit strong in-plane anisotropy with visible-spectrum excitonic gaps and sizable exciton binding energies, rendering the unique characteristics of low-dimensional semiconductors. More importantly, the predicted low domain wall energy and small migration barrier together with the coupled multiferroic order and anisotropic electronic structures suggest their great potentials for tunable multiferroic functional devices by manipulating external electrical, mechanical, and optical field to control the internal responses, and enable the development of four device concepts including 2D ferroelectric memory, 2D ferroelastic memory, and 2D ferroelastoelectric nonvolatile photonic memory as well as 2D ferroelectric excitonic photovoltaics.

  18. Single-layer group IV-V and group V-IV-III-VI semiconductors: Structural stability, electronic structures, optical properties, and photocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jia-He; Zhang, Hong; Cheng, Xin-Lu; Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki

    2017-07-01

    Recently, single-layer group III monochalcogenides have attracted both theoretical and experimental interest at their potential applications in photonic devices, electronic devices, and solar energy conversion. Excited by this, we theoretically design two kinds of highly stable single-layer group IV-V (IV =Si ,Ge , and Sn; V =N and P) and group V-IV-III-VI (IV =Si ,Ge , and Sn; V =N and P; III =Al ,Ga , and In; VI =O and S) compounds with the same structures with single-layer group III monochalcogenides via first-principles simulations. By using accurate hybrid functional and quasiparticle methods, we show the single-layer group IV-V and group V-IV-III-VI are indirect bandgap semiconductors with their bandgaps and band edge positions conforming to the criteria of photocatalysts for water splitting. By applying a biaxial strain on single-layer group IV-V, single-layer group IV nitrides show a potential on mechanical sensors due to their bandgaps showing an almost linear response for strain. Furthermore, our calculations show that both single-layer group IV-V and group V-IV-III-VI have absorption from the visible light region to far-ultraviolet region, especially for single-layer SiN-AlO and SnN-InO, which have strong absorption in the visible light region, resulting in excellent potential for solar energy conversion and visible light photocatalytic water splitting. Our research provides valuable insight for finding more potential functional two-dimensional semiconductors applied in optoelectronics, solar energy conversion, and photocatalytic water splitting.

  19. Functionalization of group IV semiconductors; Funktionalisierung von Gruppe IV-Halbleitern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeb, Marco Andreas

    2011-01-15

    The present work is focused on the structural and electronic properties of thermally and photochemically grafted alkene molecules. The semiconductor substrates used in this work are the group IV-semiconductors silicon, diamond, and silicon carbide. On silicon, functionalization via the commonly known hydrosilylation reaction was performed. During thermal treatment in vacuum-distilled 1-octadecene, the alkene molecules covalently added to the substrate via Si-C bond formation, resulting in self-assembled organic monolayers. The reaction resulted in smooth and homogeneous alkyl-terminated surfaces. Static water contact angles were determined to be 113 . Photoelectron spectroscopy was performed and showed no evidence of surface oxidation. The high packing of the organic layers is indicated by the asymmetric methylene vibrational mode, which has been redshifted by -4 cm{sup -1} with respect to the liquid alkene mode position. The average molecular tilt-angle of the alkyl-molecules, relative to the surface normal, has been identified to be 34 . The transport properties have been determined to be dominated by tunneling processes. On diamond, first results on the thermal functionalization of hydrogen- and oxygen-terminated surfaces are demonstrated. Thermal functionalization with octadecene showed high selectivity, while hydrogenated diamond surfaces were found to be inert to the thermally induced reaction with alkenes. In contrast, alkene molecules were successfully grafted to oxygen-terminated sites via covalent C-O-C bonds. Reaction temperatures as high as 160 C were necessary to initiate the functionalization process.Wetting experiments on the alkyl-modified surfaces revealed contact angle values of 103 . The high quality of the monolayers on oxygenated surfaces was confirmed by IR-spectroscopy. In addition, polarized IR-measurements indicated a tilt angle of 23 . On silicon carbide, thermal and UV-induced alkoxylation were studied. Hydrofluoric acid treatment

  20. Diversity of the Germination Apparatus in Clostridium botulinum Groups I, II, III and IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Brunt

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium botulinum is a highly dangerous pathogen that forms very resistant endospores that are ubiquitous in the environment, and which, under favourable conditions germinate to produce vegetative cells that multiply and form the exceptionally potent botulinum neurotoxin. To improve the control of botulinum neurotoxin-forming clostridia, it is important to understand the mechanisms involved in spore germination. Here we present models for spore germination in C. botulinum based on comparative genomics analyses, with C. botulinum Groups I and III sharing similar pathways, which differ from those proposed for C. botulinum Groups II and IV. All spores germinate in response to amino acids interacting with a germinant receptor, with four types of germinant receptor identified (encoded by various combinations of gerA, gerB and gerC genes (gerX. There are three gene clusters with an ABC-like configuration; ABC gerX1, ABABCB gerX2 and ACxBBB gerX4, and a single CA-B gerX3 gene cluster. Subtypes have been identified for most germinant receptors types, and the individual GerX subunits of each cluster show similar grouping in phylogenetic trees. C. botulinum Group I contained the largest variety of gerX subtypes, with three gerX1, three gerX2 and one gerX3 subtypes, while C. botulinum Group III contained two gerX1 types and one gerX4. C. botulinum Groups II and IV contained a single germinant receptor, gerX3 and gerX1, respectively. It is likely that all four C. botulinum Groups include a SpoVA channel involved in DPA release. The cortex lytic enzymes present in C. botulinum Groups I and III appear to be CwlJ and SleB, while in C. botulinum Groups II and IV, SleC appears to be important.

  1. Structural features and electronic properties of group-III-, group-IV-, and group-V-doped Si nanocrystallites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, L E; Degoli, Elena; Cantele, G; Ossicini, Stefano; Ninno, D; Furthmueller, J; Bechstedt, F

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the incorporation of group-III (B and Al), group-IV (C and Ge), and group-V (N and P) impurities in Si nanocrystallites. The structural features and electronic properties of doped Si nanocrystallites, which are faceted or spherical-like, are studied by means of an ab initio pseudopotential method including spin polarization. Jahn-Teller distortions occur in the neighborhood of the impurity sites and the bond lengths show a dependence on size and shape of the nanocrystallites. We find that the acceptor (group-III) and donor (group-V) levels become deep as the nanocrystallites become small. The energy difference between the spin-up and spin-down levels of group-III and group-V impurities decreases as the size of the Si nanocrystallite increases and tends to the value calculated for Si bulk. Doping with carbon introduces an impurity-related level in the energy gap of the Si nanocrystallites

  2. Wyoming's Early Settlement and Ethnic Groups, Unit IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Terry

    This unit on Wyoming's early settlement and ethnic groups provides concepts, activities, stories, charts, and graphs for elementary school students. Concepts include the attraction Wyoming held for trappers; the major social, economic, and religious event called "The Rendezvous"; the different ethnic and religious groups that presently…

  3. Hydrogen-bond Specific Materials Modification in Group IV Semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolk, Norman H. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Feldman, L. C. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Luepke, G. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2015-09-14

    impurity states under transient compression. This research focused on the characterization of photon and ion stimulated hydrogen related defect and impurity reactions and migration in solid state matter, which requires a detailed understanding of the rates and pathways of vibrational energy flow, of the transfer channels and of the coupling mechanisms between local vibrational modes (LVMs) and phonon bath as well as the electronic system of the host material. It should be stressed that researchers at Vanderbilt and William and Mary represented a unique group with a research focus and capabilities for low temperature creation and investigation of such material systems. Later in the program, we carried out a vigorous research effort addressing the roles of defects, interfaces, and dopants on the optical and electronic characteristics of semiconductor crystals, using phonon generation by means of ultrafast coherent acoustic phonon (CAP) spectroscopy, nonlinear characterization using second harmonic generation (SHG), and ultrafast pump-and-probe reflectivity and absorption measurements. This program featured research efforts from hydrogen defects in silicon alone to other forms of defects such as interfaces and dopant layers, as well as other important semiconducting systems. Even so, the emphasis remains on phenomena and processes far from equilibrium, such as hot electron effects and travelling localized phonon waves. This program relates directly to the mission of the Department of Energy. Knowledge of the rates and pathways of vibrational energy flow in condensed matter is critical for understanding dynamical processes in solids including electronically, optically and thermally stimulated defect and impurity reactions and migration. The ability to directly probe these pathways and rates allows tests of theory and scaling laws at new levels of precision. Hydrogen embedded in model crystalline semiconductors and metal oxides is of particular interest, since the associated

  4. Special quasirandom structures for binary/ternary group IV random alloys

    KAUST Repository

    Chroneos, Alexander I.; Jiang, Chao; Grimes, Robin W.; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2010-01-01

    Simulation of defect interactions in binary/ternary group IV semiconductor alloys at the density functional theory level is difficult due to the random distribution of the constituent atoms. The special quasirandom structures approach is a

  5. Theoretical aspects of graphene-like group IV semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houssa, M.; Broek, B. van den; Scalise, E.; Ealet, B.; Pourtois, G.; Chiappe, D.; Cinquanta, E.; Grazianetti, C.; Fanciulli, M.; Molle, A.; Afanas’ev, V.V.; Stesmans, A.

    2014-01-01

    Silicene and germanene are the silicon and germanium counterparts of graphene, respectively. Recent experimental works have reported the growth of silicene on (1 1 1)Ag surfaces with different atomic configurations, depending on the growth temperature and surface coverage. We first theoretically study the structural and electronic properties of silicene on (1 1 1)Ag surfaces, focusing on the (4 × 4)silicene/Ag structure. Due to symmetry breaking in the silicene layer (nonequivalent number of top and bottom Si atoms), the corrugated silicene layer, with the Ag substrate removed, is predicted to be semiconducting, with a computed energy bandgap of about 0.3 eV. However, the hybridization between the Si 3p orbitals and the Ag 5s orbital in the silicene/(1 1 1)Ag slab model leads to an overall metallic system, with a distribution of local electronic density of states, which is related to the slightly disordered structure of the silicene layer on the (1 1 1)Ag surface. We next study the interaction of silicene and germanene with different hexagonal non-metallic substrates, namely ZnS and ZnSe. On reconstructed (0 0 0 1)ZnS or ZnSe surfaces, which should be more energetically stable for very thin layers, silicene and germanene are found to be semiconducting. Remarkably, the nature and magnitude of their energy bandgap can be controlled by an out-of-plane electric field, an important finding for the potential use of these materials in nanoelectronic devices.

  6. Theoretical aspects of graphene-like group IV semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houssa, M., E-mail: michel.houssa@fys.kuleuven.be [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Broek, B. van den; Scalise, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Ealet, B. [Aix-Marseille University, CNRS-CINaM Laboratory, 13288 Marseille (France); Pourtois, G. [imec, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Plasmant Research Group, University of Antwerp, B-2610 Wilrijk-Antwerp (Belgium); Chiappe, D.; Cinquanta, E. [MDM Laboratory, IMM-CNR, I-20864 Agrate Brianza (Italy); Grazianetti, C.; Fanciulli, M. [MDM Laboratory, IMM-CNR, I-20864 Agrate Brianza (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Milano Bicocca, 20126 Milano (Italy); Molle, A. [MDM Laboratory, IMM-CNR, I-20864 Agrate Brianza (Italy); Afanas’ev, V.V.; Stesmans, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-02-01

    Silicene and germanene are the silicon and germanium counterparts of graphene, respectively. Recent experimental works have reported the growth of silicene on (1 1 1)Ag surfaces with different atomic configurations, depending on the growth temperature and surface coverage. We first theoretically study the structural and electronic properties of silicene on (1 1 1)Ag surfaces, focusing on the (4 × 4)silicene/Ag structure. Due to symmetry breaking in the silicene layer (nonequivalent number of top and bottom Si atoms), the corrugated silicene layer, with the Ag substrate removed, is predicted to be semiconducting, with a computed energy bandgap of about 0.3 eV. However, the hybridization between the Si 3p orbitals and the Ag 5s orbital in the silicene/(1 1 1)Ag slab model leads to an overall metallic system, with a distribution of local electronic density of states, which is related to the slightly disordered structure of the silicene layer on the (1 1 1)Ag surface. We next study the interaction of silicene and germanene with different hexagonal non-metallic substrates, namely ZnS and ZnSe. On reconstructed (0 0 0 1)ZnS or ZnSe surfaces, which should be more energetically stable for very thin layers, silicene and germanene are found to be semiconducting. Remarkably, the nature and magnitude of their energy bandgap can be controlled by an out-of-plane electric field, an important finding for the potential use of these materials in nanoelectronic devices.

  7. Electromagnetic field enhancement effects in group IV semiconductor nanowires. A Raman spectroscopy approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pura, J. L.; Anaya, J.; Souto, J.; Prieto, A. C.; Rodríguez, A.; Rodríguez, T.; Periwal, P.; Baron, T.; Jiménez, J.

    2018-03-01

    Semiconductor nanowires (NWs) are the building blocks of future nanoelectronic devices. Furthermore, their large refractive index and reduced dimension make them suitable for nanophotonics. The study of the interaction between nanowires and visible light reveals resonances that promise light absorption/scattering engineering for photonic applications. Micro-Raman spectroscopy has been used as a characterization tool for semiconductor nanowires. The light/nanowire interaction can be experimentally assessed through the micro-Raman spectra of individual nanowires. As compared to both metallic and dielectric nanowires, semiconductor nanowires add additional tools for photon engineering. In particular, one can grow heterostructured nanowires, both axial and radial, and also one could modulate the doping level and the surface condition among other factors than can affect the light/NW interaction. We present herein a study of the optical response of group IV semiconductor nanowires to visible photons. The study is experimentally carried out through micro-Raman spectroscopy of different group IV nanowires, both homogeneous and axially heterostructured (SiGe/Si). The results are analyzed in terms of the electromagnetic modelling of the light/nanowire interaction using finite element methods. The presence of axial heterostructures is shown to produce electromagnetic resonances promising new photon engineering capabilities of semiconductor nanowires.

  8. Group Capability Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olejarski, Michael; Appleton, Amy; Deltorchio, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The Group Capability Model (GCM) is a software tool that allows an organization, from first line management to senior executive, to monitor and track the health (capability) of various groups in performing their contractual obligations. GCM calculates a Group Capability Index (GCI) by comparing actual head counts, certifications, and/or skills within a group. The model can also be used to simulate the effects of employee usage, training, and attrition on the GCI. A universal tool and common method was required due to the high risk of losing skills necessary to complete the Space Shuttle Program and meet the needs of the Constellation Program. During this transition from one space vehicle to another, the uncertainty among the critical skilled workforce is high and attrition has the potential to be unmanageable. GCM allows managers to establish requirements for their group in the form of head counts, certification requirements, or skills requirements. GCM then calculates a Group Capability Index (GCI), where a score of 1 indicates that the group is at the appropriate level; anything less than 1 indicates a potential for improvement. This shows the health of a group, both currently and over time. GCM accepts as input head count, certification needs, critical needs, competency needs, and competency critical needs. In addition, team members are categorized by years of experience, percentage of contribution, ex-members and their skills, availability, function, and in-work requirements. Outputs are several reports, including actual vs. required head count, actual vs. required certificates, CGI change over time (by month), and more. The program stores historical data for summary and historical reporting, which is done via an Excel spreadsheet that is color-coded to show health statistics at a glance. GCM has provided the Shuttle Ground Processing team with a quantifiable, repeatable approach to assessing and managing the skills in their organization. They now have a common

  9. Sequence Domain Harmonic Modeling of Type-IV Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guest, Emerson; Jensen, Kim Høj; Rasmussen, Tonny Wederberg

    2017-01-01

    -sampled pulsewidth modulation and an analysis of converter generated voltage harmonics due to compensated dead-time. The decoupling capabilities of the proposed the SD harmonic model are verified through a power quality (PQ) assessment of a 3MW Type-IV wind turbine. The assessment shows that the magnitude and phase...... of low-order odd converter generated voltage harmonics are dependent on the converter operating point and the phase of the fundamental component of converter current respectively. The SD harmonic model can be used to make PQ assessments of Type-IV wind turbines or incorporated into harmonic load flows...... for computation of PQ in wind power plants....

  10. Development of Electromagnetic Analysis Model for IV-CEAPI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jinseok; Jang, Yongtae; Lee, Myounggoo; Cho, Yeonho; Kim, Hyunmin [KEPCO Engineering and Construction, Inc., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Hoonbin; Baek, Minho [Woojin Inc., Osan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    There are many different types of position indicators such as reed switch type, ultrasonic type, solenoid type, etc. Through an analysis of strengths and weakness of those types, solenoid type was selected for an IV-CEAPI. Although solenoid type CEAPIs have been used world-wide, the IV-CEAPI is to be very different from the conventional designs due to its harsh operating environment. The concept of the IV-CEAPI is simple as shown in Figure 1. The coil is made of mineral insulated wire to be able to operate inside reactor vessel. The CEA is connected to the shaft which is made of ferromagnetic material. As the CEA position varies, the inductance variation is detected by the inductance meter located outside the vessel. Unlike the conventional ones, the IV-CEAPI used only one coil to eliminate coil connection point and electric components inside vessel. A finite element model was developed to calculate inductance of the solenoid type IV-CEAPI. The model considers eddy current effect to calculate frequency dependent inductance value. Analyses were performed to produce an inductance curve to the shaft position.

  11. Development of Electromagnetic Analysis Model for IV-CEAPI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jinseok; Jang, Yongtae; Lee, Myounggoo; Cho, Yeonho; Kim, Hyunmin; Hong, Hoonbin; Baek, Minho

    2016-01-01

    There are many different types of position indicators such as reed switch type, ultrasonic type, solenoid type, etc. Through an analysis of strengths and weakness of those types, solenoid type was selected for an IV-CEAPI. Although solenoid type CEAPIs have been used world-wide, the IV-CEAPI is to be very different from the conventional designs due to its harsh operating environment. The concept of the IV-CEAPI is simple as shown in Figure 1. The coil is made of mineral insulated wire to be able to operate inside reactor vessel. The CEA is connected to the shaft which is made of ferromagnetic material. As the CEA position varies, the inductance variation is detected by the inductance meter located outside the vessel. Unlike the conventional ones, the IV-CEAPI used only one coil to eliminate coil connection point and electric components inside vessel. A finite element model was developed to calculate inductance of the solenoid type IV-CEAPI. The model considers eddy current effect to calculate frequency dependent inductance value. Analyses were performed to produce an inductance curve to the shaft position

  12. Theory and modeling group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    1989-01-01

    The primary purpose of the Theory and Modeling Group meeting was to identify scientists engaged or interested in theoretical work pertinent to the Max '91 program, and to encourage theorists to pursue modeling which is directly relevant to data which can be expected to result from the program. A list of participants and their institutions is presented. Two solar flare paradigms were discussed during the meeting -- the importance of magnetic reconnection in flares and the applicability of numerical simulation results to solar flare studies.

  13. Bondonic effects in group-IV honeycomb nanoribbons with Stone-Wales topological defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putz, Mihai V; Ori, Ottorino

    2014-04-03

    This work advances the modeling of bondonic effects on graphenic and honeycomb structures, with an original two-fold generalization: (i) by employing the fourth order path integral bondonic formalism in considering the high order derivatives of the Wiener topological potential of those 1D systems; and (ii) by modeling a class of honeycomb defective structures starting from graphene, the carbon-based reference case, and then generalizing the treatment to Si (silicene), Ge (germanene), Sn (stannene) by using the fermionic two-degenerate statistical states function in terms of electronegativity. The honeycomb nanostructures present η-sized Stone-Wales topological defects, the isomeric dislocation dipoles originally called by authors Stone-Wales wave or SWw. For these defective nanoribbons the bondonic formalism foresees a specific phase-transition whose critical behavior shows typical bondonic fast critical time and bonding energies. The quantum transition of the ideal-to-defect structural transformations is fully described by computing the caloric capacities for nanostructures triggered by η-sized topological isomerisations. Present model may be easily applied to hetero-combinations of Group-IV elements like C-Si, C-Ge, C-Sn, Si-Ge, Si-Sn, Ge-Sn.

  14. Bondonic Effects in Group-IV Honeycomb Nanoribbons with Stone-Wales Topological Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai V. Putz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This work advances the modeling of bondonic effects on graphenic and honeycomb structures, with an original two-fold generalization: (i by employing the fourth order path integral bondonic formalism in considering the high order derivatives of the Wiener topological potential of those 1D systems; and (ii by modeling a class of honeycomb defective structures starting from graphene, the carbon-based reference case, and then generalizing the treatment to Si (silicene, Ge (germanene, Sn (stannene by using the fermionic two-degenerate statistical states function in terms of electronegativity. The honeycomb nanostructures present η-sized Stone-Wales topological defects, the isomeric dislocation dipoles originally called by authors Stone-Wales wave or SWw. For these defective nanoribbons the bondonic formalism foresees a specific phase-transition whose critical behavior shows typical bondonic fast critical time and bonding energies. The quantum transition of the ideal-to-defect structural transformations is fully described by computing the caloric capacities for nanostructures triggered by η-sized topological isomerisations. Present model may be easily applied to hetero-combinations of Group-IV elements like C-Si, C-Ge, C-Sn, Si-Ge, Si-Sn, Ge-Sn.

  15. Group IV nanocrystals with ion-exchangeable surface ligands and methods of making the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Lance M.; Nichols, Asa W.; Chernomordik, Boris D.; Anderson, Nicholas C.; Beard, Matthew C.; Neale, Nathan R.

    2018-01-09

    Methods are described that include reacting a starting nanocrystal that includes a starting nanocrystal core and a covalently bound surface species to create an ion-exchangeable (IE) nanocrystal that includes a surface charge and a first ion-exchangeable (IE) surface ligand ionically bound to the surface charge, where the starting nanocrystal core includes a group IV element.

  16. Report on generation IV technical working group 3 : liquid metal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lineberry, M. J.; Rosen, S. L.; Sagayama, Y.

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports on the first round of R and D roadmap activities of the Generation IV (Gen IV) Technical Working Group (TWG) 3, on liquid metal-cooled reactors. Liquid metal coolants give rise to fast spectrum systems, and thus the reactor systems considered in this TWG are all fast reactors. Gas-cooled fast reactors are considered in the context of TWG 2. As is noted in other Gen IV papers, this first round activity is termed ''screening for potential'', and includes collecting the most complete set of liquid metal reactor/fuel cycle system concepts possible and evaluating the concepts against the Gen IV principles and goals. Those concepts or concept groups that meet the Gen IV principles and which are deemed to have reasonable potential to meet the Gen IV goals will pass to the next round of evaluation. Although we sometimes use the terms ''reactor'' or ''reactor system'' by themselves, the scope of the investigation by TWG 3 includes not only the reactor systems, but very importantly the closed fuel recycle system inevitably required by fast reactors. The response to the DOE Request for Information (RFI) on liquid metal reactor/fuel cycle systems from principal investigators, laboratories, corporations, and other institutions, was robust and gratifying. Thirty three liquid metal concept descriptions, from eight different countries, were ultimately received. The variation in the scope, depth, and completeness of the responses created a significant challenge for the group, but the TWG made a very significant effort not to screen out concepts early in the process

  17. Emergence of group B Streptococcus serotype IV in women of child-bearing age in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kiely, R A

    2011-02-01

    This study determined the carriage rate and serotype distribution of group B Streptococcus (GBS) in women of child-bearing age in the southern region of Ireland. A total of 2000 vaginal swabs collected in two periods in 2004 and 2006 were examined and revealed a GBS carriage rate of 16·1%. Serotyping of isolates showed that serotypes Ia, II, III, IV, and V were the most prevalent. A high prevalence of serotype IV was found, increasing from 7·6% to 15·2% between 2004 and 2006. Random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis demonstrated considerable genetic heterogeneity in the serotype IV isolates. This serotype should be considered for inclusion in potential vaccines for use in Ireland.

  18. A prognostic scoring model for survival after locoregional therapy in de novo stage IV breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kommalapati, Anuhya; Tella, Sri Harsha; Goyal, Gaurav; Ganti, Apar Kishor; Krishnamurthy, Jairam; Tandra, Pavan Kumar

    2018-05-02

    The role of locoregional treatment (LRT) remains controversial in de novo stage IV breast cancer (BC). We sought to analyze the role of LRT and prognostic factors of overall survival (OS) in de novo stage IV BC patients treated with LRT utilizing the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB). The objective of the current study is to create and internally validate a prognostic scoring model to predict the long-term OS for de novo stage IV BC patients treated with LRT. We included de novo stage IV BC patients reported to NCDB between 2004 and 2015. Patients were divided into LRT and no-LRT subsets. We randomized LRT subset to training and validation cohorts. In the training cohort, a seventeen-point prognostic scoring system was developed based on the hazard ratios calculated using Cox-proportional method. We stratified both training and validation cohorts into two "groups" [group 1 (0-7 points) and group 2 (7-17 points)]. Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test were used to compare OS between the two groups. Our prognostic score was validated internally by comparing the OS between the respective groups in both the training and validation cohorts. Among 67,978 patients, LRT subset (21,200) had better median OS as compared to that of no-LRT (45 vs. 24 months; p < 0.0001). The group 1 and group 2 in the training cohort showed a significant difference in the 3-year OS (p < 0.0001) (68 vs. 26%). On internal validation, comparable OS was seen between the respective groups in each cohort (p = 0.77). Our prognostic scoring system will help oncologists to predict the prognosis in de novo stage IV BC patients treated with LRT. Although firm treatment-related conclusions cannot be made due to the retrospective nature of the study, LRT appears to be associated with a better OS in specific subgroups.

  19. Incorporation of sulfate or selenate groups into oxotellurates(IV). I. Calcium, cadmium, and strontium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weil, Matthias; Shirkhanlou, Mahdi

    2017-01-01

    Seven new mixed oxochalcogenate compounds in the systems M II /X VI /Te IV /O/(H), (M II = Ca, Cd, Sr; X VI = S, Se) were obtained under hydrothermal conditions (210 C, one week). Crystal structure determinations based on single-crystal X-ray diffraction data revealed the compositions Ca 3 (SeO 4 )(TeO 3 ) 2 , Ca 3 (SeO 4 )(Te 3 O 8 ), Cd 3 (SeO 4 )(Te 3 O 8 ), Cd 3 (H 2 O)(SO 4 )(Te 3 O 8 ), Cd 4 (SO 4 )(TeO 3 ) 3 , Cd 5 (SO 4 ) 2 (TeO 3 ) 2 (OH) 2 , and Sr 3 (H 2 O) 2 (SeO 4 )(TeO 3 ) 2 for these phases. Peculiar features of the crystal structures of Ca 3 (SeO 4 )(TeO 3 ) 2 , Ca 3 (SeO 4 )(Te 3 O 8 ), Cd 3 (SeO 4 )(Te 3 O 8 ), Cd 3 (H 2 O)(SO 4 )(Te 3 O 8 ), and Sr 3 (H 2 O) 2 (SeO 4 )(TeO 3 ) 2 are metal-oxotellurate(IV) layers connected by bridging XO 4 tetrahedra and/or by hydrogen-bonding interactions involving hydroxyl or water groups, whereas Cd 4 (SO 4 )(TeO 3 ) 3 and Cd 5 (SO 4 ) 2 (TeO 3 ) 2 (OH) 2 crystallize as framework structures. Common to all crystal structures is the stereoactivity of the Te IV electron lone pair for each oxotellurate(IV) unit, pointing either into the inter-layer space, or into channels and cavities in the crystal structures. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Valley–spin Seebeck effect in heavy group-IV monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai, Xuechao; Wang, Shengdong; Zhang, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Akin to electron spin, the valley has become another highly valued degree of freedom in modern electronics, specifically after tremendous studies on monolayers of group-IV materials, i.e. graphene, silicene, germanene and stanene. Except for graphene, the other heavy group-IV monolayers have observable intrinsic spin–orbit interactions due to their buckled structures. Distinct from the usual electric or optical control of valley and spin, we here employ a temperature difference to drive electron motion in ferromagnetic heavy group-IV monolayers via designing a caloritronic device locally modulated by an interlayer electric (E z ) field. A unique valley–spin Seebeck (VSS) effect is discovered, with the current contributed only by one (the other) valley and one (the other) spin moving along one (the opposite) direction. This effect is suggested to be detected below the critical temperature about 18 K for silicene, 200 K for germanene and 400 K for stanene, arising from the characteristic valley–spin nondegenerate band structures tuned by the E z field, but cannot be driven in graphene without spin–orbit interaction. Above the critical temperature, the VSS effect is broken by overlarge temperature broadening. Besides the temperature, it is also found that the E z field can drive a transition between the VSS effect and the normal spin Seebeck effect. Further calculations indicate that the VSS effect is robust against many realistic perturbations. Our research represents a conceptually but substantially major step towards the study of the Seebeck effect. These findings provide a platform for encoding information simultaneously by the valley and spin quantum numbers of electrons in future thermal-logic circuits and energy-saving devices. (paper)

  1. Near infrared group IV optoelectronics and novel pre-cursors for CVD epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazbun, Ramsey Michael

    Near infrared and mid infrared optoelectronic devices have become increasingly important for the telecommunications, security, and medical imaging industries. The addition of nitrogen to III-V alloys has been widely studied as a method of modifying the band gap for mid infrared (IR) applications. In xGa1-xSb1-y Ny/InAs strained-layer superlattices with type-II (staggered) energy offsets on GaSb substrates, were modeled using eight-band k˙p simulations to analyze the superlattice miniband energies. Three different zero-stress strain balance conditions are reported: fixed superlattice period thickness, fixed InAs well thickness, and fixed InxGa1-xSb 1-yNy barrier thickness. Optoelectronics have traditionally been the realm of III-V semiconductors due to their direct band gap, while integrated circuit chips have been the realm of Group IV semiconductors such as silicon because of its relative abundance and ease of use. Recently the alloying of Sn with Ge and Si has been shown to allow direct band-gap light emission. This presents the exciting prospect of integrating optoelectronics into current Group IV chip fabrication facilities. However, new approaches for low temperature growth are needed to realize these new SiGeSn alloys. Silicon-germanium epitaxy via ultra-high vacuum chemical vapor deposition has the advantage of allowing low process temperatures. Deposition processes are sensitive to substrate surface preparation and the time delay between oxide removal and epitaxial growth. A new monitoring process utilizing doped substrates and defect decoration etching is demonstrated to have controllable and unique sensitivity to interfacial contaminants. Doped substrates were prepared and subjected to various loading conditions prior to the growth of typical Si/SiGe bilayers. The defect densities were correlated to the concentration of interfacial oxygen suggesting this monitoring process may be an effective complement to monitoring via secondary ion mass spectrometry

  2. Special quasirandom structures for binary/ternary group IV random alloys

    KAUST Repository

    Chroneos, Alexander I.

    2010-06-01

    Simulation of defect interactions in binary/ternary group IV semiconductor alloys at the density functional theory level is difficult due to the random distribution of the constituent atoms. The special quasirandom structures approach is a computationally efficient way to describe the random nature. We systematically study the efficacy of the methodology and generate a number of special quasirandom cells for future use. In order to demonstrate the applicability of the technique, the electronic structures of E centers in Si1-xGex and Si1-x -yGexSny alloys are discussed for a range of nearest neighbor environments. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. IGORR-IV: Proceedings of the fourth meeting of the International Group On Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbalm, K.F.

    1995-01-01

    The fourth meeting of the International Group on Research Reactors (IGORR-IV) was attended by was good 55 registered participants from 28 organizations in 13 countries, which compares well with the previous meetings. Twenty-nine papers were presented in five sessions over the two-day meeting. Session subjects were: Operating Research Reactors and Facility Upgrades; Research Reactors in Desin and Construction; Research, Development, and Analysis Results of Thermal Hydraulic Calculations, U 3 Si 2 Fuel Performance and Faibrication; Structural Materials Performance; Neutronics; Severe Accident analysis. Written versions of the papers or hard copies of the viewgraphs used are published in these Proceedings

  4. Generic process for preparing a crystalline oxide upon a group IV semiconductor substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Rodney A.; Walker, Frederick J.; Chisholm, Matthew F.

    2000-01-01

    A process for growing a crystalline oxide epitaxially upon the surface of a Group IV semiconductor, as well as a structure constructed by the process, is described. The semiconductor can be germanium or silicon, and the crystalline oxide can generally be represented by the formula (AO).sub.n (A'BO.sub.3).sub.m in which "n" and "m" are non-negative integer repeats of planes of the alkaline earth oxides or the alkaline earth-containing perovskite oxides. With atomic level control of interfacial thermodynamics in a multicomponent semiconductor/oxide system, a highly perfect interface between a semiconductor and a crystalline oxide can be obtained.

  5. IGORR-IV: Proceedings of the fourth meeting of the International Group On Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenbalm, K F [comp.

    1995-07-01

    The fourth meeting of the International Group on Research Reactors (IGORR-IV) was attended by was good 55 registered participants from 28 organizations in 13 countries, which compares well with the previous meetings. Twenty-nine papers were presented in five sessions over the two-day meeting. Session subjects were: Operating Research Reactors and Facility Upgrades; Research Reactors in Desin and Construction; Research, Development, and Analysis Results of Thermal Hydraulic Calculations, U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} Fuel Performance and Faibrication; Structural Materials Performance; Neutronics; Severe Accident analysis. Written versions of the papers or hard copies of the viewgraphs used are published in these Proceedings.

  6. Monolithic nanoscale photonics-electronics integration in silicon and other group IV elements

    CERN Document Server

    Radamson, Henry

    2014-01-01

    Silicon technology is evolving rapidly, particularly in board-to-board or chip-to chip applications. Increasingly, the electronic parts of silicon technology will carry out the data processing, while the photonic parts take care of the data communication. For the first time, this book describes the merging of photonics and electronics in silicon and other group IV elements. It presents the challenges, the limitations, and the upcoming possibilities of these developments. The book describes the evolution of CMOS integrated electronics, status and development, and the fundamentals of silicon p

  7. A first-principles study of group IV and VI atoms doped blue phosphorene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ruimin; Chen, Zheng; Gou, Manman; Zhang, Yixin

    2018-02-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we have systematically investigated the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of blue phosphorene doped by group IV and VI atoms, including C, Si, Ge, Sn, O, S, Se and Te. All the doped systems are energetically stable. Only C, Si, Ge and O-substituted systems show the characteristics of spin polarization and the magnetic moments are all 1.0 μB. Moreover, we found that C, Si, Ge and O doped systems are indirect bandgap semiconductors, while Sn, S, Se and Te doped systems present metallic property. These results show that blue phosphorene can be used prospectively in optoelectronic and spintronic devices.

  8. Group IV Light Sources to Enable the Convergence of Photonics and Electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichi eSaito

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Group IV lasers are expected to revolutionize chip-to-chip optical communications in terms of cost, scalability, yield, and compatibility to the existing infrastructure of silicon industries for mass production. Here, we review the current state-of-the-art developments of silicon and germanium light sources towards monolithic integration. Quantum confinement of electrons and holes in nano-structures has been the primary route for light emission from silicon, and we can use advanced silicon technologies using top-down patterning processes to fabricate these nano-structures, including fin-type vertical multiple quantum wells. Moreover, the electromagnetic environment can also be manipulated in a photonic crystal nano-cavity to enhance the efficiency of light extraction and emission by the Purcell effect. Germanium is also widely investigated as an active material in Group IV photonics, and novel epitaxial growth technologies are being developed to make a high quality germanium layer on a silicon substrate. To develop a practical germanium laser, various technologies are employed for tensile-stress engineering and high electron doping to compensate the indirect valleys in the conduction band. These challenges are aiming to contribute towards the convergence of electronics and photonics on a silicon chip.

  9. Modelling group dynamic animal movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langrock, Roland; Hopcraft, J. Grant C.; Blackwell, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    makes its movement decisions relative to the group centroid. The basic idea is framed within the flexible class of hidden Markov models, extending previous work on modelling animal movement by means of multi-state random walks. While in simulation experiments parameter estimators exhibit some bias......, to date, practical statistical methods which can include group dynamics in animal movement models have been lacking. We consider a flexible modelling framework that distinguishes a group-level model, describing the movement of the group's centre, and an individual-level model, such that each individual......Group dynamic movement is a fundamental aspect of many species' movements. The need to adequately model individuals' interactions with other group members has been recognised, particularly in order to differentiate the role of social forces in individual movement from environmental factors. However...

  10. Incorporation of sulfate or selenate groups into oxotellurates(IV). I. Calcium, cadmium, and strontium compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weil, Matthias; Shirkhanlou, Mahdi [Institute for Chemical Technologies and Analytics, Division Structural Chemistry, TU Wien, Vienna (Austria)

    2017-02-15

    Seven new mixed oxochalcogenate compounds in the systems M{sup II}/X{sup VI}/Te{sup IV}/O/(H), (M{sup II} = Ca, Cd, Sr; X{sup VI} = S, Se) were obtained under hydrothermal conditions (210 C, one week). Crystal structure determinations based on single-crystal X-ray diffraction data revealed the compositions Ca{sub 3}(SeO{sub 4})(TeO{sub 3}){sub 2}, Ca{sub 3}(SeO{sub 4})(Te{sub 3}O{sub 8}), Cd{sub 3}(SeO{sub 4})(Te{sub 3}O{sub 8}), Cd{sub 3}(H{sub 2}O)(SO{sub 4})(Te{sub 3}O{sub 8}), Cd{sub 4}(SO{sub 4})(TeO{sub 3}){sub 3}, Cd{sub 5}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}(TeO{sub 3}){sub 2}(OH){sub 2}, and Sr{sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}(SeO{sub 4})(TeO{sub 3}){sub 2} for these phases. Peculiar features of the crystal structures of Ca{sub 3}(SeO{sub 4})(TeO{sub 3}){sub 2}, Ca{sub 3}(SeO{sub 4})(Te{sub 3}O{sub 8}), Cd{sub 3}(SeO{sub 4})(Te{sub 3}O{sub 8}), Cd{sub 3}(H{sub 2}O)(SO{sub 4})(Te{sub 3}O{sub 8}), and Sr{sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}(SeO{sub 4})(TeO{sub 3}){sub 2} are metal-oxotellurate(IV) layers connected by bridging XO{sub 4} tetrahedra and/or by hydrogen-bonding interactions involving hydroxyl or water groups, whereas Cd{sub 4}(SO{sub 4})(TeO{sub 3}){sub 3} and Cd{sub 5}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}(TeO{sub 3}){sub 2}(OH){sub 2} crystallize as framework structures. Common to all crystal structures is the stereoactivity of the Te{sup IV} electron lone pair for each oxotellurate(IV) unit, pointing either into the inter-layer space, or into channels and cavities in the crystal structures. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Bioenergetics and ATP Synthesis during Exercise: Role of Group III/IV Muscle Afferents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broxterman, Ryan M; Layec, Gwenael; Hureau, Thomas J; Morgan, David E; Bledsoe, Amber D; Jessop, Jacob E; Amann, Markus; Richardson, Russell S

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of the group III/IV muscle afferents in the bioenergetics of exercising skeletal muscle beyond constraining the magnitude of metabolic perturbation. Eight healthy men performed intermittent isometric knee-extensor exercise to task failure at ~58% maximal voluntary contraction under control conditions (CTRL) and with lumbar intrathecal fentanyl to attenuate group III/IV leg muscle afferents (FENT). Intramuscular concentrations of phosphocreatine (PCr), inorganic phosphate (Pi), diprotonated phosphate (H2PO4), adenosine triphosphate (ATP), and pH were determined using phosphorous magnetic resonance spectroscopy (P-MRS). The magnitude of metabolic perturbation was significantly greater in FENT compared with CTRL for [Pi] (37.8 ± 16.8 vs 28.6 ± 8.6 mM), [H2PO4] (24.3 ± 12.2 vs 17.9 ± 7.1 mM), and [ATP] (75.8% ± 17.5% vs 81.9% ± 15.8% of baseline), whereas there was no significant difference in [PCr] (4.5 ± 2.4 vs 4.4 ± 2.3 mM) or pH (6.51 ± 0.10 vs 6.54 ± 0.14). The rate of perturbation in [PCr], [Pi], [H2PO4], and pH was significantly faster in FENT compared with CTRL. Oxidative ATP synthesis was not significantly different between conditions. However, anaerobic ATP synthesis, through augmented creatine kinase and glycolysis reactions, was significantly greater in FENT than in CTRL, resulting in a significantly greater ATP cost of contraction (0.049 ± 0.016 vs 0.038 ± 0.010 mM·min·N). Group III/IV muscle afferents not only constrain the magnitude of perturbation in intramuscular Pi, H2PO4, and ATP during small muscle mass exercise but also seem to play a role in maintaining efficient skeletal muscle contractile function in men.

  12. LLNL Chemical Kinetics Modeling Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Herbinet, O; Curran, H J; Silke, E J

    2008-09-24

    The LLNL chemical kinetics modeling group has been responsible for much progress in the development of chemical kinetic models for practical fuels. The group began its work in the early 1970s, developing chemical kinetic models for methane, ethane, ethanol and halogenated inhibitors. Most recently, it has been developing chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes, cycloalkanes, hexenes, and large methyl esters. These component models are needed to represent gasoline, diesel, jet, and oil-sand-derived fuels.

  13. Controlling Thermodynamic Properties of Ferromagnetic Group-IV Graphene-Like Nanosheets by Dilute Charged Impurity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmohammadi, Mohsen; Mirabbaszadeh, Kavoos

    2017-05-01

    Using the Kane-Mele Hamiltonian, Dirac theory and self-consistent Born approximation, we investigate the effect of dilute charged impurity on the electronic heat capacity and magnetic susceptibility of two-dimensional ferromagnetic honeycomb structure of group-IV elements including silicene, germanene and stanene within the Green’s function approach. We also find these quantities in the presence of applied external electric field. Our results show that the silicene (stanene) has the maximum (minimum) heat capacity and magnetic susceptibility at uniform electric fields. From the behavior of theses quantities, the band gap has been changed with impurity concentration, impurity scattering strength and electric field. The analysis on the impurity-dependent magnetic susceptibility curves shows a phase transition from ferromagnetic to paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases. Interestingly, electronic heat capacity increases (decreases) with impurity concentration in silicene (germanene and stanene) structure.

  14. Covalently-controlled properties by design in group IV graphane analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shishi; Arguilla, Maxx Q; Cultrara, Nicholas D; Goldberger, Joshua E

    2015-01-20

    CONSPECTUS: The isolation of graphene has sparked a renaissance in the study of two-dimensional materials. This led to the discovery of new and unique phenomena such as extremely high carrier mobility, thermal conductivity, and mechanical strength not observed in the parent 3D structure. While the emergence of these phenomena has spurred widespread interest in graphene, the paradox between the high-mobility Fermi-Dirac electronic structure and the need for a sizable band gap has challenged its application in traditional semiconductor devices. While graphene is a fascinating and promising material, the limitation of its electronic structure has inspired researchers to explore other 2D materials beyond graphene. In this Account, we summarize our recent work on a new family of two-dimensional materials based on sp(3)-hybridized group IV elements. Ligand-terminated Si, Ge, and Sn graphane analogues are an emerging and unique class of two-dimensional materials that offer the potential to tailor the structure, stability, and properties. Compared with bulk Si and Ge, a direct and larger band gap is apparent in group IV graphane analogues depending on the surface ligand. These materials can be synthesized in gram-scale quantities and in thin films via the topotactic deintercalation of layered Zintl phase precursors. Few layers and single layers can be isolated via manual exfoliation and deintercalation of epitaxially grown Zintl phases on Si/Ge substrates. The presence of a fourth bond on the surface of the layers allows various surface ligand termination with different organic functional groups achieved via conventional soft chemical routes. In these single-atom thick materials, the electronic structure can be systematically controlled by varying the identities of the main group elements and by attaching different surface terminating ligands. In contrast to transition metal dichalcogenides, the weaker interlayer interaction allows the direct band gap single layer

  15. Validation of Nuclear Criticality Safety Software and 27 energy group ENDF/B-IV cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B.L. Jr.

    1994-08-01

    The validation documented in this report is based on calculations that were executed during June through August 1992, and was completed in June 1993. The statistical analyses in Appendix C and Appendix D were completed in October 1993. This validation gives Portsmouth NCS personnel a basis for performing computerized KENO V.a calculations using the Martin Marietta Nuclear Criticality Safety Software. The first portion of the document outlines basic information in regard to validation of NCSS using ENDF/B-IV 27-group cross sections on the IBM 3090 at ORNL. A basic discussion of the NCSS system is provided, some discussion on the validation database and validation in general. Then follows a detailed description of the statistical analysis which was applied. The results of this validation indicate that the NCSS software may be used with confidence for criticality calculations at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. When the validation results are treated as a single group, there is 95% confidence that 99.9% of future calculations of similar critical systems will have a calculated K eff > 0.9616. Based on this result the Portsmouth Nuclear Criticality Safety Department has adopted the calculational acceptance criteria that a k eff + 2σ ≤ 0.95 is safety subcritical. The validation of NCSS on the IBM 3090 at ORNL was extended to include NCSS on the IBM 3090 at K-25

  16. The International (Ludwig) Breast Cancer Study Group Trials I-IV: 15 years follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiglione-Gertsch, M; Johnsen, C; Goldhirsch, A; Gelber, R D; Rudenstam, C M; Collins, J; Lindtner, J; Hacking, A; Cortes-Funes, H; Forbes, J

    1994-10-01

    Adjuvant systemic therapy prolongs disease-free and overall survival in both pre- and postmenopausal patients. Available data shown benefit from multi-agent chemotherapy, prolonged tamoxifen treatment, and ovarian ablation, and that the combination of chemo- and endocrine therapy might be advantageous. In 1978 the International (Ludwig) Breast Cancer Study Group (IBCSG) initiated four complementary randomized controlled clinical trials to evaluate the roles of chemo-endocrine combinations or endocrine therapy alone in specific populations defined by risk (for pre- and perimenopausal patients) or by age (for postmenopausal patients). The results at 10 and 13 years' median follow-up for these trials are summarized in this report and are compared to those of the Overview meta-analysis with regard to chemo-endocrine or endocrine therapy combinations. Furthermore, types of first relapses by sites and second malignant diseases are reported. 1601 evaluable patients with node positive disease were included into the studies I-IV. In Trial I (491 premenopausal patients with 1-3 positive axillary nodes) we studied the addition of low-dose continuous prednisone (p) to a cyclophosphamide-methotrexate-fluorouracil (CMF) combination. In Trial II 327 premenopausal patients with four or more positive axillary nodes were randomized to one year CMFp or to a surgical oophorectomy followed by CMFp. In Trial III (463 postmenopausal patients 65 years old or younger), combined chemoendocrine therapy (one year of CMFp plus tamoxifen (T)) was compared to endocrine therapy (1 year of p + T) or to surgery alone. In Trial IV 320 postmenopausal patients 66 to 80 years old were treated either by surgery alone or by surgery followed by 1 year prednisone and tamoxifen. In Trial I the addition of prednisone allowed a higher dose of cytotoxics to be administered compared with CMF alone. Despite this increased dose intensity, 13-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were similar

  17. Kinetic study of group IV nanoparticles ion beam synthesized in SiO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonafos, C. E-mail: bonafos@cemes.fr; Colombeau, B.; Altibelli, A.; Carrada, M.; Ben Assayag, G.; Garrido, B.; Lopez, M.; Perez-Rodriguez, A.; Morante, J.R.; Claverie, A

    2001-05-01

    Most studies concerning group IV (Si, Ge) ion beam synthesized nanocrystals in SiO{sub 2} have shown that a link exists between the observed physical properties and the characteristics of the 'populations' of nanoparticles (size-distribution, density, volume fraction). The aim of this paper is to study the influence of the initial supersaturation and annealing conditions on these characteristics. For this, experimental methods have been developed, that allow accurate statistical studies. Different transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging conditions have been tested and the most adequate ones have been identified for each system. An original method for the measurement of the density of precipitates embedded in an amorphous matrix has been developed and tested for Ge precipitates in SiO{sub 2} and has permitted to evidence a conservative Ostwald ripening during annealing. The kinetic behavior of Si nanoparticles has also been studied by coupling TEM measurements and 'atomistic' simulations. During annealing, the growth of these nanoparticles is very slow but their size significantly increases when increasing the initial Si excess. Simulations are in perfect agreement with experiment when taking into account interaction effects between particles.

  18. Tunable magnetic states on the zigzag edges of hydrogenated and halogenated group-IV nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Feng-Chuan; Wang, Tzu-Cheng; Hsu, Chia-Hsiu; Huang, Zhi-Quan; Su, Wan-Sheng; Guo, Guang-Yu

    The magnetic and electronic properties of hydrogenated and halogenated group-IV zigzag nanoribbons (ZNRs) are investigated by first-principles density functional calculations. Fascinatingly, we find that all the ZNRs have magnetic edges with a rich variety of electronic and magnetic properties tunable by selecting the parent and passivating elements as well as controlling the magnetization direction and external strain. In particular, the electric property of the edge band structure can be tuned from the conducting to insulating with a band gap up to 0.7 eV, depending on the parent and passivating elements as well as the applied strain, magnetic configuration and magnetization orientation. The last controllability would allow us to develop magnetic on-off nano-switches. Furthermore, ZNRs such as SiI, Ge, GeI and SnH, have fully spin-polarized metallic edge states and thus are promising materials for spintronics. The calculated magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy can be as large as 9 meV/edge-site, being 2000 time greater than that of bulk Ni and Fe ( 5 μeV/atom), and thus has great potential for high density magneto-electric data-storage devices. Finally, the calculated exchange coupling strength and thus magnetic transition temperature increases as the applied strain goes from -5 % to 5 %. Our findings thus show that these ZNRs would have exciting applications in next-generation electronic and spintronic nano-devices.

  19. Structure and magnetism in novel group IV element-based magnetic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsui, Frank [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2013-08-14

    The project is to investigate structure, magnetism and spin dependent states of novel group IV element-based magnetic thin films and heterostructures as a function of composition and epitaxial constraints. The materials systems of interest are Si-compatible epitaxial films and heterostructures of Si/Ge-based magnetic ternary alloys grown by non-equilibrium molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) techniques, specifically doped magnetic semiconductors (DMS) and half-metallic Heusler alloys. Systematic structural, chemical, magnetic, and electrical measurements are carried out, using x-ray microbeam techniques, magnetotunneling spectroscopy and microscopy, and magnetotransport. The work is aimed at elucidating the nature and interplay between structure, chemical order, magnetism, and spin-dependent states in these novel materials, at developing materials and techniques to realize and control fully spin polarized states, and at exploring fundamental processes that stabilize the epitaxial magnetic nanostructures and control the electronic and magnetic states in these complex materials. Combinatorial approach provides the means for the systematic studies, and the complex nature of the work necessitates this approach.

  20. The synthesis and properties of some organometallic compounds containing group IV (Ge, Sn)-group II (Zn, Cd) metal---metal bonds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Des Tombe, F.J.A.; Kerk, G.J.M. van der; Creemers, H.M.J.C.; Carey, N.A.D.; Noltes, J.G.

    1972-01-01

    The reactions of triphenylgermane and triphenyltin hydride with coordinatively saturated organozinc or organocadmium compounds give organometallic complexes containing Group IV (Ge, Sn)-Group II(Zn, Cd) metal---metal bonds. The 2,2′-bipyridine complexes show solvent-dependent charge-transfer

  1. Occurrences of flares with type II and IV radio events in interacting sunspot groups in the course of revolutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimes, J.; Krivsky, L.

    1984-01-01

    Using data from 11-year solar cycle No. 20, it was found that flares with type II radio bursts are more than twice as frequent and flares with type IV bursts nearly twice as frequent in sunspot groups which developed close to each other or which merged in the course of revolutions than in isolated sunspot groups. With both types the occurrence of these flares is concentrated in the revolution of the so-called sunspot group interaction (their approximation, merging). (author)

  2. First principles calculation of material properties of group IV elements and III-V compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Brad Dean

    This thesis presents first principles calculations on the properties of group IV elements and group III-V compounds. It includes investigations into what structure a material is likely to form in, and given that structure, what are its electronic, optical, and lattice dynamical properties as well as what are the properties of defects that might be introduced into the sample. The thesis is divided as follows: • Chapter 1 contains some of the conceptual foundations used in the present work. These involve the major approximations which allow us to approach the problem of systems with huge numbers of interacting electrons and atomic cores. • Then, in Chapter 2, we discuss one of the major limitations to the DFT formalism introduced in Chapter 1, namely its inability to predict the quasiparticle spectra of materials and in particular the band gap of a semiconductor. We introduce a Green's function approach to the electron self-energy Sigma known as the GW approximation and use it to compute the quasiparticle band structures of a number of group IV and III-V semiconductors. • In Chapter 3 we present a first-principles study of a number of high-pressure metastable phases of Si with tetrahedral bonding. The phases studied include all experimentally determined phases that result from decompression from the metallic beta-Sn phase, specifically the BC8 (Si-III), hexagonal diamond (Si-IV), and R8 (Si-XII). In addition to these, we also study the hypothetical ST12 structure found upon decompression from beta-Sn in germanium. • Our attention is then turned to the first principles calculations of optical properties in Chapter 4. The Bethe-Salpeter equation is then solved to obtain the optical spectrum of this material including electron-hole interactions. The calculated optical spectrum is compared with experimental data for other forms of silicon commonly used in photovoltaic devices, namely the cubic, polycrystalline, and amorphous forms. • In Chapter 5 we present

  3. Fatigue-induced changes in group IV muscle afferent activity: differences between high- and low-frequency electrically induced fatigues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darques, J L; Jammes, Y

    1997-03-07

    Recordings of group IV afferent activity of tibialis anterior muscle were performed in paralysed rabbits during runs of electrically induced fatigue produced by direct muscle stimulation at a high (100 Hz, high-frequency fatigue HFF) or a low rate (10 Hz, low-frequency fatigue LFF). In addition to analysis of afferent nerve action potentials, muscle force and compound muscle action potentials (M waves) elicited by direct muscle stimulation with single shocks were recorded. Changes in M wave configuration were used as an index of the altered propagation of membrane potentials and the associated efflux of potassium from muscle fibers. The data show that increased group IV afferent activity occurred during LFF as well as HFF trials and developed parallel with force failure. Enhanced afferent activity was significantly higher during LFF (maximal delta f(impulses) = 249 +/- 35%) than HFF (147 +/- 45%). No correlation was obtained between the responses of group IV afferents to LFF or to pressure exerted on tibialis anterior muscle. On the other hand, decreased M wave amplitude was minimal with LFF while it was pronounced with HFF. Close correlations were found between fatigue-induced activation of group IV afferents and decreases in force or M wave amplitude, but their strength was significantly higher with LFF compared to HFF. Thus, electrically induced fatigue activates group IV muscle afferents with a prominent effect of low-frequency stimulation. The mechanism of muscle afferent stimulation does not seem to be due to the sole increase in extracellular potassium concentration, but also by the efflux of muscle metabolites, present during fatiguing contractions at low rate of stimulation.

  4. Extreme IR absorption in group IV-SiGeSn core-shell nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attiaoui, Anis; Wirth, Stephan; Blanchard-Dionne, André-Pierre; Meunier, Michel; Hartmann, J. M.; Buca, Dan; Moutanabbir, Oussama

    2018-06-01

    Sn-containing Si and Ge (Ge1-y-xSixSny) alloys are an emerging family of semiconductors with the potential to impact group IV material-based devices. These semiconductors provide the ability to independently engineer both the lattice parameter and bandgap, which holds the premise to develop enhanced or novel photonic and electronic devices. With this perspective, we present detailed investigations of the influence of Ge1-y-xSixSny layers on the optical properties of Si and Ge based heterostructures and nanowires. We found that by adding a thin Ge1-y-xSixSny capping layer on Si or Ge greatly enhances light absorption especially in the near infrared range, leading to an increase in short-circuit current density. For the Ge1-y-xSixSny structure at thicknesses below 30 nm, a 14-fold increase in the short-circuit current is observed with respect to bare Si. This enhancement decreases by reducing the capping layer thickness. Conversely, decreasing the shell thickness was found to improve the short-circuit current in Si/Ge1-y-xSixSny and Ge/Ge1-y-xSixSny core/shell nanowires. The optical absorption becomes very important by increasing the Sn content. Moreover, by exploiting an optical antenna effect, these nanowires show extreme light absorption, reaching an enhancement factor, with respect to Si or Ge nanowires, on the order of 104 in Si/Ge0.84Si0.04Sn0.12 and 12 in Ge/Ge0.84Si0.04Sn0.12. Furthermore, we analyzed the optical response after the addition of a dielectric layer of Si3N4 to the Si/Ge1-y-xSixSny core-shell nanowire and found approximatively a 50% increase in the short-circuit current density for a dielectric layer of thickness equal to 45 nm and both a core radius and a shell thickness greater than 40 nm. The core-shell optical antenna benefits from a multiplication of enhancements contributed by leaky mode resonances in the semiconductor part and antireflection effects in the dielectric part.

  5. Ion beam synthesis and characterization of metastable group-IV alloy semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Naoto; Hasegawa, Masataka; Hayashi, Nobuyuki; Makita, Yunosuke; Shibata, Hajime [Electrotechnical Lab., Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Katsumata, Hiroshi; Uekusa, Shin-ichiro

    1997-03-01

    New Group-IV metastable alloy semiconductors and their heterostructures based on combinations of C-Si-Ge-Sn are recently attracting interest because of feasible new electronic and optoelectronic application in Si-technology and here research works on synthesis and characterization of the epitaxial heterostructures of Si-C, Si-Sn on Si fabricated by ion implantation together either with ion-beam-induced epitaxial crystallization (IBIEC) or solid phase epitaxial growth (SPEG) have been investigated. Formations of layers of Si{sub 1-y}C{sub y} (y=0.014 at peak concentration) on Si(100) have been performed by high-dose implantation of 17 keV C ions and successive IBIEC with 400 keV Ar or Ge ion bombardments at 300-400degC or SPEG up to 750degC. Crystalline growth by IBIEC has shown a lower growth rate in Si{sub 1-y}C{sub y}/Si than in intrinsic Si due mainly to the strain existence, which was observed by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. Photoluminescence(PL) measurements have revealed I{sub 1} or G line emissions that are relevant to small vacancy clusters or C pair formation, respectively. The crystalline growth of Si{sub 1-z}Sn{sub z} layers by 110 keV {sup 120}Sn ion implantation (z=0.029 and z=0.058 at peak concentration) into Si(100) followed either by IBIEC or by SPEG has been also investigated. PL emission from both IBIEC-grown and SPEG-grown samples with the lower Sn concentration has shown similar peaks to those by ion-implanted and annealed Si samples with intense I{sub 1} or I{sub 1}-related (Ar) peaks. Present results suggest that IBIEC has a feature for the non-thermal equilibrium fabrication of Si-C and Si-Sn alloy semiconductors. (J.P.N.)

  6. SiP monolayers: New 2D structures of group IV-V compounds for visible-light photohydrolytic catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhinan; Zhuang, Jibin; Zhang, Xu; Zhou, Zhen

    2018-06-01

    Because of graphene and phosphorene, two-dimensional (2D) layered materials of group IV and group V elements arouse great interest. However, group IV-V monolayers have not received due attention. In this work, three types of SiP monolayers were computationally designed to explore their electronic structure and optical properties. Computations confirm the stability of these monolayers, which are all indirect-bandgap semiconductors with bandgaps in the range 1.38-2.21 eV. The bandgaps straddle the redox potentials of water at pH = 0, indicating the potential of the monolayers for use as watersplitting photocatalysts. The computed optical properties demonstrate that certain monolayers of SiP 2D materials are absorbers of visible light and would serve as good candidates for optoelectronic devices.

  7. A new group in the Leptospirillum clade: cultivation-independent community genomics, proteomics and transcriptomics of the new species Leptospirillum group IV UBA BS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goltsman, Daniela [University of California, Berkeley; Dasari, Mauna [University of California, Berkeley; Thomas, BC [University of California, Berkeley; Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Banfield, Jillian F. [University of California, Berkeley

    2013-01-01

    Leptospirillum spp. are widespread members of acidophilic microbial communities that catalyze ferrous iron oxidation, thereby increasing sulfide mineral dissolution rates. These bacteria play important roles in environmental acidification and are harnessed for bioleaching-based metal recovery. Known members of the Leptospirillum clade of the Nitrospira phylum are Leptospirillum ferrooxidans (group I), Leptospirillum ferriphilum and Leptospirillum rubarum (group II), and Leptospirillum ferrodiazotrophum (group III). In the Richmond Mine acid mine drainage (AMD) system, biofilm formation is initiated by L. rubarum; L. ferrodiazotrophum appears in later developmental stages. Here we used community metagenomic data from unusual, thick floating biofilms to identify distinguishing metabolic traits in a rare and uncultivated community member, the new species Leptospirillum group IV UBA BS. These biofilms typically also contain a variety of Archaea, Actinobacteria, and a few other Leptospirillum spp. The Leptospirillum group IV UBA BS species shares 98% 16S rRNA sequence identity and 70% average amino acid identity between orthologs with its closest relative, L. ferrodiazotrophum. The presence of nitrogen fixation and reverse tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle proteins suggest an autotrophic metabolism similar to that of L. ferrodiazotrophum, while hydrogenase proteins suggest anaerobic metabolism. Community transcriptomic and proteomic analyses demonstrate expression of a multicopper oxidase unique to this species, as well as hydrogenases and core metabolic genes. Results suggest that the Leptospirillum group IV UBA BS species might play important roles in carbon fixation, nitrogen fixation, hydrogen metabolism, and iron oxidation in some acidic environments.

  8. The EU model evaluation group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, K.E.

    1999-01-01

    The model evaluation group (MEG) was launched in 1992 growing out of the Major Technological Hazards Programme with EU/DG XII. The goal of MEG was to improve the culture in which models were developed, particularly by encouraging voluntary model evaluation procedures based on a formalised and consensus protocol. The evaluation intended to assess the fitness-for-purpose of the models being used as a measure of the quality. The approach adopted was focused on developing a generic model evaluation protocol and subsequent targeting this onto specific areas of application. Five such developments have been initiated, on heavy gas dispersion, liquid pool fires, gas explosions, human factors and momentum fires. The quality of models is an important element when complying with the 'Seveso Directive' requiring that the safety reports submitted to the authorities comprise an assessment of the extent and severity of the consequences of identified major accidents. Further, the quality of models become important in the land use planning process, where the proximity of industrial sites to vulnerable areas may be critical. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  9. PENGARUH MODEL PEMBELAJARAN CREATIVE PROBLEM SOLVING BERBASIS EDUCATIVE GAMES TERHADAP KEMAMPUAN BERPIKIR KRITIS DAN HASIL BELAJAR IPA KELAS IV DI GUGUS IV KECAMATAN KUTA, KABUPATEN BADUNG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Luh Mita Sri Mahendra Yanti

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui pengaruh model pembelajaran Creative Problem Solving berbasis Educative Games terhadap kemampuan berpikir kritis dan hasil belajar IPA kelas IV di Gugus IV Kecamatan Kuta, Kabupaten Badung. Penelitian ini adalah penelitian kuasi eksperimen dengan rancangan post test only control group design. Jumlah populasi dalam penelitian ini adalah 231 siswa, dan sampel berjumlah 77 siswa. Data kemampuan berpikir kritis dan hasil belajar IPA dikumpulkan dengan metode tes. Analisis data yang digunakan yakni Manova berbantuan SPSS 17.00 for windows. Hasil Penelitian menunjukkan bahwa: 1 terdapat perbedaan kemampuan berpikir kritis antara siswa yang mengikuti model pembelajaran creative problem solving berbasis Educative Games dengan siswa yang mengikuti pembelajaran konvensional, 2 terdapat perbedaan hasil belajar IPA antara siswa yang mengikuti model pembelajaran creative problem solving berbasis Educative Games dengan siswa yang mengikuti pembelajaran konvensional, dan 3 terdapat perbedaan secara simultan antara kemampuan berpikir kritis dan hasil belajar IPA antara siswa yang mengikuti model pembelajaran creative problem solving berbasis Educative Games dengan siswa yang mengikuti pembelajaran konvensional.

  10. Group IV all-semiconductor spintronics. Materials aspects and optical spin selection rules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sircar, Narayan

    2012-04-03

    In the scope of the present thesis various aspects for the realization of spintronic applications based on group IV semiconductors are discussed. This work comprises a refined material characterization of the magnetic semiconductor GeMn. We furthermore present efforts to utilize this material as spin injector for a Si-based optical spintronic device. Applying transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography, we are able to resolve a vertical anisotropy in the self-assembly, leading to the stacking of well-defined clusters in the growth direction. Three-dimensional atom distribution maps confirm that clusters are built from a nonstoichiometric GeMn alloy and exhibit a high-Mn-concentration core with a decreasing Mn concentration toward a shell. An amorphous nature of the cluster cores as well as the crystallinity of the shells, coherent with the surrounding Ge lattice, are revealed in scanning transmission electron microscopy. We localize a strain field surrounding each GeMn cluster by scanning transmission electron microscopy. The importance of strain to the stacking phenomenon of the clusters becomes clear in studies of Ge/GeMn superlattice structures, where a vertical spatial correlation of clusters over 30 nm-thick Ge spacer layers is observed. We present evidence that electrical transport properties of the p-type GeMn thin films fabricated on high-resistivity Ge substrates are severely influenced by parallel conduction through the substrate. It is shown that substrate conduction persists also for wellconducting degenerate p-type reference thin films, giving rise to an effective two-layer conduction scheme. GeMn thin films fabricated on these substrates exhibit only a negligible magnetoresistance effect. Before integrating GeMn in an optical spintronic device, some key aspects important for an understanding of the optical injection and detection of carrier spins in Si and Si-based heterostructures are clarified in the second part of this thesis. In

  11. Magnetism in Mn-nanowires and -clusters as δ-doped layers in group IV semiconductors (Si, Ge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. R. Simov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mn doping of group-IV semiconductors (Si/Ge is achieved by embedding nanostructured Mn-layers in group-IV matrix. The Mn-nanostructures are monoatomic Mn-wires or Mn-clusters and capped with an amorphous Si or Ge layer. The precise fabrication of δ-doped Mn-layers is combined with element-specific detection of the magnetic signature with x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. The largest moment (2.5 μB/Mn is measured for Mn-wires with ionic bonding character and a-Ge overlayer cap; a-Si capping reduces the moment due to variations of bonding in agreement with theoretical predictions. The moments in δ-doped layers dominated by clusters is quenched with an antiferromagnetic component from Mn–Mn bonding.

  12. Magnetism in Mn-nanowires and -clusters as δ-doped layers in group IV semiconductors (Si, Ge)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simov, K. R.; Glans, P.-A.; Jenkins, C. A.; Liberati, M.; Reinke, P.

    2018-01-01

    Mn doping of group-IV semiconductors (Si/Ge) is achieved by embedding nanostructured Mn-layers in group-IV matrix. The Mn-nanostructures are monoatomic Mn-wires or Mn-clusters and capped with an amorphous Si or Ge layer. The precise fabrication of δ-doped Mn-layers is combined with element-specific detection of the magnetic signature with x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. The largest moment (2.5 μB/Mn) is measured for Mn-wires with ionic bonding character and a-Ge overlayer cap; a-Si capping reduces the moment due to variations of bonding in agreement with theoretical predictions. The moments in δ-doped layers dominated by clusters is quenched with an antiferromagnetic component from Mn-Mn bonding.

  13. Annotated bibliography for liquid metal surface tensions of groups III-A, IV-A, and V-A metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murtha, M.J.; Burnet, G.

    1976-04-01

    An annotated bibliography has been prepared which includes summaries of 82 publications dating from 1920 and dealing with the measurement of the surface tensions of Groups III-A, IV-A, and V-A metals in the liquid state. The bibliography is organized by key element investigated, and contains a tabulation of correlations for surface tension as a function of temperature. A brief discussion dealing with variables and methods has been included

  14. The Kubo-Greenwood spin-dependent electrical conductivity of 2D transition-metal dichalcogenides and group-IV materials: A Green's function study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoi, Bui Dinh; Yarmohammadi, Mohsen

    2018-04-01

    The spin-dependent electrical conductivity of counterparts of graphene, transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) and group-IV nanosheets, have investigated by a magnetic exchange field (MEF)-induction to gain the electronic transport properties of charge carriers. We have implemented a k.p Hamiltonian model through the Kubo-Greenwood formalism in order to address the dynamical behavior of correlated Dirac fermions. Tuning the MEF enables one to control the effective mass of carriers in group-IV and TMDs, differently. We have found the Dirac-like points in a new quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) state at strong MEFs for both structures. For both cases, a broad peak in electrical conductivity originated from the scattering rate and entropy is observed. Spin degeneracy at some critical MEFs is another remarkable point. We have found that in the limit of zero or uniform MEFs with respect to the spin-orbit interaction, the large resulting electrical conductivity depends on the spin sub-bands in group-IV and MLDs. Featuring spin-dependent electronic transport properties, one can provide a new scenario for future possible applications.

  15. Synthesis and magnetic Properties of dinuclear oxovanadium(IV) complexes bridged by tetracarboxylato groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y.-T.; Guan, H.-S.; Yan, C.-W.

    2004-01-01

    Three novel μ-tetracarboxylato-bridged oxovanadium(IV) complexes described by the overall formula [(VO) 2 (PMTA)L 2 ] where PMTA stands for the tetraanion of pyromellitic acid, and L denotes 2,2'-bipyridine(bpy), 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine (Me 2 bpy) or 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), respectively, have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, molar conductivity and room-temperature magnetic moment measurements, IR, ESR, and electronic spectral studies. It is proposed that these complexes have PMTA-bridged structures and consist of two oxovanadium(IV) ions, each in the square-pyramidal environment. The [(VO) 2 (PMTA)(bpy) 2 ] (1) and [(VO) 2 (PMTA)(phen) 2 ] (2) complexes were further characterized by variable temperature (4.2 - 300 K) magnetic susceptibility measurements and the observed data were fitted to the modified Bleaney-Bowers equation by the least-squares, giving the exchange integral J = -2.75 cm -1 for (1) and J -3.91 cm -1 for (2). This results indicates that there is a weak antiferromagnetic spin-exchange interaction between the two VO 2+ ions within each molecule. (author)

  16. Tuning the ferroelectric-to-paraelectric transition temperature and dipole orientation of group-IV monochalcogenide monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraza-Lopez, Salvador; Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.; Poudel, Shiva P.; Kumar, Pradeep

    2018-01-01

    Coordination-related, two-dimensional (2D) structural phase transitions are a fascinating facet of two-dimensional materials with structural degeneracies. Nevertheless, a unified theoretical account of these transitions remains absent, and the following points are established through ab initio molecular dynamics and 2D discrete clock models here: Group-IV monochalcogenide (GeSe, SnSe, SnTe,...) monolayers have four degenerate structural ground states, and a phase transition from a threefold coordinated onto a fivefold coordinated structure takes place at finite temperature. On unstrained samples, this phase transition requires lattice parameters to evolve freely. A fundamental energy scale J permits understanding this transition, and numerical results indicate a transition temperature Tc of about 1.41 J . Numerical data provides a relation among the experimental (rhombic) parameter 〈Δ α 〉 [Chang et al., Science 353, 274 (2016), 10.1126/science.aad8609] and T of the form 〈Δ α 〉 =Δ α (T =0 ) (1-T /Tc)β , with a critical exponent β ≃1 /3 that coincides with experiment. It is also shown that 〈Δ α 〉 is temperature independent in another theoretical work [Fei et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 097601 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.097601], and thus incompatible with experiment. Tc and the orientation of the in-plane intrinsic electric dipole can be controlled by moderate uniaxial tensile strain, and a modified discrete clock model describes the transition on strained samples qualitatively. An analysis of out-of-plane fluctuations and a discussion of the need for van der Waals corrections to describe these materials are given too. These results provide an experimentally compatible framework to understand structural phase transitions in 2D materials and their effects on material properties.

  17. An investigation of group IV alloys and their applications in bipolar transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anteney, I.M.

    2000-09-01

    This thesis investigates the use of carbon in group IV alloys and their potential uses in bipolar transistors. The first part of the thesis investigates the ability of carbon to suppress transient enhanced diffusion in SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistors, whilst the second part deals with the impact of carbon incorporation on the electrical properties of polycrystalline silicon and silicon-germanium films. A background doping concentration (10 20 cm -3 ) of C has been introduced into the base of SiGe HBTs with the aim of studying the effects of C on TED of B from the base. An electrical method is used to extract the bandgap narrowing in the base of SiGe and SiGe:C HBTs through measurements of the temperature dependence of I c at different C/B reverse biases. The method is very sensitive to small amounts of dopant out-diffusion from the base and hence is ideal for determining the effect of C on TED. Extracted BGN values of 115meV and 173meV were obtained for the SiGe and SiGe:C HBTs respectively, for a C/B reverse bias of 0V. Increasing the C/B reverse bias to 1V increased the extracted BGN of the SiGe HBT to 145meV, but left the SiGe:C value unchanged. This demonstrates that no parasitic energy barrier exists in the SiGe:C HBT and that TED has been suppressed. The effect of carbon position and concentration has been studied by introducing a peak C concentration of 10 20 cm -3 in the collector and 1.1x10 19 cm -3 or 1.5x10 19 cm -3 C in the base. From these measurements it has been shown that TED is only suppressed in the device with 1.5x10 19 cm -3 C in the base, indicating that a C concentration of 1.5x10 19 cm -3 is needed to suppress TED and that the C needs to be co-located with the B profile. The effects of carbon on the electrical properties of polycrystalline Si and SiGe films have been investigated. The resistivity, Hall mobility (μ H ) and effective carrier concentration (N EFF ) of n- and p-type polySi 1-y C y and polySi 0.82-y Ge 0.18 C y layers

  18. Holistic Medicine IV: Principles of Existential Holistic Group Therapy and the Holistic Process of Healing in a Group Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soren Ventegodt

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In existential holistic group therapy, the whole person heals in accordance with the holistic process theory and the life mission theory. Existential group psychotherapy addresses the emotional aspect of the human mind related to death, freedom, isolation, and meaninglessness, while existential holistic group therapy addresses the state of the person�s wholeness. This includes the body, the person�s philosophy of life, and often also love, purpose of life, and the spiritual dimension, to the same extent as it addresses the emotional psyche and sexuality, and it is thus much broader than traditional psychotherapy.Where existential psychotherapy is rather depressing concerning the fundamental human condition, existential holistic therapy conceives life to be basically good. The fundamentals in existential holistic therapy are that everybody has the potential for healing themselves to become loving, joyful, sexually attractive, strong, and gifted, which is a message that most patients welcome. While the patient is suffering and fighting to get through life, the most important job for the holistic therapist is to keep a positive perspective of life. In accordance with these fundamentals, many participants in holistic group therapy will have positive emotional experiences, often of an unknown intensity, and these experiences appear to transform their lives within only a few days or weeks of therapy.An important idea of the course is Bohm�s concept of �holo-movement� in the group, resulting from intense coherence between the group members. When the group comes together, the individual will be linked to the totality and the great movement forward towards love, consciousness, and happiness will happen collectively � if it happens at all. This gives the individual the feeling that everything that happens is right, important, and valuable for all the participants at the same time. Native Americans and other premodern people refer to this

  19. Holistic medicine IV: principles of existential holistic group therapy and the holistic process of healing in a group setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventegodt, Søren; Andersen, Niels Jørgen; Merrick, Joav

    2003-12-23

    In existential holistic group therapy, the whole person heals in accordance with the holistic process theory and the life mission theory. Existential group psychotherapy addresses the emotional aspect of the human mind related to death, freedom, isolation, and meaninglessness, while existential holistic group therapy addresses the state of the person"s wholeness. This includes the body, the person's philosophy of life, and often also love, purpose of life, and the spiritual dimension, to the same extent as it addresses the emotional psyche and sexuality, and it is thus much broader than traditional psychotherapy. Where existential psychotherapy is rather depressing concerning the fundamental human condition, existential holistic therapy conceives life to be basically good. The fundamentals in existential holistic therapy are that everybody has the potential for healing themselves to become loving, joyful, sexually attractive, strong, and gifted, which is a message that most patients welcome. While the patient is suffering and fighting to get through life, the most important job for the holistic therapist is to keep a positive perspective of life. In accordance with these fundamentals, many participants in holistic group therapy will have positive emotional experiences, often of an unknown intensity, and these experiences appear to transform their lives within only a few days or weeks of therapy. An important idea of the course is Bohm's concept of "holo-movement" in the group, resulting from intense coherence between the group members. When the group comes together, the individual will be linked to the totality and the great movement forward towards love, consciousness, and happiness will happen collectively--if it happens at all. This gives the individual the feeling that everything that happens is right, important, and valuable for all the participants at the same time. Native Americans and other premodern people refer to this experience as "the spiritual design

  20. The relationship between the Five-Factor Model and latent DSM-IV personality disorder dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Nestadt, Gerald; Costa, Paul T.; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Samuels, Jack; Bienvenu, O. Joseph; Eaton, William W.

    2007-01-01

    This study compared the latent structure of the DSM-IV personality disorders to the Five-Factor Model (FFM) of general personality dimensions. The subjects in the study were 742 community-residing individuals who participated in the Hopkins Epidemiology of Personality Disorder Study. DSM-IV personality disorder traits were assessed by psychologists using the International Personality Disorder Examination, and personality disorder dimensions were derived previously using dichotomous factor ana...

  1. Workshop IV – Cosmology-theoretical models/alternative scenarios ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S D Maharaj presented a talk entitled 'Some Einstein–Maxwell models with spherical sym- ... ber of spatial dimensions in the universe may be a variable and considered a ... the probability density of the de Sitter minisuperspace in 3-space as ...

  2. Modeling optical and UV polarization of AGNs. IV. Polarization timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas Lobos, P. A.; Goosmann, R. W.; Marin, F.; Savić, D.

    2018-03-01

    Context. Optical observations cannot resolve the structure of active galactic nuclei (AGN), and a unified model for AGN was inferred mostly from indirect methods, such as spectroscopy and variability studies. Optical reverberation mapping allowed us to constrain the spatial dimension of the broad emission line region and thereby to measure the mass of supermassive black holes. Recently, reverberation was also applied to the polarized signal emerging from different AGN components. In principle, this should allow us to measure the spatial dimensions of the sub-parsec reprocessing media. Aim. We conduct numerical modeling of polarization reverberation and provide theoretical predictions for the polarization time lag induced by different AGN components. The model parameters are adjusted to the observational appearance of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4151. Methods: We modeled scattering-induced polarization and tested different geometries for the circumnuclear dust component. Our tests included the effects of clumpiness and different dust prescriptions. To further extend the model, we also explored the effects of additional ionized winds stretched along the polar direction, and of an equatorial scattering ring that is responsible for the polarization angle observed in pole-on AGN. The simulations were run using a time-dependent version of the STOKES code. Results: Our modeling confirms the previously found polarization characteristics as a function of the observer`s viewing angle. When the dust adopts a flared-disk geometry, the lags reveal a clear difference between type 1 and type 2 AGN. This distinction is less clear for a torus geometry where the time lag is more sensitive to the geometry and optical depth of the inner surface layers of the funnel. The presence of a scattering equatorial ring and ionized outflows increased the recorded polarization time lags, and the polar outflows smooths out dependence on viewing angle, especially for the higher optical depth of the

  3. Modeling of Pu(IV) extraction and HNO3 speciation in nuclear fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De-Sio, S.

    2012-01-01

    The PUREX process is a solvent extraction method dedicated to the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel in order to recover pure uranium and plutonium from aqueous solutions of concentrated nitric acid. The tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) is used as the extractant in the organic phase. The aim of this thesis work was to improve the modeling of liquid-liquid extraction media in nuclear fuel reprocessing. First, Raman and 14 N NMR measurements, coupled with theoretical calculations based on simple solutions theory and BIMSA modeling, were performed in order to get a better understanding of nitric acid dissociation in binary and ternary solutions. Then, Pu(IV) speciation in TBP after extraction from low nitric acid concentrations was investigated by EXAFS and vis-NIR spectroscopies. We were able to show evidence of the extraction of Pu(IV) hydrolyzed species into the organic phase. A new structural study was conducted on An(VI)/TBP and An(IV)/TBP complexes by coupling EXAFS measurements with DFT calculations. Finally, extraction isotherms modeling was performed on the Pu(IV)/HNO 3 /H 2 O/TBP 30%/dodecane system (with Pu at tracer scale) by taking into account deviation from ideal behaviour in both organic and aqueous phases. The best modeling was obtained when considering three plutonium (IV) complexes in the organic phase: Pu(OH) 2 (NO 3 ) 2 (TBP) 2 , Pu(NO 3 ) 4 (TBP) 2 and Pu(NO 3 ) 4 (TBP) 3 . (author) [fr

  4. Group interventions for patients with cancer and HIV disease: part IV. Clinical and policy recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leszcz, Molyn; Sherman, Allen; Mosier, Julie; Burlingame, Gary M; Cleary, Trish; Ulman, Kathleen Hubbs; Simonton, Stephanie; Latif, Umaira; Strauss, Bernhard; Hazelton, Lara

    2004-10-01

    Group interventions have assumed a growing role in primary prevention and supportive care for cancer and HIV disease. Earlier sections of this Special Report examined empirical findings for these interventions and provided recommendations for future research. The current section offers brief recommendations for service providers, policymakers, and stakeholders. Group services now occupy an increasingly prominent place in primary prevention programs and medical settings. In previous sections of this Special Report (Sherman, Leszcz et al., 2004; Sherman, Mosier et al., 2004a, 2004b) we examined the efficacy of different group interventions at different phases of cancer or HIV disease, considered characteristics of the intervention and the participants that might influence outcomes, and discussed mechanisms of action. Methodological challenges and priorities for future research were highlighted. In this, the final section, we offer brief recommendations for service providers, policymakers, and other stakeholders. We consider some of the barriers that constrain use of empirically-based group interventions and note how these programs might be implemented more widely and effectively.

  5. Inter-Division IV-V-IX / Working Group Historic Radio Astronomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orchiston, Wayne; Kellermann, Kenneth I.; Davies, Rodney D.; Débarbat, Suzanne V.; Morimoto, Masaki; Slysh, Slava; Swarup, Govind; van Woerden, Hugo; Wall, Jasper V.; Wielebinski, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The Working Group was formed at the IAU XXV General Assembly in Sydney, 2003, as a joint initiative of Commissions 40 Radio Astronomy and Commission 41 History of Astronomy, in order to assemble a master list of surviving historically-significant radio telescopes and associated instrumentation found

  6. Fe concentration dependence of tunneling magnetoresistance in magnetic tunnel junctions using group-IV ferromagnetic semiconductor GeFe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Takiguchi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Group-IV-based ferromagnetic semiconductor Ge1−xFex (GeFe is one of the most promising materials for spin injection/detection in Si and Ge. In this paper, we demonstrate a systematic study of tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs composed of Fe/MgO/Ge1−xFex with various Fe concentrations (x = 0.065, 0.105, 0.140, and 0.175. With increasing x, the TMR ratio increases up to 1.5% when x≤ 0.105, and it decreases when x> 0.105. This is the first observation of the TMR ratio over 1% in MTJs containing a group-IV ferromagnetic semiconductor. With increasing x, while the Curie temperature of GeFe increases, the MgO surface becomes rougher, which is thought to be the cause of the upper limit of the TMR ratio. The quality of the MgO layer on GeFe is an important factor for further improvement of TMR in Fe/MgO/GeFe MTJs.

  7. Models of neural networks IV early vision and attention

    CERN Document Server

    Cowan, Jack; Domany, Eytan

    2002-01-01

    Close this book for a moment and look around you. You scan the scene by directing your attention, and gaze, at certain specific objects. Despite the background, you discern them. The process is partially intentional and partially preattentive. How all this can be done is described in the fourth volume of Models of Neural Networks devoted to Early Vision and Atten­ tion that you are holding in your hands. Early vision comprises the first stages of visual information processing. It is as such a scientific challenge whose clarification calls for a penetrating review. Here you see the result. The Heraeus Foundation (Hanau) is to be thanked for its support during the initial phase of this project. John Hertz, who has extensive experience in both computational and ex­ perimental neuroscience, provides in "Neurons, Networks, and Cognition" to neural modeling. John Van Opstal explains in a theoretical introduction "The Gaze Control System" how the eye's gaze control is performed and presents a novel theoretical des...

  8. IGORR-IV - Proceedings of the fourth meeting of the International Group on Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbalm, K.F.

    1995-01-01

    The International Group on Research Reactors was formed to facilitate the sharing of knowledge and experience among those institutions and individuals who are actively working to design, build, and promote new research reactors or to make significant upgrades to existing facilities. Twenty-nine papers were presented in five sessions and written versions of the papers or hard copies of the vugraphs used are published in these proceedings. The five sessions were: (1) Operating Research Reactors and Facility Upgrades; (2) Research Reactors in Design and Construction; (3) ANS Closeout Activities; (4) and (5) Research, Development, and Analysis Results

  9. IGORR-IV -- Proceedings of the fourth meeting of the International Group on Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenbalm, K.F. [comp.

    1995-12-31

    The International Group on Research Reactors was formed to facilitate the sharing of knowledge and experience among those institutions and individuals who are actively working to design, build, and promote new research reactors or to make significant upgrades to existing facilities. Twenty-nine papers were presented in five sessions and written versions of the papers or hard copies of the vugraphs used are published in these proceedings. The five sessions were: (1) Operating Research Reactors and Facility Upgrades; (2) Research Reactors in Design and Construction; (3) ANS Closeout Activities; (4) and (5) Research, Development, and Analysis Results.

  10. Discovery of DPP IV inhibitors by pharmacophore modeling and QSAR analysis followed by in silico screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Masri, Ihab M; Mohammad, Mohammad K; Taha, Mutasem O

    2008-11-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV) deactivates the natural hypoglycemic incretin hormones. Inhibition of this enzyme should restore glucose homeostasis in diabetic patients making it an attractive target for the development of new antidiabetic drugs. With this in mind, the pharmacophoric space of DPP IV was explored using a set of 358 known inhibitors. Thereafter, genetic algorithm and multiple linear regression analysis were employed to select an optimal combination of pharmacophoric models and physicochemical descriptors that yield selfconsistent and predictive quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) (r(2) (287)=0.74, F-statistic=44.5, r(2) (BS)=0.74, r(2) (LOO)=0.69, r(2) (PRESS) against 71 external testing inhibitors=0.51). Two orthogonal pharmacophores (of cross-correlation r(2)=0.23) emerged in the QSAR equation suggesting the existence of at least two distinct binding modes accessible to ligands within the DPP IV binding pocket. Docking experiments supported the binding modes suggested by QSAR/pharmacophore analyses. The validity of the QSAR equation and the associated pharmacophore models were established by the identification of new low-micromolar anti-DPP IV leads retrieved by in silico screening. One of our interesting potent anti-DPP IV hits is the fluoroquinolone gemifloxacin (IC(50)=1.12 muM). The fact that gemifloxacin was recently reported to potently inhibit the prodiabetic target glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK-3beta) suggests that gemifloxacin is an excellent lead for the development of novel dual antidiabetic inhibitors against DPP IV and GSK-3beta.

  11. "Group IV Nanomembranes, Nanoribbons, and Quantum Dots: Processing, Characterization, and Novel Devices"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    liu, feng

    2014-08-28

    This theoretical project has been carried out in close interaction with the experimental project at UW-Madison under the same title led by PI Max Lagally and co-PI Mark Eriksson. Extensive computational studies have been performed to address a broad range of topics from atomic structure, stability, mechanical property, to electronic structure, optoelectronic and transport properties of various nanoarchitectures in the context of Si and other solid nanomembranes. These have been done by using combinations of different theoretical and computational approaches, ranging from first-principles calculations and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to finite-element (FE) analyses and continuum modeling.

  12. Comparing personality disorder models: cross-method assessment of the FFM and DSM-IV-TR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Douglas B; Widiger, Thomas W

    2010-12-01

    The current edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR; American Psychiatric Association, 2000) defines personality disorders as categorical entities that are distinct from each other and from normal personality traits. However, many scientists now believe that personality disorders are best conceptualized using a dimensional model of traits that span normal and abnormal personality, such as the Five-Factor Model (FFM). However, if the FFM or any dimensional model is to be considered as a credible alternative to the current model, it must first demonstrate an increment in the validity of the assessment offered within a clinical setting. Thus, the current study extended previous research by comparing the convergent and discriminant validity of the current DSM-IV-TR model to the FFM across four assessment methodologies. Eighty-eight individuals receiving ongoing psychotherapy were assessed for the FFM and the DSM-IV-TR personality disorders using self-report, informant report, structured interview, and therapist ratings. The results indicated that the FFM had an appreciable advantage over the DSM-IV-TR in terms of discriminant validity and, at the domain level, convergent validity. Implications of the findings and directions for future research are discussed.

  13. Endogeneity in Panel Data Models with Time-Varying and Time-Fixed Regressors: To IV or not IV?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitze, Timo

    We analyse the problem of parameter inconsistency in panel data econometrics due to the correlation of exogenous variables with the error term.A common solution in this setting is to use Instrumental-Variable (IV) estimation in the spirit of Hausman-Taylor (1981). However, some potential shortcom...

  14. Spin and Optical Characterization of Defects in Group IV Semiconductors for Quantum Memory Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Brendon Charles

    This thesis is focused on the characterization of highly coherent defects in both silicon and diamond, particularly in the context of quantum memory applications. The results are organized into three parts based on the spin system: phosphorus donor electron spins in silicon, negatively charged nitrogen vacancy color centers in diamond (NV-), and neutrally charged silicon vacancy color centers in diamond (SiV0). The first part on phosphorus donor electron spins presents the first realization of strong coupling with spins in silicon. To achieve this, the silicon crystal was made highly pure and highly isotopically enriched so that the ensemble dephasing time, T2*, was long (10 micros). Additionally, the use of a 3D resonator aided in realizing uniform coupling, allowing for high fidelity spin ensemble manipulation. These two properties have eluded past implementations of strongly coupled spin ensembles and have been the limiting factor in storing and retrieving quantum information. Second, we characterize the spin properties of the NV- color center in diamond in a large magnetic field. We observe that the electron spin echo envelope modulation originating from the central 14N nuclear spin is much stronger at large fields and that the optically induced spin polarization exhibits a strong orientation dependence that cannot be explained by the existing model for the NV- optical cycle, we develop a modification of the existing model that reproduces the data in a large magnetic field. In the third part we perform characterization and stabilization of a new color center in diamond, SiV0, and find that it has attractive, highly sought-after properties for use as a quantum memory in a quantum repeater scheme. We demonstrate a new approach to the rational design of new color centers by engineering the Fermi level of the host material. The spin properties were characterized in electron spin resonance, revealing long spin relaxation and spin coherence times at cryogenic

  15. Pivotal statistics for testing subsets of structural parameters in the IV Regression Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleibergen, F.R.

    2000-01-01

    We construct a novel statistic to test hypothezes on subsets of the structural parameters in anInstrumental Variables (IV) regression model. We derive the chi squared limiting distribution of thestatistic and show that it has a degrees of freedom parameter that is equal to the number ofstructural

  16. PEALD grown high-k ZrO{sub 2} thin films on SiC group IV compound semiconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khairnar, A. G., E-mail: agkhairnar@gmail.com; Patil, V. S.; Agrawal, K. S.; Salunke, R. S.; Mahajan, A. M., E-mail: ammahajan@nmu.ac.in [North Maharashtra University, Department of Electronics, School of Physical Sciences (India)

    2017-01-15

    The study of ZrO{sub 2} thin films on SiC group IV compound semiconductor has been studied as a high mobility substrates. The ZrO{sub 2} thin films were deposited using the Plasma Enhanced Atomic Layer Deposition System. The thickness of the thin films were measured using ellipsometer and found to be 5.47 nm. The deposited ZrO{sub 2} thin films were post deposition annealed in rapid thermal annealing chamber at temperature of 400°Ð¡. The atomic force microscopy and X-гау photoelectron spectroscopy has been carried out to study the surface topography, roughness and chemical composition of thin film, respectively.

  17. Transition-metal-doped group-IV monochalcogenides: a combination of two-dimensional triferroics and diluted magnetic semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Wu, Menghao; Yao, Kailun

    2018-05-01

    We report the first-principles evidence of a series of two-dimensional triferroics (ferromagnetic + ferroelectric + ferroelastic), which can be obtained by doping transition-metal ions in group-IV monochalcogenide (SnS, SnSe, GeS, GeSe) monolayers, noting that a ferromagnetic Fe-doped SnS2 monolayer has recently been realized (Li B et al 2017 Nat. Commun. 8 1958). The ferroelectricity, ferroelasticity and ferromagnetism can be coupled and the magnetization direction may be switched upon ferroelectric/ferroelastic switching, rendering electrical writing + magnetic reading possible. They can be also two-dimensional half-metals or diluted magnetic semiconductors, where p/n channels or even multiferroic tunneling junctions can be designed by variation in doping and incorporated into a monolayer wafer.

  18. Separation method for ions of elements of the III., IV., VI. and VIII. groups of periodical system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marhol, M.

    1973-01-01

    The method is presented of separating the ions of the elements of the periodic system groups III, IV, and VIII by ion exchangers. The ions are complex-bonded to a new type of ion exchanger consisting of the polycondensates of phenol with aldehydes or ketones and containing an atom of phosphorus, arsenic or antimony with an atom of sulphur or oxygen in a complex bond. The polymers of compounds containing a double bond, e.g., of butadiene, polyvinyl alcohol, polyethylene, polypropylene, and the compounds of styrene with fural may also be used for this purpose. The method is demonstrated on a case of uranium and heavy metal concentration and the separation thereof from waste waters. (L.K.)

  19. Integrable lattice models and quantum groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleur, H.; Zuber, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    These lectures aim at introducing some basic algebraic concepts on lattice integrable models, in particular quantum groups, and to discuss some connections with knot theory and conformal field theories. The list of contents is: Vertex models and Yang-Baxter equation; Quantum sl(2) algebra and the Yang-Baxter equation; U q sl(2) as a symmetry of statistical mechanical models; Face models; Face models attached to graphs; Yang-Baxter equation, braid group and link polynomials

  20. Diverse anisotropy of phonon transport in two-dimensional group IV-VI compounds: A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Guangzhao; Qin, Zhenzhen; Fang, Wu-Zhang; Zhang, Li-Chuan; Yue, Sheng-Ying; Yan, Qing-Bo; Hu, Ming; Su, Gang

    2016-05-01

    New classes of two-dimensional (2D) materials beyond graphene, including layered and non-layered, and their heterostructures, are currently attracting increasing interest due to their promising applications in nanoelectronics, optoelectronics and clean energy, where thermal transport is a fundamental physical parameter. In this paper, we systematically investigated the phonon transport properties of the 2D orthorhombic group IV-VI compounds of GeS, GeSe, SnS and SnSe by solving the Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) based on first-principles calculations. Despite their similar puckered (hinge-like) structure along the armchair direction as phosphorene, the four monolayer compounds possess diverse anisotropic properties in many aspects, such as phonon group velocity, Young's modulus and lattice thermal conductivity (κ), etc. Especially, the κ along the zigzag and armchair directions of monolayer GeS shows the strongest anisotropy while monolayer SnS and SnSe show almost isotropy in phonon transport. The origin of the diverse anisotropy is fully studied and the underlying mechanism is discussed in details. With limited size, the κ could be effectively lowered, and the anisotropy could be effectively modulated by nanostructuring, which would extend the applications to nanoscale thermoelectrics and thermal management. Our study offers fundamental understanding of the anisotropic phonon transport properties of 2D materials, and would be of significance for further study, modulation and applications in emerging technologies.

  1. Generation of ENDF/B-IV based 35 group neutron cross-section library and its application in criticality studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garg, S.B.; Sinha, A.

    1985-01-01

    A 35 group cross-section library with P/sub 3/-anisotropic scattering matrices and resonance self-shielding factors has been generated from the basic ENDF/B-IV cross-section files for 57 elements. This library covers the neutron energy range from 0.005 ev to 15 MeV and is well suited for the neutronics and safety analysis of fission, fusion and hybrid systems. The library is contained in two well known files, namely, ISOTXS and BRKOXS. In order to test the efficacy of this library and to bring out the importance of resonance self-shielding, a few selected fast critical assemblies representing large dilute oxide and carbide fueled uranium and plutonium based systems have been analysed. These assemblies include ZPPR/sub 2/, ZPR-3-48, ZPR-3-53, ZPR-6-6A, ZPR-6-7, ZPR-9-31 and ZEBRA-2 and are amongst those recommended by the US Nuclear Data Evaluation Working Group for testing the accuracy of cross-sections. The evaluated multiplication constants of these assemblies compare favourably with those calculated by others

  2. A Clostridium Group IV Species Dominates and Suppresses a Mixed Culture Fermentation by Tolerance to Medium Chain Fatty Acids Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Stephen J.; De Groof, Vicky; Khor, Way Cern; Roume, Hugo; Props, Ruben; Coma, Marta; Rabaey, Korneel

    2017-01-01

    A microbial community is engaged in a complex economy of cooperation and competition for carbon and energy. In engineered systems such as anaerobic digestion and fermentation, these relationships are exploited for conversion of a broad range of substrates into products, such as biogas, ethanol, and carboxylic acids. Medium chain fatty acids (MCFAs), for example, hexanoic acid, are valuable, energy dense microbial fermentation products, however, MCFA tend to exhibit microbial toxicity to a broad range of microorganisms at low concentrations. Here, we operated continuous mixed population MCFA fermentations on biorefinery thin stillage to investigate the community response associated with the production and toxicity of MCFA. In this study, an uncultured species from the Clostridium group IV (related to Clostridium sp. BS-1) became enriched in two independent reactors that produced hexanoic acid (up to 8.1 g L−1), octanoic acid (up to 3.2 g L−1), and trace concentrations of decanoic acid. Decanoic acid is reported here for the first time as a possible product of a Clostridium group IV species. Other significant species in the community, Lactobacillus spp. and Acetobacterium sp., generate intermediates in MCFA production, and their collapse in relative abundance resulted in an overall production decrease. A strong correlation was present between the community composition and both the hexanoic acid concentration (p = 0.026) and total volatile fatty acid concentration (p = 0.003). MCFA suppressed species related to Clostridium sp. CPB-6 and Lactobacillus spp. to a greater extent than others. The proportion of the species related to Clostridium sp. BS-1 over Clostridium sp. CPB-6 had a strong correlation with the concentration of octanoic acid (p = 0.003). The dominance of this species and the increase in MCFA resulted in an overall toxic effect on the mixed community, most significantly on the Lactobacillus spp., which resulted in a decrease in total

  3. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of WAIS-IV in a Clinical Sample: Examining a Bi-Factor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Collinson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available There have been a number of studies that have examined the factor structure of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale IV (WAIS-IV using the standardization sample. In this study, we investigate its factor structure on a clinical neuropsychology sample of mixed aetiology. Correlated factor, higher-order and bi-factor models are all tested. Overall, the results suggest that the WAIS-IV will be suitable for use with this population.

  4. Lithium adsorption and migration in group IV-VI compounds and GeS/graphene heterostructures: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Kuan-Rong; Fang, Lincan; Yan, Qing-Bo; Su, Gang

    2018-04-18

    By means of first-principles calculations, the adsorption and transport properties of lithium (Li) in orthorhombic group IV-VI compounds MX (M = Ge, Sn; X = S, Se) and GeS/graphene heterostructures have been systematically investigated. Strong interactions and distinct charge transfer between Li and compounds MX are observed. The Li diffusion barriers along the zigzag direction are found to be much lower than that along the armchair direction in monolayer and bulk MX, showing distinct anisotropic diffusion features. In particular, monolayer GeS has a lowest barrier of 0.173 eV (zigzag) among them and it will transit from a semiconductor to a metallic state after Li intercalation, indicating fast Li and electron transport properties. As a comparison, the addition of graphene in a GeS/graphene heterostructure could enhance its binding with Li, decrease the Li diffusion barrier and inhibit the volume expansion dramatically, suggesting a potential performance improvement. Our study not only reveals the directional transport properties of Li in MX, but also improves the understanding of the role of graphene in the MX/graphene heterostructure, and shows great potential application in the field of electrode materials.

  5. Validation of nuclear criticality safety software and 27 energy group ENDF/B-IV cross sections. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B.L. Jr.; D'Aquila, D.M.

    1996-01-01

    The original validation report, POEF-T-3636, was documented in August 1994. The document was based on calculations that were executed during June through August 1992. The statistical analyses in Appendix C and Appendix D were completed in October 1993. This revision is written to clarify the margin of safety being used at Portsmouth for nuclear criticality safety calculations. This validation gives Portsmouth NCS personnel a basis for performing computerized KENO V.a calculations using the Lockheed Martin Nuclear Criticality Safety Software. The first portion of the document outlines basic information in regard to validation of NCSS using ENDF/B-IV 27-group cross sections on the IBM3090 at ORNL. A basic discussion of the NCSS system is provided, some discussion on the validation database and validation in general. Then follows a detailed description of the statistical analysis which was applied. The results of this validation indicate that the NCSS software may be used with confidence for criticality calculations at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. For calculations of Portsmouth systems using the specified codes and systems covered by this validation, a maximum k eff including 2σ of 0.9605 or lower shall be considered as subcritical to ensure a calculational margin of safety of 0.02. The validation of NCSS on the IBM 3090 at ORNL was extended to include NCSS on the IBM 3090 at K-25

  6. Does estradiol have an impact on the dipeptidyl peptidase IV enzyme activity of the Prevotella intermedia group bacteria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fteita, Dareen; Könönen, Eija; Gürsoy, Mervi; Söderling, Eva; Gürsoy, Ulvi Kahraman

    2015-12-01

    Initiation and development of pregnancy-associated gingivitis is seemingly related to the microbial shift towards specific gram-negative anaerobes in subgingival biofilms. It is known that Prevotella intermedia sensu lato is able to use estradiol as an alternative source of growth instead of vitamin K. The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of estradiol on the bacterial dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV) enzyme activity in vitro as a virulent factor of the Prevotella intermedia group bacteria, namely P. intermedia, Prevotella nigrescens, Prevotella pallens, and Prevotella aurantiaca. In all experiments, 2 strains of each Prevotella species were used. Bacteria were incubated with the concentrations of 0, 30, 90, and 120 nmol/L of estradiol and were allowed to build biofilms at an air-solid interface. DPPIV activities of biofilms were measured kinetically during 20 min using a fluorometric assay. The enzyme activity was later related to the amount of protein produced by the same biofilm, reflecting the biofilm mass. Estradiol significantly increased DPPIV activities of the 8 Prevotella strains in a strain- and dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, our in vitro experiments indicate that estradiol regulates the DPPIV enzyme activity of P. intermedia, P. nigrescens, P. pallens, and P. aurantiaca strains differently. Our results may, at least partly, explain the role of estradiol to elicit a virulent state which contributes to the pathogenesis of pregnancy-related gingivitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. First principles-based adsorption comparison of group IV elements (C, Si, Ge, and Sn) on Au(111)/Ag(111) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Sudip; Rajesh, Ch.

    2012-01-01

    We have reported a first-principle investigation of the structural properties of monomer and dimer for group IV elements (C, Si, Ge, and Sn) adsorbed on the Au(111) and Ag(111) surfaces. The calculations were performed by means of a plane wave based pseudopotential method under the framework of density functional theory. The results reveal the preference of adatom to be adsorbed on the hexagonal closed packed site of the metal (111) surfaces with strong binding energy. The structures introduce interlayer forces in the adsorbate. The strong bonding with the surface atoms is a result of p–d hybridization. The adsorption energy follows a sequence as one goes down in the group IV elements which imply that the interaction of the group IV elements with Au/Ag is decreasing as the atomic number increases.

  8. Astragaloside IV liposomes ameliorates adriamycin-induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: The rats were given a single tail intravenous injection of adriamycin (6 mg/kg) within 1 week, and then divided into four groups including normal, model, benazepril and astragaloside IV liposomes group. They were all orally administered dosage of benazepril and astragaloside IV liposomes once daily for 8 weeks.

  9. Comparing linear probability model coefficients across groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Anders; Ejrnæs, Mette; Karlson, Kristian Bernt

    2015-01-01

    of the following three components: outcome truncation, scale parameters and distributional shape of the predictor variable. These results point to limitations in using linear probability model coefficients for group comparisons. We also provide Monte Carlo simulations and real examples to illustrate......This article offers a formal identification analysis of the problem in comparing coefficients from linear probability models between groups. We show that differences in coefficients from these models can result not only from genuine differences in effects, but also from differences in one or more...... these limitations, and we suggest a restricted approach to using linear probability model coefficients in group comparisons....

  10. The i-V curve characteristics of burner-stabilized premixed flames: detailed and reduced models

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Jie

    2016-07-17

    The i-V curve describes the current drawn from a flame as a function of the voltage difference applied across the reaction zone. Since combustion diagnostics and flame control strategies based on electric fields depend on the amount of current drawn from flames, there is significant interest in modeling and understanding i-V curves. We implement and apply a detailed model for the simulation of the production and transport of ions and electrons in one-dimensional premixed flames. An analytical reduced model is developed based on the detailed one, and analytical expressions are used to gain insight into the characteristics of the i-Vcurve for various flame configurations. In order for the reduced model to capture the spatial distribution of the electric field accurately, the concept of a dead zone region, where voltage is constant, is introduced, and a suitable closure for the spatial extent of the dead zone is proposed and validated. The results from the reduced modeling framework are found to be in good agreement with those from the detailed simulations. The saturation voltage is found to depend significantly on the flame location relative to the electrodes, and on the sign of the voltage difference applied. Furthermore, at sub-saturation conditions, the current is shown to increase linearly or quadratically with the applied voltage, depending on the flame location. These limiting behaviors exhibited by the reduced model elucidate the features of i-V curves observed experimentally. The reduced model relies on the existence of a thin layer where charges are produced, corresponding to the reaction zone of a flame. Consequently, the analytical model we propose is not limited to the study of premixed flames, and may be applied easily to others configurations, e.g.~nonpremixed counterflow flames.

  11. Mathematical modeling of the radiation-chemical oxidation of U(IV) in HClO4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimirova, M.V.

    1995-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of U(IV) oxidation in 0.5-12 M HClO 4 upon α, γ-radiolysis, based on the proposed scheme of radiation-chemical reactions, has been performed. The rate constants of the U(VI) + HO 2 , U(IV) + HO 2 , U(IV) + ClO 2 , and U(IV) + ClO 2 - reactions have been determined by the comparison of the calculated and experimental kinetic and dose curves and radiation-chemical yields of U(IV) oxidation or U(VI) formation. General equations for uranium (IV) oxidation constants at various HClO 4 concentrations, based on the analysis of the rates of particular radiation-chemical reactions composing oxidation process, have been obtained

  12. Sutherland models for complex reflection groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crampe, N.; Young, C.A.S.

    2008-01-01

    There are known to be integrable Sutherland models associated to every real root system, or, which is almost equivalent, to every real reflection group. Real reflection groups are special cases of complex reflection groups. In this paper we associate certain integrable Sutherland models to the classical family of complex reflection groups. Internal degrees of freedom are introduced, defining dynamical spin chains, and the freezing limit taken to obtain static chains of Haldane-Shastry type. By considering the relation of these models to the usual BC N case, we are led to systems with both real and complex reflection groups as symmetries. We demonstrate their integrability by means of new Dunkl operators, associated to wreath products of dihedral groups

  13. Dynamic Analysis of an Impulsively Controlled Predator-Prey Model with Holling Type IV Functional Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanzhen Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic behavior of a predator-prey model with Holling type IV functional response is investigated with respect to impulsive control strategies. The model is analyzed to obtain the conditions under which the system is locally asymptotically stable and permanent. Existence of a positive periodic solution of the system and the boundedness of the system is also confirmed. Furthermore, numerical analysis is used to discover the influence of impulsive perturbations. The system is found to exhibit rich dynamics such as symmetry-breaking pitchfork bifurcation, chaos, and nonunique dynamics.

  14. Multicriteria decision group model for the selection of suppliers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Hazin Alencar

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Several authors have been studying group decision making over the years, which indicates how relevant it is. This paper presents a multicriteria group decision model based on ELECTRE IV and VIP Analysis methods, to those cases where there is great divergence among the decision makers. This model includes two stages. In the first, the ELECTRE IV method is applied and a collective criteria ranking is obtained. In the second, using criteria ranking, VIP Analysis is applied and the alternatives are selected. To illustrate the model, a numerical application in the context of the selection of suppliers in project management is used. The suppliers that form part of the project team have a crucial role in project management. They are involved in a network of connected activities that can jeopardize the success of the project, if they are not undertaken in an appropriate way. The question tackled is how to select service suppliers for a project on behalf of an enterprise that assists the multiple objectives of the decision-makers.Vários autores têm estudado decisão em grupo nos últimos anos, o que indica a relevância do assunto. Esse artigo apresenta um modelo multicritério de decisão em grupo baseado nos métodos ELECTRE IV e VIP Analysis, adequado aos casos em que se tem uma grande divergência entre os decisores. Esse modelo é composto por dois estágios. No primeiro, o método ELECTRE IV é aplicado e uma ordenação dos critérios é obtida. No próximo estágio, com a ordenação dos critérios, o método VIP Analysis é aplicado e as alternativas são selecionadas. Para ilustrar o modelo, uma aplicação numérica no contexto da seleção de fornecedores em projetos é realizada. Os fornecedores que fazem parte da equipe do projeto têm um papel fundamental no gerenciamento de projetos. Eles estão envolvidos em uma rede de atividades conectadas que, caso não sejam executadas de forma apropriada, podem colocar em risco o sucesso do

  15. Modeling Group Interactions via Open Data Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-30

    data. The state-of-art search engines are designed to help general query-specific search and not suitable for finding disconnected online groups. The...groups, (2) developing innovative mathematical and statistical models and efficient algorithms that leverage existing search engines and employ

  16. Helping General Physical Educators and Adapted Physical Educators Address the Office of Civil Rights Dear Colleague Guidance Letter: Part IV--Sport Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Lauren; Lucas, Mark; Jones, Jeffery; Humphreys, Dan; Cody, Ann; Vaughn, Bev; Storms, Tommie

    2013-01-01

    "Helping General Physical Educators and Adapted Physical Educators Address the Office of Civil Rights Dear Colleague Guidance Letter: Part IV--Sport Groups" provides the the following articles: (1) "Sport Programming Offered by Camp Abilities and the United States Association for Blind Athletes" (Lauren Lieberman and Mark…

  17. Practical routes to (SiH₃)₃P: applications in group IV semiconductor activation and in group III-V molecular synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, Jesse B; Chizmeshya, A V G; Tolle, J; D' Costa, V R; Menendez, J; Kouvetakis, J

    2010-05-21

    The (SiH₃)₃P hydride is introduced as a practical source for n-doping of group IV semiconductors and as a highly-reactive delivery agent of -(SiH₃)₂P functionalities in exploratory synthesis. In contrast to earlier methods, the compound is produced here in high purity quantitative yields via a new single-step method based on reactions of SiH₃Br and (Me₃Sn)₃P, circumventing the need for toxic and unstable starting materials. As an initial demonstration of its utility we synthesized monosubstituted Me₂M-P(SiH₃)₂ (M = Al, Ga, In) derivatives of Me₃M containing the (SiH₃)₂P ligand for the first time, in analogy to the known Me₂M-P(SiMe₃)₂ counterparts. A dimeric structure of Me₂M-P(SiH₃)₂ is proposed on the basis of spectroscopic characterizations and quantum chemical simulations. Next, in the context of materials synthesis, the (SiH₃)₃P compound was used to dope germanium for the first time by building a prototype p(++)Si(100)/i-Ge/n-Ge photodiode structure. The resultant n-type Ge layers contained active carrier concentrations of 3-4 × 10¹⁹ atoms cm⁻³ as determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry and confirmed by SIMS. Strain analysis using high resolution XRD yielded a Si content of 4 × 10²⁰ atoms cm⁻³ in agreement with SIMS and within the range expected for incorporating Si₃P type units into the diamond cubic Ge matrix. Extensive characterizations for structure, morphology and crystallinity indicate that the Si co-dopant plays essentially a passive role and does not compromise the device quality of the host material nor does it fundamentally alter its optical properties.

  18. Further insights on the French WISC-IV factor structure through Bayesian structural equation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golay, Philippe; Reverte, Isabelle; Rossier, Jérôme; Favez, Nicolas; Lecerf, Thierry

    2013-06-01

    The interpretation of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children--Fourth Edition (WISC-IV) is based on a 4-factor model, which is only partially compatible with the mainstream Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) model of intelligence measurement. The structure of cognitive batteries is frequently analyzed via exploratory factor analysis and/or confirmatory factor analysis. With classical confirmatory factor analysis, almost all cross-loadings between latent variables and measures are fixed to zero in order to allow the model to be identified. However, inappropriate zero cross-loadings can contribute to poor model fit, distorted factors, and biased factor correlations; most important, they do not necessarily faithfully reflect theory. To deal with these methodological and theoretical limitations, we used a new statistical approach, Bayesian structural equation modeling (BSEM), among a sample of 249 French-speaking Swiss children (8-12 years). With BSEM, zero-fixed cross-loadings between latent variables and measures are replaced by approximate zeros, based on informative, small-variance priors. Results indicated that a direct hierarchical CHC-based model with 5 factors plus a general intelligence factor better represented the structure of the WISC-IV than did the 4-factor structure and the higher order models. Because a direct hierarchical CHC model was more adequate, it was concluded that the general factor should be considered as a breadth rather than a superordinate factor. Because it was possible for us to estimate the influence of each of the latent variables on the 15 subtest scores, BSEM allowed improvement of the understanding of the structure of intelligence tests and the clinical interpretation of the subtest scores. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  19. Group theory for unified model building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slansky, R.

    1981-01-01

    The results gathered here on simple Lie algebras have been selected with attention to the needs of unified model builders who study Yang-Mills theories based on simple, local-symmetry groups that contain as a subgroup the SUsup(w) 2 x Usup(w) 1 x SUsup(c) 3 symmetry of the standard theory of electromagnetic, weak, and strong interactions. The major topics include, after a brief review of the standard model and its unification into a simple group, the use of Dynkin diagrams to analyze the structure of the group generators and to keep track of the weights (quantum numbers) of the representation vectors; an analysis of the subgroup structure of simple groups, including explicit coordinatizations of the projections in weight space; lists of representations, tensor products and branching rules for a number of simple groups; and other details about groups and their representations that are often helpful for surveying unified models, including vector-coupling coefficient calculations. Tabulations of representations, tensor products, and branching rules for E 6 , SO 10 , SU 6 , F 4 , SO 9 , SO 5 , SO 8 , SO 7 , SU 4 , E 7 , E 8 , SU 8 , SO 14 , SO 18 , SO 22 , and for completeness, SU 3 are included. (These tables may have other applications.) Group-theoretical techniques for analyzing symmetry breaking are described in detail and many examples are reviewed, including explicit parameterizations of mass matrices. (orig.)

  20. Hydrodynamic model research in Waseda group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muroya, Shin

    2010-01-01

    Constructing 'High Energy Material Science' had been proposed by Namiki as the guiding principle for the scientists of the high energy physics group lead by himself in Waseda University when the author started to study multiple particle production in 1980s toward the semi-phenomenological model for the quark gluon plasma (QGP). Their strategy was based on three stages to build an intermediate one between the fundamental theory of QCD and the phenomenological model. The quantum theoretical Langevin equation was taken up as the semi-phenomenological model at the intermediate stage and the Landau hydrodynamic model was chosen as the phenomenological model to focus on the 'phase transition' of QGP. A review is given here over the quantum theoretical Langevin equation formalism developed there and followed by the further progress with the 1+1 dimensional viscous fluid model as well as the hydrodynamic model with cylindrical symmetry. The developments of the baryon fluid model and Hanbury-Brown Twiss effect are also reviewed. After 1995 younger generation physicists came to the group to develop those models further. Activities by Hirano, Nonaka and Morita beyond the past generation's hydrodynamic model are picked up briefly. (S. Funahashi)

  1. Religiosity in Wedhatama by KGPAA Mangkunagara IV: An Education Model A La Javanese Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esti Ismawati

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This research purpose is to describe religious values in Wedhatama by and its relevance to today’s life. The method used is descriptive inferential, by describing religious values in Wedhatama which is in form of Pangkur, Sinom, Pucung,andGambuh, and after that, summarizing it. The analysis results in conclusion that Wedhatama by Mangkunagara IV contains high religious values, which is manifested in a belief that human beings depend on God and God is a source of salvation, so human beings should be close to or surrender deeply to God. Religious person is imagined in Wedhatama as prime being, who loves solitude, tawadu’, always be humble (he is not angry when someone calls him stupid, has less desire, puts his trust in God and sincere, knows the end, learns the essence of desolation, responses well to his wishes, sensitive, kind hearted, and loves to meditate until he finds some divine revelations, and imitates behaviors like in fiqh. This is education model a la Javanese culture, which is still relevance to be done by all people in this world. How to CiteIsmawati, E. (2016. Religiosity in Wedhatama by KGPAA Mangkunagara IV: An Education Model A La Javanese Culture. International Journal of Active Learning, 1(1. 

  2. Statistically Modeling I-V Characteristics of CNT-FET with LASSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dongsheng; Ye, Zuochang; Wang, Yan

    2017-08-01

    With the advent of internet of things (IOT), the need for studying new material and devices for various applications is increasing. Traditionally we build compact models for transistors on the basis of physics. But physical models are expensive and need a very long time to adjust for non-ideal effects. As the vision for the application of many novel devices is not certain or the manufacture process is not mature, deriving generalized accurate physical models for such devices is very strenuous, whereas statistical modeling is becoming a potential method because of its data oriented property and fast implementation. In this paper, one classical statistical regression method, LASSO, is used to model the I-V characteristics of CNT-FET and a pseudo-PMOS inverter simulation based on the trained model is implemented in Cadence. The normalized relative mean square prediction error of the trained model versus experiment sample data and the simulation results show that the model is acceptable for digital circuit static simulation. And such modeling methodology can extend to general devices.

  3. Group Buying Schemes : A Sustainable Business Model?

    OpenAIRE

    Köpp, Sebastian; Mukhachou, Aliaksei; Schwaninger, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Die Autoren gehen der Frage nach, ob "Group Buying Schemes" wie beispielsweise von den Unternehmen Groupon und Dein Deal angeboten, ein nachhaltiges Geschäftsmodell sind. Anhand der Fallstudie Groupon wird mit einem System Dynamics Modell festgestellt, dass das Geschäftsmodell geändert werden muss, wenn die Unternehmung auf Dauer lebensfähig sein soll. The authors examine if group buying schemes are a sustainable business model. By means of the Groupon case study and using a System Dynami...

  4. A model to predict the permeation of type IV hydrogen tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayle, Julien; Perreux, Dominique; Chapelle, David; Thiebaud, Frederic [MaHyTec, Dole (France); Nardin, Philippe [Franche Comte Univ. (France)

    2010-07-01

    In the frame of the certification process of the type IV hydrogen storage tanks MaHyTec aims to manufacture, this innovative SME is developing a numerical model dedicated to the study of permeation issues. Such an approach aims at avoiding complicated, time-consuming and expensive testing. Experimental results obtained under real conditions can moreover be significantly influenced by the scattering of material properties and liner dimensions. From simple testing on small-size flat membranes, the model allows to predict the gas diffusion flow through the whole structure by means of numerous parameters. On every step, theory can be compared with the results obtained from the samples. This document presents a brief review of the mathematical theory describing gas diffusion and the different aspects of the study for better understanding the proposed approach. (orig.)

  5. Affine Poisson Groups and WZW Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ctirad Klimcík

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We give a detailed description of a dynamical system which enjoys a Poisson-Lie symmetry with two non-isomorphic dual groups. The system is obtained by taking the q → ∞ limit of the q-deformed WZW model and the understanding of its symmetry structure results in uncovering an interesting duality of its exchange relations.

  6. Diagrammatic group theory in quark models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canning, G.P.

    1977-05-01

    A simple and systematic diagrammatic method is presented for calculating the numerical factors arising from group theory in quark models: dimensions, casimir invariants, vector coupling coefficients and especially recoupling coefficients. Some coefficients for the coupling of 3 quark objects are listed for SU(n) and SU(2n). (orig.) [de

  7. DSM-IV-defined anxiety disorder symptoms in a middle-childhood-aged group of Malaysian children using the Spence Children's Anxiety Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Atefeh Ahmadi; Mohamed Sharif Mustaffa; Amirmudin Udin; AliAkbar Haghdoost

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pediatric anxiety disorders are the most common mental health disorders in the middle-childhood age group. The purpose of this study is to assess anxiety disorder symptoms, as defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition (DSM-IV), in a large community sample of low socioeconomic level rural children and to investigate some of the psychometric properties (internal consistency, construct and convergent validity and items rated as often or always...

  8. Group IV Materials for High Performance Methane Sensing in Novel Slot Optical Waveguides at 2.883 μm and 3.39 μm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio M. N. PASSARO

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a detailed investigation of novel photonic sensors based on slot waveguides has been carried out. Appropriate alloys of group IV materials, such as germanium (Ge, silicon (Si, carbon (C and tin (Sn, are applied in silicon-on-insulator (SOI technology for homogeneous optical sensing at 2.883 µm and 3.39 μm. Electronic and optical properties of group IV alloys have been investigated. In addition, we have designed novel group IV vertical slot waveguides in order to achieve ultra-high sensitivities, as well as good fabrication tolerances. All these features have been compared with well-known SOI slot waveguides for optical label-free homogeneous sensing at 1.55 µm. In conclusion, theoretical investigation of ring resonators based on these novel slot waveguides has revealed very good results in terms of ultra high sensing performance of methane gas, i.e., limit of detection ~ 3.6×10-5 RIU and wavelength sensitivity > 2×103 nm/RIU.

  9. Standard model group: Survival of the fittest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, H. B.; Brene, N.

    1983-09-01

    The essential content of this paper is related to random dynamics. We speculate that the world seen through a sub-Planck-scale microscope has a lattice structure and that the dynamics on this lattice is almost completely random, except for the requirement that the random (plaquette) action is invariant under some "world (gauge) group". We see that the randomness may lead to spontaneous symmetry breakdown in the vacuum (spontaneous collapse) without explicit appeal to any scalar field associated with the usual Higgs mechanism. We further argue that the subgroup which survives as the end product of a possible chain of collapses is likely to have certain properties; the most important is that it has a topologically connected center. The standard group, i.e. the group of the gauge theory which combines the Salam-Weinberg model with QCD, has this property.

  10. Standard model group: survival of the fittest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, H.B. (Niels Bohr Inst., Copenhagen (Denmark); Nordisk Inst. for Teoretisk Atomfysik, Copenhagen (Denmark)); Brene, N. (Niels Bohr Inst., Copenhagen (Denmark))

    1983-09-19

    The essential content of this paper is related to random dynamics. We speculate that the world seen through a sub-Planck-scale microscope has a lattice structure and that the dynamics on this lattice is almost completely random, except for the requirement that the random (plaquette) action is invariant under some ''world (gauge) group''. We see that the randomness may lead to spontaneous symmetry breakdown in the vacuum (spontaneous collapse) without explicit appeal to any scalar field associated with the usual Higgs mechanism. We further argue that the subgroup which survives as the end product of a possible chain of collapse is likely to have certain properties; the most important is that it has a topologically connected center. The standard group, i.e. the group of the gauge theory which combines the Salam-Weinberg model with QCD, has this property.

  11. Standard model group: survival of the fittest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, H.B.; Brene, N.

    1983-01-01

    Th essential content of this paper is related to random dynamics. We speculate that the world seen through a sub-Planck-scale microscope has a lattice structure and that the dynamics on this lattice is almost completely random, except for the requirement that the random (plaquette) action is invariant under some ''world (gauge) group''. We see that the randomness may lead to spontaneous symmetry breakdown in the vacuum (spontaneous collapse) without explicit appeal to any scalar field associated with the usual Higgs mechanism. We further argue that the subgroup which survives as the end product of a possible chain of collapse is likely to have certain properties; the most important is that it has a topologically connected center. The standard group, i.e. the group of the gauge theory which combines the Salam-Weinberg model with QCD, has this property. (orig.)

  12. Standard model group survival of the fittest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, H.B.; Brene, N.

    1983-02-01

    The essential content of this note is related to random dynamics. The authors speculate that the world seen through a sub Planck scale microscope has a lattice structure and that the dynamics on this lattice is almost completely random, except for the requirement that the random (plaquette) action is invariant under some ''world (gauge) group''. It is seen that the randomness may lead to spontaneous symmetry breakdown in the vacuum (spontaneous collapse) without explicit appeal to any scalar field associated with the usual Higgs mechanism. It is further argued that the subgroup which survives as the end product of a possible chain of collapses is likely to have certain properties; the most important is that it has a topologically connected center. The standard group, i.e. the group of the gauge theory which combines the Salam-Weinberg model with QCD, has this property. (Auth.)

  13. Surface Engineering of PAMAM-SDB Chelating Resin with Diglycolamic Acid (DGA) Functional Group for Efficient Sorption of U(VI) and Th(IV) from Aqueous Medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilaiyaraja, P.; Venkatraman, B., E-mail: chemila07@gmail.com [Radiological Safety Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Deb, A.K. Singha [Chemical Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Ponraju, D. [Safety Engineering Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Ali, Sk. Musharaf [Chemical Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • A new DGA-PAMAM-SDB chelating resin has been synthesized for actinide sorption. • Maximum sorption capacities of resin are 682 and 544.2 mg g{sup −1}for U(VI) and Th(IV). • DGA-PAMAM-SDB chelating resin could be regenerated and reused. • DFT calculation of actinides interaction with resin corroborates the experimental. • Resin is effective for sorption of actinides from both aqueous and HNO{sub 3} medium. - Abstract: A novel chelating resin obtained via growth of PAMAM dendron on surface of styrene divinyl benzene resin beads, followed by diglycolamic acid functionalization of the dendrimer terminal. Batch experiments were conducted to study the effects of pH, nitric acid concentration, amount of adsorbent, shaking time, initial metal ion concentration and temperature on U(VI) and Th(IV) adsorption efficiency. Diglycolamic acid terminated PAMAM dendrimer functionalized styrene divinylbenzene chelating resin (DGA-PAMAM-SDB) is found to be an efficient candidate for the removal of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions from aqueous (pH > 4) and nitric acid media (> 3 M). The sorption equilibrium could be reached within 60 min, and the experimental data fits with pseudo-second-order model. Langmuir sorption isotherm model correlates well with sorption equilibrium data. The maximum U(VI) and Th(IV) sorption capacity onto DGA-PAMAMG{sub 5}-SDB was estimated to be about 682 and 544.2 mg g{sup −1} respectively at 25 °C. The interaction of actinides and chelating resin is reversible and hence, the resin can be regenerated and reused. DFT calculation on the interaction of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions with chelating resin validates the experimental findings.

  14. Group Chaos Theory: A Metaphor and Model for Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Edil Torres; Wilbur, Michael; Frank-Saraceni, James; Roberts-Wilbur, Janice; Phan, Loan T.; Garrett, Michael T.

    2005-01-01

    Group phenomena and interactions are described through the use of the chaos theory constructs and characteristics of sensitive dependence on initial conditions, phase space, turbulence, emergence, self-organization, dissipation, iteration, bifurcation, and attractors and fractals. These constructs and theoretical tenets are presented as applicable…

  15. Solution chemistry of Mo(III) and Mo(IV): Thermodynamic foundation for modeling localized corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Peiming; Wilson, Leslie L.; Wesolowski, David J.; Rosenqvist, Joergen; Anderko, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the behavior of molybdenum dissolution products in systems that approximate localized corrosion environments, solubility of Mo(III) in equilibrium with solid MoO 2 has been determined at 80 deg. C as a function of solution acidity, chloride concentration and partial pressure of hydrogen. The measurements indicate a strong increase in solubility with acidity and chloride concentration and a weak effect of hydrogen partial pressure. The obtained results have been combined with literature data for systems containing Mo(III), Mo(IV), and Mo(VI) in solutions to develop a comprehensive thermodynamic model of aqueous molybdenum chemistry. The model is based on a previously developed framework for simulating the properties of electrolyte systems ranging from infinite dilution to solid saturation or fused salt limit. To reproduce the measurements, the model assumes the presence of a chloride complex of Mo(III) (i.e., MoCl 2+ ) and hydrolyzed species (MoOH 2+ , Mo(OH) 2 + , and Mo(OH) 3 0 ) in addition to the Mo 3+ ion. The model generally reproduces the experimental data within experimental scattering and provides a tool for predicting the phase behavior and speciation in complex, concentrated aqueous solutions. Thus, it provides a foundation for simulating the behavior of molybdenum species in localized corrosion environments.

  16. A general modeling method for I-V characteristics of geometrically and electrically configured photovoltaic arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guangyu; Nguang, Sing Kiong; Partridge, Ashton

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A novel and general method is proposed for modeling PV arrays or modules. → A robust algorithm is used for the first time to improve the convergence to solution. → Auxiliary functions in other general methods are not compulsory in our method. → It is novel that geometric configuration is also incorporated. → A case study is performed to show the approach's advantages and unique features. - Abstract: A general method for modeling typical photovoltaic (PV) arrays and modules is proposed to find the exact current and voltage relationship of PV arrays or modules of geometrically and electrically different configurations. Nonlinear characteristic equations of electrical devices in solar array or module systems are numerically constructed without adding any virtual electrical components. Then, a robust damped Newton method is used to find exact I-V relationship of these general nonlinear equations, where the convergence is guaranteed. The model can deal with different mismatch effects such as different configurations of bypass diodes, and partial shading. Geometry coordinates of PV components are also considered to facilitate the modeling of the actual physical configuration. Simulation of a PV array with 48 modules, partially shaded by a concrete structure, is performed to verify the effectiveness and advantages of the proposed method.

  17. On renormalization group flow in matrix model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, H.B.

    1992-10-01

    The renormalization group flow recently found by Brezin and Zinn-Justin by integrating out redundant entries of the (N+1)x(N+1) Hermitian random matrix is studied. By introducing explicitly the RG flow parameter, and adding suitable counter terms to the matrix potential of the one matrix model, we deduce some interesting properties of the RG trajectories. In particular, the string equation for the general massive model interpolating between the UV and IR fixed points turns out to be a consequence of RG flow. An ambiguity in the UV region of the RG trajectory is remarked to be related to the large order behaviour of the one matrix model. (author). 7 refs

  18. Synthesis and crystal structure of Fe[(Te1.5Se0.5)O5]Cl, the first iron compound with selenate(IV) and tellurate(IV) groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhrorov, Akhmad Yu; Kuznetsova, Elena S.; Aksenov, Sergey M.; Berdonosov, Peter S.; Kuznetsov, Alexey N.; Dolgikh, Valery A.

    2017-12-01

    During the search for selenium analogues of FeTe2O5Cl, the new iron (III) tellurate(IV) selenate(IV) chloride with the composition Fe[(Te1.5Se0.5)O5]Cl was synthesized by chemical vapor transport (CVT) reaction and characterized by TGA-, EDX-,SCXRD-analysis, as well as IR and Raman spectroscopy. It was found that Fe[(Te1.5Se0.5)O5]Cl crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P21/c with unitcell parameters a = 5.183(3) Å, b = 15.521(9) Å, c = 7.128(5) Å and β = 107.16(1)°. The crystal structure of Fe[(Te1.5Se0.5)O5]Cl represents a new structure type and contains electroneutral heteropolyhedral layers formed by dimers of the [FeO5Cl]8- octahedra, linked via common O-O edges, and mixed [Te3SeO10]4- tetramers. Adjacent layers are stacked along the b axis and linked by weak residual bonds. The new compound is stable up to 420 °C. DFT calculations predict Fe[(Te1.5Se0.5)O5]Cl to be a wide-gap semiconductor with the band gap of ca. 2.7 eV.

  19. Computational social dynamic modeling of group recruitment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, Nina M.; Lee, Marinna; Pickett, Marc; Turnley, Jessica Glicken (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Smrcka, Julianne D. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Ko, Teresa H.; Moy, Timothy David (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Wu, Benjamin C.

    2004-01-01

    The Seldon software toolkit combines concepts from agent-based modeling and social science to create a computationally social dynamic model for group recruitment. The underlying recruitment model is based on a unique three-level hybrid agent-based architecture that contains simple agents (level one), abstract agents (level two), and cognitive agents (level three). This uniqueness of this architecture begins with abstract agents that permit the model to include social concepts (gang) or institutional concepts (school) into a typical software simulation environment. The future addition of cognitive agents to the recruitment model will provide a unique entity that does not exist in any agent-based modeling toolkits to date. We use social networks to provide an integrated mesh within and between the different levels. This Java based toolkit is used to analyze different social concepts based on initialization input from the user. The input alters a set of parameters used to influence the values associated with the simple agents, abstract agents, and the interactions (simple agent-simple agent or simple agent-abstract agent) between these entities. The results of phase-1 Seldon toolkit provide insight into how certain social concepts apply to different scenario development for inner city gang recruitment.

  20. Adriamycin continuous i.v. infusion for the treatment of childhood hepatic malignancies, toxicity and efficacy: a pilot study childrens cancer study group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega, J.A.; Feusner, J.; Reaman, G.; Woods, W.

    1986-01-01

    In an effort to increase the number of patients with hepatoblastoma and hepatocellular carcinoma receiving the benefits of complete surgical excision, a pilot study was undertaken at a few Childrens Cancer Study Group institutions. For this purpose, repeated courses of adriamycin administered as a continuous I.V. infusion either singly or in combination with c-platinum and radiation therapy treatment was selected. The patient population consisted of a total of eleven children with primary hepatic malignancies: six children had hepatoblastoma; all six were under two years of age at diagnosis. Five patients with hepatocellular carcinoma were entered to the study. Of the eleven patients, four had previously received adriamycin as an I.V. bolus. A table summarizes the patient's characteristics, the adriamycin dose they received and their responses to therapy

  1. An Application of the PMI Model at the Project Level Evaluation of ESEA Title IV-C Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBeath, Marcia

    All of the papers presented as part of a symposium concerned the application of the Planning, Monitoring, and Implementation Model (PMI) to the evaluation of the District of Columbia Public Schools' programs supported by the Elementary Secondary Education Act (ESEA) Title IV-C. PMI was developed to provide a model for systematic evaluation of…

  2. Weak instruments and the first stage F-statistic in IV models with a nonscalar error covariance structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bun, M.; de Haan, M.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the usefulness of the first stage F-statistic for detecting weak instruments in the IV model with a nonscalar error covariance structure. More in particular, we question the validity of the rule of thumb of a first stage F-statistic of 10 or higher for models with correlated errors

  3. Evaluating WAIS-IV structure through a different psychometric lens: structural causal model discovery as an alternative to confirmatory factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Marjolein J A M; Claassen, Tom; Suwartono, Christiany; van der Veld, William M; van der Heijden, Paul T; Hendriks, Marc P H

    Since the publication of the WAIS-IV in the U.S. in 2008, efforts have been made to explore the structural validity by applying factor analysis to various samples. This study aims to achieve a more fine-grained understanding of the structure of the Dutch language version of the WAIS-IV (WAIS-IV-NL) by applying an alternative analysis based on causal modeling in addition to confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). The Bayesian Constraint-based Causal Discovery (BCCD) algorithm learns underlying network structures directly from data and assesses more complex structures than is possible with factor analysis. WAIS-IV-NL profiles of two clinical samples of 202 patients (i.e. patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and a mixed psychiatric outpatient group) were analyzed and contrasted with a matched control group (N = 202) selected from the Dutch standardization sample of the WAIS-IV-NL to investigate internal structure by means of CFA and BCCD. With CFA, the four-factor structure as proposed by Wechsler demonstrates acceptable fit in all three subsamples. However, BCCD revealed three consistent clusters (verbal comprehension, visual processing, and processing speed) in all three subsamples. The combination of Arithmetic and Digit Span as a coherent working memory factor could not be verified, and Matrix Reasoning appeared to be isolated. With BCCD, some discrepancies from the proposed four-factor structure are exemplified. Furthermore, these results fit CHC theory of intelligence more clearly. Consistent clustering patterns indicate these results are robust. The structural causal discovery approach may be helpful in better interpreting existing tests, the development of new tests, and aid in diagnostic instruments.

  4. Modeling by GASP-IV simulation of high-level nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurstedt, H.A. Jr.; DePorter, E.L.; Turek, J.L.; Funk, S.K.; Rasbach, C.E.

    1981-01-01

    High-level nuclear waste generated by defense-oriented and commercial nuclear energy activities are to be stored ultimately in underground repositories. Research continues on the waste-form and waste-form processing. DOE managers must coordinate the results of this research, the capacities and availability times of the permanent geologic storage repositories, and the capacities and availability times of interim storage facilities (pending availability of permanent repositories). Comprehensive and active DOE program-management information systems contain predicted generation of nuclear wastes from defense and commercial activities; milestones on research on waste-forms; and milestones on research and development, design, acquisition, and construction of facilities and repositories. A GASP IV simulation model is presented which interfaces all of these data. The model accepts alternate management decisions; relates all critical milestones, all research and development data, and the generation of waste nuclear materials; simulates the passage of time; then, predicts the impact of those alternate decisions on the availability of storage capacity for waste nuclear materials. 3 references, 3 figures

  5. Validation of the Monte Carlo criticality program KENO IV and the Hansen-Roach sixteen-energy-group-cross sections for high-assay uranium systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handley, G.R.; Masters, L.C.; Stachowiak, R.V.

    1981-01-01

    Validation of the Monte Carlo criticality code, KENO IV, and the Hansen-Roach sixteen-energy-group cross sections was accomplished by calculating the effective neutron multiplication constant, k/sub eff/, of 29 experimentally critical assemblies which had uranium enrichments of 92.6% or higher in the uranium-235 isotope. The experiments were chosen so that a large variety of geometries and of neutron energy spectra were covered. Problems, calculating the k/sub eff/ of systems with high-uranium-concentration uranyl nitrate solution that were minimally reflected or unreflected, resulted in the separate examination of five cases

  6. Soft Magnetic Properties of Nanocrystalline Fe-M-(B and/or O)(M=Group IV A, V A Elements) Alloy Films

    OpenAIRE

    Hayakawa, Y.; Makino, A.; Inoue, A.; Masumoto, T.

    1996-01-01

    In Fe-M-(B and/or O)(M=group IV A, V A elements) alloy films, nanocrystalline bcc phase are formed by annealing the amorphous single phase for Fe-M-B films, whereas the bcc nanocrystals are already formed in an as-deposited state for Fe-M-O or Fe-M-B-O) films. Among Fe-M-B films with various M elements, Fe-(Zr, Hf, Nb, Ta)-B alloy films exhibit high saturation magnetization (Is) above 1.4 T and high relative permeability (|μ|) above 1000 at 1MHz. The highest |μ| of 3460 at 1MHz is obtained fo...

  7. First principles study of electronic and structural properties of single walled zigzag boron nitride nanotubes doped with the elements of group IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahari, Ali; jalalinejad, Amir; Bagheri, Mosahhar; Amiri, Masoud

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, structural and electronic properties and stability of (10, 0) born nitride nanotube (BNNT) are considered within density functional theory by doping group IV elements of the periodic table. The HOMO-LUMO gap has been strongly modified and treated a dual manner by choosing B or N sites for dopant atoms. Formation energy calculation shows that B site doping is more stable than N site doping. Results also show that all dopants turn the pristine BNNT into a p-type semiconductor except for carbon-doped BNNT at B site.

  8. RAGBEEF: a FORTRAN IV implementation of a time-dependent model for radionuclide contamination of beef

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pleasant, J C; McDowell-Boyer, L M; Killough, G G

    1982-06-01

    RAGBEEF is a FORTRAN IV program that calculates radionuclide concentrations in beef as a result of ingestion of contaminated feeds, pasture, and pasture soil by beef cattle. The model implemented by RAGBEEF is dynamic in nature, allowing the user to consider age- and season-dependent aspects of beef cattle management in estimating concentrations in beef. It serves as an auxiliary code to RAGTIME, previously documented by the authors, which calculates radionuclide concentrations in agricultural crops in a dynamic manner, but evaluates concentrations in beef for steady-state conditions only. The time-dependent concentrations in feeds, pasture, and pasture soil generated by RAGTIME are used as input to the RAGBEEF code. RAGBEEF, as presently implemented, calculates radionuclide concentrations in the muscle of age-based cohorts in a beef cattle herd. Concentrations in the milk of lactating cows are also calculated, but are assumed age-dependent as in RAGTIME. Radionuclide concentrations in beef and milk are described in RAGBEEF by a system of ordinary linear differential equations in which the transfer rate of radioactivity between compartments is proportional to the inventory of radioactivity in the source compartment. This system is solved by use of the GEAR package for solution of systems of ordinary differential equations. The accuracy of this solution is monitored at various check points by comparison with explicit solutions of Bateman-type equations. This report describes the age- and season-dependent considerations making up the RAGBEEF model, as well as presenting the equations which describe the model and a documentation of the associated computer code. Listings of the RAGBEEF and updated RAGTIME codes are provided in appendices, as are the results of a sample run of RAGBEEF and a description of recent modifications to RAGTIME.

  9. RAGBEEF: a FORTRAN IV implementation of a time-dependent model for radionuclide contamination of beef

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pleasant, J.C.; McDowell-Boyer, L.M; Killough, G.G.

    1982-06-01

    RAGBEEF is a FORTRAN IV program that calculates radionuclide concentrations in beef as a result of ingestion of contaminated feeds, pasture, and pasture soil by beef cattle. The model implemented by RAGBEEF is dynamic in nature, allowing the user to consider age- and season-dependent aspects of beef cattle management in estimating concentrations in beef. It serves as an auxiliary code to RAGTIME, previously documented by the authors, which calculates radionuclide concentrations in agricultural crops in a dynamic manner, but evaluates concentrations in beef for steady-state conditions only. The time-dependent concentrations in feeds, pasture, and pasture soil generated by RAGTIME are used as input to the RAGBEEF code. RAGBEEF, as presently implemented, calculates radionuclide concentrations in the muscle of age-based cohorts in a beef cattle herd. Concentrations in the milk of lactating cows are also calculated, but are assumed age-dependent as in RAGTIME. Radionuclide concentrations in beef and milk are described in RAGBEEF by a system of ordinary linear differential equations in which the transfer rate of radioactivity between compartments is proportional to the inventory of radioactivity in the source compartment. This system is solved by use of the GEAR package for solution of systems of ordinary differential equations. The accuracy of this solution is monitored at various check points by comparison with explicit solutions of Bateman-type equations. This report describes the age- and season-dependent considerations making up the RAGBEEF model, as well as presenting the equations which describe the model and a documentation of the associated computer code. Listings of the RAGBEEF and updated RAGTIME codes are provided in appendices, as are the results of a sample run of RAGBEEF and a description of recent modifications to RAGTIME

  10. PUBG; purex solvent extraction process model. [IBM3033; CDC CYBER175; FORTRAN IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geldard, J.F.; Beyerlein, A.L.

    PUBG is a chemical model of the Purex solvent extraction system, by which plutonium and uranium are recovered from spent nuclear fuel rods. The system comprises a number of mixer-settler banks. This discrete stage structure is the basis of the algorithms used in PUBG. The stages are connected to provide for countercurrent flow of the aqueous and organic phases. PUBG uses the common convention that has the aqueous phase enter at the lowest numbered stage and exit at the highest one; the organic phase flows oppositely. The volumes of the mixers are smaller than those of the settlers. The mixers generate a fine dispersion of one phase in the other. The high interfacial area is intended to provide for rapid mass transfer of the plutonium and uranium from one phase to the other. The separation of this dispersion back into the two phases occurs in the settlers. The species considered by PUBG are Hydrogen (1+), Plutonium (4+), Uranyl Oxide (2+), Plutonium (3+), Nitrate Anion, and reductant in the aqueous phase and Hydrogen (1+), Uranyl Oxide (2+), Plutonium (4+), and TBP (tri-n-butylphosphate) in the organic phase. The reductant used in the Purex process is either Uranium (4+) or HAN (hydroxylamine nitrate).IBM3033;CDC CYBER175; FORTRAN IV; OS/MVS or OS/MVT (IBM3033), NOS 1.3 (CDC CYBER175); The IBM3033 version requires 150K bytes of memory for execution; 62,000 (octal) words are required by the CDC CYBER175 version..

  11. "DSM IV," "DSM-5," and the Five-Factor Model: the Diagnosis of Personality Disorder with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, William R.; Steptoe, Lesley; McVicker, Ronnie; Haut, Fabian; Robertson, Colette

    2018-01-01

    In "DSM-5" there has been a move to dimensional personality disorder (PD) diagnosis, incorporating personality theory in the form of the five-factor model (FFM). It proposes an alternative assessment system based on diagnostic indicators and the FFM, while retaining "DSM-IV" categorical criteria. Four individuals with…

  12. A novel basolateral type IV secretion model for the CagA oncoprotein of Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silja Wessler

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Intercellular junctions are crucial structural elements for the formation and maintenance of epithelial barrier functions to control homeostasis or protect against intruding pathogens in humans. Alterations in these complexes represent key events in the development and progression of numerous cancers as well as multiple infectious diseases. Many bacterial pathogens harbor type IV secretion systems (T4SSs, which translocate virulence factors into host cells to hijack cellular processes. The pathology of the gastric pathogen and type-I carcinogen Helicobacter pylori strongly depends on a T4SS encoded by the cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI. This T4SS forms a needle-like pilus and its activity is accomplished by the pilus-associated factors CagL, CagI and CagY which target the host integrin-β1 receptor followed by injection of the CagA oncoprotein into non-polarized AGS gastric epithelial cells. The finding of a T4SS receptor, however, suggested the presence of a sophisticated control mechanism for the injection of CagA. In fact, integrins constitute a group of basolateral receptors, which are normally absent at apical surfaces of the polarized epithelium in vivo. Our new results demonstrate that T4SS-pilus formation during H. pylori infection of polarized epithelial cells occurs preferentially at basolateral sites, and not at apical membranes (Tegtmeyer et al., 2017. We propose a stepwise process how H. pylori interacts with components of intercellular tight junctions (TJs and adherens junctions (AJs, followed by contacting integrin-based focal adhesions to disrupt and transform the epithelial cell layer in the human stomach. The possible impact of this novel signaling cascade on pathogenesis during infection is reviewed.

  13. Mutual passivation of group IV donors and isovalent nitrogen in diluted GaN{sub x}As{sub 1-x} alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, K.M.; Wu, J.; Walukiewicz, W.; Shan, W.; Beeman, J.; Mars, D.E.; Chamberlin, D.R.; Scarpulla, M.A.; Dubon, O.D.; Ridgway, M.C.; Geisz, J.F.

    2003-07-23

    We demonstrate the mutual passivation of electrically active group IV donors and isovalent N atoms in the GaN{sub x}As{sub 1-x} alloy system. This phenomenon occurs through the formation of a donor-nitrogen bond in the nearest neighbor IV{sub Ga}-N{sub As} pairs. In Si doped GaInN{sub 0.017}As{sub 0.983} the electron concentration starts to decrease rapidly at an annealing temperature of 700 C from {approx} 3 x 10{sup 19}cm{sup -3} in the as-grown state to less than 10{sup 16}cm{sup -3} after an annealing at 900 C for 10 s. At the same time annealing of this sample at 950 C increases the gap by about 35 meV, corresponding to a reduction of the concentration of the active N atoms by an amount very close to the total Si concentration. We also show that the formation of Si{sub Ga}-N{sub As} pairs is controlled by the diffusion of Si via Ga vacancies to the nearest N{sub As} site. The general nature of this mutual passivation effect is confirmed by our study of Ge doped GaN{sub x}As{sub 1-x} layers formed by N and Ge co-implantation in GaAs followed by pulsed laser melting.

  14. Spin- and valley-dependent electrical conductivity of ferromagnetic group-IV 2D sheets in the topological insulator phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoi, Bui Dinh; Yarmohammadi, Mohsen; Mirabbaszadeh, Kavoos; Habibiyan, Hamidreza

    2018-03-01

    In this work, based on the Kubo-Greenwood formalism and the k . p Hamiltonian model, the impact of Rashba spin-orbit coupling on electronic band structure and electrical conductivity of spin-up and spin-down subbands in counterparts of graphene, including silicene, stanene, and germanene nanosheets has been studied. When Rashba coupling is considered, the effective mass of Dirac fermions decreases significantly and no significant change is caused by this coupling for the subband gaps. All these nanosheets are found to be in topological insulator quantum phase at low staggered on-site potentials due to the applied perpendicular external electric field. We point out that the electrical conductivity of germanene increases gradually with Rashab coupling, while silicene and stanene have some fluctuations due to their smaller Fermi velocity. Furthermore, some critical temperatures with the same electrical conductivity values for jumping to the higher energy levels are observed at various Rashba coupling strengths. For all structures, a broad peak appears at low temperatures in electrical conductivity curves corresponding to the large entropy of systems when the thermal energy reaches to the difference between the energy states. Finally, we have reported that silicene has the larger has the larger electrical conductivity than two others.

  15. Geographic structure evidenced in the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium pacificum Litaker (A. catenella - group IV (Whedon & Kofoid) Balech) along Japanese and Chinese coastal waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genovesi, Benjamin; Berrebi, Patrick; Nagai, Satoshi; Reynaud, Nathalie; Wang, Jinhui; Masseret, Estelle

    2015-09-15

    The intra-specific diversity and genetic structure within the Alexandrium pacificum Litaker (A. catenella - Group IV) populations along the Temperate Asian coasts, were studied among individuals isolated from Japan to China. The UPGMA dendrogram and FCA revealed the existence of 3 clusters. Assignment analysis suggested the occurrence of gene flows between the Japanese Pacific coast (cluster-1) and the Chinese Zhejiang coast (cluster-2). Human transportations are suspected to explain the lack of genetic difference between several pairs of distant Japanese samples, hardly explained by a natural dispersal mechanism. The genetic isolation of the population established in the Sea of Japan (cluster-3) suggested the existence of a strong ecological and geographical barrier. Along the Pacific coasts, the South-North current allows limited exchanges between Chinese and Japanese populations. The relationships between Temperate Asian and Mediterranean individuals suggested different scenario of large-scale dispersal mechanisms. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Neptunium (IV) oxalate solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luerkens, D.W.

    1983-07-01

    The equilibrium solubility of neptunium (IV) oxalate in nitric/oxalic acid solutions was determined at 22 0 C, 45 0 C, and 60 0 C. The concentrations of nitric/oxalic acid solutions represented a wide range of free oxalate ion concentration. A mathematical solubility model was developed which is based on the formation of the known complexes of neptunium (IV) oxalate. the solubility model uses a simplified concentration parameter which is proportional to the free oxalate ion concentration. The solubility model can be used to estimate the equilibrium solubility of neptunium (IV) oxalate over a wide range of oxalic and nitric acid concentrations at each temperature

  17. Modelling group decision simulation through argumentation

    OpenAIRE

    Marreiros, Goreti; Novais, Paulo; Machado, José; Ramos, Carlos; Neves, José

    2007-01-01

    Group decision making plays an important role in today’s organisations. The impact of decision making is so high and complex, that rarely the decision making process is made individually. In Group Decision Argumentation, there is a set of participants, with different profiles and expertise levels, that exchange ideas or engage in a process of argumentation and counter-argumentation, negotiate, cooperate, collaborate or even discuss techniques and/or methodologies for problem solving. In this ...

  18. Budget model can aid group practice planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, A D

    1991-12-01

    A medical practice can enhance its planning by developing a budgetary model to test effects of planning assumptions on its profitability and cash requirements. A model focusing on patient visits, payment mix, patient mix, and fee and payment schedules can help assess effects of proposed decisions. A planning model is not a substitute for planning but should complement a plan that includes mission, goals, values, strategic issues, and different outcomes.

  19. Synthesis, spectral, DFT modeling, cytotoxicity and microbial studies of novel Zr(IV), Ce(IV) and U(VI) piroxicam complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shwiniy, Walaa H.; Zordok, Wael A.

    2018-06-01

    The Zr(IV), Ce(IV) and U(VI) piroxicam anti-inflammatory drug complexes were prepared and characterized using elemental analyses, conductance, IR, UV-Vis, magnetic moment, IHNMR and thermal analysis. The ratio of metal: Pir is found to be 1:2 in all complexes estimated by using molar ratio method. The conductance data reveal that Zr(IV) and U(VI) chelates are non-electrolytes except Ce(IV) complex is electrolyte. Infrared spectroscopic confirm that the Pir behaves as a bidentate ligand co-ordinated to the metal ions via the oxygen and nitrogen atoms of ν(Cdbnd O)carbonyl and ν(Cdbnd N)pyridyl, respectively. The kinetic parameters of thermogravimetric and its differential, such as activation energy, entropy of activation, enthalpy of activation, and Gibbs free energy evaluated using Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzger equations for Pir and complexes. The geometry of the piroxicam drug in the Free State differs significantly from that in the metal complex. In the time of metal ion-drug bond formation the drug switches-on from the closed structure (equilibrium geometry) to the open one. The antimicrobial tests were assessed towards some types of bacteria and fungi. The in vitro cell cytotoxicity of the complexes in comparison with Pir against colon carcinoma (HCT-116) cell line was measured. Optimized geometrical structure of piroxicam ligand by using DFT calculations.

  20. A food chain model with impulsive perturbations and Holling IV functional response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shuwen; Wang Fengyan; Chen Lansun

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate a three trophic level food chain system with Holling IV functional responses and periodic constant impulsive perturbations of top predator. Conditions for extinction of predator are given. By using the Floquet theory of impulsive equation and small amplitude perturbation skills, we consider the local stability of predator eradication periodic solution. Further, influences of the impulsive perturbation on the inherent oscillation are studied numerically, which shows the rich dynamics in the positive octant

  1. Group Modeling in Social Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankov, Slavomir; Glavinic, Vlado; Krpan, Divna

    2012-01-01

    Students' collaboration while learning could provide better learning environments. Collaboration assumes social interactions which occur in student groups. Social theories emphasize positive influence of such interactions on learning. In order to create an appropriate learning environment that enables social interactions, it is important to…

  2. Beyond the Standard Model: Working group report

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Right-handed neutrino production in hot dense plasmas and constraints on the ... We thank all the participants of this Working Group for their all-round cooperation. The work of AR has been supported by grants from the Department of Science ...

  3. Group-IV midinfrared plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagioni, Paolo; Frigerio, Jacopo; Samarelli, Antonio; Gallacher, Kevin; Baldassarre, Leonetta; Sakat, Emilie; Calandrini, Eugenio; Millar, Ross W.; Giliberti, Valeria; Isella, Giovanni; Paul, Douglas J.; Ortolani, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The use of heavily doped semiconductors to achieve plasma frequencies in the mid-IR has been recently proposed as a promising way to obtain high-quality and tunable plasmonic materials. We introduce a plasmonic platform based on epitaxial n-type Ge grown on standard Si wafers by means of low-energy plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Due to the large carrier concentration achieved with P dopants and to the compatibility with the existing CMOS technology, SiGe plasmonics hold promises for mid-IR applications in optoelectronics, IR detection, sensing, and light harvesting. As a representative example, we show simulations of mid-IR plasmonic waveguides based on the experimentally retrieved dielectric constants of the grown materials.

  4. A zebrafish model for Waardenburg syndrome type IV reveals diverse roles for Sox10 in the otic vesicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, Kirsten; Abbas, Leila; Spencer, Joanne; Brannon, Claire; Mowbray, Catriona; Nikaido, Masataka; Kelsh, Robert N; Whitfield, Tanya T

    2009-01-01

    In humans, mutations in the SOX10 gene are a cause of the auditory-pigmentary disorder Waardenburg syndrome type IV (WS4) and related variants. SOX10 encodes an Sry-related HMG box protein essential for the development of the neural crest; deafness in WS4 and other Waardenburg syndromes is usually attributed to loss of neural-crest-derived melanocytes in the stria vascularis of the cochlea. However, SOX10 is strongly expressed in the developing otic vesicle and so direct roles for SOX10 in the otic epithelium might also be important. Here, we examine the otic phenotype of zebrafish sox10 mutants, a model for WS4. As a cochlea is not present in the fish ear, the severe otic phenotype in these mutants cannot be attributed to effects on this tissue. In zebrafish sox10 mutants, we see abnormalities in all otic placodal derivatives. Gene expression studies indicate deregulated expression of several otic genes, including fgf8, in sox10 mutants. Using a combination of mutant and morphant data, we show that the three sox genes belonging to group E (sox9a, sox9b and sox10) provide a link between otic induction pathways and subsequent otic patterning: they act redundantly to maintain sox10 expression throughout otic tissue and to restrict fgf8 expression to anterior macula regions. Single-cell labelling experiments indicate a small and transient neural crest contribution to the zebrafish ear during normal development, but this is unlikely to account for the strong defects seen in the sox10 mutant. We discuss the implication that the deafness in WS4 patients with SOX10 mutations might reflect a haploinsufficiency for SOX10 in the otic epithelium, resulting in patterning and functional abnormalities in the inner ear.

  5. The three year course of alcohol use disorders in the general population: DSM-IV, ICD-10 and the Craving Withdrawal Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruijn, Carla; van den Brink, Wim; de Graaf, Ron; Vollebergh, Wilma A. M.

    2006-01-01

    AIMS: To determine the course of alcohol use disorders (AUD) in a prospective general population study using three different classification systems: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual version IV (DSM-IV), International Classification of Diseases version 10 (ICD-10) and the craving withdrawal model

  6. Recursive renormalization group theory based subgrid modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, YE

    1991-01-01

    Advancing the knowledge and understanding of turbulence theory is addressed. Specific problems to be addressed will include studies of subgrid models to understand the effects of unresolved small scale dynamics on the large scale motion which, if successful, might substantially reduce the number of degrees of freedom that need to be computed in turbulence simulation.

  7. Asteroids IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Patrick; DeMeo, Francesca E.; Bottke, William F.

    Asteroids are fascinating worlds. Considered the building blocks of our planets, many of the authors of this book have devoted their scientific careers to exploring them with the tools of our trade: ground- and spacebased observations, in situ space missions, and studies that run the gamut from theoretical modeling efforts to laboratory work. Like fossils for paleontologists, or DNA for geneticists, they allow us to construct a veritable time machine and provide us with tantalizing glimpses of the earliest nature of our solar system. By investigating them, we can probe what our home system was like before life or even the planets existed. The origin and evolution of life on our planet is also intertwined with asteroids in a different way. It is believed that impacts on the primordial Earth may have delivered the basic components for life, with biology favoring attributes that could more easily survive the aftermath of such energetic events. In this fashion, asteroids may have banished many probable avenues for life to relative obscurity. Similarly, they may have also prevented our biosphere from becoming more complex until more recent eras. The full tale of asteroid impacts on the history of our world, and how human life managed to emerge from myriad possibilities, has yet to be fully told. The hazard posed by asteroid impacts to our civilization is low but singular. The design of efficient mitigation strategies strongly relies on asteroid detection by our ground- and spacebased surveys as well as knowledge of their physical properties. A more positive motivation for asteroid discovery is that the proximity of some asteroids to Earth may allow future astronauts to harvest their water and rare mineral resources for use in exploration. A key goal of asteroid science is therefore to learn how humans and robotic probes can interact with asteroids (and extract their materials) in an efficient way. We expect that these adventures may be commonplace in the future

  8. The Beyond the standard model working group: Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Azuelos et al.

    2004-03-18

    In this working group we have investigated a number of aspects of searches for new physics beyond the Standard Model (SM) at the running or planned TeV-scale colliders. For the most part, we have considered hadron colliders, as they will define particle physics at the energy frontier for the next ten years at least. The variety of models for Beyond the Standard Model (BSM) physics has grown immensely. It is clear that only future experiments can provide the needed direction to clarify the correct theory. Thus, our focus has been on exploring the extent to which hadron colliders can discover and study BSM physics in various models. We have placed special emphasis on scenarios in which the new signal might be difficult to find or of a very unexpected nature. For example, in the context of supersymmetry (SUSY), we have considered: how to make fully precise predictions for the Higgs bosons as well as the superparticles of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) (parts III and IV); MSSM scenarios in which most or all SUSY particles have rather large masses (parts V and VI); the ability to sort out the many parameters of the MSSM using a variety of signals and study channels (part VII); whether the no-lose theorem for MSSM Higgs discovery can be extended to the next-to-minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM) in which an additional singlet superfield is added to the minimal collection of superfields, potentially providing a natural explanation of the electroweak value of the parameter {micro} (part VIII); sorting out the effects of CP violation using Higgs plus squark associate production (part IX); the impact of lepton flavor violation of various kinds (part X); experimental possibilities for the gravitino and its sgoldstino partner (part XI); what the implications for SUSY would be if the NuTeV signal for di-muon events were interpreted as a sign of R-parity violation (part XII). Our other main focus was on the phenomenological implications of extra

  9. The 10/66 Dementia Research Group's fully operationalised DSM-IV dementia computerized diagnostic algorithm, compared with the 10/66 dementia algorithm and a clinician diagnosis: a population validation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnamoorthy ES

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The criterion for dementia implicit in DSM-IV is widely used in research but not fully operationalised. The 10/66 Dementia Research Group sought to do this using assessments from their one phase dementia diagnostic research interview, and to validate the resulting algorithm in a population-based study in Cuba. Methods The criterion was operationalised as a computerised algorithm, applying clinical principles, based upon the 10/66 cognitive tests, clinical interview and informant reports; the Community Screening Instrument for Dementia, the CERAD 10 word list learning and animal naming tests, the Geriatric Mental State, and the History and Aetiology Schedule – Dementia Diagnosis and Subtype. This was validated in Cuba against a local clinician DSM-IV diagnosis and the 10/66 dementia diagnosis (originally calibrated probabilistically against clinician DSM-IV diagnoses in the 10/66 pilot study. Results The DSM-IV sub-criteria were plausibly distributed among clinically diagnosed dementia cases and controls. The clinician diagnoses agreed better with 10/66 dementia diagnosis than with the more conservative computerized DSM-IV algorithm. The DSM-IV algorithm was particularly likely to miss less severe dementia cases. Those with a 10/66 dementia diagnosis who did not meet the DSM-IV criterion were less cognitively and functionally impaired compared with the DSMIV confirmed cases, but still grossly impaired compared with those free of dementia. Conclusion The DSM-IV criterion, strictly applied, defines a narrow category of unambiguous dementia characterized by marked impairment. It may be specific but incompletely sensitive to clinically relevant cases. The 10/66 dementia diagnosis defines a broader category that may be more sensitive, identifying genuine cases beyond those defined by our DSM-IV algorithm, with relevance to the estimation of the population burden of this disorder.

  10. Source-Term and building-Wake Consequence Modeling for the Godiva IV Reactor at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letellier, B.C.; McClure, P.; Restrepo, L.

    1999-01-01

    The objectives of this work were to evaluate the consequences of a postulated accident to onsite security personnel stationed near the facility during operations of the Godiva IV critical assembly and to identify controls needed to protect these personnel in case of an extreme criticality excursion equivalent to the design-basis accident (DBA). This paper presents the methodology and results of the source-term calculations, building ventilation rates, air concentrations, and consequence calculations that were performed using a multidisciplinary approach with several phenomenology models. Identification of controls needed to mitigate the consequences to near-field receptors is discussed

  11. Hopf and Bautin Bifurcation in a Tritrophic Food Chain Model with Holling Functional Response Types III and IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Víctor; Castillo-Santos, Francisco Eduardo; Dela-Rosa, Miguel Angel; Loreto-Hernández, Iván

    In this paper, we analyze the Hopf and Bautin bifurcation of a given system of differential equations, corresponding to a tritrophic food chain model with Holling functional response types III and IV for the predator and superpredator, respectively. We distinguish two cases, when the prey has linear or logistic growth. In both cases we guarantee the existence of a limit cycle bifurcating from an equilibrium point in the positive octant of ℝ3. In order to do so, for the Hopf bifurcation we compute explicitly the first Lyapunov coefficient, the transversality Hopf condition, and for the Bautin bifurcation we also compute the second Lyapunov coefficient and verify the regularity conditions.

  12. Endomicrobium proavitum, the first isolate of Endomicrobia class. nov. (phylum Elusimicrobia)--an ultramicrobacterium with an unusual cell cycle that fixes nitrogen with a Group IV nitrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hao; Dietrich, Carsten; Radek, Renate; Brune, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial tree contains many deep-rooting clades without any cultured representatives. One such clade is 'Endomicrobia', a class-level lineage in the phylum Elusimicrobia represented so far only by intracellular symbionts of termite gut flagellates. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of the first free-living member of this clade from sterile-filtered gut homogenate of defaunated (starch-fed) Reticulitermes santonensis. Strain Rsa215 is a strictly anaerobic ultramicrobacterium that grows exclusively on glucose, which is fermented to lactate, acetate, hydrogen and CO2. Ultrastructural analysis revealed a Gram-negative cell envelope and a peculiar cell cycle. The genome contains a single set of nif genes that encode homologues of Group IV nitrogenases, which were so far considered to have functions other than nitrogen fixation. We documented nitrogenase activity and diazotrophic growth by measuring acetylene reduction activity and (15)N2 incorporation into cell mass, and demonstrated that transcription of nifH and nitrogenase activity occur only in the absence of ammonium. Based on the ancestral relationship to 'Candidatus Endomicrobium trichonymphae' and other obligate endosymbionts, we propose the name 'Endomicrobium proavitum' gen. nov., sp. nov. for the first isolate of this lineage and the name 'Endomicrobia' class. nov. for the entire clade. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. DSM-IV-defined anxiety disorder symptoms in a middle-childhood-aged group of Malaysian children using the Spence Children's Anxiety Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Atefeh; Mustaffa, Mohamed Sharif; Udin, Amirmudin; Haghdoost, AliAkbar

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric anxiety disorders are the most common mental health disorders in the middle-childhood age group. The purpose of this study is to assess anxiety disorder symptoms, as defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition (DSM-IV), in a large community sample of low socioeconomic level rural children and to investigate some of the psychometric properties (internal consistency, construct and convergent validity and items rated as often or always experienced) of the Malay version of the Spence Children's Anxiety Scale - Child version (SCAS-C). Six hundred children aged 9-11 and 424 of their parents completely answered the child or parent versions of the SCAS. Results indicated that the internal reliability of subscales were moderate to adequate. Significant correlations between child and parent reports supported the measure's concurrent validity. Additionally, anxiety levels in this Malaysian sample were lower than among South-African children and higher than among their Western peers. There were both similarities and differences between symptom items reported as often or always experienced by Malaysian students and by children from other cultures. Confirmatory factor analysis provided evidence of the existence of five inter-correlated factors for anxiety disorders based on SCAS-C. Although some of the instrument's psychometric properties deviated from those observed in some other countries, it nevertheless appears to be useful for assessing childhood anxiety symptoms in this country.

  14. DSM-IV-defined anxiety disorder symptoms in a middle-childhood-aged group of Malaysian children using the Spence Children's Anxiety Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atefeh Ahmadi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Pediatric anxiety disorders are the most common mental health disorders in the middle-childhood age group. The purpose of this study is to assess anxiety disorder symptoms, as defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition (DSM-IV, in a large community sample of low socioeconomic level rural children and to investigate some of the psychometric properties (internal consistency, construct and convergent validity and items rated as often or always experienced of the Malay version of the Spence Children's Anxiety Scale - Child version (SCAS-C. Method Six hundred children aged 9-11 and 424 of their parents completely answered the child or parent versions of the SCAS. Results Results indicated that the internal reliability of subscales were moderate to adequate. Significant correlations between child and parent reports supported the measure's concurrent validity. Additionally, anxiety levels in this Malaysian sample were lower than among South-African children and higher than among their Western peers. There were both similarities and differences between symptom items reported as often or always experienced by Malaysian students and by children from other cultures. Confirmatory factor analysis provided evidence of the existence of five inter-correlated factors for anxiety disorders based on SCAS-C. Conclusion Although some of the instrument's psychometric properties deviated from those observed in some other countries, it nevertheless appears to be useful for assessing childhood anxiety symptoms in this country.

  15. Pentastatin-1, a collagen IV derived 20-mer peptide, suppresses tumor growth in a small cell lung cancer xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskimaki, Jacob E; Karagiannis, Emmanouil D; Tang, Benjamin C; Hammers, Hans; Watkins, D Neil; Pili, Roberto; Popel, Aleksander S

    2010-02-01

    Angiogenesis is the formation of neovasculature from a pre-existing vascular network. Progression of solid tumors including lung cancer is angiogenesis-dependent. We previously introduced a bioinformatics-based methodology to identify endogenous anti-angiogenic peptide sequences, and validated these predictions in vitro in human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation and migration assays. One family of peptides with high activity is derived from the alpha-fibrils of type IV collagen. Based on the results from the in vitro screening, we have evaluated the ability of a 20 amino acid peptide derived from the alpha5 fibril of type IV collagen, pentastatin-1, to suppress vessel growth in an angioreactor-based directed in vivo angiogenesis assay (DIVAA). In addition, pentastatin-1 suppressed tumor growth with intraperitoneal peptide administration in a small cell lung cancer (SCLC) xenograft model in nude mice using the NCI-H82 human cancer cell line. Pentastatin-1 decreased the invasion of vessels into angioreactors in vivo in a dose dependent manner. The peptide also decreased the rate of tumor growth and microvascular density in vivo in a small cell lung cancer xenograft model. The peptide treatment significantly decreased the invasion of microvessels in angioreactors and the rate of tumor growth in the xenograft model, indicating potential treatment for angiogenesis-dependent disease, and for translational development as a therapeutic agent for lung cancer.

  16. Pentastatin-1, a collagen IV derived 20-mer peptide, suppresses tumor growth in a small cell lung cancer xenograft model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koskimaki, Jacob E; Karagiannis, Emmanouil D; Tang, Benjamin C; Hammers, Hans; Watkins, D Neil; Pili, Roberto; Popel, Aleksander S

    2010-01-01

    Angiogenesis is the formation of neovasculature from a pre-existing vascular network. Progression of solid tumors including lung cancer is angiogenesis-dependent. We previously introduced a bioinformatics-based methodology to identify endogenous anti-angiogenic peptide sequences, and validated these predictions in vitro in human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation and migration assays. One family of peptides with high activity is derived from the α-fibrils of type IV collagen. Based on the results from the in vitro screening, we have evaluated the ability of a 20 amino acid peptide derived from the α5 fibril of type IV collagen, pentastatin-1, to suppress vessel growth in an angioreactor-based directed in vivo angiogenesis assay (DIVAA). In addition, pentastatin-1 suppressed tumor growth with intraperitoneal peptide administration in a small cell lung cancer (SCLC) xenograft model in nude mice using the NCI-H82 human cancer cell line. Pentastatin-1 decreased the invasion of vessels into angioreactors in vivo in a dose dependent manner. The peptide also decreased the rate of tumor growth and microvascular density in vivo in a small cell lung cancer xenograft model. The peptide treatment significantly decreased the invasion of microvessels in angioreactors and the rate of tumor growth in the xenograft model, indicating potential treatment for angiogenesis-dependent disease, and for translational development as a therapeutic agent for lung cancer

  17. WORK GROUP DEVELOPMENT MODELS – THE EVOLUTION FROM SIMPLE GROUP TO EFFECTIVE TEAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raluca ZOLTAN

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Currently, work teams are increasingly studied by virtue of the advantages they have compared to the work groups. But a true team does not appear overnight but must complete several steps to overcome the initial stage of its existence as a group. The question that arises is at what point a simple group is turning into an effective team. Even though the development process of group into a team is not a linear process, the models found in the literature provides a rich framework for analyzing and identifying the features which group acquires over time till it become a team in the true sense of word. Thus, in this article we propose an analysis of the main models of group development in order to point out, even in a relative manner, the stage when the simple work group becomes an effective work team.

  18. Working group report: Flavor physics and model building

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    cO Indian Academy of Sciences. Vol. ... This is the report of flavor physics and model building working group at ... those in model building have been primarily devoted to neutrino physics. ..... [12] Andrei Gritsan, ICHEP 2004, Beijing, China.

  19. In situ characterization of cofacial Co(IV) centers in Co4O4 cubane: Modeling the high-valent active site in oxygen-evolving catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Casey N; Hadt, Ryan G; Hayes, Dugan; Reinhart, Benjamin J; Li, Nancy; Chen, Lin X; Nocera, Daniel G

    2017-04-11

    The Co 4 O 4 cubane is a representative structural model of oxidic cobalt oxygen-evolving catalysts (Co-OECs). The Co-OECs are active when residing at two oxidation levels above an all-Co(III) resting state. This doubly oxidized Co(IV) 2 state may be captured in a Co(III) 2 (IV) 2 cubane. We demonstrate that the Co(III) 2 (IV) 2 cubane may be electrochemically generated and the electronic properties of this unique high-valent state may be probed by in situ spectroscopy. Intervalence charge-transfer (IVCT) bands in the near-IR are observed for the Co(III) 2 (IV) 2 cubane, and spectroscopic analysis together with electrochemical kinetics measurements reveal a larger reorganization energy and a smaller electron transfer rate constant for the doubly versus singly oxidized cubane. Spectroelectrochemical X-ray absorption data further reveal systematic spectral changes with successive oxidations from the cubane resting state. Electronic structure calculations correlated to experimental data suggest that this state is best represented as a localized, antiferromagnetically coupled Co(IV) 2 dimer. The exchange coupling in the cofacial Co(IV) 2 site allows for parallels to be drawn between the electronic structure of the Co 4 O 4 cubane model system and the high-valent active site of the Co-OEC, with specific emphasis on the manifestation of a doubly oxidized Co(IV) 2 center on O-O bond formation.

  20. IVS Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    International VLBI Service (IVS) is an international collaboration of organizations which operate or support Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) components. The goals are: To provide a service to support geodetic, geophysical and astrometric research and operational activities. To promote research and development activities in all aspects of the geodetic and astrometric VLBI technique. To interact with the community of users of VLBI products and to integrate VLBI into a global Earth observing system.

  1. Dynamics of group knowledge production in facilitated modelling workshops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavella, Elena; Franco, L. Alberto

    2015-01-01

    by which models are jointly developed with group members interacting face-to-face, with or without computer support. The models produced are used to inform negotiations about the nature of the issues faced by the group, and how to address them. While the facilitated modelling literature is impressive......, the workshop. Drawing on the knowledge-perspective of group communication, we conducted a micro-level analysis of a transcript of a facilitated modelling workshop held with the management team of an Alternative Food Network in the UK. Our analysis suggests that facilitated modelling interactions can take...

  2. Group Contribution Based Process Flowsheet Synthesis, Design and Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    d'Anterroches, Loïc; Gani, Rafiqul

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a process-group-contribution Method to model. simulate and synthesize a flowsheet. The process-group based representation of a flowsheet together with a process "property" model are presented. The process-group based synthesis method is developed on the basis of the computer...... aided molecular design methods and gives the ability to screen numerous process alternatives without the need to use the rigorous process simulation models. The process "property" model calculates the design targets for the generated flowsheet alternatives while a reverse modelling method (also...... developed) determines the design variables matching the target. A simple illustrative example highlighting the main features of the methodology is also presented....

  3. A mathematical model describing the glycemic response of diabetic patients to meal and i.v. infusion of insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabietti, P G; Calabrese, G; Iorio, M; Bistoni, S; Brunetti, P; Sarti, E; Benedetti, M M

    2001-10-01

    Nine type 1 diabetic patients were studied for 24 hours. During this period they were given three calibrated meals. The glycemia was feedback-controlled by means of an artificial pancreas. The blood concentration of glucose and the infusion speed of the insulin were measured every minute. The experimental data referring to each of the three meals were used to estimate the parameters of a mathematical model suitable for describing the glycemic response of diabetic patients at meals and at the i.v. infusion of exogenous insulin. From the estimate a marked dispersion of the parameters was found, both interindividual and intraindividual. Nevertheless the models thus obtained seem to be usable for the synthesis of a feedback controller, especially in view of creating a portable artificial pancreas that now seems possible owing to the realization (so far experimental) of sufficiently reliable glucose concentration sensors.

  4. MODELLING THE INHIBITORY ACTIVITY ON CARBONIC ANHYDRASE IV OF SUBSTITUTED THIADIAZOLE - AND THIADIAZOLINE - DISULFONAMIDES: INTEGRATION OF STRUCTURE INFORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorana Daniela Bolboaca

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT:Purpose: To analyze the relationships between inhibitory activities on carbonic anhydrase IV and structures of substituted 1,3,4-thiadiazole and 1,3,4-thiadiazoline disulfonamide through integration of compounds complex structure information by the use of Molecular Descriptors Family.Method: A number of forty compounds were used to generate and compute the molecular descriptors family and to build structure-activity relationships models. The obtained multi-varied models (the models with two, respectively with four descriptors were validated by computing the cross-validation leave-one-out score (r2cv-loo, and analyzed through assessment of the squared correlation coefficients (r2, and the models stability (r2 - r2cv-loo. The estimation abilities of the multi-varied MDF-SAR model with four descriptors were analyzed in training and test sets.Results: Analysis of the obtained models shows that the best results was obtained by the multi-varied model with four molecular descriptors (r2 = 0.920. The prediction abilities of this model is sustained by the cross validation leave-one-out score (r2cv-loo = 0.903, the model stability (r2 - r2cv-loo = 0.017, and the results on training versus test analysis (no significant differences between correlation coefficients in training and test sets, p > 0.05. The multi-varied model which used four descriptors proved to render higher value of correlation coefficient comparing with previous reported models (p 0.05. El modelo multivariante que utilizó cuatro descriptores mostró un valor más alto del coeficiente de correlación en comparación con los modelos divulgados anteriormente (p < 0.01.Conclusión: El modelo multivariante con cuatro descriptores es sólido y fiable e indica que la actividad de la inhibición en la carboanhidrasa IV producida por las sufonamidas sustituidas del 1,3,4-tiadiazol- y de la 1,3,4-tiadiazolina- dependen de la naturaleza de la geometría y de la topología del compuesto

  5. Investigating Facebook Groups through a Random Graph Model

    OpenAIRE

    Dinithi Pallegedara; Lei Pan

    2014-01-01

    Facebook disseminates messages for billions of users everyday. Though there are log files stored on central servers, law enforcement agencies outside of the U.S. cannot easily acquire server log files from Facebook. This work models Facebook user groups by using a random graph model. Our aim is to facilitate detectives quickly estimating the size of a Facebook group with which a suspect is involved. We estimate this group size according to the number of immediate friends and the number of ext...

  6. Group Membership, Group Change, and Intergroup Attitudes: A Recategorization Model Based on Cognitive Consistency Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Jenny; Steffens, Melanie C.; Vignoles, Vivian L.

    2018-01-01

    The present article introduces a model based on cognitive consistency principles to predict how new identities become integrated into the self-concept, with consequences for intergroup attitudes. The model specifies four concepts (self-concept, stereotypes, identification, and group compatibility) as associative connections. The model builds on two cognitive principles, balance–congruity and imbalance–dissonance, to predict identification with social groups that people currently belong to, belonged to in the past, or newly belong to. More precisely, the model suggests that the relative strength of self-group associations (i.e., identification) depends in part on the (in)compatibility of the different social groups. Combining insights into cognitive representation of knowledge, intergroup bias, and explicit/implicit attitude change, we further derive predictions for intergroup attitudes. We suggest that intergroup attitudes alter depending on the relative associative strength between the social groups and the self, which in turn is determined by the (in)compatibility between social groups. This model unifies existing models on the integration of social identities into the self-concept by suggesting that basic cognitive mechanisms play an important role in facilitating or hindering identity integration and thus contribute to reducing or increasing intergroup bias. PMID:29681878

  7. Group Membership, Group Change, and Intergroup Attitudes: A Recategorization Model Based on Cognitive Consistency Principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Roth

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The present article introduces a model based on cognitive consistency principles to predict how new identities become integrated into the self-concept, with consequences for intergroup attitudes. The model specifies four concepts (self-concept, stereotypes, identification, and group compatibility as associative connections. The model builds on two cognitive principles, balance–congruity and imbalance–dissonance, to predict identification with social groups that people currently belong to, belonged to in the past, or newly belong to. More precisely, the model suggests that the relative strength of self-group associations (i.e., identification depends in part on the (incompatibility of the different social groups. Combining insights into cognitive representation of knowledge, intergroup bias, and explicit/implicit attitude change, we further derive predictions for intergroup attitudes. We suggest that intergroup attitudes alter depending on the relative associative strength between the social groups and the self, which in turn is determined by the (incompatibility between social groups. This model unifies existing models on the integration of social identities into the self-concept by suggesting that basic cognitive mechanisms play an important role in facilitating or hindering identity integration and thus contribute to reducing or increasing intergroup bias.

  8. Group Membership, Group Change, and Intergroup Attitudes: A Recategorization Model Based on Cognitive Consistency Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Jenny; Steffens, Melanie C; Vignoles, Vivian L

    2018-01-01

    The present article introduces a model based on cognitive consistency principles to predict how new identities become integrated into the self-concept, with consequences for intergroup attitudes. The model specifies four concepts (self-concept, stereotypes, identification, and group compatibility) as associative connections. The model builds on two cognitive principles, balance-congruity and imbalance-dissonance, to predict identification with social groups that people currently belong to, belonged to in the past, or newly belong to. More precisely, the model suggests that the relative strength of self-group associations (i.e., identification) depends in part on the (in)compatibility of the different social groups. Combining insights into cognitive representation of knowledge, intergroup bias, and explicit/implicit attitude change, we further derive predictions for intergroup attitudes. We suggest that intergroup attitudes alter depending on the relative associative strength between the social groups and the self, which in turn is determined by the (in)compatibility between social groups. This model unifies existing models on the integration of social identities into the self-concept by suggesting that basic cognitive mechanisms play an important role in facilitating or hindering identity integration and thus contribute to reducing or increasing intergroup bias.

  9. Acyl and silyl group effects in reactivity-based one-pot glycosylation: synthesis of embryonic stem cell surface carbohydrates Lc4 and IV(2)Fuc-Lc4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yun; Lu, Xin-An; Zulueta, Medel Manuel L; Tsai, Chih-Ming; Lin, Kuo-I; Hung, Shang-Cheng; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2012-03-14

    Relative reactivity evaluations showed the graded arming of toluenyl thioglucosides by variously positioned silyl groups but not by their acyl counterparts. These findings were applied in reactivity-based one-pot assembly of linker-attached Lc(4) and IV(2)Fuc-Lc(4), which are components of human embryonic stem cell surface. The sugar-galectin-1 binding was also examined.

  10. Psychotherapy with schizophrenics in team groups: a systems model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeber, A R

    1991-01-01

    This paper focuses on the treatment of patients with schizophrenic disorders employing the Team Group model. The advantages and disadvantages of the Team Group are presented. Systems theory and principles of group development are applied as a basis for understanding the dynamics of the group in the context at the acute psychiatric unit. Particular problems encountered in treating patients with schizophrenic disorders in this setting are presented. These include: (1) issues of therapist style and technique, (2) basic psychopathology of the schizophrenic disorders, and (3) phase-specific problems associated with the dynamics of the group. Recommendations for therapist interventions are made that may better integrate these patients into the Team Group.

  11. A physically based compact I-V model for monolayer TMDC channel MOSFET and DMFET biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Ehsanur; Shadman, Abir; Ahmed, Imtiaz; Khan, Saeed Uz Zaman; Khosru, Quazi D M

    2018-06-08

    In this work, a compact transport model has been developed for monolayer transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) channel MOSFET. The analytical model solves the Poisson's equation for the inversion charge density to get the electrostatic potential in the channel. Current is then calculated by solving the drift-diffusion equation. The model makes gradual channel approximation to simplify the solution procedure. The appropriate density of states obtained from the first principle density functional theory simulation has been considered to keep the model physically accurate for monolayer TMDC channel FET. The outcome of the model has been benchmarked against both experimental and numerical quantum simulation results with the help of a few fitting parameters. Using the compact model, detailed output and transfer characteristics of monolayer WSe 2 FET have been studied, and various performance parameters have been determined. The study confirms excellent ON and OFF state performances of monolayer WSe 2 FET which could be viable for the next generation high-speed, low power applications. Also, the proposed model has been extended to study the operation of a biosensor. A monolayer MoS 2 channel based dielectric modulated FET is investigated using the compact model for detection of a biomolecule in a dry environment.

  12. Canadian Field Soils IV: Modeling Thermal Conductivity at Dryness and Saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnawski, V. R.; McCombie, M. L.; Leong, W. H.; Coppa, P.; Corasaniti, S.; Bovesecchi, G.

    2018-03-01

    The thermal conductivity data of 40 Canadian soils at dryness (λ _{dry}) and at full saturation (λ _{sat}) were used to verify 13 predictive models, i.e., four mechanistic, four semi-empirical and five empirical equations. The performance of each model, for λ _{dry} and λ _{sat}, was evaluated using a standard deviation ( SD) formula. Among the mechanistic models applied to dry soils, the closest λ _{dry} estimates were obtained by MaxRTCM (it{SD} = ± 0.018 Wm^{-1}\\cdot K^{-1}), followed by de Vries and a series-parallel model (S-{\\vert }{\\vert }). Among the semi-empirical equations (deVries-ave, Advanced Geometric Mean Model (A-GMM), Chaudhary and Bhandari (C-B) and Chen's equation), the closest λ _{dry} estimates were obtained by the C-B model (± 0.022 Wm^{-1}\\cdot K^{-1}). Among the empirical equations, the top λ _{dry} estimates were given by CDry-40 (± 0.021 Wm^{-1}\\cdot K^{-1} and ± 0.018 Wm^{-1}\\cdot K^{-1} for18-coarse and 22-fine soils, respectively). In addition, λ _{dry} and λ _{sat} models were applied to the λ _{sat} database of 21 other soils. From all the models tested, only the maxRTCM and the CDry-40 models provided the closest λ _{dry} estimates for the 40 Canadian soils as well as the 21 soils. The best λ _{sat} estimates for the 40-Canadian soils and the 21 soils were given by the A-GMM and the S-{\\vert }{\\vert } model.

  13. Group size, grooming and fission in primates: a modeling approach based on group structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueur, Cédric; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis; Petit, Odile; Couzin, Iain D

    2011-03-21

    In social animals, fission is a common mode of group proliferation and dispersion and may be affected by genetic or other social factors. Sociality implies preserving relationships between group members. An increase in group size and/or in competition for food within the group can result in decrease certain social interactions between members, and the group may split irreversibly as a consequence. One individual may try to maintain bonds with a maximum of group members in order to keep group cohesion, i.e. proximity and stable relationships. However, this strategy needs time and time is often limited. In addition, previous studies have shown that whatever the group size, an individual interacts only with certain grooming partners. There, we develop a computational model to assess how dynamics of group cohesion are related to group size and to the structure of grooming relationships. Groups' sizes after simulated fission are compared to observed sizes of 40 groups of primates. Results showed that the relationship between grooming time and group size is dependent on how each individual attributes grooming time to its social partners, i.e. grooming a few number of preferred partners or grooming equally or not all partners. The number of partners seemed to be more important for the group cohesion than the grooming time itself. This structural constraint has important consequences on group sociality, as it gives the possibility of competition for grooming partners, attraction for high-ranking individuals as found in primates' groups. It could, however, also have implications when considering the cognitive capacities of primates. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. How the group affects the mind : A cognitive model of idea generation in groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijstad, Bernard A.; Stroebe, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    A model called search for ideas in associative memory (SIAM) is proposed to account for various research findings in the area of group idea generation. The model assumes that idea generation is a repeated search for ideas in associative memory, which proceeds in 2 stages (knowledge activation and

  15. Model Checking Verification and Validation at JPL and the NASA Fairmont IV and V Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Frank; Easterbrook, Steve; Callahan, Jack; Montgomery, Todd

    1999-01-01

    We show how a technology transfer effort was carried out. The successful use of model checking on a pilot JPL flight project demonstrates the usefulness and the efficacy of the approach. The pilot project was used to model a complex spacecraft controller. Software design and implementation validation were carried out successfully. To suggest future applications we also show how the implementation validation step can be automated. The effort was followed by the formal introduction of the modeling technique as a part of the JPL Quality Assurance process.

  16. Studies in astronomical time series analysis. IV - Modeling chaotic and random processes with linear filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scargle, Jeffrey D.

    1990-01-01

    While chaos arises only in nonlinear systems, standard linear time series models are nevertheless useful for analyzing data from chaotic processes. This paper introduces such a model, the chaotic moving average. This time-domain model is based on the theorem that any chaotic process can be represented as the convolution of a linear filter with an uncorrelated process called the chaotic innovation. A technique, minimum phase-volume deconvolution, is introduced to estimate the filter and innovation. The algorithm measures the quality of a model using the volume covered by the phase-portrait of the innovation process. Experiments on synthetic data demonstrate that the algorithm accurately recovers the parameters of simple chaotic processes. Though tailored for chaos, the algorithm can detect both chaos and randomness, distinguish them from each other, and separate them if both are present. It can also recover nonminimum-delay pulse shapes in non-Gaussian processes, both random and chaotic.

  17. Variations on Debris Disks. IV. An Improved Analytical Model for Collisional Cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Scott J.; Bromley, Benjamin C.

    2017-04-01

    We derive a new analytical model for the evolution of a collisional cascade in a thin annulus around a single central star. In this model, r max the size of the largest object changes with time, {r}\\max \\propto {t}-γ , with γ ≈ 0.1-0.2. Compared to standard models where r max is constant in time, this evolution results in a more rapid decline of M d , the total mass of solids in the annulus, and L d , the luminosity of small particles in the annulus: {M}d\\propto {t}-(γ +1) and {L}d\\propto {t}-(γ /2+1). We demonstrate that the analytical model provides an excellent match to a comprehensive suite of numerical coagulation simulations for annuli at 1 au and at 25 au. If the evolution of real debris disks follows the predictions of the analytical or numerical models, the observed luminosities for evolved stars require up to a factor of two more mass than predicted by previous analytical models.

  18. Therapeutic Enactment: Integrating Individual and Group Counseling Models for Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westwood, Marvin J.; Keats, Patrice A.; Wilensky, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce the reader to a group-based therapy model known as therapeutic enactment. A description of this multimodal change model is provided by outlining the relevant background information, key concepts related to specific change processes, and the differences in this model compared to earlier psychodrama…

  19. Topology in two dimensions. IV - CDM models with non-Gaussian initial conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, Peter; Moscardini, Lauro; Plionis, Manolis; Lucchin, Francesco; Matarrese, Sabino; Messina, Antonio

    1993-02-01

    The results of N-body simulations with both Gaussian and non-Gaussian initial conditions are used here to generate projected galaxy catalogs with the same selection criteria as the Shane-Wirtanen counts of galaxies. The Euler-Poincare characteristic is used to compare the statistical nature of the projected galaxy clustering in these simulated data sets with that of the observed galaxy catalog. All the models produce a topology dominated by a meatball shift when normalized to the known small-scale clustering properties of galaxies. Models characterized by a positive skewness of the distribution of primordial density perturbations are inconsistent with the Lick data, suggesting problems in reconciling models based on cosmic textures with observations. Gaussian CDM models fit the distribution of cell counts only if they have a rather high normalization but possess too low a coherence length compared with the Lick counts. This suggests that a CDM model with extra large scale power would probably fit the available data.

  20. Cross sections in 25 groups obtained from ENDF/B-IV and ENDL/78 libraries, processed with GALAXY and NJOY computer codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalhoub, E.S.; Corcuera, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    The discrepancies existing between ENDF/B-IV and ENDL/78 libraries, in diferent energy regions are identified, and the order of the differences in multigroup sections are determined, when GALAXY or NJOY computer codes are used. (E.G.) [pt

  1. Emerging Trends in Heart Valve Engineering: Part IV. Computational Modeling and Experimental Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheradvar, Arash; Groves, Elliott M; Falahatpisheh, Ahmad; Mofrad, Mohammad K; Hamed Alavi, S; Tranquillo, Robert; Dasi, Lakshmi P; Simmons, Craig A; Jane Grande-Allen, K; Goergen, Craig J; Baaijens, Frank; Little, Stephen H; Canic, Suncica; Griffith, Boyce

    2015-10-01

    In this final portion of an extensive review of heart valve engineering, we focus on the computational methods and experimental studies related to heart valves. The discussion begins with a thorough review of computational modeling and the governing equations of fluid and structural interaction. We then move onto multiscale and disease specific modeling. Finally, advanced methods related to in vitro testing of the heart valves are reviewed. This section of the review series is intended to illustrate application of computational methods and experimental studies and their interrelation for studying heart valves.

  2. An Automatic User Grouping Model for a Group Recommender System in Location-Based Social Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elahe Khazaei

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Spatial group recommendation refers to suggesting places to a given set of users. In a group recommender system, members of a group should have similar preferences in order to increase the level of satisfaction. Location-based social networks (LBSNs provide rich content, such as user interactions and location/event descriptions, which can be leveraged for group recommendations. In this paper, an automatic user grouping model is introduced that obtains information about users and their preferences through an LBSN. The preferences of the users, proximity of the places the users have visited in terms of spatial range, users’ free days, and the social relationships among users are extracted automatically from location histories and users’ profiles in the LBSN. These factors are combined to determine the similarities among users. The users are partitioned into groups based on these similarities. Group size is the key to coordinating group members and enhancing their satisfaction. Therefore, a modified k-medoids method is developed to cluster users into groups with specific sizes. To evaluate the efficiency of the proposed method, its mean intra-cluster distance and its distribution of cluster sizes are compared to those of general clustering algorithms. The results reveal that the proposed method compares favourably with general clustering approaches, such as k-medoids and spectral clustering, in separating users into groups of a specific size with a lower mean intra-cluster distance.

  3. Effects of model traumatic injury on hepatic drug metabolism in the rat. IV. Glucuronidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffeth, L K; Rosen, G M; Rauckman, E J

    1985-01-01

    A previously validated small mammal trauma model, hind-limb ischemia secondary to infrarenal aortic ligation in the rat, was utilized to investigate the effects of traumatic injury on hepatic glucuronidation activity. As was previously observed with hepatic oxidative drug metabolism, model trauma resulted in a significant decrease in the in vivo glucuronidation of chloramphenicol, with a 23% drop in clearance of this drug. The effect on in vivo pharmacokinetics appeared to result from a complex interaction between trauma's differential influences on conjugating enzyme(s), deconjugating enzyme(s), and hepatic UDP-glucuronic acid levels, as well as the relative physiological importance of these variables. Hepatic UDP-glucuronyltransferase activities towards both p-nitrophenol and chloramphenicol were elevated (44-54%) after model injury when measured in native hepatic microsomes. However, microsomes which had been "activated" by treatment with Triton X-100 showed no significant difference between control and traumatized animals. Serum beta-glucuronidase activities were elevated by 58%, while hepatic beta-glucuronidase rose by about 16%. Nevertheless, in vivo deconjugation showed no significant change. Model trauma also resulted in a 46% decrease in hepatic UDP-glucuronic acid content. Thus, the observed post-traumatic depression of in vivo chloramphenicol glucuronidation could be due either to a diminished availability of a necessary cofactor (UDP-glucuronic acid) or to an alteration in enzyme kinetics or function in vivo.

  4. OLI/ESP Modeling Of The Semi-Integrated Pilot Plant For Estimate Of Campaigns I-IV Simulant Volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CARL, BARNES

    2004-01-01

    Four SIPP campaigns have been planned to investigate the effect of recycle streams on the RPP-WTP pretreatment process such as the filter flux rate and other areas of interest. This document describes OLI/ESP modeling work done in support of the planning and operation of the SIPP. An existing OLI/ESP steady-state model was expanded to represent the pretreatment system through to the TLP evaporator for the LAW train and the washed sludge for the HLW train. The model was used to investigate alternative operating scenarios, determine the optimum volumetric waste feed ratio of AP-101 to AY-102, and, for each campaign, estimate the simulant and input recycle volumes corresponding to the target glass production rates of 6MT/day HLW glass and 80MT/day LAW glass and scaled to the target of 140L of Campaign I washed sludge. It was designed to quickly achieve steady state and simulation results indicate this was accomplished by Campaign IV. The alternative operating scenarios modeled differed only in the point at which the AP-101 and AY-102 waste feed streams were introduced to the process. The results showed no difference in the production rate between the scenarios. Therefore, for these specific waste feeds the process should be operated to maximize the energy efficiency and minimize scaling in the evaporator by feeding the AY-102 waste feed to the ultra-filtration feed prep tank, bypassing the waste feed evaporator

  5. Hepatic imaging in stage IV-S neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franken, E.A. Jr.; Smith, W.L.; Iowa Univ., Iowa City; Cohen, M.D.; Kisker, C.T.; Platz, C.E.

    1986-01-01

    Stage IV-S neuroblastoma describes a group of infants with tumor spread limited to liver, skin, or bone marrow. Such patients, who constitute about 25% of affected infants with neuroblastoma, may expect spontaneous tumor remission. We report 18 infants with Stage IV-S neuroblastoma, 83% of whom had liver involvement. Imaging investigations included Technetium 99m sulfur colloid scan, ultrasound, and CT. Two patterns of liver metastasis were noted: ill-defined nodules or diffuse tumor throughout the liver. Distinction of normal and abnormal liver with diffuse type metastasis could be quite difficult, particularly with liver scans. We conclude that patients with Stage IV-S neuroblastoma have ultrasound or CT examination as an initial workup, with nuclear medicine scans reserved for followup studies. (orig.)

  6. Group-Based Active Learning of Classification Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhipeng; Hauskrecht, Milos

    2017-05-01

    Learning of classification models from real-world data often requires additional human expert effort to annotate the data. However, this process can be rather costly and finding ways of reducing the human annotation effort is critical for this task. The objective of this paper is to develop and study new ways of providing human feedback for efficient learning of classification models by labeling groups of examples. Briefly, unlike traditional active learning methods that seek feedback on individual examples, we develop a new group-based active learning framework that solicits label information on groups of multiple examples. In order to describe groups in a user-friendly way, conjunctive patterns are used to compactly represent groups. Our empirical study on 12 UCI data sets demonstrates the advantages and superiority of our approach over both classic instance-based active learning work, as well as existing group-based active-learning methods.

  7. The Beyond the Standard Model Working Group: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2002-08-08

    Various theoretical aspects of physics beyond the Standard Model at hadron colliders are discussed. Our focus will be on those issues that most immediately impact the projects pursued as part of the BSM group at this meeting.

  8. Modelling comonotonic group-life under dependent decrement causes

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Dabuxilatu

    2011-01-01

    Comonotonicity had been a extreme case of dependency between random variables. This article consider an extension of single life model under multiple dependent decrement causes to the case of comonotonic group-life.

  9. Simple kinetic theory model of reactive collisions. IV. Laboratory fixed orientational cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, G.T.

    1987-01-01

    The differential orientational cross section, obtainable from molecular beam experiments on aligned molecules, is calculated using the line-of-normals model for reactive collisions involving hard convex bodies. By means of kinetic theory methods, the dependence of the cross section on the angle of attack γ 0 is expressed in a Legendre function expansion. Each of the Legendre expansion coefficients is given by an integral over the molecule-fixed cross section and functions of the orientation dependent threshold energy

  10. Ride quality evaluation. IV - Models of subjective reaction to aircraft motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, I. D.; Richards, L. G.

    1978-01-01

    The paper examines models of human reaction to the motions typically experienced on short-haul aircraft flights. Data are taken on the regularly scheduled flights of four commercial airlines - three airplanes and one helicopter. The data base consists of: (1) a series of motion recordings distributed over each flight, each including all six degrees of freedom of motion; temperature, pressure, and noise are also recorded; (2) ratings of perceived comfort and satisfaction from the passengers on each flight; (3) moment-by-moment comfort ratings from a test subject assigned to each airplane; and (4) overall comfort ratings for each flight from the test subjects. Regression models are obtained for prediction of rated comfort from rms values for six degrees of freedom of motion. It is shown that the model C = 2.1 + 17.1 T + 17.2 V (T = transverse acceleration, V = vertical acceleration) gives a good fit to the airplane data but is less acceptable for the helicopter data.

  11. Theoretical modeling of the uranium 4f XPS for U(VI) and U(IV) oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagus, Paul S. [Department of Chemistry, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203-5017 (United States); Nelin, Connie J. [Consulting and Services, 6008 Maury' s Trail, Austin, Texas 78730 (United States); Ilton, Eugene S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2013-12-28

    A rigorous study is presented of the physical processes related to X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy, XPS, in the 4f level of U oxides, which, as well as being of physical interest in themselves, are representative of XPS in heavy metal oxides. In particular, we present compelling evidence for a new view of the screening of core-holes that extends prior understandings. Our analysis of the screening focuses on the covalent mixing of high lying U and O orbitals as opposed to the, more common, use of orbitals that are nominally pure U or pure O. It is shown that this covalent mixing is quite different for the initial and final, core-hole, configurations and that this difference is directly related to the XPS satellite intensity. Furthermore, we show that the high-lying U d orbitals as well as the U(5f) orbital may both contribute to the core-hole screening, in contrast with previous work that has only considered screening through the U(5f) shell. The role of modifying the U-O interaction by changing the U-O distance has been investigated and an unexpected correlation between U-O distance and XPS satellite intensity has been discovered. The role of flourite and octahedral crystal structures for U(IV) oxides has been examined and relationships established between XPS features and the covalent interactions in the different structures. The physical views of XPS satellites as arising from shake processes or as arising from ligand to metal charge transfers are contrasted; our analysis provides strong support that shake processes give a more fundamental physical understanding than charge transfer. Our theoretical studies are based on rigorous, strictly ab initio determinations of the electronic structure of embedded cluster models of U oxides with formal U(VI) and U(IV) oxidation states. Our results provide a foundation that makes it possible to establish quantitative relationships between features of the XPS spectra and materials properties.

  12. Theoretical modeling of the uranium 4f XPS for U(VI) and U(IV) oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagus, Paul S.; Nelin, Connie J.; Ilton, Eugene S.

    2013-12-01

    A rigorous study is presented of the physical processes related to X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy, XPS, in the 4f level of U oxides, which, as well as being of physical interest in themselves, are representative of XPS in heavy metal oxides. In particular, we present compelling evidence for a new view of the screening of core-holes that extends prior understandings. Our analysis of the screening focuses on the covalent mixing of high lying U and O orbitals as opposed to the, more common, use of orbitals that are nominally pure U or pure O. It is shown that this covalent mixing is quite different for the initial and final, core-hole, configurations and that this difference is directly related to the XPS satellite intensity. Furthermore, we show that the high-lying U d orbitals as well as the U(5f) orbital may both contribute to the core-hole screening, in contrast with previous work that has only considered screening through the U(5f) shell. The role of modifying the U-O interaction by changing the U-O distance has been investigated and an unexpected correlation between U-O distance and XPS satellite intensity has been discovered. The role of flourite and octahedral crystal structures for U(IV) oxides has been examined and relationships established between XPS features and the covalent interactions in the different structures. The physical views of XPS satellites as arising from shake processes or as arising from ligand to metal charge transfers are contrasted; our analysis provides strong support that shake processes give a more fundamental physical understanding than charge transfer. Our theoretical studies are based on rigorous, strictly ab initio determinations of the electronic structure of embedded cluster models of U oxides with formal U(VI) and U(IV) oxidation states. Our results provide a foundation that makes it possible to establish quantitative relationships between features of the XPS spectra and materials properties.

  13. Models for Quarks and Elementary Particles. Part IV: How Much do We Know of This Universe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neumann U. K. W.

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Essential laws and principles of the natural sciences were discovered at the high aggre- gation levels of matter such as molecules, metal crystals, atoms and elementary parti- cles. These principles reappear in these models in modified form at the fundamental level of the quarks. However, the following is probably true: since the principles apply at the fundamental level of the quarks they also have a continuing effect at the higher aggregation levels. In the manner of the law of mass action, eight processes for weak interaction are formulated, which are also called Weak Processes here. Rules for quark exchange of the reacting elementary particles are named and the quasi-Euclidian or complex spaces introduced in Part I associated with the respective particles. The weak processes are the gateway to the “second” strand of this universe which we practically do not know. The particles with complex space, e.g. the neutrino, form this second strand. According to the physical model of gravitation from Part III the particles of both strands have >-fields and are thus subject to the superposition, which results in the attraction by gravity of the particles of both strands. The weak processes (7 and (8 offer a fair chance for the elimination of highly radioactive waste.

  14. Models for Quarks and Elementary Particles --- Part IV: How Much Do We Know of This Universe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich K. W. Neumann

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Essential laws and principles of the natural sciences were discovered at the high aggregation levels of matter such as molecules, metal crystals, atoms and elementary particles. These principles reappear in these models in modified form at the fundamental level of the quarks. However, the following is probably true: since the principles apply at the fundamental level of the quarks they also have a continuing effect at the higher aggregation levels. In the manner of the law of mass action, eight processes for weak interaction are formulated, which are also called Weak Processes here. Rules for quark exchange of the reacting elementary particles are named and the quasi-Euclidian or complex spaces introduced in Part I associated with the respective particles. The weak processes are the gateway to the second strand of this universe which we practically do not know. The particles with complex space, e.g. the neutrino, form this second strand. According to the physical model of gravitation from Part III the particles of both strands have fields and are thus subject to the superposition, which results in the attraction by gravity of the particles of both strands. The weak processes (7 and (8 offer a fair chance for the elimination of highly radioactive waste.

  15. Physics Based Model for Cryogenic Chilldown and Loading. Part IV: Code Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchinsky, D. G.; Smelyanskiy, V. N.; Brown, B.

    2014-01-01

    This is the fourth report in a series of technical reports that describe separated two-phase flow model application to the cryogenic loading operation. In this report we present the structure of the code. The code consists of five major modules: (1) geometry module; (2) solver; (3) material properties; (4) correlations; and finally (5) stability control module. The two key modules - solver and correlations - are further divided into a number of submodules. Most of the physics and knowledge databases related to the properties of cryogenic two-phase flow are included into the cryogenic correlations module. The functional form of those correlations is not well established and is a subject of extensive research. Multiple parametric forms for various correlations are currently available. Some of them are included into correlations module as will be described in details in a separate technical report. Here we describe the overall structure of the code and focus on the details of the solver and stability control modules.

  16. The conceptual basis of mathematics in cardiology IV: statistics and model fitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Jason H T; Sobel, Burton E

    2003-06-01

    This is the fourth in a series of four articles developed for the readers of Coronary Artery Disease. Without language ideas cannot be articulated. What may not be so immediately obvious is that they cannot be formulated either. One of the essential languages of cardiology is mathematics. Unfortunately, medical education does not emphasize, and in fact, often neglects empowering physicians to think mathematically. Reference to statistics, conditional probability, multicompartmental modeling, algebra, calculus and transforms is common but often without provision of genuine conceptual understanding. At the University of Vermont College of Medicine, Professor Bates developed a course designed to address these deficiencies. The course covered mathematical principles pertinent to clinical cardiovascular and pulmonary medicine and research. It focused on fundamental concepts to facilitate formulation and grasp of ideas. This series of four articles was developed to make the material available for a wider audience. The articles will be published sequentially in Coronary Artery Disease. Beginning with fundamental axioms and basic algebraic manipulations they address algebra, function and graph theory, real and complex numbers, calculus and differential equations, mathematical modeling, linear system theory and integral transforms and statistical theory. The principles and concepts they address provide the foundation needed for in-depth study of any of these topics. Perhaps of even more importance, they should empower cardiologists and cardiovascular researchers to utilize the language of mathematics in assessing the phenomena of immediate pertinence to diagnosis, pathophysiology and therapeutics. The presentations are interposed with queries (by Coronary Artery Disease abbreviated as CAD) simulating the nature of interactions that occurred during the course itself. Each article concludes with one or more examples illustrating application of the concepts covered to

  17. Deciphering the crowd: modeling and identification of pedestrian group motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yücel, Zeynep; Zanlungo, Francesco; Ikeda, Tetsushi; Miyashita, Takahiro; Hagita, Norihiro

    2013-01-14

    Associating attributes to pedestrians in a crowd is relevant for various areas like surveillance, customer profiling and service providing. The attributes of interest greatly depend on the application domain and might involve such social relations as friends or family as well as the hierarchy of the group including the leader or subordinates. Nevertheless, the complex social setting inherently complicates this task. We attack this problem by exploiting the small group structures in the crowd. The relations among individuals and their peers within a social group are reliable indicators of social attributes. To that end, this paper identifies social groups based on explicit motion models integrated through a hypothesis testing scheme. We develop two models relating positional and directional relations. A pair of pedestrians is identified as belonging to the same group or not by utilizing the two models in parallel, which defines a compound hypothesis testing scheme. By testing the proposed approach on three datasets with different environmental properties and group characteristics, it is demonstrated that we achieve an identification accuracy of 87% to 99%. The contribution of this study lies in its definition of positional and directional relation models, its description of compound evaluations, and the resolution of ambiguities with our proposed uncertainty measure based on the local and global indicators of group relation.

  18. Deciphering the Crowd: Modeling and Identification of Pedestrian Group Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norihiro Hagita

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Associating attributes to pedestrians in a crowd is relevant for various areas like surveillance, customer profiling and service providing. The attributes of interest greatly depend on the application domain and might involve such social relations as friends or family as well as the hierarchy of the group including the leader or subordinates. Nevertheless, the complex social setting inherently complicates this task. We attack this problem by exploiting the small group structures in the crowd. The relations among individuals and their peers within a social group are reliable indicators of social attributes. To that end, this paper identifies social groups based on explicit motion models integrated through a hypothesis testing scheme. We develop two models relating positional and directional relations. A pair of pedestrians is identified as belonging to the same group or not by utilizing the two models in parallel, which defines a compound hypothesis testing scheme. By testing the proposed approach on three datasets with different environmental properties and group characteristics, it is demonstrated that we achieve an identification accuracy of 87% to 99%. The contribution of this study lies in its definition of positional and directional relation models, its description of compound evaluations, and the resolution of ambiguities with our proposed uncertainty measure based on the local and global indicators of group relation.

  19. Investigating the LGBTQ Responsive Model for Supervision of Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Melissa; Goodrich, Kristopher M.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports an investigation of the LGBTQ Responsive Model for Supervision of Group Work, a trans-theoretical supervisory framework to address the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) persons (Goodrich & Luke, 2011). Findings partially supported applicability of the LGBTQ Responsive Model for Supervision…

  20. Pile group program for full material modeling and progressive failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Strain wedge (SW) model formulation has been used, in previous work, to evaluate the response of a single pile or a group of piles (including its : pile cap) in layered soils to lateral loading. The SW model approach provides appropriate prediction f...

  1. A Creative Therapies Model for the Group Supervision of Counsellors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Paul

    1995-01-01

    Sets forth a model of group supervision, drawing on a creative therapies approach which provides an effective way of delivering process issues, conceptualization issues, and personalization issues. The model makes particular use of techniques drawn from art therapy and from psychodrama, and should be applicable to therapists of many orientations.…

  2. Loop groups, the Luttinger model, anyons, and Sutherland systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langmann, E.; Carey, A.L.

    1998-01-01

    We discuss the representation theory of loop groups and examples of how it is used in physics. These examples include the construction and solution of the Luttinger model and other 1 + 1-dimensional interacting quantum field theories, the construction of anyon field operators on the circle, and the '2 nd quantization' of the Sutherland model using anyons

  3. What is special about the group of the standard model?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, H.B.; Brene, N.

    1989-03-01

    The standard model is based on the algebra of U 1 xSU 2 xSU 3 . The systematics of charges of the fundamental fermions seems to suggest the importance of a particular group having this algebra, viz. S(U 2 xU 3 ). This group is distinguished from all other connected compact non semisimple groups with dimensionality up to 12 by a characteristic property: it is very 'skew'. By this we mean that the group has relatively few 'generalised outer automorphisms'. One may speculate about physical reasons for this fact. (orig.)

  4. What is special about the group of the standard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, H.B.; Brene, N.

    1989-06-15

    The standard model is based on the algebra of U/sub 1/xSU/sub 2/xSU/sub 3/. The systematics of charges of the fundamental fermions seems to suggest the importance of a particular group having this algebra, viz. S(U/sub 2/xU/sub 3/). This group is distinguished from all other connected compact non semisimple groups with dimensionality up to 12 by a characteristic property: it is very ''skew''. By this we mean that the group has relatively few ''generalised outer automorphisms''. One may speculate about physical reasons for this fact. (orig.).

  5. What is special about the group of the standard model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, H. B.; Brene, N.

    1989-06-01

    The standard model is based on the algebra of U 1×SU 2×SU 3. The systematics of charges of the fundamental fermions seems to suggest the importance of a particular group having this algebra, viz. S(U 2×U 3). This group is distinguished from all other connected compact non semisimple groups with dimensionality up to 12 by a characteristic property: it is very “skew”. By this we mean that the group has relatively few “generalised outer automorphisms”. One may speculate about physical reasons for this fact.

  6. Invariance of the Measurement Model Underlying the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-IV in the United States and Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, Stephen C.; Saklofske, Donald H.; Weiss, Lawrence G.

    2011-01-01

    A measurement model describes both the numerical and theoretical relationship between observed scores and the corresponding latent variables or constructs. Testing a measurement model across groups is required to determine if the tests scores are tapping the same constructs so that the same meaning can be ascribed to the scores. Contemporary tests…

  7. THE BOSS EMISSION-LINE LENS SURVEY. IV. SMOOTH LENS MODELS FOR THE BELLS GALLERY SAMPLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, Yiping [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20A Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China); Bolton, Adam S.; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.; Cornachione, Matthew A.; Zheng, Zheng; Brownstein, Joel R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, 115 South 1400 East, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Mao, Shude [Physics Department and Tsinghua Centre for Astrophysics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Kochanek, Christopher S. [Department of Astronomy and Center for Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Pérez-Fournon, Ismael; Marques-Chaves, Rui [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, C/Vía Láctea, s/n, E-38205 San Cristóbal de La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Oguri, Masamune [Research Center for the Early Universe, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Ménard, Brice, E-mail: yiping.shu@nao.cas.cn [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2016-12-20

    We present Hubble Space Telescope F606W-band imaging observations of 21 galaxy-Ly α emitter lens candidates in the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Emission-Line Lens Survey (BELLS) for the GALaxy-Ly α EmitteR sYstems (BELLS GALLERY) survey. Seventeen systems are confirmed to be definite lenses with unambiguous evidence of multiple imaging. The lenses are primarily massive early-type galaxies (ETGs) at redshifts of approximately 0.55, while the lensed sources are Ly α emitters (LAEs) at redshifts from two to three. Although most of the lens systems are well fit by smooth lens models consisting of singular isothermal ellipsoids in an external shear field, a thorough exploration of dark substructures in the lens galaxies is required. The Einstein radii of the BELLS GALLERY lenses are, on average, 60% larger than those of the BELLS lenses because of the much higher source redshifts. This will allow for a detailed investigation of the radius evolution of the mass profile in ETGs. With the aid of the average ∼13× lensing magnification, the LAEs are frequently resolved into individual star-forming knots with a wide range of properties. They have characteristic sizes from less than 100 pc to several kiloparsecs, rest-frame far-UV apparent AB magnitudes from 29.6 to 24.2, and typical projected separations of 500 pc to 2 kpc.

  8. A model of interaction between anticorruption authority and corruption groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neverova, Elena G.; Malafeyef, Oleg A.

    2015-01-01

    The paper provides a model of interaction between anticorruption unit and corruption groups. The main policy functions of the anticorruption unit involve reducing corrupt practices in some entities through an optimal approach to resource allocation and effective anticorruption policy. We develop a model based on Markov decision-making process and use Howard’s policy-improvement algorithm for solving an optimal decision strategy. We examine the assumption that corruption groups retaliate against the anticorruption authority to protect themselves. This model was implemented through stochastic game

  9. A model of interaction between anticorruption authority and corruption groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neverova, Elena G.; Malafeyef, Oleg A. [Saint-Petersburg State University, Saint-Petersburg, Russia, 35, Universitetskii prospekt, Petrodvorets, 198504 Email:elenaneverowa@gmail.com, malafeyevoa@mail.ru (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-10

    The paper provides a model of interaction between anticorruption unit and corruption groups. The main policy functions of the anticorruption unit involve reducing corrupt practices in some entities through an optimal approach to resource allocation and effective anticorruption policy. We develop a model based on Markov decision-making process and use Howard’s policy-improvement algorithm for solving an optimal decision strategy. We examine the assumption that corruption groups retaliate against the anticorruption authority to protect themselves. This model was implemented through stochastic game.

  10. Managing Model Data Introduced Uncertainties in Simulator Predictions for Generation IV Systems via Optimum Experimental Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turinsky, Paul J [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Abdel-Khalik, Hany S [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Stover, Tracy E [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2011-03-01

    An optimization technique has been developed to select optimized experimental design specifications to produce data specifically designed to be assimilated to optimize a given reactor concept. Data from the optimized experiment is assimilated to generate posteriori uncertainties on the reactor concept’s core attributes from which the design responses are computed. The reactor concept is then optimized with the new data to realize cost savings by reducing margin. The optimization problem iterates until an optimal experiment is found to maximize the savings. A new generation of innovative nuclear reactor designs, in particular fast neutron spectrum recycle reactors, are being considered for the application of closing the nuclear fuel cycle in the future. Safe and economical design of these reactors will require uncertainty reduction in basic nuclear data which are input to the reactor design. These data uncertainty propagate to design responses which in turn require the reactor designer to incorporate additional safety margin into the design, which often increases the cost of the reactor. Therefore basic nuclear data needs to be improved and this is accomplished through experimentation. Considering the high cost of nuclear experiments, it is desired to have an optimized experiment which will provide the data needed for uncertainty reduction such that a reactor design concept can meet its target accuracies or to allow savings to be realized by reducing the margin required due to uncertainty propagated from basic nuclear data. However, this optimization is coupled to the reactor design itself because with improved data the reactor concept can be re-optimized itself. It is thus desired to find the experiment that gives the best optimized reactor design. Methods are first established to model both the reactor concept and the experiment and to efficiently propagate the basic nuclear data uncertainty through these models to outputs. The representativity of the experiment

  11. Model of automatic fuel management for the Atucha II nuclear central with the PUMA IV code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marconi G, J.F.; Tarazaga, A.E.; Romero, L.D.

    2007-01-01

    The Atucha II central is a heavy water power station and natural uranium. For this reason and due to the first floor reactivity excess that have this type of reactors, it is necessary to carry out a continuous fuel management and with the central in power (for the case of Atucha II every 0.7 days approximately). To maintain in operation these centrals and to achieve a good fuels economy, different types of negotiate of fuels that include areas and roads where the fuels displace inside the core are proved; it is necessary to prove the great majority of these managements in long periods in order to corroborate the behavior of the power station and the burnt of extraction of the fuel elements. To carry out this work it is of great help that a program implements the approaches to continue in each replacement, using the roads and areas of each administration type to prove, and this way to obtain as results the one regulations execution in the time and the average burnt of extraction of the fuel elements, being fundamental this last data for the operator company of the power station. To carry out the previous work it is necessary that a physicist with experience in fuel management proves each one of the possible managements, even those that quickly can be discarded if its don't fulfill with the regulatory standards or its possess an average extraction burnt too much low. For this it is of fundamental help that with an automatic model the different administrations are proven and lastly the physicist analyzes the more important cases. The pattern in question not only allows to program different types of roads and areas of fuel management, but rather it also foresees the possibility to disable some of the approaches. (Author)

  12. New Pathways between Group Theory and Model Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, László; Goldsmith, Brendan; Strüngmann, Lutz

    2017-01-01

    This volume focuses on group theory and model theory with a particular emphasis on the interplay of the two areas. The survey papers provide an overview of the developments across group, module, and model theory while the research papers present the most recent study in those same areas. With introductory sections that make the topics easily accessible to students, the papers in this volume will appeal to beginning graduate students and experienced researchers alike. As a whole, this book offers a cross-section view of the areas in group, module, and model theory, covering topics such as DP-minimal groups, Abelian groups, countable 1-transitive trees, and module approximations. The papers in this book are the proceedings of the conference “New Pathways between Group Theory and Model Theory,” which took place February 1-4, 2016, in Mülheim an der Ruhr, Germany, in honor of the editors’ colleague Rüdiger Göbel. This publication is dedicated to Professor Göbel, who passed away in 2014. He was one of th...

  13. Fuzzy classification of phantom parent groups in an animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fikse Freddy

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic evaluation models often include genetic groups to account for unequal genetic level of animals with unknown parentage. The definition of phantom parent groups usually includes a time component (e.g. years. Combining several time periods to ensure sufficiently large groups may create problems since all phantom parents in a group are considered contemporaries. Methods To avoid the downside of such distinct classification, a fuzzy logic approach is suggested. A phantom parent can be assigned to several genetic groups, with proportions between zero and one that sum to one. Rules were presented for assigning coefficients to the inverse of the relationship matrix for fuzzy-classified genetic groups. This approach was illustrated with simulated data from ten generations of mass selection. Observations and pedigree records were randomly deleted. Phantom parent groups were defined on the basis of gender and generation number. In one scenario, uncertainty about generation of birth was simulated for some animals with unknown parents. In the distinct classification, one of the two possible generations of birth was randomly chosen to assign phantom parents to genetic groups for animals with simulated uncertainty, whereas the phantom parents were assigned to both possible genetic groups in the fuzzy classification. Results The empirical prediction error variance (PEV was somewhat lower for fuzzy-classified genetic groups. The ranking of animals with unknown parents was more correct and less variable across replicates in comparison with distinct genetic groups. In another scenario, each phantom parent was assigned to three groups, one pertaining to its gender, and two pertaining to the first and last generation, with proportion depending on the (true generation of birth. Due to the lower number of groups, the empirical PEV of breeding values was smaller when genetic groups were fuzzy-classified. Conclusion Fuzzy

  14. Group Elevator Peak Scheduling Based on Robust Optimization Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG, J.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Scheduling of Elevator Group Control System (EGCS is a typical combinatorial optimization problem. Uncertain group scheduling under peak traffic flows has become a research focus and difficulty recently. RO (Robust Optimization method is a novel and effective way to deal with uncertain scheduling problem. In this paper, a peak scheduling method based on RO model for multi-elevator system is proposed. The method is immune to the uncertainty of peak traffic flows, optimal scheduling is realized without getting exact numbers of each calling floor's waiting passengers. Specifically, energy-saving oriented multi-objective scheduling price is proposed, RO uncertain peak scheduling model is built to minimize the price. Because RO uncertain model could not be solved directly, RO uncertain model is transformed to RO certain model by elevator scheduling robust counterparts. Because solution space of elevator scheduling is enormous, to solve RO certain model in short time, ant colony solving algorithm for elevator scheduling is proposed. Based on the algorithm, optimal scheduling solutions are found quickly, and group elevators are scheduled according to the solutions. Simulation results show the method could improve scheduling performances effectively in peak pattern. Group elevators' efficient operation is realized by the RO scheduling method.

  15. Wave propagation model of heat conduction and group speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Long; Zhang, Xiaomin; Peng, Song

    2018-03-01

    In view of the finite relaxation model of non-Fourier's law, the Cattaneo and Vernotte (CV) model and Fourier's law are presented in this work for comparing wave propagation modes. Independent variable translation is applied to solve the partial differential equation. Results show that the general form of the time spatial distribution of temperature for the three media comprises two solutions: those corresponding to the positive and negative logarithmic heating rates. The former shows that a group of heat waves whose spatial distribution follows the exponential function law propagates at a group speed; the speed of propagation is related to the logarithmic heating rate. The total speed of all the possible heat waves can be combined to form the group speed of the wave propagation. The latter indicates that the spatial distribution of temperature, which follows the exponential function law, decays with time. These features show that propagation accelerates when heated and decelerates when cooled. For the model media that follow Fourier's law and correspond to the positive heat rate of heat conduction, the propagation mode is also considered the propagation of a group of heat waves because the group speed has no upper bound. For the finite relaxation model with non-Fourier media, the interval of group speed is bounded and the maximum speed can be obtained when the logarithmic heating rate is exactly the reciprocal of relaxation time. And for the CV model with a non-Fourier medium, the interval of group speed is also bounded and the maximum value can be obtained when the logarithmic heating rate is infinite.

  16. Hidden Markov models for the activity profile of terrorist groups

    OpenAIRE

    Raghavan, Vasanthan; Galstyan, Aram; Tartakovsky, Alexander G.

    2012-01-01

    The main focus of this work is on developing models for the activity profile of a terrorist group, detecting sudden spurts and downfalls in this profile, and, in general, tracking it over a period of time. Toward this goal, a $d$-state hidden Markov model (HMM) that captures the latent states underlying the dynamics of the group and thus its activity profile is developed. The simplest setting of $d=2$ corresponds to the case where the dynamics are coarsely quantized as Active and Inactive, re...

  17. Elasto-dynamic analysis of a gear pump-Part IV: Improvement in the pressure distribution modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucchi, E.; Dalpiaz, G.; Fernàndez del Rincòn, A.

    2015-01-01

    This work concerns external gear pumps for automotive applications, which operate at high speed and low pressure. In previous works of the authors (Part I and II, [1,2]), a non-linear lumped-parameter kineto-elastodynamic model for the prediction of the dynamic behaviour of external gear pumps was presented. It takes into account the most important phenomena involved in the operation of this kind of machine. The two main sources of noise and vibration are considered: pressure pulsation and gear meshing. The model has been used in order to foresee the influence of working conditions and design modifications on vibration generation. The model experimental validation is a difficult task. Thus, Part III proposes a novel methodology for the validation carried out by the comparison of simulations and experimental results concerning forces and moments: it deals with the external and inertial components acting on the gears, estimated by the model, and the reactions and inertial components on the pump casing and the test plate, obtained by measurements. The validation is carried out by comparing the level of the time synchronous average in the time domain and the waterfall maps in the frequency domain, with particular attention to identify system resonances. The validation results are satisfactory global, but discrepancies are still present. Moreover, the assessed model has been properly modified for the application to a new virtual pump prototype with helical gears in order to foresee gear accelerations and dynamic forces. Part IV is focused on improvements in the modelling and analysis of the phenomena bound to the pressure distribution around the gears in order to achieve results closer to the measured values. As a matter of fact, the simulation results have shown that a variable meshing stiffness has a notable contribution on the dynamic behaviour of the pump but this is not as important as the pressure phenomena. As a consequence, the original model was modified with

  18. Administration of a dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor enhances the intestinal adaptation in a mouse model of short bowel syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okawada, Manabu; Holst, Jens Juul; Teitelbaum, Daniel H

    2011-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 induces small intestine mucosal epithelial cell proliferation and may have benefit for patients who suffer from short bowel syndrome. However, glucagon-like peptide-2 is inactivated rapidly in vivo by dipeptidyl peptidase IV. Therefore, we hypothesized that selectively inh...... inhibiting dipeptidyl peptidase IV would prolong the circulating life of glucagon-like peptide-2 and lead to increased intestinal adaptation after development of short bowel syndrome....

  19. Waste area Grouping 2 Phase I remedial investigation: Sediment and Cesium-137 transport modeling report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clapp, R.B.; Bao, Y.S.; Moore, T.D.; Brenkert, A.L.; Purucker, S.T.; Reece, D.K.; Burgoa, B.B.

    1996-06-01

    This report is one of five reports issued in 1996 that provide follow-up information to the Phase I Remedial Investigation (RI) Report for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The five reports address areas of concern that may present immediate risk to public health at the Clinch River and ecological risk within WAG 2 at ORNL. A sixth report, on groundwater, in the series documenting WAG 2 RI Phase I results were part of project activities conducted in FY 1996. The five reports that complete activities conducted as part of Phase I of the Remedial Investigation (RI) for WAG 2 are as follows: (1) Waste Area Grouping 2, Phase I Task Data Report: Seep Data Assessment, (2) Waste Area Grouping 2, Phase I Task Data Report: Tributaries Data Assessment, (3) Waste Area Grouping 2, Phase I Task Data Report: Ecological Risk Assessment, (4) Waste Area Grouping 2, Phase I Task Data Report: Human Health Risk Assessment, (5) Waste Area Grouping 2, Phase I Task Data Report: Sediment and 137 Cs Transport Modeling In December 1990, the Remedial Investigation Plan for Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was issued (ORNL 1990). The WAG 2 RI Plan was structured with a short-term component to be conducted while upgradient WAGs are investigated and remediated, and a long-term component that will complete the RI process for WAG 2 following remediation of upgradient WAGs. RI activities for the short-term component were initiated with the approval of the Environmental Protection Agency, Region IV (EPA), and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). This report presents the results of an investigation of the risk associated with possible future releases of 137 Cs due to an extreme flood. The results are based on field measurements made during storms and computer model simulations

  20. SDSS-IV MaNGA: modelling the metallicity gradients of gas and stars - radially dependent metal outflow versus IMF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Jianhui; Thomas, Daniel; Maraston, Claudia; Goddard, Daniel; Parikh, Taniya; Fernández-Trincado, J. G.; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre; Rong, Yu; Tang, Baitian; Yan, Renbin

    2018-05-01

    In our previous work, we found that only two scenarios are capable of reproducing the observed integrated mass-metallicity relations for the gas and stellar components of local star-forming galaxies simultaneously. One scenario invokes a time-dependent metal outflow loading factor with stronger outflows at early times. The other scenario uses a time-dependent initial mass function (IMF) slope with a steeper IMF at early times. In this work, we extend our study to investigate the radial profile of gas and stellar metallicity in local star-forming galaxies using spatially resolved spectroscopic data from the SDSS-IV MaNGA survey. We find that most galaxies show negative gradients in both gas and stellar metallicity with steeper gradients in stellar metallicity. The stellar metallicity gradients tend to be mass dependent with steeper gradients in more massive galaxies while no clear mass dependence is found for the gas metallicity gradient. Then we compare the observations with the predictions from a chemical evolution model of the radial profiles of gas and stellar metallicities. We confirm that the two scenarios proposed in our previous work are also required to explain the metallicity gradients. Based on these two scenarios, we successfully reproduce the radial profiles of gas metallicity, stellar metallicity, stellar mass surface density, and star formation rate surface density simultaneously. The origin of the negative gradient in stellar metallicity turns out to be driven by either radially dependent metal outflow or IMF slope. In contrast, the radial dependence of the gas metallicity is less constrained because of the degeneracy in model parameters.

  1. Modelling animal group fission using social network dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric Sueur

    Full Text Available Group life involves both advantages and disadvantages, meaning that individuals have to compromise between their nutritional needs and their social links. When a compromise is impossible, the group splits in order to reduce conflict of interests and favour positive social interactions between its members. In this study we built a dynamic model of social networks to represent a succession of temporary fissions involving a change in social relations that could potentially lead to irreversible group fission (i.e. no more group fusion. This is the first study that assesses how a social network changes according to group fission-fusion dynamics. We built a model that was based on different parameters: the group size, the influence of nutritional needs compared to social needs, and the changes in the social network after a temporary fission. The results obtained from this theoretical data indicate how the percentage of social relation transfer, the number of individuals and the relative importance of nutritional requirements and social links influence the average number of days before irreversible fission occurs. The greater the nutritional needs and the higher the transfer of social relations during temporary fission, the fewer days will be observed before an irreversible fission. It is crucial to bridge the gap between the individual and the population level if we hope to understand how simple, local interactions may drive ecological systems.

  2. Network formation under heterogeneous costs: The multiple group model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphorst, J.J.A.; van der Laan, G.

    2007-01-01

    It is widely recognized that the shape of networks influences both individual and aggregate behavior. This raises the question which types of networks are likely to arise. In this paper we investigate a model of network formation, where players are divided into groups and the costs of a link between

  3. Migdal-Kadanoff renormalization group for the Z(5) model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baltar, V.L.V.; Carneiro, G.M.; Pol, M.E.; Zagury, N.

    1984-01-01

    The Migdal-Kadanoff renormalization group methods is used to calculate the phase diagram of the AF Z(5) model. It is found that this scheme simulates a fixed line which it is interpreted as the locus of attraction of a critical phase. This result is in reasonable agreement with the predictions of Monte Carlo simulations. (Author) [pt

  4. A consistent phenomenological model for natural organic matter linked migration of Cm(III), Pu(III/IV), Np(IV), Tc(IV) and Pa(V) in the Boom Clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martens, E.; Maes, N.; Bruggeman, C.; Van Gompel, M.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. As Natural Organic Matter (NOM) may modify/enhance the mobility of radionuclides (RNs) through complexation or colloidal interactions, it is essential to evaluate the impact of these processes before performing safety assessments aiming at demonstrating the suitability of deep-seated clayey formations for geological disposal of radioactive waste. Column migration experiments with Cm, Pu, Np, Tc and Pa in Boom Clay, initiated about 10 years ago, showed strikingly similar features despite their different chemical speciation. On a relative short time, these RNs began percolating through the clay core until a constant concentration at the outlet side was reached. As most of the aqueous forms of these RNs are supposed to sorb strongly onto the Boom Clay solid phase, it was assumed that their relative fast transport was due to colloids (either intrinsic colloids or NOM-colloids). The constant concentration percolating from the core was thought to result from a solubility limiting phase precipitated at the source position. However, the concentrations in the percolate were systematically lower than the thermodynamic calculated solubilities, and all the more, complexation to NOM would likely result in an increased RN concentration. Although these curves could be modelled by a simple diffusion-advection relationship with linear sorption, they could not be backed up by a mechanistic understanding. As the concentration in the percolate remained constant for many years, the RN-species eluting from the core are assumed to be well in equilibrium with the Boom Clay geochemical conditions. Therefore, they were used as input source (constant concentration boundary condition) for a migration experiment through a fresh clay core (i.e. the outlet of a first cell was coupled to the inlet of a second cell). The measured concentrations at the outlet of the second clay core also reached a constant value, but this value is about one order

  5. Linear mixed-effects modeling approach to FMRI group analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Saad, Ziad S; Britton, Jennifer C; Pine, Daniel S; Cox, Robert W

    2013-06-01

    Conventional group analysis is usually performed with Student-type t-test, regression, or standard AN(C)OVA in which the variance-covariance matrix is presumed to have a simple structure. Some correction approaches are adopted when assumptions about the covariance structure is violated. However, as experiments are designed with different degrees of sophistication, these traditional methods can become cumbersome, or even be unable to handle the situation at hand. For example, most current FMRI software packages have difficulty analyzing the following scenarios at group level: (1) taking within-subject variability into account when there are effect estimates from multiple runs or sessions; (2) continuous explanatory variables (covariates) modeling in the presence of a within-subject (repeated measures) factor, multiple subject-grouping (between-subjects) factors, or the mixture of both; (3) subject-specific adjustments in covariate modeling; (4) group analysis with estimation of hemodynamic response (HDR) function by multiple basis functions; (5) various cases of missing data in longitudinal studies; and (6) group studies involving family members or twins. Here we present a linear mixed-effects modeling (LME) methodology that extends the conventional group analysis approach to analyze many complicated cases, including the six prototypes delineated above, whose analyses would be otherwise either difficult or unfeasible under traditional frameworks such as AN(C)OVA and general linear model (GLM). In addition, the strength of the LME framework lies in its flexibility to model and estimate the variance-covariance structures for both random effects and residuals. The intraclass correlation (ICC) values can be easily obtained with an LME model with crossed random effects, even at the presence of confounding fixed effects. The simulations of one prototypical scenario indicate that the LME modeling keeps a balance between the control for false positives and the sensitivity

  6. Renormalisation group improved leptogenesis in family symmetry models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, Iain K.; King, Stephen F.; Luhn, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    We study renormalisation group (RG) corrections relevant for leptogenesis in the case of family symmetry models such as the Altarelli-Feruglio A 4 model of tri-bimaximal lepton mixing or its extension to tri-maximal mixing. Such corrections are particularly relevant since in large classes of family symmetry models, to leading order, the CP violating parameters of leptogenesis would be identically zero at the family symmetry breaking scale, due to the form dominance property. We find that RG corrections violate form dominance and enable such models to yield viable leptogenesis at the scale of right-handed neutrino masses. More generally, the results of this paper show that RG corrections to leptogenesis cannot be ignored for any family symmetry model involving sizeable neutrino and τ Yukawa couplings.

  7. Discriminative latent models for recognizing contextual group activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Tian; Wang, Yang; Yang, Weilong; Robinovitch, Stephen N; Mori, Greg

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, we go beyond recognizing the actions of individuals and focus on group activities. This is motivated from the observation that human actions are rarely performed in isolation; the contextual information of what other people in the scene are doing provides a useful cue for understanding high-level activities. We propose a novel framework for recognizing group activities which jointly captures the group activity, the individual person actions, and the interactions among them. Two types of contextual information, group-person interaction and person-person interaction, are explored in a latent variable framework. In particular, we propose three different approaches to model the person-person interaction. One approach is to explore the structures of person-person interaction. Differently from most of the previous latent structured models, which assume a predefined structure for the hidden layer, e.g., a tree structure, we treat the structure of the hidden layer as a latent variable and implicitly infer it during learning and inference. The second approach explores person-person interaction in the feature level. We introduce a new feature representation called the action context (AC) descriptor. The AC descriptor encodes information about not only the action of an individual person in the video, but also the behavior of other people nearby. The third approach combines the above two. Our experimental results demonstrate the benefit of using contextual information for disambiguating group activities.

  8. Topological Poisson Sigma models on Poisson-Lie groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvo, Ivan; Falceto, Fernando; Garcia-Alvarez, David

    2003-01-01

    We solve the topological Poisson Sigma model for a Poisson-Lie group G and its dual G*. We show that the gauge symmetry for each model is given by its dual group that acts by dressing transformations on the target. The resolution of both models in the open geometry reveals that there exists a map from the reduced phase of each model (P and P*) to the main symplectic leaf of the Heisenberg double (D 0 ) such that the symplectic forms on P, P* are obtained as the pull-back by those maps of the symplectic structure on D 0 . This uncovers a duality between P and P* under the exchange of bulk degrees of freedom of one model with boundary degrees of freedom of the other one. We finally solve the Poisson Sigma model for the Poisson structure on G given by a pair of r-matrices that generalizes the Poisson-Lie case. The Hamiltonian analysis of the theory requires the introduction of a deformation of the Heisenberg double. (author)

  9. Graphs of groups on surfaces interactions and models

    CERN Document Server

    White, AT

    2001-01-01

    The book, suitable as both an introductory reference and as a text book in the rapidly growing field of topological graph theory, models both maps (as in map-coloring problems) and groups by means of graph imbeddings on sufaces. Automorphism groups of both graphs and maps are studied. In addition connections are made to other areas of mathematics, such as hypergraphs, block designs, finite geometries, and finite fields. There are chapters on the emerging subfields of enumerative topological graph theory and random topological graph theory, as well as a chapter on the composition of English

  10. The Model to Assess the Implementation of Technical Conditions Defined in Annex IV of Marpol Convention 73/78: The Case of the Baltic Sea Port of Klaipeda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarzemskis Andrius

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Baltic Marine Environment Protection Commission members seeking to implement MARPOL 73/78 Annex IV amendments which recognize the Baltic Sea as special are, in which discharge of uncommitted sewage from passenger ships is forbidden, must ensure that ports are equipped with adequate reception facilities. To ensure implementation of amendments of Annex IV in port of Klaipeda, the analysis framework model was defined by authors. The model evaluates the readiness of the port to changes brought by the amendments of MARPOL Annex IV. The scientific problem comes with perception of adequacy. Resolution MEPC.200(62 amending MARPOL 73/78 Annex IV states, that port reception facilities must be adequate to the needs of passenger ships using them without causing undue delay. Concept of adequacy is not defined, therefore other guidelines explaining adequacy were used: EU directive 2000/59/EC and IMO resolution MEPC.83(44 Guidelines for ensuring adequacy of port reception facilities. Based on these sources, criteria that must be met to ensure adequacy were identified and tested in article: 1 reception facilities meet needs of ships normally using them; 2 discharge of sewage does to cause undue delay; 3 reception facilities does not provide disincentive to use them; 4 facilities are accessible; 5 facilities contribute to the improvement of the marine environment.

  11. Encyclopedia of two-phase heat transfer and flow IV modeling methodologies, boiling of CO₂, and micro-two-phase cooling

    CERN Document Server

    2018-01-01

    Set IV is a new addition to the previous Sets I, II and III. It contains 23 invited chapters from international specialists on the topics of numerical modeling of pulsating heat pipes and of slug flows with evaporation; lattice Boltzmann modeling of pool boiling; fundamentals of boiling in microchannels and microfin tubes, CO2 and nanofluids; testing and modeling of micro-two-phase cooling systems for electronics; and various special topics (flow separation in microfluidics, two-phase sensors, wetting of anisotropic surfaces, ultra-compact heat exchangers, etc.). The invited authors are leading university researchers and well-known engineers from leading corporate research laboratories (ABB, IBM, Nokia Bell Labs). Numerous "must read" chapters are also included here for the two-phase community. Set IV constitutes a "must have" engineering and research reference together with previous Sets I, II and III for thermal engineering researchers and practitioners.

  12. Simulators IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairchild, B.T.

    1987-01-01

    These proceedings contain papers on simulators with artificial intelligence, and the human decision making process; visuals for simulators: human factors, training, and psycho-physical impacts; the role of institutional structure on simulation projects; maintenance trainers for economic value and safety; biomedical simulators for understanding nature, for medical benefits, and the physiological effects of simulators; the mathematical models and numerical techniques that drive today's simulators; and the demography of simulators, with census papers identifying the population of real-time simulator training devices; nuclear reactors

  13. The monster sporadic group and a theory underlying superstring models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapline, G.

    1996-09-01

    The pattern of duality symmetries acting on the states of compactified superstring models reinforces an earlier suggestion that the Monster sporadic group is a hidden symmetry for superstring models. This in turn points to a supersymmetric theory of self-dual and anti-self-dual K3 manifolds joined by Dirac strings and evolving in a 13 dimensional spacetime as the fundamental theory. In addition to the usual graviton and dilaton this theory contains matter-like degrees of freedom resembling the massless states of the heterotic string, thus providing a completely geometric interpretation for ordinary matter. 25 refs

  14. Temporal Lobe Reactions After Carbon Ion Radiation Therapy: Comparison of Relative Biological Effectiveness–Weighted Tolerance Doses Predicted by Local Effect Models I and IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillmann, Clarissa, E-mail: clarissa.gillmann@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiation Therapy, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Jäkel, Oliver [Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiation Therapy, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Schlampp, Ingmar [Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiation Therapy, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Karger, Christian P. [Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To compare the relative biological effectiveness (RBE)–weighted tolerance doses for temporal lobe reactions after carbon ion radiation therapy using 2 different versions of the local effect model (LEM I vs LEM IV) for the same patient collective under identical conditions. Methods and Materials: In a previous study, 59 patients were investigated, of whom 10 experienced temporal lobe reactions (TLR) after carbon ion radiation therapy for low-grade skull-base chordoma and chondrosarcoma at Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung (GSI) in Darmstadt, Germany in 2002 and 2003. TLR were detected as visible contrast enhancements on T1-weighted MRI images within a median follow-up time of 2.5 years. Although the derived RBE-weighted temporal lobe doses were based on the clinically applied LEM I, we have now recalculated the RBE-weighted dose distributions using LEM IV and derived dose-response curves with Dmax,V-1 cm³ (the RBE-weighted maximum dose in the remaining temporal lobe volume, excluding the volume of 1 cm³ with the highest dose) as an independent dosimetric variable. The resulting RBE-weighted tolerance doses were compared with those of the previous study to assess the clinical impact of LEM IV relative to LEM I. Results: The dose-response curve of LEM IV is shifted toward higher values compared to that of LEM I. The RBE-weighted tolerance dose for a 5% complication probability (TD{sub 5}) increases from 68.8 ± 3.3 to 78.3 ± 4.3 Gy (RBE) for LEM IV as compared to LEM I. Conclusions: LEM IV predicts a clinically significant increase of the RBE-weighted tolerance doses for the temporal lobe as compared to the currently applied LEM I. The limited available photon data do not allow a final conclusion as to whether RBE predictions of LEM I or LEM IV better fit better clinical experience in photon therapy. The decision about a future clinical application of LEM IV therefore requires additional analysis of temporal lobe reactions in a

  15. A model for amalgamation in group decision making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutello, Vincenzo; Montero, Javier

    1992-01-01

    In this paper we present a generalization of the model proposed by Montero, by allowing non-complete fuzzy binary relations for individuals. A degree of unsatisfaction can be defined in this case, suggesting that any democratic aggregation rule should take into account not only ethical conditions or some degree of rationality in the amalgamating procedure, but also a minimum support for the set of alternatives subject to the group analysis.

  16. Polymer-bound oxidovanadium(IV) and dioxidovanadium(V) complexes as catalysts for the oxidative desulfurization of model fuel diesel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, Mannar R; Arya, Aarti; Kumar, Amit; Kuznetsov, Maxim L; Avecilla, Fernando; Costa Pessoa, João

    2010-07-19

    The Schiff base (Hfsal-dmen) derived from 3-formylsalicylic acid and N,N-dimethyl ethylenediamine has been covalently bonded to chloromethylated polystyrene to give the polymer-bound ligand, PS-Hfsal-dmen (I). Treatment of PS-Hfsal-dmen with [V(IV)O(acac)(2)] in the presence of MeOH gave the oxidovanadium(IV) complex PS-[V(IV)O(fsal-dmen)(MeO)] (1). On aerial oxidation in methanol, complex 1 was oxidized to PS-[V(V)O(2)(fsal-dmen)] (2). The corresponding neat complexes, [V(IV)O(sal-dmen)(acac)] (3) and [V(V)O(2)(sal-dmen)] (4) were similarly prepared. All these complexes are characterized by various spectroscopic techniques (IR, electronic, NMR, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)) and thermal as well as field-emission scanning electron micrographs (FE-SEM) studies, and the molecular structures of 3 and 4 were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The EPR spectrum of the polymer supported V(IV)O-complex 1 is characteristic of magnetically diluted V(IV)O-complexes, the resolved EPR pattern indicating that the V(IV)O-centers are well dispersed in the polymer matrix. A good (51)V NMR spectrum could also be measured with 4 suspended in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), the chemical shift (-503 ppm) being compatible with a VO(2)(+)-center and a N,O binding set. The catalytic oxidative desulfurization of organosulfur compounds thiophene, dibenzothiophene, benzothiophene, and 2-methyl thiophene (model of fuel diesel) was carried out using complexes 1 and 2. The sulfur in model organosulfur compounds oxidizes to the corresponding sulfone in the presence of H(2)O(2). The systems 1 and 2 do not loose efficiency for sulfoxidation at least up to the third cycle of reaction, this indicating that they preserve their integrity under the conditions used. Plausible intermediates involved in these catalytic processes are established by UV-vis, EPR, (51)V NMR, and density functional theory (DFT) studies, and an outline of the mechanism is proposed. The (51)V NMR spectra

  17. Renormalization group analysis of a simple hierarchical fermion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorlas, T.C.

    1991-01-01

    A simple hierarchical fermion model is constructed which gives rise to an exact renormalization transformation in a 2-dimensional parameter space. The behaviour of this transformation is studied. It has two hyperbolic fixed points for which the existence of a global critical line is proven. The asymptotic behaviour of the transformation is used to prove the existence of the thermodynamic limit in a certain domain in parameter space. Also the existence of a continuum limit for these theories is investigated using information about the asymptotic renormalization behaviour. It turns out that the 'trivial' fixed point gives rise to a two-parameter family of continuum limits corresponding to that part of parameter space where the renormalization trajectories originate at this fixed point. Although the model is not very realistic it serves as a simple example of the appliclation of the renormalization group to proving the existence of the thermodynamic limit and the continuum limit of lattice models. Moreover, it illustrates possible complications that can arise in global renormalization group behaviour, and that might also be present in other models where no global analysis of the renormalization transformation has yet been achieved. (orig.)

  18. Model parameters for representative wetland plant functional groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Amber S.; Kiniry, James R.; Mushet, David M.; Smith, Loren M.; McMurry, Scott T.; Attebury, Kelly; Lang, Megan; McCarty, Gregory W.; Shaffer, Jill A.; Effland, William R.; Johnson, Mari-Vaughn V.

    2017-01-01

    Wetlands provide a wide variety of ecosystem services including water quality remediation, biodiversity refugia, groundwater recharge, and floodwater storage. Realistic estimation of ecosystem service benefits associated with wetlands requires reasonable simulation of the hydrology of each site and realistic simulation of the upland and wetland plant growth cycles. Objectives of this study were to quantify leaf area index (LAI), light extinction coefficient (k), and plant nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) concentrations in natural stands of representative plant species for some major plant functional groups in the United States. Functional groups in this study were based on these parameters and plant growth types to enable process-based modeling. We collected data at four locations representing some of the main wetland regions of the United States. At each site, we collected on-the-ground measurements of fraction of light intercepted, LAI, and dry matter within the 2013–2015 growing seasons. Maximum LAI and k variables showed noticeable variations among sites and years, while overall averages and functional group averages give useful estimates for multisite simulation modeling. Variation within each species gives an indication of what can be expected in such natural ecosystems. For P and K, the concentrations from highest to lowest were spikerush (Eleocharis macrostachya), reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea), smartweed (Polygonum spp.), cattail (Typha spp.), and hardstem bulrush (Schoenoplectus acutus). Spikerush had the highest N concentration, followed by smartweed, bulrush, reed canary grass, and then cattail. These parameters will be useful for the actual wetland species measured and for the wetland plant functional groups they represent. These parameters and the associated process-based models offer promise as valuable tools for evaluating environmental benefits of wetlands and for evaluating impacts of various agronomic practices in

  19. Novel model of direct and indirect cost-benefit analysis of mechanical embolectomy over IV tPA for large vessel occlusions: a real-world dollar analysis based on improvements in mRS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangla, Sundeep; O'Connell, Keara; Kumari, Divya; Shahrzad, Maryam

    2016-01-20

    Ischemic strokes result in significant healthcare expenditures (direct costs) and loss of quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) (indirect costs). Interventional therapy has demonstrated improved functional outcomes in patients with large vessel occlusions (LVOs), which are likely to reduce the economic burden of strokes. To develop a novel real-world dollar model to assess the direct and indirect cost-benefit of mechanical embolectomy compared with medical treatment with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV tPA) based on shifts in modified Rankin scores (mRS). A cost model was developed including multiple parameters to account for both direct and indirect stroke costs. These were adjusted based upon functional outcome (mRS). The model compared IV tPA with mechanical embolectomy to assess the costs and benefits of both therapies. Direct stroke-related costs included hospitalization, inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation, home care, skilled nursing facilities, and long-term care facility costs. Indirect costs included years of life expectancy lost and lost QALYs. Values for the model cost parameters were derived from numerous resources and functional outcomes were derived from the MR CLEAN study as a reflective sample of LVOs. Direct and indirect costs and benefits for the two treatments were assessed using Microsoft Excel 2013. This cost-benefit model found a cost-benefit of mechanical embolectomy over IV tPA of $163 624.27 per patient and the cost benefit for 50 000 patients on an annual basis is $8 181 213 653.77. If applied widely within the USA, mechanical embolectomy will significantly reduce the direct and indirect financial burden of stroke ($8 billion/50 000 patients). Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  20. Renormalization group approach to causal bulk viscous cosmological models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belinchon, J A; Harko, T; Mak, M K

    2002-01-01

    The renormalization group method is applied to the study of homogeneous and flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker type universes, filled with a causal bulk viscous cosmological fluid. The starting point of the study is the consideration of the scaling properties of the gravitational field equations, the causal evolution equation of the bulk viscous pressure and the equations of state. The requirement of scale invariance imposes strong constraints on the temporal evolution of the bulk viscosity coefficient, temperature and relaxation time, thus leading to the possibility of obtaining the bulk viscosity coefficient-energy density dependence. For a cosmological model with bulk viscosity coefficient proportional to the Hubble parameter, we perform the analysis of the renormalization group flow around the scale-invariant fixed point, thereby obtaining the long-time behaviour of the scale factor

  1. Evaluation of the perceptual grouping parameter in the CTVA model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Cortijo

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The CODE Theory of Visual Attention (CTVA is a mathematical model explaining the effects of grouping by proximity and distance upon reaction times and accuracy of response with regard to elements in the visual display. The predictions of the theory agree quite acceptably in one and two dimensions (CTVA-2D with the experimental results (reaction times and accuracy of response. The difference between reaction-times for the compatible and incompatible responses, known as the responsecompatibility effect, is also acceptably predicted, except at small distances and high number of distractors. Further results using the same paradigm at even smaller distances have been now obtained, showing greater discrepancies. Then, we have introduced a method to evaluate the strength of sensory evidence (eta parameter, which takes grouping by similarity into account and minimizes these discrepancies.

  2. Extended Group Contribution Model for Polyfunctional Phase Equilibria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildskov, Jens

    of physical separation processes. In a thermodynamic sense, design requires detailed knowledge of activity coefficients in the phases at equilibrium. The prediction of these quantities from a minimum of experimental data is the broad scope of this thesis. Adequate equations exist for predicting vapor......Material and energy balances and equilibrium data form the basis of most design calculations. While material and energy balances may be stated without much difficulty, the design engineer is left with a choice between a wide variety of models for describing phase equilibria in the design......-liquid equilibria from data on binary mixtures, composed of structurally simple molecules with a single functional group. More complex is the situation with mixtures composed of structurally more complicated molecules or molecules with more than one functional group. The UNIFAC method is extended to handle...

  3. Penson-Kolb-Hubbard model: a renormalisation group study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, Bibhas; Roy, G.K.

    1995-01-01

    The Penson-Kolb-Hubbard (PKH) model in one dimension (1d) by means of real space renormalisation group (RG) method for the half-filled band has been studied. Different phases are identified by studying the RG-flow pattern, the energy gap and different correlation functions. The phase diagram consists of four phases: a spin density wave (SDW), a strong coupling superconducting phase (SSC), a weak coupling superconducting phase (WSC) and a nearly metallic phase. For the negative value of the pair hopping amplitude introduced in this model it was found that the pair-pair correlation indicates a superconducting phase for which the centre-of-mass of the pairs move with a momentum π. (author). 7 refs., 4 figs

  4. Functional renormalization group study of the Anderson–Holstein model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laakso, M A; Kennes, D M; Jakobs, S G; Meden, V

    2014-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the spectral and transport properties in the Anderson–Holstein model both in and out of equilibrium using the functional renormalization group (fRG). We show how the previously established machinery of Matsubara and Keldysh fRG can be extended to include the local phonon mode. Based on the analysis of spectral properties in equilibrium we identify different regimes depending on the strength of the electron–phonon interaction and the frequency of the phonon mode. We supplement these considerations with analytical results from the Kondo model. We also calculate the nonlinear differential conductance through the Anderson–Holstein quantum dot and find clear signatures of the presence of the phonon mode. (paper)

  5. Peace Corps Stateside Teacher Training for Volunteers in Liberia. Volume IV: Training Program for Secondary School Teachers (Group C). Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    PSI Associates, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The Peace Corps stateside training program for secondary school teachers in Liberia trained 37 volunteers in several subject area groups--language arts, mathematics and science, and health. Because many of the teachers had never taught before, their 4-week training program concentrated on teaching and learning theories and specific teaching…

  6. Validation of SCALE 4.0 -- CSAS25 module and the 27-group ENDF/B-IV cross-section library for low-enriched uranium systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, W.C.

    1993-02-01

    A version of KENO V.a and the 27-group library in SCALE-4.0 were validated for use in evaluating the nuclear criticality safety of low-enriched uranium systems. A total of 59 critical systems were analyzed. A statistical analysis of the results was performed, and subcritical acceptanced criteria are established.

  7. Validation of SCALE 4. 0 -- CSAS25 module and the 27-group ENDF/B-IV cross-section library for low-enriched uranium systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, W.C.

    1993-02-01

    A version of KENO V.a and the 27-group library in SCALE-4.0 were validated for use in evaluating the nuclear criticality safety of low-enriched uranium systems. A total of 59 critical systems were analyzed. A statistical analysis of the results was performed, and subcritical acceptanced criteria are established.

  8. On the I-V characteristic in the non-linear tenary mixture model for polycrystalline semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Van Lien; Nguyen Hoai Nam

    2000-08-01

    A simple expression for the voltage dependence of grain-boundary potential barrier heights is proposed and the Effective Medium Approximation is extended for calculating the I-V characteristic in tenary mixtures of highly non-linear circuit elements. Numerical calculations are performed for the case of polycrystalline semiconductors, such as ZnO-based varistors, where the thermoionic emission is believed to be the dominant mechanism for the electric conduction across double Schottky barriers at room temperature. (author)

  9. Renormalization group approach to a p-wave superconducting model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Continentino, Mucio A.; Deus, Fernanda; Caldas, Heron

    2014-01-01

    We present in this work an exact renormalization group (RG) treatment of a one-dimensional p-wave superconductor. The model proposed by Kitaev consists of a chain of spinless fermions with a p-wave gap. It is a paradigmatic model of great actual interest since it presents a weak pairing superconducting phase that has Majorana fermions at the ends of the chain. Those are predicted to be useful for quantum computation. The RG allows to obtain the phase diagram of the model and to study the quantum phase transition from the weak to the strong pairing phase. It yields the attractors of these phases and the critical exponents of the weak to strong pairing transition. We show that the weak pairing phase of the model is governed by a chaotic attractor being non-trivial from both its topological and RG properties. In the strong pairing phase the RG flow is towards a conventional strong coupling fixed point. Finally, we propose an alternative way for obtaining p-wave superconductivity in a one-dimensional system without spin–orbit interaction.

  10. A randomised trial of accelerated and conventional radiotherapy for stage III and IV squamous carcinoma of the head and neck: a Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulsen, Michael G.; Denham, James W.; Peters, Lester J.; Lamb, David S.; Spry, Nigel A.; Hindley, Andrew; Krawitz, Hedley; Hamilton, Chris; Keller, Jacqui; Tripcony, Lee; Walker, Quenten

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: The aims of this randomized controlled trial were to determine whether there were differences in the disease-free survival (DFS) and toxicity between conventional radiotherapy (CRT) and a continuous 3 week accelerated radiotherapy regimen (ART) in stage III and IV squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, oropharynx, larynx and hypopharynx. Patients and methods: Patients from 14 centres throughout Australia and New Zealand were randomly assigned to either CRT, using a single 2 Gy/day to a dose of 70 Gy in 35 fractions in 49 days or to ART, using 1.8 Gy twice a day to a dose of 59.4 Gy in 33 fractions in 24 days. Treatment allocation was stratified for site and stage. The accrual began in 1991 and the trial was closed in 1998 when the target of 350 patients was reached. Results: The median potential follow-up time was 53 months (range, 14-101). The DFS at 5 years was 41% (95% CI, 33-50%) for ART and 35% (95% CI, 27-43%) for CRT (P=0.323) and the hazard ratio was 0.87 in favour of ART (95% CI, 0.66-1.15). The 5-year disease-specific survival rates were 40% for CRT and 46% for ART (P=0.398) and the loco-regional control was 47% for CRT vs. 52% for ART (P=0.300). The respective hazard ratios were 0.88 (95% CI, 0.65-1.2) and 0.85 (0.62-1.16), favouring the accelerated arm. In the ART arm, confluent mucositis was more severe (94 vs. 71%; P<0.001) and peaked about 3 weeks earlier than in the CRT arm, but healing appeared complete in all cases. There were statistically significant reductions in the probability of grade 2 or greater late soft tissue effects over time in the ART arm (P<0.05), except for the mucous membrane where late effects were similar in both arms. Conclusions: Differences in DFS, disease-specific survival and loco-regional control have not been demonstrated. ART resulted in more acute mucosal toxicity, but this did not result in greater prolongation of the treatment time compared with the CRT arm. There were less late effects in the ART arm

  11. Description of group-theoretical model of developed turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saveliev, V L; Gorokhovski, M A

    2008-01-01

    We propose to associate the phenomenon of stationary turbulence with the special self-similar solutions of the Euler equations. These solutions represent the linear superposition of eigenfields of spatial symmetry subgroup generators and imply their dependence on time through the parameter of the symmetry transformation only. From this model, it follows that for developed turbulent process, changing the scale of averaging (filtering) of the velocity field is equivalent to composition of scaling, translation and rotation transformations. We call this property a renormalization-group invariance of filtered turbulent fields. The renormalization group invariance provides an opportunity to transform the averaged Navier-Stokes equation over a small scale (inner threshold of the turbulence) to larger scales by simple scaling. From the methodological point of view, it is significant to note that the turbulent viscosity term appeared not as a result of averaging of the nonlinear term in the Navier-Stokes equation, but from the molecular viscosity term with the help of renormalization group transformation.

  12. On the standard model group in F-theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Kang-Sin

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the standard model gauge group SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1) constructed in F-theory. The non-Abelian part SU(3) x SU(2) is described by a surface singularity of Kodaira type. Blow-up analysis shows that the non-Abelian part is distinguished from the naive product of SU(3) and SU(2), but that it should be a rank three group along the chain of E n groups, because it has non-generic gauge symmetry enhancement structure responsible for desirablematter curves. The Abelian part U(1) is constructed from a globally valid two-form with the desired gauge quantum numbers, using a similar method to the decomposition (factorization) method of the spectral cover. This technique makes use of an extra section in the elliptic fiber of the Calabi-Yau manifold, on which F-theory is compactified. Conventional gauge coupling unification of SU(5) is achieved, without requiring a threshold correction from the flux along the hypercharge direction. (orig.)

  13. Progress in lung modelling by the ICRP Task Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, A.C.; Birchall, A.

    1989-01-01

    The Task Group has reviewed the data on: (a) morphology and physiology of the human respiratory tract; (b) inspirability of aerosols and their deposition in anatomical regions as functions of respiratory parameters; (c) clearance of particles within and from the respiratory tract; (d) absorption of different materials into the blood in humans and in animals. The Task Group proposes a new model which predicts the deposition, retention and systemic uptake of materials, enabling doses absorbed by different respiratory tissues and other body organs to be evaluated. In the proposed model, clearance is described in terms of competition between the processes moving particles to the oropharynx or to lymph nodes and that of absorption into the blood. From studies with human subjects, characteristic rates and pathways are defined to represent mechanical clearance of particles from each region, which do not depend on the material. Conversely, the absorption rate is determined solely by the material: it is assumed to be the same in all parts of the respiratory tract and in other animal species. For several of the radiologically important forms of actinides, absorption rates can be derived from animal experiments, or, in some cases, directly from human data. Otherwise, default values are used, based on the current D, W and Y classification system. (author)

  14. How the 2SLS/IV estimator can handle equality constraints in structural equation models: a system-of-equations approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestler, Steffen

    2014-05-01

    Parameters in structural equation models are typically estimated using the maximum likelihood (ML) approach. Bollen (1996) proposed an alternative non-iterative, equation-by-equation estimator that uses instrumental variables. Although this two-stage least squares/instrumental variables (2SLS/IV) estimator has good statistical properties, one problem with its application is that parameter equality constraints cannot be imposed. This paper presents a mathematical solution to this problem that is based on an extension of the 2SLS/IV approach to a system of equations. We present an example in which our approach was used to examine strong longitudinal measurement invariance. We also investigated the new approach in a simulation study that compared it with ML in the examination of the equality of two latent regression coefficients and strong measurement invariance. Overall, the results show that the suggested approach is a useful extension of the original 2SLS/IV estimator and allows for the effective handling of equality constraints in structural equation models. © 2013 The British Psychological Society.

  15. Renormalization group flow of scalar models in gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guarnieri, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    In this Ph.D. thesis we study the issue of renormalizability of gravitation in the context of the renormalization group (RG), employing both perturbative and non-perturbative techniques. In particular, we focus on different gravitational models and approximations in which a central role is played by a scalar degree of freedom, since their RG flow is easier to analyze. We restrict our interest in particular to two quantum gravity approaches that have gained a lot of attention recently, namely the asymptotic safety scenario for gravity and the Horava-Lifshitz quantum gravity. In the so-called asymptotic safety conjecture the high energy regime of gravity is controlled by a non-Gaussian fixed point which ensures non-perturbative renormalizability and finiteness of the correlation functions. We then investigate the existence of such a non trivial fixed point using the functional renormalization group, a continuum version of the non-perturbative Wilson's renormalization group. In particular we quantize the sole conformal degree of freedom, which is an approximation that has been shown to lead to a qualitatively correct picture. The question of the existence of a non-Gaussian fixed point in an infinite-dimensional parameter space, that is for a generic f(R) theory, cannot however be studied using such a conformally reduced model. Hence we study it by quantizing a dynamically equivalent scalar-tensor theory, i.e. a generic Brans-Dicke theory with ω=0 in the local potential approximation. Finally, we investigate, using a perturbative RG scheme, the asymptotic freedom of the Horava-Lifshitz gravity, that is an approach based on the emergence of an anisotropy between space and time which lifts the Newton's constant to a marginal coupling and explicitly preserves unitarity. In particular we evaluate the one-loop correction in 2+1 dimensions quantizing only the conformal degree of freedom.

  16. The group-as-a-whole-object relations model of group psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, D; Stukenberg, K W; Saeks, S

    2001-01-01

    The authors review the theoretical basis of group psychotherapy performed at The Menninger Clinic and demonstrate how the theory has been put into practice on two different types of inpatient units. The fundamental elements of the theory and practice used can be traced to object relations theory as originally proposed by Melanie Klein. Her work with individuals was directly applied to working with groups by Ezriel and Bion, who focused on interpreting group tension. More modern approaches have reintegrated working with individual concerns while also attending to the group-as-a-whole. Historically, these principles have been applied to long-term group treatment. The authors apply the concepts from the group-as-a-whole literature to short- and medium-length inpatient groups with open membership. They offer clinical examples of the application of these principles in short-term inpatient settings in groups with open membership.

  17. An accurate mobility model for the I-V characteristics of n-channel enhancement-mode MOSFETs with single-channel boron implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chingyuan Wu; Yeongwen Daih

    1985-01-01

    In this paper an analytical mobility model is developed for the I-V characteristics of n-channel enhancement-mode MOSFETs, in which the effects of the two-dimensional electric fields in the surface inversion channel and the parasitic resistances due to contact and interconnection are included. Most importantly, the developed mobility model easily takes the device structure and process into consideration. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of the developed model, the structure- and process-oriented parameters in the present mobility model are calculated explicitly for an n-channel enhancement-mode MOSFET with single-channel boron implantation. Moreover, n-channel MOSFETs with different channel lengths fabricated in a production line by using a set of test keys have been characterized and the measured mobilities have been compared to the model. Excellent agreement has been obtained for all ranges of the fabricated channel lengths, which strongly support the accuracy of the model. (author)

  18. Exploring the Impact of Students' Learning Approach on Collaborative Group Modeling of Blood Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shinyoung; Kang, Eunhee; Kim, Heui-Baik

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the effect on group dynamics of statements associated with deep learning approaches (DLA) and their contribution to cognitive collaboration and model development during group modeling of blood circulation. A group was selected for an in-depth analysis of collaborative group modeling. This group constructed a model in a…

  19. Working Group Reports: Working Group 1 - Software Systems Design and Implementation for Environmental Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of the Interagency Steering Committee on Multimedia Environmental Modeling (ISCMEM) is to foster the exchange of information about environmental modeling tools, modeling frameworks, and environmental monitoring databases that are all in the public domain. It is compos...

  20. The positive group affect spiral : a dynamic model of the emergence of positive affective similarity in work groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walter, F.; Bruch, H.

    This conceptual paper seeks to clarify the process of the emergence of positive collective affect. Specifically, it develops a dynamic model of the emergence of positive affective similarity in work groups. It is suggested that positive group affective similarity and within-group relationship

  1. Key Informant Models for Measuring Group-Level Variables in Small Groups: Application to Plural Subject Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algesheimer, René; Bagozzi, Richard P.; Dholakia, Utpal M.

    2018-01-01

    We offer a new conceptualization and measurement models for constructs at the group-level of analysis in small group research. The conceptualization starts with classical notions of group behavior proposed by Tönnies, Simmel, and Weber and then draws upon plural subject theory by philosophers Gilbert and Tuomela to frame a new perspective…

  2. Characterization and Modeling I(V of the Gate Schottky Structures HEMTs Ni/Au/AlInN/GaN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Benyahya

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have studied the Schottky contact of Ni/Au/AlInN/GaN HEMTs. The current–voltage Igs (Vgs of Ni/Au/AlInN/GaN structures were investigated at room temperature. The electrical parameters such as ideality factor (2.3, barrier height (0.72 eV and series resistance (33 W were evaluated from I(V data, the threshold voltage (-2.42 V, the 2D gas density (1.35 ´ 1013 cm-2 and barrier height (0.94 eV were evaluated from C(V data.

  3. Phase structure of NJL model with weak renormalization group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Ken-Ichi; Kumamoto, Shin-Ichiro; Yamada, Masatoshi

    2018-06-01

    We analyze the chiral phase structure of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model at finite temperature and density by using the functional renormalization group (FRG). The renormalization group (RG) equation for the fermionic effective potential V (σ ; t) is given as a partial differential equation, where σ : = ψ bar ψ and t is a dimensionless RG scale. When the dynamical chiral symmetry breaking (DχSB) occurs at a certain scale tc, V (σ ; t) has singularities originated from the phase transitions, and then one cannot follow RG flows after tc. In this study, we introduce the weak solution method to the RG equation in order to follow the RG flows after the DχSB and to evaluate the dynamical mass and the chiral condensate in low energy scales. It is shown that the weak solution of the RG equation correctly captures vacuum structures and critical phenomena within the pure fermionic system. We show the chiral phase diagram on temperature, chemical potential and the four-Fermi coupling constant.

  4. Recommendations from Gynaecological (GYN) GEC-ESTRO Working Group (IV): Basic principles and parameters for MR imaging within the frame of image based adaptive cervix cancer brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimopoulos, Johannes C.A.; Petrow, Peter; Tanderup, Kari; Petric, Primoz; Berger, Daniel; Kirisits, Christian; Pedersen, Erik M.; Limbergen, Erik van; Haie-Meder, Christine; Pötter, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The GYN GEC-ESTRO working group issued three parts of recommendations and highlighted the pivotal role of MRI for the successful implementation of 3D image-based cervical cancer brachytherapy (BT). The main advantage of MRI as an imaging modality is its superior soft tissue depiction quality. To exploit the full potential of MRI for the better ability of the radiation oncologist to make the appropriate choice for the BT application technique and to accurately define the target volumes and the organs at risk, certain MR imaging criteria have to be fulfilled. Technical requirements, patient preparation, as well as image acquisition protocols have to be tailored to the needs of 3D image-based BT. The present recommendation is focused on the general principles of MR imaging for 3D image-based BT. Methods and parameters have been developed and progressively validated from clinical experience from different institutions (IGR, Universities of Vienna, Leuven, Aarhus and Ljubljana) and successfully applied during expert meetings, contouring workshops, as well as within clinical and interobserver studies. It is useful to perform pelvic MRI scanning prior to radiotherapy (“Pre-RT-MRI examination”) and at the time of BT (“BT MRI examination”) with one MR imager. Both low and high-field imagers, as well as both open and close magnet configurations conform to the requirements of 3D image-based cervical cancer BT. Multiplanar (transversal, sagittal, coronal and oblique image orientation) T2-weighted images obtained with pelvic surface coils are considered as the golden standard for visualisation of the tumour and the critical organs. The use of complementary MRI sequences (e.g. contrast-enhanced T1-weighted or 3D isotropic MRI sequences) is optional. Patient preparation has to be adapted to the needs of BT intervention and MR imaging. It is recommended to visualise and interpret the MR images on dedicated DICOM-viewer workstations, which should also assist the contouring

  5. IV treatment at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other IV treatments you may receive after you leave the hospital include: Treatment for hormone deficiencies Medicines for severe nausea that cancer chemotherapy or pregnancy may cause Patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) for pain (this is IV ...

  6. Genomics:GTL Contractor-Grantee Workshop IV and Metabolic Engineering Working Group Inter-Agency Conference on Metabolic Engineering 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansfield, Betty Kay [ORNL; Martin, Sheryl A [ORNL

    2006-02-01

    Welcome to the 2006 joint meeting of the fourth Genomics:GTL Contractor-Grantee Workshop and the six Metabolic Engineering Working Group Inter-Agency Conference. The vision and scope of the Genomics:GTL program continue to expand and encompass research and technology issues from diverse scientific disciplines, attracting broad interest and support from researchers at universities, DOE national laboratories, and industry. Metabolic engineering's vision is the targeted and purposeful alteration of metabolic pathways to improve the understanding and use of cellular pathways for chemical transformation, energy transduction, and supramolecular assembly. These two programs have much complementarity in both vision and technological approaches, as reflected in this joint workshop. GLT's challenge to the scientific community remains the further development and use of a broad array of innovative technologies and computational tools to systematically leverage the knowledge and capabilities brought to us by DNA sequencing projects. The goal is to seek a broad and predictive understanding of the functioning and control of complex systems--individual microbes, microbial communities, and plants. GTL's prominent position at the interface of the physical, computational, and biological sciences is both a strength and challenge. Microbes remain GTL's principal biological focus. In the complex 'simplicity' of microbes, they find capabilities needed by DOE and the nation for clean and secure energy, cleanup of environmental contamination, and sequestration of atmospheric carbon dioxide that contributes to global warming. An ongoing challenge for the entire GTL community is to demonstrate that the fundamental science conducted in each of your research projects brings us a step closer to biology-based solutions for these important national energy and environmental needs.

  7. Modeling phytoplankton community in reservoirs. A comparison between taxonomic and functional groups-based models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Maggio, Jimena; Fernández, Carolina; Parodi, Elisa R; Diaz, M Soledad; Estrada, Vanina

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we address the formulation of two mechanistic water quality models that differ in the way the phytoplankton community is described. We carry out parameter estimation subject to differential-algebraic constraints and validation for each model and comparison between models performance. The first approach aggregates phytoplankton species based on their phylogenetic characteristics (Taxonomic group model) and the second one, on their morpho-functional properties following Reynolds' classification (Functional group model). The latter approach takes into account tolerance and sensitivity to environmental conditions. The constrained parameter estimation problems are formulated within an equation oriented framework, with a maximum likelihood objective function. The study site is Paso de las Piedras Reservoir (Argentina), which supplies water for consumption for 450,000 population. Numerical results show that phytoplankton morpho-functional groups more closely represent each species growth requirements within the group. Each model performance is quantitatively assessed by three diagnostic measures. Parameter estimation results for seasonal dynamics of the phytoplankton community and main biogeochemical variables for a one-year time horizon are presented and compared for both models, showing the functional group model enhanced performance. Finally, we explore increasing nutrient loading scenarios and predict their effect on phytoplankton dynamics throughout a one-year time horizon. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Group Contribution Based Process Flowsheet Synthesis, Design and Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    d'Anterroches, Loïc; Gani, Rafiqul

    2005-01-01

    In a group contribution method for pure component property prediction, a molecule is described as a set of groups linked together to form a molecular structure. In the same way, for flowsheet "property" prediction, a flowsheet can be described as a set of process-groups linked together to represent...... the flowsheet structure. Just as a functional group is a collection of atoms, a process-group is a collection of operations forming an "unit" operation or a set of "unit" operations. The link between the process-groups are the streams similar to the bonds that are attachments to atoms/groups. Each process-group...... provides a contribution to the "property" of the flowsheet, which can be performance in terms of energy consumption, thereby allowing a flowsheet "property" to be calculated, once it is described by the groups. Another feature of this approach is that the process-group attachments provide automatically...

  9. Epigenetic chromatin modifiers in barley: IV. The study of barley Polycomb group (PcG genes during seed development and in response to external ABA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanca Michele A

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epigenetic phenomena have been associated with the regulation of active and silent chromatin states achieved by modifications of chromatin structure through DNA methylation, and histone post-translational modifications. The latter is accomplished, in part, through the action of PcG (Polycomb group protein complexes which methylate nucleosomal histone tails at specific sites, ultimately leading to chromatin compaction and gene silencing. Different PcG complex variants operating during different developmental stages have been described in plants. In particular, the so-called FIE/MEA/FIS2 complex governs the expression of genes important in embryo and endosperm development in Arabidopsis. In our effort to understand the epigenetic mechanisms regulating seed development in barley (Hordeum vulgare, an agronomically important monocot plant cultivated for its endosperm, we set out to characterize the genes encoding barley PcG proteins. Results Four barley PcG gene homologues, named HvFIE, HvE(Z, HvSu(z12a, and HvSu(z12b were identified and structurally and phylogenetically characterized. The corresponding genes HvFIE, HvE(Z, HvSu(z12a, and HvSu(z12b were mapped onto barley chromosomes 7H, 4H, 2H and 5H, respectively. Expression analysis of the PcG genes revealed significant differences in gene expression among tissues and seed developmental stages and between barley cultivars with varying seed size. Furthermore, HvFIE and HvE(Z gene expression was responsive to the abiotic stress-related hormone abscisic acid (ABA known to be involved in seed maturation, dormancy and germination. Conclusion This study reports the first characterization of the PcG homologues, HvFIE, HvE(Z, HvSu(z12a and HvSu(z12b in barley. All genes co-localized with known chromosomal regions responsible for malting quality related traits, suggesting that they might be used for developing molecular markers to be applied in marker assisted selection. The Pc

  10. Bayesian latent feature modeling for modeling bipartite networks with overlapping groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Philip H.; Mørup, Morten; Schmidt, Mikkel Nørgaard

    2016-01-01

    Bi-partite networks are commonly modelled using latent class or latent feature models. Whereas the existing latent class models admit marginalization of parameters specifying the strength of interaction between groups, existing latent feature models do not admit analytical marginalization...... by the notion of community structure such that the edge density within groups is higher than between groups. Our model further assumes that entities can have different propensities of generating links in one of the modes. The proposed framework is contrasted on both synthetic and real bi-partite networks...... feature representations in bipartite networks provides a new framework for accounting for structure in bi-partite networks using binary latent feature representations providing interpretable representations that well characterize structure as quantified by link prediction....

  11. Testing Group Mean Differences of Latent Variables in Multilevel Data Using Multiple-Group Multilevel CFA and Multilevel MIMIC Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Sook; Cao, Chunhua

    2015-01-01

    Considering that group comparisons are common in social science, we examined two latent group mean testing methods when groups of interest were either at the between or within level of multilevel data: multiple-group multilevel confirmatory factor analysis (MG ML CFA) and multilevel multiple-indicators multiple-causes modeling (ML MIMIC). The performance of these methods were investigated through three Monte Carlo studies. In Studies 1 and 2, either factor variances or residual variances were manipulated to be heterogeneous between groups. In Study 3, which focused on within-level multiple-group analysis, six different model specifications were considered depending on how to model the intra-class group correlation (i.e., correlation between random effect factors for groups within cluster). The results of simulations generally supported the adequacy of MG ML CFA and ML MIMIC for multiple-group analysis with multilevel data. The two methods did not show any notable difference in the latent group mean testing across three studies. Finally, a demonstration with real data and guidelines in selecting an appropriate approach to multilevel multiple-group analysis are provided.

  12. Stimulation of intestinal growth and function with DPP-IV inhibition in a mouse short bowel syndrome model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sueyoshi, Ryo; Ignatoski, Kathleen M Woods; Okawada, Manabu

    2014-01-01

    , and 7 days followed by 23 days washout period. Adaptive response was assessed by morphology, intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) proliferation (PCNA), epithelial barrier function (transepithelial resistance), RT-PCR for intestinal transport proteins, GLP-2R, and IGF-1R, and GLP-2 plasma levels. Glucose-stimulated...... sodium transport was assessed for intestinal absorptive function. Seven days of DPP4-I treatment facilitated an increase in GLP-2R levels, intestinal growth, and IEC proliferation. Treatment led to differential effects over time with greater absorptive function early, and enhanced proliferation at later...... time points. Interestingly, 7 day treatment followed by 23 days of non-treatment showed continued adaptation. DPP-IV-I enhanced IEC proliferative action up to 90-days post-resection, but this action seemed to peak by 30 days, as did GLP-2 plasma levels. Thus, use of DPP4-I treatment may prove...

  13. ON range searching in the group model and combinatorial discrepancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kasper Green

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we establish an intimate connection between dynamic range searching in the group model and combinatorial discrepancy. Our result states that, for a broad class of range searching data structures (including all known upper bounds), it must hold that $t_u t_q=\\Omega(\\mbox{disc}^2......)$, where $t_u$ is the worst case update time, $t_q$ is the worst case query time, and disc is the combinatorial discrepancy of the range searching problem in question. This relation immediately implies a whole range of exceptionally high and near-tight lower bounds for all of the basic range searching...... problems. We list a few of them in the following: (1) For $d$-dimensional halfspace range searching, we get a lower bound of $t_u t_q=\\Omega(n^{1-1/d})$. This comes within an lg lg $n$ factor of the best known upper bound. (2) For orthogonal range searching, we get a lower bound of $t_u t...

  14. Affine group formulation of the Standard Model coupled to gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Ching-Yi, E-mail: l2897107@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan (China); Ita, Eyo, E-mail: ita@usna.edu [Department of Physics, US Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD (United States); Soo, Chopin, E-mail: cpsoo@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan (China)

    2014-04-15

    In this work we apply the affine group formalism for four dimensional gravity of Lorentzian signature, which is based on Klauder’s affine algebraic program, to the formulation of the Hamiltonian constraint of the interaction of matter and all forces, including gravity with non-vanishing cosmological constant Λ, as an affine Lie algebra. We use the hermitian action of fermions coupled to gravitation and Yang–Mills theory to find the density weight one fermionic super-Hamiltonian constraint. This term, combined with the Yang–Mills and Higgs energy densities, are composed with York’s integrated time functional. The result, when combined with the imaginary part of the Chern–Simons functional Q, forms the affine commutation relation with the volume element V(x). Affine algebraic quantization of gravitation and matter on equal footing implies a fundamental uncertainty relation which is predicated upon a non-vanishing cosmological constant. -- Highlights: •Wheeler–DeWitt equation (WDW) quantized as affine algebra, realizing Klauder’s program. •WDW formulated for interaction of matter and all forces, including gravity, as affine algebra. •WDW features Hermitian generators in spite of fermionic content: Standard Model addressed. •Constructed a family of physical states for the full, coupled theory via affine coherent states. •Fundamental uncertainty relation, predicated on non-vanishing cosmological constant.

  15. A working group`s conclusion on site specific flow and transport modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, J. [Golder Associates AB (Sweden); Ahokas, H. [Fintact Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Koskinen, L.; Poteri, A. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland); Niemi, A. [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Hydraulic Engineering; Hautojaervi, A. [Posiva Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    1998-03-01

    This document suggests a strategy plan for groundwater flow and transport modelling to be used in the site specific performance assessment analysis of spent nuclear fuel disposal to be used for the site selection planned by the year 2000. Considering suggested general regulations in Finland, as well as suggested regulations in Sweden and the approach taken in recent safety assessment exercises conducted in these countries, it is clear that in such an analysis, in addition to showing that the proposed repository is safe, there exist needs to strengthen the link between field data, groundwater flow modelling and derivation of safety assessment parameters, and needs to assess uncertainty and variability. The suggested strategy plan builds on an evaluation of different approaches to modelling the groundwater flow in crystalline basement rock, the abundance of data collected in the site investigation programme in Finland, and the modelling methodology developed in the programme so far. It is suggested to model the whole system using nested models, where larger scale models provide the boundary conditions for the smaller ones 62 refs.

  16. A Life-Cycle Model of Human Social Groups Produces a U-Shaped Distribution in Group Size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gul Deniz Salali

    Full Text Available One of the central puzzles in the study of sociocultural evolution is how and why transitions from small-scale human groups to large-scale, hierarchically more complex ones occurred. Here we develop a spatially explicit agent-based model as a first step towards understanding the ecological dynamics of small and large-scale human groups. By analogy with the interactions between single-celled and multicellular organisms, we build a theory of group lifecycles as an emergent property of single cell demographic and expansion behaviours. We find that once the transition from small-scale to large-scale groups occurs, a few large-scale groups continue expanding while small-scale groups gradually become scarcer, and large-scale groups become larger in size and fewer in number over time. Demographic and expansion behaviours of groups are largely influenced by the distribution and availability of resources. Our results conform to a pattern of human political change in which religions and nation states come to be represented by a few large units and many smaller ones. Future enhancements of the model should include decision-making rules and probabilities of fragmentation for large-scale societies. We suggest that the synthesis of population ecology and social evolution will generate increasingly plausible models of human group dynamics.

  17. The ICRP task group respiratory tract model - an age-dependent dosimetric model for general application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, M.R.; Birchall, A.

    1992-01-01

    The ICRP Task Group on Human Respiratory Tract Models for Radiological Protection has developed a revised dosimetric model for the respiratory tract. Papers outlining the model, and describing each aspect of it were presented at the Third International Workshop on Respiratory Tract Dosimetry (Albuquerque 1-3 July 1990), the Proceedings of which were recently published in Radiation Protection Dosimetry Volume 38 Nos 1-3 (1991). Since the model had not changed substantially since the Workshop at Albuquerque, only a summary of the paper presented at Schloss Elmau is included in these Proceedings. (author)

  18. Training Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors in Group Dynamics: A Psychoeducational Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Timothy R.

    1990-01-01

    Describes a six-session psychoeducational program for training vocational rehabilitation counselors in group dynamics. Presents evaluation of program by counselors (N=15) in which leadership styles, conflict management, and typology of group tasks concepts were rated as most beneficial. (Author/ABL)

  19. School-Based Adolescent Groups: The Sail Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, John L.; And Others

    The manual outlines the processes, policies, and actual program implementation of one component of a Minnesota program for emotionally disturbed adolescents (Project SAIL): the development of school-based therapy/intervention groups. The characteristics of SAIL students are described, and some considerations involved in providing group services…

  20. Reliability of the ICRP's dose coefficients for members of the public: IV. Basis of the human alimentary tract model and uncertainties in model predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leggett, R.; Harrison, J.; Phipps, A.

    2007-01-01

    The biokinetic and dosimetric model of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract applied in current documents of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) was developed in the mid-1960's. The model was based on features of a reference adult male and was first used by the ICRP in Publication 30, Limits for Intakes of Radionuclides by Workers (Part 1, 1979). In the late 1990's an ICRP task group was appointed to develop a biokinetic and dosimetric model of the alimentary tract that reflects updated information and addresses current needs in radiation protection. The new age-specific and gender-specific model, called the Human Alimentary Tract Model (HATM), has been completed and will replace the GI model of Publication 30 in upcoming ICRP documents. This paper discusses the basis for the structure and parameter values of the HATM, summarises the uncertainties associated with selected features and types of predictions of the HATM and examines the sensitivity of dose estimates to these uncertainties for selected radionuclides. Emphasis is on generic biokinetic features of the HATM, particularly transit times through the lumen of the alimentary tract, but key dosimetric features of the model are outlined, and the sensitivity of tissue dose estimates to uncertainties in dosimetric as well as biokinetic features of the HATM are examined for selected radionuclides. (authors)

  1. Integration of the WJ IV, WISC-V, WISC-V Integrated, and WIAT-III into a School Neuropsychological Assessment Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Daniel C.

    2015-01-01

    The Woodcock-Johnson-Fourth edition (WJ IV; Schrank, McGrew, & Mather, 2014a) and the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fifth edition (WISC-V; Wechsler, 2014) are two of the major tests of cognitive abilities used in school psychology. The complete WJ IV battery includes the Woodcock-Johnson IV Tests of Cognitive Abilities (Schrank,…

  2. Discrete time duration models with group-level heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Anders; Honoré, Bo; Hu, Loujia

    2007-01-01

    Dynamic discrete choice panel data models have received a great deal of attention. In those models, the dynamics is usually handled by including the lagged outcome as an explanatory variable. In this paper we consider an alternative model in which the dynamics is handled by using the duration...

  3. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere IV. On the Nature of the Chromosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The chromosphere is the site of weak emission lines characterizing the flash spectrum observed for a few seconds during a total eclipse. This layer of the solar atmosphere is known to possess an opaque Hα emission and a great number of spicules, which can extend well above the photosphere. A stunning variety of hydrogen emission lines have been observed in this region. The production of these lines has provided the seventeenth line of evidence that the Sun is comprised of condensed matter (Robitaille P.M. Liquid Metallic Hydrogen II: A critical assessment of current and primordial helium levels in Sun. Progr. Phys., 2013, v. 2, 35–47. Contrary to the gaseous solar models, the simplest mechanism for the production of emission lines is the evaporation of excited atoms from condensed surfaces existing within the chromosphere, as found in spicules. This is reminiscent of the chemiluminescence which occurs during the condensation of silver clusters (Konig L., Rabin I., Schultze W., and Ertl G. Chemiluminescence in the Agglomeration of Metal Clusters. Science, v. 274, no. 5291, 1353–1355. The process associated with spicule formation is an exothermic one, requiring the transport of energy away from the site of condensation. As atoms leave localized surfaces, their electrons can occupy any energy level and, hence, a wide variety of emission lines are produced. In this regard, it is hypothesized that the presence of hydrides on the Sun can also facilitate hydrogen condensation in the chromosphere. The associated line emission from main group and transition elements constitutes the thirtieth line of evidence that the Sun is condensed matter. Condensation processes also help to explain why spicules manifest an apparently constant temperature over their entire length. Since the corona supports magnetic field lines, the random orientations associated with spicule formation suggests that the hydrogen condensates in the chromosphere are not metallic in

  4. Near-infrared 808 nm light boosts complex IV-dependent respiration and rescues a Parkinson-related pink1 model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Vos

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC defects are observed in Parkinson's disease (PD patients and in PD fly- and mouse-models; however it remains to be tested if acute improvement of ETC function alleviates PD-relevant defects. We tested the hypothesis that 808 nm infrared light that effectively penetrates tissues rescues pink1 mutants. We show that irradiating isolated fly or mouse mitochondria with 808 nm light that is absorbed by ETC-Complex IV acutely improves Complex IV-dependent oxygen consumption and ATP production, a feature that is wavelength-specific. Irradiating Drosophila pink1 mutants using a single dose of 808 nm light results in a rescue of major systemic and mitochondrial defects. Time-course experiments indicate mitochondrial membrane potential defects are rescued prior to mitochondrial morphological defects, also in dopaminergic neurons, suggesting mitochondrial functional defects precede mitochondrial swelling. Thus, our data indicate that improvement of mitochondrial function using infrared light stimulation is a viable strategy to alleviate pink1-related defects.

  5. Risk adjustment models for interhospital comparison of CS rates using Robson's ten group classification system and other socio-demographic and clinical variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colais, Paola; Fantini, Maria P; Fusco, Danilo; Carretta, Elisa; Stivanello, Elisa; Lenzi, Jacopo; Pieri, Giulia; Perucci, Carlo A

    2012-06-21

    Caesarean section (CS) rate is a quality of health care indicator frequently used at national and international level. The aim of this study was to assess whether adjustment for Robson's Ten Group Classification System (TGCS), and clinical and socio-demographic variables of the mother and the fetus is necessary for inter-hospital comparisons of CS rates. The study population includes 64,423 deliveries in Emilia-Romagna between January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2004, classified according to theTGCS. Poisson regression was used to estimate crude and adjusted hospital relative risks of CS compared to a reference category. Analyses were carried out in the overall population and separately according to the Robson groups (groups I, II, III, IV and V-X combined). Adjusted relative risks (RR) of CS were estimated using two risk-adjustment models; the first (M1) including the TGCS group as the only adjustment factor; the second (M2) including in addition demographic and clinical confounders identified using a stepwise selection procedure. Percentage variations between crude and adjusted RRs by hospital were calculated to evaluate the confounding effect of covariates. The percentage variations from crude to adjusted RR proved to be similar in M1 and M2 model. However, stratified analyses by Robson's classification groups showed that residual confounding for clinical and demographic variables was present in groups I (nulliparous, single, cephalic, ≥37 weeks, spontaneous labour) and III (multiparous, excluding previous CS, single, cephalic, ≥37 weeks, spontaneous labour) and IV (multiparous, excluding previous CS, single, cephalic, ≥37 weeks, induced or CS before labour) and to a minor extent in groups II (nulliparous, single, cephalic, ≥37 weeks, induced or CS before labour) and IV (multiparous, excluding previous CS, single, cephalic, ≥37 weeks, induced or CS before labour). The TGCS classification is useful for inter-hospital comparison of CS section rates, but

  6. Hydrology in a Mediterranean mountain environment, the Vallcebre Research basins (North Eastern Spain). IV. Testing hydrological and erosion models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallart, F.; Latron, J.; Llorens, P.; Martinez-Carreras, N.

    2009-01-01

    Three modelling exercises were carried out in the Vallcebre research basins in order to both improve the understanding of the hydrological processes and test the adequate of some models in such Mediterranean mountain conditions. These exercises consisted of i) the analysis of the hydrological role of the agricultural terraces using the TOPMODEL topographic index, ii) the parametrisation of TOPMODEL using internal basin information, and iii) a test of the erosion model KINEROS2 for simulating badlands erosion. (Author) 13 refs.

  7. Temperature dependent I-V characteristics of an Au/n-GaAs Schottky diode analyzed using Tung’s model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korucu, Demet; Turut, Abdulmecit; Efeoglu, Hasan

    2013-04-01

    The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of Au/n-GaAs contacts prepared with photolithography technique have been measured in the temperature range of 80-320 K. The ideality factor and barrier height (BH) values have remained almost unchanged between 1.04 and 1.10 and at a value of about 0.79 eV at temperatures above 200 K, respectively. Therefore, the ideality factor values near unity say that the experimental I-V data are almost independent of the sample temperature, that is, contacts have shown excellent Schottky diode behavior above 200 K. An abnormal decrease in the experimental BH Φb and an increase in the ideality factor with a decrease in temperature have been observed below 200 K. This behavior has been attributed to the barrier inhomogeneity by assuming a Gaussian distribution of nanometer-sized patches with low BH at the metal-semiconductor interface. The barrier inhomogeneity assumption is also confirmed by the linear relationship between the BH and the ideality factor. According to Tung’s barrier inhomogeneity model, it has been seen that the value of σT=7.41×10-5 cm2/3 V1/3from ideality factor versus (kT)-1 curve is in close agreement with σT=7.95×10-5 cm2/3 V1/3 value from the Φeff versus (2kT)-1 curve in the range of 80-200 K. The modified Richardson ln(J0/T2)-(qσT)2(Vb/η)2/3/[2(kT)2] versus (kT)-1 plot, from Tung’s Model, has given a Richardson constant value of 8.47 A cm-2 K-2which is in very close agreement with the known value of 8.16 A cm-2 K-2 for n-type GaAs; considering the effective patch area which is significantly lower than the entire geometric area of the Schottky contact, in temperature range of 80-200 K. Thus, it has been concluded that the use of Tung’s lateral inhomogeneity model is more appropriate to interpret the temperature-dependent I-V characteristics in the Schottky contacts.

  8. A model-based approach to operational event groups ranking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simic, Zdenko [European Commission Joint Research Centre, Petten (Netherlands). Inst. for Energy and Transport; Maqua, Michael [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Koeln (Germany); Wattrelos, Didier [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2014-04-15

    The operational experience (OE) feedback provides improvements in all industrial activities. Identification of the most important and valuable groups of events within accumulated experience is important in order to focus on a detailed investigation of events. The paper describes the new ranking method and compares it with three others. Methods have been described and applied to OE events utilised by nuclear power plants in France and Germany for twenty years. The results show that different ranking methods only roughly agree on which of the event groups are the most important ones. In the new ranking method the analytical hierarchy process is applied in order to assure consistent and comprehensive weighting determination for ranking indexes. The proposed method allows a transparent and flexible event groups ranking and identification of the most important OE for further more detailed investigation in order to complete the feedback. (orig.)

  9. A mathematical model for stratification of LADA risk groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Mikhailovna Tikhonova

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To stratify risk groups via discriminant analysis based on the most clinically relevant indications of LADA onset derived from medical history. Materials and Methods. Present study included 141 patients with diabetes mellitus (DM of whom 65 had preliminary diagnosis of LADA, 40 patients were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM and 36 ? with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Discriminant analysis was performed to evaluate the differences between the clinical onsets in study groups. Results. Aside from torpid onset with early evidence for insulin resistance, clinical characteristics of LADA included diagnosis during random examination, progressive loss of body mass, hyperglycemia greater than 14 mmol/L at the diagnosis and, possibly, ketonuria without history of acute ketoacidosis. Conclusion. Discriminant analysis is beneficial in stratifying risk groups for the development of LADA.

  10. Projection models for health effects assessment in populations exposed to radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants. Volume IV. SPAHR user's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, J.J.; Lundy, R.T.

    1982-09-01

    The Simulation Package for the Analysis of Health Risk (SPAHR) is a computer software package based upon a demographic model for health risk projections. The model extends several health risk projection models by making realistic assumptions about the population at risk, and thus represents a distinct improvement over previous models. Complete documentation for use of SPAHR is contained in this five-volume publication. The demographic model in SPAHR estimates population response to environmental toxic exposures. Latency of response, changing dose level over time, competing risks from other causes of death, and population structure can be incorporated into SPAHR to project health risks. Risks are measured by morbid years, number of deaths, and loss of life expectancy. Comparisons of estimates of excess deaths demonstrate that previous health risk projection models may have underestimated excess deaths by a factor of from 2 to 10, depending on the pollutant and the exposure scenario. The software supporting the use of the demographic model is designed to be user oriented. Complex risk projections are made by responding to a series of prompts generated by the package. The flexibility and ease of use of SPAHR make it an important contribution to existing models and software packages. This volume gives the more advanced user of the SPAHR computer package the information required to create tailor-made programs for addressing specific issues not covered by the three interactive packages. It assumes that the user is familiar with the concepts and terms relating to demography and health risk assessment

  11. Generation IV national program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preville, M.; Sadhankar, R.; Brady, D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper outlines the Generation IV National Program. This program involves evolutionary and innovative design with significantly higher efficiencies (∼50% compared to present ∼30%) - sustainable, economical, safe, reliable and proliferation resistant - for future energy security. The Generation IV Forum (GIF) effectively leverages the resources of the participants to meet these goals. Ten countries signed the GIF Charter in 2001

  12. A Model for Establishing an Astronomy Education Discussion Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deming, Grace; Hayes-Gehrke, M.; Zauderer, B. A.; Bovill, M. S.; DeCesar, M.

    2010-01-01

    In October 2005, a group of astronomy faculty and graduate students met to establish departmental support for participants in the UM Center for Teaching Excellence University Teaching and Learning Program. This program seeks to increase graduate students’ understanding of effective teaching methods, awareness of student learning, and appreciation of education as a scholarly pursuit. Our group has facilitated the submission of successful graduate student educational development grant proposals to the Center for Teaching Excellence (CTE). Completion of the CTE program results in a notation on the graduate student's transcript. Our discussion group met monthly during the first two years. The Astronomy Education Review, The Physics Teacher, The Washington Post, The Chronicle of Higher Education, and National Research Council publications were used to provide background for discussion. Beginning in 2007, the group began sponsoring monthly astronomy education lunches during the academic year to which the entire department was invited. Over the past two years, speakers have included graduate students, faculty, and guests, such as Jay Labov from the National Research Council. Topics have included the Astronomy Diagnostic Test, intelligent design versus evolution, active learning techniques, introducing the use of lecture tutorials, using effective demonstrations, confronting student misconceptions, engagement through clickers (or cards), and fostering critical thinking with ranking tasks. The results of an informal evaluation will be presented.

  13. Group-level self-definition and self-investment: a hierarchical (multicomponent) model of in-group identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Colin Wayne; van Zomeren, Martijn; Zebel, Sven; Vliek, Michael L W; Pennekamp, Sjoerd F; Doosje, Bertjan; Ouwerkerk, Jaap W; Spears, Russell

    2008-07-01

    Recent research shows individuals' identification with in-groups to be psychologically important and socially consequential. However, there is little agreement about how identification should be conceptualized or measured. On the basis of previous work, the authors identified 5 specific components of in-group identification and offered a hierarchical 2-dimensional model within which these components are organized. Studies 1 and 2 used confirmatory factor analysis to validate the proposed model of self-definition (individual self-stereotyping, in-group homogeneity) and self-investment (solidarity, satisfaction, and centrality) dimensions, across 3 different group identities. Studies 3 and 4 demonstrated the construct validity of the 5 components by examining their (concurrent) correlations with established measures of in-group identification. Studies 5-7 demonstrated the predictive and discriminant validity of the 5 components by examining their (prospective) prediction of individuals' orientation to, and emotions about, real intergroup relations. Together, these studies illustrate the conceptual and empirical value of a hierarchical multicomponent model of in-group identification.

  14. Working Group 1: Software System Design and Implementation for Environmental Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ISCMEM Working Group One Presentation, presentation with the purpose of fostering the exchange of information about environmental modeling tools, modeling frameworks, and environmental monitoring databases.

  15. A Renormalization Group Like Model for a Democratic Dictatorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galam, Serge

    2015-03-01

    We review a model of sociophysics which deals with democratic voting in bottom up hierarchical systems. The connection to the original physical model and technics are outlined underlining both the similarities and the differences. Emphasis is put on the numerous novel and counterintuitive results obtained with respect to the associated social and political framework. Using this model a real political event was successfully predicted with the victory of the French extreme right party in the 2000 first round of French presidential elections. The perspectives and the challenges to make sociophysics a predictive solid field of science are discussed.

  16. Working Group 2: A critical appraisal of model simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacCracken, M.; Cubasch, U.; Gates, W.L.; Harvey, L.D.; Hunt, B.; Katz, R.; Lorenz, E.; Manabe, S.; McAvaney, B.; McFarlane, N.; Meehl, G.; Meleshko, V.; Robock, A.; Stenchikov, G.; Stouffer, R.; Wang, W.C.; Washington, W.; Watts, R.; Zebiak, S.

    1990-01-01

    The complexity of the climate system and the absence of definitive analogs to the evolving climatic situation force use of theoretical models to project the future climatic influence of the relatively rapid and on-going increase in the atmospheric concentrations of CO 2 and other trace gases. A wide variety of climate models has been developed to look at particular aspects of the problem and to vary the mix of complexity and resource requirements needed to study various aspects of the problem; all such models have contributed to their insights of the problem

  17. Summary of the working group on modelling and simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schachinger, L.

    1991-11-01

    The discussions and presentations in the Simulations and Modelling subgroup of the Fifth ICFA Beam Dynamics Workshop ''The Effects of Errors in Accelerators'' are summarized. The workshop was held on October 3--8, 1991 in Corpus Christi, Texas

  18. Explorations in combining cognitive models of individuals and system dynamics models of groups.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backus, George A.

    2008-07-01

    This report documents a demonstration model of interacting insurgent leadership, military leadership, government leadership, and societal dynamics under a variety of interventions. The primary focus of the work is the portrayal of a token societal model that responds to leadership activities. The model also includes a linkage between leadership and society that implicitly represents the leadership subordinates as they directly interact with the population. The societal model is meant to demonstrate the efficacy and viability of using System Dynamics (SD) methods to simulate populations and that these can then connect to cognitive models depicting individuals. SD models typically focus on average behavior and thus have limited applicability to describe small groups or individuals. On the other hand, cognitive models readily describe individual behavior but can become cumbersome when used to describe populations. Realistic security situations are invariably a mix of individual and population dynamics. Therefore, the ability to tie SD models to cognitive models provides a critical capability that would be otherwise be unavailable.

  19. Does the interpersonal model apply across eating disorder diagnostic groups? A structural equation modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Iryna V; Tasca, Giorgio A; Proulx, Geneviève; Bissada, Hany

    2015-11-01

    Interpersonal model has been validated with binge-eating disorder (BED), but it is not yet known if the model applies across a range of eating disorders (ED). The goal of this study was to investigate the validity of the interpersonal model in anorexia nervosa (restricting type; ANR and binge-eating/purge type; ANBP), bulimia nervosa (BN), BED, and eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS). Data from a cross-sectional sample of 1459 treatment-seeking women diagnosed with ANR, ANBP, BN, BED and EDNOS were examined for indirect effects of interpersonal problems on ED psychopathology mediated through negative affect. Findings from structural equation modeling demonstrated the mediating role of negative affect in four of the five diagnostic groups. There were significant, medium to large (.239, .558), indirect effects in the ANR, BN, BED and EDNOS groups but not in the ANBP group. The results of the first reverse model of interpersonal problems as a mediator between negative affect and ED psychopathology were nonsignificant, suggesting the specificity of these hypothesized paths. However, in the second reverse model ED psychopathology was related to interpersonal problems indirectly through negative affect. This is the first study to find support for the interpersonal model of ED in a clinical sample of women with diverse ED diagnoses, though there may be a reciprocal relationship between ED psychopathology and relationship problems through negative affect. Negative affect partially explains the relationship between interpersonal problems and ED psychopathology in women diagnosed with ANR, BN, BED and EDNOS. Interpersonal psychotherapies for ED may be addressing the underlying interpersonal-affective difficulties, thereby reducing ED psychopathology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A model for group counseling with male pedophiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zessen, G

    1990-01-01

    Group treatment programs for pedophiles are often designed for populations of convicted men in closed institutions with limited application to other populations. Treatment is usually focused on reducing the "deviant" sexual arousal and/or acquiring heterosocial skills and eventually establishing the ability to engage in adult heterosexual relationships. A six-week, highly structured program is presented to five men in a non-residential setting. In addition to individual psychotherapy, group counseling is offered. Male pedophiles are trained to talk effectively about common problems surrounding man-boy relationships. Counseling is based on the notion that the emotional, erotic and sexual attraction to boys per se does not need to be legitimized or modified. The attraction, however, can be a source of psychological and social problems that can be handled by using a social support system. Social support for pedophile problems can be obtained from and in interaction with other pedophiles.

  1. The Spanish human papillomavirus vaccine consensus group: a working model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Bordoy, Javier; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2010-08-01

    Successful implementation of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in each country can only be achieved from a complementary and synergistic perspective, integrating all the different points of view of the diverse related professionals. It is this context where the Spanish HPV Vaccine Consensus Group (Grupo Español de Consenso sobre la Vacuna VPH, GEC-VPH) was created. GEC-VPH philosophy, objectives and experience are reported in this article, with particular attention to the management of negative publicity and anti-vaccine groups. Initiatives as GEC-VPH--adapted to each country's particular idiosyncrasies--might help to overcome the existing barriers and to achieve wide and early implementation of HPV vaccination.

  2. A mathematical model for stratification of LADA risk groups

    OpenAIRE

    Tat'yana Mikhaylovna Tikhonova

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To stratify risk groups via discriminant analysis based on the most clinically relevant indications of LADA onset derived from medical history.Materials and Methods. Present study included 141 patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) of whom 65 had preliminary diagnosis of LADA, 40 patients were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and 36 – with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Discriminant analysis was performed to evaluate the differences between the clinical onsets in study grou...

  3. Mechanism-based population pharmacokinetic modelling in diabetes: vildagliptin as a tight binding inhibitor and substrate of dipeptidyl peptidase IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landersdorfer, Cornelia B; He, Yan-Ling; Jusko, William J

    2012-01-01

    AIMS To assess the pharmacokinetics of vildagliptin at different doses and build a mechanism-based population model that simultaneously describes vildagliptin pharmacokinetics and its effects on DPP-4 activity based on underlying physiology and biology. METHODS Vildagliptin concentrations and DPP-4 activity vs. time from 13 type 2 diabetic patients after oral vildagliptin 10, 25 or 100 mg and placebo twice daily for 28 days were co-modelled. NONMEM VI and S-ADAPT were utilized for population modelling. RESULTS A target-mediated drug disposition (TMDD) model accounting for capacity-limited high affinity binding of vildagliptin to DPP-4 in plasma and tissues had good predictive performance. Modelling the full time course of the vildagliptin-DPP-4 interaction suggested parallel vildagliptin dissociation from DPP-4 by a slow first-order process and hydrolysis by DPP-4 to an inactive metabolite as a disposition mechanism. Due to limited amounts of DPP-4, vildagliptin concentrations increased slightly more than dose proportionally. This newly proposed model and the parameter estimates are supported by published in vitro studies. Mean parameter estimates (inter-individual coefficient of variation) were: non-saturable clearance 36 l h−1 (25%), central volume of distribution 22 l (37%), half-life of dissociation from DPP-4 1.1 h (94%) and half-life of hydrolysis 6.3 h (81%). CONCLUSIONS Vildagliptin is both an inhibitor and substrate for DPP-4. By utilizing the TMDD approach, slow dissociation of vildagliptin from DPP-4 was found in patients and the half-life of hydrolysis by DPP-4 estimated. This model can be used to predict DPP-4 inhibition effects of other dosage regimens and be modified for other DPP-4 inhibitors to differentiate their properties. PMID:22442826

  4. The Achieving Success Everyday Group Counseling Model: Implications for Professional School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Sam; Henfield, Malik S.; Booker, Beverly

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the Achieving Success Everyday (ASE) group counseling model, which is designed to help school counselors integrate students' academic and personal-social development into their group work. We first describe this group model in detail and then offer one case example of a middle school counselor using the ASE model to conduct a…

  5. Les Houches 2015: Physics at TeV Colliders Standard Model Working Group Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, J.R.; et al.

    2016-05-16

    This Report summarizes the proceedings of the 2015 Les Houches workshop on Physics at TeV Colliders. Session 1 dealt with (I) new developments relevant for high precision Standard Model calculations, (II) the new PDF4LHC parton distributions, (III) issues in the theoretical description of the production of Standard Model Higgs bosons and how to relate experimental measurements, (IV) a host of phenomenological studies essential for comparing LHC data from Run I with theoretical predictions and projections for future measurements in Run II, and (V) new developments in Monte Carlo event generators.

  6. Les Houches 2015: Physics at TeV Colliders Standard Model Working Group Report

    CERN Document Server

    Andersen, J.R.; Becker, K.; Bell, M.; Bellm, J.; Bendavid, J.; Bothmann, E.; Boughezal, R.; Butterworth, J.; Carrazza, S.; Chiesa, M.; Cieri, L.; Ciulli, V.; Denner, A.; Duehrssen-Debling, M.; Falmagne, G.; Forte, S.; Francavilla, P.; Frederix, R.; Freytsis, M.; Gao, J.; Gras, P.; Grazzini, M.; Greiner, N.; Grellscheid, D.; Heinrich, G.; Hesketh, G.; Hoche, S.; Hofer, L.; Hou, T.J.; Huss, A.; Huston, J.; Isaacson, J.; Jueid, A.; Kallweit, S.; Kar, D.; Kassabov, Z.; Konstantinides, V.; Krauss, F.; Kuttimalai, S.; Lazapoulos, A.; Lenzi, P.; Li, Y.; Lindert, J.M.; Liu, X.; Luisoni, G.; Lonnblad, L.; Maierhofer, P.; Maître, D.; Marini, A.C.; Montagna, G.; Moretti, M.; Nadolsky, P.M.; Nail, G.; Napoletano, D.; Nicrosini, O.; Oleari, C.; Pagani, D.; Pandini, C.; Perrozzi, L.; Petriello, F.; Piccinini, F.; Platzer, S.; Pogrebnyak, I.; Pozzorini, S.; Prestel, S.; Reuschle, C.; Rojo, J.; Russo, L.; Schichtel, P.; Schonherr, M.; Schumann, S.; Siodmok, A.; Skands, P.; Soper, D.; Soyez, G.; Sun, P.; Tackmann, F.J.; Tackmann, K.; Takasugi, E.; Thaler, J.; Uccirati, S.; Utku, U.; Viliani, L.; Vryonidou, E.; Wang, B.T.; Waugh, B.; Weber, M.A.; Williams, C.; Winter, J.; Xie, K.P.; Yuan, C.P.; Yuan, F.; Zapp, K.; Zaro, M.

    2016-01-01

    This Report summarizes the proceedings of the 2015 Les Houches workshop on Physics at TeV Colliders. Session 1 dealt with (I) new developments relevant for high precision Standard Model calculations, (II) the new PDF4LHC parton distributions, (III) issues in the theoretical description of the production of Standard Model Higgs bosons and how to relate experimental measurements, (IV) a host of phenomenological studies essential for comparing LHC data from Run I with theoretical predictions and projections for future measurements in Run II, and (V) new developments in Monte Carlo event generators.

  7. Cox's regression model for dynamics of grouped unemployment data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Volf, Petr

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 19 (2003), s. 151-162 ISSN 1212-074X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA402/01/0539 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1075907 Keywords : mathematical statistics * survival analysis * Cox's model Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research

  8. A Group-based Authorization Model for Cooperative Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sikkel, Nicolaas; Hughes, John A.

    Requirements for access control in CSCW systems have often been stated, but groupware in use today does not meet most of these requirements. There are practical reasons for this, but one of the problems is the inherent complexity of sophisticated access control models. We propose a general

  9. Household time allocation model based on a group utility function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, J.; Borgers, A.W.J.; Timmermans, H.J.P.

    2002-01-01

    Existing activity-based models typically assume an individual decision-making process. In household decision-making, however, interaction exists among household members and their activities during the allocation of the members' limited time. This paper, therefore, attempts to develop a new household

  10. Group-kinetic theory and modeling of atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchen, C. M.

    1989-01-01

    A group kinetic method is developed for analyzing eddy transport properties and relaxation to equilibrium. The purpose is to derive the spectral structure of turbulence in incompressible and compressible media. Of particular interest are: direct and inverse cascade, boundary layer turbulence, Rossby wave turbulence, two phase turbulence; compressible turbulence, and soliton turbulence. Soliton turbulence can be found in large scale turbulence, turbulence connected with surface gravity waves and nonlinear propagation of acoustical and optical waves. By letting the pressure gradient represent the elementary interaction among fluid elements and by raising the Navier-Stokes equation to higher dimensionality, the master equation was obtained for the description of the microdynamical state of turbulence.

  11. Coset models and D-branes in group manifolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlando, Domenico

    2006-01-01

    We conjecture the existence of a duality between heterotic closed strings on homogeneous spaces and symmetry-preserving D-branes on group manifolds, based on the observation about the coincidence of the low-energy field description for the two theories. For the closed string side we also give an explicit proof of a no-renormalization theorem as a consequence of a hidden symmetry and infer that the same property should hold true for the higher order terms of the dbi action

  12. Extending MAM5 Meta-Model and JaCalIV E Framework to Integrate Smart Devices from Real Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the extension of a meta-model (MAM5) and a framework based on the model (JaCalIVE) for developing intelligent virtual environments. The goal of this extension is to develop augmented mirror worlds that represent a real and virtual world coupled, so that the virtual world not only reflects the real one, but also complements it. A new component called a smart resource artifact, that enables modelling and developing devices to access the real physical world, and a human in the loop agent to place a human in the system have been included in the meta-model and framework. The proposed extension of MAM5 has been tested by simulating a light control system where agents can access both virtual and real sensor/actuators through the smart resources developed. The results show that the use of real environment interactive elements (smart resource artifacts) in agent-based simulations allows to minimize the error between simulated and real system. PMID:26926691

  13. Extending MAM5 Meta-Model and JaCalIV E Framework to Integrate Smart Devices from Real Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincon, J A; Poza-Lujan, Jose-Luis; Julian, V; Posadas-Yagüe, Juan-Luis; Carrascosa, C

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the extension of a meta-model (MAM5) and a framework based on the model (JaCalIVE) for developing intelligent virtual environments. The goal of this extension is to develop augmented mirror worlds that represent a real and virtual world coupled, so that the virtual world not only reflects the real one, but also complements it. A new component called a smart resource artifact, that enables modelling and developing devices to access the real physical world, and a human in the loop agent to place a human in the system have been included in the meta-model and framework. The proposed extension of MAM5 has been tested by simulating a light control system where agents can access both virtual and real sensor/actuators through the smart resources developed. The results show that the use of real environment interactive elements (smart resource artifacts) in agent-based simulations allows to minimize the error between simulated and real system.

  14. Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration within IEA Wind Task 23: Phase IV Results Regarding Floating Wind Turbine Modeling; Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonkman, J.; Larsen, T.; Hansen, A.; Nygaard, T.; Maus, K.; Karimirad, M.; Gao, Z.; Moan, T.; Fylling, I.

    2010-04-01

    Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation codes that account for the coupled dynamics of the wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity, and controls of the turbine, along with the incident waves, sea current, hydrodynamics, and foundation dynamics of the support structure. This paper describes the latest findings of the code-to-code verification activities of the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, which operates under Subtask 2 of the International Energy Agency Wind Task 23. In the latest phase of the project, participants used an assortment of codes to model the coupled dynamic response of a 5-MW wind turbine installed on a floating spar buoy in 320 m of water. Code predictions were compared from load-case simulations selected to test different model features. The comparisons have resulted in a greater understanding of offshore floating wind turbine dynamics and modeling techniques, and better knowledge of the validity of various approximations. The lessons learned from this exercise have improved the participants' codes, thus improving the standard of offshore wind turbine modeling.

  15. A unified gas-kinetic scheme for continuum and rarefied flows IV: Full Boltzmann and model equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chang, E-mail: cliuaa@ust.hk [Department of Mathematics and Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Xu, Kun, E-mail: makxu@ust.hk [Department of Mathematics and Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Sun, Quanhua, E-mail: qsun@imech.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of High-temperature Gas Dynamics, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 15 Beisihuan Xi Rd, Beijing 100190 (China); Cai, Qingdong, E-mail: caiqd@mech.pku.edu.cn [Department of Mechanics and Aerospace Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2016-06-01

    Fluid dynamic equations are valid in their respective modeling scales, such as the particle mean free path scale of the Boltzmann equation and the hydrodynamic scale of the Navier–Stokes (NS) equations. With a variation of the modeling scales, theoretically there should have a continuous spectrum of fluid dynamic equations. Even though the Boltzmann equation is claimed to be valid in all scales, many Boltzmann solvers, including direct simulation Monte Carlo method, require the cell resolution to the order of particle mean free path scale. Therefore, they are still single scale methods. In order to study multiscale flow evolution efficiently, the dynamics in the computational fluid has to be changed with the scales. A direct modeling of flow physics with a changeable scale may become an appropriate approach. The unified gas-kinetic scheme (UGKS) is a direct modeling method in the mesh size scale, and its underlying flow physics depends on the resolution of the cell size relative to the particle mean free path. The cell size of UGKS is not limited by the particle mean free path. With the variation of the ratio between the numerical cell size and local particle mean free path, the UGKS recovers the flow dynamics from the particle transport and collision in the kinetic scale to the wave propagation in the hydrodynamic scale. The previous UGKS is mostly constructed from the evolution solution of kinetic model equations. Even though the UGKS is very accurate and effective in the low transition and continuum flow regimes with the time step being much larger than the particle mean free time, it still has space to develop more accurate flow solver in the region, where the time step is comparable with the local particle mean free time. In such a scale, there is dynamic difference from the full Boltzmann collision term and the model equations. This work is about the further development of the UGKS with the implementation of the full Boltzmann collision term in the region

  16. International workshop of the Confinement Database and Modelling Expert Group in collaboration with the Edge and Pedestal Physics Expert Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordey, J.; Kardaun, O.

    2001-01-01

    A Workshop of the Confinement Database and Modelling Expert Group (EG) was held on 2-6 April at the Plasma Physics Research Center of Lausanne (CRPP), Switzerland. Presentations were held on the present status of the plasma pedestal (temperature and energy) scalings from an empirical and theoretical perspective. An integrated approach to modelling tokamaks incorporating core transport, edge pedestal and SOL, together with a model for ELMs was presented by JCT. New experimental data on on global H-mode confinement were discussed and presentations on L-H threshold power were made

  17. Kinks, chains, and loop groups in the CPn sigma models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harland, Derek

    2009-01-01

    We consider topological solitons in the CP n sigma models in two space dimensions. In particular, we study 'kinks', which are independent of one coordinate up to a rotation of the target space, and 'chains', which are periodic in one coordinate up to a rotation of the target space. Kinks and chains both exhibit constituents, similar to monopoles and calorons in SU(n) Yang-Mills-Higgs and Yang-Mills theories. We examine the constituent structure using Lie algebras.

  18. Thermodynamic Data to Model the Interaction Between Coolant and Fuel in Gen IV Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinsdale, Alan; Gisby, John; Davies, Hugh; Konings, Rudy; Benes, Ondrej

    2013-06-01

    Understanding the behaviour of nuclear fuels in various environments is vital to the design and safe operation of nuclear reactors. While this is true if the reactor is operating within its design specification, it is even more so if accidents occur and the fuel is exposed to unexpected temperatures, pressures or chemical environments. It is clearly hazardous and costly to explore all such scenarios experimentally and therefore it is necessary to undertake modelling where possible using well-grounded theoretical approaches. This paper will show examples of where calculations of chemical and phase equilibria have been applied successfully to the long term storage of nuclear waste, phase formation during core meltdown and prediction of fission product release into the atmosphere. It will also highlight the development of thermodynamic data carried out during the European Metrology Research Project Metrofission required to model the potential interaction between the coolant, nuclear fuel, containment materials and atmosphere of a sodium cooled fast reactor. (authors)

  19. A collision avoidance model for two-pedestrian groups: Considering random avoidance patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhuping; Cai, Yifei; Ke, Ruimin; Yang, Jiwei

    2017-06-01

    Grouping is a common phenomenon in pedestrian crowds and group modeling is still an open challenging problem. When grouping pedestrians avoid each other, different patterns can be observed. Pedestrians can keep close with group members and avoid other groups in cluster. Also, they can avoid other groups separately. Considering this randomness in avoidance patterns, we propose a collision avoidance model for two-pedestrian groups. In our model, the avoidance model is proposed based on velocity obstacle method at first. Then grouping model is established using Distance constrained line (DCL), by transforming DCL into the framework of velocity obstacle, the avoidance model and grouping model are successfully put into one unified calculation structure. Within this structure, an algorithm is developed to solve the problem when solutions of the two models conflict with each other. Two groups of bidirectional pedestrian experiments are designed to verify the model. The accuracy of avoidance behavior and grouping behavior is validated in the microscopic level, while the lane formation phenomenon and fundamental diagrams is validated in the macroscopic level. The experiments results show our model is convincing and has a good expansibility to describe three or more pedestrian groups.

  20. On the renormalization group flow in two dimensional superconformal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Changrim; Stanishkov, Marian

    2014-01-01

    We extend the results on the RG flow in the next to leading order to the case of the supersymmetric minimal models SM p for p≫1. We explain how to compute the NS and Ramond fields conformal blocks in the leading order in 1/p and follow the renormalization scheme proposed in [1]. As a result we obtained the anomalous dimensions of certain NS and Ramond fields. It turns out that the linear combination expressing the infrared limit of these fields in term of the IR theory SM p−2 is exactly the same as those of the nonsupersymmetric minimal theory

  1. Synopsis Session III and IV 'Water and ion mobility, up-scaling and implementation in model approaches'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The contributions of Session III 'Water and ion mobility' and Session IV 'Up-scaling and implementation in model approaches' were merged for the proceedings volume. The range of scales we are interested in starts at molecular scale (1-3 Angstrom) to crystal scale (3 Angstrom-2 nm) over particle scale with 2-200 nm dimension to the particle/macro-aggregate scale with 0.2-1500 μm. Methods available to study the particle scale concerning pore structure and connectivity which determines water mobility are under dry conditions N 2 adsorption and Hg intrusion, whereas under the hydrated state methods like X-Ray tomography and X-ray and neutron scattering are available. Going down in size molecular modeling, x-ray and neutron diffraction modeling and water adsorption gravimetry are inter alia available. There are resolution limits to the methods presented in session II (e.g. BIB-SEM) on pore characterization as e.g. the clay matrix characterization being only possible under a limited clay induration and pore throats being on the limit of resolution. These pore throats however are very important for as macroscopic phenomena observed. One methodological approach to bridge the gap between the molecular/crystal scale and the particle/macro-aggregate scale (FIB-SEM) is to use complementary techniques as cryo-NMR, N 2 and water ad-/desorption and TEM

  2. DA-1229, a dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor, protects against renal injury by preventing podocyte damage in an animal model of progressive renal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eun Lee, Jee; Kim, Jung Eun; Lee, Mi Hwa; Song, Hye Kyoung; Ghee, Jung Yeon; Kang, Young Sun; Min, Hye Sook; Kim, Hyun Wook; Cha, Jin Joo; Han, Jee Young; Han, Sang Youb; Cha, Dae Ryong

    2016-05-01

    Although dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV) inhibitors are known to have renoprotective effects, the mechanism underlying these effects has remained elusive. Here we investigated the effects of DA-1229, a novel DPPIV inhibitor, in two animal models of renal injury including db/db mice and the adriamycin nephropathy rodent model of chronic renal disease characterized by podocyte injury. For both models, DA-1229 was administered at 300 mg/kg/day. DPPIV activity in the kidney was significantly higher in diabetic mice compared with their nondiabetic controls. Although DA-1229 did not affect glycemic control or insulin resistance, DA-1229 did improve lipid profiles, albuminuria and renal fibrosis. Moreover, DA-1229 treatment resulted in decreased urinary excretion of nephrin, decreased circulating and kidney DPPIV activity, and decreased macrophage infiltration in the kidney. In adriamycin-treated mice, DPPIV activity in the kidney and urinary nephrin loss were both increased, whereas glucagon-like peptide-1 concentrations were unchanged. Moreover, DA-1229 treatment significantly improved proteinuria, renal fibrosis and inflammation associated with decreased urinary nephrin loss, and kidney DPP4 activity. In cultured podocytes, DA-1229 restored the high glucose/angiotensin II-induced increase of DPPIV activity and preserved the nephrin levels in podocytes. These findings suggest that activation of DPPIV in the kidney has a role in the progression of renal disease, and that DA-1229 may exert its renoprotective effects by preventing podocyte injury.

  3. A Thermodynamic Model for Acetate and Lactate Complexation with Am(III), Th(IV), Np(V)and U(V I) Valid to High Ionic Strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, C.R.; Free, S.J.; Bynum, R.V.

    1999-01-01

    The organic ligands acetate, lactate, oxalate and EDTA have been identified as components of wastes targeted for disposal in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) located in Southeastern New Mexico. The presence of these ligands may increase dissolved actinide concentrations and impact chemical radiation during transport. The current work considers the complexation of Am(III), Th (IV) , Np(V), and U(V I) with two of the organic ligands, acetate and lactate, in Na CI media from dilute through high concentration. A thermodynamic model for actinide complexation with the organic ligands has been developed based on the Pitzer activity coefficient formalism and the Harvie-Moller-Weare, Felmy-Weare database for describing brine evaporites systems. The model was parameterized using first apparent stability constant data from the literature. Because of complexation of other metal ions (Fe, Mg, Ni, Pb, etc.) present in the WIPP disposal room with the organic ligands, preliminary results from model calculations indicate the organic ligands do not significantly increase dissolved actinide concentrations

  4. Experimental analysis and modeling of the IV characteristics of photovoltaic solar cells under solar spectrum spot illumination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munji, M.K., E-mail: mathew.munji@nmmu.ac.z [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, PO Box 7700 Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Dyk, E.E. van; Vorster, F.J. [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, PO Box 7700 Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa)

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, some models that have been put forward to explain the characteristics of a photovoltaic solar cell device under solar spot-illumination are investigated. In the experimental procedure, small areas of the cell were selected and illuminated at different solar intensities. The solar cell open circuit voltage (V{sub oc}) and short circuit current (I{sub sc}) obtained at different illumination intensities was used to determine the solar cell ideality factor. By varying the illuminated area on the solar cell, changes in the ideality factor were studied. The ideality factor obtained increases with decreasing illumination surface ratio. The photo-generated current at the illuminated part of the cell is assumed to act as a dc source that injects charge carriers into the p-n junction of the whole solar cell while the dark region of the solar cell operates in a low space charge recombination regime with small diffusion currents. From this analysis, a different model of a spot illuminated cell that uses the variation of ideality factor with the illuminated area is proposed.

  5. Experimental analysis and modeling of the IV characteristics of photovoltaic solar cells under solar spectrum spot illumination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munji, M.K.; Dyk, E.E. van; Vorster, F.J.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, some models that have been put forward to explain the characteristics of a photovoltaic solar cell device under solar spot-illumination are investigated. In the experimental procedure, small areas of the cell were selected and illuminated at different solar intensities. The solar cell open circuit voltage (V oc ) and short circuit current (I sc ) obtained at different illumination intensities was used to determine the solar cell ideality factor. By varying the illuminated area on the solar cell, changes in the ideality factor were studied. The ideality factor obtained increases with decreasing illumination surface ratio. The photo-generated current at the illuminated part of the cell is assumed to act as a dc source that injects charge carriers into the p-n junction of the whole solar cell while the dark region of the solar cell operates in a low space charge recombination regime with small diffusion currents. From this analysis, a different model of a spot illuminated cell that uses the variation of ideality factor with the illuminated area is proposed.

  6. NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis - 2016.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  7. NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis - 2014.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  8. NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis - 2015.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  9. SAGE IV Pathfinder

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Utilizing a unique, new occultation technique involving imaging, the SAGE IV concept will meet or exceed the quality of previous SAGE measurements at a small...

  10. Public participation and marginalized groups: the community development model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, Eileen; Hogg, Christine

    1999-12-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop ways of reaching house-bound people and enabling them to give their views in planning and monitoring health and social care. STRATEGY: HealthLINK - a project based in a community health council - explored ways of involving older house-bound people in the London Borough of Camden, in planning and monitoring health and social care using community development techniques. RESULTS: HealthLINK set up an infrastructure to enable house-bound people to have access to information and to enable them to give their views. This resulted in access for health and local authorities to the views of house-bound older people and increased the self esteem and quality of life of those who became involved. CONCLUSIONS: Community development approaches that enable an infrastructure to be established may be an effective way of reaching marginalized communities. However, there are tensions in this approach between the different requirements for public involvement of statutory bodies and of users, and between representation of groups and listening to individual voices.

  11. Analytical Models of Exoplanetary Atmospheres. IV. Improved Two-stream Radiative Transfer for the Treatment of Aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heng, Kevin; Kitzmann, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    We present a novel generalization of the two-stream method of radiative transfer, which allows for the accurate treatment of radiative transfer in the presence of strong infrared scattering by aerosols. We prove that this generalization involves only a simple modification of the coupling coefficients and transmission functions in the hemispheric two-stream method. This modification originates from allowing the ratio of the first Eddington coefficients to depart from unity. At the heart of the method is the fact that this ratio may be computed once and for all over the entire range of values of the single-scattering albedo and scattering asymmetry factor. We benchmark our improved two-stream method by calculating the fraction of flux reflected by a single atmospheric layer (the reflectivity) and comparing these calculations to those performed using a 32-stream discrete-ordinates method. We further compare our improved two-stream method to the two-stream source function (16 streams) and delta-Eddington methods, demonstrating that it is often more accurate at the order-of-magnitude level. Finally, we illustrate its accuracy using a toy model of the early Martian atmosphere hosting a cloud layer composed of carbon dioxide ice particles. The simplicity of implementation and accuracy of our improved two-stream method renders it suitable for implementation in three-dimensional general circulation models. In other words, our improved two-stream method has the ease of implementation of a standard two-stream method, but the accuracy of a 32-stream method.

  12. Analytical Models of Exoplanetary Atmospheres. IV. Improved Two-stream Radiative Transfer for the Treatment of Aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heng, Kevin; Kitzmann, Daniel, E-mail: kevin.heng@csh.unibe.ch, E-mail: daniel.kitzmann@csh.unibe.ch [University of Bern, Center for Space and Habitability, Gesellschaftsstrasse 6, CH-3012, Bern (Switzerland)

    2017-10-01

    We present a novel generalization of the two-stream method of radiative transfer, which allows for the accurate treatment of radiative transfer in the presence of strong infrared scattering by aerosols. We prove that this generalization involves only a simple modification of the coupling coefficients and transmission functions in the hemispheric two-stream method. This modification originates from allowing the ratio of the first Eddington coefficients to depart from unity. At the heart of the method is the fact that this ratio may be computed once and for all over the entire range of values of the single-scattering albedo and scattering asymmetry factor. We benchmark our improved two-stream method by calculating the fraction of flux reflected by a single atmospheric layer (the reflectivity) and comparing these calculations to those performed using a 32-stream discrete-ordinates method. We further compare our improved two-stream method to the two-stream source function (16 streams) and delta-Eddington methods, demonstrating that it is often more accurate at the order-of-magnitude level. Finally, we illustrate its accuracy using a toy model of the early Martian atmosphere hosting a cloud layer composed of carbon dioxide ice particles. The simplicity of implementation and accuracy of our improved two-stream method renders it suitable for implementation in three-dimensional general circulation models. In other words, our improved two-stream method has the ease of implementation of a standard two-stream method, but the accuracy of a 32-stream method.

  13. Evaluating WAIS-IV structure through a different psychometric lens: Structural causal model discovery as an alternative to confirmatory factor analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, M.J.A.M. van; Claassen, T.; Suwartono, C.; Veld, W.M. van der; Heijden, P.T. van der; Hendriks, M.P.H.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Since the publication of the WAIS-IV in the U.S. in 2008, efforts have been made to explore the structural validity by applying factor analysis to various samples. This study aims to achieve a more fine-grained understanding of the structure of the Dutch language version of the WAIS-IV

  14. Framing Negotiation: Dynamics of Epistemological and Positional Framing in Small Groups during Scientific Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Soo-Yean; Kim, Heui-Baik

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we examined students' epistemological and positional framing during small group scientific modeling to explore their context-dependent perceptions about knowledge, themselves, and others. We focused on two small groups of Korean eighth-grade students who participated in six modeling activities about excretion. The two groups were…

  15. A friendly Maple module for one and two group reactor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baptista, Camila O.; Pavan, Guilherme A.; Braga, Kelmo L.; Silva, Marcelo V.; Pereira, P.G.S.; Werner, Rodrigo; Antunes, Valdir; Vellozo, Sergio O.

    2015-01-01

    The well known two energy groups core reactor design model is revisited. A simple and friendly Maple module was built to cover the steps calculations of a plate reactor in five situations: 1. one group bare reactor, 2. two groups bare reactor, 3. one group reflected reactor, 4. 1-1/2 groups reflected reactor and 5. two groups reflected reactor. The results show the convergent path of critical size, as it should be. (author)

  16. A friendly Maple module for one and two group reactor model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baptista, Camila O.; Pavan, Guilherme A.; Braga, Kelmo L.; Silva, Marcelo V.; Pereira, P.G.S.; Werner, Rodrigo; Antunes, Valdir; Vellozo, Sergio O., E-mail: camila.oliv.baptista@gmail.com, E-mail: pavanguilherme@gmail.com, E-mail: kelmo.lins@gmail.com, E-mail: marcelovilelasilva@gmail.com, E-mail: rodrigowerner@hotmail.com, E-mail: neutron201566@yahoo.com, E-mail: vellozo@ime.eb.br [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    The well known two energy groups core reactor design model is revisited. A simple and friendly Maple module was built to cover the steps calculations of a plate reactor in five situations: 1. one group bare reactor, 2. two groups bare reactor, 3. one group reflected reactor, 4. 1-1/2 groups reflected reactor and 5. two groups reflected reactor. The results show the convergent path of critical size, as it should be. (author)

  17. Comparison of four different chemical reaction schemes (CBM-IV, EMEP, Euro-RADM, RADM II) for the modelling of ozone formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musalek, G.; Winiwarter, W.

    1995-08-01

    Four different chemical reaction schemes (mechanisms) were tested for their applicability for inclusion in an ozone model for Eastern Austria (Pannonia) which is being developed within the Pannonian Ozone Project (POP). For this task, a box model (OZIP-W) was used. Input data were taken from actual meteorology, from background measurements and from an emission inventory for Austria. A number of scenarios were tested with all four mechanisms (CBM-IV, EMEP, RADM-II and Euro-RADM). A nine-hour daytime summer period was modelled in every case. Distinctive differences could be observed between the respective scenarios. Large influences of emission levels, of a short-term intrusion of polluted urban air, of precursor entrainment from an upper layer and of the way certain compounds like ethanol were attributed into the chemistry scheme were seen. Little difference was observed for using a detailed temporal resolution in the inventory and for the actual temperature. These differences, however, were almost identical for each of the chemical mechanisms. The mechanisms mainly differed in secondary reaction products like HO 2 and H 2 O 2 concentrations. Comparison with measurement results (airborne as well as ground based) therefore were not able to support a selection, especially since H 2 O 2 measurerment data (which otherwise seem to support RADM or EuroRADM) are only available for a different time period. Therefore the general characteristics of the mechanisms had to be taken as criteria. Special consideration was put on the comparison of measurement resu1ts with model runs. As within the POP detailed measurements of VOC will be available, the mechanism which has the most detailed VOC speciation seemed most appropriate. A decision was taken to apply the Euro-RADM chemical scheme for the POP-Model. (author)

  18. Thermodynamic data for predicting concentrations of Th(IV), U(IV), Np(IV), and Pu(IV) in geologic environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Dhanpat; Roa, Linfeng; Weger, H.T.; Felmy, A.R. [Battelle, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) (United States); Choppin, G.R. [Florida State University (United States); Yui, Mikazu [Waste Isolation Research Division, Tokai Works, Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-01-01

    This report provides thermodynamic data for predicting concentrations of Th(IV), U(IV), Np(IV), and Pu(IV) in geologic environments, and contributes to an integration of the JNC chemical thermodynamic database, JNC-TDB (previously PNC-TDB), for the performance analysis of geological isolation system for high-level radioactive wastes. Thermodynamic data for the formation of complexes or compounds with hydroxide, chloride, fluoride, carbonate, nitrate, sulfate and phosphate are discussed in this report. Where data for specific actinide(IV) species was lacking, the data were selected based on chemical analogy to other tetravalent actinides. In this study, the Pitzer ion-interaction model is used to extrapolate thermodynamic constants to zero ionic strength at 25degC. (author)

  19. Development and application of an advanced fuel model for the safety analysis of the generation IV gas-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petkevich, P.

    2008-09-01

    Until about the year 2030, current-day nuclear power plants (NPPs) will be replaced by so-called Gen-III or Gen-III+ units, which are mainly based on light water reactor technology. The principal new features are increased safety and improved economical effectiveness. However, these systems use the same fuel forms and are based on the same fuel cycle. Beyond 2030, the interest is likely to shift towards fourth generation NPPs, which offer the possibility of complete fuel cycle closure. Generation-IV reactor concepts include both thermal and fast systems, and involve a wide range of fuel forms and compositions. The present research has been focused on the development of a thermo-mechanical model for the innovative fuel design of the Generation-IV Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR). The principal distinctive feature of the fuel is that the fuel pellets are arranged within plates which enclose an inner honeycomb structure. Apart from the geometry, the usage of new materials is foreseen. Thus, the fuel pellets are of mixed uranium-plutonium carbide, and the cladding is bulk or fiber-reinforced SiC. The setting up of an appropriate materials database was thus the very first task which had to be carried out in the current work. The main purpose of the currently developed model is to provide reliable data, in the context of transient analysis, for the calculation of the principal neutronic feedbacks in the GFR core, viz. the fuel temperature for the Doppler effect and the fuel plate deformation for the axial core expansion effect. None of the available fuel modeling codes is suitable for a realistic simulation of the GFR fuel, as the inner honeycomb structure cannot be explicitly taken into account. The development work has been carried out largely in the context of PSI’s generic code system for fast reactor safety analysis, FAST. Thereby, it has mainly involved extension of the thermo-mechanical code FRED, developed originally for the modeling of traditional rodded fuel

  20. Assessment of Group Preferences and Group Uncertainty for Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-06-01

    the individ- uals. decision making , group judgments should be preferred to individual judgments if obtaining group judgments costs more. -26- -YI IV... decision making group . IV. A. 3. Aggregation using conjugate distribution. Arvther procedure for combining indivi(jai probability judgments into a group...statisticized group group decision making group judgment subjective probability Delphi method expected utility nominal group 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on

  1. Shatavarins (containing Shatavarin IV) with anticancer activity from the roots of Asparagus racemosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Shankar K.; Prakash, Neswi S.; Sundaram, Ramachandran

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The anticancer activity of shatavarins (containing shatavarin IV) isolated from the roots of Asparagus racemosus (Wild) was evaluated using in vitro and in vivo experimental models. Material and Methods: The shatavarin IV was isolated from ethyl acetate insoluble fraction (AR-2B) of chloroform:methanol (2:1) (AR-2) extract of A. racemosus roots. The cytotoxicity (in vitro) of shatavarin IV and other shatavarins rich fraction was carried out using of MTT assay using MCF-7 (human breast cancer), HT-29 (human colon adenocarcinoma), and A-498 (human kidney carcinoma) cell lines. The in vivo anticancer activity of shatavarins (containing shatavarin IV) was evaluated against Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) tumor bearing mice. Results: The isolated shatavarin IV (84.69 %) along with shatavarins rich fraction, coded AR-2B containing 5.05% shatavarin IV showed potent cytotoxicity. Oral administration of AR-2B to tumor bearing mice at doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg body weight for 10 days, showed significant reduction in percent increase in body weight, tumor volume, packed cell volume, viable tumor cell count, and increased non-viable cell count when compared to the untreated mice of the EAC control group. The restoration of hematological parameters towards normalcy was also observed. Conclusion: The result suggests that the shatavarins (containing shatavarin IV) rich fraction (AR-2B) exhibits significant anticancer activity in both in vitro and in vivo experimental models. PMID:23248403

  2. Estimation of group means when adjusting for covariates in generalized linear models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yongming; Luo, Junxiang

    2015-01-01

    Generalized linear models are commonly used to analyze categorical data such as binary, count, and ordinal outcomes. Adjusting for important prognostic factors or baseline covariates in generalized linear models may improve the estimation efficiency. The model-based mean for a treatment group produced by most software packages estimates the response at the mean covariate, not the mean response for this treatment group for the studied population. Although this is not an issue for linear models, the model-based group mean estimates in generalized linear models could be seriously biased for the true group means. We propose a new method to estimate the group mean consistently with the corresponding variance estimation. Simulation showed the proposed method produces an unbiased estimator for the group means and provided the correct coverage probability. The proposed method was applied to analyze hypoglycemia data from clinical trials in diabetes. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. A Model for Behavioral Management and Relationship Training for Parents in Groups,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behavior, Human relations, *Training, *Families(Human), Symposia, Models, Children, Psychotherapy, Problem solving, Management, Control, Learning, Skills, Decision making , Group dynamics, Military psychology, Military medicine

  4. Multi-scale approach to the modeling of fission gas discharge during hypothetical loss-of-flow accident in gen-IV sodium fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behafarid, F.; Shaver, D. R. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States); Bolotnov, I. A. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Jansen, K. E. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Antal, S. P.; Podowski, M. Z. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The required technological and safety standards for future Gen IV Reactors can only be achieved if advanced simulation capabilities become available, which combine high performance computing with the necessary level of modeling detail and high accuracy of predictions. The purpose of this paper is to present new results of multi-scale three-dimensional (3D) simulations of the inter-related phenomena, which occur as a result of fuel element heat-up and cladding failure, including the injection of a jet of gaseous fission products into a partially blocked Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) coolant channel, and gas/molten sodium transport along the coolant channels. The computational approach to the analysis of the overall accident scenario is based on using two different inter-communicating computational multiphase fluid dynamics (CMFD) codes: a CFD code, PHASTA, and a RANS code, NPHASE-CMFD. Using the geometry and time history of cladding failure and the gas injection rate, direct numerical simulations (DNS), combined with the Level Set method, of two-phase turbulent flow have been performed by the PHASTA code. The model allows one to track the evolution of gas/liquid interfaces at a centimeter scale. The simulated phenomena include the formation and breakup of the jet of fission products injected into the liquid sodium coolant. The PHASTA outflow has been averaged over time to obtain mean phasic velocities and volumetric concentrations, as well as the liquid turbulent kinetic energy and turbulence dissipation rate, all of which have served as the input to the core-scale simulations using the NPHASE-CMFD code. A sliding window time averaging has been used to capture mean flow parameters for transient cases. The results presented in the paper include testing and validation of the proposed models, as well the predictions of fission-gas/liquid-sodium transport along a multi-rod fuel assembly of SFR during a partial loss-of-flow accident. (authors)

  5. Task complexity and task, goal, and reward interdependence in group performance management : A prescriptive model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vijfeijken, H.; Kleingeld, A.; van Tuijl, H.; Algera, J.A.; Thierry, Hk.

    2002-01-01

    A prescriptive model on how to design effective combinations of goal setting and contingent rewards for group performance management is presented. The model incorporates the constructs task complexity, task interdependence, goal interdependence, and reward interdependence and specifies optimal fit

  6. Task complexity and task, goal, and reward interdependence in group performance : a prescriptive model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijfeijken, van H.T.G.A.; Kleingeld, P.A.M.; Tuijl, van H.F.J.M.; Algera, J.A.; Thierry, H.

    2002-01-01

    A prescriptive model on how to design effective combinations of goal setting and contingent rewards for group performance management is presented. The model incorporates the constructs task complexity, task interdependence, goal interdependence, and reward interdependence and specifies optimal fit

  7. Synthesis and evaluation of artificial antigens for astragaloside IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-lan Yu

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to produce artificial antigens for astragaloside IV that could be used to prepare antibodies against astragaloside IV screened in Radix astragali (Astragalus membranaceus (Fisch Bunge, Fabaceae and its preparations, using an indirect ELISA. Astragaloside IV was coupled to carrier proteins, bovine serum albumin and ovalbumin using the sodium periodate method and was then evaluated using SDS-PAGE, MALDI-TOF MS and animal immunizations. The coupling ratio of astragaloside IV to bovine serum albumin ratio was determined to be thirteen, and the indirect ELISA demonstrated that three groups of mice immunized with astragaloside IV-bovine serum albumin produced anti-astragaloside IV- bovine serum albumin-specific antibody, with a minimum serum titer of 1:9600. A method for synthesizing highly immunogenic astragaloside IV artificial antigens was successfully developed thus indicating its feasibility in the establishment of a fast immunoassay for astragaloside IV content determination in Radix astragali and its products.

  8. Predicting DPP-IV inhibitors with machine learning approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jie; Li, Chanjuan; Liu, Zhihong; Du, Jiewen; Ye, Jiming; Gu, Qiong; Xu, Jun

    2017-04-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) is a promising Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) drug target. DPP-IV inhibitors prolong the action of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and gastric inhibitory peptide (GIP), improve glucose homeostasis without weight gain, edema, and hypoglycemia. However, the marketed DPP-IV inhibitors have adverse effects such as nasopharyngitis, headache, nausea, hypersensitivity, skin reactions and pancreatitis. Therefore, it is still expected for novel DPP-IV inhibitors with minimal adverse effects. The scaffolds of existing DPP-IV inhibitors are structurally diversified. This makes it difficult to build virtual screening models based upon the known DPP-IV inhibitor libraries using conventional QSAR approaches. In this paper, we report a new strategy to predict DPP-IV inhibitors with machine learning approaches involving naïve Bayesian (NB) and recursive partitioning (RP) methods. We built 247 machine learning models based on 1307 known DPP-IV inhibitors with optimized molecular properties and topological fingerprints as descriptors. The overall predictive accuracies of the optimized models were greater than 80%. An external test set, composed of 65 recently reported compounds, was employed to validate the optimized models. The results demonstrated that both NB and RP models have a good predictive ability based on different combinations of descriptors. Twenty "good" and twenty "bad" structural fragments for DPP-IV inhibitors can also be derived from these models for inspiring the new DPP-IV inhibitor scaffold design.

  9. Modified two-fluid model for the two-group interfacial area transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Xiaodong; Ishii, Mamoru; Kelly, Joseph M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a modified two-fluid model that is ready to be applied in the approach of the two-group interfacial area transport equation. The two-group interfacial area transport equation was developed to provide a mechanistic constitutive relation for the interfacial area concentration in the two-fluid model. In the two-group transport equation, bubbles are categorized into two groups: spherical/distorted bubbles as Group 1 while cap/slug/churn-turbulent bubbles as Group 2. Therefore, this transport equation can be employed in the flow regimes spanning from bubbly, cap bubbly, slug to churn-turbulent flows. However, the introduction of the two groups of bubbles requires two gas velocity fields. Yet it is not practical to solve two momentum equations for the gas phase alone. In the current modified two-fluid model, a simplified approach is proposed. The momentum equation for the averaged velocity of both Group-1 and Group-2 bubbles is retained. By doing so, the velocity difference between Group-1 and Group-2 bubbles needs to be determined. This may be made either based on simplified momentum equations for both Group-1 and Group-2 bubbles or by a modified drift-flux model

  10. IV access in dental practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzpatrick, J J

    2009-04-01

    Intravenous (IV) access is a valuable skill for dental practitioners in emergency situations and in IV sedation. However, many people feel some apprehension about performing this procedure. This article explains the basic principles behind IV access, and the relevant anatomy and physiology, as well as giving a step-by-step guide to placing an IV cannula.

  11. Implementation and assessment of the renormalization group (Rng) k - ε model in gothic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analytis, G.Th.

    2001-01-01

    In GOTHIC, the standard k - ε model is used to model turbulence. In an attempt to enhance the turbulence modelling capabilities of the code for simulation of mixing driven by highly buoyant discharges, we implemented the Renormalization Group (RNG) k - ε model. This model which for the time being, is only implemented in the ''gas'' phase, was tested with different simple test-problems and its predictions were compared to the corresponding ones obtained when the standard k - ε model was used. (author)

  12. Internet Economics IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-08-01

    edts.): Internet Economics IV Technical Report No. 2004-04, August 2004 Information Systems Laboratory IIS, Departement of Computer Science University of...level agreements (SLA), Information technology (IT), Internet address, Internet service provider 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 18... technology and its economic impacts in the Internet world today. The second talk addresses the area of AAA protocol, summarizing authentication

  13. Uranium (IV) carboxylates - I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satpathy, K C; Patnaik, A K [Sambalpur Univ. (India). Dept. of Chemistry

    1975-11-01

    A few uranium(IV) carboxylates with monochloro and trichloro acetic acid, glycine, malic, citric, adipic, o-toluic, anthranilic and salicylic acids have been prepared by photolytic methods. The I.R. spectra of these compounds are recorded and basing on the spectral data, structure of the compounds have been suggested.

  14. PLATO IV Accountancy Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pondy, Dorothy, Comp.

    The catalog was compiled to assist instructors in planning community college and university curricula using the 48 computer-assisted accountancy lessons available on PLATO IV (Programmed Logic for Automatic Teaching Operation) for first semester accounting courses. It contains information on lesson access, lists of acceptable abbreviations for…

  15. Examination of a Group Counseling Model of Career Decision Making with College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowell, P. Clay; Mobley, A. Keith; Kemer, Gulsah; Giordano, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    The authors examined the effectiveness of a group career counseling model (Pyle, K. R., 2007) on college students' career decision-making abilities. They used a Solomon 4-group design and found that students who participated in the career counseling groups had significantly greater increases in career decision-making abilities than those who…

  16. The Achieving Success Everyday Group Counseling Model: Fostering Resiliency in Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Joy; Steen, Sam

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses a group counseling intervention used to develop and foster resiliency in middle school students by implementing the Achieving Success Everyday (ASE) group counseling model. The authors aimed to discover what impact this group counseling intervention, which focused on resiliency characteristics, would have on students'…

  17. Item Construction Using Reflective, Formative, or Rasch Measurement Models: Implications for Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Christina Hamme; Gischlar, Karen L.; Peterson, N. Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Measures that accurately capture the phenomenon are critical to research and practice in group work. The vast majority of group-related measures were developed using the reflective measurement model rooted in classical test theory (CTT). Depending on the construct definition and the measure's purpose, the reflective model may not always be the…

  18. Reviewing the Role of Stakeholders in Operational Research: Opportunities for Group Model Building

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gooyert, V. de; Rouwette, E.A.J.A.; Kranenburg, H.L. van

    2013-01-01

    Stakeholders have always received much attention in system dynamics, especially in the group model building tradition, which emphasizes the deep involvement of a client group in building a system dynamics model. In organizations, stakeholders are gaining more and more attention by managers who try

  19. COBRA-IV wire wrap data comparisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donovan, T.E.; George, T.L.; Wheeler, C.L.

    1979-02-01

    Thermal hydraulic analyses of hexagonally packed wire-wrapped fuel assemblies are complicated by the induced crossflow between adjacent subchannels. The COBRA-IV computer code simultaneously solves the hydrodynamics and thermodynamics of fuel assemblies. The modifications and the results are presented which are predicted by the COBRA-IV calculation. Comparisons are made with data measured in five experimental models of a wire-wrapped fuel assembly

  20. A preference aggregation model and application in AHP-group decision making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Taiyi; Yang, De; Chao, Xiangrui

    2018-04-01

    Group decision making process integrate individual preferences to obtain the group preference by applying aggregation rules and preference relations. The two most useful approaches, the aggregation of individual judgements and the aggregation of individual priorities, traditionally are employed in the Analytic Hierarchy Process to deal with group decision making problems. In both cases, it is assumed that the group preference is approximate weighted mathematical expectation of individual judgements and individual priorities. We propose new preference aggregation methods using optimization models in order to obtain group preference which is close to all individual priorities. Some illustrative examples are finally examined to demonstrate proposed models for application.

  1. A model parent group for enhancing aggressive children's social competence in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming-Hui

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents a semi-structured psychoeducational model of group work for parents of aggressive children based on concepts of co-parenting and bidirectionality. The group was developed for enhancing five Taiwanese aggressive children's social competence by promoting positive interactions within family. Topics covered in the group included identifying parenting styles, forming parental alliances, fostering parent-child mutual initiations/mutual compliances, establishing parent-child co-regulation, and responding to aggressive children's negative emotions. Pre- and post-group comparisons suggested the effectiveness of the group model.

  2. Safety assessment for Generation IV nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leahy, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) Risk and Safety Working Group (RSWG) was created to develop an effective approach for the safety of Generation IV advanced nuclear energy systems. Recent RSWG work has focused on the definition of an integrated safety assessment methodology (ISAM) for evaluating the safety of Generation IV systems. ISAM is an integrated 'tool-kit' consisting of 5 analytical techniques that are available and matched to appropriate stages of Generation IV system concept development: 1) qualitative safety features review - QSR, 2) phenomena identification and ranking table - PIRT, 3) objective provision tree - OPT, 4) deterministic and phenomenological analyses - DPA, and 5) probabilistic safety analysis - PSA. The integrated methodology is intended to yield safety-related insights that help actively drive the evolving design throughout the technology development cycle, potentially resulting in enhanced safety, reduced costs, and shortened development time

  3. Computations of nuclear response functions with MACK-IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.A.; Gohar, Y.

    1978-01-01

    The MACK computer program calculates energy pointwise and multigroup nuclear response functions from basic nuclear data in ENDF/B format. The new version of the program, MACK-IV, incorporates major developments and improvements aimed at maximizing the utilization of available nuclear data and ensuring energy conservation in nuclear heating calculations. A new library, MACKLIB-IV, of nuclear response functions was generated in the CTR energy group structure of 171 neutron groups and 36 gamma groups. The library was prepared using MACK-IV and ENDF/B-IV and is suitable for fusion, fusion-fission hybrids, and fission applications

  4. Computations of nuclear response functions with MACK-IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdou, M A; Gohar, Y

    1978-01-01

    The MACK computer program calculates energy pointwise and multigroup nuclear response functions from basic nuclear data in ENDF/B format. The new version of the program, MACK-IV, incorporates major developments and improvements aimed at maximizing the utilization of available nuclear data and ensuring energy conservation in nuclear heating calculations. A new library, MACKLIB-IV, of nuclear response functions was generated in the CTR energy group structure of 171 neutron groups and 36 gamma groups. The library was prepared using MACK-IV and ENDF/B-IV and is suitable for fusion, fusion-fission hybrids, and fission applications.

  5. Enhanced Design Alternative IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, N.E.

    1999-01-01

    This report evaluates Enhanced Design Alternative (EDA) IV as part of the second phase of the License Application Design Selection (LADS) effort. The EDA IV concept was compared to the VA reference design using criteria from the Design Input Request for LADS Phase II EDA Evaluations (CRWMS M and O 1999b) and (CRWMS M and O 1999f). Briefly, the EDA IV concept arranges the waste packages close together in an emplacement configuration known as line load. Continuous pre-closure ventilation keeps the waste packages from exceeding their 350 C cladding and 200 C (4.3.6) drift wall temperature limits. This EDA concept keeps relatively high, uniform emplacement drift temperatures (post-closure) to drive water away from the repository and thus dry out the pillars between emplacement drifts. The waste package is shielded to permit human access to emplacement drifts and includes an integral filler inside the package to reduce the amount of water that can contact the waste form. Closure of the repository is desired 50 years after first waste is emplaced. Both backfill and drip shields will be emplaced at closure to improve post-closure performance. The EDA IV concept includes more defense-in-depth layers than the VA reference design because of its backfill, drip shield, waste package shielding, and integral filler features. These features contribute to the low dose-rate to the public achieved during the first 10,000 years of repository life as shown in Figure 3. Investigation of the EDA IV concept has led to the following general conclusions: (1) The total life cycle cost for EDA IV is about $21.7 billion which equates to a $11.3 billion net present value (both figures rounded up). (2) The incidence of design basis events for EDA IV is similar to the VA reference design. (3) The emplacement of the waste packages in drifts will be similar to the VA reference design. However, heavier equipment may be required because the shielded waste package will be heavier. (4) The heavier

  6. A Discrete Heterogeneous-Group Economic Growth Model with Endogenous Leisure Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Bin Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a one-sector multigroup growth model with endogenous labor supply in discrete time. Proposing an alternative approach to behavior of households, we examine the dynamics of wealth and income distribution in a competitive economy with capital accumulation as the main engine of economic growth. We show how human capital levels, preferences, and labor force of heterogeneous households determine the national economic growth, wealth, and income distribution and time allocation of the groups. By simulation we demonstrate, for instance, that in the three-group economy when the rich group's human capital is improved, all the groups will economically benefit, and the leisure times of all the groups are reduced but when any other group's human capital is improved, the group will economically benefit, the other two groups economically lose, and the leisure times of all the groups are increased.

  7. To eat and not be eaten: modelling resources and safety in multi-species animal groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh Srinivasan

    Full Text Available Using mixed-species bird flocks as an example, we model the payoffs for two types of species from participating in multi-species animal groups. Salliers feed on mobile prey, are good sentinels and do not affect prey capture rates of gleaners; gleaners feed on prey on substrates and can enhance the prey capture rate of salliers by flushing prey, but are poor sentinels. These functional types are known from various animal taxa that form multi-species associations. We model costs and benefits of joining groups for a wide range of group compositions under varying abundances of two types of prey-prey on substrates and mobile prey. Our model predicts that gleaners and salliers show a conflict of interest in multi-species groups, because gleaners benefit from increasing numbers of salliers in the group, whereas salliers benefit from increasing gleaner numbers. The model also predicts that the limits to size and variability in composition of multi-species groups are driven by the relative abundance of different types of prey, independent of predation pressure. Our model emphasises resources as a primary driver of temporal and spatial group dynamics, rather than reproductive activity or predation per se, which have hitherto been thought to explain patterns of multi-species group formation and cohesion. The qualitative predictions of the model are supported by empirical patterns from both terrestrial and marine multi-species groups, suggesting that similar mechanisms might underlie group dynamics in a range of taxa. The model also makes novel predictions about group dynamics that can be tested using variation across space and time.

  8. Tracking Maneuvering Group Target with Extension Predicted and Best Model Augmentation Method Adapted

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linhai Gan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The random matrix (RM method is widely applied for group target tracking. The assumption that the group extension keeps invariant in conventional RM method is not yet valid, as the orientation of the group varies rapidly while it is maneuvering; thus, a new approach with group extension predicted is derived here. To match the group maneuvering, a best model augmentation (BMA method is introduced. The existing BMA method uses a fixed basic model set, which may lead to a poor performance when it could not ensure basic coverage of true motion modes. Here, a maneuvering group target tracking algorithm is proposed, where the group extension prediction and the BMA adaption are exploited. The performance of the proposed algorithm will be illustrated by simulation.

  9. Transformation of renormalization groups in 2N-component fermion hierarchical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanov, R.G.

    2006-01-01

    The 2N-component fermion model on the hierarchical lattice is studied. The explicit formulae for renormalization groups transformation in the space of coefficients setting the Grassmannian-significant density of the free measure are presented. The inverse transformation of the renormalization group is calculated. The definition of immovable points of renormalization groups is reduced to solving the set of algebraic equations. The interesting connection between renormalization group transformations in boson and fermion hierarchical models is found out. It is shown that one transformation is obtained from other one by the substitution of N on -N [ru

  10. THE EFFECTS OF COOPERATIVE LEARNING MODEL GROUP INVESTIGATION AND MOTIVATION TOWARD PHYSICS LEARNING RESULTS MAN TANJUNGBALAI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amalia Febri Aristi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine: (1 Is there a difference in student's learning outcomes with the application of learning models Investigation Group and Direct Instruction teaching model. (2 Is there a difference in students' motivation with the application of learning models Investigation Group and Direct Instruction teaching model, (3 Is there an interaction between learning models Investigation Group and Direct Instruction to improve students' motivation in learning outcomes Physics. This research is a quasi experimental. The study population was a student of class XII Tanjung Balai MAN. Random sample selection is done by randomizing the class. The instrument used consisted of: (1 achievement test (2 students' motivation questionnaire. The tests are used to obtain the data is shaped essay. The data in this study were analyzed using ANOVA analysis of two paths. The results showed that: (1 there were differences in learning outcomes between students who used the physics model of Group Investigation learning compared with students who used the Direct Instruction teaching model. (2 There was a difference in student's learning outcomes that had a low learning motivation and high motivation to learn both in the classroom and in the classroom Investigation Group Direct Instruction. (3 There was interaction between learning models Instruction Direct Group Investigation and motivation to learn in improving learning outcomes Physics.

  11. The Kadanoff lower-bound variational renormalization group applied to an SU(2) lattice spin model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorleifsson, G.; Damgaard, P.H.

    1990-07-01

    We apply the variational lower-bound Renormalization Group transformation of Kadanoff to an SU(2) lattice spin model in 2 and 3 dimensions. Even in the one-hypercube framework of this renormalization group transformation the present model is characterised by having an infinite basis of fundamental operators. We investigate whether the lower-bound variational renormalization group transformation yields results stable under truncations of this operator basis. Our results show that for this particular spin model this is not the case. (orig.)

  12. Oxovanadium(IV)-catalysed oxidation of dibenzothiophene and 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunlaja, Adeniyi S; Chidawanyika, Wadzanai; Antunes, Edith; Fernandes, Manuel A; Nyokong, Tebello; Torto, Nelson; Tshentu, Zenixole R

    2012-12-07

    The reaction between [V(IV)OSO(4)] and the tetradentate N(2)O(2)-donor Schiff base ligand, N,N-bis(o-hydroxybenzaldehyde)phenylenediamine (sal-HBPD), obtained by the condensation of salicylaldehyde and o-phenylenediamine in a molar ratio of 2 : 1 respectively, resulted in the formation of [V(IV)O(sal-HBPD)]. The molecular structure of [V(IV)O(sal-HBPD)] was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction, and confirmed the distorted square pyramidal geometry of the complex with the N(2)O(2) binding mode of the tetradentate ligand. The formation of the polymer-supported p[V(IV)O(sal-AHBPD)] proceeded via the nitrosation of sal-HBPD, followed by the reduction with hydrogen to form an amine group that was then linked to Merrifield beads followed by the reaction with [V(IV)OSO(4)]. XPS and EPR were used to confirm the presence of oxovanadium(IV) within the beads. The BET surface area and porosity of the heterogeneous catalyst p[V(IV)O(sal-AHBPD)] were found to be 6.9 m(2) g(-1) and 180.8 Å respectively. Microanalysis, TG, UV-Vis and FT-IR were used for further characterization of both [V(IV)O(sal-HBPD)] and p[V(IV)O(sal-AHBPD)]. Oxidation of dibenzothiophene (DBT) and 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene (4,6-DMDBT) was investigated using [V(IV)O(sal-HBPD)] and p[V(IV)O(sal-AHBPD)] as catalysts. Progress for oxidation of these model compounds was monitored with a gas chromatograph fitted with a flame ionization detector. The oxidation products were characterized using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, microanalysis and NMR. Dibenzothiophene sulfone (DBTO(2)) and 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene sulfone (4,6-DMDBTO(2)) were found to be the main products of oxidation. Oxovanadium(IV) Schiff base microspherical beads, p[V(IV)O(sal-AHBPD)], were able to catalyse the oxidation of sulfur in dibenzothiophene (DBT) and 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene (4,6-DMDBT) to a tune of 88.0% and 71.8% respectively after 3 h at 40 °C. These oxidation results show promise for potential application

  13. [Effect of compound Puerarin on the collage IV in streptozotocin-induced diabetic nephropathy rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang-xiang; Zhong, Hui-ju; Gong, Han-ren; Zhu, Fei-yue; Wang, Lin-na; Shen, Dao-jun; Li, Guo; Wang, Cai-yun; Qin, Cheng-sheng

    2008-04-01

    To observe the effect of compound Puerarin on collagen IV of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Diabetic nephropathy rats were induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ). Rats were allocated randomly to control group (10), diabetes model group (10), Vitamin C group (10), Puerarin group (10), vitamin C plus Puerarin group (10). The study period lasted for 12 weeks. During and after the treatment, the general state, blood glucose levels, glycosylated hemoglobin, blood urea nitrogen, serum collagen IV, blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, urinary albumin excretion rate of the 24-hour, and clearance rate of creatinine collagen IV protein were determined by immunohistochemistoche analysis as well as type the gene expression of collagen IV alpha 1 mRNA were determined by in situ hybridization analysis in the kidney tissue of different groups. (1) Diabetes mellitus and renal function lesion occurred in the four groups. (2) Vitamin C and Puerarin could improve the general conditions of diabetic Rats, decrease blood urea nitrogen [(8.68 +/- 0.43), (7.98 +/- 0.47) and (5.76 +/- 0.82) micromol/L, serum creatinine [(74.68 +/- 8.20), (75.52 +/- 7.98) and (58.66 +/- 6.65) mmol/L], and urinary albumin excretion rate of the 24-hour [(18.40 +/- 0.37), (17.24 +/- 0.30) and (9.97 +/- 1.27) mg/24 h x 10(-3)]; increase clearance rate of creatinine [(0.59 +/- 0.21), (0.61 +/- 0.14) and (0.69 +/- 0.32) ml/min], the expression of collage IV absorbance [(111.56 +/- 14.61), (110.78 +/- 9.69) and (95.44 +/- 9.97) ] in the diabetic Rats were significantly inhibited at the same time. The compound Puerarin might have some functions on preventing ren by inhibiting expression of type IV collagen.

  14. LDA-Based Unified Topic Modeling for Similar TV User Grouping and TV Program Recommendation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyo, Shinjee; Kim, Eunhui; Kim, Munchurl

    2015-08-01

    Social TV is a social media service via TV and social networks through which TV users exchange their experiences about TV programs that they are viewing. For social TV service, two technical aspects are envisioned: grouping of similar TV users to create social TV communities and recommending TV programs based on group and personal interests for personalizing TV. In this paper, we propose a unified topic model based on grouping of similar TV users and recommending TV programs as a social TV service. The proposed unified topic model employs two latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA) models. One is a topic model of TV users, and the other is a topic model of the description words for viewed TV programs. The two LDA models are then integrated via a topic proportion parameter for TV programs, which enforces the grouping of similar TV users and associated description words for watched TV programs at the same time in a unified topic modeling framework. The unified model identifies the semantic relation between TV user groups and TV program description word groups so that more meaningful TV program recommendations can be made. The unified topic model also overcomes an item ramp-up problem such that new TV programs can be reliably recommended to TV users. Furthermore, from the topic model of TV users, TV users with similar tastes can be grouped as topics, which can then be recommended as social TV communities. To verify our proposed method of unified topic-modeling-based TV user grouping and TV program recommendation for social TV services, in our experiments, we used real TV viewing history data and electronic program guide data from a seven-month period collected by a TV poll agency. The experimental results show that the proposed unified topic model yields an average 81.4% precision for 50 topics in TV program recommendation and its performance is an average of 6.5% higher than that of the topic model of TV users only. For TV user prediction with new TV programs, the average

  15. A sputnik IV saga

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, Charles A.

    2009-12-01

    The Sputnik IV launch occurred on May 15, 1960. On May 19, an attempt to deorbit a 'space cabin' failed and the cabin went into a higher orbit. The orbit of the cabin was monitored and Moonwatch volunteer satellite tracking teams were alerted to watch for the vehicle demise. On September 5, 1962, several team members from Milwaukee, Wisconsin made observations starting at 4:49 a.m. of a fireball following the predicted orbit of Sputnik IV. Requests went out to report any objects found under the fireball path. An early morning police patrol in Manitowoc had noticed a metal object on a street and had moved it to the curb. Later the officers recovered the object and had it dropped off at the Milwaukee Journal. The Moonwarch team got the object and reported the situation to Moonwatch Headquarters at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. A team member flew to Cambridge with the object. It was a solid, 9.49 kg piece of steel with a slag-like layer attached to it. Subsequent analyses showed that it contained radioactive nuclei produced by cosmic ray exposure in space. The scientists at the Observatory quickly recognized that measurements of its induced radioactivity could serve as a calibration for similar measurements of recently fallen nickel-iron meteorites. Concurrently, the Observatory directorate informed government agencies that a fragment from Sputnik IV had been recovered. Coincidently, a debate in the UN Committee on Peaceful Uses of Outer Space involved the issue of liability for damage caused by falling satellite fragments. On September 12, the Observatory delivered the bulk of the fragment to the US Delegation to the UN. Two days later, the fragment was used by US Ambassador Francis Plimpton as an exhibit that the time had come to agree on liability for damage from satellite debris. He offered the Sputnik IV fragment to USSR Ambassador P.D. Morozov, who refused the offer. On October 23, Drs. Alla Massevitch and E.K. Federov of the USSR visited the

  16. Development and Analysis of Group Contribution Plus Models for Property Prediction of Organic Chemical Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mustaffa, Azizul Azri

    for the GIPs are then used in the UNIFAC model to calculate activity coefficients. This approach can increase the application range of any “host” UNIFAC model by providing a reliable predictive model towards fast and efficient product development. This PhD project is focused on the analysis and further......Prediction of properties is important in chemical process-product design. Reliable property models are needed for increasingly complex and wider range of chemicals. Group-contribution methods provide useful tool but there is a need to validate them and improve their accuracy when complex chemicals...... are present in the mixtures. In accordance with that, a combined group-contribution and atom connectivity approach that is able to extend the application range of property models has been developed for mixture properties. This so-called Group-ContributionPlus (GCPlus) approach is a hybrid model which combines...

  17. Complexation of the An(IV) by NTA; Complexation des An(IV) par le NTA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonin, L. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)]|[CEA Valrho, Lab. de Chimie des Actinides (LCA), 30 - Marcoule (France)

    2006-07-01

    In the framework of the Nuclear and Environmental Toxicology program, developed in France, it has been decided to take again the studies concerning the actinides decorporation. A similar study of the neptunium complexation by the citrate ions has been carried out on the complexation of Np(IV) with the nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA). The NTA can be considered as a model molecule of the de-corporating molecules (amino-carboxy- ligand). The results of the spectrophotometric measurements being encouraging, the behaviour of several actinides at the same oxidation state (+IV) (Th(IV), U(IV), Np(IV), and Pu(IV)) has been determined. The experimental results are presented. In order to determine the structure of the complexes of stoichiometry 1:2 An(IV)-(NTA){sub 2} in solution, quantic chemistry calculations and EXAFS measurements have been carried out in parallel. These studies confirm the presence of An(IV)-nitrogen bonds whose length decreases from thorium to plutonium and indicate the presence of a water molecule bound to the thorium and the uranium (coordination number 8 for Np/Pu, 9 for Th/U). The evolution of the complexation constants determined in this study in terms of 1/r (r ionic radius of the cation taking into account its coordination number 8 or 9) confirms the change of the coordination number between Th/U and Np/Pu. (O.M.)

  18. Elucidating PID Degradation Mechanisms and In Situ Dark I-V Monitoring for Modeling Degradation Rate in CdTe Thin-Film Modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hacke, Peter; Spataru, Sergiu; Johnston, Steve

    2016-01-01

    A progression of potential-induced degradation (PID) mechanisms are observed in CdTe modules, including shunting/junction degradation and two different manifestations of series resistance depending on the stress level and water ingress. The dark I-V method for in-situ characterization of Pmax bas...

  19. Micro-mechanical modelling of ductile failure in 6005A aluminium using a physics based strain hardening larw including stage IV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simar, Aude; Nielsen, Kim Lau; de Meester, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    The strain hardening and damage behaviour of isothermally heat treated 6005A aluminium is investigated in order to link the thermal treatment conditions, microstructure and fracture strain. The need for a plastic flow rule involving a stage IV hardening at large strain was found essential to gene...

  20. Classification of finite reparametrization symmetry groups in the three-Higgs-doublet model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, Igor P.; Vdovin, E.

    2013-01-01

    Symmetries play a crucial role in electroweak symmetry breaking models with non-minimal Higgs content. Within each class of these models, it is desirable to know which symmetry groups can be implemented via the scalar sector. In N-Higgs-doublet models, this classification problem was solved only for N=2 doublets. Very recently, we suggested a method to classify all realizable finite symmetry groups of Higgs-family transformations in the three-Higgs-doublet model (3HDM). Here, we present this classification in all detail together with an introduction to the theory of solvable groups, which play the key role in our derivation. We also consider generalized-CP symmetries, and discuss the interplay between Higgs-family symmetries and CP-conservation. In particular, we prove that presence of the Z 4 symmetry guarantees the explicit CP-conservation of the potential. This work completes classification of finite reparametrization symmetry groups in 3HDM. (orig.)

  1. Group-ICA model order highlights patterns of functional brain connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed eAbou Elseoud

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Resting-state networks (RSNs can be reliably and reproducibly detected using independent component analysis (ICA at both individual subject and group levels. Altering ICA dimensionality (model order estimation can have a significant impact on the spatial characteristics of the RSNs as well as their parcellation into sub-networks. Recent evidence from several neuroimaging studies suggests that the human brain has a modular hierarchical organization which resembles the hierarchy depicted by different ICA model orders. We hypothesized that functional connectivity between-group differences measured with ICA might be affected by model order selection. We investigated differences in functional connectivity using so-called dual-regression as a function of ICA model order in a group of unmedicated seasonal affective disorder (SAD patients compared to normal healthy controls. The results showed that the detected disease-related differences in functional connectivity alter as a function of ICA model order. The volume of between-group differences altered significantly as a function of ICA model order reaching maximum at model order 70 (which seems to be an optimal point that conveys the largest between-group difference then stabilized afterwards. Our results show that fine-grained RSNs enable better detection of detailed disease-related functional connectivity changes. However, high model orders show an increased risk of false positives that needs to be overcome. Our findings suggest that multilevel ICA exploration of functional connectivity enables optimization of sensitivity to brain disorders.

  2. Using the Solving Problems Together Psychoeducational Group Counseling Model as an Intervention for Negative Peer Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Kimberly R.; Rushing, Jeri Lynn; Khurshid, Ayesha

    2011-01-01

    Problem-focused interventions are considered to be one of the most effective group counseling strategies with adolescents. This article describes a problem-focused group counseling model, Solving Problems Together (SPT), that focuses on working with students who struggle with negative peer pressure. Adapted from the teaching philosophy of…

  3. Acting in solidarity : Testing an extended dual pathway model of collective action by bystander group members

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saab, Rim; Tausch, Nicole; Spears, Russell; Cheung, Wing-Yee

    We examined predictors of collective action among bystander group members in solidarity with a disadvantaged group by extending the dual pathway model of collective action, which proposes one efficacy-based and one emotion-based path to collective action (Van Zomeren, Spears, Fischer, & Leach,

  4. Power and Vision: Group-Process Models Evolving from Social-Change Movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Susan L.; Hawxhurst, Donna M.

    1988-01-01

    Explores evolution of group process in social change movements, including the evolution of the new left, the cooperative movement,and the women's liberation movement. Proposes a group-process model that encourages people to share power and live their visions. (Author/NB)

  5. Using Molecular Modeling in Teaching Group Theory Analysis of the Infrared Spectra of Organometallic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lihua

    2012-01-01

    A new method is introduced for teaching group theory analysis of the infrared spectra of organometallic compounds using molecular modeling. The main focus of this method is to enhance student understanding of the symmetry properties of vibrational modes and of the group theory analysis of infrared (IR) spectra by using visual aids provided by…

  6. A differential-geometric approach to generalized linear models with grouped predictors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Augugliaro, Luigi; Mineo, Angelo M.; Wit, Ernst C.

    We propose an extension of the differential-geometric least angle regression method to perform sparse group inference in a generalized linear model. An efficient algorithm is proposed to compute the solution curve. The proposed group differential-geometric least angle regression method has important

  7. Becoming Stronger at Broken Places: A Model for Group Work with Young Adult from Divorced Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hage, Sally M.; Nosanow, Mia

    2000-01-01

    Describes a model for group work with young adults from divorced families using an 8-session psychoeducational group intervention. Goals include reducing isolation, establishing connectedness, and building a stronger sense of identify. By educating young adults on topics such as assertiveness, communication skills, and self-esteem, it will give…

  8. The Comparative Study of Collaborative Learning and SDLC Model to develop IT Group Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorapak Pukdesree

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The main objectives of this research were to compare the attitudes of learners between applying SDLC model with collaborative learning and typical SDLC model and to develop electronic courseware as group projects. The research was a quasi-experimental research. The populations of the research were students who took Computer Organization and Architecture course in the academic year 2015. There were 38 students who participated to the research. The participants were divided voluntary into two groups including an experimental group with 28 students using SDLC model with collaborative learning and a control group with 10 students using typical SDLC model. The research instruments were attitude questionnaire, semi-structured interview and self-assessment questionnaire. The collected data was analysed by arithmetic mean, standard deviation, and independent sample t-test. The results of the questionnaire revealed that the attitudes of the learners using collaborative learning and SDLC model were statistically significant difference between the mean score for experimental group and control group at a significance level of 0.05. The independent statistical analyses were significantly different between the two groups at a significance level of 0.05. The results of the interviewing revealed that most of the learners had the corresponding opinions that collaborative learning was very useful with highest level of their attitudes comparing with the previous methodology. Learners had left some feedbacks that collaborative learning should be applied to other courses.

  9. Incorporating social groups' responses in a descriptive model for second- and higher-order impact identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutheerawatthana, Pitch; Minato, Takayuki

    2010-01-01

    The response of a social group is a missing element in the formal impact assessment model. Previous discussion of the involvement of social groups in an intervention has mainly focused on the formation of the intervention. This article discusses the involvement of social groups in a different way. A descriptive model is proposed by incorporating a social group's response into the concept of second- and higher-order effects. The model is developed based on a cause-effect relationship through the observation of phenomena in case studies. The model clarifies the process by which social groups interact with a lower-order effect and then generate a higher-order effect in an iterative manner. This study classifies social groups' responses into three forms-opposing, modifying, and advantage-taking action-and places them in six pathways. The model is expected to be used as an analytical tool for investigating and identifying impacts in the planning stage and as a framework for monitoring social groups' responses during the implementation stage of a policy, plan, program, or project (PPPPs).

  10. Group B Strep Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... IV) to kill the germs. If you take antibiotics while you’re in labor, the chances are very good that your baby won’t get this infection. What if my baby has group B strep? If your baby gets group B strep, he or she will be treated with IV antibiotics to kill the bacteria. Your baby will stay ...

  11. Group contribution modelling for the prediction of safety-related and environmental properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frutiger, Jerome; Abildskov, Jens; Sin, Gürkan

    warming potential and ozone depletion potential. Process safety studies and environmental assessments rely on accurate property data. Safety data such as flammability limits, heat of combustion or auto ignition temperature play an important role in quantifying the risk of fire and explosions among others......We present a new set of property prediction models based on group contributions to predict major safety-related and environmental properties for organic compounds. The predicted list of properties includes lower and upper flammability limits, heat of combustion, auto ignition temperature, global...... models like group contribution (GC) models can estimate data. However, the estimation needs to be accurate, reliable and as little time-consuming as possible so that the models can be used on the fly. In this study the Marrero and Gani group contribution (MR GC) method has been used to develop the models...

  12. Understanding Group/Party Affiliation Using Social Networks and Agent-Based Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kenyth

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of group affiliation and group dispersion is a concept that is most often studied in order for political candidates to better understand the most efficient way to conduct their campaigns. While political campaigning in the United States is a very hot topic that most politicians analyze and study, the concept of group/party affiliation presents its own area of study that producers very interesting results. One tool for examining party affiliation on a large scale is agent-based modeling (ABM), a paradigm in the modeling and simulation (M&S) field perfectly suited for aggregating individual behaviors to observe large swaths of a population. For this study agent based modeling was used in order to look at a community of agents and determine what factors can affect the group/party affiliation patterns that are present. In the agent-based model that was used for this experiment many factors were present but two main factors were used to determine the results. The results of this study show that it is possible to use agent-based modeling to explore group/party affiliation and construct a model that can mimic real world events. More importantly, the model in the study allows for the results found in a smaller community to be translated into larger experiments to determine if the results will remain present on a much larger scale.

  13. Group-Wise Herding Behavior in Financial Markets: An Agent-Based Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minsung; Kim, Minki

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we shed light on the dynamic characteristics of rational group behaviors and the relationship between monetary policy and economic units in the financial market by using an agent-based model (ABM), the Hurst exponent, and the Shannon entropy. First, an agent-based model is used to analyze the characteristics of the group behaviors at different levels of irrationality. Second, the Hurst exponent is applied to analyze the characteristics of the trend-following irrationality group. Third, the Shannon entropy is used to analyze the randomness and unpredictability of group behavior. We show that in a system that focuses on macro-monetary policy, steep fluctuations occur, meaning that the medium-level irrationality group has the highest Hurst exponent and Shannon entropy among all of the groups. However, in a system that focuses on micro-monetary policy, all group behaviors follow a stable trend, and the medium irrationality group thus remains stable, too. Likewise, in a system that focuses on both micro- and macro-monetary policies, all groups tend to be stable. Consequently, we find that group behavior varies across economic units at each irrationality level for micro- and macro-monetary policy in the financial market. Together, these findings offer key insights into monetary policy. PMID:24714635

  14. A dialogue game for analysing group model building: framing collaborative modelling and its facilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoppenbrouwers, S.J.B.A.; Rouwette, E.A.J.A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper concerns a specific approach to analysing and structuring operational situations in collaborative modelling. Collaborative modelling is viewed here as 'the goal-driven creation and shaping of models that are based on the principles of rational description and reasoning'. Our long term

  15. Development of two-group interfacial area transport equation for confined flow-2. Model evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Xiaodong; Kim, Seungjin; Ishii, Mamoru; Beus, Stephen G.

    2003-01-01

    The bubble interaction mechanisms have been analytically modeled in the first paper of this series to provide mechanistic constitutive relations for the two-group interfacial area transport equation (IATE), which was proposed to dynamically solve the interfacial area concentration in the two-fluid model. This paper presents the evaluation approach and results of the two-group IATE based on available experimental data obtained in confined flow, namely, 11 data sets in or near bubbly flow and 13 sets in cap-turbulent and churn-turbulent flow. The two-group IATE is evaluated in steady state, one-dimensional form. Also, since the experiments were performed under adiabatic, air-water two-phase flow conditions, the phase change effect is omitted in the evaluation. To account for the inter-group bubble transport, the void fraction transport equation for Group-2 bubbles is also used to predict the void fraction for Group-2 bubbles. Agreement between the data and the model predictions is reasonably good and the average relative difference for the total interfacial area concentration between the 24 data sets and predictions is within 7%. The model evaluation demonstrates the capability of the two-group IATE focused on the current confined flow to predict the interfacial area concentration over a wide range of flow regimes. (author)

  16. Advances and bottlenecks in modelling the greenhouse climate: summary of a group discussion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seginer, I.; Bakker, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    This report is a summary of a group discussion at the symposium 'Models in protected cultivation' held in Wageningen, August 1997. The discussion focused on the reasons for the relatively limited acceptance and application of greenhouse climate models, especially in commercial practice. The

  17. Group Coaching on Pre-School Teachers' Implementation of Pyramid Model Strategies: A Program Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fettig, Angel; Artman-Meeker, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe a group coaching model and present preliminary evidence of its impact on teachers' implementation of Pyramid Model practices. In particular, we described coaching strategies used to support teachers in reflecting and problem solving on the implementation of the evidence-based strategies. Preliminary…

  18. Students Working Online for Group Projects: A Test of an Extended Theory of Planned Behaviour Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Eddie W. L.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined an extended theory of planned behaviour (TPB) model that specified factors affecting students' intentions to collaborate online for group work. Past behaviour, past experience and actual behavioural control were incorporated in the extended TPB model. The mediating roles of attitudes, subjective norms and perceived behavioural…

  19. Testing Measurement Invariance of the Students' Affective Characteristics Model across Gender Sub-Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Ergül

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the aim was to construct a significant structural measurement model comparing students' affective characteristics with their mathematic achievement. According to this model, the aim was to test the measurement invariances between gender sub-groups hierarchically. This study was conducted as basic and descriptive research. Secondary…

  20. Stepwise Analysis of Differential Item Functioning Based on Multiple-Group Partial Credit Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraki, Eiji

    1999-01-01

    Extended an Item Response Theory (IRT) method for detection of differential item functioning to the partial credit model and applied the method to simulated data using a stepwise procedure. Then applied the stepwise DIF analysis based on the multiple-group partial credit model to writing trend data from the National Assessment of Educational…

  1. The perceived impact of the group practice model on enhancing interpersonal skills of predoctoral dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errante, Margaret R; Gill, Gurjinder S; Rodriguez, Tobias E

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess if a clinical group practice model has an impact on enhancing the interpersonal skills of predoctoral dental students, what factors may influence the development of these skills, and what, if any, are innovative and technological solutions that can potentially influence interpersonal skills in predoctoral dental students. This study surveyed the faculty responsible for teaching the dental students in a recently developed group practice model. Out of 18 eligible group practice leaders at one US dental school, 17 respondents (94.4%) completed the survey. In addition, this study asked the faculty to provide qualitative response and recommendations to improve interpersonal skills. Based on the feedback, a focus group was conducted to explore opportunities to further enhance the skills. The results of the study suggest that the group practice model has a positive and distinct impact on the development of overall interpersonal skills for students. Further research suggests that the greatest impacted areas of personal development are critical thinking skills and teamwork. However, as a way to make the model more effectual, most faculty suggested the need for additional time, for both students and faculty. To some extent, using technology and innovative teaching pedagogies could potentially address the challenge of limited time. Based on the results of the survey, one may conclude that with adequate design and conditions, the group practice model can have a positive effect on the interpersonal skills of its students.

  2. The perceived impact of the group practice model on enhancing interpersonal skills of predoctoral dental students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errante, Margaret R; Gill, Gurjinder S; Rodriguez, Tobias E

    2018-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess if a clinical group practice model has an impact on enhancing the interpersonal skills of predoctoral dental students, what factors may influence the development of these skills, and what, if any, are innovative and technological solutions that can potentially influence interpersonal skills in predoctoral dental students. Methods This study surveyed the faculty responsible for teaching the dental students in a recently developed group practice model. Out of 18 eligible group practice leaders at one US dental school, 17 respondents (94.4%) completed the survey. In addition, this study asked the faculty to provide qualitative response and recommendations to improve interpersonal skills. Based on the feedback, a focus group was conducted to explore opportunities to further enhance the skills. Results The results of the study suggest that the group practice model has a positive and distinct impact on the development of overall interpersonal skills for students. Further research suggests that the greatest impacted areas of personal development are critical thinking skills and teamwork. However, as a way to make the model more effectual, most faculty suggested the need for additional time, for both students and faculty. To some extent, using technology and innovative teaching pedagogies could potentially address the challenge of limited time. Conclusion Based on the results of the survey, one may conclude that with adequate design and conditions, the group practice model can have a positive effect on the interpersonal skills of its students. PMID:29720884

  3. Exploring the Group Prenatal Care Model: A Critical Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thielen, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have compared perinatal outcomes between individual prenatal care and group prenatal care. A critical review of research articles that were published between 1998 and 2009 and involved participants of individual and group prenatal care was conducted. Two middle range theories, Pender’s health promotion model and Swanson’s theory of caring, were blended to enhance conceptualization of the relationship between pregnant women and the group prenatal care model. Among the 17 research studies that met inclusion criteria for this critical review, five examined gestational age and birth weight with researchers reporting longer gestations and higher birth weights in infants born to mothers participating in group prenatal care, especially in the preterm birth population. Current evidence demonstrates that nurse educators and leaders should promote group prenatal care as a potential method of improving perinatal outcomes within the pregnant population. PMID:23997549

  4. A Project Team Analysis Using Tuckman's Model of Small-Group Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natvig, Deborah; Stark, Nancy L

    2016-12-01

    Concerns about equitable workloads for nursing faculty have been well documented, yet a standardized system for workload management does not exist. A project team was challenged to establish an academic workload management system when two dissimilar universities were consolidated. Tuckman's model of small-group development was used as the framework for the analysis of processes and effectiveness of a workload project team. Agendas, notes, and meeting minutes were used as the primary sources of information. Analysis revealed the challenges the team encountered. Utilization of a team charter was an effective tool in guiding the team to become a highly productive group. Lessons learned from the analysis are discussed. Guiding a diverse group into a highly productive team is complex. The use of Tuckman's model of small-group development provided a systematic mechanism to review and understand group processes and tasks. [J Nurs Educ. 2016;55(12):675-681.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Group Approach to the Quantization of Non-Abelian Stueckelberg Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldaya, V; Lopez-Ruiz, F F; Calixto, M

    2011-01-01

    The quantum field theory of Non-Linear Sigma Models on coadjoint orbits of a semi-simple group G are formulated in the framework of a Group Approach to Quantization. In this scheme, partial-trace Lagrangians are recovered from two-cocycles defined on the infinite-dimensional group of sections of the jet-gauge group J 1 (G). This construction is extended to the entire physical system coupled to Yang-Mills fields, thus constituting an algebraic formulation of the Non-Abelian Stueckelgerg formalism devoid of the unitarity/renormalizability obstruction that this theory finds in the standard Lagrangian formalism under canonical quantization.

  6. Group Approach to the Quantization of Non-Abelian Stueckelberg Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldaya, V; Lopez-Ruiz, F F [Instituto de Astrofisica de AndalucIa (IAA-CSIC), Apartado Postal 3004, 18080 Granada (Spain); Calixto, M, E-mail: valdaya@iaa.es, E-mail: Manuel.Calixto@upct.es, E-mail: flopez@iaa.es [Departamento de Matematica Aplicada y Estadistica, Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena, Paseo Alfonso XIII 56, 30203 Cartagena (Spain)

    2011-03-01

    The quantum field theory of Non-Linear Sigma Models on coadjoint orbits of a semi-simple group G are formulated in the framework of a Group Approach to Quantization. In this scheme, partial-trace Lagrangians are recovered from two-cocycles defined on the infinite-dimensional group of sections of the jet-gauge group J{sup 1} (G). This construction is extended to the entire physical system coupled to Yang-Mills fields, thus constituting an algebraic formulation of the Non-Abelian Stueckelgerg formalism devoid of the unitarity/renormalizability obstruction that this theory finds in the standard Lagrangian formalism under canonical quantization.

  7. Research on uranium resource models. Part IV. Logic: a computer graphics program to construct integrated logic circuits for genetic-geologic models. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, W.A.; Turner, R.M.; McCammon, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    Integrated logic circuits were described as a means of formally representing genetic-geologic models for estimating undiscovered uranium resources. The logic circuits are logical combinations of selected geologic characteristics judged to be associated with particular types of uranium deposits. Each combination takes on a value which corresponds to the combined presence, absence, or don't know states of the selected characteristic within a specified geographic cell. Within each cell, the output of the logic circuit is taken as a measure of the favorability of occurrence of an undiscovered deposit of the type being considered. In this way, geological, geochemical, and geophysical data are incorporated explicitly into potential uranium resource estimates. The present report describes how integrated logic circuits are constructed by use of a computer graphics program. A user's guide is also included

  8. The type IV pilin of Burkholderia mallei is highly immunogenic but fails to protect against lethal aerosol challenge in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Paula J; Guo, Qin; Waag, David M; Donnenberg, Michael S

    2007-06-01

    Burkholderia mallei is the cause of glanders and a proven biological weapon. We identified and purified the type IV pilin protein of this organism to study its potential as a subunit vaccine. We found that purified pilin was highly immunogenic. Furthermore, mice infected via sublethal aerosol challenge developed significant increases in titers of antibody against the pilin, suggesting that it is expressed in vivo. Nevertheless, we found no evidence that high-titer antipilin antisera provided passive protection against a sublethal or lethal aerosol challenge and no evidence of protection afforded by active immunization with purified pilin. These results contrast with the utility of type IV pilin subunit vaccines against other infectious diseases and highlight the need for further efforts to identify protective responses against this pathogen.

  9. Group navigation and the "many-wrongs principle" in models of animal movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codling, E A; Pitchford, J W; Simpson, S D

    2007-07-01

    Traditional studies of animal navigation over both long and short distances have usually considered the orientation ability of the individual only, without reference to the implications of group membership. However, recent work has suggested that being in a group can significantly improve the ability of an individual to align toward and reach a target direction or point, even when all group members have limited navigational ability and there are no leaders. This effect is known as the "many-wrongs principle" since the large number of individual navigational errors across the group are suppressed by interactions and group cohesion. In this paper, we simulate the many-wrongs principle using a simple individual-based model of movement based on a biased random walk that includes group interactions. We study the ability of the group as a whole to reach a target given different levels of individual navigation error, group size, interaction radius, and environmental turbulence. In scenarios with low levels of environmental turbulence, simulation results demonstrate a navigational benefit from group membership, particularly for small group sizes. In contrast, when movement takes place in a highly turbulent environment, simulation results suggest that the best strategy is to navigate as individuals rather than as a group.

  10. Resolving Microzooplankton Functional Groups In A Size-Structured Planktonic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, D.; Dutkiewicz, S.; Follows, M. J.; Jahn, O.; Menden-Deuer, S.

    2016-02-01

    Microzooplankton are important marine grazers, often consuming a large fraction of primary productivity. They consist of a great diversity of organisms with different behaviors, characteristics, and rates. This functional diversity, and its consequences, are not currently reflected in large-scale ocean ecological simulations. How should these organisms be represented, and what are the implications for their biogeography? We develop a size-structured, trait-based model to characterize a diversity of microzooplankton functional groups. We compile and examine size-based laboratory data on the traits, revealing some patterns with size and functional group that we interpret with mechanistic theory. Fitting the model to the data provides parameterizations of key rates and properties, which we employ in a numerical ocean model. The diversity of grazing preference, rates, and trophic strategies enables the coexistence of different functional groups of micro-grazers under various environmental conditions, and the model produces testable predictions of the biogeography.

  11. 9th Annual Conference of the North East Polytechnics Mathematical Modelling & Computer Simulation Group

    CERN Document Server

    Bradley, R

    1987-01-01

    In recent years, mathematical modelling allied to computer simulation has emerged as en effective and invaluable design tool for industry and a discipline in its own right. This has been reflected in the popularity of the growing number of courses and conferences devoted to the area. The North East Polytechnics Mathematical Modelling and Computer Simulation Group has a balanced representation of academics and industrialists and, as a Group, has the objective of promoting a continuing partnership between the Polytechnics in the North East and local industry. Prior to the present conference the Group has organised eight conferences with a variety of themes related to mathematical modelling and computer simulation. The theme chosen for the Polymodel 9 Conference held in Newcastle upon Tyne in May 1986 was Industrial Vibration Modelling, which is particularly approp riate for 'Industry Year' and is an area which continues to present industry and academics with new and challenging problems. The aim of the Conferen...

  12. Distinguishing Little-Higgs product and simple group models at the LHC and ILC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilian, W.; Rainwater, D.

    2006-09-01

    We propose a means to discriminate between the two basic variants of Little Higgs models, the Product Group and Simple Group models, at the next generation of colliders. It relies on a special coupling of light pseudoscalar particles present in Little Higgs models, the pseudo-axions, to the Z and the Higgs boson, which is present only in Simple Group models. We discuss the collider phenomenology of the pseudo-axion in the presence of such a coupling at the LHC, where resonant production and decay of either the Higgs or the pseudo-axion induced by that coupling can be observed for much of parameter space. The full allowed range of parameters, including regions where the observability is limited at the LHC, is covered by a future ILC, where double scalar production would be a golden channel to look for. (orig.)

  13. Distinguishing Little-Higgs product and simple group models at the LHC and ILC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilian, W. [Siegen Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany). Fachbereich 7 - Physik]|[Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Rainwater, D. [Rochester Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Reuter, J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2006-09-15

    We propose a means to discriminate between the two basic variants of Little Higgs models, the Product Group and Simple Group models, at the next generation of colliders. It relies on a special coupling of light pseudoscalar particles present in Little Higgs models, the pseudo-axions, to the Z and the Higgs boson, which is present only in Simple Group models. We discuss the collider phenomenology of the pseudo-axion in the presence of such a coupling at the LHC, where resonant production and decay of either the Higgs or the pseudo-axion induced by that coupling can be observed for much of parameter space. The full allowed range of parameters, including regions where the observability is limited at the LHC, is covered by a future ILC, where double scalar production would be a golden channel to look for. (orig.)

  14. BANYAN. IV. Fundamental parameters of low-mass star candidates in nearby young stellar kinematic groups—isochronal age determination using magnetic evolutionary models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malo, Lison; Doyon, René; Albert, Loïc; Lafrenière, David; Artigau, Étienne; Gagné, Jonathan [Département de physique and Observatoire du Mont-Mégantic, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC H3C 3J7 (Canada); Feiden, Gregory A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Riedel, Adric, E-mail: malo@cfht.hawaii.edu, E-mail: doyon@astro.umontreal.ca [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Based on high-resolution optical spectra obtained with ESPaDOnS at Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, we determine fundamental parameters (T {sub eff}, R, L {sub bol}, log g, and metallicity) for 59 candidate members of nearby young kinematic groups. The candidates were identified through the BANYAN Bayesian inference method of Malo et al., which takes into account the position, proper motion, magnitude, color, radial velocity, and parallax (when available) to establish a membership probability. The derived parameters are compared to Dartmouth magnetic evolutionary models and field stars with the goal of constraining the age of our candidates. We find that, in general, low-mass stars in our sample are more luminous and have inflated radii compared to older stars, a trend expected for pre-main-sequence stars. The Dartmouth magnetic evolutionary models show a good fit to observations of field K and M stars, assuming a magnetic field strength of a few kG, as typically observed for cool stars. Using the low-mass members of the β Pictoris moving group, we have re-examined the age inconsistency problem between lithium depletion age and isochronal age (Hertzspring-Russell diagram). We find that the inclusion of the magnetic field in evolutionary models increases the isochronal age estimates for the K5V-M5V stars. Using these models and field strengths, we derive an average isochronal age between 15 and 28 Myr and we confirm a clear lithium depletion boundary from which an age of 26 ± 3 Myr is derived, consistent with previous age estimates based on this method.

  15. Adsorption of thorium(IV) from aqueous solution by non-living biomass of mangrove endophytic fungus Fusarium sp. ZZF51

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, S.K.; Tan, N.; Yan, X.M.; Chen, F.; Lin, Y.C.

    2013-01-01

    The adsorption of thorium(IV) from aqueous solution by mangrove endophytic fungus Fusarium sp. ZZF51 is studied by using a batch experiments. The parameters that affect the thorium(IV) sorption, such as solution pH, initial thorium(IV) concentration, contact time, and biomass dose, are discussed in detail. The maximum biosorption of thorium(IV) and the equilibrium sorption capacity are found to be 91 ± 1 % and 11.35 mg g -1 respectively at pH 3.0, contact time 20 min, initial thorium(IV) concentration 50 mg L -1 and non-living biomass dose 4.0 g L -1 . Kinetics data follow the pseudo-second-order model and equilibrium data agree with the Temkin isotherm model very well. FT-IR analysis indicates that hydroxyl and carbonyl groups play an important role in the biosorption process. (author)

  16. Diaquatetrabromidotin(IV trihydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Ye

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, [SnBr4(H2O2]·3H2O, forms large colourless crystals in originally sealed samples of tin tetrabromide. It constitutes the first structurally characterized hydrate of SnBr4 and is isostructural with the corresponding hydrate of SnCl4. It is composed of SnIV atoms octahedrally coordinated by four Br atoms and two cis-related water molecules. The octahedra exhibit site symmetry 2. They are arranged into columns along [001] via medium–strong O—H...O hydrogen bonds involving the two lattice water molecules (one situated on a twofold rotation axis while the chains are interconnected via longer O—H...Br hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional network.

  17. Cyclopentadienyluranium(IV) acetylacetonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagnall, K.W.; Edwards, J.; Rickard, C.E.F.; Tempest, A.C.

    1979-01-01

    Cyclopentadienyluranium(IV) acetylacetonate complexes, (eta 5 C 5 H 5 )UClsub(3-x)(acac)sub(x), where x = 1 or 2, and the corresponding bis triphenylphosphine oxide (tppo) complexes have been prepared. The bis cyclopentadienyl complexes, (eta 5 C 5 H 5 ) 2 U(acac) 2 and (eta 5 C 5 H 5 ) 2 UCl(acac)(tppo) 2 have also been prepared and are stable with respect to disproportionation, whereas (eta 5 C 5 H 5 ) 2 UCl(acac) is not. The IR and UV/visible spectra of the complexes are reported, together with some additional information on the UCl 2 (acac) 2 thf and -tppo systems. (author)

  18. The microscopic structure and group theory of the interacting boson model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipkin, H.J.

    1980-01-01

    The chains of groups used in calssifying states of the IBM are compared with the chains used in a composite model with j = 3/2 fermion pairs. Many similarities are found, along with differences due to Pauli principle effects in continuum fermion pairs. The classifications are shown to be characterized by several different seniority numbers, which are physically similar but formally different in the two cases because fermion pair and boson pair states used to define seniority in each model correspond to single bosons and four-fermion clusters, respectively, in the other model. The SO(6) and SO(5) groups which define boson pair seniorities in the boson sextet model are isomorphic, respectively, to SU(4) and Sp(4) which have simple physical interpretations in fermion quartet models. (orig.)

  19. Body image concerns in professional fashion models: are they really an at-risk group?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swami, Viren; Szmigielska, Emilia

    2013-05-15

    Although professional models are thought to be a high-risk group for body image concerns, only a handful of studies have empirically investigated this possibility. The present study sought to overcome this dearth of information by comparing professional models and a matched sample on key indices of body image and appeared-related concerns. A group of 52 professional fashion models was compared with a matched sample of 51 non-models from London, England, on indices of weight discrepancy, body appreciation, social physique anxiety, body dissatisfaction, drive for thinness, internalization of sociocultural messages about appearance, and dysfunctional investment in appearance. Results indicated that professional models only evidenced significantly higher drive for thinness and dysfunctional investment in appearance than the control group. Greater duration of engagement as a professional model was associated with more positive body appreciation but also greater drive for thinness. These results indicate that models, who are already underweight, have a strong desire to maintain their low body mass or become thinner. Taken together, the present results suggest that interventions aimed at promoting healthy body image among fashion models may require different strategies than those aimed at the general population. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of a middle cerebral artery occlusion model in the nonhuman primate and a safety study of i.v. infusion of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Sasaki

    Full Text Available Most experimental stroke research is carried out in rodents, but given differences between rodents and human, nonhuman primate (NHP models may provide a valuable tool to study therapeutic interventions. The authors developed a surgical method for transient occlusion of the M1 branch of middle cerebral artery (MCA in the African green monkey to evaluate safety aspects of intravenous infusion of mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs derived from human bone marrow.The left Sylvian fissure was exposed by a small fronto-temporal craniotomy. The M1 branch of the MCA was exposed by microsurgical dissection and clipped for 2 to 4 hours. Neurological examinations and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI were carried out at regular post-operative course. hMSCs were infused 1 hour after reperfusion (clip release in the 3-hour occlusion model.During M1 occlusion, two patterns of changes were observed in the lateral hemisphere surface. One pattern (Pattern 1 was darkening of venous blood, small vessel collapse, and blood pooling with no venous return in cortical veins. Animals with these three features had severe and lasting hemiplegia and MRI demonstrated extensive MCA territory infarction. Animals in the second pattern (Pattern 2 displayed darkening of venous blood, small vessel collapse, and reduced but incompletely occluded venous flow and the functional deficit was much less severe and MRI indicated smaller infarction areas in brain. The severe group (Pattern 1 likely had less extensive collateral circulation than the less severe group (Pattern 2 where venous pooling of blood was not observed. The hMSC infused animals showed a trend for greater functional improvement that was not statistically significant in the acute phase and no additive negative effects.These results indicate inter-animal variability of collateral circulation after complete M1 occlusion and that hMSC infusion is safe in the developed NHP stroke model.

  1. Are fashion models a group at risk for eating disorders and substance abuse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santonastaso, Paolo; Mondini, Silvia; Favaro, Angela

    2002-01-01

    Few studies to date have investigated whether in fact the prevalence of eating disorders (ED) and/or use of illicit drugs is higher among models than among other groups of females. A group of 63 professional fashion models of various nationalities were studied by means of self-reported questionnaires. They were compared with a control group of 126 female subjects recruited from the general population. Fashion models weigh significantly less than controls, but only a small percentage of them uses unhealthy methods to control their weight. The current frequency of full-syndrome ED did not differ between the groups, but partial-syndrome ED were significantly more common among fashion models than among controls. Current substance use or alcohol abuse was reported by 35% of fashion models and 12% of controls. Our findings suggest that fashion models are more at risk for partial ED and use of illicit drugs than females in the general population. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  2. Modeling and predicting abstract concept or idea introduction and propagation through geopolitical groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaenisch, Holger M.; Handley, James W.; Hicklen, Michael L.

    2007-04-01

    This paper describes a novel capability for modeling known idea propagation transformations and predicting responses to new ideas from geopolitical groups. Ideas are captured using semantic words that are text based and bear cognitive definitions. We demonstrate a unique algorithm for converting these into analytical predictive equations. Using the illustrative idea of "proposing a gasoline price increase of 1 per gallon from 2" and its changing perceived impact throughout 5 demographic groups, we identify 13 cost of living Diplomatic, Information, Military, and Economic (DIME) features common across all 5 demographic groups. This enables the modeling and monitoring of Political, Military, Economic, Social, Information, and Infrastructure (PMESII) effects of each group to this idea and how their "perception" of this proposal changes. Our algorithm and results are summarized in this paper.

  3. A quantitative genetic model of reciprocal altruism: a condition for kin or group selection to prevail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, K

    1983-01-01

    A condition is derived for reciprocal altruism to evolve by kin or group selection. It is assumed that many additively acting genes of small effect and the environment determine the probability that an individual is a reciprocal altruist, as opposed to being unconditionally selfish. The particular form of reciprocal altruism considered is TIT FOR TAT, a strategy that involves being altruistic on the first encounter with another individual and doing whatever the other did on the previous encounter in subsequent encounters with the same individual. Encounters are restricted to individuals of the same generation belonging to the same kin or breeding group, but first encounters occur at random within that group. The number of individuals with which an individual interacts is assumed to be the same within any kin or breeding group. There are 1 + i expected encounters between two interacting individuals. On any encounter, it is assumed that an individual who behaves altruistically suffers a cost in personal fitness proportional to c while improving his partner's fitness by the same proportion of b. Then, the condition for kin or group selection to prevail is [Formula: see text] if group size is sufficiently large and the group mean and the within-group genotypic variance of the trait value (i.e., the probability of being a TIT-FOR-TAT strategist) are uncorrelated. Here, C, Vb, and Tb are the population mean, between-group variance, and between-group third central moment of the trait value and r is the correlation between the additive genotypic values of interacting kin or of individuals within the same breeding group. The right-hand side of the above inequality is monotone decreasing in C if we hold Tb/Vb constant, and kin and group selection become superfluous beyond a certain threshold value of C. The effect of finite group size is also considered in a kin-selection model. PMID:6575395

  4. Grouping influences output interference in short-term memory: a mixture modeling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Suk eKang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Output interference is a source of forgetting induced by recalling. We investigated how grouping influences output interference in short-term memory. In Experiment 1, the participants were asked to remember four colored items. Those items were grouped by temporal coincidence as well as spatial alignment: two items were presented in the first memory array and two were presented in the second, and the items in both arrays were either vertically or horizontally aligned as well. The participants then performed two recall tasks in sequence by selecting a color presented at a cued location from a color wheel. In the same-group condition, the participants reported both items from the same memory array; however, in the different-group condition, the participants reported one item from each memory array. We analyzed participant responses with a mixture model, which yielded two measures: guess rate and precision of recalled memories. The guess rate in the second recall was higher for the different-group condition than for the same-group condition; however, the memory precisions obtained for both conditions were similarly degraded in the second recall. In Experiment 2, we varied the probability of the same- and different-group conditions with a ratio of 3 to 7. We expected output interference to be higher in the same-group condition than in the different-group condition. This is because items of the other group are more likely to be probed in the second recall phase and, thus, protecting those items during the first recall phase leads to a better performance. Nevertheless, the same pattern of results was robustly reproduced, suggesting grouping shields the grouped items from output interference because of the secured accessibility. We discussed how grouping influences output interference.

  5. Modeling Perceptual Grouping and Figure-Ground Segregation by Means of Active Reentrant Connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporns, Olaf; Tononi, Giulio; Edelman, Gerald M.

    1991-01-01

    The segmentation of visual scenes is a fundamental process of early vision, but the underlying neural mechanisms are still largely unknown. Theoretical considerations as well as neurophysiological findings point to the importance in such processes of temporal correlations in neuronal activity. In a previous model, we showed that reentrant signaling among rhythmically active neuronal groups can correlate responses along spatially extended contours. We now have modified and extended this model to address the problems of perceptual grouping and figure-ground segregation in vision. A novel feature is that the efficacy of the connections is allowed to change on a fast time scale. This results in active reentrant connections that amplify the correlations among neuronal groups. The responses of the model are able to link the elements corresponding to a coherent figure and to segregate them from the background or from another figure in a way that is consistent with the so-called Gestalt laws.

  6. Modeling perceptual grouping and figure-ground segregation by means of active reentrant connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporns, O; Tononi, G; Edelman, G M

    1991-01-01

    The segmentation of visual scenes is a fundamental process of early vision, but the underlying neural mechanisms are still largely unknown. Theoretical considerations as well as neurophysiological findings point to the importance in such processes of temporal correlations in neuronal activity. In a previous model, we showed that reentrant signaling among rhythmically active neuronal groups can correlate responses along spatially extended contours. We now have modified and extended this model to address the problems of perceptual grouping and figure-ground segregation in vision. A novel feature is that the efficacy of the connections is allowed to change on a fast time scale. This results in active reentrant connections that amplify the correlations among neuronal groups. The responses of the model are able to link the elements corresponding to a coherent figure and to segregate them from the background or from another figure in a way that is consistent with the so-called Gestalt laws.

  7. Utility Function for modeling Group Multicriteria Decision Making problems as games

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandre Bevilacqua Leoneti

    2016-01-01

    To assist in the decision making process, several multicriteria methods have been proposed. However, the existing methods assume a single decision-maker and do not consider decision under risk, which is better addressed by Game Theory. Hence, the aim of this research is to propose a Utility Function that makes it possible to model Group Multicriteria Decision Making problems as games. The advantage of using Game Theory for solving Group Multicriteria Decision Making problems is to evaluate th...

  8. Modelling the exposure of wildlife to radiation: key findings and activities of IAEA working groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beresford, Nicholas A. [NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Center, Library Av., Bailrigg, Lancaster, LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); School of Environment and Life Sciences, University of Salford, Manchester, M4 4WT (United Kingdom); Vives i Batlle, Jordi; Vandenhove, Hildegarde [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Beaugelin-Seiller, Karine [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), PRP-ENV, SERIS, LM2E, Cadarache (France); Johansen, Mathew P. [ANSTO Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, New Illawarra Rd, Menai, NSW (Australia); Goulet, Richard [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Environmental Risk Assessment Division, 280 Slater, Ottawa, K1A0H3 (Canada); Wood, Michael D. [School of Environment and Life Sciences, University of Salford, Manchester, M4 4WT (United Kingdom); Ruedig, Elizabeth [Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins (United States); Stark, Karolina; Bradshaw, Clare [Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University, SE-10691 (Sweden); Andersson, Pal [Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, SE-171 16, Stockholm (Sweden); Copplestone, David [Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA (United Kingdom); Yankovich, Tamara L.; Fesenko, Sergey [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna International Centre, 1400, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-07-01

    In total, participants from 14 countries, representing 19 organisations, actively participated in the model application/inter-comparison activities of the IAEA's EMRAS II programme Biota Modelling Group. A range of models/approaches were used by participants (e.g. the ERICA Tool, RESRAD-BIOTA, the ICRP Framework). The agreed objectives of the group were: 'To improve Member State's capabilities for protection of the environment by comparing and validating models being used, or developed, for biota dose assessment (that may be used) as part of the regulatory process of licensing and compliance monitoring of authorised releases of radionuclides.' The activities of the group, the findings of which will be described, included: - An assessment of the predicted unweighted absorbed dose rates for 74 radionuclides estimated by 10 approaches for five of the ICRPs Reference Animal and Plant geometries assuming 1 Bq per unit organism or media. - Modelling the effect of heterogeneous distributions of radionuclides in sediment profiles on the estimated exposure of organisms. - Model prediction - field data comparisons for freshwater ecosystems in a uranium mining area and a number of wetland environments. - An evaluation of the application of available models to a scenario considering radioactive waste buried in shallow trenches. - Estimating the contribution of {sup 235}U to dose rates in freshwater environments. - Evaluation of the factors contributing to variation in modelling results. The work of the group continues within the framework of the IAEA's MODARIA programme, which was initiated in 2012. The work plan of the MODARIA working group has largely been defined by the findings of the previous EMRAS programme. On-going activities of the working group, which will be described, include the development of a database of dynamic parameters for wildlife dose assessment and exercises involving modelling the exposure of organisms in the marine coastal

  9. Mathematical Model and Analysis of Negative Skin Friction of Pile Group in Consolidating Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangqiang Kong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to calculate negative skin friction (NSF of pile group embedded in a consolidating soil, the dragload calculating formulas of single pile were established by considering Davis one-dimensional nonlinear consolidation soils settlement and hyperbolic load-transfer of pile-soil interface. Based on effective influence area theory, a simple semiempirical mathematical model of analysis for predicting the group effect of pile group under dragload was described. The accuracy and reliability of mathematical models built in this paper were verified by practical engineering comparative analysis. Case studies were studied, and the prediction values were found to be in good agreement with those of measured values. Then, the influences factors, such as, soil consolidation degree, the initial volume compressibility coefficient, and the stiffness of bearing soil, were analyzed and discussed. The results show that the mathematical models considering nonlinear soil consolidation and group effect can reflect the practical NSF of pile group effectively and accurately. The results of this paper can provide reference for practical pile group embedded in consolidating soil under NSF design and calculation.

  10. One-velocity neutron diffusion calculations based on a two-group reactor model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingulac, S; Radanovic, L; Lazarevic, B; Matausek, M; Pop-Jordanov, J [Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1965-07-01

    Many processes in reactor physics are described by the energy dependent neutron diffusion equations which for many practical purposes can often be reduced to one-dimensional two-group equations. Though such two-group models are satisfactory from the standpoint of accuracy, they require rather extensive computations which are usually iterative and involve the use of digital computers. In many applications, however, and particularly in dynamic analyses, where the studies are performed on analogue computers, it is preferable to avoid iterative calculations. The usual practice in such situations is to resort to one group models, which allow the solution to be expressed analytically. However, the loss in accuracy is rather great particularly when several media of different properties are involved. This paper describes a procedure by which the solution of the two-group neutron diffusion. equations can be expressed analytically in the form which, from the computational standpoint, is as simple as the one-group model, but retains the accuracy of the two-group treatment. In describing the procedure, the case of a multi-region nuclear reactor of cylindrical geometry is treated, but the method applied and the results obtained are of more general application. Another approach in approximate solution of diffusion equations, suggested by Galanin is applicable only in special ideal cases.

  11. Testing an empirically derived mental health training model featuring small groups, distributed practice and patient discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrihy, Rachael C; Byrne, Mitchell K; Gonsalvez, Craig J

    2009-02-01

    Internationally, family doctors seeking to enhance their skills in evidence-based mental health treatment are attending brief training workshops, despite clear evidence in the literature that short-term, massed formats are not likely to improve skills in this complex area. Reviews of the educational literature suggest that an optimal model of training would incorporate distributed practice techniques; repeated practice over a lengthy time period, small-group interactive learning, mentoring relationships, skills-based training and an ongoing discussion of actual patients. This study investigates the potential role of group-based training incorporating multiple aspects of good pedagogy for training doctors in basic competencies in brief cognitive behaviour therapy (BCBT). Six groups of family doctors (n = 32) completed eight 2-hour sessions of BCBT group training over a 6-month period. A baseline control design was utilised with pre- and post-training measures of doctors' BCBT skills, knowledge and engagement in BCBT treatment. Family doctors' knowledge, skills in and actual use of BCBT with patients improved significantly over the course of training compared with the control period. This research demonstrates preliminary support for the efficacy of an empirically derived group training model for family doctors. Brief CBT group-based training could prove to be an effective and viable model for future doctor training.

  12. Indicators of suboptimal performance embedded in the Wechsler Memory Scale-Fourth Edition (WMS-IV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouman, Zita; Hendriks, Marc P H; Schmand, Ben A; Kessels, Roy P C; Aldenkamp, Albert P

    2016-01-01

    Recognition and visual working memory tasks from the Wechsler Memory Scale-Fourth Edition (WMS-IV) have previously been documented as useful indicators for suboptimal performance. The present study examined the clinical utility of the Dutch version of the WMS-IV (WMS-IV-NL) for the identification of suboptimal performance using an analogue study design. The patient group consisted of 59 mixed-etiology patients; the experimental malingerers were 50 healthy individuals who were asked to simulate cognitive impairment as a result of a traumatic brain injury; the last group consisted of 50 healthy controls who were instructed to put forth full effort. Experimental malingerers performed significantly lower on all WMS-IV-NL tasks than did the patients and healthy controls. A binary logistic regression analysis was performed on the experimental malingerers and the patients. The first model contained the visual working memory subtests (Spatial Addition and Symbol Span) and the recognition tasks of the following subtests: Logical Memory, Verbal Paired Associates, Designs, Visual Reproduction. The results showed an overall classification rate of 78.4%, and only Spatial Addition explained a significant amount of variation (p < .001). Subsequent logistic regression analysis and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis supported the discriminatory power of the subtest Spatial Addition. A scaled score cutoff of <4 produced 93% specificity and 52% sensitivity for detection of suboptimal performance. The WMS-IV-NL Spatial Addition subtest may provide clinically useful information for the detection of suboptimal performance.

  13. Modeling the Role of Networks and Individual Differences in Inter-Group Violence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Isakov

    Full Text Available There is significant heterogeneity within and between populations in their propensity to engage in conflict. Most research has neglected the role of within-group effects in social networks in contributing to between-group violence and focused instead on the precursors and consequences of violence, or on the role of between-group ties. Here, we explore the role of individual variation and of network structure within a population in promoting and inhibiting group violence towards other populations. Motivated by ethnographic observations of collective behavior in a small-scale society, we describe a model with differentiated roles for individuals embedded within friendship networks. Using a simple model based on voting-like dynamics, we explore several strategies for influencing group-level behavior. When we consider changing population level attitude changes and introducing control nodes separately, we find that a particularly effective control strategy relies on exploiting network degree. We also suggest refinements to our model such as tracking fine-grained information spread dynamics that can lead to further enrichment in using evolutionary game theory models for sociological phenomena.

  14. Renormalization group running of fermion observables in an extended non-supersymmetric SO(10) model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meloni, Davide [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Università di Roma Tre,Via della Vasca Navale 84, 00146 Rome (Italy); Ohlsson, Tommy; Riad, Stella [Department of Physics, School of Engineering Sciences,KTH Royal Institute of Technology - AlbaNova University Center,Roslagstullsbacken 21, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2017-03-08

    We investigate the renormalization group evolution of fermion masses, mixings and quartic scalar Higgs self-couplings in an extended non-supersymmetric SO(10) model, where the Higgs sector contains the 10{sub H}, 120{sub H}, and 126{sub H} representations. The group SO(10) is spontaneously broken at the GUT scale to the Pati-Salam group and subsequently to the Standard Model (SM) at an intermediate scale M{sub I}. We explicitly take into account the effects of the change of gauge groups in the evolution. In particular, we derive the renormalization group equations for the different Yukawa couplings. We find that the computed physical fermion observables can be successfully matched to the experimental measured values at the electroweak scale. Using the same Yukawa couplings at the GUT scale, the measured values of the fermion observables cannot be reproduced with a SM-like evolution, leading to differences in the numerical values up to around 80%. Furthermore, a similar evolution can be performed for a minimal SO(10) model, where the Higgs sector consists of the 10{sub H} and 126{sub H} representations only, showing an equally good potential to describe the low-energy fermion observables. Finally, for both the extended and the minimal SO(10) models, we present predictions for the three Dirac and Majorana CP-violating phases as well as three effective neutrino mass parameters.

  15. Demography-based adaptive network model reproduces the spatial organization of human linguistic groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitán, José A.; Manrubia, Susanna

    2015-12-01

    The distribution of human linguistic groups presents a number of interesting and nontrivial patterns. The distributions of the number of speakers per language and the area each group covers follow log-normal distributions, while population and area fulfill an allometric relationship. The topology of networks of spatial contacts between different linguistic groups has been recently characterized, showing atypical properties of the degree distribution and clustering, among others. Human demography, spatial conflicts, and the construction of networks of contacts between linguistic groups are mutually dependent processes. Here we introduce an adaptive network model that takes all of them into account and successfully reproduces, using only four model parameters, not only those features of linguistic groups already described in the literature, but also correlations between demographic and topological properties uncovered in this work. Besides their relevance when modeling and understanding processes related to human biogeography, our adaptive network model admits a number of generalizations that broaden its scope and make it suitable to represent interactions between agents based on population dynamics and competition for space.

  16. Analysis Method for Laterally Loaded Pile Groups Using an Advanced Modeling of Reinforced Concrete Sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Stacul

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A Boundary Element Method (BEM approach was developed for the analysis of pile groups. The proposed method includes: the non-linear behavior of the soil by a hyperbolic modulus reduction curve; the non-linear response of reinforced concrete pile sections, also taking into account the influence of tension stiffening; the influence of suction by increasing the stiffness of shallow portions of soil and modeled using the Modified Kovacs model; pile group shadowing effect, modeled using an approach similar to that proposed in the Strain Wedge Model for pile groups analyses. The proposed BEM method saves computational effort compared to more sophisticated codes such as VERSAT-P3D, PLAXIS 3D and FLAC-3D, and provides reliable results using input data from a standard site investigation. The reliability of this method was verified by comparing results from data from full scale and centrifuge tests on single piles and pile groups. A comparison is presented between measured and computed data on a laterally loaded fixed-head pile group composed by reinforced concrete bored piles. The results of the proposed method are shown to be in good agreement with those obtained in situ.

  17. Analysis Method for Laterally Loaded Pile Groups Using an Advanced Modeling of Reinforced Concrete Sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacul, Stefano; Squeglia, Nunziante

    2018-02-15

    A Boundary Element Method (BEM) approach was developed for the analysis of pile groups. The proposed method includes: the non-linear behavior of the soil by a hyperbolic modulus reduction curve; the non-linear response of reinforced concrete pile sections, also taking into account the influence of tension stiffening; the influence of suction by increasing the stiffness of shallow portions of soil and modeled using the Modified Kovacs model; pile group shadowing effect, modeled using an approach similar to that proposed in the Strain Wedge Model for pile groups analyses. The proposed BEM method saves computational effort compared to more sophisticated codes such as VERSAT-P3D, PLAXIS 3D and FLAC-3D, and provides reliable results using input data from a standard site investigation. The reliability of this method was verified by comparing results from data from full scale and centrifuge tests on single piles and pile groups. A comparison is presented between measured and computed data on a laterally loaded fixed-head pile group composed by reinforced concrete bored piles. The results of the proposed method are shown to be in good agreement with those obtained in situ.

  18. Report on US-DOE/OHER Task Group on modelling and scaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mewhinney, J.A.; Griffith, W.C.

    1989-01-01

    In early 1986, the DOE/OHER Task Group on Modeling and Scaling was formed. Membership on the Task Group is drawn from staff of several laboratories funded by the United States Department of Energy, Office of Health and Environmental Research. The primary goal of the Task Group is to promote cooperation among the laboratories in analysing mammalian radiobiology studies with emphasis on studies that used beagle dogs in linespan experiments. To assist in defining the status of modelling and scaling in animal data, the Task Group served as the programme committee for the 26th Hanford Life Sciences symposium entitled Modeling for Scaling to Man held in October 1987. This symposium had over 60 oral presentations describing current research in dosimetric, pharmacokinetic, and dose-response modelling and scaling of results from animal studies to humans. A summary of the highlights of this symposium is presented. The Task Group also is in the process of developing recommendations for analyses of results obtained from dog lifespan studies. The goal is to provide as many comparisons as possible between these studies and to scale the results to humans to strengthen limited epidemiological data on exposures of humans to radiation. Several methods are discussed. (author)

  19. Modeling Bottom-Up Visual Attention Using Dihedral Group D4 §

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet Sharma

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, first, we briefly describe the dihedral group D 4 that serves as the basis for calculating saliency in our proposed model. Second, our saliency model makes two major changes in a latest state-of-the-art model known as group-based asymmetry. First, based on the properties of the dihedral group D 4 , we simplify the asymmetry calculations associated with the measurement of saliency. This results is an algorithm that reduces the number of calculations by at least half that makes it the fastest among the six best algorithms used in this research article. Second, in order to maximize the information across different chromatic and multi-resolution features, the color image space is de-correlated. We evaluate our algorithm against 10 state-of-the-art saliency models. Our results show that by using optimal parameters for a given dataset, our proposed model can outperform the best saliency algorithm in the literature. However, as the differences among the (few best saliency models are small, we would like to suggest that our proposed model is among the best and the fastest among the best. Finally, as a part of future work, we suggest that our proposed approach on saliency can be extended to include three-dimensional image data.

  20. The respiratory tract deposition model proposed by the ICRP Task Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, A.C.; Briant, J.K.; Stahlhofen, W.; Rudolf, G.; Gehr, P.

    1990-11-01

    The Task Group has developed a new model of the deposition of inhaled aerosols in each anatomical region of the respiratory tract. The model is used to evaluate the fraction of airborne activity that is deposited in respiratory regions having distinct retention characteristics and clearance pathways: the anterior nares, the extrathoracic airways of the naso- and oropharynx and larynx, the bronchi, the bronchioles, and the alveolated airways of the lung. Drawn from experimental data on total and regional deposition in human subjects, the model is based on extrapolation of these data by means of a detailed theoretical model of aerosol transport and deposition within the lung. The Task Group model applies to all practical conditions, and for aerosol particles and vapors from atomic size up to very coarse aerosols with an activity median aerodynamic diameter of 100 μm. The model is designed to predict regional deposition in different subjects, including adults of either sex, children of various ages, and infants, and also to account for anatomical differences among Caucasian and non-Caucasian subjects. The Task Group model represents aerosol inhalability and regional deposition in different subjects by algebraic expressions of aerosol size, breathing rates, standard lung volumes, and scaling factors for airway dimensions. 35 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Spectroscopy and chemistry of uranium IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Folcher, G.; Rigny, P.

    1980-06-01

    Different fundamental research papers on uranium IV are presented, some were never edited. Molecular spectroscopy was used for identification and structural study of uranium IV in aqueous or organic solutions. The fields studied are: coordination, stereochemistry, electronic structure and chemical properties. For interpretation of results some studies were made with solid compounds or with thorium compounds or thorium complexes. Knowledge of actinides chemistry is improved, uranium and thorium being models for 5 f ions, extractive chemistry is better understood and new applications are possible [fr

  2. The Process Model of Group-Based Emotion: Integrating Intergroup Emotion and Emotion Regulation Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, Amit; Halperin, Eran; van Zomeren, Martijn; Gross, James J

    2016-05-01

    Scholars interested in emotion regulation have documented the different goals and strategies individuals have for regulating their emotions. However, little attention has been paid to the regulation of group-based emotions, which are based on individuals' self-categorization as a group member and occur in response to situations perceived as relevant for that group. We propose a model for examining group-based emotion regulation that integrates intergroup emotions theory and the process model of emotion regulation. This synergy expands intergroup emotion theory by facilitating further investigation of different goals (i.e., hedonic or instrumental) and strategies (e.g., situation selection and modification strategies) used to regulate group-based emotions. It also expands emotion regulation research by emphasizing the role of self-categorization (e.g., as an individual or a group member) in the emotional process. Finally, we discuss the promise of this theoretical synergy and suggest several directions for future research on group-based emotion regulation. © 2015 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc.

  3. Evaluation of Loss Due to Storm Surge Disasters in China Based on Econometric Model Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaoxia; Xu, Tongbin; Yin, Kedong

    2018-01-01

    Storm surge has become an important factor restricting the economic and social development of China’s coastal regions. In order to improve the scientific judgment of future storm surge damage, a method of model groups is proposed to refine the evaluation of the loss due to storm surges. Due to the relative dispersion and poor regularity of the natural property data (login center air pressure, maximum wind speed, maximum storm water, super warning water level, etc.), storm surge disaster is divided based on eight kinds of storm surge disaster grade division methods combined with storm surge water, hypervigilance tide level, and disaster loss. The storm surge disaster loss measurement model groups consist of eight equations, and six major modules are constructed: storm surge disaster in agricultural loss, fishery loss, human resource loss, engineering facility loss, living facility loss, and direct economic loss. Finally, the support vector machine (SVM) model is used to evaluate the loss and the intra-sample prediction. It is indicated that the equations of the model groups can reflect in detail the relationship between the damage of storm surges and other related variables. Based on a comparison of the original value and the predicted value error, the model groups pass the test, providing scientific support and a decision basis for the early layout of disaster prevention and mitigation. PMID:29584628

  4. Three dimensional modeling of laterally loaded pile groups resting in sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr Farouk Elhakim

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Many structures often carry lateral loads due to earth pressure, wind, earthquakes, wave action and ship impact. The accurate predictions of the load–displacement response of the pile group as well as the straining actions are needed for a safe and economic design. Most research focused on the behavior of laterally loaded single piles though piles are most frequently used in groups. Soil is modeled as an elastic-perfectly plastic model using the Mohr–Coulomb constitutive model. The three-dimensional Plaxis model is validated using load–displacement results from centrifuge tests of laterally loaded piles embedded in sand. This study utilizes three dimensional finite element modeling to better understand the main parameters that affect the response of laterally loaded pile groups (2 × 2 and 3 × 3 pile configurations including sand relative density, pile spacing (s = 2.5 D, 5 D and 8 D and pile location within the group. The fixity of the pile head affects its load–displacement under lateral loading. Typically, the pile head may be unrestrained (free head as the pile head is allowed to rotate, or restrained (fixed head condition where no pile head rotation is permitted. The analyses were performed for both free and fixed head conditions.

  5. Evaluation of Loss Due to Storm Surge Disasters in China Based on Econometric Model Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xue; Shi, Xiaoxia; Gao, Jintian; Xu, Tongbin; Yin, Kedong

    2018-03-27

    Storm surge has become an important factor restricting the economic and social development of China's coastal regions. In order to improve the scientific judgment of future storm surge damage, a method of model groups is proposed to refine the evaluation of the loss due to storm surges. Due to the relative dispersion and poor regularity of the natural property data (login center air pressure, maximum wind speed, maximum storm water, super warning water level, etc.), storm surge disaster is divided based on eight kinds of storm surge disaster grade division methods combined with storm surge water, hypervigilance tide level, and disaster loss. The storm surge disaster loss measurement model groups consist of eight equations, and six major modules are constructed: storm surge disaster in agricultural loss, fishery loss, human resource loss, engineering facility loss, living facility loss, and direct economic loss. Finally, the support vector machine (SVM) model is used to evaluate the loss and the intra-sample prediction. It is indicated that the equations of the model groups can reflect in detail the relationship between the damage of storm surges and other related variables. Based on a comparison of the original value and the predicted value error, the model groups pass the test, providing scientific support and a decision basis for the early layout of disaster prevention and mitigation.

  6. A method for assigning species into groups based on generalized Mahalanobis distance between habitat model coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, C.J.; Heglund, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    Habitat association models are commonly developed for individual animal species using generalized linear modeling methods such as logistic regression. We considered the issue of grouping species based on their habitat use so that management decisions can be based on sets of species rather than individual species. This research was motivated by a study of western landbirds in northern Idaho forests. The method we examined was to separately fit models to each species and to use a generalized Mahalanobis distance between coefficient vectors to create a distance matrix among species. Clustering methods were used to group species from the distance matrix, and multidimensional scaling methods were used to visualize the relations among species groups. Methods were also discussed for evaluating the sensitivity of the conclusions because of outliers or influential data points. We illustrate these methods with data from the landbird study conducted in northern Idaho. Simulation results are presented to compare the success of this method to alternative methods using Euclidean distance between coefficient vectors and to methods that do not use habitat association models. These simulations demonstrate that our Mahalanobis-distance- based method was nearly always better than Euclidean-distance-based methods or methods not based on habitat association models. The methods used to develop candidate species groups are easily explained to other scientists and resource managers since they mainly rely on classical multivariate statistical methods. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  7. Evaluation of Loss Due to Storm Surge Disasters in China Based on Econometric Model Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Jin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Storm surge has become an important factor restricting the economic and social development of China’s coastal regions. In order to improve the scientific judgment of future storm surge damage, a method of model groups is proposed to refine the evaluation of the loss due to storm surges. Due to the relative dispersion and poor regularity of the natural property data (login center air pressure, maximum wind speed, maximum storm water, super warning water level, etc., storm surge disaster is divided based on eight kinds of storm surge disaster grade division methods combined with storm surge water, hypervigilance tide level, and disaster loss. The storm surge disaster loss measurement model groups consist of eight equations, and six major modules are constructed: storm surge disaster in agricultural loss, fishery loss, human resource loss, engineering facility loss, living facility loss, and direct economic loss. Finally, the support vector machine (SVM model is used to evaluate the loss and the intra-sample prediction. It is indicated that the equations of the model groups can reflect in detail the relationship between the damage of storm surges and other related variables. Based on a comparison of the original value and the predicted value error, the model groups pass the test, providing scientific support and a decision basis for the early layout of disaster prevention and mitigation.

  8. Reducing Societal Obesity: Establishing a Separate Exercise Model through Studies of Group Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puterbaugh, J S

    2016-01-01

    The past 50 years has brought attention to high and increasing levels of human obesity in most of the industrialized world. The medical profession has noticed, has evaluated, and has developed models for studying, preventing, and reversing obesity. The current model prescribes activity in specific quantities such as days, minutes, heart rates, and footfalls. Although decreased levels of activity have come from changes revolving around built environments and social networks, the existing medical model to lower body weights by increasing activity remains individually prescriptive. It is not working. The study of societal obesity precludes the individual and must involve group behavioral studies. Such studies necessitate acquiring separate tools and, therefore, require a significant change in the evaluation and treatment of obesity. Finding groups with common activities and lower levels of obesity would allow the development of new models of land use and encourage active lifestyles through shared interests.

  9. The Comparative Study of Collaborative Learning and SDLC Model to develop IT Group Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Sorapak Pukdesree

    2017-01-01

    The main objectives of this research were to compare the attitudes of learners between applying SDLC model with collaborative learning and typical SDLC model and to develop electronic courseware as group projects. The research was a quasi-experimental research. The populations of the research were students who took Computer Organization and Architecture course in the academic year 2015. There were 38 students who participated to the research. The participants were divided voluntary into two g...

  10. Modeling perceptual grouping and figure-ground segregation by means of active reentrant connections.

    OpenAIRE

    Sporns, O; Tononi, G; Edelman, G M

    1991-01-01

    The segmentation of visual scenes is a fundamental process of early vision, but the underlying neural mechanisms are still largely unknown. Theoretical considerations as well as neurophysiological findings point to the importance in such processes of temporal correlations in neuronal activity. In a previous model, we showed that reentrant signaling among rhythmically active neuronal groups can correlate responses along spatially extended contours. We now have modified and extended this model ...

  11. Hydrological-niche models predict water plant functional group distributions in diverse wetland types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deane, David C; Nicol, Jason M; Gehrig, Susan L; Harding, Claire; Aldridge, Kane T; Goodman, Abigail M; Brookes, Justin D

    2017-06-01

    Human use of water resources threatens environmental water supplies. If resource managers are to develop policies that avoid unacceptable ecological impacts, some means to predict ecosystem response to changes in water availability is necessary. This is difficult to achieve at spatial scales relevant for water resource management because of the high natural variability in ecosystem hydrology and ecology. Water plant functional groups classify species with similar hydrological niche preferences together, allowing a qualitative means to generalize community responses to changes in hydrology. We tested the potential for functional groups in making quantitative prediction of water plant functional group distributions across diverse wetland types over a large geographical extent. We sampled wetlands covering a broad range of hydrogeomorphic and salinity conditions in South Australia, collecting both hydrological and floristic data from 687 quadrats across 28 wetland hydrological gradients. We built hydrological-niche models for eight water plant functional groups using a range of candidate models combining different surface inundation metrics. We then tested the predictive performance of top-ranked individual and averaged models for each functional group. Cross validation showed that models achieved acceptable predictive performance, with correct classification rates in the range 0.68-0.95. Model predictions can be made at any spatial scale that hydrological data are available and could be implemented in a geographical information system. We show the response of water plant functional groups to inundation is consistent enough across diverse wetland types to quantify the probability of hydrological impacts over regional spatial scales. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  12. Congenital bilateral neuroblastoma (stage IV-S): case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Hee; Lee, Hee Jung; Woo, Seong Ku; Lee, Sang Rak; Kim, Heung Sik

    2002-01-01

    Congenital neonatal neuroblastoma is not uncommon but bilateral adrenal neuroblastoma is rare, accounting for about ten percent of neuroblastomas in children. We report the US the MR findings of a stage IV-S congenital bilateral neuroblastoma occurring in a one-day-old neonate

  13. Synthesis, spectroscopic, structural and thermal characterizations of vanadyl(IV) adenine complex prospective as antidiabetic drug agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Megharbel, Samy M.; Hamza, Reham Z.; Refat, Moamen S.

    2015-01-01

    The vanadyl(IV) adenine complex; [VO(Adn)2]ṡSO4; was synthesized and characterized. The molar conductivity of this complex was measured in DMSO solution that showed an electrolyte nature. Spectroscopic investigation of the green solid complex studied here indicate that the adenine acts as a bidentate ligand, coordinated to vanadyl(IV) ions through the nitrogen atoms N7 and nitrogen atom of amino group. Thus, from the results presented the vanadyl(IV) complex has square pyramid geometry. Further characterizations using thermal analyses and scanning electron techniques was useful. The aim of this paper was to introduce a new drug model for the diabetic complications by synthesized a novel mononuclear vanadyl(IV) adenine complex to mimic insulin action and reducing blood sugar level. The antidiabetic ability of this complex was investigated in STZ-induced diabetic mice. The results suggested that VO(IV)/adenine complex has antidiabetic activity, it improved the lipid profile, it improved liver and kidney functions, also it ameliorated insulin hormone and blood glucose levels. The vanadyl(IV) complex possesses an antioxidant activity and this was clear through studying SOD, CAT, MDA, GSH and methionine synthase. The current results support the therapeutic potentiality of vanadyl(IV)/adenine complex for the management and treatment of diabetes.

  14. Impact Evaluation of a Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy Model in Brazilian Sexually Abused Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habigzang, Luisa Fernanda; Damasio, Bruno Figueiredo; Koller, Silvia Helena

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the impact of a cognitive behavioral group therapy model in Brazilian girls who had experienced sexual abuse. The effect of the waiting period before treatment and the enduring effectiveness of the treatment after six and 12 months were also evaluated. Forty-nine female sexual abuse victims between the ages of 9 and 16…

  15. Brief Report: Predictors of Outcomes in the Early Start Denver Model Delivered in a Group Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivanti, Giacomo; Dissanayake, Cheryl; Zierhut, Cynthia; Rogers, Sally J.

    2013-01-01

    There is a paucity of studies that have looked at factors associated with responsiveness to interventions in preschoolers with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We investigated learning profiles associated with response to the Early Start Denver Model delivered in a group setting. Our preliminary results from 21 preschool children with an ASD aged…

  16. Finite cluster renormalization and new two step renormalization group for Ising model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benyoussef, A.; El Kenz, A.

    1989-09-01

    New types of renormalization group theory using the generalized Callen identities are exploited in the study of the Ising model. Another type of two-step renormalization is proposed. Critical couplings and critical exponents y T and y H are calculated by these methods for square and simple cubic lattices, using different size clusters. (author). 17 refs, 2 tabs

  17. Developing an Integrative Play Therapy Group Model for Middle School Male Students to Address Bullying Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jakarla

    2016-01-01

    This research examines the systematic process of developing an integrative play therapy group model for middle school male students, ages 11-15 who participate in bullying behaviors. Play therapy approaches and evidence-based practices are documented as effective measures for addressing bullying behaviors with children and adolescents. This group…

  18. Virtual and Printed 3D Models for Teaching Crystal Symmetry and Point Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Lluís; Estop, Euge`nia

    2015-01-01

    Both, virtual and printed 3D crystal models can help students and teachers deal with chemical education topics such as symmetry and point groups. In the present paper, two freely downloadable tools (interactive PDF files and a mobile app) are presented as examples of the application of 3D design to study point-symmetry. The use of 3D printing to…

  19. Phase diagram of the Hubbard model with arbitrary band filling: renormalization group approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannas, Sergio A.; Cordoba Univ. Nacional; Tsallis, Constantino.

    1991-01-01

    The finite temperature phase diagram of the Hubbard model in d = 2 and d = 3 is calculated for arbitrary values of the parameter U/t and chemical potential μ using a quantum real space renormalization group. Evidence for a ferromagnetic phase at low temperatures is presented. (author). 15 refs., 5 figs

  20. Representations of the Poincare group, position operator and the bi-local model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohkawa, Tohru

    1978-01-01

    We propose two types of representations of the Poincare group which give general frameworks for introduction of internal degrees of freedom of a particle. The bi-local model recently proposed by Takabayasi is constructed through our frameworks. In this study, new covariant and non-covariant position operators are introduced and discussed. (author)

  1. Elaborations on the Socioegocentric and Dual-Level Connectionist Models of Group Interaction Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewes, Dean E.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the author's contribution to this colloquy was to spark conversation on the theoretical nature of communication processes and the evidentiary requirements for testing their relationship to group outcomes. Co-discussants have raised important issues concerning the philosophical basis of the socioegocentric model (SM) and dual-level…

  2. Models of information exchange between radio interfaces of Wi-Fi group of standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinskaya, O. S.

    2018-05-01

    This paper offers models of information exchange between radio interfaces of the Wi-Fi group of standards by the example of a real facility management system for the oil and gas industry. Interaction between the MU-MIMO and MIMO technologies is analyzed. An optimal variant of information exchange is proposed.

  3. Outlier treatment for improving parameter estimation of group contribution based models for upper flammability limit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frutiger, Jerome; Abildskov, Jens; Sin, Gürkan

    2015-01-01

    Flammability data is needed to assess the risk of fire and explosions. This study presents a new group contribution (GC) model to predict the upper flammability limit UFL oforganic chemicals. Furthermore, it provides a systematic method for outlier treatment inorder to improve the parameter...

  4. Teaching Play Skills to Children with Autism through Video Modeling: Small Group Arrangement and Observational Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozen, Arzu; Batu, Sema; Birkan, Binyamin

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine if video modeling was an effective way of teaching sociodramatic play skills to individuals with autism in a small group arrangement. Besides maintenance, observational learning and social validation data were collected. Three 9 year old boys with autism participated in the study. Multiple probe…

  5. Group-theoretical model of developed turbulence and renormalization of the Navier-Stokes equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saveliev, V L; Gorokhovski, M A

    2005-07-01

    On the basis of the Euler equation and its symmetry properties, this paper proposes a model of stationary homogeneous developed turbulence. A regularized averaging formula for the product of two fields is obtained. An equation for the averaged turbulent velocity field is derived from the Navier-Stokes equation by renormalization-group transformation.

  6. Evaluation of MIMIC-Model Methods for DIF Testing with Comparison to Two-Group Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Carol M.

    2009-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) occurs when an item on a test or questionnaire has different measurement properties for 1 group of people versus another, irrespective of mean differences on the construct. This study focuses on the use of multiple-indicator multiple-cause (MIMIC) structural equation models for DIF testing, parameterized as item…

  7. Applications of Lie Group Theory to the Modeling and Control of Multibody Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mladenova, Clementina D.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews our research activities concerning the modeling and control of rigid and elastic joint multibody mechanical systems, including some investigations into nonholonomic systems. Bearing in mind the different parameterizations of the rotation group in three-dimensional space SO(3), and the fact that the properties of the parameterization more or less influence the efficiency of the dynamics model, here the so-called vector parameter is used for parallel considerations of rigid body motion and of rigid and elastic joint multibody mechanical systems. Besides the fundamental role of this study, the vector-parameter approach is efficient in its computational aspect and quite convenient for real time simulation and control. The consideration of the mechanical system on the configuration space of pure vector parameters with a group structure opens the possibilities for the Lie group theory to be applied in problems of dynamics and control

  8. Group-level self-definition and self-investment : A hierarchical (multicomponent) model of in-group identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leach, Colin Wayne; van Zomeren, Martijn; Zebel, Sven; Vliek, Michael L. W.; Pennekamp, Sjoerd F.; Doosje, Bertjan; Ouwerkerk, Jaap W.; Spears, Russell

    Recent research shows individuals' identification with in-groups to be psychologically important and socially consequential. However, there is little agreement about how identification should be conceptualized or measured. On the basis of previous work, the authors identified 5 specific components

  9. Multi-scale inference of interaction rules in animal groups using Bayesian model selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard P Mann

    Full Text Available Inference of interaction rules of animals moving in groups usually relies on an analysis of large scale system behaviour. Models are tuned through repeated simulation until they match the observed behaviour. More recent work has used the fine scale motions of animals to validate and fit the rules of interaction of animals in groups. Here, we use a Bayesian methodology to compare a variety of models to the collective motion of glass prawns (Paratya australiensis. We show that these exhibit a stereotypical 'phase transition', whereby an increase in density leads to the onset of collective motion in one direction. We fit models to this data, which range from: a mean-field model where all prawns interact globally; to a spatial Markovian model where prawns are self-propelled particles influenced only by the current positions and directions of their neighbours; up to non-Markovian models where prawns have 'memory' of previous interactions, integrating their experiences over time when deciding to change behaviour. We show that the mean-field model fits the large scale behaviour of the system, but does not capture the observed locality of interactions. Traditional self-propelled particle models fail to capture the fine scale dynamics of the system. The most sophisticated model, the non-Markovian model, provides a good match to the data at both the fine scale and in terms of reproducing global dynamics, while maintaining a biologically plausible perceptual range. We conclude that prawns' movements are influenced by not just the current direction of nearby conspecifics, but also those encountered in the recent past. Given the simplicity of prawns as a study system our research suggests that self-propelled particle models of collective motion should, if they are to be realistic at multiple biological scales, include memory of previous interactions and other non-Markovian effects.

  10. Multi-scale inference of interaction rules in animal groups using Bayesian model selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard P Mann

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Inference of interaction rules of animals moving in groups usually relies on an analysis of large scale system behaviour. Models are tuned through repeated simulation until they match the observed behaviour. More recent work has used the fine scale motions of animals to validate and fit the rules of interaction of animals in groups. Here, we use a Bayesian methodology to compare a variety of models to the collective motion of glass prawns (Paratya australiensis. We show that these exhibit a stereotypical 'phase transition', whereby an increase in density leads to the onset of collective motion in one direction. We fit models to this data, which range from: a mean-field model where all prawns interact globally; to a spatial Markovian model where prawns are self-propelled particles influenced only by the current positions and directions of their neighbours; up to non-Markovian models where prawns have 'memory' of previous interactions, integrating their experiences over time when deciding to change behaviour. We show that the mean-field model fits the large scale behaviour of the system, but does not capture fine scale rules of interaction, which are primarily mediated by physical contact. Conversely, the Markovian self-propelled particle model captures the fine scale rules of interaction but fails to reproduce global dynamics. The most sophisticated model, the non-Markovian model, provides a good match to the data at both the fine scale and in terms of reproducing global dynamics. We conclude that prawns' movements are influenced by not just the current direction of nearby conspecifics, but also those encountered in the recent past. Given the simplicity of prawns as a study system our research suggests that self-propelled particle models of collective motion should, if they are to be realistic at multiple biological scales, include memory of previous interactions and other non-Markovian effects.

  11. Comulang: towards a collaborative e-learning system that supports student group modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troussas, Christos; Virvou, Maria; Alepis, Efthimios

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes an e-learning system that is expected to further enhance the educational process in computer-based tutoring systems by incorporating collaboration between students and work in groups. The resulting system is called "Comulang" while as a test bed for its effectiveness a multiple language learning system is used. Collaboration is supported by a user modeling module that is responsible for the initial creation of student clusters, where, as a next step, working groups of students are created. A machine learning clustering algorithm works towards group formatting, so that co-operations between students from different clusters are attained. One of the resulting system's basic aims is to provide efficient student groups whose limitations and capabilities are well balanced.

  12. Assessing the reliability of predictive activity coefficient models for molecules consisting of several functional groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. Gerber

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the most successful predictive models for activity coefficients are those based on functional groups such as UNIFAC. In contrast, these models require a large amount of experimental data for the determination of their parameter matrix. A more recent alternative is the models based on COSMO, for which only a small set of universal parameters must be calibrated. In this work, a recalibrated COSMO-SAC model was compared with the UNIFAC (Do model employing experimental infinite dilution activity coefficient data for 2236 non-hydrogen-bonding binary mixtures at different temperatures. As expected, UNIFAC (Do presented better overall performance, with a mean absolute error of 0.12 ln-units against 0.22 for our COSMO-SAC implementation. However, in cases involving molecules with several functional groups or when functional groups appear in an unusual way, the deviation for UNIFAC was 0.44 as opposed to 0.20 for COSMO-SAC. These results show that COSMO-SAC provides more reliable predictions for multi-functional or more complex molecules, reaffirming its future prospects.

  13. Group size effects in two repeated game models of a global climate agreement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helland, Leif

    2002-07-01

    What levels of total abatement can one hope for in a global climate agreement. Some potential answers to this question are provided by game theory. This working paper contains a critical discussion of two (prominent) game ,models that answer the question quite pessimistically. Both models take the n-person, infinitely repeated prisoner's dilemma game as their point of departure. The first model is a full information model and utilises the motion of a weakly re negotiation proof equilibrium. This results in the (maybe counterintuitive) prediction that an agreement that can provide high utility to the group will attract less total abatement than an agreement that can only provide low utility to the group. The second model assumes imperfect public information and utilises the notion of a trigger level equilibrium. This results in the (more intuitive) prediction that the level of total abatements will increase with improved verification techniques for a given player set. Still the level of total abatements decrease with an increasing player set for a given verification technique. Empirical implications of the two models are identified and it is argued that one should confront these with experimentally generated data in order to discriminate between the models. One reason for this is that historical data on abatement efforts in a global climate agreement do not exist since no such agreement has entered into force yet. (Author)

  14. Group size effects in two repeated game models of a global climate agreement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helland, Leif

    2002-01-01

    What levels of total abatement can one hope for in a global climate agreement. Some potential answers to this question are provided by game theory. This working paper contains a critical discussion of two (prominent) game ,models that answer the question quite pessimistically. Both models take the n-person, infinitely repeated prisoner's dilemma game as their point of departure. The first model is a full information model and utilises the motion of a weakly re negotiation proof equilibrium. This results in the (maybe counterintuitive) prediction that an agreement that can provide high utility to the group will attract less total abatement than an agreement that can only provide low utility to the group. The second model assumes imperfect public information and utilises the notion of a trigger level equilibrium. This results in the (more intuitive) prediction that the level of total abatements will increase with improved verification techniques for a given player set. Still the level of total abatements decrease with an increasing player set for a given verification technique. Empirical implications of the two models are identified and it is argued that one should confront these with experimentally generated data in order to discriminate between the models. One reason for this is that historical data on abatement efforts in a global climate agreement do not exist since no such agreement has entered into force yet. (Author)

  15. Computer-aided polymer design using group contribution plus property models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Satyanarayana, Kavitha Chelakara; Abildskov, Jens; Gani, Rafiqul

    2009-01-01

    . Polymer repeat unit property prediction models are required to calculate the properties of the generated repeat units. A systematic framework incorporating recently developed group contribution plus (GC(+)) models and an extended CAMD technique to include design of polymer repeat units is highlighted...... in this paper. The advantage of a GC(+) model in CAMD applications is that a very large number of polymer structures can be considered even though some of the group parameters may not be available. A number of case studies involving different polymer design problems have been solved through the developed......The preliminary step for polymer product design is to identify the basic repeat unit structure of the polymer that matches the target properties. Computer-aided molecular design (CAMD) approaches can be applied for generating the polymer repeat unit structures that match the required constraints...

  16. On low rank classical groups in string theory, gauge theory and matrix models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intriligator, Ken; Kraus, Per; Ryzhov, Anton V.; Shigemori, Masaki; Vafa, Cumrun

    2004-01-01

    We consider N=1 supersymmetric U(N), SO(N), and Sp(N) gauge theories, with two-index tensor matter and added tree-level superpotential, for general breaking patterns of the gauge group. By considering the string theory realization and geometric transitions, we clarify when glueball superfields should be included and extremized, or rather set to zero; this issue arises for unbroken group factors of low rank. The string theory results, which are equivalent to those of the matrix model, refer to a particular UV completion of the gauge theory, which could differ from conventional gauge theory results by residual instanton effects. Often, however, these effects exhibit miraculous cancellations, and the string theory or matrix model results end up agreeing with standard gauge theory. In particular, these string theory considerations explain and remove some apparent discrepancies between gauge theories and matrix models in the literature

  17. Mathematical Modelling of a Hybrid Micro-Cogeneration Group Based on a Four Stroke Diesel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apostol Valentin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a part of the work conducted in the first stage of a Research Grant called ”Hybrid micro-cogeneration group of high efficiency equipped with an electronically assisted ORC” acronym GRUCOHYB. The hybrid micro-cogeneration group is equipped with a four stroke Diesel engine having a maximum power of 40 kW. A mathematical model of the internal combustion engine is presented. The mathematical model is developed based on the Laws of Thermodynamics and takes into account the real, irreversible processes. Based on the mathematical model a computation program was developed. The results obtained were compared with those provided by the Diesel engine manufacturer. Results show a very high correlation between the manufacturer’s data and the simulation results for an engine running at 100% load. Future developments could involve using an exergetic analysis to show the ability of the ORC to generate electricity from recovered heat

  18. The Community Earth System Model-Polar Climate Working Group and the status of CESM2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, D. A.; Holland, M. M.; DuVivier, A. K.

    2017-12-01

    The Polar Climate Working Group (PCWG) is a consortium of scientists who are interested in modeling and understanding the climate in the Arctic and the Antarctic, and how polar climate processes interact with and influence climate at lower latitudes. Our members come from universities and laboratories, and our interests span all elements of polar climate, from the ocean depths to the top of the atmosphere. In addition to conducting scientific modeling experiments, we are charged with contributing to the development and maintenance of the state-of-the-art sea ice model component (CICE) used in the Community Earth System Model (CESM). A recent priority for the PCWG has been to come up with innovative ways to bring the observational and modeling communities together. This will allow for more robust validation of climate model simulations, the development and implementation of more physically-based model parameterizations, improved data assimilation capabilities, and the better use of models to design and implement field experiments. These have been informed by topical workshops and scientific visitors that we have hosted in these areas. These activities will be discussed and information on how the better integration of observations and models has influenced the new version of the CESM, which is due to be released in late 2017, will be provided. Additionally, we will address how enhanced interactions with the observational community will contribute to model developments and validation moving forward.

  19. F4 , E6 and G2 exceptional gauge groups in the vacuum domain structure model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahlaei, Amir; Rafibakhsh, Shahnoosh

    2018-03-01

    Using a vacuum domain structure model, we calculate trivial static potentials in various representations of F4 , E6, and G2 exceptional groups by means of the unit center element. Due to the absence of the nontrivial center elements, the potential of every representation is screened at far distances. However, the linear part is observed at intermediate quark separations and is investigated by the decomposition of the exceptional group to its maximal subgroups. Comparing the group factor of the supergroup with the corresponding one obtained from the nontrivial center elements of S U (3 ) subgroup shows that S U (3 ) is not the direct cause of temporary confinement in any of the exceptional groups. However, the trivial potential obtained from the group decomposition into the S U (3 ) subgroup is the same as the potential of the supergroup itself. In addition, any regular or singular decomposition into the S U (2 ) subgroup that produces the Cartan generator with the same elements as h1, in any exceptional group, leads to the linear intermediate potential of the exceptional gauge groups. The other S U (2 ) decompositions with the Cartan generator different from h1 are still able to describe the linear potential if the number of S U (2 ) nontrivial center elements that emerge in the decompositions is the same. As a result, it is the center vortices quantized in terms of nontrivial center elements of the S U (2 ) subgroup that give rise to the intermediate confinement in the static potentials.

  20. A qualitative assessment of a community antiretroviral therapy group model in Tete, Mozambique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freya Rasschaert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To improve retention on ART, Médecins Sans Frontières, the Ministry of Health and patients piloted a community-based antiretroviral distribution and adherence monitoring model through Community ART Groups (CAG in Tete, Mozambique. By December 2012, almost 6000 patients on ART had formed groups of whom 95.7% were retained in care. We conducted a qualitative study to evaluate the relevance, dynamic and impact of the CAG model on patients, their communities and the healthcare system. METHODS: Between October 2011 and May 2012, we conducted 16 focus group discussions and 24 in-depth interviews with the major stakeholders involved in the CAG model. Audio-recorded data were transcribed verbatim and analysed using a grounded theory approach. RESULTS: Six key themes emerged from the data: 1 Barriers to access HIV care, 2 CAG functioning and actors involved, 3 Benefits for CAG members, 4 Impacts of CAG beyond the group members, 5 Setbacks, and 6 Acceptance and future expectations of the CAG model. The model provides cost and time savings, certainty of ART access and mutual peer support resulting in better adherence to treatment. Through the active role of patients, HIV information could be conveyed to the broader community, leading to an increased uptake of services and positive transformation of the identity of people living with HIV. Potential pitfalls included limited access to CAG for those most vulnerable to defaulting, some inequity to patients in individual ART care and a high dependency on counsellors. CONCLUSION: The CAG model resulted in active patient involvement and empowerment, and the creation of a supportive environment improving the ART retention. It also sparked a reorientation of healthcare services towards the community and strengthened community actions. Successful implementation and scalability requires (a the acceptance of patients as partners in health, (b adequate resources, and (c a well-functioning monitoring and