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Sample records for modeling gps velocity

  1. Very long-period GPS waveforms. What can GPS bring to Earth seismic velocity models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelevitz, K.; Houlie, N.; Nissen-Meyer, T.; Boschi, L.; Giardini, D.; Rothacher, M.

    2014-12-01

    It is now admitted that high rate GPS observations can provide reliable surface displacement waveforms. For long-period (T > 5s) transients, it was shown that GPS and seismometer (STS-1) displacements are in agreement at least for vertical component [Houlié et al., 2011]. We propose here to supplement existing long-period seismic networks with high rate (>= 1Hz) GPS data in order to improve the resolution of global seismic velocity models. We aim at extending the use of GPS measurements beyond the range of STS-1 in the low frequency end (T>1000s). We present the results of the processing of 1Hz GPS records of the Hokkaido, Sumatra and Tohoku earthquakes (25th of September, 2003, Mw = 8.3; 26th of December, 2004, Mw = 8.9; 11th of March, 2011, Mw = 9.1, respectively). 3D waveforms phase time-series have been used to recover the ground motion histories at the GPS sites. Through the better resolution of inversion of the GPS phase observations, we determine displacement waveforms of periods ranging from 30 seconds to 1300 seconds for a selection of sites. We compare inverted GPS waveforms with STS-1 waveforms, superconducting gravity waveforms and synthetic waveforms computed using 3D global wave propagation with SPECFEM. We find that the GPS waveforms are in agreement with the SPECFEM synthetic data and are able to fill the period-gap between the broadband seismometer STS-1 data and the normal mode period range detected by the superconducting gravimeters. References: Houlié, N., G. Occhipinti, T. Blanchard, N. Shapiro, P. Lognonne, and M. Murakami (2011), New approach to detect seismic surface waves in 1Hz-sampled GPS time series, Scientific reports, 1, 44.

  2. Uncertainty estimation of the velocity model for the TrigNet GPS network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackl, Matthias; Malservisi, Rocco; Hugentobler, Urs; Wonnacott, Richard

    2010-05-01

    Satellite based geodetic techniques - above all GPS - provide an outstanding tool to measure crustal motions. They are widely used to derive geodetic velocity models that are applied in geodynamics to determine rotations of tectonic blocks, to localize active geological features, and to estimate rheological properties of the crust and the underlying asthenosphere. However, it is not a trivial task to derive GPS velocities and their uncertainties from positioning time series. In general time series are assumed to be represented by linear models (sometimes offsets, annual, and semi-annual signals are included) and noise. It has been shown that models accounting only for white noise tend to underestimate the uncertainties of rates derived from long time series and that different colored noise components (flicker noise, random walk, etc.) need to be considered. However, a thorough error analysis including power spectra analyses and maximum likelihood estimates is quite demanding and are usually not carried out for every site, but the uncertainties are scaled by latitude dependent factors. Analyses of the South Africa continuous GPS network TrigNet indicate that the scaled uncertainties overestimate the velocity errors. So we applied a method similar to the Allan Variance that is commonly used in the estimation of clock uncertainties and is able to account for time dependent probability density functions (colored noise) to the TrigNet time series. Finally, we compared these estimates to the results obtained by spectral analyses using CATS. Comparisons with synthetic data show that the noise can be represented quite well by a power law model in combination with a seasonal signal in agreement with previous studies.

  3. Medium to Long Range Kinematic GPS Positioning with Position-Velocity-Acceleration Model Using Multiple Reference Stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Chang-Ki; Park, Chi Ho; Han, Joong-hee; Kwon, Jay Hyoun

    2015-07-13

    In order to obtain precise kinematic global positioning systems (GPS) in medium to large scale networks, the atmospheric effects from tropospheric and ionospheric delays need to be properly modeled and estimated. It is also preferable to use multiple reference stations to improve the reliability of the solutions. In this study, GPS kinematic positioning algorithms are developed for the medium to large-scale network based on the position-velocity-acceleration model. Hence, the algorithm can perform even in cases where the near-constant velocity assumption does not hold. In addition, the estimated kinematic accelerations can be used for the airborne gravimetry. The proposed algorithms are implemented using Kalman filter and are applied to the in situ airborne GPS data. The performance of the proposed algorithms is validated by analyzing and comparing the results with those from reference values. The results show that reliable and comparable solutions in both position and kinematic acceleration levels can be obtained using the proposed algorithms.

  4. Using cluster analysis to organize and explore regional GPS velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Robert W.; Thatcher, Wayne; Savage, James C.

    2012-01-01

    Cluster analysis offers a simple visual exploratory tool for the initial investigation of regional Global Positioning System (GPS) velocity observations, which are providing increasingly precise mappings of actively deforming continental lithosphere. The deformation fields from dense regional GPS networks can often be concisely described in terms of relatively coherent blocks bounded by active faults, although the choice of blocks, their number and size, can be subjective and is often guided by the distribution of known faults. To illustrate our method, we apply cluster analysis to GPS velocities from the San Francisco Bay Region, California, to search for spatially coherent patterns of deformation, including evidence of block-like behavior. The clustering process identifies four robust groupings of velocities that we identify with four crustal blocks. Although the analysis uses no prior geologic information other than the GPS velocities, the cluster/block boundaries track three major faults, both locked and creeping.

  5. Present-day velocity field and block kinematics of Tibetan Plateau from GPS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Qiao, Xuejun; Yang, Shaomin; Wang, Dijin

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we present a new synthesis of GPS velocities for tectonic deformation within the Tibetan Plateau and its surrounding areas, a combined data set of ˜1854 GPS-derived horizontal velocity vectors. Assuming that crustal deformation is localized along major faults, a block modelling approach is employed to interpret the GPS velocity field. We construct a 30-element block model to describe present-day deformation in western China, with half of them located within the Tibetan Plateau, and the remainder located in its surrounding areas. We model the GPS velocities simultaneously for the effects of block rotations and elastic strain induced by the bounding faults. Our model yields a good fit to the GPS data with a mean residual of 1.08 mm a-1 compared to the mean uncertainty of 1.36 mm a-1 for each velocity component, indicating a good agreement between the predicted and observed velocities. The major strike-slip faults such as the Altyn Tagh, Xianshuihe, Kunlun and Haiyuan faults have relatively uniform slip rates in a range of 5-12 mm a-1 along most of their segments, and the estimated fault slip rates agree well with previous geologic and geodetic results. Blocks having significant residuals are located at the southern and southeastern Tibetan Plateau, suggesting complex tectonic settings and further refinement of accurate definition of block geometry in these regions.

  6. A New Arabia-Africa-Eurasia GPS Velocity Field (1994-2014) and E Mediterranean Block Model: Implications for Continental Deformation in a Zone of Active Plate Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernant, P.; Floyd, M.; Ozener, H.; Ergintav, S.; Karakhanian, A.; Kadirov, F. A.; Sokhadze, G.; ArRajehi, A.; Nankali, H. R.; Georgiev, I.; Ganas, A.; Paradissis, D.; McClusky, S.; Gomez, F. G.; Reilinger, R. E.

    2014-12-01

    We present new GPS velocities for the Arabia-Africa-Eurasia region determined with GAMIT/GLOBK (>830 velocities) spanning the period 1994-2014. Here we consider the E Mediterranean region of plate interaction. We use DEFNODE software to develop block models and estimate slip rates on major faults and strain of some blocks. The wrms of residual velocities from our new model is 1.3 mm/yr. We identify small E-W extension within the newly defined Anatolian block confined to a 100-200 km wide zone south of the North Anatolian Fault (NAF) reaching 2-3 mm/yr with rates increasing towards the west. Possible causes we consider include, un-modeled postseismic effects of the 1999 Izmit/Duzce earthquake sequence, continuing post-seismic effects of the 20th Century sequence of M>7 earthquakes, and/or toroidal sub-lithospheric flow towards the subducting Hellenic slab. The overall strain rate of the Marmara Sea block is dominantly N-S extension, and the Van block, N-S compression. Present slip rates along the NAF increase from E to W, 22-24 mm/yr along the E to E-central segment and 27-28 mm/yr along the W segment. We quantify extension in the G. of Corinth, central Greece, and G. of Evia; the W, central and E sections of the Hellenic Trench are shortening with extension in the back-arc. The W Hellenic Trench and W Peloponnese have right-lateral strike-slip and the E Hellenic Trench, left-lateral ss. N-S extension (2-4 mm/yr) in N Greece and the N Aegean Sea extends at least to 42°N. Arabia-Sinai left-lateral motion across the Dead Sea Fault is ~5 mm/yr along the S segment; significant residual velocities along the N and S segments indicate lower slip rates in the N and require fault segmentation to account for slip rate variations along strike. We identify E-W contraction of the Arabian (Persian) Gulf (~3-5 mm/yr) that extends into the E part of the Arabian Plate. We will quantify and present these and other observed deformation patterns and discuss their tectonic implications.

  7. Clustering of GPS velocities in the Mojave Block, southeastern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, James C.; Simpson, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    We find subdivisions within the Mojave Block using cluster analysis to identify groupings in the velocities observed at GPS stations there. The clusters are represented on a fault map by symbols located at the positions of the GPS stations, each symbol representing the cluster to which the velocity of that GPS station belongs. Fault systems that separate the clusters are readily identified on such a map. The most significant representation as judged by the gap test involves 4 clusters within the Mojave Block. The fault systems bounding the clusters from east to west are 1) the faults defining the eastern boundary of the Northeast Mojave Domain extended southward to connect to the Hector Mine rupture, 2) the Calico-Paradise fault system, 3) the Landers-Blackwater fault system, and 4) the Helendale-Lockhart fault system. This division of the Mojave Block is very similar to that proposed by Meade and Hager. However, no cluster boundary coincides with the Garlock Fault, the northern boundary of the Mojave Block. Rather, the clusters appear to continue without interruption from the Mojave Block north into the southern Walker Lane Belt, similar to the continuity across the Garlock Fault of the shear zone along the Blackwater-Little Lake fault system observed by Peltzer et al. Mapped traces of individual faults in the Mojave Block terminate within the block and do not continue across the Garlock Fault [Dokka and Travis, ].

  8. Kinematics of the Suez-Sinai area from combined GPS velocity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrantonio, G.; Devoti, R.; Mahmoud, S.; Riguzzi, F.

    2016-12-01

    A combined GPS velocity solution covering a wide area from Egypt to Middle East allowed us to infer the current rates across the main, already well known, tectonic features. We have estimated 126 velocities from time series of 90 permanent and 36 non permanent GPS sites located in Africa (Egypt), Eurasia and Arabia plates in the time span 1996-2015, the largest available for the Egyptian sites. We have combined our velocity solution in a least-squares sense with two other recent velocity solutions of networks located around the eastern Mediterranean, obtaining a final IGb08 velocity field of about 450 sites. Then, we have estimated the IGb08 Euler poles of Africa, Sinai and Arabia, analyzing the kinematics of the Sinai area, particular velocity profiles, and estimating the 2D strain rate field. We show that it is possible to reliably model the rigid motion of Sinai block only including some GPS sites located south of the Carmel Fault. The estimated relative motion with respect to Africa is of the order of 2-3 mm/yr, however there is a clear mismatch between the modeled and the observed velocities in the southern Sinai sites. We have also assessed the NNE left shear motion along the Dead Sea Transform Fault, estimating a relative motion between Arabia and Africa of about 6 mm/yr in the direction of the Red Sea opening.

  9. GPS/INS Sensor Fusion Using GPS Wind up Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Walton R. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method of stabilizing an inertial navigation system (INS), includes the steps of: receiving data from an inertial navigation system; and receiving a finite number of carrier phase observables using at least one GPS receiver from a plurality of GPS satellites; calculating a phase wind up correction; correcting at least one of the finite number of carrier phase observables using the phase wind up correction; and calculating a corrected IMU attitude or velocity or position using the corrected at least one of the finite number of carrier phase observables; and performing a step selected from the steps consisting of recording, reporting, or providing the corrected IMU attitude or velocity or position to another process that uses the corrected IMU attitude or velocity or position. A GPS stabilized inertial navigation system apparatus is also described.

  10. Estimating velocity from noisy GPS data for investigating the temporal variability of slope movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Wirz

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of processes and factors affecting slope instability is essential for detecting and monitoring potentially hazardous slopes. Knowing the timing of acceleration or deceleration of slope movements can help to identify important controls and hence to increase our process understanding. For this methods to derive reliable velocity estimations are important. The aim of this study was to develop and test a method to derive velocities based on noisy GPS data of various movement patterns and variable signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR. Derived velocities represent reliable average velocities representative for a given period. The applied smoothing windows directly depends on the SNR of the data, which is modeled using Monte Carlo simulation. Hence, all obtained velocities have a SNR above a predefined threshold and for each velocity period the SNR is known, which helps to interpret the temporal variability. In sensitivity tests with synthetic time-series the method was compared to established methods to derive velocities based on GPS positions, including spline and Kernel regression smoothing. Those sensitivity tests clearly demonstrated that methods are required that adopt the time window to the underlying error of the position data. The presented method performs well, even for a high noise levels and variable SNR. Different methods were further applied to investigate the inter-annual variability of permafrost slope movements based on daily GPS- and inclinometer data. In the framework of the new method, we further analyzed the error caused by a rotation of the GPS mast (hmast = 1.5 m. If the tilting is higher than its uncertainty, the rotational movement can be separated and the direction of movement became more uniform. At one GPS station, more than 12% of the measured displacement at the antenna was caused by the rotation of the station.

  11. Newly velocity field of Sulawesi Island from GPS observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarsito, D. A.; Susilo, Simons, W. J. F.; Abidin, H. Z.; Sapiie, B.; Triyoso, W.; Andreas, H.

    2017-07-01

    Sulawesi microplate Island is located at famous triple junction area of the Eurasian, India-Australian, and Philippine Sea plates. Under the influence of the northward moving Australian plate and the westward motion of the Philippine plate, the island at Eastern part of Indonesia is collide and with the Eurasian plate and Sunda Block. Those recent microplate tectonic motions can be quantitatively determine by GNSS-GPS measurement. We use combine GNSS-GPS observation types (campaign type and continuous type) from 1997 to 2015 to derive newly velocity field of the area. Several strategies are applied and tested to get the optimum result, and finally we choose regional strategy to reduce error propagation contribution from global multi baseline processing using GAMIT/GLOBK 10.5. Velocity field are analyzed in global reference frame ITRF 2008 and local reference frame by fixing with respect alternatively to Eurasian plate - Sunda block, India-Australian plate and Philippine Sea plates. Newly results show dense distribution of velocity field. This information is useful for tectonic deformation studying in geospatial era.

  12. Advantages and Limitations of Cluster Analysis in Interpreting Regional GPS Velocity Fields in California and Elsewhere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, W. R.; Savage, J. C.; Simpson, R.

    2012-12-01

    Regional Global Positioning System (GPS) velocity observations are providing increasingly precise mappings of actively deforming continental lithosphere. Cluster analysis, a venerable data analysis method, offers a simple, visual exploratory tool for the initial organization and investigation of GPS velocities (Simpson et al., 2012 GRL). Here we describe the application of cluster analysis to GPS velocities from three regions, the Mojave Desert and the San Francisco Bay regions in California, and the Aegean in the eastern Mediterranean. Our goal is to illustrate the strengths and shortcomings of the method in searching for spatially coherent patterns of deformation, including evidence for and against block-like behavior in these 3 regions. The deformation fields from dense regional GPS networks can often be concisely described in terms of relatively coherent blocks bounded by active faults, although the choice of blocks, their number and size, is subjective and usually guided by the distribution of known faults. Cluster analysis applied to GPS velocities provides a completely objective method for identifying groups of observations ranging in size from 10s to 100s of km in characteristic dimension based solely on the similarities of their velocity vectors. In the three regions we have studied, statistically significant clusters are almost invariably spatially coherent, fault bounded, and coincide with elastic, geologically identified structural blocks. Often, higher order clusters that are not statistically significant are also spatially coherent, suggesting the existence of additional blocks, or defining regions of other tectonic importance (e.g. zones of localized elastic strain accumulation near locked faults). These results can be used to both formulate tentative tectonic models with testable consequences and to suggest focused new measurements in under-sampled regions. Cluster analysis applied to GPS velocities has several potential limitations, aside from the

  13. Definition and kinematics of the northern of the Puerto Rico-Virgin Islands block and the Lesser Antilles forearc based on an updated and improved GPS velocity field and revised block models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioli, G. S.; Jansma, P. E.; Stafford-Glenn, M.; Calais, E.

    2011-12-01

    The presence of small tectonic blocks the Greater Antilles, for example the Puerto Rico-Virgin Islands block (PRVI), which may be translating, rotating, and possibly internally deforming, has been proposed and some cases well-documented by several workers. In addition, the existence of a Lesser Antilles forearc has been proposed based on interplate earthquake slip vectors (Lopez et al. 2006). Manaker et al. (2008) used sparse GPS and earthquake slip data from the northeastern Caribbean to construct a DEFNODE block and fault model to constrain interseismic fault coupling among the microplates in the northeastern Caribbean. They concluded that the Enriquillo fault in Haiti could produce a Mw7.2, if the entire accumulated elastic strain was released in one event. On January 12, 2010, the strain was released in a Mw7.0 earthquake that left Port-au-Prince in rubble. The interseismic GPS velocity field has been updated for Hispanolia (Calais et al, 2010); in addition, new data have been collected in the northern Lesser Antilles (NLA) in 2009 as well as throughout the PRVI block in 2007 and 2011, and the existing GPS time series updated and transformed into ITRF05 (IGS05). GPS data from the NLA are consistent with a NLA forearc sliver that moves differently from the Caribbean and North American plates as originally proposed by Lopez et al. (2006). The forearc does not, however, continue as single tectonic entity across the Anegada Passage as previously suggested. Here we report revised DEFNODE models using both the original geometry and constraints of Manaker et al. (2008) with an updated GPS data set as well as new models that explicitly include a forearc block. The models may be used to explicitly define the rotation parameters of the block as well as the coupling along block bounding faults. The original model geometry (without a forearc sliver) yields a higher reduced chi-squared (2.57 vs. 2.01), when additional the GPS velocities from NLA are used to condition the

  14. EVA: GPS-based extended velocity and acceleration determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Dagoberto; Hernandez-Pajares, Manuel; Juan-Zornoza, Jose Miguel; Sanz-Subirana, Jaume; Aragon-Angel, Angela

    2011-06-01

    In this work, a new GPS carrier phase-based velocity and acceleration determination method is presented that extends the effective range of previous techniques. The method is named `EVA', and may find applications in fields such as airborne gravimetry when rough terrain or water bodies make difficult or impractical to set up nearby GPS reference receivers. The EVA method is similar to methods such as Kennedy (Precise acceleration determination from carrier phase measurements. In: Proceedings of the 15th international technical meeting of the satellite division of the Institute of Navigation. ION GPS 2002, Portland pp 962-972, 2002b) since it uses L1 carrier phase observables for velocity and acceleration determination. However, it introduces a wide network of stations and it is independent of precise clock information because it estimates satellite clock drifts and drift rates `on-the-fly', requiring only orbit data of sufficient quality. Moreover, with EVA the solution rate is only limited by data rate, and not by the available precise satellite clocks data rate. The results obtained are more robust for long baselines than the results obtained with the reference Kennedy method. An advantage of being independent of precise clock information is that, beside IGS Final products, also the Rapid, Ultra-Rapid (observed) and Ultra-Rapid (predicted) products may be used. Moreover, the EVA technique may also use the undifferenced ionosphere-free carrier phase combination (LC), overcoming baseline limitations in cases where ionosphere gradients may be an issue and very low biases are required. During the development of this work, some problems were found in the velocity estimation process of the Kennedy method. The sources of the problems were identified, and an improved version of the Kennedy method was used for this research work. An experiment was performed using a light aircraft flying over the Pyrenees, showing that both EVA and the improved Kennedy methods are able to

  15. Active tectonics of northwestern U.S. inferred from GPS-derived surface velocities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert McCaffrey; Robert W. King; Suzette J. Payne; Matthew Lancaster

    2013-02-01

    Surface velocities derived from GPS observations from 1993 to 2011 at several hundred sites across the deforming northwestern United States are used to further elucidate the region's active tectonics. The new velocities reveal that the clockwise rotations, relative to North America, seen in Oregon and western Washington from earlier GPS observations, continue to the east to include the Snake River Plain of Idaho and south into the Basin and Range of northern Nevada. Regional-scale rotation is attributed to gravitationally driven extension in the Basin and Range and Pacific-North America shear transferred through the Walker Lane belt aided by potentially strong pinning below the Idaho Batholith. The large rotating section comprising eastern Oregon displays very low internal deformation rates despite seismological evidence for a thin crust, warm mantle, organized mantle flow, and elevated topography. The observed disparity between mantle and surface kinematics suggests that either little stress acts between them (low basal shear) or that the crust is strong relative to the mantle. The rotation of the Oregon block impinges on Washington across the Yakima fold-thrust belt where shortening occurs in a closing-fan style. Elastic fault locking at the Cascadia subduction zone is reevaluated using the GPS velocities and recently published uplift rates. The 18 year GPS and 80 year leveling data can both be matched with a common locking model suggesting that the locking has been stable over many decades. The rate of strain accumulation is consistent with hundreds of years between great subduction events.

  16. Effect of GPS errors on Emission model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehmann, Anders; Gross, Allan

    n this paper we will show how Global Positioning Services (GPS) data obtained from smartphones can be used to model air quality in urban settings. The paper examines the uncertainty of smartphone location utilising GPS, and ties this location uncertainty to air quality models. The results presented...

  17. Land Vehicle Navigation with the Integration of GPS and Reduced INS: Performance Improvement with Velocity Aiding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Songlai; Wang, Jinling

    The movement of a land vehicle is constrained because the vehicle always remains on the Earth's surface and only experiences small pitch and roll angles. So the GPS/INS integrated system for land vehicle navigation could be reconfigured to be the integration of GPS and reduced INS to cut down the costs. In a reduced INS, the vertical accelerometer and two horizontal gyros could be omitted from the system. But both theoretical analysis and experimental results show that this configuration may result in the divergence of height solution and large velocity errors. To improve the system performances, precise velocity derived from GPS carrier phase measurements, together with the GPS single point positioning solution, is used to aid the reduced INS. Field test results have demonstrated that first, the aiding from GPS precise velocity overcomes the divergence problem of the integrated height solutions and improves the integrated velocity and secondly the proposed novel integration scheme could achieve comparable navigation accuracy with that from the GPS and full INS integrated system.

  18. Velocity anticipation in the optimal velocity model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Li-yun; WENG Xu-dan; LI Qing-ding

    2009-01-01

    In this paper,the velocity anticipation in the optimal velocity model (OVM) is investigated.The driver adjusts the velocity of his vehicle by the desired headway,which depends on both instantaneous headway and relative velocity.The effect of relative velocity is measured by a sensitivity function.A specific form of the sensitivity function is supposed and the involved parameters are determined by the both numerical simulation and empirical data.It is shown that inclusion of velocity anticipation enhances the stability of traffic flow.Numerical simulations show a good agreement with empirical data.This model provides a better description of real traffic,including the acceleration process from standing states and the deceleration process approaching a stopped car.

  19. Seismotectonic Implications Of Clustered Regional GPS Velocities In The San Francisco Bay Region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graymer, R. W.; Simpson, R.

    2012-12-01

    We have used a hierarchical agglomerative clustering algorithm with Euclidean distance and centroid linkage, applied to continuous GPS observations for the Bay region available from the U.S. Geological Survey website. This analysis reveals 4 robust, spatially coherent clusters that coincide with 4 first-order structural blocks separated by 3 major fault systems: San Andreas (SA), Southern/Central Calaveras-Hayward-Rodgers Creek-Maacama (HAY), and Northern Calaveras-Concord-Green Valley-Berryessa-Bartlett Springs (NCAL). Because observations seaward of the San Gregorio (SG) fault are few in number, the cluster to the west of SA may actually contain 2 major structural blocks not adequately resolved: the Pacific plate to the west of the northern SA and a Peninsula block between the Peninsula SA and the SG fault. The average inter-block velocities are 11, 10, and 9 mm/yr across SA, HAY, and NCAL respectively. There appears to be a significant component of fault-normal compression across NCAL, whereas SA and HAY faults appear to be, on regional average, purely strike-slip. The velocities for the Sierra Nevada - Great Valley (SNGV) block to the west of NCAL are impressive in their similarity. The cluster of these velocities in a velocity plot forms a tighter grouping compared with the groupings for the other cluster blocks, suggesting a more rigid behavior for this block than the others. We note that for 4 clusters, none of the 3 cluster boundaries illuminate geologic structures other than north-northwest trending dominantly strike-slip faults, so plate motion is not accommodated by large-scale fault-parallel compression or extension in the region or by significant plastic deformation , at least over the time span of the GPS observations. Complexities of interseismic deformation of the upper crust do not allow simple application of inter-block velocities as long-term slip rates on bounding faults. However, 2D dislocation models using inter-block velocities and typical

  20. Modeling Terminal Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Neal; Quintanilla, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Using a simultaneously falling softball as a stopwatch, the terminal velocity of a whiffle ball can be obtained to surprisingly high accuracy with only common household equipment. This classroom activity engages students in an apparently daunting task that nevertheless is tractable, using a simple model and mathematical techniques at their…

  1. NS shear kinematics across the Lut block from a dense GPS velocity field in eastern Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walpersdorf, A.; Tavakoli, F.; Hatzfeld, D.; Jadidi, A. M.; Vergnolle, M. M.; Aghamohammadi, A.; Djamour, Y.; Nankali, H. R.; Sedighi, M.

    2009-12-01

    Since 2004, extensive GPS campaigns and the upcoming Iranian permanent GPS network are monitoring the present-day deformation in eastern Iran. We present a new GPS velocity field extending from Central Iran to the Hellmand block on the Eurasian plate. It permits to monitor the right lateral NS shear across the aseismic Lut block between Central Iran and the Hellmand block. While existing tectonic models propose an increase of slip rate from west to east, we find balanced slip rates on both Lut block boundaries. The total shear between Central Iran and the Lut block (the western limit) is evaluated to 7.0 ± 0.5 mm/yr that are accommodated by the Gowk-Nayband fault system and the Anar fault. It even slightly exceeds the 5.5 ± 0.5 mm/yr of shear between the Lut block and stable Eurasia (the eastern limit), localized on different faults of the Sistan Suture zone. Tectonic models propose that at the northern Lut block limit the regional NS shear leads to left lateral activity of large EW trending strike-slip faults (Doruneh and Dasht-e-Bayaz faults). On none of them a significant left lateral displacement is observed, in spite of the recent seismic activity of the Dasht-e-Bayaz and Abiz faults. The instantaneous active deformation is localized rather on oblique NW-SE oriented thrust faults (Janggal and Ferdows thrusts). Individual instantaneous fault slip rates are compared to short term and long term geological estimates. We find that GPS slip rates are in most cases coherent with short term geologic determinations (from dating of geomorphologic offsets over some 10-100 ka). Some differences with respect to long term estimates (from total geologic fault offsets and onset ages of several Ma) indicate non-constant slip rates over different time scales or that the onset of the present-day deformation presumed to 3-7 Ma in eastern Iran has to be revised.

  2. Source process with heterogeneous rupture velocity for the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake based on 1-Hz GPS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Kato, Teruyuki; Zhou, Xin; Fukuda, Jun'ichi

    2016-11-01

    A rupture model with varying rupture front expansion velocity for the March 11, 2011, Tohoku-Oki earthquake was obtained by the joint inversion of high-rate Global Positioning System (GPS) data and ocean bottom GPS/acoustic (OB-GPS) data. The inverted rupture velocity with a complex distribution gradually increases near the hypocenter and shows rapid rupture expansion at the shallowest part of the fault. The entire rupture process, which lasted 160 s, can be divided into three energy release stages, based on the moment rate function. The preferred slip model, showing a compatible relationship with aftershocks, has a primary asperity concentrated from the hypocenter to the trench and a small asperity located on the southern fault. Source time functions for subfaults and temporal rupture images suggest that repeated slips occurred in the primary rupture, which is consistent with that from seismic waveforms. Our estimated maximum slip and total seismic moment are 65 m and 4.2 × 1022 Nm (Mw 9.0), respectively. The large slip, stress drop, and rupture velocity are all concentrated at shallow depths, which indicates that the shallow part of the fault radiated high-frequency as well as low-frequency seismic waves.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Subdaily Earth rotation model and GPS solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panafidina, Natalia; Hugentobler, Urs; Seitz, Manuela

    2014-05-01

    In this contribution we study the influence of the subdaily Earth rotation model on the GPS solution including station coordinates, satellite orbits and daily Earth rotation parameters (ERPs). The approach used is based on the transformation of GPS normal equation systems: free daily normal equations containing ERPs with 1-hour resolution are used as input data, in this case the high-frequency ERPs can be transformed into tidal terms which then can be fixed to new a priori values, thus changing implicitly the underlying subdaily Earth rotation model. To study the influence of individual tidal terms on the solution we successively changed a priori values for one tidal term in polar motion and compared the resulting solutions for GPS orbits, station coordinates and daily ERPs for a time interval of 13 years. The comparison reveals periodic changes in all estimated parameters with periods depending on the periods of the changed tidal terms. The dynamical reference frame realized by the GPS orbits is also affected: the whole satellite constellation shows periodic orientation variations, and each individual satellite shows periodic changes in the position of the orbit origin. We present a mechanism showing how errors in the subdaily Earth rotation model are propagated into the dynamical reference frame and the estimated parameters. Our model represents a change in one tidal term over one day as the sum of a prograde diurnal wave, a retrograde diurnal wave and an offset and linear drift in x- and y-pole. We demonstrate that this simple model, in conjunction with appropriate constraints, can explain well the observed variations in a one day GPS solution as well as in daily pole rates caused by changes in the subdaily Earth rotation model.

  4. Large Crustal Velocities During a Short Lived Seismic Swarm Evidenced From Continuous GPS Observations in Aysen, Southern Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataille, K.; Baez, J. C.; Contreras, M.; Agurto, H.; Barrientos, S.; Vigny, C.; Klotz, J.

    2008-05-01

    The Aysen seismic swarm began on January 22, 2007, with a large number of events up to magnitud 6.2 during a period of several months. We recorded this sequence with 4 permanent GPS stations before the main event, and with 10 GPS stations afterwards. All the GPS observations were processed with Bernese GPS software version 5.0. Stations from the regional and global IGS network were included during the process to realize the same reference frame for each day. Daily solutions were obtained to generate time series, from which local velocity fields with the following features were extracted: (1) During the first three weeks of observations, remarkable features were obtained from four stations, namely: horizontal velocities were very high, varying between 15 and 70 cm/year; and the direction of displacements favoured a strike-slip rather than tensional faulting; (2) An event of M=5.5 occurred on April 2, 2007 producing a co-seismic displacement of 8.2 cm at station TORG. Following this event, velocities increased during three weeks: at station TORG from 30 to 45 cm/year; at station PCOE from 29 to 83 cm/year, until a M=6.2 event occurred on 21 April 2007. Unfortunately, this event triggered a landslide reaching the fiord which generated a tsunami destroying all but TORG's site; (3) The M=6.2 event produced a co- seismic displacement of 12 cm at station TORG, with similar direction as observed prior to the event. The moment tensors obtained by NEIC and Harvard are consistent with the deformation field observed with GPS prior to the event; (4) The following two weeks after the main event, the velocity field decreased at TORG from 45 to 26 cm/year, corresponding to values slightly lower than those observed during the first weeks; (5) A set of new stations were installed after the M=6.2 event. The sites located on the Aysen fiord showed a continous decrease of the velocity, until current values which are considered normal for such an environment. These observations are

  5. Accurate Solution of Navigation Equations in GPS Receivers for Very High Velocities Using Pseudorange Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Rahemi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available GPS is a satellite-based navigation system that is able to determine the exact position of objects on the Earth, sky, or space. By increasing the velocity of a moving object, the accuracy of positioning decreases; meanwhile, the calculation of the exact position in the movement by high velocities like airplane movement or very high velocities like satellite movement is so important. In this paper, seven methods for solving navigation equations in very high velocities using least squares method and its combination with the variance estimation methods for weighting observations based on their qualities are studied. Simulations on different data with different velocities from 100 m/s to 7000 m/s show that proposed method can improve the accuracy of positioning more than 50%.

  6. Present-Day 3D Velocity Field of Eastern North America Based on Continuous GPS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudarzi, Mohammad Ali; Cocard, Marc; Santerre, Rock

    2016-07-01

    The Saint Lawrence River valley in eastern Canada was studied using observations of continuously operating GPS (CGPS) stations. The area is one of the most seismically active regions in eastern North America characterized by many earthquakes, which is also subject to an ongoing glacial isostatic adjustment. We present the current three-dimensional velocity field of eastern North America obtained from more than 14 years (9 years on average) of data at 112 CGPS stations. Bernese GNSS and GITSA software were used for CGPS data processing and position time series analysis, respectively. The results show the counterclockwise rotation of the North American plate in the No-Net-Rotation model with the average of 16.8 ± 0.7 mm/year constrained to ITRF 2008. We also present an ongoing uplift model for the study region based on the present-day CGPS observations. The model shows uplift all over eastern Canada with the maximum rate of 13.7 ± 1.2 mm/year and subsidence to the south mainly over northern USA with a typical rate of -1 to -2 mm/year and the minimum value of -2.7 ± 1.4 mm/year. We compared our model with the rate of radial displacements from the ICE-5G model. Both models agree within 0.02 mm/year at the best stations; however, our model shows a systematic spatial tilt compared to ICE-5G. The misfits between two models amount to the maximum relative subsidence of -6.1 ± 1.1 mm/year to the east and maximum relative uplift of 5.9 ± 2.7 mm/year to the west. The intraplate horizontal velocities are radially outward from the centers of maximum uplift and are inward to the centers of maximum subsidence with the typical velocity of 1-1.6 ± 0.4 mm/year that is in agreement with the ICE-5G model to the first order.

  7. Tectonic stressing in California modeled from GPS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, T.

    2006-01-01

    What happens in the crust as a result of geodetically observed secular motions? In this paper we find out by distorting a finite element model of California using GPS-derived displacements. A complex model was constructed using spatially varying crustal thickness, geothermal gradient, topography, and creeping faults. GPS velocity observations were interpolated and extrapolated across the model and boundary condition areas, and the model was loaded according to 5-year displacements. Results map highest differential stressing rates in a 200-km-wide band along the Pacific-North American plate boundary, coinciding with regions of greatest seismic energy release. Away from the plate boundary, GPS-derived crustal strain reduces modeled differential stress in some places, suggesting that some crustal motions are related to topographic collapse. Calculated stressing rates can be resolved onto fault planes: useful for addressing fault interactions and necessary for calculating earthquake advances or delays. As an example, I examine seismic quiescence on the Garlock fault despite a calculated minimum 0.1-0.4 MPa static stress increase from the 1857 M???7.8 Fort Tejon earthquake. Results from finite element modeling show very low to negative secular Coulomb stress growth on the Garlock fault, suggesting that the stress state may have been too low for large earthquake triggering. Thus the Garlock fault may only be stressed by San Andreas fault slip, a loading pattern that could explain its erratic rupture history.

  8. Measuring melt and velocity of Alaskan mountain glaciers using phase-sensitive radar and differential GPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhaus, S.; Tulaczyk, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Alaskan glaciers show some of the highest rates of retreat worldwide, contributing to sea level rise. This retreat is due to both increased velocity and increased melt. We seek to understand the role of glacial meltwater on velocity. Matanuska glacier, a land terminating glacier in Alaska, has been well-studied using traditional glaciological techniques, but new technology has emerged that allows us to measure melt and velocity more accurately. We employed high-resolution differential GPS to create surface velocity profiles across flow in the ablation zone during the summer of 2015. We also measured surface ablation using stakes and measured basal melt using phase-sensitive radar designed by the British Antarctic Survey. The positions acquired by differential GPS are obtained to a resolution of less than 0.5m, while feature tracking using time-lapse photography for the same time period yields positions with greater and more variable uncertainty. The phase-sensitive radar provides ice thinning rates. Phase-sensitive radar together with ground penetrating radar provides us with an understanding of the internal structure of the glacier. This suite of data allows us to determine the relative importance of surface melt, basal melt, and internal deformation on ice velocity in warm mountain glaciers.

  9. A new GPS velocity field for the Pacific Plate - Part 2: implications for fault slip rates in western California

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMets, C.; Márquez-Azúa, Bertha; Cabral-Cano, Enrique

    2014-12-01

    Lower and upper bounds for present deformation rates across faults in central California between the San Andreas Fault and Pacific coast are estimated from a new Global Positioning System (GPS) velocity field for central, western California in light of geodetic evidence presented in a companion paper for slow, but significant deformation within the Pacific Plate between young seafloor in the eastern Pacific and older seafloor elsewhere on the plate. Transects of the GPS velocity field across the San Andreas Fault between Parkfield and San Juan Buatista, where fault slip is dominated by creep and the velocity field thus reveals the off-fault deformation, show that GPS sites in westernmost California move approximately parallel to the fault at an average rate of 3.4 ± 0.4 mm yr-1 relative to the older interior of the Pacific Plate, but only 1.8 ± 0.6 mm yr-1 if the Pacific Plate frame of reference is corrected for deformation within the plate. Modelled interseismic elastic deformation from the weakly coupled creeping segment of the San Andreas Fault is an order-of-magnitude too small to explain the southeastward motions of coastal sites in western California. Similarly, models that maximize residual viscoelastic deformation from the 1857 Fort Tejon and 1906 San Francisco earthquakes mismatch both the rates and directions of GPS site motions in central California relative to the Pacific Plate. Neither thus explains the site motions southwest of the San Andreas fault, indicating that the site motions measure deformation across faults and folds outboard of the San Andreas Fault. The non-zero site velocities thus constitute strong evidence for active folding and faulting outboard from the creeping segment of the San Andreas Fault and suggest limits of 0-2 mm yr-1 for the Rinconada Fault slip rate and 1.8 ± 0.6 to 3.4 ± 0.4 mm yr-1 for the slip rates integrated across near-coastal faults such as the Hosgri, San Gregorio and San Simeon faults.

  10. GPS Velocities and Structure Across the Burma Accretionary Prism and Shillong Plateau in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, S. H.; Steckler, M. S.; Seeber, L.; Agostinetti, N. P.; Kogan, M. G.

    2010-12-01

    We have installed a suite of 18 GPS receiver across the Bengal Basin, covering the country of Bangladesh, near the junction of the Indian Shield, the Himayalan collision belt and the Burma Arc subduction zone. The crust of the Indian Shield thins eastward across the hinge zone of an Early Cretaceous continental margin. The thin continental and/or oceanic crust of the eastern Bengal Basin beyond the hinge zone is overlain by a thick sedimentary sequence of 16 km or more. This heavily-sedimented basin is being overridden from the north by the Shillong Massif, a 2-km high plateau exposing Indian Shield, and from the east by the accretionary prism of the Burma Arc subduction system. The soft collision of the Burma Arc with the Bengal Basin and Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta (GBD) has built a large accretionary prism that widens northwards to 250-300 km. The prism reaches as much as half way across the deep Bengal Basin and the thrust front is blind and buried by the rapid sedimentation of the GBD. Our GPS data cover the frontal region of this unusual subaerial accretionary prism. The convergence across this belt is oblique and partitioned. Our GPS array in Bangladesh shows similar velocity gradients across the accretionary prism corresponding to both E-W shortening and N-S dextral shear. The rates are consistent with the data further east in India. How this motion is partitioned into elastic earthquake-cycle loading and permanent inelastic deformation is unclear. The north-dipping Dauki thrust fault is responsible for the uplifted Shillong Plateau overriding the low-lying and rapidly subsiding Surma Basin. This crustal scale convergent boundary could represent the beginning of a forward jump of the Himalayan front. The surface expression of this boundary is a regional south-verging anticline folding Quaternary sediment into its forelimb at the deformation front south of the Plateau. This suggests that the Dauki Fault, too, is blind and extends well south of the topographic

  11. Constraints on fault slip rates of the southern California plate boundary from GPS velocity and stress inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, T.W.; Hardebeck, J.L.; Anderson, G.

    2005-01-01

    We use Global Positioning System (GPS) velocities and stress orientations inferred from seismicity to invert for the distribution of slip on faults in the southern California plate-boundary region. Of particular interest is how long-term slip rates are partitioned between the Indio segment of the San Andreas fault (SAF), the San Jacinto fault (SJF) and the San Bernardino segment of the SAE We use two new sets of constraints to address this problem. The first is geodetic velocities from the Southern California Earthquake Center's (SCEC) Crustal Motion Map (version 3 by Shen et al.), which includes significantly more data than previous models. The second is a regional model of stress-field orientations at seismogenic depths, as determined from earthquake focal mechanisms. While GPS data have been used in similar studies before, this is the first application of stress-field observations to this problem. We construct a simplified model of the southern California fault system, and estimate the interseismic surface velocities using a backslip approach with purely elastic strain accumulation, following Meade et al. In addition, we model the stress orientations at seismogenic depths, assuming that crustal stress results from the loading of active faults. The geodetically derived stressing rates are found to be aligned with the stress orientations from seismicity. We therefore proceed to invert simultaneously GPS and stress observations for slip rates of the faults in our network. We find that the regional patterns of crustal deformation as imaged by both data sets can be explained by our model, and that joint inversions lead to better constrained slip rates. In our preferred model, the SJF accommodates ???15 mm yr-1 and the Indio segment of the SAF ???23 mm yr-1 of right-lateral motion, accompanied by a low slip rate on the San Bernardino segment of the SAF 'Anomalous' fault segments such as around the 1992 Mw = 7.3 Landers surface rupture can be detected. There, observed

  12. Predicting present-day rates of glacial isostatic adjustment using a smoothed GPS velocity field for the reconciliation of NAD83 reference frames in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craymer, M. R.; Henton, J. A.; Piraszewski, M.

    2008-12-01

    the continuous GPS data were combined with those from other agencies as part of the North American Reference Frame (NAREF) effort to improve the reliability of the results. This NAREF solution has then been combined with our CBN results to obtain a denser velocity sampling for fitting different types of surfaces in a first attempt to determine a continuous GPS velocity field for the entire country. Expressing this velocity field as a grid enables users to interpolate to any location in Canada, allowing for the propagation of coordinates to any desired reference epoch. We examine the accuracy and limitations of this GPS velocity field by comparing it to other published GPS velocity solutions (which are all based on less data) as well as to GIA models, including versions of ICE-3G, ICE-5G and the recent Stable North America Reference Frame (SNARF) model. Of course, the accuracy of the GPS velocity field depends directly on the density of the GPS coverage. Consequently, the GPS velocity field is unable to fully represent the actual GIA motion in the far north and tends to smooth out the signal due to the spatially sparse coverage. On the other hand, the model performs quite well in the southern parts of the country where there is a much greater spatial density of GPS measurements.

  13. The interseismic velocity field of the central Apennines from a dense GPS network

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    Alessandro Galvani

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Since 1999, we have repeatedly surveyed the central Apennines through a dense survey-style geodetic network, the Central Apennines Geodetic Network (CAGeoNet. CAGeoNet consists of 123 benchmarks distributed over an area of ca. 180 km × 130 km, from the Tyrrhenian coast to the Adriatic coast, with an average inter-site distance of 3 km to 5 km. The network is positioned across the main seismogenic structures of the region that are capable of generating destructive earthquakes. Here, we show the horizontal GPS velocity field of both CAGeoNet and continuous GPS stations in this region, as estimated from the position–time series in the time span from 1999 to 2007. We analyzed the data using both the Bernese and GAMIT software, rigorously combining the two solutions to obtain a validated result. Then, we analyzed the strain-rate field, which shows a region of extension along the axis of the Apennine chain, with values from 2 × 10–9 yr–1 to 66·× 10–9 yr–1, and a relative minimum of ca. 20 × 10–9 yr–1 located in the L'Aquila basin area. Our velocity field represents an improved estimation of the ongoing elastic interseismic deformation of the central Apennines, and in particular relating to the area of the L'Aquila earthquake of April 6, 2009.

  14. Validity and reliability of intra-stroke kayak velocity and acceleration using a GPS-based accelerometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Ina; Sachlikidis, Alexi

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the validity and reliability of the velocity and acceleration measured by a kayak-mounted GPS-based accelerometer units compared to the video-derived measurements and the effect of satellite configuration on velocity. Four GPS-based accelerometers units of varied accelerometer ranges (2 g or 6 g) were mounted on a kayak as the paddler performed 12 trials at three different stroke rates for each of three different testing sessions (two in the morning vs. one in the afternoon). The velocity and acceleration derived by the accelerometers was compared with the velocity and acceleration derived from high-speed video footage (100Hz). Validity was measured using Bland and Altman plots, R2, and the root of the mean of the squared difference (RMSe), while reliability was calculated using the coefficient of variation, R2, and repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) tests. The GPS-based accelerometers under-reported kayak velocity by 0.14-0.19 m/s and acceleration by 1.67 m/s2 when compared to the video-derived measurements. The afternoon session reported the least difference, indicating a time of day effect on the velocity measured. This study highlights the need for sports utilising GPS-based accelerometers, such as minimaxX, for intra-stroke measurements to conduct sport-specific validity and reliability studies to ensure the accuracy of their data.

  15. Atmospheric anomalies over Mt.Etna using GPS signal delays and tomography of radio wave velocities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Puglisi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the prominent topography of Mt. Etna, the use of satellite geodetic techniques may significantly suffer from atmospheric heterogeneities. This problem mainly affects the DInSAR technique. To overcome these drawbacks the present study attempts to make headway in measuring and interpreting atmospheric anomalies. We used the GAMIT software to obtain the ZTD (Zenith Total Delay values for the GPS sessions performed on 1996-97, during ERS-2 passes at Mt. Etna. GAMIT software also allows to characterize the statistical behaviour of the tropospheric effects, by using residuals for each station-satellite pair, and to locate the atmospheric anomalies, present mostly at low altitudes. The attempt at using these results to produce a tomography of radio waves velocity of the troposphere suggests that the number of GPS stations used to investigate atmosphere is a critical point in such a study. The three stations are too few to invert anomalies eventually existing in the lower atmosphere. This result is a good starting point for better direct future study to verify the applicability of this tomographic technique to a geodetic network with a higher number of stations, with the aim of characterizing the lower atmosphere of Mt. Etna for a more accurate monitoring of ground deformations.

  16. Accuracy of a 10 Hz GPS Unit in Measuring Shuttle Velocity Performed at Different Speeds and Distances (5 - 20 M).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beato, Marco; Bartolini, Davide; Ghia, Gianluigi; Zamparo, Paola

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to validate the accuracy of a 10 Hz GPS device (STATSports, Ireland) by comparing the instantaneous values of velocity determined with this device with those determined by kinematic (video) analysis (25 Hz). Ten male soccer players were required to perform shuttle runs (with 180° change of direction) at three velocities (slow: 2.2 m·s(-1); moderate: 3.2 m·s(-1); high: maximal) over four distances: 5, 10, 15 and 20 m. The experiments were video-recorded; the "point by point" values of speed recorded by the GPS device were manually downloaded and analysed in the same way as the "frame by frame" values of horizontal speed as obtained by video analysis. The obtained results indicated that shuttle distance was smaller in GPS than video analysis (p GPS than in video analysis (p GPS data underestimated criterion distance (0.31 ± 0.55 m). In conclusion, the inaccuracy of this GPS unit in determining shuttle speed can be attributed to inaccuracy in determining the shuttle distance.

  17. A Comprehensive Study of Gridding Methods for GPS Horizontal Velocity Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanqiang; Jiang, Zaisen; Liu, Xiaoxia; Wei, Wenxin; Zhu, Shuang; Zhang, Long; Zou, Zhenyu; Xiong, Xiaohui; Wang, Qixin; Du, Jiliang

    2016-12-01

    Four gridding methods for GPS velocities are compared in terms of their precision, applicability and robustness by analyzing simulated data with uncertainties from 0.0 to ±3.0 mm/a. When the input data are 1° × 1° grid sampled and the uncertainty of the additional error is greater than ±1.0 mm/a, the gridding results show that the least-squares collocation method is highly robust while the robustness of the Kriging method is low. In contrast, the spherical harmonics and the multi-surface function are moderately robust, and the regional singular values for the multi-surface function method and the edge effects for the spherical harmonics method become more significant with increasing uncertainty of the input data. When the input data (with additional errors of ±2.0 mm/a) are decimated by 50% from the 1° × 1° grid data and then erased in three 6° × 12° regions, the gridding results in these three regions indicate that the least-squares collocation and the spherical harmonics methods have good performances, while the multi-surface function and the Kriging methods may lead to singular values. The gridding techniques are also applied to GPS horizontal velocities with an average error of ±0.8 mm/a over the Chinese mainland and the surrounding areas, and the results show that the least-squares collocation method has the best performance, followed by the Kriging and multi-surface function methods. Furthermore, the edge effects of the spherical harmonics method are significantly affected by the sparseness and geometric distribution of the input data. In general, the least-squares collocation method is superior in terms of its robustness, edge effect, error distribution and stability, while the other methods have several positive features.

  18. A Comprehensive Study of Gridding Methods for GPS Horizontal Velocity Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanqiang; Jiang, Zaisen; Liu, Xiaoxia; Wei, Wenxin; Zhu, Shuang; Zhang, Long; Zou, Zhenyu; Xiong, Xiaohui; Wang, Qixin; Du, Jiliang

    2017-03-01

    Four gridding methods for GPS velocities are compared in terms of their precision, applicability and robustness by analyzing simulated data with uncertainties from 0.0 to ±3.0 mm/a. When the input data are 1° × 1° grid sampled and the uncertainty of the additional error is greater than ±1.0 mm/a, the gridding results show that the least-squares collocation method is highly robust while the robustness of the Kriging method is low. In contrast, the spherical harmonics and the multi-surface function are moderately robust, and the regional singular values for the multi-surface function method and the edge effects for the spherical harmonics method become more significant with increasing uncertainty of the input data. When the input data (with additional errors of ±2.0 mm/a) are decimated by 50% from the 1° × 1° grid data and then erased in three 6° × 12° regions, the gridding results in these three regions indicate that the least-squares collocation and the spherical harmonics methods have good performances, while the multi-surface function and the Kriging methods may lead to singular values. The gridding techniques are also applied to GPS horizontal velocities with an average error of ±0.8 mm/a over the Chinese mainland and the surrounding areas, and the results show that the least-squares collocation method has the best performance, followed by the Kriging and multi-surface function methods. Furthermore, the edge effects of the spherical harmonics method are significantly affected by the sparseness and geometric distribution of the input data. In general, the least-squares collocation method is superior in terms of its robustness, edge effect, error distribution and stability, while the other methods have several positive features.

  19. GPS Velocities and Structure Across the Burma Accretionary Prism and Shillong Anticline in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steckler, M. S.; Akhter, S. H.; Seeber, L.; Bilham, R. G.; Kogan, M. G.; Masson, F.; Maurin, T.; Mondal, D.; Piana Agostinetti, N.; Rangin, C.; Saha, P.

    2012-12-01

    We installed a suite of 25 GPS receivers between 2003 and 2012 covering the deltaic country of Bangladesh, which lies near the junction of the Indian Shield, the Himayalan collision belt and the Indo-Burman Wedge. The crust of the Indian Shield thins southeastward in the Bengal Basin across the hinge zone of an Early Cretaceous continental margin. The thin continental and/or oceanic crust of the Bengal Basin beyond the hinge zone is overlain by the southward prograding Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta (GBD) creating a total sediment thickness of ≥16 km. This heavily-sedimented basin is being overthrust from the north by the Shillong Massif, a 2-km high basement-cored anticlinorium exposing Indian Shield, and from the east by the accretionary prism of the Indo-Burma Wedge. The soft, oblique collision of Burma with the Bengal Basin and Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta (GBD) has built a large accretionary prism that widens northwards to 250-300 km. The prism reaches as much as half way across the deep Bengal Basin. The outer folds and the thrust front are blind and buried by the rapid sedimentation of the GBD. The GPS data in Bangladesh cover the frontal region of this unusual subaerial accretionary prism, while observations from India and Myanmar provide velocities for more internal parts of the system. The convergence across this belt is oblique and partitioned. The velocity gradients across the accretionary prism indicate E-W shortening at ~13 mm/y and N-S dextral shear at ~25 mm/y. The shortening appears to be more concentrated farther west, towards the thrust front, while the shear is more distributed and does not extend to the frontal folds. How this motion is further partitioned into elastic earthquake-cycle loading and permanent inelastic deformation remains unclear. The north-dipping Dauki thrust fault raises the Shillong Massif lowers the rapidly subsiding Surma Basin foredeep. This crustal scale convergent boundary could represent the beginning of a forward jump of the

  20. Slicing up the San Francisco Bay Area: Block kinematics and fault slip rates from GPS-derived surface velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessio, M. A.; Johanson, I. A.; Bürgmann, R.; Schmidt, D. A.; Murray, M. H.

    2005-06-01

    Observations of surface deformation allow us to determine the kinematics of faults in the San Francisco Bay Area. We present the Bay Area velocity unification (B?V?, "bay view"), a compilation of over 200 horizontal surface velocities computed from campaign-style and continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) observations from 1993 to 2003. We interpret this interseismic velocity field using a three-dimensional block model to determine the relative contributions of block motion, elastic strain accumulation, and shallow aseismic creep. The total relative motion between the Pacific plate and the rigid Sierra Nevada/Great Valley (SNGV) microplate is 37.9 ± 0.6 mm yr-1 directed toward N30.4°W ± 0.8° at San Francisco (±2σ). Fault slip rates from our preferred model are typically within the error bounds of geologic estimates but provide a better fit to geodetic data (notable right-lateral slip rates in mm yr-1: San Gregorio fault, 2.4 ± 1.0; West Napa fault, 4.0 ± 3.0; zone of faulting along the eastern margin of the Coast Range, 5.4 ± 1.0; and Mount Diablo thrust, 3.9 ± 1.0 of reverse slip and 4.0 ± 0.2 of right-lateral strike slip). Slip on the northern Calaveras is partitioned between both the West Napa and Concord/Green Valley fault systems. The total convergence across the Bay Area is negligible. Poles of rotation for Bay Area blocks progress systematically from the North America-Pacific to North America-SNGV poles. The resulting present-day relative motion cannot explain the strike of most Bay Area faults, but fault strike does loosely correlate with inferred plate motions at the time each fault initiated.

  1. A New Velocity Field from a Dense GPS Array in the Southernmost Longitudinal Valley, Southeastern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horng-Yue Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the southernmost Longitudinal Valley (LV, Taiwan, we analyzed a dense GPS array composed of 10 continuous stations and 86 campaign-mode stations. By removing the effects of the four major earthquakes (one regional and three local occurred during the 1992 - 2010 observation period, we derived a new horizontal velocity field in this area, which then allows better locating the surface traces of the major active faults, including the Longitudinal Valley Fault (LVF system and the Central Range Fault, and characterizing the slip behaviors along the faults. Note that LVF reveals two sub-parallel strands in the study area: the Luyeh Fault to the west and the Lichi Fault to the east. Based on the results of strain analyses, including dilatation and shear strain, and projected vectors of station velocities across the major faults, we came to the following geological interpretations. During the inter-seismic periods, the surface deformation of the southernmost LV is mainly accommodated by the faulting on the two branches of the LVF; there is very little surface deformation on the Central Range Fault. The Luyeh River appears to act as a boundary to divide the LVF to behave differently to its northern and southern sides. The Lichi Fault reveals a change of slip kinematics from an oblique shearing/thrusting in the north to a nearly pure shearing with minor extension to the south. Regarding the slip behavior of the Luyeh Fault, it exhibits a creeping behavior in the north and a partially near-surface-locked faulting behavior in the south. We interpret that the two strands of the LVF merge together in the northern Taitung alluvial plain and turns to E-W trend toward the offshore area.

  2. Accuracy Assessment of Digital Elevation Models Using GPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, Ashraf; Talaat, Ashraf; Farrag, Farrag A.

    2008-01-01

    A Digital Elevation Model (DEM) is a digital representation of ground surface topography or terrain with different accuracies for different application fields. DEM have been applied to a wide range of civil engineering and military planning tasks. DEM is obtained using a number of techniques such as photogrammetry, digitizing, laser scanning, radar interferometry, classical survey and GPS techniques. This paper presents an assessment study of DEM using GPS (Stop&Go) and kinematic techniques comparing with classical survey. The results show that a DEM generated from (Stop&Go) GPS technique has the highest accuracy with a RMS error of 9.70 cm. The RMS error of DEM derived by kinematic GPS is 12.00 cm.

  3. Impacts of Stochastic Modeling on GPS-derived ZTD Estimations

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Shuanggen

    2010-01-01

    GPS-derived ZTD (Zenith Tropospheric Delay) plays a key role in near real-time weather forecasting, especially in improving the precision of Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models. The ZTD is usually estimated using the first-order Gauss-Markov process with a fairly large correlation, and under the assumption that all the GPS measurements, carrier phases or pseudo-ranges, have the same accuracy. However, these assumptions are unrealistic. This paper aims to investigate the impact of several stochastic modeling methods on GPS-derived ZTD estimations using Australian IGS data. The results show that the accuracy of GPS-derived ZTD can be improved using a suitable stochastic model for the GPS measurements. The stochastic model using satellite elevation angle-based cosine function is better than other investigated stochastic models. It is noted that, when different stochastic modeling strategies are used, the variations in estimated ZTD can reach as much as 1cm. This improvement of ZTD estimation is certainly c...

  4. Improved Solar-Radiation-Pressure Models for GPS Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Sever, Yoaz; Kuang, Da

    2006-01-01

    A report describes a series of computational models conceived as an improvement over prior models for determining effects of solar-radiation pressure on orbits of Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites. These models are based on fitting coefficients of Fourier functions of Sun-spacecraft- Earth angles to observed spacecraft orbital motions.

  5. Method of Multi-dimensional Gross Errors Snooping of GPS Velocity Estimation in Airborne Gravimetry

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    ZHENG Kai

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Precision velocity plays an important role in airborne gravimetry. Since the aircraft in a state of stable flight, we could establish a strict state equation with constant acceleration model for it, then obtained predicted velocity which was used for constructing a priori residual Q to detect the gross errors. Theoretical research showed that Q was influenced by the accuracy of predicted velocity and the measurement errors. According to the statistical features of Q combined with IGG Ⅲ principle, we could lower the contribution of the observation that contained the gross errors. Static testing was used for analyzing the characteristic of measurement errors as well as the accuracy of predicted velocity under the simulated ideal flight environment where the acceleration was approximate to a constant, the results also showed the relationship between the sampling rate and the ability of detecting gross errors. Both the static and kinematic tests demonstrate that new method can well detect the gross error smaller than 1 cycle.

  6. New GPS-Aided SINU System Modeling using an Autoregressive Model

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    Chot Hun Lim

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Stochastic error in the Micro-Electro-Mechanical-System (MEMS Strapdown Inertial Navigation Unit (SINU is the primary issue causing sensors to be unable to operate as a standalone device. Conventional implementation of MEMS SINU fuses measurement with a global positioning system (GPS through a Kalman filter in order to achieve long-term accuracy. Such integration is known as a GPS-aided SINU system, and its estimation accuracy relies on how precise the stochastic error prediction is in Kalman filtering operation. In this paper, a comprehensive study on stochastic error modeling and analysis through a Gauss-Markov (GM model and autoregressive (AR model are presented. A wavelet denoising technique is introduced prior to error modeling to remove the MEMS SINU's high frequency noise. Without a wavelet denoising technique, neither the GM model nor AR model can be utilized to represent the stochastic error of SINU. Next, details of the Kalman filter implementation to accommodate the AR model are presented. The modeling outcomes are implemented on an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV for on-board motion sensing. The experimental results show that AR model implementation, compared to a conventional GM model, significantly reduced the estimated errors while preserving the position, velocity and orientation measurements.

  7. Measurements of ionospheric TEC in the direction of GPS satellites and comparison with three ionospheric models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Zuccheretti

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available The IEN Galileo Ferraris uses GPS for time and frequency synchronization. To obtain high performance it is important to reduce the error due to the ionospheric time-delay in GPS measurements. Evaluations of TEC in the direction of GPS satellites, obtained from three different ionospheric models, have been compared with corresponding measurements by GPS signal.

  8. Ionospheric modelling using GPS to calibrate the MWA. 1: Comparison of first order ionospheric effects between GPS models and MWA observations

    CERN Document Server

    Arora, B S; Ord, S M; Tingay, S J; Hurley-Walker, N; Bell, M; Bernardi, G; Bhat, R; Briggs, F; Callingham, J R; Deshpande, A A; Dwarakanath, K S; Ewall-Wice, A; Feng, L; For, B -Q; Hancock, P; Hazelton, B J; Hindson, L; Jacobs, D; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Kapińska, A D; Kudryavtseva, N; Lenc, E; McKinley, B; Mitchell, D; Oberoi, D; Offringa, A R; Pindor, B; Procopio, P; Riding, J; Staveley-Smith, L; Wayth, R B; Wu, C; Zheng, Q; Bowman, J D; Cappallo, R J; Corey, B E; Emrich, D; Goeke, R; Greenhill, L J; Kaplan, D L; Kasper, J C; Kratzenberg, E; Lonsdale, C J; Lynch, M J; McWhirter, S R; Morales, M F; Morgan, E; Prabu, T; Rogers, A E E; Roshi, A; Shankar, N Udaya; Srivani, K S; Subrahmanyan, R; Waterson, M; Webster, R L; Whitney, A R; Williams, A; Williams, C L

    2015-01-01

    We compare first order (refractive) ionospheric effects seen by the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) with the ionosphere as inferred from Global Positioning System (GPS) data. The first order ionosphere manifests itself as a bulk position shift of the observed sources across an MWA field of view. These effects can be computed from global ionosphere maps provided by GPS analysis centres, namely the Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE), using data from globally distributed GPS receivers. However, for the more accurate local ionosphere estimates required for precision radio astronomy applications, data from local GPS networks needs to be incorporated into ionospheric modelling. For GPS observations, the ionospheric parameters are biased by GPS receiver instrument delays, among other effects, also known as receiver Differential Code Biases (DCBs). The receiver DCBs need to be estimated for any non-CODE GPS station used for ionosphere modelling, a requirement for establishing dense GPS networks in arbitr...

  9. Higher‐order ionospheric effects on the GPS reference frame and velocities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrie, E.J.; King, M.A.; Moore, P.; Lavallée, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    We describe how GPS time series are influenced by higher‐order ionospheric effects over the last solar cycle (1995–2008) and examine implications for geophysical studies. Using 14 years of globally reprocessed solutions, we demonstrate the effect on the reference frame. Including second‐ and

  10. Investigating the Effects of Non-Gravitational Force Modelling on GPS Satellite Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, E. J.; King, R. W.; Herring, T.; Ziebart, M. K.

    2011-12-01

    Non-gravitational forces such as solar radiation pressure, earth radiation pressure, antenna thrust and thermal re-radiation are relatively small contributors to the overall GPS satellite orbital force budget. However, if neglected, these small non-gravitationally induced accelerations produce significant errors in satellite positions and velocities when integrated over time. For applications where centimetre level orbital accuracy is required (i.e. ppb accuracy ground positioning), these forces must be accounted for either through realistic a priori physical models and/or appropriate parameter estimation. Current GPS processing approaches typically use an approximate solar radiation pressure force, together with estimated parameters that are meant to account for non-modeled forces. These parameters often fall into the categories of scaling and sinusoidal once-per-revolution parameters. Here we investigate the effects of using more detailed physically based models of radiation forces and interaction between these models and the parameterisation of the non-modeled forces. Ideally, with a complete physical model, additional parameters are not required. Reduction of the number of empirical parameters estimated can result in large effects on the stability of the terrestrial reference frame determined with GPS. These analyses are done using an adapted version of the GAMIT processing software which includes a Fourier series model for radiation forces developed at University College London.

  11. Conical-Domain Model for Estimating GPS Ionospheric Delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Lawrence; Komjathy, Attila; Mannucci, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    The conical-domain model is a computational model, now undergoing development, for estimating ionospheric delays of Global Positioning System (GPS) signals. Relative to the standard ionospheric delay model described below, the conical-domain model offers improved accuracy. In the absence of selective availability, the ionosphere is the largest source of error for single-frequency users of GPS. Because ionospheric signal delays contribute to errors in GPS position and time measurements, satellite-based augmentation systems (SBASs) have been designed to estimate these delays and broadcast corrections. Several national and international SBASs are currently in various stages of development to enhance the integrity and accuracy of GPS measurements for airline navigation. In the Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) of the United States, slant ionospheric delay errors and confidence bounds are derived from estimates of vertical ionospheric delay modeled on a grid at regularly spaced intervals of latitude and longitude. The estimate of vertical delay at each ionospheric grid point (IGP) is calculated from a planar fit of neighboring slant delay measurements, projected to vertical using a standard, thin-shell model of the ionosphere. Interpolation on the WAAS grid enables estimation of the vertical delay at the ionospheric pierce point (IPP) corresponding to any arbitrary measurement of a user. (The IPP of a given user s measurement is the point where the GPS signal ray path intersects a reference ionospheric height.) The product of the interpolated value and the user s thin-shell obliquity factor provides an estimate of the user s ionospheric slant delay. Two types of error that restrict the accuracy of the thin-shell model are absent in the conical domain model: (1) error due to the implicit assumption that the electron density is independent of the azimuthal angle at the IPP and (2) error arising from the slant-to-vertical conversion. At low latitudes or at mid

  12. Subdaily Earth Rotation Models Estimated From GPS and VLBI Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steigenberger, P.; Tesmer, V.; MacMillan, D.; Thaller, D.; Rothacher, M.; Fritsche, M.; Rülke, A.; Dietrich, R.

    2007-12-01

    Subdaily changes in Earth rotation at diurnal and semi-diurnal periods are mainly caused by ocean tides. Smaller effects are attributed to the interaction of the atmosphere with the solid Earth. As the tidal periods are well known, models for the ocean tidal contribution to high-frequency Earth rotation variations can be estimated from space- geodetic observations. The subdaily ERP model recommended by the latest IERS conventions was derived from an ocean tide model based on satellite altimetry. Another possibility is the determination of subdaily ERP models from GPS- and/or VLBI-derived Earth rotation parameter series with subdaily resolution. Homogeneously reprocessed long-time series of subdaily ERPs computed by GFZ/TU Dresden (12 years of GPS data), DGFI and GSFC (both with 24 years of VLBI data) provide the basis for the estimation of single-technique and combined subdaily ERP models. The impact of different processing options (e.g., weighting) and different temporal resolutions (1 hour vs. 2 hours) will be evaluated by comparisons of the different models amongst each other and with the IERS model. The analysis of the GPS and VLBI residual signals after subtracting the estimated ocean tidal contribution may help to answer the question whether the remaining signals are technique-specific artifacts and systematic errors or true geophysical signals detected by both techniques.

  13. New empirically-derived solar radiation pressure model for GPS satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Sever, Y.; Kuang, D.

    2003-01-01

    Solar radiation pressure force is the second largest perturbation acting on GPS satellites, after the gravitational attraction from the Earth, Sun, and Moon. It is the largest error source in the modeling of GPS orbital dynamics.

  14. Ionospheric Modelling using GPS to Calibrate the MWA. II: Regional ionospheric modelling using GPS and GLONASS to estimate ionospheric gradients

    CERN Document Server

    Arora, B S; Ord, S M; Tingay, S J; Bell, M; Callingham, J R; Dwarakanath, K S; For, B -Q; Hancock, P; Hindson, L; Hurley-Walker, N; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Kapinska, A D; Lenc, E; McKinley, B; Offringa, A R; Procopio, P; Staveley-Smith, L; Wayth, R B; Wu, C; Zheng, Q

    2016-01-01

    We estimate spatial gradients in the ionosphere using the Global Positioning System (GPS) and GLONASS (Russian global navigation system) observations, utilising data from multiple GPS stations in the vicinity of Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO). In previous work the ionosphere was characterised using a single-station to model the ionosphere as a single layer of fixed height and this was compared with ionospheric data derived from radio astronomy observations obtained from the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA). Having made improvements to our data quality (via cycle slip detection and repair) and incorporating data from the GLONASS system, we now present a multi-station approach. These two developments significantly improve our modelling of the ionosphere. We also explore the effects of a variable-height model. We conclude that modelling the small-scale features in the ionosphere that have been observed with the MWA will require a much denser network of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) statio...

  15. Reparameterization of Single Difference and Undifferenced Kinematic GPS Positioning Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xianglin; C D Jong; C C J M Tiberius

    2003-01-01

    A series of advantages of single difference (SD)and undifferenced (ZD) models are given as compared wity the double difference ezist in SD and ZD models.The reparameterization method is provided to resolve this rank defect problem by estimating some combinations of the unknowns rather than the unknowns themselves. The repatameterization of SD and ZD functional models is discussed in detail with their stochastic models. The theoretical comformation of the equivalence of undifferenced and differenced models is described in a straightforward way .The relationship between SD and ZD residuals is given and verified for some special purposes,e.g.research on the stochastical properties of GPS observations.

  16. Developing a curricular module for introductory geophysics or structural geology courses to quantify crustal strain using EarthScope PBO GPS velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, V. S.; Resor, P. G.; Hammond, W. C.; Kreemer, C. W.; Olds, S. E.; Pratt-Sitaula, B.; West, N. W.

    2012-12-01

    A group from several UNAVCO-member institutions that are engaged in EarthScope research is developing resources that introduce geoscience majors to one important use of GPS geodesy: measuring the current infinitesimal strain rate of the crust. These resources will be tested during the 2012-13 academic year, and will be accessible from the Science Education Resource Center (SERC), UNAVCO and EarthScope websites. Location and velocity data (and their associated uncertainties) from the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) website are used to solve a perfectly constrained problem involving the infinitesimal strain of a triangle defined by three PBO GPS sites. Simple physical models made of inexpensive materials are used to build student intuition about homogeneous strain of a continuum. Introductory exercises with vector-field maps are used to help students understand reference frames and visualize how GPS velocity vectors can indicate crustal strain. The meanings of "extension" and "stretch" are developed through illustrations showing the simultaneous deformation of a triangle with a circle inscribed within it. A strain primer, intended to supplement textbook material, is provided for students to develop needed background. Supplemental material about vectors, vector dot products, matrix mathematics, determinants, and computation of the eigensystem of a symmetric square matrix help support students who have gaps in their mathematical background. Students compute site velocities and uncertainties from PBO data, insert data into one of three strain calculators (open-source code in MatLab, Mathematica, and an Excel spreadsheet), and learn to interpret the output. A complete algorithm and worked example are also provided so that capable students can develop their own code to solve the problem. Strain calculator output includes the mean translation velocity vector, the rotational velocity, the relative magnitudes and directions of the horizontal infinitesimal strain

  17. Comparison of the precision of three commonly used GPS models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Chavoshi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Development of science in various fields has caused change in the methods to determine geographical location. Precision farming involves new technology that provides the opportunity for farmers to change in factors such as nutrients, soil moisture available to plants, soil physical and chemical characteristics and other factors with the spatial resolution of less than a centimeter to several meters to monitor and evaluate. GPS receivers based on precision farming operations specified accuracies are used in the following areas: 1 monitoring of crop and soil sampling (less than one meter accuracy 2 use of fertilizer, pesticide and seed work (less than half a meter accuracy 3 Transplantation and row cultivation (precision of less than 4 cm (Perez et al., 2011. In one application of GPS in agriculture, route guidance precision farming tractors in the fields was designed to reduce the transmission error that deviate from the path specified in the range of 50 to 300 mm driver informed and improved way to display (Perez et al., 2011. In another study, the system automatically guidance, based on RTK-GPS technology, precision tillage operations was used between and within the rows very close to the drip irrigation pipe and without damage to their crops at a distance of 50 mm (Abidine et al., 2004. In another study, to compare the accuracy and precision of the receivers, 5 different models of Trimble Mark GPS devices from 15 stations were mapped, the results indicated that minimum error was related to Geo XT model with an accuracy of 91 cm and maximum error was related to Pharos model with an accuracy of 5.62 m (Kindra et al., 2006. Due to the increasing use of GPS receivers in agriculture as well as the lack of trust on the real accuracy and precision of receivers, this study aimed to compare the positioning accuracy and precision of three commonly used GPS receivers models used to specify receivers with the lowest error for precision

  18. Comparison of the precision of three commonly used GPS models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Chavoshi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Development of science in various fields has caused change in the methods to determine geographical location. Precision farming involves new technology that provides the opportunity for farmers to change in factors such as nutrients, soil moisture available to plants, soil physical and chemical characteristics and other factors with the spatial resolution of less than a centimeter to several meters to monitor and evaluate. GPS receivers based on precision farming operations specified accuracies are used in the following areas: 1 monitoring of crop and soil sampling (less than one meter accuracy 2 use of fertilizer, pesticide and seed work (less than half a meter accuracy 3 Transplantation and row cultivation (precision of less than 4 cm (Perez et al., 2011. In one application of GPS in agriculture, route guidance precision farming tractors in the fields was designed to reduce the transmission error that deviate from the path specified in the range of 50 to 300 mm driver informed and improved way to display (Perez et al., 2011. In another study, the system automatically guidance, based on RTK-GPS technology, precision tillage operations was used between and within the rows very close to the drip irrigation pipe and without damage to their crops at a distance of 50 mm (Abidine et al., 2004. In another study, to compare the accuracy and precision of the receivers, 5 different models of Trimble Mark GPS devices from 15 stations were mapped, the results indicated that minimum error was related to Geo XT model with an accuracy of 91 cm and maximum error was related to Pharos model with an accuracy of 5.62 m (Kindra et al., 2006. Due to the increasing use of GPS receivers in agriculture as well as the lack of trust on the real accuracy and precision of receivers, this study aimed to compare the positioning accuracy and precision of three commonly used GPS receivers models used to specify receivers with the lowest error for precision

  19. Comparison of Site Velocities Derived from Collocated GPS, VLBI and SLR Techniques at The Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory (Comparison of Site Velocities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munghemezulu C.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Space geodetic techniques provide highly accurate methods for estimating bedrock stability at subcentimetre level. We utilize data derived from Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR, Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI and Global Positioning Systems (GPS techniques, collocated at the Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory, to characterise local plate motion and compare the solutions from the three techniques. Data from the GNSS station were processed using the GAMIT/GLOBK (version 10.4 software, data from the SLR station (MOBLAS-6were processed using the Satellite Laser Ranging Data Analysis Software (SDAS and the VLBI data sets were processed using the Vienna VLBI Software (VieVS software. Results show that there is a good agreement between horizontal and vertical velocity components with a maximum deviation of 1.7 mm/yr, 0.7 mm/yr and 1.3 mm/yr between the North, East and Up velocity components respectively for the different techniques. At HartRAO there is no significant trend in the vertical component and all the techniques used are consistent with the a-priori velocities when compared with each other. This information is crucial in monitoring the local motion variations since geodetic instruments require a very stable base to minimise measurement errors. These findings demonstrate that station coordinate time-series derived with different techniques and analysis strategies provide comparable results.

  20. Model of GPS IF Signal and Its Simulation%GPS IF信号的计算机模拟和实现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭际明; 汪伟; 巢佰崇

    2009-01-01

    A GPS IF signal computer simulation method is proposed in this article. The carrier Doppler frequency and the total propagation and delay time can be modeled or calculated with the input GPS satellite ephemeris file. The simulated GPS IF signal outputs to a text file for post-processing and analysis. The simulation signal spectrum is compared with the received real GPS IF signal spectrum, and the correctness of the simulation result is verified.

  1. A METHOD OF SUPERIMPOSED TRIANGULATIONS FOR CALCULATION OF VELOCITY GRADIENT OF HORIZONTAL MOVEMENTS: APPLICATION TO THE CENTRAL ASIAN GPS NETWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Zubovich

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A new method is proposed to define piecewise continuous fields of velocity gradients of recent horizontal movements of the Earth’s crust from spatially discrete data on horizontal velocities of such movements. The method is designed to identify spatial inhomogeneities in the field of horizontal strain rates (e.g., zones of localized deformation and boundaries between areas with different strain rates in considerable detail. It is applied to determine the field of horizontal velocity gradient in the region of the Central Asian GPS network which covers vast territories of the Kyrgyz Tien-Shan and Pamirs mountain ranges, the T arim depression, and the Kazakh Shield (Fig. 1. Calculations are based on GPS survey data obtained at 308 sites from 1995 to 2006 (Fig. 4. The resolution of the proposed method is increased by using a triangulation grid which is much denser than a conventional one (Fig. 2 and 3. As a result, point x on the surface under study is covered by several triangles rather than one (Fig. 5. Strain characteristics at point x are calculated by weighted summation of corresponding characteristics in the cover triangles. Thus, for each point we estimate spin tensor W, which defines angular velocity ω, and components of horizontal strain rate tensor E. These components provide for direct calculation of orientation of principal axes and invariants of E, i.e. maximum stretching E1, maximum shortening E2, velocity divergence E=E1+E2, and maximum shear rates Γ=⎪E1−E2⎪/2 (Fig. 6 to 11. The calculated values are presented in maps which demonstrate that spatial distribution of such values is highly inhomogeneous. Regions with increased values of kinematic characteristics mentioned above stand out sharply against the background. At the same time, spatial distribution of the kinematical characteristics in the Tien Shan region is quite regular: zones of increased absolute values of E2 are mainly oriented in the ENE direction, while the NNW

  2. 3-D GPS velocity field and its implications on the present-day post-orogenic deformation of the Western Alps and Pyrenees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninh Nguyen, Hai; Vernant, Philippe; Mazzotti, Stephane; Khazaradze, Giorgi; Asensio, Eva

    2016-09-01

    We present a new 3-D GPS velocity solution for 182 sites for the region encompassing the Western Alps, Pyrenees, and southern France. The velocity field is based on a Precise Point Positioning (PPP) solution, to which we apply a common-mode filter, defined by the 26 longest time series, in order to correct for network-wide biases (reference frame, unmodeled large-scale processes, etc.). We show that processing parameters, such as troposphere delay modeling, can lead to systematic velocity variations of 0.1-0.5 mm yr-1 affecting both accuracy and precision, especially for short (< 5 years) time series. A velocity convergence analysis shows that minimum time-series lengths of ˜ 3 and ˜ 5.5 years are required to reach a velocity stability of 0.5 mm yr-1 in the horizontal and vertical components, respectively. On average, horizontal residual velocities show a stability of ˜ 0.2 mm yr-1 in the Western Alps, Pyrenees, and southern France. The only significant horizontal strain rate signal is in the western Pyrenees with up to 4 × 10-9 yr-1 NNE-SSW extension, whereas no significant strain rates are detected in the Western Alps (< 1 × 10-9 yr-1). In contrast, we identify significant uplift rates up to 2 mm yr-1 in the Western Alps but not in the Pyrenees (0.1 ± 0.2 mm yr-1). A correlation between site elevations and fast uplift rates in the northern part of the Western Alps, in the region of the Würmian ice cap, suggests that part of this uplift is induced by postglacial rebound. The very slow uplift rates in the southern Western Alps and in the Pyrenees could be accounted for by erosion-induced rebound.

  3. Performance Analysis of Several GPS/Galileo Precise Point Positioning Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Afifi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the performance of several precise point positioning (PPP models, which combine dual-frequency GPS/Galileo observations in the un-differenced and between-satellite single-difference (BSSD modes. These include the traditional un-differenced model, the decoupled clock model, the semi-decoupled clock model, and the between-satellite single-difference model. We take advantage of the IGS-MGEX network products to correct for the satellite differential code biases and the orbital and satellite clock errors. Natural Resources Canada’s GPSPace PPP software is modified to handle the various GPS/Galileo PPP models. A total of six data sets of GPS and Galileo observations at six IGS stations are processed to examine the performance of the various PPP models. It is shown that the traditional un-differenced GPS/Galileo PPP model, the GPS decoupled clock model, and the semi-decoupled clock GPS/Galileo PPP model improve the convergence time by about 25% in comparison with the un-differenced GPS-only model. In addition, the semi-decoupled GPS/Galileo PPP model improves the solution precision by about 25% compared to the traditional un-differenced GPS/Galileo PPP model. Moreover, the BSSD GPS/Galileo PPP model improves the solution convergence time by about 50%, in comparison with the un-differenced GPS PPP model, regardless of the type of BSSD combination used. As well, the BSSD model improves the precision of the estimated parameters by about 50% and 25% when the loose and the tight combinations are used, respectively, in comparison with the un-differenced GPS-only model. Comparable results are obtained through the tight combination when either a GPS or a Galileo satellite is selected as a reference.

  4. Performance Analysis of Several GPS/Galileo Precise Point Positioning Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, Akram; El-Rabbany, Ahmed

    2015-06-19

    This paper examines the performance of several precise point positioning (PPP) models, which combine dual-frequency GPS/Galileo observations in the un-differenced and between-satellite single-difference (BSSD) modes. These include the traditional un-differenced model, the decoupled clock model, the semi-decoupled clock model, and the between-satellite single-difference model. We take advantage of the IGS-MGEX network products to correct for the satellite differential code biases and the orbital and satellite clock errors. Natural Resources Canada's GPSPace PPP software is modified to handle the various GPS/Galileo PPP models. A total of six data sets of GPS and Galileo observations at six IGS stations are processed to examine the performance of the various PPP models. It is shown that the traditional un-differenced GPS/Galileo PPP model, the GPS decoupled clock model, and the semi-decoupled clock GPS/Galileo PPP model improve the convergence time by about 25% in comparison with the un-differenced GPS-only model. In addition, the semi-decoupled GPS/Galileo PPP model improves the solution precision by about 25% compared to the traditional un-differenced GPS/Galileo PPP model. Moreover, the BSSD GPS/Galileo PPP model improves the solution convergence time by about 50%, in comparison with the un-differenced GPS PPP model, regardless of the type of BSSD combination used. As well, the BSSD model improves the precision of the estimated parameters by about 50% and 25% when the loose and the tight combinations are used, respectively, in comparison with the un-differenced GPS-only model. Comparable results are obtained through the tight combination when either a GPS or a Galileo satellite is selected as a reference.

  5. Machine Cognition Models: EPAM and GPS

    CERN Document Server

    Elouafiq, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Through history, the human being tried to relay its daily tasks to other creatures, which was the main reason behind the rise of civilizations. It started with deploying animals to automate tasks in the field of agriculture(bulls), transportation (e.g. horses and donkeys), and even communication (pigeons). Millenniums after, come the Golden age with "Al-jazari" and other Muslim inventors, which were the pioneers of automation, this has given birth to industrial revolution in Europe, centuries after. At the end of the nineteenth century, a new era was to begin, the computational era, the most advanced technological and scientific development that is driving the mankind and the reason behind all the evolutions of science; such as medicine, communication, education, and physics. At this edge of technology engineers and scientists are trying to model a machine that behaves the same as they do, which pushed us to think about designing and implementing "Things that-Thinks", then artificial intelligence was. In this...

  6. Accuracy of a 10 Hz GPS Unit in Measuring Shuttle Velocity Performed at Different Speeds and Distances (5 – 20 M)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolini, Davide; Ghia, Gianluigi; Zamparo, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to validate the accuracy of a 10 Hz GPS device (STATSports, Ireland) by comparing the instantaneous values of velocity determined with this device with those determined by kinematic (video) analysis (25 Hz). Ten male soccer players were required to perform shuttle runs (with 180° change of direction) at three velocities (slow: 2.2 m·s-1; moderate: 3.2 m·s-1; high: maximal) over four distances: 5, 10, 15 and 20 m. The experiments were video-recorded; the “point by point” values of speed recorded by the GPS device were manually downloaded and analysed in the same way as the “frame by frame” values of horizontal speed as obtained by video analysis. The obtained results indicated that shuttle distance was smaller in GPS than video analysis (p GPS than in video analysis (p speed were averaged; from these data and from data of shuttle time, the distance covered was recalculated; the error (criterion distance-recalculated distance) was negligible for video data (0.04 ± 0.28 m) whereas GPS data underestimated criterion distance (0.31 ± 0.55 m). In conclusion, the inaccuracy of this GPS unit in determining shuttle speed can be attributed to inaccuracy in determining the shuttle distance. PMID:28031753

  7. Strain Distribution in Central Europe: FEM Modeling and Comparison with GPS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araszkiewicz, A.; Bogusz, J.; Jarosinski, M.; Lenik, K.

    2012-12-01

    The main aim of this research is to demonstrate how the results of permanent GPS measurements can be understand in terms of recent geodynamics by applying numerical modeling method. On the other hand, the results of modeling are testing the consistency of the GPS measurements. The method of finite element analysis was applied to develop two-dimensional model of strain and stress field in Central Europe. The FEM model was prepared in the ABAQUS software, consisting of graphic modules and ABAQUS/CAE and ABAQUS Standard modules for solving the static task. The structure of the model was created in the plane Cartesian coordinate system, assuming that for this size of model the earth curvature will not affect the stress and strain direction significantly. Simplified elastic model with frictional contact elements was used for defining mechanical properties of the model. The model consists of 48 parts representing major tectonic units/blocks characterized by different material properties. The stiffness of tectonic blocks expressed by Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio was determined based on the lithospheric thickness, surface heat flow and simplified lithological column of the lithosphere. For dislocations, different values of friction coefficient was tested in course of the trial-and-error modeling than the best fitted options were finally adopted in the model. The dynamic (force and pressure) boundary conditions were applied to the elastic model based on the recent tectonic stress directions from the World Stress Map Database. To allow fast changes of the loads the model boundary were designed normal to tectonic stresses. After each computing round the simulated stress and strain were compared with that measured, paying special attention to the GPS measurements from Poland and the adjacent areas. We have used coordinates and velocities from EPN (EUREF Permanent Network) densified by Polish national Ground-Based Augmentation System (GBAS) ASG-EUPOS. They were obtained

  8. Gravity field models derived from Swarm GPS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira da Encarnação, João; Arnold, Daniel; Bezděk, Aleš; Dahle, Christoph; Doornbos, Eelco; van den IJssel, Jose; Jäggi, Adrian; Mayer-Gürr, Torsten; Sebera, Josef; Visser, Pieter; Zehentner, Norbert

    2016-07-01

    It is of great interest to numerous geophysical studies that the time series of global gravity field models derived from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data remains uninterrupted after the end of this mission. With this in mind, some institutes have been spending efforts to estimate gravity field models from alternative sources of gravimetric data. This study focuses on the gravity field solutions estimated from Swarm global positioning system (GPS) data, produced by the Astronomical Institute of the University of Bern, the Astronomical Institute (ASU, Czech Academy of Sciences) and Institute of Geodesy (IfG, Graz University of Technology). The three sets of solutions are based on different approaches, namely the celestial mechanics approach, the acceleration approach and the short-arc approach, respectively. We derive the maximum spatial resolution of the time-varying gravity signal in the Swarm gravity field models to be degree 12, in comparison with the more accurate models obtained from K-band ranging data of GRACE. We demonstrate that the combination of the GPS-driven models produced with the three different approaches improves the accuracy in all analysed monthly solutions, with respect to any of them. In other words, the combined gravity field model consistently benefits from the individual strengths of each separate solution. The improved accuracy of the combined model is expected to bring benefits to the geophysical studies during the period when no dedicated gravimetric mission is operational.

  9. Mathematical model research on landslide monitoring through GPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wen-wei; SONG Ying-chun; ZHU Jian-jun; TANG Jing-tian

    2006-01-01

    Assuming that road slope and landslide object are rigid, the landslide's moving displacement was drawn based on their geometry shapes and the physi-mechanical features of materials, and the dynamic model of landslide was also set up, then DDOD(double difference observation data) was combined with the deformed monitoring point and the carrier phase observation data on base point, which can be used to monitor the landslide's deformation rule from horizontal, vertical and directional view simultaneously. Observing equation was set up, which sufficiently reflects the activities of landslide in entire directions. Filter model includes some information such as mechanical state and GPS observing data by Kalman filter.

  10. Validation of Microscopic Traffic Models Based on GPS Precise Measurement of Vehicle Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Apeltauer

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A necessary stage in the development of traffic models is model validation, where the developed model is verified by comparing its outputs with observed data. The most frequently used variables are average value of speed, flow intensity and flow density (during a selected period.It is possible to use these values for the calibration of macroscopic models, but one cannot always obtain a relevant microscopic dynamic model in this way. A typical use of the microsimulation models is the capacity assessment, where this sort of data (flow, speed and queues is considered to be standard and sufficient. However microsimulation is also increasingly being used for other assessments (e.g. noise and emissions where the correct representation of each vehicle’s acceleration and deceleration plays a crucial role. Another emerging area is the use of microsimulation to predict near-miss situations and conflicts to identify dangerous and accident prone locations. In such assessments the vehicle trajectory, distance from other vehicles as well as velocity and acceleration are very important.Additional source of data, which can be used to validate vehicle dynamics in microsimulation models, is the Global Positioning System (GPS that is able to determine vehicle position with centimeter accuracy.In this article we discuss validation of selected microscopic traffic models, based on the comparison of simulated vehicle dynamics with observed dynamic characteristics of vehicles recorded by the precise geodetic GPS equipment.

  11. Accuracy of a 10 Hz GPS Unit in Measuring Shuttle Velocity Performed at Different Speeds and Distances (5 – 20 M

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beato Marco

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to validate the accuracy of a 10 Hz GPS device (STATSports, Ireland by comparing the instantaneous values of velocity determined with this device with those determined by kinematic (video analysis (25 Hz. Ten male soccer players were required to perform shuttle runs (with 180° change of direction at three velocities (slow: 2.2 m·s-1; moderate: 3.2 m·s-1; high: maximal over four distances: 5, 10, 15 and 20 m. The experiments were video-recorded; the “point by point” values of speed recorded by the GPS device were manually downloaded and analysed in the same way as the “frame by frame” values of horizontal speed as obtained by video analysis. The obtained results indicated that shuttle distance was smaller in GPS than video analysis (p < 0.01. Shuttle velocity (shuttle distance/shuttle time was thus smaller in GPS than in video analysis (p < 0.001; the percentage difference (bias, % in shuttle velocity between methods was found to decrease with the distance covered (5 m: 9 ± 6%; 20 m: 3 ± 3%. The instantaneous values of speed were averaged; from these data and from data of shuttle time, the distance covered was recalculated; the error (criterion distance-recalculated distance was negligible for video data (0.04 ± 0.28 m whereas GPS data underestimated criterion distance (0.31 ± 0.55 m. In conclusion, the inaccuracy of this GPS unit in determining shuttle speed can be attributed to inaccuracy in determining the shuttle distance.

  12. Seasonal velocities of eight major marine-terminating outlet glaciers of the Greenland ice sheet from continuous in situ GPS instruments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlstrøm, A. P.; Andersen, S. B.; Andersen, M. L.;

    2013-01-01

    We present 17 velocity records derived from in situ stand-alone single-frequency Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers placed on eight marine-terminating ice sheet outlet glaciers in South, West and North Greenland, covering varying parts of the period summer 2009 to summer 2012. Common to al...... repository at doi:10.5280/GEUS000001.©Author(s) 2013....

  13. GPS-derived horizontal ice flow velocities along the traverse route from Zhongshan Station to Dome-A, East Antarctica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王清华

    2003-01-01

    The traverse route from Zhongshan Station to Dome-A is one of the most important expedition routes of ITASE Project.China carried out 3 inland traverses during the 1996/1997, 1997/1998, 1998/1999 austral summer field seasons.The field team reached inland 300 km, 500 km and 1100 km away from Zhongshan Station respectively.Some ice motion stakes were set up, occupied and reoccupied along the route by GPS technology.It showed that the ice along the traverse route flowed with an 8-25 ma-1 velocity to the northwest, the direction of the bottom of Lambert Glacier Basin.They coincide with the results along the eastern section from LGB59-70 of the LGB route deduced by Australia in both values and directions.Furthermore, the directions of the horizontal flow are perpendicular to the surface topography contour.The much larger velocity at the point of LT980 with an approximate value of 100 ma-1 was probed.It was caused by a 15 km wide trough on the bed beneath this point.

  14. Post-rifting relaxation processes in the Afar region (Ethiopia) from GPS measurements and numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennati, L.; Calais, E.; Wright, T.; Hamling, I.; Lewi, E.; Nooner, S.; Buck, R.; Ebinger, C.

    2008-12-01

    Accelerated deformation after major dike intrusion events such the 1975-1985 Krafla events in Iceland and the 1978 Asal-Ghoubbet events in Afar have been interpreted as the result of stress relaxation in a viscoelastic lithospheric mantle and/or continued magma injection. Separating these contributions, estimating mantle viscosity and quantifying the interaction with long-term stretching has however proven difficult in the absence of geodetic measurements early on after the main dike intrusion. In September 2005, a 60km-long dike intrusion took place at the Dabbahu rift, Afar, Ethiopia, at the boundary between the Nubian and Arabian (Danakil) plates. Since this major event, 8 new intrusions have affected the central and southern parts of the 2005 dike. In order to measure post-diking deformation, we installed 19 continuous stations in the near-field of the 2005 intrusion and 20 survey sites in the mid- and far-field. Time series from continuous GPS stations outside of volcanoes show a combination of discrete diking events and quasi-constant velocity displacements. Continuous GPS stations on volcanoes show non-linear behaviour related to the feeding of shallow magma chambers. Survey GPS sites in the far-field (up to 150km from the rift) show current extension rates twice as fast as the secular divergence rate between Nubia and Arabia. We present the GPS results and, with some constraints from seismicity, propose a preliminary model that accounts for the combination of dike intrusions and viscoelastic stress relaxation in the upper mantle below Afar.

  15. Joint Inversion of GPS and Teleseismic Data for the Source Model of the 2016 Meinong, Taiwan Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Y. P.; Ching, K. E.; Chuang, R.; Wen, Y. Y.; Chen, C. L.

    2016-12-01

    The ML 6.6 Meinong earthquake occurred in SW Taiwan, which is located at 22.92°N, 120.54°E, and depth of 14.6 km, at 03:57:26.1 (UTC+8) on February 6th 2016 in SW Taiwan. To understand the kinematics and geodynamics of this earthquake event, we select 43 continuous GPS (CGPS) stations, installed by the CGS, CWB, IES and NCKU, 94 campaign-mode GPS (RGPS) stations and 4 precise leveling routes, surveyed by the CGS from 2002 to 2016. The GPS coordinate daily solution is calculated using the software Bernese v.5.0 under the ITRF2008 as the velocity and coseismic displacement fields are relative to the station KMNM at the Chinese continental margin. To verify the reliability of the velocity inferred from the RGPS stations, we first consider the misfit value which is highly correlated to the quality of the time series. The misfit values from 67 stations are smaller than 20 mm and the misfit values from the other 27 stations are larger than 20 mm. We then interpolated the velocities from 43 CGPS stations into 67 RGPS stations, and compared the residuals between the observed velocities and the interpolated velocities with three standard deviation of the observation. All of the 67 RGPS stations meet the standard so we interpolated the velocity from 43 CGPS stations and 67 RGPS stations into the rest 27 RGPS stations, and then checked the value of residuals between the observed velocity and the interpolated velocity divided by the observed velocity. Finally, 19 RGPS stations are rejected, and the remaining stations are believe to increase the constraint of modeling. By using CGPS data, we correct the coseismic displacement fields of the RGPS stations and the precise leveling route by removing the postseismic effect. The horizontal coseismic displacement fields show a spreading trend start from the epicenter to the SW, west and NW while the horizontal velocity fields show only westward in the interseismic period. The vertical coseismic displacement fields are mainly uplift

  16. 基于GPS和INS的测速方法比较分析%Comparison and analysis of Velocity Measurement Based on GPS and INS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    仇立成

    2014-01-01

    目前常用的测速方法包括测速仪、GPS多普勒观测值测速、INS测速、GPS/INS测速等。文章分析了GPS多普勒测速,INS测速以及GPS/INS测速的基本原理。最后,通过对实测的车载实验数据解算对以上这三种方法进行了详细的比较分析,得出了一些比较有意义的结论。%The current measurement methods commonly used include velocimetry , GPS Doppler observations , INS speed,GPS/INS speed speed etc ..This paper analyzes GPS Doppler velocity measurement ,INS measurement and the basic principle of GPS/INS speed.Finally,through the experimental dataon the measured solution to these three kinds of methods are analyzed comparatively ,get some meaningful conclusions .

  17. GPS-based Microenvironment Tracker (MicroTrac) Model to ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    A critical aspect of air pollution exposure assessment is the estimation of the time spent by individuals in various microenvironments (ME). Accounting for the time spent in different ME with different pollutant concentrations can reduce exposure misclassifications, while failure to do so can add uncertainty and bias to risk estimates. In this study, a classification model, called MicroTrac, was developed to estimate time of day and duration spent in eight ME (indoors and outdoors at home, work, school; inside vehicles; other locations) from global positioning system (GPS) data and geocoded building boundaries. Based on a panel study, MicroTrac estimates were compared to 24 h diary data from 7 participants on workdays and 2 participants on nonworkdays, with corresponding GPS data and building boundaries of home, school, and work. MicroTrac correctly classified the ME for 99.5% of the daily time spent by the participants. The capability of MicroTrac could help to reduce the time-location uncertainty in air pollution exposure models and exposure metrics for individuals in health studies. The National Exposure Research Laboratory’s (NERL’s) Human Exposure and Atmospheric Sciences Division (HEASD) conducts research in support of EPA’s mission to protect human health and the environment. HEASD’s research program supports Goal 1 (Clean Air) and Goal 4 (Healthy People) of EPA’s strategic plan. More specifically, our division conducts research to characterize

  18. Error detection in GPS observations by means of Multi-process models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Henrik F.

    2001-01-01

    The main purpose of this article is to present the idea of using Multi-process models as a method of detecting errors in GPS observations. The theory behind Multi-process models, and double differenced phase observations in GPS is presented shortly. It is shown how to model cycle slips in the Multi...

  19. Velocity bias in a LCDM model

    CERN Document Server

    Colin, Pierre; Kravtsov, A V; Colin, Pedro; Klypin, Anatoly; Kravtsov, Andrey V.

    2000-01-01

    We use N-body simulations to study the velocity bias of dark matter halos, the difference in the velocity fields of dark matter and halos, in a flat low- density LCDM model. The high force, 2kpc/h, and mass, 10^9Msun/h, resolution allows dark matter halos to survive in very dense environments of groups and clusters making it possible to use halos as galaxy tracers. We find that the velocity bias pvb measured as a ratio of pairwise velocities of the halos to that of the dark matter evolves with time and depends on scale. At high redshifts (z ~5) halos move generally faster than the dark matter almost on all scales: pvb(r)~1.2, r>0.5Mpc/h. At later moments the bias decreases and gets below unity on scales less than r=5Mpc/h: pvb(r)~(0.6-0.8) at z=0. We find that the evolution of the pairwise velocity bias follows and probably is defined by the spatial antibias of the dark matter halos at small scales. One-point velocity bias b_v, defined as the ratio of the rms velocities of halos and dark matter, provides a mo...

  20. The RING network: improvement of a GPS velocity field in the central Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Rossi

    2010-05-01

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    Since 2004, a continuous Global Positioning System (GPS network is operated by the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV to investigate active tectonic processes in Italy and surrounding regions, which are still largely debated. This important infrastructure, named Rete Integrata Nazionale GPS (RING network, consists in about 130 stations deployed all over Italy. The development and the realization of a stable GPS monumentation, the integration with seismological instruments and the choice of both satellite and internet data transmission make this network one of the most innovative and reliable CGPS networks in the world. The technologically advanced development of the RING network has been accompanied by the development of different data processing strategies, mainly dependent on the use of different GPS analysis software. The different software-related solutions have been compared for such a large network at different scales and the consistency has been evaluated and quantified within a 0.3 mm/yr RMS value.

  1. Models for Fitting Gravimetric Geoids and GPS Results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this investigation is to study how to use a gravimetric (quasi) geoid for levelling by GPS data in an optimal way.The advent of precise geodetic GPS has made the use of a technique possible,which might be called GPS- gravimetric geoid determination.In this approach,GPS heights above the reference ellipsoid are determined for points whose levelled (orthometric) height H is above sea level people have already surveyed;for these points,we thus have the values of the geoid undulation N.These values are then used to constrain the geoid undulations N′ obtained from the gravimetric solution.

  2. Kinematic Modeling of the 2011, Mw7.1 Van, Eastern Turkey Earthquake Using Teleseismic, Regional and GPS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konca, A.

    2013-12-01

    A kinematic model for the Mw7.1 2011 Van Earthquake was obtained using regional, teleseismic and GPS data. One issue regarding regional data is that 1D Green's functions may not be appropriate due to complications in the upper mantle and crust that affects the Pnl waveforms. In order to resolve whether the 1D Green's function is appropriate, an aftershock of the main event was also modeled, which is then used as a criterion in the selection of the regional stations. The GPS data itself is not sufficient to obtain a slip model, but helps constrain the slip distribution. The slip distribution is up-dip and bilateral with more slip toward west, where the maximum slip reaches 4 meters. The rupture velocity is about 1.5 km/s.

  3. Clustering of velocities in a GPS network spanning the Sierra Nevada Block, the northern Walker Lane Belt, and the Central Nevada Seismic Belt, California-Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, James C.; Simpson, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    The deformation across the Sierra Nevada Block, the Walker Lane Belt, and the Central Nevada Seismic Belt (CNSB) between 38.5°N and 40.5°N has been analyzed by clustering GPS velocities to identify coherent blocks. Cluster analysis determines the number of clusters required and assigns the GPS stations to the proper clusters. The clusters are shown on a fault map by symbols located at the positions of the GPS stations, each symbol representing the cluster to which the velocity of that GPS station belongs. Fault systems that separate the clusters are readily identified on such a map. Four significant clusters are identified. Those clusters are strips separated by (from west to east) the Mohawk Valley-Genoa fault system, the Pyramid Lake-Wassuk fault system, and the Central Nevada Seismic Belt. The strain rates within the westernmost three clusters approximate simple right-lateral shear (~13 nstrain/a) across vertical planes roughly parallel to the cluster boundaries. Clustering does not recognize the longitudinal segmentation of the Walker Lane Belt into domains dominated by either northwesterly trending, right-lateral faults or northeasterly trending, left-lateral faults.

  4. Design of complete software GPS signal simulator with low complexity and precise multipath channel model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Arul Elango

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The need for GPS data simulators have become important due to the tremendous growth in the design of versatile GPS receivers. Commercial hardware and software based GPS simulators are expensive and time consuming. In this work, a low cost simple novel GPS L1 signal simulator is designed for testing and evaluating the performance of software GPS receiver in a laboratory environment. A typical real time paradigm, similar to actual satellite derived GPS signal is created on a computer generated scenario. In this paper, a GPS software simulator is proposed that may offer a lot of analysis and testing flexibility to the researchers and developers as it is totally software based primarily running on a laptop/personal computer without the requirement of any hardware. The proposed GPS simulator allows provision for re-configurability and test repeatability and is developed in VC++ platform to minimize the simulation time. It also incorporates Rayleigh multipath channel fading model under non-line of sight (NLOS conditions. In this work, to efficiently design the simulator, several Rayleigh fading models viz. Inverse Discrete Fourier Transform (IDFT, Filtering White Gaussian Noise (FWFN and modified Sum of Sinusoidal (SOS simulators are tested and compared in terms of accuracy of its first and second order statistical metrics, execution time and the later one is found to be as the best appropriate Rayleigh multipath model suitable for incorporating with GPS simulator. The fading model written in ‘MATLAB’ engine has been linked with software GPS simulator module enable to test GPS receiver’s functionality in different fading environments.

  5. Structure of the present-day velocity field of the crust in the area of the Central-Asian GPS network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzikov, S. I.; Mukhamediev, Sh. A.

    2010-07-01

    The structure of the vector field of present-day horizontal velocities on the Earth’s surface is investigated with the use of the territory covered by the Central-Asian GPS network as an example. A method of identification of groups of GPS points (statistically rigid clusters), for which the rate of change in distances between them is virtually zero, is proposed and realized. Sites of the Earth’s surface (regions) containing such groups of GPS points, within the required measurement accuracy, move in the horizontal plane as two-dimensional rigid bodies. The clustering algorithm, which is based on the Student t statistics in determining the so-called statistical “sample cost,” is developed and carefully tested. The results of identification of regions take into account possible random errors in velocity measurements and do not depend on the chosen frame of reference. The method of identification of regions is sufficiently stable with respect to variations in the number of GPS sites used for clustering. Of all the sites of the Central-Asian GPS network, 323 points were selected for clustering. These sites were measured from 3 to 11 times over an 11-year interval of observations (1995-2005). The estimates of errors of velocity measurement for these sites must not exceed 1.0 mm/yr. As a result, 29 statistically rigid clusters, containing from 3 to 17 GPS sites, were identified, and the kinematic regimes of motion of regions corresponding to these clusters were determined with respect to the stable part of Eurasia. With the general direction of the translatory motion of regions toward the north, the majority of them rotate counterclockwise. Nearly one third of GPS sites do not participate in the formation of clusters; these points fall into the interregional space (IRS), which is characterized by increased strain rates. The IRS structure is partitioned into zones with four directions, of which two directions virtually coincide with directions of the principal

  6. New and Improved Solar Radiation Models for GPS Satellites Based on Flight Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-04-12

    Bar-Sever, Y.E., A New Model for GPS Yaw Attitude, Journal of Geodesy , 70, pp 714-723, 1996. Bar-Sever, Y.E., Strategies for Near Real Time...1983. Watkins, M.M, Bar-Sever, Y.E., Yuan, D-N, Evaluation of GPS orbital Ephemerides with Satellite laser Ranging, Journal of geodesy , 1997

  7. A Forward GPS Multipath Simulator Based on the Vegetation Radiative Transfer Equation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xuerui; Jin, Shuanggen; Xia, Junming

    2017-06-05

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) have been widely used in navigation, positioning and timing. Nowadays, the multipath errors may be re-utilized for the remote sensing of geophysical parameters (soil moisture, vegetation and snow depth), i.e., GPS-Multipath Reflectometry (GPS-MR). However, bistatic scattering properties and the relation between GPS observables and geophysical parameters are not clear, e.g., vegetation. In this paper, a new element on bistatic scattering properties of vegetation is incorporated into the traditional GPS-MR model. This new element is the first-order radiative transfer equation model. The new forward GPS multipath simulator is able to explicitly link the vegetation parameters with GPS multipath observables (signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR), code pseudorange and carrier phase observables). The trunk layer and its corresponding scattering mechanisms are ignored since GPS-MR is not suitable for high forest monitoring due to the coherence of direct and reflected signals. Based on this new model, the developed simulator can present how the GPS signals (L1 and L2 carrier frequencies, C/A, P(Y) and L2C modulations) are transmitted (scattered and absorbed) through vegetation medium and received by GPS receivers. Simulation results show that the wheat will decrease the amplitudes of GPS multipath observables (SNR, phase and code), if we increase the vegetation moisture contents or the scatters sizes (stem or leaf). Although the Specular-Ground component dominates the total specular scattering, vegetation covered ground soil moisture has almost no effects on the final multipath signatures. Our simulated results are consistent with previous results for environmental parameter detections by GPS-MR.

  8. Research Article. Improved Dual Frequency PPP Model Using GPS and BeiDou Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afifi A.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a new dual-frequency precise point positioning (PPP model, which combines GPS and BeiDou observations. Combining GPS and BeiDou observations in a PPP model offers more visible satellites to the user, which is expected to enhance the satellite geometry and the overall PPP solution in comparison with GPSonly PPP solution. However, combining different GNSS constellations introduces additional biases, which require rigorous modelling, including GNSS time offset and hardware delays. In this research, ionosphere-free linear combination PPP model is developed. The additional biases, which result from combining the GPS and BeiDou observables, are lumped into a new unknown parameter identified as the inter-system bias. Natural Resources Canada’s GPSPace PPP software is modified to enable a combined GPS/BeiDou PPP solution and to handle the newly introduced biases. A total of four data sets at four IGS stations are processed to verify the developed PPP model. Precise satellite orbit and clock products from the IGS-MGEX network are used to correct both of the GPS and BeiDou measurements. It is shown that a sub-decimeter positioning accuracy level and 25% reduction in the solution convergence time can be achieved with combining GPS and Bei-Dou observables in a PPP model, in comparison with the GPS-only PPP solution.

  9. Research Article. Improved Dual Frequency PPP Model Using GPS and BeiDou Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, A.; El-Rabbany, A.

    2017-02-01

    This paper introduces a new dual-frequency precise point positioning (PPP) model, which combines GPS and BeiDou observations. Combining GPS and BeiDou observations in a PPP model offers more visible satellites to the user, which is expected to enhance the satellite geometry and the overall PPP solution in comparison with GPSonly PPP solution. However, combining different GNSS constellations introduces additional biases, which require rigorous modelling, including GNSS time offset and hardware delays. In this research, ionosphere-free linear combination PPP model is developed. The additional biases, which result from combining the GPS and BeiDou observables, are lumped into a new unknown parameter identified as the inter-system bias. Natural Resources Canada's GPSPace PPP software is modified to enable a combined GPS/BeiDou PPP solution and to handle the newly introduced biases. A total of four data sets at four IGS stations are processed to verify the developed PPP model. Precise satellite orbit and clock products from the IGS-MGEX network are used to correct both of the GPS and BeiDou measurements. It is shown that a sub-decimeter positioning accuracy level and 25% reduction in the solution convergence time can be achieved with combining GPS and Bei-Dou observables in a PPP model, in comparison with the GPS-only PPP solution.

  10. Rational Characterization Complex Geology Model——Macro Velocity Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SongWei

    2004-01-01

    The accuracy of migration velocity construction is always a key problem of the image quality of pre-stack depth migration. The velocity model construction process is a process from an unknown to unknown iteration procedure and involves three important steps -- model building, migration and model modification. It is necessary to rationally describe the velocity model, according to the complexity of the problem. Taking the Marmousi model as a study object, We established some standards for a rational description of the velocity model on the basis of different velocity space scales, analysis varieties of travel time, and image quality. It is considered that for any given seismic data gathered in the migration velocity model the space wavelength of velocity, which should be expressed in variation of space wavelength of various frequency contents, appears in the seismic data. Some space wavelengths, which are necessary for a description of the model velocity field, are also varying with the layer complexity. For a simple layer velocity structure it is sufficient to apply a simple velocity model (the space wavelength is large enough), whereas, for a complicated layer velocity structure it is necessary to take a velocity model of a more precise scale. In fact, when we establish a velocity model, it is difficult to describe the velocity model at a full space scale, so it is important to limit the space scale of the velocity model according to the complexity of a layer structure and establish a rational macro velocity model.

  11. Modeling and performance analysis of GPS vector tracking algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashley, Matthew

    This dissertation provides a detailed analysis of GPS vector tracking algorithms and the advantages they have over traditional receiver architectures. Standard GPS receivers use a decentralized architecture that separates the tasks of signal tracking and position/velocity estimation. Vector tracking algorithms combine the two tasks into a single algorithm. The signals from the various satellites are processed collectively through a Kalman filter. The advantages of vector tracking over traditional, scalar tracking methods are thoroughly investigated. A method for making a valid comparison between vector and scalar tracking loops is developed. This technique avoids the ambiguities encountered when attempting to make a valid comparison between tracking loops (which are characterized by noise bandwidths and loop order) and the Kalman filters (which are characterized by process and measurement noise covariance matrices) that are used by vector tracking algorithms. The improvement in performance offered by vector tracking is calculated in multiple different scenarios. Rule of thumb analysis techniques for scalar Frequency Lock Loops (FLL) are extended to the vector tracking case. The analysis tools provide a simple method for analyzing the performance of vector tracking loops. The analysis tools are verified using Monte Carlo simulations. Monte Carlo simulations are also used to study the effects of carrier to noise power density (C/N0) ratio estimation and the advantage offered by vector tracking over scalar tracking. The improvement from vector tracking ranges from 2.4 to 6.2 dB in various scenarios. The difference in the performance of the three vector tracking architectures is analyzed. The effects of using a federated architecture with and without information sharing between the receiver's channels are studied. A combination of covariance analysis and Monte Carlo simulation is used to analyze the performance of the three algorithms. The federated algorithm without

  12. Solvable Optimal Velocity Models and Asymptotic Trajectory

    CERN Document Server

    Nakanishi, K; Igarashi, Y; Bando, M

    1996-01-01

    In the Optimal Velocity Model proposed as a new version of Car Following Model, it has been found that a congested flow is generated spontaneously from a homogeneous flow for a certain range of the traffic density. A well-established congested flow obtained in a numerical simulation shows a remarkable repetitive property such that the velocity of a vehicle evolves exactly in the same way as that of its preceding one except a time delay $T$. This leads to a global pattern formation in time development of vehicles' motion, and gives rise to a closed trajectory on $\\Delta x$-$v$ (headway-velocity) plane connecting congested and free flow points. To obtain the closed trajectory analytically, we propose a new approach to the pattern formation, which makes it possible to reduce the coupled car following equations to a single difference-differential equation (Rondo equation). To demonstrate our approach, we employ a class of linear models which are exactly solvable. We also introduce the concept of ``asymptotic traj...

  13. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar atmospheric correction: GPS topography-dependent turbulence model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhenhong Li; Eric J. Fielding; Paul Cross; Jan-Peter Muller

    2006-01-01

    .... Application of the GTTM model to ERS Tandem data over the Los Angeles Southern California Integrated GPS Network area has shown that use of the GTTM can reduce water vapor effects on interferograms from ∼10 mm down...

  14. Migration velocity modeling based on common reflection surface gather

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李振春; 姚云霞; 马在田; 王华忠

    2003-01-01

    The common-reflection-surface (CRS) stacking is a new seismic imaging method, which only depends on seismic three parameters and near-surface velocity instead of macro-velocity model. According to optimized three parameters obtained by CRS stacking, we derived an analytical relationship between three parameters and migration velocity field, and put forward CRS gather migration velocity modeling method, which realize velocity estimation by optimizing three parameters in CRS gather. The test of a sag model proved that this method is more effective and adaptable for velocity modeling of a complex geological body, and the accuracy of velocity analysis depends on the precision of optimized three parameters.

  15. A comparison of hydrological deformation using GPS and global hydrological model for the Eurasian plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Yue, Jianping; Li, Wang; Lu, Dekai; Li, Xiaogen

    2017-08-01

    The 0.5° × 0.5° gridded hydrological loading from Global Land Surface Discharge Model (LSDM) mass distributions is adopted for 32 GPS sites on the Eurasian plate from January 2010 to January 2014. When the heights of these sites that have been corrected for the effects of non-tidal atmospheric and ocean loading are adjusted by the hydrological loading deformation, more than one third of the root-mean-square (RMS) values of the GPS height variability become larger. After analyzing the results by continuous wavelet transform (CWT) and wavelet transform coherence (WTC), we confirm that hydrological loading primarily contributes to the annual variations in GPS heights. Further, the cross wavelet transform (XWT) is used to investigate the relative phase between the time series of GPS heights and hydrological deformation, and it is indicated that the annual oscillations in the two time series are physically related for some sites; other geophysical effect, GPS systematic errors and hydrological modeling errors could result in the phase asynchrony between GPS and hydrological loading signals for the other sites. Consequently, the phase asynchrony confirms that the annual fluctuations in GPS observations result from a combination of geophysical signals and systematic errors.

  16. Modeling the Effects of Soil Moisture at a GPS-Interferometric Reflectometry Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, C.; Small, E. E.; Larson, K. M.; Nievinski, F. G.; Zavorotny, V.

    2011-12-01

    GPS-Interferometric Reflectometry (GPS-IR) uses ground-reflected GPS signals to estimate near-surface soil moisture. Data are recorded by high-precision, geodetic-quality GPS antennas/receivers, for example those that comprise NSF's EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory. The ground reflections used in GPS-IR are representative of a ~1000 m2 area around an antenna. As the dielectric constant of the surface fluctuates, the phase, amplitude, and frequency of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) data recorded by the GPS unit change. Based on field observations, it has been shown that these characteristics of the SNR data are sensitive to shallow soil moisture. A single-scattering, electrodynamic model was used to simulate SNR output over a range of soil moisture conditions. All simulations were for a 2.4 m tall antenna surrounded by a surface free of roughness or vegetation. The model was run using three different types of soil moisture profiles: constant with depth, monotonic variations with depth, and observed profiles interpolated from field data. For all profiles, amplitude, phase shift, and frequency changes were calculated from simulated SNR data. The three GPS metrics are well correlated with soil moisture content modeled at the soil surface because a majority of the incident microwave energy is reflected at the air-soil interface. When surface soil is dry relative to the underlying soil, GPS metrics are also strongly correlated with soil moisture averaged over the top 5 cm of the soil column. The relationship between GPS metrics and soil moisture averaged over 5 cm is not as strong when surface soil is relatively wet (>35% volumetric soil moisture). Interpolated profiles from field data resulted in a very strong correlation between SNR metrics and soil moisture averaged over the top 5 cm of soil, suggesting that soil moisture estimated from SNR data is useful for various hydrologic applications.

  17. Trend-Residual Dual Modeling for Detection of Outliers in Low-Cost GPS Trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaojian; Cui, Tingting; Fu, Jianhong; Peng, Jianwei; Shan, Jie

    2016-12-01

    Low-cost GPS (receiver) has become a ubiquitous and integral part of our daily life. Despite noticeable advantages such as being cheap, small, light, and easy to use, its limited positioning accuracy devalues and hampers its wide applications for reliable mapping and analysis. Two conventional techniques to remove outliers in a GPS trajectory are thresholding and Kalman-based methods, which are difficult in selecting appropriate thresholds and modeling the trajectories. Moreover, they are insensitive to medium and small outliers, especially for low-sample-rate trajectories. This paper proposes a model-based GPS trajectory cleaner. Rather than examining speed and acceleration or assuming a pre-determined trajectory model, we first use cubic smooth spline to adaptively model the trend of the trajectory. The residuals, i.e., the differences between the trend and GPS measurements, are then further modeled by time series method. Outliers are detected by scoring the residuals at every GPS trajectory point. Comparing to the conventional procedures, the trend-residual dual modeling approach has the following features: (a) it is able to model trajectories and detect outliers adaptively; (b) only one critical value for outlier scores needs to be set; (c) it is able to robustly detect unapparent outliers; and (d) it is effective in cleaning outliers for GPS trajectories with low sample rates. Tests are carried out on three real-world GPS trajectories datasets. The evaluation demonstrates an average of 9.27 times better performance in outlier detection for GPS trajectories than thresholding and Kalman-based techniques.

  18. Trend-Residual Dual Modeling for Detection of Outliers in Low-Cost GPS Trajectories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojian Chen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Low-cost GPS (receiver has become a ubiquitous and integral part of our daily life. Despite noticeable advantages such as being cheap, small, light, and easy to use, its limited positioning accuracy devalues and hampers its wide applications for reliable mapping and analysis. Two conventional techniques to remove outliers in a GPS trajectory are thresholding and Kalman-based methods, which are difficult in selecting appropriate thresholds and modeling the trajectories. Moreover, they are insensitive to medium and small outliers, especially for low-sample-rate trajectories. This paper proposes a model-based GPS trajectory cleaner. Rather than examining speed and acceleration or assuming a pre-determined trajectory model, we first use cubic smooth spline to adaptively model the trend of the trajectory. The residuals, i.e., the differences between the trend and GPS measurements, are then further modeled by time series method. Outliers are detected by scoring the residuals at every GPS trajectory point. Comparing to the conventional procedures, the trend-residual dual modeling approach has the following features: (a it is able to model trajectories and detect outliers adaptively; (b only one critical value for outlier scores needs to be set; (c it is able to robustly detect unapparent outliers; and (d it is effective in cleaning outliers for GPS trajectories with low sample rates. Tests are carried out on three real-world GPS trajectories datasets. The evaluation demonstrates an average of 9.27 times better performance in outlier detection for GPS trajectories than thresholding and Kalman-based techniques.

  19. Modelling and Simulation of Pseudolite-based Navigation: A GPS-independent Radio Navigation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishneshwar Tiwary

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of global positioning system (GPS for precision guidance of weapons is being questioned due to its vulnerability of jamming and spoofing for non-military code users. In this paper a novel approach is proposed for guidance of weapons where use of GPS or other civilian Satellite-based navigation system is threatened. The proposed approach is modelled and simulated using SIMULINK for realistic trajectories and scenario. The results of simulation are validated with the actual GPS data.

  20. Crustal deformations at permanent GPS sites in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Shfaqat Abbas; Knudsen, Per; Tscherning, Carl Christian

    2005-01-01

    The National Survey and Cadastre (KMS) is responsible for the geodetic definition of the reference network in Denmark. Permanent GPS stations play an important role in the monitoring and maintenance of the geodetic network. During 1998 and 1999 KMS established three permanent GPS station in Denmark......, SMID, SULD and BUDP. Using almost 4.5 years of continuous data from the Danish station and the Swedish station, ONSA, we analyse the daily GPS solution due to crustal deformation caused by glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA). Although, displacements due to GIA are only 1–3 mm/year at the Danish GPS...... sites, the current precision of positioning using GPS allows us to observe these effects. The modelled horizontal GIA velocities and the observed horizontal residuals obtained from GPS show almost the same direction for all station. However, the observed velocity residuals are larger than the modelled...

  1. Crustal deformations at permanent GPS sites in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Shfaqat Abbas; Knudsen, Per; Tscherning, Carl Christian

    2005-01-01

    The National Survey and Cadastre (KMS) is responsible for the geodetic definition of the reference network in Denmark. Permanent GPS stations play an important role in the monitoring and maintenance of the geodetic network. During 1998 and 1999 KMS established three permanent GPS station in Denmark......, SMID, SULD and BUDP. Using almost 4.5 years of continuous data from the Danish station and the Swedish station, ONSA, we analyse the daily GPS solution due to crustal deformation caused by glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA). Although, displacements due to GIA are only 1–3 mm/year at the Danish GPS...... sites, the current precision of positioning using GPS allows us to observe these effects. The modelled horizontal GIA velocities and the observed horizontal residuals obtained from GPS show almost the same direction for all station. However, the observed velocity residuals are larger than the modelled...

  2. A New Car Following Model: Comprehensive Optimal Velocity Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Jun-Fang; JIA Bin; LI Xing-Gang

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new car-following model, i.e.comprehensive optimal velocity model (COVM),whose optimal velocity function not only depends on the following distance of the preceding vehicle, but also depends on the velocity difference with preceding vehicle.Simulation results show that COVM is an improvement over the previous ones theoretically.Then, the stability condition of the model is obtained by the linear stability analysis, which has shorwn that the model could obtain a bigger stable region than previous models in the phase diagram.Through the nonlinear analysis, the Burgers, Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) and modified KdV (mKdV) equations are derived for the triangular shock wave, the soliton wave, and the kink-antikink soliton wave.At the same time, numerical simulations are edso carried out to show that the model could simulate these density waves.

  3. Precise Point Positioning Model Using Triple GNSS Constellations: GPS, Galileo and BeiDou

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, Akram; El-Rabbany, Ahmed

    2016-12-01

    This paper introduces a comparison between dual-frequency precise point positioning (PPP) post-processing model, which combines the observations of three different GNSS constellations, namely GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou and real-time PPP model. A drawback of a single GNSS system such as GPS, however, is the availability of sufficient number of visible satellites in urban areas. Combining GNSS observations offers more visible satellites to users, which in turn is expected to enhance the satellite geometry and the overall positioning solution. However, combining several GNSS observables introduces additional biases, which require rigorous modelling, including the GNSS time offsets and hardware delays. In this paper, a GNSS post-processing PPPP model is developed using ionosphere-free linear combination. The additional biases of the GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou combination are accounted for through the introduction of a new unknown parameter, which is identified as the inter-system bias, in the PPP mathematical model. Natural Resources Canada's GPSPace PPP software is modified to enable a combined GPS / Galileo / BeiDou PPP solution and to handle the newly inter-system bias. A total of four data sets at four IGS stations are processed to verify the developed PPP model. Precise satellite orbit and clock products from the IGS-MGEX network are used to correct of the GPS, Galileo and BeiDou measurements. For the real-time PPP model the corrections of the satellites orbit and clock are obtained through the international GNSS service (IGS) real-time service (RTS). GPS and Galileo Observations are used for the GNSS RTS-IGS PPP model as the RTS-IGS satellite products are not available for BeiDou satellites. This paper provides the GNSS RTS-IGS PPP model using different satellite clock corrections namely: IGS01, IGC01, IGS01, and IGS03. All PPP models results of convergence time and positioning precision are compared to the traditional GPS-only PPP model. It is shown that combining

  4. GPS"射线打靶”模式的并行计算%The Parallel Computing of GPS Ray-shooting Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李树勇; 王斌; 张昕

    2001-01-01

    全球定位系统(GPS)"射线打靶”模式是GPS/MET(气象)资料变分同化中联系GPS原始观测与大气状况的一种自成一体的观测算子,但因其计算量非常巨大而一直没能得到实用.为了克服这一困难,我们建立一个并行版本的GPS"射线打靶”模式,并在国家重点基础研究发展规划项目"大规模科学计算研究”资助下研制的微机机群系统(LSSC)上成功地实现了并行计算.取得了理想的加速比和并行效率,而且具有良好的可扩展性,为该观测算子达到实用迈出了实质性的一步.%The Global Positioning System (GPS) ray-shooting model is a self-sufficient observation operator in GPS MET (Meteorology) data variational assimilation linking up the GPS observation data and the atmospheric state variables. But its huge computations make it impracticable in real data assimilation so far. In order to overcome this default, a parallel version of the GPS ray shooting model has been developed,and has been running successfully on the PC cluster manufactured under the support of the China National Key Development Planning Project for Basic Research: The Large Scale Scientific Computation Research.High speed-up and Efficiency as well as good scalability are obtained. This is an important step for this GPS observation operator to become practicable.

  5. GPS/GLONASS Combined Precise Point Positioning with Receiver Clock Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fuhong; Chen, Xinghan; Guo, Fei

    2015-06-30

    Research has demonstrated that receiver clock modeling can reduce the correlation coefficients among the parameters of receiver clock bias, station height and zenith tropospheric delay. This paper introduces the receiver clock modeling to GPS/GLONASS combined precise point positioning (PPP), aiming to better separate the receiver clock bias and station coordinates and therefore improve positioning accuracy. Firstly, the basic mathematic models including the GPS/GLONASS observation equations, stochastic model, and receiver clock model are briefly introduced. Then datasets from several IGS stations equipped with high-stability atomic clocks are used for kinematic PPP tests. To investigate the performance of PPP, including the positioning accuracy and convergence time, a week of (1-7 January 2014) GPS/GLONASS data retrieved from these IGS stations are processed with different schemes. The results indicate that the positioning accuracy as well as convergence time can benefit from the receiver clock modeling. This is particularly pronounced for the vertical component. Statistic RMSs show that the average improvement of three-dimensional positioning accuracy reaches up to 30%-40%. Sometimes, it even reaches over 60% for specific stations. Compared to the GPS-only PPP, solutions of the GPS/GLONASS combined PPP are much better no matter if the receiver clock offsets are modeled or not, indicating that the positioning accuracy and reliability are significantly improved with the additional GLONASS satellites in the case of insufficient number of GPS satellites or poor geometry conditions. In addition to the receiver clock modeling, the impacts of different inter-system timing bias (ISB) models are investigated. For the case of a sufficient number of satellites with fairly good geometry, the PPP performances are not seriously affected by the ISB model due to the low correlation between the ISB and the other parameters. However, the refinement of ISB model weakens the

  6. Optimizing the De-Noise Neural Network Model for GPS Time-Series Monitoring of Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosbeh R. Kaloop

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Global Positioning System (GPS is recently used widely in structures and other applications. Notwithstanding, the GPS accuracy still suffers from the errors afflicting the measurements, particularly the short-period displacement of structural components. Previously, the multi filter method is utilized to remove the displacement errors. This paper aims at using a novel application for the neural network prediction models to improve the GPS monitoring time series data. Four prediction models for the learning algorithms are applied and used with neural network solutions: back-propagation, Cascade-forward back-propagation, adaptive filter and extended Kalman filter, to estimate which model can be recommended. The noise simulation and bridge’s short-period GPS of the monitoring displacement component of one Hz sampling frequency are used to validate the four models and the previous method. The results show that the Adaptive neural networks filter is suggested for de-noising the observations, specifically for the GPS displacement components of structures. Also, this model is expected to have significant influence on the design of structures in the low frequency responses and measurements’ contents.

  7. Latitudinal variation in the occurrence of GPS L-band scintillations associated with the day-to-day changes in TEC, h′F and the E×B drift velocity and their impact on GPS satellite signals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Venkatesh; P V S Rama Rao; Gopi K Seemala; D S V V D Prasad

    2015-04-01

    The present study describes the day-to-day variations in the occurrence of GPS L-band scintillations from equator to the anomaly crest location associated with the changes in TEC, h′F and E×B drift velocities. The GPS–TEC and S4 index data from an equatorial station, Trivandrum (8.47°N, 76.91°E), a low latitude station, Waltair (17.7°N, 83.3°E) and an anomaly crest location Kolkata (22.6°N, 88.4°E) during the low solar activity years of 2004 and 2005 are used. It is observed that the day-time ambient TEC is higher during scintillation days compared to that during the days on which there are no scintillations at the three different locations mentioned above. Further, the diurnal variation of TEC shows a rapid decay during 1700–2000 hr LT over the three different locations during scintillation days which is observed to be comparatively much less during no scintillation days. The average height of the F-layer in the post-sunset hours over Trivandrum is found to be higher, around 350 km during scintillation days while it is around 260 km during the days on which there is no scintillation activity. The average pre-reversal E×B drift velocity observed around 19:00 hr LT is higher (20 m/s) during scintillation days, whereas during no scintillation days, it is found to be much less (7 m/s). Further, it is observed that the GPS receivers lose their locks whenever the S4 index exceeds 0.5 (>10 dB power level) and these loss of lock events are observed to be more around the anomaly crest location (Kolkata). It may be inferred from the present observations that the level of ambient ionization around noon-time, and a fast decay (collapse) of the ionization during afternoon hours followed by rapid increase in the height of the F-layer contributes significantly to the occurrence of scintillations. The present study further indicates that the S4 index at L-band frequencies increases with an increase in latitude maximizing around the crest of the equatorial ionization

  8. Modeling and Assessment of GPS/BDS Combined Precise Point Positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junping; Wang, Jungang; Zhang, Yize; Yang, Sainan; Chen, Qian; Gong, Xiuqiang

    2016-07-22

    Precise Point Positioning (PPP) technique enables stand-alone receivers to obtain cm-level positioning accuracy. Observations from multi-GNSS systems can augment users with improved positioning accuracy, reliability and availability. In this paper, we present and evaluate the GPS/BDS combined PPP models, including the traditional model and a simplified model, where the inter-system bias (ISB) is treated in different way. To evaluate the performance of combined GPS/BDS PPP, kinematic and static PPP positions are compared to the IGS daily estimates, where 1 month GPS/BDS data of 11 IGS Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) stations are used. The results indicate apparent improvement of GPS/BDS combined PPP solutions in both static and kinematic cases, where much smaller standard deviations are presented in the magnitude distribution of coordinates RMS statistics. Comparisons between the traditional and simplified combined PPP models show no difference in coordinate estimations, and the inter system biases between the GPS/BDS system are assimilated into receiver clock, ambiguities and pseudo-range residuals accordingly.

  9. Using Allan Variance to Analyze the Zero-differenced Stochastic Model Characteristics of GPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Xiaohong

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The estimation criteria for solving parameters in zero-differenced GPS positioning is that observations obey Gaussian white noise distribution. But a number of pioneering studies point out that the white noise would be damaged by satellites errors, propagation errors, station environment errors and so on. Meanwhile, un-modeling errors also have adverse effects. These errors not only undermine the assumption estimation criteria, and some non-white noises are likely to be absorbed by state parameters. In result, the accuracy of estimates is influenced. This paper regards white noise, colored noise and un-modeling errors as ZD stochastic model of GPS. Then the Allan variance method is proposed to analyze the posteriori residuals which can represent the Stochastic characteristics of GPS data. Noise component and parameters are mainly investigated. The result shows GPS noise behaves as WN plus GM. The phase and pseudorange WN is 2.392 mm and 0.936 m respectively, GM process noise is 4.450 mm/√s and 0.833 m/√s respectively, correlation time is 52.074 s and 14.737 s respectively. It is found that the phase GM component is associated with satellite, but the rest is associated with station. A number of analysis indicate that the ZD stochastic model characteristics of GPS obeys non-Gaussian white noise distribution and is to be refined.

  10. Observation and modeling of thermoelastic strain in Southern California Integrated GPS Network daily position time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prawirodirdjo, Linette; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Bock, Yehuda

    2006-02-01

    We suggest that strain in the elastic part of the Earth's crust induced by surface temperature variations is a significant contributor to the seasonal variations observed in the spatially filtered daily position time series of Southern California Integrated GPS Network (SCIGN) stations. We compute the predicted thermoelastic strain from the observed local atmospheric temperature record assuming an elastically decoupled layer over a uniform elastic half-space and compare the seasonal variations in thermoelastic strain to the horizontal GPS position time series. We consider three regions (Palmdale, 29 Palms, and Idyllwild), each with one temperature station and three to six GPS stations. The temperature time series is used to compute thermoelastic strain at each station on the basis of its relative location in the temperature field. For each region we assume a wavelength for the temperature field that is related to the local topography. The depth of the decoupled layer is inferred from the phase delay between the temperature record and the GPS time series. The relative amplitude of strain variation at each GPS station, calculated to be on the order of 0.1 μstrain, is related to the relative location of that station in the temperature field. The goodness of fit between model and data is evaluated from the relative amplitudes of the seasonal signals, as well as the appropriateness of the chosen temperature field wavelength and decoupled layer depth. The analysis shows a good fit between the predicted strains and the GPS time series. This suggests that the model captures the key first-order ingredients that determine the thermoelastic strain in a given area. The results can be used to improve the signal/noise ratio in GPS data.

  11. Zenith total delay study of a mesoscale convective system : GPS observations and fine-scale modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cucurull, I.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Rius, A.

    2002-01-01

    Zenith Total Delay (ZTD) observations and model calculations are used to analyze a mesoscale convective system which yielded a large amount of precipitation over a short period of time in the north-western Mediterranean. ZTD observations are derived from the GPS signal delay whereas the ZTD model re

  12. Propagation modeling of ocean-scattered low-elevation GPS signals for maritime tropospheric duct inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin-Peng; Wu, Zhen-Sen; Zhao, Zhen-Wei; Zhang, Yu-Sheng; Wang, Bo

    2012-10-01

    The maritime tropospheric duct is a low-altitude anomalous refractivity structure over the ocean surface, and it can significantly affect the performance of many shore-based/shipboard radar and communication systems. We propose the idea that maritime tropospheric ducts can be retrieved from ocean forward-scattered low-elevation global positioning system (GPS) signals. Retrieval is accomplished by matching the measured power patterns of the signals to those predicted by the forward propagation model as a function of the modified refractivity profile. On the basis of a parabolic equation method and bistatic radar equation, we develop such a forward model for computing the trapped propagation characteristics of an ocean forward-scattered GPS signal within a tropospheric duct. A new GPS scattering initial field is defined for this model to start the propagation modeling. A preliminary test on the performance of this model is conducted using measured data obtained from a 2009-experiment in the South China Sea. Results demonstrate that this model can predict GPS propagation characteristics within maritime tropospheric ducts and serve as a forward model for duct inversion.

  13. Propagation modeling of ocean-scattered low-elevation GPS signals for maritime tropospheric duct inversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jin-Peng; Wu Zhen-Sen; Zhao Zhen-Wei; Zhang Yu-Sheng; Wang Bo

    2012-01-01

    The maritime tropospheric duct is a low-altitude anomalous refractivity structure over the ocean surface,and it can significantly affect the performance of many shore-based/shipboard radar and communication systems. We propose the idea that maritime tropospheric ducts can be retrieved from ocean forward-scattered low-elevation global positioning system (GPS) signals.Retrieval is accomplished by matching the measured power patterns of the signals to those predicted by the forward propagation model as a function of the modified refractivity profile.On the basis of a parabolic equation method and bistatic radar equation,we develop such a forward model for computing the trapped propagation characteristics of an ocean forward-scattered GPS signal within a tropospheric duct.A new GPS scattering initial field is defined for this model to start the propagation modeling.A preliminary test on the performance of this model is conducted using measured data obtained from a 2009-experiment in the South China Sea.Results demonstrate that this model can predict GPS propagation characteristics within maritime tropospheric ducts and serve as a forward model for duct inversion.

  14. A new car-following model considering velocity anticipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jun-Fang; Jia, Bin; Li, Xin-Gang; Gao, Zi-You

    2010-01-01

    The full velocity difference model proposed by Jiang et al. [2001 Phys. Rev. E 64 017101] has been improved by introducing velocity anticipation. Velocity anticipation means the follower estimates the future velocity of the leader. The stability condition of the new model is obtained by using the linear stability theory. Theoretical results show that the stability region increases when we increase the anticipation time interval. The mKdV equation is derived to describe the kink-antikink soliton wave and obtain the coexisting stability line. The delay time of car motion and kinematic wave speed at jam density are obtained in this model. Numerical simulations exhibit that when we increase the anticipation time interval enough, the new model could avoid accidents under urgent braking cases. Also, the traffic jam could be suppressed by considering the anticipation velocity. All results demonstrate that this model is an improvement on the full velocity difference model.

  15. Ionospheric correction for spaceborne single-frequency GPS based on single layer model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Xia Yang; Jiancheng Li; Shoujian Zhang

    2014-06-01

    A modified ionospheric correction method and the corresponding approximate algorithm for spaceborne single-frequency Global Positioning System (GPS) users are proposed in this study. Single Layer Model (SLM) mapping function for spaceborne GPS was analyzed. SLM mapping functions at different altitudes were calculated. Ionospheric Pierce Point (IPP) trajectories of the dlft station (an IGS station located at the longitude of 4° 23′ 15.22′′E and the latitude of 51° 59′ 9.63′′N, in the TU Delft University, The Netherlands) and the GRACE satellite were computed with the corresponding single layer height of 350 and 500 km, respectively. The Klobuchar model was used to compute ionospheric delays for the dlft station, and modified Klobuchar model, together with scale factors, was used to compute the fractional ionospheric corrections above the GRACE altitudes. Calculation results were validated using dual-frequency observations. The study shows that the single layer height needs to be changed from 350 to 500 km according to the altitude of GRACE. Approximate forms of Earth angle and slant factor developed for modified Klobuchar model are applicable to GRACE, with accuracy adequate to preserve the essential elements required to compute ionospheric delays. Results show that the Klobuchar model is effective for ground GPS, and the modified Klobuchar model corrects more than 80% on average of the ionospheric delays for spaceborne single-frequency GPS.

  16. Partial continuation model and its application in mitigating systematic errors of double-differenced GPS measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Jianfeng; OU Jikun; REN Chao

    2005-01-01

    Based on the so-called partial continuation model with exact finite measurements, a new stochastic assessment procedure is introduced. For every satellite pair, the temporal correlation coefficient is estimated using the original double-differenced (DD) GPS measurements. And then, the Durbin-Watson test is applied to test specific hypothesis on the temporal correlation coefficient. Unless the test is not significant with a certain significant level, a data transformation is required. These transformed measurements are free of time correlations. For purpose of illustration, two static GPS baseline data sets are analyzed in detail. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed procedure can mitigate effectively the impact of systematic errors on DD GPS measurements.

  17. Undergraduate Research - Analyzing Data Sets: Global Positioning System (GPS) and Modeling the 1994 Northridge Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simila, G.; Shubin, C.; Horn, W.

    2003-12-01

    Our undergraduate research program (2000-2003), funded by NASA, consisted of four short courses on the analysis of selected data sets from GPS, solar physics, orbital mechanics, and proteomics. During the program, approximately 80 students were recruited from science, math, engineering, and technology disciplines. This short course introduced students to GPS and earthquake data analysis with additional presentations by scientists from JPL. Additional lectures involved discussions of the wave equation, Fourier analysis, statistical techniques, and computer applications of Excel and Matlab. Each student modeled the observed GPS displacements produced by the 1994 Northridge earthquake and presented an oral report. An additional component of the program involved students as research assistants engaged in a variety of projects at CSUN and JPL. Each short course continued the following semester with weekly research lectures.

  18. Comparison of observed and modeled seasonal crustal vertical displacements derived from multi-institution GPS and GRACE solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yanchao; Fan, Dongming; You, Wei

    2017-07-01

    Eleven GPS crustal vertical displacement (CVD) solutions for 110 IGS08/IGS14 core stations provided by the International Global Navigation Satellite Systems Service Analysis Centers are compared with seven Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE)-modeled CVD solutions. The results of the internal comparison of the GPS solutions from multiple institutions imply large uncertainty in the GPS postprocessing. There is also evidence that GRACE solutions from both different institutions and different processing approaches (mascon and traditional spherical harmonic coefficients) show similar results, suggesting that GRACE can provide CVD results of good internal consistency. When the uncertainty of the GPS data is accounted for, the GRACE data can explain as much as 50% of the actual signals and more than 80% of the GPS annual signals. Our study strongly indicates that GRACE data have great potential to correct the nontidal loading in GPS time series.

  19. The Limit Deposit Velocity model, a new approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miedema Sape A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In slurry transport of settling slurries in Newtonian fluids, it is often stated that one should apply a line speed above a critical velocity, because blow this critical velocity there is the danger of plugging the line. There are many definitions and names for this critical velocity. It is referred to as the velocity where a bed starts sliding or the velocity above which there is no stationary bed or sliding bed. Others use the velocity where the hydraulic gradient is at a minimum, because of the minimum energy consumption. Most models from literature are one term one equation models, based on the idea that the critical velocity can be explained that way.

  20. Gravimetry and GPS observations at Belgrano II station to test ocean tidal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Scheinert

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of a joint Argentine-German project gravimetric time series observations are being carried out at the Argentine Antarctic station Belgrano II. Two gravity meters were installed in the first half of February 2007. The set-up of the gravimeters as well as first results of the ongoing observations are discussed. Additionally, kinematic positions derived from a GPS-station at the Vahsel Bay glacier near Belgrano II can be used to get a first insight into the floating behavior of this glacier. The goal of these observations is to discriminate the effect of ocean tides and to test ocean tidal models. Since ocean tides are an important phenomenon that has to be considered in a variety of geoscientific investigations in polar regions, appropriate corrections have to be applied in the different analyses, e.g. to infer temporal mass variations from satellite data, to investigate ice-shelf dynamics and deformations, or to come up with precise station positions and velocities within a terrestrial reference system. However, the ocean tide models show larger uncertainties in the Antarctic seas and (moreover at areas covered by ice shelves and, therefore, need to be improved. This joint Argentine-German project is a contribution to the International Polar Year 2007/2008 and its project POLENET. After completion of the recordings at Belgrano II by the end of 2007 it is planned to move the equipment to San Mart ín in order to get a second gravimetric time series during the year 2008.

  1. A modified full velocity difference model with the consideration of velocity deviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Shi, Zhong-Ke

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a modified full velocity difference model (FVDM) based on car-following theory is proposed with the consideration of velocity deviation which represents the inexact judgement of velocity. The stability condition is obtained by the use of linear stability analysis. It is shown that the stability of traffic flow varies with the deviation extent of velocity. The Burgers, Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) and modified K-dV (MKdV) equations are derived to describe the triangular shock waves, soliton waves and kink-antikink waves in the stable, metastable and unstable region, respectively. The numerical simulations show a good agreement with the analytical results, such as density wave, hysteresis loop, acceleration, deceleration and so on. The results show that traffic congestion can be suppressed by taking the positive effect of velocity deviation into account. By taking the positive effect of high estimate of velocity into account, the unrealistic high deceleration and negative velocity which occur in FVDM will be eliminated in the proposed model.

  2. Comparison of Ionospheric TEC Derived from GPS and IRI 2012 Model during Geomagnetic Storms at Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlia, Dessi; Wu, Falin

    2016-07-01

    This paper investigates the variations of vertical Total Electron Content (VTEC) at Manado, Indonesia (geographic coordinates : lat 1.34 ° S and long 124.82 ° E) for period 2013. The GPS measured TEC is compared with the TEC derived from the IRI (International Reference Ionosphere) 2012 model. Vertical TEC measurements obtained from dual frequency GPS receiver that is GISTM (GPS Ionospheric Scintillations and TEC monitor). Variation of TEC validate to IRI 2012 model at Manado station has been compared with the model for three different topside of electron density namely NeQuick, IRI-01-Corr and IRI2001.There is a need to investigation on diurnal, seasonal variations, solar activity dependence of TEC and including effects of space weather related events to TEC and modeling of TEC. In this paper, diurnal and seasonal variations of VTEC and the effect of VTEC due to space weather events like Geomagnetic storms are analyzed. The result show that the TEC prediction using IRI-2001 model overestimated the GPS TEC measurements, while IRI-NeQuick and IRI-01-corr show a tendency to underestimates the observed TEC during the day time particularly in low latitude region in the maximum solar activity period (2013). The variations of VTEC during 17th March, 2013, 29th June, 2013 storms are analyzed. During 17th March,2013 storm enhancement in VTEC with Kp value 6 and Disturbance storm index (DST) -132 nT. During 29th June, 2013 storm VTEC depletion with value 7 and DST -98 nT. Significant deviations in VTEC during the main phase of the storms are observed. It is found that the response of ionospheric TEC consist of effects of both enhancement and depletions in ionospheric structures (positive and negative storm). Keywords: TEC ionosphere, GPS, GISTM, IRI 2012 model, solar activity, geomagnetic storm

  3. An improved car-following model considering relative velocity fluctuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shaowei; Shi, Zhongke

    2016-07-01

    To explore and evaluate the impacts of relative velocity fluctuation on the dynamic characteristics and fuel consumptions of traffic flow, we present an improved car-following model considering relative velocity fluctuation based on the full velocity difference model, then we carry out several numerical simulations to determine the optimal time window length and to explore how relative velocity fluctuation affects cars' velocity and its fluctuation as well as fuel consumptions. It can be found that the improved car-following model can describe the phase transition of traffic flow and estimate the evolution of traffic congestion, and that taking relative velocity fluctuation into account in designing the advanced adaptive cruise control strategy can improve the traffic flow stability and reduce fuel consumptions.

  4. A model for seasonal changes in GPS positions and seismic wave speeds due to thermoelastic and hydrologic variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, V.C.

    2011-01-01

    It is known that GPS time series contain a seasonal variation that is not due to tectonic motions, and it has recently been shown that crustal seismic velocities may also vary seasonally. In order to explain these changes, a number of hypotheses have been given, among which thermoelastic and hydrology-induced stresses and strains are leading candidates. Unfortunately, though, since a general framework does not exist for understanding such seasonal variations, it is currently not possible to quickly evaluate the plausibility of these hypotheses. To fill this gap in the literature, I generalize a two-dimensional thermoelastic strain model to provide an analytic solution for the displacements and wave speed changes due to either thermoelastic stresses or hydrologic loading, which consists of poroelastic stresses and purely elastic stresses. The thermoelastic model assumes a periodic surface temperature, and the hydrologic models similarly assume a periodic near-surface water load. Since all three models are two-dimensional and periodic, they are expected to only approximate any realistic scenario; but the models nonetheless provide a quantitative framework for estimating the effects of thermoelastic and hydrologic variations. Quantitative comparison between the models and observations is further complicated by the large uncertainty in some of the relevant parameters. Despite this uncertainty, though, I find that maximum realistic thermoelastic effects are unlikely to explain a large fraction of the observed annual variation in a typical GPS displacement time series or of the observed annual variations in seismic wave speeds in southern California. Hydrologic loading, on the other hand, may be able to explain a larger fraction of both the annual variations in displacements and seismic wave speeds. Neither model is likely to explain all of the seismic wave speed variations inferred from observations. However, more definitive conclusions cannot be made until the model

  5. The stability analysis of the full velocity and acceleration velocity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaomei, Zhao; Ziyou, Gao

    2007-03-01

    The stability analysis is one of the important problems in the traffic flow theory, since the congestion phenomena can be regarded as the instability and the phase transition of a dynamical system. Theoretically, we analyze the stable conditions of the full velocity and acceleration difference model (FVADM), which is proposed by introducing the acceleration difference term based on the previous car-following models (the optimal velocity model and the full velocity difference model, OVM and FVDM). By numerical simulations, it is found that when the traffic flow is unstable, the traffic jam in the FVADM is weaker than that in the FVDM. Also it is observed that the spreading speed of the jam is slower in the FVADM than that in the FVDM and the fluctuations of vehicles in the FVADM are smaller than those in the FVDM. Therefore, the acceleration difference term has strong effects on traffic dynamics and plays an important role in stabilizing the traffic flow.

  6. Multiplicative Inhibitory Velocity Detector and Multi-Velocity Motion Detection Neural Network Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    Motion perception is one of the most important aspects of the biological visual system,from which people get a lot of information of the natural world.In this paper,trying to simulate the neurons in MT(motion area in visual cortex)which respond selectively both in direction and speed,the authors propose a novel multiplicative inhibitory velocity detector(MIVD)model,whose spatiotemporal joint parameter K determines its optimal velocity.Based on the Response Amplitude Disparity(RAD) property of MIVD,two multi-velocity fusion neural networks(a simple one and an active one)are built to detect the velocity of 1-Dimension motion.The experiments show that the active MIVD Neural Network with a feedback fusion method has a relatively better result.

  7. Review and perspectives: Understanding natural-hazards-generated ionospheric perturbations using GPS measurements and coupled modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komjathy, Attila; Yang, Yu-Ming; Meng, Xing; Verkhoglyadova, Olga; Mannucci, Anthony J.; Langley, Richard B.

    2016-07-01

    Natural hazards including earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and tsunamis have been significant threats to humans throughout recorded history. Global navigation satellite systems (GNSS; including the Global Positioning System (GPS)) receivers have become primary sensors to measure signatures associated with natural hazards. These signatures typically include GPS-derived seismic deformation measurements, coseismic vertical displacements, and real-time GPS-derived ocean buoy positioning estimates. Another way to use GPS observables is to compute the ionospheric total electron content (TEC) to measure, model, and monitor postseismic ionospheric disturbances caused by, e.g., earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and tsunamis. In this paper, we review research progress at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and elsewhere using examples of ground-based and spaceborne observation of natural hazards that generated TEC perturbations. We present results for state-of-the-art imaging using ground-based and spaceborne ionospheric measurements and coupled atmosphere-ionosphere modeling of ionospheric TEC perturbations. We also report advancements and chart future directions in modeling and inversion techniques to estimate tsunami wave heights and ground surface displacements using TEC measurements and error estimates. Our initial retrievals strongly suggest that both ground-based and spaceborne GPS remote sensing techniques could play a critical role in detection and imaging of the upper atmosphere signatures of natural hazards including earthquakes and tsunamis. We found that combining ground-based and spaceborne measurements may be crucial in estimating critical geophysical parameters such as tsunami wave heights and ground surface displacements using TEC observations. The GNSS-based remote sensing of natural-hazard-induced ionospheric disturbances could be applied to and used in operational tsunami and earthquake early warning systems.

  8. The performance analysis of a real-time integrated INS/GPS vehicle navigation system with abnormal GPS measurement elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Kai-Wei; Duong, Thanh Trung; Liao, Jhen-Kai

    2013-08-15

    The integration of an Inertial Navigation System (INS) and the Global Positioning System (GPS) is common in mobile mapping and navigation applications to seamlessly determine the position, velocity, and orientation of the mobile platform. In most INS/GPS integrated architectures, the GPS is considered to be an accurate reference with which to correct for the systematic errors of the inertial sensors, which are composed of biases, scale factors and drift. However, the GPS receiver may produce abnormal pseudo-range errors mainly caused by ionospheric delay, tropospheric delay and the multipath effect. These errors degrade the overall position accuracy of an integrated system that uses conventional INS/GPS integration strategies such as loosely coupled (LC) and tightly coupled (TC) schemes. Conventional tightly coupled INS/GPS integration schemes apply the Klobuchar model and the Hopfield model to reduce pseudo-range delays caused by ionospheric delay and tropospheric delay, respectively, but do not address the multipath problem. However, the multipath effect (from reflected GPS signals) affects the position error far more significantly in a consumer-grade GPS receiver than in an expensive, geodetic-grade GPS receiver. To avoid this problem, a new integrated INS/GPS architecture is proposed. The proposed method is described and applied in a real-time integrated system with two integration strategies, namely, loosely coupled and tightly coupled schemes, respectively. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, field tests with various scenarios are conducted and the results are compared with a reliable reference system.

  9. a Revised Stochastic Optimal Velocity Model Considering the Velocity Gap with a Preceding Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigaki, Keizo; Tanimoto, Jun; Hagishima, Aya

    The stochastic optimal velocity (SOV) model, which is a cellular automata model, has been widely used because of its good reproducibility of the fundamental diagram, despite its simplicity. However, it has a drawback: in SOV, a vehicle that is temporarily stopped takes a long time to restart. This study proposes a revised SOV model that suppresses this particular defect; the basic concept of this model is derived from the car-following model, which considers the velocity gap between a particular vehicle and the preceding vehicle. A series of simulations identifies the model parameters and clarifies that the proposed model can reproduce the three traffic phases: free, jam, and even synchronized phases, which cannot be achieved by the conventional SOV model.

  10. Adjustable box-wing model for solar radiation pressure impacting GPS satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Solano, C. J.; Hugentobler, U.; Steigenberger, P.

    2012-04-01

    One of the major uncertainty sources affecting Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite orbits is the direct solar radiation pressure. In this paper a new model for the solar radiation pressure on GPS satellites is presented that is based on a box-wing satellite model, and assumes nominal attitude. The box-wing model is based on the physical interaction between solar radiation and satellite surfaces, and can be adjusted to fit the GPS tracking data. To compensate the effects of solar radiation pressure, the International GNSS Service (IGS) analysis centers employ a variety of approaches, ranging from purely empirical models based on in-orbit behavior, to physical models based on pre-launch spacecraft structural analysis. It has been demonstrated, however, that the physical models fail to predict the real orbit behavior with sufficient accuracy, mainly due to deviations from nominal attitude, inaccurately known optical properties, or aging of the satellite surfaces. The adjustable box-wing model presented in this paper is an intermediate approach between the physical/analytical models and the empirical models. The box-wing model fits the tracking data by adjusting mainly the optical properties of the satellite's surfaces. In addition, the so called Y-bias and a parameter related to a rotation lag angle of the solar panels around their rotation axis (about 1.5° for Block II/IIA and 0.5° for Block IIR) are estimated. This last parameter, not previously identified for GPS satellites, is a key factor for precise orbit determination. For this study GPS orbits are generated based on one year (2007) of tracking data, with the processing scheme derived from the Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE). Two solutions are computed, one using the adjustable box-wing model and one using the CODE empirical model. Using this year of data the estimated parameters and orbits are analyzed. The performance of the models is comparable, when looking at orbit overlap and orbit

  11. Advanced corrections for InSAR using GPS and numerical weather models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, J. H.; Cossu, F.; Amelung, F.; Businger, S.; Cherubini, T.

    2016-12-01

    The complex spatial and temporal changes in the atmospheric propagation delay of the radar signal remain the single biggest factor limiting Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar's (InSAR) potential for hazard monitoring and mitigation. A new generation of InSAR systems is being built and launched, and optimizing the science and hazard applications of these systems requires advanced methodologies to mitigate tropospheric noise. We present preliminary results from an investigation into the application of GPS and numerical weather models for generating tropospheric correction fields. We use the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to generate a 900 m spatial resolution atmospheric model covering the Big Island of Hawaii and an even higher, 300 m resolution grid over Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes. By comparing a range of approaches, from the simplest, using reanalyses based on typically available meteorological observations, through to the "kitchen-sink" approach of assimilating all relevant data sets into our custom analyses, we examine the impact of the additional data sets on the atmospheric models and their effectiveness in correcting InSAR data. We focus particularly on the assimilation of information from the more than 60 GPS sites in the island. We ingest zenith tropospheric delay estimates from these sites directly into the WRF analyses, and also perform double-difference tomography using the phase residuals from the GPS processing to robustly incorporate information on atmospheric heterogeneity from the GPS data into the models. We assess our performance through comparisons of our atmospheric models with external observations not ingested into the model, and through the effectiveness of the derived phase screens in reducing InSAR variance. This work will produce best-practice recommendations for the use of weather models for InSAR correction, and inform efforts to design a global strategy for the NISAR mission, for both low-latency and definitive

  12. Assessment of stochastic models for GPS measurements with different types of receivers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI BoFeng; SHEN YunZhong; XU PeiLiang

    2008-01-01

    The stochastic model plays an important role in parameter estimation. The optimal estimator in the sense of least squares can only be obtained by using the correct stochastic model and consequently guarantees the precise positioning in GPS applications. In this contribution, the GPS measurements, collected by different types of geodetic dual-frequency receiver pairs on ultra-short baselines with a sampling interval of 1 s, are used to address their stochastic models, which include the variances of all observation types, the relationship between the observation accuracy and its elevation angle, the time correlation, as well as the correlation between observation types. The results show that the commonly used stochastic model with the assumption that all the raw GPS measurements are independent with the same variance does not meet the need for precise positioning and the elevation-dependent weight model cannot work well for different receiver and observation types. The time correlation and cross correlation are significant as well. It is therefore concluded that the stochastic model is much associ-ated with the receiver and observation types and should be specified for the receiver and observation types.

  13. Comparison of ionospheric characteristic parameters obtained by GPS and ionosonde with IRI model over China

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cheng Wang

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a comparison of ionospheric characteristic parameters obtained by a GPS networkand three ionosondes at Mohe (122.4^◦E, 53.5^◦N, dip angle 70.983^◦N), Zuolingzhen (114.6^◦E, 30.5^◦N, dipangle 46.350^◦N), and Fuke (109.1^◦E, 19.5^◦N, dip angle 27.083^◦N) located in China with an IRI model inthe year 2011. Observed NmF2 and hmF2 values at the three stations are compared with IRI2007 andIRI2012 predictions, respectively. The results show that there are clear linear correlations between theobserved values and the IRI model predicted values. The IRI model gives overestimations at the threestations mostly in 2011. For the NmF2 and hmF2 values, most of the results show that the IRI2012predicted values are closer to the observed values compared with those of IRI2007. Additionally, theGPS TEC values derived from the Crustal Movement Observation Network of China (CMONOC) arecompared with the IRI2012 predictions. From the results, it is evident that the IRI2012 model predictionsfollow the normal trend of diurnal variation of GPS measured TEC monthly means but do not reproducethe measured data well. The IRI2012 model overestimates electron density in the latter part of spring aswell as the first half of autumn and winter and underestimates electron density in early spring and thelatter part of autumn. Referring to GPS TEC, the precision of the IRI2012 model predicted TEC valuesis ∼5 TECU over China. It may also be noted that there are two discontinuities of IRI-TEC monthlymeans appearing in November and December of the year 2011. This brings a bias of ∼3 TECU of TECvalues between two adjacent months.

  14. A Vs30-derived Near-surface Seismic Velocity Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, G. P.; Jordan, T. H.; Small, P.; Maechling, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    Shallow material properties, S-wave velocity in particular, strongly influence ground motions, so must be accurately characterized for ground-motion simulations. Available near-surface velocity information generally exceeds that which is accommodated by crustal velocity models, such as current versions of the SCEC Community Velocity Model (CVM-S4) or the Harvard model (CVM-H6). The elevation-referenced CVM-H voxel model introduces rasterization artifacts in the near-surface due to course sample spacing, and sample depth dependence on local topographic elevation. To address these issues, we propose a method to supplement crustal velocity models, in the upper few hundred meters, with a model derived from available maps of Vs30 (the average S-wave velocity down to 30 meters). The method is universally applicable to regions without direct measures of Vs30 by using Vs30 estimates from topographic slope (Wald, et al. 2007). In our current implementation for Southern California, the geology-based Vs30 map of Wills and Clahan (2006) is used within California, and topography-estimated Vs30 is used outside of California. Various formulations for S-wave velocity depth dependence, such as linear spline and polynomial interpolation, are evaluated against the following priorities: (a) capability to represent a wide range of soil and rock velocity profile types; (b) smooth transition to the crustal velocity model; (c) ability to reasonably handle poor spatial correlation of Vs30 and crustal velocity data; (d) simplicity and minimal parameterization; and (e) computational efficiency. The favored model includes cubic and square-root depth dependence, with the model extending to a depth of 350 meters. Model parameters are fit to Boore and Joyner's (1997) generic rock profile as well as CVM-4 soil profiles for the NEHRP soil classification types. P-wave velocity and density are derived from S-wave velocity by the scaling laws of Brocher (2005). Preliminary assessment of the new model

  15. A Computational Model for Velocity Separation in Shallow Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋志尧; 严以新; 沈红艳; 孔俊

    2002-01-01

    Based on the hydrodynamical feature and the theoretical velocity profiles of tidal flow and wind-induced flow in shal-low sea, a computational model is established for the first time, which can separate observed velocity into tidal velocityand wind-induced velocity by use of the least square method. With the model, not only the surface velocities of tidal flowand wind-induced flow are obtained, but also the bed roughness height is determined and the wind velocity above the wa-ter surface is estimated. For verification of the model, the observed velocity in the Yellow River Estuary and the laborato-ry test is separated, then it is applied to the Yangtze River Estuary. All the results are satisfactory. The research resultsshow that the model is simple in method, feasible in process and reasonable in result. The model is a valid approach toanalysis and computation of field data, and can be applied to separate the observed velocity in shallow sea; at the sametime, reasonable boundary conditions of the surface and bottom can be obtained for two- and three-dimensional numericalsimulation.

  16. Strategies for 4-D Regional Modeling of Water Vapour Using GPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. H. Skone; S.M. Shrestha

    2003-01-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) signals experience ranging errors due to propagation through the neutral atmosphere. These range delays consist of a hydrostatic component, dependent on air pressure and temperature, and a wet delay dependent on water vapour pressure and temperature.Range delays arising from the hydrostatic component can be computed with accuracies of a few millimeters using existing models, provided that surface barometric or meteorological data are available. By using a regional network of GPS reference stations, it is possible to recover estimates of the Slant Wet Delay to all satellites in view. Observations of the Slant Wet Delay (SWD) can be used to model the vertical and horizontal structure of water vapour over a local area. These techniques are based on a tomographic approach using the SWD as input observables, where 4-D models of the wet refractivity may be derived. This method allows improved resolution of water vapour estimates for precise positioning applications and assimilation into Numerical Weather Predictions (NWP). In this paper we present strategies for real-time modeling of wet refractivity, with simulations and preliminary results of data processing for a regional GPS network in Southern California.

  17. Ingestion of FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC GPS data into La Plata Ionospheric Model: A preliminary assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, J. Federico; Brunini, Claudio

    2017-08-01

    La Plata Ionospheric Model (LPIM; Brunini et al., 2011) has been upgraded to a new stage enabling the ingestion of sTEC values retrieved from GPS receivers on board the FORMOSAT-3 Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC) satellites, in order to determine corrections to the global mean values of the ionosphere F2 layer critical frequency, fo F 2 (related to the peak density, Nm F 2) and the F2 layer peak height, hm F 2 .

  18. Velocity dispersion of M87 using a population model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angione, R. J.; Junkkarinen, V.; Talbert, F. D.; Brandt, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    The velocity dispersion of M 87 (NGC 4486) is determined using (1) a single star of class K0 III and (2) two different population models to represent the spectral region of the G-band. Although the models fit the overall spectrum better than the single-star, there is only a small difference in the derived velocity dispersion. This work revises the earlier velocity dispersion result of Brandt and Roosen (1969) down to 350 km/sec, in agreement with Faber and Jackson (1976) and Sargent et al. (1978).

  19. Appending High-Resolution Elevation Data to GPS Speed Traces for Vehicle Energy Modeling and Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, E.; Burton, E.; Duran, A.; Gonder, J.

    2014-06-01

    Accurate and reliable global positioning system (GPS)-based vehicle use data are highly valuable for many transportation, analysis, and automotive considerations. Model-based design, real-world fuel economy analysis, and the growing field of autonomous and connected technologies (including predictive powertrain control and self-driving cars) all have a vested interest in high-fidelity estimation of powertrain loads and vehicle usage profiles. Unfortunately, road grade can be a difficult property to extract from GPS data with consistency. In this report, we present a methodology for appending high-resolution elevation data to GPS speed traces via a static digital elevation model. Anomalous data points in the digital elevation model are addressed during a filtration/smoothing routine, resulting in an elevation profile that can be used to calculate road grade. This process is evaluated against a large, commercially available height/slope dataset from the Navteq/Nokia/HERE Advanced Driver Assistance Systems product. Results will show good agreement with the Advanced Driver Assistance Systems data in the ability to estimate road grade between any two consecutive points in the contiguous United States.

  20. Complex Road Intersection Modelling Based on Low-Frequency GPS Track Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J.; Deng, M.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, H.

    2017-09-01

    It is widely accepted that digital map becomes an indispensable guide for human daily traveling. Traditional road network maps are produced in the time-consuming and labour-intensive ways, such as digitizing printed maps and extraction from remote sensing images. At present, a large number of GPS trajectory data collected by floating vehicles makes it a reality to extract high-detailed and up-to-date road network information. Road intersections are often accident-prone areas and very critical to route planning and the connectivity of road networks is mainly determined by the topological geometry of road intersections. A few studies paid attention on detecting complex road intersections and mining the attached traffic information (e.g., connectivity, topology and turning restriction) from massive GPS traces. To the authors' knowledge, recent studies mainly used high frequency (1 s sampling rate) trajectory data to detect the crossroads regions or extract rough intersection models. It is still difficult to make use of low frequency (20-100 s) and easily available trajectory data to modelling complex road intersections geometrically and semantically. The paper thus attempts to construct precise models for complex road intersection by using low frequency GPS traces. We propose to firstly extract the complex road intersections by a LCSS-based (Longest Common Subsequence) trajectory clustering method, then delineate the geometry shapes of complex road intersections by a K-segment principle curve algorithm, and finally infer the traffic constraint rules inside the complex intersections.

  1. Global Ionospheric Modelling using Multi-GNSS: BeiDou, Galileo, GLONASS and GPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiaodong; Zhang, Xiaohong; Xie, Weiliang; Zhang, Keke; Yuan, Yongqiang; Li, Xingxing

    2016-09-01

    The emergence of China’s Beidou, Europe’s Galileo and Russia’s GLONASS satellites has multiplied the number of ionospheric piercing points (IPP) offered by GPS alone. This provides great opportunities for deriving precise global ionospheric maps (GIMs) with high resolution to improve positioning accuracy and ionospheric monitoring capabilities. In this paper, the GIM is developed based on multi-GNSS (GPS, GLONASS, BeiDou and Galileo) observations in the current multi-constellation condition. The performance and contribution of multi-GNSS for ionospheric modelling are carefully analysed and evaluated. Multi-GNSS observations of over 300 stations from the Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) and International GNSS Service (IGS) networks for two months are processed. The results show that the multi-GNSS GIM products are better than those of GIM products based on GPS-only. Differential code biases (DCB) are by-products of the multi-GNSS ionosphere modelling, the corresponding standard deviations (STDs) are 0.06 ns, 0.10 ns, 0.18 ns and 0.15 ns for GPS, GLONASS, BeiDou and Galileo, respectively in satellite, and the STDs for the receiver are approximately 0.2~0.4 ns. The single-frequency precise point positioning (SF-PPP) results indicate that the ionospheric modelling accuracy of the proposed method based on multi-GNSS observations is better than that of the current dual-system GIM in specific areas.

  2. Velocity model optimization for surface microseismic monitoring via amplitude stacking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Haiyu; Wang, Zhongren; Zeng, Xiaoxian; Lü, Hao; Zhou, Xiaohua; Chen, Zubin

    2016-12-01

    A usable velocity model in microseismic projects plays a crucial role in achieving statistically reliable microseismic event locations. Existing methods for velocity model optimization rely mainly on picking arrival times at individual receivers. However, for microseismic monitoring with surface stations, seismograms of perforation shots have such low signal-to-noise ratios (S/N) that they do not yield sufficiently reliable picks. In this study, we develop a framework for constructing a 1-D flat-layered a priori velocity model using a non-linear optimization technique based on amplitude stacking. The energy focusing of the perforation shot is improved thanks to very fast simulated annealing (VFSA), and the accuracies of shot relocations are used to evaluate whether the resultant velocity model can be used for microseismic event location. Our method also includes a conventional migration-based location technique that utilizes successive grid subdivisions to improve computational efficiency and source location accuracy. Because unreasonable a priori velocity model information and interference due to additive noise are the major contributors to inaccuracies in perforation shot locations, we use velocity model optimization as a compensation scheme. Using synthetic tests, we show that accurate locations of perforation shots can be recovered to within 2 m, even with pre-stack S/N ratios as low as 0.1 at individual receivers. By applying the technique to a coal-bed gas reservoir in Western China, we demonstrate that perforation shot location can be recovered to within the tolerance of the well tip location.

  3. Offset detection in GPS coordinate time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazeaux, J.; King, M. A.; Williams, S. D.

    2013-12-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) time series are commonly affected by offsets of unknown magnitude and the large volume of data globally warrants investigation of automated detection approaches. The Detection of Offsets in GPS Experiment (DOGEx) showed that accuracy of Global Positioning System (GPS) time series can be significantly improved by applying statistical offset detection methods (see Gazeaux et al. (2013)). However, the best of these approaches did not perform as well as manual detection by expert analysts. Many of the features of GPS coordinates time series have not yet been fully taken into account in existing methods. Here, we apply Bayesian theory in order to make use of prior knowledge of the site noise characteristics and metadata in an attempt to make the offset detection more accurate. In the past decades, Bayesian theory has shown relevant results for a widespread range of applications, but has not yet been applied to GPS coordinates time series. Such methods incorporate different inputs such as a dynamic model (linear trend, periodic signal..) and a-priori information in a process that provides the best estimate of parameters (velocity, phase and amplitude of periodic signals...) based on all the available information. We test the new method on the DOGEx simulated dataset and compare it to previous solutions, and to Monte-Carlo method to test the accuracy of the procedure. We make a preliminary extension of the DOGEx dataset to introduce metadata information, allowing us to test the value of this data type in detecting offsets. The flexibility, robustness and limitations of the new approach are discussed. Gazeaux, J. Williams, S., King, M., Bos, M., Dach, R., Deo, M.,Moore, A.W., Ostini, L., Petrie, E., Roggero, M., Teferle, F.N., Olivares, G.,Webb, F.H. 2013. Detecting offsets in GPS time series: First results from the detection of offsets in GPS experiment. Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth 118. 5. pp:2169-9356. Keywords : GPS

  4. A Total Generalized Optimal Velocity Model and Its Numerical Tests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Wen-xing; LIU Yun-cai

    2008-01-01

    A car-following model named total generalized optimal velocity model (TGOVM) was developed with a consideration of an arbitrary number of preceding vehicles before current one based on analyzing the previous models such as optimal velocity model (OVM), generalized OVM (GOVM) and improved GOVM (IGOVM). This model describes the physical phenomena of traffic flow more exactly and realistically than previous models. Also the performance of this model was checked out by simulating the acceleration and de- celeration process for a small delay time. On a single circular lane, the evolution of the traffic congestion was studied for a different number of headways and relative velocities of the preceding vehicles being taken into account. The simulation results show that TGOVM is reasonable and correct.

  5. Flood Water Crossing: Laboratory Model Investigations for Water Velocity Reductions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasnon N.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of floods may give a negative impact towards road traffic in terms of difficulties in mobilizing traffic as well as causing damage to the vehicles, which later cause them to be stuck in the traffic and trigger traffic problems. The high velocity of water flows occur when there is no existence of objects capable of diffusing the water velocity on the road surface. The shape, orientation and size of the object to be placed beside the road as a diffuser are important for the effective flow attenuation of water. In order to investigate the water flow, a laboratory experiment was set up and models were constructed to study the flow velocity reduction. The velocity of water before and after passing through the diffuser objects was investigated. This paper focuses on laboratory experiments to determine the flow velocity of the water using sensors before and after passing through two best diffuser objects chosen from a previous flow pattern experiment.

  6. Underwater Digital Terrain Model with GPS-aided High-resolution Profile-scan Sonar Images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yong-jun; KOU Xin-jian

    2008-01-01

    The whole procedures of underwater digital terrain model (DTM) were presented by building with the global positioning system (GPS) aided high-resolution profile-scan sonar images. The algorithm regards the digital image scanned in a cycle as the raw data. First the label rings are detected with the improved Hough transform (HT) method and followed by curve-fitting for accurate location; then the most probable window for each ping is detected with weighted neighborhood gray-level co-occurrence matrix; and finally the DTM is built by integrating the GPS data with sonar data for 3D visualization. The case of an underwater trench for immersed tube road tunnel is illustrated.

  7. Vertical motions in Thailand after the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman Earthquake from GPS observations and its geophysical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satirapod, C.; Trisirisatayawong, I.; Fleitout, L.; Garaud, J. D.; Simons, W. J. F.

    2013-04-01

    Following previous findings from ongoing GPS research in Thailand since 2004 we continue to exploit the GPS technique to monitor and model land motions induced by the Sumatra-Andaman Earthquake. Our latest results show that up to the end of 2010, Thailand has been co-seismically displaced and is subsequently undergoing a post-seismic horizontal deformation with total displacements (co-seismic plus post-seismic) ranging from 10.5 to 74.7 cm. We observed the largest horizontal displacements in the southern part of Thailand and moderate and small displacements in the central and northern parts. In addition to horizontal displacements throughout Thailand, continuous GPS measurements show that large parts of Thailand are subsiding at rates up to 1 cm/yr. It is the first time that such vertical post-seismic deformations at large distances (650-1500 km away from the Earthquake's epicentre) have been recorded. We have investigated the physical processes leading to the observed subsidence. While after-slip on the subduction interface induces negligible or even slightly positive vertical motions, relaxation in the asthenosphere is associated with a sizable subsidence. Predictions from a 3D finite element model feature an asthenosphere with an effective viscosity of the order of 3 \\midast 1018 Pas, fit the horizontal post-seismic data and the observed subsidence well. This model is then used to predict the subsidence over the whole seismic cycle. The subsidence should go on with a diminishing rate through the next two decades and its final magnitude should not exceed 10 cm in the Bangkok area.The post-seismic subsidence makes it difficult to identify other geophysical signals, particularly sea level rise, when observed from tide gauge data and thus there is a need for reliable estimation of subsidence velocities. This phenomenon may also worsen coastal erosion and flooding from sea water and so cause a considerable impact on the socio-economic development of coastal and low

  8. Crustal Velocity Model of the Altai-Sayan Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrend, M. J.; Mackey, K. G.

    2016-12-01

    We have developed a crustal velocity model for the the region encompassed by the Altai-Sayan Seismic Network of South-Central Russia (45o-55o N. X 79o-98o E.). Geographically, the study area includes the Altai and Sayan Mountain Ranges, Western Mongolia, Eastern Kazakhstan, and Northwest China. To develop our model we used phase arrival data from approximately 175 larger earthquakes recorded by the Altai-Sayan Seismic Network between 1977 and 1981 and reported in the bulletin Materialy po Seismichnosti Sibiri. To develop our model, we divided the region into 1o N-S x 2o E-W cells. Events within each cell, plus a small surrounding area, were relocated multiple times using a grid-search routine, in effort to determine the best fitting Pg and Sg velocities. Pg and Sg phase arrivals are generally from the 100-1000 km range and represent secondary arriving phases. These arrivals are dominant in this region and we consider the time picks and phase identifications to be reliable. Velocities tested range from 5.650 to 6.350 km/s for Pg and from 3.310 to 3.710 km/s for Sg. The best fitting velocities for each cell were then assigned to the geographic coordinates of the cell's center point. The standard Jeffreys-Bullen model was used for Pn velocities. The best fitting Pg and Sg velocities are those that minimize the average event residuals in a cell. High residual arrivals were omitted from the location process. In our model, Pg velocities range from 5.975-6.325 km/s, while Sg velocities range from 3.510-3.630 km/s, though the higher velocity extremes are constrained by one event and are not statistically significant. The average Pg velocity of the study area was, 6.147 km/s, and average Sg, 3.576 km/s. Geologically, these velocities are associated with the Central Asiatic Foldbelt and are consistent with regional crustal velocities along the southern edge of the Siberian Craton to the East as determined by previous studies.

  9. A new settling velocity model to describe secondary sedimentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramin, Elham; Wágner, Dorottya Sarolta; Yde, Lars

    2014-01-01

    distribution in SSTs can be predicted using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools. Despite extensive studies on the compression settling behaviour of activated sludge and the development of advanced settling velocity models for use in SST simulations, these models are not often used, due to the challenges...... associated with their calibration. In this study, we developed a new settling velocity model, including hindered, transient and compression settling, and showed that it can be calibrated to data from a simple, novel settling column experimental set-up using the Bayesian optimization method DREAM......(ZS). In addition, correlations between the Herschel-Bulkley rheological model parameters and sludge concentration were identified with data from batch rheological experiments. A 2-D axisymmetric CFD model of a circular SST containing the new settling velocity and rheological model was validated with full...

  10. AIUB-CHAMP02S: The influence of GNSS model changes on gravity field recovery using spaceborne GPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prange, L.; Jäggi, A.; Dach, R.; Bock, H.; Beutler, G.; Mervart, L.

    2010-01-01

    The gravity field model AIUB-CHAMP02S, which is based on six years of CHAMP GPS data, is presented here. The gravity field parameters were derived using a two step procedure: In a first step a kinematic trajectory of a low Earth orbiting (LEO) satellite is computed using the GPS data from the on-board receiver. In this step the orbits and clock corrections of the GPS satellites as well as the Earth rotation parameters (ERPs) are introduced as known. In the second step this kinematic orbit is represented by a gravitational force model and orbit parameters. In order to ensure full model consistency the GPS satellite orbits and clock corrections, which have been used for the generation of the kinematic LEO trajectories, were taken from the Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE), located at AIUB (Dach et al., 2009). In recent years many changes have taken place in the processing chain of global navigation satellite system (GNSS) data, e.g., the implementation of absolute antenna phase center modeling. Therefore a reprocessing of the GPS data to obtain state-of-the-art GPS satellite orbits and clock corrections was performed. From these updated GPS products new kinematic orbits of the CHAMP satellite were derived for the years 2002-2007. From the updated CHAMP trajectories spherical harmonic (SH) coefficients of the Earth’s gravity field were determined in exactly the same way as from the original LEO orbit. This allowed us to study the impact of the improved LEO orbits on the derived gravity field parameters and the generation of the multi-year gravity field model AIUB-CHAMP02S. The change of the IGS standards creates an inconsistency to existing global gravity field models, which mainly affects the zonal coefficients of low even degrees. The inconsistency is caused by the change to the absolute antenna phase center model and can be reduced by estimating the phase center variation of the CHAMP GPS antenna.

  11. Density Models for Velocity Analysis of Jet Impinged CEDM Missile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Won Ho; Kang, Tae Kyo; Cho, Yeon Ho; Chang, Sang Gyoon; Lee, Dae Hee [KEPCO EnC, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    A control element drive mechanism (CEDM) can be a potential missile in the reactor head area during one of the postulated accidents. The CEDM is propelled by the high speed water jet discharged from a broken upper head nozzle. The jet expansion models to predict the missile velocity have been investigated by Kang et al. The previous work of Kang et al. showed a continuous increase in missile velocity as the CEDM missile travels. But it is not natural in that two phase flow from the nozzle break exit tends to disperse and the thrust force on the missile decreases along the distance of the travel. The jet flow also interacts with the air surrounding itself. Therefore, the density change has to be included in the estimation of the missile velocity. In this paper, two density change models of the water jet are introduced for the jet expansion models along with the distance from the nozzle break location. The first one is the direct approximation model. Two density approximation models are introduced to predict the CEDM missile velocity. For each model, the effects of the expanded jet area were included as the area ratio to the exit nozzle area. In direct approximation model, the results have showed rapid decrease in both density and missile velocity. In pressure approach model, the density change is assumed perfectly proportional to the pressure change, and the results showed relatively smooth change in both density and missile velocity comparing to the direct approximation model. Using the model developed by Kang et al.., the maximum missile velocity is about 4 times greater comparing to the pressure approach model since the density is constant as the jet density at the nozzle exit in their model. Pressure approach model has benefits in that this model adopted neither curve fitting nor extrapolation unlike the direct approximation model, and included the effects of density change which are not considered in the model developed by Kang et al. So, this model is

  12. GPS satellite and receiver instrumental biases estimation using least squares method for accurate ionosphere modelling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Sasibhushana Rao

    2007-10-01

    The positional accuracy of the Global Positioning System (GPS)is limited due to several error sources.The major error is ionosphere.By augmenting the GPS,the Category I (CAT I)Precision Approach (PA)requirements can be achieved.The Space-Based Augmentation System (SBAS)in India is known as GPS Aided Geo Augmented Navigation (GAGAN).One of the prominent errors in GAGAN that limits the positional accuracy is instrumental biases.Calibration of these biases is particularly important in achieving the CAT I PA landings.In this paper,a new algorithm is proposed to estimate the instrumental biases by modelling the TEC using 4th order polynomial.The algorithm uses values corresponding to a single station for one month period and the results confirm the validity of the algorithm.The experimental results indicate that the estimation precision of the satellite-plus-receiver instrumental bias is of the order of ± 0.17 nsec.The observed mean bias error is of the order − 3.638 nsec and − 4.71 nsec for satellite 1 and 31 respectively.It is found that results are consistent over the period.

  13. Forward modeling of atmospheric, oceanic and hydrological loading effects in GPS processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boy, Jean-Paul; Bauder, Pierre; Ulrich, Patrice; Loomis, Bryant D.; Luthcke, Scott B.

    2017-04-01

    The dynamics of the surface geophysical fluids (atmosphere, ocean, continental hydrology) induces global mass redistributions at the Earth's surface, and therefore deformations of the Earth crust. The vertical and horizontal displacements can be modeled using outputs of general circulation models through a convolution with the appropriate Green's functions, describing the elastic response of the Earth to any surface loading. In general, all these non-tidal loading effects are not forward modeled in GPS processing. We investigate here the impact of the forward modeling of atmospheric loading using operational ECMWF surface pressure field, assuming an inverted barometer (IB) or a dynamic ocean response to pressure changes (TUGO-m), hydrological loading using GLDAS/Noah model or the latest global GRACE mascon solution produced by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. We show that the forward modeling of loading effects reduces significantly and systematically the variability of daily GPS solutions for both the horizontal and vertical components of a global network and over a 11-year period (2005-2015) processed using the latest GAMIT/GLOBK software. Due to missing components in the GLDAS/Noah model (surface and ground water), the annual component is better reduced when the continental hydrology is derived from the latest GRACE mascon solution.

  14. Three dimensional reflection velocity analysis based on velocity model scan; Model scan ni yoru sanjigen hanshaha sokudo kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minegishi, M.; Tsuru, T. [Japan National Oil Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Matsuoka, T. [Japan Petroleum Exploration Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    Introduced herein is a reflection wave velocity analysis method using model scanning as a method for velocity estimation across a section, the estimation being useful in the construction of a velocity structure model in seismic exploration. In this method, a stripping type analysis is carried out, wherein optimum structure parameters are determined for reflection waves one after the other beginning with those from shallower parts. During this process, the velocity structures previously determined for the shallower parts are fixed and only the lowest of the layers undergoing analysis at the time is subjected to model scanning. To consider the bending of ray paths at each velocity boundaries involving shallower parts, the ray path tracing method is utilized for the calculation of the reflection travel time curve for the reflection surface being analyzed. Out of the reflection wave travel time curves calculated using various velocity structure models, one that suits best the actual reflection travel time is detected. The degree of matching between the calculated result and actual result is measured by use of data semblance in a time window provided centering about the calculated reflective wave travel time. The structure parameter is estimated on the basis of conditions for the maximum semblance. 1 ref., 4 figs.

  15. Behaviour of ion velocity distributions for a simple collision model

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Maurice, J.-P.; Schunk, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    Calculation of the ion velocity distributions for a weakly ionized plasma subjected to crossed electric and magnetic fields. An exact solution to Boltzmann's equation has been obtained by replacing the Boltzmann collision integral with a simple relaxation model. At altitudes above about 150 km, where the ion collision frequency is much less than the ion cyclotron frequency, the ion distribution takes the shape of a torus in velocity space for electric fields greater than 40 mV/m. This shape persists for one to two hours after application of the electric field. At altitudes where the ion collision and cyclotron frequencies are approximately equal (about 120 km), the ion velocity distribution is shaped like a bean for large electric field strengths. This bean-shaped distribution persists throughout the lifetime of ionospheric electric fields. These highly non-Maxwellian ion velocity distributions may have an appreciable affect on the interpretation of ion temperature measurements.

  16. GPS source solution of the 2004 Parkfield earthquake

    CERN Document Server

    Houlie, N; Kim, A

    2014-01-01

    We compute a series of finite-source parameter inversions of the fault rupture of the 2004 Parkfield earthquake based on 1 Hz GPS records only. We confirm that some of the co-seismic slip at shallow depth (<5 km) constrained by InSAR data processing results from early post-seismic deformation. We also show 1) that if located very close to the rupture, a GPS receiver can saturate while it remains possible to estimate the ground velocity (~1.2 m/s) near the fault, 2) that GPS waveforms inversions constrain that the slip distribution at depth even when GPS monuments are not located directly above the ruptured areas and 3) the slip distribution at depth from our best models agree with that recovered from strong motion data. The 95th percentile of the slip amplitudes for rupture velocities ranging from 2 to 5 km/s is, 55 +/- 6 cm.

  17. A 3-mode, Variable Velocity Jet Model for HH 34

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raga, A.; Noriega-Crespo, A.

    1998-01-01

    Variable ejection velocity jet models can qualitatively explain the appearance of successive working surfaces in Herbig-Haro (HH) jets. This paper presents an attempt to explore which features of the HH 34 jet can indeed be reproduced by such a model.

  18. A Comparison between Different Error Modeling of MEMS Applied to GPS/INS Integrated Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Dovis

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Advances in the development of micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS have made possible the fabrication of cheap and small dimension accelerometers and gyroscopes, which are being used in many applications where the global positioning system (GPS and the inertial navigation system (INS integration is carried out, i.e., identifying track defects, terrestrial and pedestrian navigation, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs, stabilization of many platforms, etc. Although these MEMS sensors are low-cost, they present different errors, which degrade the accuracy of the navigation systems in a short period of time. Therefore, a suitable modeling of these errors is necessary in order to minimize them and, consequently, improve the system performance. In this work, the most used techniques currently to analyze the stochastic errors that affect these sensors are shown and compared: we examine in detail the autocorrelation, the Allan variance (AV and the power spectral density (PSD techniques. Subsequently, an analysis and modeling of the inertial sensors, which combines autoregressive (AR filters and wavelet de-noising, is also achieved. Since a low-cost INS (MEMS grade presents error sources with short-term (high-frequency and long-term (low-frequency components, we introduce a method that compensates for these error terms by doing a complete analysis of Allan variance, wavelet de-nosing and the selection of the level of decomposition for a suitable combination between these techniques. Eventually, in order to assess the stochastic models obtained with these techniques, the Extended Kalman Filter (EKF of a loosely-coupled GPS/INS integration strategy is augmented with different states. Results show a comparison between the proposed method and the traditional sensor error models under GPS signal blockages using real data collected in urban roadways.

  19. A Goldilocks principle for modeling radial velocity noise

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Fabo; Jones, H R A; Butler, R P; Vogt, S

    2016-01-01

    The doppler measurements of stars are diluted and distorted by stellar activity noise. Different choices of noise models and statistical methods have led to much controversy in the confirmation of exoplanet candidates obtained through analysing radial velocity data. To quantify the limitation of various models and methods, we compare different noise models and signal detection criteria for various simulated and real data sets in the Bayesian framework. According to our analyses, the white noise model tend to interpret noise as signal, leading to false positives. On the other hand, the red noise models are likely to interprete signal as noise, resulting in false negatives. We find that the Bayesian information criterion combined with a Bayes factor threshold of 150 can efficiently rule out false positives and confirm true detections. We further propose a Goldilocks principle aimed at modeling radial velocity noise to avoid too many false positives and too many false negatives. We propose that the noise model w...

  20. Do Financial Incentives Influence GPs' Decisions to Do After-hours Work? A Discrete Choice Labour Supply Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadway, Barbara; Kalb, Guyonne; Li, Jinhu; Scott, Anthony

    2017-02-20

    This paper analyses doctors' supply of after-hours care (AHC), and how it is affected by personal and family circumstances as well as the earnings structure. We use detailed survey data from a large sample of Australian General Practitioners (GPs) to estimate a structural, discrete choice model of labour supply and AHC. This allows us to jointly model GPs' decisions on the number of daytime-weekday working hours and the probability of providing AHC. We simulate GPs' labour supply responses to an increase in hourly earnings, both in a daytime-weekday setting and for AHC. GPs increase their daytime-weekday working hours if their hourly earnings in this setting increase, but only to a very small extent. GPs are somewhat more likely to provide AHC if their hourly earnings in that setting increase, but again, the effect is very small and only evident in some subgroups. Moreover, higher earnings in weekday-daytime practice reduce the probability of providing AHC, particularly for men. Increasing GPs' earnings appears to be at best relatively ineffective in encouraging increased provision of AHC and may even prove harmful if incentives are not well targeted. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Velocity selection in the symmetric model of dendritic crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Angelo; Hong, Daniel C.; Langer, J. S.

    1987-01-01

    An analytic solution of the problem of velocity selection in a fully nonlocal model of dendritic crystal growth is presented. The analysis uses a WKB technique to derive and evaluate a solvability condition for the existence of steady-state needle-like solidification fronts in the limit of small under-cooling Delta. For the two-dimensional symmetric model with a capillary anisotropy of strength alpha, it is found that the velocity is proportional to (Delta to the 4th) times (alpha exp 7/4). The application of the method in three dimensions is also described.

  2. Estimates of Vertical Velocity Errors for IGS ITRF2014 Stations by Applying the Improved Singular Spectrum Analysis Method and Environmental Loading Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klos, Anna; Gruszczynska, Marta; Bos, Machiel Simon; Boy, Jean-Paul; Bogusz, Janusz

    2017-02-01

    A reliable subtraction of seasonal signals from the Global Positioning System (GPS) position time series is beneficial for the accuracy of derived velocities. In this research, we propose a two-stage solution of the problem of a proper determination of seasonal changes. We employ environmental loading models (atmospheric, hydrological and ocean non-tidal) with a dominant annual signal of amplitudes in their superposition of up to 12 mm and study the seasonal signal (annual and semi-annual) estimates that change over time using improved singular spectrum analysis (ISSA). Then, this deterministic model is subtracted from GPS position time series. We studied data from 376 permanent International GNSS Service (IGS) stations, derived as the official contribution to International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF2014) to measure the influence of applying environmental loading models on the estimated vertical velocity. Having removed the environmental loadings directly from the position time series, we noticed the evident change in the power spectrum for frequencies between 4 and 80 cpy. Therefore, we modelled the seasonal signal in environmental models using the ISSA approach and subtracted it from GPS vertical time series to leave the noise character of the time series intact. We estimated the velocity dilution of precision (DP) as a ratio between classical Weighted Least Squares and ISSA approach. For a total number of 298 out of the 376 stations analysed, the DP was lower than 1. This indicates that when the ISSA-derived curve was removed from the GPS data, the error of velocity becomes lower than it was before.

  3. Is flow velocity a significant parameter in flood damage modelling?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kreibich

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Flow velocity is generally presumed to influence flood damage. However, this influence is hardly quantified and virtually no damage models take it into account. Therefore, the influences of flow velocity, water depth and combinations of these two impact parameters on various types of flood damage were investigated in five communities affected by the Elbe catchment flood in Germany in 2002. 2-D hydraulic models with high to medium spatial resolutions were used to calculate the impact parameters at the sites in which damage occurred. A significant influence of flow velocity on structural damage, particularly on roads, could be shown in contrast to a minor influence on monetary losses and business interruption. Forecasts of structural damage to road infrastructure should be based on flow velocity alone. The energy head is suggested as a suitable flood impact parameter for reliable forecasting of structural damage to residential buildings above a critical impact level of 2 m of energy head or water depth. However, general consideration of flow velocity in flood damage modelling, particularly for estimating monetary loss, cannot be recommended.

  4. GPS Separator

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Footage of the 70 degree ISOLDE GPS separator magnet MAG70 as well as the switchyard for the Central Mass and GLM (GPS Low Mass) and GHM (GPS High Mass) beamlines in the GPS separator zone. In the GPS20 vacuum sector equipment such as the long GPS scanner 482 / 483 unit, faraday cup FC 490, vacuum valves and wiregrid piston WG210 and WG475 and radiation monitors can also be seen. Also the RILIS laser guidance and trajectory can be seen, the GPS main beamgate switch box and the actual GLM, GHM and Central Beamline beamgates in the beamlines as well as the first electrostatic quadrupoles for the GPS lines. Close up of the GHM deflector plates motor and connections and the inspection glass at the GHM side of the switchyard.

  5. Hacking GPS

    CERN Document Server

    Kingsley-Hughes, Kathie

    2005-01-01

    * This is the "user manual" that didn't come with any of the 30 million GPS receivers currently in use, showing readers how to modify, tweak, and hack their GPS to take it to new levels!* Crazy-cool modifications include exploiting secret keycodes, revealing hidden features, building power cords and cables, hacking the battery and antenna, protecting a GPS from impact and falls, making a screen protector, and solar-powering a GPS* Potential power users will take the function and performance of their GPS to a whole new level by hacking into the firmware and hacking into a PC connection with a GPS* Fear not! Any potentially dangerous mod (to the device) is clearly labeled, with precautions listed that should be taken* Game time! Readers can check out GPS games, check into hacking geocaching, and even use a GPS as a metal detector

  6. Assimilative Modeling of Ionospheric Disturbances with FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC and Ground-Based GPS Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqing Pi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The four-dimensional Global Assimilative Ionospheric Model (GAIM is applied to a study of ionospheric disturbances. The investigation is focused on disturbance features, particularly in the altitude and latitude dimensions, at low latitudes during a geomagnetic storm on 7 August 2006, under solar minimum conditions. The modeling of storm-time ionospheric state (electron density is conducted by assimilating an unprecedented volume of line-of-sight TEC data collected by the Global Positioning System (GPS occultation receivers on board six FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC satellites and geodetic-quality GPS receivers at two hundred globally-distributed ground tracking stations.With a band-limited Kalman filter technique to update the ionospheric state, the assimilative modeling reveals a pronounced enhancement in the equatorial anomaly in the East Asia sector during dusk and evening hours. The disturbance characteristics, obtained by comparing with the quiet conditions prior to the storm also modeled in this study through data assimilation, include lifted F layer and reduced electron density in the equatorial region, enhanced density at the magnetically conjugate anomaly latitudes, and tilted feature of density increase towards higher altitudes at lower latitudes. The characteristics are attributed to the enhanced plasma fountain effect driven by an enhanced eastward zonal electric field. These results enable us to distinguish the storm-time electric field perturbations clearly from other sources during the storm. The possible origins of electric field perturbations are also discussed, including penetration of the magnetospheric electric field and wind dynamo disturbances.

  7. Terrain Imaging Using a SAR System Based on Reflected GPS Signals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yong-hong; C. Rizos; E. Donskoi; J. Homer; B. Mojarrabi

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a 3D multi-static synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging system which utilises reflected GPS signals from moving objects on the Earth's surface. The principle of bi-static radar is used to model the reflected GPS signals. The movement of a visible GPS satellite serves as a base for a synthetic aperture over an observation time period. As an example, a MATLAB simulation has been carried out in order to detect the movement of imaged object sunder the assumption of one static GPS receiver with two targets which move with different speeds. The influence of the visible satellite'sposition and velocity on the spatial resolution of such a SAR system isdiscussed. Simulation results show that by measuring the cross-correlation of the reflected GPS signal from the terrain and objects on it,the detection of the objects can enjoy a good spatial resolution for thecase of moving objects and a moving GPS receiver. Furthermore, thespatial resolution is also related to the selection of visible GPS satelliteswith respect to their azimuths, elevations and velocities. This systemhas the following useful features: (a) no dedicated signal transmitter is required; (b) the GPS signal frequency is reused; (c) GPS operates round-the-clock and its signals cover the entire Earth's surface; (d) low power consumption; and (e) known GPS signal structure.

  8. Two velocity difference model for a car following theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, H. X.; Cheng, R. J.; Li, Z. P.

    2008-09-01

    In the light of the optimal velocity model, a two velocity difference model for a car-following theory is put forward considering navigation in modern traffic. To our knowledge, the model is an improvement over the previous ones theoretically, because it considers more aspects in the car-following process than others. Then we investigate the property of the model using linear and nonlinear analyses. The Korteweg-de Vries equation (for short, the KdV equation) near the neutral stability line and the modified Korteweg-de Vries equation (for short, the mKdV equation) around the critical point are derived by applying the reductive perturbation method. The traffic jam could be thus described by the KdV soliton and the kink-anti-kink soliton for the KdV equation and mKdV equation, respectively. Numerical simulations are made to verify the model, and good results are obtained with the new model.

  9. A nonlinear inversion for the velocity background and perturbation models

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Zedong

    2015-08-19

    Reflected waveform inversion (RWI) provides a method to reduce the nonlinearity of the standard full waveform inversion (FWI) by inverting for the single scattered wavefield obtained using an image. However, current RWI methods usually neglect diving waves, which is an important source of information for extracting the long wavelength components of the velocity model. Thus, we propose a new optimization problem through breaking the velocity model into the background and the perturbation in the wave equation directly. In this case, the perturbed model is no longer the single scattering model, but includes all scattering. We optimize both components simultaneously, and thus, the objective function is nonlinear with respect to both the background and perturbation. The new introduced w can absorb the non-smooth update of background naturally. Application to the Marmousi model with frequencies that start at 5 Hz shows that this method can converge to the accurate velocity starting from a linearly increasing initial velocity. Application to the SEG2014 demonstrates the versatility of the approach.

  10. Horizontal and vertical velocities derived from the IDS contribution to ITRF2014, and comparisons with geophysical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreaux, G.; Lemoine, F. G.; Argus, D. F.; Santamaría-Gómez, A.; Willis, P.; Soudarin, L.; Gravelle, M.; Ferrage, P.

    2016-10-01

    In the context of the 2014 realization of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame, the International DORIS (Doppler Orbitography Radiopositioning Integrated by Satellite) Service (IDS) has delivered to the IERS a set of 1140 weekly SINEX files including station coordinates and Earth orientation parameters, covering the time period from 1993.0 to 2015.0. From this set of weekly SINEX files, the IDS combination centre estimated a cumulative DORIS position and velocity solution to obtain mean horizontal and vertical motion of 160 stations at 71 DORIS sites. The main objective of this study is to validate the velocities of the DORIS sites by comparison with external models or time-series. Horizontal velocities are compared with two recent global plate models (GEODVEL 2010 and NNR-MORVEL56). Prior to the comparisons, DORIS horizontal velocities were corrected for Global Isostatic Adjustment from the ICE-6G (VM5a) model. For more than half of the sites, the DORIS horizontal velocities differ from the global plate models by less than 2-3 mm yr-1. For five of the sites (Arequipa, Dionysos/Gavdos, Manila and Santiago) with horizontal velocity differences with respect to these models larger than 10 mm yr-1, comparisons with GNSS estimates show the veracity of the DORIS motions. Vertical motions from the DORIS cumulative solution are compared with the vertical velocities derived from the latest GPS cumulative solution over the time span 1995.0-2014.0 from the University of La Rochelle solution at 31 co-located DORIS-GPS sites. These two sets of vertical velocities show a correlation coefficient of 0.83. Vertical differences are larger than 2 mm yr-1 at 23 percent of the sites. At Thule, the disagreement is explained by fine-tuned DORIS discontinuities in line with the mass variations of outlet glaciers. Furthermore, the time evolution of the vertical time-series from the DORIS station in Thule show similar trends to the GRACE equivalent water height.

  11. Evaluation of regional ionospheric grid model over China from dense GPS observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zhao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The current global or regional ionospheric models have been established for monitoring the ionospheric variations. However, the spatial and temporal resolutions are not enough to describe total electron content (TEC variations in small scales for China. In this paper, a regional ionospheric grid model (RIGM with high spatial-temporal resolution (0.5° × 0.5° and 10-min interval in China and surrounding areas is established based on spherical harmonics expansion from dense GPS measurements provided by Crustal Movement Observation Network of China (CMONOC and the International GNSS Service (IGS. The correlation coefficient between the estimated TEC from GPS and the ionosonde measurements is 0.97, and the root mean square (RMS with respect to Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE Global Ionosphere Maps (GIMs is 4.87 TECU. In addition, the impact of different spherical harmonics orders and degrees on TEC estimations are evaluated and the degree/order 6 is better. Moreover, effective ionospheric shell heights from 300 km to 700 km are further assessed and the result indicates that 550 km is the most suitable for regional ionospheric modeling in China at solar maximum.

  12. Seasonal crustal vertical deformation induced by environmental mass loading in mainland China derived from GPS, GRACE and surface loading models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yanchao; Yuan, Linguo; Fan, Dongming; You, Wei; Su, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Obvious seasonal crustal vertical deformation largely related to mass redistribution on the Earth's surface can be captured by Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), simulated by surface loading models (SLMs), and recorded by continuous Global Positioning System (GPS). Vertical deformation time series at 224 GPS stations with more than four-year continuous observations are compared with time series obtained by GRACE and SLMs with the aim of investigating the consistency of the seasonal crustal vertical deformation obtained by different techniques in mainland China. Results of these techniques show obvious seasonal vertical deformation with high consistency at almost all stations. The GPS-derived seasonal vertical deformation can be explained, to some content, by the environmental mass redistribution effect represented by GRACE and SLMs. Though the mean weighted root mean square reduction is 34% after removing the environmental mass loading from the monthly GPS height time series (up to 47% for the mean annual signals), systematic signals are still evident in the residual time series. The systematic residuals are probably attributed to GPS related errors, such as draconitic errors, while the leakage errors in the GRACE data processing and unmodeled components in land water storage should be considered in some regions. Additionally, the obvious seasonal residual perturbations in Southwest China may be related to the leakage errors in the GRACE data processing and large uncertainty in the land water storage in SLMs, indicating that GPS observations may provide more realistic mass transport estimates in Southwest China.

  13. THE THEORETICAL MODEL FOR PREDICTING CIRCULATION VELOCITY OF HYDRAULIC BRAKE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘英林; 侯春生

    1997-01-01

    By rational hypothesis of fluid flow pattern, applied the law of conservation of energy and integrated the laboratory test results, finished the prediction by the theoretical model of circulation velocity of hydraulic brake which is important parameter. Thus provide the theoritical basis for hydraulic brake of belt conveyor whose research has just been started.

  14. A non-parametric model for the cosmic velocity field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Branchini, E; Teodoro, L; Frenk, CS; Schmoldt, [No Value; Efstathiou, G; White, SDM; Saunders, W; Sutherland, W; Rowan-Robinson, M; Keeble, O; Tadros, H; Maddox, S; Oliver, S

    1999-01-01

    We present a self-consistent non-parametric model of the local cosmic velocity field derived from the distribution of IRAS galaxies in the PSCz redshift survey. The survey has been analysed using two independent methods, both based on the assumptions of gravitational instability and linear biasing.

  15. Calculus and design of discrete velocity models using computer algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babovsky, Hans; Grabmeier, Johannes

    2016-11-01

    In [2, 3], a framework for a calculus with Discrete Velocity Models (DVM) has been derived. The rotatonal symmetry of the discrete velocities can be modelled algebraically by the action of the cyclic group C4 - or including reflections of the dihedral group D4. Taking this point of view, the linearized collision operator can be represented in a compact form as a matrix of elements in the group algebra. Or in other words, by choosing a special numbering it exhibits a certain block structure which lets it appear as a matrix with entries in a certain polynomial ring. A convenient way for approaching such a structure is the use of a computer algebra system able to treat these (predefined) algebraic structures. We used the computer algebra system FriCAS/AXIOM [4, 5] for the generation of the velocity and the collision sets and for the analysis of the structure of the collision operator. Concerning the fluid dynamic limit, the system provides the characterization of sets of collisions and their contribution to the flow parameters. It allows the design of rotationally invariant symmetric models for prescribed Prandtl numbers. The implementation in FriCAS/AXIOM is explained and its results for a 25-velocity model are presented.

  16. Earth's gravity field modelling based on satellite accelerations derived from onboard GPS phase measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, X.; Ditmar, P.; Zhao, Q.; Klees, R.; Farahani, H. H.

    2017-09-01

    GPS data collected by satellite gravity missions can be used for extracting the long-wavelength part of the Earth's gravity field. We propose a new data processing method which makes use of the `average acceleration' approach to gravity field modelling. In this method, satellite accelerations are directly derived from GPS carrier phase measurements with an epoch-differenced scheme. As a result, no ambiguity solutions are needed and the systematic errors that do not change much from epoch to epoch are largely eliminated. The GPS data collected by the Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite mission are used to demonstrate the added value of the proposed method. An analysis of the residual accelerations shows that accelerations derived in this way are more precise, with noise being reduced by about 20 and 5% at the cross-track component and the other two components, respectively, as compared to those based on kinematic orbits. The accelerations obtained in this way allow the recovery of the gravity field to a slightly higher maximum degree compared to the solution based on kinematic orbits. Furthermore, the gravity field solution has an overall better performance. Errors in spherical harmonic coefficients are smaller, especially at low degrees. The cumulative geoid height error is reduced by about 15 and 5% up to degree 50 and 150, respectively. An analysis in the spatial domain shows that large errors along the geomagnetic equator, which are caused by a high electron density coupled with large short-term variations, are substantially reduced. Finally, the new method allows for a better observation of mass transport signals. In particular, sufficiently realistic signatures of regional mass anomalies in North America and south-west Africa are obtained.

  17. Earth's gravity field modelling based on satellite accelerations derived from onboard GPS phase measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, X.; Ditmar, P.; Zhao, Q.; Klees, R.; Farahani, H. H.

    2017-02-01

    GPS data collected by satellite gravity missions can be used for extracting the long-wavelength part of the Earth's gravity field. We propose a new data processing method which makes use of the `average acceleration' approach to gravity field modelling. In this method, satellite accelerations are directly derived from GPS carrier phase measurements with an epoch-differenced scheme. As a result, no ambiguity solutions are needed and the systematic errors that do not change much from epoch to epoch are largely eliminated. The GPS data collected by the Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite mission are used to demonstrate the added value of the proposed method. An analysis of the residual accelerations shows that accelerations derived in this way are more precise, with noise being reduced by about 20 and 5% at the cross-track component and the other two components, respectively, as compared to those based on kinematic orbits. The accelerations obtained in this way allow the recovery of the gravity field to a slightly higher maximum degree compared to the solution based on kinematic orbits. Furthermore, the gravity field solution has an overall better performance. Errors in spherical harmonic coefficients are smaller, especially at low degrees. The cumulative geoid height error is reduced by about 15 and 5% up to degree 50 and 150, respectively. An analysis in the spatial domain shows that large errors along the geomagnetic equator, which are caused by a high electron density coupled with large short-term variations, are substantially reduced. Finally, the new method allows for a better observation of mass transport signals. In particular, sufficiently realistic signatures of regional mass anomalies in North America and south-west Africa are obtained.

  18. A province-scale block model of Walker Lane and western Basin and Range crustal deformation constrained by GPS observations (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, W. C.; Bormann, J.; Blewitt, G.; Kreemer, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Walker Lane in the western Great Basin of the western United States is an 800 km long and 100 km wide zone of active intracontinental transtension that absorbs ~10 mm/yr, about 20% of the Pacific/North America plate boundary relative motion. Lying west of the Sierra Nevada/Great Valley microplate (SNGV) and adjoining the Basin and Range Province to the east, deformation is predominantly shear strain overprinted with a minor component of extension. The Walker Lane responds with faulting, block rotations, structural step-overs, and has distinct and varying partitioned domains of shear and extension. Resolving these complex deformation patterns requires a long term observation strategy with a dense network of GPS stations (spacing ~20 km). The University of Nevada, Reno operates the 373 station Mobile Array of GPS for Nevada transtension (MAGNET) semi-continuous network that supplements coverage by other networks such as EarthScope's Plate Boundary Observatory, which alone has insufficient density to resolve the deformation patterns. Uniform processing of data from these GPS mega-networks provides a synoptic view and new insights into the kinematics and mechanics of Walker Lane tectonics. We present velocities for thousands of stations with time series between 3 to 17 years in duration aligned to our new GPS-based North America fixed reference frame NA12. The velocity field shows a rate budget across the southern Walker Lane of ~10 mm/yr, decreasing northward to ~7 mm/yr at the latitude of the Mohawk Valley and Pyramid Lake. We model the data with a new block model that estimates rotations and slip rates of known active faults between the Mojave Desert and northern Nevada and northeast California. The density of active faults in the region requires including a relatively large number of blocks in the model to accurately estimate deformation patterns. With 49 blocks, our the model captures structural detail not represented in previous province-scale models, and

  19. Modeling and comparative study of fluid velocities in heterogeneous rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hingerl, Ferdinand F.; Romanenko, Konstantin; Pini, Ronny; Balcom, Bruce; Benson, Sally

    2013-04-01

    Detailed knowledge of the distribution of effective porosity and fluid velocities in heterogeneous rock samples is crucial for understanding and predicting spatially resolved fluid residence times and kinetic reaction rates of fluid-rock interactions. The applicability of conventional MRI techniques to sedimentary rocks is limited by internal magnetic field gradients and short spin relaxation times. The approach developed at the UNB MRI Centre combines the 13-interval Alternating-Pulsed-Gradient Stimulated-Echo (APGSTE) scheme and three-dimensional Single Point Ramped Imaging with T1 Enhancement (SPRITE). These methods were designed to reduce the errors due to effects of background gradients and fast transverse relaxation. SPRITE is largely immune to time-evolution effects resulting from background gradients, paramagnetic impurities and chemical shift. Using these techniques quantitative 3D porosity maps as well as single-phase fluid velocity fields in sandstone core samples were measured. Using a new Magnetic Resonance Imaging technique developed at the MRI Centre at UNB, we created 3D maps of porosity distributions as well as single-phase fluid velocity distributions of sandstone rock samples. Then, we evaluated the applicability of the Kozeny-Carman relationship for modeling measured fluid velocity distributions in sandstones samples showing meso-scale heterogeneities using two different modeling approaches. The MRI maps were used as reference points for the modeling approaches. For the first modeling approach, we applied the Kozeny-Carman relationship to the porosity distributions and computed respective permeability maps, which in turn provided input for a CFD simulation - using the Stanford CFD code GPRS - to compute averaged velocity maps. The latter were then compared to the measured velocity maps. For the second approach, the measured velocity distributions were used as input for inversely computing permeabilities using the GPRS CFD code. The computed

  20. The Velocity of Money in a Life-Cycle Model

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Y; Wang, Yougui; Qiu, Hanqing

    2005-01-01

    The determinants of the velocity of money have been examined based on life-cycle hypothesis. The velocity of money can be expressed by reciprocal of the average value of holding time which is defined as interval between participating exchanges for one unit of money. This expression indicates that the velocity is governed by behavior patterns of economic agents and open a way to constructing micro-foundation of it. It is found that time pattern of income and expense for a representative individual can be obtained from a simple version of life-cycle model, and average holding time of money resulted from the individual's optimal choice depends on the expected length of relevant planning periods.

  1. A new settling velocity model to describe secondary sedimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramin, Elham; Wágner, Dorottya S; Yde, Lars; Binning, Philip J; Rasmussen, Michael R; Mikkelsen, Peter Steen; Plósz, Benedek Gy

    2014-12-01

    Secondary settling tanks (SSTs) are the most hydraulically sensitive unit operations in biological wastewater treatment plants. The maximum permissible inflow to the plant depends on the efficiency of SSTs in separating and thickening the activated sludge. The flow conditions and solids distribution in SSTs can be predicted using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools. Despite extensive studies on the compression settling behaviour of activated sludge and the development of advanced settling velocity models for use in SST simulations, these models are not often used, due to the challenges associated with their calibration. In this study, we developed a new settling velocity model, including hindered, transient and compression settling, and showed that it can be calibrated to data from a simple, novel settling column experimental set-up using the Bayesian optimization method DREAM(ZS). In addition, correlations between the Herschel-Bulkley rheological model parameters and sludge concentration were identified with data from batch rheological experiments. A 2-D axisymmetric CFD model of a circular SST containing the new settling velocity and rheological model was validated with full-scale measurements. Finally, it was shown that the representation of compression settling in the CFD model can significantly influence the prediction of sludge distribution in the SSTs under dry- and wet-weather flow conditions.

  2. Pairwise velocities in the Halo Model: Luminosity and Scale Dependence

    CERN Document Server

    Slosar, A; Tasitsiomi, A; Slosar, Anze; Seljak, Uros; Tasitsiomi, Argyro

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the properties of the pairwise velocity dispersion as a function of galaxy luminosity in the context of a halo model. We derive the distribution of velocities of pairs at a given separation taking into account both one-halo and two-halo contributions. We show that pairwise velocity distribution in real space is a complicated mixture of host-satellite, satellite-satellite and two-halo pairs. The peak value is reached at around 1 Mpc/h and does not reflect the velocity dispersion of a typical halo hosting these galaxies, but is instead dominated by the satellite-satellite pairs in high mass clusters. This is true even for cross-correlations between bins separated in luminosity. As a consequence the velocity dispersion at a given separation can decrease with luminosity, even if the underlying typical halo host mass is increasing, in agreement with some recent observations. We compare our findings to numerical simulations and find a good agreement. Numerical simulations also suggest a luminosity de...

  3. Development of an RTK-GPS Positioning Application with an Improved Position Error Model for Smartphones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongha Lee

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This study developed a smartphone application that provides wireless communication, NRTIP client, and RTK processing features, and which can simplify the Network RTK-GPS system while reducing the required cost. A determination method for an error model in Network RTK measurements was proposed, considering both random and autocorrelation errors, to accurately calculate the coordinates measured by the application using state estimation filters. The performance evaluation of the developed application showed that it could perform high-precision real-time positioning, within several centimeters of error range at a frequency of 20 Hz. A Kalman Filter was applied to the coordinates measured from the application, to evaluate the appropriateness of the determination method for an error model, as proposed in this study. The results were more accurate, compared with those of the existing error model, which only considered the random error.

  4. Development of an RTK-GPS positioning application with an improved position error model for smartphones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jinsang; Yun, Hongsik; Suh, Yongcheol; Cho, Jeongho; Lee, Dongha

    2012-09-25

    This study developed a smartphone application that provides wireless communication, NRTIP client, and RTK processing features, and which can simplify the Network RTK-GPS system while reducing the required cost. A determination method for an error model in Network RTK measurements was proposed, considering both random and autocorrelation errors, to accurately calculate the coordinates measured by the application using state estimation filters. The performance evaluation of the developed application showed that it could perform high-precision real-time positioning, within several centimeters of error range at a frequency of 20 Hz. A Kalman Filter was applied to the coordinates measured from the application, to evaluate the appropriateness of the determination method for an error model, as proposed in this study. The results were more accurate, compared with those of the existing error model, which only considered the random error.

  5. Gravimetric geoid of a part of south India and its comparison with global geopotential models and GPS-levelling data

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N Srinivas; V M Tiwari; J S Tarial; S Prajapti; A E Meshram; B Singh; B Nagarajan

    2012-08-01

    Precise information of geoid undulations is essential for obtaining the orthometric heights from Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements over any region; apart from providing the information of subsurface density distribution. This paper presents computation of geoid undulations over a part of southern Indian region from terrestrial gravity and elevation data using remove–restore technique that involves spherical Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) to compute ‘Stokes’ coefficients. Computed geoid undulations are compared with geoid obtained from global geopotential models such as EGM2008 and EIGENGRACE02S and measured GPS-levelling records at 67 locations. Statistical analysis of comparison suggests that the computed gravimetric geoid model has a good match with the geoid determined from GPS-levelling with rms of 0.1 m whereas EGM2008 has 0.46 m. The differences of GPS-levelling with EGM2008 at majority of stations fall in the range of ± 0.5 m, which indicates that EGM2008 may be used for orthometric height determination with an accuracy of > 0.5 m in the south Indian region and offers a reasonably good transformation platform from ellipsoid to local datum. However, local determination of geoid is necessary for better accuracy of orthometric height from GPS. The gravimetric geoid calculated from the available gravity data shows considerable improvement to the global model and can be used to achieve orthometric height with an accuracy of 0.1 m.

  6. Global gravity field models from the GPS positions of CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezděk, A.; Sebera, J.; Klokočník, J.; Kostelecký, J.

    2012-04-01

    The aim of our work is to generate Earth's gravity field models from the GPS positions of low Earth orbiters. We will present our inversion method and numerical results based on the real-world data of CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE satellites. The presented inversion method is based on Newton's second law of motion, which relates the observed acceleration of the satellite with the forces acting on it. The vector of the observed acceleration is obtained through a numerical second-derivative filter applied to the time series of the kinematic positions. Forces other than those due to the geopotential are either modelled (lunisolar perturbations, tides) or provided by the onboard measurements (nongravitational perturbations). Then the observation equations are formulated using the gradient of the spherical harmonic expansion of the geopotential. From this linear system the harmonic coefficients are directly obtained. We do not use any a priori gravity field model. Although the basic scheme of the acceleration approach is straightforward, the implementation details play a crucial role in obtaining reasonable results. The numerical derivative of noisy data (here the GPS positions) strongly amplifies the high frequency noise and creates autocorrelation in the observation errors. We successfully solve both of these problems by using the generalized least squares method, which defines a linear transformation of the observation equations. In the transformed variables the errors become uncorrelated, so the ordinary least squares estimation may be used to find the regression parameters with correct estimates of their uncertainties. The digital filter of the second derivative is an approximation to the analytical operation. We will show how different the results might be depending on the particular choice of the parameters defining the filter. Another problem is the correlation of the errors in the GPS positions. Here we use the tools from time series analysis. The systematic behaviour

  7. The Quasi-Biennial Vertical Oscillations at Global GPS Stations: Identification by Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanjin Pan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Modeling nonlinear vertical components of a GPS time series is critical to separating sources contributing to mass displacements. Improved vertical precision in GPS positioning at stations for velocity fields is key to resolving the mechanism of certain geophysical phenomena. In this paper, we use ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD to analyze the daily GPS time series at 89 continuous GPS stations, spanning from 2002 to 2013. EEMD decomposes a GPS time series into different intrinsic mode functions (IMFs, which are used to identify different kinds of signals and secular terms. Our study suggests that the GPS records contain not only the well-known signals (such as semi-annual and annual signals but also the seldom-noted quasi-biennial oscillations (QBS. The quasi-biennial signals are explained by modeled loadings of atmosphere, non-tidal and hydrology that deform the surface around the GPS stations. In addition, the loadings derived from GRACE gravity changes are also consistent with the quasi-biennial deformations derived from the GPS observations. By removing the modeled components, the weighted root-mean-square (WRMS variation of the GPS time series is reduced by 7.1% to 42.3%, and especially, after removing the seasonal and QBO signals, the average improvement percentages for seasonal and QBO signals are 25.6% and 7.5%, respectively, suggesting that it is significant to consider the QBS signals in the GPS records to improve the observed vertical deformations.

  8. Forest operations planning by using RTK-GPS based digital elevation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neşe Gülci

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Having large proportion of forests in mountainous terrain in Turkey, the logging methods that not only minimize operational costs but also minimize environmental damages should be determined in forest operations planning. In a case where necessary logging equipment and machines are available, ground slope is the most important factor in determining the logging method. For this reason, accurate, up to date, and precise ground slope data is very crucial in the success of forest operations planning. In recent years, high-resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEM can be generated for forested areas by using Real Time Kinematic (RTK GPS method and these DEMs can be used to develop precise slope maps. In this study, high-resolution DEM was developed by RTK-GPS method to generate precise slope map in a sample area. Then, the slope map was classified into slope classes specified by IUFRO in order to assist forest operations planning. According to the results, logging methods that are suitable for very steep and steep terrain conditions (i.e. skyline logging, cable pulling, and chute systems should be preferred in 48.1% of the study area. It was also found that logging methods that are suitable for terrain with medium slope (i.e. skidding and cable pulling and gentle slope (i.e. skidding and mobile winch should be preferred in 34.1% and 17.8% of the study area, respectively.

  9. Intraglottal velocity and pressure measurements in a hemilarynx model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Liran; Gutmark, Ephraim; Khosla, Sid

    2015-02-01

    Determining the mechanisms of self-sustained oscillation of the vocal folds requires characterization of the pressures produced by intraglottal aerodynamics. Because most of the intraglottal aerodynamic forces cannot be measured in a tissue model of the larynx, current understanding of vocal fold vibration mechanism is derived from mechanical, analytical, and computational models. Previous studies have computed intraglottal pressures from measured intraglottal velocity fields and intraglottal geometry; however, this technique for determining pressures is not yet validated. In this study, intraglottal pressure measurements taken in a hemilarynx model are compared with pressure values that are computed from simultaneous velocity measurements. The results showed that significant negative pressure formed near the superior aspect of the folds during closing, which agrees with previous measurements in other hemilarynx models. Intraglottal velocity measurements show that the flow near the superior aspect separates from the glottal wall during closing and may develop into a vortex, which further augments the magnitude of negative pressure. Intraglottal pressure distributions, computed by solving the pressure Poisson equation, showed good agreement with pressure measurements. The match between the pressure computations and its measurements validates the current technique, which was previously used to estimate intraglottal pressure distribution in a full larynx model.

  10. Comparison of induced velocity models for helicopter flight mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, R.E.; Houston, S.S.

    2002-07-01

    Modeling of rotor-induced velocity receives continued attention in the literature as the rotorcraft community addresses limitations in the fidelity of simulations of helicopter stability, control, and handling qualities. A comparison is presented of results obtained using a rigid-blade rotor-fuselage model configured with two induced velocity models: a conventional, first-order, finite state, dynamic inflow model and a wake model that solves a vorticity transport equation on a computational mesh enclosing the rotorcraft. Differences between the two models are quantified by comparing predictions of trimmed rotor blade flap, lag and feather angles, airframe pitch and roll attitudes, cross-coupling derivatives, response to control inputs, and airframe vibration. Results are presented in the context of measurements taken on a Puma aircraft in steady flight from hover to high speed. More accurate predictions of the cross-coupling derivatives, response to control, and airframe vibration obtained using the vorticity transport model suggest that incorporation of real flowfield effects is important to extending the bandwidth of applicability of helicopter simulation models. Unexpectedly small differences in some of the trim predictions obtained using the two wake models suggest that an overall improvement in simulation fidelity may not be achieved without equivalent attention to the rotor dynamic model. (Author)

  11. GPS Position Time Series @ JPL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Susan; Moore, Angelyn; Kedar, Sharon; Liu, Zhen; Webb, Frank; Heflin, Mike; Desai, Shailen

    2013-01-01

    Different flavors of GPS time series analysis at JPL - Use same GPS Precise Point Positioning Analysis raw time series - Variations in time series analysis/post-processing driven by different users. center dot JPL Global Time Series/Velocities - researchers studying reference frame, combining with VLBI/SLR/DORIS center dot JPL/SOPAC Combined Time Series/Velocities - crustal deformation for tectonic, volcanic, ground water studies center dot ARIA Time Series/Coseismic Data Products - Hazard monitoring and response focused center dot ARIA data system designed to integrate GPS and InSAR - GPS tropospheric delay used for correcting InSAR - Caltech's GIANT time series analysis uses GPS to correct orbital errors in InSAR - Zhen Liu's talking tomorrow on InSAR Time Series analysis

  12. GPS Position Time Series @ JPL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Susan; Moore, Angelyn; Kedar, Sharon; Liu, Zhen; Webb, Frank; Heflin, Mike; Desai, Shailen

    2013-01-01

    Different flavors of GPS time series analysis at JPL - Use same GPS Precise Point Positioning Analysis raw time series - Variations in time series analysis/post-processing driven by different users. center dot JPL Global Time Series/Velocities - researchers studying reference frame, combining with VLBI/SLR/DORIS center dot JPL/SOPAC Combined Time Series/Velocities - crustal deformation for tectonic, volcanic, ground water studies center dot ARIA Time Series/Coseismic Data Products - Hazard monitoring and response focused center dot ARIA data system designed to integrate GPS and InSAR - GPS tropospheric delay used for correcting InSAR - Caltech's GIANT time series analysis uses GPS to correct orbital errors in InSAR - Zhen Liu's talking tomorrow on InSAR Time Series analysis

  13. A Goldilocks principle for modelling radial velocity noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, F.; Tuomi, M.; Jones, H. R. A.; Butler, R. P.; Vogt, S.

    2016-09-01

    The Doppler measurements of stars are diluted and distorted by stellar activity noise. Different choices of noise models and statistical methods have led to much controversy in the confirmation of exoplanet candidates obtained through analysing radial velocity data. To quantify the limitation of various models and methods, we compare different noise models and signal detection criteria for various simulated and real data sets in the Bayesian framework. According to our analyses, the white noise model tend to interpret noise as signal, leading to false positives. On the other hand, the red noise models are likely to interpret signal as noise, resulting in false negatives. We find that the Bayesian information criterion combined with a Bayes factor threshold of 150 can efficiently rule out false positives and confirm true detections. We further propose a Goldilocks principle aimed at modelling radial velocity noise to avoid too many false positives and too many false negatives. We propose that the noise model with RHK-dependent jitter is used in combination with the moving average model to detect planetary signals for M dwarfs. Our work may also shed light on the noise modelling for hotter stars, and provide a valid approach for finding similar principles in other disciplines.

  14. Empirical analysis and modeling of errors of atmospheric profiles from GPS radio occultation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Scherllin-Pirscher

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of radio occultation (RO data in atmospheric studies requires precise knowledge of error characteristics. We present results of an empirical error analysis of GPS radio occultation (RO bending angle, refractivity, dry pressure, dry geopotential height, and dry temperature. We find very good agreement between data characteristics of different missions (CHAMP, GRACE-A, and Formosat-3/COSMIC (F3C. In the global mean, observational errors (standard deviation from "true" profiles at mean tangent point location agree within 0.3 % in bending angle, 0.1 % in refractivity, and 0.2 K in dry temperature at all altitude levels between 4 km and 35 km. Above ≈20 km, the observational errors show a strong seasonal dependence at high latitudes. Larger errors occur in hemispheric wintertime and are associated mainly with background data used in the retrieval process. The comparison between UCAR and WEGC results (both data centers have independent inversion processing chains reveals different magnitudes of observational errors in atmospheric parameters, which are attributable to different background fields used. Based on the empirical error estimates, we provide a simple analytical error model for GPS RO atmospheric parameters and account for vertical, latitudinal, and seasonal variations. In the model, which spans the altitude range from 4 km to 35 km, a constant error is adopted around the tropopause region amounting to 0.8 % for bending angle, 0.35 % for refractivity, 0.15 % for dry pressure, 10 m for dry geopotential height, and 0.7 K for dry temperature. Below this region the observational error increases following an inverse height power-law and above it increases exponentially. The observational error model is the same for UCAR and WEGC data but due to somewhat different error characteristics below about 10 km and above about 20 km some parameters have to be adjusted. Overall, the observational error model is easily applicable and

  15. Latitudinal characteristics of GPS derived ionospheric TEC: a comparative study with IRI 2012 model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monti Chakraborty

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the variation of Total Electron Content (TEC using Global Positioning System (GPS satellites from four equatorial to mid-latitudes stations over a period of one year. The stations are Port Blair (11.63°N, 92.70°E, Agartala (23.75°N, 91.25°E, Lhasa (29.65°N, 91.10°E and Urumqi (43.46°N, 87.16°E. The diurnal, monthly and seasonal variations of TEC have been explored to study its latitudinal characteristics. Analysis of TEC data from these stations reveals the characteristics of latitudinal variation of Equatorial Ionospheric Anomaly (EIA. To validate the latest IRI 2012 model, the monthly and seasonal variations of GPS-TEC at all the four stations have been compared with the model for three different topside options of electron density, namely, NeQuick, IRI-01-corr and IRI-2001. TEC predictions from IRI-2001 top side electron density option using IRI 2012 model overestimates the observed TEC especially at the low latitudes. TEC from IRI- NeQuick and IRI-01-corr options shows a tendency to underestimate the observed TEC during the day time particularly in low latitude region in the high solar activity period. The agreement between the model and observed values are reasonable in mid latitude regions. However, a discrepancy between IRI 2012 derived TEC with the ground based observations at low latitude regions is found. The discrepancy appears to be higher in low-latitude regions in comparison to mid latitude regions. It is concluded that largest discrepancy in TEC occur as a result of poor estimation of the hmF2 and foF2 from the coefficients.

  16. Velocity profiles in idealized model of human respiratory tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jicha M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with numerical simulation focused on velocity profiles in idealized model of human upper airways during steady inspiration. Three r gimes of breathing were investigated: Resting condition, Deep breathing and Light activity which correspond to most common regimes used for experiments and simulations. Calculation was validated with experimental data given by Phase Doppler Anemometry performed on the model with same geometry. This comparison was made in multiple points which form one cross-section in trachea near first bifurcation of bronchial tree. Development of velocity profile in trachea during steady inspiration was discussed with respect for common phenomenon formed in trachea and for future research of transport of aerosol particles in human respiratory tract.

  17. Velocity and Celerity Characteristics in the MIPs model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beven, K.

    2015-12-01

    The Multiple Interacting Pathways (MIPs) model has been shown to give good reproduction of both flows (controlled by celerities) and residence times (controlled by velocities) in comparisons with data from a small catchment. In this contribution we look at the difference in responses and basins of attraction for flow and transport inferred from the model with a view to determining the functional form of larger scale, computationally efficient, parameterisations that more properly represent the scale-dependent hysteresis that is expected as a result of velocity-celerity differences. It is hoped that this might lead to new scale-dependent formulations of runoff and water quality responses that can be applied at hillslope and catchment scales.

  18. Joint analysis of the seismic data and velocity gravity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyakov, A. S.; Lavrov, V. S.; Muchamedov, V. A.; Nikolaev, A. V.

    2016-03-01

    We performed joint analysis of the seismic noises recorded at the Japanese Ogasawara station located on Titijima Island in the Philippine Sea using the STS-2 seismograph at the OSW station in the winter period of January 1-15, 2015, over the background of a velocity gravity model. The graphs prove the existence of a cause-and-effect relation between the seismic noise and gravity and allow us to consider it as a desired signal.

  19. GPS-Supported Visual SLAM with a Rigorous Sensor Model for a Panoramic Camera in Outdoor Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryosuke Shibasaki

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Accurate localization of moving sensors is essential for many fields, such as robot navigation and urban mapping. In this paper, we present a framework for GPS-supported visual Simultaneous Localization and Mapping with Bundle Adjustment (BA-SLAM using a rigorous sensor model in a panoramic camera. The rigorous model does not cause system errors, thus representing an improvement over the widely used ideal sensor model. The proposed SLAM does not require additional restrictions, such as loop closing, or additional sensors, such as expensive inertial measurement units. In this paper, the problems of the ideal sensor model for a panoramic camera are analysed, and a rigorous sensor model is established. GPS data are then introduced for global optimization and georeferencing. Using the rigorous sensor model with the geometric observation equations of BA, a GPS-supported BA-SLAM approach that combines ray observations and GPS observations is then established. Finally, our method is applied to a set of vehicle-borne panoramic images captured from a campus environment, and several ground control points (GCP are used to check the localization accuracy. The results demonstrated that our method can reach an accuracy of several centimetres.

  20. GPS-supported visual SLAM with a rigorous sensor model for a panoramic camera in outdoor environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yun; Ji, Shunping; Shi, Zhongchao; Duan, Yulin; Shibasaki, Ryosuke

    2012-12-21

    Accurate localization of moving sensors is essential for many fields, such as robot navigation and urban mapping. In this paper, we present a framework for GPS-supported visual Simultaneous Localization and Mapping with Bundle Adjustment (BA-SLAM) using a rigorous sensor model in a panoramic camera. The rigorous model does not cause system errors, thus representing an improvement over the widely used ideal sensor model. The proposed SLAM does not require additional restrictions, such as loop closing, or additional sensors, such as expensive inertial measurement units. In this paper, the problems of the ideal sensor model for a panoramic camera are analysed, and a rigorous sensor model is established. GPS data are then introduced for global optimization and georeferencing. Using the rigorous sensor model with the geometric observation equations of BA, a GPS-supported BA-SLAM approach that combines ray observations and GPS observations is then established. Finally, our method is applied to a set of vehicle-borne panoramic images captured from a campus environment, and several ground control points (GCP) are used to check the localization accuracy. The results demonstrated that our method can reach an accuracy of several centimetres.

  1. Pairwise velocities in the "Running FLRW" cosmological model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibiano, Antonio; Croton, Darren J.

    2017-01-01

    We present an analysis of the pairwise velocity statistics from a suite of cosmological N-body simulations describing the "Running Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker" (R-FLRW) cosmological model. This model is based on quantum field theory in a curved space-time and extends ΛCDM with a time-evolving vacuum energy density, ρ _Λ. To enforce local conservation of matter a time-evolving gravitational coupling is also included. Our results constitute the first study of velocities in the R-FLRW cosmology, and we also compare with other dark energy simulations suites, repeating the same analysis. We find a strong degeneracy between the pairwise velocity and σ8 at z = 0 for almost all scenarios considered, which remains even when we look back to epochs as early as z = 2. We also investigate various Coupled Dark Energy models, some of which show minimal degeneracy, and reveal interesting deviations from ΛCDM which could be readily exploited by future cosmological observations to test and further constrain our understanding of dark energy.

  2. Plug and Play GPS for Earth Scientists: Providing Immediate Access to Low-Latency Geodetic Products for Rapid Modeling and Analysis of Natural Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meertens, C. M.; Boler, F. M.; Wier, S.; Blewitt, G.; Hammond, W. C.; Kreemer, C.

    2015-12-01

    Access to the benefits of having high precision, low-latency position time series from global GPS networks is currently limited by the need to have advanced expertise and systems for data acquisition and processing. We are taking steps to remove these barriers by developing a GPS data analysis system capable of processing all openly available data from over 13,500 continuously operating stations from around the globe. This rigorous and automated system will provide processing free of charge and will greatly ease access to GPS position time series that can be used for rapid modeling and analysis of natural hazards from earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanoes, hydrologic changes, and other applications. It is envisioned that availability of this unique resource will encourage open sharing of data and products and enable building scientific capacity in areas that are currently sparsely sampled with GPS such as Africa. We provide daily and 5-minute position time series and quality control products, with latency between 2 hours and 1 day. The users submit data to the UNAVCO archive where the Data Center services provide data ingestion, access, formatting and cataloging of accurate metadata including proper source attribution. UNR picks up hourly and/or daily data files from the UNAVCO archive and processes the data using products provided by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), including ultra-rapid GPS orbits and clock parameters, and JPL's GIPSY OASIS II software. The processed time series are presented in global (IGS08) and North America (NA12) reference frames, together with post-processed station quality control data, are cataloged in a Geodetic Seamless Archive Centers (GSAC) database that is searchable and accessible via web browsers or via newly developed simple RESTful web services. In addition, station velocities are estimated and updated automatically every week. To ensure utility of the products, AfricaArray, USGS, and JPL collaborators are included in the testing

  3. The Performance Analysis of a Real-Time Integrated INS/GPS Vehicle Navigation System with Abnormal GPS Measurement Elimination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhen-Kai Liao

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The integration of an Inertial Navigation System (INS and the Global Positioning System (GPS is common in mobile mapping and navigation applications to seamlessly determine the position, velocity, and orientation of the mobile platform. In most INS/GPS integrated architectures, the GPS is considered to be an accurate reference with which to correct for the systematic errors of the inertial sensors, which are composed of biases, scale factors and drift. However, the GPS receiver may produce abnormal pseudo-range errors mainly caused by ionospheric delay, tropospheric delay and the multipath effect. These errors degrade the overall position accuracy of an integrated system that uses conventional INS/GPS integration strategies such as loosely coupled (LC and tightly coupled (TC schemes. Conventional tightly coupled INS/GPS integration schemes apply the Klobuchar model and the Hopfield model to reduce pseudo-range delays caused by ionospheric delay and tropospheric delay, respectively, but do not address the multipath problem. However, the multipath effect (from reflected GPS signals affects the position error far more significantly in a consumer-grade GPS receiver than in an expensive, geodetic-grade GPS receiver. To avoid this problem, a new integrated INS/GPS architecture is proposed. The proposed method is described and applied in a real-time integrated system with two integration strategies, namely, loosely coupled and tightly coupled schemes, respectively. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, field tests with various scenarios are conducted and the results are compared with a reliable reference system.

  4. Modeling studies on the formation of Hurricane Helene: the impact of GPS dropwindsondes from the NAMMA 2006 field campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folmer, Michael J.; Pasken, Robert W.; Chiao, Sen; Dunion, Jason; Halverson, Jeffrey

    2016-12-01

    Numerical simulations, using the weather research and forecasting (WRF) model in concert with GPS dropwindsondes released during the NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses 2006 Field Campaign, were conducted to provide additional insight on SAL-TC interaction. Using NCEP Final analysis datasets to initialize the WRF, a sensitivity test was performed on the assimilated (i.e., observation nudging) GPS dropwindsondes to understand the effects of individual variables (i.e., moisture, temperature, and winds) on the simulation and determine the extent of improvement when compared to available observations. The results suggested that GPS dropwindsonde temperature data provided the most significant difference in the simulated storm organization, storm strength, and synoptic environment, but all of the variables assimilated at the same time give a more representative mesoscale and synoptic picture.

  5. Pembuatan Digital Elevation Model Resolusi 10m dari Peta RBI dan Survei GPS dengan Algoritma Anudem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indarto

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes the generation of Digital Elevation Model (DEM with spatial resolution of 10m x 10m by re-interpolation of elevation data. Data input for this study includes: (1 digitized datum coordinate from RBI map, (2 sample points surveyed by GPS, (3 digitized contour data fromSRTM DEM and ASTER GDEM2, and (4 digitized stream-network layer from RBI. All collected data were converted to mass point coordinats. On the top of Topogrid-ArcGIS, all points data were interpolated to produce DEM. After that the produced DEM were compared and evaluated to the SRTM and ASTER DEMvisually. The result shows that produced DEM are more accurate to represent the detailed topography of the study areas.

  6. Sensitivities of phase-velocity dispersion curves of surface waves due to high-velocity-layer and low-velocity-layer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chao; Xu, Yixian; Pan, Yudi; Wang, Ao; Gao, Lingli

    2016-12-01

    High-velocity-layer (HVL) and low-velocity-layer (LVL) models are two kinds of the most common irregular layered models in near-surface geophysical applications. When calculating dispersion curves of some extreme irregular models, current algorithms (e.g., Knopoff transfer matrix algorithm) should be modified. We computed the correct dispersion curves and analyzed their sensitivities due to several synthetic HVL and LVL models. The results show that phase-velocity dispersion curves of both Rayleigh and Love waves are sensitive to variations in S-wave velocity of an LVL, but insensitive to that of an HVL. In addition, they are both insensitive to those of layers beneath the HVL or LVL. With an increase in velocity contrast between the irregular layer and its neighboring layers, the sensitivity effects (high sensitivity for the LVL and low sensitivity for the HVL) will amplify. These characteristics may significantly influence the inversion stability, leading to an inverted result with a low level of confidence. To invert surface-wave phase velocities for a more accurate S-wave model with an HVL or LVL, priori knowledge may be required and an inversion algorithm should be treated with extra caution.

  7. Integrated navigation of aerial robot for GPS and GPS-denied environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Satoshi; Min, Hongkyu; Wada, Tetsuya; Nonami, Kenzo

    2016-09-01

    In this study, novel robust navigation system for aerial robot in GPS and GPS- denied environments is proposed. Generally, the aerial robot uses position and velocity information from Global Positioning System (GPS) for guidance and control. However, GPS could not be used in several environments, for example, GPS has huge error near buildings and trees, indoor, and so on. In such GPS-denied environment, Laser Detection and Ranging (LIDER) sensor based navigation system have generally been used. However, LIDER sensor also has an weakness, and it could not be used in the open outdoor environment where GPS could be used. Therefore, it is desired to develop the integrated navigation system which is seamlessly applied to GPS and GPS-denied environments. In this paper, the integrated navigation system for aerial robot using GPS and LIDER is developed. The navigation system is designed based on Extended Kalman Filter, and the effectiveness of the developed system is verified by numerical simulation and experiment.

  8. Small velocity and finite temperature variations in kinetic relaxation models

    KAUST Repository

    Markowich, Peter

    2010-01-01

    A small Knuden number analysis of a kinetic equation in the diffusive scaling is performed. The collision kernel is of BGK type with a general local Gibbs state. Assuming that the flow velocity is of the order of the Knudsen number, a Hilbert expansion yields a macroscopic model with finite temperature variations, whose complexity lies in between the hydrodynamic and the energy-transport equations. Its mathematical structure is explored and macroscopic models for specific examples of the global Gibbs state are presented. © American Institute of Mathematical Sciences.

  9. Modeling and Anti-Interference Performance Analysis for GPS Vector Tracking%GPS 矢量跟踪建模与抗干扰性能分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙兆妍; 王新龙; 车欢; 李群生

    2016-01-01

    The anti-interference performance of GPS vector tracking loop is discussed deeply .The systematic models and bandwidth models of vector delay lock loop and vector frequency lock loop are es -tablished , and based on the analysis for noise bandwidth of vector tracking loop , it is illustrated that vec-tor tracking loop is capable of adaptively adjusting the noise bandwidth to adapt to the interference envi -ronments of different intensity .The interference-to-signal ratio is computed with the measurement errors within vector tracking loop to determine the anti-interference performance in complex environments .Com-pared with scalar tracking loop , GPS vector tracking loop has stronger anti-interference ability .%对GPS矢量跟踪环路的抗干扰性能进行了深入讨论。建立了矢量延迟锁定环及矢量频率锁定环的系统模型及带宽模型,分析说明了矢量跟踪环路能够自适应调整噪声带宽,从而适应不同强度的干扰环境;结合环路内的测量误差,计算得到矢量跟踪环路的干信比容限,确定了复杂环境中矢量跟踪环路的抗干扰性能。通过与标量跟踪的比较分析表明, GPS矢量跟踪具有更强的抗干扰能力。

  10. Impact of single-point GPS integrated water vapor estimates on short-range WRF model forecasts over southern India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prashant; Gopalan, Kaushik; Shukla, Bipasha Paul; Shyam, Abhineet

    2016-09-01

    Specifying physically consistent and accurate initial conditions is one of the major challenges of numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. In this study, ground-based global positioning system (GPS) integrated water vapor (IWV) measurements available from the International Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) Service (IGS) station in Bangalore, India, are used to assess the impact of GPS data on NWP model forecasts over southern India. Two experiments are performed with and without assimilation of GPS-retrieved IWV observations during the Indian winter monsoon period (November-December, 2012) using a four-dimensional variational (4D-Var) data assimilation method. Assimilation of GPS data improved the model IWV analysis as well as the subsequent forecasts. There is a positive impact of ˜10 % over Bangalore and nearby regions. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model-predicted 24-h surface temperature forecasts have also improved when compared with observations. Small but significant improvements were found in the rainfall forecasts compared to control experiments.

  11. Dynamic Travel Time Prediction Models for Buses Using Only GPS Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Fan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Providing real-time and accurate travel time information of transit vehicles can be very helpful as it assists passengers in planning their trips to minimize waiting times. The purpose of this research is to develop and compare dynamic travel time prediction models which can provide accurate prediction of bus travel time in order to give real-time information at a given downstream bus stop using only global positioning system (GPS data. Historical Average (HA, Kalman Filtering (KF and Artificial Neural Network (ANN models are considered and developed in this paper. A case has been studied by making use of the three models. Promising results are obtained from the case study, indicating that the models can be used to implement an Advanced Public Transport System. The implementation of this system could assist transit operators in improving the reliability of bus services, thus attracting more travelers to transit vehicles and helping relieve congestion. The performances of the three models were assessed and compared with each other under two criteria: overall prediction accuracy and robustness. It was shown that the ANN outperformed the other two models in both aspects. In conclusion, it is shown that bus travel time information can be reasonably provided using only arrival and departure time information at stops even in the absence of traffic-stream data.

  12. Modeling the effects of Multi-path propagation and scintillation on GPS signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habash Krause, L.; Wilson, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    GPS signals traveling through the earth's ionosphere are affected by charged particles that often disrupt the signal and the information it carries due to "scintillation", which resembles an extra noise source on the signal. These signals are also affected by weather changes, tropospheric scattering, and absorption from objects due to multi-path propagation of the signal. These obstacles cause distortion within information and fading of the signal, which ultimately results in phase locking errors and noise in messages. In this work, we attempted to replicate the distortion that occurs in GPS signals using a signal processing simulation model. We wanted to be able to create and identify scintillated signals so we could better understand the environment that caused it to become scintillated. Then, under controlled conditions, we simulated the receiver's ability to suppress scintillation in a signal. We developed a code in MATLAB that was programmed to: 1. Create a carrier wave and then plant noise (four different frequencies) on the carrier wave, 2. Compute a Fourier transform on the four different frequencies to find the frequency content of a signal, 3. Use a filter and apply it to the Fourier transform of the four frequencies and then compute a Signal-to-noise ratio to evaluate the power (in Decibels) of the filtered signal, and 4.Plot each of these components into graphs. To test the code's validity, we used user input and data from an AM transmitter. We determined that the amplitude modulated signal or AM signal would be the best type of signal to test the accuracy of the MATLAB code due to its simplicity. This code is basic to give students the ability to change and use it to determine the environment and effects of noise on different AM signals and their carrier waves. Overall, we were able to manipulate a scenario of a noisy signal and interpret its behavior and change due to its noisy components: amplitude, frequency, and phase shift.

  13. Pressure and velocity profiles in a static mechanical hemilarynx model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipour, Fariborz; Scherer, Ronald C

    2002-12-01

    This study examined pressure and velocity profiles in a hemilarynx mechanical model of phonation. The glottal section had parallel walls and was fabricated from hard plastic. Twelve pressure taps were created in the vocal fold surface and connected to a differential pressure transducer through a pressure switch. The glottal gap was measured with feeler gauges and the uniform glottal duct was verified by use of a laser system. Eight pressure transducers were placed in the flat wall opposite the vocal fold. Hot-wire anemometry was used to obtain velocity profiles upstream and downstream of the glottis. The results indicate that the pressure distribution on the vocal fold surface was consistent with pressure change along a parallel duct, whereas the pressures on the opposite flat wall typically were lower (by 8%-40% of the transglottal pressure just past mid-glottis). The upstream velocity profiles were symmetric regardless of the constriction shape and size. The jet flow downstream of the glottis was turbulent even for laminar upstream conditions. The front of the jet was consistently approximately 1.5 mm from the flat wall for glottal gaps of 0.4, 0.8 and 1.2 mm. The turbulence intensity also remained approximately at the same location of about 4 mm from the flat wall for the two larger gaps.

  14. A new settling velocity model to describe secondary sedimentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramin, Elham; Wágner, Dorottya Sarolta; Yde, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Secondary settling tanks (SSTs) are the most hydraulically sensitive unit operations in biological wastewater treatment plants. The maximum permissible inflow to the plant depends on the efficiency of SSTs in separating and thickening the activated sludge. The flow conditions and solids distribut......Secondary settling tanks (SSTs) are the most hydraulically sensitive unit operations in biological wastewater treatment plants. The maximum permissible inflow to the plant depends on the efficiency of SSTs in separating and thickening the activated sludge. The flow conditions and solids...... associated with their calibration. In this study, we developed a new settling velocity model, including hindered, transient and compression settling, and showed that it can be calibrated to data from a simple, novel settling column experimental set-up using the Bayesian optimization method DREAM......(ZS). In addition, correlations between the Herschel-Bulkley rheological model parameters and sludge concentration were identified with data from batch rheological experiments. A 2-D axisymmetric CFD model of a circular SST containing the new settling velocity and rheological model was validated with full...

  15. Land Vehicle Positioning Using GPS and Dead Reckoning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Dong-kai; C. L. Law; N. Nagarajan; Xu Ai-gong

    2003-01-01

    To ensure reliable land vehicle positioning, the Global Positioning System (GPS) is one of the best techniques commonly used in present-day positioning systems. However, GPS signals are not available if line of sight with the satellites is lost. In this respect, the addition of the Dead Reckoning (DR) method to complement the GPS unit would enhance the reliability of land vehicle positioning system. For implementing the DR method, the magnetic sensor and accelerometer are used for obtaining heading and velocity or distance information. Calibration of two sensors' dynamic model and DR algorithm are also introduced in this paper. The test result utilizing the GPS and DR methods is analyzed in this paper. It utilize spositioning information from GPS receiver when GPSsignal is available, otherwise DR is started to compensate GPS outage with the GPS output as the original point. The results showed that the error in east and north produced by the DR algorithm for a short time interval can be limitedwithin an acceptable range.

  16. Empirical analysis and modeling of errors of atmospheric profiles from GPS radio occultation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Foelsche

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of radio occultation (RO data in atmospheric studies requires precise knowledge of error characteristics. We present results of an empirical error analysis of GPS RO bending angle, refractivity, dry pressure, dry geopotential height, and dry temperature. We find very good agreement between data characteristics of different missions (CHAMP, GRACE-A, and Formosat-3/COSMIC (F3C. In the global mean, observational errors (standard deviation from "true" profiles at mean tangent point location agree within 0.3% in bending angle, 0.1% in refractivity, and 0.2 K in dry temperature at all altitude levels between 4 km and 35 km. Above 35 km the increase of the CHAMP raw bending angle observational error is more pronounced than that of GRACE-A and F3C leading to a larger observational error of about 1% at 42 km. Above ≈20 km, the observational errors show a strong seasonal dependence at high latitudes. Larger errors occur in hemispheric wintertime and are associated mainly with background data used in the retrieval process particularly under conditions when ionospheric residual is large. The comparison between UCAR and WEGC results (both data centers have independent inversion processing chains reveals different magnitudes of observational errors in atmospheric parameters, which are attributable to different background fields used. Based on the empirical error estimates, we provide a simple analytical error model for GPS RO atmospheric parameters for the altitude range of 4 km to 35 km and up to 50 km for UCAR raw bending angle and refractivity. In the model, which accounts for vertical, latitudinal, and seasonal variations, a constant error is adopted around the tropopause region amounting to 0.8% for bending angle, 0.35% for refractivity, 0.15% for dry pressure, 10 m for dry geopotential height, and 0.7 K for dry temperature. Below this region the observational error increases following an inverse height power-law and above it increases

  17. Velocity potential formulations of highly accurate Boussinesq-type models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bingham, Harry B.; Madsen, Per A.; Fuhrman, David R.

    2009-01-01

    processes on the weather side of reflective structures. Coast. Eng. 53, 929-945). An exact infinite series solution for the potential is obtained via a Taylor expansion about an arbitrary vertical position z=(z) over cap. For practical implementation however, the solution is expanded based on a slow...... variation of (z) over cap and terms are retained to first-order. With shoaling enhancement, the new models obtain a comparable accuracy in linear shoaling to the original velocity formulation. General consistency relations are also derived which are convenient for verifying that the differential operators...

  18. Beyond pressureless gas dynamics : Quadrature-based velocity moment models

    CERN Document Server

    Chalons, Christophe; Massot, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Following the seminal work of F. Bouchut on zero pressure gas dynamics which has been extensively used for gas particle-flows, the present contribution investigates quadrature-based velocity moments models for kinetic equations in the framework of the infinite Knudsen number limit, that is, for dilute clouds of small particles where the collision or coalescence probability asymptotically approaches zero. Such models define a hierarchy based on the number of moments and associated quadrature nodes, the first level of which leads to pressureless gas dynamics. We focus in particular on the four moment model where the flux closure is provided by a two-node quadrature in the velocity phase space and provide the right framework for studying both smooth and singular solutions. The link with both the kinetic underlying equation as well as with zero pressure gas dynamics is provided and we define the notion of measure solutions as well as the mathematical structure of the resulting system of four PDEs. We exhibit a fa...

  19. Nondissipative Velocity and Pressure Regularizations for the ICON Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restelli, M.; Giorgetta, M.; Hundertmark, T.; Korn, P.; Reich, S.

    2009-04-01

    A challenging aspect in the numerical simulation of atmospheric and oceanic flows is the multiscale character of the problem both in space and time. The small spacial scales are generated by the turbulent energy and enstrophy cascades, and are usually dealt with by means of turbulence parametrizations, while the small temporal scales are governed by the propagation of acoustic and gravity waves, which are of little importance for the large scale dynamics and are often eliminated by means of a semi-implicit time discretization. We propose to treat both phenomena of subgrid turbulence and temporal scale separation in a unified way by means of nondissipative regularizations of the underlying model equations. More precisely, we discuss the use of two regularized equation sets: the velocity regularization, also know as Lagrangian averaged Navier-Stokes system, and the pressure regularization. Both regularizations are nondissipative since they do not enhance the dissipation of energy and enstrophy of the flow. The velocity regularization models the effects of the subgrid velocity fluctuations on the mean flow, it has thus been proposed as a turbulence parametrization and it has been found to yield promising results in ocean modeling [HHPW08]. In particular, the velocity regularization results in a higher variability of the numerical solution. The pressure regularization, discussed in [RWS07], modifies the propagation of acoustic and gravity waves so that the resulting system can be discretized explicitly in time with time steps analogous to those allowed by a semi-implicit method. Compared to semi-implicit time integrators, however, the pressure regularization takes fully into account the geostrophic balance of the flow. We discuss here the implementation of the velocity and pressure regularizations within the numerical framework of the ICON general circulation model (GCM) [BR05] for the case of the rotating shallow water system, showing how the original numerical

  20. Mean velocity and moments of turbulent velocity fluctuations in the wake of a model ship propulsor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pego, J.P. [Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, LSTM, Erlangen, Lehrstuhl fuer Stroemungsmechanik, Erlangen (Germany); Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Porto (Portugal); Lienhart, H.; Durst, F. [Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, LSTM, Erlangen, Lehrstuhl fuer Stroemungsmechanik, Erlangen (Germany)

    2007-08-15

    Pod drives are modern outboard ship propulsion systems with a motor encapsulated in a watertight pod, whose shaft is connected directly to one or two propellers. The whole unit hangs from the stern of the ship and rotates azimuthally, thus providing thrust and steering without the need of a rudder. Force/momentum and phase-resolved laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) measurements were performed for in line co-rotating and contra-rotating propellers pod drive models. The measurements permitted to characterize these ship propulsion systems in terms of their hydrodynamic characteristics. The torque delivered to the propellers and the thrust of the system were measured for different operation conditions of the propellers. These measurements lead to the hydrodynamic optimization of the ship propulsion system. The parameters under focus revealed the influence of distance between propeller planes, propeller frequency of rotation ratio and type of propellers (co- or contra-rotating) on the overall efficiency of the system. Two of the ship propulsion systems under consideration were chosen, based on their hydrodynamic characteristics, for a detailed study of the swirling wake flow by means of laser Doppler anemometry. A two-component laser Doppler system was employed for the velocity measurements. A light barrier mounted on the axle of the rear propeller motor supplied a TTL signal to mark the beginning of each period, thus providing angle information for the LDA measurements. Measurements were conducted for four axial positions in the slipstream of the pod drive models. The results show that the wake of contra-rotating propeller is more homogeneous than when they co-rotate. In agreement with the results of the force/momentum measurements and with hypotheses put forward in the literature (see e.g. Poehls in Entwurfsgrundlagen fuer Schraubenpropeller, 1984; Schneekluth in Hydromechanik zum Schiffsentwurf, 1988; Breslin and Andersen in Hydrodynamics of ship propellers, 1996

  1. Mean velocity and moments of turbulent velocity fluctuations in the wake of a model ship propulsor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pêgo, J. P.; Lienhart, H.; Durst, F.

    2007-08-01

    Pod drives are modern outboard ship propulsion systems with a motor encapsulated in a watertight pod, whose shaft is connected directly to one or two propellers. The whole unit hangs from the stern of the ship and rotates azimuthally, thus providing thrust and steering without the need of a rudder. Force/momentum and phase-resolved laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) measurements were performed for in line co-rotating and contra-rotating propellers pod drive models. The measurements permitted to characterize these ship propulsion systems in terms of their hydrodynamic characteristics. The torque delivered to the propellers and the thrust of the system were measured for different operation conditions of the propellers. These measurements lead to the hydrodynamic optimization of the ship propulsion system. The parameters under focus revealed the influence of distance between propeller planes, propeller frequency of rotation ratio and type of propellers (co- or contra-rotating) on the overall efficiency of the system. Two of the ship propulsion systems under consideration were chosen, based on their hydrodynamic characteristics, for a detailed study of the swirling wake flow by means of laser Doppler anemometry. A two-component laser Doppler system was employed for the velocity measurements. A light barrier mounted on the axle of the rear propeller motor supplied a TTL signal to mark the beginning of each period, thus providing angle information for the LDA measurements. Measurements were conducted for four axial positions in the slipstream of the pod drive models. The results show that the wake of contra-rotating propeller is more homogeneous than when they co-rotate. In agreement with the results of the force/momentum measurements and with hypotheses put forward in the literature (see e.g. Poehls in Entwurfsgrundlagen für Schraubenpropeller, 1984; Schneekluth in Hydromechanik zum Schiffsentwurf, 1988; Breslin and Andersen in Hydrodynamics of ship propellers, 1996

  2. GPS & Roadpricing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zabic, Martina

    2005-01-01

    I denne artikel præsenteres analysemetoderne og resultaterne fra et eksamensprojekt omhandlende en analyse af GPS kvaliteten i forhold til roadpricing i København. Denne undersøgelse af GPS kvaliteten i forbindelse med roadpricing, er foretaget i tilknytning til det danske AKTA forsøg (www.......akta-kbh.dk), hvor GPS data er indsamlet for 500 biler over en 2-årig periode (2001-2003). Artiklen præsenterer således en analyse af GPS nøjagtigheden med henblik på at undersøge om kvalitet og pålidelighed er tilstrækkelig, til et GPS-baseret roadpricingssystem i København. Ved GPS-baseret roadpricing, udstyres...... med henblik på enhedsomkostningerne skulle være økonomisk realisable til brug i et så omfattende roadpricingssystem. Endvidere vanskeliggøres positionerings forholdene, idet bilen der ønskes positionsbestemt er i bevægelse. Når både satellitterne og GPS modtageren er i bevægelse, reduceres...

  3. GPS & Roadpricing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zabic, Martina

    2005-01-01

    I denne artikel præsenteres analysemetoderne og resultaterne fra et eksamensprojekt omhandlende en analyse af GPS kvaliteten i forhold til roadpricing i København. Denne undersøgelse af GPS kvaliteten i forbindelse med roadpricing, er foretaget i tilknytning til det danske AKTA forsøg (www.......akta-kbh.dk), hvor GPS data er indsamlet for 500 biler over en 2-årig periode (2001-2003). Artiklen præsenterer således en analyse af GPS nøjagtigheden med henblik på at undersøge om kvalitet og pålidelighed er tilstrækkelig, til et GPS-baseret roadpricingssystem i København. Ved GPS-baseret roadpricing, udstyres...... med henblik på enhedsomkostningerne skulle være økonomisk realisable til brug i et så omfattende roadpricingssystem. Endvidere vanskeliggøres positionerings forholdene, idet bilen der ønskes positionsbestemt er i bevægelse. Når både satellitterne og GPS modtageren er i bevægelse, reduceres...

  4. Stabilization and Riesz basis property for an overhead crane model with feedback in velocity and rotating velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toure K. Augustin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies a variant of an overhead crane model's problem, with a control force in velocity and rotating velocity on the platform. We obtain under certain conditions the well-posedness and the strong stabilization of the closed-loop system. We then analyze the spectrum of the system. Using a method due to Shkalikov, we prove the existence of a sequence of generalized eigenvectors of the system, which forms a Riesz basis for the state energy Hilbert space.

  5. Velocity Structure Determination Through Seismic Waveform Modeling and Time Deviations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, B.; Zhu, L.; Tan, Y.; Helmberger, D. V.

    2001-12-01

    Through the use of seismic waveforms recorded by TriNet, a dataset of earthquake focal mechanisms and deviations (time shifts) relative to a standard model facilitates the investigation of the crust and uppermost mantle of southern California. The CAP method of focal mechanism determination, in use by TriNet on a routine basis, provides time shifts for surface waves and Pnl arrivals independently relative to the reference model. These shifts serve as initial data for calibration of local and regional seismic paths. Time shifts from the CAP method are derived by splitting the Pnl section of the waveform, the first arriving Pn to just before the arrival of the S wave, from the much slower surface waves then cross-correlating the data with synthetic waveforms computed from a standard model. Surface waves interact with the entire crust, but the upper crust causes the greatest effect. Whereas, Pnl arrivals sample the deeper crust, upper mantle, and source region. This natural division separates the upper from lower crust for regional calibration and structural modeling and allows 3-D velocity maps to be created using the resulting time shifts. Further examination of Pnl and other arrivals which interact with the Moho illuminate the complex nature of this boundary. Initial attempts at using the first 10 seconds of the Pnl section to determine upper most mantle structure have proven insightful. Two large earthquakes north of southern California in Nevada and Mammoth Lakes, CA allow the creation of record sections from 200 to 600 km. As the paths swing from east to west across southern California, simple 1-D models turn into complex structure, dramatically changing the waveform character. Using finite difference models to explain the structure, we determine that a low velocity zone is present at the base of the crust and extends to 100 km in depth. Velocity variations of 5 percent of the mantle in combination with steeply sloping edges produces complex waveform variations

  6. THE DETERMINATION OF THE POSITION, VELOCITY AND ACCELERATION SOFTWARE FOR GPS IN AIRBORNE GRAVIMETRY%航空重力测量中的GPS后处理解算软件

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘寅彪; 李晓斌; 张贵宾

    2012-01-01

    The key problem that airborne gravimetry has to solve is how to separate the disturbing accelerations generated by aviation from the total acceleration observed by gravimeter. The GPS technology is one of the methods to solve the problem. With it, we can get the position, velocity, acceleration and any other parameters of the aircraft carrier with high accuracy which can be used to make the necessary correction of the total acceleration. The authors have developed the GPS post-processing software system for airborne gravimetry, which is called EGPS, on the basis of the concept of software architecture. The software is the integration of different functional components according to certain interactive mode. EGPS uses the method of pseudo-range difference to get the position, and employs the method of Doppler frequency shift to get the velocity of the aircraft carrier with high accuracy. This paper presents the processing results of actual airborne gravimetry GPS data using EGPS. The data support a conclusion that EGPS has basically met the requirement of airborne gravimetry for GPS post-processing.%在航空重力测量的后期资料处理中,GPS技术主要作用是精确确定飞机的位置、速度和加速度,以提供可靠的飞机飞行参数和必要的重力加速度改正等.笔者以航空重力领域的实际需求,开发了航空重力的GPS后处理软件-EGPS.该软件能够利用伪距差分、多普勒频移的方法解算航空重力测量的载体位置、速度和加速度等.通过处理航空重力测量中GPS资料的速度解算实例,并与国外已经先进的航空重力测量处理软件的速度解算结果对比、分析,EGPS已经基本达到了航空重力测量领域对GPS速度高精度解算的要求.

  7. Traveling waves in an optimal velocity model of freeway traffic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Peter; Woods, Andrew

    2001-03-01

    Car-following models provide both a tool to describe traffic flow and algorithms for autonomous cruise control systems. Recently developed optimal velocity models contain a relaxation term that assigns a desirable speed to each headway and a response time over which drivers adjust to optimal velocity conditions. These models predict traffic breakdown phenomena analogous to real traffic instabilities. In order to deepen our understanding of these models, in this paper, we examine the transition from a linear stable stream of cars of one headway into a linear stable stream of a second headway. Numerical results of the governing equations identify a range of transition phenomena, including monotonic and oscillating travelling waves and a time- dependent dispersive adjustment wave. However, for certain conditions, we find that the adjustment takes the form of a nonlinear traveling wave from the upstream headway to a third, intermediate headway, followed by either another traveling wave or a dispersive wave further downstream matching the downstream headway. This intermediate value of the headway is selected such that the nonlinear traveling wave is the fastest stable traveling wave which is observed to develop in the numerical calculations. The development of these nonlinear waves, connecting linear stable flows of two different headways, is somewhat reminiscent of stop-start waves in congested flow on freeways. The different types of adjustments are classified in a phase diagram depending on the upstream and downstream headway and the response time of the model. The results have profound consequences for autonomous cruise control systems. For an autocade of both identical and different vehicles, the control system itself may trigger formations of nonlinear, steep wave transitions. Further information is available [Y. Sugiyama, Traffic and Granular Flow (World Scientific, Singapore, 1995), p. 137].

  8. Developing a Fundamental Model for an Integrated GPS/INS State Estimation System with Kalman Filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Stephen

    1999-01-01

    This work will demonstrate the integration of sensor and system dynamic data and their appropriate models using an optimal filter to create a robust, adaptable, easily reconfigurable state (motion) estimation system. This state estimation system will clearly show the application of fundamental modeling and filtering techniques. These techniques are presented at a general, first principles level, that can easily be adapted to specific applications. An example of such an application is demonstrated through the development of an integrated GPS/INS navigation system. This system acquires both global position data and inertial body data, to provide optimal estimates of current position and attitude states. The optimal states are estimated using a Kalman filter. The state estimation system will include appropriate error models for the measurement hardware. The results of this work will lead to the development of a "black-box" state estimation system that supplies current motion information (position and attitude states) that can be used to carry out guidance and control strategies. This black-box state estimation system is developed independent of the vehicle dynamics and therefore is directly applicable to a variety of vehicles. Issues in system modeling and application of Kalman filtering techniques are investigated and presented. These issues include linearized models of equations of state, models of the measurement sensors, and appropriate application and parameter setting (tuning) of the Kalman filter. The general model and subsequent algorithm is developed in Matlab for numerical testing. The results of this system are demonstrated through application to data from the X-33 Michael's 9A8 mission and are presented in plots and simple animations.

  9. Modeling L1-GPS Errors for an Enhanced Data Fusion with Lane Marking Maps for Road Automated Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    International audience; This paper describes a method which models the time correlation errors of a standalone L1-GPS receiver by integrating front-view camera measurements map-matched with a lane marking map. An identification method of the parameters of the shaping model is presented and evaluated with real data. The observability of the augmented state vector is demonstrated according to an algebraic definition. A positioning solver based on extended Kalman filtering with measured input is...

  10. Wildfire simulation using LES with synthetic-velocity SGS models

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, J. M.; Tang, Tingting

    2016-11-01

    Wildland fires are becoming more prevalent and intense worldwide as climate change leads to warmer, drier conditions; and large-eddy simulation (LES) is receiving increasing attention for fire spread predictions as computing power continues to improve (see, e.g.,). We report results from wildfire simulations over general terrain employing implicit LES for solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes (N.-S.) and thermal energy equations with Boussinesq approximation, altered with Darcy, Forchheimer and Brinkman extensions, to represent forested regions as porous media with varying (in both space and time) porosity and permeability. We focus on subgrid-scale (SGS) behaviors computed with a synthetic-velocity model, a discrete dynamical system, based on the poor man's N.-S. equations and investigate the ability of this model to produce fire whirls (tornadoes of fire) at the (unresolved) SGS level. Professor, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.

  11. GPS DATA INVERSION OF KINEMATIC MODEL OF MAIN FAULTS IN YUNNAN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShenChongyang; WuYun; WangQi; YouXinzhao; QiaoXuejun

    2003-01-01

    On the basis of GPS observations in Yunnan from 1999 to 2001, we adopt the robust Bayesian least square estimation and multi-fault dislocation model to analyze the quantitative kinematics models of the main faults in Yunnan. The geodetic inversion suggests that, (1) The horizontal movement of crust in Yunnan is affected distinctly by fault activity whose characters are consistent with geological results; (2) The activity of the north segment of the Red River fault zone is maximum, in the middle segment is moderate, and in the south segment is minimum; (3)Among others, the Xiaojiang fault zone has the strongest activity, the secondary are the Lancang fault zone and the north segment of Nujiang fault zone, the Qujiang fault zone shows the characteristic of hinge fault; (4)Each fault could produce an earthquake of Ms=6 more or less per year; (5) The larger value of maximum shear strain are mostly located along the main active fault zones and their intersections; earthquakes did not occur at the place of maximum shear strain, and mostly take place at the higher gradient zones, especially at its corner.

  12. GPS DATA INVERSION OF KINEMATIC MODEL OF MAIN FAULTS IN YUNNAN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shen Chongyang; Wu Yun; Wang Qi; You Xinzhao; Qiao Xuejun

    2003-01-01

    On the basis of GPS observations in Yunnan from 1999 to 2001, we adopt the robust Bayesian least square estimation and multi-fault dislocation model to analyze the quantitative kinematics models of the main faults in Yunnan. The geodetic inversion suggests that: (1) The horizontal movement of crust in Yunnan is affected distinctly by fault activity whose characters are consistent with geological results; (2) The activity of the north segment of the Red River fault zone is maximum, in the middle segment is moderate, and in the south segment is minimum; (3)Among others, the Xiaojiang fault zone has the strongest activity, the secondary are the Lancang fault zone and the north segment of Nujiang fault zone, the Qujiang fault zone shows the characteristic of hinge fault; (4)Each fault could produce an earthquake of Ms=6 more or less per year; (5) The larger value of maximum shear strain are mostly located along the main active fault zones and their intersections; earthquakes did not occur at the place of maximum shear strain, and mostly take place at the higher gradient zones, especially at its corner.

  13. The Limit Deposit Velocity model: a new approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, S.A.; Ramsdell, R.C.

    2015-01-01

    In slurry transport of settling slurries in Newtonian fluids, it is often stated that one should apply a line speed above a critical velocity, because blow this critical velocity there is the danger of plugging the line. There are many definitions and names for this critical velocity. It is referred

  14. Transients in Pacific/North American Plate Boundary Deformation: Synthesis and Modeling of GPS and Borehole Strain Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Sean C.; Frey, H. V. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This is the Final Technical Report on research conducted between 1 June 1997 and 14 September 2001 entitled "Transients in Pacific/North American plate boundary deformation: Synthesis and modeling of GPS and borehole strain observations." As the project title implies, our effort involved a geodetic study of strain transients, i.e., temporal variations in deformation rates, that occur within plate boundary zones and their relationship to earthquakes and plate motions. Important transients occur during and following large earthquakes, and there are also strain transients not apparently associated with earthquakes. A particularly intriguing class of transients, for which there is a modest but growing list of examples, are preseismic anomalies. Such earthquake precursors, if further documented and understood, would have obvious importance for earthquake hazard mitigation. Because the timescales for these diverse transients range over at least 6 orders of magnitude (minutes to years), no single geodetic technique is optimum. We therefore undertook a systematic synthesis of Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) and borehole strainmeter data in three areas in California where there are adequate numbers of both types of instruments (or their equivalent): the San Francisco Bay region (within the Bay Area Regional Deformation network), southern California (within the Southern California Integrated GPS Network), and Parkfield (where a two-color laser system provides a proxy for continuous GPS measurements). An integral component of our study was the elucidation of the physical mechanisms by which such transients occur and propagate. We therefore initiated the development of multiple forward models, using two independent approaches. In the first, we explored the response to specified earthquake slip in viscoelastic models that incorporated failure criteria and the geometry of major faults in California. In the second approach, we examined the dynamical response of a complex

  15. Open-Source Digital Elevation Model (DEMs) Evaluation with GPS and LiDAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, N. F.; Din, A. H. M.; Omar, K. M.; Khanan, M. F. A.; Omar, A. H.; Hamid, A. I. A.; Pa'suya, M. F.

    2016-09-01

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer-Global Digital Elevation Model (ASTER GDEM), Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), and Global Multi-resolution Terrain Elevation Data 2010 (GMTED2010) are freely available Digital Elevation Model (DEM) datasets for environmental modeling and studies. The quality of spatial resolution and vertical accuracy of the DEM data source has a great influence particularly on the accuracy specifically for inundation mapping. Most of the coastal inundation risk studies used the publicly available DEM to estimated the coastal inundation and associated damaged especially to human population based on the increment of sea level. In this study, the comparison between ground truth data from Global Positioning System (GPS) observation and DEM is done to evaluate the accuracy of each DEM. The vertical accuracy of SRTM shows better result against ASTER and GMTED10 with an RMSE of 6.054 m. On top of the accuracy, the correlation of DEM is identified with the high determination of coefficient of 0.912 for SRTM. For coastal zone area, DEMs based on airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) dataset was used as ground truth data relating to terrain height. In this case, the LiDAR DEM is compared against the new SRTM DEM after applying the scale factor. From the findings, the accuracy of the new DEM model from SRTM can be improved by applying scale factor. The result clearly shows that the value of RMSE exhibit slightly different when it reached 0.503 m. Hence, this new model is the most suitable and meets the accuracy requirement for coastal inundation risk assessment using open source data. The suitability of these datasets for further analysis on coastal management studies is vital to assess the potentially vulnerable areas caused by coastal inundation.

  16. Independent scattering model and velocity dispersion in trabecular bone: comparison with a multiple scattering model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haïat, G; Naili, S

    2011-02-01

    Speed of sound measurements are used clinically to assess bone strength. Trabecular bone is an attenuating composite material in which negative values of velocity dispersion have been measured; this behavior remaining poorly explained physically. The aim of this work is to describe the ultrasonic propagation in trabecular bone modeled by infinite cylinders immersed in a saturating matrix and to derive the physical determinants of velocity dispersion. An original homogenization model accounting for the coupling of independent scattering and absorption phenomena allows the computation of phase velocity and of dispersion while varying bone properties. The first step of the model consists in the computation of the attenuation coefficient at all frequencies. The second step of the model corresponds to the application of the general Kramers-Krönig relationship to derive the frequency dependence of phase velocity. The model predicts negative values of velocity dispersion in agreement with experimental results obtained in phantoms mimicking trabecular bone. In trabecular bone, only negative values of velocity dispersion are predicted by the model, which span within the range of values measured experimentally. However, the comparison of the present results with results obtained in Haiat et al. (J Acoust Soc Am 124:4047-4058, 2008) assuming multiple scattering indicates that accounting for multiple scattering phenomena leads to a better prediction of velocity dispersion in trabecular bone.

  17. Velocity field measurements in the wake of a propeller model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukund, R.; Kumar, A. Chandan

    2016-10-01

    Turboprop configurations are being revisited for the modern-day regional transport aircrafts for their fuel efficiency. The use of laminar flow wings is an effort in this direction. One way to further improve their efficiency is by optimizing the flow over the wing in the propeller wake. Previous studies have focused on improving the gross aerodynamic characteristics of the wing. It is known that the propeller slipstream causes early transition of the boundary layer on the wing. However, an optimized design of the propeller and wing combination could delay this transition and decrease the skin friction drag. Such a wing design would require the detailed knowledge of the development of the slipstream in isolated conditions. There are very few studies in the literature addressing the requirements of transport aircraft having six-bladed propeller and cruising at a high propeller advance ratio. Low-speed wind tunnel experiments have been conducted on a powered propeller model in isolated conditions, measuring the velocity field in the vertical plane behind the propeller using two-component hot-wire anemometry. The data obtained clearly resolved the mean velocity, the turbulence, the ensemble phase averages and the structure and development of the tip vortex. The turbulence in the slipstream showed that transition could be close to the leading edge of the wing, making it a fine case for optimization. The development of the wake with distance shows some interesting flow features, and the data are valuable for flow computation and optimization.

  18. A new voxel-based model for the determination of atmospheric weighted mean temperature in GPS atmospheric sounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Changyong; Wu, Suqin; Wang, Xiaoming; Hu, Andong; Wang, Qianxin; Zhang, Kefei

    2017-06-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) is a powerful atmospheric observing system for determining precipitable water vapour (PWV). In the detection of PWV using GPS, the atmospheric weighted mean temperature (Tm) is a crucial parameter for the conversion of zenith tropospheric delay (ZTD) to PWV since the quality of PWV is affected by the accuracy of Tm. In this study, an improved voxel-based Tm model, named GWMT-D, was developed using global reanalysis data over a 4-year period from 2010 to 2013 provided by the United States National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). The performance of GWMT-D was assessed against three existing empirical Tm models - GTm-III, GWMT-IV, and GTmN - using different data sources in 2014 - the NCEP reanalysis data, surface Tm data provided by Global Geodetic Observing System and radiosonde measurements. The results show that the new GWMT-D model outperforms all the other three models with a root-mean-square error of less than 5.0 K at different altitudes over the globe. The new GWMT-D model can provide a practical alternative Tm determination method in real-time GPS-PWV remote sensing systems.

  19. GPS Auto-Navigation Design for Unmanned Air Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Caroline C. A.; Heinzen, Stearns N.; Hall, Charles E., Jr.; Chokani, Ndaona

    2003-01-01

    A GPS auto-navigation system is designed for Unmanned Air Vehicles. The objective is to enable the air vehicle to be used as a test-bed for novel flow control concepts. The navigation system uses pre-programmed GPS waypoints. The actual GPS position, heading, and velocity are collected by the flight computer, a PC104 system running in Real-Time Linux, and compared with the desired waypoint. The navigator then determines the necessity of a heading correction and outputs the correction in the form of a commanded bank angle, for a level coordinated turn, to the controller system. This controller system consists of 5 controller! (pitch rate PID, yaw damper, bank angle PID, velocity hold, and altitude hold) designed for a closed loop non-linear aircraft model with linear aerodynamic coefficients. The ability and accuracy of using GPS data, is validated by a GPS flight. The autopilots are also validated in flight. The autopilot unit flight validations show that the designed autopilots function as designed. The aircraft model, generated on Matlab SIMULINK is also enhanced by the flight data to accurately represent the actual aircraft.

  20. Model-based robust estimation and fault detection for MEMS-INS/GPS integrated navigation systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao Lingjuan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In micro-electro-mechanical system based inertial navigation system (MEMS-INS/global position system (GPS integrated navigation systems, there exist unknown disturbances and abnormal measurements. In order to obtain high estimation accuracy and enhance detection sensitivity to faults in measurements, this paper deals with the problem of model-based robust estimation (RE and fault detection (FD. A filter gain matrix and a post-filter are designed to obtain a RE and FD algorithm with current measurements, which is different from most of the existing priori filters using measurements in one-step delay. With the designed filter gain matrix, the H-infinity norm of the transfer function from noise inputs to estimation error outputs is limited within a certain range; with the designed post-filter, the residual signal is robust to disturbances but sensitive to faults. Therefore, the algorithm can guarantee small estimation errors in the presence of disturbances and have high sensitivity to faults. The proposed method is evaluated in an integrated navigation system, and the simulation results show that it is more effective in position estimation and fault signal detection than priori RE and FD algorithms.

  1. Model-based robust estimation and fault detection for MEMS-INS/GPS integrated navigation systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miao Lingjuan; Shi Jing

    2014-01-01

    In micro-electro-mechanical system based inertial navigation system (MEMS-INS)/global position system (GPS) integrated navigation systems, there exist unknown disturbances and abnormal measurements. In order to obtain high estimation accuracy and enhance detection sensitivity to faults in measurements, this paper deals with the problem of model-based robust esti-mation (RE) and fault detection (FD). A filter gain matrix and a post-filter are designed to obtain a RE and FD algorithm with current measurements, which is different from most of the existing pri-ori filters using measurements in one-step delay. With the designed filter gain matrix, the H-infinity norm of the transfer function from noise inputs to estimation error outputs is limited within a certain range;with the designed post-filter, the residual signal is robust to disturbances but sensitive to faults. Therefore, the algorithm can guarantee small estimation errors in the presence of distur-bances and have high sensitivity to faults. The proposed method is evaluated in an integrated navigation system, and the simulation results show that it is more effective in position estimation and fault signal detection than priori RE and FD algorithms.

  2. Unsteady velocity measurements in a realistic intracranial aneurysm model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugron, Ádám; Farinas, Marie-Isabelle; Kiss, László; Paál, György

    2012-01-01

    The initiation, growth and rupture of intracranial aneurysms are intensively studied by computational fluid dynamics. To gain confidence in the results of numerical simulations, validation of the results is necessary. To this end the unsteady flow was measured in a silicone phantom of a realistic intracranial aneurysm. A flow circuit was built with a novel unsteady flow rate generating method, used to model the idealised shape of the heartbeat. This allowed the measurement of the complex three-dimensional velocity distribution by means of laser-optical methods such as laser doppler anemometry (LDA) and particle image velocimetry (PIV). The PIV measurements, available with high temporal and spatial distribution, were found to have good agreement with the control LDA measurements. Furthermore, excellent agreement was found with the numerical results.

  3. GPS Composite Clock Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, James R.

    2008-01-01

    The GPS composite clock defines GPS time, the timescale used today in GPS operations. GPS time is illuminated by examination of its role in the complete estimation and control problem relative to UTC/TAI. The phase of each GPS clock is unobservable from GPS pseudorange measurements, and the mean phase of the GPS clock ensemble (GPS time) is unobservable. A new and useful observability definition is presented, together with new observability theorems, to demonstrate explicitly that GPS time is...

  4. GPS Metric Tracking Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    As Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) applications become more prevalent for land- and air-based vehicles, GPS applications for space vehicles will also increase. The Applied Technology Directorate of Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has developed a lightweight, low-cost GPS Metric Tracking Unit (GMTU), the first of two steps in developing a lightweight, low-cost Space-Based Tracking and Command Subsystem (STACS) designed to meet Range Safety's link margin and latency requirements for vehicle command and telemetry data. The goals of STACS are to improve Range Safety operations and expand tracking capabilities for space vehicles. STACS will track the vehicle, receive commands, and send telemetry data through the space-based asset, which will dramatically reduce dependence on ground-based assets. The other step was the Low-Cost Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) Transceiver (LCT2), developed by the Wallops Flight Facility (WFF), which allows the vehicle to communicate with a geosynchronous relay satellite. Although the GMTU and LCT2 were independently implemented and tested, the design collaboration of KSC and WFF engineers allowed GMTU and LCT2 to be integrated into one enclosure, leading to the final STACS. In operation, GMTU needs only a radio frequency (RF) input from a GPS antenna and outputs position and velocity data to the vehicle through a serial or pulse code modulation (PCM) interface. GMTU includes one commercial GPS receiver board and a custom board, the Command and Telemetry Processor (CTP) developed by KSC. The CTP design is based on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) with embedded processors to support GPS functions.

  5. GPS receivers timing data processing using neural networks: optimal estimation and errors modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosavi, M R

    2007-10-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) is a network of satellites, whose original purpose was to provide accurate navigation, guidance, and time transfer to military users. The past decade has also seen rapid concurrent growth in civilian GPS applications, including farming, mining, surveying, marine, and outdoor recreation. One of the most significant of these civilian applications is commercial aviation. A stand-alone civilian user enjoys an accuracy of 100 meters and 300 nanoseconds, 25 meters and 200 nanoseconds, before and after Selective Availability (SA) was turned off. In some applications, high accuracy is required. In this paper, five Neural Networks (NNs) are proposed for acceptable noise reduction of GPS receivers timing data. The paper uses from an actual data collection for evaluating the performance of the methods. An experimental test setup is designed and implemented for this purpose. The obtained experimental results from a Coarse Acquisition (C/A)-code single-frequency GPS receiver strongly support the potential of methods to give high accurate timing. Quality of the obtained results is very good, so that GPS timing RMS error reduce to less than 120 and 40 nanoseconds, with and without SA.

  6. Source Rupture Models for the 2016 Mw6.2 Central Italy Earthquake from Joint Inversions of GPS and Teleseismic and strong motion data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, K.; Liu, Z.; Song, Y. T.

    2016-12-01

    As a result of shallow normal faulting in the Central Apennines, the August 24th, 2016 Mw 6.2 Central Italy earthquake caused severe damages and killed more than 300 people. This event ruptured in a densely-instrumented area and provided very rich data for a better understanding of the local tectonic behavior, which can help to minimize seismic hazards of Italy in the future. In this contribution, we examine the spatiotemporal rupture details of the earthquake by jointly inverting local coseismic GPS offsets from Rete Integrata Nazionale GPS (RING), strong motion waveform records from Rete Accelerometrica Nazionale (RAN) and teleseismic body waves from Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology(IRIS). We estimate the fault geometry from global CMT solution and discretize the fault plane into subfaults. A frequency-wavenumber method is used to compute near-field dynamic and static Green's functions based on 1-D layered velocity model from CRUST 2.0. We use TEL3 [Chen et al., 2015] to model teleseismic data. We allow variable rake for fault slip and apply Laplacian regularization in solving earthquake rupture history in space and time. Non-negative least square method is used for inversion and 2D Akaike's Bayesian Information Criterion (ABIC) is chosen to determine optimal parameters. Our preliminary results show that the main ruptures locate at about 4 km depth with two distinct slip zones: one close to the epicenter and another lie to the northwest of the epicenter, about 20 kilometers away, and it is where the largest slip (about 30 centimeters) occurred. The equivalent seismic moment is 3.9*1018 Nm that is in agreement with other studies. In addition, we are going to refine the rupture model and evolution process by adding more data (e.g., InSAR data from sentinel-1A) and optimizing parameters settings.

  7. FEM Modeling of Lithospheric Rheology of Taiwan from GPS and PSInSAR Observations of Postseismic Deformation of the 1999 Chi-Chi Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, G.; Chang, W. L.; Chang, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    Postseismic deformation following large earthquakes can persist from years to decades. Since the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake (Mw=7.6), more than a decade of GPS records reveal postseismic deformation across Taiwan and have been used for afterslip and lithospheric rheology studies. Previous researches show that this earthquake has experienced rapid afterslip on deeper part of Chelungpu fault with slip rates decreased within years [Hsu et al., 2002 and 2007]. Other postseismic deformation signals were modeled by assumed Maxwell viscoelastic relaxation with heterogeneous lower crust and upper mantle [Rousset et al., 2012; Tang et al., 2015], which suggest that the pattern of vertical displacements is more sensitive to the geometry of heterogeneous viscoelastic lithospheric structure. To improve the spatial coverage of observation, this study processed both ERS and Envisat SAR images from 1999-2008 with PSInSAR techniques, and the result provide a better illustration of Line-Of-Sight (LOS) deformation field which is near to vertical. Both GPS and PSInSAR results reveal that the surface displacement rates (horizontal or vertical?) of eastern Taiwan are higher than interseismic rates after a decade, and this feature may reveal the importance of low viscosity zone beneath central range of Taiwan. With the benefits from GPS and PSInSAR data, we intend to test other posssible viscosity and the geometry of viscoelastic structure. We adopt coseismic fault geometry and slip distribution of the Chi-Chi earthquake based on previous studies, and build a set of 2D rheological models with an elastic upper-crust layer overlain a viscoelastic lower-crust layer and a viscoelastic upper mantle. The depths of the two layer boundaries are determined according to subsurface tectonic and velocity structures inferred by previous literatures. We employ the finite element method (FEM), Pylith, to estimate the postseismic surface deformation corresponding to different viscosities. Benefit from the

  8. Parallel Computing of a Variational Data Assimilation Model for GPS/MET Observation Using the Ray-Tracing Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张昕; 刘月巍; 王斌; 季仲贞

    2004-01-01

    The Spectral Statistical Interpolation (SSI) analysis system of NCEP is used to assimilate meteorological data from the Global Positioning Satellite System (GPS/MET) refraction angles with the variational technique. Verified by radiosonde, including GPS/MET observations into the analysis makes an overall improvement to the analysis variables of temperature, winds, and water vapor. However, the variational model with the ray-tracing method is quite expensive for numerical weather prediction and climate research. For example, about 4 000 GPS/MET refraction angles need to be assimilated to produce an ideal global analysis. Just one iteration of minimization will take more than 24 hours CPU time on the NCEP's Gray C90 computer. Although efforts have been taken to reduce the computational cost, it is still prohibitive for operational data assimilation. In this paper, a parallel version of the three-dimensional variational data assimilation model of GPS/MET occultation measurement suitable for massive parallel processors architectures is developed. The divide-and-conquer strategy is used to achieve parallelism and is implemented by message passing. The authors present the principles for the code's design and examine the performance on the state-of-the-art parallel computers in China. The results show that this parallel model scales favorably as the number of processors is increased. With the Memory-IO technique implemented by the author, the wall clock time per iteration used for assimilating 1420 refraction angles is reduced from 45 s to 12 s using 1420 processors. This suggests that the new parallelized code has the potential to be useful in numerical weather prediction (NWP) and climate studies.

  9. Development of a regional tropospheric delay model for GPS-based navigation with emphasis to the Indian Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parameswaran, K.; Saha, Korak; Suresh Raju, C.

    2008-08-01

    The accuracy of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), aimed to support precise positioning for aircraft navigation globally by coordinating different regional augmentation systems, is limited by the extent to which the atmospheric propagation delay of microwave signals can be modeled. An algorithm is developed for modeling the tropospheric delay based on mean meteorological parameters. A Region-specific Tropospheric Delay (RTD) model is developed exclusively for the Indian region using meteorological data from the Indian subcontinent, as a part of GPS Aided Geo Augmented Navigation (GAGAN) program. The applicability of this model is examined in the context of the global model used in Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS), developed employing meteorological data mostly from North American continent, by comparing the estimated zenith tropospheric delay (ZTD) with those obtained from regional models employing measured atmospheric parameters at the surface. The rms deviation of ZTD estimated using RTD model from that of the surface model is found to be ˜5 cm. A further validation by comparing with GPS measurements from two IGS stations at Bangalore and Hyderabad showed that predictions made using the RTD model are within an rms deviation of ±5 cm while those using WAAS model is ±7 cm. Maximum value of the residual error for RTD model is ˜15 cm, which corresponds to a ˜0.5 m error in the vertical coordinates for the lowest satellite elevation angles usually encountered.

  10. Earthquake Cycle Deformation at the Ballenas Transform, Gulf of California, Mexico, from InSAR and GPS Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plattner, Christina; Fattahi, Heresh; Malservisi, Rocco; Amelung, Falk; Verdecchia, Alessandro; Dixon, Timothy H.

    2015-05-01

    We study crustal deformation across the Ballenas marine channel, Gulf of California, Mexico using InSAR and campaign GPS data. Interseismic velocities are calculated by time-series analysis spanning five years of data. Displacements from the August 3rd 2009 Mw 6.9 earthquake are calculated by differencing the most recent observations before and after the event. To estimate the offset across the marine channel we calibrate the InSAR velocity and displacement fields using the corresponding GPS data. Unfortunately, the InSAR interseismic velocity field is affected by residual tropospheric delay. We interpret the GPS interseismic and the GPS and InSAR coseismic deformation data using dislocation modeling and compare the fault kinematics during these periods of the earthquake cycle.

  11. Comparison of CME radial velocities from a flux rope model and an ice cream cone model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, T.; Moon, Y.; Na, H.

    2011-12-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) on the Sun are the largest energy release process in the solar system and act as the primary driver of geomagnetic storms and other space weather phenomena on the Earth. So it is very important to infer their directions, velocities and three-dimensional structures. In this study, we choose two different models to infer radial velocities of halo CMEs since 2008 : (1) an ice cream cone model by Xue et al (2005) using SOHO/LASCO data, (2) a flux rope model by Thernisien et al. (2009) using the STEREO/SECCHI data. In addition, we use another flux rope model in which the separation angle of flux rope is zero, which is morphologically similar to the ice cream cone model. The comparison shows that the CME radial velocities from among each model have very good correlations (R>0.9). We will extending this comparison to other partial CMEs observed by STEREO and SOHO.

  12. Welding wire velocity modelling and control using an optical sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten M.; Pedersen, Tom S.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper a method for controlling the velocity of a welding wire at the tip of the handle is described. The method is an alternative to the traditional welding apparatus control system where the wire velocity is controlled internal in the welding machine implying a poor disturbance reduction...

  13. Shear-wave Velocity Model from Rayleigh Wave Group Velocities Centered on the Sacramento/San Joaquin Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Jon B.; Erdem, Jemile

    2017-06-01

    Rayleigh wave group velocities obtained from ambient noise tomography are inverted for an upper crustal model of the Central Valley, California, centered on the Sacramento/San Joaquin Delta. Two methods were tried; the first uses SURF96, a least squares routine. It provides a good fit to the data, but convergence is dependent on the starting model. The second uses a genetic algorithm, whose starting model is random. This method was tried at several nodes in the model and compared to the output from SURF96. The genetic code is run five times and the variance of the output of all five models can be used to obtain an estimate of error. SURF96 produces a more regular solution mostly because it is typically run with a smoothing constraint. Models from the genetic code are generally consistent with the SURF96 code sometimes producing lower velocities at depth. The full model, calculated using SURF96, employed a 2-pass strategy, which used a variable damping scheme in the first pass. The resulting model shows low velocities near the surface in the Central Valley with a broad asymmetrical sedimentary basin located close to the western edge of the Central Valley near 122°W longitude. At shallow depths, the Rio Vista Basin is found nestled between the Pittsburgh/Kirby Hills and Midland faults, but a significant basin also seems to exist to the west of the Kirby Hills fault. There are other possible correlations between fast and slow velocities in the Central Valley and geologic features such as the Stockton Arch, oil or gas producing regions and the fault-controlled western boundary of the Central Valley.

  14. J2: An evaluation of new estimates from GPS, GRACE, and load models compared to SLR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lavallée, D.A.; Moore, P.; Clarke, P.J.; Petrie, E.J.; Van Dam, T.; King, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    Changes in J2, resulting from past and present changes in Earth's climate, are traditionally observed by Satellite Laser ranging (SLR). Assuming an elastic Earth, it is possible to infer changes in J2 from changes in Earth's shape observed by GPS. We compare estimates of non-secular J2 changes from

  15. J2: An evaluation of new estimates from GPS, GRACE, and load models compared to SLR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lavallée, D.A.; Moore, P.; Clarke, P.J.; Petrie, E.J.; Van Dam, T.; King, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    Changes in J2, resulting from past and present changes in Earth's climate, are traditionally observed by Satellite Laser ranging (SLR). Assuming an elastic Earth, it is possible to infer changes in J2 from changes in Earth's shape observed by GPS. We compare estimates of non-secular J2 changes from

  16. Ultralow-velocity zone geometries resolved by multidimensional waveform modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanacore, E. A.; Rost, S.; Thorne, M. S.

    2016-07-01

    Ultralow-velocity zones (ULVZs) are thin patches of material with strongly reduced seismic wave speeds situated on top of the core-mantle boundary (CMB). A common phase used to detect ULVZs is SPdKS (SKPdS), an SKS wave with a short diffracted P leg along the CMB. Most previous efforts have examined ULVZ properties using 1-D waveform modelling approaches. We present waveform modelling results using the 2.5-D finite-difference algorithm PSVaxi allowing us better insight into ULVZ structure and location. We characterize ULVZ waveforms based on ULVZ elastic properties, shape and position along the SPdKS ray path. In particular, we vary the ULVZ location (e.g. source or receiver side), ULVZ topographical profiles (e.g. boxcar, trapezoidal or Gaussian) and ULVZ lateral scale along great circle path (2.5°, 5°, 10°). We observe several waveform effects absent in 1-D ULVZ models and show evidence for waveform effects allowing the differentiation between source and receiver side ULVZs. Early inception of the SPdKS/SKPdS phase is difficult to detect for receiver-side ULVZs with maximum shifts in SKPdS initiation of ˜3° in epicentral distance, whereas source-side ULVZs produce maximum shifts of SPdKS initiation of ˜5°, allowing clear separation of source- versus receiver-side structure. We present a case study using data from up to 300 broad-band stations in Turkey recorded between 2005 and 2010. We observe a previously undetected ULVZ in the southern Atlantic Ocean region centred near 45°S, 12.5°W, with a lateral scale of ˜3°, VP reduction of 10 per cent, VS reduction of 30 per cent and density increase of 10 per cent relative to PREM.

  17. Applications of GPS technologies to field sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aughey, Robert J

    2011-09-01

    Global positioning system (GPS) technology was made possible after the invention of the atomic clock. The first suggestion that GPS could be used to assess the physical activity of humans followed some 40 y later. There was a rapid uptake of GPS technology, with the literature concentrating on validation studies and the measurement of steady-state movement. The first attempts were made to validate GPS for field sport applications in 2006. While GPS has been validated for applications for team sports, some doubts continue to exist on the appropriateness of GPS for measuring short high-velocity movements. Thus, GPS has been applied extensively in Australian football, cricket, hockey, rugby union and league, and soccer. There is extensive information on the activity profile of athletes from field sports in the literature stemming from GPS, and this includes total distance covered by players and distance in velocity bands. Global positioning systems have also been applied to detect fatigue in matches, identify periods of most intense play, different activity profiles by position, competition level, and sport. More recent research has integrated GPS data with the physical capacity or fitness test score of athletes, game-specific tasks, or tactical or strategic information. The future of GPS analysis will involve further miniaturization of devices, longer battery life, and integration of other inertial sensor data to more effectively quantify the effort of athletes.

  18. Estimation Model and Accuracy Analysis of BeiDou/GPS Real-time Precise Satellite Clock Error Integrated Resolving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Liang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Real-time high-precise satellite orbit and clock products are needed in real-time GNSS precise point positioning (PPP. In this paper, Estimation model and strategy of multi-GNSS precise satellite clock integrated resolving are researched and BeiDou/GPS real-time precise clock integrated estimation algorithm is realized by filter. Real-time simulation test results show: the STD accuracy of BeiDou/GPS real-time clock estimated in this paper compared to GFZ multi-GNSS precise clock(GBM is about 0.15ns; horizontal accuracy after convergence of GPS kinematic PPP using simulation real-time clock products estimated in this paper is better than 5cm and vertical accuracy is better than 10cm, respectively; in BeiDou kinematic PPP test, horizontal and vertical accuracy results are same as the results using GFZ multi-GNSS precise clock(GBM products, and the decimeter positioning can be realized.

  19. The velocity-density relation in the spherical model

    CERN Document Server

    Bilicki, Maciej

    2008-01-01

    We study the cosmic velocity-density relation using the spherical collapse model (SCM) as a proxy to non-linear dynamics. Although the dependence of this relation on cosmological parameters is known to be weak, we retain the density parameter Omega_m in SCM equations, in order to study the limit Omega_m -> 0. We show that in this regime the considered relation is strictly linear, for arbitrary values of the density contrast, on the contrary to some claims in the literature. On the other hand, we confirm that for realistic values of Omega_m the exact relation in the SCM is well approximated by the classic formula of Bernardeau (1992), both for voids (delta<0) and for overdensities up to delta ~ 3. Inspired by this fact, we find further analytic approximations to the relation for the whole range delta from -1 to infinity. Our formula for voids accounts for the weak Omega_m-dependence of their maximal rate of expansion, which for Omega_m < 1 is slightly smaller that 3/2. For positive density contrasts, we ...

  20. 基于改进的扩展卡尔曼滤波在GPS测速中的应用%Application of improved extended Kalman filtering algorithm in velocity determination with GPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯雪丽; 颜伏伍; 胡杰

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic velocity determination had to meet the higher requirement from the vehicle electronic control system. The algorithm combining finite⁃difference algorithm with extended Kalman filtering algorithm has higher accuracy in GPS veloci⁃ty determination than GPS location difference velocity determination method,but there is a larger measuring error during the fast turning of car. The finite⁃difference operation is adopted to achieve the priori error covariance matrix and the posterior error cova⁃riance matrix of filtering to enhance the convergence of the filtering process,and then the finite⁃difference extended Kalman fil⁃tering algorithm is used to calculate car’s real⁃time location,so as to get the real⁃time speed of the vehicle. The experiment re⁃sults show that the improved algorithm has higher measuring accuracy than that of the extended Kalman filtering velocity determi⁃nation algorithm.%汽车电子控制系统对动态测速提出较高的要求,使用位差法和扩展卡尔曼滤波融合算法用于GPS测速比GPS位置差分测速方法具有更高的精度,但在汽车快速转弯时误差较大。为此通过有限差分运算获取滤波验前、验后误差协方差矩阵,增强滤波过程的收敛性,再以有限差分扩展卡尔曼滤波算法对汽车实时位置进行运算以获取实时车速。实验结果表明,相比扩展卡尔曼滤波GPS测速方法,该文算法具有更高的测速精度。

  1. Using Allan Variance to Analyze the Zero-differenced Stochastic Model Characteristics of GPS%利用 Allan 方差分析 GPS 非差随机模型特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张小红; 朱锋; 薛学铭; 唐龙

    2015-01-01

    非差 GPS 定位中,通常采用以观测值服从高斯白噪声条件的估计准则进行参数求解。研究表明卫星端误差、传播路径误差、测站环境误差等会破坏观测值的白噪声特性,并且未模型化误差同样具有不利影响。这不仅破坏了估计准则的假设条件,而且部分非白噪声有可能被状态参数吸收,影响估计的准确性。本文将观测值白噪声、有色噪声和未模型化误差一同纳入 GPS 非差随机模型,以验后残差来表征 GPS 数据的随机特性,进行 Allan 方差分析,研究噪声成分及其参数。结果表明,GPS 非差噪声组合主要为 WN + GM ,相位白噪声为2.392 mm ,GM过程噪声为4.450 mm/ s ,相关时间为52.074 s ,伪距白噪声为0.936 m ,GM过程噪声为0.833 m/ s ,相关时间为14.737 s ,相位的 GM过程噪声与卫星相关性较大,而其余噪声则与测站相关性较大,大量分析结果表明 GPS 非差随机模型并不服从高斯白噪声假设,有待精化。%The estimation criteria for solving parameters in zero‐differenced GPS positioning is that obser‐vations obey Gaussian white noise distribution .But a number of pioneering studies point out that the white noise would be damaged by satellites errors ,propagation errors ,station environment errors and so on . Meanwhile ,un‐modeling errors also have adverse effects .These errors not only undermine the assumption estimation criteria ,and some non‐white noises are likely to be absorbed by state parameters .In result ,the accuracy of estimates is influenced .This paper regards white noise ,colored noise and un‐modeling errors as ZD stochastic model of GPS .Then the Allan variance method is proposed to analyze the posteriori residuals which can represent the Stochastic characteristics of GPS data .Noise component and parameters are mainly investigated .The result shows GPS noise behaves as WN plus GM .The phase and

  2. Velocity measurement of model vertical axis wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.A.; McWilliam, M. [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2006-07-01

    An increasingly popular solution to future energy demand is wind energy. Wind turbine designs can be grouped according to their axis of rotation, either horizontal or vertical. Horizontal axis wind turbines have higher power output in a good wind regime than vertical axis turbines and are used in most commercial class designs. Vertical axis Savonius-based wind turbine designs are still widely used in some applications because of their simplistic design and low wind speed performance. There are many design variables that must be considered in order to optimize the power output in a given wind regime in a typical wind turbine design. Using particle image velocimetry, a study of the air flow around five different model vertical axis wind turbines was conducted in a closed loop wind tunnel. A standard Savonius design with two semi-circular blades overlapping, and two variations of this design, a deep blade and a shallow blade design were among the turbine models included in this study. It also evaluated alternate designs that attempt to increase the performance of the standard design by allowing compound blade curvature. Measurements were collected at a constant phase angle and also at random rotor orientations. It was found that evaluation of the flow patterns and measured velocities revealed consistent and stable flow patterns at any given phase angle. Large scale flow structures are evident in all designs such as vortices shed from blade surfaces. An important performance parameter was considered to be the ability of the flow to remain attached to the forward blade and redirect and reorient the flow to the following blade. 6 refs., 18 figs.

  3. A mathematical model of turbulence in flows with uniform stationary velocity gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    Certain cases of turbulence as a postinstability state of a fluid in motion modeled by the introduction of multivalued velocity fields are examined. The turbulence is regarded as occurring in the form of random pulsations which grow until the external energy input in the average flow is balanced by the dissipated energy of pulsations by means of turbulent friction. Closed form analytic solutions are shown to be possible when the considered velocity fields, the pulsation velocity and the fluid velocity, are decoupled.

  4. Coseismic source model of the 2003 Mw 6.8 Chengkung earthquake, Taiwan, determined from GPS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, K.-E.; Rau, R.-J.; Zeng, Y.

    2007-01-01

    A coseismic source model of the 2003 Mw 6.8 Chengkung, Taiwan, earthquake was well determined with 213 GPS stations, providing a unique opportunity to study the characteristics of coseismic displacements of a high-angle buried reverse fault. Horizontal coseismic displacements show fault-normal shortening across the fault trace. Displacements on the hanging wall reveal fault-parallel and fault-normal lengthening. The largest horizontal and vertical GPS displacements reached 153 and 302 mm, respectively, in the middle part of the network. Fault geometry and slip distribution were determined by inverting GPS data using a three-dimensional (3-D) layered-elastic dislocation model. The slip is mainly concentrated within a 44 ?? 14 km slip patch centered at 15 km depth with peak amplitude of 126.6 cm. Results from 3-D forward-elastic model tests indicate that the dome-shaped folding on the hanging wall is reproduced with fault dips greater than 40??. Compared with the rupture area and average slip from slow slip earthquakes and a compilation of finite source models of 18 earthquakes, the Chengkung earthquake generated a larger rupture area and a lower stress drop, suggesting lower than average friction. Hence the Chengkung earthquake seems to be a transitional example between regular and slow slip earthquakes. The coseismic source model of this event indicates that the Chihshang fault is divided into a creeping segment in the north and the locked segment in the south. An average recurrence interval of 50 years for a magnitude 6.8 earthquake was estimated for the southern fault segment. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. Investigation for improving Global Positioning System (GPS) orbits using a discrete sequential estimator and stochastic models of selected physical processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goad, Clyde C.; Chadwell, C. David

    1993-01-01

    GEODYNII is a conventional batch least-squares differential corrector computer program with deterministic models of the physical environment. Conventional algorithms were used to process differenced phase and pseudorange data to determine eight-day Global Positioning system (GPS) orbits with several meter accuracy. However, random physical processes drive the errors whose magnitudes prevent improving the GPS orbit accuracy. To improve the orbit accuracy, these random processes should be modeled stochastically. The conventional batch least-squares algorithm cannot accommodate stochastic models, only a stochastic estimation algorithm is suitable, such as a sequential filter/smoother. Also, GEODYNII cannot currently model the correlation among data values. Differenced pseudorange, and especially differenced phase, are precise data types that can be used to improve the GPS orbit precision. To overcome these limitations and improve the accuracy of GPS orbits computed using GEODYNII, we proposed to develop a sequential stochastic filter/smoother processor by using GEODYNII as a type of trajectory preprocessor. Our proposed processor is now completed. It contains a correlated double difference range processing capability, first order Gauss Markov models for the solar radiation pressure scale coefficient and y-bias acceleration, and a random walk model for the tropospheric refraction correction. The development approach was to interface the standard GEODYNII output files (measurement partials and variationals) with software modules containing the stochastic estimator, the stochastic models, and a double differenced phase range processing routine. Thus, no modifications to the original GEODYNII software were required. A schematic of the development is shown. The observational data are edited in the preprocessor and the data are passed to GEODYNII as one of its standard data types. A reference orbit is determined using GEODYNII as a batch least-squares processor and the

  6. Velocity Modeling and Inversion Techniques for Locating Microseismic Events in Unconventional Reservoirs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianzhong Zhang; Han Liu; Zhihui Zou; Zhonglai Huang

    2015-01-01

    A velocity model is an important factor influencing microseismic event locations. We re-view the velocity modeling and inversion techniques for locating microseismic events in exploration for unconventional oil and gas reservoirs. We first describe the geological and geophysical characteristics of reservoir formations related to hydraulic fracturing in heterogeneity, anisotropy, and variability, then discuss the influences of velocity estimation, anisotropy model, and their time-lapse changes on the accuracy in determining microseismic event locations, and then survey some typical methods for build-ing velocity models in locating event locations. We conclude that the three tangled physical attributes of reservoirs make microseismic monitoring very challenging. The uncertainties in velocity model and ig-noring its anisotropies and its variations in hydraulic fracturing can cause systematic mislocations of microseismic events which are unacceptable in microseismic monitoring. So, we propose some potential ways for building accurate velocity models.

  7. GPS radio interferometry of travelling ionospheric disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afraimovich, E. L.; Palamartchouk, K. S.; Perevalova, N. P.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents some results investigating the new possibilities of radio interferometry of Travelling Ionospheric Disturbances (TIDs) that are based on exploiting standard measurements of transionospheric radio signal characteristics and coordinate-time measurements using dual-frequency multichannel receivers of the Global Positioning System (GPS). A Statistical Angle-of-arrival and Doppler Method for GPS radio interferometry (SADM-GPS) is proposed for determining the characteristics of the TIDs dynamics by measuring variations of GPS phase derivatives with respect to time and spatial coordinates. These data are used to calculate corresponding values of the velocity vector, in view of a correction for satellite motions based on the current information available regarding the angular coordinates of the satellites. Subsequently, velocity and direction distributions are constructed and analyzed to verify the hypothesis of whether there is a predominant displacement. If it exists, then the pattern can be considered to be travelling, and the mean travel velocity can be determined from the velocity distribution. Through a computer simulation it was shown that multi-satellite GPS radio interferometry in conjunction with the SADM-GPS algorithm allows the detection and measurement of the velocity vector of TIDs in virtually the entire azimuthal range of possible TID propagation directions. The use of the proposed method is exemplified by an investigation of TIDs during the solar eclipse of 9 March 1997, using the GPS-radio interferometer GPSINT at Irkutsk.

  8. GPS Radiation Measurements: Instrument Modeling and Simulation (Project w14_gpsradiation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, John P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-29

    The following topics are covered: electron response simulations and typical calculated response. Monte Carlo calculations of the response of future charged particle instruments (dosimeters) intended to measure the flux of charged particles in space were performed. The electron channels are called E1- E11 – each of which is intended to detect a different range of electron energies. These instruments are on current and future GPS satellites.

  9. Crevasse Extent and Lateral Shearing of the McMurdo Shear Zone, Antarctica, Using GPR and GPS Observations, and Numerical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaluzienski, L. M.; Hamilton, G. S.; Koons, P. O.; Arcone, S. A.; Ray, L.; Lever, J.; Fastook, J.; Walker, B.

    2015-12-01

    Sub-ice-shelf circulation plays a fundamental role in ice shelf mass budget. The shape of the underside of an ice shelf is important, such that the presence of basal crevasses can significantly modulate the transfer of heat at the ice-ocean interface. In situ observations of basal crevasses are challenging to obtain, but surface-based ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys can be used to determine crevasse location and orientation. Here, we use GPR methods to map the internal structures in the McMurdo Shear Zone (SZ) which marks the boundary between the Ross Ice Shelf and the slower-moving McMurdo Ice Shelf. Radar surveys with 200 MHz and 400 MHz antennas reveal the presence of crevasses both in the upper firn and within a zone of accreted marine ice at a depth of approximately 170 meters. A spatial correspondence between near-surface and basal crevasses suggests that both are formed locally by lateral shearing. A combination of three dimensional higher order and Shallow Shelf Approximation ice flow equations within the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM) are used to test this hypothesis. This model estimates the detailed velocity field of the SZ and is constrained by GPS-derived observations of surface motion. The distribution and orientations of surface crevasses is consistent with the gradients in velocity field predicted by the model. Though a wider range of orientation angles exists for crevasses within the basal regime, the average strike angle is consistent with firn crevassing and we conclude that the marine ice coevally fractured with the firn layer.

  10. The SMS-GPS-Trip-Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinau, Kristian Hegner; Harder, Henrik; Weber, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a new method for collecting travel behavior data, based on a combination of GPS tracking and SMS technology, coined the SMS–GPS-Trip method. The state-of-the-art method for collecting data for activity based traffic models is a combination of travel diaries and GPS tracking...

  11. GPS coordinate time series measurements in Ontario and Quebec, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadi Alinia, Hadis; Tiampo, Kristy F.; James, Thomas S.

    2017-01-01

    New precise network solutions for continuous GPS (cGPS) stations distributed in eastern Ontario and western Québec provide constraints on the regional three-dimensional crustal velocity field. Five years of continuous observations at fourteen cGPS sites were analyzed using Bernese GPS processing software. Several different sub-networks were chosen from these stations, and the data were processed and compared to in order to select the optimal configuration to accurately estimate the vertical and horizontal station velocities and minimize the associated errors. The coordinate time series were then compared to the crustal motions from global solutions and the optimized solution is presented here. A noise analysis model with power-law and white noise, which best describes the noise characteristics of all three components, was employed for the GPS time series analysis. The linear trend, associated uncertainties, and the spectral index of the power-law noise were calculated using a maximum likelihood estimation approach. The residual horizontal velocities, after removal of rigid plate motion, have a magnitude consistent with expected glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA). The vertical velocities increase from subsidence of almost 1.9 mm/year south of the Great Lakes to uplift near Hudson Bay, where the highest rate is approximately 10.9 mm/year. The residual horizontal velocities range from approximately 0.5 mm/year, oriented south-southeastward, at the Great Lakes to nearly 1.5 mm/year directed toward the interior of Hudson Bay at stations adjacent to its shoreline. Here, the velocity uncertainties are estimated at less than 0.6 mm/year for the horizontal component and 1.1 mm/year for the vertical component. A comparison between the observed velocities and GIA model predictions, for a limited range of Earth models, shows a better fit to the observations for the Earth model with the smallest upper mantle viscosity and the largest lower mantle viscosity. However, the

  12. GPS coordinate time series measurements in Ontario and Quebec, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadi Alinia, Hadis; Tiampo, Kristy F.; James, Thomas S.

    2017-06-01

    New precise network solutions for continuous GPS (cGPS) stations distributed in eastern Ontario and western Québec provide constraints on the regional three-dimensional crustal velocity field. Five years of continuous observations at fourteen cGPS sites were analyzed using Bernese GPS processing software. Several different sub-networks were chosen from these stations, and the data were processed and compared to in order to select the optimal configuration to accurately estimate the vertical and horizontal station velocities and minimize the associated errors. The coordinate time series were then compared to the crustal motions from global solutions and the optimized solution is presented here. A noise analysis model with power-law and white noise, which best describes the noise characteristics of all three components, was employed for the GPS time series analysis. The linear trend, associated uncertainties, and the spectral index of the power-law noise were calculated using a maximum likelihood estimation approach. The residual horizontal velocities, after removal of rigid plate motion, have a magnitude consistent with expected glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA). The vertical velocities increase from subsidence of almost 1.9 mm/year south of the Great Lakes to uplift near Hudson Bay, where the highest rate is approximately 10.9 mm/year. The residual horizontal velocities range from approximately 0.5 mm/year, oriented south-southeastward, at the Great Lakes to nearly 1.5 mm/year directed toward the interior of Hudson Bay at stations adjacent to its shoreline. Here, the velocity uncertainties are estimated at less than 0.6 mm/year for the horizontal component and 1.1 mm/year for the vertical component. A comparison between the observed velocities and GIA model predictions, for a limited range of Earth models, shows a better fit to the observations for the Earth model with the smallest upper mantle viscosity and the largest lower mantle viscosity. However, the

  13. An improved multidirectional velocity model for micro-seismic monitoring in rock engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李健; 吴顺川; 高永涛; 李莉洁; 周喻

    2015-01-01

    An improved multidirectional velocity model was proposed for more accurately locating micro-seismic events in rock engineering. It was assumed that the stress wave propagation velocities from a micro-seismic source to three nearest monitoring sensors in a sensor’s array arrangement were the same. Since the defined objective function does not require pre-measurement of the stress wave propagation velocity in the field, errors from the velocity measurement can be avoided in comparison to three traditional velocity models. By analyzing 24 different cases, the proposed multidirectional velocity model iterated by the Simplex method is found to be the best option no matter the source is within the region of the sensor’s array or not. The proposed model and the adopted iterative algorithm are verified by field data and it is concluded that it can significantly reduce the error of the estimated source location.

  14. Gravimetry and GPS observations at Belgrano II station to test ocean tidal models Observaciones gravimètricas y de GPS en la base Belgrano II para probar modelos de mareas oceánicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Scheinert

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of a joint Argentine-German project gravimetric time series observations are being carried out at the Argentine Antarctic station Belgrano II. Two gravity meters were installed in the first half of February 2007. The set-up of the gravimeters as well as first results of the ongoing observations are discussed. Additionally, kinematic positions derived from a GPS-station at the Vahsel Bay glacier near Belgrano II can be used to get a first insight into the floating behavior of this glacier. The goal of these observations is to discriminate the effect of ocean tides and to test ocean tidal models. Since ocean tides are an important phenomenon that has to be considered in a variety of geoscientific investigations in polar regions, appropriate corrections have to be applied in the different analyses, e.g. to infer temporal mass variations from satellite data, to investigate ice-shelf dynamics and deformations, or to come up with precise station positions and velocities within a terrestrial reference system. However, the ocean tide models show larger uncertainties in the Antarctic seas and (moreover at areas covered by ice shelves and, therefore, need to be improved. This joint Argentine-German project is a contribution to the International Polar Year 2007/2008 and its project POLENET. After completion of the recordings at Belgrano II by the end of 2007 it is planned to move the equipment to San Mart ín in order to get a second gravimetric time series during the year 2008.En el marco de un proyecto conjunto germano-argentino se están obteniendo registros gravimétricos en la base antártica argentina Belgrano II, mediante dos gravímetros instalados durante la primera mitad de febrero de 2007. Se describen la puesta en marcha del sistema y los primeros resultados obtenidos de las observaciones en curso. Además, posiciones cinemáticas obtenidas mediante una estación GPS emplazada sobre el glaciar de la bahía Vahsel, en un sitio

  15. Estimation of flow velocity for a debris flow via the two-phase fluid model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Guo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The two-phase fluid model is applied in this study to calculate the steady velocity of a debris flow along a channel bed. By using the momentum equations of the solid and liquid phases in the debris flow together with an empirical formula to describe the interaction between two phases, the steady velocities of the solid and liquid phases are obtained theoretically. The comparison of those velocities obtained by the proposed method with the observed velocities of two real-world debris flows shows that the proposed method can estimate accurately the velocity for a debris flow.

  16. Velocity measurements in jets with application to noise source modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Philip J.; Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    2010-02-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation of the statistical properties of turbulent velocity fluctuations in an axisymmetric jet. The focus is on those properties that are relevant to the prediction of noise. Measurements are performed using two single hot-wire anemometers as well as a two-component anemometer. Two-point cross correlations of the axial velocity fluctuations and of the fluctuations in the square of the axial velocity fluctuations are presented. Several reference locations in the jet are used including points on the jet lip and centerline. The scales of the turbulence and the convection velocity are determined, both in an overall sense as well as a function of frequency. The relationship between the second and fourth order correlations is developed and compared with the experimental data. The implications of the use of dimensional as well as non-dimensional correlations are considered. Finally, a comparison is made between the length scales deduced from the flow measurements and a RANS CFD calculation.

  17. A comparative study of velocity increment generation between the rigid body and flexible models of MMET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, Norilmi Amilia, E-mail: aenorilmi@usm.my [School of Aerospace Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

    2016-02-01

    The motorized momentum exchange tether (MMET) is capable of generating useful velocity increments through spin–orbit coupling. This study presents a comparative study of the velocity increments between the rigid body and flexible models of MMET. The equations of motions of both models in the time domain are transformed into a function of true anomaly. The equations of motion are integrated, and the responses in terms of the velocity increment of the rigid body and flexible models are compared and analysed. Results show that the initial conditions, eccentricity, and flexibility of the tether have significant effects on the velocity increments of the tether.

  18. A Mathematical Model for Differential—Velocity Circulating Fluidized Bed Boiler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiZhao; XiangdongXu

    1999-01-01

    The scheme of differential-velocity circulating fluidized bed was put forward by Thermal Engineering Department of Tsinghua university in 1992 and got patent simultaneously.An internal bed material circulation in combustor can be established by the discrepancy of entrainment at different air velocity,and separates the combustor into three different velocity regions,which constitutes the differential-velocity inside circulation.Mathematical modeling and simulation may facilitate understanding,Development and operation of this new process.Here cell model method was adopted to set up the model.

  19. Development of a curved ray tracing method for modeling of phase paths from GPS radio occultation: A two-dimensional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Tae-Kwon; Kuo, Ying-Hwa; Lee, Dong-Kyou

    2010-12-01

    A two-dimensional curved ray tracer (CRT) is developed to study the propagation path of radio signals across a heterogeneous planetary atmosphere. The method, designed to achieve improvements in both computational efficiency and accuracy over conventional straight-line methods, takes rays' first-order bending into account to better describe curved raypaths in the stratified atmosphere. CRT is then used to simulate the phase path from GPS radio occultation (RO). The merit of the ray tracing approach in GPS RO is explicit consideration of horizontal variation in the atmosphere, which may lead to a sizable error but is disregarded in traditional retrieval schemes. In addition, direct modeling of the phase path takes advantage of simple error characteristics in the measurement. With provision of ionospheric and neutral atmospheric refractive indices, in this effort, rays are traced along the full range of GPS-low Earth orbiting (LEO) radio links just as the measurements are made in real life. Here, ray shooting is employed to realize the observed radio links with controlled accuracy. CRT largely reproduces the very measured characteristics of GPS signals. When compared, the measured and simulated phases show remarkable agreement. The cross validation between CRT and GPS RO has confirmed not only the strength of CRT but also the high accuracy of GPS RO measurements. The primary motivation for this study is enabling effective quality control for GPS RO data, overcoming a complicated error structure in the high-level data. CRT has also shown a great deal of potential for improved utilization of GPS RO data for geophysical research.

  20. Global Three-Dimensional Ionospheric Data Assimilation Model Using Ground-based GPS and Radio Occultation Total Electron Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jann-Yenq Liu, Tiger; Lin, Chi-Yen; Matsuo, Tomoko; Lin, Charles C. H.; Tsai, Ho-Fang; Chen, Chao-Yen

    2017-04-01

    An ionospheric data assimilation approach presented here is based on the Gauss-Markov Kalman filter with International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) as the background model and designed to assimilate the total electron content (TEC) observed from ground-based GPS receivers and space-based radio occultation (RO) of FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (F3/C) or FORMOSAT-7/COSMIC-2 (F7/C2). The Kalman filter consists of the forecast step according to Gauss-Markov process and measurement update step. Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) show that the Gauss-Markov Kalman filter procedure can increase the accuracy of the data assimilation analysis over the procedure consisting of the measurement update step alone. Moreover, in comparing to F3/C, the dense F7/C2 RO observation can further increase the model accuracy significantly. Validating the data assimilation results with the vertical TEC in Global Ionosphere Maps and that derived from ground-based GPS measurements, as well as the ionospheric F2-peak height and electron density sounded by ionosondes is also carried out. Both the OSSE results and the observation validations confirm that the developed data assimilation model can be used to reconstruct the three-dimensional electron density in the ionosphere satisfactorily.

  1. GPS for land surveyors

    CERN Document Server

    Van Sickle, Jan

    2008-01-01

    The GPS SignalGlobal Positioning System (GPS) Signal StructureTwo ObservablesPseudorangingCarrier Phase RangingBiases and SolutionsThe Error BudgetDifferencingThe FrameworkTechnological ForerunnersVery Long Baseline InterferometryTransitNavstar GPSGPS Segment OrganizationGPS ConstellationThe Control SegmentReceivers and MethodsCommon Features of GPS ReceiversChoosing a GPS ReceiverSome GPS Surveying MethodsCoordinatesA Few Pertinent Ideas About Geodetic Datums for GPSState Plane CoordinatesHeightsGPS Surveying TechniquesStatic GPS SurveyingReal-Time Kinematic (RTK) and Differential GPS (DGPS)T

  2. Empirical model for mean temperature for Indian zone and estimation of precipitable water vapor from ground based GPS measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Suresh Raju

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Estimation of precipitable water (PW in the atmosphere from ground-based Global Positioning System (GPS essentially involves modeling the zenith hydrostatic delay (ZHD in terms of surface Pressure (Ps and subtracting it from the corresponding values of zenith tropospheric delay (ZTD to estimate the zenith wet (non-hydrostatic delay (ZWD. This further involves establishing an appropriate model connecting PW and ZWD, which in its simplest case assumed to be similar to that of ZHD. But when the temperature variations are large, for the accurate estimate of PW the variation of the proportionality constant connecting PW and ZWD is to be accounted. For this a water vapor weighted mean temperature (Tm has been defined by many investigations, which has to be modeled on a regional basis. For estimating PW over the Indian region from GPS data, a region specific model for Tm in terms of surface temperature (Ts is developed using the radiosonde measurements from eight India Meteorological Department (IMD stations spread over the sub-continent within a latitude range of 8.5°–32.6° N. Following a similar procedure Tm-based models are also evolved for each of these stations and the features of these site-specific models are compared with those of the region-specific model. Applicability of the region-specific and site-specific Tm-based models in retrieving PW from GPS data recorded at the IGS sites Bangalore and Hyderabad, is tested by comparing the retrieved values of PW with those estimated from the altitude profile of water vapor measured using radiosonde. The values of ZWD estimated at 00:00 UTC and 12:00 UTC are used to test the validity of the models by estimating the PW using the models and comparing it with those obtained from radiosonde data. The region specific Tm-based model is found to be in par with if not better than a

  3. GPS operations at Olkiluoto in 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kallio, U.; Nyberg, S.; Koivula, H.; Jokela, J.; Poutanen, M.; Ahola, J. (Finnish Geodetic Institute, Masala (Finland))

    2010-06-15

    The GPS based deformation studies have been made at the investigation areas of Posiva since 1995, when the network of ten GPS pillars was established at Olkiluoto. One pillar in the investigation area belongs to the Finnish permanent GPS network, FinnRef. 28 GPS measurement campaigns have been carried out at Olkiluoto since 1995. According to the time series of the GPS results 1/3 of the baselines at Olkiluoto have statistically significant change rates. However, the observed movements are smaller than +-0.20 mm/a. There are five pillars, which have statistically significant horizontal velocities at Olkiluoto. These local velocity components are small but taking into account the standard deviations the largest velocity components seems to be reliably determined. At Olkiluoto a baseline for electronic distance measurements (EDM) was built in 2002. The baseline has been measured using EDM instruments in connection to the GPS observations. Changes in he difference between the GPS and EDM results indicate the systematic change in GPS results. No corrections based on only one baseline were not applied to GPS vectors. The GPS network at Olkiluoto was extended in 2003. The new pillars were built close to Kuivalahti village and on a small island of Iso Pyrekari. According to the geological evidence it is expected that a fracture zone is located between the new stations, thus enabling the determination of possible deformations along the fracture zone. The new pillars have been observed since 2003 and now we have computed the first deformation analysis from the six years data. Four new permanent stations will be established in summer 2010 at Olkiluoto. We have automated the processing of the campaign data by using the Bernese processing engine (BPE) together with our own Perl scripts. The local crustal deformations have been studied in GeoSatakunta project, too. This GPS network is located in Cities of Pori and Rauma and their neighbouring municipalities. Two new pillars

  4. Multijam Solutions in Traffic Models with Velocity-Dependent Driver Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, Paul; Christiansen, Peter Leth; Gaididei, Yuri B.

    2014-01-01

    The optimal-velocity follow-the-leader model is augmented with an equation that allows each driver to adjust their target headway according to the velocity difference between the driver and the car in front. In this more detailed model, which is investigated on a ring, stable and unstable...

  5. A Proposed Model for Traffic Signal Preemption Using Global Positioning System (GPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil Mascarenhas

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A Traffic Signal Preemption system is an automated system that allows normal operation of traffic lights at automated signalized intersection s to be preempted. Preemption of signals is generally done to assist emergency vehicles, such a s ambulances, so that response times are reduced and right-of-way is provided in a smooth an d controlled manner. This paper proposes an innovative and cost-effective server-centric mod el to facilitate preemption using a simple mobile phone app which uses Global Positioning Syst em (GPS and a microcontroller which controls traffic signals.

  6. Performance evaluation of linear time-series ionospheric Total Electron Content model over low latitude Indian GPS stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabbakuti, J. R. K. Kumar; Venkata Ratnam, D.

    2017-10-01

    Precise modeling of the ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) is a critical aspect of Positioning, Navigation, and Timing (PNT) services intended for the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) applications as well as Earth Observation System (EOS), satellite communication, and space weather forecasting applications. In this paper, linear time series modeling has been carried out on ionospheric TEC at two different locations at Koneru Lakshmaiah University (KLU), Guntur (geographic 16.44° N, 80.62° E; geomagnetic 7.55° N) and Bangalore (geographic 12.97° N, 77.59° E; geomagnetic 4.53° N) at the northern low-latitude region, for the year 2013 in the 24th solar cycle. The impact of the solar and geomagnetic activity on periodic oscillations of TEC has been investigated. Results confirm that the correlation coefficient of the estimated TEC from the linear model TEC and the observed GPS-TEC is around 93%. Solar activity is the key component that influences ionospheric daily averaged TEC while periodic component reveals the seasonal dependency of TEC. Furthermore, it is observed that the influence of geomagnetic activity component on TEC is different at both the latitudes. The accuracy of the model has been assessed by comparing the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) 2012 model TEC and TEC measurements. Moreover, the absence of winter anomaly is remarkable, as determined by the Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) between the linear model TEC and GPS-TEC. On the contrary, the IRI2012 model TEC evidently failed to predict the absence of winter anomaly in the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly (EIA) crest region. The outcome of this work will be useful for improving the ionospheric now-casting models under various geophysical conditions.

  7. VELOCITY AND GRAVITATIONAL EFFECTS ON GPS SATELLITES: AN OUTLINE OF EARLY PREDICTION AND DETECTION OF STRONG EARTHQUAKES EFECTOS DE VELOCIDAD Y DE GRAVITACIÓN EN GPS SATELITALES: UN ESQUEMA PARA LA PREDICCIÓN Y DETECCIÓN TEMPRANA DE FUERTES TERREMOTOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Torres-Silva

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Today, the global navigation satellite systems, GPS used as global positioning systems, are based on a gravitational model and hence they are only operative when several relativistic effects are taken into account. The most important relativistic effects (to order 1/c² are: the Doppler red shift of second order, due to the motion of the satellite (special relativity and the Einstein gravitational blue shift effect of the satellite clock frequency (equivalence principle of general relativity. Both of these effects can be treated at a basic level, making for an appealing application of relativity to every life. This paper examines the significant effects that must be taken into account in the design and operation of systems GPS without resorting to the theory of special and general relativity, yielding the same results for these systems, where one of the effects can be treated with the time contraction approach proposed here and the other using the Newton's theory as an approximation of the General Relativity. This approach allow us to propose an outline of early prediction and detection on strong earthquake phenomena.Hoy en día, los sistemas de navegación global por satélite, GPS utilizados como sistemas de posicionamiento global, se basan en un modelo gravitacional y por lo tanto solo son operativos cuando varios efectos relativistas son tenidos en cuenta. Los efectos relativistas más importantes (hasta el orden 1/c² son: el desplazamiento Doppler al rojo de segundo orden, debido al movimiento del satélite (la relatividad especial y el efecto gravitacional de Einstein corrimiento al azul de la frecuencia de reloj del satélite (principio de equivalencia de la relatividad general. Ambos efectos pueden ser tratados en un nivel básico, apelando a la relatividad del día a día. Este artículo examina los efectos significativos que deben tenerse en cuenta en la operación de sistemas de GPS sin tener que recurrir a las teorías de la

  8. Modelling the maximum voluntary joint torque/angular velocity relationship in human movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeadon, Maurice R; King, Mark A; Wilson, Cassie

    2006-01-01

    The force exerted by a muscle is a function of the activation level and the maximum (tetanic) muscle force. In "maximum" voluntary knee extensions muscle activation is lower for eccentric muscle velocities than for concentric velocities. The aim of this study was to model this "differential activation" in order to calculate the maximum voluntary knee extensor torque as a function of knee angular velocity. Torque data were collected on two subjects during maximal eccentric-concentric knee extensions using an isovelocity dynamometer with crank angular velocities ranging from 50 to 450 degrees s(-1). The theoretical tetanic torque/angular velocity relationship was modelled using a four parameter function comprising two rectangular hyperbolas while the activation/angular velocity relationship was modelled using a three parameter function that rose from submaximal activation for eccentric velocities to full activation for high concentric velocities. The product of these two functions gave a seven parameter function which was fitted to the joint torque/angular velocity data, giving unbiased root mean square differences of 1.9% and 3.3% of the maximum torques achieved. Differential activation accounts for the non-hyperbolic behaviour of the torque/angular velocity data for low concentric velocities. The maximum voluntary knee extensor torque that can be exerted may be modelled accurately as the product of functions defining the maximum torque and the maximum voluntary activation level. Failure to include differential activation considerations when modelling maximal movements will lead to errors in the estimation of joint torque in the eccentric phase and low velocity concentric phase.

  9. Modeling and analysis of GPS-TEC low latitude climatology during the 24th solar cycle using empirical orthogonal functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabbakuti, J. R. K. Kumar; Venkata Ratnam, D.

    2017-10-01

    The Total Electron Content (TEC) is an essential component describing the temporal and spatial characteristics of the ionosphere. In this paper, an empirical orthogonal function (EOF) model is constructed by using ground based Global Navigational Satellite System (GNSS) TEC observation data at the Bangalore International GNSS Service (IGS) station (geographic - 13.02° N, 77.57° E; geomagnetic latitude 4.4° N) during an extended period (2009-2016) in the 24th solar cycle. EOF model can be decomposed into base functions and its corresponding coefficients. These decomposed modes well represented the influence of solar and geomagnetic activity towards TEC. The first three EOFs modes constitute about 98% of the total variance of the observed data sets. The Fourier Series Analysis (FSA) is carried out to characterize the solar-cycle, annual and semi-annual dependences by modulating the first three EOF coefficients with solar (F10.7) and geomagnetic (Ap and Dst) indices. The TEC model is validated during daytime and nighttime conditions as well as under different solar activity and geomagnetic conditions. A positive correlation (0.85) of averaged daily GPS-TEC with averaged daily F10.7 strongly supports those time-varying characteristics of the ionosphere features depends on the solar activity. Further, the validity and reliability of EOF model is verified by comparing with the GPS-TEC data, and standard global ionospheric models (International Reference Ionosphere, IRI2016 and Standard Plasmasphere-Ionosphere Model, SPIM). The performances of the standard ionospheric models are marked to be relatively better during High Solar Activity (HSA) periods as compared to the Low Solar Activity (LSA) periods.

  10. Validation of tectonic models for an intraplate seismic zone, Charleston, South Carolina, with GPS geodetic data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talwani, P.; Kellogg, J.N.; Trenkamp, R. [South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences

    1997-02-01

    Although the average strain rate in intraplate settings is 2--3 orders of magnitude lower than at plate boundaries, there are pockets of high strain rates within intraplate regions. The results of a Global Positioning System survey near the location of current seismicity (and the inferred location of the destructive 1886 Charleston, South Carolina earthquake) suggest that there is anomalous strain build-up occurring there. By reoccupying 1930 triangulation and 1980 GPS sites with six Trimble SST dual frequency receivers, a strain rate of 0.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} yr{sup {minus}1} was observed. At the 95% confidence level, this value is not significant; however, at a lower level of confidence ({approximately} 85%) it is about two orders of magnitude greater than the background of 10{sup {minus}9} to 10{sup {minus}10} yr{sup {minus}1}. The direction of contraction inferred from the GPS survey 66{degree} {+-} 11{degree} is in excellent agreement with the direction of the maximum horizontal stress (N 60{degree} E) in the area, suggesting that the observed strain rate is also real. 66 refs.

  11. Modelling and simulation of German BIOGEST/EL-AGAMY wastewater treatment plants – Egypt using GPS-X simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud S. Nasr

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on modelling and simulation of German BIOGEST/EL-AGAMY Sequencing Batch Reactor (SBR using a package software GPS-X simulator to investigate the plant performance among six scenarios of various durations of fill, react and settle phases as a case study. The Activated Sludge Model 1 (ASM1 was used for biological processes, and the Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD based influent model was used for influent characterization. This case study presents the rule of denitrification process via anoxic conditions to remove nitrates and nitrites which is known to be eutrophic, toxic for aquatic animals, hazardous to human health as well as inhibit phosphorus removal during activated sludge treatment. Also, denitrification process provides a selector operation to prevent filamentous sludge bulking that is considered a major problem in EL-AGAMY WWTP, as well as decreases the overall aeration energy of the batch cycle time.

  12. M-Health Service for Train Passengers Using Mobile GPS System: An ArchiMate Service Layer Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUHAMMAD SAJID

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available EA (Enterprise Architecture is an instrument that is employed to describe the organization?s structure, business layout and operations within the IT (Information Technology environment. Different types of organizations extensively employed EA for aligning their business and operations with IT resources. EA may also be employed in non-organizational setting such as service providing agencies; rescue, medical emergency and education services. This paper suggests an EAF (Enterprise Architecture Framework for non-organizational setting by critically analyzing the top four EAs. The paper also proposes a new m-Health service model based on the mobile GPS (Global Positioning System for train/rail passengers by employing the ArchiMate modeling language and compares the proposed model with existing service providers.

  13. Modelling Solar Oscillation Power Spectra: II. Parametric Model of Spectral Lines Observed in Doppler Velocity Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Vorontsov, Sergei V

    2013-01-01

    We describe a global parametric model for the observed power spectra of solar oscillations of intermediate and low degree. A physically motivated parameterization is used as a substitute for a direct description of mode excitation and damping as these mechanisms remain poorly understood. The model is targeted at the accurate fitting of power spectra coming from Doppler velocity measurements and uses an adaptive response function that accounts for both the vertical and horizontal components of the velocity field on the solar surface and for possible instrumental and observational distortions. The model is continuous in frequency, can easily be adapted to intensity measurements and extends naturally to the analysis of high-frequency pseudo modes (interference peaks at frequencies above the atmospheric acoustic cutoff).

  14. An improved car-following model considering the immediately ahead car's velocity difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shaowei; Zhao, Xiangmo; Xu, Zhigang; Shi, Zhongke

    2016-11-01

    The field car-following data at a signalized intersection of Jinan in China are collected for data mining. An improved car-following model considering the immediately ahead car's velocity difference on a single-lane road was proposed, calibrated and verified based on full velocity difference model. The results of some numerical simulations indicate that the immediately ahead car's velocity difference has significant effects on the following car's motion, that the improved car-following model fits the measured data well and can qualitatively describe the impacts of the immediately ahead car's velocity difference on traffic flow, and that modeling the car-following behavior considering the immediately ahead car's velocity difference can improve the stability of the simulated traffic flow.

  15. Hard-sphere interactions in velocity-jump models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Benjamin; Taylor-King, Jake P.; Yates, Christian; Erban, Radek

    2016-07-01

    Group-level behavior of particles undergoing a velocity-jump process with hard-sphere interactions is investigated. We derive N -particle transport equations that include the possibility of collisions between particles and apply different approximation techniques to get expressions for the dependence of the collective diffusion coefficient on the number of particles and their diameter. The derived approximations are compared with numerical results obtained from individual-based simulations. The theoretical results compare well with Monte Carlo simulations providing the excluded-volume fraction is small.

  16. Hard-sphere interactions in velocity jump models

    CERN Document Server

    Franz, Benjamin; Yates, Christian; Erban, Radek

    2014-01-01

    Group-level behaviour of particles undergoing a velocity jump process with hard-sphere interactions is investigated. We derive $N$-particle transport equations that include the possibility of collisions between particles and apply different approximation techniques to get expressions for the dependence of the collective diffusion coefficient on the number of particles and their diameter. The derived approximations are compared with numerical results obtained from individual-based simulations. The theoretical results compare well with Monte Carlo simulations providing the excluded volume fraction is small.

  17. A New Model for Prediction of Mean Liquid Circulating Velocity in Bubble Columns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A new model without any fitting parameter for estimating the mean liquid recirculating velocity has been derived from previous work directly. The prediction agrees with experimental data reasonably well. Accurency of prediction from the new model is comparable with the models reported in the literature. However, the new model has a potential capability to predict the average liquid recirculation velocity at elevated pressure bubble columns since n and c is developed under pressure. However this needs to be further tested experimentally.

  18. A New Model of Present-day Deformation of the Philippine Mobile Belt based on GPS and Seismological Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacolcol, T. C.; Galgana, G. A.; Hamburger, M. W.; Nowicki, M. A.; McCaffrey, R.; Johnson, K. M.; Solidum, R.; Pelicano, A.; Luis, A.; Jorgio, R.; Rau, R.

    2013-12-01

    We present a comprehensive crustal deformation model for the Philippine Mobile Belt, based on a newly available suite of geodetic data from a dense nationwide network of newly observed and previously published continuous and campaign GPS sites in the Philippines, collected by PHIVOLCS and Indiana University. We use elastic block models constrained by known fault geometries, observed GPS observations and focal mechanism solutions to invert for an estimate of block rotations, fault coupling, and intra-block deformation. In our preferred model, the Philippine Mobile Belt can be represented by at least 12 independently moving rigid tectonic blocks, separated by active faults and subduction zones. We observe rapid convergence along the Manila Trench, which decreases progressively southwards, from > 100 mm/yr at around 20°N, to less than 20 mm/yr near its southern termination at Mindoro Island reflecting the ongoing collision between Mindoro and the Palawan block. Along the Philippine Trench, we observe ~50 mm/yr of oblique convergence, with the convergence changing from nearly westward in the south to NW near its northern termination. Slip rates along the Philippine fault vary from ~10 - 40 mm/yr, trending subparallel to the fault trace. In northern Luzon, Philippine Fault splays accommodate transpressional strain. The Central Visayas block experiences convergence with the Sundaland block along the Sulu Trench and the Mindoro-Palawan collision zone. Mindanao Island in the southern Philippines is dominated by east-verging subduction along the Cotabato Trench, and strain partitioning in eastern Mindanao along the southern Philippine Fault and Philippine Trench. We examine the spatial variation of subduction zone coupling along the Manila and Philippine trenches and examine their contribution to earthquake potential, through dynamic modeling of subduction-zone creeping and locked segments. Tests utilizing synthetic models of locking and creeping segments of the Manila

  19. Full velocity difference and acceleration model for a car-following theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shaowei; Liu, Qingling; Li, Xiuhai

    2013-05-01

    In order to describe the car-following behavior more actually in real traffic, a full velocity difference and acceleration model (for short, FVDAM) is proposed by synthetically taking into account headway, velocity difference and acceleration of the leading car on the basis of full velocity difference model. The analytical method and numerical simulation results show that the proposed model can describe the phase transition of traffic flow and estimate the evolution of traffic congestion, that incorporating the acceleration of the leading car into car-following model can stabilize traffic flow, suppress the traffic jam and increase capacity, and that the following car in FVDAM can accelerate more quickly than in FVDM.

  20. Performance assessment of the COAMPS numerical weather prediction model in precise GPS positioning: EUPOS network case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielgosz, Pawel; Paziewski, Jacek; Krankowski, Andrzej; Kroszczynski, Krzyszfof; Figurski, Mariusz

    2010-05-01

    The Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS®) represents a complete three-dimensional data assimilation system comprised of data quality control, analysis, initialization, and forecast model components. COAMPS has been developed by the Marine Meteorology Division (MMD) of the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). The U.S. Navy uses the system for short-term numerical weather predictions for various regions of the world. Currently COAMPS ver.3.1 is also operated and tested at the Department of Civil Engineering and Geodesy of the Military University of Technology, Warsaw, Poland (MUT). It is primarily used for military applications, but also a new module has been developed to provide tropospheric zenith total delays (ZTD) for stations of the Polish part of the European Position Determination System (EUPOS). ZTDs can be obtained in both near-real time and several hours ahead. In the highest-precision GPS applications tropospheric delays are usually estimated from satellite observables. When processing long baselines the common practice is to derive the hydrostatic component from any troposphere model and use it as a priori information. The non-hydrostatic part is estimated in the adjustment along with station coordinates. The change of satellite geometry during the observational session allows overcome high correlation between the tropospheric delays and the station height components. However, when processing very short sessions and medium baselines, this change is too small and does not allow estimating reliable ZTDs. Hence, ZTD are derived from troposphere models and used for correction of GPS data in the processing. This contribution presents the application of COAMPS-derived ZTDs in precise GPS positioning when using short data spans (1-5 minutes) and processing medium baselines (50-80 km). The presented tests were performed in two areas: Wielkopolska Lowland (all stations located at similar heights), and Carpathian Mountains (where station

  1. GPS定位信号随机误差自适应模型%RANDOM ERROR ADAPTIVE MODEL FOR GPS POSITIONING SIGNAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨海军; 郭美凤; 滕云鹤

    2000-01-01

    GPS, integrated with Inertial Navigation System, can improve theaccuracy of navigation and positioning. In order to apply the GPSsignal, the paper investigate the random error adaptive AR model of GPSpositioning signal, and improve the model and the algorithm based onnumerical analysis.

  2. Neural Network Aided Kalman Filtering For Integrated GPS/INS Navigation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haidong GUO

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Kalman filter (KF uses measurement updates to correct system states error and to limit the errors in navigation solutions. However, only when the system dynamic and measurement models are correctly defined, and the noise statistics for the process are completely known, KF can optimally estimate a system’s states. Without measurement updates, Kalman filter’s prediction diverges; therefore the performance of an integrated GPS/INS navigation system may degrade rapidly when GPS signals are unavailable. This paper presents a neural network (NN aided Kalman filtering method to improve navigation solutions of integrated GPS/INS navigation system. In the proposed loosely coupled GPS/INS navigation system, extended KF (EKF estimates the INS measurement errors, plus position, velocity and attitude errors, and provides precise navigation solutions while GPS signals are available. At the same time, multi-layer NN is trained to map the vehicle manoeuvre with INS prediction errors during each GPS epoch, which is the input of the EKF. During GPS signal blockages, the NN can be used to predict the INS errors for EKF measurement updates, and in this way to improve navigation solutions. The principle of this hybrid method and the NN design are presented. Land vehicle based field test data are processed to evaluate the performance of the proposed method.

  3. Calibration of the Khibiny Massif velocity model using registration of industrial explosions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asming V.E.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring of geodynamic activity of the Khibiny Massif assumes an accurate location of seismic events occurring here. This requires on the one hand knowledge of seismic wave velocities in the massif and adjacent territories and on the other hand software tools for seismic location in inhomogeneous media. The Seismic Configurator program developed in the Kola Branch of Geophysical Survey of RAS enables to create velocity models of 3D media, locate events and compute apparent velocities of seismic waves propagating along different paths. As a result of registration of industrial explosions in Khibiny, a set of apparent velocities of Pwaves along paths crossing the massif has been obtained. 2D and 3D velocity models matched the observations have been fitted by these data using the Seismic Configurator program. A method of modification of the existing location system for practical usage of the models has been proposed

  4. Real-time inversions for finite fault slip models and rupture geometry based on high-rate GPS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minson, Sarah E.; Murray, Jessica R.; Langbein, John O.; Gomberg, Joan S.

    2015-01-01

    We present an inversion strategy capable of using real-time high-rate GPS data to simultaneously solve for a distributed slip model and fault geometry in real time as a rupture unfolds. We employ Bayesian inference to find the optimal fault geometry and the distribution of possible slip models for that geometry using a simple analytical solution. By adopting an analytical Bayesian approach, we can solve this complex inversion problem (including calculating the uncertainties on our results) in real time. Furthermore, since the joint inversion for distributed slip and fault geometry can be computed in real time, the time required to obtain a source model of the earthquake does not depend on the computational cost. Instead, the time required is controlled by the duration of the rupture and the time required for information to propagate from the source to the receivers. We apply our modeling approach, called Bayesian Evidence-based Fault Orientation and Real-time Earthquake Slip, to the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake, 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake, and a simulated Hayward fault earthquake. In all three cases, the inversion recovers the magnitude, spatial distribution of slip, and fault geometry in real time. Since our inversion relies on static offsets estimated from real-time high-rate GPS data, we also present performance tests of various approaches to estimating quasi-static offsets in real time. We find that the raw high-rate time series are the best data to use for determining the moment magnitude of the event, but slightly smoothing the raw time series helps stabilize the inversion for fault geometry.

  5. Influence of Velocity Shell Correlations on Anomalous Scaling Exponents of Passive Scalars in Shell Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiao-Qiang; WANG Guang-Rui; CHEN Shi-Gang

    2008-01-01

    We propose a new approach to the old-standing problem of the anomaly of the scaling exponents of passive scalars of turbulence.Different to the original problem,the distribution function of the prescribed random velocity field is multi-dimensional normal and delta-correlated in time.Here,our random velocity field is spatially correlative.For comparison,we also give the result obtained by the Gaussian random velocity field without spatial correlation.The anomalous scaling exponents H (p) of passive scalar advected by two kinds of random velocity above are determined for structure function up to p= 15 by numerical simulations of the random shell model with Runge-Kutta methods to solve the stochastic differential equations.We observed that the H (p)'s obtained by the multi-dimensional normal distribution random velocity are more anomalous than those obtained by the independent Gaussian random velocity.

  6. Lagrangian velocity statistics of directed launch strategies in a Gulf of Mexico model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Toner

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The spatial dependence of Lagrangian displacement and velocity statistics is studied in the context of a data assimilating numerical model of the Gulf Mexico. In the active eddy region of the Western Gulf, a combination of Eulerian and Lagrangian measures are used to locate strongly hyperbolic regions of the flow. The statistics of the velocity field sampled by sets of drifters launched specifically in these hyperbolic regions are compared to those produced by randomly chosen launch sites. The results show that particle trajectories initialized in hyperbolic regions preferentially sample a broader range of Eulerian velocities than do members of ensembles of randomly launched drifters. The velocity density functions produced by the directed launches compare well with Eulerian velocity pdfs. Implications for the development of launch strategies to improve Eulerian velocity field reconstruction from drifter data are discussed.

  7. Rare events and their impact on velocity diffusion in a stochastic Fermi-Ulam model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlis, A K; Diakonos, F K; Constantoudis, V; Schmelcher, P

    2008-10-01

    A simplified version of the stochastic Fermi-Ulam model is investigated in order to elucidate the effect of a class of rare low-velocity events on the velocity diffusion process and consequently Fermi acceleration. The relative fraction of these events, for sufficiently large times, decreases monotonically with increasing variance of the magnitude of the particle velocity. However, a treatment of the diffusion problem which totally neglects these events, gives rise to a glaring inconsistency associated with the mean value of the magnitude of the velocity in the ensemble. We propose a general scheme for treating the diffusion process in velocity space, which succeeds in capturing the effect of the low-velocity events on the diffusion, providing a consistent description of the acceleration process. The present study exemplifies the influence of low-probability events on the transport properties of time-dependent billiards.

  8. Modeling of velocity field for vacuum induction melting process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Bo; JIANG Zhi-guo; LIU Kui; LI Yi-yi

    2005-01-01

    The numerical simulation for the recirculating flow of melting of an electromagnetically stirred alloy in a cylindrical induction furnace crucible was presented. Inductive currents and electromagnetic body forces in the alloy under three different solenoid frequencies and three different melting powers were calculated, and then the forces were adopted in the fluid flow equations to simulate the flow of the alloy and the behavior of the free surface. The relationship between the height of the electromagnetic stirring meniscus, melting power, and solenoid frequency was derived based on the law of mass conservation. The results show that the inductive currents and the electromagnetic forces vary with the frequency, melting power, and the physical properties of metal. The velocity and the height of the meniscus increase with the increase of the melting power and the decrease of the solenoid frequency.

  9. Nonaligned shocks for discrete velocity models of the Boltzmann equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Greenberg

    1991-05-01

    Full Text Available At the conclusion of I. Bonzani's presentation on the existence of structured shock solutions to the six-velocity, planar, discrete Boltzmann equation (with binary and triple collisions, Greenberg asked whether such solutions were possible in directions e(α=(cosα ,sinα when α was not one of the particle flow directions. This question generated a spirited discussion but the question was still open at the conclusion of the conference. In this note the author will provide a partial resolution to the question raised above. Using formal perturbation arguments he will produce approximate solutions to the equation considered by Bonzani which represent traveling waves propagating in any direction e(α=(cosα ,sinα.

  10. Simple Model for Simulating Characteristics of River Flow Velocity in Large Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husin Alatas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a simple computer based phenomenological model to simulate the characteristics of river flow velocity in large scale. We use shuttle radar tomography mission based digital elevation model in grid form to define the terrain of catchment area. The model relies on mass-momentum conservation law and modified equation of motion of falling body in inclined plane. We assume inelastic collision occurs at every junction of two river branches to describe the dynamics of merged flow velocity.

  11. Topside-plasmasphere electron density profiles model by using AIS ionosonde measurements and calibrates GPS TEC data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaroni, Claudio; Scotto, Carlo; Ippolito, Alessandro; Ciraolo, Luigi

    2013-04-01

    The Upper Atmosphere Physics group at INGV (Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia) developed Autoscala, a computer program for automatic scaling of the critical frequency foF2 and other ionospheric parameters derived from ionograms. Autoscala includes a routine that automatically estimates the electron density profile below F layer peak height hmF2, by adjusting the parameters of a model according to the recorded ionogram [Scotto (2009)]. By integrating this profile we can estimate bottom-side total electron content (bTEC). By means of a calibration technique [Ciraolo et al. (2007)], we are able to obtain calibrated vertical TEC (vTEC) values from GPS measurements over a receiver station. This method permits to estimate biases of the received signal due to transmitter-receiver hardware configuration. These biases must be eliminated from the GPS data in order to calibrate the experimental slant total electron content (sTEC) along the satellite-receiver line-of-sight (LoS). The difference between vTEC and bottom-side TEC (bTEC) permits to evaluate electron content of the topside ionospheric region (tTEC). Starting from tTEC, bottom-side parameters (foF2, hmF2, scale height at hmF2) obtained by ionosonde and O+ - H+ transition level, we can solve a system of equations based on different ionospheric profiler (Chapman, sech-squared and exponential) the solution of which provides ion scale height [Stankov et al. (2003)]. This last factor is sufficient to establish the vertical distribution of electrons in topside and plasmasphere regions. Obtained vertical profiles could be used to develop a new model for real time estimation of TEC and topside electron density distribution. References: Scotto, C. (2009). Electron density profile calculation technique for Autoscala ionogram analysis. Advances in Space Research, 44(6), 756-766. doi:10.1016/j.asr.2009.04.037 Ciraolo, L., et al. "Calibration errors on experimental slant total electron content (TEC) determined with

  12. A dual-phantom system for validation of velocity measurements in stenosis models under steady flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, James R; Easson, William J; Hoskins, Peter R

    2009-09-01

    A dual-phantom system is developed for validation of velocity measurements in stenosis models. Pairs of phantoms with identical geometry and flow conditions are manufactured, one for ultrasound and one for particle image velocimetry (PIV). The PIV model is made from silicone rubber, and a new PIV fluid is made that matches the refractive index of 1.41 of silicone. Dynamic scaling was performed to correct for the increased viscosity of the PIV fluid compared with that of the ultrasound blood mimic. The degree of stenosis in the models pairs agreed to less than 1%. The velocities in the laminar flow region up to the peak velocity location agreed to within 15%, and the difference could be explained by errors in ultrasound velocity estimation. At low flow rates and in mild stenoses, good agreement was observed in the distal flow fields, excepting the maximum velocities. At high flow rates, there was considerable difference in velocities in the poststenosis flow field (maximum centreline differences of 30%), which would seem to represent real differences in hydrodynamic behavior between the two models. Sources of error included: variation of viscosity because of temperature (random error, which could account for differences of up to 7%); ultrasound velocity estimation errors (systematic errors); and geometry effects in each model, particularly because of imperfect connectors and corners (systematic errors, potentially affecting the inlet length and flow stability). The current system is best placed to investigate measurement errors in the laminar flow region rather than the poststenosis turbulent flow region.

  13. A spatio-velocity model based semantic event detection algorithm for traffic surveillance video

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Detection of vehicle events is a research hotspot in digital traffic.In this paper,an approach is proposed to detect vehicle events with semantic analysis of traffic surveillance video using spatio-velocity statistic models.The approach includes two successive phases:trajectory clustering and semantic events detection.For trajectory clustering,a statistic model of vehicle trajectories are presented,for which a spatio-velocity model is trained by analyzing the trajectories of moving vehicles in the scene.Based on the trajectory,which represents both the position of the vehicle and its instantaneous velocity,a trajectory similarity measure is proposed.Then,an improved hierarchical clustering algorithm is adopted to cluster the trajectories according to different spatial and velocity distributions.In each cluster,trajectories that are spatially close have similar velocities of motion and represent one type of activity pattern.For the semantic events detection phase,statistic models of semantic regions in the scene are generated by estimating the probability density and velocity distributions of each type of activity pattern.Finally,semantic events are detected by the proposed spatio-velocity statistic models.The paper also presents experiments using real video sequence to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  14. Rupture model of Mw 7.8 2015 Gorkha, Nepal earthquake: Constraints from GPS measurements of coseismic offsets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rajeev Kumar; Roy, P. N. S.; Gupta, Sandeep Kumar; Khan, P. K.; Catherine, J. K.; Prajapati, Sanjay K.; Kumar, Amit; Puviarasan, N.; Bhu, Harsh; Devachandra, M.; Malik, Javed; Kundu, Bhaskar; Debbarma, Chandrani; Gahalaut, V. K.

    2017-01-01

    We estimate coseismic offsets at 20 sites in India due to the 25 April 2015 Gorkha, Nepal (Mw 7.8) earthquake. Only four sites in the Indian region, immediately to the south of the rupture, showed discernible coseismic horizontal offsets ranging between 3 and 7 mm toward north. We invert these offsets along with 13 other offsets at GPS sites in Nepal and 33 offsets at sites in China, for the estimation of slip distribution on the causative rupture. We assume that rupture occurred on the Main Himalayan Thrust (MHT). In our estimated slip model, high slip reaching ∼5 m occurred east of the mainshock epicenter, and the slip on rupture terminated close to the Main Boundary Thrust (MBT). Thus the rupture for this earthquake remained blind, increasing the potential for future earthquake in the shallow, updip unruptured part of the MHT.

  15. An Enhanced Error Model for EKF-Based Tightly-Coupled Integration of GPS and Land Vehicle’s Motion Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tashfeen B. Karamat

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Reduced inertial sensor systems (RISS have been introduced by many researchers as a low-cost, low-complexity sensor assembly that can be integrated with GPS to provide a robust integrated navigation system for land vehicles. In earlier works, the developed error models were simplified based on the assumption that the vehicle is mostly moving on a flat horizontal plane. Another limitation is the simplified estimation of the horizontal tilt angles, which is based on simple averaging of the accelerometers’ measurements without modelling their errors or tilt angle errors. In this paper, a new error model is developed for RISS that accounts for the effect of tilt angle errors and the accelerometer’s errors. Additionally, it also includes important terms in the system dynamic error model, which were ignored during the linearization process in earlier works. An augmented extended Kalman filter (EKF is designed to incorporate tilt angle errors and transversal accelerometer errors. The new error model and the augmented EKF design are developed in a tightly-coupled RISS/GPS integrated navigation system. The proposed system was tested on real trajectories’ data under degraded GPS environments, and the results were compared to earlier works on RISS/GPS systems. The findings demonstrated that the proposed enhanced system introduced significant improvements in navigational performance.

  16. Rapid SAR and GPS Measurements and Models for Hazard Science and Situational Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, S. E.; Yun, S. H.; Hua, H.; Agram, P. S.; Liu, Z.; Moore, A. W.; Rosen, P. A.; Simons, M.; Webb, F.; Linick, J.; Fielding, E. J.; Lundgren, P.; Sacco, G. F.; Polet, J.; Manipon, G.

    2016-12-01

    The Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) project for Natural Hazards is focused on rapidly generating higher level geodetic imaging products and placing them in the hands of the solid earth science and local, national, and international natural hazard communities by providing science product generation, exploration, and delivery capabilities at an operational level. Space-based geodetic measurement techniques such as Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS), SAR-based change detection, and image pixel tracking have recently become critical additions to our toolset for understanding and mapping the damage caused by earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, and floods. Analyses of these data sets are still largely handcrafted following each event and are not generated rapidly and reliably enough for response to natural disasters or for timely analysis of large data sets. The ARIA project, a joint venture co-sponsored by California Institute of Technology (Caltech) and by NASA through the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), has been capturing the knowledge applied to these responses and building it into an automated infrastructure to generate imaging products in near real-time that can improve situational awareness for disaster response. In addition, the ARIA project is developing the capabilities to provide automated imaging and analysis capabilities necessary to keep up with the imminent increase in raw data from geodetic imaging missions planned for launch by NASA, as well as international space agencies. We will present the progress we have made on automating the analysis of SAR data for hazard monitoring and response using data from Sentinel 1a/b as well as continuous GPS stations. Since the beginning of our project, our team has imaged events and generated response products for events around the world. These response products have enabled many conversations with those in the disaster response community

  17. UCVM: Open Source Software for Understanding and Delivering 3D Velocity Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, D.; Small, P.; Maechling, P. J.; Jordan, T. H.; Shaw, J. H.; Plesch, A.; Chen, P.; Lee, E. J.; Taborda, R.; Olsen, K. B.; Callaghan, S.

    2014-12-01

    Physics-based ground motion simulations can calculate the propagation of earthquake waves through 3D velocity models of the Earth. The Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) has developed the Unified Community Velocity Model (UCVM) framework to help researchers build structured or unstructured velocity meshes from 3D velocity models for use in wave propagation simulations. The UCVM software framework makes it easy to extract P and S wave propagation speeds and other material properties from 3D velocity models by providing a common interface through which researchers can query earth models for a given location and depth. Currently, the platform supports multiple California models, including SCEC CVM-S4 and CVM-H 11.9.1, and has been designed to support models from any region on earth. UCVM is currently being use to generate velocity meshes for many SCEC wave propagation codes, including AWP-ODC-SGT and Hercules. In this presentation, we describe improvements to the UCVM software. The current version, UCVM 14.3.0, released in March of 2014, supports the newest Southern California velocity model, CVM-S4.26, which was derived from 26 full-3D tomographic iterations using CVM-S4 as the starting model (Lee et al., this meeting), and the Broadband 1D velocity model used in the CyberShake 14.2 study. We have ported UCVM to multiple Linux distributions and OS X. Also included in this release is the ability to add small-scale stochastic heterogeneities to extract Cartesian meshes for use in high-frequency ground motion simulations. This tool was built using the C language open-source FFT library, FFTW. The stochastic parameters (Hurst exponent, correlation length, and the horizontal/vertical aspect ratio) can be customized by the user. UCVM v14.3.0 also provides visualization scripts for constructing cross-sections, horizontal slices, basin depths, and Vs30 maps. The interface allows researchers to visually review velocity models . Also, UCVM v14.3.0 can extract

  18. Ionospheric data assimilation with thermosphere-ionosphere-electrodynamics general circulation model and GPS-TEC during geomagnetic storm conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C. H.; Lin, C. H.; Matsuo, T.; Chen, W. H.; Lee, I. T.; Liu, J. Y.; Lin, J. T.; Hsu, C. T.

    2016-06-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of rapid assimilation-forecast cycling on the performance of ionospheric data assimilation during geomagnetic storm conditions. An ensemble Kalman filter software developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), called Data Assimilation Research Testbed, is applied to assimilate ground-based GPS total electron content (TEC) observations into a theoretical numerical model of the thermosphere and ionosphere (NCAR thermosphere-ionosphere-electrodynamics general circulation model) during the 26 September 2011 geomagnetic storm period. Effects of various assimilation-forecast cycle lengths: 60, 30, and 10 min on the ionospheric forecast are examined by using the global root-mean-squared observation-minus-forecast (OmF) TEC residuals. Substantial reduction in the global OmF for the 10 min assimilation-forecast cycling suggests that a rapid cycling ionospheric data assimilation system can greatly improve the quality of the model forecast during geomagnetic storm conditions. Furthermore, updating the thermospheric state variables in the coupled thermosphere-ionosphere forecast model in the assimilation step is an important factor in improving the trajectory of model forecasting. The shorter assimilation-forecast cycling (10 min in this paper) helps to restrain unrealistic model error growth during the forecast step due to the imbalance among model state variables resulting from an inadequate state update, which in turn leads to a greater forecast accuracy.

  19. Non-lane-based full velocity difference car following model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Sheng; Wang, Dianhai; Tao, Pengfei; Li, Pingfan

    2010-11-01

    In order to describe car following behavior in real world, this paper presents a non-lane-based car following model by incorporating the effects of the lane width in traffic. The stability condition of the model is obtained by using the linear stability theory. And numerical simulation is carried out to validate the analytic results. The property of the model is investigated, and it is found that the proposed model can describe the phase transition of traffic flow and estimate the evolution of traffic congestion. The results implied that incorporating the lane width effects in car following model not only stabilize traffic flow and suppress the traffic jam, but also lower critical headway and increase capacity. Thus, the lateral separation effects greatly enhance the realism of car following models.

  20. A Discrete Velocity Traffic Kinetic Model Including Desired Speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoufeng Lu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We introduce the desired speed variable into the table of games and formulate a new table of games and the corresponding discrete traffic kinetic model. We use the hybrid programming technique of VB and MATLAB to develop the program. Lastly, we compared the proposed model result and the detector data. The results show that the proposed model can describe the traffic flow evolution.

  1. Improving estimation of microseismic focal mechanisms using a high-resolution velocity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, T.; Chen, Y.; Lin, Y.; Huang, L.

    2015-12-01

    Injection and migration of CO2 during the geological carbon sequestration change the pore pressure and stress distribution in the reservoir. The change in stress may induce brittle failure on fractures, causing microseismic events. Focal mechanisms of induced microseismic events are useful for understanding stress evolution in the reservoir. An accurate estimation of microseismic focal mechanism depends on the accuracy of velocity models. In this work, we study the improvement on estimation of microseismic focal mechanisms using a high-resolution velocity model. We obtain the velocity model using a velocity inversion algorithm with a modified total-variation scheme rather than the commonly used Tikhonov regularization technique. We demonstrate with synthetic microseismic data that the velocity inversion method with a modified total-variation regularization scheme improves velocity inversion, and the improved velocity models enhance the accuracy of estimated focal mechanisms of microseismic events. We apply the new methodology to microseismic data acquired at a CO2-EOR (enhanced oil recovery) site at Aneth, Utah.

  2. Refined Turbulence Modeling for Swirl Velocity in Turbomachinery Seals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namhyo Kim

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A generalized new form of the rotation-sensitive source term coefficient previously proposed by Bardina and colleagues as an extension of the standard k-ε turbulence model was developed. The proposal made by Bardina and colleagues focused on rotating flows without significant turbulence generation, and the result was a negative-valued constant coefficient. The new functional form developed here for the coefficient has global as well as local dependence. The new model predictions of laser Doppler anemometry measurements of swirling flows in labyrinth seals were compared with the swirl distribution measurements and with the standard k-ε model (i.e., no rotation source term predictions. It was found that for the labyrinth seal cases for which detailed measurements are available, the standard k-ε model gives unsatisfactory predictions, whereas the new model gives significantly improved predictions.

  3. High-Resolution Seismic Velocity and Attenuation Models of the Caucasus-Caspian Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-20

    bottom). complicated tectonics . Lg appears to propagate well in the Arabian plate but is dramatically attenuated in the Lesser Caucasus. This may be...AFRL-RV-HA-TR-2010-1022 High-Resolution Seismic Velocity and Attenuation Models of the Caucasus-Caspian Region Robert J. Mellors...Resolution Seismic Velocity and Attenuation Models of the Caucasus-Caspian Region 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8718-07-C-0007 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  4. A WEAKLY NONLINEAR WATER WAVE MODEL TAKING INTO ACCOUNT DISPERSION OF WAVE PHASE VELOCITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李瑞杰; 李东永

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a weakly nonlinear water wave model using a mild slope equation and a new explicit formulation which takes into account dispersion of wave phase velocity, approximates Hedges' (1987) nonlinear dispersion relationship, and accords well with the original empirical formula. Comparison of the calculating results with those obtained from the experimental data and those obtained from linear wave theory showed that the present water wave model considering the dispersion of phase velocity is rational and in good agreement with experiment data.

  5. Modeling Of Maritime Vehicle Using Gold Coin Coding Technique and GPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miss.Lavanya.G

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of the project is to identify the ship or boat on the zone level. While travelling in boat or ship the iceberg in the sea is detected by using ultrasonic sensor and the prediction of tsunami is carried out using vibration sensor. If the boat or ship crosses the limitation of border it gives a voice message, if they try to move forward then the ship/boat will automatically stop functioning. There is one emergency switch available on the boat side that will inform about the route to home. In the problematic time, the information is passed to the control room then the ship/boat is rescued in case of danger. A GPS receiver shows the position of the ship/boat by receiving the signal from the satellite. The microcontroller is used to calculate the accurate position of the boat/ship which will indicate the fisherman through an alarm system that the ship/boat has crossed the boundary. Through this process the system helps in saving the lives of the fisherman and reduces the risks and damages caused to them when they are lost in the sea.

  6. Fault Slip Model of 2013 Lushan Earthquake Retrieved Based on GPS Coseismic Displacements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mengkui Li; Shuangxi Zhang; Chaoyu Zhang; Yu Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Lushan Earthquake (~Mw 6.6) occurred in Sichuan Province of China on 20 April 2013, was the largest earthquake in Longmenshan fault belt since 2008 Wenchuan Earthquake. To better understand its rupture pattern, we focused on the influences of fault parameters on fault slips and performed fault slip inversion using Akaike’s Bayesian Information Criterion (ABIC) method. Based on GPS coseismic data, our inverted results showed that the fault slip was mainly confined at depths. The maximum slip amplitude is about 0.7 m, and the scalar seismic moment is about 9.47×1018 N·m. Slip pattern reveals that the earthquake occurred on the thrust fault with large dip-slip and small strike-slip, such a simple fault slip represents no second sub-event occurred. The Coulomb stress changes (DCFF) matched the most aftershocks with negative anomalies. The in-verted results demonstrated that the source parameters have significant impacts on fault slip distri-bution, especially on the slip direction and maximum displacement.

  7. OSGM02: A new model for converting GPS-derived heights to local height datums in Great Britain and Ireland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iliffe, J.C.; Ziebart, M.; Cross, P.A.

    2003-01-01

    to the GPS and levelling networks in the various regions of the British Isles in such a way that it can be used in conjunction with GPS to form a replacement for the existing system of bench marks. The error sources induced in this procedure are discussed, and the theoretical basis given for the fitting...

  8. Positioning accuracy and reliability of GALILEO,integrated GPS-GALILEO system based on single positioning model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Chunmei; OU Jikun; YUAN Yunbin

    2005-01-01

    A kind of uniform reliability index suitable for the code and phase observations is presented and used in reliability evaluation of satellite systems. Then, based on 25 stations of Crustal Movement Observation Network of China, satellite visibility, positioning availability and observation reliability of GPS, GALILEO and integrated GPS- GALILEO are calculated and analyzed in detail. Simulation results reveal that the satellite visibility of GALILEO is superior to that of GPS. Given positioning accuracy, horizontal positioning availability of GALILEO is consistent with that of GPS, but its vertical positioning availability is superior to that of GPS. However, the integrated GPS-GALILEO is shown to be superior to each of the single systems in the aspects of positioning accuracy and availability. The reliability of code and phase observations based on GALILEO and integrated GPS-GALILEO system is superior to that of GPS both in spatial and temporal domains on the whole. The new reliability index presented is simple to calculate and reflects reliability differences of different satellite systems.

  9. Crustal kinematics of the Colorado Plateau from GPS geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, A. A.; Broermann, J.; Bennett, R. A.; Kreemer, C.; Blewitt, G.

    2013-12-01

    We present results from new continuous and campaign GPS networks spanning the state of Arizona and the southern portion of Utah. The 33 station continuous GPS network, funded by the NSF EarthScope Program, supplements a sparse distribution of continuous GPS stations that comprise the NSF EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory network. The campaign network originally established by the National Geodetic survey in the mid-1990's, has been reoccupied two or more times over the past five years with support from the Arizona Geological Survey. The data from the continuous GPS stations are analyzed independently with the GIPSY and GAMIT software. The new horizontal velocity data set provides an improved image of deformation in the transition zone between the Colorado Plateau and the Northern and Southern Basin and Ranges Provinces. Preliminary modeling of the crustal kinematics reveals that only a very limited part of the region can be modeled as a rigid-body rotation. Most of the area is part of a broad zone of diffuse east-west directed extension from the Rio Grande Rift in the East to the Mojave Desert in the west. Only near the transition from the northern Colorado Plateau to the northern Basin and Range Province is the extension more localized. Besides a discussion of the regional kinematics, we will also discuss the affect the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake had on the geodetic data in the southern Basin and Range.

  10. GPS (Global Positioning System) Range Applications Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-31

    Portability + + All; Improved Due to Fewer Resources * Availabilty - + All; (-) Small Satellite Window, (+) Better MTMF * Data Timeliness 0 0 GPS APPLICABILITY...calculations to maxi- mum and minimum values based on the spread evidenced in his- torical range usage . 7-23 THE ANALYTIC SCIENCES CORPORATION accuracy... Availabilty 0 + Less Reliance on Older Equipment a Data Timeliness + 0 Labor Intensive Optics for Velocity GPS APPLICABILITY HIGH HIGH Accuracy and Coverage in

  11. Surface velocity divergence model of air/water interfacial gas transfer in open-channel flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjou, M.; Nezu, I.; Okamoto, T.

    2017-04-01

    Air/water interfacial gas transfer through a free surface plays a significant role in preserving and restoring water quality in creeks and rivers. However, direct measurements of the gas transfer velocity and reaeration coefficient are still difficult, and therefore a reliable prediction model needs to be developed. Varying systematically the bulk-mean velocity and water depth, laboratory flume experiments were conducted and we measured surface velocities and dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations in open-channel flows to reveal the relationship between DO transfer velocity and surface divergence (SD). Horizontal particle image velocimetry measurements provide the time-variations of surface velocity divergence. Positive and negative regions of surface velocity divergence are transferred downstream in time, as occurs in boil phenomenon on natural river free-surfaces. The result implies that interfacial gas transfer is related to bottom-situated turbulence motion and vertical mass transfer. The original SD model focuses mainly on small-scale viscous motion, and this model strongly depends on the water depth. Therefore, we modify the SD model theoretically to accommodate the effects of the water depth on gas transfer, introducing a non-dimensional parameter that includes contributions of depth-scale large-vortex motion, such as secondary currents, to surface renewal events related to DO transport. The modified SD model proved effective and reasonable without any dependence on the bulk mean velocity and water depth, and has a larger coefficient of determination than the original SD model. Furthermore, modeling of friction velocity with the Reynolds number improves the practicality of a new formula that is expected to be used in studies of natural rivers.

  12. Seasonal Effects on GPS PPP Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saracoglu, Aziz; Ugur Sanli, D.

    2016-04-01

    GPS Precise Point Positioning (PPP) is now routinely used in many geophysical applications. Static positioning and 24 h data are requested for high precision results however real life situations do not always let us collect 24 h data. Thus repeated GPS surveys of 8-10 h observation sessions are still used by some research groups. Positioning solutions from shorter data spans are subject to various systematic influences, and the positioning quality as well as the estimated velocity is degraded. Researchers pay attention to the accuracy of GPS positions and of the estimated velocities derived from short observation sessions. Recently some research groups turned their attention to the study of seasonal effects (i.e. meteorological seasons) on GPS solutions. Up to now usually regional studies have been reported. In this study, we adopt a global approach and study the various seasonal effects (including the effect of the annual signal) on GPS solutions produced from short observation sessions. We use the PPP module of the NASA/JPL's GIPSY/OASIS II software and globally distributed GPS stations' data of the International GNSS Service. Accuracy studies previously performed with 10-30 consecutive days of continuous data. Here, data from each month of a year, incorporating two years in succession, is used in the analysis. Our major conclusion is that a reformulation for the GPS positioning accuracy is necessary when taking into account the seasonal effects, and typical one term accuracy formulation is expanded to a two-term one.

  13. The Argos-CLS Kalman Filter: Error Structures and State-Space Modelling Relative to Fastloc GPS Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D Lowther

    Full Text Available Understanding how an animal utilises its surroundings requires its movements through space to be described accurately. Satellite telemetry is the only means of acquiring movement data for many species however data are prone to varying amounts of spatial error; the recent application of state-space models (SSMs to the location estimation problem have provided a means to incorporate spatial errors when characterising animal movements. The predominant platform for collecting satellite telemetry data on free-ranging animals, Service Argos, recently provided an alternative Doppler location estimation algorithm that is purported to be more accurate and generate a greater number of locations that its predecessor. We provide a comprehensive assessment of this new estimation process performance on data from free-ranging animals relative to concurrently collected Fastloc GPS data. Additionally, we test the efficacy of three readily-available SSM in predicting the movement of two focal animals. Raw Argos location estimates generated by the new algorithm were greatly improved compared to the old system. Approximately twice as many Argos locations were derived compared to GPS on the devices used. Root Mean Square Errors (RMSE for each optimal SSM were less than 4.25 km with some producing RMSE of less than 2.50 km. Differences in the biological plausibility of the tracks between the two focal animals used to investigate the utility of SSM highlights the importance of considering animal behaviour in movement studies. The ability to reprocess Argos data collected since 2008 with the new algorithm should permit questions of animal movement to be revisited at a finer resolution.

  14. The Argos-CLS Kalman Filter: Error Structures and State-Space Modelling Relative to Fastloc GPS Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowther, Andrew D; Lydersen, Christian; Fedak, Mike A; Lovell, Phil; Kovacs, Kit M

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how an animal utilises its surroundings requires its movements through space to be described accurately. Satellite telemetry is the only means of acquiring movement data for many species however data are prone to varying amounts of spatial error; the recent application of state-space models (SSMs) to the location estimation problem have provided a means to incorporate spatial errors when characterising animal movements. The predominant platform for collecting satellite telemetry data on free-ranging animals, Service Argos, recently provided an alternative Doppler location estimation algorithm that is purported to be more accurate and generate a greater number of locations that its predecessor. We provide a comprehensive assessment of this new estimation process performance on data from free-ranging animals relative to concurrently collected Fastloc GPS data. Additionally, we test the efficacy of three readily-available SSM in predicting the movement of two focal animals. Raw Argos location estimates generated by the new algorithm were greatly improved compared to the old system. Approximately twice as many Argos locations were derived compared to GPS on the devices used. Root Mean Square Errors (RMSE) for each optimal SSM were less than 4.25 km with some producing RMSE of less than 2.50 km. Differences in the biological plausibility of the tracks between the two focal animals used to investigate the utility of SSM highlights the importance of considering animal behaviour in movement studies. The ability to reprocess Argos data collected since 2008 with the new algorithm should permit questions of animal movement to be revisited at a finer resolution.

  15. Satellite Galaxy Velocity Dispersions in the SDSS and Modified Gravity Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W. Moffat

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS provides data on several hundred thousand galaxies. The precise location of these galaxies in the sky, along with information about their luminosities and line-of-sight (Doppler velocities, allows one to construct a three-dimensional map of their location and estimate their line-of-sight velocity dispersion. This information, in principle, allows one to test dynamical gravity models, specifically models of satellite galaxy velocity dispersions near massive hosts. A key difficulty is the separation of true satellites from interlopers. We sidestep this problem by not attempting to derive satellite galaxy velocity dispersions from the data, but instead incorporate an interloper background into the mathematical models and compare the result to the actual data. We find that due to the presence of interlopers, it is not possible to exclude several gravitational theories on the basis of the SDSS data.

  16. Validity of Viscous Core Correction Models for Self-Induced Velocity Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Van Hoydonck, Wim

    2012-01-01

    Viscous core correction models are used in free wake simulations to remove the infinite velocities at the vortex centreline. It will be shown that the assumption that these corrections converge to the Biot-Savart law in the far field is not correct for points near the tangent line of a vortex segment. Furthermore, the self-induced velocity of a vortex ring with a viscous core is shown to converge to the wrong value. The source of these errors in the model is identified and an improved model is presented that rectifies the errors. It results in correct values for the self-induced velocity of a viscous vortex ring and induced velocities that converge to the values predicted by the Biot-Savart law for all points in the far field.

  17. Comparison of GPS-TEC variation during quiet and disturbed period using the Holt-Winter method and IRI-2012 model over Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed Ismail, Nouf Abd Emunim; Abdullah, Mardina; Hasbi, Alina Marie

    2016-07-01

    Total Electron Content (TEC) is the main parameter in the ionosphere that has significant effects on radio wave; it changes the speed and direction of the signal propagation, causing the delay of the Global Positioning System (GPS) signals. Therefore, it is crucial to validate the performance of the ionospheric model to reveal the variety of ionospheric behaviour during quiet and disturbed period. This research presents the performance evaluation of the statistical Holt-Winter method and IRI-2012 model using three topside electron density options: IRI-2001, IRI01-corr and NeQuick with the observed GPS-TEC during quiet and disturbed period. The GPS-TEC data were derived from the dual frequency GPS receiver at JUPEM (Department of Survey and Mapping Malaysia), from the UUMK station (north Peninsular Malaysia) at geographic coordinates of 6.46°N-100.50°E and geomagnetic coordinates of 3.32°S-172.99°E and TGPG station (south Peninsular Malaysia) at geographic coordinates of 1.36°N-104.10°E and geomagnetic coordinates of 8.43°S -176.53°E, during March of 2013. The maximum value of the GPS-TEC was at the post noon time at 17:00 LT and the minimum was in the early morning from 6:00-7:00 LT. During the quiet period, the maximum GPS-TEC at the UUMK station was 52 TECU while at the TGPG station, it was 60 TECU. During the disturbed period, when intense geomagnetic storm occurred on 17 March 2013, the maximum GPS-TEC recorded was 58 TECU and 65 TECU in UUMK and TGPG station, respectively. The diurnal hourly variation during the quiet period indicated that IRI-2001, IRI01-corr, and NeQuick had overestimation agreement during the day hours except for the time between 11:00-19:00 LT when IRI01-corr and NeQuick showed underestimation, while during 13:00-20:00 LT, IRI-2001 showed slight underestimation whereas the Holt-Winter method showed good agreement with GPS-TEC. During the disturbed period, IRI-2001 showed overestimation agreement for all hours, while the IRI01-corr

  18. Professional growth of trainees: applying teacher training models to the training of GPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavriel, George; Gavriel, Jennifer

    2011-10-01

    Study of professional growth is useful for reflective purposes at any time during a career. The concept of known knowns and unknowns with a training twist can be used to summarise the overall stages of any trainee. At the start of vocational training the trainee does not know what they do not know, they have not yet recognised how much they have to learn. This happens in the second stage (that could be equated to survival) when they begin to understand the vast array of skills they must develop to make it look easy. With time and practice they will reach the point where they know what they have to do--not always getting it right but then who does? Finally, and it is particularly important that trainers recognise this, an individual will reach the point where everything is so automatic they are no longer aware of the intricacies of the skills they have acquired. This is where most trainers, both for teachers and GPs, find themselves and this can be frustrating for both trainee and trainer as they find they are unable to communicate effectively. A good trainer will spend time dissecting and 'unlearning' their skills so they are able to teach their trainees successfully. Trainees, meanwhile, must realise that, one day, they will have their own unknown knowns, but they cannot expect it to happen overnight or without substantial effort. In moving forward from our training it is how we deal with repeated survival stages that determines if we can keep doing the job, it is how we deal with the plateau that determines if we will be any good at it--effective on-the-job training leads to lifelong on-the-job learning.

  19. Three Dimensional P Wave Velocity Model for the Crust Containing Aftershocks of the Bhuj, India Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, C. A.; Vlahovic, G.; Bodin, P.; Horton, S.

    2001-12-01

    A three-dimensional P wave velocity model has been constructed for the crust in the vicinity of the Mw=7.7 January 26th Bhuj, India earthquake using aftershock data obtained by CERI away teams. Aftershocks were recorded by 8 portable, digital K2 seismographs (the MAEC/ISTAR network) and by a continuously recording Guralp CMG40TD broad-band seismometer. Station spacing is roughly 30 km. The network was in place for 18 days and recorded ground motions from about 2000 aftershocks located within about 100 km of all stations. The 3-D velocity model is based upon an initial subset of 461 earthquakes with 2848 P wave arrivals. The initial 1-D velocity model was determined using VELEST and the 3-D model was determined using the nonlinear travel time tomography method of Benz et al. [1996]. Block size was set at 2 by 2 by 2 km. A 45% reduction in RMS travel time residuals was obtained after 10 iterations holding hypocenters fixed. We imaged velocity anomalies in the range -2 to 4%. Low velocities were found in the upper 6 km and the anomalies follow surface features such as the Rann of Kutch. High velocity features were imaged at depth and are associated with the aftershock hypocenters. High crustal velocities are present at depths exceeding 20 km with the exception of the crust below the Rann of Kutch. The imaged velocity anomaly pattern does not change when different starting models are used and when hypocenters are relocated using P wave arrivals only. The analysis will be extended to an expanded data set of 941 aftershocks.

  20. Lane-changing behavior and its effect on energy dissipation using full velocity difference model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Ding, Jian-Xun; Shi, Qin; Kühne, Reinhart D.

    2016-07-01

    In real urban traffic, roadways are usually multilane with lane-specific velocity limits. Most previous researches are derived from single-lane car-following theory which in the past years has been extensively investigated and applied. In this paper, we extend the continuous single-lane car-following model (full velocity difference model) to simulate the three-lane-changing behavior on an urban roadway which consists of three lanes. To meet incentive and security requirements, a comprehensive lane-changing rule set is constructed, taking safety distance and velocity difference into consideration and setting lane-specific speed restriction for each lane. We also investigate the effect of lane-changing behavior on distribution of cars, velocity, headway, fundamental diagram of traffic and energy dissipation. Simulation results have demonstrated asymmetric lane-changing “attraction” on changeable lane-specific speed-limited roadway, which leads to dramatically increasing energy dissipation.

  1. The estimation method of GPS instrumental biases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A model of estimating the global positioning system (GPS) instrumental biases and the methods to calculate the relative instrumental biases of satellite and receiver are presented. The calculated results of GPS instrumental biases, the relative instrumental biases of satellite and receiver, and total electron content (TEC) are also shown. Finally, the stability of GPS instrumental biases as well as that of satellite and receiver instrumental biases are evaluated, indicating that they are very stable during a period of two months and a half.

  2. Microblock rotations and fault coupling in SE Asia triple junction (Sulawesi, Indonesia) from GPS and earthquake slip vector data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Socquet, A.; Simons, W.J.F.; Vigny, C.; McCaffrey, R.; Subarya, C.; Sarsito, D.; Ambrosius, B.; Spakman, W.

    2006-01-01

    The island of Sulawesi, eastern Indonesia, is located within the triple junction of the Australian, Philippine, and Sunda plates and accommodates the convergence of continental fragments with the Sunda margin. We quantify the kinematics of Sulawesi by modeling GPS velocities and earthquake slip vect

  3. Present-day Kinematics of Papua New Guinea from GPS campaign measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koulali Idrissi, A.; McClusky, S.; Tregoning, P.

    2013-12-01

    Papua New Guinea (PNG) is a complex tectonic region located in the convergence zone between the Australian and Pacific Plate. It occupies arguably one of the most tectonically complicated regions of the world, and its geodynamic evolution involves micro-plate rotation, lithospheric rupture forming ocean basins, arc-continent collision, subduction polarity reversal, collisional orogenesis, ophiolite obduction, and exhumation of high-pressure metamorphic (ultramafic) rocks. In this study we present a GPS derived velocity field based on 1993-2008 survey mode observations at 30 GPS sites. We combine our results with previously published GPS velocities to investigate the deformation in northern and northwestern Papua New Guinea. We use an elastic block model to invert the regional GPS velocities as well as earthquake slip vectors for poles of rotation of several micro-plates. The micro-plate block boundary fault geometry is based on geological mapping and regional seismicity. The results show that fault system north of the Highlands fold and thrust belt is the major boundary between the rigid Australian Plate and the north Highlands block, with convergence occurring at rates of between ~ 6 and 11.5 mm/yr. The relative motion across the northern Highlands block increases to the north to ~ 21-24 mm/yr, meaning that the New Guinea trench is likely accumulating elastic strain and confirming that the new Guinea Trench is an active inter-plate boundary. Our results also show, that the north New Guinea Highlands and the Papuan peninsula are best modelled as two blocks separated by a boundary through the Aure Fold belt Belt complex. This block boundary today is accommodating an estimated 4-5 mm/yr dextral motion. Our model also confirms previous results showing that the Ramu-Markham fault accommodates the deformation associated with the Finisterre arc-continent collision. This new GPS velocity field provides fresh insights into the details of the kinematics of the PNG present

  4. GPS-based regional ionospheric models and their suitability in Antarctica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AN Jiachun; WANG Zemin; NING Xinguo

    2014-01-01

    There are a number of ionospheric models available for research and application, such as the polynomial model, generalized trigonometric series function model, low degree spherical harmonic function model, adjusted spherical harmonic function model, and spherical cap harmonic function analysis. Using observations from more than 40 continuously operating stations across Antarctica in 2010, ifve models are compared with regard to their precision and applicability to polar regions. The results show that all the models perform well in Antarctica with 0.1 TECU of residual mean value and 2 TECU of root mean square error.

  5. One-dimensional velocity model of the Middle Kura Depresion from local earthquakes data of Azerbaijan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetirmishli, G. C.; Kazimova, S. E.; Kazimov, I. E.

    2011-09-01

    We present the method for determining the velocity model of the Earth's crust and the parameters of earthquakes in the Middle Kura Depression from the data of network telemetry in Azerbaijan. Application of this method allowed us to recalculate the main parameters of the hypocenters of the earthquake, to compute the corrections to the arrival times of P and S waves at the observation station, and to significantly improve the accuracy in determining the coordinates of the earthquakes. The model was constructed using the VELEST program, which calculates one-dimensional minimal velocity models from the travel times of seismic waves.

  6. GPS-Derived Precipitable Water Compared with the Air Force Weather Agency’s MM5 Model Output

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-03-26

    SC 32.90 -80.03 15 Charleston, SC (CHA1) 23.63 CRP Corpus Christi , TX 27.77 -97.50 14 Aransas Pass, TX (ARP3) 44.01 DEN Denver, CO 39.77 -104.88 1611...values with GPS-derived PW values at five GPS sites in the Madrid Sierra region of central Spain. The case was during 2-15 December 1996 and

  7. Converting NAD83 GPS Heights Into NAVD88 Elevations With LVGEOID, a Hybrid Geoid Height Model for the Long Valley Volcanic Region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Maurizio; Dzurisin, Daniel; Langbein, John; Svarc, Jerry; Hill, David P.

    2008-01-01

    A GPS survey of leveling benchmarks done in Long Valley Caldera in 1999 showed that the application of the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) geoid model GEOID99 to tie GPS heights to historical leveling measurements would significantly underestimate the caldera ground deformation (known from other geodetic measurements). The NGS geoid model was able to correctly reproduce the shape of the deformation, but required a local adjustment to give a realistic estimate of the magnitude of the uplift. In summer 2006, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a new leveling survey along two major routes crossing the Long Valley region from north to south (Hwy 395) and from east to west (Hwy 203 - Benton Crossing). At the same time, 25 leveling bench marks were occupied with dual frequency GPS receivers to provide a measurement of the ellipsoid heights. Using the heights from these two surveys, we were able to compute a precise geoid height model (LVGEOID) for the Long Valley volcanic region. Our results show that although the LVGEOID and the latest NGS GEOID03 model practically coincide in areas outside the caldera, there is a difference of up to 0.2 m between the two models within the caldera. Accounting for this difference is critical when using the geoid height model to estimate the ground deformation due to magmatic or tectonic activity in the caldera.

  8. Traffic stability of a car-following model considering driver’s desired velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Geng; Sun, Di-Hua; Liu, Wei-Ning; Liu, Hui

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, a new car-following model is proposed by considering driver’s desired velocity according to Transportation Cyber Physical Systems. The effect of driver’s desired velocity on traffic flow has been investigated through linear stability theory and nonlinear reductive perturbation method. The linear stability condition shows that driver’s desired velocity effect can enlarge the stable region of traffic flow. From nonlinear analysis, the Burgers equation and mKdV equation are derived to describe the evolution properties of traffic density waves in the stable and unstable regions respectively. Numerical simulation is carried out to verify the analytical results, which reveals that traffic congestion can be suppressed efficiently by taking driver’s desired velocity effect into account.

  9. Convergence across the northwest Himalaya from GPS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, P.; Bürgmann, R.

    2002-07-01

    Horizontal velocities of 26 Global Positioning System (GPS) stations in the northwest Himalayan region provide new constraints on the partitioning of India-Eurasia convergence and elastic strain accumulation about the locked Main Frontal Thrust (MFT). The northwest-striking Karakorum fault slips at 11 +/- 4 mm/yr and contributes to east-west extension of southern Tibet and westward motion of the northwest Himalaya towards Nanga Parbat, rather than playing a role in eastward extrusion of Tibet. Crustal shortening across the Himalaya occurs within a zone centered about 100 km north of the Siwalik Foothills and the MFT. Model inversions of the GPS data indicate that the MFT is locked over a width of ~100 km. Comparison with geologic MFT-slip-rate estimates suggests that this zone is building up a slip deficit at a rate of 14 +/- 1 mm/yr and will eventually fail in future great earthquakes.

  10. Estimation of transient deformation on cGPS measurements at Taiwan region: Implications for tectonic and surface processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, K. H.; Chan, Y. C.

    2015-12-01

    Transient deformation on geodetic time series is usually caused by the tectonic or surface processes. Surface processes include multiple durations that could be trapped or ignored using general time series analysis. We first recognize overall transient signals in Taiwan region recorded by continuous GPS (cGPS) networks. Sparse estimation techniques and Bi-splines function are used to detect the signals on cGPS time series then estimate the parameters. Our study analyzes the transient deformation by using a multi-dataset of the cGPS, seismogram, digital terrain model (DTM), and rainfall gauges. We establish a systematic classification by weighting both the empirical trigger factors and regional criterion to classify the signals into seven types. Spatial and temporal characteristics of transient deformation show three major contributions in Taiwan region including the seismic-related, landslides-related, and slow-slip transients. The cGPS networks in Taiwan region show long-term transient deformation at rates 2-68 mm/yr, ~14%-75% of their tectonic interseismic velocities. Tectonic and surface processes involve ~38%-85% and ~15%-62%, respectively, in the transient deformation under different geological units of Taiwan region. The lack of consideration for the transient deformation in surface processes would underestimate their biases on tectonic interseismic velocity. Statistical linking between cGPS transient deformation, tectonic and surface processes of Taiwan indicate that earthquake, typhoon, and topography play important roles in the occurrence of transient deformation.

  11. A simple way to model the pressure dependency of rock velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tongcheng

    2016-04-01

    Modeling the pressure dependency of rock velocity is important for interpreting and comparing the seismic and earthquake data from different depths. This study develops a multicomponent differential effective medium model for the elastic properties of porous rocks with two types of pores in the grain background without mixing order. The developed model is applied to modeling the pressure dependent elastic velocity of porous rocks by incorporating the variation of stiff and compliant porosity as a function of pressure. The pressure dependent stiff and compliant porosity were inverted from the measured total porosity under pressure using a dual porosity model, and the unknown constant stiff and compliant pore aspect ratios were inverted by best fitting the modeled velocity to the measured data. Application of the approach to a low porosity granite and a medium porosity sandstone sample showed that the pressure dependency of rock velocity can be satisfactorily modeled by the developed model using the pressure dependent stiff and compliant porosity and carefully estimated stiff and compliant pore aspect ratio values.

  12. Using the IRI, the MAGIC model, and the co-located ground-based GPS receivers to study ionospheric solar eclipse and storm signatures on July 22, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chi-Yen; Liu, Jann-Yenq; Lin, Chien-Hung; Sun, Yang-Yi; Araujo-Pradere, Eduardo A.; Kakinami, Yoshihiro

    2012-06-01

    The longest total solar eclipse in the 21st century occurred in Southeast Asia on 22 July 2009 from 00:55 to 04:15 UT, and was accompanied by a moderate magnetic storm starting at 03:00 UT with a D st reduction of -78 nT at 07:00 UT. In this study, we use the ionospheric reference model IRI, the data assimilation model MAGIC, and ground-based GPS receivers to simulate and examine the ionospheric solar eclipse and geomagnetic storm signatures in Taiwan and Japan. Cross-comparisons between the two model results and observations show that IRI fails to simulate the two signatures while MAGIC partially reproduces the storm features. It is essential to include ground-based GPS measurements to improve the IRI performance.

  13. Noise levels in Southern California Integrated GPS Network (SCIGN) data; Preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langbein, J.; Heflin, M. B.; Hurst, K.; Kedar, S.; Herring, T.; King, N. E.; Prawirodirdjo, L.

    2002-12-01

    Quantifying the noise levels in GPS data is a necessary for estimating station velocities and their uncertainties. The estimate of velocity uncertainty is particularly sensitive to the noise model used to characterize the time-series at its lowest frequencies. Previous published analysis (Zhang et. al, 1997 and Mao et. al, 1999) of noise levels in GPS data indicated that the flicker noise (1/f where f is frequency) best represent the temporal correlations at low frequencies in GPS station position time-series. On the other hand, analysis of high precision EDM data (Langbein and Johnson, 1995) show temporal correlations at low frequencies that is consistent with a random-walk (1/{f2}). It is believed that localized monument wobble is the cause for the random-walk. With the more recent GPS solutions that use data from a regional network and, as a consequence of resolving the ambiguity in GPS phase data, these solutions have better precision than those used in the published results. To test whether random-walk could be a component of the GPS data, time series of GPS data processed by JPL using GIPSY-OASIS II are examined. These data are from a subset of SCIGN for which the ambiguities have been resolved and a local reference frame has been defined. Preliminary analysis indicates that either flicker or a wide-band, seasonal noise is present. In addition, it is possible to place an upper bound on the amount of random-walk noise in the SCIGN data since these data span enough time and the recent data have less flicker noise than the published solutions.

  14. GPS Separator HD

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Footage of the 70 degree ISOLDE GPS separator magnet MAG70 as well as the switchyard for the Central Mass and GLM (GPS Low Mass) and GHM (GPS High Mass) beamlines in the GPS separator zone. In the GPS20 vacuum sector equipment such as the long GPS scanner 482 / 483 unit, faraday cup FC 490, vacuum valves and wiregrid piston WG210 and WG475 and radiation monitors can also be seen. Also the RILIS laser guidance and trajectory can be seen, the GPS main beamgate switch box and the actual GLM, GHM and Central Beamline beamgates in the beamlines as well as the first electrostatic quadrupoles for the GPS lines. Close up of the GHM deflector plates motor and connections and the inspection glass at the GHM side of the switchyard.

  15. GPS Satellite Simulation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The GPS satellite simulation facility consists of a GPS satellite simulator controlled by either a Silicon Graphics Origin 2000 or PC depending upon unit under test...

  16. Animal models of surgically manipulated flow velocities to study shear stress-induced atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, Leah C; Hoogendoorn, Ayla; Xing, Ruoyu; Wentzel, Jolanda J; Van der Heiden, Kim

    2015-07-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial tree that develops at predisposed sites, coinciding with locations that are exposed to low or oscillating shear stress. Manipulating flow velocity, and concomitantly shear stress, has proven adequate to promote endothelial activation and subsequent plaque formation in animals. In this article, we will give an overview of the animal models that have been designed to study the causal relationship between shear stress and atherosclerosis by surgically manipulating blood flow velocity profiles. These surgically manipulated models include arteriovenous fistulas, vascular grafts, arterial ligation, and perivascular devices. We review these models of manipulated blood flow velocity from an engineering and biological perspective, focusing on the shear stress profiles they induce and the vascular pathology that is observed.

  17. a Dynamical Model with Next-Nearest Interaction in Relative Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhipeng; Liu, Yuncai; Liu, Fuqiang

    By introducing the velocity difference between the preceding car and the car before the preceding one into the optimal velocity model (OVM), we present an extended dynamical model which takes into account the next-nearest-neighbor interaction in relative velocity. The stability condition of this model is derived by considering a small perturbation around the uniform flow solution and the validity of our theoretical analysis is also confirmed by direct simulations. The analytic and simulation results indicate that traffic congestion is suppressed efficiently by incorporating the effect of new consideration. Moreover, the effect of the new consideration is investigated by numerical simulation. In particular, the jamming flow, the current-density relation, and the propagation speed of small disturbance are examined in detail by varying various values of the parameter.

  18. GPS-based microenvironment tracker (MicroTrac) model to estimate time–location of individuals for air pollution exposure assessments: Model evaluation in central North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Michael S.; Long, Thomas C.; Schultz, Bradley D.; Crooks, James; Breen, Miyuki; Langstaff, John E.; Isaacs, Kristin K.; Tan, Yu-Mei; Williams, Ronald W.; Cao, Ye; Geller, Andrew M.; Devlin, Robert B.; Batterman, Stuart A.; Buckley, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    A critical aspect of air pollution exposure assessment is the estimation of the time spent by individuals in various microenvironments (ME). Accounting for the time spent in different ME with different pollutant concentrations can reduce exposure misclassifications, while failure to do so can add uncertainty and bias to risk estimates. In this study, a classification model, called MicroTrac, was developed to estimate time of day and duration spent in eight ME (indoors and outdoors at home, work, school; inside vehicles; other locations) from global positioning system (GPS) data and geocoded building boundaries. Based on a panel study, MicroTrac estimates were compared with 24-h diary data from nine participants, with corresponding GPS data and building boundaries of home, school, and work. MicroTrac correctly classified the ME for 99.5% of the daily time spent by the participants. The capability of MicroTrac could help to reduce the time–location uncertainty in air pollution exposure models and exposure metrics for individuals in health studies. PMID:24619294

  19. Characteristics of seismogenic model of MW9.0 earthquake in Tohoku, Japan reflected by GPS data%GPS资料反映的日本东北MW9.0地震的孕震特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈光齐; 武艳强; 江在森; 刘晓霞; 赵静

    2013-01-01

    在对海洋板块俯冲型地震孕震模式的分阶段变形特征进行分析的基础上,结合同震位错反演结果分析了MW9.0级地震的同震变形特征,分析过程中通过精度检验讨论了该反演结果的可靠性.通过对震前和同震GPS结果的对比分析,讨论了二者的差异性.GPS应变(率)结果表明,震前日本岛应变积累主要反映了太平洋板块和菲律宾板块的俯冲作用,同震结果表现为指向震源方向拉张应变的释放,对日本岛的主要影响区域介于35°N和43°N之间.震前和同震GPS剖面结果反映的变形特征具有互补性,但量值相差上百倍.震前的GPS速度、应变率剖面和时间序列结果表明靠近日本岛东海岸一侧可能存在变形趋于极限现象.通过对此次地震可能前兆的分析表明,中长期预测方面、震前GPS时间序列的趋势性偏离、前震活动、震源区b值降低等现象在一定程度上反映了此次地震的孕震特征.%Based on the analysis of deformation characteristics in different stages of seismogenic model in oceanic plate subduction regions, we analyzed the coseismic deformation characteristics of MW9. 0 earthquake using the inversion result of coseismic dislocation, whose reliability has been analyzed before used. Then, we discussed the differences between longterm and coseismic deformation from GPS data. GPS strain (rate) illustrates that the strain accumulation reflects the seduction effects of Pacific and Philippine plate before this earthquake, while the result of coseismic event reflects tension strain release whose affecting region mainly located between 35°N and 43° N. The deformation features reflected by GPS profile before earthquake and coseismic event are complementary, though the value differs by hundreds of times. GPS velocity and strain rate profile and GPS time-series results showed that the deformation had possibly reached its limit on the east coast of Japan. Through analyzing the

  20. Geodetic model of the 2016 Central Italy earthquake sequence inferred from InSAR and GPS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheloni, Daniele

    2017-04-01

    On 24th August 2016, a Mw 6.0 earthquake struck a sector of the Apennines in Central Italy, causing extensive damage to the town of Amatrice and several surroundings villages, and killing about 300 inhabitants. The seismic sequence which followed was characterized by numerous aftershocks southeast and northwest of the main event, which decreased in frequency and magnitude until the end of October, when an event of magnitude Mw 5.9 occurred on 26th October about 25 km to the NW of the 24th August event, close to Visso village. In addition, few days later, on 30th October a third great shock of magnitude Mw 6.5, nucleated below the town of Norcia, hit an area encompassing the two previous main events. In order to infer the ground displacement field and to determine the source parameters of the causative faults associated with the three main events of the seismic sequence we exploit the InSAR and GPS coseismic measurements. In particular, we use SAR data acquired by the ALOS-2 (Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency), Sentinel-1 (European Space Agency) and COSMO-SkyMed (Italian Space Agency) satellites, from both ascending and descending orbits, and data from continuous and survey-mode GPS stations operating during the earthquake sequence. We show that our preferred model is consistent with the activation of at least four main coseismic asperities during the entire sequence, belonging to a SW-dipping normal fault system, the surface expression of which could be associated with the Mt. Gorzano-Mt. Vettore-Mt. Bove alignment. To better simulate the complex deformation pattern associated with the greatest event of the sequence (the 30th October Mw 6.5 Norcia earthquake), additional slip is required by secondary anti- and synthetic faults in the hanging-wall of the main fault, and by a further SW-dipping low-angle fault plane. Finally, we compare the latter retrieved geodetic source with the known geological structures of the Central Apennines; this result may suggest a

  1. GPS Control Segment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-29

    Luke J. Schaub Chief, GPS Control Segment Division 29 Apr 15 GPS Control Segment Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188...00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE GPS Control Segment 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...Center, GPS Control Segment Division,Los Angeles AFB, El Segundo,CA,90245 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S

  2. A 1D P-wave velocity model of the Gargano promontory (south-eastern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lorenzo, Salvatore; Michele, Maddalena; Emolo, Antonio; Tallarico, Andrea

    2017-07-01

    We investigate the elastic properties of the crust in the Gargano promontory, located in the northern part of the Apulia region (Southeastern Italy). Starting on April, 2013, a local-scale seismic network, composed of 12 short-period (1 Hz) seismic stations, was deployed on the Gargano promontory. Starting on October, 2013, the network was integrated with the recordings of nine seismic stations managed by the Italian Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology (INGV). The network recorded more than 1200 seismic events in about 15 months of data acquisition, with more than 700 small magnitude events localized in the Gargano promontory and surrounding areas. A Wadati-modified method allowed us to infer VP/VS = 1.73 for the area. A subset of about 400 events having a relatively smaller azimuthal gap (inversion code. The preferred model was obtained from the average of ten velocity models, each of them representing the inversion result from given initial velocity models, calibrated on previous geological and geophysical studies in the area. The results obtained under the assumption that VP could decrease with depth are unstable, with very different depths of the top of low-velocity layers. Therefore, the velocity model was obtained from the average of the results obtained under the assumption that VP cannot decrease with depth. A strong reduction of both RMS (about 58%) and errors on the location of the events was obtained with respect to the starting model. The final velocity model shows a strong velocity gradient in the upper 5 km of the crust and a small increase (from 6.7 to 7 km) at 30 km of depth. The epicenters of relocated events do not show clear correlations with the surface projection of known seismic faults. A cluster of the epicenters of the relocated events intersects almost perpendicularly the Candelaro fault trace at the surface.

  3. GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM (GPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celalettin Karaali

    1996-02-01

    Full Text Available Use of GPS is becoming more widespread on surveying engineering. Especially, preference to GPS is increased by getting accuracy of order of milimeter, making observation on every weather forecast, without requiring intervisibility between station. Besides, developing new observation techniques and technologies in GPS increased its use in deformation easurements, monitoring crustal movements, mapping precise geoid maps, detail surveying, etc.

  4. A Model for the Calculation of Velocity Reduction Behind A Plane Fishing Net

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUI Fu-kun; LI Yu-cheng; ZHAO Yun-peng; DONG Guo-hai

    2006-01-01

    A model for the calculation of velocity reduction behind a fishing net is proposed in this paper. Comparisons are made between the calculated results and experimental data. It is shown that by the application of the effective adjacent area coefficient of fluid flowing around a solid structure to the fishing net, the calculated results agree well with the experimental data. The model proposed in this paper can also be applied to the analysis of the velocity reduction within a fishing cage and can be introduced into the numerical simulation of the hydrodynamic behavior of fishing cages for the improvement of computational accuracy.

  5. Finite-Source Inversion for the 2004 Parkfield Earthquake using 3D Velocity Model Green's Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, A.; Dreger, D.; Larsen, S.

    2008-12-01

    We determine finite fault models of the 2004 Parkfield earthquake using 3D Green's functions. Because of the dense station coverage and detailed 3D velocity structure model in this region, this earthquake provides an excellent opportunity to examine how the 3D velocity structure affects the finite fault inverse solutions. Various studies (e.g. Michaels and Eberhart-Phillips, 1991; Thurber et al., 2006) indicate that there is a pronounced velocity contrast across the San Andreas Fault along the Parkfield segment. Also the fault zone at Parkfield is wide as evidenced by mapped surface faults and where surface slip and creep occurred in the 1966 and the 2004 Parkfield earthquakes. For high resolution images of the rupture process"Ait is necessary to include the accurate 3D velocity structure for the finite source inversion. Liu and Aurchuleta (2004) performed finite fault inversions using both 1D and 3D Green's functions for 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake using the same source paramerization and data but different Green's functions and found that the models were quite different. This indicates that the choice of the velocity model significantly affects the waveform modeling at near-fault stations. In this study, we used the P-wave velocity model developed by Thurber et al (2006) to construct the 3D Green's functions. P-wave speeds are converted to S-wave speeds and density using by the empirical relationships of Brocher (2005). Using a finite difference method, E3D (Larsen and Schultz, 1995), we computed the 3D Green's functions numerically by inserting body forces at each station. Using reciprocity, these Green's functions are recombined to represent the ground motion at each station due to the slip on the fault plane. First we modeled the waveforms of small earthquakes to validate the 3D velocity model and the reciprocity of the Green"fs function. In the numerical tests we found that the 3D velocity model predicted the individual phases well at frequencies lower than 0

  6. NASA's GPS tracking system for Aristoteles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, E. S.; Hajj, G.; Kursinski, E. R.; Kyriacou, C.; Meehan, T. K.; Melbourne, William G.; Neilan, R. E.; Young, L. E.; Yunck, Thomas P.

    1991-12-01

    NASA 's Global Positioning System (GPS) tracking system for Artistoteles receivers and a GPS flight receiver aboard Aristoteles is described. It will include a global network of GPS ground receivers and a GPS flight receiver aboard Aristoteles. The flight receiver will operate autonomously; it will provide real time navigation solutions for Aristoteles and tracking data needed by ESOC for operational control of the satellite. The GPS flight and ground receivers will currently and continuously track all visible GPS satellites. These observations will yield high accuracy differential positions and velocities of Aristoteles in a terrestrial frame defined by the locations of the globally distributed ground work. The precise orbits and tracking data will be made available to science investigators as part of the geophysical data record. The characteristics of the GPS receivers, both flight and ground based, that NASA will be using to support Aristoteles are described. The operational aspects of the overall tracking system, including the data functions and the resulting data products are summarized. The expected performance of the tracking system is compared to Aristoteles requirements and the need to control key error sources such as multipath is identified.

  7. Current Arabian Plate Motion From Campaign GPS Measurements in Saudi Arabia: Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almuslmani, B.; Teferle, F. N.; Bingley, R. M.; Moore, T.

    2007-12-01

    Current investigations of the motions of the Arabian and its neighboring plates are primarily based on GPS measurements obtained in the surrounding areas of the Arabian plate, with few stations actually located on the Arabian plate itself in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. In order to advance the knowledge of the dynamics of the Arabian plate and its intra-plate deformations, the General Directorate of Military Survey (GDMS), through collaboration with the Institute of Engineering Surveying and Space Geodesy (IESSG), densified the GPS network in Saudi Arabia, covering nearly two thirds of the tectonic plate. Since July 2002, a network of 32 GPS stations has been established at locations of the Saudi Arabia geodetic network. At all of these GPS stations a concrete pillar has been used as the monument and the locations have been selected in order to give the broadest distribution of observing sites. During 2005, 27 additional GPS stations in the Hejaz and Asser Mountains, and the Farasan Islands, all in south-western Saudi Arabia, have been established, for which the past and future campaign GPS measurements will provide valuable data for investigations of crustal deformations close to the plate boundaries between the Nubia, Somalian and Arabian plates. In this presentation we will show results in the form of velocity field and plate motion estimates based on data from at least three campaigns occupying the initial 32 GDMS GPS network stations, but also from a number of IGS stations in the region. Our reference frame is aligned to ITRF2005 and uses approximately 40 IGS reference frame stations located on all major tectonic plates, e.g. Nubia and Somalia, surrounding the Arabian plate. Furthermore, we apply absolute satellite and receiver antenna phase center models together with newly available GPS products from a recent global re-processing effort.

  8. GPS observations of coseismic deformation following the 2016, August 24, Mw 6 Amatrice earthquake (central Italy: data, analysis and preliminary fault model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Cheloni

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We used continuous Global Positioning System (GPS measurements to infer the fault geometry and the amount of coseismic slip associated to the August 24, 2016 Mw 6 Amatrice earthquake. We realized a three dimensional coseismic displacement field by combining different geodetic solutions generated by three independent analyses of the raw GPS observations. The coseismic deformation field described in this work aims at representing a consensus solution that minimizes the systematic biases potentially present in the individual geodetic solutions. Because of the limited number of stations available we modeled the measured coseismic displacements using a uniform slip model, deriving the geometry and kinematics of the causative fault, finding good agreement between our geodetically derived fault plane and other seismological and geological observations.

  9. Joint probability density function modeling of velocity and scalar in turbulence with unstructured grids

    CERN Document Server

    Bakosi, J; Boybeyi, Z

    2010-01-01

    In probability density function (PDF) methods a transport equation is solved numerically to compute the time and space dependent probability distribution of several flow variables in a turbulent flow. The joint PDF of the velocity components contains information on all one-point one-time statistics of the turbulent velocity field, including the mean, the Reynolds stresses and higher-order statistics. We developed a series of numerical algorithms to model the joint PDF of turbulent velocity, frequency and scalar compositions for high-Reynolds-number incompressible flows in complex geometries using unstructured grids. Advection, viscous diffusion and chemical reaction appear in closed form in the PDF formulation, thus require no closure hypotheses. The generalized Langevin model (GLM) is combined with an elliptic relaxation technique to represent the non-local effect of walls on the pressure redistribution and anisotropic dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy. The governing system of equations is solved fully...

  10. Refining the 3D seismic velocity and attenuation models for Katmai National Park, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, R. A.; Thurber, C. H.; Prejean, S. G.

    2009-12-01

    We invert data from approximately 4,000 local earthquakes occurring between September 2004 and August 2009 to determine the 3D P-wave velocity and P-wave attenuation structures in the Katmai volcanic region. Arrival information and waveforms for the study come from the Alaska Volcano Observatory’s permanent network of 20 seismometers in the area, which are predominantly single-component, short period instruments. The absolute and relative arrival times are used in a double-difference seismic tomography inversion to solve for an improved velocity model for the main volcanic centers. We use the resulting 3D velocity model to relocate all catalog earthquakes in Katmai between January 1996 and August 2009. Inversions for the quality factor Q are completed using a spectral decay approach to determine source parameters, t*, and site response with a nonlinear inversion. Using the final 3D velocity model to define the ray paths, t* values are then inverted to determine frequency-independent Q models. The final models developed through these inversions reveal a low velocity and low Q zone from the surface to ~7 km depth centered on the volcanic axis and extending ~25 km between Martin and Katmai volcanoes. The relocated hypocenters provide insight into the geometry of seismogenic structures in the area, revealing clustering of events into four distinct zones associated with Martin, Mageik, Trident, and Katmai. While the Martin, Mageik, and Katmai clusters are all at 3-4 km depth, the Trident cluster is slightly deeper at 4-6 km. Many new features are apparent within these clusters, including a strand of earthquakes trending NE-SW between the main Martin and Mageik clusters. Smaller linear features are also visible in the Katmai cluster along with a small migrating swarm which occurred NW of the Katmai caldera during mid-2006. Data from an array of 11 three-component broadband instruments currently deployed in the area between Mageik volcano and Katmai caldera will be

  11. GPS Scintillation Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Rev. 2-89) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-1 298-102 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION 1 2. GPS COMPARISON WITH ALL-SKY IMAGES OVER AGUA VERDE...Depletions from 1 October 1994 2 3. GPS data from Agua Verde, Chile on the night of 1 October 1994 3 4. PL-SCINDA display of GPS ionospheric...comparison of GPS measurements with GOES8 L-band scintillation data, are discussed. 2. GPS COMPARISON WITH ALL-SKY IMAGES OVER AGUA VERDE, CHILE As

  12. GPS Control Segment Improvements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-29

    Systems Center GPS Control Segment Improvements Mr. Tim McIntyre GPS Product Support Manager GPS Ops Support and Sustainment Division Peterson...DATE 29 APR 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE GPS Control Segment Improvements 5a. CONTRACT...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Air Force Space Command,Space and Missile Systems Center, GPS Ops Support and Sustainment Division,Peterson AFB,CO,80916 8

  13. Broadband Waveform Modeling to Evaluate the USGS Seismic Velocity Model for the San Francisco Bay Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, A.; Petersson, A.; Nilsson, S.; Sjogreen, B.; McCandless, K.

    2006-12-01

    As part of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake centenary, the USGS developed a three-dimensional seismic velocity and attenuation model for Northern California based on detailed geologic and geophysical constraints. The model was used to predict ground motions for the 1906 rupture. In this study we evaluate the model to assess its ability to accurately predict ground motions from moderate earthquakes recorded on broadband stations. Satisfactory prediction of ground motions from these events will provide hope for accurate modeling of future scenario earthquakes. Simulations were performed on large parallel computer(s) with a new elastic finite difference code developed at LLNL. We simulated broadband ground motions (0-0.25 Hz) for several moderate (magnitude 3.5-5.0) earthquakes in the region observed at Berkeley Digital Seismic Network (BDSN) broadband stations. These events are well located and can be modeled with simple point moment tensor sources (taken from the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory catalog), helping to isolate the effects of structure on the waveforms. These data sample the region's diverse tectonic structures, such as the bay muds, sedimentary basins and hard rock complexes. Preliminary results indicate that the simulations reproduce many important features in the data. For example, observed long duration surface waves are often predicted for complex paths (traveling across contrasting structures) and through sedimentary basins. Excellent waveform fits were frequently obtained for long-period comparisons (0.02-0.1) and good fits were often obtained for shorter periods. We will attempt higher frequency simulations to test the ability of the model to match the high frequency response. Finally, we performed large scenario earthquake simulations for the Hayward Fault. These simulations predict large amplifications across the Santa Clara and San Ramon/Livermore Valley sedimentary basins and with the Sacramento/San Joaquin River Delta.

  14. An improved car-following model with multiple preceding cars' velocity fluctuation feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lantian; Zhao, Xiangmo; Yu, Shaowei; Li, Xiuhai; Shi, Zhongke

    2017-04-01

    In order to explore and evaluate the effects of velocity variation trend of multiple preceding cars used in the Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control (CACC) strategy on the dynamic characteristic, fuel economy and emission of the corresponding traffic flow, we conduct a study as follows: firstly, with the real-time car-following (CF) data, the close relationship between multiple preceding cars' velocity fluctuation feedback and the host car's behaviors is explored, the evaluation results clearly show that multiple preceding cars' velocity fluctuation with different time window-width are highly correlated to the host car's acceleration/deceleration. Then, a microscopic traffic flow model is proposed to evaluate the effects of multiple preceding cars' velocity fluctuation feedback in the CACC strategy on the traffic flow evolution process. Finally, numerical simulations on fuel economy and exhaust emission of the traffic flow are also implemented by utilizing VT-micro model. Simulation results prove that considering multiple preceding cars' velocity fluctuation feedback in the control strategy of the CACC system can improve roadway traffic mobility, fuel economy and exhaust emission performance.

  15. Microthrix parvicella abundance associates with activated sludge settling velocity and rheology - Quantifying and modelling filamentous bulking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wágner, Dorottya S; Ramin, Elham; Szabo, Peter; Dechesne, Arnaud; Plósz, Benedek Gy

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this work is to identify relevant settling velocity and rheology model parameters and to assess the underlying filamentous microbial community characteristics that can influence the solids mixing and transport in secondary settling tanks. Parameter values for hindered, transient and compression settling velocity functions were estimated by carrying out biweekly batch settling tests using a novel column setup through a four-month long measurement campaign. To estimate viscosity model parameters, rheological experiments were carried out on the same sludge sample using a rotational viscometer. Quantitative fluorescence in-situ hybridisation (qFISH) analysis, targeting Microthrix parvicella and phylum Chloroflexi, was used. This study finds that M. parvicella - predominantly residing inside the microbial flocs in our samples - can significantly influence secondary settling through altering the hindered settling velocity and yield stress parameter. Strikingly, this is not the case for Chloroflexi, occurring in more than double the abundance of M. parvicella, and forming filaments primarily protruding from the flocs. The transient and compression settling parameters show a comparably high variability, and no significant association with filamentous abundance. A two-dimensional, axi-symmetrical computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was used to assess calibration scenarios to model filamentous bulking. Our results suggest that model predictions can significantly benefit from explicitly accounting for filamentous bulking by calibrating the hindered settling velocity function. Furthermore, accounting for the transient and compression settling velocity in the computational domain is crucial to improve model accuracy when modelling filamentous bulking. However, the case-specific calibration of transient and compression settling parameters as well as yield stress is not necessary, and an average parameter set - obtained under bulking and good settling

  16. Comparison of tropospheric integrated water vapor content by using GPS, radiosonde, radiometer data and models for the tropical Island of Tahiti (French Polynesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, J.; Barriot, J.; Fadil, A.; Sichoix, L.

    2011-12-01

    The integrated precipitable water (IPW) in the troposphere can be subject to strong spatial and temporal variations, in particular over tropical zones. The IPW is estimated at the Geodetic Tahiti Observatory site from GPS, radiosonde, radiometer measurements. 8 years (2001-2008) of GPS observations at the IGS THTI station are processed with the GIPSY-OASIS II software package following the precise point positioning (PPP) mode. We compare the IPW of the permanent GPS data with those derived from the collocated radiometer and radiosonde data. The Global Forecast System (GFS) model which covers the entire globe with one degree latitude and longitude grid spacing, is then used to obtain the IPW at the same site. The meteorological surface data (pressure, temperature and relative humidity) also help to compute the IPW by using the Saastamoinen model. Finally, the analysis of the correlation between all these IPW estimates leads us to re-adjust the Saastamoinen parameters such that correction coefficients now better constrain the tropospheric model.

  17. On the assimilation of ice velocity and concentration data into large-scale sea ice models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Dulière

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Data assimilation into sea ice models designed for climate studies has started about 15 years ago. In most of the studies conducted so far, it is assumed that the improvement brought by the assimilation is straightforward. However, some studies suggest this might not be true. In order to elucidate this question and to find an appropriate way to further assimilate sea ice concentration and velocity observations into a global sea ice-ocean model, we analyze here results from a number of twin experiments (i.e. experiments in which the assimilated data are model outputs carried out with a simplified model of the Arctic sea ice pack. Our objective is to determine to what degree the assimilation of ice velocity and/or concentration data improves the global performance of the model and, more specifically, reduces the error in the computed ice thickness. A simple optimal interpolation scheme is used, and outputs from a control run and from perturbed experiments without and with data assimilation are thoroughly compared. Our results indicate that, under certain conditions depending on the assimilation weights and the type of model error, the assimilation of ice velocity data enhances the model performance. The assimilation of ice concentration data can also help in improving the model behavior, but it has to be handled with care because of the strong connection between ice concentration and ice thickness.

    This study is preliminary study towards real observation data assimilation into NEMOLIM, a global sea ice-ocean model.

  18. Comparison of Selected Geopotential Models in Terms of the GOCE Orbit Determination Using Simulated GPS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobojć, Andrzej

    2016-12-01

    This work contains a comparative study of the performance of six geopotential models in an orbit estimation process of the satellite of the Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) mission. For testing, such models as ULUX_CHAMP2013S, ITG-GRACE 2010S, EIGEN-51C, EIGEN5S, EGM2008, EGM96, were adopted. Different sets of pseudo-range simulations along reference GOCE satellite orbital arcs were obtained using real orbits of the Global Positioning System satellites. These sets were the basic observation data used in the adjustment. The centimeter-accuracy Precise Science Orbit (PSO) for the GOCE satellite provided by the European Space Agency (ESA) was adopted as the GOCE reference orbit. Comparing various variants of the orbital solutions, the relative accuracy of geopotential models in an orbital aspect is determined. Full geopotential models were used in the adjustment process. The solutions were also determined taking into account truncated geopotential models. In such case, an accuracy of the solutions was slightly enhanced. Different arc lengths were taken for the computation.

  19. The covariance of GPS coordinates and frames

    CERN Document Server

    Lachièze-Rey, M

    2006-01-01

    We explore, in the general relativistic context, the properties of the recently introduced GPS coordinates, as well as those of the associated frames and coframes. We show that they are covariant, and completely independent of any observer. We show that standard spectroscopic and astrometric observations allow any observer to measure (i) the values of the GPS coordinates at his position, (ii) the components of his [four-]velocity and (iii) the components of the metric in the GPS frame. This provides to this system an unique value both for conceptual discussion (no frame dependence) and for practical use (involved quantities are directly measurable): localisation, motion monitoring, astrometry, cosmography, tests of gravitation theories. We show explicitly, in the general relativistic context, how an observer may estimate its position and motion, and reconstruct the components of the metric. This arises from two main results: the extension of the velocity fields of the probes to the whole (curved) spacetime; a...

  20. GPS Modernization Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    space vehicles currently set healthy • 6 GPS IIA, 12 GPS IIR , 7 GPS IIR -M, 5 GPS IIF – 5 additional satellites in residual status, 1 in test status...Advisory Board Final.pptx S P A C E A N D M I S S I L E S Y S T E M S C E N T E R Legacy GPS IIA/ IIR • Single Frequency (L1) • Coarse...acquisition (C/A) code • Y-Code (L1Y & L2Y) GPS IIR -M • 2nd Civil Signal (L2C) • M-Code (L1M & L2M) GPS IIF • 3rd civil signal (L5) • 2 Rb + 1 Cs

  1. A RLS-SVM Aided Fusion Methodology for INS during GPS Outages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yiqing; Xu, Xiaosu

    2017-01-01

    In order to maintain a relatively high accuracy of navigation performance during global positioning system (GPS) outages, a novel robust least squares support vector machine (LS-SVM)-aided fusion methodology is explored to provide the pseudo-GPS position information for the inertial navigation system (INS). The relationship between the yaw, specific force, velocity, and the position increment is modeled. Rather than share the same weight in the traditional LS-SVM, the proposed algorithm allocates various weights for different data, which makes the system immune to the outliers. Field test data was collected to evaluate the proposed algorithm. The comparison results indicate that the proposed algorithm can effectively provide position corrections for standalone INS during the 300 s GPS outage, which outperforms the traditional LS-SVM method. Historical information is also involved to better represent the vehicle dynamics. PMID:28245549

  2. Deformation Study of Papandayan Volcano using GPS Survey Method and Its Correlation with Seismic Data Observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina A. Sarsito

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Papandayan volcano located in the southern part of Garut regency, around 70 km away from Bandung city, West Java. Many methods carried out to monitoring the activities of volcano, both continuously or periodically, one of the monitoring method is periodically GPS survey. Basically those surveys are carried out to understand the pattern and velocity of displacement which occurred in the volcano body, both horizontally and vertically, and also others deformation elements such as; translation, rotation and dilatation. The Mogi modeling was also used to determine the location and volume of the pressure source which caused deformation of volcano body. By comparing seismic activity and the deformation reveal from GPS measurement, before, during and after eruption, it could be understood there is a correlation between the seismicity and its deformation. These studies is hoping that GPS measurement in Papandayan volcano could be one of supported method to determine the volcano activities, at least in Papandayan volcano.

  3. A RLS-SVM Aided Fusion Methodology for INS during GPS Outages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yiqing; Xu, Xiaosu

    2017-02-24

    In order to maintain a relatively high accuracy of navigation performance during global positioning system (GPS) outages, a novel robust least squares support vector machine (LS-SVM)-aided fusion methodology is explored to provide the pseudo-GPS position information for the inertial navigation system (INS). The relationship between the yaw, specific force, velocity, and the position increment is modeled. Rather than share the same weight in the traditional LS-SVM, the proposed algorithm allocates various weights for different data, which makes the system immune to the outliers. Field test data was collected to evaluate the proposed algorithm. The comparison results indicate that the proposed algorithm can effectively provide position corrections for standalone INS during the 300 s GPS outage, which outperforms the traditional LS-SVM method. Historical information is also involved to better represent the vehicle dynamics.

  4. A RLS-SVM Aided Fusion Methodology for INS during GPS Outages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiqing Yao

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to maintain a relatively high accuracy of navigation performance during global positioning system (GPS outages, a novel robust least squares support vector machine (LS-SVM-aided fusion methodology is explored to provide the pseudo-GPS position information for the inertial navigation system (INS. The relationship between the yaw, specific force, velocity, and the position increment is modeled. Rather than share the same weight in the traditional LS-SVM, the proposed algorithm allocates various weights for different data, which makes the system immune to the outliers. Field test data was collected to evaluate the proposed algorithm. The comparison results indicate that the proposed algorithm can effectively provide position corrections for standalone INS during the 300 s GPS outage, which outperforms the traditional LS-SVM method. Historical information is also involved to better represent the vehicle dynamics.

  5. Car-following model with relative-velocity effect and its experimental verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamoto, Daisuke; Tomoeda, Akiyasu; Nishi, Ryosuke; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2011-04-01

    In driving a vehicle, drivers respond to the changes of both the headway and the relative velocity to the vehicle in front. In this paper a new car-following model including these maneuvers is proposed. The acceleration of the model becomes infinite (has a singularity) when the distance between two vehicles is zero, and the asymmetry between the acceleration and the deceleration is incorporated in a nonlinear way. The model is simple but contains enough features of driving for reproducing real vehicle traffic. From the linear stability analysis, we confirm that the model shows the metastable homogeneous flow around the critical density, beyond which a traffic jam emerges. Moreover, we perform experiments to verify this model. From the data it is shown that the acceleration of a vehicle has a positive correlation with the relative velocity.

  6. Comparison of Models for GPS Kinematic Data Processing%GPS动态定位数据处理模型的比较研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘立龙; 文鸿雁; 刘斌

    2008-01-01

    The characteristics of three GPS kinematic data processing models, Least Squares (LS), Kalman filtering and H ∞ filtering are discussed and their advantages and disadvantages are compared. With observational data and pertinent data processing software, the applicable condition, context and effect of the three models are experimented. Results show that when the mobile platform is in uniform motion, the accuracy of the three models are almost equal; when the mobile platform is in stochastic acceleration, the accuracy of H∞ filtering model is superior to that of LS, while that of Kalman filtering is the worst.

  7. Spectral sensitivity analysis of FWI in a constant-gradient background velocity model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kazei, V.; Kashtan, B.M.; Troyan, V.N.; Mulder, W.A.

    2013-01-01

    Full waveform inversion suffers from local minima, due to a lack of low frequencies in the data. A reflector below the zone of interest may help in recovering the long-wavelength components of a velocity perturbation, as demonstrated in a paper by Mora. Because smooth models are more popular as init

  8. Inertialess Velocity Change and a Two Particle Model of the Photon

    OpenAIRE

    David L. Spencer

    2017-01-01

    Building on the idea presented earlier that the gravitational fields outside of basic particles are those particles’ inertia and that acceleration results only from inertial field imbalances, inertialess velocity changes may result when motivation for motion arises from within basic particles. A two particle model of the photon shows how this might work

  9. Models for Gas Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Inferred from Hydraulic Permeability and Elastic Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung W.

    2008-01-01

    Elastic velocities and hydraulic permeability of gas hydrate-bearing sediments strongly depend on how gas hydrate accumulates in pore spaces and various gas hydrate accumulation models are proposed to predict physical property changes due to gas hydrate concentrations. Elastic velocities and permeability predicted from a cementation model differ noticeably from those from a pore-filling model. A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) log provides in-situ water-filled porosity and hydraulic permeability of gas hydrate-bearing sediments. To test the two competing models, the NMR log along with conventional logs such as velocity and resistivity logs acquired at the Mallik 5L-38 well, Mackenzie Delta, Canada, were analyzed. When the clay content is less than about 12 percent, the NMR porosity is 'accurate' and the gas hydrate concentrations from the NMR log are comparable to those estimated from an electrical resistivity log. The variation of elastic velocities and relative permeability with respect to the gas hydrate concentration indicates that the dominant effect of gas hydrate in the pore space is the pore-filling characteristic.

  10. Modeling the spatiotemporal organization of velocity storage in the vestibuloocular reflex by optokinetic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphan, T.; Sturm, D.; Cohen, B. (Principal Investigator)

    1991-01-01

    1. A generalized three-dimensional state space model of visual vestibular interaction was developed. Matrix and dynamical system operators associated with inputs from the semicircular canals, otolith velocity estimator, and the visual system have been incorporated into the model, which focus on their relationship to the velocity storage integrator. 2. A relationship was postulated between the eigenvalues and the direction of the eigenvectors of the system matrix and the orientation of the spatial vertical. It was assumed that the system matrix for a tilted position was a composition of two linear transformations of the system matrix for the upright position. One transformation modifies the eigenvalues of the system matrix, whereas another rotates the eigenvectors of the system matrix. The pitch and roll eigenvectors rotate with the head, whereas the yaw axis eigenvector remains approximately spatially invariant. 3. Based on the three-dimensional model, a computational procedure was formulated to identify the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the system matrix with the use of a modification of the marquardt algorithm. With the use of data obtained from a monkey, it was shown that the three-dimensional behavior of velocity storage cannot be predicted solely in terms of its time constants, i.e., the inverse of its eigenvalues. With the use of the same eigenvalues the data could either be fit or not fit, depending on the eigenvector directions. Therefore, it is necessary to specify eigenvector directions when characterizing velocity storage in three dimensions. 4. Parameters found with the use of the Marquardt algorithm were incorporated into the model. Diagonal matrices in a head coordinate frame were introduced for coupling the visual system to the integrator and to the direct optokinetic pathway. Simulations of optokinetic nystagmus (OKN) and optokinetic after-nystagmus (OKAN) were run. The model predicted the behavior of yaw and pitch OKN and OKAN when the animal is

  11. Horses for Courses: Designing a GPS Tracking Data Collection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinau, Kristian Hegner; Harder, Henrik; Overgård, Christian Hansen

    2014-01-01

    phases of a GPS tracking data collection and the choices that have to be made in each phase. Thereafter, the authors show how this model can be applied in practice in a case study. The V-model is the first model that systematically combines methodological insights from the literature on GPS tracking...... and practical experiences from a number of GPS tracking projects into a practical guideline. Researchers can use this model as a starting point when designing a GPS tracking data collection. The authors hope that the model can constitute a first step towards the development of best practice.......During the last decade, GPS tracking has become a key technology for data collection. In this chapter, the authors develop a practice-ready guideline for how to design and conduct GPS tracking investigations. They do so by first developing a V-model for GPS tracking, which describes the different...

  12. Collapse Velocity and Prompt Explosion for the Presupernova Model Ws15M⊙

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Quan Luo; Men-Quan Liu; Qiu-He Peng; Zuo-Heng Xie

    2006-01-01

    For the presupernova model Ws15M⊙, we re-calculate the electron capture (EC) timescale and hydrodynamical (HD) timescale. We found that the EC timescale can be smaller than the HD timescale in the inner region of the collapse iron core at the moment immediately before the shock wave bounce. The change in these two timescales at the late stage of core collapse is expected to affect the collapse velocity. If the late-time collapse velocity is artificially increased by a small quantity, then prompt explosion of the supernova may happen. Further calculations are still needed to check the plausibility of the acceleration mechanism caused by the faster EC process.

  13. The covariance of GPS coordinates and frames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lachieze-Rey, Marc [CNRS APC, UMR 7164 Service d' Astrophysique, CE Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France)

    2006-05-21

    We explore, in the general relativistic context, the properties of the recently introduced global positioning system (GPS) coordinates, as well as those of the associated frames and coframes that they define. We show that they are covariant and completely independent of any observer. We show that standard spectroscopic and astrometric observations allow any observer to measure (i) the values of the GPS coordinates at his position (ii) the components of his 4-velocity and (iii) the components of the metric in the GPS frame. This provides this system with a unique value both for conceptual discussion (no frame dependence) and for practical use (involved quantities are directly measurable): localization, motion monitoring, astrometry, cosmography and tests of gravitation theories. We show explicitly, in the general relativistic context, how an observer may estimate his position and motion, and reconstruct the components of the metric. This arises from two main results: the extension of the velocity fields of the probes to the whole (curved) spacetime, and the identification of the components of the observer's velocity in the GPS frame with the (inversed) observed redshifts of the probes. Specific cases (non-relativistic velocities, Minkowski and Friedmann-Lemaitre spacetimes, geodesic motions) are studied in detail.

  14. Modelling of two-phase flow based on separation of the flow according to velocity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narumo, T. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Nuclear Energy

    1997-12-31

    The thesis concentrates on the development work of a physical one-dimensional two-fluid model that is based on Separation of the Flow According to Velocity (SFAV). The conventional way to model one-dimensional two-phase flow is to derive conservation equations for mass, momentum and energy over the regions occupied by the phases. In the SFAV approach, the two-phase mixture is divided into two subflows, with as distinct average velocities as possible, and momentum conservation equations are derived over their domains. Mass and energy conservation are treated equally with the conventional model because they are distributed very accurately according to the phases, but momentum fluctuations follow better the flow velocity. Submodels for non-uniform transverse profile of velocity and density, slip between the phases within each subflow and turbulence between the subflows have been derived. The model system is hyperbolic in any sensible flow conditions over the whole range of void fraction. Thus, it can be solved with accurate numerical methods utilizing the characteristics. The characteristics agree well with the used experimental data on two-phase flow wave phenomena Furthermore, the characteristics of the SFAV model are as well in accordance with their physical counterparts as of the best virtual-mass models that are typically optimized for special flow regimes like bubbly flow. The SFAV model has proved to be applicable in describing two-phase flow physically correctly because both the dynamics and steady-state behaviour of the model has been considered and found to agree well with experimental data This makes the SFAV model especially suitable for the calculation of fast transients, taking place in versatile form e.g. in nuclear reactors. 45 refs. The thesis includes also five previous publications by author.

  15. Upper mantle SH velocity structure beneath Qiangtang Terrane by modeling triplicated phases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG RuiQing; WU QingJu; LI YongHua; ZENG RongSheng

    2008-01-01

    We constrain SH wave velocity structure for the upper mantle beneath western Qiangtang Terrane by comparing regional distance seismic triplicated waveforms with synthetic seismograms, based on an intermediate event (~220 km) recorded by the INDEPTH-Ⅲ seismic array. The ATIP model reveals a low-velocity anomaly with up to -4% variation at the depth of 190--270 km and a relatively small ve-locity gradient above the depth of 410 km in the upper mantle, which is in agreement with previous results. In combination with other geological studies, we suggest that the depth of top asthenosphere is 190 km and no large-scale lithosphere thinning occurs in western Qiangtang Terrane, besides, Qiangtang Terrane has the same kind of upper mantle structure as the stable Eurasia.

  16. A critical examination of the maximum velocity of shortening used in simulation models of human movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domire, Zachary J; Challis, John H

    2010-12-01

    The maximum velocity of shortening of a muscle is an important parameter in musculoskeletal models. The most commonly used values are derived from animal studies; however, these values are well above the values that have been reported for human muscle. The purpose of this study was to examine the sensitivity of simulations of maximum vertical jumping performance to the parameters describing the force-velocity properties of muscle. Simulations performed with parameters derived from animal studies were similar to measured jump heights from previous experimental studies. While simulations performed with parameters derived from human muscle were much lower than previously measured jump heights. If current measurements of maximum shortening velocity in human muscle are correct, a compensating error must exist. Of the possible compensating errors that could produce this discrepancy, it was concluded that reduced muscle fibre excursion is the most likely candidate.

  17. Angular velocity estimation based on star vector with improved current statistical model Kalman filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Niu, Yanxiong; Lu, Jiazhen; Zhang, He

    2016-11-20

    Angular velocity information is a requisite for a spacecraft guidance, navigation, and control system. In this paper, an approach for angular velocity estimation based merely on star vector measurement with an improved current statistical model Kalman filter is proposed. High-precision angular velocity estimation can be achieved under dynamic conditions. The amount of calculation is also reduced compared to a Kalman filter. Different trajectories are simulated to test this approach, and experiments with real starry sky observation are implemented for further confirmation. The estimation accuracy is proved to be better than 10-4  rad/s under various conditions. Both the simulation and the experiment demonstrate that the described approach is effective and shows an excellent performance under both static and dynamic conditions.

  18. UCVM: An Open Source Software Package for Querying and Visualizing 3D Velocity Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, D.; Small, P.; Maechling, P. J.; Jordan, T. H.; Shaw, J. H.; Plesch, A.; Chen, P.; Lee, E. J.; Taborda, R.; Olsen, K. B.; Callaghan, S.

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) seismic velocity models provide foundational data for ground motion simulations that calculate the propagation of earthquake waves through the Earth. The Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) has developed the Unified Community Velocity Model (UCVM) package for both Linux and OS X. This unique framework provides a cohesive way for querying and visualizing 3D models. UCVM v14.3.0, supports many Southern California velocity models including CVM-S4, CVM-H 11.9.1, and CVM-S4.26. The last model was derived from 26 full-3D tomographic iterations on CVM-S4. Recently, UCVM has been used to deliver a prototype of a new 3D model of central California (CCA) also based on full-3D tomographic inversions. UCVM was used to provide initial plots of this model and will be used to deliver CCA to users when the model is publicly released. Visualizing models is also possible with UCVM. Integrated within the platform are plotting utilities that can generate 2D cross-sections, horizontal slices, and basin depth maps. UCVM can also export models in NetCDF format for easy import into IDV and ParaView. UCVM has also been prototyped to export models that are compatible with IRIS' new Earth Model Collaboration (EMC) visualization utility. This capability allows for user-specified horizontal slices and cross-sections to be plotted in the same 3D Earth space. UCVM was designed to help a wide variety of researchers. It is currently being use to generate velocity meshes for many SCEC wave propagation codes, including AWP-ODC-SGT and Hercules. It is also used to provide the initial input to SCEC's CyberShake platform. For those interested in specific data points, the software framework makes it easy to extract P and S wave propagation speeds and other material properties from 3D velocity models by providing a common interface through which researchers can query earth models for a given location and depth. Also included in the last release was the ability to add small

  19. A Complete Model for Displacement Monitoring Based on Undifferenced GPS Observations

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, Johan Vium

    2008-01-01

    During recent years there has been a great focus on the climate changes within the media. More or less every day more newspaper articles are presented about the global warming issue and the effect on us human race. Climate models predict higher temperatures and more rain in the northern part of Europe. It is also predicted that the weather will become more extreme e.g. it will rain a lot during longer periods than has been the norm. If these predictions are correct, the amount of water that i...

  20. Elastic-wave velocity in marine sediments with gas hydrates: Effective medium modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgerud, M.B.; Dvorkin, J.; Nur, A.; Sakai, A.; Collett, T.

    1999-01-01

    We offer a first-principle-based effective medium model for elastic-wave velocity in unconsolidated, high porosity, ocean bottom sediments containing gas hydrate. The dry sediment frame elastic constants depend on porosity, elastic moduli of the solid phase, and effective pressure. Elastic moduli of saturated sediment are calculated from those of the dry frame using Gassmann's equation. To model the effect of gas hydrate on sediment elastic moduli we use two separate assumptions: (a) hydrate modifies the pore fluid elastic properties without affecting the frame; (b) hydrate becomes a component of the solid phase, modifying the elasticity of the frame. The goal of the modeling is to predict the amount of hydrate in sediments from sonic or seismic velocity data. We apply the model to sonic and VSP data from ODP Hole 995 and obtain hydrate concentration estimates from assumption (b) consistent with estimates obtained from resistivity, chlorinity and evolved gas data. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  1. A Discrete Velocity Kinetic Model with Food Metric: Chemotaxis Traveling Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sun-Ho; Kim, Yong-Jung

    2017-02-01

    We introduce a mesoscopic scale chemotaxis model for traveling wave phenomena which is induced by food metric. The organisms of this simplified kinetic model have two discrete velocity modes, [Formula: see text] and a constant tumbling rate. The main feature of the model is that the speed of organisms is constant [Formula: see text] with respect to the food metric, not the Euclidean metric. The uniqueness and the existence of the traveling wave solution of the model are obtained. Unlike the classical logarithmic model case there exist traveling waves under super-linear consumption rates and infinite population pulse-type traveling waves are obtained. Numerical simulations are also provided.

  2. A rapid and accurate two-point ray tracing method in horizontally layered velocity model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Yue; CHEN Xiao-fei

    2005-01-01

    A rapid and accurate method for two-point ray tracing in horizontally layered velocity model is presented in this paper. Numerical experiments show that this method provides stable and rapid convergence with high accuracies, regardless of various 1-D velocity structures, takeoff angles and epicentral distances. This two-point ray tracing method is compared with the pseudobending technique and the method advanced by Kim and Baag (2002). It turns out that the method in this paper is much more efficient and accurate than the pseudobending technique, but is only applicable to 1-D velocity model. Kim(s method is equivalent to ours for cases without large takeoff angles, but it fails to work when the takeoff angle is close to 90o. On the other hand, the method presented in this paper is applicable to cases with any takeoff angles with rapid and accurate convergence. Therefore, this method is a good choice for two-point ray tracing problems in horizontally layered velocity model and is efficient enough to be applied to a wide range of seismic problems.

  3. Quantifying uncertainty in climatological fields from GPS radio occultation: an empirical-analytical error model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Scherllin-Pirscher

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to the measurement principle of the radio occultation (RO technique, RO data are highly suitable for climate studies. Single RO profiles can be used to build climatological fields of different atmospheric parameters like bending angle, refractivity, density, pressure, geopotential height, and temperature. RO climatologies are affected by random (statistical errors, sampling errors, and systematic errors, yielding a total climatological error. Based on empirical error estimates, we provide a simple analytical error model for these error components, which accounts for vertical, latitudinal, and seasonal variations. The vertical structure of each error component is modeled constant around the tropopause region. Above this region the error increases exponentially, below the increase follows an inverse height power-law. The statistical error strongly depends on the number of measurements. It is found to be the smallest error component for monthly mean 10° zonal mean climatologies with more than 600 measurements per bin. Due to smallest atmospheric variability, the sampling error is found to be smallest at low latitudes equatorwards of 40°. Beyond 40°, this error increases roughly linearly, with a stronger increase in hemispheric winter than in hemispheric summer. The sampling error model accounts for this hemispheric asymmetry. However, we recommend to subtract the sampling error when using RO climatologies for climate research since the residual sampling error remaining after such subtraction is estimated to be 50 % of the sampling error for bending angle and 30 % or less for the other atmospheric parameters. The systematic error accounts for potential residual biases in the measurements as well as in the retrieval process and generally dominates the total climatological error. Overall the total error in monthly means is estimated to be smaller than 0.07 % in refractivity and 0.15 K in temperature at low to mid latitudes, increasing towards

  4. Learning Together 1: an educational model for training GPs, paediatricians: initial findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaulay, Chloe; Spicer, John; Riches, Wendy; Lakhanpaul, Monica

    2017-01-01

    Learning Together is primarily an educational intervention, where paediatric registrars [SpRs] and General Practice (GP) registrars [GPSTs] see children together in a primary care setting. Over a six month period in 2013/2014, 44 learning pairs were set up mainly in North East and Central London. Proof of concept for the model at scale was achieved. Reported learning demonstrated: clinical learning themes of new knowledge, skill and communication skills; and collaborative themes of ongoing collaboration, satisfaction with team working and change in attitudes. These themes were identified in both sets of trainees. The self-reported learning is backed up by the results of a retrospective notes review of four common conditions based on NICE guidelines; constipation, asthma, feverish illness and eczema (CAFE). Guidance adherence improved from 57% before the intervention in solo GP training consultations to 72% during the joint clinic intervention (p Learning Together in its South London extension.

  5. Comparison of solar wind velocity measurements with a theoretical acceleration model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coles, W.A. (Univ. of California, La Jolla (United States)); Esser, R. (Univ. of Tromsoe (Norway)); Loevhaug, U.P. (EISCAT, Ramfjordbotn (Norway)); Markkanen, J. (Geophysical Observatory, Sodankyla (Finland))

    1991-08-01

    Interplanetary radio scintillation (IPS) measurements of the solar wind velocity were made using the receiving antennas of the European Incoherent Scatter Facility (EISCAT) radar system in northern Scandinavia from June through October 1990. The observations, which cover the distance range from 11 to 90 R{sub s} from Sun center, were taken with sufficient density to measure the same stream at two (or more) different distances. The deduced velocities are in the range 100 {approx lt} U {approx lt} 540 km s{sup {minus}1}. The authors selected from 192 observations, 16 examples of streams observed with good radial alignment, of which 12 were observed unchanged for several days. The measured velocities are compared with calculations based on a two-fluid solar wind model with Alfven waves. In eight cases the measurements are in good agreement with the model when a moderate amount of wave energy is added to the flow. In four cases the observed streams show low or moderate velocities below, say, 20 R{sub s} but then accelerate fast at larger distances from the Sun. This delayed acceleration is much steeper than the acceleration in the model at these distances. In the remaining four cases the streams seem to reach their final velocities much closer to the base than in other cases, and they are not observed to accelerate much between 10 and 90 R{sub s}. At these distances all related solar wind models they have seen give the same results; they all fit half the data, and none can fit the other half.

  6. MEASUREMENT OF MOTION CORRECTED WIND VELOCITY USING AN AEROSTAT LOFTED SONIC ANEMOMETER

    Science.gov (United States)

    An aerostat-lofted, sonic anemometer was used to determine instantaneous 3 dimensional wind velocities at altitudes relevant to fire plume dispersion modeling. An integrated GPS, inertial measurement unit, and attitude heading and reference system corrected the wind data for th...

  7. Depth-integrated modelling on onshore and offshore sandbar migration: Revision of fall velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Hong; Sanchez-Arcilla, Agustin; Caceres, Ivan

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents the results of morphodynamic modelling and analysis of onshore and offshore sandbar migration based on a depth-integrated approach. The coastal flow was modeled using the Boussinesq equation and the morphological evolution was modeled using the suspended sediment transport equation and bed load formulae based on the instantaneous velocity and acceleration. The proposed model was applied to the accretive and erosive conditions and the model reproduced the onshore and offshore sandbar migration and the formation of a berm around the shoreline reasonably. An analysis of the computed results revealed the following. (i) The vertical flow velocity can affect the suspension time of the sediments considerably and the bottom evolution. (ii) The suspended load is the main contributor to the morphological changes in terms of the quantity and quality, regardless of the accretive or erosive conditions. (iii) Regardless of accretive or erosive conditions, in terms of the time-average, the instantaneous flow velocity and acceleration-based bed load models always yielded an offshore and onshore direction sediment flux, respectively, except in the swash zone. On the other hand, the suspended sediment flux calculated by the advection-diffusion equation results in the sediment transport in either direction depending on the flow field.

  8. Modelling of human exposure to air pollution in the urban environment: a GPS-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Daniela; Tchepel, Oxana

    2014-03-01

    The main objective of this work was the development of a new modelling tool for quantification of human exposure to traffic-related air pollution within distinct microenvironments by using a novel approach for trajectory analysis of the individuals. For this purpose, mobile phones with Global Positioning System technology have been used to collect daily trajectories of the individuals with higher temporal resolution and a trajectory data mining, and geo-spatial analysis algorithm was developed and implemented within a Geographical Information System to obtain time-activity patterns. These data were combined with air pollutant concentrations estimated for several microenvironments. In addition to outdoor, pollutant concentrations in distinct indoor microenvironments are characterised using a probabilistic approach. An example of the application for PM2.5 is presented and discussed. The results obtained for daily average individual exposure correspond to a mean value of 10.6 and 6.0-16.4 μg m(-3) in terms of 5th-95th percentiles. Analysis of the results shows that the use of point air quality measurements for exposure assessment will not explain the intra- and inter-variability of individuals' exposure levels. The methodology developed and implemented in this work provides time-sequence of the exposure events thus making possible association of the exposure with the individual activities and delivers main statistics on individual's air pollution exposure with high spatio-temporal resolution.

  9. Inversion of GPS meteorology data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hocke

    Full Text Available The GPS meteorology (GPS/MET experiment, led by the Universities Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR, consists of a GPS receiver aboard a low earth orbit (LEO satellite which was launched on 3 April 1995. During a radio occultation the LEO satellite rises or sets relative to one of the 24 GPS satellites at the Earth's horizon. Thereby the atmospheric layers are successively sounded by radio waves which propagate from the GPS satellite to the LEO satellite. From the observed phase path increases, which are due to refraction of the radio waves by the ionosphere and the neutral atmosphere, the atmospheric parameter refractivity, density, pressure and temperature are calculated with high accuracy and resolution (0.5–1.5 km. In the present study, practical aspects of the GPS/MET data analysis are discussed. The retrieval is based on the Abelian integral inversion of the atmospheric bending angle profile into the refractivity index profile. The problem of the upper boundary condition of the Abelian integral is described by examples. The statistical optimization approach which is applied to the data above 40 km and the use of topside bending angle profiles from model atmospheres stabilize the inversion. The retrieved temperature profiles are compared with corresponding profiles which have already been calculated by scientists of UCAR and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL, using Abelian integral inversion too. The comparison shows that in some cases large differences occur (5 K and more. This is probably due to different treatment of the upper boundary condition, data runaways and noise. Several temperature profiles with wavelike structures at tropospheric and stratospheric heights are shown. While the periodic structures at upper stratospheric heights could be caused by residual errors of the ionospheric correction method, the periodic temperature fluctuations at heights below 30 km are most likely caused by atmospheric waves (vertically

  10. Comparative Experimental and Modeling Study of Fluid Velocities in Heterogeneous Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hingerl, F.; Romanenko, K.; Pini, R.; Balcom, B.; Benson, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the spatial distribution of fluid velocities and effective porosities in rocks is crucial for predicting kinetic reaction rates and fluid-rock interactions in a plethora of geo-engineering applications, ranging from geothermal systems, Enhanced Oil Recovery to Carbon Capture and Storage. Magnetic Resonance Imaging can be used to measure spatially resolved porosities and fluid velocities in porous media. Large internal field gradients and short spin relaxation times, however, constrain the usability of the conventional MRI technique in natural rock samples. The combination of three-dimensional Single Point Ramped Imaging with T1 Enhancement (SPRITE) and the 13-interval Alternating-Pulsed-Gradient Stimulated-Echo (APGSTE) scheme - a method developed at the UNB MRI Center - is able to compensate for those challenges and quantitative 3 dimensional maps of porosities and fluid velocities can be obtained. In this study we measured velocities and porosities using MRI in a sandstone rock sample showing meso-scale heterogeneities. Then we generated permeabilities using three independent approaches, employed them to model single-phase fluid flow in the measured rock sample and compared the generated velocity maps with the respective MRI measurements. For the first modeling approach, we applied the Kozeny-Carman relationship to create a permeability map based on porosities measured using MRI. For the second approach we used permeabilities derived from CO2-H2O multi-phase experiments performed in the same rock sample assuming the validity of the J-Leverett function. The permeabilities in the third approach were generated by applying a new inverse iterative-updating technique. The resulting three permeability maps were then used as input for a CFD simulation - using the Stanford CFD code AD-GPRS - to create a respective velocity map, which in turn was then compared to the measured velocity map. The results of the different independent methods for generating

  11. Quality control of GPS deformation data from Forsmark and analysis of crustal deformation in the local scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekman, Lennart; Ekman, Mats [LE Geokonsult AB, Baelinge (Sweden)

    2013-03-15

    A network comprising seven GPS stations was established at Forsmark, Sweden, within about 10 km radius from the centre of the investigation area for a final repository for spent nuclear fuel with the purpose of monitoring slow rock motion. During the period November 2005 to December 2009, GPS data were collected in eighteen intermittent measurement campaigns, each with a duration of between three and seven days. As shown in Gustafson and Ljungberg (2010), the data expose a considerable scatter, indicating a non-linear variability of the GPS baseline velocities. However, the commission narrated in Gustafson and Ljungberg (2010) was restricted to account only for the field performance of the GPS measurement campaign and to present the resulting measurement data per se, merely supplemented with a linear regression solution for the baseline motions. The preliminary interpretation of GPS data in Gustafson and Ljungberg (2010) was in the present report followed by a closer examination where the non-linear variability is modelled as sinusoidal. Evidence for sinusoidal variations were also found in resulting data from GPS measurements at the Aespoe/Laxemar area at Oskarshamn (Sjoeberg et al. 2004), as well as in GPS data from several sites in western, middle and north-eastern Finland (Ollikainen et al. 2004, Ahola et al. 2008, Poutanen et al. 2010). We here postulate that the baseline velocities are characterized by a long-term linear drift superposed by a non-linear sinusoidal motion. This was modelled in two steps. Initially an Auto Regressive (AR) model was applied and the linear trends between the GPS stations were estimated. In a second step, an Auto Regressive Moving Average (ARMA) model was estimated for (almost) all baselines. The residuals between the original data and the one-step predictor for the ARMA model were then used to estimate new linear trends for the baselines. Our analysis of the Forsmark GPS data indicates relative motions more than 10 times slower

  12. Validating material modelling for OFHC copper using dynamic tensile extrusion (DTE) test at different velocity impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonora, N.; Testa, G.; Ruggiero, A.; Iannitti, G.; Colliander, M. Hörnquist; Mortazavi, N.

    2017-01-01

    In the Dynamic Tensile Extrusion (DTE) test, the material is subjected to very large strain, high strain rate and elevated temperature. Numerical simulation, validated comparing with measurements obtained on soft-recovered extruded fragments, can be used to probe material response under such extreme conditions and to assess constitutive models. In this work, the results of a parametric investigation on the simulation of DTE test of annealed OFHC copper - at impact velocity ranging from 350 up to 420 m/s - using the modified Rusinek-Klepaczko model, are presented. Simulation of microstructure evolution was performed using the visco-plastic self consistent model (VPSC), providing, as input, the velocity gradient history obtained with FEM at selected locations along the axis of the fragment trapped in the extrusion die. Finally, results are compared with EBSD analysis.

  13. The Probabilities of Orbital-Companion Models for Stellar Radial Velocity Data

    CERN Document Server

    Hou, Fengji; Hogg, David W

    2014-01-01

    The fully marginalized likelihood, or Bayesian evidence, is of great importance in probabilistic data analysis, because it is involved in calculating the posterior probability of a model or re-weighting a mixture of models conditioned on data. It is, however, extremely challenging to compute. This paper presents a geometric-path Monte Carlo method, inspired by multi-canonical Monte Carlo to evaluate the fully marginalized likelihood. We show that the algorithm is very fast and easy to implement and produces a justified uncertainty estimate on the fully marginalized likelihood. The algorithm performs efficiently on a trial problem and multi-companion model fitting for radial velocity data. For the trial problem, the algorithm returns the correct fully marginalized likelihood, and the estimated uncertainty is also consistent with the standard deviation of results from multiple runs. We apply the algorithm to the problem of fitting radial velocity data from HIP 88048 ($\

  14. Cluster statistics and quasisoliton dynamics in microscopic optimal-velocity models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Xu, Xihua; Pang, John Z. F.; Monterola, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    Using the non-linear optimal velocity models as an example, we show that there exists an emergent intrinsic scale that characterizes the interaction strength between multiple clusters appearing in the solutions of such models. The interaction characterizes the dynamics of the localized quasisoliton structures given by the time derivative of the headways, and the intrinsic scale is analogous to the "charge" of the quasisolitons, leading to non-trivial cluster statistics from the random perturbations to the initial steady states of uniform headways. The cluster statistics depend both on the quasisoliton charge and the density of the traffic. The intrinsic scale is also related to an emergent quantity that gives the extremum headways in the cluster formation, as well as the coexistence curve separating the absolute stable phase from the metastable phase. The relationship is qualitatively universal for general optimal velocity models.

  15. Regional three-dimensional seismic velocity model of the crust and uppermost mantle of northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, C.; Zhang, H.; Brocher, T.; Langenheim, V.

    2009-01-01

    We present a three-dimensional (3D) tomographic model of the P wave velocity (Vp) structure of northern California. We employed a regional-scale double-difference tomography algorithm that incorporates a finite-difference travel time calculator and spatial smoothing constraints. Arrival times from earthquakes and travel times from controlled-source explosions, recorded at network and/or temporary stations, were inverted for Vp on a 3D grid with horizontal node spacing of 10 to 20 km and vertical node spacing of 3 to 8 km. Our model provides an unprecedented, comprehensive view of the regional-scale structure of northern California, putting many previously identified features into a broader regional context and improving the resolution of a number of them and revealing a number of new features, especially in the middle and lower crust, that have never before been reported. Examples of the former include the complex subducting Gorda slab, a steep, deeply penetrating fault beneath the Sacramento River Delta, crustal low-velocity zones beneath Geysers-Clear Lake and Long Valley, and the high-velocity ophiolite body underlying the Great Valley. Examples of the latter include mid-crustal low-velocity zones beneath Mount Shasta and north of Lake Tahoe. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. Modeling Atmospheric Turbulence via Rapid Distortion Theory: Spectral Tensor of Velocity and Buoyancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chougule, Abhijit S.; Mann, Jakob; Kelly, Mark C.

    2017-01-01

    A spectral tensor model is presented for turbulent fluctuations of wind velocity components and temperature, assuming uniform vertical gradients in mean temperature and mean wind speed. The model is built upon rapid distortion theory (RDT) following studies by Mann and by Hanazaki and Hunt, using...... the eddy lifetime parameterization of Mann to make the model stationary. The buoyant spectral tensor model is driven via five parameters: the viscous dissipation rate epsilon, length scale of energy-containing eddies L, a turbulence anisotropy parameter Gamma, gradient Richardson number (Ri) representing...... separation. Finally, it is shown that the RDT output can deviate from Monin-Obukhov similarity theory....

  17. Validating Velocities in the GeoClaw Tsunami Model using Observations Near Hawaii from the 2011 Tohoku Tsunami

    CERN Document Server

    Arcos, M E M

    2014-01-01

    The ability to measure, predict, and compute tsunami flow velocities is of importance in risk assessment and hazard mitigation. Substantial damage can be done by high velocity flows, particularly in harbors and bays, even when the wave height is small. Moreover, advancing the study of sediment transport and tsunami deposits depends on the accurate interpretation and modeling of tsunami flow velocities and accelerations. Until recently, few direct measurements of tsunami velocities existed to compare with model results. During the 11 March 2011 Tohoku Tsunami 328 current meters were in place around the Hawaiian Islands, USA, that captured time series of water velocity in 18 locations, in both harbors and deep channels, at a series of depths. We compare several of these velocity records against numerical simulations performed using the GeoClaw numerical tsunami model, based on solving the depth-averaged shallow water equations with adaptive mesh refinement, to confirm that this model can accurately predict velo...

  18. A comparison of measured and modeled velocity fields for a laminar flow in a porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, B. D.; Apte, S. V.; Liburdy, J. A.; Ziazi, R. M.; He, X.; Finn, J. R.; Patil, V. A.

    2015-11-01

    Obtaining highly-resolved velocity data from experimental measurements in porous media is a significant challenge. The goal of this work is to compare the velocity fields measured in a randomly-packed porous medium obtained from particle image velocimetry (PIV) with corresponding fields predicted from direct numerical simulation (DNS). Experimentally, the porous medium was comprised of 15 mm diameter spherical beads made of optical glass placed in a glass flow cell to create the packed bed. A solution of ammonium thiocyanate was refractive-index matched to the glass creating a medium that could be illuminated with a laser sheet without distortion. The bead center locations were quantified using the imaging system so that the geometry of the porous medium was known very accurately. Two-dimensional PIV data were collected and processed to provide high-resolution velocity fields at a single plane within the porous medium. A Cartesian-grid-based fictitious domain approach was adopted for the direct numerical simulation of flow through the same geometry as the experimental measurements and without any adjustable parameters. The uncertainties associated with characterization of the pore geometry, PIV measurements, and DNS predictions were all systematically quantified. Although uncertainties in bead position measurements led to minor discrepancies in the comparison of the velocity fields, the axial and normal velocity deviations exhibited normalized root mean squared deviations (NRMSD) of only 11.32% and 4.74%, respectively. The high fidelity of both the experimental and numerical methods have significant implications for understanding and even for engineering the micro-macro relationship in porous materials. The ability to measure and model sub-pore-scale flow features also has relevance to the development of upscaled models for flow in porous media, where physically reasonable closure models must be developed at the sub-pore scale. These results provide valuable data

  19. An extended macro traffic flow model accounting for multiple optimal velocity functions with different probabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Rongjun; Ge, Hongxia; Wang, Jufeng

    2017-08-01

    Due to the maximum velocity and safe headway distance of the different vehicles are not exactly the same, an extended macro model of traffic flow with the consideration of multiple optimal velocity functions with probabilities is proposed in this paper. By means of linear stability theory, the new model's linear stability condition considering multiple probabilities optimal velocity is obtained. The KdV-Burgers equation is derived to describe the propagating behavior of traffic density wave near the neutral stability line through nonlinear analysis. The numerical simulations of influences of multiple maximum velocities and multiple safety distances on model's stability and traffic capacity are carried out. The cases of two different kinds of maximum speeds with same safe headway distance, two different types of safe headway distances with same maximum speed and two different max velocities and two different time-gaps are all explored by numerical simulations. First cases demonstrate that when the proportion of vehicles with a larger vmax increase, the traffic tends to unstable, which also means that jerk and brakes is not conducive to traffic stability and easier to result in stop and go phenomenon. Second cases show that when the proportion of vehicles with greater safety spacing increases, the traffic tends to be unstable, which also means that too cautious assumptions or weak driving skill is not conducive to traffic stability. Last cases indicate that increase of maximum speed is not conducive to traffic stability, while reduction of the safe headway distance is conducive to traffic stability. Numerical simulation manifests that the mixed driving and traffic diversion does not have effect on the traffic capacity when traffic density is low or heavy. Numerical results also show that mixed driving should be chosen to increase the traffic capacity when the traffic density is lower, while the traffic diversion should be chosen to increase the traffic capacity when

  20. Advanced GPS Technologies (AGT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    V Air Force Research Laboratory ••• Advanced GPS Technologies (AGT) Integrity *Service *Excellence 1 May 2015 Kevin Slimak Program Manager...2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Advanced GPS Technologies (AGT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Presented at the GPS Partnership

  1. A Teachable Moment in Earth Deformation: An Undergraduate Strain Module Incorporating GPS Measurement of the August 24, 2014 M6.0 South Napa Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resor, P. G.; Cronin, V. S.; Hammond, W. C.; Pratt-Sitaula, B.; Olds, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    The August 24, 2014 M 6.0 South Napa Earthquake was the largest earthquake to occur in the San Francisco Bay Area, home to more than 7 million people, in almost 25 years. The event occurred within an area of dense GPS instrumentation including continuous stations from the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory, Bay Area Regional Deformation Network and other networks. Coseismic displacements of up to 3 cm were rapidly estimated within one day after the event, providing a map of Earth shape change at over one hundred stations around the epicenter. The earthquake thus presets as an excellent "teachable moment" to introduce students to basic geoscience concepts, modern geophysical methods, and the state of knowledge in earthquake science. We have developed an example exercise that uses GPS-derived interseismic velocities and coseismic offsets to explore deformation in the vicinity of the earthquake rupture. This exercise builds on the UNAVCO education resource "Infinitesimal Strain Analysis Using GPS Data" (http://www.unavco.org/education/resources/educational-resources/lesson/majors-gps-strain/majors-gps-strain.html), a module designed to introduce undergraduate geoscience majors to concepts of crustal deformation using GPS velocity data. In the module students build their intuition about infinitesimal strain through manipulation of physical models, apply this intuition to interpret maps of GPS velocity vectors, and ultimately calculate the instantaneous deformation rate of triangles on the Earth's surface defined by three GPS sites. The South Napa data sets provide an example with clear societal relevance that can be used to explore the basic concepts of deformation, but may also be extended to explore topics such as strain accumulation, release, and transfer associated with the earthquake cycle. The UNAVCO module could be similarly extended to create additional exercises in response to future events with clear geodetic signals.

  2. Updated Rupture Model for the M7.8 October 28, 2012, Haida Gwaii Earthquake as Constrained by GPS-Observed Displacements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nykolaishen, L.; Dragert, H.; Wang, K.; James, T. S.; de Lange Boom, B.; Schmidt, M.; Sinnott, D.

    2014-12-01

    The M7.8 low-angle thrust earthquake off the west coast of southern Haida Gwaii on October 28, 2012, provided Canadian scientists the opportunity to study a local large thrust earthquake and has provided important information towards an improved understanding of geohazards in coastal British Columbia. Most large events along the Pacific-North America boundary in this region have involved strike-slip motion, such as the 1949 M8.1 earthquake on the Queen Charlotte Fault. In contrast along the southern portion of Haida Gwaii, the young (~8 Ma) Pacific plate crust also underthrusts North America and has been viewed as a small-scale analogy of the Cascadia Subduction Zone. Initial seismic-based rupture models for this event were improved through inclusion of GPS observed coseismic displacements, which are as large as 115 cm of horizontal motion (SSW) and 30 cm of subsidence. Additional campaign-style GPS surveys have since been repeated by the Canadian Hydrographic Service (CHS) at seven vertical reference benchmarks throughout Haida Gwaii, significantly improving the coverage of coseismic displacement observations in the region. These added offsets were typically calculated by differencing a single occupation before and after the earthquake and preliminary displacement estimates are consistent with previous GPS observations from the Geological Survey of Canada. Addition of the CHS coseismic offset estimates may allow direct inversion of the GPS data to derive a purely GPS-based rupture model. To date, cumulative postseismic displacements at six sites indicate up to 6 cm of motion, varying in azimuth between SSW and SE. Preliminary postseismic timeseries curve fitting to date has utilized a double exponential function characteristic of mantle relaxation. The current postseismic trends also suggest afterslip on the deeper plate interface beneath central Haida Gwaii along with possible induced aseismic slip on a deeper segment of the Queen Charlotte Fault located offshore

  3. Acoustic reconstruction of the velocity field in a furnace using a characteristic flow model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanqin; Zhou, Huaichun; Chen, Shiying; Zhang, Yindi; Wei, Xinli; Zhao, Jinhui

    2012-06-01

    An acoustic method can provide a noninvasive, efficient and full-field reconstruction of aerodynamic fields in a furnace. A simple yet reasonable model is devised for reconstruction of a velocity field in a cross section of a tangential furnace from acoustic measurements based on typical physical characteristics of the field. The solenoidal component of the velocity field is modeled by a curved surface, derived by rotating a curve of Gaussian distribution, determined by six characteristic parameters, while the nonrotational component is governed by a priori knowledge. Thus the inverse problem is translated into determination of the characteristic parameters using a set of acoustic projection data. First numerical experiments were undertaken to simulate the acoustic measurement, so as to preliminarily validate the effectiveness of the model. Based on this, physical experiments under different operating conditions were performed in a pilot-scale setup to provide a further test. Hot-wire anemometry and strip floating were applied to compare with acoustic measurements. The acoustic measurements provided satisfactory consistency with both of these approaches. Nevertheless, for a field with a relatively large magnitude of air velocities, the acoustic measurement can give more reliable reconstructions. Extension of the model to measurements of hot tangential furnaces is also discussed.

  4. A global shear velocity model of the mantle from normal modes and surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    durand, S.; Debayle, E.; Ricard, Y. R.; Lambotte, S.

    2013-12-01

    We present a new global shear wave velocity model of the mantle based on the inversion of all published normal mode splitting functions and the large surface wave dataset measured by Debayle & Ricard (2012). Normal mode splitting functions and surface wave phase velocity maps are sensitive to lateral heterogeneities of elastic parameters (Vs, Vp, xi, phi, eta) and density. We first only consider spheroidal modes and Rayleigh waves and restrict the inversion to Vs, Vp and the density. Although it is well known that Vs is the best resolved parameter, we also investigate whether our dataset allows to extract additional information on density and/or Vp. We check whether the determination of the shear wave velocity is affected by the a priori choice of the crustal model (CRUST2.0 or 3SMAC) or by neglecting/coupling poorly resolved parameters. We include the major discontinuities, at 400 and 670 km. Vertical smoothing is imposed through an a priori gaussian covariance matrix on the model and we discuss the effect of coupling/decoupling the inverted structure above and below the discontinuities. We finally discuss the large scale structure of our model and its geodynamical implications regarding the amount of mass exchange between the upper and lower mantle.

  5. GPS Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Global Positioning System (GPS) Test Facility Instrumentation Suite (GPSIS) provides great flexibility in testing receivers by providing operational control of...

  6. The Application of Federated Kalman Filtering in SINS/GPS/CNS Intergrated Navigation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DENG Chun-lin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Federated filter was an important method to estimate high-precision navigation parameters based on “SINS/GPS/CNS”. A no-feedback federated filter with UD_UKF algorithm was designed in the paper, a threetime amendment scheme to correct navigation parameters was designed at the same time and the mathematical model of SINS/GPS/CNS was established in launch inertial coordinate system too. The paper discussed the simulation conditions and a lot of simulations were carried out to compare 2 aspects: (1the performance between four navigation mode, which respectively is SINS, SINS/GPS, SINS/CNS, SINS/GPS/CNS;(2the estimate precision of federated filter and that of centralized Kalman filter. The results of simulation showed that the designed federated filter and amendment scheme based on SINS/GPS/CNS had high estimate precision and led to gain high hitting precision of ballistic missile, that is to say position errors were less than 20 meter and velocity errors were less than 0.1m/s in simulation.

  7. Assessing waveform predictions of recent three-dimensional velocity models of the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xueyang; Shen, Yang

    2016-04-01

    Accurate velocity models are essential for both the determination of earthquake locations and source moments and the interpretation of Earth structures. With the increasing number of three-dimensional velocity models, it has become necessary to assess the models for accuracy in predicting seismic observations. Six models of the crustal and uppermost mantle structures in Tibet and surrounding regions are investigated in this study. Regional Rayleigh and Pn (or Pnl) waveforms from two ground truth events, including one nuclear explosion and one natural earthquake located in the study area, are simulated by using a three-dimensional finite-difference method. Synthetics are compared to observed waveforms in multiple period bands of 20-75 s for Rayleigh waves and 1-20 s for Pn/Pnl waves. The models are evaluated based on the phase delays and cross-correlation coefficients between synthetic and observed waveforms. A model generated from full-wave ambient noise tomography best predicts Rayleigh waves throughout the data set, as well as Pn/Pnl waves traveling from the Tarim Basin to the stations located in central Tibet. In general, the models constructed from P wave tomography are not well suited to predict Rayleigh waves, and vice versa. Possible causes of the differences between observed and synthetic waveforms, and frequency-dependent variations of the "best matching" models with the smallest prediction errors are discussed. This study suggests that simultaneous prediction for body and surface waves requires an integrated velocity model constructed with multiple seismic waveforms and consideration of other important properties, such as anisotropy.

  8. Efficient fitting of multiplanet Keplerian models to radial velocity and astrometry data

    CERN Document Server

    Howard, J T Wright A W

    2009-01-01

    We describe a technique for solving for the orbital elements of multiple planets from radial velocity (RV) and/or astrometric data taken with 1 m/s and microarcsecond precision, appropriate for efforts to detect Earth-massed planets in their stars' habitable zones, such as NASA's proposed Space Interferometry Mission. We include details of calculating analytic derivatives for use in the Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithm for the problems of fitting RV and astrometric data separately and jointly. We also explicate the general method of separating the linear and nonlinear components of a model fit in the context of an LM fit, show how explicit derivatives can be calculated in such a model, and demonstrate the speed up and convergence improvements of such a scheme in the case of a five-planet fit to published radial velocity data for 55 Cnc.

  9. Velocity mode transition of dynamic crack propagation in hyperviscoelastic materials: A continuum model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Atsushi; Umeno, Yoshitaka

    2017-02-10

    Experiments of crack propagation in rubbers have shown that a discontinuous jump of crack propagation velocity can occur as energy release rate increases, which is known as the "mode transition" phenomenon. Although it is believed that the mode transition is strongly related to the mechanical properties, the nature of the mode transition had not been revealed. In this study, dynamic crack propagation on an elastomer was investigated using the finite element method (FEM) with a hyperviscoelastic material model. A series of pure shear test was carried out numerically with FEM simulations and crack velocities were measured under various values of tensile strain. As a result, our FEM simulations successfully reproduced the mode transition. The success of realising the mode transition phenomenon by a simple FEM model, which was achieved for the first time ever, helped to explain that the phenomenon occurs owing to a characteristic non-monotonic temporal development of principal stress near the crack tip.

  10. Velocity mode transition of dynamic crack propagation in hyperviscoelastic materials: A continuum model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Atsushi; Umeno, Yoshitaka

    2017-02-01

    Experiments of crack propagation in rubbers have shown that a discontinuous jump of crack propagation velocity can occur as energy release rate increases, which is known as the “mode transition” phenomenon. Although it is believed that the mode transition is strongly related to the mechanical properties, the nature of the mode transition had not been revealed. In this study, dynamic crack propagation on an elastomer was investigated using the finite element method (FEM) with a hyperviscoelastic material model. A series of pure shear test was carried out numerically with FEM simulations and crack velocities were measured under various values of tensile strain. As a result, our FEM simulations successfully reproduced the mode transition. The success of realising the mode transition phenomenon by a simple FEM model, which was achieved for the first time ever, helped to explain that the phenomenon occurs owing to a characteristic non-monotonic temporal development of principal stress near the crack tip.

  11. Velocity selection at large undercooling in a two-dimensional nonlocal model of solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Angelo

    1987-01-01

    The formation of needle-crystal dendrites from an undercooled melt is investigated analytically, applying the method of Caroli et al. (1986) to Langer's (1980) symmetric two-dimensional nonlocal model of solidification with finite anisotropy in the limit of large undercooling. A solution based on the WKB approximation is obtained, and a saddle-point evaluation is performed. It is shown that needle-crystal solutions exist only if the capillary anisotropy is nonzero, in which case a particular value of the growth velocity can be selected. This finding and the expression for the dependence of the selected velocity on the singular perturbation parameter and the strength of the anisotropy are found to be in complete agreement with the results of a boundary-layer model (Langer and Hong, 1986).

  12. Microthrix parvicella abundance associates with activated sludge settling velocity and rheology - Quantifying and modelling filamentous bulking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wágner, Dorottya Sarolta; Ramin, Elham; Szabo, Peter;

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work is to identify relevant settling velocity and rheology model parameters and to assess the underlying filamentous microbial community characteristics that can influence the solids mixing and transport in secondary settling tanks. Parameter values for hindered, transient...... viscometer. Quantitative fluorescence in-situ hybridisation (qFISH) analysis, targeting Microthrix parvicella and phylum Chloroflexi, was used. This study finds that M. parvicella - predominantly residing inside the microbial flocs in our samples - can significantly influence secondary settling through...... and compression settling velocity functions were estimated by carrying out biweekly batch settling tests using a novel column setup through a four-month long measurement campaign. To estimate viscosity model parameters, rheological experiments were carried out on the same sludge sample using a rotational...

  13. A microscopic "social norm" model to obtain realistic macroscopic velocity and density pedestrian distributions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Zanlungo

    Full Text Available We propose a way to introduce in microscopic pedestrian models a "social norm" in collision avoiding and overtaking, i.e. the tendency, shared by pedestrians belonging to the same culture, to avoid collisions and perform overtaking in a preferred direction. The "social norm" is implemented, regardless of the specific collision avoiding model, as a rotation in the perceived velocity vector of the opponent at the moment of computation of the collision avoiding strategy, and justified as an expectation that the opponent will follow the same "social norm" (for example a tendency to avoid on the left and overtake on the right, as proposed in this work for Japanese pedestrians. By comparing with real world data, we show that the introduction of this norm allows for a better reproduction of macroscopic pedestrian density and velocity patterns.

  14. Velocity and pressure characteristics of a model SSME high pressure fuel turbopump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, D. G-N.; Sabnis, J. S.; Mcdonald, H.

    1991-01-01

    Under the present effort an experiment rig has been constructed, an instrumentation package developed and a series of mean and rms velocity and pressure measurements made in a turbopump which modelled the first stage of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) High Pressure Fuel Turbopump. The rig was designed so as to allow initial experiments with a single configuration consisting of a bell-mouth inlet, a flight impeller, a vaneless diffuser and a volute. Allowance was made for components such as inlet guide vanes, exit guide vanes, downstream pumps, etc. to be added in future experiments. This flexibility will provide a clear baseline set of experiments and allow evaluation in later experiments of the effect of adding specific components upon the pump performance properties. The rotational speed of the impeller was varied between 4260 and 7680 rpm which covered the range of scaled SSME rotation speeds when due allowance is made for the differing stagnation temperature, model to full scale. The results at the inlet obtained with rotational speeds of 4260, 6084 and 7680 rpm showed that the axial velocity at the bell-mouth inlet remained roughly constant at 2.2 of the bulk velocity at the exit of the turbopump near the center of the inlet, but it decreased rapidly with increasing radius at all three speeds. Reverse flow occurred at a radius greater than 0.9 R for all three speeds and the maximum negative velocity reduced from 1.3 of the bulk velocity at the exit of the turbopump at 4260 rpm to 0.35 at 7680 rpm, suggesting that operating at a speed closer to the design condition of 8700 rpm improved the inlet characteristics. The reverse flow caused positive prerotation at the impeller inlet which was negligibly small near the center but reached 0.7 of the impeller speed at the outer annulus. The results in the diffuser and the volute obtained at 7680 rpm show that the hub and shroud walls of the diffuser were characterized by regions of transient reverse flow with

  15. Unsteady Velocity Measurements Taken Behind a Model Helicopter Rotor Hub in Forward Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, John D.

    1997-01-01

    Drag caused by separated flow behind the hub of a helicopter has an adverse effect on aerodynamic performance of the aircraft. To determine the effect of separated flow on a configuration used extensively for helicopter aerodynamic investigations, an experiment was conducted using a laser velocimeter to measure velocities in the wake of a model helicopter hub operating at Mach-scaled conditions in forward flight. Velocity measurements were taken using a laser velocimeter with components in the vertical and downstream directions. Measurements were taken at 13 stations downstream from the rotor hub. At each station, measurements were taken in both a horizontal and vertical row of locations. These measurements were analyzed for harmonic content based on the rotor period of revolution. After accounting for these periodic velocities, the remaining unsteady velocities were treated as turbulence. Turbulence intensity distributions are presented. Average turbulent intensities ranged from approximately 2 percent of free stream to over 15 percent of free stream at specific locations and azimuths. The maximum average value of turbulence was located near the rear-facing region of the fuselage.

  16. Quantitative explanation of circuit experiments and real traffic using the optimal velocity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Akihiro; Kikuchi, Macoto; Shibata, Akihiro; Sugiyama, Yuki; Tadaki, Shin-ichi; Yukawa, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    We have experimentally confirmed that the occurrence of a traffic jam is a dynamical phase transition (Tadaki et al 2013 New J. Phys. 15 103034, Sugiyama et al 2008 New J. Phys. 10 033001). In this study, we investigate whether the optimal velocity (OV) model can quantitatively explain the results of experiments. The occurrence and non-occurrence of jammed flow in our experiments agree with the predictions of the OV model. We also propose a scaling rule for the parameters of the model. Using this rule, we obtain critical density as a function of a single parameter. The obtained critical density is consistent with the observed values for highway traffic.

  17. Global bifurcation investigation of an optimal velocity traffic model with driver reaction time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orosz, Gábor; Wilson, R. Eddie; Krauskopf, Bernd

    2004-08-01

    We investigate an optimal velocity model which includes the reflex time of drivers. After an analytical study of the stability and local bifurcations of the steady-state solution, we apply numerical continuation techniques to investigate the global behavior of the system. Specifically, we find branches of oscillating solutions connecting Hopf bifurcation points, which may be super- or subcritical, depending on parameters. This analysis reveals several regions of multistability.

  18. The role of ocean velocity in chlorophyll variability. A modelling study in the Alboran Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Solé, Jordi; Ballabrera-Poy, Joaquim; Macías, Diego; Catalán, Ignacio A.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we focus on the Alboran Sea (western Mediterranean) to relate wind field and ocean velocity variability with chlorophyll a (Chl a) behaviour, using a 2-km resolution, coupled 3D ocean circulation-NPZD model (ROMS). The analysis is done in three steps. First, we split the seasonal and residual contribution for the fields under study. Second, we calculate the corresponding empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) for the seasonal and residual parts. Finally, we relate each pair of var...

  19. Modeling of integrated sunlight velocity measurements: The effect of surface darkening by magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, R. K.; Henney, C. J.; Schimpf, S.; Fossat, E.; Gelly, B.; Grec, G.; Loudagh, S.; Schmider, F.-X; Palle, P.; Regulo, C.

    1993-01-01

    It has been known since the work by Claverie et al. (1982) that integrated-sunlight velocities measured with the resonance scattering technique show variations with time scales of weeks to months. The cause can be understood in terms of the effects of solar activity as was pointed out by Edmunds & Gough (1983) and Andersen & Maltby (1983). The latter authors included a model calculation based on sunspot areas which showed good promise of being able to quantitatively reproduce the observed velocity shifts. We discuss in this paper a new modeling effort based on daily magnetograms obtained at the 150-ft tower on Mt. Wilson. This type of database is more quantitative than sunspot area. Similar maps of magnetically sensitive quantities will be measured on a continuous time base as part of several planned helioseismology experiments (from space with the Solar Oscillations Imagery/Michelson Doppler Imager (SOI/MDI) experiment on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), see Scherrer et al. (1991) or with ground-based networks, see Hill & Leibacher (1991)). We discuss the correlations between various magnetically sensitive quantities and develop a new model for the effects of magnetic field on line profiles and surface brightness. From these correlations we integrate the line profile changes over the solar surface using observed magnetic field strengths measured at lambda 5250.2. The final output is a new model for the effects of magnetic fields on integrated sunlight velocities which we compare with daily offset velocities derived from the International Research on the Interior of the Sun (IRIS)-T instrument at the Observatorio del Teide.

  20. The influence of bus stop on traffic flow with velocity-difference-separation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Pengjun; Wang, Wei; Ge, Hongxia

    2016-06-01

    Based on velocity-difference-separation model, the mixed traffic flow on two-lane road is investigated. For a fixed road length, the influence of bus and bus stops on traffic flow is studied with the increasing traffic density. Compared with the result without bus stops given by Li et al., a new traffic state is found, which is valuable for studying the impacts of public transport on urban traffic flow.

  1. Analytic solutions for seismic travel time and ray path geometry through simple velocity models.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballard, Sanford

    2007-12-01

    The geometry of ray paths through realistic Earth models can be extremely complex due to the vertical and lateral heterogeneity of the velocity distribution within the models. Calculation of high fidelity ray paths and travel times through these models generally involves sophisticated algorithms that require significant assumptions and approximations. To test such algorithms it is desirable to have available analytic solutions for the geometry and travel time of rays through simpler velocity distributions against which the more complex algorithms can be compared. Also, in situations where computational performance requirements prohibit implementation of full 3D algorithms, it may be necessary to accept the accuracy limitations of analytic solutions in order to compute solutions that satisfy those requirements. Analytic solutions are described for the geometry and travel time of infinite frequency rays through radially symmetric 1D Earth models characterized by an inner sphere where the velocity distribution is given by the function V (r) = A-Br{sup 2}, optionally surrounded by some number of spherical shells of constant velocity. The mathematical basis of the calculations is described, sample calculations are presented, and results are compared to the Taup Toolkit of Crotwell et al. (1999). These solutions are useful for evaluating the fidelity of sophisticated 3D travel time calculators and in situations where performance requirements preclude the use of more computationally intensive calculators. It should be noted that most of the solutions presented are only quasi-analytic. Exact, closed form equations are derived but computation of solutions to specific problems generally require application of numerical integration or root finding techniques, which, while approximations, can be calculated to very high accuracy. Tolerances are set in the numerical algorithms such that computed travel time accuracies are better than 1 microsecond.

  2. GPS operations at Olkiluoto, Kivetty and Romuvaara in 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kallio, U.; Nyberg, S.; Koivula, H.; Jokela, J.; Poutanen, M. [Finnish Geodetic Institute, Masala (Finland)

    2011-11-15

    The Finnish Geodetic Institute (FGI) has studied crustal deformations in co-operation with the Posiva Oy since 1994, when a network of ten pillars for GPS observations was established at Olkiluoto. In 2010 the local GPS network at Olkiluoto consisted of 14 concrete pillars. The whole network has been measured twice a year in the static GPS campaigns with 24 h sessions. The four new pillars were established in 2010 and the permanent measurements on them will start in 2011. The network of seven GPS pillars was built at Kivetty and Romuvaara during the year 1996. One pillar in each investigation area belongs to the Finnish permanent GPS network, FinnRef. A total of 28 GPS measurement campaigns have been carried out at Olkiluoto since 1995, and 18 campaigns at Kivetty and Romuvaara. At Olkiluoto a baseline for electronic distance measurements (EDM) was built in 2002. The baseline has been measured in connection to the GPS observations using the EDM instrument Kern ME5000 Mekometer. The GPS operations in 2010 included the two GPS campaigns at Olkiluoto, GPS campaigns at Kivetty and Romuvaara, EDM baseline measurements at Olkiluoto, and the control marker measurements with the tachymeter at Olkiluoto. All GPS data history was reprocessed with Bernese GPS software using the new processing strategy tested in 2009. The results were analysed by computing the change rates of the baselines and estimating horizontal velocities for the pillars using the barycenter of the velocities as a reference. In the Olkiluoto inner network 80 percent of the change rates were smaller than 0.10 mm/a. Roughly one fourth of the change rates could be considered as statistically significant (change rate larger than 3 {sigma}. The statistically significant change rates were mainly related to the Olkiluoto permanent station (GPS1) and to the pillar GPS5, which had also the maximum change rate (0.21 {+-} 0.03 mm/a). In Olkiluoto outer network the maximum and statistically significant change rates

  3. The Three-Dimensional Velocity Distribution of Wide Gap Taylor-Couette Flow Modelled by CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Shina Adebayo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical investigation is conducted for the flow between two concentric cylinders with a wide gap, relevant to bearing chamber applications. This wide gap configuration has received comparatively less attention than narrow gap journal bearing type geometries. The flow in the gap between an inner rotating cylinder and an outer stationary cylinder has been modelled as an incompressible flow using an implicit finite volume RANS scheme with the realisable k-ε model. The model flow is above the critical Taylor number at which axisymmetric counterrotating Taylor vortices are formed. The tangential velocity profiles at all axial locations are different from typical journal bearing applications, where the velocity profiles are quasilinear. The predicted results led to two significant findings of impact in rotating machinery operations. Firstly, the axial variation of the tangential velocity gradient induces an axially varying shear stress, resulting in local bands of enhanced work input to the working fluid. This is likely to cause unwanted heat transfer on the surface in high torque turbomachinery applications. Secondly, the radial inflow at the axial end-wall boundaries is likely to promote the transport of debris to the junction between the end-collar and the rotating cylinder, causing the build-up of fouling in the seal.

  4. Modeling brain injury response for rotational velocities of varying directions and magnitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Ashley A; Danelson, Kerry A; Stitzel, Joel D

    2012-09-01

    An estimated 1.7 million people in the United States sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI) annually. To investigate the effects of rotational motions on TBI risk and location, this study modeled rotational velocities of five magnitudes and 26 directions of rotation using the Simulated Injury Monitor finite element brain model. The volume fraction of the total brain exceeding a predetermined strain threshold, the Cumulative Strain Damage Measure (CSDM), was investigated to evaluate global model response. To evaluate regional response, this metric was computed relative to individual brain structures and termed the Structure Cumulative Strain Damage Measure (SCSDM). CSDM increased as input magnitude increased and varied with the direction of rotation. CSDM was 0.55-1.7 times larger in simulations with transverse plane rotation compared to those without transverse plane rotation. The largest SCSDM in the cerebrum and brainstem occurred with rotations in the transverse and sagittal planes, respectively. Velocities causing medial rotation of the cerebellum resulted in the largest SCSDM in this structure. For velocities of the same magnitude, injury risk calculated from CSDM varied from 0 to 97% with variations in the direction of rotation. These findings demonstrate injury risk, as estimated by CSDM and SCSDM, is affected by the direction of rotation and input magnitude, and these may be important considerations for injury prediction.

  5. Laboratory model study of the effect of aeration on axial velocity attenuation of turbulent jet flows in plunge pool

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓军; 张法星; 田忠; 许唯临; 刘斌; 卫望汝

    2015-01-01

    In the laboratory model experiment, the velocities of the jet flow along the axis are measured, using the CQY−Z8a velocity-meter. The velocity attenuations of the jet flow along the axis under different conditions are studied. The effects of the aeration concentration, the initial jet velocity at the entry and the thickness of the jet flow on the velocity attenuation of the jet flow are analyzed. It is seen that the velocity attenuation of the jet flow along the axis sees a regular variation. It is demonstrated by the test results that under the experimental conditions, the velocity along the axis decreases linearly. The higher the air concentration is, the faster the velocity will be decayed. The absolute value of the slopeK increases with the rise of the air concentration. The relationship can be defined as=a+bKACK. The coefficientA is 0.03 under the experimental conditions. With the low air concentration of the jet flow, the thinner the jet flow is, the faster the velocity will be decayed. With the increase of the air concentra- tion, the influence of the thickness of the jet flow on the velocity attenuation is reduced. When the air concentration is increased to a certain value, the thickness of the jet flow may not have any influence on the velocity attenuation. The initial jet velocity itself at the entry has no influence on the variation of the velocity attenuation as the curves of the velocity attenuation at different velocities at the entry are practically parallel, even coinciding one with another. Therefore, improving the air concentration of the jet flow and disper- sing the jet flow in the plunge pool could reduce the influence of the jet flow on the scour.

  6. Comparison of GPS-TEC measurements with IRI-2007 and IRI-2012 modeled TEC at an equatorial latitude station, Bangkok, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunpold, Sanit; Tripathi, Nitin K.; Rajesh Chowdhary, V.; Raju, Durairaju Kumaran

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents the first vertical total electron content (VTEC) data derived from a dual-frequency GPS receiver installed at the Asian Institute of Technology in Bangkok, as part of project SCINDA (Scintillation Network and Decision Aid) with a magnetic dip latitude of 14°N, The diurnal, monthly, and seasonal variation in TEC, measured between August 2010 and July 2012, was compared with values derived from two International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) models: the IRI-2007 and the recently released IRI-2012. The highest diurnal TEC always occurred between 08:00 and 12:00 Universal Time (UT). The diurnal pattern of GPS-TEC reached its maximum values during equinoctial months (March, April, September, and October) and minimum values during solstice months (June, July, December, and January), which can be attributed to the solar extreme ultra-violet ionization coupled with the upward vertical E×B drift. The modeled TEC was underestimated in 2010 and 2011 and overestimated in 2012, especially with the IRI-2007 model. The measured values were better correlated with the IRI-2012 model, especially in 2012. However, neither of the IRI models responded to geomagnetic activity, despite the selection of the “storm” option, generally showing a smooth curve and underestimating TEC during a storm. To verify this phenomenon, the impacts of geomagnetic storms were considered.

  7. Block modeling of crustal deformation in Tierra del Fuego from GNSS velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, L.; Richter, A.; Fritsche, M.; Hormaechea, J. L.; Perdomo, R.; Dietrich, R.

    2015-05-01

    The Tierra del Fuego (TDF) main island is divided by a major transform boundary between the South America and Scotia tectonic plates. Using a block model, we infer slip rates, locking depths and inclinations of active faults in TDF from inversion of site velocities derived from Global Navigation Satellite System observations. We use interseismic velocities from 48 sites, obtained from field measurements spanning 20 years. Euler vectors consistent with a simple seismic cycle are estimated for each block. In addition, we introduce far-field information into the modeling by applying constraints on Euler vectors of major tectonic plates. The difference between model and observed surface deformation near the Magallanes Fagnano Fault System (MFS) is reduced by considering finite dip in the forward model. For this tectonic boundary global plate circuits models predict relative movements between 7 and 9 mm yr- 1, while our regional model indicates that a strike-slip rate of 5.9 ± 0.2 mm yr- 1 is accommodated across the MFS. Our results indicate faults dipping 66- 4+ 6° southward, locked to a depth of 11- 5+ 5 km, which are consistent with geological models for the MFS. However, normal slip also dominates the fault perpendicular motion throughout the eastern MFS, with a maximum rate along the Fagnano Lake.

  8. Modeling the Radial Velocity Curve of the Water Vapor Maser in VX UMa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, D. M.; Benson, P. J.; Strelnitski, V. S.

    1999-12-01

    VX UMa is a unique Mira-type star that demonstrates a triple-peaked spectrum of its 1.35-cm H2O maser emission. We used the high-precision curves of radial velocities of the spectral peaks, obtained by Benson & Little-Marenin from 1988 to 1992, as probes of the kinematics of the masing region. The pronounced periodicity of the radial velocity of the central component, with a period equal to the pulsational period of the optical variations, suggests the involvement of pulsations in the observed excursions of radial velocity. However, the radial velocity of the central spectral component produced by a symmetrical, pulsating spherical layer should be constantly zero. Rotation seems to be the most obvious mechanism to impart a small non-zero component to the central feature. We assume that the bulk of maser radiation originates in the equatorial "belt" around the star and approximate this region as a two-dimensional, rotating and pulsating ring. We found that any combination of rotation and pulsation produces a quadruple peaked, not a triple peaked spectrum. Therefore, some asymmetry in the disk or unequal absorption of the two central peaks by ionized gas (e.g. in the shock responsible for the maser emission) is needed. We demonstrate that one of the central peaks can then undergo periodic changes of its radial velocity with the period of pulsation, as observed. A VLBA experiment that may verify our model is under way. This project was supported by the NSF/REU grant AST-9820555.

  9. Model-based Permeability Estimation of Shaly Sands Using Seismic Velocity and Resistivity Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, T.

    2016-12-01

    Permeability is an indispensable parameter for hydraulic characterization of soils and rocks in many applications. Permeability of soils and rocks is usually obtained with the in-situ permeability test in a borehole and/or laboratory permeability test of soil/rock core samples obtained in the borehole. Many boreholes are necessary for building a hydraulic model of a large soil/rock mass. It is, however, often difficult to drill many boreholes due to time and cost constraints. For such a case, geophysical methods can be effectively utilized for profiling permeability of a large soil/rock mass if geophysical properties such as seismic velocity and resistivity can be used for estimating permeability. We, therefore, propose an effective method for estimating permeability of shaly sands by applying a rock physics model to seismic velocity and resistivity data. Because consolidated shaly sand is a key rock for aquifers and oil/gas reservoirs, and unconsolidated shaly sand is very common soils whose hydraulic properties are often important for safety evaluation of river embankments and designing countermeasure of its liquefaction. The method first estimates the grain size distribution of the shaly sand by applying a shaly sand model to seismic velocity and resistivity data obtained with seismic and resistivity measurements. The grain size of the soil/rock thus obtained and porosity estimated from resistivity data by applying the Glover's equation are then input to the Kozeny-Carman equation for estimating permeability of the shaly sand. The proposed method is applied to P- and S-wave velocities and resistivity data measured in the laboratory, well logging and surface seismic and electric surveys for shaly sands. Comparison of estimated permeability with actual measurements reveals that permeability can be estimated in accuracy less than one order of magnitude and the method can be used for profiling permeability of a large shaly sand using geophysical data measured on it.

  10. Assessment of earthquake locations in 3-D deterministic velocity models: A case study from the Altotiberina Near Fault Observatory (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre, D.; Mirabella, F.; Chiaraluce, L.; Trippetta, F.; Lomax, A.

    2016-11-01

    The accuracy of earthquake locations and their correspondence with subsurface geology depends strongly on the accuracy of the available seismic velocity model. Most modern methods to construct a velocity model for earthquake location are based on the inversion of passive source seismological data. Another approach is the integration of high-resolution geological and geophysical data to construct deterministic velocity models in which earthquake locations can be directly correlated to the geological structures. Such models have to be kinematically consistent with independent seismological data in order to provide precise hypocenter solutions. We present the Altotiberina (AT) seismic model, a three-dimensional velocity model for the Upper Tiber Valley region (Northern Apennines, Italy), constructed by combining 300 km of seismic reflection profiles, six deep boreholes (down to 5 km depth), detailed data from geological surveys and direct measurements of P and S wave velocities performed in situ and in laboratory. We assess the robustness of the AT seismic model by locating 11,713 earthquakes with a nonlinear, global-search inversion method and comparing the probabilistic hypocenter solutions to those calculated in three previously published velocity models, constructed by inverting passive seismological data only. Our results demonstrate that the AT seismic model is able to provide higher-quality hypocenter locations than the previous velocity models. Earthquake locations are consistent with the subsurface geological structures and show a high degree of spatial correlation with specific lithostratigraphic units, suggesting a lithological control on the seismic activity evolution.

  11. National 2000' GPS control network of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    An accurately unified national GPS network with more than 2500 stations, named "National 2000' GPS Control Network", signed the epoch 2000.0, has been established by integrating the existing six nationwide GPS networks of China set up by different departments with different objectives. This paper presents the characteristics of the existing GPS networks, summarizes the strategies in the integrated adjustment of the GPS network, including functional model, stochastic model as well as the adjustment principle modification. By modifying the adjustment strategies according to the characteristics of the existing GPS networks and under the support of the IGS stations, the accuracy of the integrated national GPS network is greatly improved. The datum differences among the sub networks disappear, the systematic error influences are weakened, and the effects of the outliers on the estimated coordinates and their variances are controlled. It is shown that the average standard deviation for the horizontal component is smaller than 1.0 cm, the vertical component is smaller than 2.0 cm, and the three-dimensional (3-D) position of geocenter coordinates is smaller than 3.0 cm. The exterior checking accuracy for the 3-D position is averagely better than 1.0 cm.

  12. Lithospheric velocity model of Texas and implications for the Ouachita orogeny and the opening of the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yao; Li, Aibing

    2016-12-01

    A 3-D shear wave velocity model of Texas has been developed from Rayleigh wave phase velocities by using ambient noise data recorded at the USArray stations. In the upper crust, the Ouachita front separates high velocity in the Laurentia to its west from low velocity in the east and south Texas basins. The Ouachita belt is characterized as a high-velocity zone with local maximums coinciding with known uplifts, which we interpret as accreted island arcs during the Ouachita orogeny. Our model evidences a strong Ouachita lithosphere that helped to buffer crust thinning from the Mesozoic rifting. A significantly low-velocity anomaly is present in southeast Texas in the lower crust and upper mantle. We associate this anomaly with a past asthenosphere upwelling that likely originated from the edge of the subducted slab during the Ouachita collision and was potentially responsible for the opening of the Gulf of Mexico.

  13. A Layer-Stripping Method for 3D Near-Surface Velocity Model Building Using Seismic First-Arrival Times

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Taikun Shi; Jianzhong Zhang; Zhonglai Huang; Changkun Jin

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve the efficiency of 3D near-surface velocity model building, we develop a layer-stripping method using seismic first-arrival times. The velocity model within a Common Mid-Point (CMP) gather is assumed to be stratified into thin layers, and the velocity of each layer var-ies linearly with depth. The thickness and velocity of the top layer are estimated using minimum-offset first-arrival data in a CMP gather. Then the top layer is stripped and the second layer becomes a new top layer. After removing the effect of the top layer from the former first-arrival data, the new first-arrival data are obtained and then used to estimate the parameters of the second layer. In this manner, the velocity model, being regarded as that at a CMP location, is built layer-by-layer from the top to the bottom. A 3D near-surface velocity model is then formed using the velocity models at all CMP locations. The tests on synthetic and observed seismic data show that the layer-stripping method can be used to build good near-surface velocity models for static correction, and its computation speed is ap-proximately hundred times faster than that of grid tomography.

  14. A DAMAGE ACCUMULATING MODELING OF FAILURE WAVES IN GLASS UNDER HIGH VELOCITY IMPACT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘占芳; 姚国文; 詹先义

    2001-01-01

    The failure wave phenomenon was interpreted in glass media under the high velocity impact with the stress levels below the Hugoniot elastic limit. In view of the plate impact experimental observations a damage-accumulating model predominated by the deviatoric stress impulse was proposed while Heaviside function was adopted in the damageaccumulating model to describe the failure delay in the interior of materials. Features of the failure layer and propagation mechanism as well as their dynamic characteristics were further presented. The reduction in failure wave propagation speed is pointed out as the reflected rarefaction waves reflect again from the failure layer boundary.

  15. Markov random field modelling for fluid distributions from the seismic velocity structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwatani, T.; Nagata, K.; Okada, M.; Toriumi, M.

    2011-12-01

    Recent development of geophysical observations, such as seismic tomography, seismic reflection method and geomagnetic method, provide us detailed images of the earth's interior. However, it has still been difficult to interpret these data geologically, including predicting lithology and fluid distributions, mainly because (1) available data usually have large noise and uncertainty, and (2) the number of observable parameters is usually smaller than the number of target parameters. Therefore, the statistical analyses of geophysical data sets are essential for the objective and quantitative geological interpretation. We propose the use of Markov random field (MRF) model to geophysical image data as an alternative to classical deterministic approaches. The MRF model is a Bayesian stochastic model using a generalized form of Markov Chains, and is often applied to the analysis of images, particularly in the detection of visual patterns or textures. The MRF model assumes that the spatial gradients of physical properties are relatively small compared to the observational noises. By hyperparameter estimation, the variances of noises can be appropriately estimated only from available data sets without prior information about observational noises. In this study, we try to image the fluid distributions based on the seismic velocity structure by using the Markov random field model. According to Nakajima et al. (2005), seismic velocities (Vp and Vs) are expressed as functions of porosity and pore geometry using the unified formulation proposed by Takei (2002). Additionally, the spatial continuity of porosity and pore geometry is incorporated by Gaussian Markov Chains as prior probabilities. The most probable estimation can be obtained by maximizing the posterior probability of the fluid distribution given the observed velocity structures. In the present study, the steepest descent method was implemented in order to minimize the free energy (i.e. maximize the posterior

  16. General spherical anisotropic Jeans models of stellar kinematics: including proper motions and radial velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Cappellari, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Cappellari (2008) presented a flexible and efficient method to model the stellar kinematics of anisotropic axisymmetric and spherical stellar systems. The spherical formalism could be used to model the line-of-sight velocity second moments allowing for essentially arbitrary radial variation in the anisotropy and general luminous and total density profiles. Here we generalize the spherical formalism by providing the expressions for all three components of the projected second moments, including the two proper motion components. A reference implementation is now included in the public JAM package available at http://purl.org/cappellari/software

  17. Referee comment on Velocity-Based Terrain Coefficients for Time-Based Models of Human Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irmela Herzog

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In many archaeological studies assessing the impact of topography on past human movement, only weak arguments without validation for the weights assigned to different terrain features are given. Therefore a study presenting terrain coefficients relying on sound tests is most welcome though the range of applications in archaeological modelling is limited. This article is a referee comment for de Gruchy, M., Caswell, E and Edwards, J. 2017 Velocity-Based Terrain Coefficients for Time-Based Models of Human Movement, Internet Archaeology.

  18. Spiral Galaxies - classical description of spiral arms and rotational velocity pattern - toy model

    CERN Document Server

    Lobodzinski, Bogdan

    2014-01-01

    We propose an explanation of features of spiral galaxies: spiral arms and observed flat rotation curves, without the presence of an exotic form of matter. The formalism is based on Boltzmanns transport equation for the collisional matter and the very-low-velocity post-Newtonian approximation of the general relativity equations expressed in the Maxwell-like form. The Maxwell-like formulation provides the base for the explanation of the above phenomena in the language of dynamically created gravitoelectromagnetic fields by the movement of mass streams in the plane of the galaxy disc. In the model we use radical simplifications expressed as neglect of the gravitational interaction between neighbors and approximation of the incompressible mass flow. In this frame we show that if the galaxy is fuelled constantly by mass from an external gas reservoir, then the amplification of the gravitomagnetic field can be large enough to create the rotational velocity pattern and spiral arms without the necessity of introducin...

  19. Development of the EUREF Velocity Model - Status and Roadmap for Future Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidberg, Martin; Steffen, Holger; Altamimi, Zuheir; Bruyninx, Carine; Caporali, Alessandro; Dousa, Jan; Habrich, Heinz; Kenyeres, Ambrus; da Silva Fernandes, Rui Manuel; Stangl, Günter

    2013-04-01

    Interplate and intraplate deformations are present all over Europe. They can be subdivided by their spatial or temporal nature as well as their magnitude. For example, different, partly overlapping processes are related to several geodynamic zones such as plate boundaries, micro-plates, volcanoes, (formerly) glaciated areas, hydrological basins etc. On the other side, there are long-term processes such as the Fennoscandian post-glacial rebound, episodic events such as earthquakes and many temporarily intermediate deformations from e.g. volcanic swelling or anthropogenic influences due to oil or gas extraction or CO2 sequestration. The corresponding deformations of different scales are measured as three-dimensional crustal velocities by Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) reference stations with meanwhile sufficient detail and accuracy. The IAG Reference Frame Sub-Commission for Europe (EUREF) working group on "Deformation models" aims at obtaining velocity models for Europe and adjacent areas and significantly improving the prediction of the time evolution of coordinates, thus overcoming the limitations in the use of the European Terrestrial Reference System 1989 (ETRS89). A general understanding of the physics behind such a velocity field is also a major goal. In particular, the working group will model and correct for interplate and intraplate deformations, while using the reference frame, and thus extend the useful lifetime of a realisation of the ETRS89. Hence, the purpose of this working group are twofold; first, pure scientific interests in improved knowledge of the surface deformations of Eurasia and adjacent areas, and second, providing a valuable tool in the management and use of the national realisations of the ETRS89. The work will strongly benefit from sophisticated infrastructures such as the European Plate Observing System (EPOS). Key information for improved knowledge of crustal deformations is observed motions at stations. This includes

  20. The thin section rock physics: Modeling and measurement of seismic wave velocity on the slice of carbonates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wardaya, P. D., E-mail: pongga.wardaya@utp.edu.my; Noh, K. A. B. M., E-mail: pongga.wardaya@utp.edu.my; Yusoff, W. I. B. W., E-mail: pongga.wardaya@utp.edu.my [Petroleum Geosciences Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Tronoh, Perak, 31750 (Malaysia); Ridha, S. [Petroleum Engineering Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Tronoh, Perak, 31750 (Malaysia); Nurhandoko, B. E. B. [Wave Inversion and Subsurface Fluid Imaging Research Laboratory (WISFIR), Dept. of Physics, Institute of Technology Bandung, Bandung, Indonesia and Rock Fluid Imaging Lab, Bandung (Indonesia)

    2014-09-25

    This paper discusses a new approach for investigating the seismic wave velocity of rock, specifically carbonates, as affected by their pore structures. While the conventional routine of seismic velocity measurement highly depends on the extensive laboratory experiment, the proposed approach utilizes the digital rock physics view which lies on the numerical experiment. Thus, instead of using core sample, we use the thin section image of carbonate rock to measure the effective seismic wave velocity when travelling on it. In the numerical experiment, thin section images act as the medium on which wave propagation will be simulated. For the modeling, an advanced technique based on artificial neural network was employed for building the velocity and density profile, replacing image's RGB pixel value with the seismic velocity and density of each rock constituent. Then, ultrasonic wave was simulated to propagate in the thin section image by using finite difference time domain method, based on assumption of an acoustic-isotropic medium. Effective velocities were drawn from the recorded signal and being compared to the velocity modeling from Wyllie time average model and Kuster-Toksoz rock physics model. To perform the modeling, image analysis routines were undertaken for quantifying the pore aspect ratio that is assumed to represent the rocks pore structure. In addition, porosity and mineral fraction required for velocity modeling were also quantified by using integrated neural network and image analysis technique. It was found that the Kuster-Toksoz gives the closer prediction to the measured velocity as compared to the Wyllie time average model. We also conclude that Wyllie time average that does not incorporate the pore structure parameter deviates significantly for samples having more than 40% porosity. Utilizing this approach we found a good agreement between numerical experiment and theoretically derived rock physics model for estimating the effective seismic

  1. Present-day crustal deformation along the Magallanes-Fagnano Fault System in Tierra del Fuego from repeated GPS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, L.; Perdomo, R.; Hormaechea, J. L.; Del Cogliano, D.; Fritsche, M.; Richter, A.; Dietrich, R.

    2011-03-01

    The present-day deformation of the earth crust in the Argentine part of Tierra del Fuego main island (southernmost South America) is here investigated based on repeated geodetic GPS observations. The island is traversed by the active transform boundary between the South American and Scotia tectonic plates, represented by the Magallanes-Fagnano fault system. Since 1993 a regional network comprising to date 29 GPS sites has been observed almost every year. The complete set of accumulated observations was processed using the Bernese GPS software and state-of-the-art processing strategies and models. The utilization of homogeneous GPS products resulting from a reprocessing of the global IGS network warrants a stable realization of a global reference frame. For each GPS site 3-D positions and linear velocities with error estimates were obtained. A strain analysis of the horizontal velocity components revealed the zones of major deformation activity. A 30-km-wide deformation belt centred on the main trace of the fault system was identified. This belt is bordered to the north (South America) and south (Scotia) by geodynamically stable zones, which move horizontally with a relative average velocity of 4.4 ± 0.6 (east) and -0.3 ± 0.4 (north) mm a-1. Within the deformation belt a maximum strain rate in the order of 0.25 μstrain per year has been detected. A pronounced change in the deformation style from transtension (east) to transpression (west) is observed. The area of predominating shortening of the crust coincides with a local rotation minimum and relative uplift. Throughout the period covered by the GPS observations the displacements and deformations occurred to be linear with time.

  2. Three-Dimensional Modeling of Shallow Shear-Wave Velocities for Las Vegas, Nevada, Using Sediment Type

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Barbara Luke; Helena Murvosh; Wanda Taylor; Jeff Wagoner

    2009-01-01

    A three-dimensional model of near-surface shear-wave velocity in the deep alluvial basin underlying the metropolitan area of Las Vegas, Nevada (USA), is being developed for earthquake site response projections. The velocity dataset, which includes 230 measurements, is interpolated across the model using depth-dependent correlations of velocity with sediment type. The sediment-type database contains more than 1 400 well and borehole logs. Sediment sequences reported in logs are assigned to one of four units. A characteristic shear-wave velocity profile b developed for each unit by analyzing closely spaced pairs of velocity profiles and well or borehole logs. The resulting velocity model exhibits reasonable values and patterns, although it does not explicitly honor the measured shear-wave velocity profiles. Site response investigations that applied a preliminary version of the velocity model support a two-zone ground-shaking hazard model for the valley. Areas in which clay predominates in the upper 30 m are predicted to have stronger ground motions than the rest of the basin.

  3. Application of neural models as controllers in mobile robot velocity control loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerkala, Jakub; Jadlovska, Anna

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the application of an inverse neural models used as controllers in comparison to classical PI controllers for velocity tracking control task used in two-wheel, differentially driven mobile robot. The PI controller synthesis is based on linear approximation of actuators with equivalent load. In order to obtain relevant datasets for training of feed-forward multi-layer perceptron based neural network used as neural model, the mathematical model of mobile robot, that combines its kinematic and dynamic properties such as chassis dimensions, center of gravity offset, friction and actuator parameters is used. Neural models are trained off-line to act as an inverse dynamics of DC motors with particular load using data collected in simulation experiment for motor input voltage step changes within bounded operating area. The performances of PI controllers versus inverse neural models in mobile robot internal velocity control loops are demonstrated and compared in simulation experiment of navigation control task for line segment motion in plane.

  4. A GLOBAL MODEL OF THE LIGHT CURVES AND EXPANSION VELOCITIES OF TYPE II-PLATEAU SUPERNOVAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pejcha, Ondřej [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, 4 Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Prieto, Jose L., E-mail: pejcha@astro.princeton.edu [Núcleo de Astronomía de la Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Diego Portales, Av. Ejército 441 Santiago (Chile)

    2015-02-01

    We present a new self-consistent and versatile method that derives photospheric radius and temperature variations of Type II-Plateau supernovae based on their expansion velocities and photometric measurements. We apply the method to a sample of 26 well-observed, nearby supernovae with published light curves and velocities. We simultaneously fit ∼230 velocity and ∼6800 mag measurements distributed over 21 photometric passbands spanning wavelengths from 0.19 to 2.2 μm. The light-curve differences among the Type II-Plateau supernovae are well modeled by assuming different rates of photospheric radius expansion, which we explain as different density profiles of the ejecta, and we argue that steeper density profiles result in flatter plateaus, if everything else remains unchanged. The steep luminosity decline of Type II-Linear supernovae is due to fast evolution of the photospheric temperature, which we verify with a successful fit of SN 1980K. Eliminating the need for theoretical supernova atmosphere models, we obtain self-consistent relative distances, reddenings, and nickel masses fully accounting for all internal model uncertainties and covariances. We use our global fit to estimate the time evolution of any missing band tailored specifically for each supernova, and we construct spectral energy distributions and bolometric light curves. We produce bolometric corrections for all filter combinations in our sample. We compare our model to the theoretical dilution factors and find good agreement for the B and V filters. Our results differ from the theory when the I, J, H, or K bands are included. We investigate the reddening law toward our supernovae and find reasonable agreement with standard R{sub V}∼3.1 reddening law in UBVRI bands. Results for other bands are inconclusive. We make our fitting code publicly available.

  5. Assessing waveform predictions of recent three-dimensional velocity models of Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, X.; Shen, Y.

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution tomographic models are essential for understanding the physical and compositional properties in the lithosphere and obtaining accurate earthquake source locations and moment tensors. Yet, there are significant disagreements in recent three-dimensional velocity models of the crust and uppermost mantle in Tibet. Question also remains as to whether models constructed from one type of seismic waves (body or surface waves) can be used to predict travel times and waveforms of another. In this study, six global or regional models are selected for Tibet, most of which became publically available in the past five years. A three-dimensional finite-difference method in the spherical coordinates is applied to simulate full-wave propagation of regional Pn (with periods longer than 1 second) and Rayleigh waves (20-75 s period) for ground-truth events located at regional distances. The models are evaluated based on the phase delays and cross-correlation coefficients between synthetic and observed waveforms. A model generated from full-wave ambient noise tomography by Shen and Zhang (2012) consistently produces the best predictions for Rayleigh waves throughout the dataset and the Pn waves for the paths from the Tarim Basin to central Tibet. LITHO1.0, inverted from surface wave dispersions, shows a relatively stable but intermediate performance in predicting Pn and Rayleigh waves. None of the models provide the best matches to both waves throughout the region. Furthermore, the models constructed from surface waves are not well suited to predict Pn, and vice versa. We attribute this mainly to lack of accurate constraints on radial anisotropy and Vp/Vs ratios in the upper mantle, and Moho topography. We conclude that simultaneous prediction for P, S, and surface waves requires an integrated velocity model constructed with multiple seismic waveforms and consideration of other important properties, such as anisotropy and attenuation.

  6. Applying the critical velocity model for an off-season interval training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Ida E; West, Brianne M; Reynolds, Sheila K; Murray, Steven R; Pettitt, Robert W

    2013-12-01

    The critical velocity (CV) model offers an opportunity to prescribe and to test empirically different velocity-time (V-t) configurations of high-intensity interval training (HIIT); however, such experiments are lacking. We evaluated a group of competitive, female soccer players (age = 19 ± 1 years, height = 168 ± 6 cm, mass = 61 ± 6 kg) completing 1 of 2 different HIIT regimes: a short group (n = 6) completing higher V and shorter t configurations, and a long group (n = 10) completing lower V, longer t configurations. Both groups trained 2 d·wk for 4 weeks. For each workout, both groups ran at velocities exceeding CV and designed to deplete identical fractional percentages of the finite work capacity above CV (D'). The metrics of CV and D' were evaluated at pretraining and posttraining using the 3-minute all-out exercise test on an indoor track using video digitizing of displacement relative to time. Despite differences in the V-t configurations, both groups increased their CV (+0.22 m·s, +6%) and decreased their D' (-24 m, -13%; p 130% of maximum oxygen uptake.

  7. a computational modeling for image motion velocity on focal plane of aerial & aerospace frame camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Jin, G.; Li, Z. Y.

    As the resolving power and geometric accuracy of aerial aerospace imaging is demanded to be higher the researches in technology of IMC become very important In order to compensate the image motion on focal plane the rule of FPIMV Focal Plane Image Motion Velocity should be grasped while the posture of aircraft and the modes of imaging are under changing In this paper a reasonable computational modeling scheme to the problem is introduced Coordinates transformation method is utilized for calculation of forward FPIMV under different condition of vertical and sloped imaging meanwhile integrated with three axes posture and angle velocity of aircraft Forward FPIMV combine with pitch roll and yaw FPIMV is considered simultaneously and the derivation calculating expressions of frame camera FPIMV under different conditions is presented in detail The solution is applied to computational simulation and has been confirmed to be effective based on the calculation result and it lays the foundation for our farther researches on frame camera IMC technology Key words IMC FPIMV Focal Plane Image Motion Velocity Coordinates transformation method

  8. Estimating a continuous p-wave velocity profile with constant squared-slowness gradient models from seismic field data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponomarenko, A.V.; Kashtan, B.M.; Troyan, V.N.; Mulder, W.A.

    2015-01-01

    We inverted seismic field data for a continuous, laterally invariant P-wave velocity profile. Instead of the usual approach that involves horizontal layers with piecewise constant densities and velocities, we consider models of one or two layers with a constant gradient of the squared slowness above

  9. Climate-driven vertical acceleration of Icelandic crust measured by continuous GPS geodesy

    KAUST Repository

    Compton, Kathleen

    2015-02-06

    © 2015 The Authors. Earth\\'s present-day response to enhanced glacial melting resulting from climate change can be measured using Global Positioning System (GPS) technology. We present data from 62 continuously operating GPS instruments in Iceland. Statistically significant upward velocity and accelerations are recorded at 27 GPS stations, predominantly located in the Central Highlands region of Iceland, where present-day thinning of the Iceland ice caps results in velocities of more than 30mm/yr and uplift accelerations of 1-2mm/yr2. We use our acceleration estimates to back calculate to a time of zero velocity, which coincides with the initiation of ice loss in Iceland from ice mass balance calculations and Arctic warming trends. We show, through a simple inversion, a direct relationship between ice mass balance measurements and vertical position and show that accelerated unloading is required to reproduce uplift observations for a simple elastic layer over viscoelastic half-space model.

  10. A velocity-difference-separation model for car-following theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-Peng; Liu, Yun-Cai

    2006-07-01

    We introduce a velocity-difference-separation model that modifies the previous models in the literature. The improvement of this new model over the previous ones lies in that it not only theoretically retains many strong points of the previous ones, but also performs more realistically than others in the dynamical evolution of congestion. Furthermore, the proposed model is investigated with analytic and numerical methods, with the finding that it can demonstrate some complex physical features observed in real traffic such as the existence of three phases: free flow, synchronized flow, and wide moving jam; sudden flow drop in flow-density plane; and traffic hysteresis in transition between the free and the synchronized flow.